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Sample records for nucleation heterogeneous multicomponent

  1. Heterogeneous nucleation or homogeneous nucleation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. Y.

    2000-06-01

    The generic heterogeneous effect of foreign particles on three dimensional nucleation was examined both theoretically and experimentally. It shows that the nucleation observed under normal conditions includes a sequence of progressive heterogeneous processes, characterized by different interfacial correlation function f(m,x)s. At low supersaturations, nucleation will be controlled by the process with a small interfacial correlation function f(m,x), which results from a strong interaction and good structural match between the foreign bodies and the crystallizing phase. At high supersaturations, nucleation on foreign particles having a weak interaction and poor structural match with the crystallizing phase (f(m,x)→1) will govern the kinetics. This frequently leads to the false identification of homogeneous nucleation. Genuine homogeneous nucleation, which is the up-limit of heterogeneous nucleation, may not be easily achievable under gravity. In order to check these results, the prediction is confronted with nucleation experiments of some organic and inorganic crystals. The results are in excellent agreement with the theory.

  2. Heterogeneous nucleation in multi-component vapor on a partially wettable charged conducting particle. II. The generalized Laplace, Gibbs-Kelvin, and Young equations and application to nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noppel, M.; Vehkamäki, H.; Winkler, P. M.; Kulmala, M.; Wagner, P. E.

    2013-10-01

    Based on the results of a previous paper [M. Noppel, H. Vehkamäki, P. M. Winkler, M. Kulmala, and P. E. Wagner, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 134107 (2013)], we derive a thermodynamically consistent expression for reversible or minimal work needed to form a dielectric liquid nucleus of a new phase on a charged insoluble conducting sphere within a uniform macroscopic one- or multicomponent mother phase. The currently available model for ion-induced nucleation assumes complete spherical symmetry of the system, implying that the seed ion is immediately surrounded by the condensing liquid from all sides. We take a step further and treat more realistic geometries, where a cap-shaped liquid cluster forms on the surface of the seed particle. We derive the equilibrium conditions for such a cluster. The equalities of chemical potentials of each species between the nucleus and the vapor represent the conditions of chemical equilibrium. The generalized Young equation that relates contact angle with surface tensions, surface excess polarizations, and line tension, also containing the electrical contribution from triple line excess polarization, expresses the condition of thermodynamic equilibrium at three-phase contact line. The generalized Laplace equation gives the condition of mechanical equilibrium at vapor-liquid dividing surface: it relates generalized pressures in neighboring bulk phases at an interface with surface tension, excess surface polarization, and dielectric displacements in neighboring phases with two principal radii of surface curvature and curvatures of equipotential surfaces in neighboring phases at that point. We also re-express the generalized Laplace equation as a partial differential equation, which, along with electrostatic Laplace equations for bulk phases, determines the shape of a nucleus. We derive expressions that are suitable for calculations of the size and composition of a critical nucleus (generalized version of the classical Kelvin-Thomson equation).

  3. Multicomponent dynamical nucleation theory and sensitivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Kathmann, Shawn M; Schenter, Gregory K; Garrett, Bruce C

    2004-05-15

    Vapor to liquid multicomponent nucleation is a dynamical process governed by a delicate interplay between condensation and evaporation. Since the population of the vapor phase is dominated by monomers at reasonable supersaturations, the formation of clusters is governed by monomer association and dissociation reactions. Although there is no intrinsic barrier in the interaction potential along the minimum energy path for the association process, the formation of a cluster is impeded by a free energy barrier. Dynamical nucleation theory provides a framework in which equilibrium evaporation rate constants can be calculated and the corresponding condensation rate constants determined from detailed balance. The nucleation rate can then be obtained by solving the kinetic equations. The rate constants governing the multistep kinetics of multicomponent nucleation including sensitivity analysis and the potential influence of contaminants will be presented and discussed. PMID:15267849

  4. Nonstoichiometric nucleation and growth of multicomponent nanocrystals in solution.

    PubMed

    Min, Yuho; Kwak, Junghyeok; Soon, Aloysius; Jeong, Unyong

    2014-10-21

    The ability to assemble nanoscale functional building blocks is a useful and modular way for scientists to design valuable materials with specific physical and chemical properties. Chemists expect multicomponent, heterostructured nanocrystals to show unique electrical, thermal, and optical properties not seen in homogeneous, single-phase nanocrystals. Although researchers have made remarkable advances in heterogeneous nucleation and growth, design of synthetic conditions for obtaining nanocrystals with a target composition and shape is still a big challenge. There are several outstanding issues that chemists need to address before they can successfully carry out the design-based synthesis of multicomponent nanocrystals. For instance, small changes in the reaction parameters, such as the precursor, solvent, surfactant, reducing agent, and the reaction temperature, often result in changes in the structure and chemical composition of the final product. Although scientists do not fully understand the mechanisms underlying the nucleation and growth processes involved in the synthesis of these multicomponent nanocrystals, recent progress in understanding of the thermodynamic and kinetic factors have improved our control over their final structure and chemical composition. In this Account, we summarize our recent advances in understanding of the nucleation and growth mechanisms involved in the solution-based synthesis of multicomponent nanocrystals. We also discuss the various challenges encountered in their synthesis, emphasizing what still needs special consideration. We first discuss the three different nucleation paths from a thermodynamics perspective: amorphous nucleation, crystalline nucleation, and two-step nucleation. Amorphous nucleation and two-step nucleation involve the generation of nonstoichiometric nuclei. We initiate this process mainly by introducing an imbalance in the concentrations of the reduced elements. When the nonstoichiometric nuclei grow, we

  5. Surface area controlled heterogeneous nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steer, Brian; Gorbunov, Boris; Rowles, Jonathan; Green, David

    2012-02-01

    Heterogeneous nucleation of liquid from a gas phase on nanoparticles has been studied under various saturation ratios and nuclei size. The probability of liquid droplet nucleation, especially at a low degree of deviation from equilibrium, was measured for both atmospheric aerosol particles and engineered nanoparticles Cr2O3. The concept of a critical saturation ratio and the validity of the one-to-one relationship between the nuclei number and the number of droplets were examined. A transient zone between no nucleation and established nucleation termed the surface area controlled nucleation was observed. In this zone, the probability of stable phase formation is determined by the surface area of nuclei. There are two distinctive features of the surface area controlled nucleation: the nucleation probability is much less than 1 and is proportional to the surface area of nuclei. For condensation particle counters (CPCs) counting nanoparticles, these features mean that counts measured are proportional to the surface area of nanoparticles and, therefore, the CPCs counts can be calibrated to measure the surface area.

  6. Heterogeneous nucleation in hypermonotectic aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, M.; Ratke, L.; Kaban, I.; Hoyer, W.

    2012-01-01

    Simple casting experiments were set up to solve the question, if heterogeneous nucleation of the liquid-liquid decomposition in monotectic systems is possible. Al-Pb alloys with different inoculants were solidified, and the resulting microstructure was analysed by SEM and X-ray microtomography. Pronounced changes in the distribution of the lead precipitations indicate that it is possible to trigger the nucleation.

  7. Effective binary theory of multi-component nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Kalikmanov, V. I.

    2015-03-28

    Classical theory of multi-component nucleation [O. Hirschfelder, J. Chem. Phys. 61, 2690 (1974)] belongs to the class of the so-called intractable problems: it requires computational time which is an exponential function of the number of components N. For a number of systems of practical interest with N > 10, the brute-force use of the classical theory becomes virtually impossible and one has to resort to an effective medium approach. We present an effective binary model which captures important physics of multi-component nucleation. The distinction between two effective species is based on the observation that while all N components contribute to the cluster thermodynamic properties, there is only a part of them which trigger the nucleation process. The proposed 2D-theory takes into account adsorption by means of the Gibbs dividing surface formalism and uses statistical mechanical considerations for the treatment of small clusters. Theoretical predictions for binary-, ternary-, and 14-component mixtures are compared with available experimental data and other models.

  8. Heterogeneous nucleation of aspartame from aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Noriaki; Kinno, Hiroaki; Shimizu, Kenji

    1990-03-01

    Waiting times, the time from the instant of quenching needed for a first nucleus to appear, were measured at constant supercoolings for primary nucleation of aspartame (α-L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methylester) from aqueous solutions, which were sealed into glass ampoules (solution volume = 3.16 cm 3). Since the waiting time became shorter by filtering the solution prior to quenching, the nucleation was concluded to be heterogeneously induced. The measured waiting time consisted of two parts: time needed for the nucleus to grow to a detactable size (growth time) and stochastic time needed for nucleation (true waiting time). The distribution of the true waiting time, is well explained by a stochastic model, in which nucleation is regarded to occur heterogeneously and in a stochastic manner by two kinds of active sites. The active sites are estimated to be located on foreign particles in which such elements as Si, Al and Mg were contained. The amount of each element is very small in the order of magnitude of ppb (mass basis) of the whole solution. The growth time was correlated with the degree of supercooling.

  9. Heterogeneous nucleation of calcium oxalate on native oxide surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Song, L.; Pattillo, M.J.; Graff, G.L.; Campbell, A.A.; Bunker, B.C.

    1994-12-31

    The aqueous deposition of calcium oxalate onto colloidal oxides has been studied as a model system for understanding heterogeneous nucleation processes of importance in biomimetic synthesis of ceramic thin films. Calcium oxalate nucleation has been monitored by measuring induction times for nucleation using Constant Composition techniques and by measuring nucleation densities on extended oxide surfaces using an atomic force microscope. Results show that the dependence of calcium oxalate nucleation on solution supersaturation fits the functional form predicted by classical nucleation theories. Anionic surfaces appear to promote nucleation better than cationic surfaces, lowering the effective energy barrier to heterogeneous nucleation.

  10. Ice nucleation on carbon surface supports the classical theory for heterogeneous nucleation.

    PubMed

    Cabriolu, Raffaela; Li, Tianshu

    2015-05-01

    The prevalence of heterogeneous nucleation in nature was explained qualitatively by the classical theory for heterogeneous nucleation established over more than 60 years ago, but the quantitative validity and the key conclusions of the theory have remained unconfirmed. Employing the forward flux sampling method and the coarse-grained water model (mW), we explicitly computed the heterogeneous ice nucleation rates in the supercooled water on a graphitic surface at various temperatures. The independently calculated ice nucleation rates were found to fit well according to the classical theory for heterogeneous nucleation. The fitting procedure further yields the estimate of the potency factor, which measures the ratio of the heterogeneous nucleation barrier to the homogeneous nucleation barrier. Remarkably, the estimated potency factor agrees quantitatively with the volumetric ratio of the critical nuclei between the heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation. Our numerical study thus provides a strong support to the quantitative power of the theory and allows understanding ice nucleation behaviors under the most relevant freezing conditions. PMID:26066178

  11. A nanoscale temperature-dependent heterogeneous nucleation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Y. Y.; Yang, G. W.

    2015-06-14

    Classical nucleation theory relies on the hypothetical equilibrium of the whole nucleation system, and neglects the thermal fluctuations of the surface; this is because the high entropic gains of the (thermodynamically extensive) surface would lead to multiple stable states. In fact, at the nanometer scale, the entropic gains of the surface are high enough to destroy the stability of the thermal equilibrium during nucleation, comparing with the whole system. We developed a temperature-dependent nucleation theory to elucidate the heterogeneous nucleation process, by considering the thermal fluctuations based on classical nucleation theory. It was found that the temperature not only affected the phase transformation, but also influenced the surface energy of the nuclei. With changes in the Gibbs free energy barrier, nucleation behaviors, such as the nucleation rate and the critical radius of the nuclei, showed temperature-dependent characteristics that were different from those predicted by classical nucleation theory. The temperature-dependent surface energy density of a nucleus was deduced based on our theoretical model. The agreement between the theoretical and experimental results suggested that the developed nucleation theory has the potential to contribute to the understanding and design of heterogeneous nucleation at the nanoscale.

  12. Note: Heterogeneous ice nucleation on silver-iodide-like surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraux, Guillaume; Doye, Jonathan P. K.

    2014-12-01

    We attempt to simulate the heterogeneous nucleation of ice at model silver-iodide surfaces and find relatively facile ice nucleation and growth at the Ag+ terminated basal face, but never see nucleation at the I- terminated basal face or the prism and normal faces. Water molecules strongly adsorb onto the Ag+ terminated face to give a well-ordered hexagonal ice-like bilayer that then acts as a template for further ice growth.

  13. Thermokinetics of heterogeneous droplet nucleation on conically textured substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singha, Sanat K.; Das, Prasanta K.; Maiti, Biswajit

    2015-11-01

    Within the framework of the classical theory of heterogeneous nucleation, a thermokinetic model is developed for line-tension-associated droplet nucleation on conical textures considering growth or shrinkage of the formed cluster due to both interfacial and peripheral monomer exchange and by considering different geometric configurations. Along with the principle of free energy extremization, Katz kinetic approach has been employed to study the effect of substrate conicity and wettability on the thermokinetics of heterogeneous water droplet nucleation. Not only the peripheral tension is found to have a considerable effect on the free energy barrier but also the substrate hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity are observed to switch over their roles between conical crest and trough for different growth rates of the droplet. Besides, the rate of nucleation increases and further promotes nucleation for negative peripheral tension as it diminishes the free energy barrier appreciably. Moreover, nucleation inhibition can be achievable for positive peripheral tension due to the enhancement of the free energy barrier. Analyzing all possible geometric configurations, the hydrophilic narrower conical cavity is found to be the most preferred nucleation site. These findings suggest a physical insight into the context of surface engineering for the promotion or the suppression of nucleation on real or engineered substrates.

  14. Heterogeneous nucleation on surfaces of the ellipsoid of rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang-Ming; Liu, Qing-Hui

    2016-08-01

    This paper focusses on the heterogeneous nucleation on the surface with the non-constant curvature. The formation of a spherical nucleus on the ellipsoid of rotation is considered. Following the classical nucleation theory, the work of formation of a critical nucleus on the ellipsoid of rotation has been given, and the effects of geometry sizes and the material properties of the ellipsoid of rotation on the work of formation of a critical nucleus have been obtained. When the geometry size of the substrate is about value of the critical nucleus radius, there may exist twice nucleation on the ellipsoid of rotation for the case of the smaller value of λ and ϕ < π / 2. As the work of formation of a nucleus has only one extremum (the maximum), the nucleation on the oblate rotational ellipsoid is more easy than on the spherical surface, while nucleation on the prolate ellipsoid of rotation is more difficult than on the spherical surface. Furthermore, if the particles of the ellipsoid are added into the parent phase as nucleation agents or catalysts, for some geometry sizes, they would not have the effects on the heterogeneous nucleation.

  15. Heterogeneous Nucleation of Protein Crystals on Fluorinated Layered Silicate

    PubMed Central

    Ino, Keita; Udagawa, Itsumi; Iwabata, Kazuki; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Kubota, Munehiro; Kurosaka, Keiichi; Arai, Kazuhito; Seki, Yasutaka; Nogawa, Masaya; Tsunoda, Tatsuo; Mizukami, Fujio; Taguchi, Hayao; Sakaguchi, Kengo

    2011-01-01

    Here, we describe an improved system for protein crystallization based on heterogeneous nucleation using fluorinated layered silicate. In addition, we also investigated the mechanism of nucleation on the silicate surface. Crystallization of lysozyme using silicates with different chemical compositions indicated that fluorosilicates promoted nucleation whereas the silicates without fluorine did not. The use of synthesized saponites for lysozyme crystallization confirmed that the substitution of hydroxyl groups contained in the lamellae structure for fluorine atoms is responsible for the nucleation-inducing property of the nucleant. Crystallization of twelve proteins with a wide range of pI values revealed that the nucleation promoting effect of the saponites tended to increase with increased substitution rate. Furthermore, the saponite with the highest fluorine content promoted nucleation in all the test proteins regardless of their overall net charge. Adsorption experiments of proteins on the saponites confirmed that the density of adsorbed molecules increased according to the substitution rate, thereby explaining the heterogeneous nucleation on the silicate surface. PMID:21818343

  16. Heterogeneous nucleation of protein crystals on fluorinated layered silicate.

    PubMed

    Ino, Keita; Udagawa, Itsumi; Iwabata, Kazuki; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Kubota, Munehiro; Kurosaka, Keiichi; Arai, Kazuhito; Seki, Yasutaka; Nogawa, Masaya; Tsunoda, Tatsuo; Mizukami, Fujio; Taguchi, Hayao; Sakaguchi, Kengo

    2011-01-01

    Here, we describe an improved system for protein crystallization based on heterogeneous nucleation using fluorinated layered silicate. In addition, we also investigated the mechanism of nucleation on the silicate surface. Crystallization of lysozyme using silicates with different chemical compositions indicated that fluorosilicates promoted nucleation whereas the silicates without fluorine did not. The use of synthesized saponites for lysozyme crystallization confirmed that the substitution of hydroxyl groups contained in the lamellae structure for fluorine atoms is responsible for the nucleation-inducing property of the nucleant. Crystallization of twelve proteins with a wide range of pI values revealed that the nucleation promoting effect of the saponites tended to increase with increased substitution rate. Furthermore, the saponite with the highest fluorine content promoted nucleation in all the test proteins regardless of their overall net charge. Adsorption experiments of proteins on the saponites confirmed that the density of adsorbed molecules increased according to the substitution rate, thereby explaining the heterogeneous nucleation on the silicate surface. PMID:21818343

  17. From embryos to precipitates: A study of nucleation and growth in a multicomponent ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z. W.; Liu, C. T.; Wang, X.-L.; Littrell, K. C.; Miller, M. K.; An, K.; Chin, B. A.

    2011-11-01

    The nucleation and growth of nanoscale precipitates in a new class of high-strength, multicomponent, ferritic steels has been studied with complementary state-of-the-art microstructural characterization techniques of atom probe tomography for individual embryos and precipitates and small-angle neutron scattering for their statistical averages. Both techniques revealed a bimodal size distribution, with subnanometer embryos, and nanoscale precipitates. The embryos, which have a radius of ˜0.4 nm, are enriched in Cu and served as preferential sites for nucleation. The critical radius for nucleation was determined to be ˜0.7 nm. Subsequent growth of the precipitates is dictated by volumetric diffusion, as predicted by the Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner theory.

  18. Dimple-assisted dewetting: heterogeneous nucleation in undercooled wetting films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blossey, Ralf

    2001-09-01

    Undercooled wetting films near a first-order wetting transition exhibit an unusually long lifetime: the thermal nucleation barrier for formation of a critical hole in a film of thickness F diverges according to exp (c/kBT) where the excess free energy c F with ≥ 2. Localized perturbations of the liquid-vapor interface (dimples) are shown to be a useful tool in reducing in a controlled way: they act as heterogeneous nucleation centers for thermal critical nuclei. For 4He wetting films on weak-binding alkali substrates (Cs, Rb) dimples can be generated either by vortices in a superfluid film or by surface electrons. The theory of the heterogeneous nucleation process initiated by the presence of surface dimples (dimple-assisted dewetting) is developed, accompanied by quantitative predictions for experiment.

  19. Heterogeneous nucleation of ice on model carbon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinero, V.; Lupi, L.; Hudait, A.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonaceous particles account for 10% of the particulate matter in the atmosphere. The experimental investigation of heterogeneous freezing of water droplets by carbonaceous particles reveals widespread ice freezing temperatures. The origin of the soot and its oxidation and aging modulate its ice nucleation ability, however, it is not known which structural and chemical characteristics of soot account for the variability in ice nucleation efficiency. We find that atomically flat carbon surfaces promote heterogeneous nucleation of ice, while molecularly rough surfaces with the same hydrophobicity do not. We investigate a large set of graphitic surfaces of various dimensions and radii of curvature consistent with those of soot in experiments, and find that variations in nanostructures alone could account for the spread in the freezing temperatures of ice on soot in experiments. A characterization of the nanostructure of soot is needed to predict its ice nucleation efficiency. Atmospheric oxidation and aging of soot modulates its ice nucleation ability. It has been suggested that an increase in the ice nucleation ability of aged soot results from an increase in the hydrophilicity of the surfaces upon oxidation. Oxidation, however, also impacts the nanostructure of soot, making it difficult to assess the separate effects of soot nanostructure and hydrophilicity in experiments. We investigate the effect of changes in hydrophilicity of model graphitic surfaces on the freezing temperature of ice. Our results indicate that the hydrophilicity of the surface is not in general a good predictor of ice nucleation ability. We find a correlation between the ability of a surface to promote nucleation of ice and the layering of liquid water at the surface. The results of this work suggest that ordering of liquid water in contact with the surface plays an important role in the heterogeneous ice nucleation mechanism. References: L. Lupi, A. Hudait and V. Molinero, J. Am. Chem. Soc

  20. An adsorption model of the heterogeneous nucleation of solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, W.T.; Cantor, B. . Oxford Centre for Advanced Materials and Composites)

    1994-09-01

    An adsorption model has been developed to describe the heterogeneous nucleation of solidification in an A-B eutectic or monotectic alloy system. The interface between A-rich [alpha] solid and B-rich liquid is treated as a mixture of A solid, B solid, A liquid and B liquid atoms, randomly distributed as a monolayer between the two phases. The interfacial energy is calculated by summing pairwise bonding energies, and is then minimized to determine the equilibrium interface solid fraction and composition. With decreasing temperature, the interface monolayer changes sharply from liquid to solid, with a composition close to pure B. This sharp onset of interface adsorption of solid B atoms corresponds to [alpha] acting as a catalyst for the heterogeneous nucleation of B-rich [beta] solid. Adsorption close to the eutectic temperature and therefore efficient nucleation catalysis is promoted by a large difference between the melting points of A and B, and a small difference between the solid and liquid immiscibilities of A and B. Predicted undercoolings for the onset of adsorption and nucleation catalysis can be obtained directly from simple phase diagram data, and give good agreement with previous measurements in the Ag-Pb and Al-Sn alloy systems.

  1. Molecular simulations of heterogeneous ice nucleation. I. Controlling ice nucleation through surface hydrophilicity

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, Stephen J.; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Slater, B.; Michaelides, Angelos

    2015-05-14

    Ice formation is one of the most common and important processes on earth and almost always occurs at the surface of a material. A basic understanding of how the physicochemical properties of a material’s surface affect its ability to form ice has remained elusive. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations to directly probe heterogeneous ice nucleation at a hexagonal surface of a nanoparticle of varying hydrophilicity. Surprisingly, we find that structurally identical surfaces can both inhibit and promote ice formation and analogous to a chemical catalyst, it is found that an optimal interaction between the surface and the water exists for promoting ice nucleation.We use our microscopic understanding of the mechanism to design a modified surface in silico with enhanced ice nucleating ability. C 2015 Author(s). All article content, except where otherwise noted, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

  2. Elastic and plastic effects on heterogeneous nucleation and nanowire formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boussinot, G.; Schulz, R.; Hüter, C.; Brener, E. A.; Spatschek, R.

    2014-02-01

    We investigate theoretically the effects of elastic and plastic deformations on heterogeneous nucleation and nanowire formation. In the first case, the influence of the confinement of the critical nucleus between two parallel misfitting substrates is investigated using scaling arguments. We present phase diagrams giving the nature of the nucleation regime as a function of the driving force and the degree of confinement. We complement this analytical study by amplitude equations simulations. In the second case, the influence of a screw dislocation inside a nanowire on the development of the morphological surface instability of the wire, related to the Rayleigh-Plateau instability, is examined. Here the screw dislocation provokes a torsion of the wire known as Eshelby twist. Numerical calculations using the finite element method and the amplitude equations are performed to support analytical investigations. It is shown that the screw dislocation promotes the Rayleigh-Plateau instability.

  3. Heterogeneous Nucleation of Naphthalene Vapor on Water Surface

    PubMed

    Smolík; Schwarz

    1997-01-15

    The evaporation of a water drop into a ternary gaseous mixture of air, steam, and naphthalene vapor was investigated. The experimental results were compared with a theoretical prediction based on a numerical solution of coupled boundary layer equations for heat and mass transfer from a drop moving in ternary gas. In the experiments the naphthalene vapor condensed on the water drop as a supercooled liquid even at temperatures far below the melting point of naphthalene. The condensation on drop surface is discussed in terms of classical theory of heterogeneous nucleation on smooth surfaces. PMID:9028892

  4. Alteration of Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation Properties Induced by Particle Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, R. C.; Polen, M.; Beydoun, H.; Lawlis, E.; Ahern, A.; Jahn, L.; Hill, T. C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol particles that can serve as ice nuclei frequently experience rapid and extensive chemical aging during atmospheric transport. This is known to significantly alter some ice nucleation modes of the few types of ice nucleation particle systems where aging effects have been simulated, such as for mineral dust. Yet much of our understanding of atmospheric particle freezing properties is derived from measurements of fresh or unaged particles. We know almost nothing regarding how atmospheric aging might alter the freezing properties of biomass burning aerosol or biological particle nucleants. We have investigated the effects of simulated aging using a chamber reactor on the heterogeneous ice nucleation properties of biomass burning aerosol (BBA) and ice-active bacteria particles. Some types of aging were found to enhance the freezing ability of BBA, exhibited as a shift in a portion of the droplet freezing curve to warmer temperatures by a few °C. Ice-active bacteria were found to consistently loose their most ice-active nucleants after repeated aging cycles. The bacterial systems always retained significantly efficient ice active sites that still allowed them to induce freezing at mild/warm temperatures, despite this decrease in freezing ability. A comprehensive series of online single-particle mass spectrometry and offline spectromicroscopic analysis of individual particles was used to determine how the aging altered the aerosol's composition, and gain mechanistic insights into how this in turn altered the freezing properties. Our new ice nucleation framework that uses a continuous distribution of ice active site ability (contact angle) was used to interpret the droplet freezing spectra and understand how aging alters the internal and external variability, and rigidity, of the ice active sites.

