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Sample records for nuclear-associated nucleosome assembly

  1. Nucleosomal regulation of chromatin composition and nuclear assembly revealed by histone depletion.

    PubMed

    Zierhut, Christian; Jenness, Christopher; Kimura, Hiroshi; Funabiki, Hironori

    2014-07-01

    Nucleosomes are the fundamental unit of chromatin, but analysis of transcription-independent nucleosome functions has been complicated by the gene-expression changes resulting from histone manipulation. Here we solve this dilemma by developing Xenopus laevis egg extracts deficient for nucleosome formation and by analyzing the proteomic landscape and behavior of nucleosomal chromatin and nucleosome-free DNA. We show that although nucleosome-free DNA can recruit nuclear-envelope membranes, nucleosomes are required for spindle assembly and for formation of the lamina and of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). We show that, in addition to the Ran G-nucleotide exchange factor RCC1, ELYS, the initiator of NPC formation, fails to associate with naked DNA but directly binds histone H2A-H2B dimers and nucleosomes. Tethering ELYS and RCC1 to DNA bypasses the requirement for nucleosomes in NPC formation in a synergistic manner. Thus, the minimal essential function of nucleosomes in NPC formation is to recruit RCC1 and ELYS. PMID:24952593

  2. Preferential Nucleosome Assembly at DNA Triplet Repeats from the Myotonic Dystrophy Gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuh-Hwa; Amirhaeri, Sorour; Kang, Seongman; Wells, Robert D.; Griffith, Jack D.

    1994-07-01

    The expansion of CTG repeats in DNA occurs in or near genes involved in several human diseases, including myotonic dystrophy and Huntington's disease. Nucleosomes, the basic structural element of chromosomes, consist of 146 base pairs of DNA coiled about an octamer of histone proteins and mediate general transcriptional repression. Electron microscopy was used to examine in vitro the nucleosome assembly of DNA containing repeating CTG triplets. The efficiency of nucleosome formation increased with expanded triplet blocks, suggesting that such blocks may repress transcription through the creation of stable nucleosomes.

  3. NAP1-Assisted Nucleosome Assembly on DNA Measured in Real Time by Single-Molecule Magnetic Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Vlijm, Rifka; Smitshuijzen, Jeremy S. J.; Lusser, Alexandra; Dekker, Cees

    2012-01-01

    While many proteins are involved in the assembly and (re)positioning of nucleosomes, the dynamics of protein-assisted nucleosome formation are not well understood. We study NAP1 (nucleosome assembly protein 1) assisted nucleosome formation at the single-molecule level using magnetic tweezers. This method allows to apply a well-defined stretching force and supercoiling density to a single DNA molecule, and to study in real time the change in linking number, stiffness and length of the DNA during nucleosome formation. We observe a decrease in end-to-end length when NAP1 and core histones (CH) are added to the dsDNA. We characterize the formation of complete nucleosomes by measuring the change in linking number of DNA, which is induced by the NAP1-assisted nucleosome assembly, and which does not occur for non-nucleosomal bound histones H3 and H4. By rotating the magnets, the supercoils formed upon nucleosome assembly are removed and the number of assembled nucleosomes can be counted. We find that the compaction of DNA at low force is about 56 nm per assembled nucleosome. The number of compaction steps and associated change in linking number indicate that NAP1-assisted nucleosome assembly is a two-step process. PMID:23050009

  4. Centromere specific assembly of CENP-A nucleosomes is mediated by HJURP

    PubMed Central

    Foltz, Daniel R.; Jansen, Lars E.T.; Bailey, Aaron O.; Yates, John R.; Bassett, Emily A.; Wood, Stacey; Black, Ben E.; Cleveland, Don W.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The centromere is responsible for accurate chromosome segregation. Mammalian centromeres are specified epigenetically, with all active centromeres containing centromere specific chromatin in which CENP-A replaces histone H3 within the nucleosome. The proteins responsible for assembly of human CENP-A into centromeric nucleosomes during the G1 phase of the cell cycle are now identified to be distinct from the chromatin assembly factors that load other histone H3 variants. Prenucleosomal CENP-A is complexed with histone H4, nucleophosmin 1 and HJURP. Recruitment of new CENP-A into nucleosomes at replicated centromeres is dependent on HJURP. Recognition by HJURP is mediated through the centromere targeting domain (CATD) of CENP-A, a region that induces a unique conformational rigidity to both the subnucleosomal CENP-A heterotetramer and the corresponding assembled nucleosome. We propose HJURP to be a cell cycle regulated CENP-A specific histone chaperone required for centromeric chromatin assembly. PMID:19410544

  5. Dimerization of the CENP-A assembly factor HJURP is required for centromeric nucleosome deposition

    PubMed Central

    Zasadzińska, Ewelina; Barnhart-Dailey, Meghan C; Kuich, P Henning J L; Foltz, Daniel R

    2013-01-01

    The epigenetic mark of the centromere is thought to be a unique centromeric nucleosome that contains the histone H3 variant, centromere protein-A (CENP-A). The deposition of new centromeric nucleosomes requires the CENP-A-specific chromatin assembly factor HJURP (Holliday junction recognition protein). Crystallographic and biochemical data demonstrate that the Scm3-like domain of HJURP binds a single CENP-A–histone H4 heterodimer. However, several lines of evidence suggest that HJURP forms an octameric CENP-A nucleosome. How an octameric CENP-A nucleosome forms from individual CENP-A/histone H4 heterodimers is unknown. Here, we show that HJURP forms a homodimer through its C-terminal domain that includes the second HJURP_C domain. HJURP exists as a dimer in the soluble preassembly complex and at chromatin when new CENP-A is deposited. Dimerization of HJURP is essential for the deposition of new CENP-A nucleosomes. The recruitment of HJURP to centromeres occurs independent of dimerization and CENP-A binding. These data provide a mechanism whereby the CENP-A pre-nucleosomal complex achieves assembly of the octameric CENP-A nucleosome through the dimerization of the CENP-A chaperone HJURP. PMID:23771058

  6. Nucleosome Assembly Alters the Accessibility of the Antitumor Agent Duocarmycin B2 to Duplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Zou, Tingting; Kizaki, Seiichiro; Pandian, Ganesh N; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2016-06-20

    To evaluate the reactivity of antitumor agents in a nucleosome architecture, we conducted in vitro studies to assess the alkylation level of duocarmycin B2 on nucleosomes with core and linker DNA using sequencing gel electrophoresis. Our results suggested that the alkylating efficiencies of duocarmycin B2 were significantly decreased in core DNA and increased at the histone-free linker DNA sites when compared with naked DNA conditions. Our finding that nucleosome assembly alters the accessibility of duocarmycin B2 to duplex DNA could advance its design as an antitumor agent. PMID:27123891

  7. Centromere assembly requires the direct recognition of CENP-A nucleosomes by CENP-N

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Christopher W.; Silva, Mariana C.C.; Godek, Kristina M.; Jansen, Lars E.T.; Straight, Aaron F.

    2009-01-01

    Centromeres are specialized chromosomal domains that direct kinetochore assembly during mitosis. CENP-A, a histone H3-variant present exclusively in centromeric nucleosomes, is thought to act as an epigenetic mark that specifies centromere identity. Here we identify the essential centromere protein CENP-N as the first protein to selectively bind CENP-A nucleosomes but not H3 nucleosomes. CENP-N bound CENP-A nucleosomes in a DNA-sequence independent manner but did not bind soluble CENP-A/H4 tetramers. Mutations in CENP-N that reduced the affinity of CENP-N for CENP-A nucleosomes caused defects in CENP-N localization and had dominant effects on the recruitment of CENP-H, CENP-I and CENP-K to centromeres. Depletion of CENP-N with siRNA’s led to similar centromere assembly defects and resulted in reduced assembly of nascent CENP-A into centromeric chromatin. These data suggest that CENP-N interprets the information encoded within CENP-A nucleosomes and recruits to centromeric chromatin other proteins required for centromere function and propagation. PMID:19543270

  8. Dual recognition of CENP-A nucleosomes is required for centromere assembly

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Christopher W.; Milks, Kirstin J.

    2010-01-01

    Centromeres contain specialized nucleosomes in which histone H3 is replaced by the histone variant centromere protein A (CENP-A). CENP-A nucleosomes are thought to act as an epigenetic mark that specifies centromere identity. We previously identified CENP-N as a CENP-A nucleosome-specific binding protein. Here, we show that CENP-C also binds directly and specifically to CENP-A nucleosomes. Nucleosome binding by CENP-C required the extreme C terminus of CENP-A and did not compete with CENP-N binding, which suggests that CENP-C and CENP-N recognize distinct structural elements of CENP-A nucleosomes. A mutation that disrupted CENP-C binding to CENP-A nucleosomes in vitro caused defects in CENP-C targeting to centromeres. Moreover, depletion of CENP-C with siRNA resulted in the mislocalization of all other nonhistone CENPs examined, including CENP-K, CENP-H, CENP-I, and CENP-T, and led to a partial reduction in centromeric CENP-A. We propose that CENP-C binds directly to CENP-A chromatin and, together with CENP-N, provides the foundation upon which other centromere and kinetochore proteins are assembled. PMID:20566683

  9. Nucleotide excision repair of the 5 S ribosomal RNA gene assembled into a nucleosome.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Smerdon, M J

    2000-08-01

    A-175-base pair fragment containing the Xenopus borealis somatic 5 S ribosomal RNA gene was used as a model system to determine the effect of nucleosome assembly on nucleotide excision repair (NER) of the major UV photoproduct (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD)) in DNA. Xenopus oocyte nuclear extracts were used to carry out repair in vitro on reconstituted, positioned 5 S rDNA nucleosomes. Nucleosome structure strongly inhibits NER at many CPD sites in the 5 S rDNA fragment while having little effect at a few sites. The time course of CPD removal at 35 different sites indicates that >85% of the CPDs in the naked DNA fragment have t(12) values <2 h, whereas <26% of the t(12) values in nucleosomes are <2 h, and 15% are >8 h. Moreover, removal of histone tails from these mononucleosomes has little effect on the repair rates. Finally, nucleosome inhibition of repair shows no correlation with the rotational setting of a 14-nucleotide-long pyrimidine tract located 30 base pairs from the nucleosome dyad. These results suggest that inhibition of NER by mononucleosomes is not significantly influenced by the rotational orientation of CPDs on the histone surface, and histone tails play little (or no) role in this inhibition. PMID:10821833

  10. Nucleosomal arrays self-assemble into supramolecular globular structures lacking 30-nm fibers.

    PubMed

    Maeshima, Kazuhiro; Rogge, Ryan; Tamura, Sachiko; Joti, Yasumasa; Hikima, Takaaki; Szerlong, Heather; Krause, Christine; Herman, Jake; Seidel, Erik; DeLuca, Jennifer; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Hansen, Jeffrey C

    2016-05-17

    The existence of a 30-nm fiber as a basic folding unit for DNA packaging has remained a topic of active discussion. Here, we characterize the supramolecular structures formed by reversible Mg(2+)-dependent self-association of linear 12-mer nucleosomal arrays using microscopy and physicochemical approaches. These reconstituted chromatin structures, which we call "oligomers", are globular throughout all stages of cooperative assembly and range in size from ~50 nm to a maximum diameter of ~1,000 nm. The nucleosomal arrays were packaged within the oligomers as interdigitated 10-nm fibers, rather than folded 30-nm structures. Linker DNA was freely accessible to micrococcal nuclease, although the oligomers remained partially intact after linker DNA digestion. The organization of chromosomal fibers in human nuclei in situ was stabilized by 1 mM MgCl2, but became disrupted in the absence of MgCl2, conditions that also dissociated the oligomers in vitro These results indicate that a 10-nm array of nucleosomes has the intrinsic ability to self-assemble into large chromatin globules stabilized by nucleosome-nucleosome interactions, and suggest that the oligomers are a good in vitro model for investigating the structure and organization of interphase chromosomes. PMID:27072995

  11. Nucleosome formation with the testis-specific histone H3 variant, H3t, by human nucleosome assembly proteins in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Osakabe, Akihisa; Kimura, Hiroshi; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2008-01-01

    Five non-allelic histone H3 variants, H3.1, H3.2, H3.3, H3t and CENP-A, have been identified in mammals. H3t is robustly expressed in the testis, and thus was assigned as the testis-specific H3 variant. However, recent proteomics and tissue-specific RT-PCR experiments revealed a small amount of H3t expression in somatic cells. In the present study, we purified human H3t as a recombinant protein, and showed that H3t/H4 forms nucleosomes with H2A/H2B by the salt-dialysis method, like the conventional H3.1/H4. We found that H3t/H4 is not efficiently incorporated into the nucleosome by human Nap1 (hNap1), due to its defective H3t/H4 deposition on DNA. In contrast, human Nap2 (hNap2), a paralog of hNap1, promotes nucleosome assembly with H3t/H4. Mutational analyses revealed that the Ala111 residue, which is conserved among H3.1, H3.2 and H3.3, but not in H3t, is the essential residue for the hNap1-mediated nucleosome assembly. These results suggest that H3t may be incorporated into chromatin by a specific chaperone-mediated pathway. PMID:18281699

  12. Histone-modifying enzymes, histone modifications and histone chaperones in nucleosome assembly: Lessons learned from Rtt109 histone acetyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Dahlin, Jayme L; Chen, Xiaoyue; Walters, Michael A.; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    During DNA replication, nucleosomes ahead of replication forks are disassembled to accommodate replication machinery. Following DNA replication, nucleosomes are then reassembled onto replicated DNA using both parental and newly synthesized histones. This process, termed DNA replication-coupled nucleosome assembly (RCNA), is critical for maintaining genome integrity and for the propagation of epigenetic information, dysfunctions of which have been implicated in cancers and aging. In recent years, it has been shown that RCNA is carefully orchestrated by a series of histone modifications, histone chaperones and histone-modifying enzymes. Interestingly, many features of RCNA are also found in processes involving DNA replication-independent nucleosome assembly like histone exchange and gene transcription. In yeast, histone H3 lysine K56 acetylation (H3K56ac) is found in newly synthesized histone H3 and is critical for proper nucleosome assembly and for maintaining genomic stability. The histone acetyltransferase (HAT) regulator of Ty1 transposition 109 (Rtt109) is the sole enzyme responsible for H3K56ac in yeast. Much research has centered on this particular histone modification and histone-modifying enzyme. This Critical Review summarizes much of our current understanding of nucleosome assembly and highlights many important insights learned from studying Rtt109 HATs in fungi. We highlight some seminal features in nucleosome assembly conserved in mammalian systems and describe some of the lingering questions in the field. Further studying fungal and mammalian chromatin assembly may have important public health implications, including deeper understandings of human cancers and aging as well as the pursuit of novel anti-fungal therapies. PMID:25365782

  13. Structural evidence for Nap1-dependent H2A-H2B deposition and nucleosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Gurrieri, Carmen; Larabi, Amédé; Vinayachandran, Vinesh; Patel, Nisha A; Yen, Kuangyu; Reja, Rohit; Ebong, Ima-O; Schoehn, Guy; Robinson, Carol V; Pugh, B Franklin; Panne, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Nap1 is a histone chaperone involved in the nuclear import of H2A-H2B and nucleosome assembly. Here, we report the crystal structure of Nap1 bound to H2A-H2B together with in vitro and in vivo functional studies that elucidate the principles underlying Nap1-mediated H2A-H2B chaperoning and nucleosome assembly. A Nap1 dimer provides an acidic binding surface and asymmetrically engages a single H2A-H2B heterodimer. Oligomerization of the Nap1-H2A-H2B complex results in burial of surfaces required for deposition of H2A-H2B into nucleosomes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation-exonuclease (ChIP-exo) analysis shows that Nap1 is required for H2A-H2B deposition across the genome. Mutants that interfere with Nap1 oligomerization exhibit severe nucleosome assembly defects showing that oligomerization is essential for the chaperone function. These findings establish the molecular basis for Nap1-mediated H2A-H2B deposition and nucleosome assembly. PMID:27225933

  14. Assembly in G1 phase and long-term stability are unique intrinsic features of CENP-A nucleosomes

    PubMed Central

    Bodor, Dani L.; Valente, Luis P.; Mata, João F.; Black, Ben E.; Jansen, Lars E. T.

    2013-01-01

    Centromeres are the site of kinetochore formation during mitosis. Centromere protein A (CENP-A), the centromere-specific histone H3 variant, is essential for the epigenetic maintenance of centromere position. Previously we showed that newly synthesized CENP-A is targeted to centromeres exclusively during early G1 phase and is subsequently maintained across mitotic divisions. Using SNAP-based fluorescent pulse labeling, we now demonstrate that cell cycle–restricted chromatin assembly at centromeres is unique to CENP-A nucleosomes and does not involve assembly of other H3 variants. Strikingly, stable retention is restricted to the CENP-A/H4 core of the nucleosome, which we find to outlast general chromatin across several cell divisions. We further show that cell cycle timing of CENP-A assembly is independent of centromeric DNA sequences and instead is mediated by the CENP-A targeting domain. Unexpectedly, this domain also induces stable transmission of centromeric nucleosomes, independent of the CENP-A deposition factor HJURP. This demonstrates that intrinsic properties of the CENP-A protein direct its cell cycle–restricted assembly and induces quantitative mitotic transmission of the CENP-A/H4 nucleosome core, ensuring long-term stability and epigenetic maintenance of centromere position. PMID:23363600

  15. Stable complex formation between HIV Rev and the nucleosome assembly protein, NAP1, affects Rev function

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, Alan; Murley, Laura Lea; Gao Mian; Wong, Raymond; Clayton, Kiera; Brufatto, Nicole; Canadien, Veronica; Mamelak, Daniel; Chen, Tricia; Richards, Dawn; Zeghouf, Mahel; Greenblatt, Jack; Burks, Christian; Frappier, Lori

    2009-05-25

    The Rev protein of HIV-1 is essential for HIV-1 proliferation due to its role in exporting viral RNA from the nucleus. We used a modified version of tandem affinity purification (TAP) tagging to identify proteins interacting with HIV-1 Rev in human cells and discovered a prominent interaction between Rev and nucleosome assembly protein 1 (Nap1). This interaction was also observed by specific retention of Nap1 from human cell lysates on a Rev affinity column. Nap1 was found to bind Rev through the Rev arginine-rich domain and altered the oligomerization state of Rev in vitro. Overexpression of Nap1 stimulated the ability of Rev to export RNA, reduced the nucleolar localization of Rev, and affected Rev nuclear import rates. The results suggest that Nap-1 may influence Rev function by increasing the availability of Rev.

  16. KSHV encoded LANA recruits Nucleosome Assembly Protein NAP1L1 for regulating viral DNA replication and transcription

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Namrata; Thakker, Suhani; Verma, Subhash C.

    2016-01-01

    The establishment of latency is an essential for lifelong persistence and pathogenesis of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is the most abundantly expressed protein during latency and is important for viral genome replication and transcription. Replication-coupled nucleosome assembly is a major step in packaging the newly synthesized DNA into chromatin, but the mechanism of KSHV genome chromatinization post-replication is not understood. Here, we show that nucleosome assembly protein 1-like protein 1 (NAP1L1) associates with LANA. Our binding assays revealed an association of LANA with NAP1L1 in KSHV-infected cells, which binds through its amino terminal domain. Association of these proteins confirmed their localization in specific nuclear compartments of the infected cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays from NAP1L1-depleted cells showed LANA-mediated recruitment of NAP1L1 at the terminal repeat (TR) region of the viral genome. Presence of NAP1L1 stimulated LANA-mediated DNA replication and persistence of a TR-containing plasmid. Depletion of NAP1L1 led to a reduced nucleosome positioning on the viral genome. Furthermore, depletion of NAP1L1 increased the transcription of viral lytic genes and overexpression decreased the promoter activities of LANA-regulated genes. These results confirmed that LANA recruitment of NAP1L1 helps in assembling nucleosome for the chromatinization of newly synthesized viral DNA. PMID:27599637

  17. KSHV encoded LANA recruits Nucleosome Assembly Protein NAP1L1 for regulating viral DNA replication and transcription.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Namrata; Thakker, Suhani; Verma, Subhash C

    2016-01-01

    The establishment of latency is an essential for lifelong persistence and pathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is the most abundantly expressed protein during latency and is important for viral genome replication and transcription. Replication-coupled nucleosome assembly is a major step in packaging the newly synthesized DNA into chromatin, but the mechanism of KSHV genome chromatinization post-replication is not understood. Here, we show that nucleosome assembly protein 1-like protein 1 (NAP1L1) associates with LANA. Our binding assays revealed an association of LANA with NAP1L1 in KSHV-infected cells, which binds through its amino terminal domain. Association of these proteins confirmed their localization in specific nuclear compartments of the infected cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays from NAP1L1-depleted cells showed LANA-mediated recruitment of NAP1L1 at the terminal repeat (TR) region of the viral genome. Presence of NAP1L1 stimulated LANA-mediated DNA replication and persistence of a TR-containing plasmid. Depletion of NAP1L1 led to a reduced nucleosome positioning on the viral genome. Furthermore, depletion of NAP1L1 increased the transcription of viral lytic genes and overexpression decreased the promoter activities of LANA-regulated genes. These results confirmed that LANA recruitment of NAP1L1 helps in assembling nucleosome for the chromatinization of newly synthesized viral DNA. PMID:27599637

  18. Nucleosome dynamics: Sequence matters.

    PubMed

    Eslami-Mossallam, Behrouz; Schiessel, Helmut; van Noort, John

    2016-06-01

    About three quarter of all eukaryotic DNA is wrapped around protein cylinders, forming nucleosomes. Even though the histone proteins that make up the core of nucleosomes are highly conserved in evolution, nucleosomes can be very different from each other due to posttranslational modifications of the histones. Another crucial factor in making nucleosomes unique has so far been underappreciated: the sequence of their DNA. This review provides an overview of the experimental and theoretical progress that increasingly points to the importance of the nucleosomal base pair sequence. Specifically, we discuss the role of the underlying base pair sequence in nucleosome positioning, sliding, breathing, force-induced unwrapping, dissociation and partial assembly and also how the sequence can influence higher-order structures. A new view emerges: the physical properties of nucleosomes, especially their dynamical properties, are determined to a large extent by the mechanical properties of their DNA, which in turn depends on DNA sequence. PMID:26896338

  19. Nucleosome Positioning

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Hiromi

    2012-01-01

    Nucleosome positioning is not only related to genomic DNA compaction but also to other biological functions. After the chromatin is digested by micrococcal nuclease, nucleosomal (nucleosome-bound) DNA fragments can be sequenced and mapped on the genomic DNA sequence. Due to the development of modern DNA sequencing technology, genome-wide nucleosome mapping has been performed in a wide range of eukaryotic species. Comparative analyses of the nucleosome positions have revealed that the nucleosome is more frequently formed in exonic than intronic regions, and that most of transcription start and translation (or transcription) end sites are located in nucleosome linker DNA regions, indicating that nucleosome positioning influences transcription initiation, transcription termination, and gene splicing. In addition, nucleosomal DNA contains guanine and cytosine (G + C)-rich sequences and a high level of cytosine methylation. Thus, the nucleosome positioning system has been conserved during eukaryotic evolution.

  20. O-linked N-acetylglucosamine transferase (OGT) interacts with the histone chaperone HIRA complex and regulates nucleosome assembly and cellular senescence.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Sun; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2016-06-01

    The histone chaperone HIRA complex, consisting of histone cell cycle regulator (HIRA), Ubinuclein1 (UBN1), and calcineurin binding protein 1 (CABIN1), deposits histone variant H3.3 to genic regions and regulates gene expression in various cellular processes, including cellular senescence. How HIRA-mediated nucleosome assembly of H3.3-H4 is regulated remains not well understood. Here, we show that O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) transferase (OGT), an enzyme that catalyzes O-GlcNAcylation of serine or threonine residues, interacts with UBN1, modifies HIRA, and promotes nucleosome assembly of H3.3. Depletion of OGT or expression of the HIRA S231A O-GlcNAcylation-deficient mutant compromises formation of the HIRA-H3.3 complex and H3.3 nucleosome assembly. Importantly, OGT depletion or expression of the HIRA S231A mutant delays premature cellular senescence in primary human fibroblasts, whereas overexpression of OGT accelerates senescence. Taken together, these results support a model in which OGT modifies HIRA to regulate HIRA-H3.3 complex formation and H3.3 nucleosome assembly and reveal the mechanism by which OGT functions in cellular senescence. PMID:27217568

  1. Hmo1 directs pre-initiation complex assembly to an appropriate site on its target gene promoters by masking a nucleosome-free region.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Koji; Ohyama, Yoshifumi; Kokubo, Tetsuro

    2011-05-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Hmo1 binds to the promoters of ∼ 70% of ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) at high occupancy, but is observed at lower occupancy on the remaining RPG promoters. In Δhmo1 cells, the transcription start site (TSS) of the Hmo1-enriched RPS5 promoter shifted upstream, while the TSS of the Hmo1-limited RPL10 promoter did not shift. Analyses of chimeric RPS5/RPL10 promoters revealed a region between the RPS5 upstream activating sequence (UAS) and core promoter, termed the intervening region (IVR), responsible for strong Hmo1 binding and an upstream TSS shift in Δhmo1 cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses showed that the RPS5-IVR resides within a nucleosome-free region and that pre-initiation complex (PIC) assembly occurs at a site between the IVR and a nucleosome overlapping the TSS (+1 nucleosome). The PIC assembly site was shifted upstream in Δhmo1 cells on this promoter, indicating that Hmo1 normally masks the RPS5-IVR to prevent PIC assembly at inappropriate site(s). This novel mechanism ensures accurate transcriptional initiation by delineating the 5'- and 3'-boundaries of the PIC assembly zone. PMID:21288884

  2. In vitro chromatin assembly of the HIV-1 promoter. ATP-dependent polar repositioning of nucleosomes by Sp1 and NFkappaB.

    PubMed

    Widlak, P; Gaynor, R B; Garrard, W T

    1997-07-11

    Nuclease hypersensitive sites exist in vivo in the chromatin of the integrated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 proviral genome, in the 5'-long terminal repeat (LTR) within the promoter/enhancer region near Sp1 and NFkappaB binding sites. Previous studies from the Kadonaga and Jones laboratories have shown that Sp1 and NFkappaB can establish hypersensitive sites in a truncated form of this LTR when added before in vitro chromatin assembly with Drosophila extracts, thus facilitating subsequent transcriptional activation of a linked reporter gene upon the association of additional factors (Pazin, M. J., Sheridan, P. L., Cannon, K., Cao, Z., Keck, J. G., Kadanaga, J. T., and Jones, K. A. (1996) Genes & Dev. 10, 37-49). Here we assess the role of a full-length LTR and 1 kilobase pair of downstream flanking HIV sequences in chromatin remodeling when these transcription factors are added after chromatin assembly. Using Xenopus laevis oocyte extracts to assemble chromatin in vitro, we have confirmed that Sp1 and NFkappaB can indeed induce sites hypersensitive to DNase I, micrococcal nuclease, or restriction enzymes on either side of factor binding sites in chromatin but not naked DNA. We extend these earlier studies by demonstrating that the process is ATP-dependent when the factors are added after chromatin assembly and that histone H1, AP1, TBP, or Tat had no effect on hypersensitive site formation. Furthermore, we have found that nucleosomes upstream of NFkappaB sites are rotationally positioned prior to factor binding and that their translational frame is registered after binding NFkappaB. On the other hand, binding of Sp1 positions adjacent downstream nucleosome(s). We term this polar repositioning because each factor aligns nucleosomes only on one side of its binding sites. Mutational analysis and oligonucleotide competition each demonstrated that this remodeling required Sp1 and NFkappaB binding sites. PMID:9211915

  3. Interaction of nucleosome assembly proteins abolishes nuclear localization of DGK{zeta} by attenuating its association with importins

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Masashi; Hozumi, Yasukazu; Ichimura, Tohru; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Takahashi, Nobuya; Iseki, Ken; Yagisawa, Hitoshi; Shinkawa, Takashi; Isobe, Toshiaki; Goto, Kaoru

    2011-12-10

    Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) is involved in the regulation of lipid-mediated signal transduction through the metabolism of a second messenger diacylglycerol. Of the DGK family, DGK{zeta}, which contains a nuclear localization signal, localizes mainly to the nucleus but translocates to the cytoplasm under pathological conditions. However, the detailed mechanism of translocation and its functional significance remain unclear. To elucidate these issues, we used a proteomic approach to search for protein targets that interact with DGK{zeta}. Results show that nucleosome assembly protein (NAP) 1-like 1 (NAP1L1) and NAP1-like 4 (NAP1L4) are identified as novel DGK{zeta} binding partners. NAP1Ls constitutively shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm in transfected HEK293 cells. The molecular interaction of DGK{zeta} and NAP1Ls prohibits nuclear import of DGK{zeta} because binding of NAP1Ls to DGK{zeta} blocks import carrier proteins, Qip1 and NPI1, to interact with DGK{zeta}, leading to cytoplasmic tethering of DGK{zeta}. In addition, overexpression of NAP1Ls exerts a protective effect against doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity. These findings suggest that NAP1Ls are involved in a novel molecular basis for the regulation of nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of DGK{zeta} and provide a clue to examine functional significance of its translocation under pathological conditions.

  4. Direct interaction between nucleosome assembly protein 1 and the papillomavirus E2 proteins involved in activation of transcription.

    PubMed

    Rehtanz, Manuela; Schmidt, Hanns-Martin; Warthorst, Ursula; Steger, Gertrud

    2004-03-01

    Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we identified human nucleosome assembly protein 1 (hNAP-1) as a protein interacting with the activation domain of the transcriptional activator encoded by papillomaviruses (PVs), the E2 protein. We show that the interaction between E2 and hNAP-1 is direct and not merely mediated by the transcriptional coactivator p300, which is bound by both proteins. Coexpression of hNAP-1 strongly enhances activation by E2, indicating a functional interaction as well. E2 binds to at least two separate domains within hNAP-1, one within the C terminus and an internal domain. The binding of E2 to hNAP-1 is necessary for cooperativity between the factors. Moreover, the N-terminal 91 amino acids are crucial for the transcriptional activity of hNAP-1, since deletion mutants lacking this N-terminal portion fail to cooperate with E2. We provide evidence that hNAP-1, E2, and p300 can form a ternary complex efficient in the activation of transcription. We also show that p53 directly interacts with hNAP-1, indicating that transcriptional activators in addition to PV E2 interact with hNAP-1. These results suggest that the binding of sequence-specific DNA binding proteins to hNAP-1 may be an important step contributing to the activation of transcription. PMID:14966293

  5. Induced ectopic kinetochore assembly bypasses the requirement for CENP-A nucleosomes

    PubMed Central

    Gascoigne, Karen E.; Takeuchi, Kozo; Suzuki, Aussie; Hori, Tetsuya; Fukagawa, Tatsuo; Cheeseman, Iain M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Accurate chromosome segregation requires assembly of the multi-protein kinetochore complex at centromeres. Although prior work identified the centromeric histone H3-variant CENP-A as the important upstream factor necessary for centromere specification, in human cells CENP-A is not sufficient for kinetochore assembly. Here, we demonstrate that two constitutive DNA-binding kinetochore components, CENP-C and CENP-T, function to direct kinetochore formation. Replacing the DNA-binding regions of CENP-C and CENP-T with alternate chromosome-targeting domains recruits these proteins to ectopic loci, resulting in CENP-A-independent kinetochore assembly. These ectopic kinetochore-like foci are functional based on the stoichiometric assembly of multiple kinetochore components including the microtubule-binding KMN network, the presence of microtubule attachments, the microtubule-sensitive recruitment of the spindle checkpoint protein Mad2, and the segregation behavior of foci-containing chromosomes. We additionally find that CENP-T phosphorylation regulates the mitotic assembly of both endogenous and ectopic kinetochores. Thus, CENP-C and CENP-T form a critical regulated platform for vertebrate kinetochore assembly. PMID:21529714

  6. The Chp1 chromodomain binds the H3K9me tail and the nucleosome core to assemble heterochromatin

    PubMed Central

    Zocco, Manuel; Marasovic, Mirela; Pisacane, Paola; Bilokapic, Silvija; Halic, Mario

    2016-01-01

    To maintain genome stability, cells pack large portions of their genome into silent chromatin or heterochromatin. Histone H3 lysine 9 methylation, a hallmark of heterochromatin, is recognized by conserved readers called chromodomains. But how chromodomains interact with their actual binding partner, the H3K9 methylated nucleosome, remains elusive. We have determined the structure of a nucleosome trimethylated at lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me3 Nucleosome) in a complex with the chromodomain of Chp1, a protein required for RNA interference-dependent heterochromatin formation in fission yeast. The cryo-electron microscopy structure reveals that the chromodomain of Chp1 binds the histone H3 lysine 9 methylated tail and the core of the nucleosome, primarily histones H3 and H2B. Mutations in chromodomain of Chp1 loops, which interact with the nucleosome core, abolished this interaction in vitro. Moreover, fission yeast cells with Chp1 loop mutations have a defect in Chp1 recruitment and heterochromatin formation. This study reveals the structural basis for heterochromatic silencing and suggests that chromodomains could read histone code in the H3 tail and the nucleosome core, which would provide an additional layer of regulation. PMID:27462451

  7. Substantial Histone Reduction Modulates Genomewide Nucleosomal Occupancy and Global Transcriptional Output

    PubMed Central

    Celona, Barbara; Weiner, Assaf; Di Felice, Francesca; Mancuso, Francesco M.; Cesarini, Elisa; Rossi, Riccardo L.; Gregory, Lorna; Baban, Dilair; Rossetti, Grazisa; Grianti, Paolo; Pagani, Massimiliano; Bonaldi, Tiziana; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Friedman, Nir; Camilloni, Giorgio; Bianchi, Marco E.; Agresti, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    The basic unit of genome packaging is the nucleosome, and nucleosomes have long been proposed to restrict DNA accessibility both to damage and to transcription. Nucleosome number in cells was considered fixed, but recently aging yeast and mammalian cells were shown to contain fewer nucleosomes. We show here that mammalian cells lacking High Mobility Group Box 1 protein (HMGB1) contain a reduced amount of core, linker, and variant histones, and a correspondingly reduced number of nucleosomes, possibly because HMGB1 facilitates nucleosome assembly. Yeast nhp6 mutants lacking Nhp6a and -b proteins, which are related to HMGB1, also have a reduced amount of histones and fewer nucleosomes. Nucleosome limitation in both mammalian and yeast cells increases the sensitivity of DNA to damage, increases transcription globally, and affects the relative expression of about 10% of genes. In yeast nhp6 cells the loss of more than one nucleosome in four does not affect the location of nucleosomes and their spacing, but nucleosomal occupancy. The decrease in nucleosomal occupancy is non-uniform and can be modelled assuming that different nucleosomal sites compete for available histones. Sites with a high propensity to occupation are almost always packaged into nucleosomes both in wild type and nucleosome-depleted cells; nucleosomes on sites with low propensity to occupation are disproportionately lost in nucleosome-depleted cells. We suggest that variation in nucleosome number, by affecting nucleosomal occupancy both genomewide and gene-specifically, constitutes a novel layer of epigenetic regulation. PMID:21738444

  8. The Modifier of Transcription 1 (Mot1) ATPase and Spt16 Histone Chaperone Co-regulate Transcription through Preinitiation Complex Assembly and Nucleosome Organization.

    PubMed

    True, Jason D; Muldoon, Joseph J; Carver, Melissa N; Poorey, Kunal; Shetty, Savera J; Bekiranov, Stefan; Auble, David T

    2016-07-15

    Modifier of transcription 1 (Mot1) is a conserved and essential Swi2/Snf2 ATPase that can remove TATA-binding protein (TBP) from DNA using ATP hydrolysis and in so doing exerts global effects on transcription. Spt16 is also essential and functions globally in transcriptional regulation as a component of the facilitates chromatin transcription (FACT) histone chaperone complex. Here we demonstrate that Mot1 and Spt16 regulate a largely overlapping set of genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. As expected, Mot1 was found to control TBP levels at co-regulated promoters. In contrast, Spt16 did not affect TBP recruitment. On a global scale, Spt16 was required for Mot1 promoter localization, and Mot1 also affected Spt16 localization to genes. Interestingly, we found that Mot1 has an unanticipated role in establishing or maintaining the occupancy and positioning of nucleosomes at the 5' ends of genes. Spt16 has a broad role in regulating chromatin organization in gene bodies, including those nucleosomes affected by Mot1. These results suggest that the large scale overlap in Mot1 and Spt16 function arises from a combination of both their unique and shared functions in transcription complex assembly and chromatin structure regulation. PMID:27226635

  9. Replication-guided nucleosome packing and nucleosome breathing expedite the formation of dense arrays

    PubMed Central

    Osberg, Brendan; Nuebler, Johannes; Korber, Philipp; Gerland, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    The first level of genome packaging in eukaryotic cells involves the formation of dense nucleosome arrays, with DNA coverage near 90% in yeasts. How cells achieve such high coverage within a short time, e.g. after DNA replication, remains poorly understood. It is known that random sequential adsorption of impenetrable particles on a line reaches high density extremely slowly, due to a jamming phenomenon. The nucleosome-shifting action of remodeling enzymes has been proposed as a mechanism to resolve such jams. Here, we suggest two biophysical mechanisms which assist rapid filling of DNA with nucleosomes, and we quantitatively characterize these mechanisms within mathematical models. First, we show that the ‘softness’ of nucleosomes, due to nucleosome breathing and stepwise nucleosome assembly, significantly alters the filling behavior, speeding up the process relative to ‘hard’ particles with fixed, mutually exclusive DNA footprints. Second, we explore model scenarios in which the progression of the replication fork could eliminate nucleosome jamming, either by rapid filling in its wake or via memory of the parental nucleosome positions. Taken together, our results suggest that biophysical effects promote rapid nucleosome filling, making the reassembly of densely packed nucleosomes after DNA replication a simpler task for cells than was previously thought. PMID:25428353

  10. A deformation energy-based model for predicting nucleosome dyads and occupancy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guoqing; Xing, Yongqiang; Zhao, Hongyu; Wang, Jianying; Shang, Yu; Cai, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosome plays an essential role in various cellular processes, such as DNA replication, recombination, and transcription. Hence, it is important to decode the mechanism of nucleosome positioning and identify nucleosome positions in the genome. In this paper, we present a model for predicting nucleosome positioning based on DNA deformation, in which both bending and shearing of the nucleosomal DNA are considered. The model successfully predicted the dyad positions of nucleosomes assembled in vitro and the in vitro map of nucleosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Applying the model to Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster, we achieved satisfactory results. Our data also show that shearing energy of nucleosomal DNA outperforms bending energy in nucleosome occupancy prediction and the ability to predict nucleosome dyad positions is attributed to bending energy that is associated with rotational positioning of nucleosomes. PMID:27053067

  11. Structural and functional characterization of a cell cycle associated HDAC1/2 complex reveals the structural basis for complex assembly and nucleosome targeting

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Toshimasa; Fairall, Louise; Muskett, Frederick W.; Milano, Charles P.; Watson, Peter J.; Arnaudo, Nadia; Saleh, Almutasem; Millard, Christopher J.; El-Mezgueldi, Mohammed; Martino, Fabrizio; Schwabe, John W.R.

    2015-01-01

    Recent proteomic studies have identified a novel histone deacetylase complex that is upregulated during mitosis and is associated with cyclin A. This complex is conserved from nematodes to man and contains histone deacetylases 1 and 2, the MIDEAS corepressor protein and a protein called DNTTIP1 whose function was hitherto poorly understood. Here, we report the structures of two domains from DNTTIP1. The amino-terminal region forms a tight dimerization domain with a novel structural fold that interacts with and mediates assembly of the HDAC1:MIDEAS complex. The carboxy-terminal domain of DNTTIP1 has a structure related to the SKI/SNO/DAC domain, despite lacking obvious sequence homology. We show that this domain in DNTTIP1 mediates interaction with both DNA and nucleosomes. Thus, DNTTIP1 acts as a dimeric chromatin binding module in the HDAC1:MIDEAS corepressor complex. PMID:25653165

  12. A brief review of nucleosome structure.

    PubMed

    Cutter, Amber R; Hayes, Jeffrey J

    2015-10-01

    The nucleosomal subunit organization of chromatin provides a multitude of functions. Nucleosomes elicit an initial ∼7-fold linear compaction of genomic DNA. They provide a critical mechanism for stable repression of genes and other DNA-dependent activities by restricting binding of trans-acting factors to cognate DNA sequences. Conversely they are engineered to be nearly meta-stable and disassembled (and reassembled) in a facile manner to allow rapid access to the underlying DNA during processes such as transcription, replication and DNA repair. Nucleosomes protect the genome from DNA damaging agents and provide a lattice onto which a myriad of epigenetic signals are deposited. Moreover, vast strings of nucleosomes provide a framework for assembly of the chromatin fiber and higher-order chromatin structures. Thus, in order to provide a foundation for understanding these functions, we present a review of the basic elements of nucleosome structure and stability, including the association of linker histones. PMID:25980611

  13. The nucleosomal core histone octamer at 3.1 A resolution: a tripartite protein assembly and a left-handed superhelix.

    PubMed Central

    Arents, G; Burlingame, R W; Wang, B C; Love, W E; Moudrianakis, E N

    1991-01-01

    The structure of the octameric histone core of the nucleosome has been determined by x-ray crystallography to a resolution of 3.1 A. The histone octamer is a tripartite assembly in which a centrally located (H3-H4)2 tetramer is flanked by two H2A-H2B dimers. It has a complex outer surface; depending on the perspective, the structure appears as a wedge or as a flat disk. The disk represents the planar projection of a left-handed proteinaceous superhelix with approximately 28 A pitch. The diameter of the particle is 65 A and the length is 60 A at its maximum and approximately 10 A at its minimum extension; these dimensions are in agreement with those reported earlier by Klug et al. [Klug, A., Rhodes, D., Smith, J., Finch, J. T. & Thomas, J. O. (1980) Nature (London) 287, 509-516]. The folded histone chains are elongated rather than globular and are assembled in a characteristic "handshake" motif. The individual polypeptides share a common central structural element of the helix-loop-helix type, which we name the histone fold. Images PMID:1946434

  14. Structural basis for retroviral integration into nucleosomes

    PubMed Central

    Maskell, Daniel P.; Renault, Ludovic; Serrao, Erik; Lesbats, Paul; Matadeen, Rishi; Hare, Stephen; Lindemann, Dirk; Engelman, Alan N.; Costa, Alessandro; Cherepanov, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Retroviral integration is catalyzed by a tetramer of integrase (IN) assembled on viral DNA ends in a stable complex, known as the intasome1,2. How the intasome interfaces with chromosomal DNA, which exists in the form of nucleosomal arrays, is currently unknown. Here we show that the prototype foamy virus (PFV) intasome is proficient at stable capture of nucleosomes as targets for integration. Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (EM) reveals a multivalent intasome-nucleosome interface involving both gyres of nucleosomal DNA and one H2A-H2B heterodimer. While the histone octamer remains intact, the DNA is lifted from the surface of the H2A-H2B heterodimer to allow integration at strongly preferred superhelix location (SHL) ±3.5 positions. Amino acid substitutions disrupting these contacts impinge on the ability of the intasome to engage nucleosomes in vitro and redistribute viral integration sites on the genomic scale. Our findings elucidate the molecular basis for nucleosome capture by the viral DNA recombination machinery and the underlying nucleosome plasticity that allows integration. PMID:26061770

  15. Combination of Hypomorphic Mutations of the Drosophila Homologues of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor and Nucleosome Assembly Protein Family Genes Disrupts Morphogenesis, Memory and Detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Cherezov, Roman O.; Vorontsova, Julia E.; Slezinger, Mikhail S.; Zatsepina, Olga G.; Simonova, Olga B.; Enikolopov, Grigori N.; Savvateeva-Popova, Elena V.

    2014-01-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor is essential for biological responses to endogenous and exogenous toxins in mammals. Its Drosophila homolog spineless plays an important role in fly morphogenesis. We have previously shown that during morphogenesis spineless genetically interacts with CG5017 gene, which encodes a nucleosome assembly factor and may affect cognitive function of the fly. We now demonstrate synergistic interactions of spineless and CG5017 in pathways controlling oxidative stress response and long-term memory formation in Drosophila melanogaster. Oxidative stress was induced by low doses of X-ray irradiation of flies carrying hypomorphic mutation of spineless, mutation of CG5017, and their combination. To determine the sensitivity of these mutants to pharmacological modifiers of the irradiation effect, we irradiated flies growing on standard medium supplemented by radiosensitizer furazidin and radioprotector serotonin. The effects of irradiation were investigated by analyzing leg and antenna morphological structures and by using real-time PCR to measure mRNA expression levels for spineless, Cyp6g1 and Gst-theta genes. We also examined long-term memory in these mutants using conditioned courtship suppression paradigm. Our results show that the interaction of spineless and CG5017 is important for regulation of morphogenesis, long-term memory formation, and detoxification during oxidative stress. Since spineless and CG5017 are evolutionary conserved, these results must be considered when evaluating the risk of combining similar mutations in other organisms, including humans. PMID:24736732

  16. Combination of hypomorphic mutations of the Drosophila homologues of aryl hydrocarbon receptor and nucleosome assembly protein family genes disrupts morphogenesis, memory and detoxification.

    PubMed

    Kuzin, Boris A; Nikitina, Ekaterina A; Cherezov, Roman O; Vorontsova, Julia E; Slezinger, Mikhail S; Zatsepina, Olga G; Simonova, Olga B; Enikolopov, Grigori N; Savvateeva-Popova, Elena V

    2014-01-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor is essential for biological responses to endogenous and exogenous toxins in mammals. Its Drosophila homolog spineless plays an important role in fly morphogenesis. We have previously shown that during morphogenesis spineless genetically interacts with CG5017 gene, which encodes a nucleosome assembly factor and may affect cognitive function of the fly. We now demonstrate synergistic interactions of spineless and CG5017 in pathways controlling oxidative stress response and long-term memory formation in Drosophila melanogaster. Oxidative stress was induced by low doses of X-ray irradiation of flies carrying hypomorphic mutation of spineless, mutation of CG5017, and their combination. To determine the sensitivity of these mutants to pharmacological modifiers of the irradiation effect, we irradiated flies growing on standard medium supplemented by radiosensitizer furazidin and radioprotector serotonin. The effects of irradiation were investigated by analyzing leg and antenna morphological structures and by using real-time PCR to measure mRNA expression levels for spineless, Cyp6g1 and Gst-theta genes. We also examined long-term memory in these mutants using conditioned courtship suppression paradigm. Our results show that the interaction of spineless and CG5017 is important for regulation of morphogenesis, long-term memory formation, and detoxification during oxidative stress. Since spineless and CG5017 are evolutionary conserved, these results must be considered when evaluating the risk of combining similar mutations in other organisms, including humans. PMID:24736732

  17. Nucleosome positioning and composition modulate in silico chromatin flexibility.

    PubMed

    Clauvelin, N; Lo, P; Kulaeva, O I; Nizovtseva, E V; Diaz-Montes, J; Zola, J; Parashar, M; Studitsky, V M; Olson, W K

    2015-02-18

    The dynamic organization of chromatin plays an essential role in the regulation of gene expression and in other fundamental cellular processes. The underlying physical basis of these activities lies in the sequential positioning, chemical composition, and intermolecular interactions of the nucleosomes-the familiar assemblies of ∼150 DNA base pairs and eight histone proteins-found on chromatin fibers. Here we introduce a mesoscale model of short nucleosomal arrays and a computational framework that make it possible to incorporate detailed structural features of DNA and histones in simulations of short chromatin constructs. We explore the effects of nucleosome positioning and the presence or absence of cationic N-terminal histone tails on the 'local' inter-nucleosomal interactions and the global deformations of the simulated chains. The correspondence between the predicted and observed effects of nucleosome composition and numbers on the long-range communication between the ends of designed nucleosome arrays lends credence to the model and to the molecular insights gleaned from the simulated structures. We also extract effective nucleosome-nucleosome potentials from the simulations and implement the potentials in a larger-scale computational treatment of regularly repeating chromatin fibers. Our results reveal a remarkable effect of nucleosome spacing on chromatin flexibility, with small changes in DNA linker length significantly altering the interactions of nucleosomes and the dimensions of the fiber as a whole. In addition, we find that these changes in nucleosome positioning influence the statistical properties of long chromatin constructs. That is, simulated chromatin fibers with the same number of nucleosomes exhibit polymeric behaviors ranging from Gaussian to worm-like, depending upon nucleosome spacing. These findings suggest that the physical and mechanical properties of chromatin can span a wide range of behaviors, depending on nucleosome positioning, and

  18. Global remodeling of nucleosome positions in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Eukaryotic chromatin architecture is affected by intrinsic histone-DNA sequence preferences, steric exclusion between nucleosome particles, formation of higher-order structures, and in vivo activity of chromatin remodeling enzymes. Results To disentangle sequence-dependent nucleosome positioning from the other factors, we have created two high-throughput maps of nucleosomes assembled in vitro on genomic DNA from the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans. A comparison of in vitro nucleosome positions with those observed in a mixed-stage, mixed-tissue population of C. elegans cells reveals that in vivo sequence preferences are modified on the genomic scale. Indeed, G/C dinucleotides are predicted to be most favorable for nucleosome formation in vitro but not in vivo. Nucleosome sequence read coverage in vivo is distinctly lower in chromosome arms than in central regions; the observed changes in apparent nucleosome sequence specificity, likely due to genome-wide chromatin remodeler activity, contribute to the formation of these megabase-scale chromatin domains. We also observe that the majority of well-positioned in vivo nucleosomes do not occupy thermodynamically favorable sequences observed in vitro. Finally, we find that exons are intrinsically more amenable to nucleosome formation compared to introns. Nucleosome occupancy of introns and exons consistently increases with G/C content in vitro but not in vivo, in agreement with our observation that G/C dinucleotide enrichment does not strongly promote in vivo nucleosome formation. Conclusions Our findings highlight the importance of both sequence specificity and active nucleosome repositioning in creating large-scale chromatin domains, and the antagonistic roles of intrinsic sequence preferences and chromatin remodelers in C. elegans. Sequence read data has been deposited into Sequence Read Archive (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sra; accession number SRA050182). Additional data, software and computational

  19. DPNuc: Identifying Nucleosome Positions Based on the Dirichlet Process Mixture Model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huidong; Guan, Jihong; Zhou, Shuigeng

    2015-01-01

    Nucleosomes and the free linker DNA between them assemble the chromatin. Nucleosome positioning plays an important role in gene transcription regulation, DNA replication and repair, alternative splicing, and so on. With the rapid development of ChIP-seq, it is possible to computationally detect the positions of nucleosomes on chromosomes. However, existing methods cannot provide accurate and detailed information about the detected nucleosomes, especially for the nucleosomes with complex configurations where overlaps and noise exist. Meanwhile, they usually require some prior knowledge of nucleosomes as input, such as the size or the number of the unknown nucleosomes, which may significantly influence the detection results. In this paper, we propose a novel approach DPNuc for identifying nucleosome positions based on the Dirichlet process mixture model. In our method, Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations are employed to determine the mixture model with no need of prior knowledge about nucleosomes. Compared with three existing methods, our approach can provide more detailed information of the detected nucleosomes and can more reasonably reveal the real configurations of the chromosomes; especially, our approach performs better in the complex overlapping situations. By mapping the detected nucleosomes to a synthetic benchmark nucleosome map and two existing benchmark nucleosome maps, it is shown that our approach achieves a better performance in identifying nucleosome positions and gets a higher F-score. Finally, we show that our approach can more reliably detect the size distribution of nucleosomes. PMID:26671796

  20. Nucleosome positioning and composition modulate in silico chromatin flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clauvelin, N.; Lo, P.; Kulaeva, O. I.; Nizovtseva, E. V.; Diaz-Montes, J.; Zola, J.; Parashar, M.; Studitsky, V. M.; Olson, W. K.

    2015-02-01

    The dynamic organization of chromatin plays an essential role in the regulation of gene expression and in other fundamental cellular processes. The underlying physical basis of these activities lies in the sequential positioning, chemical composition, and intermolecular interactions of the nucleosomes—the familiar assemblies of ˜150 DNA base pairs and eight histone proteins—found on chromatin fibers. Here we introduce a mesoscale model of short nucleosomal arrays and a computational framework that make it possible to incorporate detailed structural features of DNA and histones in simulations of short chromatin constructs. We explore the effects of nucleosome positioning and the presence or absence of cationic N-terminal histone tails on the ‘local’ inter-nucleosomal interactions and the global deformations of the simulated chains. The correspondence between the predicted and observed effects of nucleosome composition and numbers on the long-range communication between the ends of designed nucleosome arrays lends credence to the model and to the molecular insights gleaned from the simulated structures. We also extract effective nucleosome-nucleosome potentials from the simulations and implement the potentials in a larger-scale computational treatment of regularly repeating chromatin fibers. Our results reveal a remarkable effect of nucleosome spacing on chromatin flexibility, with small changes in DNA linker length significantly altering the interactions of nucleosomes and the dimensions of the fiber as a whole. In addition, we find that these changes in nucleosome positioning influence the statistical properties of long chromatin constructs. That is, simulated chromatin fibers with the same number of nucleosomes exhibit polymeric behaviors ranging from Gaussian to worm-like, depending upon nucleosome spacing. These findings suggest that the physical and mechanical properties of chromatin can span a wide range of behaviors, depending on nucleosome

  1. Molecular characterization of hNRP, a cDNA encoding a human nucleosome-assembly-protein-I-related gene product involved in the induction of cell proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, H U; Mills, G B; Kozlowski, M; Hogg, D; Branch, D; Ishimi, Y; Siminovitch, K A

    1994-01-01

    We have isolated from a human thymus cDNA library a cDNA clone encoding a potential protein with 54% amino acid similarity to that encoded by a previously identified cDNA for yeast nucleosome assembly protein I (NAP-I). The deduced amino acid sequence for this newly identified cDNA, designated hNRP (human NAP-related protein), contains a potential seven-residue nuclear localization motif, three clusters of highly acidic residues and other structural features found in various proteins implicated in chromatin formation. When expressed as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli, hNRP reacted specifically with a monoclonal antibody raised against human NAP-I. The hNRP transcript was detected in all tissues and cell lines studied, but levels were somewhat increased in rapidly proliferating cells. Moreover, levels of both hNRP mRNA and protein increased rapidly in cultured T-lymphocytes induced to proliferate by incubation with phorbol ester and ionomycin. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate/ionomycin-induced increases in both hNRP mRNA and mitogenesis, as measured by thymidine incorporation, were markedly inhibited, however, in cells treated with an hNRP antisense oligonucleotide. These results demonstrate a correlation between induction of hNRP expression and mitogenesis and taken together with the structural similarities between hNRP and yeast NAP-I suggest that the hNRP gene product participates in DNA replication and thereby plays an important role in the process of cell proliferation. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8297347

  2. The prenucleosome, a stable conformational isomer of the nucleosome

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Jia; Torigoe, Sharon E.; Brown, Christopher R.; Khuong, Mai T.; Kassavetis, George A.; Boeger, Hinrich; Kadonaga, James T.

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin comprises nucleosomes as well as nonnucleosomal histone–DNA particles. Prenucleosomes are rapidly formed histone–DNA particles that can be converted into canonical nucleosomes by a motor protein such as ACF. Here we show that the prenucleosome is a stable conformational isomer of the nucleosome. It consists of a histone octamer associated with ∼80 base pair (bp) of DNA, which is located at a position that corresponds to the central 80 bp of a nucleosome core particle. Monomeric prenucleosomes with free flanking DNA do not spontaneously fold into nucleosomes but can be converted into canonical nucleosomes by an ATP-driven motor protein such as ACF or Chd1. In addition, histone H3K56, which is located at the DNA entry and exit points of a canonical nucleosome, is specifically acetylated by p300 in prenucleosomes relative to nucleosomes. Prenucleosomes assembled in vitro exhibit properties that are strikingly similar to those of nonnucleosomal histone–DNA particles in the upstream region of active promoters in vivo. These findings suggest that the prenucleosome, the only known stable conformational isomer of the nucleosome, is related to nonnucleosomal histone–DNA species in the cell. PMID:26680301

  3. Statistical mechanics of nucleosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chereji, Razvan V.

    Eukaryotic cells contain long DNA molecules (about two meters for a human cell) which are tightly packed inside the micrometric nuclei. Nucleosomes are the basic packaging unit of the DNA which allows this millionfold compactification. A longstanding puzzle is to understand the principles which allow cells to both organize their genomes into chromatin fibers in the crowded space of their nuclei, and also to keep the DNA accessible to many factors and enzymes. With the nucleosomes covering about three quarters of the DNA, their positions are essential because these influence which genes can be regulated by the transcription factors and which cannot. We study physical models which predict the genome-wide organization of the nucleosomes and also the relevant energies which dictate this organization. In the last five years, the study of chromatin knew many important advances. In particular, in the field of nucleosome positioning, new techniques of identifying nucleosomes and the competing DNA-binding factors appeared, as chemical mapping with hydroxyl radicals, ChIP-exo, among others, the resolution of the nucleosome maps increased by using paired-end sequencing, and the price of sequencing an entire genome decreased. We present a rigorous statistical mechanics model which is able to explain the recent experimental results by taking into account nucleosome unwrapping, competition between different DNA-binding proteins, and both the interaction between histones and DNA, and between neighboring histones. We show a series of predictions of our new model, all in agreement with the experimental observations.

  4. Nucleosome Positioning and Epigenetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, David; Bruinsma, Robijn

    2008-03-01

    The role of chromatin structure in gene regulation has recently taken center stage in the field of epigenetics, phenomena that change the phenotype without changing the DNA sequence. Recent work has also shown that nucleosomes, a complex of DNA wrapped around a histone octamer, experience a sequence dependent energy landscape due to the variation in DNA bend stiffness with sequence composition. In this talk, we consider the role nucleosome positioning might play in the formation of heterochromatin, a compact form of DNA generically responsible for gene silencing. In particular, we discuss how different patterns of nucleosome positions, periodic or random, could either facilitate or suppress heterochromatin stability and formation.

  5. Modeling the dynamics of the nucleosome at various levels.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onufriev, Alexey; Fenley, Andrew; Zmuda-Ruscio, Jory; Adams, David

    2007-03-01

    The primary level of DNA compaction in eukaryotic organisms is the nucleosome, yet details of its dynamics are not fully understood. While the whole nucleosome must be highly stable, protective of its genetic material, at the same time its tightly wrapped DNA should be highly accessible, easily revealing its information content. A combination of atom-level classical molecular dynamics and a course-grained continuum description provide insights into the functioning of the system. In particular, the nucleosomal DNA appears to be considerably more flexible than what can be expected based on its canonical persistence length. A coarse-grained electrostatic model of the nucleosome explains how its stability can be modulated with small environmental changes as well as post-translational modifications. Implications for the nucleosome assembly process in vivo are discussed.

  6. Octamer displacement and redistribution in transcription of single nucleosomes.

    PubMed Central

    O'Donohue, M F; Duband-Goulet, I; Hamiche, A; Prunell, A

    1994-01-01

    Single nucleosomes were assembled on a 357bp DNA fragment containing a 5S RNA gene from sea urchin and a promoter for SP6 RNA polymerase, and were fractionated as a function of their positions by gel electrophoresis. Transcribed nucleosome positions were detected by observing band disappearance in gels, which in turn provided evidence for the displacement of the histone octamer upon transcription. Differential band disappearance showed that nucleosomes closer to the promoter were harder to transcribe, and transcription was blocked when the nucleosome proximal boundary was at the start site. Nucleosomes located at discrete positions were also eluted from the gel bands and transcribed. In this case, new bands appeared as a consequence of octamer redistribution. Such redistribution occurred over all untranscribed positions, as well as over transcribed positions close enough to the promoter. Similar conclusions were derived from another previously investigated fragment containing a Xenopus 5S RNA gene. Images PMID:8152924

  7. RSC unravels the nucleosome.

    PubMed

    Lorch, Y; Zhang, M; Kornberg, R D

    2001-01-01

    RSC and SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complexes were previously reported to generate a stably altered nucleosome. We now describe the formation of hybrids between nucleosomes of different sizes, showing that the stably altered structure is a noncovalent dimer. A basis for dimer formation is suggested by an effect of RSC on the supercoiling of closed, circular arrays of nucleosomes. The effect may be explained by the interaction of RSC with DNA at the ends of the nucleosome, which could lead to the release 60--80 bp or more from the ends. DNA released in this way may be trapped in the stable dimer or lead to alternative fates such as histone octamer transfer to another DNA or sliding along the same DNA molecule. PMID:11172714

  8. Baculoviruses and nucleosome management

    SciTech Connect

    Volkman, Loy E.

    2015-02-15

    Negatively-supercoiled-ds DNA molecules, including the genomes of baculoviruses, spontaneously wrap around cores of histones to form nucleosomes when present within eukaryotic nuclei. Hence, nucleosome management should be essential for baculovirus genome replication and temporal regulation of transcription, but this has not been documented. Nucleosome mobilization is the dominion of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes. SWI/SNF and INO80, two of the best-studied complexes, as well as chromatin modifier TIP60, all contain actin as a subunit. Retrospective analysis of results of AcMNPV time course experiments wherein actin polymerization was blocked by cytochalasin D drug treatment implicate actin-containing chromatin modifying complexes in decatenating baculovirus genomes, shutting down host transcription, and regulating late and very late phases of viral transcription. Moreover, virus-mediated nuclear localization of actin early during infection may contribute to nucleosome management. - Highlights: • Baculoviruses have negatively-supercoiled, circular ds DNA. • Negatively-supercoiled DNA spontaneously forms nucleosomes in the nucleus. • Nucleosomes must be mobilized for replication and transcription to proceed. • Actin-containing chromatin modifiers participate in baculovirus replication.

  9. Genome-wide profiling of nucleosome sensitivity and chromatin accessibility in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Chereji, Răzvan V.; Kan, Tsung-Wai; Grudniewska, Magda K.; Romashchenko, Alexander V.; Berezikov, Eugene; Zhimulev, Igor F.; Guryev, Victor; Morozov, Alexandre V.; Moshkin, Yuri M.

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosomal DNA is thought to be generally inaccessible to DNA-binding factors, such as micrococcal nuclease (MNase). Here, we digest Drosophila chromatin with high and low concentrations of MNase to reveal two distinct nucleosome types: MNase-sensitive and MNase-resistant. MNase-resistant nucleosomes assemble on sequences depleted of A/T and enriched in G/C-containing dinucleotides, whereas MNase-sensitive nucleosomes form on A/T-rich sequences found at transcription start and termination sites, enhancers and DNase I hypersensitive sites. Estimates of nucleosome formation energies indicate that MNase-sensitive nucleosomes tend to be less stable than MNase-resistant ones. Strikingly, a decrease in cell growth temperature of about 10°C makes MNase-sensitive nucleosomes less accessible, suggesting that observed variations in MNase sensitivity are related to either thermal fluctuations of chromatin fibers or the activity of enzymatic machinery. In the vicinity of active genes and DNase I hypersensitive sites nucleosomes are organized into periodic arrays, likely due to ‘phasing’ off potential barriers formed by DNA-bound factors or by nucleosomes anchored to their positions through external interactions. The latter idea is substantiated by our biophysical model of nucleosome positioning and energetics, which predicts that nucleosomes immediately downstream of transcription start sites are anchored and recapitulates nucleosome phasing at active genes significantly better than sequence-dependent models. PMID:26429969

  10. Statistical physics of nucleosome positioning and chromatin structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, Alexandre

    2012-02-01

    Genomic DNA is packaged into chromatin in eukaryotic cells. The fundamental building block of chromatin is the nucleosome, a 147 bp-long DNA molecule wrapped around the surface of a histone octamer. Arrays of nucleosomes are positioned along DNA according to their sequence preferences and folded into higher-order chromatin fibers whose structure is poorly understood. We have developed a framework for predicting sequence-specific histone-DNA interactions and the effective two-body potential responsible for ordering nucleosomes into regular higher-order structures. Our approach is based on the analogy between nucleosomal arrays and a one-dimensional fluid of finite-size particles with nearest-neighbor interactions. We derive simple rules which allow us to predict nucleosome occupancy solely from the dinucleotide content of the underlying DNA sequences.Dinucleotide content determines the degree of stiffness of the DNA polymer and thus defines its ability to bend into the nucleosomal superhelix. As expected, the nucleosome positioning rules are universal for chromatin assembled in vitro on genomic DNA from baker's yeast and from the nematode worm C.elegans, where nucleosome placement follows intrinsic sequence preferences and steric exclusion. However, the positioning rules inferred from in vivo C.elegans chromatin are affected by global nucleosome depletion from chromosome arms relative to central domains, likely caused by the attachment of the chromosome arms to the nuclear membrane. Furthermore, intrinsic nucleosome positioning rules are overwritten in transcribed regions, indicating that chromatin organization is actively managed by the transcriptional and splicing machinery.

  11. Nucleosome positioning by genomic excluding-energy barriers.

    PubMed

    Milani, Pascale; Chevereau, Guillaume; Vaillant, Cédric; Audit, Benjamin; Haftek-Terreau, Zofia; Marilley, Monique; Bouvet, Philippe; Argoul, Françoise; Arneodo, Alain

    2009-12-29

    Recent genome-wide nucleosome mappings along with bioinformatics studies have confirmed that the DNA sequence plays a more important role in the collective organization of nucleosomes in vivo than previously thought. Yet in living cells, this organization also results from the action of various external factors like DNA-binding proteins and chromatin remodelers. To decipher the code for intrinsic chromatin organization, there is thus a need for in vitro experiments to bridge the gap between computational models of nucleosome sequence preferences and in vivo nucleosome occupancy data. Here we combine atomic force microscopy in liquid and theoretical modeling to demonstrate that a major sequence signaling in vivo are high-energy barriers that locally inhibit nucleosome formation rather than favorable positioning motifs. We show that these genomic excluding-energy barriers condition the collective assembly of neighboring nucleosomes consistently with equilibrium statistical ordering principles. The analysis of two gene promoter regions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the human genome indicates that these genomic barriers direct the intrinsic nucleosome occupancy of regulatory sites, thereby contributing to gene expression regulation. PMID:20018700

  12. Probing Nucleosome Remodeling by Unzipping Single DNA Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Michelle

    2006-03-01

    At the core of eukaryotic chromatin is the nucleosome, which consists of 147 bp of DNA wrapped 1.65 turns around an octamer of histone proteins. Even this lowest level of genomic compaction presents a strong barrier to DNA-binding cellular factors that are required for essential processes such as transcription, DNA replication, recombination and repair. Chromatin remodeling enzymes use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to regulate accessibility of the genetic code by altering chromatin structure. While remodeling enzymes have been the subject of extensive research in recent years, their precise mechanism remains unclear. In order to probe the structure of individual nucleosomes and their remodeling, we assembled a histone octamer onto a DNA segment containing a strong nucleosome positioning sequence. As the DNA double helix was unzipped through the nucleosome using a feedback-enhanced optical trap, the presence of the nucleosome was detected as a series of dramatic increases in the tension in the DNA, followed by sudden tension reductions. Analysis of the unzipping force throughout the disruption accurately revealed the spatial location and fine structure of the nucleosome to near base pair precision. Using this approach, we investigate how remodeling enzymes may alter the location and structure of a nucleosome.

  13. Identification of nucleosome assembly protein 1 (NAP1) as an interacting partner of plant ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) and a positive regulator of rDNA transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Ora; Kim, Sunghan; Shin, Yun-jeong; Kim, Woo-Young; Koh, Hee-Jong; Cheon, Choong-Ill

    2015-09-18

    The ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) is a downstream component of the signaling mediated by the target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase that acts as a central regulator of the key metabolic processes, such as protein translation and ribosome biogenesis, in response to various environmental cues. In our previous study, we identified a novel role of plant RPS6, which negatively regulates rDNA transcription, forming a complex with a plant-specific histone deacetylase, AtHD2B. Here we report that the Arabidopsis RPS6 interacts additionally with a histone chaperone, nucleosome assembly protein 1(AtNAP1;1). The interaction does not appear to preclude the association of RPS6 with AtHD2B, as the AtNAP1 was also able to interact with AtHD2B as well as with an RPS6-AtHD2B fusion protein in the BiFC assay and pulldown experiment. Similar to a positive effect of the ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (AtS6K1) on rDNA transcription observed in this study, overexpression or down regulation of the AtNAP1;1 resulted in concomitant increase and decrease, respectively, in rDNA transcription suggesting a positive regulatory role played by AtNAP1 in plant rDNA transcription, possibly through derepression of the negative effect of the RPS6-AtHD2B complex. - Highlights: • Nucleosome assembly protein 1 (AtNAP1) interacts with RPS6 as well as with AtHD2B. • rDNA transcription is regulated S6K1. • Overexpression or down regulation of AtNAP1 results in concomitant increase or decrease in rDNA transcription.

  14. Nucleosome Core Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Nucleosome Core Particle grown on STS-81. The fundamental structural unit of chromatin and is the basis for organization within the genome by compaction of DNA within the nucleus of the cell and by making selected regions of chromosomes available for transcription and replication. Principal Investigator's are Dr. Dan Carter and Dr. Gerard Bunick of New Century Pharmaceuticals.

  15. Histone octamer acetylation affects the free energy of nucleosome formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooney, Alex; Manohar, Mridula; Edon, Annick; Nakkula, Robin; Ottesen, Jennifer; Poirier, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Nucleosomes, histone octamer-DNA complexes, form the fundamental repeating units of eukaryotic chromatin. Numerous post-translational modifications of histone octamers are found in vivo and are known to play roles in gene regulation and DNA repair, but the molecular functions of these modifications are not well understood. In this study we consider the effects of acetylating histone protein H3 residues Lys^115 and Lys^122. These modifications reduce the positive surface charge of the histone octamer at contact points with the negatively charged DNA phosphate backbone and add steric bulk in the dyad region. We report results from competitive reconstitutions that show the free energy of nucleosome formation between wild-type and modified histone octamer binding to a strong nucleosome positioning sequence is reduced. These results suggest that these modifications may be involved in nucleosome assembly and disassembly.

  16. Nucleosome breathing and remodeling constrain CRISPR-Cas9 function

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, R Stefan; Jiang, Fuguo; Doudna, Jennifer A; Lim, Wendell A; Narlikar, Geeta J; Almeida, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR-Cas9 bacterial surveillance system has become a versatile tool for genome editing and gene regulation in eukaryotic cells, yet how CRISPR-Cas9 contends with the barriers presented by eukaryotic chromatin is poorly understood. Here we investigate how the smallest unit of chromatin, a nucleosome, constrains the activity of the CRISPR-Cas9 system. We find that nucleosomes assembled on native DNA sequences are permissive to Cas9 action. However, the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA to Cas9 is variable over several orders of magnitude depending on dynamic properties of the DNA sequence and the distance of the PAM site from the nucleosome dyad. We further find that chromatin remodeling enzymes stimulate Cas9 activity on nucleosomal templates. Our findings imply that the spontaneous breathing of nucleosomal DNA together with the action of chromatin remodelers allow Cas9 to effectively act on chromatin in vivo. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13450.001 PMID:27130520

  17. Replacement of histone H3 with CENP-A directs global nucleosome array condensation and loosening of nucleosome superhelical termini.

    PubMed

    Panchenko, Tanya; Sorensen, Troy C; Woodcock, Christopher L; Kan, Zhong-Yuan; Wood, Stacey; Resch, Michael G; Luger, Karolin; Englander, S Walter; Hansen, Jeffrey C; Black, Ben E

    2011-10-01

    Centromere protein A (CENP-A) is a histone H3 variant that marks centromere location on the chromosome. To study the subunit structure and folding of human CENP-A-containing chromatin, we generated a set of nucleosomal arrays with canonical core histones and another set with CENP-A substituted for H3. At the level of quaternary structure and assembly, we find that CENP-A arrays are composed of octameric nucleosomes that assemble in a stepwise mechanism, recapitulating conventional array assembly with canonical histones. At intermediate structural resolution, we find that CENP-A-containing arrays are globally condensed relative to arrays with the canonical histones. At high structural resolution, using hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry (H/DX-MS), we find that the DNA superhelical termini within each nucleosome are loosely connected to CENP-A, and we identify the key amino acid substitution that is largely responsible for this behavior. Also the C terminus of histone H2A undergoes rapid hydrogen exchange relative to canonical arrays and does so in a manner that is independent of nucleosomal array folding. These findings have implications for understanding CENP-A-containing nucleosome structure and higher-order chromatin folding at the centromere. PMID:21949362

  18. Mediator-nucleosome interaction.

    PubMed

    Lorch, Y; Beve, J; Gustafsson, C M; Myers, L C; Kornberg, R D

    2000-07-01

    Mediator, a multiprotein complex involved in the regulation of RNA polymerase II transcription, binds to nucleosomes and acetylates histones. Three lines of evidence identify the Nut1 subunit of Mediator as responsible for the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity. An "in-gel" HAT assay reveals a single band of the appropriate size. Sequence alignment shows significant similarity of Nut1 to the GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase superfamily. Finally, recombinant Nut1 exhibits HAT activity in an in-gel assay. PMID:10949041

  19. Why Do Nucleosomes Unwrap Asymmetrically?

    PubMed

    de Bruin, Lennart; Tompitak, Marco; Eslami-Mossallam, Behrouz; Schiessel, Helmut

    2016-07-01

    Nucleosomes, DNA spools with a protein core, engage about three-quarters of eukaryotic DNA and play a critical role in chromosomal processes, ranging from gene regulation, recombination, and replication to chromosome condensation. For more than a decade, micromanipulation experiments where nucleosomes are put under tension, as well as the theoretical interpretations of these experiments, have deepened our understanding of the stability and dynamics of nucleosomes. Here we give a theoretical explanation for a surprising new experimental finding: nucleosomes wrapped onto the 601 positioning sequence (the sequence used in most laboratories) respond highly asymmetrically to external forces by always unwrapping from the same end. Using a computational nucleosome model, we show that this asymmetry can be explained by differences in the DNA mechanics of two very short stretches on the wrapped DNA portion. Our finding suggests that the physical properties of nucleosomes, here the response to forces, can be tuned locally by the choice of the underlying base-pair sequence. This leads to a new view of nucleosomes: a physically highly varied set of DNA-protein complexes whose properties can be tuned on evolutionary time scales to their specific function in the genomic context. PMID:26991771

  20. Measuring genome-wide nucleosome turnover using CATCH-IT.

    PubMed

    Teves, Sheila S; Deal, Roger B; Henikoff, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The dynamic interplay between DNA-binding proteins and nucleosomes underlies essential nuclear processes such as transcription, replication, and DNA repair. Manifestations of this interplay include the assembly, eviction, and replacement of nucleosomes. Hence, measurements of nucleosome turnover kinetics can lead to insights into the regulation of dynamic chromatin processes. In this chapter, we describe a genome-wide method for measuring nucleosome turnover that uses metabolic labeling followed by capture of newly synthesized histones, which we have termed Covalent Attachment of Tagged Histones to Capture and Identify Turnover (CATCH-IT). Although CATCH-IT can be used with any genome-wide mapping procedure, high-resolution profiling is attainable using paired-end sequencing of native chromatin. Our protocol also includes an efficient Solexa DNA sequencing library preparation protocol that can be used for single base-pair resolution mapping of both nucleosome and subnucleosomal particles. We not only describe the use of these protocols in the context of a Drosophila cell line but also provide the necessary changes for adaptation to other model systems. PMID:22929769

  1. DNA sequence templates adjacent nucleosome and ORC sites at gene amplification origins in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Zimmer, Kurt; Rusch, Douglas B.; Paranjape, Neha; Podicheti, Ram; Tang, Haixu; Calvi, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic origins of DNA replication are bound by the origin recognition complex (ORC), which scaffolds assembly of a pre-replicative complex (pre-RC) that is then activated to initiate replication. Both pre-RC assembly and activation are strongly influenced by developmental changes to the epigenome, but molecular mechanisms remain incompletely defined. We have been examining the activation of origins responsible for developmental gene amplification in Drosophila. At a specific time in oogenesis, somatic follicle cells transition from genomic replication to a locus-specific replication from six amplicon origins. Previous evidence indicated that these amplicon origins are activated by nucleosome acetylation, but how this affects origin chromatin is unknown. Here, we examine nucleosome position in follicle cells using micrococcal nuclease digestion with Ilumina sequencing. The results indicate that ORC binding sites and other essential origin sequences are nucleosome-depleted regions (NDRs). Nucleosome position at the amplicons was highly similar among developmental stages during which ORC is or is not bound, indicating that being an NDR is not sufficient to specify ORC binding. Importantly, the data suggest that nucleosomes and ORC have opposite preferences for DNA sequence and structure. We propose that nucleosome hyperacetylation promotes pre-RC assembly onto adjacent DNA sequences that are disfavored by nucleosomes but favored by ORC. PMID:26227968

  2. TRF2 Controls Telomeric Nucleosome Organization in a Cell Cycle Phase-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Galati, Alessandra; Magdinier, Frédérique; Colasanti, Valentina; Bauwens, Serge; Pinte, Sébastien; Ricordy, Ruggero; Giraud-Panis, Marie-Josèphe; Pusch, Miriam Caroline; Savino, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian telomeres stabilize chromosome ends as a result of their assembly into a peculiar form of chromatin comprising a complex of non-histone proteins named shelterin. TRF2, one of the shelterin components, binds to the duplex part of telomeric DNA and is essential to fold the telomeric chromatin into a protective cap. Although most of the human telomeric DNA is organized into tightly spaced nucleosomes, their role in telomere protection and how they interplay with telomere-specific factors in telomere organization is still unclear. In this study we investigated whether TRF2 can regulate nucleosome assembly at telomeres. By means of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and Micrococcal Nuclease (MNase) mapping assay, we found that the density of telomeric nucleosomes in human cells was inversely proportional to the dosage of TRF2 at telomeres. This effect was not observed in the G1 phase of the cell cycle but appeared coincident of late or post-replicative events. Moreover, we showed that TRF2 overexpression altered nucleosome spacing at telomeres increasing internucleosomal distance. By means of an in vitro nucleosome assembly system containing purified histones and remodeling factors, we reproduced the short nucleosome spacing found in telomeric chromatin. Importantly, when in vitro assembly was performed in the presence of purified TRF2, nucleosome spacing on a telomeric DNA template increased, in agreement with in vivo MNase mapping. Our results demonstrate that TRF2 negatively regulates the number of nucleosomes at human telomeres by a cell cycle-dependent mechanism that alters internucleosomal distance. These findings raise the intriguing possibility that telomere protection is mediated, at least in part, by the TRF2-dependent regulation of nucleosome organization. PMID:22536324

  3. Nucleosome dynamics during chromatin remodeling in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Henikoff, Steven

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Precise positioning of nucleosomes around regulatory sites is achieved by the action of chromatin remodelers, which use the energy of ATP to slide, evict or change the composition of nucleosomes. Chromatin remodelers act to bind nucleosomes, disrupt histone-DNA interactions and translocate the DNA around the histone core to reposition nucleosomes. Hence, remodeling is expected to involve nucleosomal intermediates with a structural organization that is distinct from intact nucleosomes. We describe the identification of a partially unwrapped nucleosome structure using methods that map histone-DNA contacts genome-wide. This alternative nucleosome structure is likely formed as an intermediate or by-product during nucleosome remodeling by the RSC complex. Identification of the loss of histone-DNA contacts during chromatin remodeling by RSC in vivo has implications for the regulation of transcriptional initiation. PMID:26933790

  4. Nucleosome dynamics during chromatin remodeling in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Henikoff, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Precise positioning of nucleosomes around regulatory sites is achieved by the action of chromatin remodelers, which use the energy of ATP to slide, evict or change the composition of nucleosomes. Chromatin remodelers act to bind nucleosomes, disrupt histone-DNA interactions and translocate the DNA around the histone core to reposition nucleosomes. Hence, remodeling is expected to involve nucleosomal intermediates with a structural organization that is distinct from intact nucleosomes. We describe the identification of a partially unwrapped nucleosome structure using methods that map histone-DNA contacts genome-wide. This alternative nucleosome structure is likely formed as an intermediate or by-product during nucleosome remodeling by the RSC complex. Identification of the loss of histone-DNA contacts during chromatin remodeling by RSC in vivo has implications for the regulation of transcriptional initiation. PMID:26933790

  5. Coregulation of transcription factor binding and nucleosome occupancy through DNA features of mammalian enhancers.

    PubMed

    Barozzi, Iros; Simonatto, Marta; Bonifacio, Silvia; Yang, Lin; Rohs, Remo; Ghisletti, Serena; Natoli, Gioacchino

    2014-06-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) preferentially bind sites contained in regions of computationally predicted high nucleosomal occupancy, suggesting that nucleosomes are gatekeepers of TF binding sites. However, because of their complexity mammalian genomes contain millions of randomly occurring, unbound TF consensus binding sites. We hypothesized that the information controlling nucleosome assembly may coincide with the information that enables TFs to bind cis-regulatory elements while ignoring randomly occurring sites. Hence, nucleosomes would selectively mask genomic sites that can be contacted by TFs and thus be potentially functional. The hematopoietic pioneer TF Pu.1 maintained nucleosome depletion at macrophage-specific enhancers that displayed a broad range of nucleosome occupancy in other cell types and in reconstituted chromatin. We identified a minimal set of DNA sequence and shape features that accurately predicted both Pu.1 binding and nucleosome occupancy genome-wide. These data reveal a basic organizational principle of mammalian cis-regulatory elements whereby TF recruitment and nucleosome deposition are controlled by overlapping DNA sequence features. PMID:24813947

  6. Novel nucleosomal particles containing core histones and linker DNA but no histone H1

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Hope A.; Cui, Feng; Ocampo, Josefina; Burke, Tara L.; Nikitina, Tatiana; Nagarajavel, V.; Kotomura, Naoe; Zhurkin, Victor B.; Clark, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic chromosomal DNA is assembled into regularly spaced nucleosomes, which play a central role in gene regulation by determining accessibility of control regions. The nucleosome contains ∼147 bp of DNA wrapped ∼1.7 times around a central core histone octamer. The linker histone, H1, binds both to the nucleosome, sealing the DNA coils, and to the linker DNA between nucleosomes, directing chromatin folding. Micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digests the linker to yield the chromatosome, containing H1 and ∼160 bp, and then converts it to a core particle, containing ∼147 bp and no H1. Sequencing of nucleosomal DNA obtained after MNase digestion (MNase-seq) generates genome-wide nucleosome maps that are important for understanding gene regulation. We present an improved MNase-seq method involving simultaneous digestion with exonuclease III, which removes linker DNA. Remarkably, we discovered two novel intermediate particles containing 154 or 161 bp, corresponding to 7 bp protruding from one or both sides of the nucleosome core. These particles are detected in yeast lacking H1 and in H1-depleted mouse chromatin. They can be reconstituted in vitro using purified core histones and DNA. We propose that these ‘proto-chromatosomes’ are fundamental chromatin subunits, which include the H1 binding site and influence nucleosome spacing independently of H1. PMID:26400169

  7. Strategies for crystallizing a chromatin protein in complex with the nucleosome core particle

    PubMed Central

    Makde, Ravindra D.; Tan, Song

    2013-01-01

    The molecular details for how chromatin factors and enzymes interact with the nucleosome are critical to understand fundamental genetic processes including cell division and gene regulation. A structural understanding of such processes has been hindered by the difficulty producing diffraction quality crystals of chromatin proteins in complex with the nucleosome. We describe here the steps used to grow crystals of the 300 kDa RCC1 chromatin factor/nucleosome core particle complex which diffract to 2.9 Å resolution. These steps included both pre- and post-crystallization strategies potentially useful to other complexes. We screened multiple variant RCC1-nucleosome core particle complexes assembled using different RCC1 homologs and deletion variants, and nucleosomes containing nucleosomal DNA with different sequences and lengths as well as histone deletion variants. We found that using RCC1 from different species produced different crystal forms of the RCC1-nucleosome complex consistent with key crystal packing interactions mediated by RCC1. Optimization of post-crystallization soaks to dehydrate the crystals dramatically improved the diffraction quality of the RCC1/nucleosome crystal from 5.0 to 2.9 Å resolution. PMID:23928047

  8. Effect of the Spiroiminodihydantoin Lesion on Nucleosome Stability and Positioning.

    PubMed

    Norabuena, Erika M; Barnes Williams, Sara; Klureza, Margaret A; Goehring, Liana J; Gruessner, Brian; Radhakrishnan, Mala L; Jamieson, Elizabeth R; Núñez, Megan E

    2016-04-26

    DNA is constantly under attack by oxidants, generating a variety of potentially mutagenic covalently modified species, including oxidized guanine base products. One such product is spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp), a chiral, propeller-shaped lesion that strongly destabilizes the DNA helix in its vicinity. Despite its unusual shape and thermodynamic effect on double-stranded DNA structure, DNA duplexes containing the Sp lesion form stable nucleosomes upon being incubated with histone octamers. Indeed, among six different combinations of lesion location and stereochemistry, only two duplexes display a diminished ability to form nucleosomes, and these only by ∼25%; the other four are statistically indistinguishable from the control. Nonetheless, kinetic factors also play a role: when the histone proteins have less time during assembly of the core particle to sample both lesion-containing and normal DNA strands, they are more likely to bind the Sp lesion DNA than during slower assembly processes that better approximate thermodynamic equilibrium. Using DNase I footprinting and molecular modeling, we discovered that the Sp lesion causes only a small perturbation (±1-2 bp) on the translational position of the DNA within the nucleosome. Each diastereomeric pair of lesions has the same effect on nucleosome positioning, but lesions placed at different locations behave differently, illustrating that the location of the lesion and not its shape serves as the primary determinant of the most stable DNA orientation. PMID:27074396

  9. Folding of Nucleosome Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Steven; Jimenez-Useche, Isabel; Andresen, Kurt; Yuan, Chongli; Qiu, Xiangyun

    2014-03-01

    Chromatin conformation and dynamics is central to gene functions including packaging, regulation, and repair. At the molecular level, the basic building block of chromatin is a nucleosome core particle (NCP) made of 147 base pairs (bp) of dsDNA wrapped around an octamer of histone proteins. These NCPs are connected by short 10-90 bps of linker DNA as beads on a string. Key factors determining the packaging of NCP arrays to form chromatin include ionic condition, linker DNA length, and epigenetic modifications, especially of the histone tails. We have investigated how the conformations of model tetra-NCP arrays are modulated by these factors using small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). Here we present recent studies of the effects of ion (KCl and MgCl2), linker length, and histone modification (tail deletions) on NCP arrays. Our SAXS measurement makes it possible to learn about both the global compaction of NCP arrays and local inter-NCP spatial correlations within the same array.

  10. Conditions for positioning of nucleosomes on DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheinman, Michael; Chung, Ho-Ryun

    2015-08-01

    Positioning of nucleosomes along a eukaryotic genome plays an important role in its organization and regulation. There are many different factors affecting the location of nucleosomes. Some can be viewed as preferential binding of a single nucleosome to different locations along the DNA and some as interactions between neighboring nucleosomes. In this study, we analyze positioning of nucleosomes and derive conditions for their good positioning. Using analytic and numerical approaches we find that, if the binding preferences are very weak, an interplay between the interactions and the binding preferences is essential for a good positioning of nucleosomes, especially on correlated energy landscapes. Analyzing the empirical energy landscape, we conclude that good positioning of nucleosomes in vivo is possible only if they strongly interact. In this case, our model, predicting long-length-scale fluctuations of nucleosomes' occupancy along the DNA, accounts well for the empirical observations.

  11. Distinct influences of tandem repeats and retrotransposons on CENH3 nucleosome positioning

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Unique structural characteristics of centromere chromatin enable it to support assembly of the kinetochore and its associated tensions. The histone H3 variant CENH3 (centromeric histone H3) is viewed as the key element of centromere chromatin and its interaction with centromere DNA is epigenetic in that its localization to centromeres is not sequence-dependent. Results In order to investigate what influence the DNA sequence exerts on CENH3 chromatin structure, we examined CENH3 nucleosome footprints on maize centromere DNA. We found a predominant average nucleosome spacing pattern of roughly 190-bp intervals, which was also the dominant arrangement for nucleosomes genome-wide. For CENH3-containing nucleosomes, distinct modes of nucleosome positioning were evident within that general spacing constraint. Over arrays of the major ~156-bp centromeric satellite sequence (tandem repeat) CentC, nucleosomes were not positioned in register with CentC monomers but in conformity with a striking ~10-bp periodicity of AA/TT dimers within the sequence. In contrast, nucleosomes on a class of centromeric retrotransposon (CRM2) lacked a detectable AA/TT periodicity but exhibited tightly phased positioning. Conclusions These data support a model in which general chromatin factors independent of both DNA sequence and CENH3 enforce roughly uniform centromeric nucleosome spacing while allowing flexibility in the mode in which nucleosomes are positioned. In the case of tandem repeat DNA, the natural bending effects related to AA/TT periodicity produce an energetically-favourable arrangement consistent with conformationally rigid nucleosomes and stable chromatin at centromeres. PMID:21352520

  12. Nucleosome Organization in Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Jared F.; Khattab, Omar S.; Chen, Yu-Han; Chen, Yumay; Jacobsen, Steven E.; Wang, Ping H.

    2015-01-01

    The fundamental repeating unit of eukaryotic chromatin is the nucleosome. Besides being involved in packaging DNA, nucleosome organization plays an important role in transcriptional regulation and cellular identity. Currently, there is much debate about the major determinants of the nucleosome architecture of a genome and its significance with little being known about its role in stem cells. To address these questions, we performed ultra-deep sequencing of nucleosomal DNA in two human embryonic stem cell lines and integrated our data with numerous epigenomic maps. Our analyses have revealed that the genome is a determinant of nucleosome organization with transcriptionally inactive regions characterized by a “ground state” of nucleosome profiles driven by underlying DNA sequences. DNA sequence preferences are associated with heterogeneous chromatin organization around transcription start sites. Transcription, histone modifications, and DNA methylation alter this “ground state” by having distinct effects on both nucleosome positioning and occupancy. As the transcriptional rate increases, nucleosomes become better positioned. Exons transcribed and included in the final spliced mRNA have distinct nucleosome profiles in comparison to exons not included at exon-exon junctions. Genes marked by the active modification H3K4m3 are characterized by lower nucleosome occupancy before the transcription start site compared to genes marked by the inactive modification H3K27m3, while bivalent domains, genes associated with both marks, lie exactly in the middle. Combinatorial patterns of epigenetic marks (chromatin states) are associated with unique nucleosome profiles. Nucleosome organization varies around transcription factor binding in enhancers versus promoters. DNA methylation is associated with increasing nucleosome occupancy and different types of methylations have distinct location preferences within the nucleosome core particle. Finally, computational analysis of

  13. Nucleosome repositioning underlies dynamic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Nocetti, Nicolas; Whitehouse, Iestyn

    2016-03-15

    Nucleosome repositioning at gene promoters is a fundamental aspect of the regulation of gene expression. However, the extent to which nucleosome repositioning is used within eukaryotic genomes is poorly understood. Here we report a comprehensive analysis of nucleosome positions as budding yeast transit through an ultradian cycle in which expression of >50% of all genes is highly synchronized. We present evidence of extensive nucleosome repositioning at thousands of gene promoters as genes are activated and repressed. During activation, nucleosomes are relocated to allow sites of general transcription factor binding and transcription initiation to become accessible. The extent of nucleosome shifting is closely related to the dynamic range of gene transcription and generally related to DNA sequence properties and use of the coactivators TFIID or SAGA. However, dynamic gene expression is not limited to SAGA-regulated promoters and is an inherent feature of most genes. While nucleosome repositioning occurs pervasively, we found that a class of genes required for growth experience acute nucleosome shifting as cells enter the cell cycle. Significantly, our data identify that the ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling enzyme Snf2 plays a fundamental role in nucleosome repositioning and the expression of growth genes. We also reveal that nucleosome organization changes extensively in concert with phases of the cell cycle, with large, regularly spaced nucleosome arrays being established in mitosis. Collectively, our data and analysis provide a framework for understanding nucleosome dynamics in relation to fundamental DNA-dependent transactions. PMID:26966245

  14. Multiscale modelling of nucleosome core particle aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubartsev, Alexander P.; Korolev, Nikolay; Fan, Yanping; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2015-02-01

    The nucleosome core particle (NCP) is the basic building block of chromatin. Under the influence of multivalent cations, isolated mononucleosomes exhibit a rich phase behaviour forming various columnar phases with characteristic NCP-NCP stacking. NCP stacking is also a regular element of chromatin structure in vivo. Understanding the mechanism of nucleosome stacking and the conditions leading to self-assembly of NCPs is still incomplete. Due to the complexity of the system and the need to describe electrostatics properly by including the explicit mobile ions, novel modelling approaches based on coarse-grained (CG) methods at the multiscale level becomes a necessity. In this work we present a multiscale CG computer simulation approach to modelling interactions and self-assembly of solutions of NCPs induced by the presence of multivalent cations. Starting from continuum simulations including explicit three-valent cobalt(III)hexammine (CoHex3+) counterions and 20 NCPs, based on a previously developed advanced CG NCP model with one bead per amino acid and five beads per two DNA base pair unit (Fan et al 2013 PLoS One 8 e54228), we use the inverse Monte Carlo method to calculate effective interaction potentials for a ‘super-CG’ NCP model consisting of seven beads for each NCP. These interaction potentials are used in large-scale simulations of up to 5000 NCPs, modelling self-assembly induced by CoHex3+. The systems of ‘super-CG’ NCPs form a single large cluster of stacked NCPs without long-range order in agreement with experimental data for NCPs precipitated by the three-valent polyamine, spermidine3+.

  15. DNA repair of a single UV photoproduct in a designed nucleosome

    SciTech Connect

    Kosmoskil, Joseph V.; Ackerman, Eric J. ); Smerdon, Michael J.

    2001-08-28

    Eukaryotic DNA repair enzymes must interact with the architectural hierarchy of chromatin. The challenge of finding damaged DNA complexed with histone proteins in nucleosomes is complicated by the need to maintain local chromatin structures involved in regulating other DNA processing events. The heterogeneity of lesions induced by DNA-damaging agents has led us to design homogeneously damaged substrates to directly compare repair of naked DNA with that of nucleosomes. Here we report that nucleotide excision repair in Xenopus nuclear extracts can effectively repair a single UV radiation photoproduct located 5 bases from the dyad center of a positioned nucleosome, although the nucleosome is repaired at about half the rate at which the naked DNA fragment is. Extract repair within the nucleosome is > 50-fold more rapid than either enzymatic photoreversal or endonuclease cleavage of the lesion in vitro. Furthermore, nucleosome formation occurs (after repair) only on damaged naked DNA ( 165-bp fragments) during a 1-h incubation in these extracts, even in the presence of a large excess of undamaged DNA. This is an example of selective nucleosome assembly by Xenopus nuclear extracts on a short linear DNA fragment containing a DNA lesion.

  16. A high-resolution map of nucleosome positioning on a fission yeast centromere.

    PubMed

    Song, Jun S; Liu, Xingkun; Liu, X Shirley; He, Xiangwei

    2008-07-01

    A key element for defining the centromere identity is the incorporation of a specific histone H3, CENPA, known as Cnp1p in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Previous studies have suggested that functional S. pombe centromeres lack regularly positioned nucleosomes and may involve chromatin remodeling as a key step of kinetochore assembly. We used tiling microarrays to show that nucleosomes are, in fact, positioned in regular intervals in the core of centromere 2, providing the first high-resolution map of regional centromere chromatin. Nucleosome locations are not disrupted by mutations in kinetochore protein genes cnp1, mis18, mis12, nuf2, mal2; overexpression of cnp1; or the deletion of ams2, which encodes a GATA-like factor participating in CENPA incorporation. Bioinformatics analysis of the centromere sequence indicates certain enriched motifs in linker regions between nucleosomes and reveals a sequence bias in nucleosome positioning. In addition, sequence analysis of nucleosome-free regions identifies novel binding sites of Ams2p. We conclude that centromeric nucleosome positions are stable and may be derived from the underlying DNA sequence. PMID:18411404

  17. Conformational selection and dynamic adaptation upon linker histone binding to the nucleosome.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Mehmet Ali; Pachov, Georgi V; Wade, Rebecca C; Cojocaru, Vlad

    2016-08-19

    Linker histones are essential for DNA compaction in chromatin. They bind to nucleosomes in a 1:1 ratio forming chromatosomes. Alternative configurations have been proposed in which the globular domain of the linker histone H5 (gH5) is positioned either on- or off-dyad between the nucleosomal and linker DNAs. However, the dynamic pathways of chromatosome assembly remain elusive. Here, we studied the conformational plasticity of gH5 in unbound and off-dyad nucleosome-bound forms with classical and accelerated molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the unbound gH5 converts between open and closed conformations, preferring the closed form. However, the open gH5 contributes to a more rigid chromatosome and restricts the motion of the nearby linker DNA through hydrophobic interactions with thymidines. Moreover, the closed gH5 opens and reorients in accelerated simulations of the chromatosome. Brownian dynamics simulations of chromatosome assembly, accounting for a range of amplitudes of nucleosome opening and different nucleosome DNA sequences, support the existence of both on- and off-dyad binding modes of gH5 and reveal alternative, sequence and conformation-dependent chromatosome configurations. Taken together, these findings suggest that the conformational dynamics of linker histones and nucleosomes facilitate alternative chromatosome configurations through an interplay between induced fit and conformational selection. PMID:27270081

  18. Nucleosome architecture throughout the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Deniz, Özgen; Flores, Oscar; Aldea, Martí; Soler-López, Montserrat; Orozco, Modesto

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosomes provide additional regulatory mechanisms to transcription and DNA replication by mediating the access of proteins to DNA. During the cell cycle chromatin undergoes several conformational changes, however the functional significance of these changes to cellular processes are largely unexplored. Here, we present the first comprehensive genome-wide study of nucleosome plasticity at single base-pair resolution along the cell cycle in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We determined nucleosome organization with a specific focus on two regulatory regions: transcription start sites (TSSs) and replication origins (ORIs). During the cell cycle, nucleosomes around TSSs display rearrangements in a cyclic manner. In contrast to gap (G1 and G2) phases, nucleosomes have a fuzzier organization during S and M phases, Moreover, the choreography of nucleosome rearrangements correlate with changes in gene expression during the cell cycle, indicating a strong association between nucleosomes and cell cycle-dependent gene functionality. On the other hand, nucleosomes are more dynamic around ORIs along the cell cycle, albeit with tighter regulation in early firing origins, implying the functional role of nucleosomes on replication origins. Our study provides a dynamic picture of nucleosome organization throughout the cell cycle and highlights the subsequent impact on transcription and replication activity. PMID:26818620

  19. Changing Chromatin Fiber Conformation by Nucleosome Repositioning

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Oliver; Kepper, Nick; Schöpflin, Robert; Ettig, Ramona; Rippe, Karsten; Wedemann, Gero

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin conformation is dynamic and heterogeneous with respect to nucleosome positions, which can be changed by chromatin remodeling complexes in the cell. These molecular machines hydrolyze ATP to translocate or evict nucleosomes, and establish loci with regularly and more irregularly spaced nucleosomes as well as nucleosome-depleted regions. The impact of nucleosome repositioning on the three-dimensional chromatin structure is only poorly understood. Here, we address this issue by using a coarse-grained computer model of arrays of 101 nucleosomes considering several chromatin fiber models with and without linker histones, respectively. We investigated the folding of the chain in dependence of the position of the central nucleosome by changing the length of the adjacent linker DNA in basepair steps. We found in our simulations that these translocations had a strong effect on the shape and properties of chromatin fibers: i), Fiber curvature and flexibility at the center were largely increased and long-range contacts between distant nucleosomes on the chain were promoted. ii), The highest destabilization of the fiber conformation occurred for a nucleosome shifted by two basepairs from regular spacing, whereas effects of linker DNA changes of ∼10 bp in phase with the helical twist of DNA were minimal. iii), A fiber conformation can stabilize a regular spacing of nucleosomes inasmuch as favorable stacking interactions between nucleosomes are facilitated. This can oppose nucleosome translocations and increase the energetic costs for chromatin remodeling. Our computational modeling framework makes it possible to describe the conformational heterogeneity of chromatin in terms of nucleosome positions, and thus advances theoretical models toward a better understanding of how genome compaction and access are regulated within the cell. PMID:25418099

  20. SWI/SNF has intrinsic nucleosome disassembly activity that is dependent on adjacent nucleosomes

    PubMed Central

    Dechassa, Mekonnen Lemma; Sabri, Abdellah; Pondugula, Santhi; Kassabov, Stefan R.; Chatterjee, Nilanjana; Kladde, Michael P.; Bartholomew, Blaine

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complex SWI/SNF regulates transcription and has been implicated in promoter nucleosome eviction. Efficient nucleosome disassembly by SWI/SNF alone in biochemical assays has however not been directly observed. Employing a model system of dinucleosomes rather than mononucleosomes, we demonstrate that remodeling leads to ordered and efficient disassembly of one of the two nucleosomes. An H2A/H2B dimer is first rapidly displaced and then in a slower reaction an entire histone octamer is lost. Nucleosome disassembly by SWI/SNF did not require additional factors such as chaperones or acceptors of histones. Observations in single molecules as well as bulk measurement suggest that a key intermediate in this process is one in which a nucleosome is moved towards the adjacent nucleosome. SWI/SNF recruited by the transcriptional activator Gal4-VP16 preferentially mobilizes the proximal nucleosome and destabilizes the adjacent nucleosome. PMID:20513433

  1. Nucleosomal promoter variation generates gene expression noise

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Christopher R.; Boeger, Hinrich

    2014-01-01

    Gene product molecule numbers fluctuate over time and between cells, confounding deterministic expectations. The molecular origins of this noise of gene expression remain unknown. Recent EM analysis of single PHO5 gene molecules of yeast indicated that promoter molecules stochastically assume alternative nucleosome configurations at steady state, including the fully nucleosomal and nucleosome-free configuration. Given that distinct configurations are unequally conducive to transcription, the nucleosomal variation of promoter molecules may constitute a source of gene expression noise. This notion, however, implies an untested conjecture, namely that the nucleosomal variation arises de novo or intrinsically (i.e., that it cannot be explained as the result of the promoter’s deterministic response to variation in its molecular surroundings). Here, we show—by microscopically analyzing the nucleosome configurations of two juxtaposed physically linked PHO5 promoter copies—that the configurational variation, indeed, is intrinsically stochastic and thus, a cause of gene expression noise rather than its effect. PMID:25468975

  2. Mapping nucleosome positions using DNase-seq.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jianling; Luo, Kaixuan; Winter, Peter S; Crawford, Gregory E; Iversen, Edwin S; Hartemink, Alexander J

    2016-03-01

    Although deoxyribonuclease I (DNase I) was used to probe the structure of the nucleosome in the 1960s and 1970s, in the current high-throughput sequencing era, DNase I has mainly been used to study genomic regions devoid of nucleosomes. Here, we reveal for the first time that DNase I can be used to precisely map the (translational) positions of in vivo nucleosomes genome-wide. Specifically, exploiting a distinctive DNase I cleavage profile within nucleosome-associated DNA--including a signature 10.3 base pair oscillation that corresponds to accessibility of the minor groove as DNA winds around the nucleosome--we develop a Bayes-factor-based method that can be used to map nucleosome positions along the genome. Compared to methods that require genetically modified histones, our DNase-based approach is easily applied in any organism, which we demonstrate by producing maps in yeast and human. Compared to micrococcal nuclease (MNase)-based methods that map nucleosomes based on cuts in linker regions, we utilize DNase I cuts both outside and within nucleosomal DNA; the oscillatory nature of the DNase I cleavage profile within nucleosomal DNA enables us to identify translational positioning details not apparent in MNase digestion of linker DNA. Because the oscillatory pattern corresponds to nucleosome rotational positioning, it also reveals the rotational context of transcription factor (TF) binding sites. We show that potential binding sites within nucleosome-associated DNA are often centered preferentially on an exposed major or minor groove. This preferential localization may modulate TF interaction with nucleosome-associated DNA as TFs search for binding sites. PMID:26772197

  3. Theoretical models of possible compact nucleosome structures.

    PubMed

    Besker, Neva; Anselmi, Claudio; De Santis, Pasquale

    2005-04-01

    Chromatin structure seems related to the DNA linker length. This paper presents a systematic search of the possible chromatin structure as a function of the linker lengths, starting from three different low-resolution molecular models of the nucleosome. Gay-Berne potential was used to evaluate the relative nucleosome packing energy. Results suggest that linker DNAs, which bridges and orientate nucleosomes, affect both the geometry and the rigidity of the global chromatin structure. PMID:15752596

  4. Nucleosomes Shape DNA Polymorphism and Divergence

    PubMed Central

    Langley, Sasha A.; Karpen, Gary H.; Langley, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    An estimated 80% of genomic DNA in eukaryotes is packaged as nucleosomes, which, together with the remaining interstitial linker regions, generate higher order chromatin structures [1]. Nucleosome sequences isolated from diverse organisms exhibit ∼10 bp periodic variations in AA, TT and GC dinucleotide frequencies. These sequence elements generate intrinsically curved DNA and help establish the histone-DNA interface. We investigated an important unanswered question concerning the interplay between chromatin organization and genome evolution: do the DNA sequence preferences inherent to the highly conserved histone core exert detectable natural selection on genomic divergence and polymorphism? To address this hypothesis, we isolated nucleosomal DNA sequences from Drosophila melanogaster embryos and examined the underlying genomic variation within and between species. We found that divergence along the D. melanogaster lineage is periodic across nucleosome regions with base changes following preferred nucleotides, providing new evidence for systematic evolutionary forces in the generation and maintenance of nucleosome-associated dinucleotide periodicities. Further, Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) frequency spectra show striking periodicities across nucleosomal regions, paralleling divergence patterns. Preferred alleles occur at higher frequencies in natural populations, consistent with a central role for natural selection. These patterns are stronger for nucleosomes in introns than in intergenic regions, suggesting selection is stronger in transcribed regions where nucleosomes undergo more displacement, remodeling and functional modification. In addition, we observe a large-scale (∼180 bp) periodic enrichment of AA/TT dinucleotides associated with nucleosome occupancy, while GC dinucleotide frequency peaks in linker regions. Divergence and polymorphism data also support a role for natural selection in the generation and maintenance of these super-nucleosomal

  5. Nucleosome Spacing Generated by ISWI and CHD1 Remodelers Is Constant Regardless of Nucleosome Density

    PubMed Central

    Lieleg, Corinna; Ketterer, Philip; Nuebler, Johannes; Ludwigsen, Johanna; Gerland, Ulrich; Dietz, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Arrays of regularly spaced nucleosomes are a hallmark of chromatin, but it remains unclear how they are generated. Recent genome-wide studies, in vitro and in vivo, showed constant nucleosome spacing even if the histone concentration was experimentally reduced. This counters the long-held assumption that nucleosome density determines spacing and calls for factors keeping spacing constant regardless of nucleosome density. We call this a clamping activity. Here, we show in a purified system that ISWI- and CHD1-type nucleosome remodelers have a clamping activity such that they not only generate regularly spaced nucleosome arrays but also generate constant spacing regardless of nucleosome density. This points to a functionally attractive nucleosome interaction that could be mediated either directly by nucleosome-nucleosome contacts or indirectly through the remodelers. Mutant Drosophila melanogaster ISWI without the HAND-SANT-SLIDE (HSS) domain had no detectable spacing activity even though it is known to remodel and slide nucleosomes. This suggests that the role of ISWI remodelers in generating constant spacing is not just to mediate nucleosome sliding; they actively contribute to the attractive interaction. Additional factors are necessary to set physiological spacing in absolute terms. PMID:25733687

  6. Tetrameric organization of vertebrate centromeric nucleosomes

    PubMed Central

    Dimitriadis, Emilios K.; Weber, Christian; Gill, Rajbir K.; Diekmann, Stephan; Dalal, Yamini

    2010-01-01

    Mitosis ensures equal genome segregation in the eukaryotic lineage. This process is facilitated by microtubule attachment to each chromosome via its centromere. In centromeres, canonical histone H3 is replaced in nucleosomes by a centromere-specific histone H3 variant (CENH3), providing the unique epigenetic signature required for microtubule binding. Due to recent findings of alternative CENH3 nucleosomal forms in invertebrate centromeres, it has been debated whether the classical octameric nucleosomal arrangement of two copies of CENH3, H4, H2A, and H2B forms the basis of the vertebrate centromere. To address this question directly, we examined CENH3 [centromere protein A (CENP-A)] nucleosomal organization in human cells, using a combination of nucleosome component analysis, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and immunoelectron microscopy (immuno-EM). We report that native CENP-A nucleosomes contain centromeric alpha satellite DNA, have equimolar amounts of H2A, H2B, CENP-A, and H4, and bind kinetochore proteins. These nucleosomes, when measured by AFM, yield one-half the dimensions of canonical octameric nucleosomes. Using immuno-EM, we find that one copy of CENP-A, H2A, H2B, and H4 coexist in CENP-A nucleosomes, in which internal C-terminal domains are accessible. Our observations indicate that CENP-A nucleosomes are organized as asymmetric heterotypic tetramers, rather than canonical octamers. Such altered nucleosomes form a chromatin fiber with distinct folding characteristics, which we utilize to discriminate tetramers directly within bulk chromatin. We discuss implications of our observations in the context of universal epigenetic and mechanical requirements for functional centromeres. PMID:21059934

  7. Structural analysis of nucleosomal barrier to transcription

    PubMed Central

    Gaykalova, Daria A.; Kulaeva, Olga I.; Volokh, Olesya; Shaytan, Alexey K.; Hsieh, Fu-Kai; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P.; Sokolova, Olga S.; Studitsky, Vasily M.

    2015-01-01

    Thousands of human and Drosophila genes are regulated at the level of transcript elongation and nucleosomes are likely targets for this regulation. However, the molecular mechanisms of formation of the nucleosomal barrier to transcribing RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and nucleosome survival during/after transcription remain unknown. Here we show that both DNA–histone interactions and Pol II backtracking contribute to formation of the barrier and that nucleosome survival during transcription likely occurs through allosterically stabilized histone–histone interactions. Structural analysis indicates that after Pol II encounters the barrier, the enzyme backtracks and nucleosomal DNA recoils on the octamer, locking Pol II in the arrested state. DNA is displaced from one of the H2A/H2B dimers that remains associated with the octamer. The data reveal the importance of intranucleosomal DNA–protein and protein–protein interactions during conformational changes in the nucleosome structure on transcription. Mechanisms of nucleosomal barrier formation and nucleosome survival during transcription are proposed. PMID:26460019

  8. A physical analysis of nucleosome positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerland, Ulrich

    2015-03-01

    The first level of genome packaging in eukaryotic cells involves the formation of dense nucleosome arrays, with DNA coverage near 90% in yeasts. A high nucleosome coverage is essential for cells, e.g. to prevent cryptic transcription, and the local positions of specific nucleosomes can play an important role in gene regulation. It is known that in vivo nucleosome positions are affected by a complex mix of passive and active mechanisms, including sequence-specific histone-DNA binding, nucleosome-nucleosome interactions, ATP-dependent remodeling enzymes, transcription, and DNA replication. Yet, the statistical distribution of nucleosome positions is extremely well described by simple physical models that treat the chromatin fiber as an interacting one-dimensional gas. I will discuss how can we interpret this surprising observation from a mechanistic perspective. I will also discuss the kinetics of the interacting gas model, which is pertinent to the question of how cells achieve the high nucleosome coverage within a short time, e.g. after DNA replication.

  9. Strong nucleosomes of mouse genome including recovered centromeric sequences.

    PubMed

    Salih, Bilal F; Teif, Vladimir B; Tripathi, Vijay; Trifonov, Edward N

    2015-01-01

    Recently discovered strong nucleosomes (SNs) characterized by visibly periodical DNA sequences have been found to concentrate in centromeres of Arabidopsis thaliana and in transient meiotic centromeres of Caenorhabditis elegans. To find out whether such affiliation of SNs to centromeres is a more general phenomenon, we studied SNs of the Mus musculus. The publicly available genome sequences of mouse, as well as of practically all other eukaryotes do not include the centromere regions which are difficult to assemble because of a large amount of repeat sequences in the centromeres and pericentromeric regions. We recovered those missing sequences using the data from MNase-seq experiments in mouse embryonic stem cells, where the sequence of DNA inside nucleosomes, including missing regions, was determined by 100-bp paired-end sequencing. Those nucleosome sequences, which are not matching to the published genome sequence, would largely belong to the centromeres. By evaluating SN densities in centromeres and in non-centromeric regions, we conclude that mouse SNs concentrate in the centromeres of telocentric mouse chromosomes, with ~3.9 times excess compared to their density in the rest of the genome. The remaining non-centromeric SNs are harbored mainly by introns and intergenic regions, by retro-transposons, in particular. The centromeric involvement of the SNs opens new horizons for the chromosome and centromere structure studies. PMID:24998943

  10. Acetylated histone H3 increases nucleosome dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Marek; Manohar, Mridula; Ottesen, Jennifer; Poirier, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Chromatin's basic unit structure is the nucleosome, i.e. genomic DNA wrapped around a particular class of proteins -- histones -- which due to their physical hindrance, block vital biological processes, such as DNA repair, DNA replication, and RNA transcription. Histone post-translational modifications, which are known to exist in vivo, are hypothesized to regulate these biological processes by directly altering DNA-histone interactions and thus nucleosome structure and stability. Using magnetic tweezers technique we studied the acetylation of histone H3 in the dyad region, i.e. at K115 and K122, on reconstituted arrays of nucleosomes under constant external force. Based on the measured increase in the probability of dissociation of modified nucleosomes, we infer that this double modification could facilitate histone chaperone mediated nucleosome disassembly in vivo.

  11. Characterization of Dnmt1 Binding and DNA Methylation on Nucleosomes and Nucleosomal Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Thalhammer, Verena; Längst, Gernot

    2015-01-01

    The packaging of DNA into nucleosomes and the organisation into higher order structures of chromatin limits the access of sequence specific DNA binding factors to DNA. In cells, DNA methylation is preferentially occuring in the linker region of nucleosomes, suggesting a structural impact of chromatin on DNA methylation. These observations raise the question whether DNA methyltransferases are capable to recognize the nucleosomal substrates and to modify the packaged DNA. Here, we performed a detailed analysis of nucleosome binding and nucleosomal DNA methylation by the maintenance DNA methyltransferase Dnmt1. Our binding studies show that Dnmt1 has a DNA length sensing activity, binding cooperatively to DNA, and requiring a minimal DNA length of 20 bp. Dnmt1 needs linker DNA to bind to nucleosomes and most efficiently recognizes nucleosomes with symmetric DNA linkers. Footprinting experiments reveal that Dnmt1 binds to both DNA linkers exiting the nucleosome core. The binding pattern correlates with the efficient methylation of DNA linkers. However, the enzyme lacks the ability to methylate nucleosomal CpG sites on mononucleosomes and nucleosomal arrays, unless chromatin remodeling enzymes create a dynamic chromatin state. In addition, our results show that Dnmt1 functionally interacts with specific chromatin remodeling enzymes to enable complete methylation of hemi-methylated DNA in chromatin. PMID:26496704

  12. Fitness landscape for nucleosome positioning

    PubMed Central

    Weghorn, Donate; Lässig, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Histone–DNA complexes, so-called nucleosomes, are the building blocks of DNA packaging in eukaryotic cells. The histone-binding affinity of a local DNA segment depends on its elastic properties and determines its accessibility within the nucleus, which plays an important role in the regulation of gene expression. Here, we derive a fitness landscape for intergenic DNA segments in yeast as a function of two molecular phenotypes: their elasticity-dependent histone affinity and their coverage with transcription factor binding sites. This landscape reveals substantial selection against nucleosome formation over a wide range of both phenotypes. We use it as the core component of a quantitative evolutionary model for intergenic DNA segments. This model consistently predicts the observed diversity of histone affinities within wild Saccharomyces paradoxus populations, as well as the affinity divergence between neighboring Saccharomyces species. Our analysis establishes histone binding and transcription factor binding as two separable modes of sequence evolution, each of which is a direct target of natural selection. PMID:23784778

  13. Exploring the Free Energy Landscape of Nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Zheng, Weihua; Papoian, Garegin A; Wolynes, Peter G

    2016-07-01

    The nucleosome is the fundamental unit for packaging the genome. A detailed molecular picture for its conformational dynamics is crucial for understanding transcription and gene regulation. We investigate the disassembly of single nucleosomes using a predictive coarse-grained protein DNA model with transferable force fields. This model quantitatively describes the thermodynamic stability of both the histone core complex and the nucleosome and predicts rates of transient nucleosome opening that match experimental measurements. Quantitative characterization of the free-energy landscapes reveals the mechanism of nucleosome unfolding in which DNA unwinding and histone protein disassembly are coupled. The interfaces between H2A-H2B dimers and the (H3-H4)2 tetramer are first lost when the nucleosome opens releasing a large fraction but not all of its bound DNA. For the short strands studied in single molecule experiments, the DNA unwinds asymmetrically from the histone proteins, with only one of its two ends preferentially exposed. The detailed molecular mechanism revealed in this work provides a structural basis for interpreting experimental studies of nucleosome unfolding. PMID:27300314

  14. Stepwise nucleosome translocation by RSC remodeling complexes.

    PubMed

    Harada, Bryan T; Hwang, William L; Deindl, Sebastian; Chatterjee, Nilanjana; Bartholomew, Blaine; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    The SWI/SNF-family remodelers regulate chromatin structure by coupling the free energy from ATP hydrolysis to the repositioning and restructuring of nucleosomes, but how the ATPase activity of these enzymes drives the motion of DNA across the nucleosome remains unclear. Here, we used single-molecule FRET to monitor the remodeling of mononucleosomes by the yeast SWI/SNF remodeler, RSC. We observed that RSC primarily translocates DNA around the nucleosome without substantial displacement of the H2A-H2B dimer. At the sites where DNA enters and exits the nucleosome, the DNA moves largely along or near its canonical wrapping path. The translocation of DNA occurs in a stepwise manner, and at both sites where DNA enters and exits the nucleosome, the step size distributions exhibit a peak at approximately 1-2 bp. These results suggest that the movement of DNA across the nucleosome is likely coupled directly to DNA translocation by the ATPase at its binding site inside the nucleosome. PMID:26895087

  15. Structure, dynamics, and evolution of centromeric nucleosomes

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Yamini; Furuyama, Takehito; Vermaak, Danielle; Henikoff, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Centromeres are defining features of eukaryotic chromosomes, providing sites of attachment for segregation during mitosis and meiosis. The fundamental unit of centromere structure is the centromeric nucleosome, which differs from the conventional nucleosome by the presence of a centromere-specific histone variant (CenH3) in place of canonical H3. We have shown that the CenH3 nucleosome core found in interphase Drosophila cells is a heterotypic tetramer, a “hemisome” consisting of one molecule each of CenH3, H4, H2A, and H2B, rather than the octamer of canonical histones that is found in bulk nucleosomes. The surprising discovery of hemisomes at centromeres calls for a reevaluation of evidence that has long been interpreted in terms of a more conventional nucleosome. We describe how the hemisome structure of centromeric nucleosomes can account for enigmatic properties of centromeres, including kinetochore accessibility, epigenetic inheritance, rapid turnover of misincorporated CenH3, and transcriptional quiescence of pericentric heterochromatin. Structural differences mediated by loop 1 are proposed to account for the formation of stable tetramers containing CenH3 rather than stable octamers containing H3. Asymmetric CenH3 hemisomes might interrupt the global condensation of octameric H3 arrays and present an asymmetric surface for kinetochore formation. We suggest that this simple mechanism for differentiation between centromeric and packaging nucleosomes evolved from an archaea-like ancestor at the dawn of eukaryotic evolution. PMID:17893333

  16. Stepwise nucleosome translocation by RSC remodeling complexes

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Bryan T; Hwang, William L; Deindl, Sebastian; Chatterjee, Nilanjana; Bartholomew, Blaine; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    The SWI/SNF-family remodelers regulate chromatin structure by coupling the free energy from ATP hydrolysis to the repositioning and restructuring of nucleosomes, but how the ATPase activity of these enzymes drives the motion of DNA across the nucleosome remains unclear. Here, we used single-molecule FRET to monitor the remodeling of mononucleosomes by the yeast SWI/SNF remodeler, RSC. We observed that RSC primarily translocates DNA around the nucleosome without substantial displacement of the H2A-H2B dimer. At the sites where DNA enters and exits the nucleosome, the DNA moves largely along or near its canonical wrapping path. The translocation of DNA occurs in a stepwise manner, and at both sites where DNA enters and exits the nucleosome, the step size distributions exhibit a peak at approximately 1–2 bp. These results suggest that the movement of DNA across the nucleosome is likely coupled directly to DNA translocation by the ATPase at its binding site inside the nucleosome. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10051.001 PMID:26895087

  17. Nucleosome transactions on the Hypocrea jecorina (Trichoderma reesei) cellulase promoter cbh2 associated with cellulase induction.

    PubMed

    Zeilinger, S; Schmoll, M; Pail, M; Mach, R L; Kubicek, C P

    2003-10-01

    The 5' regulatory region of the cbh2 gene of Hypocrea jecorina contains the cbh2 activating element (CAE) which is essential for induction of cbh2 gene expression by sophorose and cellulose. The CAE consists of two motifs, a CCAAT box on the template strand and a GTAATA box on the coding strand, which cooperate during induction. Northern analyses of cbh2 gene expression has revealed an absolute dependence on induction, but no direct effect of Cre1-mediated carbon catabolite repression. Investigation of the chromatin structure in the wild-type strain showed that, under repressing conditions, there is a nucleosome free region (nfr) around the CAE, which is flanked by strictly positioned nucleosomes. Induction results in a loss of positioning of nucleosomes -1 and -2 downstream of the CAE, thus making the TATA box accessible. Simultaneous mutation of both motifs of the CAE, or of the CCAAT-box alone, also leads to shifting of nucleosome -1, which normally covers the TATA-box under repressing conditions, whereas mutation of the GTAATA element results in a narrowing of the nfr, indicating that the proteins that bind to both motifs in the CAE interact with chromatin, although in different ways. A cellulase-negative mutant strain, which has previously been shown to be altered in protein binding to the CAE, still displayed the induction-specific changes in nucleosome structure, indicating that none of the proteins that directly interact with CAE are affected, and that nucleosome rearrangement and induction of cbh2 expression are uncoupled. Interestingly, the carbon catabolite repressor Cre1 is essential for strict nucleosome positioning in the 5' regulatory sequences of cbh2 under all of the conditions tested, and induction can occur in a promoter that lacks positioned nucleosomes. These data suggest that Cre1, the Hap2/3/5 complex and the GTAATA-binding protein are all involved in nucleosome assembly on the cbh2 promoter, and that the latter two respond to inducing

  18. Nucleosome positioning from tiling microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Yassour, Moran; Kaplan, Tommy; Jaimovich, Ariel; Friedman, Nir

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: The packaging of DNA around nucleosomes in eukaryotic cells plays a crucial role in regulation of gene expression, and other DNA-related processes. To better understand the regulatory role of nucleosomes, it is important to pinpoint their position in a high (5–10 bp) resolution. Toward this end, several recent works used dense tiling arrays to map nucleosomes in a high-throughput manner. These data were then parsed and hand-curated, and the positions of nucleosomes were assessed. Results: In this manuscript, we present a fully automated algorithm to analyze such data and predict the exact location of nucleosomes. We introduce a method, based on a probabilistic graphical model, to increase the resolution of our predictions even beyond that of the microarray used. We show how to build such a model and how to compile it into a simple Hidden Markov Model, allowing for a fast and accurate inference of nucleosome positions. We applied our model to nucleosomal data from mid-log yeast cells reported by Yuan et al. and compared our predictions to those of the original paper; to a more recent method that uses five times denser tiling arrays as explained by Lee et al.; and to a curated set of literature-based nucleosome positions. Our results suggest that by applying our algorithm to the same data used by Yuan et al. our fully automated model traced 13% more nucleosomes, and increased the overall accuracy by about 20%. We believe that such an improvement opens the way for a better understanding of the regulatory mechanisms controlling gene expression, and how they are encoded in the DNA. Contact: nir@cs.huji.ac.il PMID:18586706

  19. Oligonucleotide Sequence Motifs as Nucleosome Positioning Signals

    PubMed Central

    Collings, Clayton K.; Fernandez, Alfonso G.; Pitschka, Chad G.; Hawkins, Troy B.; Anderson, John N.

    2010-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of the sequence patterns that characterize positioned nucleosomes, we first performed an analysis of the periodicities of the 256 tetranucleotides in a yeast genome-wide library of nucleosomal DNA sequences that was prepared by in vitro reconstitution. The approach entailed the identification and analysis of 24 unique tetranucleotides that were defined by 8 consensus sequences. These consensus sequences were shown to be responsible for most if not all of the tetranucleotide and dinucleotide periodicities displayed by the entire library, demonstrating that the periodicities of dinucleotides that characterize the yeast genome are, in actuality, due primarily to the 8 consensus sequences. A novel combination of experimental and bioinformatic approaches was then used to show that these tetranucleotides are important for preferred formation of nucleosomes at specific sites along DNA in vitro. These results were then compared to tetranucleotide patterns in genome-wide in vivo libraries from yeast and C. elegans in order to assess the contributions of DNA sequence in the control of nucleosome residency in the cell. These comparisons revealed striking similarities in the tetranucleotide occurrence profiles that are likely to be involved in nucleosome positioning in both in vitro and in vivo libraries, suggesting that DNA sequence is an important factor in the control of nucleosome placement in vivo. However, the strengths of the tetranucleotide periodicities were 3–4 fold higher in the in vitro as compared to the in vivo libraries, which implies that DNA sequence plays less of a role in dictating nucleosome positions in vivo. The results of this study have important implications for models of sequence-dependent positioning since they suggest that a defined subset of tetranucleotides is involved in preferred nucleosome occupancy and that these tetranucleotides are the major source of the dinucleotide periodicities that are characteristic of

  20. Herpes simplex virus 1 DNA is in unstable nucleosomes throughout the lytic infection cycle, and the instability of the nucleosomes is independent of DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Lacasse, Jonathan J; Schang, Luis M

    2012-10-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) DNA is chromatinized during latency and consequently regularly digested by micrococcal nuclease (MCN) to nucleosome-size fragments. In contrast, MCN digests HSV-1 DNA in lytically infected cells to mostly heterogeneous sizes. Yet HSV-1 DNA coimmunoprecipitates with histones during lytic infections. We have shown that at 5 h postinfection, most nuclear HSV-1 DNA is in particularly unstable nucleoprotein complexes and consequently is more accessible to MCN than DNA in cellular chromatin. HSV-1 DNA was quantitatively recovered at this time in complexes with the biophysical properties of mono- to polynucleosomes following a modified MCN digestion developed to detect potential unstable intermediates. We proposed that most HSV-1 DNA is in unstable nucleosome-like complexes during lytic infections. Physiologically, nucleosome assembly typically associates with DNA replication, although DNA replication transiently disrupts nucleosomes. It therefore remained unclear whether the instability of the HSV-1 nucleoprotein complexes was related to the ongoing viral DNA replication. Here we tested whether HSV-1 DNA is in unstable nucleosome-like complexes before, during, or after the peak of viral DNA replication or when HSV-1 DNA replication is inhibited. HSV-1 DNA was quantitatively recovered in complexes fractionating as mono- to polynucleosomes from nuclei harvested at 2, 5, 7, or 9 h after infection, even if viral DNA replication was inhibited. Therefore, most HSV-1 DNA is in unstable nucleosome-like complexes throughout the lytic replication cycle, and the instability of these complexes is surprisingly independent of HSV-1 DNA replication. The specific accessibility of nuclear HSV-1 DNA, however, varied at different times after infection. PMID:22875975

  1. Nucleosome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The fundamental structural unit of chromatin and is the basis for organization within the genome by compaction of DNA within the nucleus of the cell and by making selected regions of chromosomes available for transcription and replication.

  2. Improved nucleosome-positioning algorithm iNPS for accurate nucleosome positioning from sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weizhong; Liu, Yi; Zhu, Shanshan; Green, Christopher D; Wei, Gang; Han, Jing-Dong Jackie

    2014-01-01

    Accurate determination of genome-wide nucleosome positioning can provide important insights into global gene regulation. Here, we describe the development of an improved nucleosome-positioning algorithm-iNPS-which achieves significantly better performance than the widely used NPS package. By determining nucleosome boundaries more precisely and merging or separating shoulder peaks based on local MNase-seq signals, iNPS can unambiguously detect 60% more nucleosomes. The detected nucleosomes display better nucleosome 'widths' and neighbouring centre-centre distance distributions, giving rise to sharper patterns and better phasing of average nucleosome profiles and higher consistency between independent data subsets. In addition to its unique advantage in classifying nucleosomes by shape to reveal their different biological properties, iNPS also achieves higher significance and lower false positive rates than previously published methods. The application of iNPS to T-cell activation data demonstrates a greater ability to facilitate detection of nucleosome repositioning, uncovering additional biological features underlying the activation process. PMID:25233085

  3. Chromatin remodeling by nucleosome disassembly in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lorch, Yahli; Maier-Davis, Barbara; Kornberg, Roger D

    2006-02-28

    The RSC chromatin-remodeling complex completely disassembles a nucleosome in the presence of the histone chaperone Nap1 and ATP. Disassembly occurs in a stepwise manner, with the removal of H2A/H2B dimers, followed by the rest of the histones and the release of naked DNA. RSC and related chromatin-remodeling complexes may be responsible for the removal of promoter nucleosomes during transcriptional activation in vivo. PMID:16492771

  4. Nucleosome repeat lengths and columnar chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Trifonov, Edward N

    2016-06-01

    Thorough quantitative study of nucleosome repeat length (NRL) distributions, conducted in 1992 by J. Widom, resulted in a striking observation that the linker lengths between the nucleosomes are quantized. Comparison of the NRL average values with the MNase cut distances predicted from the hypothetical columnar structure of chromatin (this work) shows a close correspondence between the two. This strongly suggests that the NRL distribution, actually, reflects the dominant role of columnar chromatin structure common for all eukaryotes. PMID:26208520

  5. Doxorubicin enhances nucleosome turnover around promoters.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Kemp, Christopher J; Henikoff, Steven

    2013-05-01

    Doxorubicin is an anthracycline DNA intercalator that is among the most commonly used anticancer drugs. Doxorubicin causes DNA double-strand breaks in rapidly dividing cells, although whether it also affects general chromatin properties is unknown. Here, we use a metabolic labeling strategy to directly measure nucleosome turnover to examine the effect of doxorubicin on chromatin dynamics in squamous cell carcinoma cell lines derived from genetically defined mice. We find that doxorubicin enhances nucleosome turnover around gene promoters and that turnover correlates with gene expression level. Consistent with a direct action of doxorubicin, enhancement of nucleosome turnover around promoters gradually increases with time of exposure to the drug. Interestingly, enhancement occurs both in wild-type cells and in cells lacking either the p53 tumor suppressor gene or the master regulator of the DNA damage response, ATM, suggesting that doxorubicin action on nucleosome dynamics is independent of the DNA damage checkpoint. In addition, another anthracycline drug, aclarubicin, shows similar effects on enhancing nucleosome turnover around promoters. Our results suggest that anthracycline intercalation promotes nucleosome turnover around promoters by its effect on DNA topology, with possible implications for mechanisms of cell killing during cancer chemotherapy. PMID:23602475

  6. Trajectories of microsecond molecular dynamics simulations of nucleosomes and nucleosome core particles.

    PubMed

    Shaytan, Alexey K; Armeev, Grigoriy A; Goncearenco, Alexander; Zhurkin, Victor B; Landsman, David; Panchenko, Anna R

    2016-06-01

    We present here raw trajectories of molecular dynamics simulations for nucleosome with linker DNA strands as well as minimalistic nucleosome core particle model. The simulations were done in explicit solvent using CHARMM36 force field. We used this data in the research article Shaytan et al., 2016 [1]. The trajectory files are supplemented by TCL scripts providing advanced visualization capabilities. PMID:27222871

  7. Theoretical analysis of epigenetic cell memory by nucleosome modification.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Ian B; Micheelsen, Mille A; Sneppen, Kim; Thon, Geneviève

    2007-05-18

    Chromosomal regions can adopt stable and heritable alternative states resulting in bistable gene expression without changes to the DNA sequence. Such epigenetic control is often associated with alternative covalent modifications of histones. The stability and heritability of the states are thought to involve positive feedback where modified nucleosomes recruit enzymes that similarly modify nearby nucleosomes. We developed a simplified stochastic model for dynamic nucleosome modification based on the silent mating-type region of the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We show that the mechanism can give strong bistability that is resistant both to high noise due to random gain or loss of nucleosome modifications and to random partitioning upon DNA replication. However, robust bistability required: (1) cooperativity, the activity of more than one modified nucleosome, in the modification reactions and (2) that nucleosomes occasionally stimulate modification beyond their neighbor nucleosomes, arguing against a simple continuous spreading of nucleosome modification. PMID:17512413

  8. UV damage in DNA promotes nucleosome unwrapping.

    PubMed

    Duan, Ming-Rui; Smerdon, Michael J

    2010-08-20

    The association of DNA with histones in chromatin impedes DNA repair enzymes from accessing DNA lesions. Nucleosomes exist in a dynamic equilibrium in which portions of the DNA molecule spontaneously unwrap, transiently exposing buried DNA sites. Thus, nucleosome dynamics in certain regions of chromatin may provide the exposure time and space needed for efficient repair of buried DNA lesions. We have used FRET and restriction enzyme accessibility to study nucleosome dynamics following DNA damage by UV radiation. We find that FRET efficiency is reduced in a dose-dependent manner, showing that the presence of UV photoproducts enhances spontaneous unwrapping of DNA from histones. Furthermore, this UV-induced shift in unwrapping dynamics is associated with increased restriction enzyme accessibility of histone-bound DNA after UV treatment. Surprisingly, the increased unwrapping dynamics is even observed in nucleosome core particles containing a single UV lesion at a specific site. These results highlight the potential for increased "intrinsic exposure" of nucleosome-associated DNA lesions in chromatin to repair proteins. PMID:20562439

  9. The Nucleosome Map of the Mammalian Liver

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhaoyu; Schug, Jonathan; Tuteja, Geetu; White, Peter; Kaestner, Klaus H.

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian genomes contain billions of basepairs of DNA that must be highly compacted as chromatin to fit into the nano-scale of the nucleus, but yet be accessible to allow for transcription to occur. Binding to nucleosomal DNA is critical for ‘pioneer’ transcription factors such as the winged helix transcription factors Foxa1 and Foxa2 to regulate chromatin structure and gene activation. Here we report the genome-wide map of nucleosome positions in the mouse liver, with emphasis on transcriptional start sites, CpG islands, Foxa2 binding sites, and their correlation with gene expression. Despite the heterogeneity of liver tissue, we could clearly discern the nucleosome pattern of the predominant liver cell, the hepatocyte. By analyzing nucleosome occupancy and the distributions of heterochromatin protein 1 (Hp1), CBP (also known as Crebbp), and p300 (Ep300) in Foxa1/2-deficient livers we find, surprisingly, that the maintenance of nucleosome position and chromatin structure surrounding Foxa2 binding sites is independent of Foxa1/2. PMID:21623366

  10. Predicting Nucleosome Positioning Using Multiple Evidence Tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Sheila M.; Weng, Zhiping; Bilmes, Jeff A.; Noble, William Stafford

    We describe a probabilistic model, implemented as a dynamic Bayesian network, that can be used to predict nucleosome positioning along a chromosome based on one or more genomic input tracks containing position-specific information (evidence). Previous models have either made predictions based on primary DNA sequence alone, or have been used to infer nucleosome positions from experimental data. Our framework permits the combination of these two distinct types of information. We show how this flexible framework can be used to make predictions based on either sequence-model scores or experimental data alone, or by using the two in combination to interpret the experimental data and fill in gaps. The model output represents the posterior probability, at each position along the chromosome, that a nucleosome core overlaps that position, given the evidence. This posterior probability is computed by integrating the information contained in the input evidence tracks along the entire input sequence, and fitting the evidence to a simple grammar of alternating nucleosome cores and linkers. In addition to providing a novel mechanism for the prediction of nucleosome positioning from arbitrary heterogeneous data sources, this framework is also applicable to other genomic segmentation tasks in which local scores are available from models or from data that can be interpreted as defining a probability assignment over labels at that position. The ability to combine sequence-based predictions and data from experimental assays is a significant and novel contribution to the ongoing research regarding the primary structure of chromatin and its effects upon gene regulation.

  11. BINOCh: binding inference from nucleosome occupancy changes

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Clifford A.; He, Housheng H.; Brown, Myles; Liu, X. Shirley

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Transcription factor binding events are frequently associated with a pattern of nucleosome occupancy changes in which nucleosomes flanking the binding site increase in occupancy, while those in the vicinity of the binding site itself are displaced. Genome-wide information on enhancer proximal nucleosome occupancy can be readily acquired using ChIP-seq targeting enhancer-related histone modifications such as H3K4me2. Here, we present a software package, BINOCh that allows biologists to use such data to infer the identity of key transcription factors that regulate the response of a cell to a stimulus or determine a program of differentiation. Availability: The BINOCh open source Python package is freely available at http://liulab.dfci.harvard.edu/BINOCh under the FreeBSD license. Contact: cliff@jimmy.harvard.edu; xsliu@jimmy.harvard.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:21551136

  12. Nucleosome structure in chromatin from heated cells

    SciTech Connect

    Warters, R.L.; Roti Roti, J.L.; Winward, R.T.

    1980-12-01

    The effect of hyperthermia (40 to 80/sup 0/C) on the nucleosome structure of mammalian chromatin was determined using the enzyme micrococcal nuclease. At equivalent fractional DNA digestion it was found that neither the size of DNA nor the total fraction of cellular DNA associated with nucleosome structure is altered by heat exposure up to 48/sup 0/C for 30 min. It is proposed that this heat-induced reduction in the accessibility to nuclease attack of DNA in chromatin from heated cells is due to the increased protein mass associated with chromatin.

  13. Epigenetic Centromere Propagation and the Nature of CENP-A Nucleosomes

    PubMed Central

    Black, Ben E.; Cleveland, Don W.

    2011-01-01

    Centromeres direct chromosome inheritance, but in multicellular organisms their positions on chromosomes are primarily specified epigenetically rather than by a DNA sequence. The major candidate for the epigenetic mark is chromatin assembled with the histone H3 variant, CENP-A. Recent studies offer conflicting evidence for the structure of CENP-A containing chromatin, including the histone composition and handedness of the DNA wrapped around the histones. We present a model for the assembly and deposition of centromeric nucleosomes that couples these processes to the cell cycle. This model not only reconciles the divergent data for the CENP-A containing nucleosomes but also provides insights about how centromere identity is stably inherited. PMID:21335232

  14. Nucleosomes unfold completely at a transcriptionally active promoter.

    PubMed

    Boeger, Hinrich; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Strattan, J Seth; Kornberg, Roger D

    2003-06-01

    It has long been known that promoter DNA is converted to a nuclease-sensitive state upon transcriptional activation. Recent findings have raised the possibility that this conversion reflects only a partial unfolding or other perturbation of nucleosomal structure, rather than the loss of nucleosomes. We report topological, sedimentation, nuclease digestion, and ChIP analyses, which demonstrate the complete unfolding of nucleosomes at the transcriptionally active PHO5 promoter of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although nucleosome loss occurs at all promoter sites, it is not complete at any of them, suggesting the existence of an equilibrium between the removal of nucleosomes and their reformation. PMID:12820971

  15. Binding of TATA Binding Protein to a Naturally Positioned Nucleosome Is Facilitated by Histone Acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Sewack, Gerald F.; Ellis, Thomas W.; Hansen, Ulla

    2001-01-01

    The TATA sequence of the human, estrogen-responsive pS2 promoter is complexed in vivo with a rotationally and translationally positioned nucleosome (NUC T). Using a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, we demonstrate that TATA binding protein (TBP) does not detectably interact with this genomic binding site in MCF-7 cells in the absence of transcriptional stimuli. Estrogen stimulation of these cells results in hyperacetylation of both histones H3 and H4 within the pS2 chromatin encompassing NUC T and the TATA sequence. Concurrently, TBP becomes associated with the pS2 promoter region. The relationship between histone hyperacetylation and the binding of TBP was assayed in vitro using an in vivo-assembled nucleosomal array over the pS2 promoter. With chromatin in its basal state, the binding of TBP to the pS2 TATA sequence at the edge of NUC T was severely restricted, consistent with our in vivo data. Acetylation of the core histones facilitated the binding of TBP to this nucleosomal TATA sequence. Therefore, we demonstrate that one specific, functional consequence of induced histone acetylation at a native promoter is the alleviation of nucleosome-mediated repression of the binding of TBP. Our data support a fundamental role for histone acetylation at genomic promoters in transcriptional activation by nuclear receptors and provide a general mechanism for rapid and reversible transcriptional activation from a chromatin template. PMID:11158325

  16. Structure of Actin-related protein 8 and its contribution to nucleosome binding

    PubMed Central

    Gerhold, Christian B.; Winkler, Duane D.; Lakomek, Kristina; Seifert, Florian U.; Fenn, Sebastian; Kessler, Brigitte; Witte, Gregor; Luger, Karolin; Hopfner, Karl-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear actin-related proteins (Arps) are subunits of several chromatin remodelers, but their molecular functions within these complexes are unclear. We report the crystal structure of the INO80 complex subunit Arp8 in its ATP-bound form. Human Arp8 has several insertions in the conserved actin fold that explain its inability to polymerize. Most remarkably, one insertion wraps over the active site cleft and appears to rigidify the domain architecture, while active site features shared with actin suggest an allosterically controlled ATPase activity. Quantitative binding studies with nucleosomes and histone complexes reveal that Arp8 and the Arp8–Arp4–actin-HSA sub-complex of INO80 strongly prefer nucleosomes and H3–H4 tetramers over H2A–H2B dimers, suggesting that Arp8 functions as a nucleosome recognition module. In contrast, Arp4 prefers free (H3–H4)2 over nucleosomes and may serve remodelers through binding to (dis)assembly intermediates in the remodeling reaction. PMID:22977180

  17. Activated RSC-nucleosome complex and persistently altered form of the nucleosome.

    PubMed

    Lorch, Y; Cairns, B R; Zhang, M; Kornberg, R D

    1998-07-10

    RSC, an abundant, essential chromatin-remodeling complex, related to SWI/SNF complex, binds nucleosomes and naked DNA with comparable affinities, as shown by gel shift analysis. The RSC-nucleosome complex is converted in the presence of ATP to a slower migrating form. This activated complex exhibits greatly increased susceptibility to endo- and exonucleases but retains a full complement of histones. Activation persists in the absence of ATP, and on removal of RSC, the nucleosome is released in an altered form, with a diminished electrophoretic mobility, greater sedimentation rate, and marked instability at elevated ionic strength. The reaction is reversible in the presence of RSC and ATP, with conversion of the altered form back to the nucleosome. PMID:9674424

  18. Quantitative test of the barrier nucleosome model for statistical positioning of nucleosomes up- and downstream of transcription start sites.

    PubMed

    Möbius, Wolfram; Gerland, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    The positions of nucleosomes in eukaryotic genomes determine which parts of the DNA sequence are readily accessible for regulatory proteins and which are not. Genome-wide maps of nucleosome positions have revealed a salient pattern around transcription start sites, involving a nucleosome-free region (NFR) flanked by a pronounced periodic pattern in the average nucleosome density. While the periodic pattern clearly reflects well-positioned nucleosomes, the positioning mechanism is less clear. A recent experimental study by Mavrich et al. argued that the pattern observed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is qualitatively consistent with a "barrier nucleosome model," in which the oscillatory pattern is created by the statistical positioning mechanism of Kornberg and Stryer. On the other hand, there is clear evidence for intrinsic sequence preferences of nucleosomes, and it is unclear to what extent these sequence preferences affect the observed pattern. To test the barrier nucleosome model, we quantitatively analyze yeast nucleosome positioning data both up- and downstream from NFRs. Our analysis is based on the Tonks model of statistical physics which quantifies the interplay between the excluded-volume interaction of nucleosomes and their positional entropy. We find that although the typical patterns on the two sides of the NFR are different, they are both quantitatively described by the same physical model with the same parameters, but different boundary conditions. The inferred boundary conditions suggest that the first nucleosome downstream from the NFR (the +1 nucleosome) is typically directly positioned while the first nucleosome upstream is statistically positioned via a nucleosome-repelling DNA region. These boundary conditions, which can be locally encoded into the genome sequence, significantly shape the statistical distribution of nucleosomes over a range of up to approximately 1,000 bp to each side. PMID:20808881

  19. Genome-wide nucleosome positioning during embryonic stem cell development.

    PubMed

    Teif, Vladimir B; Vainshtein, Yevhen; Caudron-Herger, Maïwen; Mallm, Jan-Philipp; Marth, Caroline; Höfer, Thomas; Rippe, Karsten

    2012-11-01

    We determined genome-wide nucleosome occupancies in mouse embryonic stem cells and their neural progenitor and embryonic fibroblast counterparts to assess features associated with nucleosome positioning during lineage commitment. Cell-type- and protein-specific binding preferences of transcription factors to sites with either low (Myc, Klf4 and Zfx) or high (Nanog, Oct4 and Sox2) nucleosome occupancy as well as complex patterns for CTCF were identified. Nucleosome-depleted regions around transcription start and transcription termination sites were broad and more pronounced for active genes, with distinct patterns for promoters classified according to CpG content or histone methylation marks. Throughout the genome, nucleosome occupancy was correlated with certain histone methylation or acetylation modifications. In addition, the average nucleosome repeat length increased during differentiation by 5-7 base pairs, with local variations for specific regions. Our results reveal regulatory mechanisms of cell differentiation that involve nucleosome repositioning. PMID:23085715

  20. Dynamic Nucleosome Organization at hox Promoters during Zebrafish Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Weicksel, Steven E.; Xu, Jia; Sagerström, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    Nucleosome organization at promoter regions plays an important role in regulating gene activity. Genome-wide studies in yeast, flies, worms, mammalian embryonic stem cells and transformed cell lines have found well-positioned nucleosomes flanking a nucleosome depleted region (NDR) at transcription start sites. This nucleosome arrangement depends on DNA sequence (cis-elements) as well as DNA binding factors and ATP-dependent chromatin modifiers (trans-factors). However, little is understood about how the nascent embryonic genome positions nucleosomes during development. This is particularly intriguing since the embryonic genome must undergo a broad reprogramming event upon fusion of sperm and oocyte. Using four stages of early embryonic zebrafish development, we map nucleosome positions at the promoter region of 37 zebrafish hox genes. We find that nucleosome arrangement at the hox promoters is a progressive process that takes place over several stages. At stages immediately after fertilization, nucleosomes appear to be largely disordered at hox promoter regions. At stages after activation of the embryonic genome, nucleosomes are detectable at hox promoters, with positions becoming more uniform and more highly occupied. Since the genomic sequence is invariant during embryogenesis, this progressive change in nucleosome arrangement suggests that trans-factors play an important role in organizing nucleosomes during embryogenesis. Separating hox genes into expressed and non-expressed groups shows that expressed promoters have better positioned and occupied nucleosomes, as well as distinct NDRs, than non-expressed promoters. Finally, by blocking the retinoic acid-signaling pathway, we disrupt early hox gene transcription, but observe no effect on nucleosome positions, suggesting that active hox transcription is not a driving force behind the arrangement of nucleosomes at the promoters of hox genes during early development. PMID:23671670

  1. MNase titration reveals differences between nucleosome occupancy and chromatin accessibility

    PubMed Central

    Mieczkowski, Jakub; Cook, April; Bowman, Sarah K.; Mueller, Britta; Alver, Burak H.; Kundu, Sharmistha; Deaton, Aimee M.; Urban, Jennifer A.; Larschan, Erica; Park, Peter J.; Kingston, Robert E.; Tolstorukov, Michael Y.

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin accessibility plays a fundamental role in gene regulation. Nucleosome placement, usually measured by quantifying protection of DNA from enzymatic digestion, can regulate accessibility. We introduce a metric that uses micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion in a novel manner to measure chromatin accessibility by combining information from several digests of increasing depths. This metric, MACC (MNase accessibility), quantifies the inherent heterogeneity of nucleosome accessibility in which some nucleosomes are seen preferentially at high MNase and some at low MNase. MACC interrogates each genomic locus, measuring both nucleosome location and accessibility in the same assay. MACC can be performed either with or without a histone immunoprecipitation step, and thereby compares histone and non-histone protection. We find that changes in accessibility at enhancers, promoters and other regulatory regions do not correlate with changes in nucleosome occupancy. Moreover, high nucleosome occupancy does not necessarily preclude high accessibility, which reveals novel principles of chromatin regulation. PMID:27151365

  2. MNase titration reveals differences between nucleosome occupancy and chromatin accessibility.

    PubMed

    Mieczkowski, Jakub; Cook, April; Bowman, Sarah K; Mueller, Britta; Alver, Burak H; Kundu, Sharmistha; Deaton, Aimee M; Urban, Jennifer A; Larschan, Erica; Park, Peter J; Kingston, Robert E; Tolstorukov, Michael Y

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin accessibility plays a fundamental role in gene regulation. Nucleosome placement, usually measured by quantifying protection of DNA from enzymatic digestion, can regulate accessibility. We introduce a metric that uses micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion in a novel manner to measure chromatin accessibility by combining information from several digests of increasing depths. This metric, MACC (MNase accessibility), quantifies the inherent heterogeneity of nucleosome accessibility in which some nucleosomes are seen preferentially at high MNase and some at low MNase. MACC interrogates each genomic locus, measuring both nucleosome location and accessibility in the same assay. MACC can be performed either with or without a histone immunoprecipitation step, and thereby compares histone and non-histone protection. We find that changes in accessibility at enhancers, promoters and other regulatory regions do not correlate with changes in nucleosome occupancy. Moreover, high nucleosome occupancy does not necessarily preclude high accessibility, which reveals novel principles of chromatin regulation. PMID:27151365

  3. Independent RNA polymerase II preinitiation complex dynamics and nucleosome turnover at promoter sites in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Grimaldi, Yoselin; Ferrari, Paolo; Strubin, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Transcription by all three eukaryotic RNA polymerases involves the assembly of a large preinitiation complex (PIC) at gene promoters. The PIC comprises several general transcription factors (GTFs), including TBP, and the respective RNA polymerase. It has been suggested that some GTFs remain stably bound at active promoters to facilitate multiple transcription events. Here we used two complementary approaches to show that, in G1-arrested yeast cells, TBP exchanges very rapidly even at the most highly active RNA Pol II promoters. A similar situation is observed at RNA Pol III promoters. In contrast, TBP remains stably bound at RNA Pol I promoters. We also provide evidence that, unexpectedly, PIC dynamics are neither the cause nor the consequence of nucleosome exchange at most of the RNA Pol II promoters we analyzed. These results point to a stable reinitiation complex at RNA Pol I promoters and suggest independent PIC and nucleosome turnover at many RNA Pol II promoters. PMID:24298073

  4. [The effect of DNA supercoiling DNA on nucleosome structure].

    PubMed

    Sivolob, A V; Khrapunov, S N

    1991-01-01

    The circular DNA which contains nucleosomes and additional supercoils has been considered theoretically. The different possible effect of increased negative supercoiling on the nucleosome structure have been studied. According to the model proposed all supercoils in the nucleosome-containing circular DNA are realized as torsional deformations of the double helix. The free energy of both supercoiling (torsional deformations) and nucleosome stabilization have been taken into consideration to obtain the equation for free energy of nucleosome-containing circular DNA. The analysis of this equation and the experimental data by Garner et al. (II Psoc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 1987. P. 2620-2623) about the maximum amount of supercoiling obtained by DNA-topoisomerase II treatment of nucleosome-containing pBR322 plasmid has been performed. It has been shown that two possibilities are consistent with both the equation and experimental data. These are: (1) the increased supercoiling induces the torsional strains not only in linker regions but also in nucleosome DNA and thus supercoiling causes an instability on nucleosome structure; (2) increased supercoiling induces a structural change of nucleosome which is accompanied by nucleosome DNA unwinding and its transition into form with approximately 11 base pairs per turn of double helix. It has been evaluated that in the first case the average torsional rigidity of nucleosome DNA should be approximately 2.5 times as much and in the second case--much more than the rigidity of naked DNA. Both types of nucleosome structural changes may cause its transition to a potentially active state for transcription. It is suggested that increased supercoiling can be a switch mechanism of chromatin activation. PMID:1654518

  5. Nucleosome immobilization strategies for single-pair FRET microscopy.

    PubMed

    Koopmans, Wiepke J A; Schmidt, Thomas; van Noort, John

    2008-10-01

    All genomic transactions in eukaryotes take place in the context of the nucleosome, the basic unit of chromatin, which is responsible for DNA compaction. Overcoming the steric hindrance that nucleosomes present for DNA-processing enzymes requires significant conformational changes. The dynamics of these have been hard to resolve. Single-pair Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (spFRET) microscopy is a powerful technique for observing conformational dynamics of the nucleosome. Nucleosome immobilization allows the extension of observation times to a limit set only by photobleaching, and thus opens the possibility of studying processes occurring on timescales ranging from milliseconds to minutes. It is crucial however, that immobilization itself does not introduce artifacts in the dynamics. Here we report on various nucleosome immobilization strategies, such as single-point attachment to polyethylene glycol (PEG) or surfaces coated with bovine serum albumin (BSA), and confinement in porous agarose or polyacrylamide gels. We compare the immobilization specificity and structural integrity of immobilized nucleosomes. A crosslinked star polyethylene glycol coating performs best with respect to tethering specificity and nucleosome integrity, and enables us to reproduce for the first time bulk nucleosome unwrapping kinetics in single nucleosomes without immobilization artifacts. PMID:18792054

  6. A positioned +1 nucleosome enhances promoter-proximal pausing

    PubMed Central

    Jimeno-González, Silvia; Ceballos-Chávez, María; Reyes, José C.