  5. Impurity-stimulated heterogeneous nucleation of supercooled H2 clusters.

    PubMed

    Knuth, Eldon; Schaper, Sven; Toennies, J Peter

    2004-01-01

    The sizes and mass spectra of large (N=1900-13,700 molecules) cold (approximately 3.1 K) H2 clusters have been measured after scattering from CO molecules. Cluster-size measurements after between 2 and 8 collisions indicate that 7% of the H2 molecules are evaporated. This loss agrees with calculations for the number of H2 molecules evaporated by the heat released in the transition from an initial liquid state to a final solid state. Even though heterogeneous nucleation is initiated after only a few collisions with CO molecules, the mass spectra show that additional captured CO molecules coagulate to form large CO clusters with up to n=11 molecules, suggesting that the outer layer is sufficiently liquidlike to facilitate mobility of the CO molecules. Since the calculated H2 cluster temperature (approximately 3.1 K) is below the superfluid transition temperature predicted for pH2 with density between 40% and 80% of the triple-point density, a shell-like region of low density near the cluster surface can be expected to be superfluid. PMID:15267283

  6. Heterogeneous ice nucleation: exploring the transition from stochastic to singular freezing behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermeier, D.; Shaw, R. A.; Hartmann, S.; Wex, H.; Clauss, T.; Voigtländer, J.; Stratmann, F.

    2011-08-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation, a primary pathway for ice formation in the atmosphere, has been described alternately as being stochastic, in direct analogy with homogeneous nucleation, or singular, with ice nuclei initiating freezing at deterministic temperatures. We present an idealized, conceptual model to explore the transition between stochastic and singular ice nucleation. This "soccer ball" model treats particles as being covered with surface sites (patches of finite area) characterized by different nucleation barriers, but with each surface site following the stochastic nature of ice embryo formation. The model provides a phenomenological explanation for seemingly contradictory experimental results obtained in our research groups. Even with ice nucleation treated fundamentally as a stochastic process this process can be masked by the heterogeneity of surface properties, as might be typical for realistic atmospheric particle populations. Full evaluation of the model findings will require experiments with well characterized ice nucleating particles and the ability to vary both temperature and waiting time for freezing.

  7. Godunov Method for Calculating Multicomponent Heterogeneous Medium Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surov, V. S.

    2014-03-01

    The modified Godunov method intended for integrating the nondivergent systems that describe a multivelocity heterogeneous mixture flow is presented. The linearized Riemann solver has been used in solving the Riemann problems.

  8. Line-tension effects on heterogeneous nucleation on a spherical substrate and in a spherical cavity.

    PubMed

    Iwamatsu, Masao

    2015-04-01

    The line-tension effects on heterogeneous nucleation are considered when a spherical lens-shaped nucleus is nucleated on top of a spherical substrate and on the bottom of the wall of a spherical cavity. The effect of line tension on the nucleation barrier can be separated from the usual volume term. As the radius of the substrate increases, the nucleation barrier decreases and approaches that of a flat substrate. However, as the radius of the cavity increases, the nucleation barrier increases and approaches that of a flat substrate. A small spherical substrate is a less active nucleation site than a flat substrate, and a small spherical cavity is a more active nucleation site than a flat substrate. In contrast, the line-tension effect on the nucleation barrier is maximum when the radii of the nucleus and the substrate or cavity become comparable. Therefore, by tuning the size of the spherical substrate or spherical cavity, the effect of the line tension can be optimized. These results will be useful in broad range of applications from material processing to understanding of global climate, where the heterogeneous nucleation plays a vital role. PMID:25775383

  9. Heterogeneous ice nucleation on particles composed of humic-like substances impacted by O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingbing; Knopf, Daniel A.

    2011-02-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation plays important roles in cirrus and mixed-phase cloud formation, but the efficiency of organic particles to act as ice nuclei (IN) is still not well understood. Furthermore, the effect of particle oxidation by O3 on corresponding IN efficiencies has not yet been sufficiently assessed. We present heterogeneous ice nucleation on kaolinite, Suwannee River standard fulvic acid (SRFA), and leonardite standard humic acid particles as a function of particle temperature (Tp), relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice), nucleation mode, and O3 exposure. Ice nucleation and water uptake were studied for Tp >203 K and RHice up to water saturation using a novel ice nucleation apparatus. This study shows that SRFA, leonardite, and corresponding O3-exposed particles can nucleate ice via different modes at relevant atmospheric conditions. These particles nucleated ice via deposition mode at Tp ≤ 231 K, and for higher Tp water was taken up or ice was nucleated via deposition or immersion mode. Oxidation of leonardite and SRFA particles by O3 led to a decrease in deposition nucleation efficiency and to water uptake at lower temperatures for the former and to an increase in the lowest temperature at which deposition nucleation was observed for the latter. Activated IN fractions and heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficients (Jhet) were derived, and corresponding contact angles (θ) were calculated. A parameterization of θ as a function of RHice is presented which allows derivation of Jhet for various deposition IN and corresponding ice crystal production rates for application in cloud-resolving models.

  10. Heterogeneous ice nucleation on atmospheric aerosols: a review of results from laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoose, C.; Möhler, O.

    2012-10-01

    A small subset of the atmospheric aerosol population has the ability to induce ice formation at conditions under which ice would not form without them (heterogeneous ice nucleation). While no closed theoretical description of this process and the requirements for good ice nuclei is available, numerous studies have attempted to quantify the ice nucleation ability of different particles empirically in laboratory experiments. In this article, an overview of these results is provided. Ice nucleation "onset" conditions for various mineral dust, soot, biological, organic and ammonium sulfate particles are summarized. Typical temperature-supersaturation regions can be identified for the "onset" of ice nucleation of these different particle types, but the various particle sizes and activated fractions reported in different studies have to be taken into account when comparing results obtained with different methodologies. When intercomparing only data obtained under the same conditions, it is found that dust mineralogy is not a consistent predictor of higher or lower ice nucleation ability. However, the broad majority of studies agrees on a reduction of deposition nucleation by various coatings on mineral dust. The ice nucleation active surface site (INAS) density is discussed as a simple and empirical normalized measure for ice nucleation activity. For most immersion and condensation freezing measurements on mineral dust, estimates of the temperature-dependent INAS density agree within about two orders of magnitude. For deposition nucleation on dust, the spread is significantly larger, but a general trend of increasing INAS densities with increasing supersaturation is found. For soot, the presently available results are divergent. Estimated average INAS densities are high for ice-nucleation active bacteria at high subzero temperatures. At the same time, it is shown that INAS densities of some other biological aerosols, like certain pollen grains, fungal spores and diatoms

  11. Competitive heterogeneous nucleation onto a microscopic impurity in a Potts model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asuquo, Cletus C.; McArthur, Danielle; Bowles, Richard K.

    2016-08-01

    Many metastable systems can nucleate to multiple competing stable or intermediate metastable states. In this work, a Potts model, subject to external fields, is used to study the competitive nucleation of two phases attempting to grow on a microscopic impurity. Monte Carlo simulations are used to calculate the free energy surfaces for the system under different conditions, where the relative stability of the phases is adjusted by changing the interaction parameters, and the nucleation rates obtained using multicomponent transition state theory (TST) are compared with the rates measured using the survival probability method. We find that the two methods predict similar nucleation rates when the free energy barrier used in the transition state theory is defined as the work required to form a critical embryo from the metastable phase. An analysis of the free energy surfaces also reveals that the competition between the nucleating phases leads to an effective drying of the impurity which slows down the nucleation rate compared to the single phase case.

  12. Improved Success of Sparse Matrix Protein Crystallization Screening with Heterogeneous Nucleating Agents

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Anil S.; Robin, Gautier; Guncar, Gregor; Saunders, Neil F. W.; Newman, Janet; Martin, Jennifer L.; Kobe, Bostjan

    2007-01-01

    Background Crystallization is a major bottleneck in the process of macromolecular structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Successful crystallization requires the formation of nuclei and their subsequent growth to crystals of suitable size. Crystal growth generally occurs spontaneously in a supersaturated solution as a result of homogenous nucleation. However, in a typical sparse matrix screening experiment, precipitant and protein concentration are not sampled extensively, and supersaturation conditions suitable for nucleation are often missed. Methodology/Principal Findings We tested the effect of nine potential heterogenous nucleating agents on crystallization of ten test proteins in a sparse matrix screen. Several nucleating agents induced crystal formation under conditions where no crystallization occurred in the absence of the nucleating agent. Four nucleating agents: dried seaweed; horse hair; cellulose and hydroxyapatite, had a considerable overall positive effect on crystallization success. This effect was further enhanced when these nucleating agents were used in combination with each other. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that the addition of heterogeneous nucleating agents increases the chances of crystal formation when using sparse matrix screens. PMID:17971854

  13. The interface of heterogeneous nucleation on single crystal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, L.; Xia, M.; Li, J.

    2016-03-01

    Under controlled nucleation process was achieved by solidifying a high purity Al droplet on a single crystal Al2O3 substrate in a high vacuum chamber. The following X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis and measured undercooling prove that the nucleation was triggered by the substrate. Various lattice mismatches between new crystal and substrate (C/S) were obtained through this approach. Combining XRD patterns and high resolution transmission electron microscope analysis we found that the morphology of interface was affected by lattice misfit. An epitaxial layer was found at C/S interface with larger lattice misfit, as in Al(100)//Al2O3(0001) system. Further experiments on introduced alloying element, Sb, into liquid Al shows a suppressed epitaxial layer of Al. Chemical reaction between liquid and substrate also contributes to the formation of the interface. The nucleation of Al on the MgO substrates was actually nucleated on MgAl2O4, chemical reaction product of Al and MgO, rather than MgO.

  14. Heterogeneous nucleation of ice from supercooled NaCl solution confined in porous cement paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Qiang; Li, Kefei; Fen-Chong, Teddy

    2015-01-01

    Clarifying the nucleation process of chloride-based deicing salt solution (e.g., NaCl solution) confined in cement-based porous materials remains an important issue to understand its detrimental effects on material substrates. In this study, the pore structures of hardened cement pastes were characterized by mercury-intrusion and nitrogen-sorption porosimetry. The ice nucleation temperature of NaCl solution of different concentrations confined in the hardened cement pastes was measured and analyzed by classical heterogeneous nucleation theory. The kinetic factor, contact-angle factor including the contact angle between ice and the substrate were evaluated. The results revealed that the contact angle between ice and the substrate showed the minimum value when adding 3% NaCl into water. The heterogeneous ice nucleation rates were found to be proportional to the water activity shifts.

  15. Heterogeneous Nucleation of Ice on Anthropogenic Organic Particles Collected in Mexico City

    SciTech Connect

    Knopf, Daniel A.; Wang, BingBing; Laskin, Alexander; Moffet, Ryan C.; Gilles, Marry K.

    2010-06-05

    This study reports on heterogeneous ice nucleation activity of predominantly organic or coated with organic material anthropogenic particles sampled within and around the polluted environment of Mexico City. The onset of heterogeneous ice nucleation was observed as a function of particle temperature (Tp), relative humidity (RH), nucleation mode, and chemical composition of particles influenced by their photochemical atmospheric aging. Particle analyses was conducted using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). In contrast to the majority of laboratory studies employing proxies of organic aerosol, we show that anthropogenic organic particles collected in Mexico City have can potentially induce ice nucleation at experimental conditions relevant to cirrus formation. The reported results suggest a new paradigm for the potential impact of organic particles on ice cloud formation and climate.

  16. Heterogeneous nucleation of ice on anthropogenic organic particles collected in Mexico City

    SciTech Connect

    Knopf, D.A.; Wang, B.; Laskin, A.; Moffet, R.C.; Gilles, M.K.

    2010-06-20

    This study reports on heterogeneous ice nucleation activity of predominantly organic (or coated with organic material) anthropogenic particles sampled within and around the polluted environment of Mexico City. The onset of heterogeneous ice nucleation was observed as a function of particle temperature (Tp), relative humidity (RH), nucleation mode, and particle chemical composition which is influenced by photochemical atmospheric aging. Particle analyses included computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). In contrast to most laboratory studies employing proxies of organic aerosol, we show that anthropogenic organic particles collected in Mexico City can potentially induce ice nucleation at experimental conditions relevant to cirrus formation. The results suggest a new precedent for the potential impact of organic particles on ice cloud formation and climate.

  17. Molecular Simulations of Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation. II. Peeling back the Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, Stephen J.; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Slater, B.; Michaelides, Angelos

    2015-05-14

    Coarse grained molecular dynamics simulations are presented in which the sensitivity of the ice nucleation rate to the hydrophilicity of a graphene nanoflake is investigated. We find that an optimal interaction strength for promoting ice nucleation exists, which coincides with that found previously for a face centered cubic (111) surface. We further investigate the role that the layering of interfacial water plays in heterogeneous ice nucleation and demonstrate that the extent of layering is not a good indicator of ice nucleating ability for all surfaces. Our results suggest that to be an efficient ice nucleating agent, a surface should not bind water too strongly if it is able to accommodate high coverages of water.

  18. Heterogeneous nucleation of ice particles on glassy aerosols modifies TTL cirrus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, T. W.; Murray, B. J.; Dobbie, S.; Al-Jumur, S. M.; Cui, Z.; Wagner, R.; Moehler, O.; Schnaiter, M.; Benz, S.; Niemand, M.; Saathoff, H.; Skrotzki, J.; Ebert, V.; Wagner, S.; Karcher, B.

    2010-12-01

    Experiments at the AIDA chamber, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, have shown that glassy aqueous citric acid aerosol can nucleate ice at temperatures relevant to the tropical tropopause layer (TTL)(1). Modelling suggests this new route to the formation of TTL cirrus can provide an explanation for the very low ice particle number density observed in cirrus clouds in this region and may lead to high in-cloud supersaturations(1). Nucleation of ice on glassy aerosol is consistent with the absence of traditional ice nuclei in sampled TTL cirrus residue(2). In addition, we will present new data from experiments performed in July 2010 at the AIDA chamber using glassy aerosols composed of other atmospherically relevant compounds (levoglucosan, raffinose) and an internal mixture of five dicarboxylic acids and ammonium sulphate (raffinose/M5AS)(3). All four systems tested nucleate ice when in a glassy state. This indicates that heterogeneous ice nucleation is a general property of glassy aerosols and that natural aerosols which are composed of similar molecules will also nucleate ice if glassy. Glassy aqueous levoglucosan and raffinose/M5AS aerosol nucleated ice at temperatures similar to those found for glassy aqueous citric acid aerosol (<202 K). Whereas raffinose, which forms a glass at much higher temperatures, nucleated ice heterogeneously at up to ~220 K. This activity at higher temperatures suggests that ice nucleation by glassy aerosol may also play a role in the formation of warmer ice clouds. (1)B. J. Murray et al., Heterogeneous nucleation of ice particles on glassy aerosols under cirrus conditions, Nature Geosci, 2010, 3, 233-237. (2)K. D. Froyd et al., Aerosols that form subvisible cirrus at the tropical tropopause, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 2010, 10, 209-218. (3)B. Zobrist et al., Do atmospheric aerosols form glasses?, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 2008, 8, 5221-5244.

  19. Heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by field-collected atmospheric particles below 273 K

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander; Roedel, Tobias R.; Gilles, Marry K.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Knopf, Daniel A.

    2012-09-25

    Atmospheric ice formation induced by particles with complex chemical and physical properties through heterogeneous nucleation is not well understood. Heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by ambient particles collected from urban environments in Los Angeles and Mexico City are presented. Using a vapour controlled cooling system equipped with an optical microscopy, the range of onset conditions for ice nucleation and water uptake by the collected particles was determined as a function of temperature (200{273 K) and relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice) up to water saturation. Three distinctly different types of authentic atmospheric particles were investigated including soot particles associated with organics/inorganics, inorganic particles of marine origin coated with organic material, and Pb/Zn containing inorganic particles apportioned to anthropogenic emissions relevant to waste incineration. Single particle characterization was provided by micro-spectroscopic analyses using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption ne structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Above 230 K, signicant differences in water uptake and immersion freezing effciencies of the different particle types were observed. Below 230 K, the particles exhibited high deposition ice nucleation effciencies and formed ice at RHice values well below homogeneous ice nucleation limits. The data show that the chemical composition of these eld{collected particles plays an important role in determining water uptake and immersion freezing. Heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coeffcients, cumulative ice nuclei (IN) spectrum, and IN activated fraction for deposition ice nucleation are derived. The presented ice nucleation data demonstrate that anthropogenic and marine particles comprising of various chemical and physical properties exhibit distinctly different ice

  20. Heterogeneous ice nucleation on atmospheric aerosols: a review of results from laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoose, C.; Möhler, O.

    2012-05-01

    A small subset of the atmospheric aerosol population has the ability to induce ice formation at conditions under which ice would not form without them (heterogeneous ice nucleation). While no closed theoretical description of this process and the requirements for good ice nuclei is available, numerous studies have attempted to quantify the ice nucleation ability of different particles empirically in laboratory experiments. In this article, an overview of these results is provided. Ice nucleation onset conditions for various mineral dust, soot, biological, organic and ammonium sulphate particles are summarized. Typical temperature-supersaturation regions can be identified for the onset of ice nucleation of these different particle types, but the various particle sizes and activated fractions reported in different studies have to be taken into account when comparing results obtained with different methodologies. When intercomparing only data obtained under the same conditions, it is found that dust mineralogy is not a consistent predictor of higher or lower ice nucleation ability. However, the broad majority of studies agrees on a reduction of deposition nucleation by various coatings on mineral dust. The ice nucleation active surface site (INAS) density is discussed as a normalized measure for ice nucleation activity. For most immersion and condensation freezing measurements on mineral dust, estimates of the temperature-dependent INAS density agree within about two orders of magnitude. For deposition nucleation on dust, the spread is significantly larger, but a general trend of increasing INAS densities with increasing supersaturation is found. For soot, the presently available results are divergent. Estimated average INAS densities are high for ice-nucleation active bacteria at high subzero temperatures. At the same time, it is shown that some other biological aerosols, like certain pollen grains and fungal spores, are not intrinsically better ice nuclei than dust

  1. FOREWORD: Heterogenous nucleation and microstructure formation—a scale- and system-bridging approach Heterogenous nucleation and microstructure formation—a scale- and system-bridging approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmerich, H.

    2009-11-01

    Scope and aim of this volume. Nucleation and initial microstructure formation play an important role in almost all aspects of materials science [1-5]. The relevance of the prediction and control of nucleation and the subsequent microstructure formation is fully accepted across many areas of modern surface and materials science and technology. One reason is that a large range of material properties, from mechanical ones such as ductility and hardness to electrical and magnetic ones such as electric conductivity and magnetic hardness, depend largely on the specific crystalline structure that forms in nucleation and the subsequent initial microstructure growth. A very demonstrative example for the latter is the so called bamboo structure of an integrated circuit, for which resistance against electromigration [6] , a parallel alignment of grain boundaries vertical to the direction of electricity, is most favorable. Despite the large relevance of predicting and controlling nucleation and the subsequent microstructure formation, and despite significant progress in the experimental analysis of the later stages of crystal growth in line with new theoretical computer simulation concepts [7], details about the initial stages of solidification are still far from being satisfactorily understood. This is in particular true when the nucleation event occurs as heterogenous nucleation. The Priority Program SPP 1296 'Heterogenous Nucleation and Microstructure Formation—a Scale- and System-Bridging Approach' [8] sponsored by the German Research Foundation, DFG, intends to contribute to this open issue via a six year research program that enables approximately twenty research groups in Germany to work interdisciplinarily together following this goal. Moreover, it enables the participants to embed themselves in the international community which focuses on this issue via internationally open joint workshops, conferences and summer schools. An outline of such activities can be found

  2. Heterogeneous ice nucleation in aqueous solutions: the role of water activity.

    PubMed

    Zobrist, B; Marcolli, C; Peter, T; Koop, T

    2008-05-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation experiments have been performed with four different ice nuclei (IN), namely nonadecanol, silica, silver iodide and Arizona test dust. All IN are either immersed in the droplets or located at the droplets surface. The IN were exposed to various aqueous solutions, which consist of (NH4)2SO4, H2SO4, MgCl2, NaCl, LiCl, Ca(NO3)2, K2CO3, CH3COONa, ethylene glycol, glycerol, malonic acid, PEG300 or a NaCl/malonic acid mixture. Freezing was studied using a differential scanning calorimeter and a cold finger cell. The results show that the heterogeneous ice freezing temperatures decrease with increasing solute concentration; however, the magnitude of this effect is solute dependent. In contrast, when the results are analyzed in terms of the solution water activity a very consistent behavior emerges: heterogeneous ice nucleation temperatures for all four IN converge each onto a single line, irrespective of the nature of the solute. We find that a constant offset with respect to the ice melting point curve, Deltaaw,het, can describe the observed freezing temperatures for each IN. Such a behavior is well-known for homogeneous ice nucleation from supercooled liquid droplets and has led to the development of water-activity-based ice nucleation theory. The large variety of investigated solutes together with different general types of ice nuclei studied (monolayers, ionic crystals, covalently bound network-forming compounds, and a mixture of chemically different crystallites) underlines the general applicability of water-activity-based ice nucleation theory also for heterogeneous ice nucleation in the immersion mode. Finally, the ice nucleation efficiencies of the various IN, as well as the atmospheric implication of the developed parametrization are discussed. PMID:18363389

  3. Heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by field-collected atmospheric particles below 273 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander; Roedel, Tobias; Gilles, Mary K.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Knopf, Daniel A.

    2012-09-01

    Ice formation induced by atmospheric particles through heterogeneous nucleation is not well understood. Onset conditions for heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by particles collected in Los Angeles and Mexico City were determined as a function of temperature (200-273 K) and relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice). Four dominant particle types were identified including soot associated with organics, soot with organic and inorganics, inorganic particles of marine origin coated with organic material, and Pb/Zn-containing particles apportioned to emissions relevant to waste incineration. Single particle characterization was provided by micro-spectroscopic analyses using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Above 230 K, significant differences in onsets of water uptake and immersion freezing of different particle types were observed. Below 230 K, particles exhibited high deposition ice nucleation efficiencies and formed ice atRHicewell below homogeneous ice nucleation limits. The data suggest that water uptake and immersion freezing are more sensitive to changes in particle chemical composition compared to deposition ice nucleation. The data demonstrate that anthropogenic and marine influenced particles, exhibiting various chemical and physical properties, possess distinctly different ice nucleation efficiencies and can serve as efficient IN at atmospheric conditions typical for cirrus and mixed-phase clouds.

  4. Heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by field-collected atmospheric particles below 273 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander; Roedel, Tobias; Gilles, Mary K.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Knopf, Daniel A.

    2011-11-01

    Ice formation induced by atmospheric particles through heterogeneous nucleation is not well understood. Onset conditions for heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by particles collected in Los Angeles and Mexico City were determined as a function of temperature (200-273 K) and relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice). Four dominant particle types were identified including soot associated with organics, soot with organic and inorganics, inorganic particles of marine origin coated with organic material, and Pb/Zn-containing particles apportioned to emissions relevant to waste incineration. Single particle characterization was provided by micro-spectroscopic analyses using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Above 230 K, significant differences in onsets of water uptake and immersion freezing of different particle types were observed. Below 230 K, particles exhibited high deposition ice nucleation efficiencies and formed ice atRHicewell below homogeneous ice nucleation limits. The data suggest that water uptake and immersion freezing are more sensitive to changes in particle chemical composition compared to deposition ice nucleation. The data demonstrate that anthropogenic and marine influenced particles, exhibiting various chemical and physical properties, possess distinctly different ice nucleation efficiencies and can serve as efficient IN at atmospheric conditions typical for cirrus and mixed-phase clouds.

  5. Heterogeneous ice nucleation of viscous secondary organic aerosol produced from ozonolysis of α-pinene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatius, Karoliina; Kristensen, Thomas B.; Järvinen, Emma; Nichman, Leonid; Fuchs, Claudia; Gordon, Hamish; Herenz, Paul; Hoyle, Christopher R.; Duplissy, Jonathan; Garimella, Sarvesh; Dias, Antonio; Frege, Carla; Höppel, Niko; Tröstl, Jasmin; Wagner, Robert; Yan, Chao; Amorim, Antonio; Baltensperger, Urs; Curtius, Joachim; Donahue, Neil M.; Gallagher, Martin W.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kulmala, Markku; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Schnaiter, Martin; Tomé, Antonio; Virtanen, Annele; Worsnop, Douglas; Stratmann, Frank

    2016-05-01

    There are strong indications that particles containing secondary organic aerosol (SOA) exhibit amorphous solid or semi-solid phase states in the atmosphere. This may facilitate heterogeneous ice nucleation and thus influence cloud properties. However, experimental ice nucleation studies of biogenic SOA are scarce. Here, we investigated the ice nucleation ability of viscous SOA particles. The SOA particles were produced from the ozone initiated oxidation of α-pinene in an aerosol chamber at temperatures in the range from -38 to -10 °C at 5-15 % relative humidity with respect to water to ensure their formation in a highly viscous phase state, i.e. semi-solid or glassy. The ice nucleation ability of SOA particles with different sizes was investigated with a new continuous flow diffusion chamber. For the first time, we observed heterogeneous ice nucleation of viscous α-pinene SOA for ice saturation ratios between 1.3 and 1.4 significantly below the homogeneous freezing limit. The maximum frozen fractions found at temperatures between -39.0 and -37.2 °C ranged from 6 to 20 % and did not depend on the particle surface area. Global modelling of monoterpene SOA particles suggests that viscous biogenic SOA particles are indeed present in regions where cirrus cloud formation takes place. Hence, they could make up an important contribution to the global ice nucleating particle budget.