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin distribution is not uniform along the human genome. In most genes there is a promoter-associated nucleosome free region (NFR) followed by an array of nucleosomes towards the gene body in which the first (+1) nucleosome is strongly positioned. The function of this characteristic chromatin distribution in transcription is not fully understood. Here we show in vivo that the +1 nucleosome plays a role in modulating RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) promoter-proximal pausing. When a +1 nucleosome is strongly positioned, elongating RNAPII has a tendency to stall at the promoter-proximal region, recruits more negative elongation factor (NELF) and produces less mRNA. The nucleosome-induced pause favors pre-mRNA quality control by promoting the addition of the cap to the nascent RNA. Moreover, the uncapped RNAs produced in the absence of a positioned nucleosome are degraded by the 5′-3′ exonuclease XRN2. Interestingly, reducing the levels of the chromatin remodeler ISWI factor SNF2H decreases +1 nucleosome positioning and increases RNAPII pause release. This work demonstrates a function for +1 nucleosome in regulation of transcription elongation, pre-mRNA processing and gene expression. PMID:25735750

  7. The effect of DNA supercoiling on nucleosome structure and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbel, Tabea; Langowski, Jörg

    2015-02-01

    Nucleosomes have to open to allow access to DNA in transcription, replication, and DNA damage repair. Changes in DNA torsional strain (e.g. during transcription elongation) influence the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA. Here we investigated the effect of DNA supercoiling-induced torsional strain on nucleosome structure and stability by scanning force microscopy (SFM) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Nucleosomes were reconstituted onto 2.7 kb DNA plasmids with varying superhelical densities. The SFM results show a clear dependence of the amount of DNA wrapped around the nucleosome core on the strength and type of supercoiling. Negative supercoiling led to smaller nucleosome opening angles as compared to relaxed or positively supercoiled DNA. FCS experiments show that nucleosomes reconstituted on negatively superhelical DNA are more resistant to salt-induced destabilization, as seen by reduced H2A-H2B dimer eviction from the nucleosome. Our results show that changes in DNA topology, e.g. during transcription elongation, affect the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA.

  8. A cell-free CENP-A assembly system defines the chromatin requirements for centromere maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Westhorpe, Frederick G.; Fuller, Colin J.

    2015-01-01

    Centromeres are defined by the presence of CENP-A nucleosomes in chromatin and are essential for accurate chromosome segregation. Centromeric chromatin epigenetically seeds new CENP-A nucleosome formation, thereby maintaining functional centromeres as cells divide. The features within centromeric chromatin that direct new CENP-A assembly remain unclear. Here, we developed a cell-free CENP-A assembly system that enabled the study of chromatin-bound CENP-A and soluble CENP-A separately. We show that two distinct domains of CENP-A within existing CENP-A nucleosomes are required for new CENP-A assembly and that CENP-A nucleosomes recruit the CENP-A assembly factors CENP-C and M18BP1 independently. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the mechanism of CENP-C recruitment to centromeres is dependent on the density of underlying CENP-A nucleosomes. PMID:26076692

  9. A Chemical Biology Approach to Reveal Sirt6-targeted Histone H3 Sites in Nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wesley Wei; Zeng, Yu; Wu, Bo; Deiters, Alexander; Liu, Wenshe R

    2016-07-15

    As a member of a highly conserved family of NAD(+)-dependent histone deacetylases, Sirt6 is a key regulator of mammalian genome stability, metabolism, and life span. Previous studies indicated that Sirt6 is hardwired to remove histone acetylation at H3K9 and H3K56. However, how Sirt6 recognizes its nucleosome substrates has been elusive due to the difficulty of accessing homogeneous acetyl-nucleosomes and the low activity of Sirt6 toward peptide substrates. Based on the fact that Sirt6 has an enhanced activity to remove long chain fatty acylation from lysine, we developed an approach to recombinantly synthesize histone H3 with a fatty acylated lysine, N(ε)-(7-octenoyl)-lysine (OcK), installed at a number of lysine sites and used these acyl-H3 proteins to assemble acyl-nucleosomes as active Sirt6 substrates. A chemical biology approach that visualizes OcK in nucleosomes and therefore allows direct sensitization of Sirt6 activities on its acyl-nucleosome substrates was also formulated. By combining these two approaches, we showed that Sirt6 actively removes acylation from H3K9, H3K18, and H3K27; has relatively low activities toward H3K4 and K3K23; but sluggishly removes acylation at H3K14, H3K36, H3K56, and H3K79. Overexpressing Sirt6 in 293T cells led to downregulated acetylation at H3K18 and K3K27, confirming these two novel Sirt6-targeted nucleosome lysine sites in cells. Given that downregulation of H3K18 acetylation is correlated with a poor prognosis of several cancer types and H3K27 acetylation antagonizes repressive gene regulation by di- and trimethylation at H3K27, our current study implies that Sirt6 may serve as a target for cancer intervention and regulatory pathway investigation in cells. PMID:27152839

  10. Histone Acetylation near the Nucleosome Dyad Axis Enhances Nucleosome Disassembly by RSC and SWI/SNF

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Nilanjana; North, Justin A.; Dechassa, Mekonnen Lemma; Manohar, Mridula; Prasad, Rashmi; Luger, Karolin; Ottesen, Jennifer J.; Poirier, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Signaling associated with transcription activation occurs through posttranslational modification of histones and is best exemplified by lysine acetylation. Lysines are acetylated in histone tails and the core domain/lateral surface of histone octamers. While acetylated lysines in histone tails are frequently recognized by other factors referred to as “readers,” which promote transcription, the mechanistic role of the modifications in the lateral surface of the histone octamer remains unclear. By using X-ray crystallography, we found that acetylated lysines 115 and 122 in histone H3 are solvent accessible, but in biochemical assays they appear not to interact with the bromodomains of SWI/SNF and RSC to enhance recruitment or nucleosome mobilization, as previously shown for acetylated lysines in H3 histone tails. Instead, we found that acetylation of lysines 115 and 122 increases the predisposition of nucleosomes for disassembly by SWI/SNF and RSC up to 7-fold, independent of bromodomains, and only in conjunction with contiguous nucleosomes. Thus, in combination with SWI/SNF and RSC, acetylation of lateral surface lysines in the histone octamer serves as a crucial regulator of nucleosomal dynamics distinct from the histone code readers and writers. PMID:26416878

  11. Histone Acetylation near the Nucleosome Dyad Axis Enhances Nucleosome Disassembly by RSC and SWI/SNF.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Nilanjana; North, Justin A; Dechassa, Mekonnen Lemma; Manohar, Mridula; Prasad, Rashmi; Luger, Karolin; Ottesen, Jennifer J; Poirier, Michael G; Bartholomew, Blaine

    2015-12-01

    Signaling associated with transcription activation occurs through posttranslational modification of histones and is best exemplified by lysine acetylation. Lysines are acetylated in histone tails and the core domain/lateral surface of histone octamers. While acetylated lysines in histone tails are frequently recognized by other factors referred to as "readers," which promote transcription, the mechanistic role of the modifications in the lateral surface of the histone octamer remains unclear. By using X-ray crystallography, we found that acetylated lysines 115 and 122 in histone H3 are solvent accessible, but in biochemical assays they appear not to interact with the bromodomains of SWI/SNF and RSC to enhance recruitment or nucleosome mobilization, as previously shown for acetylated lysines in H3 histone tails. Instead, we found that acetylation of lysines 115 and 122 increases the predisposition of nucleosomes for disassembly by SWI/SNF and RSC up to 7-fold, independent of bromodomains, and only in conjunction with contiguous nucleosomes. Thus, in combination with SWI/SNF and RSC, acetylation of lateral surface lysines in the histone octamer serves as a crucial regulator of nucleosomal dynamics distinct from the histone code readers and writers. PMID:26416878

  12. Genome wide nucleosome mapping for HSV-1 shows nucleosomes are deposited at preferred positions during lytic infection.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jaewook; Sanders, Iryna F; Chen, Eric Z; Li, Hongzhe; Tobias, John W; Isett, R Benjamin; Penubarthi, Sindura; Sun, Hao; Baldwin, Don A; Fraser, Nigel W

    2015-01-01

    HSV is a large double stranded DNA virus, capable of causing a variety of diseases from the common cold sore to devastating encephalitis. Although DNA within the HSV virion does not contain any histone protein, within 1 h of infecting a cell and entering its nucleus the viral genome acquires some histone protein (nucleosomes). During lytic infection, partial micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion does not give the classic ladder band pattern, seen on digestion of cell DNA or latent viral DNA. However, complete digestion does give a mono-nucleosome band, strongly suggesting that there are some nucleosomes present on the viral genome during the lytic infection, but that they are not evenly positioned, with a 200 bp repeat pattern, like cell DNA. Where then are the nucleosomes positioned? Here we perform HSV-1 genome wide nucleosome mapping, at a time when viral replication is in full swing (6 hr PI), using a microarray consisting of 50mer oligonucleotides, covering the whole viral genome (152 kb). Arrays were probed with MNase-protected fragments of DNA from infected cells. Cells were not treated with crosslinking agents, thus we are only mapping tightly bound nucleosomes. The data show that nucleosome deposition is not random. The distribution of signal on the arrays suggest that nucleosomes are located at preferred positions on the genome, and that there are some positions that are not occupied (nucleosome free regions -NFR or Nucleosome depleted regions -NDR), or occupied at frequency below our limit of detection in the population of genomes. Occupancy of only a fraction of the possible sites may explain the lack of a typical MNase partial digestion band ladder pattern for HSV DNA during lytic infection. On average, DNA encoding Immediate Early (IE), Early (E) and Late (L) genes appear to have a similar density of nucleosomes. PMID:25710170

  13. Genome Wide Nucleosome Mapping for HSV-1 Shows Nucleosomes Are Deposited at Preferred Positions during Lytic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jaewook; Sanders, Iryna F.; Chen, Eric Z.; Li, Hongzhe; Tobias, John W.; Isett, R. Benjamin; Penubarthi, Sindura; Sun, Hao; Baldwin, Don A.; Fraser, Nigel W.

    2015-01-01

    HSV is a large double stranded DNA virus, capable of causing a variety of diseases from the common cold sore to devastating encephalitis. Although DNA within the HSV virion does not contain any histone protein, within 1 h of infecting a cell and entering its nucleus the viral genome acquires some histone protein (nucleosomes). During lytic infection, partial micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion does not give the classic ladder band pattern, seen on digestion of cell DNA or latent viral DNA. However, complete digestion does give a mono-nucleosome band, strongly suggesting that there are some nucleosomes present on the viral genome during the lytic infection, but that they are not evenly positioned, with a 200bp repeat pattern, like cell DNA. Where then are the nucleosomes positioned? Here we perform HSV-1 genome wide nucleosome mapping, at a time when viral replication is in full swing (6hr PI), using a microarray consisting of 50mer oligonucleotides, covering the whole viral genome (152kb). Arrays were probed with MNase-protected fragments of DNA from infected cells. Cells were not treated with crosslinking agents, thus we are only mapping tightly bound nucleosomes. The data show that nucleosome deposition is not random. The distribution of signal on the arrays suggest that nucleosomes are located at preferred positions on the genome, and that there are some positions that are not occupied (nucleosome free regions -NFR or Nucleosome depleted regions -NDR), or occupied at frequency below our limit of detection in the population of genomes. Occupancy of only a fraction of the possible sites may explain the lack of a typical MNase partial digestion band ladder pattern for HSV DNA during lytic infection. On average, DNA encoding Immediate Early (IE), Early (E) and Late (L) genes appear to have a similar density of nucleosomes. PMID:25710170

  14. Training-free atomistic prediction of nucleosome occupancy.

    PubMed

    Minary, Peter; Levitt, Michael

    2014-04-29

    Nucleosomes alter gene expression by preventing transcription factors from occupying binding sites along DNA. DNA methylation can affect nucleosome positioning and so alter gene expression epigenetically (without changing DNA sequence). Conventional methods to predict nucleosome occupancy are trained on observed DNA sequence patterns or known DNA oligonucleotide structures. They are statistical and lack the physics needed to predict subtle epigenetic changes due to DNA methylation. The training-free method presented here uses physical principles and state-of-the-art all-atom force fields to predict both nucleosome occupancy along genomic sequences as well as binding to known positioning sequences. Our method calculates the energy of both nucleosomal and linear DNA of the given sequence. Based on the DNA deformation energy, we accurately predict the in vitro occupancy profile observed experimentally for a 20,000-bp genomic region as well as the experimental locations of nucleosomes along 13 well-established positioning sequence elements. DNA with all C bases methylated at the 5 position shows less variation of nucleosome binding: Strong binding is weakened and weak binding is strengthened compared with normal DNA. Methylation also alters the preference of nucleosomes for some positioning sequences but not others. PMID:24733939

  15. Rigid-body molecular dynamics of DNA inside a nucleosome.

    PubMed

    Fathizadeh, Arman; Berdy Besya, Azim; Reza Ejtehadi, Mohammad; Schiessel, Helmut

    2013-03-01

    The majority of eukaryotic DNA, about three quarter, is wrapped around histone proteins forming so-called nucleosomes. To study nucleosomal DNA we introduce a coarse-grained molecular dynamics model based on sequence-dependent harmonic rigid base pair step parameters of DNA and nucleosomal binding sites. Mixed parametrization based on all-atom molecular dynamics and crystallographic data of protein-DNA structures is used for the base pair step parameters. The binding site parameters are adjusted by experimental B-factor values of the nucleosome crystal structure. The model is then used to determine the energy cost for placing a twist defect into the nucleosomal DNA which allows us to use Kramers theory to calculate nucleosome sliding caused by such defects. It is shown that the twist defect scenario together with the sequence-dependent elasticity of DNA can explain the slow time scales observed for nucleosome mobility along DNA. With this method we also show how the twist defect mechanism leads to a higher mobility of DNA in the presence of sin mutations near the dyad axis. Finally, by performing simulations on 5s rDNA, 601, and telomeric base pair sequences, it is demonstrated that the current model is a powerful tool to predict nucleosome positioning. PMID:23475204

  16. Tetrameric structure of centromeric nucleosomes in interphase Drosophila cells.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Yamini; Wang, Hongda; Lindsay, Stuart; Henikoff, Steven

    2007-08-01

    Centromeres, the specialized chromatin structures that are responsible for equal segregation of chromosomes at mitosis, are epigenetically maintained by a centromere-specific histone H3 variant (CenH3). However, the mechanistic basis for centromere maintenance is unknown. We investigated biochemical properties of CenH3 nucleosomes from Drosophila melanogaster cells. Cross-linking of CenH3 nucleosomes identifies heterotypic tetramers containing one copy of CenH3, H2A, H2B, and H4 each. Interphase CenH3 particles display a stable association of approximately 120 DNA base pairs. Purified centromeric nucleosomal arrays have typical "beads-on-a-string" appearance by electron microscopy but appear to resist condensation under physiological conditions. Atomic force microscopy reveals that native CenH3-containing nucleosomes are only half as high as canonical octameric nucleosomes are, confirming that the tetrameric structure detected by cross-linking comprises the entire interphase nucleosome particle. This demonstration of stable half-nucleosomes in vivo provides a possible basis for the instability of centromeric nucleosomes that are deposited in euchromatic regions, which might help maintain centromere identity. PMID:17676993

  17. Transfer of nucleosomes from parental to replicated chromatin.

    PubMed Central

    Krude, T; Knippers, R

    1991-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) minichromosomes were used as the substrate for in vitro replication. Protein-free SV40 DNA or plasmids, carrying the SV40 origin of replication, served as controls. Replicated minichromosomal DNA possessed constrained negative superhelicity indicative of the presence of nucleosomes. The topological state of replicated minichromosomal DNA was precisely determined by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. We show that most or all nucleosomes, present on the replicated minichromosomal DNA, were derived from the parental minichromosome substrate. The mode and the rate of nucleosome transfer from parental to minichromosomal daughter DNA were not influenced by high concentrations of competing replicating and nonreplicating protein-free DNA, indicating that nucleosomes remain associated with DNA during the replication process. The data also show that parental nucleosomes were segregated to the replicated daughter DNA strands in a dispersive manner. Images PMID:1658628

  18. Single-cell nucleosome mapping reveals the molecular basis of gene expression heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Small, Eliza C.; Xi, Liqun; Wang, Ji-Ping; Widom, Jonathan; Licht, Jonathan D.

    2014-01-01

    Nucleosomes, the basic unit of chromatin, have a critical role in the control of gene expression. Nucleosome positions have generally been determined by examining bulk populations of cells and then correlated with overall gene expression. Here, we describe a technique to determine nucleosome positioning in single cells by virtue of the ability of the nucleosome to protect DNA from GpC methylation. In the acid phosphatase inducible PHO5 gene, we find that there is significant cell-to-cell variation in nucleosome positions and shifts in nucleosome positioning correlate with changes in gene expression. However, nucleosome positioning is not absolute, and even with major shifts in gene expression, some cells fail to change nucleosome configuration. Mutations of the PHO5 promoter that introduce a poly(dA:dT) tract-stimulated gene expression under nonpermissive conditions led to shifts of positioned nucleosomes similar to induction of PHO5. By contrast, mutations that altered AA/TT/AT periodicity reduced gene expression upon PHO5 induction and stabilized nucleosomes in most cells, suggesting that enhanced nucleosome affinity for DNA antagonizes chromatin remodelers. Finally, we determined nucleosome positioning in two regions described as “fuzzy” or nucleosome-free when examined in a bulk assay. These regions consisted of distinct nucleosomes with a larger footprint for potential location and an increase population of cells lacking a nucleosome altogether. These data indicate an underlying complexity of nucleosome positioning that may contribute to the flexibility and heterogeneity of gene expression. PMID:24889621

  19. Bivalent interaction of the PZP domain of BRPF1 with the nucleosome impacts chromatin dynamics and acetylation.

    PubMed

    Klein, Brianna J; Muthurajan, Uma M; Lalonde, Marie-Eve; Gibson, Matthew D; Andrews, Forest H; Hepler, Maggie; Machida, Shinichi; Yan, Kezhi; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Poirier, Michael G; Côté, Jacques; Luger, Karolin; Kutateladze, Tatiana G

    2016-01-01

    BRPF1 (bromodomain PHD finger 1) is a core subunit of the MOZ histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complex, critical for normal developmental programs and implicated in acute leukemias. BRPF1 contains a unique assembly of zinc fingers, termed a PZP domain, the physiological role of which remains unclear. Here, we elucidate the structure-function relationship of this novel epigenetic reader and detail the biological and mechanistic consequences of its interaction with nucleosomes. PZP has a globular architecture and forms a 2:1 stoichiometry complex with the nucleosome, bivalently interacting with histone H3 and DNA. This binding impacts the nucleosome dynamics, shifting the DNA unwrapping/rewrapping equilibrium toward the unwrapped state and increasing DNA accessibility. We demonstrate that the DNA-binding function of the BRPF1 PZP domain is required for the MOZ-BRPF1-ING5-hEaf6 HAT complex to be recruited to chromatin and to acetylate nucleosomal histones. Our findings reveal a novel link between chromatin dynamics and MOZ-mediated acetylation. PMID:26626149

  20. Bivalent interaction of the PZP domain of BRPF1 with the nucleosome impacts chromatin dynamics and acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Brianna J.; Muthurajan, Uma M.; Lalonde, Marie-Eve; Gibson, Matthew D.; Andrews, Forest H.; Hepler, Maggie; Machida, Shinichi; Yan, Kezhi; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Poirier, Michael G.; Côté, Jacques; Luger, Karolin; Kutateladze, Tatiana G.

    2016-01-01

    BRPF1 (bromodomain PHD finger 1) is a core subunit of the MOZ histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complex, critical for normal developmental programs and implicated in acute leukemias. BRPF1 contains a unique assembly of zinc fingers, termed a PZP domain, the physiological role of which remains unclear. Here, we elucidate the structure-function relationship of this novel epigenetic reader and detail the biological and mechanistic consequences of its interaction with nucleosomes. PZP has a globular architecture and forms a 2:1 stoichiometry complex with the nucleosome, bivalently interacting with histone H3 and DNA. This binding impacts the nucleosome dynamics, shifting the DNA unwrapping/rewrapping equilibrium toward the unwrapped state and increasing DNA accessibility. We demonstrate that the DNA-binding function of the BRPF1 PZP domain is required for the MOZ-BRPF1-ING5-hEaf6 HAT complex to be recruited to chromatin and to acetylate nucleosomal histones. Our findings reveal a novel link between chromatin dynamics and MOZ-mediated acetylation. PMID:26626149

  1. Nucleosome positioning changes during human embryonic stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjuan; Li, Yaping; Kulik, Michael; Tiedemann, Rochelle L; Robertson, Keith D; Dalton, Stephen; Zhao, Shaying

    2016-06-01

    Nucleosomes are the basic unit of chromatin. Nucleosome positioning (NP) plays a key role in transcriptional regulation and other biological processes. To better understand NP we used MNase-seq to investigate changes that occur as human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) transition to nascent mesoderm and then to smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Compared to differentiated cell derivatives, nucleosome occupancy at promoters and other notable genic sites, such as exon/intron junctions and adjacent regions, in hESCs shows a stronger correlation with transcript abundance and is less influenced by sequence content. Upon hESC differentiation, genes being silenced, but not genes being activated, display a substantial change in nucleosome occupancy at their promoters. Genome-wide, we detected a shift of NP to regions of higher G+C content as hESCs differentiate to SMCs. Notably, genomic regions with higher nucleosome occupancy harbor twice as many G↔C changes but fewer than half A↔T changes, compared to regions with lower nucleosome occupancy. Finally, our analysis indicates that the hESC genome is not rearranged and has a sequence mutation rate resembling normal human genomes. Our study reveals another unique feature of hESC chromatin, and sheds light on the relationship between nucleosome occupancy and sequence G+C content. PMID:27088311

  2. Sequence structure of Lowary/Widom clones forming strong nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Trifonov, Edward N

    2016-04-01

    Lowary and Widom selected from random sequences those which form exceptionally stable nucleosomes, including clone 601, the current champion of strong nucleosome (SN) sequences. This unique sequence database (LW sequences) carries sequence elements which confer stability on the nucleosomes formed on the sequences, and, thus, may serve as source of information on the structure of "ideal" or close to ideal nucleosome DNA sequence. An important clue is also provided by crystallographic study of Vasudevan and coauthors on clone 601 nucleosomes. It demonstrated that YR·YR dinucleotide stacks (primarily TA·TA) follow one another at distances 10 or 11 bases or multiples thereof, such that they all are located on the interface between DNA and histone octamer. Combining this important information with alignment of the YR-containing 10-mers and 11-mers from LW sequences, the bendability matrices of the stable nucleosome DNA are derived. The matrices suggest that the periodically repeated TA (YR), RR, and YY dinucleotides are the main sequence features of the SNs. This consensus coincides with the one for recently discovered SNs with visibly periodic DNA sequences. Thus, the experimentally observed stable LW nucleosomes and SNs derived computationally appear to represent the same entity - exceptionally stable SNs. PMID:26208855

  3. Predicting Nucleosome Positioning Based on Geometrically Transformed Tsallis Entropy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing; Zhang, Yusen; Mu, Zengchao

    2014-01-01

    As the fundamental unit of eukaryotic chromatin structure, nucleosome plays critical roles in gene expression and regulation by controlling physical access to transcription factors. In this paper, based on the geometrically transformed Tsallis entropy and two index-vectors, a valid nucleosome positioning information model is developed to describe the distribution of A/T-riched and G/C-riched dimeric and trimeric motifs along the DNA duplex. When applied to train the support vector machine, the model achieves high AUCs across five organisms, which have significantly outperformed the previous studies. Besides, we adopt the concept of relative distance to describe the probability of arbitrary DNA sequence covered by nucleosome. Thus, the average nucleosome occupancy profile over the S.cerevisiae genome is calculated. With our peak detection model, the isolated nucleosomes along genome sequence are located. When compared with some published results, it shows that our model is effective for nucleosome positioning. The index-vector component is identified to be an important influencing factor of nucleosome organizations. PMID:25380134

  4. Single-molecule decoding of combinatorially modified nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Shema, Efrat; Jones, Daniel; Shoresh, Noam; Donohue, Laura; Ram, Oren; Bernstein, Bradley E

    2016-05-01

    Different combinations of histone modifications have been proposed to signal distinct gene regulatory functions, but this area is poorly addressed by existing technologies. We applied high-throughput single-molecule imaging to decode combinatorial modifications on millions of individual nucleosomes from pluripotent stem cells and lineage-committed cells. We identified definitively bivalent nucleosomes with concomitant repressive and activating marks, as well as other combinatorial modification states whose prevalence varies with developmental potency. We showed that genetic and chemical perturbations of chromatin enzymes preferentially affect nucleosomes harboring specific modification states. Last, we combined this proteomic platform with single-molecule DNA sequencing technology to simultaneously determine the modification states and genomic positions of individual nucleosomes. This single-molecule technology has the potential to address fundamental questions in chromatin biology and epigenetic regulation. PMID:27151869

  5. Multiplexing Genetic and Nucleosome Positioning Codes: A Computational Approach

    PubMed Central

    Eslami-Mossallam, Behrouz; Schram, Raoul D.; Tompitak, Marco; van Noort, John; Schiessel, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA is strongly bent inside fundamental packaging units: the nucleosomes. It is known that their positions are strongly influenced by the mechanical properties of the underlying DNA sequence. Here we discuss the possibility that these mechanical properties and the concomitant nucleosome positions are not just a side product of the given DNA sequence, e.g. that of the genes, but that a mechanical evolution of DNA molecules might have taken place. We first demonstrate the possibility of multiplexing classical and mechanical genetic information using a computational nucleosome model. In a second step we give evidence for genome-wide multiplexing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosacharomyces pombe. This suggests that the exact positions of nucleosomes play crucial roles in chromatin function. PMID:27272176

  6. Multiplexing Genetic and Nucleosome Positioning Codes: A Computational Approach.

    PubMed

    Eslami-Mossallam, Behrouz; Schram, Raoul D; Tompitak, Marco; van Noort, John; Schiessel, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA is strongly bent inside fundamental packaging units: the nucleosomes. It is known that their positions are strongly influenced by the mechanical properties of the underlying DNA sequence. Here we discuss the possibility that these mechanical properties and the concomitant nucleosome positions are not just a side product of the given DNA sequence, e.g. that of the genes, but that a mechanical evolution of DNA molecules might have taken place. We first demonstrate the possibility of multiplexing classical and mechanical genetic information using a computational nucleosome model. In a second step we give evidence for genome-wide multiplexing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosacharomyces pombe. This suggests that the exact positions of nucleosomes play crucial roles in chromatin function. PMID:27272176

  7. DNA damage may drive nucleosomal reorganization to facilitate damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeGresley, Sarah E.; Wilt, Jamie; Antonik, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    One issue in genome maintenance is how DNA repair proteins find lesions at rates that seem to exceed diffusion-limited search rates. We propose a phenomenon where DNA damage induces nucleosomal rearrangements which move lesions to potential rendezvous points in the chromatin structure. These rendezvous points are the dyad and the linker DNA between histones, positions in the chromatin which are more likely to be accessible by repair proteins engaged in a random search. The feasibility of this mechanism is tested by considering the statistical mechanics of DNA containing a single lesion wrapped onto the nucleosome. We consider lesions which make the DNA either more flexible or more rigid by modeling the lesion as either a decrease or an increase in the bending energy. We include this energy in a partition function model of nucleosome breathing. Our results indicate that the steady state for a breathing nucleosome will most likely position the lesion at the dyad or in the linker, depending on the energy of the lesion. A role for DNA binding proteins and chromatin remodelers is suggested based on their ability to alter the mechanical properties of the DNA and DNA-histone binding, respectively. We speculate that these positions around the nucleosome potentially serve as rendezvous points where DNA lesions may be encountered by repair proteins which may be sterically hindered from searching the rest of the nucleosomal DNA. The strength of the repositioning is strongly dependent on the structural details of the DNA lesion and the wrapping and breathing of the nucleosome. A more sophisticated evaluation of this proposed mechanism will require detailed information about breathing dynamics, the structure of partially wrapped nucleosomes, and the structural properties of damaged DNA.

  8. Asymmetric Unwrapping of Nucleosomes under Tension Directed by DNA Local Flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Thuy T. M.; Zhang, Qiucen; Zhou, Ruobo

    2015-01-01

    Summary Dynamics of the nucleosome and exposure of nucleosomal DNA play key roles in many nuclear processes but local dynamics of the nucleosome and its modulation by DNA sequence are poorly understood. Using single-molecule assays we observed that the nucleosome can unwrap asymmetrically and directionally under force. The relative DNA flexibility of the inner quarters of nucleosomal DNA controls the unwrapping direction such that the nucleosome unwraps from the stiffer side. If the DNA flexibility is similar on two sides, it stochastically unwraps from either side. The two ends of the nucleosome are orchestrated such that the opening of one end helps to stabilize the other end, providing a mechanism to amplify even small differences in flexibility to a large asymmetry in nucleosome stability. Our discovery of DNA flexibility as a critical factor for nucleosome dynamics and mechanical stability suggests a novel mechanism of gene regulation by DNA sequence and modifications. PMID:25768909

  9. Role of DNA sequence in chromatin remodeling and the formation of nucleosome-free regions

    PubMed Central

    Lorch, Yahli; Maier-Davis, Barbara; Kornberg, Roger D.

    2014-01-01

    AT-rich DNA is concentrated in the nucleosome-free regions (NFRs) associated with transcription start sites of most genes. We tested the hypothesis that AT-rich DNA engenders NFR formation by virtue of its rigidity and consequent exclusion of nucleosomes. We found that the AT-rich sequences present in many NFRs have little effect on the stability of nucleosomes. Rather, these sequences facilitate the removal of nucleosomes by the RSC chromatin remodeling complex. RSC activity is stimulated by AT-rich sequences in nucleosomes and inhibited by competition with AT-rich DNA. RSC may remove NFR nucleosomes without effect on adjacent ORF nucleosomes. Our findings suggest that many NFRs are formed and maintained by an active mechanism involving the ATP-dependent removal of nucleosomes rather than a passive mechanism due to the intrinsic instability of nucleosomes on AT-rich DNA sequences. PMID:25403179

  10. Role of DNA sequence in chromatin remodeling and the formation of nucleosome-free regions.

    PubMed

    Lorch, Yahli; Maier-Davis, Barbara; Kornberg, Roger D

    2014-11-15

    AT-rich DNA is concentrated in the nucleosome-free regions (NFRs) associated with transcription start sites of most genes. We tested the hypothesis that AT-rich DNA engenders NFR formation by virtue of its rigidity and consequent exclusion of nucleosomes. We found that the AT-rich sequences present in many NFRs have little effect on the stability of nucleosomes. Rather, these sequences facilitate the removal of nucleosomes by the RSC chromatin remodeling complex. RSC activity is stimulated by AT-rich sequences in nucleosomes and inhibited by competition with AT-rich DNA. RSC may remove NFR nucleosomes without effect on adjacent ORF nucleosomes. Our findings suggest that many NFRs are formed and maintained by an active mechanism involving the ATP-dependent removal of nucleosomes rather than a passive mechanism due to the intrinsic instability of nucleosomes on AT-rich DNA sequences. PMID:25403179

  11. Asymmetric unwrapping of nucleosomes under tension directed by DNA local flexibility.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Thuy T M; Zhang, Qiucen; Zhou, Ruobo; Yodh, Jaya G; Ha, Taekjip

    2015-03-12

    Dynamics of the nucleosome and exposure of nucleosomal DNA play key roles in many nuclear processes, but local dynamics of the nucleosome and its modulation by DNA sequence are poorly understood. Using single-molecule assays, we observed that the nucleosome can unwrap asymmetrically and directionally under force. The relative DNA flexibility of the inner quarters of nucleosomal DNA controls the unwrapping direction such that the nucleosome unwraps from the stiffer side. If the DNA flexibility is similar on two sides, it stochastically unwraps from either side. The two ends of the nucleosome are orchestrated such that the opening of one end helps to stabilize the other end, providing a mechanism to amplify even small differences in flexibility to a large asymmetry in nucleosome stability. Our discovery of DNA flexibility as a critical factor for nucleosome dynamics and mechanical stability suggests a novel mechanism of gene regulation by DNA sequence and modifications. PMID:25768909

  12. Nucleosome alterations caused by mutations at modifiable histone residues in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongde; Wang, Pingyan; Liu, Lingjie; Min, Zhu; Luo, Kun; Wan, Yakun

    2015-01-01

    Nucleosome organization exhibits dynamic properties depending on the cell state and environment. Histone proteins, fundamental components of nucleosomes, are subject to chemical modifications on particular residues. We examined the effect of substituting modifiable residues of four core histones with the non-modifiable residue alanine on nucleosome dynamics. We mapped the genome-wide nucleosomes in 22 histone mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and compared the nucleosome alterations relative to the wild-type strain. Our results indicated that different types of histone mutation resulted in different phenotypes and a distinct reorganization of nucleosomes. Nucleosome occupancy was altered at telomeres, but not at centromeres. The first nucleosomes upstream (−1) and downstream (+1) of the transcription start site (TSS) were more dynamic than other nucleosomes. Mutations in histones affected the nucleosome array downstream of the TSS. Highly expressed genes, such as ribosome genes and genes involved in glycolysis, showed increased nucleosome occupancy in many types of histone mutant. In particular, the H3K56A mutant exhibited a high percentage of dynamic genomic regions, decreased nucleosome occupancy at telomeres, increased occupancy at the +1 and −1 nucleosomes, and a slow growth phenotype under stress conditions. Our findings provide insight into the influence of histone mutations on nucleosome dynamics. PMID:26498326

  13. Comprehensive nucleosome mapping of the human genome in cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Druliner, Brooke R.; Vera, Daniel; Johnson, Ruth; Ruan, Xiaoyang; Apone, Lynn M.; Dimalanta, Eileen T.; Stewart, Fiona J.; Boardman, Lisa; Dennis, Jonathan H.

    2016-01-01

    Altered chromatin structure is a hallmark of cancer, and inappropriate regulation of chromatin structure may represent the origin of transformation. Important studies have mapped human nucleosome distributions genome wide, but the role of chromatin structure in cancer progression has not been addressed. We developed a MNase-Transcription Start Site Sequence Capture method (mTSS-seq) to map the nucleosome distribution at human transcription start sites genome-wide in primary human lung and colon adenocarcinoma tissue. Here, we confirm that nucleosome redistribution is an early, widespread event in lung (LAC) and colon (CRC) adenocarcinoma. These altered nucleosome architectures are consistent between LAC and CRC patient samples indicating that they may serve as important early adenocarcinoma markers. We demonstrate that the nucleosome alterations are driven by the underlying DNA sequence and potentiate transcription factor binding. We conclude that DNA-directed nucleosome redistributions are widespread early in cancer progression. We have proposed an entirely new hierarchical model for chromatin-mediated genome regulation. PMID:26735342

  14. Nucleosomes determine their own patch size in base excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Meas, Rithy; Smerdon, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) processes non-helix distorting lesions (e.g., uracils and gaps) and is composed of two subpathways that differ in the number of nucleotides (nts) incorporated during the DNA synthesis step: short patch (SP) repair incorporates 1 nt and long patch (LP) repair incorporates 2–12 nts. This choice for either LP or SP repair has not been analyzed in the context of nucleosomes. Initial studies with uracil located in nucleosome core DNA showed a distinct DNA polymerase extension profile in cell-free extracts that specifically limits extension to 1 nt, suggesting a preference for SP BER. Therefore, we developed an assay to differentiate long and short repair patches in ‘designed’ nucleosomes containing a single-nucleotide gap at specific locations relative to the dyad center. Using cell-free extracts or purified enzymes, we found that DNA lesions in the nucleosome core are preferentially repaired by DNA polymerase β and there is a significant reduction in BER polymerase extension beyond 1 nt, creating a striking bias for incorporation of short patches into nucleosomal DNA. These results show that nucleosomes control the patch size used by BER. PMID:27265863

  15. Nucleosomes determine their own patch size in base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Meas, Rithy; Smerdon, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) processes non-helix distorting lesions (e.g., uracils and gaps) and is composed of two subpathways that differ in the number of nucleotides (nts) incorporated during the DNA synthesis step: short patch (SP) repair incorporates 1 nt and long patch (LP) repair incorporates 2-12 nts. This choice for either LP or SP repair has not been analyzed in the context of nucleosomes. Initial studies with uracil located in nucleosome core DNA showed a distinct DNA polymerase extension profile in cell-free extracts that specifically limits extension to 1 nt, suggesting a preference for SP BER. Therefore, we developed an assay to differentiate long and short repair patches in 'designed' nucleosomes containing a single-nucleotide gap at specific locations relative to the dyad center. Using cell-free extracts or purified enzymes, we found that DNA lesions in the nucleosome core are preferentially repaired by DNA polymerase β and there is a significant reduction in BER polymerase extension beyond 1 nt, creating a striking bias for incorporation of short patches into nucleosomal DNA. These results show that nucleosomes control the patch size used by BER. PMID:27265863

  16. Role of nucleosome remodeling in neurodevelopmental and intellectual disability disorders

    PubMed Central

    López, Alberto J.; Wood, Marcelo A.

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly important to understand how epigenetic mechanisms control gene expression during neurodevelopment. Two epigenetic mechanisms that have received considerable attention are DNA methylation and histone acetylation. Human exome sequencing and genome-wide association studies have linked several neurobiological disorders to genes whose products actively regulate DNA methylation and histone acetylation. More recently, a third major epigenetic mechanism, nucleosome remodeling, has been implicated in human developmental and intellectual disability (ID) disorders. Nucleosome remodeling is driven primarily through nucleosome remodeling complexes with specialized ATP-dependent enzymes. These enzymes directly interact with DNA or chromatin structure, as well as histone subunits, to restructure the shape and organization of nucleosome positioning to ultimately regulate gene expression. Of particular interest is the neuron-specific Brg1/hBrm Associated Factor (nBAF) complex. Mutations in nBAF subunit genes have so far been linked to Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS), Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome (NBS), schizophrenia, and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Together, these human developmental and ID disorders are powerful examples of the impact of epigenetic modulation on gene expression. This review focuses on the new and emerging role of nucleosome remodeling in neurodevelopmental and ID disorders and whether nucleosome remodeling affects gene expression required for cognition independently of its role in regulating gene expression required for development. PMID:25954173

  17. The universality of nucleosome organization: from yeast to human

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chereji, Razvan

    The basic units of DNA packaging are called nucleosomes. Their locations on the chromosomes play an essential role in gene regulation. We study nucleosome positioning in yeast, fly, mouse, and human, and build biophysical models in order to explain the genome-wide nucleosome organization. We show that DNA sequence alone is not able to generate the phased arrays of nucleosomes observed in vivo near the transcription start sites. We discuss simple models which can account for the formation of nucleosome depleted regions and nucleosome phasing at the gene promoters. We show that the same principles apply to different organisms. References: [1] RV Chereji, D Tolkunov, G Locke, AV Morozov - Phys. Rev. E 83, 050903 (2011) [2] RV Chereji, AV Morozov - J. Stat. Phys. 144, 379 (2011) [3] RV Chereji, AV Morozov - Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 111, 5236 (2014) [4] RV Chereji, T-W Kan, et al. - Nucleic Acids Res. (2015) doi: 10.1093/nar/gkv978 [5] RV Chereji, AV Morozov - Brief. Funct. Genomics 14, 50 (2015) [6] HA Cole, J Ocampo, JR Iben, RV Chereji, DJ Clark - Nucleic Acids Res. 42, 12512 (2014) [7] D Ganguli, RV Chereji, J Iben, HA Cole, DJ Clark - Genome Res. 24, 1637 (2014)

  18. Role of nucleosome remodeling in neurodevelopmental and intellectual disability disorders.

    PubMed

    López, Alberto J; Wood, Marcelo A

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly important to understand how epigenetic mechanisms control gene expression during neurodevelopment. Two epigenetic mechanisms that have received considerable attention are DNA methylation and histone acetylation. Human exome sequencing and genome-wide association studies have linked several neurobiological disorders to genes whose products actively regulate DNA methylation and histone acetylation. More recently, a third major epigenetic mechanism, nucleosome remodeling, has been implicated in human developmental and intellectual disability (ID) disorders. Nucleosome remodeling is driven primarily through nucleosome remodeling complexes with specialized ATP-dependent enzymes. These enzymes directly interact with DNA or chromatin structure, as well as histone subunits, to restructure the shape and organization of nucleosome positioning to ultimately regulate gene expression. Of particular interest is the neuron-specific Brg1/hBrm Associated Factor (nBAF) complex. Mutations in nBAF subunit genes have so far been linked to Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS), Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome (NBS), schizophrenia, and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Together, these human developmental and ID disorders are powerful examples of the impact of epigenetic modulation on gene expression. This review focuses on the new and emerging role of nucleosome remodeling in neurodevelopmental and ID disorders and whether nucleosome remodeling affects gene expression required for cognition independently of its role in regulating gene expression required for development. PMID:25954173

  19. Binding of NF-κB to Nucleosomes: Effect of Translational Positioning, Nucleosome Remodeling and Linker Histone H1

    PubMed Central

    Lone, Imtiaz Nisar; Shukla, Manu Shubhdarshan; Charles Richard, John Lalith; Peshev, Zahary Yordanov; Dimitrov, Stefan; Angelov, Dimitar

    2013-01-01

    NF-κB is a key transcription factor regulating the expression of inflammatory responsive genes. How NF-κB binds to naked DNA templates is well documented, but how it interacts with chromatin is far from being clear. Here we used a combination of UV laser footprinting, hydroxyl footprinting and electrophoretic mobility shift assay to investigate the binding of NF-κB to nucleosomal templates. We show that NF-κB p50 homodimer is able to bind to its recognition sequence, when it is localized at the edge of the core particle, but not when the recognition sequence is at the interior of the nucleosome. Remodeling of the nucleosome by the chromatin remodeling machine RSC was not sufficient to allow binding of NF-κB to its recognition sequence located in the vicinity of the nucleosome dyad, but RSC-induced histone octamer sliding allowed clearly detectable binding of NF-κB with the slid particle. Importantly, nucleosome dilution-driven removal of H2A–H2B dimer led to complete accessibility of the site located close to the dyad to NF-κB. Finally, we found that NF-κB was able to displace histone H1 and prevent its binding to nucleosome. These data provide important insight on the role of chromatin structure in the regulation of transcription of NF-κB dependent genes. PMID:24086160

  20. Plasticity and epigenetic inheritance of centromere-specific histone H3 (CENP-A)-containing nucleosome positioning in the fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jianhui; Liu, Xingkun; Sakuno, Takeshi; Li, Wenzhu; Xi, Yuanxin; Aravamudhan, Pavithra; Joglekar, Ajit; Li, Wei; Watanabe, Yoshinori; He, Xiangwei

    2013-06-28

    Nucleosomes containing the specific histone H3 variant CENP-A mark the centromere locus on each chromatin and initiate kinetochore assembly. For the common type of regional centromeres, little is known in molecular detail of centromeric chromatin organization, its propagation through cell division, and how distinct organization patterns may facilitate kinetochore assembly. Here, we show that in the fission yeast S. pombe, a relatively small number of CENP-A/Cnp1 nucleosomes are found within the centromeric core and that their positioning relative to underlying DNA varies among genetically homogenous cells. Consistent with the flexible positioning of Cnp1 nucleosomes, a large portion of the endogenous centromere is dispensable for its essential activity in mediating chromosome segregation. We present biochemical evidence that Cnp1 occupancy directly correlates with silencing of the underlying reporter genes. Furthermore, using a newly developed pedigree analysis assay, we demonstrated the epigenetic inheritance of Cnp1 positioning and quantified the rate of occasional repositioning of Cnp1 nucleosomes throughout cell generations. Together, our results reveal the plasticity and the epigenetically inheritable nature of centromeric chromatin organization. PMID:23661703

  1. Plasticity and Epigenetic Inheritance of Centromere-specific Histone H3 (CENP-A)-containing Nucleosome Positioning in the Fission Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jianhui; Liu, Xingkun; Sakuno, Takeshi; Li, Wenzhu; Xi, Yuanxin; Aravamudhan, Pavithra; Joglekar, Ajit; Li, Wei; Watanabe, Yoshinori; He, Xiangwei

    2013-01-01

    Nucleosomes containing the specific histone H3 variant CENP-A mark the centromere locus on each chromatin and initiate kinetochore assembly. For the common type of regional centromeres, little is known in molecular detail of centromeric chromatin organization, its propagation through cell division, and how distinct organization patterns may facilitate kinetochore assembly. Here, we show that in the fission yeast S. pombe, a relatively small number of CENP-A/Cnp1 nucleosomes are found within the centromeric core and that their positioning relative to underlying DNA varies among genetically homogenous cells. Consistent with the flexible positioning of Cnp1 nucleosomes, a large portion of the endogenous centromere is dispensable for its essential activity in mediating chromosome segregation. We present biochemical evidence that Cnp1 occupancy directly correlates with silencing of the underlying reporter genes. Furthermore, using a newly developed pedigree analysis assay, we demonstrated the epigenetic inheritance of Cnp1 positioning and quantified the rate of occasional repositioning of Cnp1 nucleosomes throughout cell generations. Together, our results reveal the plasticity and the epigenetically inheritable nature of centromeric chromatin organization. PMID:23661703

  2. Long-range effects of histone point mutations on DNA remodeling revealed from computational analyses of SIN-mutant nucleosome structures

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fei; Colasanti, Andrew V.; Li, Yun; Olson, Wilma K.

    2010-01-01

    The packaging of DNA into nucleosomes impedes the binding and access of molecules involved in its processing. The SWI/SNF multi-protein assembly, found in yeast, is one of many regulatory factors that stimulate the remodeling of DNA required for its transcription. Amino-acid point mutations in histones H3 or H4 partially bypass the requirement of the SWI/SNF complex in this system. The mechanisms underlying the observed remodeling, however, are difficult to discern from the crystal structures of nucleosomes bearing these so-called SIN (SWI/SNF INdependent) mutations. Here, we report detailed analyses of the conformations and interactions of the histones and DNA in these assemblies. We find that the loss of direct protein–DNA contacts near point-mutation sites, reported previously, is coupled to unexpected additional long-range effects, i.e. loss of intermolecular contacts and accompanying DNA conformational changes at sequentially and spatially distant sites. The SIN mutations seemingly transmit information relevant to DNA binding across the nucleosome. The energetic cost of deforming the DNA to the states found in the SIN-mutant structures helps to distinguish the mutants that show phenotypes in yeast from those that do not. Models incorporating these deformed dimer steps suggest ways that nucleosomal DNA may be remodeled during its biological processing. PMID:20647418

  3. Characterization of Nucleosome Unwrapping within Chromatin Fibers Using Magnetic Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Fan-Tso; van der Heijden, Thijn

    2014-01-01

    Nucleosomal arrays fold into chromatin fibers and the higher-order folding of chromatin plays a strong regulatory role in all processes involving DNA access, such as transcription and replication. A fundamental understanding of such regulation requires insight into the folding properties of the chromatin fiber in molecular detail. Despite this, the structure and the mechanics of chromatin fibers remain highly disputed. Single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments have the potential to provide such insight, but interpretation of the data has been hampered by the large variations in experimental force-extension traces. Here we explore the possibility that chromatin fibers are composed of both single-turn and fully wrapped histone octamers. By characterizing the force-dependent behavior of in vitro reconstituted chromatin fibers and reanalyzing existing data, we show the unwrapping of the outer turn of nucleosomal DNA at 3 pN. We present a model composed of two freely-jointed chains, which reveals that nucleosomes within the chromatin fiber show identical force-extension behavior to mononucleosomes, indicating that nucleosome-nucleosome interactions are orders-of-magnitude smaller than previously reported and therefore can be overcome by thermal fluctuations. We demonstrate that lowering the salt concentration externally increases the wrapping energy significantly, indicative of the electrostatic interaction between the wrapped DNA and the histone octamer surface. We propose that the weak interaction between nucleosomes could allow easy access to nucleosomal DNA, while DNA unwrapping from the histone core could provide a stable yet dynamic structure during DNA maintenance. PMID:25028879

  4. Electrostatic Analysis of The Nucleosome Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenley, Andrew; Adams, David; Onufriev, Alexey

    2007-03-01

    The wrapping and unwrapping of the DNA around the histone octomer of a nucleosome core particle (NCP) plays a vital role in many cellular processes, such as transcription, replication, and cell differentiation. The exact mechanisms underlying the associated transitions in the NCP are still not well understood. We present a simple, two-state electrostatic model of the NCP that agrees with a number of experiments and suggests mechanisms that could initiate DNA unwrapping in vivo. We present and discuss a 2D phase diagram of the system as a function of ambient salt concentration and the net charge of the histone octomer. The model also predicts the free energy of a NCP at physiological conditions. The stability of the system is strongly dependent on the charge of the histone octomer, hinting at possible modes of control in in vivo (acetylation and/or pH changes). The model permits analytical solutions in the low and high salt limits. The analysis of these solutions suggests simple physical mechanisms behind the observed folding and unfolding behavior at environmental solvent conditions.

  5. Acetylation curtails nucleosome binding, not stable nucleosome remodeling, by FoxO1

    SciTech Connect

    Hatta, M.; Liu, F.; Cirillo, L.A.

    2009-02-20

    Transcriptional activity of FoxO factors is controlled through the actions of multiple growth factors signaling through protein kinase B, whereby phosphorylation of FoxO factors inhibits FoxO-mediated transactivation by promoting nuclear export. Phosphorylation of FoxO factors is enhanced by p300-mediated acetylation, which decreases their affinity for DNA. The negative effect of acetylation on FoxO DNA binding, together with nuclear FoxO mobility, is eliminated by over-expression of the de-acetylase Sirt1, suggesting that acetylation mobilizes FoxO factors in chromatin for inducible gene expression. Here, we show that acetylation significantly curtails the affinity of FoxO1 for its binding sites in nucleosomal DNA but has no effect on either stable nucleosome binding or remodeling by this factor. We suggest that, while acetylation provides a first, essential step toward mobilizing FoxO factors for inducible gene repression, additional mechanisms exist for overcoming their inherent capacity to stably bind and remodel nuclear chromatin.

  6. Nucleosome-driven transcription factor binding and gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Ballaré, Cecilia; Castellano, Giancarlo; Gaveglia, Laura; Althammer, Sonja; González-Vallinas, Juan; Eyras, Eduardo; Le Dily, Francois; Zaurin, Roser; Soronellas, Daniel; Vicent, Guillermo P; Beato, Miguel

    2013-01-10

    Elucidating the global function of a transcription factor implies the identification of its target genes and genomic binding sites. The role of chromatin in this context is unclear, but the dominant view is that factors bind preferentially to nucleosome-depleted regions identified as DNaseI-hypersensitive sites (DHS). Here we show by ChIP, MNase, and DNaseI assays followed by deep sequencing that the progesterone receptor (PR) requires nucleosomes for optimal binding and function. In breast cancer cells treated with progestins, we identified 25,000 PR binding sites (PRbs). The majority of these sites encompassed several copies of the hexanucleotide TGTYCY, which is highly abundant in the genome. We found that functional PRbs accumulate around progesterone-induced genes, mainly in enhancers. Most of these sites overlap with DHS but exhibit high nucleosome occupancy. Progestin stimulation results in remodeling of these nucleosomes with displacement of histones H1 and H2A/H2B dimers. Our results strongly suggest that nucleosomes are crucial for PR binding and hormonal gene regulation. PMID:23177737

  7. Electrostatic mechanism of nucleosomal array folding revealed by computer simulation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jian; Zhang, Qing; Schlick, Tamar

    2005-01-01

    Although numerous experiments indicate that the chromatin fiber displays salt-dependent conformations, the associated molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here, we apply an irregular Discrete Surface Charge Optimization (DiSCO) model of the nucleosome with all histone tails incorporated to describe by Monte Carlo simulations salt-dependent rearrangements of a nucleosomal array with 12 nucleosomes. The ensemble of nucleosomal array conformations display salt-dependent condensation in good agreement with hydrodynamic measurements and suggest that the array adopts highly irregular 3D zig-zag conformations at high (physiological) salt concentrations and transitions into the extended “beads-on-a-string” conformation at low salt. Energy analyses indicate that the repulsion among linker DNA leads to this extended form, whereas internucleosome attraction drives the folding at high salt. The balance between these two contributions determines the salt-dependent condensation. Importantly, the internucleosome and linker DNA–nucleosome attractions require histone tails; we find that the H3 tails, in particular, are crucial for stabilizing the moderately folded fiber at physiological monovalent salt. PMID:15919827

  8. Integrated molecular mechanism directing nucleosome reorganization by human FACT

    PubMed Central

    Tsunaka, Yasuo; Fujiwara, Yoshie; Oyama, Takuji; Hirose, Susumu; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2016-01-01

    Facilitates chromatin transcription (FACT) plays essential roles in chromatin remodeling during DNA transcription, replication, and repair. Our structural and biochemical studies of human FACT–histone interactions present precise views of nucleosome reorganization, conducted by the FACT-SPT16 (suppressor of Ty 16) Mid domain and its adjacent acidic AID segment. AID accesses the H2B N-terminal basic region exposed by partial unwrapping of the nucleosomal DNA, thereby triggering the invasion of FACT into the nucleosome. The crystal structure of the Mid domain complexed with an H3–H4 tetramer exhibits two separate contact sites; the Mid domain forms a novel intermolecular β structure with H4. At the other site, the Mid–H2A steric collision on the H2A-docking surface of the H3–H4 tetramer within the nucleosome induces H2A–H2B displacement. This integrated mechanism results in disrupting the H3 αN helix, which is essential for retaining the nucleosomal DNA ends, and hence facilitates DNA stripping from histone. PMID:26966247

  9. RNF8-dependent histone modifications regulate nucleosome removal during spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lin-Yu; Wu, Jiaxue; Ye, Lin; Gavrilina, Galina B.; Saunders, Thomas L.; Yu, Xiaochun

    2010-01-01

    Summary During spermatogenesis, global nucleosome removal occurs where histones are initially replaced by transition proteins and subsequently by protamines. This chromatin reorganization is thought to facilitate the compaction of the paternal genome into the sperm head and to protect the DNA from damaging agents. Histone ubiquitination has been suggested to be important for sex chromosome inactivation during meiotic prophase and nucleosome removal at post-meiotic stages. However, the mechanisms regulating these ubiquitin-mediated processes are unknown. In this study, we investigate the role of the ubiquitin ligase RNF8 during spermatogenesis and find that RNF8-deficient mice are proficient in meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI), but deficient in global nucleosome removal. Moreover, we show that RNF8-dependent histone ubiquitination induces H4K16 acetylation, which may be an initial step in nucleosome removal. Thus, our results show that RNF8 plays an important role during spermatogenesis through histone ubiquitination, resulting in trans-histone acetylation and global nucleosome removal. PMID:20153262

  10. Integrated molecular mechanism directing nucleosome reorganization by human FACT.

    PubMed

    Tsunaka, Yasuo; Fujiwara, Yoshie; Oyama, Takuji; Hirose, Susumu; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2016-03-15

    Facilitates chromatin transcription (FACT) plays essential roles in chromatin remodeling during DNA transcription, replication, and repair. Our structural and biochemical studies of human FACT-histone interactions present precise views of nucleosome reorganization, conducted by the FACT-SPT16 (suppressor of Ty 16) Mid domain and its adjacent acidic AID segment. AID accesses the H2B N-terminal basic region exposed by partial unwrapping of the nucleosomal DNA, thereby triggering the invasion of FACT into the nucleosome. The crystal structure of the Mid domain complexed with an H3-H4 tetramer exhibits two separate contact sites; the Mid domain forms a novel intermolecular β structure with H4. At the other site, the Mid-H2A steric collision on the H2A-docking surface of the H3-H4 tetramer within the nucleosome induces H2A-H2B displacement. This integrated mechanism results in disrupting the H3 αN helix, which is essential for retaining the nucleosomal DNA ends, and hence facilitates DNA stripping from histone. PMID:26966247

  11. Statistical mechanics of chromatin: Inferring free energies of nucleosome formation from high-throughput data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, Alexandre

    2009-03-01

    Formation of nucleosome core particles is a first step towards packaging genomic DNA into chromosomes in living cells. Nucleosomes are formed by wrapping 147 base pairs of DNA around a spool of eight histone proteins. It is reasonable to assume that formation of single nucleosomes in vitro is determined by DNA sequence alone: it costs less elastic energy to wrap a flexible DNA polymer around the histone octamer, and more if the polymer is rigid. However, it is unclear to which extent this effect is important in living cells. Cells have evolved chromatin remodeling enzymes that expend ATP to actively reposition nucleosomes. In addition, nucleosome positioning on long DNA sequences is affected by steric exclusion - many nucleosomes have to form simultaneously without overlap. Currently available bioinformatics methods for predicting nucleosome positions are trained on in vivo data sets and are thus unable to distinguish between extrinsic and intrinsic nucleosome positioning signals. In order to see the relative importance of such signals for nucleosome positioning in vivo, we have developed a model based on a large collection of DNA sequences from nucleosomes reconstituted in vitro by salt dialysis. We have used these data to infer the free energy of nucleosome formation at each position along the genome. The method uses an exact result from the statistical mechanics of classical 1D fluids to infer the free energy landscape from nucleosome occupancy. We will discuss the degree to which in vitro nucleosome occupancy profiles are predictive of in vivo nucleosome positions, and will estimate how many nucleosomes are sequence-specific and how many are positioned purely by steric exclusion. Our approach to nucleosome energetics should be applicable across multiple organisms and genomic regions.

  12. RNase P protein subunit Rpp29 represses histone H3.3 nucleosome deposition

    PubMed Central

    Newhart, Alyshia; Powers, Sara Lawrence; Shastrula, Prashanth Krishna; Sierra, Isabel; Joo, Lucy M.; Hayden, James E.; Cohen, Andrew R.; Janicki, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, histone H3.3 is a critical regulator of transcription state change and heritability at both euchromatin and heterochromatin. The H3.3-specific chaperone, DAXX, together with the chromatin-remodeling factor, ATRX, regulates H3.3 deposition and transcriptional silencing at repetitive DNA, including pericentromeres and telomeres. However, the events that precede H3.3 nucleosome incorporation have not been fully elucidated. We previously showed that the DAXX-ATRX-H3.3 pathway regulates a multi-copy array of an inducible transgene that can be visualized in single living cells. When this pathway is impaired, the array can be robustly activated. H3.3 is strongly recruited to the site during activation where it accumulates in a complex with transcribed sense and antisense RNA, which is distinct from the DNA/chromatin. This suggests that transcriptional events regulate H3.3 recruited to its incorporation sites. Here we report that the nucleolar RNA proteins Rpp29, fibrillarin, and RPL23a are also components of this H3.3/RNA complex. Rpp29 is a protein subunit of RNase P. Of the other subunits, POP1 and Rpp21 are similarly recruited suggesting that a variant of RNase P regulates H3.3 chromatin assembly. Rpp29 knockdown increases H3.3 chromatin incorporation, which suggests that Rpp29 represses H3.3 nucleosome deposition, a finding with implications for epigenetic regulation. PMID:26842893

  13. Hierarchical regulation of the genome: global changes in nucleosome organization potentiate genome response

    PubMed Central

    Sexton, Brittany S.; Druliner, Brooke R.; Vera, Daniel L.; Avey, Denis; Zhu, Fanxiu; Dennis, Jonathan H.

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosome occupancy is critically important in regulating access to the eukaryotic genome. Few studies in human cells have measured genome-wide nucleosome distributions at high temporal resolution during a response to a common stimulus. We measured nucleosome distributions at high temporal resolution following Kaposi's-sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) reactivation using our newly developed mTSS-seq technology, which maps nucleosome distribution at the transcription start sites (TSS) of all human genes. Nucleosomes underwent widespread changes in organization 24 hours after KSHV reactivation and returned to their basal nucleosomal architecture 48 hours after KSHV reactivation. The widespread changes consisted of an indiscriminate remodeling event resulting in the loss of nucleosome rotational phasing signals. Additionally, one in six TSSs in the human genome possessed nucleosomes that are translationally remodeled. 72% of the loci with translationally remodeled nucleosomes have nucleosomes that moved to positions encoded by the underlying DNA sequence. Finally we demonstrated that these widespread alterations in nucleosomal architecture potentiated regulatory factor binding. These descriptions of nucleosomal architecture changes provide a new framework for understanding the role of chromatin in the genomic response, and have allowed us to propose a hierarchical model for chromatin-based regulation of genome response. PMID:26771136

  14. Histone H1 null vertebrate cells exhibit altered nucleosome architecture

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Hideharu; Takami, Yasunari; Sonoda, Eiichiro; Iwasaki, Tomohito; Iwano, Hidetomo; Tachibana, Makoto; Takeda, Shunichi; Nakayama, Tatsuo; Kimura, Hiroshi; Shinkai, Yoichi

    2010-01-01

    In eukaryotic nuclei, DNA is wrapped around an octamer of core histones to form nucleosomes, and chromatin fibers are thought to be stabilized by linker histones of the H1 type. Higher eukaryotes express multiple variants of histone H1; chickens possess six H1 variants. Here, we generated and analyzed the phenotype of a complete deletion of histone H1 genes in chicken cells. The H1-null cells showed decreased global nucleosome spacing, expanded nuclear volumes, and increased chromosome aberration rates, although proper mitotic chromatin structure appeared to be maintained. Expression array analysis revealed that the transcription of multiple genes was affected and was mostly downregulated in histone H1-deficient cells. This report describes the first histone H1 complete knockout cells in vertebrates and suggests that linker histone H1, while not required for mitotic chromatin condensation, plays important roles in nucleosome spacing and interphase chromatin compaction and acts as a global transcription regulator. PMID:20156997

  15. Hierarchical looping of zigzag nucleosome chains in metaphase chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Grigoryev, Sergei A.; Bascom, Gavin; Buckwalter, Jenna M.; Schubert, Michael B.; Woodcock, Christopher L.; Schlick, Tamar

    2016-01-01

    The architecture of higher-order chromatin in eukaryotic cell nuclei is largely unknown. Here, we use electron microscopy-assisted nucleosome interaction capture (EMANIC) cross-linking experiments in combination with mesoscale chromatin modeling of 96-nucleosome arrays to investigate the internal organization of condensed chromatin in interphase cell nuclei and metaphase chromosomes at nucleosomal resolution. The combined data suggest a novel hierarchical looping model for chromatin higher-order folding, similar to rope flaking used in mountain climbing and rappelling. Not only does such packing help to avoid tangling and self-crossing, it also facilitates rope unraveling. Hierarchical looping is characterized by an increased frequency of higher-order internucleosome contacts for metaphase chromosomes compared with chromatin fibers in vitro and interphase chromatin, with preservation of a dominant two-start zigzag organization associated with the 30-nm fiber. Moreover, the strong dependence of looping on linker histone concentration suggests a hierarchical self-association mechanism of relaxed nucleosome zigzag chains rather than longitudinal compaction as seen in 30-nm fibers. Specifically, concentrations lower than one linker histone per nucleosome promote self-associations and formation of these looped networks of zigzag fibers. The combined experimental and modeling evidence for condensed metaphase chromatin as hierarchical loops and bundles of relaxed zigzag nucleosomal chains rather than randomly coiled threads or straight and stiff helical fibers reconciles aspects of other models for higher-order chromatin structure; it constitutes not only an efficient storage form for the genomic material, consistent with other genome-wide chromosome conformation studies that emphasize looping, but also a convenient organization for local DNA unraveling and genome access. PMID:26787893

  16. Hierarchical looping of zigzag nucleosome chains in metaphase chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Grigoryev, Sergei A; Bascom, Gavin; Buckwalter, Jenna M; Schubert, Michael B; Woodcock, Christopher L; Schlick, Tamar

    2016-02-01

    The architecture of higher-order chromatin in eukaryotic cell nuclei is largely unknown. Here, we use electron microscopy-assisted nucleosome interaction capture (EMANIC) cross-linking experiments in combination with mesoscale chromatin modeling of 96-nucleosome arrays to investigate the internal organization of condensed chromatin in interphase cell nuclei and metaphase chromosomes at nucleosomal resolution. The combined data suggest a novel hierarchical looping model for chromatin higher-order folding, similar to rope flaking used in mountain climbing and rappelling. Not only does such packing help to avoid tangling and self-crossing, it also facilitates rope unraveling. Hierarchical looping is characterized by an increased frequency of higher-order internucleosome contacts for metaphase chromosomes compared with chromatin fibers in vitro and interphase chromatin, with preservation of a dominant two-start zigzag organization associated with the 30-nm fiber. Moreover, the strong dependence of looping on linker histone concentration suggests a hierarchical self-association mechanism of relaxed nucleosome zigzag chains rather than longitudinal compaction as seen in 30-nm fibers. Specifically, concentrations lower than one linker histone per nucleosome promote self-associations and formation of these looped networks of zigzag fibers. The combined experimental and modeling evidence for condensed metaphase chromatin as hierarchical loops and bundles of relaxed zigzag nucleosomal chains rather than randomly coiled threads or straight and stiff helical fibers reconciles aspects of other models for higher-order chromatin structure; it constitutes not only an efficient storage form for the genomic material, consistent with other genome-wide chromosome conformation studies that emphasize looping, but also a convenient organization for local DNA unraveling and genome access. PMID:26787893

  17. Coupling between Histone Conformations and DNA Geometry in Nucleosomes on a Microsecond Timescale: Atomistic Insights into Nucleosome Functions.

    PubMed

    Shaytan, Alexey K; Armeev, Grigoriy A; Goncearenco, Alexander; Zhurkin, Victor B; Landsman, David; Panchenko, Anna R

    2016-01-16

    An octamer of histone proteins wraps about 200bp of DNA into two superhelical turns to form nucleosomes found in chromatin. Although the static structure of the nucleosomal core particle has been solved, details of the dynamic interactions between histones and DNA remain elusive. We performed extensively long unconstrained, all-atom microsecond molecular dynamics simulations of nucleosomes including linker DNA segments and full-length histones in explicit solvent. For the first time, we were able to identify and characterize the rearrangements in nucleosomes on a microsecond timescale including the coupling between the conformation of the histone tails and the DNA geometry. We found that certain histone tail conformations promoted DNA bulging near its entry/exit sites, resulting in the formation of twist defects within the DNA. This led to a reorganization of histone-DNA interactions, suggestive of the formation of initial nucleosome sliding intermediates. We characterized the dynamics of the histone tails upon their condensation on the core and linker DNA and showed that tails may adopt conformationally constrained positions due to the insertion of "anchoring" lysines and arginines into the DNA minor grooves. Potentially, these phenomena affect the accessibility of post-translationally modified histone residues that serve as important sites for epigenetic marks (e.g., at H3K9, H3K27, H4K16), suggesting that interactions of the histone tails with the core and linker DNA modulate the processes of histone tail modifications and binding of the effector proteins. We discuss the implications of the observed results on the nucleosome function and compare our results to different experimental studies. PMID:26699921

  18. Nucleosome Presence at AML-1 Binding Sites Inversely Correlates with Ly49 Expression: Revelations from an Informatics Analysis of Nucleosomes and Immune Cell Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Ioshikhes, Ilya; Makrigiannis, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Beyond its role in genomic organization and compaction, the nucleosome is believed to participate in the regulation of gene transcription. Here, we report a computational method to evaluate the nucleosome sensitivity for a transcription factor over a given stretch of the genome. Sensitive factors are predicted to be those with binding sites preferentially contained within nucleosome boundaries and lacking 10 bp periodicity. Based on these criteria, the Acute Myeloid Leukemia-1a (AML-1a) transcription factor, a regulator of immune gene expression, was identified as potentially sensitive to nucleosomal regulation within the mouse Ly49 gene family. This result was confirmed in RMA, a cell line with natural expression of Ly49, using MNase-Seq to generate a nucleosome map of chromosome 6, where the Ly49 gene family is located. Analysis of this map revealed a specific depletion of nucleosomes at AML-1a binding sites in the expressed Ly49A when compared to the other, silent Ly49 genes. Our data suggest that nucleosome-based regulation contributes to the expression of Ly49 genes, and we propose that this method of predicting nucleosome sensitivity could aid in dissecting the regulatory role of nucleosomes in general. PMID:27124577

  19. Comparative analysis of methods for genome-wide nucleosome cartography.

    PubMed

    Quintales, Luis; Vázquez, Enrique; Antequera, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    Nucleosomes contribute to compacting the genome into the nucleus and regulate the physical access of regulatory proteins to DNA either directly or through the epigenetic modifications of the histone tails. Precise mapping of nucleosome positioning across the genome is, therefore, essential to understanding the genome regulation. In recent years, several experimental protocols have been developed for this purpose that include the enzymatic digestion, chemical cleavage or immunoprecipitation of chromatin followed by next-generation sequencing of the resulting DNA fragments. Here, we compare the performance and resolution of these methods from the initial biochemical steps through the alignment of the millions of short-sequence reads to a reference genome to the final computational analysis to generate genome-wide maps of nucleosome occupancy. Because of the lack of a unified protocol to process data sets obtained through the different approaches, we have developed a new computational tool (NUCwave), which facilitates their analysis, comparison and assessment and will enable researchers to choose the most suitable method for any particular purpose. NUCwave is freely available at http://nucleosome.usal.es/nucwave along with a step-by-step protocol for its use. PMID:25296770

  20. Routes to DNA Accessibility: Alternative Pathways for Nucleosome Unwinding

    PubMed Central

    Schlingman, Daniel J.; Mack, Andrew H.; Kamenetska, Masha; Mochrie, Simon G.J.; Regan, Lynne

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic packaging of DNA into chromatin is a key determinant of eukaryotic gene regulation and epigenetic inheritance. Nucleosomes are the basic unit of chromatin, and therefore the accessible states of the nucleosome must be the starting point for mechanistic models regarding these essential processes. Although the existence of different unwound nucleosome states has been hypothesized, there have been few studies of these states. The consequences of multiple states are far reaching. These states will behave differently in all aspects, including their interactions with chromatin remodelers, histone variant exchange, and kinetic properties. Here, we demonstrate the existence of two distinct states of the unwound nucleosome, which are accessible at physiological forces and ionic strengths. Using optical tweezers, we measure the rates of unwinding and rewinding for these two states and show that the rewinding rates from each state are different. In addition, we show that the probability of unwinding into each state is dependent on the applied force and ionic strength. Our results demonstrate not only that multiple unwound states exist but that their accessibility can be differentially perturbed, suggesting possible roles for these states in gene regulation. For example, different histone variants or modifications may facilitate or suppress access to DNA by promoting unwinding into one state or the other. We anticipate that the two unwound states reported here will be the basis for future models of eukaryotic transcriptional control. PMID:25028880

  1. Promoter nucleosome dynamics regulated by signalling through the CTD code.

    PubMed

    Materne, Philippe; Anandhakumar, Jayamani; Migeot, Valerie; Soriano, Ignacio; Yague-Sanz, Carlo; Hidalgo, Elena; Mignion, Carole; Quintales, Luis; Antequera, Francisco; Hermand, Damien

    2015-01-01

    The phosphorylation of the RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain (CTD) plays a key role in delineating transcribed regions within chromatin by recruiting histone methylases and deacetylases. Using genome-wide nucleosome mapping, we show that CTD S2 phosphorylation controls nucleosome dynamics in the promoter of a subset of 324 genes, including the regulators of cell differentiation ste11 and metabolic adaptation inv1. Mechanistic studies on these genes indicate that during gene activation a local increase of phospho-S2 CTD nearby the promoter impairs the phospho-S5 CTD-dependent recruitment of Set1 and the subsequent recruitment of specific HDACs, which leads to nucleosome depletion and efficient transcription. The early increase of phospho-S2 results from the phosphorylation of the CTD S2 kinase Lsk1 by MAP kinase in response to cellular signalling. The artificial tethering of the Lsk1 kinase at the ste11 promoter is sufficient to activate transcription. Therefore, signalling through the CTD code regulates promoter nucleosomes dynamics. PMID:26098123

  2. Promoter nucleosome dynamics regulated by signalling through the CTD code

    PubMed Central

    Materne, Philippe; Anandhakumar, Jayamani; Migeot, Valerie; Soriano, Ignacio; Yague-Sanz, Carlo; Hidalgo, Elena; Mignion, Carole; Quintales, Luis; Antequera, Francisco; Hermand, Damien

    2015-01-01

    The phosphorylation of the RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain (CTD) plays a key role in delineating transcribed regions within chromatin by recruiting histone methylases and deacetylases. Using genome-wide nucleosome mapping, we show that CTD S2 phosphorylation controls nucleosome dynamics in the promoter of a subset of 324 genes, including the regulators of cell differentiation ste11 and metabolic adaptation inv1. Mechanistic studies on these genes indicate that during gene activation a local increase of phospho-S2 CTD nearby the promoter impairs the phospho-S5 CTD-dependent recruitment of Set1 and the subsequent recruitment of specific HDACs, which leads to nucleosome depletion and efficient transcription. The early increase of phospho-S2 results from the phosphorylation of the CTD S2 kinase Lsk1 by MAP kinase in response to cellular signalling. The artificial tethering of the Lsk1 kinase at the ste11 promoter is sufficient to activate transcription. Therefore, signalling through the CTD code regulates promoter nucleosomes dynamics. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09008.001 PMID:26098123

  3. Nucleosome eviction in mitosis assists condensin loading and chromosome condensation.

    PubMed

    Toselli-Mollereau, Esther; Robellet, Xavier; Fauque, Lydia; Lemaire, Sébastien; Schiklenk, Christoph; Klein, Carlo; Hocquet, Clémence; Legros, Pénélope; N'Guyen, Lia; Mouillard, Léo; Chautard, Emilie; Auboeuf, Didier; Haering, Christian H; Bernard, Pascal

    2016-07-15

    Condensins associate with DNA and shape mitotic chromosomes. Condensins are enriched nearby highly expressed genes during mitosis, but how this binding is achieved and what features associated with transcription attract condensins remain unclear. Here, we report that condensin accumulates at or in the immediate vicinity of nucleosome-depleted regions during fission yeast mitosis. Two transcriptional coactivators, the Gcn5 histone acetyltransferase and the RSC chromatin-remodelling complex, bind to promoters adjoining condensin-binding sites and locally evict nucleosomes to facilitate condensin binding and allow efficient mitotic chromosome condensation. The function of Gcn5 is closely linked to condensin positioning, since neither the localization of topoisomerase II nor that of the cohesin loader Mis4 is altered in gcn5 mutant cells. We propose that nucleosomes act as a barrier for the initial binding of condensin and that nucleosome-depleted regions formed at highly expressed genes by transcriptional coactivators constitute access points into chromosomes where condensin binds free genomic DNA. PMID:27266525

  4. Nucleosome interactions in chromatin: fiber stiffening and hairpin formation.

    PubMed

    Mergell, Boris; Everaers, Ralf; Schiessel, Helmut

    2004-07-01

    We use Monte Carlo simulations to study attractive and excluded volume interactions between nucleosome core particles in 30-nm chromatin fibers. The nucleosomes are treated as disklike objects having an excluded volume and short-range attraction modeled by a variant of the Gay-Berne potential. The nucleosomes are connected via bendable and twistable linker DNA in the crossed linker fashion. We investigate the influence of the nucleosomal excluded volume on the stiffness of the fiber. For parameter values that correspond to chicken erythrocyte chromatin, we find that the persistence length is governed to a large extent by that excluded volume whereas the soft linker backbone elasticity plays only a minor role. We further find that internucleosomal attraction can induce the formation of hairpin configurations. Tension-induced opening of such configurations into straight fibers manifests itself in a quasiplateau in the force-extension curve that resembles results from recent micromanipulation experiments. Such hairpins may play a role in the formation of higher-order structures in chromosomes like chromonema fibers. PMID:15324096

  5. More help than hindrance: nucleosomes aid transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Ballaré, Cecilia; Zaurin, Roser; Vicent, Guillermo P; Beato, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge of modern human biology is to understand how a differentiated somatic cell integrates the response to external signals in the complex context of basic metabolic and tissue-specific gene expression programs. This requires exploring two interconnected basic processes: the signaling network and the global function of the key transcription factors on which signaling acts to modulate gene expression. An apparently simple model to study these questions has been steroid hormones action, since their intracellular receptors both initiate signaling and are the key transcription factors orchestrating the cellular response. We have used progesterone action in breast cancer cells to elucidate the intricacies of progesterone receptor (PR) signaling crosstalk with protein kinases, histone modifying enzymes and ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes. ( 1) Recently we have described the cistrome of PR in these cells at different times after addition of hormone and its relationship to chromatin structure. ( 2) The role of chromatin in transcription factor binding to the genome is still debated, but the dominant view is that factors bind preferentially to nucleosome-depleted regions, usually identified as DNaseI-hypersensitive sites (DHS). In contrast with this vision, we have shown that PR requires nucleosomes for optimal binding and function. In breast cancer cells treated with progestins we identified 25,000 PR binding sites (PRbs), the majority encompassing several copies of the hexanucleotide TGTYCY, highly abundant in the genome. We found that strong functional PRbs accumulate around progesterone-induced genes mainly in enhancers, are enriched in DHS but exhibit high nucleosome occupancy. Progestin stimulation results in remodeling of these nucleosomes with displacement of histones H1 and H2A/H2B dimers. Our results strongly suggest that nucleosomes play crucial role in PR binding and hormonal gene regulation. PMID:23756349

  6. Structural mechanics of DNA wrapping in the nucleosome.

    PubMed

    Battistini, Federica; Hunter, Christopher A; Gardiner, Eleanor J; Packer, Martin J

    2010-02-19

    Experimental X-ray crystal structures and a database of calculated structural parameters of DNA octamers were used in combination to analyse the mechanics of DNA bending in the nucleosome core complex. The 1kx5 X-ray crystal structure of the nucleosome core complex was used to determine the relationship between local structure at the base-step level and the global superhelical conformation observed for nucleosome-bound DNA. The superhelix is characterised by a large curvature (597 degrees) in one plane and very little curvature (10 degrees) in the orthogonal plane. Analysis of the curvature at the level of 10-step segments shows that there is a uniform curvature of 30 degrees per helical turn throughout most of the structure but that there are two sharper kinks of 50 degrees at +/-2 helical turns from the central dyad base pair. The curvature is due almost entirely to the base-step parameter roll. There are large periodic variations in roll, which are in phase with the helical twist and account for 500 degrees of the total curvature. Although variations in the other base-step parameters perturb the local path of the DNA, they make minimal contributions to the total curvature. This implies that DNA bending in the nucleosome is achieved using the roll-slide-twist degree of freedom previously identified as the major degree of freedom in naked DNA oligomers. The energetics of bending into a nucleosome-bound conformation were therefore analysed using a database of structural parameters that we have previously developed for naked DNA oligomers. The minimum energy roll, the roll flexibility force constant and the maximum and minimum accessible roll values were obtained for each base step in the relevant octanucleotide context to account for the effects of conformational coupling that vary with sequence context. The distribution of base-step roll values and corresponding strain energy required to bend DNA into the nucleosome-bound conformation defined by the 1kx5 structure

  7. High mobility group protein 1: A collaborator in nucleosome dynamics and estrogen-responsive gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Scovell, William M

    2016-01-01

    High mobility group protein 1 (HMGB1) is a multifunctional protein that interacts with DNA and chromatin to influence the regulation of transcription, DNA replication and repair and recombination. We show that HMGB1 alters the structure and stability of the canonical nucleosome (N) in a nonenzymatic, adenosine triphosphate-independent manner. As a result, the canonical nucleosome is converted to two stable, physically distinct nucleosome conformers. Although estrogen receptor (ER) does not bind to its consensus estrogen response element within a nucleosome, HMGB1 restructures the nucleosome to facilitate strong ER binding. The isolated HMGB1-restructured nucleosomes (N’ and N’’) remain stable and exhibit a number of characteristics that are distinctly different from the canonical nucleosome. These findings complement previous studies that showed (1) HMGB1 stimulates in vivo transcriptional activation at estrogen response elements and (2) knock down of HMGB1 expression by siRNA precipitously reduced transcriptional activation. The findings indicate that a major facet of the mechanism of HMGB1 action involves a restructuring of aspects of the nucleosome that appear to relax structural constraints within the nucleosome. The findings are extended to reveal the differences between ER and the other steroid hormone receptors. A working proposal outlines mechanisms that highlight the multiple facets that HMGB1 may utilize in restructuring the nucleosome. PMID:27247709

  8. Structured nucleosome fingerprints enable high-resolution mapping of chromatin architecture within regulatory regions.

    PubMed

    Schep, Alicia N; Buenrostro, Jason D; Denny, Sarah K; Schwartz, Katja; Sherlock, Gavin; Greenleaf, William J

    2015-11-01

    Transcription factors canonically bind nucleosome-free DNA, making the positioning of nucleosomes within regulatory regions crucial to the regulation of gene expression. Using the assay of transposase accessible chromatin (ATAC-seq), we observe a highly structured pattern of DNA fragment lengths and positions around nucleosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and use this distinctive two-dimensional nucleosomal "fingerprint" as the basis for a new nucleosome-positioning algorithm called NucleoATAC. We show that NucleoATAC can identify the rotational and translational positions of nucleosomes with up to base-pair resolution and provide quantitative measures of nucleosome occupancy in S. cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and human cells. We demonstrate the application of NucleoATAC to a number of outstanding problems in chromatin biology, including analysis of sequence features underlying nucleosome positioning, promoter chromatin architecture across species, identification of transient changes in nucleosome occupancy and positioning during a dynamic cellular response, and integrated analysis of nucleosome occupancy and transcription factor binding. PMID:26314830

  9. High mobility group protein 1: A collaborator in nucleosome dynamics and estrogen-responsive gene expression.

    PubMed

    Scovell, William M

    2016-05-26

    High mobility group protein 1 (HMGB1) is a multifunctional protein that interacts with DNA and chromatin to influence the regulation of transcription, DNA replication and repair and recombination. We show that HMGB1 alters the structure and stability of the canonical nucleosome (N) in a nonenzymatic, adenosine triphosphate-independent manner. As a result, the canonical nucleosome is converted to two stable, physically distinct nucleosome conformers. Although estrogen receptor (ER) does not bind to its consensus estrogen response element within a nucleosome, HMGB1 restructures the nucleosome to facilitate strong ER binding. The isolated HMGB1-restructured nucleosomes (N' and N'') remain stable and exhibit a number of characteristics that are distinctly different from the canonical nucleosome. These findings complement previous studies that showed (1) HMGB1 stimulates in vivo transcriptional activation at estrogen response elements and (2) knock down of HMGB1 expression by siRNA precipitously reduced transcriptional activation. The findings indicate that a major facet of the mechanism of HMGB1 action involves a restructuring of aspects of the nucleosome that appear to relax structural constraints within the nucleosome. The findings are extended to reveal the differences between ER and the other steroid hormone receptors. A working proposal outlines mechanisms that highlight the multiple facets that HMGB1 may utilize in restructuring the nucleosome. PMID:27247709

  10. Structured nucleosome fingerprints enable high-resolution mapping of chromatin architecture within regulatory regions

    PubMed Central

    Schep, Alicia N.; Buenrostro, Jason D.; Denny, Sarah K.; Schwartz, Katja; Sherlock, Gavin; Greenleaf, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors canonically bind nucleosome-free DNA, making the positioning of nucleosomes within regulatory regions crucial to the regulation of gene expression. Using the assay of transposase accessible chromatin (ATAC-seq), we observe a highly structured pattern of DNA fragment lengths and positions around nucleosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and use this distinctive two-dimensional nucleosomal “fingerprint” as the basis for a new nucleosome-positioning algorithm called NucleoATAC. We show that NucleoATAC can identify the rotational and translational positions of nucleosomes with up to base-pair resolution and provide quantitative measures of nucleosome occupancy in S. cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and human cells. We demonstrate the application of NucleoATAC to a number of outstanding problems in chromatin biology, including analysis of sequence features underlying nucleosome positioning, promoter chromatin architecture across species, identification of transient changes in nucleosome occupancy and positioning during a dynamic cellular response, and integrated analysis of nucleosome occupancy and transcription factor binding. PMID:26314830

  11. Using DNA mechanics to predict intrinsic and extrinsic nucleosome positioning signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, Alexandre

    2008-03-01

    In eukaryotic genomes, nucleosomes function to compact DNA and to regulate access to it both by simple physical occlusion and by providing the substrate for numerous covalent epigenetic tags. While nucleosome positions in vitro are determined by sequence alone, in vivo competition with other DNA-binding factors and action of chromatin remodeling enzymes play a role that needs to be quantified. We developed a biophysical, DNA mechanics-based model for the sequence dependence of DNA bending energies, and validated it against a collection of in vitro free energies of nucleosome formation and a nucleosome crystal structure; we also successfully designed both strong and poor histone binding sequences ab initio. For in vivo data from S.cerevisiae, the strongest positioning signal came from the competition with other factors rather than intrinsic nucleosome sequence preferences. Based on sequence alone, our model predicts that functional transcription factor binding sites tend to be covered by nucleosomes, yet are uncovered in vivo because functional sites cluster within a single nucleosome footprint and thus make transcription factors bind cooperatively. Similarly a weak enhancement of nucleosome binding in the TATA region becomes a strong depletion when the TATA-binding protein is included, in quantitative agreement with experiment. Our model distinguishes multiple ways in which genomic sequence influences nucleosome positions, and thus provides alternative explanations for several genome-wide experimental findings. In the future our approach will be used to rationally alter gene expression levels in model systems through redesign of nucleosome occupancy profiles.

  12. Assembly of spaced chromatin involvement of ATP and DNA topoisomerase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Almouzni, G; Méchali, M

    1988-01-01

    Undiluted extracts from eggs or oocytes of Xenopus laevis support the assembly of chromatin with physiologically spaced nucleosomes. Micrococcal nuclease and DNase I digestion experiments show that nucleosome formation as well as supercoiling of circular DNA concomitant to assembly do not require ATP or Mg2+. However these factors are essential for the stability and the physiological spacing of the assembled chromatin. gamma-S-ATP can substitute for ATP in this process. With topoisomers of defined linking number topological interconversions proceed by steps of unity, both in vitro as well as in vivo, indicating that topoisomerase I is dominantly acting in this process. Novobiocin sensitivity occurred only with diluted extracts and was unrelated to an inhibition of topoisomerase II. Finally, nucleosome assembly occurs efficiently on linear DNA although the assembled DNA is less stable than with circular DNA. From these results we propose that mature chromatin is formed in a two-step reaction. In the first step, nucleosome deposition occurs independently of ATP and Mg2+. Thus, nucleosome formation can be uncoupled from their spacing. In this step, topoisomerase activity is involved in the relaxation of the topological constraints generated by chromatin assembly rather than in the process of assembly itself. The second step, requiring ATP and Mg2+, generates properly spaced chromatin. Images PMID:2854062

  13. Linker histone subtypes differ in their effect on nucleosomal spacing in vivo.

    PubMed

    Öberg, Christine; Izzo, Annalisa; Schneider, Robert; Wrange, Örjan; Belikov, Sergey

    2012-06-01

    Linker histone H1 is located on the surface of the nucleosome where it interacts with the linker DNA region and stabilizes the 30-nm chromatin fiber. Vertebrates have several different, relatively conserved subtypes of H1; however, the functional reason for this is unclear. We have previously shown that H1 can be reconstituted in Xenopus oocytes, cells that lack somatic H1, by cytosolic mRNA injection and incorporated into in vivo assembled chromatin. Using this assay, we have expressed individual H1 subtypes in the oocytes to study their effect on chromatin structure using nucleosomal repeat length (NRL) as readout. We have compared chicken differentiation-specific histone H5, Xenopus differentiation-specific xH1(0) and the somatic variant xH1A as well as the ubiquitously expressed human somatic subtypes hH1.2, hH1.3, hH1.4 and hH1.5. This shows that all subtypes, except for human H1.5, result in a saturable increase in NRL. hH1.4 results in an increase of approximately 13-20 bp as does xH1(0) and xH1A. chH5 gives rise to the same or slightly longer increase compared to hH1.4. Interestingly, both hH1.2 and hH1.3 show a less extensive increase of only 4.5-7 bp in the NRL, thus yielding the shortest increase of the studied subtypes. We show for the first time in an in vivo system lacking H1 background that ubiquitously expressed and redundant H1 subtypes that coexist in most types of cells of higher eukaryotes differ in their effects on the nucleosomal spacing in vivo. This suggests that H1 subtypes have different roles in the organization and functioning of the chromatin fiber. PMID:22446683

  14. Statistical mechanics of nucleosome ordering by chromatin-structure-induced two-body interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chereji, Răzvan V.; Tolkunov, Denis; Locke, George; Morozov, Alexandre V.

    2011-05-01

    One-dimensional arrays of nucleosomes (DNA-bound histone octamers separated by stretches of linker DNA) fold into higher-order chromatin structures which ultimately make up eukaryotic chromosomes. Chromatin structure formation leads to 10-11 base pair (bp) discretization of linker lengths caused by the smaller free energy cost of packaging nucleosomes into regular chromatin fibers if their rotational setting (defined by the DNA helical twist) is conserved. We describe nucleosome positions along the fiber using a thermodynamic model of finite-size particles with both intrinsic histone-DNA interactions and an effective two-body potential. We infer one- and two-body energies directly from high-throughput maps of nucleosome positions. We show that higher-order chromatin structure helps explains in vitro and in vivo nucleosome ordering in transcribed regions, and plays a leading role in establishing well-known 10-11 bp genome-wide periodicity of nucleosome positions.

  15. Structure of RCC1 chromatin factor bound to the nucleosome core particle

    SciTech Connect

    Makde, Ravindra D.; England, Joseph R.; Yennawar, Hemant P.; Tan, Song

    2010-11-11

    The small GTPase Ran enzyme regulates critical eukaryotic cellular functions including nuclear transport and mitosis through the creation of a RanGTP gradient around the chromosomes. This concentration gradient is created by the chromatin-bound RCC1 (regulator of chromosome condensation) protein, which recruits Ran to nucleosomes and activates Ran's nucleotide exchange activity. Although RCC1 has been shown to bind directly with the nucleosome, the molecular details of this interaction were not known. Here we determine the crystal structure of a complex of Drosophila RCC1 and the nucleosome core particle at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution, providing an atomic view of how a chromatin protein interacts with the histone and DNA components of the nucleosome. Our structure also suggests that the Widom 601 DNA positioning sequence present in the nucleosomes forms a 145-base-pair nucleosome core particle, not the expected canonical 147-base-pair particle.

  16. The nature of the interaction of nucleosomes with a eukaryotic RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Lilley, D M; Jacobs, M F; Houghton, M

    1979-01-01

    The integrity and stability of nucleosomes under transcription assay conditions has been found to depend on concentration and ionic environment. Rifamycin AF/013, a commonly used inhibitor of initiation, is particularly effective in destabilisation of nucleosomes. Intact nucleosomes are refractory to transcription by wheat RNA polymerase II, the histone core preventing initiation. Template titration suggests that the polymerase can, however, bind to nucleosomes, and a 15--16S complex has been observed on sucrose gradients. DNase I digestion of polymerase-nucleosome incubations indicates that whilst histone is still present in the complex, the nucleosome conformation is altered resulting in enhanced nucleolysis at sites near the DNA centre but reduced overall kinetics of digestion. Images PMID:493150

  17. The structure of nucleosomal core particles within transcribed and repressed gene regions.

    PubMed Central

    Studitsky, V M; Belyavsky, A V; Melnikova, A F; Mirzabekov, A D

    1988-01-01

    The arrangement of histones along DNA in nucleosomal core particles within transcribed heat shock gene (hsp 70) region and repressed insertion within ribosomal genes of Drosophila was analysed by using protein-DNA crosslinking methods combined with hybridization tests. In addition, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was employed to compare the overall nucleosomal shape and the nucleosomal DNA size. The arrangement of histones along DNA and general compactness of nucleosomes were shown to be rather similar in transcriptionally active and inactive genomic regions. On the other hand, nucleosomes within transcriptionally active chromatin are characterized by a larger size of nucleosomal DNA produced by micrococcal nuclease digestion and some peculiarity in electrophoretic mobility. Images PMID:3144704

  18. An advanced coarse-grained nucleosome core particle model for computer simulations of nucleosome-nucleosome interactions under varying ionic conditions.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yanping; Korolev, Nikolay; Lyubartsev, Alexander P; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2013-01-01

    In the eukaryotic cell nucleus, DNA exists as chromatin, a compact but dynamic complex with histone proteins. The first level of DNA organization is the linear array of nucleosome core particles (NCPs). The NCP is a well-defined complex of 147 bp DNA with an octamer of histones. Interactions between NCPs are of paramount importance for higher levels of chromatin compaction. The polyelectrolyte nature of the NCP implies that nucleosome-nucleosome interactions must exhibit a great influence from both the ionic environment as well as the positively charged and highly flexible N-terminal histone tails, protruding out from the NCP. The large size of the system precludes a modelling analysis of chromatin at an all-atom level and calls for coarse-grained approximations. Here, a model of the NCP that include the globular histone core and the flexible histone tails described by one particle per each amino acid and taking into account their net charge is proposed. DNA wrapped around the histone core was approximated at the level of two base pairs represented by one bead (bases and sugar) plus four beads of charged phosphate groups. Computer simulations, using a Langevin thermostat, in a dielectric continuum with explicit monovalent (K(+)), divalent (Mg(2+)) or trivalent (Co(NH(3))(6) (3+)) cations were performed for systems with one or ten NCPs. Increase of the counterion charge results in a switch from repulsive NCP-NCP interaction in the presence of K(+), to partial aggregation with Mg(2+) and to strong mutual attraction of all 10 NCPs in the presence of CoHex(3+). The new model reproduced experimental results and the structure of the NCP-NCP contacts is in agreement with available data. Cation screening, ion-ion correlations and tail bridging contribute to the NCP-NCP attraction and the new NCP model accounts for these interactions. PMID:23418426

  19. Genomic approaches for determining nucleosome occupancy in yeast.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Kyle; Durbic, Tanja; Gebbia, Marinella; Nislow, Corey

    2012-01-01

    The basic unit of chromatin is double-stranded DNA wrapped around nucleosome core particles, the -classic "beads-on-a-string" described by Kornberg and colleagues. The history of chromatin studies has experienced many peaks, from the earliest studies by Miescher to the biochemical studies of the 1960s and 1970s, the appreciation for the influence of histone modifications in controlling gene expression in the 1990s to the genome-wide studies that began in 2006 and show no signs of abating with the introduction of next generation sequencing technologies. Genome-wide studies not only have provided a base line to understand relationships between chromatin structure and gene function but also have begun to provide new insights into chromatin remodelling. Here, we describe the use of genome-wide approaches to determining nucleosome occupancy in yeast. PMID:22183606

  20. Super-coil me: Sizing up centromeric nucleosomes

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    Every chromosome needs a centromere for proper segregation during cell division. Centromeric chromatin wraps around histones, providing an anchor for kinetochore proteins and spindle attachment. It is clear why cells need centromeres, but how they form and what they look like is less so. Recent reports extend our understanding of chaperones involved in centromere formation. And other accounts of half-sized, right-handed nucleosomes have created an unexpected twist. PMID:19704018

  1. Toward a unified physical model of nucleosome patterns flanking transcription start sites

    PubMed Central

    Möbius, Wolfram; Osberg, Brendan; Tsankov, Alexander M.; Rando, Oliver J.; Gerland, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Recent genome-wide maps of nucleosome positions in different eukaryotes revealed patterns around transcription start sites featuring a nucleosome-free region flanked by a periodic modulation of the nucleosome density. For Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the average in vivo pattern was previously shown to be quantitatively described by a “nucleosome gas” model based on the statistical positioning mechanism. However, this simple physical description is challenged by the fact that the pattern differs quantitatively between species and by recent experiments that appear incompatible with statistical positioning, indicating important roles for chromatin remodelers. We undertake a data-driven search for a unified physical model to describe the nucleosome patterns of 12 yeast species and also consider an extension of the model to capture remodeling effects. We are led to a nucleosome gas that takes into account nucleosome breathing, i.e., transient unwrapping of nucleosomal DNA segments. This known biophysical property of nucleosomes rationalizes a “pressure”-induced dependence of the effective nucleosome size that is suggested by the data. By fitting this model to the data, we find an average energy cost for DNA unwrapping consistent with previous biophysical experiments. Although the available data are not sufficient to reconstruct chromatin remodeling mechanisms, a minimal model extension by one mechanism yields an “active nucleosome gas” that can rationalize the behavior of systems with reduced histone–DNA ratio and remodeler knockouts. We therefore establish a basis for a physical description of nucleosome patterns that can serve as a null model for sequence-specific effects at individual genes and in models of transcription regulation. PMID:23509245

  2. Maintenance of Nucleosomal Balance in cis by Conserved AAA-ATPase Yta7

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Laura M.; Davis, Matthew D.; Rine, Jasper

    2015-01-01

    The extent of chromatin compaction is a fundamental driver of nuclear metabolism . Yta7 is a chromatin-associated AAA-ATPase, the human ortholog of which, ANCCA/ATAD2 transcriptionally activates pathways of malignancy in a broad range of cancers. Yta7 directly binds histone H3, and bulk chromatin exhibits increased nucleosomal density in yta7Δ mutants. The suppression of yta7Δ mutant growth and transcriptional phenotypes in budding yeast by decreased dosage of histones H3 and H4 indicates the acute sensitivity of cells to deviations in nucleosome spacing. This study investigated the global changes in chromatin structure upon Yta7 loss or overexpression and determined which of these effects reflected direct Yta7 activity. Metagene analysis of Yta7’s genome-wide localization indicated peak binding of Yta7 just downstream of the transcription start site. Cells lacking Yta7 exhibited increased nucleosome density within genes downstream of the +1 nucleosome, as defined by decreased internucleosomal distance, resulting in progressively 5′-shifted nucleosomes within the gene. In contrast, cells overexpressing Yta7 displayed profound 3′-shifts in nucleosome position and reduced nucleosome density within genes. Importantly, Yta7-bound regions were enriched for nucleosomal shifts, indicating that Yta7 acted locally to modulate nucleosome spacing. The phenotype of cells lacking both Yta7 and Rtt106, the histone H3/H4 chaperone, indicated that Yta7 functions in both Rtt106-dependent and Rtt106-independent ways to modulate nucleosome spacing within genes. This study suggested that Yta7 affected nucleosome density throughout the gene by both blocking Rtt106 from entering the gene, as shown previously at HTA1, and facilitating the loss of nucleosomes from the 5′-end. PMID:25406467

  3. Histone H3 phosphorylation near the nucleosome dyad alters chromatin structure

    PubMed Central

    North, Justin A.; Šimon, Marek; Ferdinand, Michelle B.; Shoffner, Matthew A.; Picking, Jonathan W.; Howard, Cecil J.; Mooney, Alex M.; van Noort, John; Poirier, Michael G.; Ottesen, Jennifer J.

    2014-01-01

    Nucleosomes contain ∼146 bp of DNA wrapped around a histone protein octamer that controls DNA accessibility to transcription and repair complexes. Posttranslational modification (PTM) of histone proteins regulates nucleosome function. To date, only modest changes in nucleosome structure have been directly attributed to histone PTMs. Histone residue H3(T118) is located near the nucleosome dyad and can be phosphorylated. This PTM destabilizes nucleosomes and is implicated in the regulation of transcription and repair. Here, we report gel electrophoretic mobility, sucrose gradient sedimentation, thermal disassembly, micrococcal nuclease digestion and atomic force microscopy measurements of two DNA–histone complexes that are structurally distinct from nucleosomes. We find that H3(T118ph) facilitates the formation of a nucleosome duplex with two DNA molecules wrapped around two histone octamers, and an altosome complex that contains one DNA molecule wrapped around two histone octamers. The nucleosome duplex complex forms within short ∼150 bp DNA molecules, whereas altosomes require at least ∼250 bp of DNA and form repeatedly along 3000 bp DNA molecules. These results are the first report of a histone PTM significantly altering the nucleosome structure. PMID:24561803

  4. Crystal structures of heterotypic nucleosomes containing histones H2A.Z and H2A

    PubMed Central

    Horikoshi, Naoki; Arimura, Yasuhiro; Taguchi, Hiroyuki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    H2A.Z is incorporated into nucleosomes located around transcription start sites and functions as an epigenetic regulator for the transcription of certain genes. During transcriptional regulation, the heterotypic H2A.Z/H2A nucleosome containing one each of H2A.Z and H2A is formed. However, previous homotypic H2A.Z nucleosome structures suggested that the L1 loop region of H2A.Z would sterically clash with the corresponding region of canonical H2A in the heterotypic nucleosome. To resolve this issue, we determined the crystal structures of heterotypic H2A.Z/H2A nucleosomes. In the H2A.Z/H2A nucleosome structure, the H2A.Z L1 loop structure was drastically altered without any structural changes of the canonical H2A L1 loop, thus avoiding the steric clash. Unexpectedly, the heterotypic H2A.Z/H2A nucleosome is more stable than the homotypic H2A.Z nucleosome. These data suggested that the flexible character of the H2A.Z L1 loop plays an essential role in forming the stable heterotypic H2A.Z/H2A nucleosome. PMID:27358293

  5. The Role of Histone H4 Biotinylation in the Structure of Nucleosomes

    PubMed Central

    Filenko, Nina A.; Kolar, Carol; West, John T.; Smith, S. Abbie; Hassan, Yousef I.; Borgstahl, Gloria E. O.; Zempleni, Janos; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Post-translational modifications of histones play important roles in regulating nucleosome structure and gene transcription. It has been shown that biotinylation of histone H4 at lysine-12 in histone H4 (K12Bio-H4) is associated with repression of a number of genes. We hypothesized that biotinylation modifies the physical structure of nucleosomes, and that biotin-induced conformational changes contribute to gene silencing associated with histone biotinylation. Methodology/Principal Findings To test this hypothesis we used atomic force microscopy to directly analyze structures of nucleosomes formed with biotin-modified and non-modified H4. The analysis of the AFM images revealed a 13% increase in the length of DNA wrapped around the histone core in nucleosomes with biotinylated H4. This statistically significant (p<0.001) difference between native and biotinylated nucleosomes corresponds to adding approximately 20 bp to the classical 147 bp length of nucleosomal DNA. Conclusions/Significance The increase in nucleosomal DNA length is predicted to stabilize the association of DNA with histones and therefore to prevent nucleosomes from unwrapping. This provides a mechanistic explanation for the gene silencing associated with K12Bio-H4. The proposed single-molecule AFM approach will be instrumental for studying the effects of various epigenetic modifications of nucleosomes, in addition to biotinylation. PMID:21298003

  6. Transcription-dependent and transcription-independent nucleosome disruption induced by dioxin.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, J E; Whitlock, J P

    1992-01-01

    In mouse hepatoma cells, both the regulatory and the transcribed regions of the cyp1a1 gene assume a nucleosomal configuration when the gene is silent; two nucleosomes occupy specific sites at the transcriptional promoter. Activation of transcription by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin is accompanied by changes in chromatin structure, which depend upon a functional aromatic hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor. In the transcribed region of the gene, nucleosome disruption occurs as a consequence of RNA elongation. In contrast, at the promoter, loss of positioned nucleosome sis independent of transcription and represents an event in the mechanism by which the liganded Ah receptor enhances transcriptional initiation. Images PMID:1454854

  7. Genome-wide mapping of nucleosome positioning and DNA methylation within individual DNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Theresa K.; Liu, Yaping; Lay, Fides D.; Liang, Gangning; Berman, Benjamin P.; Jones, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning work together to generate chromatin structures that regulate gene expression. Nucleosomes are typically mapped using nuclease digestion requiring significant amounts of material and varying enzyme concentrations. We have developed a method (NOMe-seq) that uses a GpC methyltransferase (M.CviPI) and next generation sequencing to generate a high resolution footprint of nucleosome positioning genome-wide using less than 1 million cells while retaining endogenous DNA methylation information from the same DNA strand. Using a novel bioinformatics pipeline, we show a striking anti-correlation between nucleosome occupancy and DNA methylation at CTCF regions that is not present at promoters. We further show that the extent of nucleosome depletion at promoters is directly correlated to expression level and can accommodate multiple nucleosomes and provide genome-wide evidence that expressed non-CpG island promoters are nucleosome-depleted. Importantly, NOMe-seq obtains DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning information from the same DNA molecule, giving the first genome-wide DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning correlation at the single molecule, and thus, single cell level, that can be used to monitor disease progression and response to therapy. PMID:22960375

  8. Structure of human nucleosome containing the testis-specific histone variant TSH2B

    SciTech Connect

    Urahama, Takashi; Horikoshi, Naoki; Osakabe, Akihisa; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2014-03-25

    The crystal structure of human nucleosome containing the testis-specific TSH2B variant has been determined. The TSH2B Ser85 residue does not interact with H4 in the nucleosome, and induces a local structural difference between TSH2B and H2B in nucleosomes. The human histone H2B variant TSH2B is highly expressed in testis and may function in the chromatin transition during spermatogenesis. In the present study, the crystal structure of the human testis-specific nucleosome containing TSH2B was determined at 2.8 Å resolution. A local structural difference between TSH2B and canonical H2B in nucleosomes was detected around the TSH2B-specific amino-acid residue Ser85. The TSH2B Ser85 residue does not interact with H4 in the nucleosome, but in the canonical nucleosome the H2B Asn84 residue (corresponding to the TSH2B Ser85 residue) forms water-mediated hydrogen bonds with the H4 Arg78 residue. In contrast, the other TSH2B-specific amino-acid residues did not induce any significant local structural changes in the TSH2B nucleosome. These findings may provide important information for understanding how testis-specific histone variants form nucleosomes during spermatogenesis.

  9. Dynamics of the Competition Between Nucleosome Unwrapping and DNA Binding Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundschuh, Ralf

    2015-03-01

    In eukaryotic organisms DNA is tightly wrapped into nucleosomes. This bears the question how this DNA can be accessed in order to be copied, transcribed, or repaired. A process that allows access to the DNA is transient unwrapping of the DNA from the histone proteins. We have developed a quantitative model of this unwrapping process which we calibrate by comparison to nucleosome unzipping experiments by the Wang group. We then apply this model to quantitatively explain the dynamics of transcription factor binding within nucleosomal DNA. In this context, it has been well known that nucleosomes reduce the affinity for transcription factors to binding sites covered by the nucleosome. It has been assumed that this is due to a reduction in on-rate since a transcription factor can only bind when a rare thermal fluctuation of the nucleosome makes the DNA accessible. However, recent experimental data surprisingly shows that the off-rate of transcription factors is also strongly affected in the presence of a nucleosome. The application of our nucleosome unwrapping free energy landscape demonstrates that this increase in off-rate by several orders of magnitude is a consequence of a competition between partial binding events of dimeric transcription factors and the nucleosome. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Nos. 1105458 and 1410172.

  10. The nucleosome landscape of Plasmodium falciparum reveals chromatin architecture and dynamics of regulatory sequences

    PubMed Central

    Kensche, Philip Reiner; Hoeijmakers, Wieteke Anna Maria; Toenhake, Christa Geeke; Bras, Maaike; Chappell, Lia; Berriman, Matthew; Bártfai, Richárd

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the chromatin architecture has a pivotal role in regulating all DNA-associated processes and it is central to the control of gene expression. For Plasmodium falciparum, a causative agent of human malaria, the nucleosome positioning profile of regulatory regions deserves particular attention because of their extreme AT-content. With the aid of a highly controlled MNase-seq procedure we reveal how positioning of nucleosomes provides a structural and regulatory framework to the transcriptional unit by demarcating landmark sites (transcription/translation start and end sites). In addition, our analysis provides strong indications for the function of positioned nucleosomes in splice site recognition. Transcription start sites (TSSs) are bordered by a small nucleosome-depleted region, but lack the stereotypic downstream nucleosome arrays, highlighting a key difference in chromatin organization compared to model organisms. Furthermore, we observe transcription-coupled eviction of nucleosomes on strong TSSs during intraerythrocytic development and demonstrate that nucleosome positioning and dynamics can be predictive for the functionality of regulatory DNA elements. Collectively, the strong nucleosome positioning over splice sites and surrounding putative transcription factor binding sites highlights the regulatory capacity of the nucleosome landscape in this deadly human pathogen. PMID:26578577

  11. Chromatin assembly during S phase: contributions from histone deposition, DNA replication and the cell division cycle.

    PubMed

    Krude, T; Keller, C

    2001-05-01

    During S phase of the eukaryotic cell division cycle, newly replicated DNA is rapidly assembled into chromatin. Newly synthesised histones form complexes with chromatin assembly factors, mediating their deposition onto nascent DNA and their assembly into nucleosomes. Chromatin assembly factor 1, CAF-1, is a specialised assembly factor that targets these histones to replicating DNA by association with the replication fork associated protein, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, PCNA. Nucleosomes are further organised into ordered arrays along the DNA by the activity of ATP-dependent chromatin assembly and spacing factors such as ATP-utilising chromatin assembly and remodelling factor ACE An additional level of controlling chromatin assembly pathways has become apparent by the observation of functional requirements for cyclin-dependent protein kinases, casein kinase II and protein phosphatases. In this review, we will discuss replication-associated histone deposition and nucleosome assembly pathways, and we will focus in particular on how nucleosome assembly is linked to DNA replication and how it may be regulated by the cell cycle control machinery. PMID:11437228

  12. Binding of the wheat basic leucine zipper protein EmBP-1 to nucleosomal binding sites is modulated by nucleosome positioning.

    PubMed Central

    Niu, X; Adams, C C; Workman, J L; Guiltinan, M J

    1996-01-01

    To investigate interactions of the basic leucine zipper transcription factor EmBP-1 with its recognition sites in nucleosomal DNA, we reconstituted an abscisic acid response element and a high-affinity binding site for EmBP-1 into human and wheat nucleosome cores in vitro. DNA binding studies demonstrated that nucleosomal elements can be bound by EmBP-1 at reduced affinities relative to naked DNA. EmBP-1 affinity was lowest when the recognition sites were positioned near the center of the nucleosome. Binding was achieved with a truncated DNA binding domain; however, binding of full-length EmBP-1 caused additional strong DNase I hypersensitivity flanking the binding sites. Similar results were observed with nucleosomes reconstituted with either human or wheat histones, demonstrating a conserved mechanism of transcription factor-nucleosome interactions. We conclude that positioning of recognition sequences on a nucleosome may play an important role in regulating interactions of EmBP-1 with its target sites in plant cells. PMID:8837510

  13. The roles of the monomer length and nucleotide context of plant tandem repeats in nucleosome positioning.

    PubMed

    Levitsky, Victor G; Babenko, Vladimir N; Vershinin, Alexander V

    2014-01-01

    Similar to regularly spaced nucleosomes in chromatin, long tandem DNA arrays are composed of regularly alternating monomers that have almost identical primary DNA structures. Such a similarity in the structural organization makes these arrays especially interesting for studying the role of intrinsic DNA preferences in nucleosome positioning. We have studied the nucleosome formation potential of DNA tandem repeat families with different monomer lengths (ML). In total, 165 plant tandem repeat families from the PlantSat database (http://w3lamc.umbr.cas.cz/PlantSat/) were divided into two classes based on the number of nucleosome repeats in one DNA monomer. For predicting nucleosome formation potential, we developed the Phase method, which combines the advantages of multiple bioinformatics models. The Phase method was able to distinguish interfamily differences and intrafamily monomer variation and identify the influence of nucleotide context on nucleosome formation potential. Three main types of nucleosome arrangement in DNA tandem repeat arrays--regular, partially regular (partial), and flexible--were distinguished among a great variety of Phase profiles. The regular type, in which all nucleosomes of the monomer array are positioned in a context-dependent manner, is the most representative type of the class 1 families, with ML equal to or a multiple of the nucleosome repeat length (NRL). In the partially regular type, nucleotide context influences the positioning of only a subset of nucleosomes. The influence of the nucleotide context on nucleosome positioning has the least effect in the flexible type, which contains the greatest number of families (65). The majority of these families belong to class 2 and have nonmultiple ML to NRL ratios. PMID:23384242

  14. Binding of disparate transcriptional activators to nucleosomal DNA is inherently cooperative.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, C C; Workman, J L

    1995-01-01

    To investigate mechanisms by which multiple transcription factors access complex promoters and enhancers within cellular chromatin, we have analyzed the binding of disparate factors to nucleosome cores. We used a purified in vitro system to analyze binding of four activator proteins, two GAL4 derivatives, USF, and NF-kappa B (KBF1), to reconstituted nucleosome cores containing different combinations of binding sites. Here we show that binding of any two or all three of these factors to nucleosomal DNA is inherently cooperative. Thus, the binuclear Zn clusters of GAL4, the helix-loop-helix/basic domains of USF, and the rel domain of NF-kappa B all participated in cooperative nucleosome binding, illustrating that this effect is not restricted to a particular DNA-binding domain. Simultaneous binding by two factors increased the affinity of individual factors for nucleosomal DNA by up to 2 orders of magnitude. Importantly, cooperative binding resulted in efficient nucleosome binding by factors (USF and NF-kappa B) which independently possess little nucleosome-binding ability. The participation of GAL4 derivatives in cooperative nucleosome binding required only DNA-binding and dimerization domains, indicating that disruption of histone-DNA contacts by factor binding was responsible for the increased affinity of additional factors. Cooperative nucleosome binding required sequence-specific binding of all transcription factors, appeared to have spatial constraints, and was independent of the orientation of the binding sites on the nucleosome. These results indicate that cooperative nucleosome binding is a general mechanism that may play a significant role in loading complex enhancer and promoter elements with multiple diverse factors in chromatin and contribute to the generation of threshold responses and transcriptional synergy by multiple activator sites in vivo. PMID:7862134

  15. Reactivity in ELISA with DNA-loaded nucleosomes in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Dieker, Jürgen; Schlumberger, Wolfgang; McHugh, Neil; Hamann, Philip; van der Vlag, Johan; Berden, Jo H

    2015-11-01

    Autoantibodies against nucleosomes are considered a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We compared in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis the diagnostic usefulness of a dsDNA-loaded nucleosome ELISA (anti-dsDNA-NcX) with ELISAs in which dsDNA or nucleosomes alone were coated. First, we analysed whether DNA loading on nucleosomes led to masking of epitopes by using defined monoclonal anti-DNA, anti-histone and nucleosome-specific autoantibodies to evaluate the accessibility of nucleosomal epitopes in the anti-dsDNA-NcX ELISA. Second, autoantibody levels were measured in these 3 ELISAs in 100 patients with proliferative lupus nephritis (LN) before immunosuppressive treatment and in 128 non-SLE disease controls. In patients with LN inter-assay comparisons and associations with clinical and serological parameters were analysed. The panel of monoclonal antibodies revealed that all epitopes were equally accessible in the anti-dsDNA-NcX ELISA as in the two other ELISAs. Patients with proliferative lupus nephritis were positive with dsDNA-loaded nucleosomes in 86%, with DNA in 66% and with nucleosomes in 85%. In the non-lupus disease control group these frequencies were 1.6% (2 out of 128) for both the anti-dsDNA-NcX and the anti-dsDNA ELISA and 0% in the anti-nucleosome ELISA. The levels in the anti-dsDNA-NcX ELISA were high in a group of patients with LN that showed absent reactivity in the anti-DNA or low levels in the anti-nucleosome ELISA. Anti-dsDNA-NcX positivity was associated with higher SLEDAI scores within this group. Within nucleosome-based ELISAs, we propose the anti-dsDNA-NcX ELISA as the preferred test system. PMID:26597199

  16. Determinants of nucleosome positioning and their influence on plant gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming-Jung; Seddon, Alexander E.; Tsai, Zing Tsung-Yeh; Major, Ian T.; Floer, Monique; Howe, Gregg A.; Shiu, Shin-Han

    2015-01-01

    Nucleosome positioning influences the access of transcription factors (TFs) to their binding sites and gene expression. Studies in plant, animal, and fungal models demonstrate similar nucleosome positioning patterns along genes and correlations between occupancy and expression. However, the relationships among nucleosome positioning, cis-regulatory element accessibility, and gene expression in plants remain undefined. Here we showed that plant nucleosome depletion occurs on specific 6-mer motifs and this sequence-specific nucleosome depletion is predictive of expression levels. Nucleosome-depleted regions in Arabidopsis thaliana tend to have higher G/C content, unlike yeast, and are centered on specific G/C-rich 6-mers, suggesting that intrinsic sequence properties, such as G/C content, cannot fully explain plant nucleosome positioning. These 6-mer motif sites showed higher DNase I hypersensitivity and are flanked by strongly phased nucleosomes, consistent with known TF binding sites. Intriguingly, this 6-mer-specific nucleosome depletion pattern occurs not only in promoter but also in genic regions and is significantly correlated with higher gene expression level, a phenomenon also found in rice but not in yeast. Among the 6-mer motifs enriched in genes responsive to treatment with the defense hormone jasmonate, there are no significant changes in nucleosome occupancy, suggesting that these sites are potentially preconditioned to enable rapid response without changing chromatin state significantly. Our study provides a global assessment of the joint contribution of nucleosome occupancy and motif sequences that are likely cis-elements to the control of gene expression in plants. Our findings pave the way for further understanding the impact of chromatin state on plant transcriptional regulatory circuits. PMID:26063739

  17. Establishment of a promoter-based chromatin architecture on recently replicated DNA can accommodate variable inter-nucleosome spacing

    PubMed Central

    Fennessy, Ross T.; Owen-Hughes, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosomes, the fundamental subunits of eukaryotic chromatin, are organized with respect to transcriptional start sites. A major challenge to the persistence of this organization is the disassembly of nucleosomes during DNA replication. Here, we use complimentary approaches to map the locations of nucleosomes on recently replicated DNA. We find that nucleosomes are substantially realigned with promoters during the minutes following DNA replication. As a result, the nucleosomal landscape is largely re-established before newly replicated chromosomes are partitioned into daughter cells and can serve as a platform for the re-establishment of gene expression programmes. When the supply of histones is disrupted through mutation of the chaperone Caf1, a promoter-based architecture is generated, but with increased inter-nucleosomal spacing. This indicates that the chromatin remodelling enzymes responsible for spacing nucleosomes are capable of organizing nucleosomes with a range of different linker DNA lengths. PMID:27106059

  18. Enzymatic and chemical mapping of nucleosome distribution in purified micro- and macronuclei of the ciliated model organism, Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao; Gao, Shan; Liu, Yifan; Wang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yurui; Song, Weibo

    2016-09-01

    Genomic distribution of the nucleosome, the basic unit of chromatin, contains important epigenetic information. To map nucleosome distribution in structurally and functionally differentiated micronucleus (MIC) and macronucleus (MAC) of the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila, we have purified MIC and MAC and performed micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion as well as hydroxyl radical cleavage. Different factors that may affect MNase digestion were examined, to optimize mono-nucleosome production. Mono-nucleosome purity was further improved by ultracentrifugation in a sucrose gradient. As MNase concentration increased, nucleosomal DNA sizes in MIC and MAC converged on 147 bp, as expected for the nucleosome core particle. Both MNase digestion and hydroxyl radical cleavage consistently showed a nucleosome repeat length of ~200 bp in MAC of Tetrahymena, supporting ~50 bp of linker DNA. Our work has systematically tested methods currently available for mapping nucleosome distribution in Tetrahymena, and provided a solid foundation for future epigenetic studies in this ciliated model organism. PMID:27568393

  19. DNA-guided establishment of nucleosome patterns within coding regions of a eukaryotic genome

    PubMed Central

    Beh, Leslie Y.; Müller, Manuel M.; Muir, Tom W.; Kaplan, Noam; Landweber, Laura F.

    2015-01-01

    A conserved hallmark of eukaryotic chromatin architecture is the distinctive array of well-positioned nucleosomes downstream from transcription start sites (TSS). Recent studies indicate that trans-acting factors establish this stereotypical array. Here, we present the first genome-wide in vitro and in vivo nucleosome maps for the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila. In contrast with previous studies in yeast, we find that the stereotypical nucleosome array is preserved in the in vitro reconstituted map, which is governed only by the DNA sequence preferences of nucleosomes. Remarkably, this average in vitro pattern arises from the presence of subsets of nucleosomes, rather than the whole array, in individual Tetrahymena genes. Variation in GC content contributes to the positioning of these sequence-directed nucleosomes and affects codon usage and amino acid composition in genes. Given that the AT-rich Tetrahymena genome is intrinsically unfavorable for nucleosome formation, we propose that these “seed” nucleosomes—together with trans-acting factors—may facilitate the establishment of nucleosome arrays within genes in vivo, while minimizing changes to the underlying coding sequences. PMID:26330564

  20. Affinity, stoichiometry and cooperativity of heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) binding to nucleosomal arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teif, Vladimir B.; Kepper, Nick; Yserentant, Klaus; Wedemann, Gero; Rippe, Karsten

    2015-02-01

    Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) participates in establishing and maintaining heterochromatin via its histone-modification-dependent chromatin interactions. In recent papers HP1 binding to nucleosomal arrays was measured in vitro and interpreted in terms of nearest-neighbour cooperative binding. This mode of chromatin interaction could lead to the spreading of HP1 along the nucleosome chain. Here, we reanalysed previous data by representing the nucleosome chain as a 1D binding lattice and showed how the experimental HP1 binding isotherms can be explained by a simpler model without cooperative interactions between neighboring HP1 dimers. Based on these calculations and spatial models of dinucleosomes and nucleosome chains, we propose that binding stoichiometry depends on the nucleosome repeat length (NRL) rather than protein interactions between HP1 dimers. According to our calculations, more open nucleosome arrays with long DNA linkers are characterized by a larger number of binding sites in comparison to chains with a short NRL. Furthermore, we demonstrate by Monte Carlo simulations that the NRL dependent folding of the nucleosome chain can induce allosteric changes of HP1 binding sites. Thus, HP1 chromatin interactions can be modulated by the change of binding stoichiometry and the type of binding to condensed (methylated) and non-condensed (unmethylated) nucleosome arrays in the absence of direct interactions between HP1 dimers.

  1. Properties of active nucleosomes as revealed by HMG 14 and 17 chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    Weisbrod, S T

    1982-01-01

    Nucleosomes from actively transcribed genes (active nucleosomes) contain nonhistone proteins HMG 14 and 17 and are preferentially sensitive to digestion by DNAse I. Active nucleosomes isolated by chromatography on an HMG 14 and 17 glass bead affinity column were analyzed with respect to overall structure, accessory nonhistone components and modifications to the DNA and histones. The experiments lead to the following conclusions: the DNA in the active nucleosome is undermethylated compared to bulk DNA; topoisomerase I is a non-stoichiometric component of the active nucleosome fraction; the level of histone acetylation is enriched in active nucleosomes, but the extent of enrichment cannot account for HMG binding; and the two histone H3 molecules in the active nucleosome can dimerize more readily and are, therefore, probably closer together than those in the bulk of the nucleosomes. Additionally it is shown that HMG 14 and 17 prefer to bind to single- vs. double-stranded nucleic acids. The role of HMG 14 and 17 in producing a highly DNAse I sensitive structure and correspondingly helping to facilitate transcription is discussed in terms of these properties. Images PMID:6210882

  2. Genome-wide nucleosome specificity and function of chromatin remodellers in ES cells

    PubMed Central

    de Dieuleveult, Maud; Yen, Kuangyu; Hmitou, Isabelle; Depaux, Arnaud; Boussouar, Fayçal; Dargham, Daria Bou; Jounier, Sylvie; Humbertclaude, Hélène; Ribierre, Florence; Baulard, Céline; Farrell, Nina P.; Park, Bongsoo; Keime, Céline; Carrière, Lucie; Berlivet, Soizick; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Werner, Michel; Deleuze, Jean-François; Olaso, Robert; Aude, Jean-Christophe; Chantalat, Sophie; Pugh, B. Franklin; Gérard, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    Summary ATP-dependent chromatin remodellers allow access to DNA for transcription factors and the general transcription machinery, but whether mammalian chromatin remodellers1–3 target specific nucleosomes to regulate transcription is unclear. Here, we present genome-wide remodeller-nucleosome interaction profiles for Chd1, Chd2, Chd4, Chd6, Chd8, Chd9, Brg1 and Ep400 in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. These remodellers bind one or both full nucleosomes that flank MNase-defined nucleosome-free promoter regions (NFRs), where they separate divergent transcription. Surprisingly, large CpG-rich NFRs that extend downstream of annotated transcriptional start sites (TSSs) are nevertheless chromatinized with non-nucleosomal or subnucleosomal histone variants (H3.3 and H2A.Z) and modifications (H3K4me3 and H3K27ac). RNA polymerase (pol) II therefore navigates hundreds of bp of altered chromatin in the sense direction before encountering an MNase-resistant nucleosome at the 3′ end of the NFR. Transcriptome analysis upon remodeller depletion reveals reciprocal mechanisms of transcriptional regulation by remodellers. Whereas at active genes individual remodellers play either positive or negative roles via altering nucleosome stability, at polycomb-enriched bivalent genes the same remodellers act in an opposite manner. These findings indicate that remodellers target specific nucleosomes at the edge of NFRs, where they regulate ES cell transcriptional programs. PMID:26814966

  3. Closing the Gap between Single Molecule and Bulk FRET Analysis of Nucleosomes

    PubMed Central

    Gansen, Alexander; Hieb, Aaron R.; Böhm, Vera; Tóth, Katalin; Langowski, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Nucleosome structure and stability affect genetic accessibility by altering the local chromatin morphology. Recent FRET experiments on nucleosomes have given valuable insight into the structural transformations they can adopt. Yet, even if performed under seemingly identical conditions, experiments performed in bulk and at the single molecule level have given mixed answers due to the limitations of each technique. To compare such experiments, however, they must be performed under identical conditions. Here we develop an experimental framework that overcomes the conventional limitations of each method: single molecule FRET experiments are carried out at bulk concentrations by adding unlabeled nucleosomes, while bulk FRET experiments are performed in microplates at concentrations near those used for single molecule detection. Additionally, the microplate can probe many conditions simultaneously before expending valuable instrument time for single molecule experiments. We highlight this experimental strategy by exploring the role of selective acetylation of histone H3 on nucleosome structure and stability; in bulk, H3-acetylated nucleosomes were significantly less stable than non-acetylated nucleosomes. Single molecule FRET analysis further revealed that acetylation of histone H3 promoted the formation of an additional conformational state, which is suppressed at higher nucleosome concentrations and which could be an important structural intermediate in nucleosome regulation. PMID:23637734

  4. Differential Nucleosome Occupancies across Oct4-Sox2 Binding Sites in Murine Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sebeson, Amy; Xi, Liqun; Zhang, Quanwei; Sigmund, Audrey; Wang, Ji-Ping; Wang, Xiaozhong

    2015-01-01

    The binding sequence for any transcription factor can be found millions of times within a genome, yet only a small fraction of these sequences encode functional transcription factor binding sites. One of the reasons for this dichotomy is that many other factors, such as nucleosomes, compete for binding. To study how the competition between nucleosomes and transcription factors helps determine a functional transcription factor site from a predicted transcription factor site, we compared experimentally-generated in vitro nucleosome occupancy with in vivo nucleosome occupancy and transcription factor binding in murine embryonic stem cells. Using a solution hybridization enrichment technique, we generated a high-resolution nucleosome map from targeted regions of the genome containing predicted sites and functional sites of Oct4/Sox2 regulation. We found that at Pax6 and Nes, which are bivalently poised in stem cells, functional Oct4 and Sox2 sites show high amounts of in vivo nucleosome displacement compared to in vitro. Oct4 and Sox2, which are active, show no significant displacement of in vivo nucleosomes at functional sites, similar to nonfunctional Oct4/Sox2 binding. This study highlights a complex interplay between Oct4 and Sox2 transcription factors and nucleosomes among different target genes, which may result in distinct patterns of stem cell gene regulation. PMID:25992972

  5. Nucleosome disassembly during human non-homologous end joining followed by concerted HIRA- and CAF-1-dependent reassembly

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuan; Tyler, Jessica K

    2016-01-01

    The cell achieves DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair in the context of chromatin structure. However, the mechanisms used to expose DSBs to the repair machinery and to restore the chromatin organization after repair remain elusive. Here we show that induction of a DSB in human cells causes local nucleosome disassembly, apparently independently from DNA end resection. This efficient removal of histone H3 from the genome during non-homologous end joining was promoted by both ATM and the ATP-dependent nucleosome remodeler INO80. Chromatin reassembly during DSB repair was dependent on the HIRA histone chaperone that is specific to the replication-independent histone variant H3.3 and on CAF-1 that is specific to the replication-dependent canonical histones H3.1/H3.2. Our data suggest that the epigenetic information is re-established after DSB repair by the concerted and interdependent action of replication-independent and replication-dependent chromatin assembly pathways. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15129.001 PMID:27269284

  6. Nucleosome competition reveals processive acetylation by the SAGA HAT module.

    PubMed

    Ringel, Alison E; Cieniewicz, Anne M; Taverna, Sean D; Wolberger, Cynthia

    2015-10-01

    The Spt-Ada-Gcn5 acetyltransferase (SAGA) coactivator complex hyperacetylates histone tails in vivo in a manner that depends upon histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3), a histone mark enriched at promoters of actively transcribed genes. SAGA contains a separable subcomplex known as the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) module that contains the HAT, Gcn5, bound to Sgf29, Ada2, and Ada3. Sgf29 contains a tandem Tudor domain that recognizes H3K4me3-containing peptides and is required for histone hyperacetylation in vivo. However, the mechanism by which H3K4me3 recognition leads to lysine hyperacetylation is unknown, as in vitro studies show no effect of the H3K4me3 modification on histone peptide acetylation by Gcn5. To determine how H3K4me3 binding by Sgf29 leads to histone hyperacetylation by Gcn5, we used differential fluorescent labeling of histones to monitor acetylation of individual subpopulations of methylated and unmodified nucleosomes in a mixture. We find that the SAGA HAT module preferentially acetylates H3K4me3 nucleosomes in a mixture containing excess unmodified nucleosomes and that this effect requires the Tudor domain of Sgf29. The H3K4me3 mark promotes processive, multisite acetylation of histone H3 by Gcn5 that can account for the different acetylation patterns established by SAGA at promoters versus coding regions. Our results establish a model for Sgf29 function at gene promoters and define a mechanism governing crosstalk between histone modifications. PMID:26401015

  7. The activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) efficiently targets DNA in nucleosomes but only during transcription

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hong Ming; Poirier, Michael G.; Allen, Michael J.; North, Justin; Lal, Ratnesh; Widom, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    The activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) initiates somatic hypermutation, class-switch recombination, and gene conversion of immunoglobulin genes. In vitro, AID has been shown to target single-stranded DNA, relaxed double-stranded DNA, when transcribed, or supercoiled DNA. To simulate the in vivo situation more closely, we have introduced two copies of a nucleosome positioning sequence, MP2, into a supercoiled AID target plasmid to determine where around the positioned nucleosomes (in the vicinity of an ampicillin resistance gene) cytidine deaminations occur in the absence or presence of transcription. We found that without transcription nucleosomes prevented cytidine deamination by AID. However, with transcription AID readily accessed DNA in nucleosomes on both DNA strands. The experiments also showed that AID targeting any DNA molecule was the limiting step, and they support the conclusion that once targeted to DNA, AID acts processively in naked DNA and DNA organized within transcribed nucleosomes. PMID:19380635

  8. Brownian dynamics simulation of the nucleosome chirality - the wrapping direction of DNA on the histone octamer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng-Ye

    2005-03-01

    In eukaryote nucleosome, DNA wraps around a histone octamer in a left-handed way. We study the process of chirality formation of nucleosome with Brownian dynamics simulation. We model the histone octamer with a quantitatively adjustable chirality: left-handed, right-handed or non-chiral, and simulate the dynamical wrapping process of a DNA molecule on it. We find that the chirality of a nucleosome formed is strongly dependent on that of the histone octamer, and different chiralities of the histone octamer induce its different rotation directions in the wrapping process of DNA. In addition, a very weak chirality of the histone octamer is quite enough for sustaining the correct chirality of the nucleosome formed. We also show that the chirality of a nucleosome may be broken at elevated temperature.

  9. Pioneer Transcription Factors Target Partial DNA Motifs on Nucleosomes to Initiate Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Soufi, Abdenour; Garcia, Meilin Fernandez; Jaroszewicz, Artur; Osman, Nebiyu; Pellegrini, Matteo; Zaret, Kenneth S.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Pioneer transcription factors (TFs) access silent chromatin and initiate cell fate changes, using diverse types of DNA binding domains (DBDs). FoxA, the paradigm pioneer TF, has a winged helix DBD that resembles linker histone and thereby binds its target sites on nucleosomes and in compacted chromatin. Herein we compare the nucleosome and chromatin targeting activities of Oct4 (POU DBD), Sox2 (HMG box DBD), Klf4 (zinc finger DBD), and c-Myc (bHLH DBD), which together reprogram somatic cells to pluripotency. Purified Oct4, Sox2, and Klf4 proteins can bind nucleosomes in vitro, and in vivo they preferentially target silent sites enriched for nucleosomes. Pioneer activity relates simply to the ability of a given DBD to target partial motifs displayed on the nucleosome surface. Such partial motif recognition can occur by coordinate binding between factors. Our findings provide insight into how pioneer factors can target naïve chromatin sites. PMID:25892221

  10. Pausing of RNA polymerase II Disrupts DNA-specified Nucleosome Organization to Enable Precise Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Gilchrist, Daniel A.; Santos, Gilberto Dos; Fargo, David C.; Xie, Bin; Gao, Yuan; Li, Leping; Adelman, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Metazoan transcription is controlled either through coordinated recruitment of transcription machinery to the gene promoter, or through regulated pausing of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in early elongation. We report that a striking difference between genes that use these distinct regulatory strategies lies in the “default” chromatin architecture specified by their DNA sequences. Pol II pausing is prominent at highly-regulated genes whose sequences inherently disfavor nucleosome formation within the gene, but favor occlusion of the promoter by nucleosomes. In contrast, housekeeping genes that lack pronounced Pol II pausing show higher nucleosome occupancy downstream, but their promoters are deprived of nucleosomes regardless of polymerase binding. Our results indicate that a key role of paused Pol II is to compete with nucleosomes for occupancy of highly-regulated promoters, thereby preventing the formation of repressive chromatin architecture to facilitate further or future gene activation. PMID:21074046

  11. Genome-wide Mapping of Nucleosome Positioning and DNA Methylation Within Individual DNA Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yaping; Lay, Fides D.; Liang, Gangning; Berman, Benjamin P.; Jones, Peter A.; Kelly, Terry

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning work together to generate chromatin structures that regulate gene expression. Nucleosomes are typically mapped using nuclease digestion requiring significant amounts of material and varying enzyme concentrations. We have developed a method that uses a GpC methyltransferase (M.CviPI) and next generation sequencing to footprint nucleosome positioning genome-wide using less than 1 million cells, which does not suffer from sequence based biases associated with MNase digestion and retains endogenous DNA methylation information. Using a novel bioinformatics pipeline we identify chromatin configurations associated with a variety of functional genomic loci including distinct promoter types, enhancers, insulators, X-inactivated and imprinted genes. Importantly, DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning information are obtained from the same DNA molecule, giving the first genome-wide DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning correlation at the single molecule level that can be used to monitor disease progression and response to therapy.

  12. Structure and dynamics of DNA loops on nucleosomes studied with atomistic, microsecond-scale molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Pasi, Marco; Lavery, Richard

    2016-01-01

    DNA loop formation on nucleosomes is strongly implicated in chromatin remodeling and occurs spontaneously in nucleosomes subjected to superhelical stress. The nature of such loops depends crucially on the balance between DNA deformation and DNA interaction with the nucleosome core. Currently, no high-resolution structural data on these loops exist. Although uniform rod models have been used to study loop size and shape, these models make assumptions concerning DNA mechanics and DNA–core binding. We present here atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations for two different loop sizes. The results point to the key role of localized DNA kinking within the loops. Kinks enable the relaxation of DNA bending strain to be coupled with improved DNA–core interactions. Kinks lead to small, irregularly shaped loops that are asymmetrically positioned with respect to the nucleosome core. We also find that loop position can influence the dynamics of the DNA segments at the extremities of the nucleosome. PMID:27098037

  13. Structure and dynamics of DNA loops on nucleosomes studied with atomistic, microsecond-scale molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Pasi, Marco; Lavery, Richard

    2016-06-20

    DNA loop formation on nucleosomes is strongly implicated in chromatin remodeling and occurs spontaneously in nucleosomes subjected to superhelical stress. The nature of such loops depends crucially on the balance between DNA deformation and DNA interaction with the nucleosome core. Currently, no high-resolution structural data on these loops exist. Although uniform rod models have been used to study loop size and shape, these models make assumptions concerning DNA mechanics and DNA-core binding. We present here atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations for two different loop sizes. The results point to the key role of localized DNA kinking within the loops. Kinks enable the relaxation of DNA bending strain to be coupled with improved DNA-core interactions. Kinks lead to small, irregularly shaped loops that are asymmetrically positioned with respect to the nucleosome core. We also find that loop position can influence the dynamics of the DNA segments at the extremities of the nucleosome. PMID:27098037

  14. Interaction of RNA polymerase II with acetylated nucleosomal core particles

    SciTech Connect

    Pineiro, M.; Gonzalez, P.J.; Hernandez, F.; Palacian, E. )

    1991-05-31

    Chemical acetylation of nucleosomal cores is accompanied by an increase in their efficiency as in vitro transcription templates. Low amounts of acetic anhydride cause preferential modification of the amino-terminal tails of core histones. Modification of these domains, which causes moderate structural effects, is apparently correlated with the observed stimulation of RNA synthesis. In contrast, extensive modification of the globular regions of core histones, which is accompanied by a large structural relaxation of the particle, causes little additional effect on transcription. Acetylation of the amino-terminal domains of histones might stimulate transcription by changing the interaction of the histone tails with components of the transcriptional machinery.

  15. A Compendium of Nucleosome and Transcript Profiles Reveals Determinants of Chromatin Architecture and Transcription

    PubMed Central

    van Bakel, Harm; Tsui, Kyle; Gebbia, Marinella; Mnaimneh, Sanie; Hughes, Timothy R.; Nislow, Corey

    2013-01-01

    Nucleosomes in all eukaryotes examined to date adopt a characteristic architecture within genes and play fundamental roles in regulating transcription, yet the identity and precise roles of many of the trans-acting factors responsible for the establishment and maintenance of this organization remain to be identified. We profiled a compendium of 50 yeast strains carrying conditional alleles or complete deletions of genes involved in transcriptional regulation, histone biology, and chromatin remodeling, as well as compounds that target transcription and histone deacetylases, to assess their respective roles in nucleosome positioning and transcription. We find that nucleosome patterning in genes is affected by many factors, including the CAF-1 complex, Spt10, and Spt21, in addition to previously reported remodeler ATPases and histone chaperones. Disruption of these factors or reductions in histone levels led genic nucleosomes to assume positions more consistent with their intrinsic sequence preferences, with pronounced and specific shifts of the +1 nucleosome relative to the transcription start site. These shifts of +1 nucleosomes appear to have functional consequences, as several affected genes in Ino80 mutants exhibited altered expression responses. Our parallel expression profiling compendium revealed extensive transcription changes in intergenic and antisense regions, most of which occur in regions with altered nucleosome occupancy and positioning. We show that the nucleosome-excluding transcription factors Reb1, Abf1, Tbf1, and Rsc3 suppress cryptic transcripts at their target promoters, while a combined analysis of nucleosome and expression profiles identified 36 novel transcripts that are normally repressed by Tup1/Cyc8. Our data confirm and extend the roles of chromatin remodelers and chaperones as major determinants of genic nucleosome positioning, and these data provide a valuable resource for future studies. PMID:23658529

  16. Two functionally distinct forms of the RSC nucleosome-remodeling complex, containing essential AT hook, BAH, and bromodomains.

    PubMed

    Cairns, B R; Schlichter, A; Erdjument-Bromage, H; Tempst, P; Kornberg, R D; Winston, F

    1999-11-01

    RSC is an essential 15 protein nucleosome-remodeling complex from S. cerevisiae. We have identified two closely related RSC members, Rsc1 and Rsc2. Biochemical analysis revealed Rsc1 and Rsc2 in distinct complexes, defining two forms of RSC. Genetic analysis has shown that Rsc1 and Rsc2 possess shared and unique functions. Rsc1 and Rsc2 each contain two bromodomains, a bromo-adjacent homology (BAH) domain, and an AT hook. One of the bromodomains, the BAH domain, and the AT hook are each essential for Rsc1 and Rsc2 functions, although they are not required for assembly into RSC complexes. Therefore, these domains are required for RSC function. Additional genetic analysis provides further evidence that RSC function is related to transcriptional control. PMID:10619019

  17. Shearing of the CENP-A dimerization interface mediates plasticity in the octameric centromeric nucleosome

    PubMed Central

    Winogradoff, David; Zhao, Haiqing; Dalal, Yamini; Papoian, Garegin A.

    2015-01-01

    The centromeric nucleosome is a key epigenetic determinant of centromere identity and function. Consequently, deciphering how CENP-A containing nucleosomes contribute structurally to centromere function is a fundamental question in chromosome biology. Here, we performed microsecond timescale all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of CENP-A and H3 nucleosomes, and report that the octameric CENP-A core particles and nucleosomes display different dynamics from their canonical H3-containing counterparts. The most significant motion observed is within key interactions at the heart of the CENP-A octameric core, wherein shearing of contacts within the CENP-A:CENP-A’ dimerization interface results in a weaker four helix bundle, and an extrusion of 10–30 bp of DNA near the pseudo-dyad. Coupled to other local and global fluctuations, the CENP-A nucleosome occupies a more rugged free energy landscape than the canonical H3 nucleosome. Taken together, our data suggest that CENP-A encodes enhanced distortability to the octameric nucleosome, which may allow for enhanced flexing of the histone core in vivo. PMID:26602160

  18. Role of transcription factor-mediated nucleosome disassembly in PHO5 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Kharerin, Hungyo; Bhat, Paike J.; Marko, John F.; Padinhateeri, Ranjith

    2016-01-01

    Studying nucleosome dynamics in promoter regions is crucial for understanding gene regulation. Nucleosomes regulate gene expression by sterically occluding transcription factors (TFs) and other non–histone proteins accessing genomic DNA. How the binding competition between nucleosomes and TFs leads to transcriptionally compatible promoter states is an open question. Here, we present a computational study of the nucleosome dynamics and organization in the promoter region of PHO5 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Introducing a model for nucleosome kinetics that takes into account ATP-dependent remodeling activity, DNA sequence effects, and kinetics of TFs (Pho4p), we compute the probability of obtaining different “promoter states” having different nucleosome configurations. Comparing our results with experimental data, we argue that the presence of local remodeling activity (LRA) as opposed to basal remodeling activity (BRA) is crucial in determining transcriptionally active promoter states. By modulating the LRA and Pho4p binding rate, we obtain different mRNA distributions—Poisson, bimodal, and long-tail. Through this work we explain many features of the PHO5 promoter such as sequence-dependent TF accessibility and the role of correlated dynamics between nucleosomes and TFs in opening/coverage of the TATA box. We also obtain possible ranges for TF binding rates and the magnitude of LRA. PMID:26843321

  19. Genome-Wide Chromatin Remodeling Identified at GC-Rich Long Nucleosome-Free Regions

    PubMed Central

    Hochreiter, Sepp

    2012-01-01

    To gain deeper insights into principles of cell biology, it is essential to understand how cells reorganize their genomes by chromatin remodeling. We analyzed chromatin remodeling on next generation sequencing data from resting and activated T cells to determine a whole-genome chromatin remodeling landscape. We consider chromatin remodeling in terms of nucleosome repositioning which can be observed most robustly in long nucleosome-free regions (LNFRs) that are occupied by nucleosomes in another cell state. We found that LNFR sequences are either AT-rich or GC-rich, where nucleosome repositioning was observed much more prominently in GC-rich LNFRs — a considerable proportion of them outside promoter regions. Using support vector machines with string kernels, we identified a GC-rich DNA sequence pattern indicating loci of nucleosome repositioning in resting T cells. This pattern appears to be also typical for CpG islands. We found out that nucleosome repositioning in GC-rich LNFRs is indeed associated with CpG islands and with binding sites of the CpG-island-binding ZF-CXXC proteins KDM2A and CFP1. That this association occurs prominently inside and also prominently outside of promoter regions hints at a mechanism governing nucleosome repositioning that acts on a whole-genome scale. PMID:23144837

  20. Molecular dynamics of DNA and nucleosomes in solution studied by fast-scanning atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yuki; Higuchi, Yuji; Hizume, Kohji; Yokokawa, Masatoshi; Yoshimura, Shige H; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Takeyasu, Kunio

    2010-05-01

    Nucleosome is a fundamental structural unit of chromatin, and the exposure from or occlusion into chromatin of genomic DNA is closely related to the regulation of gene expression. In this study, we analyzed the molecular dynamics of poly-nucleosomal arrays in solution by fast-scanning atomic force microscopy (AFM) to obtain a visual glimpse of nucleosome dynamics on chromatin fiber at single molecule level. The influence of the high-speed scanning probe on nucleosome dynamics can be neglected since bending elastic energy of DNA molecule showed similar probability distributions at different scan rates. In the sequential images of poly-nucleosomal arrays, the sliding of the nucleosome core particle and the dissociation of histone particle were visualized. The sliding showed limited fluctuation within approximately 50nm along the DNA strand. The histone dissociation occurs by at least two distinct ways: a dissociation of histone octamer or sequential dissociations of tetramers. These observations help us to develop the molecular mechanisms of nucleosome dynamics and also demonstrate the ability of fast-scanning AFM for the analysis of dynamic protein-DNA interaction in sub-seconds time scale. PMID:20236766

  1. Shearing of the CENP-A dimerization interface mediates plasticity in the octameric centromeric nucleosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winogradoff, David; Zhao, Haiqing; Dalal, Yamini; Papoian, Garegin A.

    2015-11-01

    The centromeric nucleosome is a key epigenetic determinant of centromere identity and function. Consequently, deciphering how CENP-A containing nucleosomes contribute structurally to centromere function is a fundamental question in chromosome biology. Here, we performed microsecond timescale all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of CENP-A and H3 nucleosomes, and report that the octameric CENP-A core particles and nucleosomes display different dynamics from their canonical H3-containing counterparts. The most significant motion observed is within key interactions at the heart of the CENP-A octameric core, wherein shearing of contacts within the CENP-A:CENP-A’ dimerization interface results in a weaker four helix bundle, and an extrusion of 10-30 bp of DNA near the pseudo-dyad. Coupled to other local and global fluctuations, the CENP-A nucleosome occupies a more rugged free energy landscape than the canonical H3 nucleosome. Taken together, our data suggest that CENP-A encodes enhanced distortability to the octameric nucleosome, which may allow for enhanced flexing of the histone core in vivo.

  2. Multiscale coarse-grained modelling of chromatin components: DNA and the nucleosome.

    PubMed

    Korolev, Nikolay; Nordenskiöld, Lars; Lyubartsev, Alexander P

    2016-06-01

    To model large biomolecular systems, such as cell and organelles an atomistic description is not currently achievable and is not generally practical. Therefore, simplified coarse-grained (CG) modelling becomes a necessity. One of the most important cellular components is chromatin, a large DNA-protein complex where DNA is highly compacted. Recent progress in coarse graining modelling of the major chromatin components, double helical DNA and the nucleosome core particle (NCP) is presented. First, general principles and approaches allowing rigorous bottom-to-top generation of interaction potentials in the CG models are presented. Then, recent CG models of DNA are reviewed and their adequacy is benchmarked against experimental data on the salt dependence of DNA flexibility (persistence length). Furthermore, a few recent CG models of the NCP are described and their application for studying salt-dependent NCP-NCP interaction is discussed. An example of a multiscale approach to CG modelling of chromatin is presented where interactions and self-assembly of thousands of NCPs in solution are observed. PMID:26956528

  3. Comparative analysis of the nucleosomal structure of rye, wheat and their relatives.

    PubMed

    Vershinin, A V; Heslop-Harrison, J S

    1998-01-01

    Analysis of the structure of chromatin in cereal species using micrococcal nuclease (MNase) cleavage showed nucleosomal organization and a ladder with typical nucleosomal spacing of 175-185 bp. Probing with a set of DNA probes localized in the authentic telomeres, subtelomeric regions and bulk chromatin revealed that these chromosomal regions have nucleosomal organization but differ in size of nucleosomes and rate of cleavage between both species and regions. Chromatin from Secale and Dasypyrum cleaved more quickly than that from wheat and barley, perhaps because of their higher content of repetitive sequences with hairpin structures accessible to MNase cleavage. In all species, the telomeric chromatin showed more rapid cleavage kinetics and a shorter nucleosome length (160 bp spacing) than bulk chromatin. Rye telomeric repeat arrays were shortest, ranging from 8 kb to 50 kb while those of wheat ranged from 15 kb up to 175 kb. A gradient of sensitivity to MNase was detected along rye chromosomes. The rye-specific subtelomeric sequences pSc200 and pSc250 have nucleosomes of two lengths, those of the telomeric and of bulk nucleosomes, indicating that the telomeric structure may extended into the chromosomes. More proximal sequences common to rye and wheat, the short tandem-repeat pSc119.2 and rDNA sequence pTa71, showed longer nucleosomal sizes characteristic of bulk chromatin in both species. A strictly defined spacing arrangement (phasing) of nucleosomes was demonstrated along arrays of tandem repeats with different monomer lengths (118, 350 and 550 bp) by combining MNase and restriction enzyme digestion. PMID:9484470

  4. Selective removal of promoter nucleosomes by the RSC chromatin-remodeling complex.

    PubMed

    Lorch, Yahli; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Boeger, Hinrich; Maier-Davis, Barbara; Kornberg, Roger D

    2011-08-01

    Purified chromatin rings, excised from the PHO5 locus of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in transcriptionally repressed and activated states, were remodeled with RSC and ATP. Nucleosomes were translocated, and those originating on the promoter of repressed rings were removed, whereas those originating on the open reading frame (ORF) were retained. Treatment of the repressed rings with histone deacetylase diminished the removal of promoter nucleosomes. These findings point to a principle of promoter chromatin remodeling for transcription, namely that promoter specificity resides primarily in the nucleosomes rather than in the remodeling complex that acts upon them. PMID:21725295

  5. NSeq: a multithreaded Java application for finding positioned nucleosomes from sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Nellore, Abhinav; Bobkov, Konstantin; Howe, Elizabeth; Pankov, Aleksandr; Diaz, Aaron; Song, Jun S.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce NSeq, a fast and efficient Java application for finding positioned nucleosomes from the high-throughput sequencing of MNase-digested mononucleosomal DNA. NSeq includes a user-friendly graphical interface, computes false discovery rates (FDRs) for candidate nucleosomes from Monte Carlo simulations, plots nucleosome coverage and centers, and exploits the availability of multiple processor cores by parallelizing its computations. Java binaries and source code are freely available at https://github.com/songlab/NSeq. The software is supported on all major platforms equipped with Java Runtime Environment 6 or later. PMID:23335939

  6. Exploration of nucleosome positioning patterns in transcription factor function

    PubMed Central

    Maehara, Kazumitsu; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    The binding of transcription factors (TFs) triggers activation of specific chromatin regions through the recruitment and activation of RNA polymerase. Unique nucleosome positioning (NP) occurs during gene expression and has been suggested to be involved in various other chromatin functions. However, the diversity of NP that can occur for each function has not been clarified. Here we used MNase-Seq data to evaluate NP around 258 cis-regulatory elements in the mouse genome. Principal component analysis of the 258 elements revealed that NP consisted of five major patterns. Furthermore, the five NP patterns had predictive power for the level of gene expression. We also demonstrated that selective NP patterns appeared around TF binding sites. These results suggest that the NP patterns are correlated to specific functions on chromatin. PMID:26790608

  7. Histone hyperacetylation can induce unfolding of the nucleosome core particle.

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, R; Bazett-Jones, D P; Locklear, L; Dixon, G H

    1990-01-01

    A direct correlation exists between the level of histone H4 hyperacetylation induced by sodium butyrate and the extent to which nucleosomes lose their compact shape and become elongated (62.0% of the particles have a length/width ratio over 1.6; overall mean in the length/width ratio = 1.83 +/- 0.48) when bound to electron microscope specimen grids at low ionic strength (1mM EDTA, 10mM Tris, pH 8.0). A marked proportion of elongated core particles is also observed in the naturally occurring hyperacetylated chicken testis chromatin undergoing spermatogenesis when analyzed at low ionic strength (36.8% of the particles have a length/width ratio over 1.6). Core particles of elongated shape (length/width ratio over 1.6) generated under low ionic strength conditions are absent in the hypoacetylated chicken erythrocyte chromatin and represent only 2.3% of the untreated Hela S3 cell core particles containing a low proportion of hyperacetylated histones. The marked differences between control and hyperacetylated core particles are absent if the particles are bound to the carbon support film in the presence of 0.2 M NaCl, 6mM MgCl2 and 10mM Tris pH 8.0, conditions known to stabilize nucleosomes. A survey of the published work on histone hyperacetylation together with the present results indicate that histone hyperacetylation does not produce any marked disruption of the core particle 'per se', but that it decreases intranucleosomal stabilizing forces as judged by the lowered stability of the hyperacetylated core particle under conditions of shearing stress such as cationic competition by the carbon support film of the EM grid for DNA binding. Images PMID:2339060

  8. Induction of inflammatory and immune responses by HMGB1–nucleosome complexes: implications for the pathogenesis of SLE

    PubMed Central

    Urbonaviciute, Vilma; Fürnrohr, Barbara G.; Meister, Silke; Munoz, Luis; Heyder, Petra; De Marchis, Francesco; Bianchi, Marco E.; Kirschning, Carsten; Wagner, Hermann; Manfredi, Angelo A.; Kalden, Joachim R.; Schett, Georg; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia; Herrmann, Martin; Voll, Reinhard E.