  6. Heterogeneous nucleation in a glass-forming alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, J. J.; Liu, C. T.; Rhim, W.-K.; Li, J. J. Z.; Liaw, P. K.; Choo, H.; Johnson, W. L.

    2008-06-01

    Nucleation in the undercooled liquid state in the bulk metallic glass-forming composition Zr52.5Cu17.9Ni14.6Al10Ti5 (VIT-105), produced using high purity (PA) and commercial purity (CA) raw materials was investigated using electrostatic levitation and ex situ neutron diffraction. The CA material was observed to have a lower density than the PA sample and crystallized at relatively shallow undercooling. The densities of the samples at temperatures above the solidus showed an oxygen-dependent hysteresis associated with the state change, indicating the presence of oxygen-stabilized intermetallics. The PA alloy exhibited three distinct crystallization modes dependent on the thermal history of the melt, one of which showed a net volume expansion.

  7. Heterogeneous Crystal Nucleation: The Effect of Lattice Mismatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Gyula I.; Tegze, György; Pusztai, Tamás; Gránásy, László

    2012-01-01

    A simple dynamical density functional theory is used to investigate freezing of an undercooled liquid in the presence of a crystalline substrate. We find that the adsorption of the crystalline phase on the substrate, the contact angle, and the height of the nucleation barrier are nonmonotonic functions of the lattice constant of the substrate. We show that the free-growth-limited model of particle-induced freezing by Greer et al. [Acta Mater. 48, 2823 (2000)ACMAFD1359-645410.1016/S1359-6454(00)00094-X] is valid for larger nanoparticles and a small anisotropy of the interface free energy. Faceting due to the small size of the foreign particle or a high anisotropy decouples free growth from the critical size of homogeneous nuclei.

  8. On the heterogeneous nucleation of mesospheric ice on meteoric smoke particles: Microphysical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmus, Heiner; Wilms, Henrike; Strelnikov, Boris; Rapp, Markus

    2014-10-01

    Meteor smoke particles (MSP), which are thought to be the nucleation germs for mesospheric ice, are currently discussed to consist of highly absorbing materials such as magnesiowüstite, hematite or magnesium-iron-silicates and may therefore be warmer than the ambient atmosphere. In order to quantify the temperature difference between MSP and the atmosphere we developed a model to calculate the MSP equilibrium temperature in radiational and collisional balance. The temperature difference between MSP and the surrounding atmosphere strongly depends on the composition of the MSP, especially on the relative iron content, where a higher iron content leads to warmer MSP. We then derive an expression of the nucleation rate of mesospheric ice particles which explicitly accounts for this temperature difference. We find that the nucleation rate is strongly reduced by several orders of magnitude if the germ temperature is increased by only a few Kelvin. Implementing this nucleation rate depending on the germ temperature into CARMA, the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres, we find that fewer but larger ice particles are formed compared to a reference scenario with no temperature difference between MSP and ambient atmosphere. This may indicate that iron-rich MSP are not ideal ice nuclei and that either other MSP-types or other nucleation pathways (e.g. wave induced heterogeneous nucleation or even homogeneous nucleation) are responsible for ice formation at the mesopause.

  9. Inclusion of line tension effect in classical nucleation theory for heterogeneous nucleation: A rigorous thermodynamic formulation and some unique conclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Singha, Sanat K.; Das, Prasanta K. Maiti, Biswajit

    2015-03-14

    A rigorous thermodynamic formulation of the geometric model for heterogeneous nucleation including line tension effect is missing till date due to the associated mathematical hurdles. In this work, we develop a novel thermodynamic formulation based on Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT), which is supposed to illustrate a systematic and a more plausible analysis for the heterogeneous nucleation on a planar surface including the line tension effect. The appreciable range of the critical microscopic contact angle (θ{sub c}), obtained from the generalized Young’s equation and the stability analysis, is θ{sub ∞} < θ{sub c} < θ′ for positive line tension and is θ{sub M} < θ{sub c} < θ{sub ∞} for negative line tension. θ{sub ∞} is the macroscopic contact angle, θ′ is the contact angle for which the Helmholtz free energy has the minimum value for the positive line tension, and θ{sub M} is the local minima of the nondimensional line tension effect for the negative line tension. The shape factor f, which is basically the dimensionless critical free energy barrier, becomes higher for lower values of θ{sub ∞} and higher values of θ{sub c} for positive line tension. The combined effect due to the presence of the triple line and the interfacial areas (f{sup L} + f{sup S}) in shape factor is always within (0, 3.2), resulting f in the range of (0, 1.7) for positive line tension. A formerly presumed appreciable range for θ{sub c}(0 < θ{sub c} < θ{sub ∞}) is found not to be true when the effect of negative line tension is considered for CNT. Estimation based on the property values of some real fluids confirms the relevance of the present analysis.

  10. Recent Developments in Modeling Heteroepitaxy/Heterogeneous Nucleation by Dynamical Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podmaniczky, Frigyes; Tóth, Gyula I.; Tegze, György; Gránásy, László

    2015-11-01

    Crystallization of supersaturated liquids usually starts by epitaxial growth or by heterogeneous nucleation on foreign surfaces. Herein, we review recent advances made in modeling heteroepitaxy and heterogeneous nucleation on flat/modulated surfaces and nanoparticles within the framework of a simple dynamical density functional theory, known as the phase-field crystal model. It will be shown that the contact angle and the nucleation barrier are nonmonotonous functions of the lattice mismatch between the substrate and the crystalline phase. In continuous cooling studies for substrates with lattice mismatch, we recover qualitatively the Matthews-Blakeslee mechanism of stress release via the misfit dislocations. The simulations performed for particle-induced freezing will be confronted with recent analytical results, exploring thus the validity range of the latter. It will be demonstrated that time-dependent studies are essential, as investigations based on equilibrium properties often cannot identify the preferred nucleation pathways. Modeling of these phenomena is essential for designing materials on the basis of controlled nucleation and/or nano-patterning.

  11. A technique for quantifying heterogeneous ice nucleation in microlitre supercooled water droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whale, T. F.; Murray, B. J.; O'Sullivan, D.; Umo, N. S.; Baustian, K. J.; Atkinson, J. D.; Morris, G. J.

    2014-09-01

    The ice content of mixed phase clouds, which contain both supercooled water and ice, affects both their lifetime and radiative properties. In many clouds, the formation of ice requires the presence of particles capable of nucleating ice. One of the most important features of ice nucleating particles (INPs) is that they are rare in comparison to cloud condensation nuclei. However, the fact that only a small fraction of aerosol particles can nucleate ice means that detection and quantification of INPs is challenging. This is particularly true at temperatures above about -20 °C since the population of particles capable of serving as INPs decreases dramatically with increasing temperature. In this paper, we describe an experimental technique in which droplets of microlitre volume containing ice nucleating material are cooled down at a controlled rate and their freezing temperatures recorded. The advantage of using large droplet volumes is that the surface area per droplet is vastly larger than in experiments focused on single aerosol particles or cloud-sized droplets. This increases the probability of observing the effect of less common, but important, high temperature INPs and therefore allows the quantification of their ice nucleation efficiency. The potential artefacts which could influence data from this experiment, and other similar experiments, are mitigated and discussed. Experimentally determined heterogeneous ice nucleation efficiencies for K-feldspar (microcline), kaolinite, chlorite, Snomax®, and silver iodide are presented.

  12. A technique for quantifying heterogeneous ice nucleation in microlitre supercooled water droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whale, T. F.; Murray, B. J.; O'Sullivan, D.; Wilson, T. W.; Umo, N. S.; Baustian, K. J.; Atkinson, J. D.; Workneh, D. A.; Morris, G. J.

    2015-06-01

    In many clouds, the formation of ice requires the presence of particles capable of nucleating ice. Ice-nucleating particles (INPs) are rare in comparison to cloud condensation nuclei. However, the fact that only a small fraction of aerosol particles can nucleate ice means that detection and quantification of INPs is challenging. This is particularly true at temperatures above about -20 °C since the population of particles capable of serving as INPs decreases dramatically with increasing temperature. In this paper, we describe an experimental technique in which droplets of microlitre volume containing ice-nucleating material are cooled down at a controlled rate and their freezing temperatures recorded. The advantage of using large droplet volumes is that the surface area per droplet is vastly larger than in experiments focused on single aerosol particles or cloud-sized droplets. This increases the probability of observing the effect of less common, but important, high-temperature INPs and therefore allows the quantification of their ice nucleation efficiency. The potential artefacts which could influence data from this experiment, and other similar experiments, are mitigated and discussed. Experimentally determined heterogeneous ice nucleation efficiencies for K-feldspar (microcline), kaolinite, chlorite, NX-illite, Snomax® and silver iodide are presented.

  13. Probabilistic aspects of polymorph selection by heterogeneous nucleation on microporous hydrophobic membrane surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curcio, Efrem; Di Profio, Gianluca; Drioli, Enrico

    2008-12-01

    In this work, probabilistic aspects related to the heterogeneous nucleation on microporous hydrophobic surfaces, i.e. polymeric membranes, have been theoretically investigated to understand the ability of this innovative crystallization technique to promote the formation of different polymorphs. The theoretical results, which clarify the effects of physicochemical properties of membranes (i.e. porosity, contact angle between supersaturated solution, and polymeric substrate) on the nucleation process of polymorphs, have been used to discuss the experimentally observed selective crystallization of forms I and II of paracetamol.

  14. High variability of the heterogeneous ice nucleation potential of oxalic acid dihydrate and sodium oxalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R.; Möhler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Leisner, T.

    2010-04-01

    The heterogeneous ice nucleation potential of airborne oxalic acid dihydrate and sodium oxalate particles in the deposition and condensation mode has been investigated by controlled expansion cooling cycles in the AIDA aerosol and cloud chamber of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology at temperatures between 244 and 228 K. Previous laboratory studies have highlighted the particular role of oxalic acid dihydrate as the only species amongst a variety of other investigated dicarboxylic acids to be capable of acting as a heterogeneous ice nucleus in both the deposition and immersion mode. We could confirm a high deposition mode ice activity for 0.03 to 0.8 μm sized oxalic acid dihydrate particles that were either formed by nucleation from a gaseous oxalic acid/air mixture or by rapid crystallisation of highly supersaturated aqueous oxalic acid solution droplets. The critical saturation ratio with respect to ice required for deposition nucleation was found to be less than 1.1 and the size-dependent ice-active fraction of the aerosol population was in the range from 0.1 to 22%. In contrast, oxalic acid dihydrate particles that had crystallised from less supersaturated solution droplets and had been allowed to slowly grow in a supersaturated environment from still unfrozen oxalic acid solution droplets over a time period of several hours were found to be much poorer heterogeneous ice nuclei. We speculate that under these conditions a crystal surface structure with less-active sites for the initiation of ice nucleation was generated. Such particles partially proved to be almost ice-inactive in both the deposition and condensation mode. At times, the heterogeneous ice nucleation ability of oxalic acid dihydrate significantly changed when the particles had been processed in preceding cloud droplet activation steps. Such behaviour was also observed for the second investigated species, namely sodium oxalate. Our experiments address the atmospheric scenario that coating layers

  15. High variability of the heterogeneous ice nucleation potential of oxalic acid dihydrate and sodium oxalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R.; Möhler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Leisner, T.

    2010-08-01

    The heterogeneous ice nucleation potential of airborne oxalic acid dihydrate and sodium oxalate particles in the deposition and condensation mode has been investigated by controlled expansion cooling cycles in the AIDA aerosol and cloud chamber of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology at temperatures between 244 and 228 K. Previous laboratory studies have highlighted the particular role of oxalic acid dihydrate as the only species amongst a variety of other investigated dicarboxylic acids to be capable of acting as a heterogeneous ice nucleus in both the deposition and immersion mode. We could confirm a high deposition mode ice activity for 0.03 to 0.8 μm sized oxalic acid dihydrate particles that were either formed by nucleation from a gaseous oxalic acid/air mixture or by rapid crystallisation of highly supersaturated aqueous oxalic acid solution droplets. The critical saturation ratio with respect to ice required for deposition nucleation was found to be less than 1.1 and the size-dependent ice-active fraction of the aerosol population was in the range from 0.1 to 22%. In contrast, oxalic acid dihydrate particles that had crystallised from less supersaturated solution droplets and had been allowed to slowly grow in a supersaturated environment from still unfrozen oxalic acid solution droplets over a time period of several hours were found to be much poorer heterogeneous ice nuclei. We speculate that under these conditions a crystal surface structure with less-active sites for the initiation of ice nucleation was generated. Such particles partially proved to be almost ice-inactive in both the deposition and condensation mode. At times, the heterogeneous ice nucleation ability of oxalic acid dihydrate significantly changed when the particles had been processed in preceding cloud droplet activation steps. Such behaviour was also observed for the second investigated species, namely sodium oxalate. Our experiments address the atmospheric scenario that coating layers

  16. Heterogeneous Formation of Polar Stratospheric Clouds- Part 1: Nucleation of Nitric Acid Trihydrate (NAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyle, C. R.; Engel, I.; Luo, B. P.; Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.; Grooss, J.-U.; Peter, T.

    2013-01-01

    Satellite-based observations during the Arctic winter of 2009/2010 provide firm evidence that, in contrast to the current understanding, the nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) in the polar stratosphere does not only occur on preexisting ice particles. In order to explain the NAT clouds observed over the Arctic in mid-December 2009, a heterogeneous nucleation mechanism is required, occurring via immersion freezing on the surface of solid particles, likely of meteoritic origin. For the first time, a detailed microphysical modelling of this NAT formation pathway has been carried out. Heterogeneous NAT formation was calculated along more than sixty thousand trajectories, ending at Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) observation points. Comparing the optical properties of the modelled NAT with these observations enabled a thorough validation of a newly developed NAT nucleation parameterisation, which has been built into the Zurich Optical and Microphysical box Model (ZOMM). The parameterisation is based on active site theory, is simple to implement in models and provides substantial advantages over previous approaches which involved a constant rate of NAT nucleation in a given volume of air. It is shown that the new method is capable of reproducing observed polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) very well, despite the varied conditions experienced by air parcels travelling along the different trajectories. In a companion paper, ZOMM is applied to a later period of the winter, when ice PSCs are also present, and it is shown that the observed PSCs are also represented extremely well under these conditions.

  17. Heterogeneous formation of polar stratospheric clouds - Part 1: Nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, C. R.; Engel, I.; Luo, B. P.; Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.; Grooß, J.-U.; Peter, T.

    2013-09-01

    Satellite-based observations during the Arctic winter of 2009/2010 provide firm evidence that, in contrast to the current understanding, the nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) in the polar stratosphere does not only occur on preexisting ice particles. In order to explain the NAT clouds observed over the Arctic in mid-December 2009, a heterogeneous nucleation mechanism is required, occurring via immersion freezing on the surface of solid particles, likely of meteoritic origin. For the first time, a detailed microphysical modelling of this NAT formation pathway has been carried out. Heterogeneous NAT formation was calculated along more than sixty thousand trajectories, ending at Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) observation points. Comparing the optical properties of the modelled NAT with these observations enabled a thorough validation of a newly developed NAT nucleation parameterisation, which has been built into the Zurich Optical and Microphysical box Model (ZOMM). The parameterisation is based on active site theory, is simple to implement in models and provides substantial advantages over previous approaches which involved a constant rate of NAT nucleation in a given volume of air. It is shown that the new method is capable of reproducing observed polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) very well, despite the varied conditions experienced by air parcels travelling along the different trajectories. In a companion paper, ZOMM is applied to a later period of the winter, when ice PSCs are also present, and it is shown that the observed PSCs are also represented extremely well under these conditions.

  18. Heterogeneous formation of polar stratospheric clouds - Part 1: Nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, C. R.; Engel, I.; Luo, B. P.; Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.; Grooß, J.-U.; Peter, T.

    2013-03-01

    Satellite based observations during the Arctic winter of 2009/2010 provide firm evidence that, in contrast to the current understanding, the nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) in the polar stratosphere does not only occur on preexisting ice particles. In order to explain the NAT clouds observed over the Arctic in mid December 2009, a heterogeneous nucleation mechanism is required, occurring via immersion freezing on the surface of solid particles, likely of meteoritic origin. For the first time, a detailed microphysical modelling of this NAT formation pathway has been carried out. Heterogeneous NAT formation was calculated along more than sixty thousand trajectories, ending at Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarisation (CALIOP) observation points. Comparing the optical properties of the modelled NAT with these observations enabled the thorough validation of a newly developed NAT nucleation parameterisation, which has been built into the Zurich Optical and Microphysical box Model (ZOMM). The parameterisation is based on active site theory, is simple to implement in models and provides substantial advantages over previous approaches which involved a constant rate of NAT nucleation in a given volume of air. It is shown that the new method is capable of reproducing observed PSCs very well, despite the varied conditions experienced by air parcels travelling along the different trajectories. In a companion paper, ZOMM is applied to a later period of the winter, when ice PSCs are also present, and it is shown that the observed PSCs are also represented extremely well under these conditions.

  19. Nitride precipitation in compositionally heterogeneous alloys: Nucleation, growth and coarsening during nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Landeghem, H. P.; Gouné, M.; Redjaïmia, A.

    2012-02-01

    A theoretical approach is proposed to take into the account nucleation, growth and coarsening of nitrides in alloys featuring heterogeneous nitrogen content. It is based on physical considerations and accounts for both bulk nitrogen diffusion, which results from the nitriding process and nitrides precipitation kinetics. It predicts local information such as average particle density, radius and volume fraction of nitrides as a function of depth. The work presented in this paper leads to two important conclusions. First, the precipitation rate is not so high that precipitation can be considered as infinitely faster than the diffusion of nitrogen into the bulk. Second, the precipitation state at a given depth depends on the local interaction between nucleation, growth and coarsening phenomena, themselves depending on the local nitrogen content. Finally, the precipitation in alloys with heterogeneous nitrogen content induced by nitriding is radically different from classical precipitation in a single phase where the driving force for precipitation is consumed.

  20. Heterogeneous ice nucleation of viscous secondary organic aerosol produced from ozonolysis of α-pinene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatius, K.; Kristensen, T. B.; Järvinen, E.; Nichman, L.; Fuchs, C.; Gordon, H.; Herenz, P.; Hoyle, C. R.; Duplissy, J.; Garimella, S.; Dias, A.; Frege, C.; Höppel, N.; Tröstl, J.; Wagner, R.; Yan, C.; Amorim, A.; Baltensperger, U.; Curtius, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Gallagher, M. W.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Möhler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Tomé, A.; Virtanen, A.; Worsnop, D.; Stratmann, F.

    2015-12-01

    There are strong indications that particles containing secondary organic aerosol (SOA) exhibit amorphous solid or semi-solid phase states in the atmosphere. This may facilitate deposition ice nucleation and thus influence cirrus cloud properties. However, experimental ice nucleation studies of biogenic SOA are scarce. Here, we investigated the ice nucleation ability of viscous SOA particles. The SOA particles were produced from the ozone initiated oxidation of α-pinene in an aerosol chamber at temperatures in the range from -38 to -10 °C at 5-15 % relative humidity with respect to water to ensure their formation in a highly viscous phase state, i.e. semi-solid or glassy. The ice nucleation ability of SOA particles with different sizes was investigated with a new continuous flow diffusion chamber. For the first time, we observed heterogeneous ice nucleation of viscous α-pinene SOA in the deposition mode for ice saturation ratios between 1.3 and 1.4 significantly below the homogeneous freezing limit. The maximum frozen fractions found at temperatures between -36.5 and -38.3 °C ranged from 6 to 20 % and did not depend on the particle surface area. Global modelling of monoterpene SOA particles suggests that viscous biogenic SOA particles are indeed present in regions where cirrus cloud formation takes place. Hence, they could make up an important contribution to the global ice nuclei (IN) budget.

  1. Heterogeneous ice nucleation and phase transition of viscous α-pinene secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatius, Karoliina; Kristensen, Thomas B.; Järvinen, Emma; Nichman, Leonid; Fuchs, Claudia; Gordon, Hamish; Herenz, Paul; Hoyle, Christopher R.; Duplissy, Jonathan; Baltensperger, Urs; Curtius, Joachim; Donahue, Neil M.; Gallagher, Martin W.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kulmala, Markku; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Schnaiter, Martin; Virtanen, Annele; Stratmann, Frank

    2016-04-01

    There are strong indications that particles containing secondary organic aerosol (SOA) exhibit amorphous solid or semi-solid phase states in the atmosphere. This may facilitate deposition ice nucleation and thus influence cirrus cloud properties. Global model simulations of monoterpene SOA particles suggest that viscous biogenic SOA are indeed present in regions where cirrus cloud formation takes place. Hence, they could make up an important contribution to the global ice nucleating particle (INP) budget. However, experimental ice nucleation studies of biogenic SOA are scarce. Here, we investigated the ice nucleation ability of viscous SOA particles at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) experiment at CERN (Ignatius et al., 2015, Järvinen et al., 2015). In the CLOUD chamber, the SOA particles were produced from the ozone initiated oxidation of α-pinene at temperatures in the range from -38 to -10° C at 5-15 % relative humidity with respect to water (RHw) to ensure their formation in a highly viscous phase state, i.e. semi-solid or glassy. We found that particles formed and grown in the chamber developed an asymmetric shape through coagulation. As the RHw was increased to between 35 % at -10° C and 80 % at -38° C, a transition to spherical shape was observed with a new in-situ optical method. This transition confirms previous modelling of the viscosity transition conditions. The ice nucleation ability of SOA particles was investigated with a new continuous flow diffusion chamber SPIN (Spectrometer for Ice Nuclei) for different SOA particle sizes. For the first time, we observed heterogeneous ice nucleation of viscous α-pinene SOA in the deposition mode for ice saturation ratios between 1.3 and 1.4, significantly below the homogeneous freezing limit. The maximum frozen fractions found at temperatures between -36.5 and -38.3° C ranged from 6 to 20 % and did not depend on the particle surface area. References Ignatius, K. et al., Heterogeneous ice

  2. A novel approach to the theory of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation.

    PubMed

    Ruckenstein, Eli; Berim, Gersh O; Narsimhan, Ganesan

    2015-01-01

    A new approach to the theory of nucleation, formulated relatively recently by Ruckenstein, Narsimhan, and Nowakowski (see Refs. [7-16]) and developed further by Ruckenstein and other colleagues, is presented. In contrast to the classical nucleation theory, which is based on calculating the free energy of formation of a cluster of the new phase as a function of its size on the basis of macroscopic thermodynamics, the proposed theory uses the kinetic theory of fluids to calculate the condensation (W(+)) and dissociation (W(-)) rates on and from the surface of the cluster, respectively. The dissociation rate of a monomer from a cluster is evaluated from the average time spent by a surface monomer in the potential well as obtained from the solution of the Fokker-Planck equation in the phase space of position and momentum for liquid-to-solid transition and the phase space of energy for vapor-to-liquid transition. The condensation rates are calculated using traditional expressions. The knowledge of those two rates allows one to calculate the size of the critical cluster from the equality W(+)=W(-) as well as the rate of nucleation. The developed microscopic approach allows one to avoid the controversial application of classical thermodynamics to the description of nuclei which contain a few molecules. The new theory was applied to a number of cases, such as the liquid-to-solid and vapor-to-liquid phase transitions, binary nucleation, heterogeneous nucleation, nucleation on soluble particles and protein folding. The theory predicts higher nucleation rates at high saturation ratios (small critical clusters) than the classical nucleation theory for both solid-to-liquid as well as vapor-to-liquid transitions. As expected, at low saturation ratios for which the size of the critical cluster is large, the results of the new theory are consistent with those of the classical one. The present approach was combined with the density functional theory to account for the density

  3. AIDA experiments on heterogeneous ice nucleation in warm mixed-phase clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möhler, Ottmar; Benz, Stefan; Leisner, Thomas; Niemand, Monika; Oehm, Caroline; Saathoff, Harald; Schnaiter, Martin; Wagner, Robert

    2010-05-01

    Clouds are important regulators of the Earth's temperature, because they scatter shortwave radiation from the sun back to space (cooling effect) and absorb long wave terrestrial radiation from the Earth surface (warming effect). About 60% of the Earth's surface is covered with clouds at any time. The response of cloud characteristics and precipitation processes to changing natural and anthropogenic aerosol sources is one of the largest uncertainties in the current understanding of climate change. Cloud development and precipitation are related to a complex chain of microphysical processes which in many cases starts with the formation of the ice phase. The occurrence and abundance of the ice phase in tropospheric clouds is strongly linked to the freezing properties of cloud droplets and aerosol solution particles as well as the abundance and properties of insoluble aerosol particles which selectively act as heterogeneous ice nuclei. Field and laboratory work have demonstrated that in particular mineral dust and bological particles can act as heterogeneous ice nuclei in mixed-phase clouds. Little is known however about the ice nucleation impact of organic matter, which has been found as a prominent compound of tropospheric aerosol particles and has the potential to form surface coatings to other aerosol particles during their transport through the atmosphere. The AIDA (Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) facility at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology has been used to investigate the heterogeneous ice nucleation efficiency of various dust and biological particles. The temperature, pressure and humidity conditions in the cloud chamber can be varied in a wide range of natural cloud systems. This is achieved by expansion cooling induced by strong pumping to the chamber volume. This talk will summarise AIDA experiments and results on the ice nucleation behaviour of bacteria, mineral dust particles, and dust particles coated with sulphuric acid and

  4. Strain heterogeneity and damage nucleation at grain boundaries during monotonic deformation in commercial purity titanium.