    2008-01-01

    Autoantibodies against double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and nucleosomes represent a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, the mechanisms involved in breaking the immunological tolerance against these poorly immunogenic nuclear components are not fully understood. Impaired phagocytosis of apoptotic cells with consecutive release of nuclear antigens may contribute to the immune pathogenesis. The architectural chromosomal protein and proinflammatory mediator high mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1) is tightly attached to the chromatin of apoptotic cells. We demonstrate that HMGB1 remains bound to nucleosomes released from late apoptotic cells in vitro. HMGB1–nucleosome complexes were also detected in plasma from SLE patients. HMGB1-containing nucleosomes from apoptotic cells induced secretion of interleukin (IL) 1β, IL-6, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α and expression of costimulatory molecules in macrophages and dendritic cells (DC), respectively. Neither HMGB1-free nucleosomes from viable cells nor nucleosomes from apoptotic cells lacking HMGB1 induced cytokine production or DC activation. HMGB1-containing nucleosomes from apoptotic cells induced anti-dsDNA and antihistone IgG responses in a Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2–dependent manner, whereas nucleosomes from living cells did not. In conclusion, HMGB1–nucleosome complexes activate antigen presenting cells and, thereby, may crucially contribute to the pathogenesis of SLE via breaking the immunological tolerance against nucleosomes/dsDNA. PMID:19064698

  9. Atomic Force Microscopy Imaging of SWI/SNF Action: Mapping the Nucleosome Remodeling and Sliding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montel, F.; Fontaine, E.; Stjean, P.; Castelnovo, M.; Faivremoskalenko, C.

    2007-07-01

    We propose a combined experimental (Atomic Force Microscopy) and theoretical study of the structural and dynamical properties of nucleosomes. In contrast to biochemical approaches, this method allows to determine simultaneously the DNA complexed length distribution and nucleosome position in various contexts. First, we show that differences in the nucleo-proteic structure observed between conventional H2A and H2A.Bbd variant nucleosomes induce quantitative changes in the in the length distribution of DNA complexed with histones. Then, the sliding action of remodeling complex SWI/SNF is characterized through the evolution of the nucleosome position and wrapped DNA length mapping. Using a linear energetic model for the distribution of DNA complexed length, we extract the net wrapping energy of DNA onto the histone octamer, and compare it to previous studies.

  10. Nucleosome Retention and The Stochastic Nature of Promoter Chromatin Remodeling for Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Boeger, Hinrich; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Kornberg, Roger D.

    2008-01-01

    The rate-limiting step of transcriptional activation in eukaryotes, and thus the critical point for gene regulation, is unknown. Using the inducible PHO5 gene of yeast as a model, we show that essential features of the transcriptional activation process can be described by a small number of simple assumptions about the chemical nature of the process. Our analysis elucidates the functional link between the dynamics of chromatin structure and gene regulation. It suggests a model for the underlying mechanism of promoter chromatin remodeling, which stochastically removes nucleosomes but appears to conserve a single nucleosome at all times when the promoter is bounded with respect to nucleosome sliding. All current experimental data are consistent with the hypothesis that promoter nucleosome disassembly is rate limiting for PHO5 expression. PMID:18485878

  11. A species-specific nucleosomal signature defines a periodic distribution of amino acids in proteins.

    PubMed

    Quintales, Luis; Soriano, Ignacio; Vázquez, Enrique; Segurado, Mónica; Antequera, Francisco

    2015-04-01

    Nucleosomes are the basic structural units of chromatin. Most of the yeast genome is organized in a pattern of positioned nucleosomes that is stably maintained under a wide range of physiological conditions. In this work, we have searched for sequence determinants associated with positioned nucleosomes in four species of fission and budding yeasts. We show that mononucleosomal DNA follows a highly structured base composition pattern, which differs among species despite the high degree of histone conservation. These nucleosomal signatures are present in transcribed and non-transcribed regions across the genome. In the case of open reading frames, they correctly predict the relative distribution of codons on mononucleosomal DNA, and they also determine a periodicity in the average distribution of amino acids along the proteins. These results establish a direct and species-specific connection between the position of each codon around the histone octamer and protein composition. PMID:25854683

  12. A species-specific nucleosomal signature defines a periodic distribution of amino acids in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Quintales, Luis; Soriano, Ignacio; Vázquez, Enrique; Segurado, Mónica; Antequera, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Nucleosomes are the basic structural units of chromatin. Most of the yeast genome is organized in a pattern of positioned nucleosomes that is stably maintained under a wide range of physiological conditions. In this work, we have searched for sequence determinants associated with positioned nucleosomes in four species of fission and budding yeasts. We show that mononucleosomal DNA follows a highly structured base composition pattern, which differs among species despite the high degree of histone conservation. These nucleosomal signatures are present in transcribed and non-transcribed regions across the genome. In the case of open reading frames, they correctly predict the relative distribution of codons on mononucleosomal DNA, and they also determine a periodicity in the average distribution of amino acids along the proteins. These results establish a direct and species-specific connection between the position of each codon around the histone octamer and protein composition. PMID:25854683

  13. Synthetic Nucleosomes Reveal that GlcNAcylation Modulates Direct Interaction with the FACT Complex.

    PubMed

    Raj, Ritu; Lercher, Lukas; Mohammed, Shabaz; Davis, Benjamin G

    2016-07-25

    Transcriptional regulation can be established by various post-translational modifications (PTMs) on histone proteins in the nucleosome and by nucleobase modifications on chromosomal DNA. Functional consequences of histone O-GlcNAcylation (O-GlcNAc=O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine) are largely unexplored. Herein, we generate homogeneously GlcNAcylated histones and nucleosomes by chemical post-translational modification. Mass-spectrometry-based quantitative interaction proteomics reveals a direct interaction between GlcNAcylated nucleosomes and the "facilitates chromatin transcription" (FACT) complex. Preferential binding of FACT to GlcNAcylated nucleosomes may point towards O-GlcNAcylation as one of the triggers for FACT-driven transcriptional control. PMID:27272618

  14. nuMap: a web platform for accurate prediction of nucleosome positioning.

    PubMed

    Alharbi, Bader A; Alshammari, Thamir H; Felton, Nathan L; Zhurkin, Victor B; Cui, Feng

    2014-10-01

    Nucleosome positioning is critical for gene expression and of major biological interest. The high cost of experimentally mapping nucleosomal arrangement signifies the need for computational approaches to predict nucleosome positions at high resolution. Here, we present a web-based application to fulfill this need by implementing two models, YR and W/S schemes, for the translational and rotational positioning of nucleosomes, respectively. Our methods are based on sequence-dependent anisotropic bending that dictates how DNA is wrapped around a histone octamer. This application allows users to specify a number of options such as schemes and parameters for threading calculation and provides multiple layout formats. The nuMap is implemented in Java/Perl/MySQL and is freely available for public use at http://numap.rit.edu. The user manual, implementation notes, description of the methodology and examples are available at the site. PMID:25220945

  15. The Nucleosome Remodeling and Deacetylase Complex NuRD Is Built from Preformed Catalytically Active Sub-modules.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W; Aubert, A; Gomez de Segura, J M; Karuppasamy, M; Basu, S; Murthy, A S; Diamante, A; Drury, T A; Balmer, J; Cramard, J; Watson, A A; Lando, D; Lee, S F; Palayret, M; Kloet, S L; Smits, A H; Deery, M J; Vermeulen, M; Hendrich, B; Klenerman, D; Schaffitzel, C; Berger, I; Laue, E D

    2016-07-17

    The nucleosome remodeling deacetylase (NuRD) complex is a highly conserved regulator of chromatin structure and transcription. Structural studies have shed light on this and other chromatin modifying machines, but much less is known about how they assemble and whether stable and functional sub-modules exist that retain enzymatic activity. Purification of the endogenous Drosophila NuRD complex shows that it consists of a stable core of subunits, while others, in particular the chromatin remodeler CHD4, associate transiently. To dissect the assembly and activity of NuRD, we systematically produced all possible combinations of different components using the MultiBac system, and determined their activity and biophysical properties. We carried out single-molecule imaging of CHD4 in live mouse embryonic stem cells, in the presence and absence of one of core components (MBD3), to show how the core deacetylase and chromatin-remodeling sub-modules associate in vivo. Our experiments suggest a pathway for the assembly of NuRD via preformed and active sub-modules. These retain enzymatic activity and are present in both the nucleus and the cytosol, an outcome with important implications for understanding NuRD function. PMID:27117189

  16. Nucleosome Repositioning: A Novel Mechanism for Nicotine- and Cocaine-Induced Epigenetic Changes.

    PubMed

    Brown, Amber N; Vied, Cynthia; Dennis, Jonathan H; Bhide, Pradeep G

    2015-01-01

    Drugs of abuse modify behavior by altering gene expression in the brain. Gene expression can be regulated by changes in DNA methylation as well as by histone modifications, which alter chromatin structure, DNA compaction and DNA accessibility. In order to better understand the molecular mechanisms directing drug-induced changes in chromatin structure, we examined DNA-nucleosome interactions within promoter regions of 858 genes in human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) exposed to nicotine or cocaine. Widespread, drug- and time-resolved repositioning of nucleosomes was identified at the transcription start site and promoter region of multiple genes. Nicotine and cocaine produced unique and shared changes in terms of the numbers and types of genes affected, as well as repositioning of nucleosomes at sites which could increase or decrease the probability of gene expression based on DNA accessibility. Half of the drug-induced nucleosome positions approximated a theoretical model of nucleosome occupancy based on physical and chemical characteristics of the DNA sequence, whereas the basal or drug naïve positions were generally DNA sequence independent. Thus we suggest that nucleosome repositioning represents an initial dynamic genome-wide alteration of the transcriptional landscape preceding more selective downstream transcriptional reprogramming, which ultimately characterizes the cell- and tissue-specific responses to drugs of abuse. PMID:26414157

  17. Barriers and silencers: a theoretical toolkit for control and containment of nucleosome-based epigenetic states.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Ian B; Sneppen, Kim

    2011-12-01

    Positive feedback in nucleosome modification has been proposed to allow large chromatin regions to exist stably and heritably in distinct expression states. However, modeling has shown that such epigenetic bistability requires that modifying enzymes recruited by nucleosomes are active on distant nucleosomes, potentially allowing uncontrollable spreading of modification. By modeling the silencing of mating-type loci in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we show that a modification reaction that combines a long-range component and a locally acting component can provide bistability and can be blocked by simple barriers that interrupt the nucleosome chain. We find that robust containment of the silenced region could be achieved by the presence of a number of weak simple barriers in the surrounding chromatin and a limited capacity of the positive feedback reaction. In addition, we show that the state of the silenced region can be regulated by silencer elements acting only on neighboring nucleosomes. Thus, a relatively simple set of nucleosome-modifying enzymes and recognition domains is all that is needed to make chromatin-based epigenetics useful and safe. PMID:22037584

  18. Theoretical estimates of exposure timescales of protein binding sites on DNA regulated by nucleosome kinetics.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Jyotsana J; Das, Dibyendu; Padinhateeri, Ranjith

    2016-02-29

    It is being increasingly realized that nucleosome organization on DNA crucially regulates DNA-protein interactions and the resulting gene expression. While the spatial character of the nucleosome positioning on DNA has been experimentally and theoretically studied extensively, the temporal character is poorly understood. Accounting for ATPase activity and DNA-sequence effects on nucleosome kinetics, we develop a theoretical method to estimate the time of continuous exposure of binding sites of non-histone proteins (e.g. transcription factors and TATA binding proteins) along any genome. Applying the method to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we show that the exposure timescales are determined by cooperative dynamics of multiple nucleosomes, and their behavior is often different from expectations based on static nucleosome occupancy. Examining exposure times in the promoters of GAL1 and PHO5, we show that our theoretical predictions are consistent with known experiments. We apply our method genome-wide and discover huge gene-to-gene variability of mean exposure times of TATA boxes and patches adjacent to TSS (+1 nucleosome region); the resulting timescale distributions have non-exponential tails. PMID:26553807

  19. Free-energy landscape of mono- and dinucleosomes: Enhanced rotational flexibility of interconnected nucleosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Gi-Moon; Arya, Gaurav

    2016-03-01

    The nucleosome represents the basic unit of eukaryotic genome organization, and its conformational fluctuations play a crucial role in various cellular processes. Here we provide insights into the flipping transition of a nucleosome by computing its free-energy landscape as a function of the linking number and nucleosome orientation using the density-of-states Monte Carlo approach. To investigate how the energy landscape is affected by the presence of neighboring nucleosomes in a chromatin fiber, we also compute the free-energy landscape for a dinucleosome array. We find that the mononucleosome is bistable between conformations with negatively and positively crossed linkers while the conformation with open linkers appears as a transition state. The dinucleosome exhibits a markedly different energy landscape in which the conformation with open linkers populates not only the transition state but also the global minimum. This enhanced stability of the open state is attributed to increased rotational flexibility of nucleosomes arising from their mechanical coupling with neighboring nucleosomes. Our results provide a possible mechanism by which chromatin may enhance the accessibility of its DNA and facilitate the propagation and mitigation of DNA torsional stresses.

  20. AFM studies in diverse ionic environments of nucleosomes reconstituted on the 601 positioning sequence.

    PubMed

    Nazarov, Igor; Chekliarova, Iana; Rychkov, Georgy; Ilatovskiy, Andrey V; Crane-Robinson, Colyn; Tomilin, Alexey

    2016-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study mononucleosomes reconstituted from a DNA duplex of 353 bp containing the strong 601 octamer positioning sequence, together with recombinant human core histone octamers. Three parameters were measured: 1) the length of DNA wrapped around the core histones; 2) the number of superhelical turns, calculated from the total angle through which the DNA is bent, and 3) the volume of the DNA-histone core. This approach allowed us to define in detail the structural diversity of nucleosomes caused by disassembly of the octasome to form subnucleosomal structures containing hexasomes, tetrasomes and disomes. At low ionic strength (TE buffer) and in the presence of physiological concentrations of monovalent cations, the majority of the particles were subnucleosomal, but physiological concentrations of bivalent cations resulted in about half of the nucleosomes being canonical octasomes in which the exiting DNA duplexes cross orthogonally. The dominance of this last species explains why bivalent but not monovalent cations can induce the initial step towards compaction and convergence of neighboring nucleosomes in nucleosomal arrays to form the chromatin fiber in the absence of linker histone. The observed nucleosome structural diversity may reflect the functional plasticity of nucleosomes under physiological conditions. PMID:26586109

  1. The Flexible Ends of CENP-A Nucleosome Are Required for Mitotic Fidelity.

    PubMed

    Roulland, Yohan; Ouararhni, Khalid; Naidenov, Mladen; Ramos, Lorrie; Shuaib, Muhammad; Syed, Sajad Hussain; Lone, Imtiaz Nizar; Boopathi, Ramachandran; Fontaine, Emeline; Papai, Gabor; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Gautier, Thierry; Skoufias, Dimitrios; Padmanabhan, Kiran; Bednar, Jan; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Schultz, Patrick; Angelov, Dimitar; Hamiche, Ali; Dimitrov, Stefan

    2016-08-18

    CENP-A is a histone variant, which replaces histone H3 at centromeres and confers unique properties to centromeric chromatin. The crystal structure of CENP-A nucleosome suggests flexible nucleosomal DNA ends, but their dynamics in solution remains elusive and their implication in centromere function is unknown. Using electron cryo-microscopy, we determined the dynamic solution properties of the CENP-A nucleosome. Our biochemical, proteomic, and genetic data reveal that higher flexibility of DNA ends impairs histone H1 binding to the CENP-A nucleosome. Substituting the 2-turn αN-helix of CENP-A with the 3-turn αN-helix of H3 results in compact particles with rigidified DNA ends, able to bind histone H1. In vivo replacement of CENP-A with H3-CENP-A hybrid nucleosomes leads to H1 recruitment, delocalization of kinetochore proteins, and significant mitotic and cytokinesis defects. Our data reveal that the evolutionarily conserved flexible ends of the CENP-A nucleosomes are essential to ensure the fidelity of the mitotic pathway. PMID:27499292

  2. Distinct Features of the Histone Core Structure in Nucleosomes Containing the Histone H2A.B Variant

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Masaaki; Arimura, Yasuhiro; Shirayama, Kazuyoshi; Fujita, Risa; Oba, Yojiro; Sato, Nobuhiro; Inoue, Rintaro; Oda, Takashi; Sato, Mamoru; Heenan, Richard K.; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    Nucleosomes containing a human histone variant, H2A.B, in an aqueous solution were analyzed by small-angle neutron scattering utilizing a contrast variation technique. Comparisons with the canonical H2A nucleosome structure revealed that the DNA termini of the H2A.B nucleosome are detached from the histone core surface, and flexibly expanded toward the solvent. In contrast, the histone tails are compacted in H2A.B nucleosomes compared to those in canonical H2A nucleosomes, suggesting that they bind to the surface of the histone core and/or DNA. Therefore, the histone tail dynamics may function to regulate the flexibility of the DNA termini in the nucleosomes. PMID:24853749

  3. PuFFIN - a parameter-free method to build nucleosome maps from paired-end reads

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We introduce a novel method, called PuFFIN, that takes advantage of paired-end short reads to build genome-wide nucleosome maps with larger numbers of detected nucleosomes and higher accuracy than existing tools. In contrast to other approaches that require users to optimize several parameters according to their data (e.g., the maximum allowed nucleosome overlap or legal ranges for the fragment sizes) our algorithm can accurately determine a genome-wide set of non-overlapping nucleosomes without any user-defined parameter. This feature makes PuFFIN significantly easier to use and prevents users from choosing the "wrong" parameters and obtain sub-optimal nucleosome maps. Results PuFFIN builds genome-wide nucleosome maps using a multi-scale (or multi-resolution) approach. Our algorithm relies on a set of nucleosome "landscape" functions at different resolution levels: each function represents the likelihood of each genomic location to be occupied by a nucleosome for a particular value of the smoothing parameter. After a set of candidate nucleosomes is computed for each function, PuFFIN produces a consensus set that satisfies non-overlapping constraints and maximizes the number of nucleosomes. Conclusions We report comprehensive experimental results that compares PuFFIN with recently published tools (NOrMAL, TEMPLATE FILTERING, and NucPosSimulator) on several synthetic datasets as well as real data for S. cerevisiae and P. falciparum. Experimental results show that our approach produces more accurate nucleosome maps with a higher number of non-overlapping nucleosomes than other tools. PMID:25252810

  4. Increased Nucleosomes and Neutrophil Activation Link to Disease Progression in Patients with Scrub Typhus but Not Murine Typhus in Laos

    PubMed Central

    Paris, Daniel H.; Stephan, Femke; Bulder, Ingrid; Wouters, Diana; van der Poll, Tom; Newton, Paul N.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Zeerleder, Sacha

    2015-01-01

    Cell-mediated immunity is essential in protection against rickettsial illnesses, but the role of neutrophils in these intracellular vasculotropic infections remains unclear. This study analyzed the plasma levels of nucleosomes, FSAP-activation (nucleosome-releasing factor), and neutrophil activation, as evidenced by neutrophil-elastase (ELA) complexes, in sympatric Lao patients with scrub typhus and murine typhus. In acute scrub typhus elevated nucleosome levels correlated with lower GCS scores, raised respiratory rate, jaundice and impaired liver function, whereas neutrophil activation correlated with fibrinolysis and high IL-8 plasma levels, a recently identified predictor of severe disease and mortality. Nucleosome and ELA complex levels were associated with a 4.8-fold and 4-fold increased risk of developing severe scrub typhus, beyond cut off values of 1,040 U/ml for nucleosomes and 275 U/ml for ELA complexes respectively. In murine typhus, nucleosome levels associated with pro-inflammatory cytokines and the duration of illness, while ELA complexes correlated strongly with inflammation markers, jaundice and increased respiratory rates. This study found strong correlations between circulating nucleosomes and neutrophil activation in patients with scrub typhus, but not murine typhus, providing indirect evidence that nucleosomes could originate from neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) degradation. High circulating plasma nucleosomes and ELA complexes represent independent risk factors for developing severe complications in scrub typhus. As nucleosomes and histones exposed on NETs are highly cytotoxic to endothelial cells and are strongly pro-coagulant, neutrophil-derived nucleosomes could contribute to vascular damage, the pro-coagulant state and exacerbation of disease in scrub typhus, thus indicating a detrimental role of neutrophil activation. The data suggest that increased neutrophil activation relates to disease progression and severe complications, and

  5. Nucleosome structure incorporated histone acetylation site prediction in arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Acetylation is a crucial post-translational modification for histones, and plays a key role in gene expression regulation. Due to limited data and lack of a clear acetylation consensus sequence, a few researches have focused on prediction of lysine acetylation sites. Several systematic prediction studies have been conducted for human and yeast, but less for Arabidopsis thaliana. Results Concerning the insufficient observation on acetylation site, we analyzed contributions of the peptide-alignment-based distance definition and 3D structure factors in acetylation prediction. We found that traditional structure contributes little to acetylation site prediction. Identified acetylation sites of histones in Arabidopsis thaliana are conserved and cross predictable with that of human by peptide based methods. However, the predicted specificity is overestimated, because of the existence of non-observed acetylable site. Here, by performing a complete exploration on the factors that affect the acetylability of lysines in histones, we focused on the relative position of lysine at nucleosome level, and defined a new structure feature to promote the performance in predicting the acetylability of all the histone lysines in A. thaliana. Conclusion We found a new spacial correlated acetylation factor, and defined a ε-N spacial location based feature, which contains five core spacial ellipsoid wired areas. By incorporating the new feature, the performance of predicting the acetylability of all the histone lysines in A. Thaliana was promoted, in which the previous mispredicted acetylable lysines were corrected by comparing to the peptide-based prediction. PMID:21047388

  6. The uni chromosome of Chlamydomonas: histone genes and nucleosome structure.

    PubMed

    Walther, Z; Hall, J L

    1995-09-25

    The uni linkage group (ULG) of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii contains many genes involved in the basal body-flagellar system. Recent evidence suggests that the corresponding uni chromosome is located in close proximity to the basal body complex. In the course of studies into its molecular organization, we have found a cluster of four histone genes on the ULG. The genes are arranged as divergently-transcribed pairs: H3-H4 and H2B-H2A. Genomic sequencing reveals that these genes lack introns and contain characteristic 3' palindromes similar to those of animals. The predicted amino acid sequences are highly conserved across species, with greatest similarities to the histone genes of Volvox. Southern analysis shows that each histone gene is present in 15-20 copies in Chlamydomonas and suggests a dispersed genomic organization. Northern analysis of mitotically-synchronized cells shows that, like the replication-dependent histones of higher eukaryotes, Chlamydomonas histone genes are expressed during S-phase. Using a gene-specific probe on Northern blots, we provide evidence that the ULG H4 gene is regulated in the same manner as other Chlamydomonas histone genes. Finally, micrococcal nuclease protection experiments show that the uni chromosome itself associates with histone proteins and displays a conventional nucleosomal banding pattern. PMID:7479007

  7. A unique nucleosome arrangement, maintained actively by chromatin remodelers facilitates transcription of yeast tRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background RNA polymerase (pol) III transcribes a unique class of genes with intra-genic promoters and high transcriptional activity. The major contributors to the pol III transcriptome, tRNAs genes are found scattered on all chromosomes of yeast. A prototype tDNA of <150 bp length, is generally considered nucleosome-free while some pol III-transcribed genes have been shown to have nucleosome-positioning properties. Results Using high resolution ChIP-chip and ChIP-seq methods, we found several unique features associated with nucleosome profiles on all tRNA genes of budding yeast, not seen on nucleosome-dense counterparts in fission yeast and resting human CD4+ T cells. The nucleosome-free region (NFR) on all but three yeast tDNAs is found bordered by an upstream (US) nucleosome strongly positioned at −140 bp position and a downstream (DS) nucleosome at variable positions with respect to the gene terminator. Perturbation in this nucleosomal arrangement interferes with the tRNA production. Three different chromatin remodelers generate and maintain the NFR by targeting different gene regions. Isw1 localizes to the gene body and makes it nucleosome-depleted, Isw2 maintains periodicity in the upstream nucleosomal array, while RSC targets the downstream nucleosome. Direct communication of pol III with RSC serves as a stress-sensory mechanism for these genes. In its absence, the downstream nucleosome moves towards the gene terminator. Levels of tRNAs from different families are found to vary considerably as different pol III levels are seen even on isogenes within a family. Pol III levels show negative correlation with the nucleosome occupancies on different genes. Conclusions Budding yeast tRNA genes maintain an open chromatin structure, which is not due to sequence-directed nucleosome positioning or high transcription activity of genes. Unlike 5′ NFR on pol II-transcribed genes, the tDNA NFR, which facilitates tDNA transcription, results from action of chromatin

  8. A 145-base pair DNA sequence that positions itself precisely and asymmetrically on the nucleosome core.

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, N; Felsenfeld, G; Rushton, B M; McGhee, J D

    1984-01-01

    A 145-bp DNA sequence, cloned from Escherichia coli, was reconstituted into nucleosome core particles by a number of methods. The behaviour of the resulting complex upon sucrose gradient sedimentation and nucleoprotein gel electrophoresis closely resembled that of control bulk nucleosome core particles. DNase I digestion of the 32P-end-labelled complex revealed the 10-bp periodicity of cleavages expected for DNA bound on a histone surface. The narrow cleavage sites observed (1 bp wide) imply that the sequence occupies a single preferred position on the nucleosome core, accurate to the level of single base pairs. By relating the digestion pattern observed to the pattern of site protection found for random sequence nucleosomes, the DNA position was found to be offset by 17 bp from that in the normal core particle. A number of experiments argue against the involvement of length or end effects and suggest that it is some feature of the DNA sequence itself that determines this precise positioning of DNA on the nucleosome. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:6096135

  9. Distinct Roles of Histone H3 and H2A Tails in Nucleosome Stability.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenhai; Kono, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosome breathing potentially increases the DNA exposure, which in turn recruits DNA-binding protein and regulates gene transcription. Numerous studies have shown the critical roles of N-terminal tails of histones H3 and H4 in gene expression; however, few studies have focused on the H2A C-terminal tail. Here we present thorough computational studies on a single nucleosome particle showing the linker DNA closing and opening, which is thought to be nucleosome breathing. With our simulation, the H2A C-terminal and H3 N-terminal tails were found to modulate the nucleosome conformation differently. The H2A C-terminal tail regulates nucleosome conformation by binding to linker DNA at different locations, whereas the H3 N-terminal tail regulates linker DNA by binding to it in different patterns. Further MD simulation on tail truncated structures corroborates this analysis. These findings replenish our understanding of the histone tail regulation mechanism on atomic level. PMID:27527579

  10. The role of Nucleosome Positions on Chromatin Structure: A multi-scale approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lequieu, Joshua; Cordoba, Andres; de Pablo, Juan J.

    Nucleosomes compose the basic unit of chromatin, and their locations are central to the regulation and compaction of eukaryotic genomes. In this work, we examine the coupling between different length scales within chromatin by examining the influence of nucleosome positions on three-dimensional chromatin structure. First, using a detailed molecular model of DNA and proteins, we predict the one-dimensional positioning of nucleosomes and the repositioning mechanisms of nucleosomal DNA. We demonstrate that this mechanism is strongly dependent on DNA sequence and that DNA slides around the histone proteins by either a screw-like or loop-like rearrangement. Next, we couple this detailed model to a coarsened model of chromatin and examine the impact of DNA sequence on chromatin's three-dimensional structure. We show that both the locations of nucleosomes and the mechanisms by which they move have a significant impact on higher-order chromatin structure and that variations in DNA sequence lead to ''open'' or ''closed'' regions of chromatin. This approach represents an efficient tool towards understanding the higher order structure of chromatin and how various aspects of chromatin structure are coupled together.

  11. Zelda overcomes the high intrinsic nucleosome barrier at enhancers during Drosophila zygotic genome activation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yujia; Nien, Chung-Yi; Chen, Kai; Liu, Hsiao-Yun; Johnston, Jeff; Zeitlinger, Julia; Rushlow, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The Drosophila genome activator Vielfaltig (Vfl), also known as Zelda (Zld), is thought to prime enhancers for activation by patterning transcription factors (TFs). Such priming is accompanied by increased chromatin accessibility, but the mechanisms by which this occurs are poorly understood. Here, we analyze the effect of Zld on genome-wide nucleosome occupancy and binding of the patterning TF Dorsal (Dl). Our results show that early enhancers are characterized by an intrinsically high nucleosome barrier. Zld tackles this nucleosome barrier through local depletion of nucleosomes with the effect being dependent on the number and position of Zld motifs. Without Zld, Dl binding decreases at enhancers and redistributes to open regions devoid of enhancer activity. We propose that Zld primes enhancers by lowering the high nucleosome barrier just enough to assist TFs in accessing their binding motifs and promoting spatially controlled enhancer activation if the right patterning TFs are present. We envision that genome activators in general will utilize this mechanism to activate the zygotic genome in a robust and precise manner. PMID:26335633

  12. Distinct Roles of Histone H3 and H2A Tails in Nucleosome Stability

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenhai; Kono, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosome breathing potentially increases the DNA exposure, which in turn recruits DNA-binding protein and regulates gene transcription. Numerous studies have shown the critical roles of N-terminal tails of histones H3 and H4 in gene expression; however, few studies have focused on the H2A C-terminal tail. Here we present thorough computational studies on a single nucleosome particle showing the linker DNA closing and opening, which is thought to be nucleosome breathing. With our simulation, the H2A C-terminal and H3 N-terminal tails were found to modulate the nucleosome conformation differently. The H2A C-terminal tail regulates nucleosome conformation by binding to linker DNA at different locations, whereas the H3 N-terminal tail regulates linker DNA by binding to it in different patterns. Further MD simulation on tail truncated structures corroborates this analysis. These findings replenish our understanding of the histone tail regulation mechanism on atomic level. PMID:27527579

  13. A one-dimensional statistical mechanics model for nucleosome positioning on genomic DNA.

    PubMed

    Tesoro, S; Ali, I; Morozov, A N; Sulaiman, N; Marenduzzo, D

    2016-02-01

    The first level of folding of DNA in eukaryotes is provided by the so-called '10 nm chromatin fibre', where DNA wraps around histone proteins (∼10 nm in size) to form nucleosomes, which go on to create a zig-zagging bead-on-a-string structure. In this work we present a one-dimensional statistical mechanics model to study nucleosome positioning within one such 10 nm fibre. We focus on the case of genomic sheep DNA, and we start from effective potentials valid at infinite dilution and determined from high-resolution in vitro salt dialysis experiments. We study positioning within a polynucleosome chain, and compare the results for genomic DNA to that obtained in the simplest case of homogeneous DNA, where the problem can be mapped to a Tonks gas. First, we consider the simple, analytically solvable, case where nucleosomes are assumed to be point-like. Then, we perform numerical simulations to gauge the effect of their finite size on the nucleosomal distribution probabilities. Finally we compare nucleosome distributions and simulated nuclease digestion patterns for the two cases (homogeneous and sheep DNA), thereby providing testable predictions of the effect of sequence on experimentally observable quantities in experiments on polynucleosome chromatin fibres reconstituted in vitro. PMID:26871546

  14. Measuring inter-nucleosome interactions and the roles of histone tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Steven; Andresen, Kurt; Jimenez-Useche, Isabel; Yuan, Chongli; Qiu, Xiangyun

    2013-03-01

    Nucleosome is the first level of genome organization and regulation in eukaryotes, where negatively charged DNA is wrapped around positively charged histone proteins. Being a DNA-protein complex of biological origin, nucleosome is also a model multi-phasic nanoparticle with heterogeneous charge distributions and brush-like flexible tails of the histone proteins. In solutions of nucleosomes, electrostatic forces dominate inter-nucleosome interactions at long range while specific contacts, in particular the flexible histone tails, guides short range interactions. We have thus quantified how the ions from salts (KCl, MgCl2) modulate the inter-nucleosome pair potential by modeling the total small angle x-ray scattering profiles. We additionally elucidated the individual role of the charged tails of histones H3 and H4. We found that measured effective changes at low salt concentrations are about 1/5th of theoretically predicted renormalized charges and that H4 tail deletion suppresses the attraction at high salt concentrations to a larger extent than H3 tail deletion.

  15. Perturbation of nucleosome structure by the erythroid transcription factor GATA-1.

    PubMed

    Boyes, J; Omichinski, J; Clark, D; Pikaart, M; Felsenfeld, G

    1998-06-12

    The ability of transcription factors to gain access to their sites in chromatin requires the disruption or displacement of nucleosomes covering the promoter, signalled by the generation of a nuclease hypersensitive site. We characterise here the alterations in nucleosome structure caused by binding of the erythroid factor GATA-1 to a nucleosome carrying GATA-1 sites. DNase I and micrococcal nuclease probes show that GATA-1 binding causes extensive, cooperative breakage of the histone/DNA contacts to generate a complex very similar to that formed by the factor with free DNA. The only region which differs is confined to about 50 bp surrounding the nucleosome dyad axis which appears to be the domain of residual contact between the DNA and histone octamer. Despite considerable breakage of the histone/DNA contacts, the complex is completely stable in solution, and disruption of the nucleosome is entirely reversible: it is regenerated quantitatively upon removal of the transcription factor. Moreover, the histone 2A/2B component of the octamer does not exchange to external competitor. We suggest that formation of this complex may be a step in the generation of a fully hypersensitive site in vivo over regulatory elements containing GATA family binding sites. PMID:9641976

  16. Coordinated Action of Nap1 and RSC in Disassembly of Tandem Nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Rashmi; D'Arcy, Sheena; Hada, Arjan; Luger, Karolin; Bartholomew, Blaine

    2016-09-01

    The SWI/SNF and RSC family of ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers disassembles nucleosomes by moving nucleosomes into the vicinity of adjoining nucleosomes. We found that the histone chaperone Nap1 efficiently promotes disassembly of adjacent nucleosomes with which RSC collides and not the disassembly of nucleosomes mobilized by RSC. Nap1 is specific to RSC, as it does not target SWI/SNF, its paralog in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Extensive mutational analysis of Nap1 has revealed that Nap1 affinity for histones H2A-H2B and H3-H4 and its ability to displace histones from DNA are required for Nap1 to enhance RSC-mediated disassembly. Other histone chaperones, such as Vps75, that also bind histones are not able to enhance RSC-mediated disassembly. Our study suggests a mechanism by which Nap1 is recruited to actively transcribed regions and assists in the passage of the transcription complex through chromatin, and it provides a novel mechanism for the coordinated action of RSC and Nap1. PMID:27273866

  17. A one-dimensional statistical mechanics model for nucleosome positioning on genomic DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesoro, S.; Ali, I.; Morozov, A. N.; Sulaiman, N.; Marenduzzo, D.

    2016-02-01

    The first level of folding of DNA in eukaryotes is provided by the so-called ‘10 nm chromatin fibre’, where DNA wraps around histone proteins (∼10 nm in size) to form nucleosomes, which go on to create a zig-zagging bead-on-a-string structure. In this work we present a one-dimensional statistical mechanics model to study nucleosome positioning within one such 10 nm fibre. We focus on the case of genomic sheep DNA, and we start from effective potentials valid at infinite dilution and determined from high-resolution in vitro salt dialysis experiments. We study positioning within a polynucleosome chain, and compare the results for genomic DNA to that obtained in the simplest case of homogeneous DNA, where the problem can be mapped to a Tonks gas [1]. First, we consider the simple, analytically solvable, case where nucleosomes are assumed to be point-like. Then, we perform numerical simulations to gauge the effect of their finite size on the nucleosomal distribution probabilities. Finally we compare nucleosome distributions and simulated nuclease digestion patterns for the two cases (homogeneous and sheep DNA), thereby providing testable predictions of the effect of sequence on experimentally observable quantities in experiments on polynucleosome chromatin fibres reconstituted in vitro.

  18. A novel hybrid single molecule approach reveals spontaneous DNA motion in the nucleosome

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Sijie; Falk, Samantha J.; Black, Ben E.; Lee, Tae-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Structural dynamics of nucleic acid and protein is an important physical basis of their functions. These motions are often very difficult to synchronize and too fast to be clearly resolved with the currently available single molecule methods. Here we demonstrate a novel hybrid single molecule approach combining stochastic data analysis with fluorescence correlation that enables investigations of sub-ms unsynchronized structural dynamics of macromolecules. Based on the method, we report the first direct evidence of spontaneous DNA motions at the nucleosome termini. The nucleosome, comprising DNA and a histone core, is the fundamental packing unit of eukaryotic genes that must be accessed during various genome transactions. Spontaneous DNA opening at the nucleosome termini has long been hypothesized to enable gene access in the nucleosome, but has yet to be directly observed. Our approach reveals that DNA termini in the nucleosome open and close repeatedly at 0.1–1 ms−1. The kinetics depends on salt concentration and DNA–histone interactions but not much on DNA sequence, suggesting that this dynamics is universal and imposes the kinetic limit to gene access. These results clearly demonstrate that our method provides an efficient and robust means to investigate unsynchronized structural changes of DNA at a sub-ms time resolution. PMID:26013809

  19. Nucleosome compaction facilitates HP1γ binding to methylated H3K9

    PubMed Central

    Mishima, Yuichi; Jayasinghe, Chanika D.; Lu, Kai; Otani, Junji; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Kawakami, Toru; Kimura, Hironobu; Hojo, Hironobu; Carlton, Peter; Tajima, Shoji; Suetake, Isao

    2015-01-01

    The α, β and γ isoforms of mammalian heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) selectively bind to methylated lysine 9 of histone H3 via their chromodomains. Although the phenotypes of HP1-knockout mice are distinct for each isoform, the molecular mechanisms underlying HP1 isoform-specific function remain elusive. In the present study, we found that in contrast to HP1α, HP1γ could not bind tri-methylated H3 lysine 9 in a reconstituted tetra-nucleosomes when the nucleosomes were in an uncompacted state. The hinge region connecting HP1's chromodomain and chromoshadow domain contributed to the distinct recognition of the nucleosomes by HP1α and HP1γ. HP1γ, but not HP1α, was strongly enhanced in selective binding to tri-methylated lysine 9 in histone H3 by the addition of Mg2+ or linker histone H1, which are known to induce compaction of nucleosomes. We propose that this novel property of HP1γ recognition of lysine 9 in the histone H3 tail in different nucleosome structures plays a role in reading the histone code. PMID:26319017

  20. Nucleosome positioning and kinetics near transcription-start-site barriers are controlled by interplay between active remodeling and DNA sequence

    PubMed Central

    Parmar, Jyotsana J.; Marko, John F.; Padinhateeri, Ranjith

    2014-01-01

    We investigate how DNA sequence, ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling and nucleosome-depleted ‘barriers’ co-operate to determine the kinetics of nucleosome organization, in a stochastic model of nucleosome positioning and dynamics. We find that ‘statistical’ positioning of nucleosomes against ‘barriers’, hypothesized to control chromatin structure near transcription start sites, requires active remodeling and therefore cannot be described using equilibrium statistical mechanics. We show that, unlike steady-state occupancy, DNA site exposure kinetics near a barrier is dominated by DNA sequence rather than by proximity to the barrier itself. The timescale for formation of positioning patterns near barriers is proportional to the timescale for active nucleosome eviction. We also show that there are strong gene-to-gene variations in nucleosome positioning near barriers, which are eliminated by averaging over many genes. Our results suggest that measurement of nucleosome kinetics can reveal information about sequence-dependent regulation that is not apparent in steady-state nucleosome occupancy. PMID:24068556

  1. Physical properties of naked DNA influence nucleosome positioning and correlate with transcription start and termination sites in yeast

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In eukaryotic organisms, DNA is packaged into chromatin structure, where most of DNA is wrapped into nucleosomes. DNA compaction and nucleosome positioning have clear functional implications, since they modulate the accessibility of genomic regions to regulatory proteins. Despite the intensive research effort focused in this area, the rules defining nucleosome positioning and the location of DNA regulatory regions still remain elusive. Results Naked (histone-free) and nucleosomal DNA from yeast were digested by microccocal nuclease (MNase) and sequenced genome-wide. MNase cutting preferences were determined for both naked and nucleosomal DNAs. Integration of their sequencing profiles with DNA conformational descriptors derived from atomistic molecular dynamic simulations enabled us to extract the physical properties of DNA on a genomic scale and to correlate them with chromatin structure and gene regulation. The local structure of DNA around regulatory regions was found to be unusually flexible and to display a unique pattern of nucleosome positioning. Ab initio physical descriptors derived from molecular dynamics were used to develop a computational method that accurately predicts nucleosome enriched and depleted regions. Conclusions Our experimental and computational analyses jointly demonstrate a clear correlation between sequence-dependent physical properties of naked DNA and regulatory signals in the chromatin structure. These results demonstrate that nucleosome positioning around TSS (Transcription Start Site) and TTS (Transcription Termination Site) (at least in yeast) is strongly dependent on DNA physical properties, which can define a basal regulatory mechanism of gene expression. PMID:21981773

  2. SWI/SNF remodeling and p300-dependent transcription of histone variant H2ABbd nucleosomal arrays

    PubMed Central

    Angelov, Dimitar; Verdel, André; An, Woojin; Bondarenko, Vladimir; Hans, Fabienne; Doyen, Cécile-Marie; Studitsky, Vassily M; Hamiche, Ali; Roeder, Robert G; Bouvet, Philippe; Dimitrov, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    A histone variant H2ABbd was recently identified, but its function is totally unknown. Here we have studied the structural and functional properties of nucleosome and nucleosomal arrays reconstituted with this histone variant. We show that H2ABbd can replace the conventional H2A in the nucleosome, but this replacement results in alterations of the nucleosomal structure. The remodeling complexes SWI/SNF and ACF are unable to mobilize the variant H2ABbd nucleosome. However, SWI/SNF was able to increase restriction enzyme access to the variant nucleosome and assist the transfer of variant H2ABbd–H2B dimer to a tetrameric histone H3–H4 particle. In addition, the p300- and Gal4-VP16-activated transcription appeared to be more efficient for H2ABbd nucleosomal arrays than for conventional H2A arrays. The intriguing mechanisms by which H2ABbd affects both nucleosome remodeling and transcription are discussed. PMID:15372075

  3. Sequence-directed nucleosome-depletion is sufficient to activate transcription from a yeast core promoter in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Yuichi; Morohashi, Nobuyuki; Tomita, Nobuyuki; Mitchell, Aaron P; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Shimizu, Mitsuhiro

    2016-07-22

    Nucleosome-depleted regions (NDRs) (also called nucleosome-free regions or NFRs) are often found in the promoter regions of many yeast genes, and are formed by multiple mechanisms, including the binding of activators and enhancers, the actions of chromatin remodeling complexes, and the specific DNA sequences themselves. However, it remains unclear whether NDR formation per se is essential for transcriptional activation. Here, we examined the relationship between nucleosome organization and gene expression using a defined yeast reporter system, consisting of the CYC1 minimal core promoter and the lacZ gene. We introduced simple repeated sequences that should be either incorporated in nucleosomes or excluded from nucleosomes in the site upstream of the TATA boxes. The (CTG)12, (GAA)12 and (TGTAGG)6 inserts were incorporated into a positioned nucleosome in the core promoter region, and did not affect the reporter gene expression. In contrast, the insertion of (CGG)12, (TTAGGG)6, (A)34 or (CG)8 induced lacZ expression by 10-20 fold. Nucleosome mapping analyses revealed that the inserts that induced the reporter gene expression prevented nucleosome formation, and created an NDR upstream of the TATA boxes. Thus, our results demonstrated that NDR formation dictated by DNA sequences is sufficient for transcriptional activation from the core promoter in vivo. PMID:27208777

  4. Brownian dynamics simulation of the effect of histone modification on nucleosome structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Xie, Ping; Wang, Peng-Ye

    2007-05-01

    Using Brownian dynamics we simulate the effect of histone modification, such as phosphorylation, acetylation, and methylation, on nucleosome structure by varying the interaction force between DNA and the histone octamer. The simulation shows that the structural stability of nucleosome is very sensitive to the interaction force, and the DNA unwrapping from the modified histone octamer usually occurs turn by turn. Furthermore, the effects of temperature and DNA break as well as the competition between modified and normal histone octamers are investigated, with the simulation results being in agreement with the experimental observation that phosphorylated nucleosomes near DNA breaks are more easily depleted. Though the simulation study may only give a coarse grained view of the DNA unwrapping process for the modified histone octamer, it may provide insight into the mechanism of DNA repair.

  5. Human mitotic chromosomes consist predominantly of irregularly folded nucleosome fibres without a 30-nm chromatin structure

    PubMed Central

    Nishino, Yoshinori; Eltsov, Mikhail; Joti, Yasumasa; Ito, Kazuki; Takata, Hideaki; Takahashi, Yukio; Hihara, Saera; Frangakis, Achilleas S; Imamoto, Naoko; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Maeshima, Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    How a long strand of genomic DNA is compacted into a mitotic chromosome remains one of the basic questions in biology. The nucleosome fibre, in which DNA is wrapped around core histones, has long been assumed to be folded into a 30-nm chromatin fibre and further hierarchical regular structures to form mitotic chromosomes, although the actual existence of these regular structures is controversial. Here, we show that human mitotic HeLa chromosomes are mainly composed of irregularly folded nucleosome fibres rather than 30-nm chromatin fibres. Our comprehensive and quantitative study using cryo-electron microscopy and synchrotron X-ray scattering resolved the long-standing contradictions regarding the existence of 30-nm chromatin structures and detected no regular structure >11 nm. Our finding suggests that the mitotic chromosome consists of irregularly arranged nucleosome fibres, with a fractal nature, which permits a more dynamic and flexible genome organization than would be allowed by static regular structures. PMID:22343941

  6. Nucleosome Binding Alters the Substrate Bonding Environment of Histone H3 Lysine 36 Methyltransferase NSD2.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Myles B; Schneck, Jessica L; Matico, Rosalie E; Hou, Wangfang; McDevitt, Patrick J; Holbert, Marc; Schramm, Vern L

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear receptor-binding SET domain protein 2 (NSD2) is a histone H3 lysine 36 (H3K36)-specific methyltransferase enzyme that is overexpressed in a number of cancers, including multiple myeloma. NSD2 binds to S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) and nucleosome substrates to catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from SAM to the ε-amino group of histone H3K36. Equilibrium binding isotope effects and density functional theory calculations indicate that the SAM methyl group is sterically constrained in complex with NSD2, and that this steric constraint is released upon nucleosome binding. Together, these results show that nucleosome binding to NSD2 induces a significant change in the chemical environment of enzyme-bound SAM. PMID:27183271

  7. Site-specific aflatoxin B sub 1 adduction of sequence-positioned nucleosome core particles

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    The question of how the presence of nucleosomal packing of DNA modifies carcinogen interaction at specific sites cannot be answered by studies on whole chromatin or bulk nucleosomes because of the heterogeneity of DNA sequences in the particles. This problem was circumvented by constructing nucleosomes that are homogenous in DNA-histone contact points. A cloned DNA fragment, containing a sea urchin 5S gene which precisely positions a histone octamer was employed. By using {sup 32}P end-labeled DNA and genotoxins that allow cleavage at sites of attack, the frequency of adduction at every susceptible nucleotide can be determined on sequencing gels. The small methylating agent dimethyl sulfate (DMS) and the bulky alkylating agent afatoxin B{sub 1}-dichloride (AFB{sub 1}-Cl{sub 2}) were used to probe the influence of DNA-histone interactions on DNA alkylation patterns in sequence-positioned core particles.

  8. RNF4 interacts with both SUMO and nucleosomes to promote the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Groocock, Lynda M; Nie, Minghua; Prudden, John; Moiani, Davide; Wang, Tao; Cheltsov, Anton; Rambo, Robert P; Arvai, Andrew S; Hitomi, Chiharu; Tainer, John A; Luger, Karolin; Perry, J Jefferson P; Lazzerini-Denchi, Eros; Boddy, Michael N

    2014-05-01

    The post-translational modification of DNA repair and checkpoint proteins by ubiquitin and small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) critically orchestrates the DNA damage response (DDR). The ubiquitin ligase RNF4 integrates signaling by SUMO and ubiquitin, through its selective recognition and ubiquitination of SUMO-modified proteins. Here, we define a key new determinant for target discrimination by RNF4, in addition to interaction with SUMO. We identify a nucleosome-targeting motif within the RNF4 RING domain that can bind DNA and thereby enables RNF4 to selectively ubiquitinate nucleosomal histones. Furthermore, RNF4 nucleosome-targeting is crucially required for the repair of TRF2-depleted dysfunctional telomeres by 53BP1-mediated non-homologous end joining. PMID:24714598

  9. Structural Basis of Silencing: Sir3 BAH Domain in Complex with a Nucleosome at 3.0 Å Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Armache, Karim-Jean; Garlick, Joseph D.; Canzio, Daniele; Narlikar, Geeta J.; Kingston, Robert E.

    2011-11-30

    Gene silencing is essential for regulating cell fate in eukaryotes. Altered chromatin architectures contribute to maintaining the silenced state in a variety of species. The silent information regulator (Sir) proteins regulate mating type in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. One of these proteins, Sir3, interacts directly with the nucleosome to help generate silenced domains. We determined the crystal structure of a complex of the yeast Sir3 BAH (bromo-associated homology) domain and the nucleosome core particle at 3.0 angstrom resolution. We see multiple molecular interactions between the protein surfaces of the nucleosome and the BAH domain that explain numerous genetic mutations. These interactions are accompanied by structural rearrangements in both the nucleosome and the BAH domain. The structure explains how covalent modifications on H4K16 and H3K79 regulate formation of a silencing complex that contains the nucleosome as a central component.

  10. DNA Physical Properties and Nucleosome Positions Are Major Determinants of HIV-1 Integrase Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Naughtin, Monica; Haftek-Terreau, Zofia; Xavier, Johan; Meyer, Sam; Silvain, Maud; Jaszczyszyn, Yan; Levy, Nicolas; Miele, Vincent; Benleulmi, Mohamed Salah; Ruff, Marc; Parissi, Vincent; Vaillant, Cédric; Lavigne, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Retroviral integrases (INs) catalyse the integration of the reverse transcribed viral DNA into the host cell genome. This process is selective, and chromatin has been proposed to be a major factor regulating this step in the viral life cycle. However, the precise underlying mechanisms are still under investigation. We have developed a new in vitro integration assay using physiologically-relevant, reconstituted genomic acceptor chromatin and high-throughput determination of nucleosome positions and integration sites, in parallel. A quantitative analysis of the resulting data reveals a chromatin-dependent redistribution of the integration sites and establishes a link between integration sites and nucleosome positions. The co-activator LEDGF/p75 enhanced integration but did not modify the integration sites under these conditions. We also conducted an in cellulo genome-wide comparative study of nucleosome positions and human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) integration sites identified experimentally in vivo. These studies confirm a preferential integration in nucleosome-covered regions. Using a DNA mechanical energy model, we show that the physical properties of DNA probed by IN binding are important in determining IN selectivity. These novel in vitro and in vivo approaches confirm that IN has a preference for integration into a nucleosome, and suggest the existence of two levels of IN selectivity. The first depends on the physical properties of the target DNA and notably, the energy required to fit DNA into the IN catalytic pocket. The second depends on the DNA deformation associated with DNA wrapping around a nucleosome. Taken together, these results indicate that HIV-1 IN is a shape-readout DNA binding protein. PMID:26075397

  11. Nucleosomal organization of chromatin in sperm nuclei of the bivalve mollusc Aulacomya ater.

    PubMed

    Olivares, C; Ruiz, S

    1991-03-13

    The sperm nuclei of Aulacomya ater, family Mitylidae, contain three proteins (X, Aa5 and Aa6) which are specific to this cell type coexisting with a set of five somatic-type histones. Information about the chromatin structure resulting from this kind of association is scarce. Therefore, we have probed the structure of this sperm chromatin through digestion with micrococcal nuclease in combination with salt fractionation. The data obtained have allowed us to propose a nucleosomal arrangement for this chromatin. However, two types of nucleosomes would be present in agreement with their protein components. PMID:1861676

  12. Temperature-dependent cleavage of chromatin by micrococcal nuclease near the nucleosome center.

    PubMed

    Huang, S Y; Garrard, W T

    1986-04-01

    Digestion of nuclei at 4 degrees C with micrococcal nuclease results in significant intranucleosomal cleavage compared to digestion conducted at 37 degrees C. Employing nucleoprotein gel electrophoresis in one dimension followed by DNA electrophoresis in a second dimension, we demonstrate that such temperature-sensitive, internal cleavage predominantly occurs about 20 bp from the nucleosome center. We suggest that lower temperatures reduce the stability of hydrophobic interactions within the histone octamer and lead to a conformational alteration in nucleosomes that is detected by micrococcal nuclease. PMID:3956749

  13. Assembly of Drosophila Centromeric Chromatin Proteins during Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Mellone, Barbara G.; Bowers, Sarion R.; Oderberg, Isaac; Karpen, Gary H.

    2011-01-01

    Semi-conservative segregation of nucleosomes to sister chromatids during DNA replication creates gaps that must be filled by new nucleosome assembly. We analyzed the cell-cycle timing of centromeric chromatin assembly in Drosophila, which contains the H3 variant CID (CENP-A in humans), as well as CENP-C and CAL1, which are required for CID localization. Pulse-chase experiments show that CID and CENP-C levels decrease by 50% at each cell division, as predicted for semi-conservative segregation and inheritance, whereas CAL1 displays higher turnover. Quench-chase-pulse experiments demonstrate that there is a significant lag between replication and replenishment of centromeric chromatin. Surprisingly, new CID is recruited to centromeres in metaphase, by a mechanism that does not require an intact mitotic spindle, but does require proteasome activity. Interestingly, new CAL1 is recruited to centromeres before CID in prophase. Furthermore, CAL1, but not CENP-C, is found in complex with pre-nucleosomal CID. Finally, CENP-C displays yet a different pattern of incorporation, during both interphase and mitosis. The unusual timing of CID recruitment and unique dynamics of CAL1 identify a distinct centromere assembly pathway in Drosophila and suggest that CAL1 is a key regulator of centromere propagation. PMID:21589899

  14. Opposing roles of H3- and H4-acetylation in the regulation of nucleosome structure—a FRET study

    PubMed Central

    Gansen, Alexander; Tóth, Katalin; Schwarz, Nathalie; Langowski, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Using FRET in bulk and on single molecules, we assessed the structural role of histone acetylation in nucleosomes reconstituted on the 170 bp long Widom 601 sequence. We followed salt-induced nucleosome disassembly, using donor–acceptor pairs on the ends or in the internal part of the nucleosomal DNA, and on H2B histone for measuring H2A/H2B dimer exchange. This allowed us to distinguish the influence of acetylation on salt-induced DNA unwrapping at the entry–exit site from its effect on nucleosome core dissociation. The effect of lysine acetylation is not simply cumulative, but showed distinct histone-specificity. Both H3- and H4-acetylation enhance DNA unwrapping above physiological ionic strength; however, while H3-acetylation renders the nucleosome core more sensitive to salt-induced dissociation and to dimer exchange, H4-acetylation counteracts these effects. Thus, our data suggest, that H3- and H4-acetylation have partially opposing roles in regulating nucleosome architecture and that distinct aspects of nucleosome dynamics might be independently controlled by individual histones. PMID:25589544

  15. Solution scattering and FRET studies on nucleosomes reveal DNA unwrapping effects of H3 and H4 tail removal.

    PubMed

    Andresen, Kurt; Jimenez-Useche, Isabel; Howell, Steven C; Yuan, Chongli; Qiu, Xiangyun

    2013-01-01

    Using a combination of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements we have determined the role of the H3 and H4 histone tails, independently, in stabilizing the nucleosome DNA terminal ends from unwrapping from the nucleosome core. We have performed solution scattering experiments on recombinant wild-type, H3 and H4 tail-removed mutants and fit all scattering data with predictions from PDB models and compared these experiments to complementary DNA-end FRET experiments. Based on these combined SAXS and FRET studies, we find that while all nucleosomes exhibited DNA unwrapping, the extent of this unwrapping is increased for nucleosomes with the H3 tails removed but, surprisingly, decreased in nucleosomes with the H4 tails removed. Studies of salt concentration effects show a minimum amount of DNA unwrapping for all complexes around 50-100mM of monovalent ions. These data exhibit opposite roles for the positively-charged nucleosome tails, with the ability to decrease access (in the case of the H3 histone) or increase access (in the case of the H4 histone) to the DNA surrounding the nucleosome. In the range of salt concentrations studied (0-200mM KCl), the data point to the H4 tail-removed mutant at physiological (50-100mM) monovalent salt concentration as the mononucleosome with the least amount of DNA unwrapping. PMID:24265699

  16. Solution Scattering and FRET Studies on Nucleosomes Reveal DNA Unwrapping Effects of H3 and H4 Tail Removal

    PubMed Central

    Andresen, Kurt; Jimenez-Useche, Isabel; Howell, Steven C.; Yuan, Chongli; Qiu, Xiangyun

    2013-01-01

    Using a combination of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements we have determined the role of the H3 and H4 histone tails, independently, in stabilizing the nucleosome DNA terminal ends from unwrapping from the nucleosome core. We have performed solution scattering experiments on recombinant wild-type, H3 and H4 tail-removed mutants and fit all scattering data with predictions from PDB models and compared these experiments to complementary DNA-end FRET experiments. Based on these combined SAXS and FRET studies, we find that while all nucleosomes exhibited DNA unwrapping, the extent of this unwrapping is increased for nucleosomes with the H3 tails removed but, surprisingly, decreased in nucleosomes with the H4 tails removed. Studies of salt concentration effects show a minimum amount of DNA unwrapping for all complexes around 50-100mM of monovalent ions. These data exhibit opposite roles for the positively-charged nucleosome tails, with the ability to decrease access (in the case of the H3 histone) or increase access (in the case of the H4 histone) to the DNA surrounding the nucleosome. In the range of salt concentrations studied (0-200mM KCl), the data point to the H4 tail-removed mutant at physiological (50-100mM) monovalent salt concentration as the mononucleosome with the least amount of DNA unwrapping. PMID:24265699

  17. Organisation of nucleosomal arrays reconstituted with repetitive African green monkey α-satellite DNA as analysed by atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bussiek, Malte; Müller, Gabriele; Waldeck, Waldemar; Diekmann, Stephan

    2007-01-01

    Alpha-satellite DNA (AS) is part of centromeric DNA and could be relevant for centromeric chromatin structure: its repetitive character may generate a specifically ordered nucleosomal arrangement and thereby facilitate kinetochore protein binding and chromatin condensation. Although nucleosomal positioning on some satellite sequences had been shown, including AS from African green monkey (AGM), the sequence-dependent nucleosomal organisation of repetitive AS of this species has so far not been analysed. We therefore studied the positioning of reconstituted nucleosomes on AGM AS tandemly repeated DNA. Enzymatic analysis of nucleosome arrays formed on an AS heptamer as well as the localisation of mononucleosomes on an AS dimer by atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed one major positioning frame, in agreement with earlier results. The occupancy of this site was in the range of 45–50%, in quite good agreement with published in vivo observations. AFM measurements of internucleosomal distances formed on the heptamer indicated that the nucleosomal arrangement is governed by sequence-specific DNA-histone interactions yielding defined internucleosomal distances, which, nevertheless, are not compatible with a uniform phasing of the nucleosomes with the AGM AS repeats. PMID:17503032

  18. Robustness of nucleosome patterns in the presence of DNA sequence-specific free energy landscapes and active remodeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuebler, Johannes; Obermayer, Benedikt; Möbius, Wolfram; Wolff, Michael; Gerland, Ulrich

    Proper positioning of nucleosomes in eukaryotic cells is important for transcription regulation. When averaged over many genes, nucleosome positions in coding regions follow a simple oscillatory pattern, which is described to a surprising degree of accuracy by a simple one-dimensional gas model for particles interacting via a soft-core repulsion. The quantitative agreement is surprising given that nucleosome positions are known to be determined by a complex interplay of mechanisms including DNA sequence-specific nucleosome stability and active repositioning of nucleosomes by remodeling enzymes. We rationalize the observed robustness of the simple oscillatory pattern by showing that the main effect of several known nucleosome positioning mechanisms is a renormalization of the particle interaction. For example, ``disorder'' from sequence-specific affinities leads to an apparent softening, while active remodeling can result in apparent softening for directional sliding or apparent stiffening for clamping mechanisms. We suggest that such parameter renormalization can explain the apparent difference of nucleosome properties in two yeast species, S. cerevisiae and S. pombe.

  19. High-resolution biophysical analysis of the dynamics of nucleosome formation.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Akiko; Hartmann, Brigitte; Travers, Andrew; Nogues, Claude; Buckle, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    We describe a biophysical approach that enables changes in the structure of DNA to be followed during nucleosome formation in in vitro reconstitution with either the canonical "Widom" sequence or a judiciously mutated sequence. The rapid non-perturbing photochemical analysis presented here provides 'snapshots' of the DNA configuration at any given moment in time during nucleosome formation under a very broad range of reaction conditions. Changes in DNA photochemical reactivity upon protein binding are interpreted as being mainly induced by alterations in individual base pair roll angles. The results strengthen the importance of the role of an initial (H3/H4)2 histone tetramer-DNA interaction and highlight the modulation of this early event by the DNA sequence. (H3/H4)2 binding precedes and dictates subsequent H2A/H2B-DNA interactions, which are less affected by the DNA sequence, leading to the final octameric nucleosome. Overall, our results provide a novel, exciting way to investigate those biophysical properties of DNA that constitute a crucial component in nucleosome formation and stabilization. PMID:27263658

  20. Changes in the molecular structure of mouse fetal astrocyte nucleosomes produced in vitro by methylmercuric chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, B.H.; Simpkins, H.

    1986-04-01

    The fluorescent probe N-(3-pyrene)maleimide, which specifically labels the cysteine residues of histone H3 within the nucleosome, was used to monitor changes in the nucleosomal structure of mouse fetal astrocytes exposed to varying concentrations of methylmercuric chloride. Methylmercuric chloride treatment (10 ..mu..m) for 6 hr produced a significant decrease in the degree of fluorescence of the probe. The decrease was much smaller following a 4-hr incubation period. These results correlate with recent observations showing that significant changes in the thymidine labeling index occur following 4-6 hr of exposure to methylmercury (MeHg). It is hypothesized that MeHg enters the cells during the growth phase and attaches to the protein moiety of the nucleosome in or near the cysteine groups of histone H3, thus diminishing the binding capacity of the fluorescent probe. Addition of a detergent (sodium dodecyl sulfate) resulted in only a small increase in the degree of fluorescence of the treated nucleosomes as compared to controls, showing that the interaction of MeHg with the nuclear proteins was not dissociated by detergent. In view of the strong interaction between DNA and the histone dimer H3-H4 and the potential importance of the latter in gene regulation, these results suggest an additional means by which MeHg may exert its toxic effects.

  1. Small-Activating RNA Can Change Nucleosome Positioning in Human Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Sun, Jing; Shi, Jiandong; Guo, Qing; Tong, Xiangrong; Zhang, Jin; Hu, Ningzhu; Hu, YunZhang

    2016-07-01

    RNA activation (RNAa) is a mechanism of positive gene expression regulation mediated by small-activating RNAs (saRNAs), which target gene promoters and have been used as tools to manipulate gene expression. Studies have shown that RNAa is associated with epigenetic modifications at promoter regions; however, it is unclear whether these modifications are the cause or a consequence of RNAa. In this study, we examined changes in nucleosome repositioning and the involvement of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) in this process. We screened saRNAs for OCT4 (POU5F1), SOX2, and NANOG, and identified several novel saRNAs. We found that nucleosome positioning was altered after saRNA treatment and that the formation of nucleosome-depleted regions (NDRs) contributed to RNAa at sites of RNAPII binding, such as the TATA box, CpG islands (CGIs), proximal enhancers, and proximal promoters. Moreover, RNAPII appeared to be bound specifically to NDRs. These results suggested that changes in nucleosome positions resulted from RNAa. We thus propose a hypothesis that targeting promoter regions using exogenous saRNAs can induce the formation of NDRs, exposing regulatory binding sites to recruit RNAPII, a key component of preinitiation complex, and leading to increased initiation of transcription. PMID:26993320

  2. High-resolution biophysical analysis of the dynamics of nucleosome formation

    PubMed Central

    Hatakeyama, Akiko; Hartmann, Brigitte; Travers, Andrew; Nogues, Claude; Buckle, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    We describe a biophysical approach that enables changes in the structure of DNA to be followed during nucleosome formation in in vitro reconstitution with either the canonical “Widom” sequence or a judiciously mutated sequence. The rapid non-perturbing photochemical analysis presented here provides ‘snapshots’ of the DNA configuration at any given moment in time during nucleosome formation under a very broad range of reaction conditions. Changes in DNA photochemical reactivity upon protein binding are interpreted as being mainly induced by alterations in individual base pair roll angles. The results strengthen the importance of the role of an initial (H3/H4)2 histone tetramer-DNA interaction and highlight the modulation of this early event by the DNA sequence. (H3/H4)2 binding precedes and dictates subsequent H2A/H2B-DNA interactions, which are less affected by the DNA sequence, leading to the final octameric nucleosome. Overall, our results provide a novel, exciting way to investigate those biophysical properties of DNA that constitute a crucial component in nucleosome formation and stabilization. PMID:27263658

  3. Kinase-mediated changes in nucleosome conformation trigger chromatin decondensation via poly-ADP-ribosylation

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Colin J.; Kotova, Elena; Andrake, Mark; Adolf-Bryfogle, Jared; Glaser, Robert; Regnard, Catherine; Tulin, Alexei V.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Dynamically controlled post-translational modifications of nucleosomal histones alter chromatin condensation to regulate transcriptional activation. We report that a nuclear tandem kinase, JIL-1, controls gene expression by activating Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase 1 (PARP-1). JIL-1 phosphorylates the C-terminus of the H2Av histone variant, which stimulates PARP-1 enzymatic activity in the surrounding chromatin, leading to further modification of histones and chromatin loosening. The H2Av nucleosome has a higher surface representation of PARP-1 binding patch consisting of H3 and H4 epitopes. Phosphorylation of H2Av by JIL-1 restructures this surface patch leading to activation of PARP-1. Exposure of Val61 and Leu23 of the H4 histone is critical for PARP-1 binding on nucleosome and PARP-1 activation following H2Av phosphorylation. We propose that chromatin loosening and associated initiation of gene expression is activated by phosphorylation of H2Av in a nucleosome positioned in promoter regions of PARP-1 dependent genes. PMID:24508391

  4. Single-molecule tools elucidate H2A.Z nucleosome composition

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiji; Miller, Andrew; Kirchmaier, Ann L.; Irudayaraj, Joseph M. K.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Although distinct epigenetic marks correlate with different chromatin states, how they are integrated within single nucleosomes to generate combinatorial signals remains largely unknown. We report the successful implementation of single molecule tools constituting fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), pulse interleave excitation-based Förster resonance energy transfer (PIE-FRET) and fluorescence lifetime imaging-based FRET (FLIM-FRET) to elucidate the composition of single nucleosomes containing histone variant H2A.Z (Htz1p in yeast) in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrate that yeast nucleosomes containing Htz1p are primarily composed of H4 K12ac and H3 K4me3 but not H3 K36me3 and that these patterns are conserved in mammalian cells. Quantification of epigenetic modifications in nucleosomes will provide a new dimension to epigenetics research and lead to a better understanding of how these patterns contribute to the targeting of chromatin-binding proteins and chromatin structure during gene regulation. PMID:22393239

  5. A Highly Conserved Region within H2B Is Important for FACT To Act on Nucleosomes

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Suting; Crickard, J. Brooks; Srikanth, Abhinaya

    2014-01-01

    Histone N-terminal tails play crucial roles in chromatin-related processes. The tails of histones H3 and H4 are highly conserved and well characterized, but much less is known about the functions of the tails of histones H2A and H2B and their sequences are more divergent among eukaryotes. Here we characterized the function of the only highly conserved region in the H2B tail, the H2B repression (HBR) domain. Once thought to play a role only in repression, it also has an uncharacterized function in gene activation and DNA damage responses. We report that deletion of the HBR domain impairs the eviction of nucleosomes at the promoters and open reading frames of genes. A closer examination of the HBR domain mutants revealed that they displayed phenotypes similar to those of histone chaperone complex FACT mutants, including an increase in intragenic transcription and the accumulation of free histones in cells. Biochemical characterization of recombinant nucleosomes indicates that deletion of the HBR domain impairs FACT-dependent removal of H2A-H2B from nucleosomes, suggesting that the HBR domain plays an important role in allowing FACT to disrupt dimer-DNA interactions. We have uncovered a previously unappreciated role for the HBR domain in regulating chromatin structure and have provided insight into how FACT acts on nucleosomes. PMID:24248595

  6. The MTA1 subunit of the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase complex can recruit two copies of RBBP4/7.

    PubMed

    Schmidberger, Jason W; Sharifi Tabar, Mehdi; Torrado, Mario; Silva, Ana P G; Landsberg, Michael J; Brillault, Lou; AlQarni, Saad; Zeng, Yi Cheng; Parker, Benjamin L; Low, Jason K K; Mackay, Joel P

    2016-08-01

    The nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex remodels the genome in the context of both gene transcription and DNA damage repair. It is essential for normal development and is distributed across multiple tissues in organisms ranging from mammals to nematode worms. In common with other chromatin-remodeling complexes, however, its molecular mechanism of action is not well understood and only limited structural information is available to show how the complex is assembled. As a step towards understanding the structure of the NuRD complex, we have characterized the interaction between two subunits: the metastasis associated protein MTA1 and the histone-binding protein RBBP4. We show that MTA1 can bind to two molecules of RBBP4 and present negative stain electron microscopy and chemical crosslinking data that allow us to build a low-resolution model of an MTA1-(RBBP4)2 subcomplex. These data build on our understanding of NuRD complex structure and move us closer towards an understanding of the biochemical basis for the activity of this complex. PMID:27144666

  7. The NH2 Tail of the Novel Histone Variant H2BFWT Exhibits Properties Distinct from Conventional H2B with Respect to the Assembly of Mitotic Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Boulard, Mathieu; Gautier, Thierry; Mbele, Gaelh Ouengue; Gerson, Véronique; Hamiche, Ali; Angelov, Dimitar; Bouvet, Philippe; Dimitrov, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the functional and structural properties of nucleosomes reconstituted with H2BFWT, a recently identified putative histone variant of the H2B family with totally unknown function. We show that H2BFWT can replace the conventional histone H2B in the nucleosome. The presence of H2BFWT did not affect the overall structure of the nucleosome, and the H2BFWT nucleosomes exhibited the same stability as conventional nucleosomes. SWI/SNF was able to efficiently remodel and mobilize the H2BFWT nucleosomes. Importantly, H2BFWT, in contrast to conventional H2B, was unable to recruit chromosome condensation factors and to participate in the assembly of mitotic chromosomes. This was determined by the highly divergent (compared to conventional H2B) NH2 tail of H2BFWT. These data, in combination with the observations that H2BFWT was found by others in the sperm nuclei and appeared to be associated with the telomeric chromatin, suggest that H2BFWT could act as a specific epigenetic marker. PMID:16449661

  8. Nucleolin mediates nucleosome disruption critical for DNA double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Michael; Derheimer, Frederick A; Tait-Mulder, Jacqueline; Kastan, Michael B

    2013-10-15

    Recruitment of DNA repair factors and modulation of chromatin structure at sites of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is a complex and highly orchestrated process. We developed a system that can induce DSBs rapidly at defined endogenous sites in mammalian genomes and enables direct assessment of repair and monitoring of protein recruitment, egress, and modification at DSBs. The tight regulation of the system also permits assessments of relative kinetics and dependencies of events associated with cellular responses to DNA breakage. Distinct advantages of this system over focus formation/disappearance assays for assessing DSB repair are demonstrated. Using ChIP, we found that nucleosomes are partially disassembled around DSBs during nonhomologous end-joining repair in G1-arrested mammalian cells, characterized by a transient loss of the H2A/H2B histone dimer. Nucleolin, a protein with histone chaperone activity, interacts with RAD50 via its arginine-glycine rich domain and is recruited to DSBs rapidly in an MRE11-NBS1-RAD50 complex-dependent manner. Down-regulation of nucleolin abrogates the nucleosome disruption, the recruitment of repair factors, and the repair of the DSB, demonstrating the functional importance of nucleosome disruption in DSB repair and identifying a chromatin-remodeling protein required for the process. Interestingly, the nucleosome disruption that occurs during DSB repair in cycling cells differs in that both H2A/H2B and H3/H4 histone dimers are removed. This complete nucleosome disruption is also dependent on nucleolin and is required for recruitment of replication protein A to DSBs, a marker of DSB processing that is a requisite for homologous recombination repair. PMID:24082117

  9. Identification of two independent nucleosome-binding domains in the transcriptional co-activator SPBP.

    PubMed

    Darvekar, Sagar; Johnsen, Sylvia Sagen; Eriksen, Agnete Bratsberg; Johansen, Terje; Sjøttem, Eva

    2012-02-15

    Transcriptional regulation requires co-ordinated action of transcription factors, co-activator complexes and general transcription factors to access specific loci in the dense chromatin structure. In the present study we demonstrate that the transcriptional co-regulator SPBP [stromelysin-1 PDGF (platelet-derived growth factor)-responsive element binding protein] contains two independent chromatin-binding domains, the SPBP-(1551-1666) region and the C-terminal extended PHD [ePHD/ADD (extended plant homeodomain/ATRX-DNMT3-DNMT3L)] domain. The region 1551-1666 is a novel core nucleosome-interaction domain located adjacent to the AT-hook motif in the DNA-binding domain. This novel nucleosome-binding region is critically important for proper localization of SPBP in the cell nucleus. The ePHD/ADD domain associates with nucleosomes in a histone tail-dependent manner, and has significant impact on the dynamic interaction between SPBP and chromatin. Furthermore, SPBP and its homologue RAI1 (retinoic-acid-inducible protein 1), are strongly enriched on chromatin in interphase HeLa cells, and both proteins display low nuclear mobility. RAI1 contains a region with homology to the novel nucleosome-binding region SPBP-(1551-1666) and an ePHD/ADD domain with ability to bind nucleosomes. These results indicate that the transcriptional co-regulator SPBP and its homologue RAI1 implicated in Smith-Magenis syndrome and Potocki-Lupski syndrome both belong to the expanding family of chromatin-binding proteins containing several domains involved in specific chromatin interactions. PMID:22081970

  10. Autoantibodies to histone, DNA and nucleosome antigens in canine systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Monestier, M; Novick, K E; Karam, E T; Chabanne, L; Monier, J C; Rigal, D

    1995-01-01

    Dogs can develop systemic lupus erythematosus syndromes that are clinically similar to those seen in humans. In contrast, previous observations suggest differences in their autoantibody reactivity patterns against histones and DNA which are components of the nucleosome in chromatin. The objective of this study was to assess comprehensively the levels of autoantibodies against histone, DNA and nucleosome antigens in a population of lupus dogs. The specificities of antibodies in lupus and control dog sera were determined using IgM- and IgG-specific reagents in an ELISA against a variety of chromatin antigens. When compared with control sera, IgG antibodies to individual histones H1, H2A, H3 and H4 were significantly higher in the lupus group. In contrast, we did not detect IgG antibodies specific for H2B, H2A-H2B, DNA, H2A-H2B-DNA or nucleosome in lupus dogs. There was no significant increase in any of the IgM specificities tested. Therefore, the reactivity pattern to nucleosome antigens in canine lupus is restricted to IgG antibodies against individual histones H1, H2A, H3 and H4. This stands in contrast with human and murine lupus, where autoantibodies are directed against a wide variety of nucleosomal determinants, suggesting that unique mechanisms lead to the expansion of anti-histone antibody clones in canine lupus. The high incidence of glomerulonephritis in dog lupus suggests that anti-DNA antibodies are not required for the development of this complication, whereas IgG anti-histone antibodies may be relevant to its pathogenesis. PMID:7529150

  11. Natural abundance carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance studies of histone and DNA dynamics in nucleosome cores.