    SciTech Connect

    Bieler, T. R.; Crimp, M. A.; Yang, Y.; Wang, L.; Eisenlohr, P.; Mason, D. E.; Liu, W.; Ice, G. E.; Michigan State Univ.; Air Force Office of Scientific Research

    2009-01-01

    Heterogeneous strain was analyzed in polycrystalline, commercial-purity titanium using many experimental techniques that provide information about microstructure, dislocation arrangement, grain orientation, orientation gradients, surface topography, and local strain gradients. The recrystallized microstructure with 50-200 {micro}m grains was extensively characterized before and after deformation using 4-point bending to strains between 2% and 15%. Extremely heterogeneous deformation occurred along some grain boundaries, leading to orientation gradients exceeding 10{sup o} over 10-20 {micro}m. Patches of highly characterized micro-structure were modeled using crystal plasticity finite element (CPFE) analysis to simulate the deformation to evaluate the ability of the CPFE model to capture local deformation processes. Damage nucleation events were identified that are associated with twin interactions with grain boundaries. Progress toward identifying fracture initiation criteria based upon slip and twin interactions with grain boundaries is illustrated with related CPFE simulations of deformation in a TiAl alloy.

  5. Heterogeneous nucleation of calcium oxalate crystals in the presence of membrane vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Saeed R.; Whalen, Patrick O.; Glenton, Patricia A.

    1993-12-01

    Membrane-assisted crystallization of calcium oxalate was studied in vitro, using constant composition methodology. Rat renal tubular brush border membrane vesicles were incubated in supersaturated solution of calcium oxalate. Calcium and oxalate depletion started much earlier in the presence of the vesicles than in their absence; within 8, 32, or 258 min of the incubation of vesicles in calcium oxalate solutions of relative supersaturation of 12, 10 or 6 respectively. Thin plate-like crystals with jagged edges formed in association with the membrane vesicles. Since crystal nucleation in the presence of membrane vesicles started within 8 min at a relative supersaturation as low as 12, it will start significantly earlier in the urine of stone formers which is known to have higher relative supersaturation with respect to calcium oxalate. These results demonstrate that cellular membranes can efficiently induce nucleation of calcium oxalate crystals from a metastable solution in an vitro system. Similar membrane induced heterogeneous nucleation of calcium oxalate in vivo within the renal tubules is a distinct possibility.

  6. Heterogeneous ice nucleation activity of bacteria: new laboratory experiments at simulated cloud conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möhler, O.; Georgakopoulos, D. G.; Morris, C. E.; Benz, S.; Ebert, V.; Hunsmann, S.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Wagner, R.

    2008-10-01

    The ice nucleation activities of five different Pseudomonas syringae, Pseudomonas viridiflava and Erwinia herbicola bacterial species and of Snomax™ were investigated in the temperature range between -5 and -15°C. Water suspensions of these bacteria were directly sprayed into the cloud chamber of the AIDA facility of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe at a temperature of -5.7°C. At this temperature, about 1% of the Snomax™ cells induced immersion freezing of the spray droplets before the droplets evaporated in the cloud chamber. The living cells didn't induce any detectable immersion freezing in the spray droplets at -5.7°C. After evaporation of the spray droplets the bacterial cells remained as aerosol particles in the cloud chamber and were exposed to typical cloud formation conditions in experiments with expansion cooling to about -11°C. During these experiments, the bacterial cells first acted as cloud condensation nuclei to form cloud droplets. Then, only a minor fraction of the cells acted as heterogeneous ice nuclei either in the condensation or the immersion mode. The results indicate that the bacteria investigated in the present study are mainly ice active in the temperature range between -7 and -11°C with an ice nucleation (IN) active fraction of the order of 10-4. In agreement to previous literature results, the ice nucleation efficiency of Snomax™ cells was much larger with an IN active fraction of 0.2 at temperatures around -8°C.

  7. Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation During Ozonolysis of Organic Thin Films on Aqueous Solution Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicks, G.; Cantrell, W.

    2005-12-01

    The mechanism by which ice is created affects cloud properties and processes. Although homogeneous ice nucleation is reasonably well understood, both experimentally and theoretically, heterogeneous ice nucleation is not. Since deep convection in the tropics lofts organic materials high into the atmosphere, it is important to achieve an understanding of heterogeneous nucleation by these materials and how it affects cirrus cloud formation. Sources of atmospheric organic compounds include combustion, biomass burning, emissions from vegetation, and sea spray which contains organic material from the ocean's surface. Fatty acids such as stearic acid and oleic acid are common organic constituents. The reaction of oleic acid with atmospheric ozone has recently become a model for understanding how atmospheric oxidation processes affect organic particles. Over the past six years, more than twenty publications have described reactive uptake coefficients, primary products, secondary reactions, mechanisms, and other aspects of this oxidation. With this background information in mind, we built an ozonolysis apparatus in tandem with a solution drop freezer to study the freezing point of 10-microliter, 0.25 M sodium chloride solution droplets coated with thin layers of 18-carbon fatty acids or alcohols. We determined the freezing points before and after ozonolysis for solution droplets coated with stearic acid, oleic acid, cis-13-octadecenoic acid, oleyl alcohol, and 1-octadecanol. During the experiments, temperature cycling was controlled by a computer-driven temperature controller. Results showed little change in mean freezing temperature before and after ozonolysis for all of the organic compounds studied except oleyl alcohol. The lack of a significant temperature change for oleic acid may be good news for atmospheric modelers since the well-studied reaction of ozone with oleic acid is known to give a complex mixture of products.

  8. Size-dependent surface-induced heterogeneous nucleation driven phase-change in Ge2Sb2Te5 nanowires.

    PubMed

    Lee, Se-Ho; Jung, Yeonwoong; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2008-10-01

    By combining electron microscopy and size-dependent electrical measurements, we demonstrate surface-induced heterogeneous nucleation-dominant mechanism for recrystallization of amorphous phase-change Ge2Sb2Te5 nanowires. Heterogeneous nucleation theory quantitatively predicts the nucleation rates that vary by 5 orders of magnitude from 190 to 20 nm lengthscales. Our work demonstrates that increasing the surface-to-volume ratio of nanowires has two effects: lowering of the activation energy barrier due to phonon instability and providing nucleation sites for recrystallization. The systematic study of the effect of surface in phase-change behavior is critical for understanding nanoscale phase-transitions and design of nonvolatile memory devices. PMID:18778106

  9. Shear zone nucleation and deformation transient: effect of heterogeneities and loading conditions in experimentally deformed calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, L. F. G.; Rybacki, E.; Dresen, G. H.; Kilian, R.

    2015-12-01

    In the Earth's middle to lower crust, strain is frequently localized along ductile shear zones, which commonly nucleate at structural and material heterogeneities. To investigate shear zone nucleation and development due to heterogeneities, we performed constant strain-rate (CSR) and constant stress (CS) simple shear (torsion) deformation experiments on Carrara marble samples containing weak (limestone) inclusions. The experiments were conducted in a Paterson-type gas deformation apparatus at 900 °C temperature and 400 MPa confining pressure and maximum bulk shear strains of 3. Peak shear stress was about 20 MPa for all the samples, followed by smooth weakening and steady state behavior. The strain is predominantly localized in the host marble within the process zone in front of the inclusion, defined by a zone of intense grain size reduction due to dynamic recrystallization. In CS tests a narrow shear zone developed in front of the inclusion, whereas in CSR experiments the deformation is more heterogeneously distributed, up to g=3.. In the later, secondary foliations oblique to the process zone and alternating thin, high-strain layers are common. In samples deformed at the same shear strain (g=1), the average recrystallized grain size in the process zone is similar for CS and CSR conditions. Crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) measurements shows that different grain sizes have slightly different CPO patterns. CPO strength varies for different grain sizes, with a CPO strength peak between 40-50 μm, decreasing progressively within smaller grain size, but with secondary peaks for different coarse-grained sizes. Our observations suggest that the initial formation and transient deformation of shear zones is strongly affected by loading conditions.

  10. Revealing heterogeneous nucleation of primary Si and eutectic Si by AlP in hypereutectic Al-Si alloys

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiehua; Hage, Fredrik S.; Liu, Xiangfa; Ramasse, Quentin; Schumacher, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The heterogeneous nucleation of primary Si and eutectic Si can be attributed to the presence of AlP. Although P, in the form of AlP particles, is usually observed in the centre of primary Si, there is still a lack of detailed investigations on the distribution of P within primary Si and eutectic Si in hypereutectic Al-Si alloys at the atomic scale. Here, we report an atomic-scale experimental investigation on the distribution of P in hypereutectic Al-Si alloys. P, in the form of AlP particles, was observed in the centre of primary Si. However, no significant amount of P was detected within primary Si, eutectic Si and the Al matrix. Instead, P was observed at the interface between the Al matrix and eutectic Si, strongly indicating that P, in the form of AlP particles (or AlP ‘patch’ dependent on the P concentration), may have nucleated on the surface of the Al matrix and thereby enhanced the heterogeneous nucleation of eutectic Si. The present investigation reveals some novel insights into heterogeneous nucleation of primary Si and eutectic Si by AlP in hypereutectic Al-Si alloys and can be used to further develop heterogeneous nucleation mechanisms based on adsorption. PMID:27120994

  11. Revealing heterogeneous nucleation of primary Si and eutectic Si by AlP in hypereutectic Al-Si alloys.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiehua; Hage, Fredrik S; Liu, Xiangfa; Ramasse, Quentin; Schumacher, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The heterogeneous nucleation of primary Si and eutectic Si can be attributed to the presence of AlP. Although P, in the form of AlP particles, is usually observed in the centre of primary Si, there is still a lack of detailed investigations on the distribution of P within primary Si and eutectic Si in hypereutectic Al-Si alloys at the atomic scale. Here, we report an atomic-scale experimental investigation on the distribution of P in hypereutectic Al-Si alloys. P, in the form of AlP particles, was observed in the centre of primary Si. However, no significant amount of P was detected within primary Si, eutectic Si and the Al matrix. Instead, P was observed at the interface between the Al matrix and eutectic Si, strongly indicating that P, in the form of AlP particles (or AlP 'patch' dependent on the P concentration), may have nucleated on the surface of the Al matrix and thereby enhanced the heterogeneous nucleation of eutectic Si. The present investigation reveals some novel insights into heterogeneous nucleation of primary Si and eutectic Si by AlP in hypereutectic Al-Si alloys and can be used to further develop heterogeneous nucleation mechanisms based on adsorption. PMID:27120994

  12. Revealing heterogeneous nucleation of primary Si and eutectic Si by AlP in hypereutectic Al-Si alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiehua; Hage, Fredrik S.; Liu, Xiangfa; Ramasse, Quentin; Schumacher, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The heterogeneous nucleation of primary Si and eutectic Si can be attributed to the presence of AlP. Although P, in the form of AlP particles, is usually observed in the centre of primary Si, there is still a lack of detailed investigations on the distribution of P within primary Si and eutectic Si in hypereutectic Al-Si alloys at the atomic scale. Here, we report an atomic-scale experimental investigation on the distribution of P in hypereutectic Al-Si alloys. P, in the form of AlP particles, was observed in the centre of primary Si. However, no significant amount of P was detected within primary Si, eutectic Si and the Al matrix. Instead, P was observed at the interface between the Al matrix and eutectic Si, strongly indicating that P, in the form of AlP particles (or AlP ‘patch’ dependent on the P concentration), may have nucleated on the surface of the Al matrix and thereby enhanced the heterogeneous nucleation of eutectic Si. The present investigation reveals some novel insights into heterogeneous nucleation of primary Si and eutectic Si by AlP in hypereutectic Al-Si alloys and can be used to further develop heterogeneous nucleation mechanisms based on adsorption.

  13. Heterogeneous-nucleation and glass-formation studies of 56Ga2O3-44CaO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, Edwin C.; Curreri, Peter A.; Pline, David

    1987-01-01

    Glass formation and heterogeneous crystallization are described for the reluctant-glass-forming 56Ga2O3-44CaO eutectic composition. The times and temperatures for nucleation at various cooling rates and experimental conditions were measured and empirical continuous-cooling-crystallization boundaries were constructed for various heterogeneous nucleation processes. A definition for an empirical critical cooling rate to form a glass from reluctant borderline glass formers is proposed, i.e., the cooling rate that results in glass formation in 95 percent of the quenching experiments.

  14. Epitaxy versus oriented heterogeneous nucleation of organic crystals on ionic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, K. R.; Shlichta, P. J.; Wilcox, W. R.; Lefever, R. A.

    1997-04-01

    It is plausible to assume that epitaxy is a special case of heterogeneous nucleation in which a restrictive crystallographic relationship exists between substrate and deposit orientations. This would mean that epitaxial substrates should always induce a perceptible reduction in the critical supercooling for nucleation of the deposit. To test this hypothesis, the critical supercoolings of six organic compounds were measured on glass and 11 single-crystal cleaved substrates including (0001) graphite, (001) mica, (111) BaF 2, SrF 2, and CaF 2, and (100) KCl, KBr, KI, NaCl, NaF, and LiF. Reductions in supercooling (with reference to glass substrates) were checked many times for repeatability and reproducibility and shown in almost all cases to have a standard deviation of 1 C or less. Acetanilide, benzoic acid, and p-bromochlorobenzene showed a wide range of supercooling reductions and were oriented on all crystalline substrates. Naphthalene and p-dibromobenzene showed only slight supercooling reductions but were oriented on all substrates, including glass. Benzil showed strong supercooling reductions only for mica and KI but was oriented not only in these cases but also with KI, BaF 2, CaF 2, and graphite. There was little correlation between degree of lattice match and either supercooling reduction or degree of preferred orientation. These results suggest that, for the systems and geometry studied, forces such as molecular dipole binding and growth anisotropy had a stronger effect than lattice match.

  15. ZnO nanoparticles favours heterogeneous nucleation in PET-ZnO nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Harshita; Awasthi, Kamlendra; Saraswat, Yogendra K.; Saraswat, Vibhav K.

    2015-07-01

    The structural and chemical properties with non-isothermal crystallization kinetics of PET-ZnO nanocomposites have been reported in this article. ZnO nanoparticles have been synthesized via chemical route with average diameter 19 nm which made confirm by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometer (XRD) techniques. PET-ZnO nanocomposites have been prepared by solution casting method. The structural and chemical changes occurred in poly (ethylene terephthalate) after inclusion of ZnO nanoparticles have been studied with the help of XRD and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, respectively. It was observed from differential scanning calorimeter that ZnO nanoparticles work as nucleating agent for heterogeneous nucleation in PET matrix under non-isothermal crystallization process. The combined Avrami and Ozawa models have been proved adequate to explain non-isothermal crystallization kinetics of PET-ZnO nanocomposites, and also, ZnO nanoparticles have been caused to reduce crystallization activation energy in pristine PET as per the applied Kissinger model.

  16. Heterogeneous nucleation of Al melt in symmetrical or asymmetrical confined nanoslits.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuyan; Liu, Sida; Wang, Long; Li, Yifan; Wu, Weikang; Duan, Yunrui; Li, Hui

    2016-06-16

    MD simulations are performed to study the solidification of Al melt in confined nanoslits (NSs) constructed by identical or different substrates, as well as on Fe substrates. Compared to the single substrate, the confined NS could promote the crystallization of Al melt, and its size has a significant impact on the solidified structure. In symmetrical NSs, liquid Al atoms would stack based on the atomic arrangement mode of the substrate, however in asymmetrical confined NSs, the atomic arrangement mode of liquid Al is governed by the constitution of asymmetrical substrates. Specifically, for the NS formed by Fe(110) and Fe(111) substrates, the induced region from the Fe(110) substrate is much bigger than that from Fe(111). Moreover, the freezing of liquid Al in asymmetrical NSs constructed from copper and iron has also been studied. These results throw light on heterogeneous nucleation in confined space. PMID:27272439

  17. A case of type I polar stratospheric cloud formation by heterogeneous nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Ferry, G. V.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Goodman, J.; Dye, J. E.; Baumgardner, D.; Gandrud, B. W.

    1992-01-01

    The NASA ER-2 aircraft flew on January 24, 1989, from Stavanger to Spitsbergen, Norway, at the 430-440 K potential temperature surface (19.2-19.8 km pressure altitude). Aerosols were sampled continuously by an optical particle counter (PMS-FSSP300) for concentration and size analyses, and during five 10-min intervals by four wire and one replicator impactor for concentration, size, composition, and phase analysis. During sampling, the air saturation of H2O with respect to ice changed from 20 to 100 percent, and of HNO3 with respect to nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) from subsaturation to supersaturation. Data from both instruments indicate a condensation of hydrochloric acid and, later, nitric acid on the background aerosol particles as the ambient temperature decreases along the flight track. This heterogeneous nucleation mechanism generates type I polar stratospheric cloud particles of 10-fold enhanced optical depth, which could play a role in stratospheric ozone depletion.

  18. Heterogeneous nucleation of Al melt in symmetrical or asymmetrical confined nanoslits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xuyan; Liu, Sida; Wang, Long; Li, Yifan; Wu, Weikang; Duan, Yunrui; Li, Hui

    2016-06-01

    MD simulations are performed to study the solidification of Al melt in confined nanoslits (NSs) constructed by identical or different substrates, as well as on Fe substrates. Compared to the single substrate, the confined NS could promote the crystallization of Al melt, and its size has a significant impact on the solidified structure. In symmetrical NSs, liquid Al atoms would stack based on the atomic arrangement mode of the substrate, however in asymmetrical confined NSs, the atomic arrangement mode of liquid Al is governed by the constitution of asymmetrical substrates. Specifically, for the NS formed by Fe(110) and Fe(111) substrates, the induced region from the Fe(110) substrate is much bigger than that from Fe(111). Moreover, the freezing of liquid Al in asymmetrical NSs constructed from copper and iron has also been studied. These results throw light on heterogeneous nucleation in confined space.

  19. Strain Heterogeneity and Damage Nucleation at Grain Boundaries during Monotonic Deformation in Commercial Purity Titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Bieler, T. R.; Crimp, M. A.; Yang, Y.; Eisenlohr, P.; Mason, D. E.; Liu, W.; Ice, Gene E

    2009-01-01

    Heteroeneous strain was analyzed in polycrystalline, commercial-purity titanium using many experimental techniques that provide information about microstructure, dislocation arrangement, grain orientation, orientation gradients, surface topography, and local strain gradients. The recrystallized microstructure with 50-200 ?m grains was extensively characterized before and after deformation using 4-point bending to strains between 2% and 15%. Extremely heterogeneous deformation occurred along some grain boundaries, leading to orientation gradients exceeding 10{sup o} over 10-20 {micro}m. Patches of highly characterized microstructure were modeled using crystal plasticity finite element (CPFE) analysis to simulate the deformation to evaluate the ability of the CPFE model to capture local deformation processes. Damage nucleation events were identified that are associated with twin interactions with grain boundaries. Progress toward identifying fracture initiation criteria based upon slip and twin interactions with grain boundaries is illustrated with related CPFE simulations of deformation in a TiAl alloy.

  20. Transformation of truncated gold octahedrons into triangular nanoprisms through the heterogeneous nucleation of silver.

    PubMed

    Gilroy, K D; Sundar, A; Hajfathalian, M; Yaghoubzade, A; Tan, T; Sil, D; Borguet, E; Hughes, R A; Neretina, S

    2015-04-21

    Described is a straightforward procedure for forming organized substrate-immobilized nanoprisms which are single crystalline, surfactant-free and which form a heteroepitaxial relationship with the underlying substrate. The devised route utilizes truncated Au octahedrons formed through solid state dewetting techniques as high temperature heterogeneous nucleation sites for Ag adatoms which are arriving to the substrate surface in the vapour phase. Observed is a morphological and compositional transformation of the Au structures to triangular nanoprisms comprised of a homogeneous AuAg alloy. During this transformation, the localized surface plasmon resonance red-shifts, broadens and increases in strength. The shape transformation, which cannot be rationalized using thermodynamic arguments dependent on the surface energy minimization, is described in terms of a kinetically driven growth mode, previously predicted by molecular dynamic simulations. The so-formed structures, when coated with a thin layer of Pd, are demonstrated as plasmonic sensing elements for hydrogen detection. PMID:25807181

  1. Transformation of truncated gold octahedrons into triangular nanoprisms through the heterogeneous nucleation of silver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilroy, K. D.; Sundar, A.; Hajfathalian, M.; Yaghoubzade, A.; Tan, T.; Sil, D.; Borguet, E.; Hughes, R. A.; Neretina, S.

    2015-04-01

    Described is a straightforward procedure for forming organized substrate-immobilized nanoprisms which are single crystalline, surfactant-free and which form a heteroepitaxial relationship with the underlying substrate. The devised route utilizes truncated Au octahedrons formed through solid state dewetting techniques as high temperature heterogeneous nucleation sites for Ag adatoms which are arriving to the substrate surface in the vapour phase. Observed is a morphological and compositional transformation of the Au structures to triangular nanoprisms comprised of a homogeneous AuAg alloy. During this transformation, the localized surface plasmon resonance red-shifts, broadens and increases in strength. The shape transformation, which cannot be rationalized using thermodynamic arguments dependent on the surface energy minimization, is described in terms of a kinetically driven growth mode, previously predicted by molecular dynamic simulations. The so-formed structures, when coated with a thin layer of Pd, are demonstrated as plasmonic sensing elements for hydrogen detection.Described is a straightforward procedure for forming organized substrate-immobilized nanoprisms which are single crystalline, surfactant-free and which form a heteroepitaxial relationship with the underlying substrate. The devised route utilizes truncated Au octahedrons formed through solid state dewetting techniques as high temperature heterogeneous nucleation sites for Ag adatoms which are arriving to the substrate surface in the vapour phase. Observed is a morphological and compositional transformation of the Au structures to triangular nanoprisms comprised of a homogeneous AuAg alloy. During this transformation, the localized surface plasmon resonance red-shifts, broadens and increases in strength. The shape transformation, which cannot be rationalized using thermodynamic arguments dependent on the surface energy minimization, is described in terms of a kinetically driven growth mode

  2. Line-tension-induced scenario of heterogeneous nucleation on a spherical substrate and in a spherical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamatsu, Masao

    2015-07-01

    Line-tension-induced scenario of heterogeneous nucleation is studied for a lens-shaped nucleus with a finite contact angle nucleated on a spherical substrate and on the bottom of the wall of a spherical cavity. The effect of line tension on the free energy of a critical nucleus can be separated from the usual volume term. By comparing the free energy of a lens-shaped critical nucleus of a finite contact angle with that of a spherical nucleus, we find that a spherical nucleus may have a lower free energy than a lens-shaped nucleus when the line tension is positive and large, which is similar to the drying transition predicted by Widom [B. Widom, J. Phys. Chem. 99, 2803 (1995)]. Then, the homogeneous nucleation rather than the heterogeneous nucleation will be favorable. Similarly, the free energy of a lens-shaped nucleus becomes negative when the line tension is negative and large. Then, the barrier-less nucleation with no thermal activation called athermal nucleation will be realized.

  3. Heterogeneous nucleation as the predominant mode of crystallization in natural magmas: numerical model and implications for crystal-melt interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Špillar, Václav; Dolejš, David

    2015-01-01

    Crystallization of natural magmas is inherently a disequilibrium process, which involves nucleation and growth kinetics, melt-crystal mechanical interactions and subsolidus modifications, which are all recorded in the resulting rock texture. We use a new high-resolution three-dimensional numerical model to address the significance and consequences of homogeneous versus heterogeneous crystal nucleation in silicate magmas. With increasing amount of heterogeneous nuclei during crystallization, initially equigranular textures evolve to porphyritic, bimodal and spherulitic types. The corresponding crystal size distributions (CSDs) become concave-up curved, the clustering index progressively decreases, and the grain contact relationships record increased clustering. Concave-up curved CSDs previously interpreted as resulting from multistage crystallization, mixing of crystal populations, grain agglomeration, or size-dependent growth are now predicted, consistently with other size, spatial and clustering parameters, to form by heterogeneous crystal nucleation. Correlation relationships between various textural parameters and the fraction of heterogeneous nuclei are calibrated and used on representative volcanic and plutonic rocks, including cumulate rocks, to deduce the fraction of heterogeneous nuclei. The results indicate that ~60 to ~99 % of all nuclei are heterogeneous. For plutonic and cumulate rocks, the estimate of the heterogeneous nuclei fraction based on the clustering index is significantly lower than other estimates. Such discrepancies, in general, point to the occurrence of other processes, and here, the results imply that crystal-mush compaction and interstitial melt extraction were involved during the magma solidification. Formation of crystals in clusters, implicit for heterogeneous nucleation, implies that greater efficiency of crystal-melt separation is expected in these situations.