    PubMed

    Hilliard, P R; Smith, R M; Rill, R L

    1986-05-01

    Natural abundance carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectra (67.9 MHz) were obtained for native nucleosome cores: cores dissociated in 2 M NaCl and 2 M NaCl, 6 M urea; and cores degraded with DNase I plus proteinase K. Phosphorus-31 NMR spectra of native and dissociated cores and core length DNA were also obtained at 60.7 MHz. The 31P resonance and spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) of DNA were only slightly affected by packaging in nucleosome cores, in agreement with other reports, but 13C resonances of DNA were essentially unobservable. The loss of DNA spectral intensity suggests that rapid internal motions of DNA sugar carbons in protein-free DNA previously demonstrated by 13C NMR methods are partly restricted in nucleosomes. The 13C spectrum of native cores contains many narrow intense resonances assigned to lysine side chain and alpha-carbons, glycine alpha-carbons, alanine alpha- and beta- carbons, and arginine side chain carbons. Several weaker resonances were also assigned. The narrow line widths, short T1 values, and non-minimal nuclear Overhauser enhancements of these resonances, including alpha- and beta-carbons, show that some terminal chain segments of histones in nucleosomes are as mobile as small random coil polypeptides. The mobile segments include about 9% of all histone residues and 25% of all lysines, but only 10% of all arginines. The compositions of these segments indicate that mobile regions are located in amino- or carboxyl-terminal sequences of two or more histones. In addition, high mobility was observed for side chain carbons of 45-50% of all lysines (delta and epsilon carbons) and about 25% of all arginines (zeta carbon) in histones (including those in mobile segments), suggesting that basic residues in terminal histone sequences are not strongly involved in nucleosome structure and may instead help stabilize higher order chromatin structure. PMID:3700380

  12. Serum nitrated nucleosome levels in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: a retrospective longitudinal cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Circulating nucleosomes released from apoptotic cells are important in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Both nucleosomes and anti-nucleosome antibodies are deposited in inflamed tissues in patients with SLE. Active inflammation promotes nitration of tyrosine residues on serum proteins. Our hypothesis was that levels of nitrated nucleosomes would be elevated in patients with SLE and could be associated with disease activity. We therefore carried out a retrospective longitudinal study to investigate factors affecting levels of nitrated nucleosomes (NN) in patients with SLE. Methods A novel serum ELISA was developed to measure serum NN and modified to measure serum nitrated albumin (NA). Levels of both NN and NA were measured in 397 samples from 49 patients with SLE followed through periods of disease flare and remission for a mean of 89 months. Anti-nucleosome antibody (anti-nuc) levels were measured in the same samples. The effects of 24 different clinical, demographic and serological variables on NN, NA and anti-nuc levels were assessed by univariable and multivariable analysis. Results Patients with SLE had higher mean NN than healthy controls or patients with other autoimmune rheumatic diseases (P =0.01). Serum samples from 18 out of 49 (36.7%) of SLE patients were never positive for NN. This group of 18 patients was characterized by lower anti-double stranded DNA antibodies (anti-dsDNA), disease activity and use of immunosuppressants. In the remaining 63.3%, NN levels were variable. High NN was significantly associated with anti-Sm antibodies, vasculitis, immunosuppressants, hydroxychloroquine and age at diagnosis. NN levels were raised in neuropsychiatric flares. NN levels did not completely parallel NA results, thus providing additional information over measuring nitration status alone. NN levels were not associated with anti-nuc levels. Conclusions NN are raised in a subset of patients with SLE, particularly those who are

  13. The involvement of nucleosomes in Giemsa staining of chromosomes. A new hypothesis on the banding mechanism.

    PubMed

    van Duijn, P; van Prooijen-Knegt, A C; van der Ploeg, M

    1985-01-01

    A new hypothesis is proposed on the involvement of nucleosomes in Giemsa banding of chromosomes. Giemsa staining as well as the concomitant swelling can be explained as an insertion of the triple charged hydrophobic dye complex between the negatively-charged super-coiled helical DNA and the denatured histone cores of the nucleosomes still present in the fixed chromosomes. New cytochemical data and recent results from biochemical literature on nucleosomes are presented in support of this hypothesis. Chromosomes are stained by the Giemsa procedure in a purple (magenta) colour. Giemsa staining of DNA and histone (isolated or in a simple mixture) in model experiments results in different colours, indicating that a higher order configuration of these chromosomal components lies at the basis of the Giemsa method. Cytophotometry of Giemsa dye absorbance of chromosomes shows that the banding in the case of saline pretreatment is due to a relative absence of the complex in the faintly coloured bands (interbands). Pretreatment with trypsin results in an increase in Giemsa dye uptake in the stained bands. Cytophotometric measurements of free phosphate groups before and after pretreatment with saline, reveal a blocking of about half of the free phosphate groups indicating that a substantial number of free amino groups is still present in the fixed chromosomes. Glutaraldehyde treatment inhibited Giemsa-banding irreversibly while the formaldehyde-induced disappearance of the bands could be restored by a washing procedure. These results correlate with those of biochemical nucleosome studies using the same aldehydes. Based on these findings and on the known properties of nucleosomes, a mechanism is proposed that explains the collapse of the chromosome structure when fixed chromosomes are transferred to aqueous buffer solutions. During homogeneous Giemsa staining reswelling of the unpretreated chromosome is explained by insertion of the hydrophobic Giemsa complex between the

  14. The structural basis of modified nucleosome recognition by 53BP1.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Marcus D; Benlekbir, Samir; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Sherker, Alana; Julien, Jean-Philippe; McEwan, Andrea; Noordermeer, Sylvie M; Sicheri, Frank; Rubinstein, John L; Durocher, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) elicit a histone modification cascade that controls DNA repair. This pathway involves the sequential ubiquitination of histones H1 and H2A by the E3 ubiquitin ligases RNF8 and RNF168, respectively. RNF168 ubiquitinates H2A on lysine 13 and lysine 15 (refs 7, 8) (yielding H2AK13ub and H2AK15ub, respectively), an event that triggers the recruitment of 53BP1 (also known as TP53BP1) to chromatin flanking DSBs. 53BP1 binds specifically to H2AK15ub-containing nucleosomes through a peptide segment termed the ubiquitination-dependent recruitment motif (UDR), which requires the simultaneous engagement of histone H4 lysine 20 dimethylation (H4K20me2) by its tandem Tudor domain. How 53BP1 interacts with these two histone marks in the nucleosomal context, how it recognizes ubiquitin, and how it discriminates between H2AK13ub and H2AK15ub is unknown. Here we present the electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) structure of a dimerized human 53BP1 fragment bound to a H4K20me2-containing and H2AK15ub-containing nucleosome core particle (NCP-ubme) at 4.5 Å resolution. The structure reveals that H4K20me2 and H2AK15ub recognition involves intimate contacts with multiple nucleosomal elements including the acidic patch. Ubiquitin recognition by 53BP1 is unusual and involves the sandwiching of the UDR segment between ubiquitin and the NCP surface. The selectivity for H2AK15ub is imparted by two arginine fingers in the H2A amino-terminal tail, which straddle the nucleosomal DNA and serve to position ubiquitin over the NCP-bound UDR segment. The structure of the complex between NCP-ubme and 53BP1 reveals the basis of 53BP1 recruitment to DSB sites and illuminates how combinations of histone marks and nucleosomal elements cooperate to produce highly specific chromatin responses, such as those elicited following chromosome breaks. PMID:27462807

  15. The Use of Nucleosome Substrates Improves Binding of SAM Analogs to SETD8.

    PubMed

    Strelow, John M; Xiao, Min; Cavitt, Rachel N; Fite, Nathan C; Margolis, Brandon J; Park, Kyu-Jin

    2016-09-01

    SETD8 is the methyltransferase responsible for monomethylation of lysine at position 20 of the N-terminus of histone H4 (H4K20). This activity has been implicated in both DNA damage and cell cycle progression. Existing biochemical assays have utilized truncated enzymes containing the SET domain of SETD8 and peptide substrates. In this report, we present the development of a mechanistically balanced biochemical assay using full-length SETD8 and a recombinant nucleosome substrate. This improves the binding of SAM, SAH, and sinefungin by up to 10,000-fold. A small collection of inhibitors structurally related to SAM were screened and 40 compounds were identified that only inhibit SETD8 when a nucleosome substrate is used. PMID:27369108

  16. Nucleosomal structure at hyperacetylated loci probed in nuclei by DNA-histone crosslinking.

    PubMed Central

    Ebralidse, K K; Hebbes, T R; Clayton, A L; Thorne, A W; Crane-Robinson, C

    1993-01-01

    Chemically induced histone-DNA crosslinking in nuclei is used to monitor structural changes in chromosomal domains containing hyperacetylated histones. Core particles harbouring the crosslinks are immunofractionated with antibodies specific for acetylated histones. Crosslinking is revealed by gel separation of tryptic peptides from core histones that carry 32P-labelled residual nucleotide. The large number of DNA-histone crosslinks retained indicates that acetylated core histone tails are not totally displaced from the DNA. Changes in the patterns of crosslinked peptides imply a restructuring of hyperacetylated histone-DNA interactions at several points within the nucleosome. This demonstrates that a distinct conformational state is adopted in acetylated nucleosomes, known to be concentrated at transcriptionally active loci. Images PMID:8233821

  17. Alternative Computational Analysis Shows No Evidence for Nucleosome Enrichment at Repetitive Sequences in Mammalian Spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Royo, Hélène; Stadler, Michael Beda; Peters, Antoine Hendrik Felix Marie

    2016-04-01

    Samans et al. (2014) reported the enrichment of nucleosomes in human and bovine spermatozoa at centromere repeats and retrotransposon sequences such as LINE-1 and SINE. We demonstrate here that nucleosomal enrichments at repetitive sequences as reported result from bioinformatic analyses that make redundant use of sequencing reads that map to multiple locations in the genome. To illustrate that this computational approach is flawed, we observed comparable artificial enrichments at repetitive sequences when aligning control genomic DNA or simulated reads of uniform genome coverage. These results imply that the main conclusions of the article by Samans et al. (2014) are confounded by an inappropriate computational methodology used to analyze the primary data. PMID:27046835

  18. Post-Translational Modifications of Nucleosomal Histones in Oligodendrocyte Lineage Cells in Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Siming; Casaccia-Bonnefil, Patrizia

    2008-01-01

    The role of epigenetics in modulating gene expression in the development of organs and tissues and in disease states is becoming increasingly evident. Epigenetics refers to the several mechanisms modulating inheritable changes in gene expression that are independent of modifications of the primary DNA sequence and include post-translational modifications of nucleosomal histones, changes in DNA methylation, and the role of microRNA. This review focuses on the epigenetic regulation of gene expression in oligodendroglial lineage cells. The biological effects that post-translational modifications of critical residues in the N-terminal tails of nucleosomal histones have on oligodendroglial cells are reviewed, and the implications for disease and repair are critically discussed. PMID:17999198

  19. Modulation of p300/CBP Acetylation of Nucleosomes by Bromodomain Ligand I-CBP112.

    PubMed

    Zucconi, Beth E; Luef, Birgit; Xu, Wei; Henry, Ryan A; Nodelman, Ilana M; Bowman, Gregory D; Andrews, Andrew J; Cole, Philip A

    2016-07-12

    The histone acetyltransferase (HAT) enzymes p300 and CBP are closely related paralogs that serve as transcriptional coactivators and have been found to be dysregulated in cancer and other diseases. p300/CBP is a multidomain protein and possesses a highly conserved bromodomain that has been shown to bind acetylated Lys residues in both proteins and various small molecules, including I-CBP112 and CBP30. Here we show that the ligand I-CBP112 can stimulate nucleosome acetylation up to 3-fold while CBP30 does not. Activation of p300/CBP by I-CBP112 is not observed with the isolated histone H3 substrate but requires a nucleosome substrate. I-CBP112 does not impact nucleosome acetylation by the isolated p300 HAT domain, and the effects of I-CBP112 on p300/CBP can be neutralized by CBP30, suggesting that I-CBP112 likely allosterically activates p300/CBP through bromodomain interactions. Using mass spectrometry and Western blots, we have found that I-CBP112 particularly stimulates acetylation of Lys18 of histone H3 (H3K18) in nucleosomes, an established in vivo site of p300/CBP. In addition, we show that I-CBP112 enhances H3K18 acetylation in acute leukemia and prostate cancer cells in a concentration range commensurate with its antiproliferative effects. Our findings extend the known pharmacology of bromodomain ligands in the regulation of p300/CBP and suggest a novel approach to modulating histone acetylation in cancer. PMID:27332697

  20. Enzymatic Excision of Uracil Residues in Nucleosomes Depends on Local DNA Structure and Dynamics†

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Yu; Stahley, Mary R.; Xu, Jianqing; Friedman, Joshua I.; Sun, Yan; McKnight, Jeffrey N.; Gray, Jeffrey J.; Bowman, Gregory D.; Stivers, James T.

    2012-01-01

    The excision of uracil bases from DNA is accomplished by the enzyme uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG). Recognition of uracil bases in free DNA is facilitated by uracil base pair dynamics, but it is not known whether this same mechanistic feature is relevant for detection and excision of uracil residues embedded in nucleosomes. Here we investigate this question using nucleosome core particles (NCPs) generated from X. laevis histones and the high-affinity “Widom 601” positioning sequence. The reactivity of uracil residues in NCPs under steady-state multiple turnover conditions was generally decreased as compared to free 601 DNA, mostly due to anticipated steric effects of histones. However, some sites in NCPs had equal or even greater reactivity than free DNA, and the observed reactivities were not readily explained by simple steric considerations, or by global DNA unwrapping models for nucleosome invasion. In particular, some reactive uracils were found in occluded positions, while some unreactive uracils were found in exposed positions. One feature of many exposed reactive sites is a wide DNA minor groove, which allows penetration of a key active site loop of the enzyme. In single-turnover kinetic measurements, multi-phasic reaction kinetics were observed for several uracil sites, where each kinetic transient was independent of the UNG concentration. These kinetic measurements, and supporting structural analyses, support a mechanism where some uracils are transiently exposed to UNG by local, rate-limiting nucleosome conformational dynamics, followed by rapid trapping of the exposed state by the enzyme. We present structural models and plausible reaction mechanisms for the reaction of UNG at three distinct uracil sites in the NCP. PMID:22784353

  1. Formation and positioning of nucleosomes: effect of sequence-dependent long-range correlated structural disorder.

    PubMed

    Vaillant, C; Audit, B; Thermes, C; Arnéodo, A

    2006-03-01

    The understanding of the long-range correlations (LRC) observed in DNA sequences is still an open and very challenging problem. In this paper, we start reviewing recent results obtained when exploring the scaling properties of eucaryotic, eubacterial and archaeal genomic sequences using the space-scale decomposition provided by the wavelet transform (WT). These results suggest that the existence of LRC up to distances approximately 20-30 kbp is the signature of the nucleosomal structure and dynamics of the chromatin fiber. Actually the LRC are mainly observed in the DNA bending profiles obtained when using some structural coding of the DNA sequences that accounts for the fluctuations of the local double-helix curvature within the nucleosome complex. Because of the approximate planarity of nucleosomal DNA loops, we then study the influence of the LRC structural disorder on the thermodynamical properties of 2D elastic chains submitted locally to mechanical/topological constraint as loops. The equilibrium properties of the one-loop system are derived numerically and analytically in the quite realistic weak-disorder limit. The LRC are shown to favor the spontaneous formation of small loops, the larger the LRC, the smaller the size of the loop. We further investigate the dynamical behavior of such a loop using the mean first passage time (MFPT) formalism. We show that the typical short-time loop dynamics is superdiffusive in the presence of LRC. For displacements larger than the loop size, we use large-deviation theory to derive a LRC-dependent anomalous-diffusion rule that accounts for the lack of disorder self-averaging. Potential biological implications on DNA loops involved in nucleosome positioning and dynamics in eucaryotic chromatin are discussed. PMID:16477390

  2. Patching Broken DNA: Nucleosome Dynamics and the Repair of DNA Breaks.

    PubMed

    Gursoy-Yuzugullu, Ozge; House, Nealia; Price, Brendan D

    2016-05-01

    The ability of cells to detect and repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is dependent on reorganization of the surrounding chromatin structure by chromatin remodeling complexes. These complexes promote access to the site of DNA damage, facilitate processing of the damaged DNA and, importantly, are essential to repackage the repaired DNA. Here, we will review the chromatin remodeling steps that occur immediately after DSB production and that prepare the damaged chromatin template for processing by the DSB repair machinery. DSBs promote rapid accumulation of repressive complexes, including HP1, the NuRD complex, H2A.Z and histone methyltransferases at the DSB. This shift to a repressive chromatin organization may be important to inhibit local transcription and limit mobility of the break and to maintain the DNA ends in close contact. Subsequently, the repressive chromatin is rapidly dismantled through a mechanism involving dynamic exchange of the histone variant H2A.Z. H2A.Z removal at DSBs alters the acidic patch on the nucleosome surface, promoting acetylation of the H4 tail (by the NuA4-Tip60 complex) and shifting the chromatin to a more open structure. Further, H2A.Z removal promotes chromatin ubiquitination and recruitment of additional DSB repair proteins to the break. Modulation of the nucleosome surface and nucleosome function during DSB repair therefore plays a vital role in processing of DNA breaks. Further, the nucleosome surface may function as a central hub during DSB repair, directing specific patterns of histone modification, recruiting DNA repair proteins and modulating chromatin packing during processing of the damaged DNA template. PMID:26625977

  3. CENP-C recruits M18BP1 to centromeres to promote CENP-A chromatin assembly

    PubMed Central

    Moree, Ben; Meyer, Corey B.; Fuller, Colin J.

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic chromosomes segregate by attaching to microtubules of the mitotic spindle through a chromosomal microtubule binding site called the kinetochore. Kinetochores assemble on a specialized chromosomal locus termed the centromere, which is characterized by the replacement of histone H3 in centromeric nucleosomes with the essential histone H3 variant CENP-A (centromere protein A). Understanding how CENP-A chromatin is assembled and maintained is central to understanding chromosome segregation mechanisms. CENP-A nucleosome assembly requires the Mis18 complex and the CENP-A chaperone HJURP. These factors localize to centromeres in telophase/G1, when new CENP-A chromatin is assembled. The mechanisms that control their targeting are unknown. In this paper, we identify a mechanism for recruiting the Mis18 complex protein M18BP1 to centromeres. We show that depletion of CENP-C prevents M18BP1 targeting to metaphase centromeres and inhibits CENP-A chromatin assembly. We find that M18BP1 directly binds CENP-C through conserved domains in the CENP-C protein. Thus, CENP-C provides a link between existing CENP-A chromatin and the proteins required for new CENP-A nucleosome assembly. PMID:21911481

  4. CENP-C recruits M18BP1 to centromeres to promote CENP-A chromatin assembly.

    PubMed

    Moree, Ben; Meyer, Corey B; Fuller, Colin J; Straight, Aaron F

    2011-09-19

    Eukaryotic chromosomes segregate by attaching to microtubules of the mitotic spindle through a chromosomal microtubule binding site called the kinetochore. Kinetochores assemble on a specialized chromosomal locus termed the centromere, which is characterized by the replacement of histone H3 in centromeric nucleosomes with the essential histone H3 variant CENP-A (centromere protein A). Understanding how CENP-A chromatin is assembled and maintained is central to understanding chromosome segregation mechanisms. CENP-A nucleosome assembly requires the Mis18 complex and the CENP-A chaperone HJURP. These factors localize to centromeres in telophase/G1, when new CENP-A chromatin is assembled. The mechanisms that control their targeting are unknown. In this paper, we identify a mechanism for recruiting the Mis18 complex protein M18BP1 to centromeres. We show that depletion of CENP-C prevents M18BP1 targeting to metaphase centromeres and inhibits CENP-A chromatin assembly. We find that M18BP1 directly binds CENP-C through conserved domains in the CENP-C protein. Thus, CENP-C provides a link between existing CENP-A chromatin and the proteins required for new CENP-A nucleosome assembly. PMID:21911481

  5. Nucleosome-like structural subunits of intranuclear parental adenovirus type 2 DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Sergeant, A; Tigges, M A; Raskas, H J

    1979-01-01

    The intranuclear structure of parental adenovirus 2 DNA was studied using digestion with micrococcal nuclease as a probe. When cultures were infected with 32P-labeled virions, at a multiplicity of 3,000 particles per cell, 14 to 21% of parental DNA penetrated the cell and reached the nucleus. Of this parental DNA, 60% could be solubilized by extensive digestion with micrococcal nuclease. The nuclease-resistant fraction contained viral deoxyribonucleoprotein monomers and oligomers. These nucleosome-like structures contained DNA fragments which are integral multiples of a unit-length DNA of approximately 185 base pairs. The monomeric DNA is similar in length to the unit-length DNA contained in cellular nucleosomes. However, the viral oligomers are slightly smaller than their cellular counterparts. DNA-DNA hybridization demonstrated that all segments of the viral genome, including those expressed as mRNA only at late times, are represented in the nucleosomal viral DNA. The amount of early intranuclear viral chromatin was proportional to multiplicity of infection up to multiplicities of 4,000 particles per cell. However, viral transcriptional activity did not increase in direct proportion to the amount of viral chromatin. Maximum accumulation of intranuclear viral chromatin was achieved by 3 h after infection. The intranuclear parental viral chromatin remained resistant to nuclease digestion even at late times in infection, after viral DNA replication had begun. Images PMID:448800

  6. Genome-wide nucleosome map and cytosine methylation levels of an ancient human genome

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Valen, Eivind; Velazquez, Amhed M. Vargas; Parker, Brian J.; Rasmussen, Morten; Lindgreen, Stinus; Lilje, Berit; Tobin, Desmond J.; Kelly, Theresa K.; Vang, Søren; Andersson, Robin; Jones, Peter A.; Hoover, Cindi A.; Tikhonov, Alexei; Prokhortchouk, Egor; Rubin, Edward M.; Sandelin, Albin; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Krogh, Anders; Willerslev, Eske; Orlando, Ludovic

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic information is available from contemporary organisms, but is difficult to track back in evolutionary time. Here, we show that genome-wide epigenetic information can be gathered directly from next-generation sequence reads of DNA isolated from ancient remains. Using the genome sequence data generated from hair shafts of a 4000-yr-old Paleo-Eskimo belonging to the Saqqaq culture, we generate the first ancient nucleosome map coupled with a genome-wide survey of cytosine methylation levels. The validity of both nucleosome map and methylation levels were confirmed by the recovery of the expected signals at promoter regions, exon/intron boundaries, and CTCF sites. The top-scoring nucleosome calls revealed distinct DNA positioning biases, attesting to nucleotide-level accuracy. The ancient methylation levels exhibited high conservation over time, clustering closely with modern hair tissues. Using ancient methylation information, we estimated the age at death of the Saqqaq individual and illustrate how epigenetic information can be used to infer ancient gene expression. Similar epigenetic signatures were found in other fossil material, such as 110,000- to 130,000-yr-old bones, supporting the contention that ancient epigenomic information can be reconstructed from a deep past. Our findings lay the foundation for extracting epigenomic information from ancient samples, allowing shifts in epialleles to be tracked through evolutionary time, as well as providing an original window into modern epigenomics. PMID:24299735

  7. Topoisomerase II, not topoisomerase I, is the proficient relaxase of nucleosomal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Salceda, Javier; Fernández, Xavier; Roca, Joaquim

    2006-01-01

    Eukaryotic topoisomerases I and II efficiently remove helical tension in naked DNA molecules. However, this activity has not been examined in nucleosomal DNA, their natural substrate. Here, we obtained yeast minichromosomes holding DNA under (+) helical tension, and incubated them with topoisomerases. We show that DNA supercoiling density can rise above +0.04 without displacement of the histones and that the typical nucleosome topology is restored upon DNA relaxation. However, in contrast to what is observed in naked DNA, topoisomerase II relaxes nucleosomal DNA much faster than topoisomerase I. The same effect occurs in cell extracts containing physiological dosages of topoisomeraseI and II. Apparently, the DNA strand-rotation mechanism of topoisomerase I does not efficiently relax chromatin, which imposes barriers for DNA twist diffusion. Conversely, the DNA cross-inversion mechanism of topoisomerase II is facilitated in chromatin, which favor the juxtaposition of DNA segments. We conclude that topoisomerase II is the main modulator of DNA topology in chromatin fibers. The nonessential topoisomerase I then assists DNA relaxation where chromatin structure impairs DNA juxtaposition but allows twist diffusion. PMID:16710299

  8. An rtt109-independent role for vps75 in transcription-associated nucleosome dynamics.

    PubMed

    Selth, Luke A; Lorch, Yahli; Ocampo-Hafalla, Maria T; Mitter, Richard; Shales, Michael; Krogan, Nevan J; Kornberg, Roger D; Svejstrup, Jesper Q

    2009-08-01

    The histone chaperone Vps75 forms a complex with, and stimulates the activity of, the histone acetyltransferase Rtt109. However, Vps75 can also be isolated on its own and might therefore possess Rtt109-independent functions. Analysis of epistatic miniarray profiles showed that VPS75 genetically interacts with factors involved in transcription regulation whereas RTT109 clusters with genes linked to DNA replication/repair. Additional genetic and biochemical experiments revealed a close relationship between Vps75 and RNA polymerase II. Furthermore, Vps75 is recruited to activated genes in an Rtt109-independent manner, and its genome-wide association with genes correlates with transcription rate. Expression microarray analysis identified a number of genes whose normal expression depends on VPS75. Interestingly, histone H2B dynamics at some of these genes are consistent with a role for Vps75 in histone H2A/H2B eviction/deposition during transcription. Indeed, reconstitution of nucleosome disassembly using the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler Rsc and Vps75 revealed that these proteins can cooperate to remove H2A/H2B dimers from nucleosomes. These results indicate a role for Vps75 in nucleosome dynamics during transcription, and importantly, this function appears to be largely independent of Rtt109. PMID:19470761

  9. Whole genome nucleosome sequencing identifies novel types of forensic markers in degraded DNA samples

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chun-nan; Yang, Ya-dong; Li, Shu-jin; Yang, Ya-ran; Zhang, Xiao-jing; Fang, Xiang-dong; Yan, Jiang-wei; Cong, Bin

    2016-01-01

    In the case of mass disasters, missing persons and forensic caseworks, highly degraded biological samples are often encountered. It can be a challenge to analyze and interpret the DNA profiles from these samples. Here we provide a new strategy to solve the problem by taking advantage of the intrinsic structural properties of DNA. We have assessed the in vivo positions of more than 35 million putative nucleosome cores in human leukocytes using high-throughput whole genome sequencing, and identified 2,462 single nucleotide variations (SNVs), 128 insertion-deletion polymorphisms (indels). After comparing the sequence reads with 44 STR loci commonly used in forensics, five STRs (TH01, TPOX, D18S51, DYS391, and D10S1248)were matched. We compared these “nucleosome protected STRs” (NPSTRs) with five other non-NPSTRs using mini-STR primer design, real-time PCR, and capillary gel electrophoresis on artificially degraded DNA. Moreover, genotyping performance of the five NPSTRs and five non-NPSTRs was also tested with real casework samples. All results show that loci located in nucleosomes are more likely to be successfully genotyped in degraded samples. In conclusion, after further strict validation, these markers could be incorporated into future forensic and paleontology identification kits, resulting in higher discriminatory power for certain degraded sample types. PMID:27189082

  10. Whole genome nucleosome sequencing identifies novel types of forensic markers in degraded DNA samples.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chun-Nan; Yang, Ya-Dong; Li, Shu-Jin; Yang, Ya-Ran; Zhang, Xiao-Jing; Fang, Xiang-Dong; Yan, Jiang-Wei; Cong, Bin

    2016-01-01

    In the case of mass disasters, missing persons and forensic caseworks, highly degraded biological samples are often encountered. It can be a challenge to analyze and interpret the DNA profiles from these samples. Here we provide a new strategy to solve the problem by taking advantage of the intrinsic structural properties of DNA. We have assessed the in vivo positions of more than 35 million putative nucleosome cores in human leukocytes using high-throughput whole genome sequencing, and identified 2,462 single nucleotide variations (SNVs), 128 insertion-deletion polymorphisms (indels). After comparing the sequence reads with 44 STR loci commonly used in forensics, five STRs (TH01, TPOX, D18S51, DYS391, and D10S1248)were matched. We compared these "nucleosome protected STRs" (NPSTRs) with five other non-NPSTRs using mini-STR primer design, real-time PCR, and capillary gel electrophoresis on artificially degraded DNA. Moreover, genotyping performance of the five NPSTRs and five non-NPSTRs was also tested with real casework samples. All results show that loci located in nucleosomes are more likely to be successfully genotyped in degraded samples. In conclusion, after further strict validation, these markers could be incorporated into future forensic and paleontology identification kits, resulting in higher discriminatory power for certain degraded sample types. PMID:27189082

  11. Studies of torsional properties of DNA and nucleosomes using angular optical trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheinin, Maxim Y.

    DNA in vivo is subjected to torsional stress due to the action of molecular motors and other DNA-binding proteins. Several decades of research have uncovered the fascinating diversity of DNA transformations under torsion and the important role they play in the regulation of vital cellular processes such as transcription and replication. Recent studies have also suggested that torsion can influence the structure and stability of nucleosomes---basic building blocks of the eukaryotic genome. However, our understanding of the impact of torsion is far from being complete due to significant experimental challenges. In this work we have used a powerful single-molecule experimental technique, angular optical trapping, to address several long-standing issues in the field of DNA and nucleosome mechanics. First, we utilized the high resolution and direct torque measuring capability of the angular optical trapping to precisely measure DNA twist-stretch coupling. Second, we characterized DNA melting under tension and torsion. We found that torsionally underwound DNA forms a left-handed structure, significantly more flexible compared to the regular B-DNA. Finally, we performed the first comprehensive investigation of the single nucleosome behavior under torque and force. Importantly, we discovered that positive torque causes significant dimer loss, which can have implications for transcription through chromatin.

  12. Two distinct promoter architectures centered on dynamic nucleosomes control ribosomal protein gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Knight, Britta; Kubik, Slawomir; Ghosh, Bhaswar; Bruzzone, Maria Jessica; Geertz, Marcel; Martin, Victoria; Dénervaud, Nicolas; Jacquet, Philippe; Ozkan, Burak; Rougemont, Jacques; Maerkl, Sebastian J; Naef, Félix; Shore, David

    2014-08-01

    In yeast, ribosome production is controlled transcriptionally by tight coregulation of the 138 ribosomal protein genes (RPGs). RPG promoters display limited sequence homology, and the molecular basis for their coregulation remains largely unknown. Here we identify two prevalent RPG promoter types, both characterized by upstream binding of the general transcription factor (TF) Rap1 followed by the RPG-specific Fhl1/Ifh1 pair, with one type also binding the HMG-B protein Hmo1. We show that the regulatory properties of the two promoter types are remarkably similar, suggesting that they are determined to a large extent by Rap1 and the Fhl1/Ifh1 pair. Rapid depletion experiments allowed us to define a hierarchy of TF binding in which Rap1 acts as a pioneer factor required for binding of all other TFs. We also uncovered unexpected features underlying recruitment of Fhl1, whose forkhead DNA-binding domain is not required for binding at most promoters, and Hmo1, whose binding is supported by repeated motifs. Finally, we describe unusually micrococcal nuclease (MNase)-sensitive nucleosomes at all RPG promoters, located between the canonical +1 and -1 nucleosomes, which coincide with sites of Fhl1/Ifh1 and Hmo1 binding. We speculate that these "fragile" nucleosomes play an important role in regulating RPG transcriptional output. PMID:25085421

  13. The temperature of flash-cooling has dramatic effects on the diffraction quality of nucleosome crystals.

    PubMed

    Edayathumangalam, Rajeswari S; Luger, Karolin

    2005-07-01

    Nucleosome core-particle crystals are routinely flash-cooled in liquid propane at temperatures of approximately 153 K, followed by transfer into a cold nitrogen-gas stream (approximately 93 K). Analysis of diffraction data from crystals flash-cooled at different temperatures shows that the optimal temperature is approximately 153 K. The data quality worsens, with a concomitant reduction in the diffraction limit, at temperatures both higher and lower than 153 K. With some batches of crystals, significant shrinkage of the unit-cell volume is also observed at temperatures of 138 K and lower. The lattice shrinkage is always restricted to the c axis, concurrent with closer packing of two nucleosomes. Direct plunge-cooling of crystals in liquid nitrogen leads to loss of diffraction quality and resolution limit. Thus, in cases where flash-cooling into liquid nitrogen is detrimental to diffraction, optimizing cooling protocols at higher temperatures using liquid propane or other cryogens with similar properties may lead to dramatically improved results. In a related study, it is shown that a nucleosome crystal transported under 'cryocooled' conditions has higher mosaicity and yields inferior data quality in comparison to a crystal cryocooled at the synchrotron. For fragile crystals, transport in mother liquor and/or cryoprotectant followed by subsequent flash-cooling at the synchrotron may be the best procedure. PMID:15983411

  14. CHD4 Is a Peripheral Component of the Nucleosome Remodeling and Deacetylase Complex.

    PubMed

    Low, Jason K K; Webb, Sarah R; Silva, Ana P G; Saathoff, Hinnerk; Ryan, Daniel P; Torrado, Mario; Brofelth, Mattias; Parker, Benjamin L; Shepherd, Nicholas E; Mackay, Joel P

    2016-07-22

    Chromatin remodeling enzymes act to dynamically regulate gene accessibility. In many cases, these enzymes function as large multicomponent complexes that in general comprise a central ATP-dependent Snf2 family helicase that is decorated with a variable number of regulatory subunits. The nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex, which is essential for normal development in higher organisms, is one such macromolecular machine. The NuRD complex comprises ∼10 subunits, including the histone deacetylases 1 and 2 (HDAC1 and HDAC2), and is defined by the presence of a CHD family remodeling enzyme, most commonly CHD4 (chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4). The existing paradigm holds that CHD4 acts as the central hub upon which the complex is built. We show here that this paradigm does not, in fact, hold and that CHD4 is a peripheral component of the NuRD complex. A complex lacking CHD4 that has HDAC activity can exist as a stable species. The addition of recombinant CHD4 to this nucleosome deacetylase complex reconstitutes a NuRD complex with nucleosome remodeling activity. These data contribute to our understanding of the architecture of the NuRD complex. PMID:27235397

  15. Acetylation of histone H3 at lysine 64 regulates nucleosome dynamics and facilitates transcription

    PubMed Central

    Di Cerbo, Vincenzo; Mohn, Fabio; Ryan, Daniel P; Montellier, Emilie; Kacem, Salim; Tropberger, Philipp; Kallis, Eleni; Holzner, Monika; Hoerner, Leslie; Feldmann, Angelika; Richter, Florian Martin; Bannister, Andrew J; Mittler, Gerhard; Michaelis, Jens; Khochbin, Saadi; Feil, Robert; Schuebeler, Dirk; Owen-Hughes, Tom; Daujat, Sylvain; Schneider, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of proteins have emerged as a major mechanism for regulating gene expression. However, our understanding of how histone modifications directly affect chromatin function remains limited. In this study, we investigate acetylation of histone H3 at lysine 64 (H3K64ac), a previously uncharacterized acetylation on the lateral surface of the histone octamer. We show that H3K64ac regulates nucleosome stability and facilitates nucleosome eviction and hence gene expression in vivo. In line with this, we demonstrate that H3K64ac is enriched in vivo at the transcriptional start sites of active genes and it defines transcriptionally active chromatin. Moreover, we find that the p300 co-activator acetylates H3K64, and consistent with a transcriptional activation function, H3K64ac opposes its repressive counterpart H3K64me3. Our findings reveal an important role for a histone modification within the nucleosome core as a regulator of chromatin function and they demonstrate that lateral surface modifications can define functionally opposing chromatin states. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01632.001 PMID:24668167

  16. Dynamic Conformations of Nucleosome Arrays in Solution from Small-Angle X-ray Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Steven C.

    Chromatin conformation and dynamics remains unsolved despite the critical role of the chromatin in fundamental genetic functions such as transcription, replication, and repair. At the molecular level, chromatin can be viewed as a linear array of nucleosomes, each consisting of 147 base pairs (bp) of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) wrapped around a protein core and connected by 10 to 90 bp of linker dsDNA. Using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we investigated how the conformations of model nucleosome arrays in solution are modulated by ionic condition as well as the effect of linker histone proteins. To facilitate ensemble modeling of these SAXS measurements, we developed a simulation method that treats coarse-grained DNA as a Markov chain, then explores possible DNA conformations using Metropolis Monte Carlo (MC) sampling. This algorithm extends the functionality of SASSIE, a program used to model intrinsically disordered biological molecules, adding to the previous methods for simulating protein, carbohydrates, and single-stranded DNA. Our SAXS measurements of various nucleosome arrays together with the MC generated models provide valuable solution structure information identifying specific differences from the structure of crystallized arrays.

  17. A conformational switch in HP1 releases auto-inhibition to drive heterochromatin assembly

    PubMed Central

    Canzio, Daniele; Liao, Maofu; Naber, Nariman; Pate, Ed; Larson, Adam; Wu, Shenping; Marina, Diana B.; Garcia, Jennifer F.; Madhani, Hiten D.; Cooke, Roger; Schuck, Peter; Cheng, Yifan; Narlikar, Geeta J.

    2014-01-01

    A hallmark of histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) methylated heterochromatin, conserved from fission yeast,Schizosaccharomyces pombe (S. pombe), to humans, is its ability to spread to adjacent genomic regions1–6. Central to heterochromatin spread is the heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1), which recognizes H3K9 methylated chromatin, oligomerizes, and forms a versatile platform that participates in diverse nuclear functions, ranging from gene silencing to chromosome segregation1–6. How HP1 proteins assemble on methylated nucleosomal templates and how the HP1-nucleosome complex achieves functional versatility remain poorly understood. Here, we show that binding of the major S. pombe HP1 protein, Swi6, to methylated nucleosomes drives a switch from an auto-inhibited state to a spreading competent state. In the auto-inhibited state, a histone mimic sequence in one Swi6 monomer blocks methyl mark recognition by the chromodomain of another monomer. Auto-inhibition is relieved by recognition of two template features, the H3K9 methyl mark and nucleosomal DNA. Cryo-Electron Microscopy (EM) based reconstruction of the Swi6-nucleosome complex provides the overall architecture of the spreading-competent state in which two unbound chromodomain sticky ends appear exposed. Disruption of the switch between the auto-inhibited and spreading competent state disrupts heterochromatin assembly and gene silencing in vivo. These findings are reminiscent of other conditionally activated polymerization processes, such as actin nucleation, and open up a new class of regulatory mechanisms that operate on chromatin in vivo. PMID:23485968

  18. CAF-1-Mediated Chromatin Assembly Generates a Bilateral Asymmetry in C. elegans Neuroanatomy

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Shunji; Stillman, Bruce; Horvitz, H. Robert

    2012-01-01

    Summary Chromatin assembly is a fundamental cellular process, but its role during animal development remains largely elusive. Here we report that the CAF-1 protein complex, an evolutionarily conserved histone chaperone that deposits histone H3-H4 proteins onto replicating DNA, is required to generate a bilateral asymmetry in the C. elegans nervous system. We describe our findings that a mutation in one of 24 C. elegans histone H3 genes specifically eliminates this aspect of neuronal asymmetry. This histone H3 mutation causes a defect in the formation of a histone H3-H4 tetramer and the consequent inhibition of CAF-1-mediated nucleosome formation. Our results reveal that replication-coupled nucleosome assembly is necessary to generate a bilateral asymmetry in C. elegans neuroanatomy and suggest that left-right asymmetric epigenetic regulation can establish bilateral asymmetry in the nervous system. PMID:22177093

  19. HJURP is a CENP-A chromatin assembly factor sufficient to form a functional de novo kinetochore

    PubMed Central

    Barnhart, Meghan C.; Kuich, P. Henning J. L.; Stellfox, Madison E.; Ward, Jared A.; Bassett, Emily A.; Black, Ben E.

    2011-01-01

    Centromeres of higher eukaryotes are epigenetically marked by the centromere-specific CENP-A nucleosome. New CENP-A recruitment requires the CENP-A histone chaperone HJURP. In this paper, we show that a LacI (Lac repressor) fusion of HJURP drove the stable recruitment of CENP-A to a LacO (Lac operon) array at a noncentromeric locus. Ectopically targeted CENP-A chromatin at the LacO array was sufficient to direct the assembly of a functional centromere as indicated by the recruitment of the constitutive centromere-associated network proteins, the microtubule-binding protein NDC80, and the formation of stable kinetochore–microtubule attachments. An amino-terminal fragment of HJURP was able to assemble CENP-A nucleosomes in vitro, demonstrating that HJURP is a chromatin assembly factor. Furthermore, HJURP recruitment to endogenous centromeres required the Mis18 complex. Together, these data suggest that the role of the Mis18 complex in CENP-A deposition is to recruit HJURP and that the CENP-A nucleosome assembly activity of HJURP is responsible for centromeric chromatin assembly to maintain the epigenetic mark. PMID:21768289

  20. HJURP is a CENP-A chromatin assembly factor sufficient to form a functional de novo kinetochore.

    PubMed

    Barnhart, Meghan C; Kuich, P Henning J L; Stellfox, Madison E; Ward, Jared A; Bassett, Emily A; Black, Ben E; Foltz, Daniel R

    2011-07-25

    Centromeres of higher eukaryotes are epigenetically marked by the centromere-specific CENP-A nucleosome. New CENP-A recruitment requires the CENP-A histone chaperone HJURP. In this paper, we show that a LacI (Lac repressor) fusion of HJURP drove the stable recruitment of CENP-A to a LacO (Lac operon) array at a noncentromeric locus. Ectopically targeted CENP-A chromatin at the LacO array was sufficient to direct the assembly of a functional centromere as indicated by the recruitment of the constitutive centromere-associated network proteins, the microtubule-binding protein NDC80, and the formation of stable kinetochore-microtubule attachments. An amino-terminal fragment of HJURP was able to assemble CENP-A nucleosomes in vitro, demonstrating that HJURP is a chromatin assembly factor. Furthermore, HJURP recruitment to endogenous centromeres required the Mis18 complex. Together, these data suggest that the role of the Mis18 complex in CENP-A deposition is to recruit HJURP and that the CENP-A nucleosome assembly activity of HJURP is responsible for centromeric chromatin assembly to maintain the epigenetic mark. PMID:21768289

  1. The ISW1 and CHD1 ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers compete to set nucleosome spacing in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ocampo, Josefina; Chereji, Răzvan V.; Eriksson, Peter R.; Clark, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate-dependent chromatin remodeling machines play a central role in gene regulation by manipulating chromatin structure. Most genes have a nucleosome-depleted region at the promoter and an array of regularly spaced nucleosomes phased relative to the transcription start site. In vitro, the three known yeast nucleosome spacing enzymes (CHD1, ISW1 and ISW2) form arrays with different spacing. We used genome-wide nucleosome sequencing to determine whether these enzymes space nucleosomes differently in vivo. We find that CHD1 and ISW1 compete to set the spacing on most genes, such that CHD1 dominates genes with shorter spacing and ISW1 dominates genes with longer spacing. In contrast, ISW2 plays a minor role, limited to transcriptionally inactive genes. Heavily transcribed genes show weak phasing and extreme spacing, either very short or very long, and are depleted of linker histone (H1). Genes with longer spacing are enriched in H1, which directs chromatin folding. We propose that CHD1 directs short spacing, resulting in eviction of H1 and chromatin unfolding, whereas ISW1 directs longer spacing, allowing H1 to bind and condense the chromatin. Thus, competition between the two remodelers to set the spacing on each gene may result in a highly dynamic chromatin structure. PMID:26861626

  2. DNA-histone interactions are sufficient to position a single nucleosome juxtaposing Drosophila Adh adult enhancer and distal promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, J R; Benyajati, C

    1993-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase gene (Adh) of Drosophila melanogaster is transcribed from two tandem promoters in distinct developmental and tissue-specific patterns. Both promoters are regulated by separate upstream enhancer regions. In its wild-type context the adult enhancer specifically stimulates only the distal promoter, approximately 400 bp downstream, and not the proximal promoter, which is approximately 700 bp further downstream. Genomic footprinting and micrococcal nuclease analyses have revealed a specifically positioned nucleosome between the distal promoter and adult enhancer. In vitro reconstitution of this nucleosome demonstrated that DNA-core histone interactions alone are sufficient to position the nucleosome. Based on this observation and sequence periodicities in the underlying DNA, the mechanism of positioning appears to involve specific DNA structural features (ie flexibility or curvature). We have observed this nucleosome positioned early during development, before tissue differentiation, and before non-histone protein-DNA interactions are established at the distal promoter or adult enhancer. This nucleosome positioning element in the Adh regulatory region could be involved in establishing a specific tertiary nucleoprotein structure that facilitates specific cis-element accessibility and/or distal promoter-adult enhancer interactions. Images PMID:8451195

  3. Periodic Distribution of a Putative Nucleosome Positioning Motif in Human, Nonhuman Primates, and Archaea: Mutual Information Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sosa, Daniela; Miramontes, Pedro; Li, Wentian; Mireles, Víctor; Bobadilla, Juan R.; José, Marco V.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, Trifonov's group proposed a 10-mer DNA motif YYYYYRRRRR as a solution of the long-standing problem of sequence-based nucleosome positioning. To test whether this generic decamer represents a biological meaningful signal, we compare the distribution of this motif in primates and Archaea, which are known to contain nucleosomes, and in Eubacteria, which do not possess nucleosomes. The distribution of the motif is analyzed by the mutual information function (MIF) with a shifted version of itself (MIF profile). We found common features in the patterns of this generic decamer on MIF profiles among primate species, and interestingly we found conspicuous but dissimilar MIF profiles for each Archaea tested. The overall MIF profiles for each chromosome in each primate species also follow a similar pattern. Trifonov's generic decamer may be a highly conserved motif for the nucleosome positioning, but we argue that this is not the only motif. The distribution of this generic decamer exhibits previously unidentified periodicities, which are associated to highly repetitive sequences in the genome. Alu repetitive elements contribute to the most fundamental structure of nucleosome positioning in higher Eukaryotes. In some regions of primate chromosomes, the distribution of the decamer shows symmetrical patterns including inverted repeats. PMID:23841049

  4. The ISW1 and CHD1 ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers compete to set nucleosome spacing in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ocampo, Josefina; Chereji, Răzvan V; Eriksson, Peter R; Clark, David J

    2016-06-01

    Adenosine triphosphate-dependent chromatin remodeling machines play a central role in gene regulation by manipulating chromatin structure. Most genes have a nucleosome-depleted region at the promoter and an array of regularly spaced nucleosomes phased relative to the transcription start site. In vitro, the three known yeast nucleosome spacing enzymes (CHD1, ISW1 and ISW2) form arrays with different spacing. We used genome-wide nucleosome sequencing to determine whether these enzymes space nucleosomes differently in vivo We find that CHD1 and ISW1 compete to set the spacing on most genes, such that CHD1 dominates genes with shorter spacing and ISW1 dominates genes with longer spacing. In contrast, ISW2 plays a minor role, limited to transcriptionally inactive genes. Heavily transcribed genes show weak phasing and extreme spacing, either very short or very long, and are depleted of linker histone (H1). Genes with longer spacing are enriched in H1, which directs chromatin folding. We propose that CHD1 directs short spacing, resulting in eviction of H1 and chromatin unfolding, whereas ISW1 directs longer spacing, allowing H1 to bind and condense the chromatin. Thus, competition between the two remodelers to set the spacing on each gene may result in a highly dynamic chromatin structure. PMID:26861626

  5. The translational placement of nucleosome cores in vitro determines the access of the transacting factor suGF1 to DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Patterton, H G; Hapgood, J

    1996-01-01

    The sea urchin G-string binding factor (suGF1) is one of several proteins that bind sequence-specifically to oligo(dGxdC) motifs, frequently present upstream of eukaryotic genes. In this study we investigate the interaction of suGF1, purified to near homogeneity, with its oligo(dGxdC) binding site in a reconstituted nucleosome core in vitro. We show that the in vitro reconstitution of a 214 bp fragment containing a suGF1 binding site results in the appearance of five distinct nucleosome core species. These species contain the histone octamer in an identical rotational setting but in different translational frames. The resulting different nucleosomal locations of the suGF1 binding site in the five core species are shown to modulate the ability of suGF1 to bind to nucleosomal DNA, even though the rotational setting of the DNA in the nucleosome cores maximally exposes the suGF1 binding site. We propose that a direct protein-protein steric clash between suGF1 and the histone octamer is the most likely determinant in modulating the binding of suGF1 to its nucleosomally wrapped binding site. This result suggests that in vivo suGF1, like TBP, NF1 and heat shock factor, may require a complementary nucleosome disrupting activity or that suGF1 binds to free nascent replicated DNA prior to nucleosome deposition. PMID:8932393

  6. The translational placement of nucleosome cores in vitro determines the access of the transacting factor suGF1 to DNA.

    PubMed

    Patterton, H G; Hapgood, J

    1996-11-01

    The sea urchin G-string binding factor (suGF1) is one of several proteins that bind sequence-specifically to oligo(dGxdC) motifs, frequently present upstream of eukaryotic genes. In this study we investigate the interaction of suGF1, purified to near homogeneity, with its oligo(dGxdC) binding site in a reconstituted nucleosome core in vitro. We show that the in vitro reconstitution of a 214 bp fragment containing a suGF1 binding site results in the appearance of five distinct nucleosome core species. These species contain the histone octamer in an identical rotational setting but in different translational frames. The resulting different nucleosomal locations of the suGF1 binding site in the five core species are shown to modulate the ability of suGF1 to bind to nucleosomal DNA, even though the rotational setting of the DNA in the nucleosome cores maximally exposes the suGF1 binding site. We propose that a direct protein-protein steric clash between suGF1 and the histone octamer is the most likely determinant in modulating the binding of suGF1 to its nucleosomally wrapped binding site. This result suggests that in vivo suGF1, like TBP, NF1 and heat shock factor, may require a complementary nucleosome disrupting activity or that suGF1 binds to free nascent replicated DNA prior to nucleosome deposition. PMID:8932393

  7. The Chromatin Remodelling Enzymes SNF2H and SNF2L Position Nucleosomes adjacent to CTCF and Other Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Wiechens, Nicola; Gkikopoulos, Triantaffyllos; Schofield, Pieta; Rocha, Sonia; Owen-Hughes, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Within the genomes of metazoans, nucleosomes are highly organised adjacent to the binding sites for a subset of transcription factors. Here we have sought to investigate which chromatin remodelling enzymes are responsible for this. We find that the ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling enzyme SNF2H plays a major role organising arrays of nucleosomes adjacent to the binding sites for the architectural transcription factor CTCF sites and acts to promote CTCF binding. At many other factor binding sites SNF2H and the related enzyme SNF2L contribute to nucleosome organisation. The action of SNF2H at CTCF sites is functionally important as depletion of CTCF or SNF2H affects transcription of a common group of genes. This suggests that chromatin remodelling ATPase’s most closely related to the Drosophila ISWI protein contribute to the function of many human gene regulatory elements. PMID:27019336

  8. Fast, long-range, reversible conformational fluctuations in nucleosomes revealed by single-pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    PubMed Central

    Tomschik, Miroslav; Zheng, Haocheng; van Holde, Ken; Zlatanova, Jordanka; Leuba, Sanford H.

    2005-01-01

    The nucleosome core particle, the basic repeated structure in chromatin fibers, consists of an octamer of eight core histone molecules, organized as dimers (H2A/H2B) and tetramers [(H3/H4)2] around which DNA wraps tightly in almost two left-handed turns. The nucleosome has to undergo certain conformational changes to allow processes that need access to the DNA template to occur. By single-pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer, we demonstrate fast, long-range, reversible conformational fluctuations in nucleosomes between two states: fully folded (closed), with the DNA wrapped around the histone core, or open, with the DNA significantly unraveled from the histone octamer. The brief excursions into an extended open state may create windows of opportunity for protein factors involved in DNA transactions to bind to or translocate along the DNA. PMID:15728351

  9. The Disequilibrium of Nucleosomes Distribution along Chromosomes Plays a Functional and Evolutionarily Role in Regulating Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lingfang; Ding, Feng; Xin, Chengqi; Zhang, Daoyong; Sun, Fanglin; Hu, Songnian; Yu, Jun

    2011-01-01

    To further understand the relationship between nucleosome-space occupancy (NO) and global transcriptional activity in mammals, we acquired a set of genome-wide nucleosome distribution and transcriptome data from the mouse cerebrum and testis based on ChIP (H3)-seq and RNA-seq, respectively. We identified a nearly consistent NO patterns among three mouse tissues—cerebrum, testis, and ESCs—and found, through clustering analysis for transcriptional activation, that the NO variations among chromosomes are closely associated with distinct expression levels between house-keeping (HK) genes and tissue-specific (TS) genes. Both TS and HK genes form clusters albeit the obvious majority. This feature implies that NO patterns, i.e. nucleosome binding and clustering, are coupled with gene clustering that may be functionally and evolutionarily conserved in regulating gene expression among different cell types. PMID:21886783

  10. A core viral protein binds host nucleosomes to sequester immune danger signals.

    PubMed

    Avgousti, Daphne C; Herrmann, Christin; Kulej, Katarzyna; Pancholi, Neha J; Sekulic, Nikolina; Petrescu, Joana; Molden, Rosalynn C; Blumenthal, Daniel; Paris, Andrew J; Reyes, Emigdio D; Ostapchuk, Philomena; Hearing, Patrick; Seeholzer, Steven H; Worthen, G Scott; Black, Ben E; Garcia, Benjamin A; Weitzman, Matthew D

    2016-07-01

    Viral proteins mimic host protein structure and function to redirect cellular processes and subvert innate defenses. Small basic proteins compact and regulate both viral and cellular DNA genomes. Nucleosomes are the repeating units of cellular chromatin and play an important part in innate immune responses. Viral-encoded core basic proteins compact viral genomes, but their impact on host chromatin structure and function remains unexplored. Adenoviruses encode a highly basic protein called protein VII that resembles cellular histones. Although protein VII binds viral DNA and is incorporated with viral genomes into virus particles, it is unknown whether protein VII affects cellular chromatin. Here we show that protein VII alters cellular chromatin, leading us to hypothesize that this has an impact on antiviral responses during adenovirus infection in human cells. We find that protein VII forms complexes with nucleosomes and limits DNA accessibility. We identified post-translational modifications on protein VII that are responsible for chromatin localization. Furthermore, proteomic analysis demonstrated that protein VII is sufficient to alter the protein composition of host chromatin. We found that protein VII is necessary and sufficient for retention in the chromatin of members of the high-mobility-group protein B family (HMGB1, HMGB2 and HMGB3). HMGB1 is actively released in response to inflammatory stimuli and functions as a danger signal to activate immune responses. We showed that protein VII can directly bind HMGB1 in vitro and further demonstrated that protein VII expression in mouse lungs is sufficient to decrease inflammation-induced HMGB1 content and neutrophil recruitment in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Together, our in vitro and in vivo results show that protein VII sequesters HMGB1 and can prevent its release. This study uncovers a viral strategy in which nucleosome binding is exploited to control extracellular immune signaling. PMID:27362237

  11. Regulation of Budding Yeast CENP-A levels Prevents Misincorporation at Promoter Nucleosomes and Transcriptional Defects

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrand, Erica M.; Biggins, Sue

    2016-01-01

    The exclusive localization of the histone H3 variant CENP-A to centromeres is essential for accurate chromosome segregation. Ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis helps to ensure that CENP-A does not mislocalize to euchromatin, which can lead to genomic instability. Consistent with this, overexpression of the budding yeast CENP-ACse4 is lethal in cells lacking Psh1, the E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets CENP-ACse4 for degradation. To identify additional mechanisms that prevent CENP-ACse4 misincorporation and lethality, we analyzed the genome-wide mislocalization pattern of overexpressed CENP-ACse4 in the presence and absence of Psh1 by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high throughput sequencing. We found that ectopic CENP-ACse4 is enriched at promoters that contain histone H2A.ZHtz1 nucleosomes, but that H2A.ZHtz1 is not required for CENP-ACse4 mislocalization. Instead, the INO80 complex, which removes H2A.ZHtz1 from nucleosomes, promotes the ectopic deposition of CENP-ACse4. Transcriptional profiling revealed gene expression changes in the psh1Δ cells overexpressing CENP-ACse4. The down-regulated genes are enriched for CENP-ACse4 mislocalization to promoters, while the up-regulated genes correlate with those that are also transcriptionally up-regulated in an htz1Δ strain. Together, these data show that regulating centromeric nucleosome localization is not only critical for maintaining centromere function, but also for ensuring accurate promoter function and transcriptional regulation. PMID:26982580

  12. Regulation of Budding Yeast CENP-A levels Prevents Misincorporation at Promoter Nucleosomes and Transcriptional Defects.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Erica M; Biggins, Sue

    2016-03-01

    The exclusive localization of the histone H3 variant CENP-A to centromeres is essential for accurate chromosome segregation. Ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis helps to ensure that CENP-A does not mislocalize to euchromatin, which can lead to genomic instability. Consistent with this, overexpression of the budding yeast CENP-A(Cse4) is lethal in cells lacking Psh1, the E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets CENP-A(Cse4) for degradation. To identify additional mechanisms that prevent CENP-A(Cse4) misincorporation and lethality, we analyzed the genome-wide mislocalization pattern of overexpressed CENP-A(Cse4) in the presence and absence of Psh1 by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high throughput sequencing. We found that ectopic CENP-A(Cse4) is enriched at promoters that contain histone H2A.Z(Htz1) nucleosomes, but that H2A.Z(Htz1) is not required for CENP-A(Cse4) mislocalization. Instead, the INO80 complex, which removes H2A.Z(Htz1) from nucleosomes, promotes the ectopic deposition of CENP-A(Cse4). Transcriptional profiling revealed gene expression changes in the psh1Δ cells overexpressing CENP-A(Cse4). The down-regulated genes are enriched for CENP-A(Cse4) mislocalization to promoters, while the up-regulated genes correlate with those that are also transcriptionally up-regulated in an htz1Δ strain. Together, these data show that regulating centromeric nucleosome localization is not only critical for maintaining centromere function, but also for ensuring accurate promoter function and transcriptional regulation. PMID:26982580

  13. The Role of Histone Tails in the Nucleosome: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Erler, Jochen; Zhang, Ruihan; Petridis, Loukas; Cheng, Xiaolin; Smith, Jeremy C.; Langowski, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Histone tails play an important role in gene transcription and expression. We present here a systematic computational study of the role of histone tails in the nucleosome, using replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations with an implicit solvent model and different well-established force fields. We performed simulations for all four histone tails, H4, H3, H2A, and H2B, isolated and with inclusion of the nucleosome. The results confirm predictions of previous theoretical studies for the secondary structure of the isolated tails but show a strong dependence on the force field used. In the presence of the entire nucleosome for all force fields, the secondary structure of the histone tails is destabilized. Specific contacts are found between charged lysine and arginine residues and DNA phosphate groups and other binding sites in the minor and major DNA grooves. Using cluster analysis, we found a single dominant configuration of binding to DNA for the H4 and H2A histone tails, whereas H3 and H2B show multiple binding configurations with an equal probability. The leading stabilizing contribution for those binding configurations is the attractive interaction between the positively charged lysine and arginine residues and the negatively charged phosphate groups, and thus the resulting charge neutralization. Finally, we present results of molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent to confirm our conclusions. Results from both implicit and explicit solvent models show that large portions of the histone tails are not bound to DNA, supporting the complex role of these tails in gene transcription and expression and making them possible candidates for binding sites of transcription factors, enzymes, and other proteins. PMID:25517156

  14. Altered Nucleosome Positioning at the Transcription Start Site and Deficient Transcriptional Initiation in Friedreich Ataxia*

    PubMed Central

    Chutake, Yogesh K.; Costello, Whitney N.; Lam, Christina; Bidichandani, Sanjay I.

    2014-01-01

    Most individuals with Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) are homozygous for an expanded GAA triplet repeat (GAA-TR) mutation in intron 1 of the FXN gene, which results in deficiency of FXN transcript. Consistent with the expanded GAA-TR sequence as a cause of variegated gene silencing, evidence for heterochromatin has been detected in intron 1 in the immediate vicinity of the expanded GAA-TR mutation in FRDA. Transcriptional deficiency in FRDA is thought to result from deficient elongation through the expanded GAA-TR sequence because of repeat-proximal heterochromatin and abnormal DNA structures adopted by the expanded repeat. There is also evidence for deficient transcriptional initiation in FRDA, but its relationship to the expanded GAA-TR mutation remains unclear. We show that repressive chromatin extends from the expanded GAA-TR in intron 1 to the upstream regions of the FXN gene, involving the FXN transcriptional start site. Using a chromatin accessibility assay and a high-resolution nucleosome occupancy assay, we found that the major FXN transcriptional start site, which is normally in a nucleosome-depleted region, is rendered inaccessible by altered nucleosome positioning in FRDA. Consistent with the altered epigenetic landscape the FXN gene promoter, a typical CpG island promoter, was found to be in a transcriptionally non-permissive state in FRDA. Both metabolic labeling of nascent transcripts and an unbiased whole transcriptome analysis revealed a severe deficiency of transcriptional initiation in FRDA. Deficient transcriptional initiation, and not elongation, is the major cause of FXN transcriptional deficiency in FRDA, and it is related to the spread of repressive chromatin from the expanded GAA-TR mutation. PMID:24737321

  15. Comparing the Assembly and Handedness Dynamics of (H3.3-H4)2 Tetrasomes to Canonical Tetrasomes

    PubMed Central

    Vlijm, Rifka; Lee, Mina; Ordu, Orkide; Boltengagen, Anastasiya; Lusser, Alexandra; Dekker, Nynke H.; Dekker, Cees

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic nucleosomes consists of an (H3-H4)2 tetramer and two H2A-H2B dimers, around which 147 bp of DNA are wrapped in 1.7 left-handed helical turns. During chromatin assembly, the (H3-H4)2 tetramer binds first, forming a tetrasome that likely constitutes an important intermediate during ongoing transcription. We recently showed that (H3-H4)2 tetrasomes spontaneously switch between a left- and right-handed wrapped state of the DNA, a phenomenon that may serve to buffer changes in DNA torque induced by RNA polymerase in transcription. Within nucleosomes of actively transcribed genes, however, canonical H3 is progressively replaced by its variant H3.3. Consequently, one may ask if and how the DNA chirality dynamics of tetrasomes is altered by H3.3. Recent findings that H3.3-containing nucleosomes result in less stable and less condensed chromatin further underline the need to study the microscopic underpinnings of H3.3-containing tetrasomes and nucleosomes. Here we report real-time single-molecule studies of (H3.3-H4)2 tetrasome dynamics using Freely Orbiting Magnetic Tweezers and Electromagnetic Torque Tweezers. We find that the assembly of H3.3-containing tetrasomes and nucleosomes by the histone chaperone Nucleosome Assembly Protein 1 (NAP1) occurs in an identical manner to that of H3-containing tetrasomes and nucleosomes. Likewise, the flipping behavior of DNA handedness in tetrasomes is not impacted by the presence of H3.3. We also examine the effect of free NAP1, H3.3, and H4 in solution on flipping behavior and conclude that the probability for a tetrasome to occupy the left-handed state is only slightly enhanced by the presence of free protein. These data demonstrate that the incorporation of H3.3 does not alter the structural dynamics of tetrasomes, and hence that the preferred incorporation of this histone variant in transcriptionally active regions does not result from its enhanced ability to accommodate torsional stress, but rather may be linked to

  16. Monitoring Conformational Dynamics with Single-Molecule Fluorescence Energy Transfer: Applications in Nucleosome Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Deindl, Sebastian; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    Due to its ability to track distance changes within individual molecules or molecular complexes on the nanometer scale and in real time, single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (single-molecule FRET) is a powerful tool to tackle a wide range of important biological questions. Using our recently developed single-molecule FRET assay to monitor nucleosome translocation as an illustrative example, we describe here in detail how to set up, carry out, and analyze single-molecule FRET experiments that provide time-dependent information on biomolecular processes. PMID:22929765

  17. BAF250a Protein Regulates Nucleosome Occupancy and Histone Modifications in Priming Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lei, Ienglam; West, Jason; Yan, Zhijiang; Gao, Xiaolin; Fang, Peng; Dennis, Jonathan H; Gnatovskiy, Leonid; Wang, Weidong; Kingston, Robert E; Wang, Zhong

    2015-07-31

    The unique chromatin signature of ES cells is fundamental to the pluripotency and differentiation of ES cells. One key feature is the poised chromatin state of master developmental genes that are transcriptionally repressed in ES cells but ready to be activated in response to differentiation signals. Poised chromatin in ES cells contains both H3 Lys-4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) and H3 Lys-27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) methylation, indicating activating and repressing potential. However, the contribution of non-covalent chromatin structure to the poised state is not well understood. To address whether remodeling of nucleosomes is important to the poised state, we characterized the function of BAF250a, a key regulatory subunit of the ES cell ATP-dependent Brahma-associated factor (BAF) chromatin remodeling complex (esBAF). Acute deletion of BAF250a disrupted the differentiation potential of ES cells by altering the expression timing of key developmental genes and pluripotent genes. Our genome-wide nucleosome and histone modification analyses indicated that the disruption of gene expression timing was largely due to changes of chromatin structures at poised genes, particularly those key developmental genes mediated by BAF250a. Specifically, BAF250a deletion caused a nucleosome occupancy increase at H3K4me3- and/or H3K27me3-associated promoters. Moreover, H3K27me3 levels and the number of bivalent promoter genes were reduced in BAF250a KO ES cells. We revealed that BAF250a ablation led to elevated Brg1 but reduced Suz12 recruitment at nucleosome occupancy-increased regions, indicating an unexpected and complicated role of BAF250a in regulating esBAF and Polycomb repressive complex (PRC) activities. Together, our studies identified that BAF250a mediates esBAF and PRC functions to establish the poised chromatin configuration in ES cells, which is essential for the proper differentiation of ES cells. PMID:26070559

  18. Subnucleosomes and their relationships to the arrangement of histone binding sites along nucleosome deoxyribonucleic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.A.; Mencke, A.J.; Chambers, S.A.; Oosterhof, D.K.; Rill, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    Micrococcal nuclease cleaves within nucleosomes at sites spaced about 10.4 base pairs (bp) apart. Cleavages at sites equivalent to 30-35 bp from the ends of 146-bp cores cause spontaneous loss of an H2a-H2b pair associated with 30-40 bp length DNA. Cleavages at certain other sites do not affect the nucleosome integrity unless a solvent perturbant such as urea is added. Chromatin moderately digested with micrococcal nuclease, when fractionated by sedimentation or electrophoresis in the presence of 3 M urea, yielded four previously unobserved subnucleosomes with the following histone/DNA compositions: (H3)/sub 2/(H4)/sub 2/(H2a)(H2b)/95-115 bp; (H3)(H4)/70-80 bp DNA; (H2a)(H2b)/50-60 bp DNA; and (H1)/60-70 bp DNA. All but the latter subnucleosome were also obtained upon DNase I digestion of purified nucleosome cores labeled on the 5' ends with /sup 32/P. Only subnucleosomes that retained H2a and H2b also retained labeled ends. These results show that H2a and H2b are paired on the terminal 30-40 bp of core DNA, as suggested from analyses of histone-DNA cross-link products by Mirzabekov and coworkers. Considerations of the orgins and compositions of subnucleosomes and of cross-linking data suggest an expanded model for the locations of histone binding sites along nucleosome core DNA. The principal features of this model are (i) strong electrostatic binding sites of H2a and H2b occur at positions approximately 20-30 bp from the core ends, (ii) strong electrostatic binding sites of H3 and H4 occur primarily on the central 40 bp of core DNA, (iii) strong nonelectrostatic, urea-sensitive binding sites of H3 and H4 occur at positions approximately 30-50 bp from the core ends, and (iv) urea-sensitive binding sites of H2a or H2b may occur on the terminal 10-20 bp of core DNA.

  19. GAGA Factor Maintains Nucleosome-Free Regions and Has a Role in RNA Polymerase II Recruitment to Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Fuda, Nicholas J.; Guertin, Michael J.; Sharma, Sumeet; Danko, Charles G.; Martins, André L.; Siepel, Adam; Lis, John T.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that GAGA Factor (GAF) is enriched on promoters with paused RNA Polymerase II (Pol II), but its genome-wide function and mechanism of action remain largely uncharacterized. We assayed the levels of transcriptionally-engaged polymerase using global run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) in control and GAF-RNAi Drosophila S2 cells and found promoter-proximal polymerase was significantly reduced on a large subset of paused promoters where GAF occupancy was reduced by knock down. These promoters show a dramatic increase in nucleosome occupancy upon GAF depletion. These results, in conjunction with previous studies showing that GAF directly interacts with nucleosome remodelers, strongly support a model where GAF directs nucleosome displacement at the promoter and thereby allows the entry Pol II to the promoter and pause sites. This action of GAF on nucleosomes is at least partially independent of paused Pol II because intergenic GAF binding sites with little or no Pol II also show GAF-dependent nucleosome displacement. In addition, the insulator factor BEAF, the BEAF-interacting protein Chriz, and the transcription factor M1BP are strikingly enriched on those GAF-associated genes where pausing is unaffected by knock down, suggesting insulators or the alternative promoter-associated factor M1BP protect a subset of GAF-bound paused genes from GAF knock-down effects. Thus, GAF binding at promoters can lead to the local displacement of nucleosomes, but this activity can be restricted or compensated for when insulator protein or M1BP complexes also reside at GAF bound promoters. PMID:25815464

  20. Inferring coarse-grain histone-DNA interaction potentials from high-resolution structures of the nucleosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Sam; Everaers, Ralf

    2015-02-01

    The histone-DNA interaction in the nucleosome is a fundamental mechanism of genomic compaction and regulation, which remains largely unknown despite increasing structural knowledge of the complex. In this paper, we propose a framework for the extraction of a nanoscale histone-DNA force-field from a collection of high-resolution structures, which may be adapted to a larger class of protein-DNA complexes. We applied the procedure to a large crystallographic database extended by snapshots from molecular dynamics simulations. The comparison of the structural models first shows that, at histone-DNA contact sites, the DNA base-pairs are shifted outwards locally, consistent with locally repulsive forces exerted by the histones. The second step shows that the various force profiles of the structures under analysis derive locally from a unique, sequence-independent, quadratic repulsive force-field, while the sequence preferences are entirely due to internal DNA mechanics. We have thus obtained the first knowledge-derived nanoscale interaction potential for histone-DNA in the nucleosome. The conformations obtained by relaxation of nucleosomal DNA with high-affinity sequences in this potential accurately reproduce the experimental values of binding preferences. Finally we address the more generic binding mechanisms relevant to the 80% genomic sequences incorporated in nucleosomes, by computing the conformation of nucleosomal DNA with sequence-averaged properties. This conformation differs from those found in crystals, and the analysis suggests that repulsive histone forces are related to local stretch tension in nucleosomal DNA, mostly between adjacent contact points. This tension could play a role in the stability of the complex.

  1. Nucleosomes impede Cas9 access to DNA in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Horlbeck, Max A; Witkowsky, Lea B; Guglielmi, Benjamin; Replogle, Joseph M; Gilbert, Luke A; Villalta, Jacqueline E; Torigoe, Sharon E; Tjian, Robert; Weissman, Jonathan S

    2016-01-01

    The prokaryotic CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats)-associated protein, Cas9, has been widely adopted as a tool for editing, imaging, and regulating eukaryotic genomes. However, our understanding of how to select single-guide RNAs (sgRNAs) that mediate efficient Cas9 activity is incomplete, as we lack insight into how chromatin impacts Cas9 targeting. To address this gap, we analyzed large-scale genetic screens performed in human cell lines using either nuclease-active or nuclease-dead Cas9 (dCas9). We observed that highly active sgRNAs for Cas9 and dCas9 were found almost exclusively in regions of low nucleosome occupancy. In vitro experiments demonstrated that nucleosomes in fact directly impede Cas9 binding and cleavage, while chromatin remodeling can restore Cas9 access. Our results reveal a critical role of eukaryotic chromatin in dictating the targeting specificity of this transplanted bacterial enzyme, and provide rules for selecting Cas9 target sites distinct from and complementary to those based on sequence properties. PMID:26987018

  2. Arginine-phosphate salt bridges between histones and DNA: Intermolecular actuators that control nucleosome architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusufaly, Tahir I.; Li, Yun; Singh, Gautam; Olson, Wilma K.

    2014-10-01

    Structural bioinformatics and van der Waals density functional theory are combined to investigate the mechanochemical impact of a major class of histone-DNA interactions, namely, the formation of salt bridges between arginine residues in histones and phosphate groups on the DNA backbone. Principal component analysis reveals that the configurational fluctuations of the sugar-phosphate backbone display sequence-specific directionality and variability, and clustering of nucleosome crystal structures identifies two major salt-bridge configurations: a monodentate form in which the arginine end-group guanidinium only forms one hydrogen bond with the phosphate, and a bidentate form in which it forms two. Density functional theory calculations highlight that the combination of sequence, denticity, and salt-bridge positioning enables the histones to apply a tunable mechanochemical stress to the DNA via precise and specific activation of backbone deformations. The results suggest that selection for specific placements of van der Waals contacts, with high-precision control of the spatial distribution of intermolecular forces, may serve as an underlying evolutionary design principle for the structure and function of nucleosomes, a conjecture that is corroborated by previous experimental studies.