  4. Effect of Manganese Sulphide Size on the Precipitation of Tin Heterogeneous Nucleation in as-Cast Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guilin; Song, Bo; Tao, Sufen; Cai, Zeyun

    2015-05-01

    Tramp elements in steels such as tin have been thought harmful because of the hot brittleness at grain boundaries and will be enriched in new steels because of difficulty of removal. It has been an important and difficult matter for metallurgist to use these elements. In the present paper, the as-cast steel containing high concentration of tin is prepared in laboratory and tin precipitates at the manganese sulphide inclusions have been found. A theoretical model is established to calculate the size of manganese sulphide inclusions acted as the heterogeneous nucleation site of tin precipitation. The results show that the inclusions with the smaller contact angle between tin precipitate is more advantageous to be the nucleus of tin heterogeneous nucleation. In this experiment, the manganese sulphide inclusions whose size is 2~4 μm in diameter can act as the nuclei of the nucleation of tin precipitation.

  5. Laboratory Measurements on Heterogeneous Nucleation and Growth of Water Vapor on Meteor Smoke Particle Analogues under Conditions of the Mesopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duft, D.; Nachbar, M.; Wilms, H.; Rapp, M.; Leisner, T.

    2014-12-01

    Heterogeneous nucleation of water vapor on charged nanometer sized (radius< 2nm) meteor smoke particles (MSP) is believed to be the dominating nucleation process in the mesopause region leading to the formation of polar mesospheric clouds (PMC). However, application of classical nucleation theory to the cold conditions of the polar summer mesopause comprises large uncertainties giving rise to strongly variant model predictions of PMC formation. To reduce these uncertainties laboratory measurements of nucleation and growth rates are required. We use an electrodynamic trap to investigate the nucleation and growth of water vapor on singly charged sub-3nm MSP analogues in the laboratory under mesospheric conditions typical during PMC growth initiation. The particles are created in a microwave plasma particle source and stored in a quadrupole ion trap under mesospheric pressure and temperature, where they are subjected to the high supersaturation necessary for nucleation and growth on nanometer sized particles. The particle mass and mass change by water accretion is monitored with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer as a function of residence time under supersaturated conditions. In this contribution we present for the first time measurements of nucleation and growth rates of water vapor on MSP analogues with an initial radius between 1.5nm and 3 nm. Contact parameter, sticking coefficient as well as charge effects on vapor pressure of small particles at mesospheric conditions are presented. These parameters are essential for the microphysical understanding and further global model calculations of PMC formation.

  6. Heterogeneous Nucleation of n-Butanol Vapor on Submicrometer Particles of SiO2 and TiO2.

    PubMed

    Chen; Huang; Tao

    1999-03-15

    Condensation of a supersaturated vapor of n-butanol on monodisperse submicrometer particles is investigated in a flow cloud chamber (FCC). The size dependence of critical supersaturation in the range of 20 to 90 nm is experimentally determined. Two types of aerosol, SiO2 and TiO2, are tested. The results show that both aerosols induce heterogeneous nucleation better than perfectly wetted particles. The experimental critical supersaturation is smaller than that predicted by the Fletcher version of Volmer theory of heterogeneous nucleation even with the line tension and surface diffusion taken into account and has a size dependence in qualitative agreement with that theoretically predicted but to a lesser degree. The discrepancy can not be fully accounted for by the effects of line tension and surface diffusion and the existing theory concerning the curvature-dependent physical properties. The law of corresponding states was extended to the heterogeneous nucleation, and a simple correlation was observed. We conclude that the macroscopic theory of heterogeneous nucleation leads to a prediction of critical supersaturation higher than that experimentally measured. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:10049535

  7. Heterogeneous Nucleation and Growth of Barium Sulfate at Organic-Water Interfaces: Interplay between Surface Hydrophobicity and Ba(2+) Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chong; Stack, Andrew G; Koishi, Ayumi; Fernandez-Martinez, Alejandro; Lee, Sang Soo; Hu, Yandi

    2016-05-31

    Barium sulfate (BaSO4) is a common scale-forming mineral in natural and engineered systems, yet the rates and mechanisms of heterogeneous BaSO4 nucleation are not understood. To address these, we created idealized interfaces on which to study heterogeneous nucleation rates and mechanisms, which also are good models for organic-water interfaces: self-assembled thin films terminated with different functional groups (i.e., -COOH, -SH, or mixed -SH & COOH) coated on glass slides. BaSO4 precipitation on coatings from Barite-supersaturated solutions (saturation index, SI, = 1.1) was investigated using grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering. After reaction for 1 h, a little amount of BaSO4 formed on hydrophilic bare and -COOH coated glasses. Meanwhile, BaSO4 nucleation was significantly promoted on hydrophobic -SH and mixed -SH & COOH coatings. This is because substrate hydrophobicity likely affected the interfacial energy and hence thermodynamic favorability of heterogeneous nucleation. The heterogeneous BaSO4 nucleation and growth kinetics were found to be affected by the amount of Ba(2+) adsorption onto the substrate and incipient BaSO4 nuclei. The importance of Ba(2+) adsorption was further corroborated by the finding that precipitation rate increased under [Ba(2+)]/[SO4(2-)] concentration ratios >1. These observations suggest that thermodynamic favorability for nucleation is governed by substrate-water interfacial energy, while given favorable thermodynamics, the rate is governed by ion attachment to substrates and incipient nuclei. PMID:27163157

  8. Aluminum affects heterogeneous Fe(III) (Hydr)oxide nucleation, growth, and ostwald ripening.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yandi; Li, Qingyun; Lee, Byeongdu; Jun, Young-Shin

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneous coprecipitation of iron and aluminum oxides is an important process for pollutant immobilization and removal in natural and engineered aqueous environments. Here, using a synchrotron-based small-angle X-ray scattering technique, we studied heterogeneous nucleation and growth of Fe(III) (hydr)oxide on quartz under conditions found in acid mine drainage (at pH = 3.7 ± 0.2, [Fe(3+)] = 10(-4) M) with different initial aqueous Al/Fe ratios (0:1, 1:1, and 5:1). Interestingly, although the atomic ratios of Al/Fe in the newly formed Fe(III) (hydr)oxide precipitates were less than 1%, the in situ particle size and volume evolutions of the precipitates on quartz were significantly influenced by aqueous Al/Fe ratios. At the end of the 3 h experiments, with aqueous Al/Fe ratios of 0:1, 1:1, and 5:1, the average radii of gyration of particles on quartz were 5.7 ± 0.3, 4.6 ± 0.1, and 3.7 ± 0.3 nm, respectively, and the ratio of total particle volumes on quartz was 1.7:3.4:1.0. The Fe(III) (hydr)oxide precipitates were poorly crystallized, and were positively charged in all solutions. In the presence of Al(3+), Al(3+) adsorption onto quartz changed the surface charge of quartz from negative to positive, which caused the slower heterogeneous growth of Fe(III) (hydr)oxide on quartz. Furthermore, Al affected the amount of water included in the Fe(III) (hydr)oxides, which can influence their adsorption capacity. This study yielded important information usable for pollutant removal not only in natural environments, but also in engineered water treatment processes. PMID:24289329

  9. Heterogeneous chemistry of atmospheric mineral dust particles and their resulting cloud-nucleation properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Ryan Christopher

    Mineral dust particles are a major component of tropospheric aerosol mass and affect regional and global atmospheric chemistry and climate. Dust particles experience heterogeneous reactions with atmospheric gases that alter the gas and particle-phase chemistry. These in turn influence the warm and cold cloud nucleation ability and optical properties of the dust particles. This dissertation investigates the atmospheric chemistry of mineral dust particles and their role in warm cloud nucleation through a combination of synergistic field measurements, laboratory experiments, and theoretical modeling. In-situ measurements made with a single-particle mass spectrometer during the ACE-Asia field campaign in 2001 provide the motivation for this work. The observed mixing state of the individual ambient particles with secondary organic and inorganic components is described in Chapter 2. A large Asian dust storm occurred during the campaign and produced dramatic changes in the aerosol's composition and mixing state. The effect of particle size and mineralogy on the atmospheric processing of individual dust particles is explored in Chapters 3 & 4. Sulfate was found to accumulate preferentially in submicron iron and aluminosilicate-rich dust particles, while nitrate and chloride were enriched in supermicron calcite-rich dust. The mineral dust (and sea salt particles) were also enriched in oxalic acid, the dominant component of water soluble organic carbon. Chapter 5 explores the roles of gas-phase photochemistry and partitioning of the diacids to the alkaline particles in producing this unique behavior. The effect of the dust's mixing state with secondary organic and inorganic components on the dust particles' solubility, hygroscopicity, and thus warm cloud nucleation properties is explored experimentally and theoretically in Chapter 6. Cloud condensation nucleation (CCN) activation curves revealed that while calcium nitrate and calcium chloride particles were very hygroscopic

  10. Laboratory measurements of heterogeneous CO2 ice nucleation on nanoparticles under conditions relevant to the Martian mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachbar, Mario; Duft, Denis; Mangan, Thomas Peter; Martin, Juan Carlos Gomez; Plane, John M. C.; Leisner, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Clouds of CO2 ice particles have been observed in the Martian mesosphere. These clouds are believed to be formed through heterogeneous nucleation of CO2 on nanometer-sized meteoric smoke particles (MSPs) or upward propagated Martian dust particles (MDPs). Large uncertainties still exist in parameterizing the microphysical formation process of these clouds as key physicochemical parameters are not well known. We present measurements on the nucleation and growth of CO2 ice on sub-4 nm radius iron oxide and silica particles representing MSPs at conditions close to the mesosphere of Mars. For both particle materials we determine the desorption energy of CO2 to be ΔFdes = (18.5 ± 0.2) kJ mol-1 corresponding to ΔFdes = (0.192 ± 0.002) eV and obtain m = 0.78 ± 0.02 for the contact parameter that governs heterogeneous nucleation by analyzing the measurements using classical heterogeneous nucleation theory. We did not find any temperature dependence for the contact parameter in the temperature range examined (64 K to 73 K). By applying these values for MSPs in the Martian mesosphere, we derive characteristic temperatures for the onset of CO2 ice nucleation, which are 8-18 K below the CO2 frost point temperature, depending on particle size. This is in line with the occurrence of highly supersaturated conditions extending to 20 K below frost point temperature without the observation of clouds. Moreover, the sticking coefficient of CO2 on solid CO2 was determined to be near unity. We further argue that the same parameters can be applied to CO2 nucleation on upward propagated MDPs.

  11. Laboratory Experiments on Heterogeneous CO2 Ice Nucleation and Growth Rates on Meteor Smoke Particle Analogues in the Martian Mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachbar, M.; Duft, D.; Mangan, T.; Gomez Martin, J. C.; Plane, J. M. C.; Leisner, T.

    2014-12-01

    CO2 ice particles with radii of about 100 nm have been detected in the Martian mesosphere region at heights between 80 km and 100 km. Gravity waves propagating upward cause a cooling of this region leading to temporary supersaturated conditions during which heterogeneous nucleation of CO2 can take place. Large uncertainties in describing the nucleation processes at the extreme conditions of the Martian mesopause region state the need of laboratory measurements. Sub-3 nanometer radius meteor smoke particle (MSP) analogues are created in a microwave plasma and stored in an electrodynamic trap for examining CO2 ice nucleation as well as growth rates at low particle temperatures between 60 K and 75 K and CO2 concentrations up to 1017 m-3 which are reasonably close to conditions present in the Martian mesosphere. Ice nucleation and growth processes of the particles are examined by analyzing the mass distribution of the particles with a time of flight spectrometer as a function of the residence time under supersaturated conditions. In this paper, first measurements of CO2 ice nucleation and growth on iron oxide and silicate particles will be presented. These results are extrapolated to realistic Martian conditions reducing the large uncertainty in dealing with CO2 ice nucleation on MSPs.

  12. In Situ Determination of Interfacial Energies between Heterogeneously Nucleated CaCO 3 and Quartz Substrates: Thermodynamics of CO 2 Mineral Trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Martinez, Alejandro; Hu, Yandi; Lee, Byeongdu; Jun, Young-Shin; Waychunas, Glenn A.

    2013-01-02

    The precipitation of carbonate minerals—mineral trapping—is considered one of the safest sequestration mechanisms ensuring long-term geologic storage of CO{sub 2}. However, little is known about the thermodynamic factors controlling the extent of heterogeneous nucleation at mineral surfaces exposed to the fluids in porous reservoirs. The goal of this study is to determine the thermodynamic factors controlling heterogeneous nucleation of carbonate minerals on pristine quartz (100) surfaces, which are assumed representative of sandstone reservoirs. To probe CaCO{sub 3} nucleation on quartz (100) in solution and with nanoscale resolution, an in situ grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering technique has been utilized. With this method, a value of α = 36 ± 5 mJ/m{sup 2} for the effective interfacial free energy governing heterogeneous nucleation of CaCO{sub 3} has been obtained by measuring nucleation rates at different solution supersaturations. This value is lower than the interfacial energy governing calcite homogeneous nucleation (α ≈ 120 mJ/m{sup 2}), suggesting that heterogeneous nucleation of calcium carbonate is favored on quartz (100) at ambient pressure and temperature conditions, with nucleation barriers between 2.5% and 15% lower than those expected for homogeneous nucleation. These observations yield important quantitative parameters readily usable in reactive transport models of nucleation at the reservoir scale.

  13. Heterogeneous nucleation of the primary phase in the rapid solidification of Al-4.5wt%Cu alloy droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maitre, A.; Bogno, A.-A.; Bedel, M.; Reinhart, G.; Henein, H.

    2015-06-01

    This paper reports on rapid solidification of Al-Cu alloys. A heterogeneous nucleation/growth model coupled with a thermal model of a falling droplet through a stagnant gas was developed. The primary undercooling as well as the number of nucleation points was compared with Al-Cu alloy droplets produced by Impulse Atomization (IA). Based on experimental results from Neutron Diffraction, secondary (eutectic) phases were obtained. Then, primary and secondary undercoolings were estimated using the metastable extensions of solidus and liquidus lines calculated by Thermo-Calc. Moreover, Synchrotron X-ray microtomography has been performed on Al-4.5wt%Cu droplets. The undercoolings are in good agreement. Results also evidence the presence of one nucleation point and are in agreement with the experimental observations.

  14. Parameterization of heterogeneous ice nucleation on mineral dust particles: An application in a regional scale model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemand, M.; Vogel, B.; Vogel, H.; Connolly, P.; Klein, H.; Bingemer, H.; Hoose, C.; Moehler, O.; Leisner, T.

    2010-12-01

    In climate and weather models, the quantitative description of aerosol and cloud processes relies on simplified assumptions. This contributes major uncertainties to the prediction of global and regional climate change. The parameterization of heterogeneous ice nucleation is a step towards improving our current knowledge of the importance of the cloud ice phase in weather and climate models and can aid in the theoretical understanding of such processes. This contribution presents a new parameterization derived from a large number of experiments carried out at the aerosol and cloud chamber facility AIDA [1] of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. AIDA is especially suitable to study ice nucleation processes at tropospheric and stratospheric cloud conditions covering a wide range of temperature and pressure. During pumping expansion, cooling rates between -0.3 and -5.0 K/min, equating to vertical wind velocities of 0.5 to 8 m/s, and a relative humidity range of up to more than 200% with respect to ice can be reached. The parameterization is valid for the temperature range -35°C to -15°C. In order to derive and test the parameterization a parameter called the ice-active surface site density was calculated for a number of different experiments with mineral dust acting as ice nuclei in the immersion and/or deposition mode. An exponential function was fitted to this data of ice-active surface site density vs. temperature. The curve fit was then used within the bin microphysical model ACPIM [2] to simulate the ice formation rates from the experiments. The major dust outbreak over the Sahara in May 2008 which was followed by a dust transport over the Mediterranean and Western Europe was simulated using the regional scale online coupled model system COSMO-ART (Vogel et al., 2009). Based on the model results the exponential curve fit was used to calculate the ice nuclei number concentration at Kleiner Feldberg (Germany). The results will be compared to measurements from

  15. A theory-based parameterization for heterogeneous ice nucleation and implications for the simulation of ice processes in atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savre, J.; Ekman, A. M. L.

    2015-05-01

    A new parameterization for heterogeneous ice nucleation constrained by laboratory data and based on classical nucleation theory is introduced. Key features of the parameterization include the following: a consistent and modular modeling framework for treating condensation/immersion and deposition freezing, the possibility to consider various potential ice nucleating particle types (e.g., dust, black carbon, and bacteria), and the possibility to account for an aerosol size distribution. The ice nucleating ability of each aerosol type is described using a contact angle (θ) probability density function (PDF). A new modeling strategy is described to allow the θ PDF to evolve in time so that the most efficient ice nuclei (associated with the lowest θ values) are progressively removed as they nucleate ice. A computationally efficient quasi Monte Carlo method is used to integrate the computed ice nucleation rates over both size and contact angle distributions. The parameterization is employed in a parcel model, forced by an ensemble of Lagrangian trajectories extracted from a three-dimensional simulation of a springtime low-level Arctic mixed-phase cloud, in order to evaluate the accuracy and convergence of the method using different settings. The same model setup is then employed to examine the importance of various parameters for the simulated ice production. Modeling the time evolution of the θ PDF is found to be particularly crucial; assuming a time-independent θ PDF significantly overestimates the ice nucleation rates. It is stressed that the capacity of black carbon (BC) to form ice in the condensation/immersion freezing mode is highly uncertain, in particular at temperatures warmer than -20°C. In its current version, the parameterization most likely overestimates ice initiation by BC.

  16. Heterogeneous nucleation of supercooled water, and the effect of an added catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Heneghan, A. F.; Wilson, P. W.; Haymet, A. D. J.

    2002-01-01

    The statistics of liquid-to-crystal nucleation are measured rigorously by using a recently developed automated lag-time apparatus (ALTA). A single sample, in this case a sample of pure water both with and without an (insoluble) AgI crystal, is repeatedly cooled, nucleated, and thawed. Analysis of the data, coupled with a second kind of experiment, shows that the statistics of nucleation are consistent with a first-order kinetic mechanism over a wide range of supercooling temperatures. The limitations of classical nucleation theory are exhibited. Our analysis unifies many related experiments in biology, physics, chemistry, and chemical engineering. PMID:12114536

  17. Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation on Kaolinite Particles, Particle Surrogates of HUmic-Like Substances (HULIS), and Organics-Containing Urban Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Knopf, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    Aerosol particles can affect the global radiation budget through aerosol-cloud interactions by acting as cloud condensation nuclei and ice nuclei (IN) thereby inducing new clouds and/or modifying the radiative properties of existing clouds. This study presents heterogeneous ice nucleation data as a function of particle temperature and relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice) for laboratory generated kaolinite particles, leonardite and fulvic acid particles serving as surrogates for aerosols composed of HULIS, and organics-containing urban aerosols collected during the MILAGRO (Mexico City) campaign. These experiments are conducted using an improved version of a previously developed ice nucleation cell coupled to an optical microscope which allows to control particle temperatures between 200-300 K and corresponding atmospherically relevant RHice. Micrometer-sized particles are deposited onto a hydrophobic substrate and are placed in the nucleation cell. To validate the experimental approach and quality of substrates, ice nucleation experiments were performed 1. on plain sample substrates and 2. using a well studied IN: kaolinite particles. The results corroborate that kaolinite particles are efficient IN inducing ice nucleation at 102-120% RHice via deposition mode at temperatures between 200 and 245 K, in agreement with previous studies. The ice nucleation efficiency of leonardite and fulvic acid particles with median diameters of 2-3 µm is determined. Leonardite particles nucleate ice via deposition mode at 120-140% RHice for temperatures between 200 and 240 K with the minimum RHice threshold observed at 220 K. Fulvic acid particles nucleate ice via deposition mode at 135-150% RHice for temperatures between 200 and 230 K with the minimum RHice threshold determined at 216 K. The fulvic acid particles take up water at RH>95% for temperatures between 235 and 250 K. The contact angle derived from experimentally determined heterogeneous ice nucleation rate

  18. Unprecedented Evidence for Large Scale Heterogeneous Nucleation of Polar Stratospheric Clouds, Likely by Nanometer-Sized Meteoritic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, I.; Pitts, M. C.; Luo, B.; Hoyle, C. R.; Zobrist, B.; Jacot, L.; Poole, L. R.; Grooss, J.; Weigel, R.; Borrmann, S.; Ebert, M.; Duprat, J.; Peter, T.

    2012-12-01

    Recent observations cast serious doubts on our understanding of the processes responsible for polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation. PSCs play crucial roles in polar ozone chemistry by hosting heterogeneous reactions and by removal of reactive nitrogen through sedimenting nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) particles. An extensive field campaign took place in the Arctic during the winter 2009/2010 within the European Union project RECONCILE, complemented by measurements from the spaceborne CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization) instrument. Through trajectory and microphysical box model calculations, we analyzed CALIOP data from the RECONCILE winter to investigate the nucleation of PSC particles in detail. One significant finding was that liquid/NAT mixture PSCs were prevalent in late December 2009, a period during which no ice PSCs were observed, and temperatures were higher by 6 K than required for homogeneous ice freezing at the onset of PSC formation. These NAT particles must have formed through some non-ice nucleation mechanism, which runs counter to the widely held view that the only efficient NAT nuclei were ice crystals formed by homogeneous freezing of STS droplets. Furthermore, in mid-January 2010, a large region of the Arctic vortex cooled below the frost point, leading to widespread synoptic-scale ice PSCs, unusual for the Arctic. Our modeling studies indicate that a match with the CALIOP data calls for new heterogeneous nucleation mechanisms for both NAT and ice particles, namely freezing on nanometer-sized, solid nuclei immersed in the liquid stratospheric aerosols. Number concentrations of non-volatile particles were measured in situ during RECONCILE by means of the heated channel of the condensation nuclei (CN) counter COPAS on board of the high-flying aircraft Geophysica. 60-80 % of all CN survived heating to 250 °C. Offline Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis of RECONCILE impactor samples

  19. A first test of the hypothesis of biogenic magnetite-based heterogeneous ice-crystal nucleation in cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Atsuko; Golash, Harry N; Kirschvink, Joseph L

    2016-06-01

    An outstanding biophysical puzzle is focused on the apparent ability of weak, extremely low-frequency oscillating magnetic fields to enhance cryopreservation of many biological tissues. A recent theory holds that these weak magnetic fields could be inhibiting ice-crystal nucleation on the nanocrystals of biological magnetite (Fe3O4, an inverse cubic spinel) that are present in many plant and animal tissues by causing them to oscillate. In this theory, magnetically-induced mechanical oscillations disrupt the ability of water molecules to nucleate on the surface of the magnetite nanocrystals. However, the ability of the magnetite crystal lattice to serve as a template for heterogeneous ice crystal nucleation is as yet unknown, particularly for particles in the 10-100 nm size range. Here we report that the addition of trace-amounts of finely-dispersed magnetite into ultrapure water samples reduces strongly the incidence of supercooling, as measured in experiments conducted using a controlled freezing apparatus with multiple thermocouples. SQUID magnetometry was used to quantify nanogram levels of magnetite in the water samples. We also report a relationship between the volume change of ice, and the degree of supercooling, that may indicate lower degassing during the crystallization of supercooled water. In addition to supporting the role of ice-crystal nucleation by biogenic magnetite in many tissues, magnetite nanocrystals could provide inexpensive, non-toxic, and non-pathogenic ice nucleating agents needed in a variety of industrial processes, as well as influencing the dynamics of ice crystal nucleation in many natural environments. PMID:27087604

  20. Importance of aerosol composition, mixing state, and morphology for heterogeneous ice nucleation: A combined field and laboratory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baustian, Kelly J.; Cziczo, Daniel J.; Wise, Matthew E.; Pratt, Kerri A.; Kulkarni, Gourihar; Hallar, A. Gannet; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    2012-03-01

    In this study chemical compositions of background aerosol and ice nuclei were examined through laboratory investigations using Raman spectroscopy and field measurements by single-particle mass spectrometry. Aerosol sampling took place at Storm Peak Laboratory in Steamboat Springs, Colorado (elevation of 3210 m). A cascade impactor was used to collect coarse-mode aerosol particles for laboratory analysis by Raman spectroscopy; the composition, mixing state, and heterogeneous ice nucleation activity of individual particles were examined. For in situ analysis of fine-mode aerosol, ice nucleation on ambient particles was observed using a compact ice nucleation chamber. Ice crystals were separated from unactivated aerosol using a pumped counterflow virtual impactor, and ice nuclei were analyzed using particle analysis by laser mass spectrometry. For both fine and coarse modes, the ice nucleating particle fractions were enriched in minerals and depleted in sulfates and nitrates, compared to the background aerosol sampled. The vast majority of particles in both the ambient and ice active aerosol fractions contained a detectable amount of organic material. Raman spectroscopy showed that organic material is sometimes present in the form of a coating on the surface of inorganic particles. We find that some organic-containing particles serve as efficient ice nuclei while others do not. For coarse-mode aerosol, organic particles were only observed to initiate ice formation when oxygen signatures were also present in their spectra.