  3. Effects of cytosine modifications on DNA flexibility and nucleosome mechanical stability

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Thuy T. M.; Yoo, Jejoong; Dai, Qing; Zhang, Qiucen; He, Chuan; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Ha, Taekjip

    2016-01-01

    Cytosine can undergo modifications, forming 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) and its oxidized products 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5-fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5-caC). Despite their importance as epigenetic markers and as central players in cellular processes, it is not well understood how these modifications influence physical properties of DNA and chromatin. Here we report a comprehensive survey of the effect of cytosine modifications on DNA flexibility. We find that even a single copy of 5-fC increases DNA flexibility markedly. 5-mC reduces and 5-hmC enhances flexibility, and 5-caC does not have a measurable effect. Molecular dynamics simulations show that these modifications promote or dampen structural fluctuations, likely through competing effects of base polarity and steric hindrance, without changing the average structure. The increase in DNA flexibility increases the mechanical stability of the nucleosome and vice versa, suggesting a gene regulation mechanism where cytosine modifications change the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA through their effects on DNA flexibility. PMID:26905257

  4. Nucleosomes impede Cas9 access to DNA in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Horlbeck, Max A; Witkowsky, Lea B; Guglielmi, Benjamin; Replogle, Joseph M; Gilbert, Luke A; Villalta, Jacqueline E; Torigoe, Sharon E; Tjian, Robert; Weissman, Jonathan S

    2016-01-01

    The prokaryotic CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats)-associated protein, Cas9, has been widely adopted as a tool for editing, imaging, and regulating eukaryotic genomes. However, our understanding of how to select single-guide RNAs (sgRNAs) that mediate efficient Cas9 activity is incomplete, as we lack insight into how chromatin impacts Cas9 targeting. To address this gap, we analyzed large-scale genetic screens performed in human cell lines using either nuclease-active or nuclease-dead Cas9 (dCas9). We observed that highly active sgRNAs for Cas9 and dCas9 were found almost exclusively in regions of low nucleosome occupancy. In vitro experiments demonstrated that nucleosomes in fact directly impede Cas9 binding and cleavage, while chromatin remodeling can restore Cas9 access. Our results reveal a critical role of eukaryotic chromatin in dictating the targeting specificity of this transplanted bacterial enzyme, and provide rules for selecting Cas9 target sites distinct from and complementary to those based on sequence properties. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12677.001 PMID:26987018

  5. Dynamics of histone H3 acetylation in the nucleosome core during mouse pre-implantation development.

    PubMed

    Ziegler-Birling, Céline; Daujat, Sylvain; Schneider, Robert; Torres-Padilla, Maria-Elena

    2016-08-01

    In mammals, the time period that follows fertilization is characterized by extensive chromatin remodeling, which enables epigenetic reprogramming of the gametes. Major changes in chromatin structure persist until the time of implantation, when the embryo develops into a blastocyst, which comprises the inner cell mass and the trophectoderm. Changes in DNA methylation, histone variant incorporation, and covalent modifications of the histones tails have been intensively studied during pre-implantation development. However, modifications within the core of the nucleosomes have not been systematically analyzed. Here, we report the first characterization and temporal analysis of 3 key acetylated residues in the core of the histone H3: H3K64ac, H3K122ac, and H3K56ac, all located at structurally important positions close to the DNA. We found that all 3 acetylations occur during pre-implantation development, but with different temporal kinetics. Globally, H3K64ac and H3K56ac were detected throughout cleavage stages, while H3K122ac was only weakly detectable during this time. Our work contributes to the understanding of the contribution of histone modifications in the core of the nucleosome to the "marking" of the newly established embryonic chromatin and unveils new modification pathways potentially involved in epigenetic reprogramming. PMID:26479850

  6. Early nucleosome deposition on, and replication of, HSV DNA requires cell factor PCNA

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Iryna; Boyer, Mark; Fraser, Nigel W.

    2015-01-01

    Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) is a double stranded DNA virus that can cause lytic infections in epithelial cells of the skin and latent infections in neuronal cells of the peripheral nervous system. After virion attachment to the cell membrane, the capsid enters the cytoplasm and is transported to the nucleus. Following docking at the nuclear pore, the HSV DNA, and contents of the virion, are injected into the nucleus. The viral DNA that enters the nucleus is devoid of histones, but begins to be covered with them soon after entry. The covering of histones, in the form of nucleosomes, reaches a maximum during the early stages of infection and drops off during late infection (after DNA replication). However during latency the genome is saturated with nucleosomes. In this study, we examine the role of cell Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) a cellular DNA polymerase accessory protein (processivity factor), and cell DNA polymerases in histone deposition during the early stages of HSV infection. Using SiRNA knockdown, and a cytosine arabinoside (araC) chemical inhibitor, we conclude that PCNA is important for viral replication and histone deposition. However, cell DNA polymerases that bind PCNA do not appear to be required for these processes and PCNA does not appear to bind to the viral DNA polymerase (which has its own viral processivity factor). PMID:25672886

  7. DNA transposon Hermes inserts into DNA in nucleosome-free regions in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gangadharan, Sunil; Mularoni, Loris; Fain-Thornton, Jennifer; Wheelan, Sarah J; Craig, Nancy L

    2010-12-21

    Transposons are mobile genetic elements that are an important source of genetic variation and are useful tools for genome engineering, mutagenesis screens, and vectors for transgenesis including gene therapy. We have used second-generation sequencing to analyze ≈2 × 10(5) unique de novo transposon insertion sites of the transposon Hermes in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome from both in vitro transposition reactions by using purified yeast genomic DNA, to better characterize intrinsic sequence specificity, and sites recovered from in vivo transposition events, to characterize the effect of intracellular factors such as chromatin on target site selection. We find that Hermes transposon targeting in vivo is profoundly affected by chromatin structure: The subset of genome-wide target sites used in vivo is strongly associated (P < 2e-16 by Fisher's exact test) with nucleosome-free chromatin. Our characterization of the insertion site preferences of Hermes not only assists in the future use of this transposon as a molecular biology tool but also establishes methods to more fully determine targeting mechanisms of other transposons. We have also discovered a long-range sequence motif that defines S. cerevisiae nucleosome-free regions. PMID:21131571

  8. DNA transposon Hermes inserts into DNA in nucleosome-free regions in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gangadharan, Sunil; Mularoni, Loris; Fain-Thornton, Jennifer; Wheelan, Sarah J.; Craig, Nancy L.

    2010-01-01

    Transposons are mobile genetic elements that are an important source of genetic variation and are useful tools for genome engineering, mutagenesis screens, and vectors for transgenesis including gene therapy. We have used second-generation sequencing to analyze ≈2 × 105 unique de novo transposon insertion sites of the transposon Hermes in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome from both in vitro transposition reactions by using purified yeast genomic DNA, to better characterize intrinsic sequence specificity, and sites recovered from in vivo transposition events, to characterize the effect of intracellular factors such as chromatin on target site selection. We find that Hermes transposon targeting in vivo is profoundly affected by chromatin structure: The subset of genome-wide target sites used in vivo is strongly associated (P < 2e-16 by Fisher's exact test) with nucleosome-free chromatin. Our characterization of the insertion site preferences of Hermes not only assists in the future use of this transposon as a molecular biology tool but also establishes methods to more fully determine targeting mechanisms of other transposons. We have also discovered a long-range sequence motif that defines S. cerevisiae nucleosome-free regions. PMID:21131571

  9. Effects of cytosine modifications on DNA flexibility and nucleosome mechanical stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Thuy T. M.; Yoo, Jejoong; Dai, Qing; Zhang, Qiucen; He, Chuan; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Ha, Taekjip

    2016-02-01

    Cytosine can undergo modifications, forming 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) and its oxidized products 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5-fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5-caC). Despite their importance as epigenetic markers and as central players in cellular processes, it is not well understood how these modifications influence physical properties of DNA and chromatin. Here we report a comprehensive survey of the effect of cytosine modifications on DNA flexibility. We find that even a single copy of 5-fC increases DNA flexibility markedly. 5-mC reduces and 5-hmC enhances flexibility, and 5-caC does not have a measurable effect. Molecular dynamics simulations show that these modifications promote or dampen structural fluctuations, likely through competing effects of base polarity and steric hindrance, without changing the average structure. The increase in DNA flexibility increases the mechanical stability of the nucleosome and vice versa, suggesting a gene regulation mechanism where cytosine modifications change the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA through their effects on DNA flexibility.

  10. Nucleolin is a histone chaperone with FACT-like activity and assists remodeling of nucleosomes

    PubMed Central

    Angelov, Dimitar; Bondarenko, Vladimir A; Almagro, Sébastien; Menoni, Hervé; Mongélard, Fabien; Hans, Fabienne; Mietton, Flore; Studitsky, Vasily M; Hamiche, Ali; Dimitrov, Stefan; Bouvet, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    Remodeling machines play an essential role in the control of gene expression, but how their activity is regulated is not known. Here we report that the nuclear protein nucleolin possesses a histone chaperone activity and that this factor greatly enhances the activity of the chromatin remodeling machineries SWI/SNF and ACF. Interestingly, nucleolin is able to induce the remodeling by SWI/SNF of macroH2A, but not of H2ABbd nucleosomes, which are otherwise resistant to remodeling. This new histone chaperone promotes the destabilization of the histone octamer, helping the dissociation of a H2A–H2B dimer, and stimulates the SWI/SNF-mediated transfer of H2A–H2B dimers. Furthermore, nucleolin facilitates transcription through the nucleosome, which is reminiscent of the activity of the FACT complex. This work defines new functions for histone chaperones in chromatin remodeling and regulation of transcription and explains how nucleolin could act on transcription. PMID:16601700

  11. At the right place at the right time: novel CENP-A binding proteins shed light on centromere assembly.

    PubMed

    Silva, Mariana C C; Jansen, Lars E T

    2009-10-01

    Centromeres, the chromosomal loci that form the sites of attachment for spindle microtubules during mitosis, are identified by a unique chromatin structure generated by nucleosomes containing the histone H3 variant CENP-A. The apparent epigenetic mode of centromere inheritance across mitotic and meiotic divisions has generated much interest in how CENP-A assembly occurs and how structurally divergent centromeric nucleosomes can specify the centromere complex. Although a substantial number of proteins have been implicated in centromere assembly, factors that can bind CENP-A specifically and deliver nascent protein to the centromere were, thus far, lacking. Several recent reports on experiments in fission yeast and human cells have now shown significant progress on this problem. Here, we discuss these new developments and their implications for epigenetic centromere inheritance. PMID:19590885

  12. Comparative analysis of linker histone H1, MeCP2, and HMGD1 on nucleosome stability and target site accessibility.

    PubMed

    Riedmann, Caitlyn; Fondufe-Mittendorf, Yvonne N

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin architectural proteins (CAPs) bind the entry/exit DNA of nucleosomes and linker DNA to form higher order chromatin structures with distinct transcriptional outcomes. How CAPs mediate nucleosome dynamics is not well understood. We hypothesize that CAPs regulate DNA target site accessibility through alteration of the rate of spontaneous dissociation of DNA from nucleosomes. We investigated the effects of histone H1, high mobility group D1 (HMGD1), and methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2), on the biophysical properties of nucleosomes and chromatin. We show that MeCP2, like the repressive histone H1, traps the nucleosome in a more compact mononucleosome structure. Furthermore, histone H1 and MeCP2 hinder model transcription factor Gal4 from binding to its cognate DNA site within the nucleosomal DNA. These results demonstrate that MeCP2 behaves like a repressor even in the absence of methylation. Additionally, MeCP2 behaves similarly to histone H1 and HMGD1 in creating a higher-order chromatin structure, which is susceptible to chromatin remodeling by ISWI. Overall, we show that CAP binding results in unique changes to nucleosome structure and dynamics. PMID:27624769

  13. High-Density Nucleosome Occupancy Map of Human Chromosome 9p21–22 Reveals Chromatin Organization of the Type I Interferon Gene Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Freaney, Jonathan E.; Zhang, Quanwei; Yigit, Erbay; Kim, Rebecca; Widom, Jonathan; Wang, Ji-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide investigations have dramatically increased our understanding of nucleosome positioning and the role of chromatin in gene regulation, yet some genomic regions have been poorly represented in human nucleosome maps. One such region is represented by human chromosome 9p21–22, which contains the type I interferon gene cluster that includes 16 interferon alpha genes and the single interferon beta, interferon epsilon, and interferon omega genes. A high-density nucleosome mapping strategy was used to generate locus-wide maps of the nucleosome organization of this biomedically important locus at a steady state and during a time course of infection with Sendai virus, an inducer of interferon gene expression. Detailed statistical and computational analysis illustrates that nucleosomes in this locus exhibit preferences for particular dinucleotide and oligomer DNA sequence motifs in vivo, which are similar to those reported for lower eukaryotic nucleosome–DNA interactions. These data were used to visualize the region's chromatin architecture and reveal features that are common to the organization of all the type I interferon genes, indicating a common nucleosome-mediated gene regulatory paradigm. Additionally, this study clarifies aspects of the dynamic changes that occur with the nucleosome occupying the transcriptional start site of the interferon beta gene after virus infection. PMID:24673249

  14. Proximity of H2A.Z containing nucleosome to the transcription start site influences gene expression levels in the mammalian liver and brain

    PubMed Central

    Bargaje, Rhishikesh; Alam, Mohammad Parwez; Patowary, Ashok; Sarkar, Maharnob; Ali, Tamer; Gupta, Shivani; Garg, Manali; Singh, Meghna; Purkanti, Ramya; Scaria, Vinod; Sivasubbu, Sridhar; Brahmachari, Vani; Pillai, Beena

    2012-01-01

    Nucleosome positioning maps of several organisms have shown that Transcription Start Sites (TSSs) are marked by nucleosome depleted regions flanked by strongly positioned nucleosomes. Using genome-wide nucleosome maps and histone variant occupancy in the mouse liver, we show that the majority of genes were associated with a single prominent H2A.Z containing nucleosome in their promoter region. We classified genes into clusters depending on the proximity of H2A.Z to the TSS. The genes with no detectable H2A.Z showed lowest expression level, whereas H2A.Z was positioned closer to the TSS of genes with higher expression levels. We confirmed this relation between the proximity of H2A.Z and expression level in the brain. The proximity of histone variant H2A.Z, but not H3.3 to the TSS, over seven consecutive nucleosomes, was correlated with expression. Further, a nucleosome was positioned over the TSS of silenced genes while it was displaced to expose the TSS in highly expressed genes. Our results suggest that gene expression levels in vivo are determined by accessibility of the TSS and proximity of H2A.Z. PMID:22821566

  15. A Modular Enhancer Is Differentially Regulated by GATA and NFAT Elements That Direct Different Tissue-Specific Patterns of Nucleosome Positioning and Inducible Chromatin Remodeling▿

    PubMed Central

    Bert, Andrew G.; Johnson, Brett V.; Baxter, Euan W.; Cockerill, Peter N.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated alternate mechanisms employed by enhancers to position and remodel nucleosomes and activate tissue-specific genes in divergent cell types. We demonstrated that the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) gene enhancer is modular and recruits different sets of transcription factors in T cells and myeloid cells. The enhancer recruited distinct inducible tissue-specific enhanceosome-like complexes and directed nucleosomes to different positions in these cell types. In undifferentiated T cells, the enhancer was activated by inducible binding of two NFAT/AP-1 complexes which disrupted two specifically positioned nucleosomes (N1 and N2). In myeloid cells, the enhancer was remodeled by GATA factors which constitutively displaced an upstream nucleosome (N0) and cooperated with inducible AP-1 elements to activate transcription. In mast cells, which express both GATA-2 and NFAT, these two pathways combined to activate the enhancer and generate high-level gene expression. At least 5 kb of the GM-CSF locus was organized as an array of nucleosomes with fixed positions, but the enhancer adopted different nucleosome positions in T cells and mast cells. Furthermore, nucleosomes located between the enhancer and promoter were mobilized upon activation in an enhancer-dependent manner. These studies reveal that distinct tissue-specific mechanisms can be used either alternately or in combination to activate the same enhancer. PMID:17283044

  16. Vaccination with L. infantum chagasi Nucleosomal Histones Confers Protection against New World Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Caused by Leishmania braziliensis

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Marcia W.; Santos, Diego M.; Fukutani, Kiyoshi F.; Clarencio, Jorge; Miranda, Jose Carlos; Brodskyn, Claudia; Barral, Aldina; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Soto, Manuel; de Oliveira, Camila I.

    2012-01-01

    Background Nucleosomal histones are intracellular proteins that are highly conserved among Leishmania species. After parasite destruction or spontaneous lysis, exposure to these proteins elicits a strong host immune response. In the present study, we analyzed the protective capability of Leishmania infantum chagasi nucleosomal histones against L. braziliensis infection using different immunization strategies. Methodology/Principal Findings BALB/c mice were immunized with either a plasmid DNA cocktail (DNA) containing four Leishmania nucleosomal histones or with the DNA cocktail followed by the corresponding recombinant proteins plus CpG (DNA/Protein). Mice were later challenged with L. braziliensis, in the presence of sand fly saliva. Lesion development, parasite load and the cellular immune response were analyzed five weeks after challenge. Immunization with either DNA alone or with DNA/Protein was able to inhibit lesion development. This finding was highlighted by the absence of infected macrophages in tissue sections. Further, parasite load at the infection site and in the draining lymph nodes was also significantly lower in vaccinated animals. This outcome was associated with increased expression of IFN-γ and down regulation of IL-4 at the infection site. Conclusion The data presented here demonstrate the potential use of L. infantum chagasi nucleosomal histones as targets for the development of vaccines against infection with L. braziliensis, as shown by the significant inhibition of disease development following a live challenge. PMID:23284976

  17. High-Resolution Mapping of Changes in Histone-DNA Contacts of Nucleosomes Remodeled by ISW2

    PubMed Central

    Kassabov, Stefan R.; Henry, Nathalia M.; Zofall, Martin; Tsukiyama, Toshio; Bartholomew, Blaine

    2002-01-01

    The imitation switch (ISWI) complex from yeast containing the Isw2 and Itc1 proteins was shown to preferentially slide mononucleosomes with as little as 23 bp of linker DNA from the end to the center of DNA. The contacts of unique residues in the histone fold regions of H4, H2B, and H2A with DNA were determined with base pair resolution before and after chromatin remodeling by a site-specific photochemical cross-linking approach. The path of DNA and the conformation of the histone octamer in the nucleosome remodeled or slid by ISW2 were not altered, because after adjustment for the new translational position, the DNA contacts at specific sites in the histone octamer had not been changed. Maintenance of the canonical nucleosome structure after sliding was also demonstrated by DNA photoaffinity labeling of histone proteins at specific sites within the DNA template. In addition, nucleosomal DNA does not become more accessible during ISW2 remodeling, as assayed by restriction endonuclease cutting. ISW2 was also shown to have the novel capability of counteracting transcriptional activators by sliding nucleosomes through Gal4-VP16 bound initially to linker DNA and displacing the activator from DNA. PMID:12370299

  18. [THE MODEL OF NUCLEOSOME STRUCTURE BASED ON THE LOCAL ROTATION OF THE NUCLEOHISTONE CHAIN, WHICH INDUCES ITS FOLDING].

    PubMed

    Priyatkina, T N

    2015-01-01

    An alternative model to the "double turn of DNA on the histone core" approach is forwarded based on the biochemical, cytological, and crystallographic data on the structural organization of the chromatin units--nucleosomes. The model assumes that the initial structure is a linear nucleohistone cord with a repeating symmetrical histone sequence. The compact (core) particle (a minimal nucleosome) is forming upon a stepwise rotation of DNA (kinks) at the centre and at two symmetrical sites into each repeating fragment stemming from the electrostatic binding of the lysine ε-NH2-groups with the followed one by one phosphates of the sugar-phosphate chain. As a result, we have a rhomboid structure composed of two counter-symmetrical DNA folds stabilized by histone-histone interactions. Based on disposable data, the histone sequence along nucleosome DNA is deduced. The following characteristics of the sequence are considered: continuity, non-overlapping, versatility, and dyadic symmetry in dispose of two every kind histone molecules and the sequence on the whole. The model is in agreement with a topology of nucleosome DNA, as well as the pattern of DNA-histone and histone-histone interactions in chromatin. PMID:26495705

  19. Regulation of the nucleosome repeat length in vivo by the DNA sequence, protein concentrations and long-range interactions.

    PubMed

    Beshnova, Daria A; Cherstvy, Andrey G; Vainshtein, Yevhen; Teif, Vladimir B

    2014-07-01

    The nucleosome repeat length (NRL) is an integral chromatin property important for its biological functions. Recent experiments revealed several conflicting trends of the NRL dependence on the concentrations of histones and other architectural chromatin proteins, both in vitro and in vivo, but a systematic theoretical description of NRL as a function of DNA sequence and epigenetic determinants is currently lacking. To address this problem, we have performed an integrative biophysical and bioinformatics analysis in species ranging from yeast to frog to mouse where NRL was studied as a function of various parameters. We show that in simple eukaryotes such as yeast, a lower limit for the NRL value exists, determined by internucleosome interactions and remodeler action. For higher eukaryotes, also the upper limit exists since NRL is an increasing but saturating function of the linker histone concentration. Counterintuitively, smaller H1 variants or non-histone architectural proteins can initiate larger effects on the NRL due to entropic reasons. Furthermore, we demonstrate that different regimes of the NRL dependence on histone concentrations exist depending on whether DNA sequence-specific effects dominate over boundary effects or vice versa. We consider several classes of genomic regions with apparently different regimes of the NRL variation. As one extreme, our analysis reveals that the period of oscillations of the nucleosome density around bound RNA polymerase coincides with the period of oscillations of positioning sites of the corresponding DNA sequence. At another extreme, we show that although mouse major satellite repeats intrinsically encode well-defined nucleosome preferences, they have no unique nucleosome arrangement and can undergo a switch between two distinct types of nucleosome positioning. PMID:24992723

  20. Regulation of the Nucleosome Repeat Length In Vivo by the DNA Sequence, Protein Concentrations and Long-Range Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Beshnova, Daria A.; Cherstvy, Andrey G.; Vainshtein, Yevhen; Teif, Vladimir B.

    2014-01-01

    The nucleosome repeat length (NRL) is an integral chromatin property important for its biological functions. Recent experiments revealed several conflicting trends of the NRL dependence on the concentrations of histones and other architectural chromatin proteins, both in vitro and in vivo, but a systematic theoretical description of NRL as a function of DNA sequence and epigenetic determinants is currently lacking. To address this problem, we have performed an integrative biophysical and bioinformatics analysis in species ranging from yeast to frog to mouse where NRL was studied as a function of various parameters. We show that in simple eukaryotes such as yeast, a lower limit for the NRL value exists, determined by internucleosome interactions and remodeler action. For higher eukaryotes, also the upper limit exists since NRL is an increasing but saturating function of the linker histone concentration. Counterintuitively, smaller H1 variants or non-histone architectural proteins can initiate larger effects on the NRL due to entropic reasons. Furthermore, we demonstrate that different regimes of the NRL dependence on histone concentrations exist depending on whether DNA sequence-specific effects dominate over boundary effects or vice versa. We consider several classes of genomic regions with apparently different regimes of the NRL variation. As one extreme, our analysis reveals that the period of oscillations of the nucleosome density around bound RNA polymerase coincides with the period of oscillations of positioning sites of the corresponding DNA sequence. At another extreme, we show that although mouse major satellite repeats intrinsically encode well-defined nucleosome preferences, they have no unique nucleosome arrangement and can undergo a switch between two distinct types of nucleosome positioning. PMID:24992723

  1. Intrauterine growth restriction perturbs nucleosome depletion at a growth hormone-responsive element in the mouse IGF-1 gene.

    PubMed

    McKnight, Robert A; Yost, Christian C; Yu, Xing; Wiedmeier, Julia E; Callaway, Christopher W; Brown, Ashley S; Lane, Robert H; Fung, Camille M

    2015-12-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is a common human pregnancy complication. IUGR offspring carry significant postnatal risk for early-onset metabolic syndrome, which is associated with persistent reduction in IGF-1 protein expression. We have previously shown that preadolescent IUGR male mice have decreased hepatic IGF-1 mRNA and circulating IGF-1 protein at postnatal day 21, the age when growth hormone (GH) normally upregulates hepatic IGF-1 expression. Here we studied nucleosome occupancy and CpG methylation at a putative growth hormone-responsive element in intron 2 (in2GHRE) of the hepatic IGF-1 gene in normal, sham-operated, and IUGR mice. Nucleosome occupancy and CpG methylation were determined in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and in liver at postnatal days 14, 21, and 42. For CpG methylation, additional time points out to 2 yr were analyzed. We confirmed the putative mouse in2GHRE was GH-responsive, and in normal mice, a single nucleosome was displaced from the hepatic in2GHRE by postnatal day 21, which exposed two STAT5b DNA binding sites. Nucleosome displacement correlated with developmentally programmed CpG demethylation. Finally, IUGR significantly altered the nucleosome-depleted region (NDR) at the in2GHRE of IGF-1 on postnatal day 21, with either complete absence of the NDR or with a shifted NDR exposing only one of two STAT5b DNA binding sites. An NDR shift was also seen in offspring of sham-operated mothers. We conclude that prenatal insult such as IUGR or anesthesia/surgery could perturb the proper formation of a well-positioned NDR at the mouse hepatic IGF-1 in2GHRE necessary for transitioning to an open chromatin state. PMID:26487705

  2. Intracellular Hmgb1 Inhibits Inflammatory Nucleosome Release and Limits Acute Pancreatitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Rui; Zhang, Qiuhong; Hou, Wen; Yan, Zhenwen; Chen, Ruochan; Bonaroti, Jillian; Bansal, Preeti; Billiar, Timothy R.; Tsung, Allan; Wang, Qingde; Bartlett, David L.; Whitcomb, David C; Chang, Eugene B.; Zhu, Xiaorong; Wang, Haichao; Lu, Ben; Tracey, Kevin J.; Cao, Lizhi; Fan, Xue-Gong; Lotze, Michael T.; Zeh, Herbert J.; Tang, Daolin

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is an abundant protein that regulates chromosome architecture and also functions as a damage-associated molecular pattern molecule. Little is known about its intracellular roles in response to tissue injury or during subsequent local and systemic inflammatory responses. We investigated the function of Hmgb1 in mice following induction of acute pancreatitis. METHODS: We utilized a Cre/LoxP system to create mice with pancreas-specific disruption in Hmbg1 (Pdx1-Cre; HMGB1flox/flox mice). Acute pancreatitis was induced in these mice (HMGB1flox/flox mice served as controls) following injection of L-arginine or cerulein. Pancreatic tissues and acinar cells were collected and analyzed by histologic, immunoblot, and immunohistochemical analyses. RESULTS: Following injection of L-arginine or cerulein, Pdx1-Cre; HMGB1flox/flox mice developed acute pancreatitis more rapidly than controls, with increased mortality. Pancreatic tissues of these mice also had higher levels of serum amylase, acinar cell death, leukocyte infiltration, and interstitial edema than controls. Pancreatic tissues and acinar cells collected from the Pdx1-Cre; HMGB1flox/flox mice following L-arginine- or cerulein injection demonstrated nuclear catastrophe with greater nucleosome release when compared with controls, along with increased phosphorylation/activation of RELA Nfκb, degradation of Iκb, and phosphorylation of Mapk. Inhibitors of reactive oxygen species (N-acetyl-L-cysteine) blocked L-arginine–induced DNA damage, necrosis, apoptosis, release of nucleosomes, and activation of Nfκb in pancreatic tissues and acinar cells from Pdx1-Cre; HMGB1flox/flox and control mice. Exogenous genomic DNA and recombinant histone H3 proteins significantly induced release of HMGB1 from mouse macrophages; administration of antibodies against H3 to mice reduced serum levels of HMGB1 and increased survival following L-arginine injection. CONCLUSIONS: In 2 mouse

  3. Full and partial genome-wide assembly and disassembly of the yeast transcription machinery in response to heat shock

    PubMed Central

    Zanton, Sara J.; Pugh, B. Franklin

    2006-01-01

    Eukaryotic genes are controlled by sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins, chromatin regulators, general transcription factors, and elongation factors. Here we examine the genome-wide location of representative members of these groups and their redistribution when the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome is reprogrammed by heat shock. As expected, assembly of active transcription complexes is coupled to eviction of H2A.Z nucleosomes, and disassembly is coupled to the return of nucleosomes. Remarkably, a large number of promoters assemble into partial preinitiation complexes (partial PICs), containing TFIIA, TFIID (and/or SAGA), TFIIB, TFIIE, and TFIIF. However, RNA polymerase II and TFIIH are generally not recruited, and nucleosomes are not displaced. These promoters may be preparing for additional stress that naturally accompany heat stress. For example, we find that oxidative stress, which often occurs with prolonged exposure of cells to high temperature, converts partial PICs into full PICs. Partial PICs therefore represent novel regulated intermediates that assemble at promoters in the midst of chromatin. PMID:16912275

  4. Precise nucleosome positioning in the promoter of the chicken beta A globin gene.

    PubMed

    Kefalas, P; Gray, F C; Allan, J

    1988-01-25

    Histone octamers were reconstituted onto 5' end-labelled DNA fragments derived from the promoter region of the chicken beta A globin gene. The location of the reconstituted histone octamer with respect to the DNA sequence of each fragment was assessed by Exonuclease III digestion of purified nucleosome monomers. By this approach we have found a strong preference for histone octamers to be positioned over nucleotides -206 to -62 relative to the gene cap site. This stretch of DNA contains all those 5' beta globin sequences which, by DNase footprinting, bind specific protein factors and incorporates three promoter consensus sequence motifs. The upstream terminal 32 base pairs of this DNA segment contains the binding sites for the erythrocyte specific G-string binding protein and transcription factor Spl and appears to be relatively weakly bound to the histone octamer. PMID:3340546

  5. Chromatin De-Compaction By The Nucleosomal Binding Protein HMGN5 Impairs Nuclear Sturdiness

    PubMed Central

    Furusawa, Takashi; Rochman, Mark; Taher, Leila; Dimitriadis, Emilios K.; Nagashima, Kunio; Anderson, Stasia; Bustin, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In most metazoan nuclei, heterochromatin is located at the nuclear periphery in contact with the nuclear lamina, which provides mechanical stability to the nucleus. We show that in cultured cells, chromatin de-compaction by the nucleosome binding protein HMGN5 decreases the sturdiness, elasticity, and rigidity of the nucleus. Mice overexpressing HMGN5, either globally or only in the heart, are normal at birth but develop hypertrophic heart with large cardiomyoctyes, deformed nuclei and disrupted lamina, and die of cardiac malfunction. Chromatin de-compaction is seen in cardiomyocytes of newborn mice but misshaped nuclei with disrupted lamina are seen only in adult cardiomyocytes, suggesting that loss of heterochromatin diminishes the ability of the nucleus to withstand the mechanical forces of the contracting heart. Thus, heterochromatin enhances the ability of the nuclear lamina to maintain the sturdiness and shape of the eukaryotic nucleus; a structural role for chromatin that is distinct from its genetic functions. PMID:25609380

  6. Long-Range Correlations in Genomic DNA: A Signature of the Nucleosomal Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audit, B.; Thermes, C.; Vaillant, C.; D'Aubenton-Carafa, Y.; Muzy, J. F.; Arneodo, A.

    2001-03-01

    We use the ``wavelet transform microscope'' to carry out a comparative statistical analysis of DNA bending profiles and of the corresponding DNA texts. In the three kingdoms, one reveals on both signals a characteristic scale of 100-200 bp that separates two different regimes of power-law correlations (PLC). In the small-scale regime, PLC are observed in eukaryotic, in double-strand DNA viral, and in archaeal genomes, which contrasts with their total absence in the genomes of eubacteria and their viruses. This strongly suggests that small-scale PLC are related to the mechanisms underlying the wrapping of DNA in the nucleosomal structure. We further speculate that the large scale PLC are the signature of the higher-order structure and dynamics of chromatin.

  7. The structural plasticity of SCA7 domains defines their differential nucleosome-binding properties

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Jacques; Wang, Ying-Hui; Spedale, Gianpiero; Atkinson, R Andrew; Romier, Christophe; Hamiche, Ali; Pijnappel, W W M Pim; Timmers, H Th Marc; Tora, László; Devys, Didier; Kieffer, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    SAGA (Spt–Ada–Gcn5 acetyltransferase), a coactivator complex involved in chromatin remodelling, harbours both histone acetylation and deubiquitination activities. ATXN7/Sgf73 and ATXN7L3, two subunits of the SAGA deubiquitination module, contain an SCA7 domain characterized by an atypical zinc-finger. We show that the yeast Sgf73–SCA7 domain is not required to recruit Sgf73 into SAGA. Instead, it binds to nucleosomes, a property that is conserved in the human ATXN7–SCA7 domain but is lost in the ATXN7L3 domain. The solution structures of the SCA7 domain of both ATXN7 and ATXN7L3 reveal a new, common zinc-finger motif at the heart of two distinct folds, providing a molecular basis for the observed functional differences. PMID:20634802

  8. Precise nucleosome positioning in the promoter of the chicken beta A globin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Kefalas, P; Gray, F C; Allan, J

    1988-01-01

    Histone octamers were reconstituted onto 5' end-labelled DNA fragments derived from the promoter region of the chicken beta A globin gene. The location of the reconstituted histone octamer with respect to the DNA sequence of each fragment was assessed by Exonuclease III digestion of purified nucleosome monomers. By this approach we have found a strong preference for histone octamers to be positioned over nucleotides -206 to -62 relative to the gene cap site. This stretch of DNA contains all those 5' beta globin sequences which, by DNase footprinting, bind specific protein factors and incorporates three promoter consensus sequence motifs. The upstream terminal 32 base pairs of this DNA segment contains the binding sites for the erythrocyte specific G-string binding protein and transcription factor Spl and appears to be relatively weakly bound to the histone octamer. Images PMID:3340546

  9. PARP3 is a sensor of nicked nucleosomes and monoribosylates histone H2BGlu2

    PubMed Central

    Grundy, Gabrielle J.; Polo, Luis M.; Zeng, Zhihong; Rulten, Stuart L.; Hoch, Nicolas C.; Paomephan, Pathompong; Xu, Yingqi; Sweet, Steve M.; Thorne, Alan W.; Oliver, Antony W.; Matthews, Steve J.; Pearl, Laurence H.; Caldecott, Keith W.

    2016-01-01

    PARP3 is a member of the ADP-ribosyl transferase superfamily that we show accelerates the repair of chromosomal DNA single-strand breaks in avian DT40 cells. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance experiments reveal that PARP3 employs a conserved DNA-binding interface to detect and stably bind DNA breaks and to accumulate at sites of chromosome damage. PARP3 preferentially binds to and is activated by mononucleosomes containing nicked DNA and which target PARP3 trans-ribosylation activity to a single-histone substrate. Although nicks in naked DNA stimulate PARP3 autoribosylation, nicks in mononucleosomes promote the trans-ribosylation of histone H2B specifically at Glu2. These data identify PARP3 as a molecular sensor of nicked nucleosomes and demonstrate, for the first time, the ribosylation of chromatin at a site-specific DNA single-strand break. PMID:27530147

  10. Thermomechanical damage of nucleosome by the shock wave initiated by ion passing through liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakubovich, Alexander V.; Surdutovich, Eugene; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2012-05-01

    We report on the results of full-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the heat spike in the water medium caused by the propagation of the heavy ion in the vicinity of its Bragg peak. High rate of energy transfer from an ion to the molecules of surrounding water environment leads to the rapid increase of the temperature of the molecules in the vicinity of ions trajectory. As a result of an abrupt increase of the temperature we observe the formation of the nanoscale shock wave propagating through the medium. We investigate the thermomechanical damage caused by the shock wave to the nucleosome located in the vicinity of heavy ion trajectory. We observe the substantial deformation of the DNA secondary structure. We show that the produced shock wave can lead to the thermomechanical breakage of the DNA backbone covalent bonds and present estimates for the number of such strand brakes per one cell nucleus.

  11. The Spectrum of Anti-Chromatin/Nucleosome Autoantibodies: Independent and Interdependent Biomarkers of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mehra, Sonal; Fritzler, Marvin J.

    2014-01-01

    Autoantibodies directed to chromatin components date back to the discovery of the LE cell and the LE cell phenomenon circa 1950, and subsequent evidence that major components of that reaction were chromatin components and histones in particular. Over time, immunoassays ranging from ELISA and line immunoassays to more modern bead-based assays incorporated histone and DNA mixtures, purified histones, and purified nucleosomes leading to a more thorough understanding of the genesis and pathogenetic relationships of antibodies to chromatin components in systemic lupus erythematosus and other autoimmune conditions. More recently, interest has focussed on other components of chromatin such as high mobility group (HMG) proteins both as targets of B cell responses and pro-inflammatory mediators. This review will focus on immunoassays that utilize chromatin components, their clinical relationships, and newer evidence implicating HMG proteins and DNA neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) as important players in systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases. PMID:24804269

  12. A role for tuned levels of nucleosome remodeler subunit ACF1 during Drosophila oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Börner, Kenneth; Jain, Dhawal; Vazquez-Pianzola, Paula; Vengadasalam, Sandra; Steffen, Natascha; Fyodorov, Dmitry V.; Tomancak, Pavel; Konev, Alexander; Suter, Beat; Becker, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    The Chromatin Accessibility Complex (CHRAC) consists of the ATPase ISWI, the large ACF1 subunit and a pair of small histone-like proteins, CHRAC-14/16. CHRAC is a prototypical nucleosome sliding factor that mobilizes nucleosomes to improve the regularity and integrity of the chromatin fiber. This may facilitate the formation of repressive chromatin. Expression of the signature subunit ACF1 is restricted during embryonic development, but remains high in primordial germ cells. Therefore, we explored roles for ACF1 during Drosophila oogenesis. ACF1 is expressed in somatic and germline cells, with notable enrichment in germline stem cells and oocytes. The asymmetrical localization of ACF1 to these cells depends on the transport of the Acf1 mRNA by the Bicaudal-D/Egalitarian complex. Loss of ACF1 function in the novel Acf17 allele leads to defective egg chambers and their elimination through apoptosis. In addition, we find a variety of unusual 16-cell cyst packaging phenotypes in the previously known Acf11 allele, with a striking prevalence of egg chambers with two functional oocytes at opposite poles. Surprisingly, we found that the Acf11 deletion – despite disruption of the Acf1 reading frame – expresses low levels of a PHD-bromodomain module from the C-terminus of ACF1 that becomes enriched in oocytes. Expression of this module from the Acf1 genomic locus leads to packaging defects in the absence of functional ACF1, suggesting competitive interactions with unknown target molecules. Remarkably, a two-fold overexpression of CHRAC (ACF1 and CHRAC-16) leads to increased apoptosis and packaging defects. Evidently, finely tuned CHRAC levels are required for proper oogenesis. PMID:26851213

  13. Histone Methylation Marks on Circulating Nucleosomes as Novel Blood-Based Biomarker in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gezer, Ugur; Yörüker, Ebru E.; Keskin, Metin; Kulle, Cemil Burak; Dharuman, Yoganiranjana; Holdenrieder, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Circulating nucleic acids (CNAs) are under investigation as a liquid biopsy in cancer as potential non-invasive biomarkers, as stable structure in circulation nucleosomes could be valuable sources for detection of cancer-specific alterations in histone modifications. Our interest is in histone methylation marks with a focus on colorectal cancer, one of the leading cancers respective the incidence and mortality. Our previous work included the analysis of trimethylations of lysine 9 on histone 3 (H3K9me3) and of lysine 20 on histone 4 (H4K20me3) by chromatin immuno- precipitation-related PCR in circulating nucleosomes. Here we asked whether global immunologic measurement of histone marks in circulation could be a suitable approach to show their potential as biomarkers. In addition to H3K9me3 and H4K20me3 we also measured H3K27me3 in plasma samples from CRC patients (n = 63) and cancer free individuals (n = 40) by ELISA-based methylation assays. Our results show that of three marks, the amounts of H3K27me3 (p = 0.04) and H4K20me3 (p < 0.001) were significantly lower in CRC patients than in healthy controls. For H3K9me3 similar amounts were measured in both groups. Areas under the curve (AUC) in receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves indicating the power of CRC detection were 0.620 for H3K27me3, 0.715 for H4K20me3 and 0.769 for the combination of both markers. In conclusion, findings of this preliminary study reveal the potential of blood-based detection of CRC by quantification of histone methylation marks and the additive effect of the marker combination. PMID:26690425

  14. Histone H1 compacts DNA under force and during chromatin assembly.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Botao; Freedman, Benjamin S; Miller, Kelly E; Heald, Rebecca; Marko, John F

    2012-12-01

    Histone H1 binds to linker DNA between nucleosomes, but the dynamics and biological ramifications of this interaction remain poorly understood. We performed single-molecule experiments using magnetic tweezers to determine the effects of H1 on naked DNA in buffer or during chromatin assembly in Xenopus egg extracts. In buffer, nanomolar concentrations of H1 induce bending and looping of naked DNA at stretching forces below 0.6 pN, effects that can be reversed with 2.7-pN force or in 200 mM monovalent salt concentrations. Consecutive tens-of-nanometer bending events suggest that H1 binds to naked DNA in buffer at high stoichiometries. In egg extracts, single DNA molecules assemble into nucleosomes and undergo rapid compaction. Histone H1 at endogenous physiological concentrations increases the DNA compaction rate during chromatin assembly under 2-pN force and decreases it during disassembly under 5-pN force. In egg cytoplasm, histone H1 protects sperm nuclei undergoing genome-wide decondensation and chromatin assembly from becoming abnormally stretched or fragmented due to astral microtubule pulling forces. These results reveal functional ramifications of H1 binding to DNA at the single-molecule level and suggest an important physiological role for H1 in compacting DNA under force and during chromatin assembly. PMID:23097493

  15. Sequence-dependent Kink-and-Slide Deformations of Nucleosomal DNA Facilitated by Histone Arginines Bound in the Minor Groove

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Difei; Ulyanov, Nikolai B.; Zhurkin, Victor B.

    2010-01-01

    In addition to bending and twisting deformabilities, the lateral displacements of the DNA axis (Kink-and-Slide) play an important role in DNA wrapping around the histone core (M. Y. Tolstorukov, A. V. Colasanti, D. M. McCandlish, W. K. Olson, V. B. Zhurkin, J. Mol. Biol. 371, 725-738 (2007)). Here, we show that these Kink-and-Slide deformations are likely to be stabilized by the arginine residues of histones interacting with the minor groove of DNA. The arginines are positioned asymmetrically in the minor groove, being closer to one strand. The asymmetric arginine-DNA interactions facilitate lateral displacement of base pairs across the DNA grooves, thus leading to a stepwise accumulation of the superhelical pitch of nucleosomal DNA. To understand the sequence dependence of such Kink-and-Slide deformations, we performed all-atom calculations of DNA hexamers with the YR and RY steps in the center. We found that when the unrestrained DNA deformations are allowed, the YR steps tend to bend into the major groove, and RY steps bend into the minor groove. However, when the nucleosomal Kink-and-Slide deformation is considered, the YR steps prove to be more favorable for bending into the minor groove. Overall, the Kink-and-Slide deformation energy of DNA increases in the order TA < CA < CG < GC < AC < AT. We propose a simple stereochemical model accounting for this sequence dependence. Our results agree with experimental data indicating that the TA step most frequently occurs in the minor-groove kink positions in the most stable nucleosomes. Our computations demonstrate that the Kink-and-Slide distortion is accompanied by the BI to BII transition. This fact, together with irregularities in the two-dimensional (Roll, Slide) energy contour maps, suggest that the Kink-and-Slide deformations represent a nonharmonic behavior of the duplex. This explains the difference between the two estimates of the DNA deformation energy in nucleosome – the earlier one made using knowledge

  16. A nucleosome turnover map reveals that the stability of histone H4 Lys20 methylation depends on histone recycling in transcribed chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, J. Peter; Shukla, Manu; Menendez-Benito, Victoria; Norman-Axelsson, Ulrika; Audergon, Pauline; Sinha, Indranil; Tanny, Jason C.; Allshire, Robin C.; Ekwall, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Nucleosome composition actively contributes to chromatin structure and accessibility. Cells have developed mechanisms to remove or recycle histones, generating a landscape of differentially aged nucleosomes. This study aimed to create a high-resolution, genome-wide map of nucleosome turnover in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The recombination-induced tag exchange (RITE) method was used to study replication-independent nucleosome turnover through the appearance of new histone H3 and the disappearance or preservation of old histone H3. The genome-wide location of histones was determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation–exonuclease methodology (ChIP-exo). The findings were compared with diverse chromatin marks, including histone variant H2A.Z, post-translational histone modifications, and Pol II binding. Finally, genome-wide mapping of the methylation states of H4K20 was performed to determine the relationship between methylation (mono, di, and tri) of this residue and nucleosome turnover. Our analysis showed that histone recycling resulted in low nucleosome turnover in the coding regions of active genes, stably expressed at intermediate levels. High levels of transcription resulted in the incorporation of new histones primarily at the end of transcribed units. H4K20 was methylated in low-turnover nucleosomes in euchromatic regions, notably in the coding regions of long genes that were expressed at low levels. This transcription-dependent accumulation of histone methylation was dependent on the histone chaperone complex FACT. Our data showed that nucleosome turnover is highly dynamic in the genome and that several mechanisms are at play to either maintain or suppress stability. In particular, we found that FACT-associated transcription conserves histones by recycling them and is required for progressive H4K20 methylation. PMID:25778913

  17. Histone chaperone Anp32e removes H2A.Z from DNA double-strand breaks and promotes nucleosome reorganization and DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Gursoy-Yuzugullu, Ozge; Ayrapetov, Marina K.; Price, Brendan D.

    2015-01-01

    The repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) requires open, flexible chromatin domains. The NuA4–Tip60 complex creates these flexible chromatin structures by exchanging histone H2A.Z onto nucleosomes and promoting acetylation of histone H4. Here, we demonstrate that the accumulation of H2A.Z on nucleosomes at DSBs is transient, and that rapid eviction of H2A.Z is required for DSB repair. Anp32e, an H2A.Z chaperone that interacts with the C-terminal docking domain of H2A.Z, is rapidly recruited to DSBs. Anp32e functions to remove H2A.Z from nucleosomes, so that H2A.Z levels return to basal within 10 min of DNA damage. Further, H2A.Z removal by Anp32e disrupts inhibitory interactions between the histone H4 tail and the nucleosome surface, facilitating increased acetylation of histone H4 following DNA damage. When H2A.Z removal by Anp32e is blocked, nucleosomes at DSBs retain elevated levels of H2A.Z, and assume a more stable, hypoacetylated conformation. Further, loss of Anp32e leads to increased CtIP-dependent end resection, accumulation of single-stranded DNA, and an increase in repair by the alternative nonhomologous end joining pathway. Exchange of H2A.Z onto the chromatin and subsequent rapid removal by Anp32e are therefore critical for creating open, acetylated nucleosome structures and for controlling end resection by CtIP. Dynamic modulation of H2A.Z exchange and removal by Anp32e reveals the importance of the nucleosome surface and nucleosome dynamics in processing the damaged chromatin template during DSB repair. PMID:26034280

  18. Using informative Multinomial-Dirichlet prior in a t-mixture with reversible jump estimation of nucleosome positions for genome-wide profiling.

    PubMed

    Samb, Rawane; Khadraoui, Khader; Belleau, Pascal; Deschênes, Astrid; Lakhal-Chaieb, Lajmi; Droit, Arnaud

    2015-12-01

    Genome-wide mapping of nucleosomes has revealed a great deal about the relationships between chromatin structure and control of gene expression. Recent next generation CHIP-chip and CHIP-Seq technologies have accelerated our understanding of basic principles of chromatin organization. These technologies have taught us that nucleosomes play a crucial role in gene regulation by allowing physical access to transcription factors. Recent methods and experimental advancements allow the determination of nucleosome positions for a given genome area. However, most of these methods estimate the number of nucleosomes either by an EM algorithm using a BIC criterion or an effective heuristic strategy. Here, we introduce a Bayesian method for identifying nucleosome positions. The proposed model is based on a Multinomial-Dirichlet classification and a hierarchical mixture distributions. The number and the positions of nucleosomes are estimated using a reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation technique. We compare the performance of our method on simulated data and MNase-Seq data from Saccharomyces cerevisiae against PING and NOrMAL methods. PMID:26656614

  19. Joint assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A joint assembly is provided which includes a drive assembly and a swivel mechanism. The drive assembly features a motor operatively associated with a plurality of drive shafts for driving auxiliary elements, and a plurality of swivel shafts for pivoting the drive assembly. The swivel mechanism engages the swivel shafts and has a fixable element that may be attached to a foundation. The swivel mechanism is adapted to cooperate with the swivel shafts to pivot the drive assembly with at least two degrees of freedom relative to the foundation. The joint assembly allows for all components to remain encased in a tight, compact, and sealed package, making it ideal for space, exploratory, and commercial applications.

  20. Factor H uptake regulates intracellular C3 activation during apoptosis and decreases the inflammatory potential of nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Martin, M; Leffler, J; Smoląg, K I; Mytych, J; Björk, A; Chaves, L D; Alexander, J J; Quigg, R J; Blom, A M

    2016-05-01

    Factor H (FH) binds apoptotic cells to limit the inflammatory potential of complement. Here we report that FH is actively internalized by apoptotic cells to enhance cathepsin L-mediated cleavage of endogenously expressed C3, which results in increased surface opsonization with iC3b. In addition, internalized FH forms complexes with nucleosomes, facilitates their phagocytosis by monocytes and induces an anti-inflammatory biased cytokine profile. A similar cytokine response was noted for apoptotic cells coated with FH, confirming that FH diminishes the immunogenic and inflammatory potential of autoantigens. These findings were supported by in vivo observations from CFH(-/-) MRL-lpr mice, which exhibited higher levels of circulating nucleosomes and necrotic cells than their CFH(+/+) littermates. This unconventional function of FH broadens the established view of apoptotic cell clearance and appears particularly important considering the strong associations with genetic FH alterations and diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26768663

  1. Rapid deamination of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photoproducts at TCG sites in a translationally and rotationally positioned nucleosome in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cannistraro, Vincent J; Pondugula, Santhi; Song, Qian; Taylor, John-Stephen

    2015-10-30

    Sunlight-induced C to T mutation hot spots in skin cancers occur primarily at methylated CpG sites that coincide with sites of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) formation. The C and 5-methyl-C in CPDs are not stable and deaminate to U and T, respectively, which leads to the insertion of A by the DNA damage bypass polymerase η, thereby defining a probable mechanism for the origin of UV-induced C to T mutations. Deamination rates for T(m)CG CPDs have been found to vary 12-fold with rotational position in a nucleosome in vitro. To determine the influence of nucleosome structure on deamination rates in vivo, we determined the deamination rates of CPDs at TCG sites in a stably positioned nucleosome within the FOS promoter in HeLa cells. A procedure for in vivo hydroxyl radical footprinting with Fe-EDTA was developed, and, together with results from a cytosine methylation protection assay, we determined the translational and rotational positions of the TCG sites. Consistent with the in vitro observations, deamination was slower for one CPD located at an intermediate rotational position compared with two other sites located at outside positions, and all were much faster than for CPDs at non-TCG sites. Photoproduct formation was also highly suppressed at one site, possibly due to its interaction with a histone tail. Thus, it was shown that CPDs of TCG sites deaminate the fastest in vivo and that nucleosomes can modulate both their formation and deamination, which could contribute to the UV mutation hot spots and cold spots. PMID:26354431

  2. Inhibition of chromatin remodeling by Polycomb Group protein Posterior Sex Combs is mechanistically distinct from nucleosome binding1

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Stanley M.; Francis, Nicole J.

    2010-01-01

    Polycomb Group (PcG) proteins are essential regulators of development that maintain gene silencing in Drosophila and mammals through alterations of chromatin structure. One key PcG protein, Posterior Sex Combs (PSC), is part of at least two complexes: Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1) and dRING Associated Factors (dRAF). PRC1-class complexes compact chromatin and inhibit chromatin remodeling, while dRAF has E3 ligase activity for ubiquitylation of histone H2A; activities of both complexes can inhibit transcription. The noncovalent effects of PRC1-class complexes on chromatin can be recapitulated by PSC alone, and the region of PSC required for these activities is essential for PSC function in vivo. To understand how PSC interacts with chromatin to exert its repressive effects, we compared the ability of PSC to bind to and inhibit remodeling of various nucleosomal templates, and determined which regions of PSC are required for mononucleosome binding and inhibition of chromatin remodeling. We find that PSC binds mononucleosome templates but inhibits their remodeling poorly. Addition of linker DNA to mononucleosomes allows their remodeling to be inhibited, although higher concentrations of PSC are required than for inhibition of multi-nucleosome templates. The C-terminal region of PSC (aa 456-1603) is important for inhibition of chromatin remodeling, and we identified aa 456-909 as sufficient for stable nucleosome binding but not for inhibition of chromatin remodeling. Our data suggest distinct mechanistic steps between nucleosome binding and inhibition of chromatin remodeling. PMID:20873869

  3. Genome-wide chromatin footprinting reveals changes in replication origin architecture induced by pre-RC assembly

    PubMed Central

    MacAlpine, Heather K.; Lubelsky, Yoav; Hartemink, Alexander J.

    2015-01-01

    Start sites of DNA replication are marked by the origin recognition complex (ORC), which coordinates Mcm2–7 helicase loading to form the prereplicative complex (pre-RC). Although pre-RC assembly is well characterized in vitro, the process is poorly understood within the local chromatin environment surrounding replication origins. To reveal how the chromatin architecture modulates origin selection and activation, we “footprinted” nucleosomes, transcription factors, and replication proteins at multiple points during the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell cycle. Our nucleotide-resolution protein occupancy profiles resolved a precise ORC-dependent footprint at 269 origins in G2. A separate class of inefficient origins exhibited protein occupancy only in G1, suggesting that stable ORC chromatin association in G2 is a determinant of origin efficiency. G1 nucleosome remodeling concomitant with pre-RC assembly expanded the origin nucleosome-free region and enhanced activation efficiency. Finally, the local chromatin environment restricts the loading of the Mcm2–7 double hexamer either upstream of or downstream from the ARS consensus sequence (ACS). PMID:25593310

  4. Apoptosis-related deregulation of proteolytic activities and high serum levels of circulating nucleosomes and DNA in blood correlate with breast cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background As cell-free circulating DNA exists predominantly as mono- and oligonucleosomes, the focus of the current study was to examine the interplay of circulating nucleosomes, DNA, proteases and caspases in blood of patients with benign and malignant breast diseases. Methods The concentrations of cell-free DNA and nucleosomes as well as the protease and caspase activities were measured in serum of patients with benign breast disease (n = 20), primary breast cancer (M0, n = 31), metastatic breast cancer (M1, n = 32), and healthy individuals (n = 28) by PicoGreen, Cell Death Detection ELISA, Protease Fluorescent Detection Kit and Caspase-Glo®3/7 Assay, respectively. Results Patients with benign and malignant tumors had significantly higher levels of circulating nucleic acids in their blood than healthy individuals (p = 0.001, p = 0.0001), whereas these levels could not discriminate between benign and malignant lesions. Our analyses of all serum samples revealed significant correlations of circulating nucleosome with DNA concentrations (p = 0.001), nucleosome concentrations with caspase activities (p = 0.008), and caspase with protease activities (p = 0.0001). High serum levels of protease and caspase activities associated with advanced tumor stages (p = 0.009). Patients with lymph node-positive breast cancer had significantly higher nucleosome levels in their blood than node-negative patients (p = 0.004). The presence of distant metastases associated with a significant increase in serum nucleosome (p = 0.01) and DNA levels (p = 0.04), and protease activities (p = 0.008). Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that high circulating nucleic acid concentrations in blood are no indicators of a malignant breast tumor. However, the observed changes in apoptosis-related deregulation of proteolytic activities along with the elevated serum levels of nucleosomes and DNA in blood are linked to breast cancer progression. PMID:21211028

  5. Genome-wide prediction of nucleosome occupancy in maize reveals plant chromatin structural features at genes and other elements at multiple scales.

    PubMed

    Fincher, Justin A; Vera, Daniel L; Hughes, Diana D; McGinnis, Karen M; Dennis, Jonathan H; Bass, Hank W

    2013-06-01

    The nucleosome is a fundamental structural and functional chromatin unit that affects nearly all DNA-templated events in eukaryotic genomes. It is also a biochemical substrate for higher order, cis-acting gene expression codes and the monomeric structural unit for chromatin packaging at multiple scales. To predict the nucleosome landscape of a model plant genome, we used a support vector machine computational algorithm trained on human chromatin to predict the nucleosome occupancy likelihood (NOL) across the maize (Zea mays) genome. Experimentally validated NOL plots provide a novel genomic annotation that highlights gene structures, repetitive elements, and chromosome-scale domains likely to reflect regional gene density. We established a new genome browser (http://www.genomaize.org) for viewing support vector machine-based NOL scores. This annotation provides sequence-based comprehensive coverage across the entire genome, including repetitive genomic regions typically excluded from experimental genomics data. We find that transposable elements often displayed family-specific NOL profiles that included distinct regions, especially near their termini, predicted to have strong affinities for nucleosomes. We examined transcription start site consensus NOL plots for maize gene sets and discovered that most maize genes display a typical +1 nucleosome positioning signal just downstream of the start site but not upstream. This overall lack of a -1 nucleosome positioning signal was also predicted by our method for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genes and verified by additional analysis of previously published Arabidopsis MNase-Seq data, revealing a general feature of plant promoters. Our study advances plant chromatin research by defining the potential contribution of the DNA sequence to observed nucleosome positioning and provides an invariant baseline annotation against which other genomic data can be compared. PMID:23572549

  6. Chromatin higher-order structure: two-start double superhelix formed by zig-zag shaped nucleosome chain with folded linker DNA.

    PubMed

    Osipova, T N; Karpova, E V; Vorob'ev, V I

    1990-08-01

    Hydrodynamic properties of chromatins differing in linker DNA length and in transcriptional activity have been studied by the method of sedimentation velocity. Oligonucleosomes of different chain length were isolated from chromatins of pigeon brain cortical neurones, rat thymus and sea urchin sperm characterized by nucleosome DNA repeat length of 165, 198 and 248 base pairs respectively. The hydrodynamic behaviour of oligonucleosomes in the dependence on the number of nucleosomes in the chain and on the ionic strength has been analysed on the basis of cylinder model. The data obtained allows one to calculate the main structural parameters of the oligonucleosomal chain: its mass per unit length, the hydrodynamic diameter of the chain, the length of the chain per nucleosome and DNA packing ratio. It is shown that hydrodynamic behaviour of nucleosome oligomers from all types of chromatins investigated at low ionic strength can be well described by the model of three-dimensional zig-zag chain with similar diameter and length of the chain per nucleosome, DNA packing ratio growing with the increase of linker DNA length. It can be achieved by unfolding the short linker DNA in neurone chromatin and by coiling the long linker DNA of sea urchin sperm chromatin into a loop. With the increase of ionic strength zig-zag shaped nucleosomal chain is condensed into a two-start double superhelix with closely arranged nucleosomes and linker DNA loops packed inside the superhelix. The suggested model is in good agreement with available experimental data and overcomes a number of difficulties which arise for the solenoid model and other models of the 30-nm chromatin fibril. PMID:2275789

  7. Epigenetic Regulation of Stem Cell Maintenance in the Drosophila Testis via the Nucleosome Remodeling Factor NURF

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Christopher M.; Matunis, Erika L.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Regulation of stem cells depends on both tissue-specific transcriptional regulators and changes in chromatin organization, yet the coordination of these events in endogenous niches is poorly understood. In the Drosophila testis, local JAK-STAT signaling maintains germline and somatic stem cells (GSCs and cyst progenitor cells, or CPCs) in a single niche. Here we show that epigenetic regulation via the nucleosome remodeling factor (NURF) complex ensures GSC and CPC maintenance by positively regulating JAK-STAT signaling, thereby preventing premature differentiation. Conversely, NURF is not required in early differentiating daughter cells of either lineage. Since three additional ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers (ACF, CHRAC, and dMi-2/NuRD) are dispensable for stem cell maintenance in the testis, epigenetic regulation of stem cells within this niche may rely primarily on NURF. Thus, local signals cooperate with specific chromatin remodeling complexes in intact niches to coordinately regulate a common set of target genes to prevent premature stem cell differentiation. PMID:20569693

  8. Widespread compensatory evolution conserves DNA-encoded nucleosome organization in yeast.

    PubMed

    Kenigsberg, Ephraim; Bar, Amir; Segal, Eran; Tanay, Amos

    2010-01-01

    Evolution maintains organismal fitness by preserving genomic information. This is widely assumed to involve conservation of specific genomic loci among species. Many genomic encodings are now recognized to integrate small contributions from multiple genomic positions into quantitative dispersed codes, but the evolutionary dynamics of such codes are still poorly understood. Here we show that in yeast, sequences that quantitatively affect nucleosome occupancy evolve under compensatory dynamics that maintain heterogeneous levels of A+T content through spatially coupled A/T-losing and A/T-gaining substitutions. Evolutionary modeling combined with data on yeast polymorphisms supports the idea that these substitution dynamics are a consequence of weak selection. This shows that compensatory evolution, so far believed to affect specific groups of epistatically linked loci like paired RNA bases, is a widespread phenomenon in the yeast genome, affecting the majority of intergenic sequences in it. The model thus derived suggests that compensation is inevitable when evolution conserves quantitative and dispersed genomic functions. PMID:21203484

  9. Lineage-Specific Conserved Noncoding Sequences of Plant Genomes: Their Possible Role in Nucleosome Positioning

    PubMed Central

    Hettiarachchi, Nilmini; Kryukov, Kirill; Sumiyama, Kenta; Saitou, Naruya

    2014-01-01

    Many studies on conserved noncoding sequences (CNSs) have found that CNSs are enriched significantly in regulatory sequence elements. We conducted whole-genome analysis on plant CNSs to identify lineage-specific CNSs in eudicots, monocots, angiosperms, and vascular plants based on the premise that lineage-specific CNSs define lineage-specific characters and functions in groups of organisms. We identified 27 eudicot, 204 monocot, 6,536 grass, 19 angiosperm, and 2 vascular plant lineage-specific CNSs (lengths range from 16 to 1,517 bp) that presumably originated in their respective common ancestors. A stronger constraint on the CNSs located in the untranslated regions was observed. The CNSs were often flanked by genes involved in transcription regulation. A drop of A+T content near the border of CNSs was observed and CNS regions showed a higher nucleosome occupancy probability. These CNSs are candidate regulatory elements, which are expected to define lineage-specific features of various plant groups. PMID:25364802

  10. Mapping nucleosome resolution chromosome folding in yeast by Micro-C

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Tsung-Han S.; Weiner, Assaf; Lajoie, Bryan; Dekker, Job; Friedman, Nir; Rando, Oliver J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY We describe a Hi-C based method, Micro-C, in which micrococcal nuclease is used instead of restriction enzymes to fragment chromatin, enabling nucleosome resolution chromosome folding maps. Analysis of Micro-C maps for budding yeast reveals abundant self-associating domains similar to those reported in other species, but not previously observed in yeast. These structures, far shorter than topologically-associating domains in mammals, typically encompass one to five genes in yeast. Strong boundaries between self-associating domains occur at promoters of highly transcribed genes and regions of rapid histone turnover that are typically bound by the RSC chromatin-remodeling complex. Investigation of chromosome folding in mutants confirms roles for RSC, “gene looping” factor Ssu72, Mediator, H3K56 acetyltransferase Rtt109, and the N-terminal tail of H4 in folding of the yeast genome. This approach provides detailed structural maps of a eukaryotic genome, and our findings provide insights into the machinery underlying chromosome compaction. PMID:26119342

  11. A new way of measuring apoptosis by absolute quantitation of inter-nucleosomally fragmented genomic DNA

    PubMed Central

    Hooker, David J.; Mobarok, Masqura; Anderson, Jenny L.; Rajasuriar, Reena; Gray, Lachlan R.; Ellett, Anne M.; Lewin, Sharon R.; Gorry, Paul R.; Cherry, Catherine L.

    2012-01-01

    Several critical events of apoptosis occur in the cell nucleus, including inter-nucleosomal DNA fragmentation (apoptotic DNA) and eventual chromatin condensation. The generation of apoptotic DNA has become a biochemical hallmark of apoptosis because it is a late ‘point of no return’ step in both the extrinsic (cell-death receptor) and intrinsic (mitochondrial) apoptotic pathways. Despite investigators observing apoptotic DNA and understanding its decisive role as a marker of apoptosis for over 20 years, measuring it has proved elusive. We have integrated ligation-mediated PCR and qPCR to design a new way of measuring apoptosis, termed ApoqPCR, which generates an absolute value for the amount (picogram) of apoptotic DNA per cell population. ApoqPCR’s advances over current methods include a 1000-fold linear dynamic range yet sensitivity to distinguish subtle low-level changes, measurement with a 3- to 4-log improvement in sample economy, and capacity for archival or longitudinal studies combined with high-throughput capability. We demonstrate ApoqPCR’s utility in both in vitro and in vivo contexts. Considering the fundamental role apoptosis has in vertebrate and invertebrate health, growth and disease, the reliable measurement of apoptotic nucleic acid by ApoqPCR will be of value in cell biology studies in basic and applied science. PMID:22544708

  12. Nucleosome dynamics and maintenance of epigenetic states of CpG islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneppen, Kim; Dodd, Ian B.

    2016-06-01

    Methylation of mammalian DNA occurs primarily at CG dinucleotides. These CpG sites are located nonrandomly in the genome, tending to occur within high density clusters of CpGs (islands) or within large regions of low CpG density. Cluster methylation tends to be bimodal, being dominantly unmethylated or mostly methylated. For CpG clusters near promoters, low methylation is associated with transcriptional activity, while high methylation is associated with gene silencing. Alternative CpG methylation states are thought to be stable and heritable, conferring localized epigenetic memory that allows transient signals to create long-lived gene expression states. Positive feedback where methylated CpG sites recruit enzymes that methylate nearby CpGs, can produce heritable bistability but does not easily explain that as clusters increase in size or density they change from being primarily methylated to primarily unmethylated. Here, we show that an interaction between the methylation state of a cluster and its occupancy by nucleosomes provides a mechanism to generate these features and explain genome wide systematics of CpG islands.

  13. Nucleosome dynamics and maintenance of epigenetic states of CpG islands.

    PubMed

    Sneppen, Kim; Dodd, Ian B

    2016-06-01

    Methylation of mammalian DNA occurs primarily at CG dinucleotides. These CpG sites are located nonrandomly in the genome, tending to occur within high density clusters of CpGs (islands) or within large regions of low CpG density. Cluster methylation tends to be bimodal, being dominantly unmethylated or mostly methylated. For CpG clusters near promoters, low methylation is associated with transcriptional activity, while high methylation is associated with gene silencing. Alternative CpG methylation states are thought to be stable and heritable, conferring localized epigenetic memory that allows transient signals to create long-lived gene expression states. Positive feedback where methylated CpG sites recruit enzymes that methylate nearby CpGs, can produce heritable bistability but does not easily explain that as clusters increase in size or density they change from being primarily methylated to primarily unmethylated. Here, we show that an interaction between the methylation state of a cluster and its occupancy by nucleosomes provides a mechanism to generate these features and explain genome wide systematics of CpG islands. PMID:27415308

  14. Pluripotency Transcription Factor Oct4 Mediates Stepwise Nucleosome Demethylation and Depletion

    PubMed Central

    Shakya, Arvind; Callister, Catherine; Goren, Alon; Yosef, Nir; Garg, Neha; Khoddami, Vahid; Nix, David; Regev, Aviv

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms whereby the crucial pluripotency transcription factor Oct4 regulates target gene expression are incompletely understood. Using an assay system based on partially differentiated embryonic stem cells, we show that Oct4 opposes the accumulation of local H3K9me2 and subsequent Dnmt3a-mediated DNA methylation. Upon binding DNA, Oct4 recruits the histone lysine demethylase Jmjd1c. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) time course experiments identify a stepwise Oct4 mechanism involving Jmjd1c recruitment and H3K9me2 demethylation, transient FACT (facilitates chromatin transactions) complex recruitment, and nucleosome depletion. Genome-wide and targeted ChIP confirms binding of newly synthesized Oct4, together with Jmjd1c and FACT, to the Pou5f1 enhancer and a small number of other Oct4 targets, including the Nanog promoter. Histone demethylation is required for both FACT recruitment and H3 depletion. Jmjd1c is required to induce endogenous Oct4 expression and fully reprogram fibroblasts to pluripotency, indicating that the assay system identifies functional Oct4 cofactors. These findings indicate that Oct4 sequentially recruits activities that catalyze histone demethylation and depletion. PMID:25582194

  15. Crew Assembly

    NASA Video Gallery

    Train to improve your dexterity and hand-eye coordination by assembling a puzzle.The Train Like an Astronaut project uses the excitement of exploration to challenge students to set goals, practice ...

  16. Seal assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Roger Neal; Longfritz, William David

    2001-01-01

    A seal assembly that seals a gap formed by a groove comprises a seal body, a biasing element, and a connection that connects the seal body to the biasing element to form the seal assembly. The seal assembly further comprises a concave-shaped center section and convex-shaped contact portions at each end of the seal body. The biasing element is formed from an elastic material and comprises a convex-shaped center section and concave-shaped biasing zones that are opposed to the convex-shaped contact portions. The biasing element is adapted to be compressed to change a width of the seal assembly from a first width to a second width that is smaller than the first width. In the compressed state, the seal assembly can be disposed in the groove. After release of the compressing force, the seal assembly expands. The contact portions will move toward a surface of the groove and the biasing zones will move into contact with another surface of the groove. The biasing zones will bias the contact portions of the seal body against the surface of the groove.

  17. The ATP binding site of the chromatin remodeling homolog Lsh is required for nucleosome density and de novo DNA methylation at repeat sequences

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jianke; Briones, Victorino; Barbour, Samantha; Yu, Weishi; Han, Yixing; Terashima, Minoru; Muegge, Kathrin

    2015-01-01

    Lsh, a chromatin remodeling protein of the SNF2 family, is critical for normal heterochromatin structure. In particular, DNA methylation at repeat elements, a hallmark of heterochromatin, is greatly reduced in Lsh−/− (KO) cells. Here, we examined the presumed nucleosome remodeling activity of Lsh on chromatin in the context of DNA methylation. We found that dynamic CG methylation was dependent on Lsh in embryonic stem cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that ATP function is critical for de novo methylation at repeat sequences. The ATP binding site of Lsh is in part required to promote stable association of the DNA methyltransferase 3b with the repeat locus. By performing nucleosome occupancy assays, we found distinct nucleosome occupancy in KO ES cells compared to WT ES cells after differentiation. Nucleosome density was restored to wild-type level by re-expressing wild-type Lsh but not the ATP mutant in KO ES cells. Our results suggest that ATP-dependent nucleosome remodeling is the primary molecular function of Lsh, which may promote de novo methylation in differentiating ES cells. PMID:25578963

  18. Methylation of Lysine 9 in Histone H3 Directs Alternative Modes of Highly Dynamic Interaction of Heterochromatin Protein hHP1β with the Nucleosome*

    PubMed Central

    Munari, Francesca; Soeroes, Szabolcs; Zenn, Hans Michael; Schomburg, Adrian; Kost, Nils; Schröder, Sabrina; Klingberg, Rebecca; Rezaei-Ghaleh, Nasrollah; Stützer, Alexandra; Gelato, Kathy Ann; Walla, Peter Jomo; Becker, Stefan; Schwarzer, Dirk; Zimmermann, Bastian; Fischle, Wolfgang; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Binding of heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) to the histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) mark is a hallmark of establishment and maintenance of heterochromatin. Although genetic and cell biological aspects have been elucidated, the molecular details of HP1 binding to H3K9me3 nucleosomes are unknown. Using a combination of NMR spectroscopy and biophysical measurements on fully defined recombinant experimental systems, we demonstrate that H3K9me3 works as an on/off switch regulating distinct binding modes of hHP1β to the nucleosome. The methyl-mark determines a highly flexible and very dynamic interaction of the chromodomain of hHP1β with the H3-tail. There are no other constraints of interaction or additional multimerization interfaces. In contrast, in the absence of methylation, the hinge region and the N-terminal tail form weak nucleosome contacts mainly with DNA. In agreement with the high flexibility within the hHP1β-H3K9me3 nucleosome complex, the chromoshadow domain does not provide a direct binding interface. Our results report the first detailed structural analysis of a dynamic protein-nucleosome complex directed by a histone modification and provide a conceptual framework for understanding similar interactions in the context of chromatin. PMID:22815475

  19. Methylation of lysine 9 in histone H3 directs alternative modes of highly dynamic interaction of heterochromatin protein hHP1β with the nucleosome.

    PubMed

    Munari, Francesca; Soeroes, Szabolcs; Zenn, Hans Michael; Schomburg, Adrian; Kost, Nils; Schröder, Sabrina; Klingberg, Rebecca; Rezaei-Ghaleh, Nasrollah; Stützer, Alexandra; Gelato, Kathy Ann; Walla, Peter Jomo; Becker, Stefan; Schwarzer, Dirk; Zimmermann, Bastian; Fischle, Wolfgang; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2012-09-28

    Binding of heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) to the histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) mark is a hallmark of establishment and maintenance of heterochromatin. Although genetic and cell biological aspects have been elucidated, the molecular details of HP1 binding to H3K9me3 nucleosomes are unknown. Using a combination of NMR spectroscopy and biophysical measurements on fully defined recombinant experimental systems, we demonstrate that H3K9me3 works as an on/off switch regulating distinct binding modes of hHP1β to the nucleosome. The methyl-mark determines a highly flexible and very dynamic interaction of the chromodomain of hHP1β with the H3-tail. There are no other constraints of interaction or additional multimerization interfaces. In contrast, in the absence of methylation, the hinge region and the N-terminal tail form weak nucleosome contacts mainly with DNA. In agreement with the high flexibility within the hHP1β-H3K9me3 nucleosome complex, the chromoshadow domain does not provide a direct binding interface. Our results report the first detailed structural analysis of a dynamic protein-nucleosome complex directed by a histone modification and provide a conceptual framework for understanding similar interactions in the context of chromatin. PMID:22815475

  20. Efficient cleavage of single and clustered AP site lesions within mono-nucleosome templates by CHO-K1 nuclear extract contrasts with retardation of incision by purified APE1

    PubMed Central

    Eccles, Laura J.; Menoni, Hervé; Angelov, Dimitar; Lomax, Martine E.; O’Neill, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Clustered DNA damage is a unique characteristic of radiation-induced DNA damage and the formation of these sites poses a serious challenge to the cell’s repair machinery. Within a cell DNA is compacted, with nucleosomes being the first order of higher level structure. However, few data are reported on the efficiency of clustered-lesion processing within nucleosomal DNA templates. Here, we show retardation of cleavage of a single AP site by purified APE1 when contained in nucleosomal DNA, compared to cleavage of an AP site in non-nucleosomal DNA. This retardation seen in nucleosomal DNA was alleviated by incubation with CHO-K1 nuclear extract. When clustered DNA damage sites containing bistranded AP sites were present in nucleosomal DNA, efficient cleavage of the AP sites was observed after treatment with nuclear extract. The resultant DSB formation led to DNA dissociating from the histone core and nucleosomal dispersion. Clustered damaged sites containing bistranded AP site/8-oxoG residues showed no retardation of cleavage of the AP site but retardation of 8-oxoG excision, compared to isolated lesions, thus DSB formation was not seen. An increased understanding of processing of clustered DNA damage in a nucleosomal environment may lead to new strategies to enhance the cytotoxic effects of radiotherapeutics. PMID:26439176

  1. Probe assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Avera, C.J.

    1981-01-06

    A hand-held probe assembly, suitable for monitoring a radioactive fibrinogen tracer, is disclosed comprising a substantially cylindrically shaped probe handle having an open end. The probe handle is adapted to be interconnected with electrical circuitry for monitoring radioactivity that is sensed or detected by the probe assembly. Mounted within the probe handle is a probe body assembly that includes a cylindrically shaped probe body inserted through the open end of the probe handle. The probe body includes a photomultiplier tube that is electrically connected with a male connector positioned at the rearward end of the probe body. Mounted at the opposite end of the probe body is a probe head which supports an optical coupler therewithin. The probe head is interconnected with a probe cap which supports a detecting crystal. The probe body assembly, which consists of the probe body, the probe head, and the probe cap is supported within the probe handle by means of a pair of compressible o-rings which permit the probe assembly to be freely rotatable, preferably through 360*, within the probe handle and removable therefrom without requiring any disassembly.

  2. High mobility group nucleosome-binding family proteins promote astrocyte differentiation of neural precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Motoshi; Lanjakornsiripan, Darin; Itoh, Yasuhiro; Kishi, Yusuke; Ogata, Toru; Gotoh, Yukiko

    2014-11-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant cell type in the mammalian brain and are important for the functions of the central nervous system. Although previous studies have shown that the STAT signaling pathway or its regulators promote the generation of astrocytes from multipotent neural precursor cells (NPCs) in the developing mammalian brain, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the astrocytic fate decision have still remained largely unclear. Here, we show that the high mobility group nucleosome-binding (HMGN) family proteins, HMGN1, 2, and 3, promote astrocyte differentiation of NPCs during brain development. HMGN proteins were expressed in NPCs, Sox9(+) glial progenitors, and GFAP(+) astrocytes in perinatal and adult brains. Forced expression of either HMGN1, 2, or 3 in NPCs in cultures or in the late embryonic neocortex increased the generation of astrocytes at the expense of neurons. Conversely, knockdown of either HMGN1, 2, or 3 in NPCs suppressed astrocyte differentiation and promoted neuronal differentiation. Importantly, overexpression of HMGN proteins did not induce the phosphorylation of STAT3 or activate STAT reporter genes. In addition, HMGN family proteins did not enhance DNA demethylation and acetylation of histone H3 around the STAT-binding site of the gfap promoter. Moreover, knockdown of HMGN family proteins significantly reduced astrocyte differentiation induced by gliogenic signal ciliary neurotrophic factor, which activates the JAK-STAT pathway. Therefore, we propose that HMGN family proteins are novel chromatin regulatory factors that control astrocyte fate decision/differentiation in parallel with or downstream of the JAK-STAT pathway through modulation of the responsiveness to gliogenic signals. PMID:25069414

  3. PGC-1alpha induces dynamic protein interactions on the ERRalpha gene multi-hormone response element nucleosome in kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liangli; Li, Yin; Hu, Peng; Teng, Christina T

    2008-12-15

    ERR (oestrogen-related receptor)-alpha modulates the oestrogen signalling pathway and regulates genes participating in the physiological energy balance programme. Oestrogen and PGC-1alpha (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha), the master regulator of the energy homoeostasis programme, both regulate the expression of ERRalpha through the MHRE (multi-hormone response element) of the ERRalpha gene. Although the molecular mechanism of oestrogen action on ERRalpha regulation is well characterized, the mechanism of PGC-1alpha induction is unclear. In this study, we examine chromatin structural changes and protein interactions at the MHRE nucleosome in response to PGC-1alpha expression in HK2 human kidney cells. We mapped the nucleosome positions of the ERRalpha gene promoter and examined the changes of histone acetylation in response to PGC-1alpha expression. The interactions of DNA-binding proteins, ERRalpha and ERRgamma, co-activators {CBP [CREB (cAMP-response-element-binding protein)-binding protein], p300, PCAF (p300/CBP-associated factor)}, co-repressor [RIP140 (receptor-interacting protein of 140 kDa)] and RNA polymerase II at the MHRE nucleosome region were investigated over time before and after PGC-1alpha expression in the HK2 cells. We found a dynamic cyclic interaction of these proteins shortly after PGC-1alpha expression and a slower cycling interaction, with fewer proteins involved, 20 h later. By using the siRNA (small interfering RNA) knockdown approach, we discovered that ERRgamma was involved in the initial phase, but not in the later phase, of PGC-1alpha-induced ERRalpha expression. PMID:18673300

  4. A histone arginine methylation localizes to nucleosomes in satellite II and III DNA sequences in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Applying supervised learning/classification techniques to epigenomic data may reveal properties that differentiate histone modifications. Previous analyses sought to classify nucleosomes containing histone H2A/H4 arginine 3 symmetric dimethylation (H2A/H4R3me2s) or H2A.Z using human CD4+ T-cell chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) data. However, these efforts only achieved modest accuracy with limited biological interpretation. Here, we investigate the impact of using appropriate data pre-processing —deduplication, normalization, and position- (peak-) finding to identify stable nucleosome positions — in conjunction with advanced classification algorithms, notably discriminatory motif feature selection and random forests. Performance assessments are based on accuracy and interpretative yield. Results We achieved dramatically improved accuracy using histone modification features (99.0%; previous attempts, 68.3%) and DNA sequence features (94.1%; previous attempts, <60%). Furthermore, the algorithms elicited interpretable features that withstand permutation testing, including: the histone modifications H4K20me3 and H3K9me3, which are components of heterochromatin; and the motif TCCATT, which is part of the consensus sequence of satellite II and III DNA. Downstream analysis demonstrates that satellite II and III DNA in the human genome is occupied by stable nucleosomes containing H2A/H4R3me2s, H4K20me3, and/or H3K9me3, but not 18 other histone methylations. These results are consistent with the recent biochemical finding that H4R3me2s provides a binding site for the DNA methyltransferase (Dnmt3a) that methylates satellite II and III DNA. Conclusions Classification algorithms applied to appropriately pre-processed ChIP-Seq data can accurately discriminate between histone modifications. Algorithms that facilitate interpretation, such as discriminatory motif feature selection, have the added potential to impart information about underlying

  5. Hinge assembly

    DOEpatents

    Vandergriff, D.H.

    1999-08-31

    A hinge assembly is disclosed having a first leaf, a second leaf and linking member. The first leaf has a contact surface. The second leaf has a first contact surface and a second contact surface. The linking member pivotally connects to the first leaf and to the second leaf. The hinge assembly is capable of moving from a closed position to an open position. In the closed position, the contact surface of the first leaf merges with the first contact surface of the second leaf. In the open position, the contact surface of the first leaf merges with the second contact surface of the second leaf. The hinge assembly can include a seal on the contact surface of the first leaf. 8 figs.

  6. Hinge assembly

    DOEpatents

    Vandergriff, David Houston

    1999-01-01

    A hinge assembly having a first leaf, a second leaf and linking member. The first leaf has a contact surface. The second leaf has a first contact surface and a second contact surface. The linking member pivotally connects to the first leaf and to the second leaf. The hinge assembly is capable of moving from a closed position to an open position. In the closed position, the contact surface of the first leaf merges with the first contact surface of the second leaf. In the open position, the contact surface of the first leaf merges with the second contact surface of the second leaf. The hinge assembly can include a seal on the contact surface of the first leaf.

  7. A cell free system for functional centromere and kinetochore assembly Authors

    PubMed Central

    Guse, Annika; Fuller, Colin J.; Straight, Aaron F.

    2013-01-01

    Summary This protocol describes a cell free system to study vertebrate centromere and kinetochore formation. We reconstitute tandem arrays of centromere protein A (CENP-A) nucleosomes as a substrate for centromere and kinetochore assembly. These chromatin substrates are immobilized on magnetic beads and then incubated in Xenopus egg extracts that provide a source for centromere and kinetochore proteins and that can be cycled between mitotic and interphase cell cycle states. This cell free system lends itself to protein immunodepletion, complementation and drug inhibition as tools to perturb centromere and kinetochore assembly, cytoskeletal dynamics, DNA modification, and protein post-translational modification. This system provides a distinct advantage over cell-based investigations where perturbing centromere and kinetochore function often results in lethality. Reconstituted CENP-A chromatin specifically assembles centromere and kinetochore proteins after incubation in egg extract that locally stabilize microtubules and, upon microtubule depolymerization with nocodazole, activate the mitotic checkpoint. A typical experiment occupies 3 days. PMID:23018190

  8. Latch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Frederickson, J.R.; Harper, W.H.; Perez, R.

    1984-08-17

    A latch assembly for releasably securing an article in the form of a canister within a container housing. The assembly includes a cam pivotally mounted on the housing wall and biased into the housing interior. The cam is urged into a disabled position by the canister as it enters the housing and a latch release plate maintains the cam disabled when the canister is properly seated in the housing. Upon displacement of the release plate, the cam snaps into latching engagement against the canister for securing the same within the housing. 2 figs.

  9. Latch assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Frederickson, James R.; Harper, William H.; Perez, Raymond

    1986-01-01

    A latch assembly for releasably securing an article in the form of a canister within a container housing. The assembly includes a cam pivotally mounted on the housing wall and biased into the housing interior. The cam is urged into a disabled position by the canister as it enters the housing and a latch release plate maintains the cam disabled when the canister is properly seated in the housing. Upon displacement of the release plate, the cam snaps into latching engagement against the canister for securing the same within the housing.

  10. Ubiquitous human ‘master’ origins of replication are encoded in the DNA sequence via a local enrichment in nucleosome excluding energy barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drillon, Guénola; Audit, Benjamin; Argoul, Françoise; Arneodo, Alain

    2015-02-01

    As the elementary building block of eukaryotic chromatin, the nucleosome is at the heart of the compromise between the necessity of compacting DNA in the cell nucleus and the required accessibility to regulatory proteins. The recent availability of genome-wide experimental maps of nucleosome positions for many different organisms and cell types has provided an unprecedented opportunity to elucidate to what extent the DNA sequence conditions the primary structure of chromatin and in turn participates in the chromatin-mediated regulation of nuclear functions, such as gene expression and DNA replication. In this study, we use in vivo and in vitro genome-wide nucleosome occupancy data together with the set of nucleosome-free regions (NFRs) predicted by a physical model of nucleosome formation based on sequence-dependent bending properties of the DNA double-helix, to investigate the role of intrinsic nucleosome occupancy in the regulation of the replication spatio-temporal programme in human. We focus our analysis on the so-called replication U/N-domains that were shown to cover about half of the human genome in the germline (skew-N domains) as well as in embryonic stem cells, somatic and HeLa cells (mean replication timing U-domains). The ‘master’ origins of replication (MaOris) that border these megabase-sized U/N-domains were found to be specified by a few hundred kb wide regions that are hyper-sensitive to DNase I cleavage, hypomethylated, and enriched in epigenetic marks involved in transcription regulation, the hallmarks of localized open chromatin structures. Here we show that replication U/N-domain borders that are conserved in all considered cell lines have an environment highly enriched in nucleosome-excluding-energy barriers, suggesting that these ubiquitous MaOris have been selected during evolution. In contrast, MaOris that are cell-type-specific are mainly regulated epigenetically and are no longer favoured by a local abundance of intrinsic NFRs

  11. Generation of a synthetic GlcNAcylated nucleosome reveals regulation of stability by H2A-Thr101 GlcNAcylation

    PubMed Central

    Lercher, Lukas; Raj, Ritu; Patel, Nisha A.; Price, Joshua; Mohammed, Shabaz; Robinson, Carol V.; Schofield, Christopher J.; Davis, Benjamin G.

    2015-01-01

    O-GlcNAcylation is a newly discovered histone modification implicated in transcriptional regulation, but no structural information on the physical effect of GlcNAcylation on chromatin exists. Here, we generate synthetic, pure GlcNAcylated histones and nucleosomes and reveal that GlcNAcylation can modulate structure through direct destabilization of H2A/H2B dimers in the nucleosome, thus promoting an ‘open' chromatin state. The results suggest that a plausible molecular basis for one role of histone O-GlcNAcylation in epigenetic regulation is to lower the barrier for RNA polymerase passage and hence increase transcription. PMID:26305776

  12. Ubiquitous human 'master' origins of replication are encoded in the DNA sequence via a local enrichment in nucleosome excluding energy barriers.

    PubMed

    Drillon, Guénola; Audit, Benjamin; Argoul, Françoise; Arneodo, Alain

    2015-02-18

    As the elementary building block of eukaryotic chromatin, the nucleosome is at the heart of the compromise between the necessity of compacting DNA in the cell nucleus and the required accessibility to regulatory proteins. The recent availability of genome-wide experimental maps of nucleosome positions for many different organisms and cell types has provided an unprecedented opportunity to elucidate to what extent the DNA sequence conditions the primary structure of chromatin and in turn participates in the chromatin-mediated regulation of nuclear functions, such as gene expression and DNA replication. In this study, we use in vivo and in vitro genome-wide nucleosome occupancy data together with the set of nucleosome-free regions (NFRs) predicted by a physical model of nucleosome formation based on sequence-dependent bending properties of the DNA double-helix, to investigate the role of intrinsic nucleosome occupancy in the regulation of the replication spatio-temporal programme in human. We focus our analysis on the so-called replication U/N-domains that were shown to cover about half of the human genome in the germline (skew-N domains) as well as in embryonic stem cells, somatic and HeLa cells (mean replication timing U-domains). The 'master' origins of replication (MaOris) that border these megabase-sized U/N-domains were found to be specified by a few hundred kb wide regions that are hyper-sensitive to DNase I cleavage, hypomethylated, and enriched in epigenetic marks involved in transcription regulation, the hallmarks of localized open chromatin structures. Here we show that replication U/N-domain borders that are conserved in all considered cell lines have an environment highly enriched in nucleosome-excluding-energy barriers, suggesting that these ubiquitous MaOris have been selected during evolution. In contrast, MaOris that are cell-type-specific are mainly regulated epigenetically and are no longer favoured by a local abundance of intrinsic NFRs encoded in

  13. Sequence-dependent nucleosome structural and dynamic polymorphism. Potential involvement of histone H2B N-terminal tail proximal domain.

    PubMed

    Sivolob, Andrei; Lavelle, Christophe; Prunell, Ariel

    2003-02-01

    Relaxation of nucleosomes on an homologous series (pBR) of ca 350-370 bp DNA minicircles originating from plasmid pBR322 was recently used as a tool to study their structure and dynamics. These nucleosomes thermally fluctuated between three distinct DNA conformations within a histone N-terminal tail-modulated equilibrium: one conformation was canonical, with 1.75 turn wrapping and negatively crossed entering and exiting DNAs; another was also "closed", but with these DNAs positively crossed; and the third was "open", with a lower than 1.5 turn wrapping and uncrossed DNAs. In this work, a new minicircle series (5S) of similar size was used, which contained the 5S nucleosome positioning sequence. Results showed that DNA in pBR nucleosomes was untwisted by approximately 0.2 turn relative to 5S nucleosomes, which DNase I footprinting confirmed in revealing a approximately 1 bp untwisting at each of the two dyad-distal sites where H2B N-terminal tails pass between the two gyres. In contrast, both nucleosomes showed untwistings at the dyad-proximal sites, i.e. on the other gyre, which were also observed in the high-resolution crystal structure. 5S nucleosomes also differ with respect to their dynamics: they hardly accessed the positively crossed conformation, but had an easier access to the negatively crossed conformation. Simulation showed that such reverse effects on the conformational free energies could be simply achieved by slightly altering the trajectories of entering and exiting DNAs. We propose that this is accomplished by H2B tail untwisting at the distal sites through action at a distance ( approximately 20 bp) on H3-tail interactions with the small groove at the nucleosome entry-exit. These results may help to gain a first glimpse into the two perhaps most intriguing features of the high-resolution structure: the alignment of the grooves on the two gyres and the passage of H2B and H3 N-terminal tails between them. PMID:12547190

  14. Generation of a synthetic GlcNAcylated nucleosome reveals regulation of stability by H2A-Thr101 GlcNAcylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lercher, Lukas; Raj, Ritu; Patel, Nisha A.; Price, Joshua; Mohammed, Shabaz; Robinson, Carol V.; Schofield, Christopher J.; Davis, Benjamin G.

    2015-08-01

    O-GlcNAcylation is a newly discovered histone modification implicated in transcriptional regulation, but no structural information on the physical effect of GlcNAcylation on chromatin exists. Here, we generate synthetic, pure GlcNAcylated histones and nucleosomes and reveal that GlcNAcylation can modulate structure through direct destabilization of H2A/H2B dimers in the nucleosome, thus promoting an `open' chromatin state. The results suggest that a plausible molecular basis for one role of histone O-GlcNAcylation in epigenetic regulation is to lower the barrier for RNA polymerase passage and hence increase transcription.

  15. Generation of a synthetic GlcNAcylated nucleosome reveals regulation of stability by H2A-Thr101 GlcNAcylation.

    PubMed

    Lercher, Lukas; Raj, Ritu; Patel, Nisha A; Price, Joshua; Mohammed, Shabaz; Robinson, Carol V; Schofield, Christopher J; Davis, Benjamin G

    2015-01-01

    O-GlcNAcylation is a newly discovered histone modification implicated in transcriptional regulation, but no structural information on the physical effect of GlcNAcylation on chromatin exists. Here, we generate synthetic, pure GlcNAcylated histones and nucleosomes and reveal that GlcNAcylation can modulate structure through direct destabilization of H2A/H2B dimers in the nucleosome, thus promoting an 'open' chromatin state. The results suggest that a plausible molecular basis for one role of histone O-GlcNAcylation in epigenetic regulation is to lower the barrier for RNA polymerase passage and hence increase transcription. PMID:26305776

  16. Furnace assembly

    DOEpatents

    Panayotou, Nicholas F.; Green, Donald R.; Price, Larry S.

    1985-01-01

    A method of and apparatus for heating test specimens to desired elevated temperatures for irradiation by a high energy neutron source. A furnace assembly is provided for heating two separate groups of specimens to substantially different, elevated, isothermal temperatures in a high vacuum environment while positioning the two specimen groups symmetrically at equivalent neutron irradiating positions.

  17. Furnace assembly

    DOEpatents

    Panayotou, N.F.; Green, D.R.; Price, L.S.

    A method of and apparatus for heating test specimens to desired elevated temperatures for irradiation by a high energy neutron source. A furnace assembly is provided for heating two separate groups of specimens to substantially different, elevated, isothermal temperatures in a high vacuum environment while positioning the two specimen groups symmetrically at equivalent neutron irradiating positions.

  18. SMARCAD1 is an ATP-dependent stimulator of nucleosomal H2A acetylation via CBP, resulting in transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Doiguchi, Masamichi; Nakagawa, Takeya; Imamura, Yuko; Yoneda, Mitsuhiro; Higashi, Miki; Kubota, Kazuishi; Yamashita, Satoshi; Asahara, Hiroshi; Iida, Midori; Fujii, Satoshi; Ikura, Tsuyoshi; Liu, Ziying; Nandu, Tulip; Kraus, W. Lee; Ueda, Hitoshi; Ito, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Histone acetylation plays a pivotal role in transcriptional regulation, and ATP-dependent nucleosome remodeling activity is required for optimal transcription from chromatin. While these two activities have been well characterized, how they are coordinated remains to be determined. We discovered ATP-dependent histone H2A acetylation activity in Drosophila nuclear extracts. This activity was column purified and demonstrated to be composed of the enzymatic activities of CREB-binding protein (CBP) and SMARCAD1, which belongs to the Etl1 subfamily of the Snf2 family of helicase-related proteins. SMARCAD1 enhanced acetylation by CBP of H2A K5 and K8 in nucleosomes in an ATP-dependent fashion. Expression array analysis of S2 cells having ectopically expressed SMARCAD1 revealed up-regulated genes. Using native genome templates of these up-regulated genes, we found that SMARCAD1 activates their transcription in vitro. Knockdown analysis of SMARCAD1 and CBP indicated overlapping gene control, and ChIP-seq analysis of these commonly controlled genes showed that CBP is recruited to the promoter prior to SMARCAD1. Moreover, Drosophila genetic experiments demonstrated interaction between SMARCAD1/Etl1 and CBP/nej during development. The interplay between the remodeling activity of SMARCAD1 and histone acetylation by CBP sheds light on the function of chromatin and the genome-integrity network. PMID:26888216

  19. Structure of the conserved core of the yeast Dot1p, a nucleosomal histone H3 lysine 79 methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Ken; Yang, Zhe; Horton, John R; Collins, Robert E; Zhang, Xing; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2004-10-01

    Methylation of Lys79 on histone H3 by Dot1p is important for gene silencing. The elongated structure of the conserved core of yeast Dot1p contains an N-terminal helical domain and a seven-stranded catalytic domain that harbors the binding site for the methyl-donor and an active site pocket sided with conserved hydrophobic residues. The S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine exhibits an extended conformation distinct from the folded conformation observed in structures of SET domain histone lysine methyltransferases. A catalytic asparagine (Asn479), located at the bottom of the active site pocket, suggests a mechanism similar to that employed for amino methylation in DNA and protein glutamine methylation. The acidic, concave cleft between the two domains contains two basic residue binding pockets that could accommodate the outwardly protruding basic side chains around Lys79 of histone H3 on the disk-like nucleosome surface. Biochemical studies suggest that recombinant Dot1 proteins are active on recombinant nucleosomes, free of any modifications. PMID:15292170

  20. Distinct Cellular Assembly Stoichiometry of Polycomb Complexes on Chromatin Revealed by Single-molecule Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Imaging.

    PubMed

    Tatavosian, Roubina; Zhen, Chao Yu; Duc, Huy Nguyen; Balas, Maggie M; Johnson, Aaron M; Ren, Xiaojun

    2015-11-20

    Epigenetic complexes play an essential role in regulating chromatin structure, but information about their assembly stoichiometry on chromatin within cells is poorly understood. The cellular assembly stoichiometry is critical for appreciating the initiation, propagation, and maintenance of epigenetic inheritance during normal development and in cancer. By combining genetic engineering, chromatin biochemistry, and single-molecule fluorescence imaging, we developed a novel and sensitive approach termed single-molecule chromatin immunoprecipitation imaging (Sm-ChIPi) to enable investigation of the cellular assembly stoichiometry of epigenetic complexes on chromatin. Sm-ChIPi was validated by using chromatin complexes with known stoichiometry. The stoichiometry of subunits within a polycomb complex and the assembly stoichiometry of polycomb complexes on chromatin have been extensively studied but reached divergent views. Moreover, the cellular assembly stoichiometry of polycomb complexes on chromatin remains unexplored. Using Sm-ChIPi, we demonstrated that within mouse embryonic stem cells, one polycomb repressive complex (PRC) 1 associates with multiple nucleosomes, whereas two PRC2s can bind to a single nucleosome. Furthermore, we obtained direct physical evidence that the nucleoplasmic PRC1 is monomeric, whereas PRC2 can dimerize in the nucleoplasm. We showed that ES cell differentiation induces selective alteration of the assembly stoichiometry of Cbx2 on chromatin but not other PRC1 components. We additionally showed that the PRC2-mediated trimethylation of H3K27 is not required for the assembly stoichiometry of PRC1 on chromatin. Thus, these findings uncover that PRC1 and PRC2 employ distinct mechanisms to assemble on chromatin, and the novel Sm-ChIPi technique could provide single-molecule insight into other epigenetic complexes. PMID:26381410

  1. Cartwheel assembly

    PubMed Central

    Hirono, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    The cartwheel is a subcentriolar structure consisting of a central hub and nine radially arranged spokes, located at the proximal end of the centriole. It appears at the initial stage of the centriole assembly process as the first ninefold symmetrical structure. The cartwheel was first described more than 50 years ago, but it is only recently that its pivotal role in establishing the ninefold symmetry of the centriole was demonstrated. Significant progress has since been made in understanding its fine structure and assembly mechanism. Most importantly, the central part of the cartwheel, from which the ninefold symmetry originates, is shown to form by self-association of nine dimers of the protein SAS-6. This finding, together with emerging data on other components of the cartwheel, has opened new avenues in centrosome biology. PMID:25047612

  2. Sensor assembly

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Thomas E.; Nelson, Drew V.

    2004-04-13

    A ribbon-like sensor assembly is described wherein a length of an optical fiber embedded within a similar lengths of a prepreg tow. The fiber is ""sandwiched"" by two layers of the prepreg tow which are merged to form a single consolidated ribbon. The consolidated ribbon achieving a generally uniform distribution of composite filaments near the embedded fiber such that excess resin does not ""pool"" around the periphery of the embedded fiber.

  3. Dynamic recruitment of Ets1 to both nucleosome-occupied and -depleted enhancer regions mediates a transcriptional program switch during early T-cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cauchy, Pierre; Maqbool, Muhammad A.; Zacarias-Cabeza, Joaquin; Vanhille, Laurent; Koch, Frederic; Fenouil, Romain; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Santana, Maria A.; Griffon, Aurélien; Imbert, Jean; Moraes-Cabé, Carolina; Bories, Jean-Christophe; Ferrier, Pierre; Spicuglia, Salvatore; Andrau, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Ets1 is a sequence-specific transcription factor that plays an important role during hematopoiesis, and is essential for the transition of CD4−/CD8− double negative (DN) to CD4+/CD8+ double positive (DP) thymocytes. Using genome-wide and functional approaches, we investigated the binding properties, transcriptional role and chromatin environment of Ets1 during this transition. We found that while Ets1 binding at distal sites was associated with active genes at both DN and DP stages, its enhancer activity was attained at the DP stage, as reflected by levels of the core transcriptional hallmarks H3K4me1/3, RNA Polymerase II and eRNA. This dual, stage-specific ability reflected a switch from non-T hematopoietic toward T-cell specific gene expression programs during the DN-to-DP transition, as indicated by transcriptome analyses of Ets1−/− thymic cells. Coincidentally, Ets1 associates more specifically with Runx1 in DN and with TCF1 in DP cells. We also provide evidence that Ets1 predominantly binds distal nucleosome-occupied regions in DN and nucleosome-depleted regions in DP. Finally and importantly, we demonstrate that Ets1 induces chromatin remodeling by displacing H3K4me1-marked nucleosomes. Our results thus provide an original model whereby the ability of a transcription factor to bind nucleosomal DNA changes during differentiation with consequences on its cognate enhancer activity. PMID:26673693

  4. Glucocorticoid receptor-dependent disruption of a specific nucleosome on the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter is prevented by sodium butyrate.

    PubMed Central

    Bresnick, E H; John, S; Berard, D S; LeFebvre, P; Hager, G L

    1990-01-01

    Our laboratory has previously developed cell lines derived from mouse NIH 3T3 fibroblasts and C127 mammary tumor cells that stably express mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) long terminal repeat fusion genes in bovine papillomavirus-based episomes. Glucocorticoid hormone strongly activates transcription from episomes and induces the disruption of a single nucleosome in an array of phased nucleosomes on the MMTV promoter. Sodium butyrate inhibits the glucocorticoid hormone-dependent development of a nuclease-hypersensitive site that is due to the displacement of this nucleosome, and inhibits induction of RNA transcripts from episomes. Saturation binding studies show that butyrate treatment does not significantly affect the amount or the hormone-binding affinity of the glucocorticoid receptor. In a transient transfection assay, glucocorticoid hormone can activate transcription from a MMTV long terminal repeat-driven luciferase gene construct equivalently in untreated and butyrate-treated cells, indicating that the soluble factors necessary for transactivation of the MMTV promoter are unaffected by butyrate. The differential effect of butyrate on the induction of stable chromatin templates and transiently expressed plasmids suggests that butyrate prevents nucleosome displacement and represses transcription by inducing a modification of chromatin. Images PMID:2160080

  5. Dynamic recruitment of Ets1 to both nucleosome-occupied and -depleted enhancer regions mediates a transcriptional program switch during early T-cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Cauchy, Pierre; Maqbool, Muhammad A; Zacarias-Cabeza, Joaquin; Vanhille, Laurent; Koch, Frederic; Fenouil, Romain; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Santana, Maria A; Griffon, Aurélien; Imbert, Jean; Moraes-Cabé, Carolina; Bories, Jean-Christophe; Ferrier, Pierre; Spicuglia, Salvatore; Andrau, Jean-Christophe

    2016-05-01

    Ets1 is a sequence-specific transcription factor that plays an important role during hematopoiesis, and is essential for the transition of CD4(-)/CD8(-) double negative (DN) to CD4(+)/CD8(+) double positive (DP) thymocytes. Using genome-wide and functional approaches, we investigated the binding properties, transcriptional role and chromatin environment of Ets1 during this transition. We found that while Ets1 binding at distal sites was associated with active genes at both DN and DP stages, its enhancer activity was attained at the DP stage, as reflected by levels of the core transcriptional hallmarks H3K4me1/3, RNA Polymerase II and eRNA. This dual, stage-specific ability reflected a switch from non-T hematopoietic toward T-cell specific gene expression programs during the DN-to-DP transition, as indicated by transcriptome analyses of Ets1(-/-) thymic cells. Coincidentally, Ets1 associates more specifically with Runx1 in DN and with TCF1 in DP cells. We also provide evidence that Ets1 predominantly binds distal nucleosome-occupied regions in DN and nucleosome-depleted regions in DP. Finally and importantly, we demonstrate that Ets1 induces chromatin remodeling by displacing H3K4me1-marked nucleosomes. Our results thus provide an original model whereby the ability of a transcription factor to bind nucleosomal DNA changes during differentiation with consequences on its cognate enhancer activity. PMID:26673693

  6. Co-Positivity for Anti-dsDNA, -Nucleosome and -Histone Antibodies in Lupus Nephritis Is Indicative of High Serum Levels and Severe Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Manshu; Han, Jihua; Sun, Lijie; Jia, Xiuzhi; Zhang, Haiyu; Han, Changsong; Jin, Xiaoming; Gao, Fei; Liu, Yanhong; Li, Yang; Cao, Jianbin; Ling, Hong; Zhang, Fengmin; Ren, Huan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To characterize the significance of correlated autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and its complication lupus nephritis (LN) in a large cohort of patients. Methods Clinical data were statistically analyzed in 1699 SLE patients with or without nephritis who were diagnosed and treated during 2002–2013 in the northeast region of China. Reactivity to a list of 16 autoantibodies was detected by the serum test Euroline ANA profile (IgG). Serum titers of the anti-nucleosome autoantibodies were measured by ELISA assays. Kidney biopsies were examined by pathologists. Immune complex deposition was identified by immunohistochemistry stain. Results Simultaneous positivity of anti-dsDNA, -nucleosome and -histone antibodies (3-pos) was prevalent in SLE patients with LN compared to Non-renal SLE patients (41% vs 11%, p< 0.001). Significant correlations were found between any two of the above three anti-nucleosome antibodies in LN patients. In comparison to non-3-pos cohorts, 3-pos patients with LN had significantly higher serum levels of the three antibodies and more active disease; was associated with type IV disease; suffered from more severe renal damages; received more intensive treatment and had worse disease outcome. The serum levels of these three autoantibodies in 3-pos LN patients were significantly decreased when they underwent clinical recovery. Conclusions Simultaneous reactivity to anti-dsDNA, -nucleosome and -histone antibodies by Euroline ANA profile (IgG) may indicate severe nephropathy in patients with SLE. PMID:26465327

  7. Genome-Wide Mapping Targets of the Metazoan Chromatin Remodeling Factor NURF Reveals Nucleosome Remodeling at Enhancers, Core Promoters and Gene Insulators

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, So Yeon; Grisan, Valentina; Jang, Boyun; Herbert, John; Badenhorst, Paul

    2016-01-01

    NURF is a conserved higher eukaryotic ISWI-containing chromatin remodeling complex that catalyzes ATP-dependent nucleosome sliding. By sliding nucleosomes, NURF is able to alter chromatin dynamics to control transcription and genome organization. Previous biochemical and genetic analysis of the specificity-subunit of Drosophila NURF (Nurf301/Enhancer of Bithorax (E(bx)) has defined NURF as a critical regulator of homeotic, heat-shock and steroid-responsive gene transcription. It has been speculated that NURF controls pathway specific transcription by co-operating with sequence-specific transcription factors to remodel chromatin at dedicated enhancers. However, conclusive in vivo demonstration of this is lacking and precise regulatory elements targeted by NURF are poorly defined. To address this, we have generated a comprehensive map of in vivo NURF activity, using MNase-sequencing to determine at base pair resolution NURF target nucleosomes, and ChIP-sequencing to define sites of NURF recruitment. Our data show that, besides anticipated roles at enhancers, NURF interacts physically and functionally with the TRF2/DREF basal transcription factor to organize nucleosomes downstream of active promoters. Moreover, we detect NURF remodeling and recruitment at distal insulator sites, where NURF functionally interacts with and co-localizes with DREF and insulator proteins including CP190 to establish nucleosome-depleted domains. This insulator function of NURF is most apparent at subclasses of insulators that mark the boundaries of chromatin domains, where multiple insulator proteins co-associate. By visualizing the complete repertoire of in vivo NURF chromatin targets, our data provide new insights into how chromatin remodeling can control genome organization and regulatory interactions. PMID:27046080

  8. Genome-Wide Mapping Targets of the Metazoan Chromatin Remodeling Factor NURF Reveals Nucleosome Remodeling at Enhancers, Core Promoters and Gene Insulators.

    PubMed

    Kwon, So Yeon; Grisan, Valentina; Jang, Boyun; Herbert, John; Badenhorst, Paul

    2016-04-01

    NURF is a conserved higher eukaryotic ISWI-containing chromatin remodeling complex that catalyzes ATP-dependent nucleosome sliding. By sliding nucleosomes, NURF is able to alter chromatin dynamics to control transcription and genome organization. Previous biochemical and genetic analysis of the specificity-subunit of Drosophila NURF (Nurf301/Enhancer of Bithorax (E(bx)) has defined NURF as a critical regulator of homeotic, heat-shock and steroid-responsive gene transcription. It has been speculated that NURF controls pathway specific transcription by co-operating with sequence-specific transcription factors to remodel chromatin at dedicated enhancers. However, conclusive in vivo demonstration of this is lacking and precise regulatory elements targeted by NURF are poorly defined. To address this, we have generated a comprehensive map of in vivo NURF activity, using MNase-sequencing to determine at base pair resolution NURF target nucleosomes, and ChIP-sequencing to define sites of NURF recruitment. Our data show that, besides anticipated roles at enhancers, NURF interacts physically and functionally with the TRF2/DREF basal transcription factor to organize nucleosomes downstream of active promoters. Moreover, we detect NURF remodeling and recruitment at distal insulator sites, where NURF functionally interacts with and co-localizes with DREF and insulator proteins including CP190 to establish nucleosome-depleted domains. This insulator function of NURF is most apparent at subclasses of insulators that mark the boundaries of chromatin domains, where multiple insulator proteins co-associate. By visualizing the complete repertoire of in vivo NURF chromatin targets, our data provide new insights into how chromatin remodeling can control genome organization and regulatory interactions. PMID:27046080

  9. Dump assembly

    DOEpatents

    Goldmann, L.H.

    1984-12-06

    This is a claim for a dump assembly having a fixed conduit and a rotatable conduit provided with overlapping plates, respectively, at their adjacent ends. The plates are formed with openings, respectively, normally offset from each other to block flow. The other end of the rotatable conduit is provided with means for securing the open end of a filled container thereto. Rotation of the rotatable conduit raises and inverts the container to empty the contents while concurrently aligning the conduit openings to permit flow of material therethrough. 4 figs.

  10. Pushrod assembly

    DOEpatents

    Potter, Jerry D.

    1987-01-01

    A pushrod assembly including a carriage mounted on a shaft for movement therealong and carrying a pushrod engageable with a load to be moved. A magnet is mounted on a supporting bracket for movement along such shaft. Means are provided for adjustably spacing said magnet away from said carriage to obtain a selected magnetic attractive or coupling force therebetween. Movement of the supporting bracket and the magnet carried thereby pulls the carriage along with it until the selected magnetic force is exceeded by a resistance load acting on the carriage.

  11. Shingle assembly

    DOEpatents

    Dinwoodie, Thomas L.

    2007-02-20

    A barrier, such as a PV module, is secured to a base by a support to create a shingle assembly with a venting region defined between the barrier and base for temperature regulation. The first edge of one base may be interengageable with the second edge of an adjacent base to be capable of resisting first and second disengaging forces oriented perpendicular to the edges and along planes oriented parallel to and perpendicular to the base. A deflector may be used to help reduce wind uplift forces.

  12. CAL1 is the Drosophila CENP-A assembly factor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chin-Chi; Dechassa, Mekonnen Lemma; Bettini, Emily; Ledoux, Mary B.; Belisario, Christian; Heun, Patrick; Luger, Karolin

    2014-01-01

    Centromeres are specified epigenetically by the incorporation of the histone H3 variant CENP-A. In humans, amphibians, and fungi, CENP-A is deposited at centromeres by the HJURP/Scm3 family of assembly factors, but homologues of these chaperones are absent from a number of major eukaryotic lineages such as insects, fish, nematodes, and plants. In Drosophila, centromeric deposition of CENP-A requires the fly-specific protein CAL1. Here, we show that targeting CAL1 to noncentromeric DNA in Drosophila cells is sufficient to heritably recruit CENP-A, kinetochore proteins, and microtubule attachments. CAL1 selectively interacts with CENP-A and is sufficient to assemble CENP-A nucleosomes that display properties consistent with left-handed octamers. The CENP-A assembly activity of CAL1 resides within an N-terminal domain, whereas the C terminus mediates centromere recognition through an interaction with CENP-C. Collectively, this work identifies the “missing” CENP-A chaperone in flies, revealing fundamental conservation between insect and vertebrate centromere-specification mechanisms. PMID:24469636

  13. PARP3 is a sensor of nicked nucleosomes and monoribosylates histone H2B(Glu2).

    PubMed

    Grundy, Gabrielle J; Polo, Luis M; Zeng, Zhihong; Rulten, Stuart L; Hoch, Nicolas C; Paomephan, Pathompong; Xu, Yingqi; Sweet, Steve M; Thorne, Alan W; Oliver, Antony W; Matthews, Steve J; Pearl, Laurence H; Caldecott, Keith W

    2016-01-01

    PARP3 is a member of the ADP-ribosyl transferase superfamily that we show accelerates the repair of chromosomal DNA single-strand breaks in avian DT40 cells. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance experiments reveal that PARP3 employs a conserved DNA-binding interface to detect and stably bind DNA breaks and to accumulate at sites of chromosome damage. PARP3 preferentially binds to and is activated by mononucleosomes containing nicked DNA and which target PARP3 trans-ribosylation activity to a single-histone substrate. Although nicks in naked DNA stimulate PARP3 autoribosylation, nicks in mononucleosomes promote the trans-ribosylation of histone H2B specifically at Glu2. These data identify PARP3 as a molecular sensor of nicked nucleosomes and demonstrate, for the first time, the ribosylation of chromatin at a site-specific DNA single-strand break. PMID:27530147

  14. Calibrating ChIP-seq with nucleosomal internal standards to measure histone modification density genome-wide

    PubMed Central

    Grzybowski, Adrian T.; Chen, Zhonglei; Ruthenburg, Alexander J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) serves as a central experimental technique in epigenetics research, yet there are serious drawbacks: it is a relative measurement, which untethered to any external scale obscures fair comparison amongst experiments; it employs antibody reagents that have differing affinities and specificities for target epitopes that vary in abundance; and it is frequently not reproducible. To address these problems, we developed Internal Standard Calibrated ChIP (ICeChIP), wherein a native chromatin sample is spiked with nucleosomes reconstituted from recombinant and semisynthetic histones on barcoded DNA prior to immunoprecipitation. ICeChIP measures local histone modification densities on a biologically meaningful scale, enabling unbiased trans-experimental comparisons and reveals unique insight into the nature of bivalent domains. This technology provides in situ assessment of the immunoprecipitation step, accommodating for many experimental pitfalls, as well as providing a critical examination of untested assumptions inherent to conventional ChIP. PMID:26004229

  15. Nick translation of HeLa cell nuclei as a probe for locating DNase I-sensitive nucleosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Javaherian, K.; Fasman, G.D.

    1984-03-10

    The technique of nick translation of nuclei has been used in HeLa cells to label DNase I-sensitive regions. Micrococcal nuclease digestion of the nick translated nuclei was followed by a low ionic strength gel electrophoresis system which separates different types of mononucleosomes. The major label was observed in the vicinity of high mobility group protein containing mononucleosomes. However, further analysis revealed that the particle does not sediment in the position of mononucleosomes on a sucrose gradient. Two alternative explanations are discussed as the possible source of this particle. It is either a high mobility group protein containing nucleosome in some unfolded conformation or the labeled particle originates from discrete DNA fragments, wrapped around some nonhistone proteins, located in a highly DNase I-sensitive region, which is resistant to micrococcal nuclease digestion. 36 references, 7 figures.

  16. MARCC (Matrix-Assisted Reader Chromatin Capture): an antibody-free method to enrich and analyze combinatorial nucleosome modifications

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhangli

    2016-01-01

    Combinatorial patterns of histone modifications are key indicators of different chromatin states. Most of the current approaches rely on the usage of antibodies to analyze combinatorial histone modifications. Here we detail an antibody-free method named MARCC (Matrix-Assisted Reader Chromatin Capture) to enrich combinatorial histone modifications. The combinatorial patterns are enriched on native nucleosomes extracted from cultured mammalian cells and prepared by micrococcal nuclease digestion. Such enrichment is achieved by recombinant chromatin-interacting protein modules, or so-called reader domains, which can bind in a combinatorial modification-dependent manner. The enriched chromatin can be quantified by western blotting or mass spectrometry for the co-existence of histone modifications, while the associated DNA content can be analyzed by qPCR or next-generation sequencing. Altogether, MARCC provides a reproducible, efficient and customizable solution to enrich and analyze combinatorial histone modifications. PMID:26131849

  17. Chromatin assembly factor I and Hir proteins contribute to building functional kinetochores in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Judith A.; Franco, Alexa A.; Osley, Mary Ann; Kaufman, Paul D.

    2002-01-01

    Budding yeast centromeres are comprised of ∼125-bp DNA sequences that direct formation of the kinetochore, a specialized chromatin structure that mediates spindle attachment to chromosomes. We report here a novel role for the histone deposition complex chromatin assembly factor I (CAF-I) in building centromeric chromatin. The contribution of CAF-I to kinetochore function overlaps that of the Hir proteins, which have also been implicated in nucleosome formation and heterochromatic gene silencing. cacΔ hirΔ double mutant cells lacking both CAF-I and Hir proteins are delayed in anaphase entry in a spindle assembly checkpoint-dependent manner. Further, cacΔ and hirΔ deletions together cause increased rates of chromosome missegregation, genetic synergies with mutations in kinetochore protein genes, and alterations in centromeric chromatin structure. Finally, CAF-I subunits and Hir1 are enriched at centromeres, indicating that these proteins make a direct contribution to centromeric chromatin structures. PMID:11782447

  18. Swivel assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Pixton, David S.; Briscoe, Michael; Bradford, Kline; Rawle, Michael; Bartholomew, David B.; McPherson, James

    2007-03-20

    A swivel assembly for a downhole tool string comprises a first and second coaxial housing cooperatively arranged. The first housing comprises a first transmission element in communication with surface equipment. The second housing comprises a second transmission element in communication with the first transmission element. The second housing further comprises a third transmission element adapted for communication with a network integrated into the downhole tool string. The second housing may be rotational and adapted to transmit a signal between the downhole network and the first housing. Electronic circuitry is in communication with at least one of the transmission elements. The electronic circuitry may be externally mounted to the first or second housing. Further, the electronic circuitry may be internally mounted in the second housing. The electronic circuitry may be disposed in a recess in either first or second housing of the swivel.

  19. RETORT ASSEMBLY

    DOEpatents

    Loomis, C.C.; Ash, W.J.

    1957-11-26

    An improved retort assembly useful in the thermal reduction of volatilizable metals such as magnesium and calcium is described. In this process a high vacuum is maintained in the retort, however the retort must be heated to very high temperatures while at the same time the unloading end must bo cooled to condense the metal vapors, therefore the retention of the vacuum is frequently difficult due to the thermal stresses involved. This apparatus provides an extended condenser sleeve enclosed by the retort cover which forms the vacuum seal. Therefore, the seal is cooled by the fluid in the condenser sleeve and the extreme thermal stresses found in previous designs together with the deterioration of the sealing gasket caused by the high temperatures are avoided.

  20. Thermocouple assembly

    DOEpatents

    Thermos, Anthony Constantine; Rahal, Fadi Elias

    2002-01-01

    A thermocouple assembly includes a thermocouple; a plurality of lead wires extending from the thermocouple; an insulating jacket extending along and enclosing the plurality of leads; and at least one internally sealed area within the insulating jacket to prevent fluid leakage along and within the insulating jacket. The invention also provides a method of preventing leakage of a fluid along and through an insulating jacket of a thermocouple including the steps of a) attaching a plurality of lead wires to a thermocouple; b) adding a heat sensitive pseudo-wire to extend along the plurality of lead wires; c) enclosing the lead wires and pseudo-wire inside an insulating jacket; d) locally heating axially spaced portions of the insulating jacket to a temperature which melts the pseudo-wire and fuses it with an interior surface of the jacket.

  1. Chromatin Modulation of Herpesvirus Lytic Gene Expression: Managing Nucleosome Density and Heterochromatic Histone Modifications.

    PubMed

    Kristie, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    Like their cellular hosts, herpesviruses are subject to the regulatory impacts of chromatin assembled on their genomes. Upon infection, these viruses are assembled into domains of chromatin with heterochromatic signatures that suppress viral gene expression or euchromatic characteristics that promote gene expression. The organization and modulation of these chromatin domains appear to be intimately linked to the coordinated expression of the different classes of viral genes and thus ultimately play an important role in the progression of productive infection or the establishment and maintenance of viral latency. A recent report from the Knipe laboratory (J. S. Lee, P. Raja, and D. M. Knipe, mBio 7:e02007-15, 2016) contributes to the understanding of the dynamic modulation of chromatin assembled on the herpes simplex virus genome by monitoring the levels of characteristic heterochromatic histone modifications (histone H3 lysine 9 and 27 methylation) associated with a model viral early gene during the progression of lytic infection. Additionally, this study builds upon previous observations that the viral immediate-early protein ICP0 plays a role in reducing the levels of heterochromatin associated with the early genes. PMID:26884430

  2. Histone H3 Lysine 14 (H3K14) Acetylation Facilitates DNA Repair in a Positioned Nucleosome by Stabilizing the Binding of the Chromatin Remodeler RSC (Remodels Structure of Chromatin)*

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Ming-Rui; Smerdon, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Histone H3 acetylation is induced by UV damage in yeast and may play an important role in regulating the repair of UV photolesions in nucleosome-loaded genomic loci. However, it remains elusive how H3 acetylation facilitates repair. We generated a strongly positioned nucleosome containing homogeneously acetylated H3 at Lys-14 (H3K14ac) and investigated possible mechanisms by which H3K14 acetylation modulates repair. We show that H3K14ac does not alter nucleosome unfolding dynamics or enhance the repair of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers by UV photolyase. Importantly, however, nucleosomes with H3K14ac have a higher affinity for purified chromatin remodeling complex RSC (Remodels the Structure of Chromatin) and show greater cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer repair compared with unacetylated nucleosomes. Our study indicates that, by anchoring RSC, H3K14 acetylation plays an important role in the unfolding of strongly positioned nucleosomes during repair of UV damage. PMID:24515106

  3. Genome-wide cooperation by HAT Gcn5, remodeler SWI/SNF, and chaperone Ydj1 in promoter nucleosome eviction and transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Hongfang; Chereji, Răzvan V; Hu, Cuihua; Cole, Hope A; Rawal, Yashpal; Clark, David J; Hinnebusch, Alan G

    2016-02-01

    Chaperones, nucleosome remodeling complexes, and histone acetyltransferases have been implicated in nucleosome disassembly at promoters of particular yeast genes, but whether these cofactors function ubiquitously, as well as the impact of nucleosome eviction on transcription genome-wide, is poorly understood. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation of histone H3 and RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in mutants lacking single or multiple cofactors to address these issues for about 200 genes belonging to the Gcn4 transcriptome, of which about 70 exhibit marked reductions in H3 promoter occupancy on induction by amino acid starvation. Examining four target genes in a panel of mutants indicated that SWI/SNF, Gcn5, the Hsp70 cochaperone Ydj1, and chromatin-associated factor Yta7 are required downstream from Gcn4 binding, whereas Asf1/Rtt109, Nap1, RSC, and H2AZ are dispensable for robust H3 eviction in otherwise wild-type cells. Using ChIP-seq to interrogate all 70 exemplar genes in single, double, and triple mutants implicated Gcn5, Snf2, and Ydj1 in H3 eviction at most, but not all, Gcn4 target promoters, with Gcn5 generally playing the greatest role and Ydj1 the least. Remarkably, these three cofactors cooperate similarly in H3 eviction at virtually all yeast promoters. Defective H3 eviction in cofactor mutants was coupled with reduced Pol II occupancies for the Gcn4 transcriptome and the most highly expressed uninduced genes, but the relative Pol II levels at most genes were unaffected or even elevated. These findings indicate that nucleosome eviction is crucial for robust transcription of highly expressed genes but that other steps in gene activation are more rate-limiting for most other yeast genes. PMID:26602697

  4. The Structure of the yFACT Pob3-M Domain, Its Interaction with the DNA Replication Factor RPA, and a Potential Role in Nucleosome Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    VanDemark,A.; Blanksma, M.; Ferris, E.; Heroux, A.; Hill, C.; Formosa, T.

    2006-01-01

    We report the crystal structure of the middle domain of the Pob3 subunit (Pob3-M) of S. cerevisiae FACT (yFACT, facilitates chromatin transcription), which unexpectedly adopts an unusual double pleckstrin homology (PH) architecture. A mutation within a conserved surface cluster in this domain causes a defect in DNA replication that is suppressed by mutation of replication protein A (RPA). The nucleosome reorganizer yFACT therefore interacts in a physiologically important way with the central single-strand DNA (ssDNA) binding factor RPA to promote a step in DNA replication. Purified yFACT and RPA display a weak direct physical interaction, although the genetic suppression is not explained by simple changes in affinity between the purified proteins. Further genetic analysis suggests that coordinated function by yFACT and RPA is important during nucleosome deposition. These results support the model that the FACT family has an essential role in constructing nucleosomes during DNA replication, and suggest that RPA contributes to this process.

  5. Abasic and oxidized abasic site reactivity in DNA: enzyme inhibition, cross-linking, and nucleosome catalyzed reactions.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Marc M

    2014-02-18

    , an enzyme that is irreversibly inactivated, is vitally important in base excision repair and is overproduced in some tumor cells. Nucleosome core particles, the monomeric components that make up chromatin, accentuate the chemical instability of abasic lesions. In experiments using synthetic nucleosome core particles containing abasic sites, the histone proteins catalyze strand cleavage at the sites that incorporate these lesions. Furthermore, in the presence of the C4-AP lesion, strand scission is accompanied by modification of the histone protein. The reactivity of (oxidized) abasic lesions illustrates how seemingly simple nucleic acid modifications can have significant biochemical effects and may provide a chemical basis for the cytotoxicity of the chemotherapeutic agents that produce them. PMID:24369694

  6. Structural insights into Paf1 complex assembly and histone binding.

    PubMed

    Chu, Xinlei; Qin, Xiaohong; Xu, Huisha; Li, Lei; Wang, Zheng; Li, Fengzhi; Xie, Xingqiao; Zhou, Hao; Shen, Yuequan; Long, Jiafu

    2013-12-01

    The highly conserved Paf1 complex (PAF1C) plays critical roles in RNA polymerase II transcription elongation and in the regulation of histone modifications. It has also been implicated in other diverse cellular activities, including posttranscriptional events, embryonic development and cell survival and maintenance of embryonic stem cell identity. Here, we report the structure of the human Paf1/Leo1 subcomplex within PAF1C. The overall structure reveals that the Paf1 and Leo1 subunits form a tightly associated heterodimer through antiparallel beta-sheet interactions. Detailed biochemical experiments indicate that Leo1 binds to PAF1C through Paf1 and that the Ctr9 subunit is the key scaffold protein in assembling PAF1C. Furthermore, we show that the Paf1/Leo1 heterodimer is necessary for its binding to histone H3, the histone octamer, and nucleosome in vitro. Our results shed light on the PAF1C assembly process and substrate recognition during various PAF1C-coordinated histone modifications. PMID:24038468

  7. Latching relay switch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Duimstra, Frederick A.

    1991-01-01

    A latching relay switch assembly which includes a coil section and a switch or contact section. The coil section includes at least one permanent magnet and at least one electromagnet. The respective sections are, generally, arranged in separate locations or cavities in the assembly. The switch is latched by a permanent magnet assembly and selectively switched by an overriding electromagnetic assembly.

  8. PGC1α -1 Nucleosome Position and Splice Variant Expression and Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Overweight and Obese Individuals.

    PubMed

    Henagan, Tara M; Stewart, Laura K; Forney, Laura A; Sparks, Lauren M; Johannsen, Neil; Church, Timothy S

    2014-01-01

    PGC1α, a transcriptional coactivator, interacts with PPARs and others to regulate skeletal muscle metabolism. PGC1α undergoes splicing to produce several mRNA variants, with the NTPGC1α variant having a similar biological function to the full length PGC1α (FLPGC1α). CVD is associated with obesity and T2D and a lower percentage of type 1 oxidative fibers and impaired mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle, characteristics determined by PGC1α expression. PGC1α expression is epigenetically regulated in skeletal muscle to determine mitochondrial adaptations, and epigenetic modifications may regulate mRNA splicing. We report in this paper that skeletal muscle PGC1α  -1 nucleosome (-1N) position is associated with splice variant NTPGC1α but not FLPGC1α expression. Division of participants based on the -1N position revealed that those individuals with a -1N phased further upstream from the transcriptional start site (UP) expressed lower levels of NTPGC1α than those with the -1N more proximal to TSS (DN). UP showed an increase in body fat percentage and serum total and LDL cholesterol. These findings suggest that the -1N may be a potential epigenetic regulator of NTPGC1α splice variant expression, and -1N position and NTPGC1α variant expression in skeletal muscle are linked to CVD risk. This trial is registered with clinicaltrials.gov, identifier NCT00458133. PMID:25614734

  9. Silver Nanoscale Hexagonal Column Chips for Detecting Cell-free DNA and Circulating Nucleosomes in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hiroaki; Hasegawa, Katsuyuki; Hasegawa, Yuuki; Nishimaki, Tadashi; Hosomichi, Kazuyoshi; Kimura, Satoshi; Ohba, Motoi; Yao, Hiroshi; Onimaru, Manabu; Inoue, Ituro; Inoue, Haruhiro

    2015-01-01

    Blood tests, which are commonly used for cancer screening, generally have low sensitivity. Here, we developed a novel rapid and simple method to generate silver nanoscale hexagonal columns (NHCs) for use in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). We reported that the intensity of SERS spectra of clinical serum samples obtained from gastrointestinal cancer patients is was significantly higher than that of SERS spectra of clinical serum samples obtained from non-cancer patients. We estimated the combined constituents on silver NHCs by using a field emission-type scanning electron microscope, Raman microscopes, and a 3D laser scanning confocal microscope. We obtained the Raman scattering spectra of samples of physically fractured cells and clinical serum. No spectra were obtained for chemically lysed cultured cells and DNA, RNA, and protein extracted from cultured cells. We believe that our method, which uses SERS with silver NHCs to detect circulating nucleosomes bound by methylated cell-free DNA, may be successfully implemented in blood tests for cancer screening. PMID:25994878

  10. Splice variants of the SWR1-type nucleosome remodeling factor Domino have distinct functions during Drosophila melanogaster oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Börner, Kenneth; Becker, Peter B

    2016-09-01

    SWR1-type nucleosome remodeling factors replace histone H2A by variants to endow chromatin locally with specialized functionality. In Drosophila melanogaster a single H2A variant, H2A.V, combines functions of mammalian H2A.Z and H2A.X in transcription regulation and the DNA damage response. A major role in H2A.V incorporation for the only SWR1-like enzyme in flies, Domino, is assumed but not well documented in vivo. It is also unclear whether the two alternatively spliced isoforms, DOM-A and DOM-B, have redundant or specialized functions. Loss of both DOM isoforms compromises oogenesis, causing female sterility. We systematically explored roles of the two DOM isoforms during oogenesis using a cell type-specific knockdown approach. Despite their ubiquitous expression, DOM-A and DOM-B have non-redundant functions in germline and soma for egg formation. We show that chromatin incorporation of H2A.V in germline and somatic cells depends on DOM-B, whereas global incorporation in endoreplicating germline nurse cells appears to be independent of DOM. By contrast, DOM-A promotes the removal of H2A.V from stage 5 nurse cells. Remarkably, therefore, the two DOM isoforms have distinct functions in cell type-specific development and H2A.V exchange. PMID:27578180

  11. The Putzig-NURF nucleosome remodeling complex is required for ecdysone receptor signaling and innate immunity in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Kugler, Sabrina J; Gehring, Eva-Maria; Wallkamm, Veronika; Krüger, Victoria; Nagel, Anja C

    2011-05-01

    Putzig (Pzg) was originally identified as being an integral component of the TRF2/DREF complex in Drosophila melanogaster, thereby regulating the transcriptional activation of replication-related genes. In a DREF-independent manner, Pzg was shown to mediate Notch target gene activation. This function of Pzg entails an association with the nucleosome remodeling factor complex NURF, which directly binds the ecdysone receptor EcR and coregulates targets of the EcR via the NURF-specific subunit Nurf-301. In contrast, Nurf-301 acts as a negative regulator of JAK/STAT signaling. Here, we provide evidence to show that Pzg is fundamental for these functions of NURF, apart from the regulation of Notch signaling activity. A jump-out mutagenesis provided us with a pzg null mutant displaying early larval lethality, defects in growth, and molting accompanied by aberrant feeding behavior. We show that Pzg is associated with EcR in vivo and required for the transcriptional induction of EcR target genes, whereas reduced ecdysteroid levels imply a NURF-independent function of Pzg. Moreover, pzg interferes with JAK/STAT-signaling activity by acting as a corepressor of Ken. Lamellocyte differentiation was consistently affected in a JAK/STAT mutant background and the expression level of defense response genes was elevated in pzg mutants, leading to the formation of melanotic tumors. Our results suggest that Pzg acts as an important partner of NURF in the regulation of EcR and JAK/STAT signaling. PMID:21385730

  12. The NuRD nucleosome remodelling complex and NHK-1 kinase are required for chromosome condensation in oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nikalayevich, Elvira; Ohkura, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chromosome condensation during cell division is one of the most dramatic events in the cell cycle. Condensin and topoisomerase II are the most studied factors in chromosome condensation. However, their inactivation leads to only mild defects and little is known about the roles of other factors. Here, we took advantage of Drosophila oocytes to elucidate the roles of potential condensation factors by performing RNA interference (RNAi). Consistent with previous studies, depletion of condensin I subunits or topoisomerase II in oocytes only mildly affected chromosome condensation. In contrast, we found severe undercondensation of chromosomes after depletion of the Mi-2-containing NuRD nucleosome remodelling complex or the protein kinase NHK-1 (also known as Ballchen in Drosophila). The further phenotypic analysis suggests that Mi-2 and NHK-1 are involved in different pathways of chromosome condensation. We show that the main role of NHK-1 in chromosome condensation is to phosphorylate Barrier-to-autointegration factor (BAF) and suppress its activity in linking chromosomes to nuclear envelope proteins. We further show that NHK-1 is important for chromosome condensation during mitosis as well as in oocytes. PMID:25501812

  13. Inlet nozzle assembly

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Karnesky, Richard A.; Precechtel, Donald R.; Smith, Bob G.; Knight, Ronald C.

    1987-01-01

    An inlet nozzle assembly for directing coolant into the duct tube of a fuel assembly attached thereto. The nozzle assembly includes a shell for housing separable components including an orifice plate assembly, a neutron shield block, a neutron shield plug, and a diffuser block. The orifice plate assembly includes a plurality of stacked plates of differently configurated and sized openings for directing coolant therethrough in a predesigned flow pattern.

  14. Inlet nozzle assembly

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, D.W.; Karnesky, R.A.; Knight, R.C.; Precechtel, D.R.; Smith, B.G.

    1985-09-09

    An inlet nozzle assembly for directing coolant into the duct tube of a fuel assembly attached thereto. The nozzle assembly includes a shell for housing separable components including an orifice plate assembly, a neutron shield block, a neutron shield plug, and a diffuser block. The orifice plate assembly includes a plurality of stacked plates of differently configurated and sized openings for directing coolant therethrough in a predesigned flow pattern.

  15. Structural assembly in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, J. W.; Pruett, E. C.

    1980-01-01

    A cost algorithm for predicting assembly costs for large space structures is given. Assembly scenarios are summarized which describe the erection, deployment, and fabrication tasks for five large space structures. The major activities that impact total costs for structure assembly from launch through deployment and assembly to scientific instrument installation and checkout are described. Individual cost elements such as assembly fixtures, handrails, or remote minipulators are also presented.

  16. Tilt assembly for tracking solar collector assembly

    DOEpatents

    Almy, Charles; Peurach, John; Sandler, Reuben

    2012-01-24

    A tilt assembly is used with a solar collector assembly of the type comprising a frame, supporting a solar collector, for movement about a tilt axis by pivoting a drive element between first and second orientations. The tilt assembly comprises a drive element coupler connected to the drive element and a driver, the driver comprising a drive frame, a drive arm and a drive arm driver. The drive arm is mounted to the drive frame for pivotal movement about a drive arm axis. Movement on the drive arm mimics movement of the drive element. Drive element couplers can extend in opposite directions from the outer portion of the drive arm, whereby the assembly can be used between adjacent solar collector assemblies in a row of solar collector assemblies.

  17. Structural assembly demonstration experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    The experiment is of an operational variety, designed to assess crew capability in Large Space System (LSS) assembly. The six Structural Assembly Demonstration Experiment objectives include: (1) the establishment of a quantitative correlation between LSS neutral buoyancy simulation and on-orbit assembly operations in order to enhance the validity of those assembly simulations; (2) the quantitative study of the capabilities and mechanics of human assembly in an Extravehicular Activity environment; (3) the further corroboration of the LSS Assembly Analysis cost algorithm through the obtainment of hard data base information; (4) the verification of LSS assembly techniques and timeless, as well as the identification of crew imposed loads and assembly aid requirements and concepts; (5) verification of a Launch/Assembly Platform structure concept for other LSS missions; and (6) lastly, to advance thermal control concepts through a flexible heat pipe.

  18. Autonomous electrochromic assembly

    DOEpatents

    Berland, Brian Spencer; Lanning, Bruce Roy; Stowell, Jr., Michael Wayne

    2015-03-10

    This disclosure describes system and methods for creating an autonomous electrochromic assembly, and systems and methods for use of the autonomous electrochromic assembly in combination with a window. Embodiments described herein include an electrochromic assembly that has an electrochromic device, an energy storage device, an energy collection device, and an electrochromic controller device. These devices may be combined into a unitary electrochromic insert assembly. The electrochromic assembly may have the capability of generating power sufficient to operate and control an electrochromic device. This control may occur through the application of a voltage to an electrochromic device to change its opacity state. The electrochromic assembly may be used in combination with a window.

  19. Firearm trigger assembly

    DOEpatents

    Crandall, David L.; Watson, Richard W.

    2010-02-16

    A firearm trigger assembly for use with a firearm includes a trigger mounted to a forestock of the firearm so that the trigger is movable between a rest position and a triggering position by a forwardly placed support hand of a user. An elongated trigger member operatively associated with the trigger operates a sear assembly of the firearm when the trigger is moved to the triggering position. An action release assembly operatively associated with the firearm trigger assembly and a movable assembly of the firearm prevents the trigger from being moved to the triggering position when the movable assembly is not in the locked position.

  20. Dynamic Histone Acetylation of H3K4me3 Nucleosome Regulates MCL1 Pre-mRNA Splicing.

    PubMed

    Khan, Dilshad H; Gonzalez, Carolina; Tailor, Nikesh; Hamedani, Mohammad K; Leygue, Etienne; Davie, James R

    2016-10-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is a cotranscriptional process affected by the chromatin architecture along the body of coding genes. Recruited to the pre-mRNA by splicing factors, histone deacetylases (HDACs) and K-acetyltransferases (KATs) catalyze dynamic histone acetylation along the gene. In colon carcinoma HCT 116 cells, HDAC inhibition specifically increased KAT2B occupancy as well as H3 and H4 acetylation of the H3K4 trimethylated (H3K4me3) nucleosome positioned over alternative exon 2 of the MCL1 gene, an event paralleled with the exclusion of exon 2. These results were reproduced in MDA-MB-231, but not in MCF7 breast adenocarcinoma cells. These later cells have much higher levels of demethylase KDM5B than either HCT 116 or MDA-MB-231 cells. We show that H3K4me3 steady-state levels and H3K4me3 occupancy at the end of exon 1 and over exon 2 of the MCL1 gene were lower in MCF7 than in MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, in MCF7 cells, there was minimal effect of HDAC inhibition on H3/H4 acetylation and H3K4me3 levels along the MCL1 gene and no change in pre-mRNA splicing choice. These results show that, upon HDAC inhibition, the H3K4me3 mark plays a critical role in the exclusion of exon 2 from the MCL1 pre-mRNA. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2196-2204, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26864447

  1. Immunity related genes in dipterans share common enrichment of AT-rich motifs in their 5' regulatory regions that are potentially involved in nucleosome formation

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Romano, Jesus; Carlos-Rivera, Francisco J; Salgado, Heladia; Lamadrid-Figueroa, Hector; Valverde-Garduño, Veronica; Rodriguez, Mario H; Martinez-Barnetche, Jesus

    2008-01-01

    Background Understanding the transcriptional regulation mechanisms in response to environmental challenges is of fundamental importance in biology. Transcription factors associated to response elements and the chromatin structure had proven to play important roles in gene expression regulation. We have analyzed promoter regions of dipteran genes induced in response to immune challenge, in search for particular sequence patterns involved in their transcriptional regulation. Results 5' upstream regions of D. melanogaster and A. gambiae immunity-induced genes and their corresponding orthologous genes in 11 non-melanogaster drosophilid species and Ae. aegypti share enrichment in AT-rich short motifs. AT-rich motifs are associated with nucleosome formation as predicted by two different algorithms. In A. gambiae and D. melanogaster, many immunity genes 5' upstream sequences also showed NFκB response elements, located within 500 bp from the transcription start site. In A. gambiae, the frequency of ATAA motif near the NFκB response elements was increased, suggesting a functional link between nucleosome formation/remodelling and NFκB regulation of transcription. Conclusion AT-rich motif enrichment in 5' upstream sequences in A. gambiae, Ae. aegypti and the Drosophila genus immunity genes suggests a particular pattern of nucleosome formation/chromatin organization. The co-occurrence of such motifs with the NFκB response elements suggests that these sequence signatures may be functionally involved in transcriptional activation during dipteran immune response. AT-rich motif enrichment in regulatory regions in this group of co-regulated genes could represent an evolutionary constrained signature in dipterans and perhaps other distantly species. PMID:18613977

  2. Sodium butyrate epigenetically modulates high-fat diet-induced skeletal muscle mitochondrial adaptation, obesity and insulin resistance through nucleosome positioning

    PubMed Central

    Henagan, Tara M; Stefanska, Barbara; Fang, Zhide; Navard, Alexandra M; Ye, Jianping; Lenard, Natalie R; Devarshi, Prasad P

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Sodium butyrate (NaB), an epigenetic modifier, is effective in promoting insulin sensitivity. The specific genomic loci and mechanisms underlying epigenetically induced obesity and insulin resistance and the targets of NaB are not fully understood. Experimental Approach The anti-diabetic and anti-obesity effects of NaB treatment were measured by comparing phenotypes and physiologies of C57BL/6J mice fed a low-fat diet (LF), high-fat diet (HF) or high-fat diet plus NaB (HF + NaB) for 10 weeks. We determined a possible mechanism of NaB action through induction of beneficial skeletal muscle mitochondrial adaptations and applied microccocal nuclease digestion with sequencing (MNase-seq) to assess whole genome differences in nucleosome occupancy or positioning and to identify associated epigenetic targets of NaB. Key Results NaB prevented HF diet-induced increases in body weight and adiposity without altering food intake or energy expenditure, improved insulin sensitivity as measured by glucose and insulin tolerance tests, and decreased respiratory exchange ratio. In skeletal muscle, NaB increased the percentage of type 1 fibres, improved acylcarnitine profiles as measured by metabolomics and produced a chromatin structure, determined by MNase-seq, similar to that seen in LF. Targeted analysis of representative nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes showed specific repositioning of the −1 nucleosome in association with altered gene expression. Conclusions and Implications NaB treatment may be an effective pharmacological approach for type 2 diabetes and obesity by inducing −1 nucleosome repositioning within nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes, causing skeletal muscle mitochondrial adaptations that result in more complete β-oxidation and a lean, insulin sensitive phenotype. PMID:25559882

  3. Space assembly methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, J. W.; Watters, H. H.

    1981-02-01

    Large space structure assembly analysis techniques are defined and simulation activities are described. The simulations included are: an extravehicular activity assembly simulation; a fabricated beam assembly series using a beam generating machine end caps, and cross beam brackets; deployment of a deployable truss, using the neutral buoyancy remote manipulator system with crewman assistance; and a series aboard the KC-135 zero g aircraft.

  4. Membrane module assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kaschemekat, Jurgen

    1994-01-01

    A membrane module assembly adapted to provide a flow path for the incoming feed stream that forces it into prolonged heat-exchanging contact with a heating or cooling mechanism. Membrane separation processes employing the module assembly are also disclosed. The assembly is particularly useful for gas separation or pervaporation.

  5. Membrane module assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kaschemekat, J.

    1994-03-15

    A membrane module assembly is described which is adapted to provide a flow path for the incoming feed stream that forces it into prolonged heat-exchanging contact with a heating or cooling mechanism. Membrane separation processes employing the module assembly are also disclosed. The assembly is particularly useful for gas separation or pervaporation. 2 figures.

  6. Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Miller, David H.

    2012-04-10

    Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies are provided. In an embodiment, by way of example only, a sensor mount assembly includes a busbar, a main body, a backing surface, and a first finger. The busbar has a first end and a second end. The main body is overmolded onto the busbar. The backing surface extends radially outwardly relative to the main body. The first finger extends axially from the backing surface, and the first finger has a first end, a second end, and a tooth. The first end of the first finger is disposed on the backing surface, and the tooth is formed on the second end of the first finger.

  7. Interconnect assembly for an electronic assembly and assembly method therefor

    DOEpatents

    Gerbsch, Erich William

    2003-06-10

    An interconnect assembly and method for a semiconductor device, in which the interconnect assembly can be used in lieu of wirebond connections to form an electronic assembly. The interconnect assembly includes first and second interconnect members. The first interconnect member has a first surface with a first contact and a second surface with a second contact electrically connected to the first contact, while the second interconnect member has a flexible finger contacting the second contact of the first interconnect member. The first interconnect member is adapted to be aligned and registered with a semiconductor device having a contact on a first surface thereof, so that the first contact of the first interconnect member electrically contacts the contact of the semiconductor device. Consequently, the assembly method does not require any wirebonds, but instead merely entails aligning and registering the first interconnect member with the semiconductor device so that the contacts of the first interconnect member and the semiconductor device make electrically contact, and then contacting the second contact of the first interconnect member with the flexible finger of the second interconnect member.

  8. Telerobotic truss assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan, Philip L.

    1987-01-01

    The ACCESS truss was telerobotically assembled in order to gain experience with robotic assembly of hardware designed for astronaut extravehicular (EVA) assembly. Tight alignment constraints of the ACCESS hardware made telerobotic assembly difficult. A wider alignment envelope and a compliant end effector would have reduced the problem. The manipulator had no linear motion capability, but many of the assembly operations required straight line motion. The manipulator was attached to a motion table in order to provide the X, Y, and Z translations needed. A programmable robot with linear translation capability would have eliminated the need for the motion table and streamlined the assembly. Poor depth perception was a major problem. Shaded paint schemes and alignment lines were helpful in reducing this problem. The four cameras used worked well for only some operations. It was not possible to identify camera locations that worked well for all assembly steps. More cameras or movable cameras would have simplified some operations. The audio feedback system was useful.

  9. Molecular Architecture of  Yeast Chromatin Assembly Factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Daegeun; Setiaputra, Dheva; Jung, Taeyang; Chung, Jaehee; Leitner, Alexander; Yoon, Jungmin; Aebersold, Ruedi; Hebert, Hans; Yip, Calvin K.; Song, Ji-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin Assembly Complex 1 (CAF-1) is a major histone chaperone involved in deposition of histone H3 and H4 into nucleosome. CAF-1 is composed of three subunits; p150, p60 and p48 for human and Cac1, Cac2 and Cac3 for yeast. Despite of its central role in chromatin formation, structural features of the full CAF-1 in complex with histones and other chaperones have not been well characterized. Here, we dissect molecular architecture of yeast CAF-1 (yCAF-1) by cross-linking mass spectrometry (XL-MS) and negative stain single-particle electron microscopy (EM). Our work revealed that Cac1, the largest subunit of yCAF-1, might serve as a major histone binding platform linking Cac2 and Cac3. In addition, EM analysis showed that yCAF-1 adopts a bilobal shape and Cac1 connecting Cac2 and Cac3 to generate a platform for binding histones. This study provides the first structural glimpse of the full CAF-1 complex and a structural framework to understand histone chaperoning processes. PMID:27221973

  10. Molecular Architecture of  Yeast Chromatin Assembly Factor 1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daegeun; Setiaputra, Dheva; Jung, Taeyang; Chung, Jaehee; Leitner, Alexander; Yoon, Jungmin; Aebersold, Ruedi; Hebert, Hans; Yip, Calvin K; Song, Ji-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin Assembly Complex 1 (CAF-1) is a major histone chaperone involved in deposition of histone H3 and H4 into nucleosome. CAF-1 is composed of three subunits; p150, p60 and p48 for human and Cac1, Cac2 and Cac3 for yeast. Despite of its central role in chromatin formation, structural features of the full CAF-1 in complex with histones and other chaperones have not been well characterized. Here, we dissect molecular architecture of yeast CAF-1 (yCAF-1) by cross-linking mass spectrometry (XL-MS) and negative stain single-particle electron microscopy (EM). Our work revealed that Cac1, the largest subunit of yCAF-1, might serve as a major histone binding platform linking Cac2 and Cac3. In addition, EM analysis showed that yCAF-1 adopts a bilobal shape and Cac1 connecting Cac2 and Cac3 to generate a platform for binding histones. This study provides the first structural glimpse of the full CAF-1 complex and a structural framework to understand histone chaperoning processes. PMID:27221973

  11. Eaf5/7/3 form a functionally independent NuA4 submodule linked to RNA polymerase II-coupled nucleosome recycling

    PubMed Central

    Rossetto, Dorine; Cramet, Myriam; Wang, Alice Y; Steunou, Anne-Lise; Lacoste, Nicolas; Schulze, Julia M; Côté, Valérie; Monnet-Saksouk, Julie; Piquet, Sandra; Nourani, Amine; Kobor, Michael S; Côté, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    The NuA4 histone acetyltransferase complex is required for gene regulation, cell cycle progression, and DNA repair. Dissection of the 13-subunit complex reveals that the Eaf7 subunit bridges Eaf5 with Eaf3, a H3K36me3-binding chromodomain protein, and this Eaf5/7/3 trimer is anchored to NuA4 through Eaf5. This trimeric subcomplex represents a functional module, and a large portion exists in a native form outside the NuA4 complex. Gene-specific and genome-wide location analyses indicate that Eaf5/7/3 correlates with transcription activity and is enriched over the coding region. In agreement with a role in transcription elongation, the Eaf5/7/3 trimer interacts with phosphorylated RNA polymerase II and helps its progression. Loss of Eaf5/7/3 partially suppresses intragenic cryptic transcription arising in set2 mutants, supporting a role in nucleosome destabilization. On the other hand, loss of the trimer leads to an increase of replication-independent histone exchange over the coding region of transcribed genes. Taken together, these results lead to a model where Eaf5/7/3 associates with elongating polymerase to promote the disruption of nucleosomes in its path, but also their refolding in its wake. PMID:24843044

  12. iNuc-STNC: a sequence-based predictor for identification of nucleosome positioning in genomes by extending the concept of SAAC and Chou's PseAAC.

    PubMed

    Tahir, Muhammad; Hayat, Maqsood

    2016-07-19

    The nucleosome is the fundamental unit of eukaryotic chromatin, which participates in regulating different cellular processes. Owing to the huge exploration of new DNA primary sequences, it is indispensable to develop an automated model. However, identification of novel protein sequences using conventional methods is difficult or sometimes impossible because of vague motifs and the intricate structure of DNA. In this regard, an effective and high throughput automated model "iNuc-STNC" has been proposed in order to identify accurately and reliably nucleosome positioning in genomes. In this proposed model, DNA sequences are expressed into three distinct feature extraction strategies containing dinucleotide composition, trinucleotide composition and split trinucleotide composition (STNC). Various statistical models were utilized as learner hypotheses. Jackknife test was employed to evaluate the success rates of the proposed model. The experiential results expressed that SVM, in combination with STNC, has obtained an outstanding performance on all benchmark datasets. The predicted outcomes of the proposed model "iNuc-STNC" is higher than current state of the art methods in the literature so far. It is ascertained that the "iNuc-STNC" model will provide a rudimentary framework for the pharmaceutical industry in the development of drug design. PMID:27271822

  13. Recruitment of Phosphorylated Chromatin Assembly Factor 1 to Chromatin after UV Irradiation of Human Cells

    PubMed Cen