  1. Importance of aerosol composition, mixing state, and morphology for heterogeneous ice nucleation: A combined field and laboratory approach

    SciTech Connect

    Baustian, Kelly J.; Cziczo, Daniel J.; Wise, M. A.; Pratt, Kerri; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Hallar, Anna G.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    2012-03-30

    In this study chemical compositions of background aerosol and ice nuclei were examined through laboratory investigations using Raman spectroscopy and field measurements by single-particle mass spectrometry. Aerosol sampling took place at Storm Peak Laboratory in Steamboat Springs, Colorado (elevation of 3210 m). A cascade impactor was used to collect coarse-mode aerosol particles for laboratory analysis by Raman spectroscopy; the composition, mixing state, and heterogeneous ice nucleation activity of individual particles were examined. For in situ analysis of fine-mode aerosol, ice nucleation on ambient particles was observed using a compact ice nucleation chamber. Ice crystals were separated from unactivated aerosol using a pumped counterflow virtual impactor, and ice nuclei were analyzed using particle analysis by laser mass spectrometry. For both fine and coarse modes, the ice nucleating particle fractions were enriched in minerals and depleted in sulfates and nitrates, compared to the background aerosol sampled. The vast majority of particles in both the ambient and ice active aerosol fractions contained a detectable amount of organic material. Raman spectroscopy showed that organic material is sometimes present in the form of a coating on the surface of inorganic particles. We find that some organic-containing particles serve as efficient ice nuclei while others do not. For coarse-mode aerosol, organic particles were only observed to initiate ice formation when oxygen signatures were also present in their spectra.

  2. Heterogeneous Nucleation of n-Butanol Vapor on Submicrometer Charged and Neutral Particles of Lactose and Monosodium Glutamate.

    PubMed

    Chen; Tao; Shu

    2000-04-01

    Condensation of a supersaturated vapor of n-butanol on monodisperse submicrometer particles of lactose and monosodium glutamate is investigated in a flow cloud chamber (FCC). The dependence of critical supersaturation S(cr) on the particle size in the range 30 to 90 nm is experimentally examined. The results show that the size dependence of S(cr) qualitatively agrees with that predicted by the Fletcher version of the Volmer theory of heterogeneous nucleation, but to a lesser degree. The experimental S(cr) is smaller than the theoretical prediction even with the line tension and surface diffusion taken into account, and they induce heterogeneous nucleation better than perfectly wetted particles. The discrepancy can not be fully accounted for by the effects of line tension and surface diffusion and the existing theory concerning the curvature-dependent surface tension. The condensation on single positive-charged particles of diameter 30, 60, and 90 nm is also examined. A lowering of S(cr) at an efficiency much larger than the prediction by Volmer's theory for ion-induced nucleation is observed, and the charge effect fades away as particle size increases. Copyright 2000 Academic Press. PMID:10708489

  3. Effect of surface free energies on the heterogeneous nucleation of water droplet: a molecular dynamics simulation approach.

    PubMed

    Xu, W; Lan, Z; Peng, B L; Wen, R F; Ma, X H

    2015-02-01

    Heterogeneous nucleation of water droplet on surfaces with different solid-liquid interaction intensities is investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. The interaction potentials between surface atoms and vapor molecules are adjusted to obtain various surface free energies, and the nucleation process and wetting state of nuclei on surfaces are investigated. The results indicate that near-constant contact angles are already established for nano-scale nuclei on various surfaces, with the contact angle decreasing with solid-liquid interaction intensities linearly. Meanwhile, noticeable fluctuation of vapor-liquid interfaces can be observed for the nuclei that deposited on surfaces, which is caused by the asymmetric forces from vapor molecules. The formation and growth rate of nuclei are increasing with the solid-liquid interaction intensities. For low energy surface, the attraction of surface atoms to water molecules is comparably weak, and the pre-existing clusters can depart from the surface and enter into the bulk vapor phase. The distribution of clusters within the bulk vapor phase becomes competitive as compared with that absorbed on surface. For moderate energy surfaces, heterogeneous nucleation predominates and the formation of clusters within bulk vapor phase is suppressed. The effect of high energy particles that embedded in low energy surface is also discussed under the same simulation system. The nucleation preferably initiates on the high energy particles, and the clusters that formed on the heterogeneous particles are trapped around their original positions instead of migrating around as that observed on smooth surfaces. This feature makes it possible for the heterogeneous particles to act as fixed nucleation sites, and simulation results also suggest that the number of nuclei increases monotonously with the number of high energy particles. The growth of nuclei on high energy particles can be divided into three sub-stages, beginning with the formation

  4. Effect of surface free energies on the heterogeneous nucleation of water droplet: A molecular dynamics simulation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.; Lan, Z.; Peng, B. L.; Wen, R. F.; Ma, X. H.

    2015-02-01

    Heterogeneous nucleation of water droplet on surfaces with different solid-liquid interaction intensities is investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. The interaction potentials between surface atoms and vapor molecules are adjusted to obtain various surface free energies, and the nucleation process and wetting state of nuclei on surfaces are investigated. The results indicate that near-constant contact angles are already established for nano-scale nuclei on various surfaces, with the contact angle decreasing with solid-liquid interaction intensities linearly. Meanwhile, noticeable fluctuation of vapor-liquid interfaces can be observed for the nuclei that deposited on surfaces, which is caused by the asymmetric forces from vapor molecules. The formation and growth rate of nuclei are increasing with the solid-liquid interaction intensities. For low energy surface, the attraction of surface atoms to water molecules is comparably weak, and the pre-existing clusters can depart from the surface and enter into the bulk vapor phase. The distribution of clusters within the bulk vapor phase becomes competitive as compared with that absorbed on surface. For moderate energy surfaces, heterogeneous nucleation predominates and the formation of clusters within bulk vapor phase is suppressed. The effect of high energy particles that embedded in low energy surface is also discussed under the same simulation system. The nucleation preferably initiates on the high energy particles, and the clusters that formed on the heterogeneous particles are trapped around their original positions instead of migrating around as that observed on smooth surfaces. This feature makes it possible for the heterogeneous particles to act as fixed nucleation sites, and simulation results also suggest that the number of nuclei increases monotonously with the number of high energy particles. The growth of nuclei on high energy particles can be divided into three sub-stages, beginning with the formation

  5. Effect of surface free energies on the heterogeneous nucleation of water droplet: A molecular dynamics simulation approach

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, W.; Lan, Z.; Peng, B. L.; Wen, R. F.; Ma, X. H.

    2015-02-07

    Heterogeneous nucleation of water droplet on surfaces with different solid-liquid interaction intensities is investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. The interaction potentials between surface atoms and vapor molecules are adjusted to obtain various surface free energies, and the nucleation process and wetting state of nuclei on surfaces are investigated. The results indicate that near-constant contact angles are already established for nano-scale nuclei on various surfaces, with the contact angle decreasing with solid-liquid interaction intensities linearly. Meanwhile, noticeable fluctuation of vapor-liquid interfaces can be observed for the nuclei that deposited on surfaces, which is caused by the asymmetric forces from vapor molecules. The formation and growth rate of nuclei are increasing with the solid-liquid interaction intensities. For low energy surface, the attraction of surface atoms to water molecules is comparably weak, and the pre-existing clusters can depart from the surface and enter into the bulk vapor phase. The distribution of clusters within the bulk vapor phase becomes competitive as compared with that absorbed on surface. For moderate energy surfaces, heterogeneous nucleation predominates and the formation of clusters within bulk vapor phase is suppressed. The effect of high energy particles that embedded in low energy surface is also discussed under the same simulation system. The nucleation preferably initiates on the high energy particles, and the clusters that formed on the heterogeneous particles are trapped around their original positions instead of migrating around as that observed on smooth surfaces. This feature makes it possible for the heterogeneous particles to act as fixed nucleation sites, and simulation results also suggest that the number of nuclei increases monotonously with the number of high energy particles. The growth of nuclei on high energy particles can be divided into three sub-stages, beginning with the formation

  6. New cloud chamber experiments on the heterogeneous ice nucleation ability of oxalic acid in the deposition nucleation and immersion freezing modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moehler, O.; Wagner, R.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Leisner, T.

    2010-12-01

    crystallised from less supersaturated solution droplets and exposed to slow growth conditions in a supersaturated environment in the AIDA camber over a time period of several hours, were found to be much poorer heterogeneous ice nuclei. We speculate that under these conditions a crystal surface structure with less-active sites for the initiation of ice nucleation was generated. Such particles were found to be almost ice-inactive in both the deposition and condensation mode. At times, the heterogeneous ice nucleation ability of oxalic acid dihydrate significantly changed when the particles had been processed in preceding cloud droplet activation steps. Experimental methods, results, and atmospheric implications will be presented and discussed at the conference. [1] Kerminen et al., Atmos. Env., 33, 2089-2100, 1999. [2] Kerminen et al., J. Aerosol Sci., 31, 349-362, 2000. [3] Kawamura et al., Atmos. Env., 30, 1709-1722, 1996. [4] Marcolli et al., J. Phys. Chem. A, 108, 2216-2224, 2004. [5] Zobrist et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys., 6, 3115-3129, 2006. [6] Wagner et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 7617-7641, 2010.

  7. Understanding cirrus ice crystal number variability for different heterogeneous ice nucleation spectra

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sullivan, Sylvia C.; Morales Betancourt, Ricardo; Barahona, Donifan; Nenes, Athanasios

    2016-03-03

    Along with minimizing parameter uncertainty, understanding the cause of temporal and spatial variability of the nucleated ice crystal number, Ni, is key to improving the representation of cirrus clouds in climate models. To this end, sensitivities of Ni to input variables like aerosol number and diameter provide valuable information about nucleation regime and efficiency for a given model formulation. Here we use the adjoint model of the adjoint of a cirrus formation parameterization (Barahona and Nenes, 2009b) to understand Ni variability for various ice-nucleating particle (INP) spectra. Inputs are generated with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5, and simulations are donemore » with a theoretically derived spectrum, an empirical lab-based spectrum and two field-based empirical spectra that differ in the nucleation threshold for black carbon particles and in the active site density for dust. The magnitude and sign of Ni sensitivity to insoluble aerosol number can be directly linked to nucleation regime and efficiency of various INP. The lab-based spectrum calculates much higher INP efficiencies than field-based ones, which reveals a disparity in aerosol surface properties. Ni sensitivity to temperature tends to be low, due to the compensating effects of temperature on INP spectrum parameters; this low temperature sensitivity regime has been experimentally reported before but never deconstructed as done here.« less

  8. Understanding cirrus ice crystal number variability for different heterogeneous ice nucleation spectra

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sullivan, Sylvia C.; Morales Betancourt, Ricardo; Barahona, Donifan; Nenes, Athanasios

    2016-03-03

    Along with minimizing parameter uncertainty, understanding the cause of temporal and spatial variability of the nucleated ice crystal number, Ni, is key to improving the representation of cirrus clouds in climate models. To this end, sensitivities of Ni to input variables like aerosol number and diameter provide valuable information about nucleation regime and efficiency for a given model formulation. Here we use the adjoint model of the adjoint of a cirrus formation parameterization (Barahona and Nenes, 2009b) to understand Ni variability for various ice-nucleating particle (INP) spectra. Inputs are generated with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5, and simulations are donemore » with a theoretically derived spectrum, an empirical lab-based spectrum and two field-based empirical spectra that differ in the nucleation threshold for black carbon particles and in the active site density for dust. The magnitude and sign of Ni sensitivity to insoluble aerosol number can be directly linked to nucleation regime and efficiency of various INP. The lab-based spectrum calculates much higher INP efficiencies than field-based ones, which reveals a disparity in aerosol surface properties. In conclusion, Ni sensitivity to temperature tends to be low, due to the compensating effects of temperature on INP spectrum parameters; this low temperature sensitivity regime has been experimentally reported before but never deconstructed as done here.« less

  9. Understanding cirrus ice crystal number variability for different heterogeneous ice nucleation spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Sylvia C.; Morales Betancourt, Ricardo; Barahona, Donifan; Nenes, Athanasios

    2016-03-01

    Along with minimizing parameter uncertainty, understanding the cause of temporal and spatial variability of the nucleated ice crystal number, Ni, is key to improving the representation of cirrus clouds in climate models. To this end, sensitivities of Ni to input variables like aerosol number and diameter provide valuable information about nucleation regime and efficiency for a given model formulation. Here we use the adjoint model of the adjoint of a cirrus formation parameterization (Barahona and Nenes, 2009b) to understand Ni variability for various ice-nucleating particle (INP) spectra. Inputs are generated with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5, and simulations are done with a theoretically derived spectrum, an empirical lab-based spectrum and two field-based empirical spectra that differ in the nucleation threshold for black carbon particles and in the active site density for dust. The magnitude and sign of Ni sensitivity to insoluble aerosol number can be directly linked to nucleation regime and efficiency of various INP. The lab-based spectrum calculates much higher INP efficiencies than field-based ones, which reveals a disparity in aerosol surface properties. Ni sensitivity to temperature tends to be low, due to the compensating effects of temperature on INP spectrum parameters; this low temperature sensitivity regime has been experimentally reported before but never deconstructed as done here.

  10. Heterogeneous nucleation and growth of water vapor on meteoric smoke particle analogues at mesospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachbar, Mario; Duft, Denis; Leisner, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Sub 2 nm meteoric smoke particles (MSP) produced from the ablation and recondensation of meteoric material are believed to be the major kind of nuclei causing the formation of water ice particles in the mesopause of Earth at heights of 80-90 km. These so called noctiLucent clouds (NLC) are frequently detected during polar summer, whereas the microphysical nucleation process and subsequent growth on such small particles are understood only poorly. Parameterizing these processes results in large uncertainties especially due to a lack of experimental data on desorption energies and critical saturation for the activation of nucleation under realistic mesospheric conditions, which states the need of laboratory measurements. We produce charged nanometer sized (2-3 nm) MSP analogues in a microwave plasma particle source and transfer them to a novel linear ion trap which allows us to trap the particles under typical mesospheric temperatures and H2O concentrations. The adsorption of H2O molecules on the particles surface followed by nucleation and growth can be examined by analyzing the mass distribution of the particles with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer as function of the residence time under supersaturated conditions. In this contribution we present such measurements for single positively as well as negatively charged particles which allow us to determine the desorption energy of water vapor on the investigated nanoparticles as well as the critical saturation needed to activate nucleation and subsequent growth.

  11. Producing Solar Cells By Surface Preparation For Accelerated Nucleation Of Microcrystalline Silicon On Heterogeneous Substrates.

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Liyou; Chen, Liangfan

    1998-03-24

    Attractive multi-junction solar cells and single junction solar cells with excellent conversion efficiency can be produced with a microcrystalline tunnel junction, microcrystalline recombination junction or one or more microcrystalline doped layers by special plasma deposition processes which includes plasma etching with only hydrogen or other specified etchants to enhance microcrystalline growth followed by microcrystalline. nucleation with a doped hydrogen-diluted feedstock.

  12. On the feasibility of cirrus cloud thinning: Dependence of homo- and heterogeneous ice nucleation on latitude and season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, David; Garnier, Anne; Avery, Melody

    2015-04-01

    While GCM testing of cirrus cloud climate engineering (CE) reveals some advantages over stratospheric aerosol injection, cirrus CE will not work when ice is primarily formed through heterogeneous nucleation for T < -38°C. Field campaigns have shown that ice in cold cirrus is generally produced heterogeneously, but these campaigns have not addressed the cirrus at high latitudes that would determine the effectiveness of cirrus CE. This presentation introduces a new understanding of the satellite retrieved "effective absorption optical depth ratio", or βeff, based on the 12.05 and 10.60 μm channels of the imaging infrared radiometer (IIR) aboard the CALIPSO satellite. Using βeff calculations from in situ data, it is found that βeff is tightly related to the N/IWC ratio, where N = ice particle number concentration and IWC = ice water content. This is because N is primarily determined by the smallest ice particles, and βeff is primarily due to differences in wave resonance (i.e. photon tunneling) absorption, a process that is only significant when ice particle maximum dimension D < ~ 60 μm (i.e. when wavelength and effective particle size are comparable). Thus βeff is a measure of the concentration of small (D < 60 μm) ice crystals relative to the concentration of larger ice particles. Since homogeneous ice nucleation generally results in N > 500 liter-1, with a relatively high concentration of small ice crystals, βeff may be used to determine when homogeneous nucleation dominates in a region for T < -38°C. Satellite retrievals of βeff from anvil cirrus having N > 500 liter-1 (based on co-located/coincident in situ measurements) suggest that homogeneous nucleation dominates when βeff > 1.15 ± 0.05. A global analysis of βeff was conducted for the boreal summer (July-Aug.) and winter (Jan.-Feb.) of 2007 and 2008, respectively. Using βeff to discriminate between regions of homo- and heterogeneous ice nucleation for cirrus clouds having emissivities between

  13. Heterogeneous nucleation of entrained eutectic Si in high purity melt spun Al-Si alloys investigated by entrained droplet technique and DSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. H.; Albu, M.; Ludwig, T. H.; Hofer, F.; Arnberg, L.; Schumacher, P.

    2016-03-01

    Entrained droplet technique and DSC analyses were employed to investigate the influence of trace elements of Sr, Eu and P on the heterogeneous nucleation of entrained eutectic Si in high purity melt spun Al-5wt.% Si alloys. Sr and Eu addition was found to exert negative effects on the nucleation process, while an increased undercooling was observed. This can be attributed to the formation of phosphide compounds having a lower free energy and hence may preferentially form compared to AlP. Only a trace P addition was found to have a profound effect on the nucleation process. The nucleation kinetics is discussed on the basis of the classical nucleation theory and the free growth model, respectively. The estimated AlP patch size was found to be sufficient for the free growth of Si to occur within the droplets, which strongly indicates that the nucleation of Si on an AlP patch or AlP particle is a limiting step for free growth. The maximum nucleation site density within one droplet is directly related to the size distribution of AlP particles or AlP patches for Si nucleation, but is independent of the cooling rates. Although the nucleation conditions were optimized in entrained droplet experiments, the observed mechanisms are also valid at moderate cooling conditions, such as in shape casting.

  14. Can we define an asymptotic value for the ice active surface site density for heterogeneous ice nucleation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermeier, Dennis; Augustin-Bauditz, Stefanie; Hartmann, Susan; Wex, Heike; Ignatius, Karoliina; Stratmann, Frank

    2015-04-01

    The formation of ice in atmospheric clouds has a substantial influence on the radiative properties of clouds as well as on the formation of precipitation. Therefore much effort has been made to understand and quantify the major ice formation processes in clouds. Immersion freezing has been suggested to be a dominant primary ice formation process in low and mid-level clouds (mixed-phase cloud conditions). It also has been shown that mineral dust particles are the most abundant ice nucleating particles in the atmosphere and thus may play an important role for atmospheric ice nucleation (Murray et al., 2012). Additionally, biological particles like bacteria and pollen are suggested to be potentially involved in atmospheric ice formation, at least on a regional scale (Murray et al., 2012). In recent studies for biological particles (SNOMAX and birch pollen), it has been demonstrated that freezing is induced by ice nucleating macromolecules and that an asymptotic value for the mass density of these ice nucleating macromolecules can be determined (Hartmann et al., 2013; Augustin et al., 2013, Wex et al., 2014). The question arises whether such an asymptotic value can also be determined for the ice active surface site density ns, a parameter which is commonly used to describe the ice nucleation activity of e.g., mineral dust. Such an asymptotic value for ns could be an important input parameter for atmospheric modeling applications. In the presented study, we therefore investigated the immersion freezing behavior of droplets containing size-segregated, monodisperse feldspar particles utilizing the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS). For all particle sizes considered in the experiments, we observed a leveling off of the frozen droplet fraction reaching a plateau within the heterogeneous freezing temperature regime (T > -38°C) which was proportional to the particle surface area. Based on these findings, we could determine an asymptotic value for the ice

  15. A water activity based model of heterogeneous ice nucleation kinetics for freezing of water and aqueous solution droplets.

    PubMed

    Knopf, Daniel A; Alpert, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    Immersion freezing of water and aqueous solutions by particles acting as ice nuclei (IN) is a common process of heterogeneous ice nucleation which occurs in many environments, especially in the atmosphere where it results in the glaciation of clouds. Here we experimentally show, using a variety of IN types suspended in various aqueous solutions, that immersion freezing temperatures and kinetics can be described solely by temperature, T, and solution water activity, a(w), which is the ratio of the vapour pressure of the solution and the saturation water vapour pressure under the same conditions and, in equilibrium, equivalent to relative humidity (RH). This allows the freezing point and corresponding heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient, J(het), to be uniquely expressed by T and a(w), a result we term the a(w) based immersion freezing model (ABIFM). This method is independent of the nature of the solute and accounts for several varying parameters, including cooling rate and IN surface area, while providing a holistic description of immersion freezing and allowing prediction of freezing temperatures, J(het), frozen fractions, ice particle production rates and numbers. Our findings are based on experimental freezing data collected for various IN surface areas, A, and cooling rates, r, of droplets variously containing marine biogenic material, two soil humic acids, four mineral dusts, and one organic monolayer acting as IN. For all investigated IN types we demonstrate that droplet freezing temperatures increase as A increases. Similarly, droplet freezing temperatures increase as the cooling rate decreases. The log10(J(het)) values for the various IN types derived exclusively by Tand a(w), provide a complete description of the heterogeneous ice nucleation kinetics. Thus, the ABIFM can be applied over the entire range of T, RH, total particulate surface area, and cloud activation timescales typical of atmospheric conditions. Lastly, we demonstrate that ABIFM can

  16. Heterogeneous nucleation and growth dynamics in the light-induced phase transition in vanadium dioxide

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brady, Nathaniel F.; Appavoo, Kannatassen; Seo, Minah; Nag, Joyeeta; Prasankumar, Rohit P.; Haglund, Richard F.; Hilton, David J.

    2016-03-02

    Here we report on ultrafast optical investigations of the light-induced insulator-to-metal phase transition in vanadium dioxide with controlled disorder generated by substrate mismatch. These results reveal common dynamics of this optically-induced phase transition that are independent of this disorder. Lastly, above the fluence threshold for completing the transition to the rutile crystalline phase, we find a common time scale, independent of sample morphology, of 40.5 ± 2 ps that is consistent with nucleation and growth dynamics of the R phase from the parent M1 ground state.

  17. Heterogeneous nucleation and growth dynamics in the light-induced phase transition in vanadium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Brady, Nathaniel F; Appavoo, Kannatassen; Seo, Minah; Nag, Joyeeta; Prasankumar, Rohit P; Haglund, Richard F; Hilton, David J

    2016-03-31

    We report on ultrafast optical investigations of the light-induced insulator-to-metal phase transition in vanadium dioxide with controlled disorder generated by substrate mismatch. These results reveal common dynamics of this optically-induced phase transition that are independent of this disorder. Above the fluence threshold for completing the transition to the rutile crystalline phase, we find a common time scale, independent of sample morphology, of [Formula: see text] ps that is consistent with nucleation and growth dynamics of the R phase from the parent M1 ground state. PMID:26932975

  18. Heterogeneous nucleation and growth dynamics in the light-induced phase transition in vanadium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, Nathaniel F.; Appavoo, Kannatassen; Seo, Minah; Nag, Joyeeta; Prasankumar, Rohit P.; Haglund, Richard F., Jr.; Hilton, David J.

    2016-03-01

    We report on ultrafast optical investigations of the light-induced insulator-to-metal phase transition in vanadium dioxide with controlled disorder generated by substrate mismatch. These results reveal common dynamics of this optically-induced phase transition that are independent of this disorder. Above the fluence threshold for completing the transition to the rutile crystalline phase, we find a common time scale, independent of sample morphology, of 40.5+/- 2 ps that is consistent with nucleation and growth dynamics of the R phase from the parent M1 ground state.

  19. Heterogeneous ice nucleation activity of bacteria: new laboratory experiments at simulated cloud conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möhler, O.; Georgakopoulos, D. G.; Morris, C. E.; Benz, S.; Ebert, V.; Hunsmann, S.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Wagner, R.

    2008-04-01

    The ice nucleation activities of five different Pseudomonas syringae, Pseudomonas viridiflava and Erwinia herbicola bacterial species and of SnomaxTM were investigated in the temperature range between -5 and -15°C. Water suspensions of these bacteria were directly spray into the cloud chamber of the AIDA facility of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe at a temperature of -5.7°. At this temperature, about 1% of the SnomaxTM cells induced freezing of the spray droplets before they evaporated in the cloud chamber. The other suspensions of living cells didn't induce any measurable ice concentration during spray formation at -5.7°. The remaining aerosol was exposed to typical cloud activation conditions in subsequent experiments with expansion cooling to about -11°C. During these experiments, the bacterial cells first acted as cloud condensation nuclei to form cloud droplets and then eventually acted as ice nuclei to freeze the droplets. The results indicate that the bacteria investigated in the present study are mainly ice active in the temperature range between -7 and -11°C with an INA fraction of the order of 10-4. The ice nucleation efficiency of SnomaxTM cells was much larger with an INA fraction of 0.2 at temperatures around -8°C.

  20. Capturing heterogeneous nucleation of nanoscale pits and subsequent crystal shrinkage during Ostwald ripening of a metal phosphate.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sung-Yoon; Kim, Young-Min; Choi, Si-Young; Kim, Jin-Gyu

    2015-01-27

    It has been generally accepted that crystal shrinkage during Ostwald ripening can be understood simply as a reverse process of crystal growth, and as a result, little attention has been paid to shrinkage behavior. The entire microstructure of polycrystalline materials, however, forms as a consequence of both growing and shrinking crystals. Thus, scrutiny of shrinking characteristics in addition to growth aspects is essential for a complete understanding of the evolution of microstructure during Ostwald ripening. By capturing real-time in situ high-resolution electron micrographs at high temperature, we herein demonstrate the shrinkage behavior of nanocrystals embedded in a solid crystalline matrix during the ripening process of a metal phosphate. Unlike typical crystal growth behavior based on two-dimensional homogeneous nucleation, heterogeneous types of nucleation with nanoscale pits at solid-solid interfaces (or crystal edges) are observed to dominantly occur during shrinkage of the crystals. The findings of this study suggest that crystal shrinkage proceeds with a lower activation energy barrier than that of crystal growth, although both crystal growth and shrinkage take place at the same time during Ostwald ripening. PMID:25588182

  1. Inversion of multicomponent seismic data and rock-physics intepretation for evaluating lithology, fracture and fluid distribution in heterogeneous anisotropic reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Ilya Tsvankin; Kenneth L. Larner

    2004-11-17

    Within the framework of this collaborative project with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Stanford University, the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) group developed and implemented a new efficient approach to the inversion and processing of multicomponent, multiazimuth seismic data in anisotropic media. To avoid serious difficulties in the processing of mode-converted (PS) waves, we devised a methodology for transforming recorded PP- and PS-wavefields into the corresponding SS-wave reflection data that can be processed by velocity-analysis algorithms designed for pure (unconverted) modes. It should be emphasized that this procedure does not require knowledge of the velocity model and can be applied to data from arbitrarily anisotropic, heterogeneous media. The azimuthally varying reflection moveouts of the PP-waves and constructed SS-waves are then combined in anisotropic stacking-velocity tomography to estimate the velocity field in the depth domain. As illustrated by the case studies discussed in the report, migration of the multicomponent data with the obtained anisotropic velocity model yields a crisp image of the reservoir that is vastly superior to that produced by conventional methods. The scope of this research essentially amounts to building the foundation of 3D multicomponent, anisotropic seismology. We have also worked with the LLNL and Stanford groups on relating the anisotropic parameters obtained from seismic data to stress, lithology, and fluid distribution using a generalized theoretical treatment of fractured, poroelastic rocks.

  2. Nonclassical nucleation and growth of inorganic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jisoo; Yang, Jiwoong; Kwon, Soon Gu; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2016-08-01

    The synthesis of nanoparticles with particular compositions and structures can lead to nanoparticles with notable physicochemical properties, thus promoting their use in various applications. In this area of nanoscience, the focus is shifting from size- and shape-uniform single-component nanoparticles to multicomponent nanoparticles with enhanced performance and/or multifunctionality. With the increasing complexity of synthetic reactions, an understanding of the formation mechanisms of the nanoparticles is needed to enable a systematic synthetic approach. This Review highlights mechanistic studies underlying the synthesis of nanoparticles, with an emphasis on nucleation and growth behaviours that are not expected from classical theories. We discuss the structural properties of nanoclusters that are of a size that bridges molecules and solids. We then describe the role of nanoclusters in the prenucleation process as well as in nonclassical nucleation models. The growth of nanoparticles via the assembly and merging of primary particles is also overviewed. Finally, we present the heterogeneous nucleation mechanisms behind the synthesis of multicomponent nanoparticles.

  3. A comprehensive parameterization of heterogeneous ice nucleation of dust surrogate: laboratory study with hematite particles and its application to atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiranuma, N.; Paukert, M.; Steinke, I.; Zhang, K.; Kulkarni, G.; Hoose, C.; Schnaiter, M.; Saathoff, H.; Möhler, O.

    2014-12-01

    A new heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterization that covers a wide temperature range (-36 to -78 °C) is presented. Developing and testing such an ice nucleation parameterization, which is constrained through identical experimental conditions, is important to accurately simulate the ice nucleation processes in cirrus clouds. The ice nucleation active surface-site density (ns) of hematite particles, used as a proxy for atmospheric dust particles, were derived from AIDA (Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) cloud chamber measurements under water subsaturated conditions. These conditions were achieved by continuously changing the temperature (T) and relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice) in the chamber. Our measurements showed several different pathways to nucleate ice depending on T and RHice conditions. For instance, almost T-independent freezing was observed at -60 °C < T < -50 °C, where RHice explicitly controlled ice nucleation efficiency, while both T and RHice played roles in other two T regimes: -78 °C < T < -60 °C and -50 °C < T < -36 °C. More specifically, observations at T lower than -60 °C revealed that higher RHice was necessary to maintain a constant ns, whereas T may have played a significant role in ice nucleation at T higher than -50 °C. We implemented the new hematite-derived ns parameterization, which agrees well with previous AIDA measurements of desert dust, into two conceptual cloud models to investigate their sensitivity to the new parameterization in comparison to existing ice nucleation schemes for simulating cirrus cloud properties. Our results show that the new AIDA-based parameterization leads to an order of magnitude higher ice crystal concentrations and to an inhibition of homogeneous nucleation in lower-temperature regions. Our cloud simulation results suggest that atmospheric dust particles that form ice nuclei at lower temperatures, below -36 °C, can potentially have a stronger influence on cloud

  4. A Comprehensive Parameterization of Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation of Dust Surrogate: Laboratory Study with Hematite Particles and Its Application to Atmospheric Models

    SciTech Connect

    Hiranuma, Naruki; Paukert, Marco; Steinke, Isabelle; Zhang, Kai; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Hoose, Corinna; Schnaiter, Martin; Saathoff, Harald; Mohler, Ottmar

    2014-12-10

    A new heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterization that covers a wide temperature range (-36 °C to -78 °C) is presented. Developing and testing such an ice nucleation parameterization, which is constrained through identical experimental conditions, is critical in order to accurately simulate the ice nucleation processes in cirrus clouds. The surface-scaled ice nucleation efficiencies of hematite particles, inferred by ns, were derived from AIDA (Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) cloud chamber measurements under water subsaturated conditions that were realized by continuously changing temperature (T) and relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice) in the chamber. Our measurements showed several different pathways to nucleate ice depending on T and RHice conditions. For instance, almost independent freezing was observed at -60 °C < T < -50 °C, where RHice explicitly controlled ice nucleation efficiency, while both T and RHice played roles in other two T regimes: -78 °C < T < -60 °C and -50 °C < T < -36 °C. More specifically, observations at T colder than -60 °C revealed that higher RHice was necessary to maintain constant ns, whereas T may have played a significant role in ice nucleation at T warmer than -50 °C. We implemented new ns parameterizations into two cloud models to investigate its sensitivity and compare with the existing ice nucleation schemes towards simulating cirrus cloud properties. Our results show that the new AIDA-based parameterizations lead to an order of magnitude higher ice crystal concentrations and inhibition of homogeneous nucleation in colder temperature regions. Our cloud simulation results suggest that atmospheric dust particles that form ice nuclei at lower temperatures, below -36 °C, can potentially have stronger influence on cloud properties such as cloud longevity and initiation when compared to previous parameterizations.

  5. Application of an online-coupled regional climate model, WRF-CAM5, over East Asia for examination of ice nucleation schemes. Part II. Sensitivity to heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterizations and dust emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yang; Chen, Ying; Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai -Yung

    2015-09-14

    Aerosol particles can affect cloud microphysical properties by serving as ice nuclei (IN). Large uncertainties exist in the ice nucleation parameterizations (INPs) used in current climate models. In this Part II paper, to examine the sensitivity of the model predictions to different heterogeneous INPs, WRF-CAM5 simulation using the INP of Niemand et al. (N12) [1] is conducted over East Asia for two full years, 2006 and 2011, and compared with simulation using the INP of Meyers et al. (M92) [2], which is the original INP used in CAM5. M92 calculates the nucleated ice particle concentration as a function of ice supersaturation, while N12 represents the nucleated ice particle concentration as a function of temperature and the number concentrations and surface areas of dust particles. Compared to M92, the WRF-CAM5 simulation with N12 produces significantly higher nucleated ice crystal number concentrations (ICNCs) in the northern domain where dust sources are located, leading to significantly higher cloud ice number and mass concentrations and ice water path, but the opposite is true in the southern domain where temperatures and moistures play a more important role in ice formation. Overall, the simulation with N12 gives lower downward shortwave radiation but higher downward longwave radiation, cloud liquid water path, cloud droplet number concentrations, and cloud optical depth. The increase in cloud optical depth and the decrease in downward solar flux result in a stronger shortwave and longwave cloud forcing, and decreases temperature at 2-m and precipitation. Changes in temperature and radiation lower surface concentrations of OH, O₃, SO₄²⁻, and PM2.5, but increase surface concentrations of CO, NO₂, and SO₂ over most of the domain. By acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and IN, dust particles have different impacts on cloud water and ice number concentrations, radiation, and temperature at 2-m and precipitation depending on

  6. Application of an online-coupled regional climate model, WRF-CAM5, over East Asia for examination of ice nucleation schemes. Part II. Sensitivity to heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterizations and dust emissions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Yang; Chen, Ying; Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai -Yung

    2015-09-14

    Aerosol particles can affect cloud microphysical properties by serving as ice nuclei (IN). Large uncertainties exist in the ice nucleation parameterizations (INPs) used in current climate models. In this Part II paper, to examine the sensitivity of the model predictions to different heterogeneous INPs, WRF-CAM5 simulation using the INP of Niemand et al. (N12) [1] is conducted over East Asia for two full years, 2006 and 2011, and compared with simulation using the INP of Meyers et al. (M92) [2], which is the original INP used in CAM5. M92 calculates the nucleated ice particle concentration as a function of icemore » supersaturation, while N12 represents the nucleated ice particle concentration as a function of temperature and the number concentrations and surface areas of dust particles. Compared to M92, the WRF-CAM5 simulation with N12 produces significantly higher nucleated ice crystal number concentrations (ICNCs) in the northern domain where dust sources are located, leading to significantly higher cloud ice number and mass concentrations and ice water path, but the opposite is true in the southern domain where temperatures and moistures play a more important role in ice formation. Overall, the simulation with N12 gives lower downward shortwave radiation but higher downward longwave radiation, cloud liquid water path, cloud droplet number concentrations, and cloud optical depth. The increase in cloud optical depth and the decrease in downward solar flux result in a stronger shortwave and longwave cloud forcing, and decreases temperature at 2-m and precipitation. Changes in temperature and radiation lower surface concentrations of OH, O₃, SO₄²⁻, and PM2.5, but increase surface concentrations of CO, NO₂, and SO₂ over most of the domain. By acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and IN, dust particles have different impacts on cloud water and ice number concentrations, radiation, and temperature at 2-m and precipitation depending on whether the

  7. Characterizing protein crystal nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akella, Sathish V.

    We developed an experimental microfluidic based technique to measure the nucleation rates and successfully applied the technique to measure nucleation rates of lysozyme crystals. The technique involves counting the number of samples which do not have crystals as a function of time. Under the assumption that nucleation is a Poisson process, the fraction of samples with no crystals decays exponentially with the decay constant proportional to nucleation rate and volume of the sample. Since nucleation is a random and rare event, one needs to perform measurements on large number of samples to obtain good statistics. Microfluidics offers the solution of producing large number of samples at minimal material consumption. Hence, we developed a microfluidic method and measured nucleation rates of lysozyme crystals in supersaturated protein drops, each with volume of ˜ 1 nL. Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT) describes the kinetics of nucleation and predicts the functional form of nucleation rate in terms of the thermodynamic quantities involved, such as supersaturation, temperature, etc. We analyzed the measured nucleation rates in the context of CNT and obtained the activation energy and the kinetic pre-factor characterizing the nucleation process. One conclusion is that heterogeneous nucleation dominates crystallization. We report preliminary studies on selective enhancement of nucleation in one of the crystal polymorprhs of lysozyme (spherulite) using amorphous mesoporous bioactive gel-glass te{naomi06, naomi08}, CaO.P 2O5.SiO2 (known as bio-glass) with 2-10 nm pore-size diameter distribution. The pores act as heterogeneous nucleation centers and claimed to enhance the nucleation rates by molecular confinement. The measured kinetic profiles of crystal fraction of spherulites indicate that the crystallization of spherulites may be proceeding via secondary nucleation pathways.

  8. Crystallization and immersion freezing ability of oxalic and succinic acid in multicomponent aqueous organic aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Robert; Höhler, Kristina; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Schnaiter, Martin

    2015-04-01

    This study reports on heterogeneous ice nucleation efficiency of immersed oxalic and succinic acid crystals in the temperature range from 245 to 215 K, as investigated with expansion cooling experiments using suspended particles. In contrast to previous laboratory work with emulsified solution droplets where the precipitation of solid inclusions required a preceding freezing/evaporation cycle, we show that immersed solids readily form by homogeneous crystallization within aqueous solution droplets of multicomponent organic mixtures, which have noneutonic compositions with an excess of oxalic or succinic acid. Whereas succinic acid crystals did not act as heterogeneous ice nuclei, immersion freezing by oxalic acid dihydrate crystals led to a reduction of the ice saturation ratio at freezing onset by 0.066-0.072 compared to homogeneous freezing, which is by a factor of 2 higher than previously reported laboratory data. These observations emphasize the importance of oxalic acid in heterogeneous ice nucleation.

  9. Gas-dynamic signs of explosive eruptions of volcanoes. 2. Model of homogeneous-heterogeneous nucleation. Specific features of destruction of the cavitating magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedrinskii, V. K.

    2009-03-01

    The dynamics of state of the crystallite-containing magma is studied within the framework of the gas-dynamic model of bubble cavitation. The effect of crystallites on flow evolution is considered for two cases: where the crystallites are cavitation nuclei (homogeneous-heterogeneous nucleation model) and where large clusters of crystallites are formed in the magma in the period between eruptions. In the first case, decompression jumps are demonstrated to arise as early as in the wave precursor; the intensity of these jumps turns out to be sufficient to form a series of discrete zones of nucleation ahead of the front of the main decompression wave. Results of experimental modeling of an explosive eruption with ejection of crystallite clusters (magmatic “bombs”) suggest that a cocurrent flow of the cavitating magma with dynamically varying properties (mean density and viscosity) transforms to an independent unsteady flow whose velocity is greater than the magma flow velocity. Experimental results on modeling the flow structure during the eruption show that coalescence of bubbles in the flow leads to the formation of spatial “slugs” consisting of the gas and particles. This process is analyzed within a combined nucleation model including the two-phase Iordansky-Kogarko-van Wijngaarden model and the model of the “frozen” field of mass velocities in the cavitation zone.

  10. Heterogeneous nucleation at a wall near a wetting transition: a Monte Carlo test of the classical theory.

    PubMed

    Winter, David; Virnau, Peter; Binder, Kurt

    2009-11-18

    While for a slightly supersaturated vapor the free energy barrier ΔF(hom)(*), which needs to be overcome in a homogeneous nucleation event, may be extremely large, nucleation is typically much easier at the walls of the container in which the vapor is located. While no nucleation barrier exists if the walls are wet, for incomplete wetting of the walls, described via a nonzero contact angle Θ, classical theory predicts that nucleation happens through sphere-cap-shaped droplets attracted to the wall, and their formation energy is ΔF(het)(*) = ΔF(hom)(*)f(Θ), with f(Θ) = (1-cosΘ)(2)(2+cosΘ)/4. This prediction is tested through simulations for the simple cubic lattice gas model with nearest-neighbor interactions. The attractive wall is described in terms of a local 'surface field', leading to a critical wetting transition. The variation of the contact angle with the strength of the surface field is determined by using thermodynamic integration methods to obtain the wall free energies which enter Young's equation. Obtaining the chemical potential as a function of the density for a system with periodic boundary conditions (and no walls), the droplet free energy of a spherical droplet in the bulk is obtained for a wide range of droplet radii. Similarly, ΔF(het)(*) is obtained for a system with two parallel walls. We find that the classical theory is fairly accurate if a line tension correction for the contact angle is taken into account. PMID:21715882

  11. CRYSTALLIZATION IN MULTICOMPONENT GLASSES

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; HRMA PR

    2009-10-08

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  12. Preferential earthquake-nucleating locations on faults determined by heterogeneous direct- and evolution-effect parameters of rate- and state-dependent friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viesca, R. C.; Ray, S.

    2015-12-01

    Rock friction experiments show that low-velocity fault friction may have a direct and subsequent evolutionary response to changes in slip velocity; the magnitude of which are respectively proportional to parameters a and b in constitutive relations of such rate- and state-dependent friction [e.g., Dieterich 1979; Ruina, 1983]. When a and b are uniform on a fault, translational invariance implies any location is a potential nucleation site, the choice determined by pre-instability conditions and external forcing. With heterogeneous parameters, symmetry is broken, which can create preferred nucleation sites. Recent work showed such heterogeneity does create favorable sites (Ray and Viesca, AGU '14). Here we study how distributions of (i) relative (0nucleation occurs at the local minimum and maximum of (ii) for nonlocal and local interactions, respectively

  13. Kinetics of heterogeneous bubble nucleation in rhyolitic melts: implications for the number density of bubbles in volcanic conduits and for pumice textures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cluzel, N.; Laporte, D.; Provost, A.; Kannewischer, I.

    2008-12-01

    We performed decompression experiments to simulate the ascent of a phenocryst-bearing rhyolitic magma in a volcanic conduit. The starting materials were bubble-free rhyolites water-saturated at 200 MPa 800°C under oxidizing conditions: they contained 6.0 wt% dissolved H2O and a dense population of hematite crystals (8.7 ± 2 × 105 mm-3). Pressure was decreased from the saturation value to a final value ranging from 99 to 20 MPa, at constant temperature (800°C); the rate of decompression was either 1,000 or 27.8 kPa/s. In all experiments, we observed a single event of heterogeneous bubble nucleation beginning at a pressure P N equal to 63 ± 3 MPa in the 1,000 kPa/s series, and to 69 ± 1 MPa in the 27.8 kPa/s series. Below P N, the degree of water supersaturation in the liquid rapidly decreased to a few 0.1 wt%, the nucleation rate dropped, and the bubble number density (BND) stabilized to a value strongly sensitive to decompression rate: 80 mm-3 at 27.8 kPa/s vs. 5,900 mm-3 at 1,000 kPa/s. This behaviour is like the behavior formerly described in the case of homogeneous bubble nucleation in the rhyolite-H2O system and in numerical simulations of vesiculation in ascending magmas. Similar degrees of water supersaturation were measured at 27.8 and 1,000 kPa/s, implying that a faster decompression rate does not result in a larger departure from equilibrium. Our experimental results imply that BNDs in acid to intermediate magmas ascending in volcanic conduits will depend on both the decompression rate left| {left. {{text{d}}P/{text{d}}t} right|} right. and the number density of phenocrysts, especially the number density of magnetite microphenocrysts (1 100 mm-3), which is the only mineral species able to reduce significantly the degree of water supersaturation required for bubble nucleation. Very low BNDs (≈1 mm-3) are predicted in the case of effusive eruptions ( left| {left. {{text{d}}P/{text{d}}t} right|} right. ≈ 0.1 kPa/s). High BNDs (up to 107 mm-3) and

  14. An Atomistic View of Amyloidogenic Self-assembly: Structure and Dynamics of Heterogeneous Conformational States in the Pre-nucleation Phase.

    PubMed

    Matthes, Dirk; Gapsys, Vytautas; Brennecke, Julian T; de Groot, Bert L

    2016-01-01

    The formation of well-defined filamentous amyloid structures involves a polydisperse collection of oligomeric states for which relatively little is known in terms of structural organization. Here we use extensive, unbiased explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the structural and dynamical features of oligomeric aggregates formed by a number of highly amyloidogenic peptides at atomistic resolution on the μs time scale. A consensus approach has been adopted to analyse the simulations in multiple force fields, yielding an in-depth characterization of pre-fibrillar oligomers and their global and local structure properties. A collision cross section analysis revealed structurally heterogeneous aggregate ensembles for the individual oligomeric states that lack a single defined quaternary structure during the pre-nucleation phase. To gain insight into the conformational space sampled in early aggregates, we probed their substructure and found emerging β-sheet subunit layers and a multitude of ordered intermolecular β-structure motifs with growing aggregate size. Among those, anti-parallel out-of-register β-strands compatible with toxic β-barrel oligomers were particularly prevalent already in smaller aggregates and formed prior to ordered fibrillar structure elements. Notably, also distinct fibril-like conformations emerged in the oligomeric state and underscore the notion that pre-nucleated oligomers serve as a critical intermediate step on-pathway to fibrils. PMID:27616019

  15. A computer model for one-dimensional mass and energy transport in and around chemically reacting particles, including complex gas-phase chemistry, multicomponent molecular diffusion, surface evaporation, and heterogeneous reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, S. Y.; Yetter, R. A.; Dryer, F. L.

    1992-01-01

    Various chemically reacting flow problems highlighting chemical and physical fundamentals rather than flow geometry are presently investigated by means of a comprehensive mathematical model that incorporates multicomponent molecular diffusion, complex chemistry, and heterogeneous processes, in the interest of obtaining sensitivity-related information. The sensitivity equations were decoupled from those of the model, and then integrated one time-step behind the integration of the model equations, and analytical Jacobian matrices were applied to improve the accuracy of sensitivity coefficients that are calculated together with model solutions.

  16. Nucleation in Synoptically Forced Cirrostratus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R.-F.; Starr, D. OC.; Reichardt, J.; DeMott, P. J.

    2004-01-01

    Formation and evolution of cirrostratus in response to weak, uniform and constant synoptic forcing is simulated using a one-dimensional numerical model with explicit microphysics, in which the particle size distribution in each grid box is fully resolved. A series of tests of the model response to nucleation modes (homogeneous-freezing-only/heterogeneous nucleation) and heterogeneous nucleation parameters are performed. In the case studied here, nucleation is first activated in the prescribed moist layer. A continuous cloud-top nucleation zone with a depth depending on the vertical humidity gradient and one of the nucleation parameters is developed afterward. For the heterogeneous nucleation cases, intermittent nucleation zones in the mid-upper portion of the cloud form where the relative humidity is on the rise, because existent ice crystals do not uptake excess water vapor efficiently, and ice nuclei (IN) are available. Vertical resolution as fine as 1 m is required for realistic simulation of the homogeneous-freezing-only scenario, while the model resolution requirement is more relaxed in the cases where heterogeneous nucleation dominates. Bulk microphysical and optical properties are evaluated and compared. Ice particle number flux divergence, which is due to the vertical gradient of the gravity-induced particle sedimentation, is constantly and rapidly changing the local ice number concentration, even in the nucleation zone. When the depth of the nucleation zone is shallow, particle number concentration decreases rapidly as ice particles grow and sediment away from the nucleation zone. When the depth of the nucleation zone is large, a region of high ice number concentration can be sustained. The depth of nucleation zone is an important parameter to be considered in parametric treatments of ice cloud generation.

  17. Hybrid Au-CdSe and Ag-CdSe nanoflowers and core-shell nanocrystals via one-pot heterogeneous nucleation and growth.

    PubMed

    AbouZeid, Khaled M; Mohamed, Mona B; El-Shall, M Samy

    2011-12-01

    A general approach, based on heterogeneous nucleation and growth of CdSe nanostructures on Au or Ag nanocrystals, for the synthesis of Au-CdSe and Ag-CdSe hybrid nanostructures is developed. The new approach provides a versatile one-pot route for the synthesis of hybrid nanoflowers consisting of a gold or silver core and multipod CdSe rods or an intact CdSe shell with controlled thickness, depending on the nucleation and growth parameters. At lower growth temperatures such as 150 °C, the CdSe clusters are adsorbed on the surface of the metal cores in their surface defects, then multiple arms and branches form, resulting in nanoflower-shaped hybrid structures. Increasing the size of the metal core through the choice of the reducing and capping agents results in an improvement of the interface between the metal and CdSe domains, producing core-shell structures. The growth temperature appears to be the most important factor determining the nature of the interface between the metal and CdSe domains. At relatively high temperatures such as 300 °C, the formation of large, faceted Au cores creates preferential growth sites for the CdSe nanocrystalline shell, thus resulting in well-defined Au-CdSe core-shell structures with large interfaces between the Au and CdSe domains. The present approach is expected to foster systematic studies of the electronic structures and optical properties of the metal-semiconductor hybrid materials for potential applications in photovoltaic and nanoelectronic devices. PMID:21994186

  18. Can we define an asymptotic value for the ice active surface site density for heterogeneous ice nucleation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermeier, Dennis; Augustin-Bauditz, Stefanie; Hartmann, Susan; Wex, Heike; Ignatius, Karoliina; Stratmann, Frank

    2015-05-01

    The immersion freezing behavior of droplets containing size-segregated, monodisperse feldspar particles was investigated. For all particle sizes investigated, a leveling off of the frozen droplet fraction was observed reaching a plateau within the heterogeneous freezing temperature regime (T >- 38°C). The frozen fraction in the plateau region was proportional to the particle surface area. Based on these findings, an asymptotic value for ice active surface site density ns, which we named ns⋆, could be determined for the investigated feldspar sample. The comparison of these results with those of other studies not only elucidates the general feasibility of determining such an asymptotic value but also shows that the value of ns⋆ strongly depends on the method of the particle surface area determination. However, such an asymptotic value might be an important input parameter for atmospheric modeling applications. At least it shows that care should be taken when ns is extrapolated to lower or higher temperature.

  19. Multicomponent membranes

    DOEpatents

    Kulprathipanja, Santi; Kulkarni, Sudhir S.; Funk, Edward W.

    1988-01-01

    A multicomponent membrane which may be used for separating various components which are present in a fluid feed mixture comprises a mixture of a plasticizer such as a glycol and an organic polymer cast upon a porous organic polymer support. The membrane may be prepared by casting an emulsion or a solution of the plasticizer and polymer on the porous support, evaporating the solvent and recovering the membrane after curing.

  20. On the Ice Nucleation Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barahona, D.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a novel formulation of the ice nucleation spectrum, i.e. the function relating the ice crystal concentration to cloud formation conditions and aerosol properties. The new formulation is physically-based and explicitly accounts for the dependency of the ice crystal concentration on temperature, supersaturation, cooling rate, and particle size, surface area and composition. This is achieved by introducing the concepts of ice nucleation coefficient (the number of ice germs present in a particle) and nucleation probability dispersion function (the distribution of ice nucleation coefficients within the aerosol population). The new formulation is used to generate ice nucleation parameterizations for the homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets and the heterogeneous deposition ice nucleation on dust and soot ice nuclei. For homogeneous freezing, it was found that by increasing the dispersion in the droplet volume distribution the fraction of supercooled droplets in the population increases. For heterogeneous ice nucleation the new formulation consistently describes singular and stochastic behavior within a single framework. Using a fundamentally stochastic approach, both cooling rate independence and constancy of the ice nucleation fraction over time, features typically associated with singular behavior, were reproduced. Analysis of the temporal dependency of the ice nucleation spectrum suggested that experimental methods that measure the ice nucleation fraction over few seconds would tend to underestimate the ice nuclei concentration. It is shown that inferring the aerosol heterogeneous ice nucleation properties from measurements of the onset supersaturation and temperature may carry significant error as the variability in ice nucleation properties within the aerosol population is not accounted for. This work provides a simple and rigorous ice nucleation framework where theoretical predictions, laboratory measurements and field campaign data can be

  1. Direct observation of metal nanoparticles as heterogeneous nuclei for the condensation of supersaturated organic vapors: Nucleation of size-selected aluminum nanoparticles in acetonitrile and n-hexane vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelsayed, Victor; Samy El-Shall, M.

    2014-08-07

    This work reports the direct observation and separation of size-selected aluminum nanoparticles acting as heterogeneous nuclei for the condensation of supersaturated vapors of both polar and nonpolar molecules. In the experiment, we study the condensation of supersaturated acetonitrile and n-hexane vapors on charged and neutral Al nanoparticles by activation of the metal nanoparticles to act as heterogeneous nuclei for the condensation of the organic vapor. Aluminum seed nanoparticles with diameters of 1 and 2 nm are capable of acting as heterogeneous nuclei for the condensation of supersaturated acetonitrile and hexane vapors. The comparison between the Kelvin and Fletcher diameters indicates that for the heterogeneous nucleation of both acetonitrile and hexane vapors, particles are activated at significantly smaller sizes than predicted by the Kelvin equation. The activation of the Al nanoparticles occurs at nearly 40% and 65% of the onset of homogeneous nucleation of acetonitrile and hexane supersaturated vapors, respectively. The lower activation of the charged Al nanoparticles in acetonitrile vapor is due to the charge-dipole interaction which results in rapid condensation of the highly polar acetonitrile molecules on the charged Al nanoparticles. The charge-dipole interaction decreases with increasing the size of the Al nanoparticles and therefore at low supersaturations, most of the heterogeneous nucleation events are occurring on neutral nanoparticles. No sign effect has been observed for the condensation of the organic vapors on the positively and negatively charged Al nanoparticles. The present approach of generating metal nanoparticles by pulsed laser vaporization within a supersaturated organic vapor allows for efficient separation between nucleation and growth of the metal nanoparticles and, consequently controls the average particle size, particle density, and particle size distribution within the liquid droplets of the condensing vapor. Strong

  2. The influence of heterogeneous nucleation on the surface crystallization of guaifenesin from melt extrudates containing Eudragit L10055 or Acryl-EZE.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Caroline D; Fegely, Kurt A; Rajabi-Siahboomi, Ali R; McGinity, James W

    2010-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of talc and humidity conditions during storage on the crystal growth of guaifenesin on the surface of melt-extruded matrix tablets. Tablets consisted of the model drug guaifenesin in a matrix of either Acryl-EZE(R) or Eudragit(R) L10055 and either no talc, 25% or 50% talc. After processing, the hot-melt-extruded matrix tablets were supersaturated with amorphous guaifenesin, which resulted in the development of guaifenesin drug crystals on exposed surfaces of the tablet during storage (all tablets were stored at 24 degrees C). A previously developed, quantitative test was used to assay for surface guaifenesin. In tablets with a drug-to-polymer ratio of 19:81, talc-containing tablets exhibited an earlier onset of crystal growth (storage at 17% relative humidity). The presence of talc also increased the amount of surface crystallization and was independent of the talc concentration, since the talc levels used in this study exceeded the critical nucleant concentration. Additional non-melting components did not have an additive effect on surface crystal growth. High humidity during storage (78%) increased guaifenesin crystallization, but moisture uptake of tablets did not correlate with increased drug recrystallization. When storage at 17% relative humidity was interrupted for 3days by storage at 78% relative humidity before the tablets were returned to their previous low RH storage conditions, crystal growth quickly increased during the high RH interval and remained at an elevated level throughout the remaining storage period. A similar intermediate period of low, 17% relative humidity in tablets stored before and after that time at 78% RH did not affect surface crystallization levels. The effects of humidity and talc on the crystallization of guaifenesin from melt-extruded dosage forms supersaturated with amorphous drug were ascribed to heterogeneous nucleation. PMID:19995604

  3. Nucleation dynamics of water nanodroplets.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Dipanjan; Bosman, Michel; Mokkapati, Venkata R S S; Leong, Fong Yew; Mirsaidov, Utkur

    2014-04-01

    The origin of the condensation of water begins at the nanoscale, a length-scale that is challenging to probe for liquids. In this work we directly image heterogeneous nucleation of water nanodroplets by in situ transmission electron microscopy. Using gold nanoparticles bound to a flat surface as heterogeneous nucleation sites, we observe nucleation and growth of water nanodroplets. The growth of nanodroplet radii follows the power law: R(t)~(t-t 0) β , where β~0.2-0.3. PMID:24667092

  4. Theoretical study of production of unique glasses in space. [kinetic relationships describing nucleation and crystallization phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, D. C.; Sievert, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    The potential of producing the glassy form of selected materials in the weightless, containerless nature of space processing is examined through the development of kinetic relationships describing nucleation and crystallization phenomena. Transformation kinetics are applied to a well-characterized system (SiO2), an excellent glass former (B2O3), and a poor glass former (Al2O3) by conventional earth processing methods. Viscosity and entropy of fusion are shown to be the primary materials parameters controlling the glass forming tendency. For multicomponent systems diffusion-controlled kinetics and heterogeneous nucleation effects are considered. An analytical empirical approach is used to analyze the mullite system. Results are consistent with experimentally observed data and indicate the promise of mullite as a future space processing candidate.

  5. The C-protein tetramer binds 230 to 240 nucleotides of pre-mRNA and nucleates the assembly of 40S heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, M; Rech, J E; Northington, S J; Flicker, P F; Mayeda, A; Krainer, A R; LeStourgeon, W M

    1994-01-01

    A series of in vitro protein-RNA binding studies using purified native (C1)3C2 and (A2)3B1 tetramers, total soluble heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP), and pre-mRNA molecules differing in length and sequence have revealed that a single C-protein tetramer has an RNA site size of 230 to 240 nucleotides (nt). Two tetramers bind twice this RNA length, and three tetramers fold monoparticle lengths of RNA (700 nt) into a unique 19S triangular complex. In the absence of this unique structure, the basic A- and B-group proteins bind RNA to form several different artifactual structures which are not present in preparations of native hnRNP and which do not function in hnRNP assembly. Three (A2)3B1 tetramers bind the 19S complex to form a 35S assembly intermediate. Following UV irradiation to immobilize the C proteins on the packaged RNA, the 19S triangular complex is recovered as a remnant structure from both native and reconstituted hnRNP particles. C protein-RNA complexes composed of three, six, or nine tetramers (one, two, or three triangular complexes) nucleate the stoichiometric assembly of monomer, dimer, and trimer hnRNP particles. The binding of C-protein tetramers to RNAs longer than 230 nt is through a self-cooperative combinatorial mode. RNA packaged in the 19S complex and in 40S hnRNP particles is efficiently spliced in vitro. These findings demonstrate that formation of the triangular C protein-RNA complex is an obligate first event in the in vitro and probably the in vivo assembly the 40S hnRNP core particle, and they provide insight into the mechanism through which the core proteins package 700-nt increments of RNA. These findings also demonstrate that unless excluded by other factors, the C proteins are likely to be located along the length of nascent transcripts. Images PMID:8264621

  6. Absorption cross sections of surface-adsorbed H2O in the 295-370 nm region and heterogeneous nucleation of H2O on fused silica surfaces.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Huang, Li; Zhu, Lei

    2013-09-12

    We have determined absorption cross sections of a monolayer of H2O adsorbed on the fused silica surfaces in the 295-370 nm region at 293 ± 1 K by using Brewster angle cavity ring-down spectroscopy. Absorption cross sections of surface-adsorbed H2O vary between (4.66 ± 0.83) × 10(-20) and (1.73 ± 0.52) × 10(-21) cm(2)/molecule over this wavelength range, where errors quoted represent experimental scatter (1σ). Our experimental study provides direct evidence that surface-adsorbed H2O is an absorber of the near UV solar radiation. We also varied the H2O pressure in the surface study cell over the 0.01-17 Torr range and obtained probe laser absorptions at 295, 340, and 350 nm by multilayer of adsorbed H2O molecules until the heterogeneous nucleation of water occurred on fused silica surfaces. The average absorption cross sections of multilayer adsorbed H2O are (2.17 ± 0.53) × 10(-20), (2.48 ± 0.67) × 10(-21), and (2.34 ± 0.59) × 10(-21) cm(2)/molecule at 295, 340, and 350 nm. The average absorption cross sections of transitional H2O layer are (6.06 ± 2.73) × 10(-20), (6.48 ± 3.85) × 10(-21), and (8.04 ± 4.92) × 10(-21) cm(2)/molecule at 295, 340, and 350 nm. The average thin water film absorption cross sections are (2.39 ± 0.50) × 10(-19), (3.21 ± 0.81) × 10(-20), and (3.37 ± 0.94) × 10(-20) cm(2)/molecule at 295 nm, 340 nm, and 350 nm. Atmospheric implications of the results are discussed. PMID:23947798

  7. Climate Impacts of Ice Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gettelman, Andrew; Liu, Xiaohong; Barahona, Donifan; Lohmann, Ulrike; Chen, Celia

    2012-01-01

    Several different ice nucleation parameterizations in two different General Circulation Models (GCMs) are used to understand the effects of ice nucleation on the mean climate state, and the Aerosol Indirect Effects (AIE) of cirrus clouds on climate. Simulations have a range of ice microphysical states that are consistent with the spread of observations, but many simulations have higher present-day ice crystal number concentrations than in-situ observations. These different states result from different parameterizations of ice cloud nucleation processes, and feature different balances of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation. Black carbon aerosols have a small (0.06 Wm(exp-2) and not statistically significant AIE when included as ice nuclei, for nucleation efficiencies within the range of laboratory measurements. Indirect effects of anthropogenic aerosols on cirrus clouds occur as a consequence of increasing anthropogenic sulfur emissions with different mechanisms important in different models. In one model this is due to increases in homogeneous nucleation fraction, and in the other due to increases in heterogeneous nucleation with coated dust. The magnitude of the effect is the same however. The resulting ice AIE does not seem strongly dependent on the balance between homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation. Regional effects can reach several Wm2. Indirect effects are slightly larger for those states with less homogeneous nucleation and lower ice number concentration in the base state. The total ice AIE is estimated at 0.27 +/- 0.10 Wm(exp-2) (1 sigma uncertainty). This represents a 20% offset of the simulated total shortwave AIE for ice and liquid clouds of 1.6 Wm(sup-2).

  8. Climate Impacts of Ice Nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Gettelman, A.; Liu, Xiaohong; Barahona, Donifan; Lohmann, U.; Chen, Chih-Chieh

    2012-10-19

    [1] Several different ice nucleation parameterizations in two different General Circulation Models (GCMs) are used to understand the effects of ice nucleation on the mean climate state, and the Aerosol Indirect Effects (AIE) of cirrus clouds on climate. Simulations have a range of ice microphysical states that are consistent with the spread of observations, but many simulations have higher present-day ice crystal number concentrations than in-situ observations. These different states result from different parameterizations of ice cloud nucleation processes, and feature different balances of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation. Black carbon aerosols have a small (-0.06 Wm-2) and not statistically significant AIE when included as ice nuclei, for nucleation efficiencies within the range of laboratory measurements. Indirect effects of anthropogenic aerosols on cirrus clouds occur as a consequence of increasing anthropogenic sulfur emissions with different mechanisms important in different models. In one model this is due to increases in homogeneous nucleation fraction, and in the other due to increases in heterogeneous nucleation with coated dust. The magnitude of the effect is the same however. The resulting ice AIE does not seem strongly dependent on the balance between homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation. Regional effects can reach several Wm-2. Indirect effects are slightly larger for those states with less homogeneous nucleation and lower ice number concentration in the base state. The total ice AIE is estimated at 0.27 ± 0.10 Wm-2 (1σ uncertainty). Finally, this represents a 20% offset of the simulated total shortwave AIE for ice and liquid clouds of -1.6 Wm-2.

  9. Ice Nucleation Properties of Oxidized Carbon Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Whale, Thomas F; Rosillo-Lopez, Martin; Murray, Benjamin J; Salzmann, Christoph G

    2015-08-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is an important process in many fields, particularly atmospheric science, but is still poorly understood. All known inorganic ice nucleating particles are relatively large in size and tend to be hydrophilic. Hence it is not obvious that carbon nanomaterials should nucleate ice. However, in this paper we show that four different readily water-dispersible carbon nanomaterials are capable of nucleating ice. The tested materials were carboxylated graphene nanoflakes, graphene oxide, oxidized single walled carbon nanotubes and oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The carboxylated graphene nanoflakes have a diameter of ∼30 nm and are among the smallest entities observed so far to nucleate ice. Overall, carbon nanotubes were found to nucleate ice more efficiently than flat graphene species, and less oxidized materials nucleated ice more efficiently than more oxidized species. These well-defined carbon nanomaterials may pave the way to bridging the gap between experimental and computational studies of ice nucleation. PMID:26267196

  10. Ice Nucleation Properties of Oxidized Carbon Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is an important process in many fields, particularly atmospheric science, but is still poorly understood. All known inorganic ice nucleating particles are relatively large in size and tend to be hydrophilic. Hence it is not obvious that carbon nanomaterials should nucleate ice. However, in this paper we show that four different readily water-dispersible carbon nanomaterials are capable of nucleating ice. The tested materials were carboxylated graphene nanoflakes, graphene oxide, oxidized single walled carbon nanotubes and oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The carboxylated graphene nanoflakes have a diameter of ∼30 nm and are among the smallest entities observed so far to nucleate ice. Overall, carbon nanotubes were found to nucleate ice more efficiently than flat graphene species, and less oxidized materials nucleated ice more efficiently than more oxidized species. These well-defined carbon nanomaterials may pave the way to bridging the gap between experimental and computational studies of ice nucleation. PMID:26267196

  11. Communication. Kinetics of scavenging of small, nucleating clusters. First nucleation theorem and sum rules

    SciTech Connect

    Malila, Jussi; McGraw, Robert; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtinen, Kari E. J.

    2015-01-07

    Despite recent advances in monitoring nucleation from a vapor at close-to-molecular resolution, the identity of the critical cluster, forming the bottleneck for the nucleation process, remains elusive. During past twenty years, the first nucleation theorem has been often used to extract the size of the critical cluster from nucleation rate measurements. However, derivations of the first nucleation theorem invoke certain questionable assumptions that may fail, e.g., in the case of atmospheric new particle formation, including absence of subcritical cluster losses and heterogeneous nucleation on pre-existing nanoparticles. Here we extend the kinetic derivation of the first nucleation theorem to give a general framework to include such processes, yielding sum rules connecting the size dependent particle formation and loss rates to the corresponding loss-free nucleation rate and the apparent critical size from a naïve application of the first nucleation theorem that neglects them.

  12. Communication. Kinetics of scavenging of small, nucleating clusters. First nucleation theorem and sum rules

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Malila, Jussi; McGraw, Robert; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtinen, Kari E. J.

    2015-01-07

    Despite recent advances in monitoring nucleation from a vapor at close-to-molecular resolution, the identity of the critical cluster, forming the bottleneck for the nucleation process, remains elusive. During past twenty years, the first nucleation theorem has been often used to extract the size of the critical cluster from nucleation rate measurements. However, derivations of the first nucleation theorem invoke certain questionable assumptions that may fail, e.g., in the case of atmospheric new particle formation, including absence of subcritical cluster losses and heterogeneous nucleation on pre-existing nanoparticles. Here we extend the kinetic derivation of the first nucleation theorem to give amore » general framework to include such processes, yielding sum rules connecting the size dependent particle formation and loss rates to the corresponding loss-free nucleation rate and the apparent critical size from a naïve application of the first nucleation theorem that neglects them.« less

  13. Influence of local structural disorders on spectroscopic properties of multi-component CaF₂-Bi₂O₃-P₂O₅-B₂O₃ glass ceramics with Cr₂O₃ as nucleating agent.

    PubMed

    Suresh, S; Narendrudu, T; Yusub, S; Kumar, A Suneel; Kumar, V Ravi; Veeraiah, N; Rao, D Krishna

    2016-01-15

    Multi-component CaF2-Bi2O3-P2O5-B2O3 glasses doped with different concentrations of Cr2O3 were crystallized through heat treatment. The prepared glass ceramic samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). Spectroscopic studies viz., optical absorption, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), Raman and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) were carried out. The XRD, SEM and DTA studies indicated that the samples contain different crystalline phases. Results of optical absorption and EPR studies pointed out the gradual conversion of chromium ions from Cr(3+) state to Cr(6+) state with an increase of Cr2O3 content from 0.1 to 0.5 mol%. The results of FTIR, Raman and EPR studies revealed that Cr(6+) ions participate in the glass network in tetrahedral positions and seemed to increase the polymerization of the glass ceramics. The quantitative analysis of results of the spectroscopic studies further indicated that the glasses crystallized with low concentration of Cr2O3 are favourable for solid state laser devices. PMID:26318703

  14. Influence of local structural disorders on spectroscopic properties of multi-component CaF2-Bi2O3-P2O5-B2O3 glass ceramics with Cr2O3 as nucleating agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, S.; Narendrudu, T.; Yusub, S.; Suneel Kumar, A.; Ravi Kumar, V.; Veeraiah, N.; Krishna Rao, D.

    2016-01-01

    Multi-component CaF2-Bi2O3-P2O5-B2O3 glasses doped with different concentrations of Cr2O3 were crystallized through heat treatment. The prepared glass ceramic samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). Spectroscopic studies viz., optical absorption, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), Raman and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) were carried out. The XRD, SEM and DTA studies indicated that the samples contain different crystalline phases. Results of optical absorption and EPR studies pointed out the gradual conversion of chromium ions from Cr3 + state to Cr6 + state with an increase of Cr2O3 content from 0.1 to 0.5 mol%. The results of FTIR, Raman and EPR studies revealed that Cr6 + ions participate in the glass network in tetrahedral positions and seemed to increase the polymerization of the glass ceramics. The quantitative analysis of results of the spectroscopic studies further indicated that the glasses crystallized with low concentration of Cr2O3 are favourable for solid state laser devices.

  15. Truncated Dual-Cap Nucleation Site Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matson, Douglas M.; Sander, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    During heterogeneous nucleation within a metastable mushy-zone, several geometries for nucleation site development must be considered. Traditional spherical dual cap and crevice models are compared to a truncated dual cap to determine the activation energy and critical cluster growth kinetics in ternary Fe-Cr-Ni steel alloys. Results of activation energy results indicate that nucleation is more probable at grain boundaries within the solid than at the solid-liquid interface.

  16. Particle Formation (Nucleation) in the Martian Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Määttänen, A.; Vehkamäki, H.; Lauri, A.; Napari, I.; Merikallio, S.; Kauhanen, J.; Savijärvi, H.; Kulmala, M.

    2006-10-01

    We have studied ice particle formation via heterogeneous nucleation in the present atmospheric conditions of Mars for both one-component (water OR carbon dioxide) and two-component (water AND carbon dioxide) cases.

  17. Pb, Nd, and Sr isotopic evidence for a multicomponent source for rocks of Cook-Austral Islands and heterogeneities of mantle plumes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nakamura, Y.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1988-01-01

    Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions were measured in alkaline volcanic rocks (alkali basalt, ankaramite, nephelinite, phonolite, and trachyte) from the South Cook Islands (Aitutaki, Mauke, Rarotonga, Atiu, and Mangaia) and the Austral Islands (Rimatara and Rurutu). The results show that the Cook-Austral rocks have an extremely wide range in isotopic compositions of Pb: 206Pb 204Pb from 18.25 to 21.76, 207pb 204pb from 15.48 to 15.83, and sol208pb 204Pb from 38.37 to 40.62, whereas isotopic compositions of Sr and Nd are less variable. Isotopically, Mangaia, Rimatara, and Rurutu form one group (Mangaia group), which shows extremely radiogenic Pb isotopic compositions but near-MORB (mid-oceanic ridge basalts) values for Sr and Nd isotopic ratios. In contrast, samples from Aitutaki, Rarotonga, Mauke, and Atiu (Aitutaki group) have high 207Pb 204Pb and 208Pb 204Pb and moderately high 87Sr 86Sr (Dupal anomaly). The Aitutaki group could have been derived from heterogeneous mantle plumes, which rose from the enriched deep mantle (the almost primitive lower mantle or recycled continental and oceanic slabs). On the other hand, the Mangaia component could have been derived from the depleted upper mantle which may have been metasomatized with a CO2-rich fluid, as indicated by the near-MORB values of Sr and Nd isotopes. Although Pb isotopic data of the two groups cannot be distinguished from each other statistically, the end components of the Pb-Pb system do not match with those of the Nd-Sr system. Thus, the data must be explained by a multi-, at least three, component mixing model: the mantle plumes (Dupal component and a recycled oceanic slab), metasomatized upper mantle, and lithosphere. The K-Ar ages and isotopic characteristics of the Cook-Austral rocks indicate that if one mantle plume rises from the deep mantle in this region, it has separated into at least two segments on the way to the surface. ?? 1988.

  18. Atmospheric Aerosol Nucleation: Formation of Sub-3 nm Particles and Their Subsequent Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosol nucleation is an important step in the chain reaction that lead to cloud formation but the nucleation mechanisms are poorly understand. Most of the previous aerosol nucleation studies were based on measurements of particles, typically larger than 3 nm, so it was unclear how gas phase molecules nucleate to form clusters and how they further grow to become aerosol particles. In this presentation, we will show recent results of aerosol nucleation based on direct measurements of sub-3 nm particles. We will show laboratory studies of multicomponent nucleation involving sulfuric acid, ammonia, and organic amines and atmospheric observations made in various atmospheric conditions (biogenic, marine, and less polluted continental atmosphere).

  19. Physical and spectroscopic properties of multi-component Na2O-PbO-Bi2O3-SiO2 glass ceramics with Cr2O3 as nucleating agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambasiva Rao, M. V.; Rajyasree, Ch.; Narendrudu, T.; Suresh, S.; Suneel Kumar, A.; Veeraiah, N.; Krishna Rao, D.

    2015-09-01

    Transparent glass ceramics, synthesized from melt quenching followed by heat treatment, of the composition 10Na2O-30PbO-10Bi2O3-(50 - x)SiO2:xCr2O3 (mol%), where 0 ⩽ x ⩽ 0.5, were characterized with XRD, DTA, SEM and EDS. Physical and spectroscopic studies, viz., optical absorption, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), FTIR and Raman were investigated. The characterization of the host glass ceramic has revealed that the formation of a major phase of sodium silicate along with two minor phases such as lead silicate and bismuth oxide. By integrating Cr2O3 to the host glass additional crystal phases viz., NaCrO2, Na2Cr2O7 and Pb(CrO4) which are the complexes of Cr3+ and Cr6+ ions were also developed. As the concentration of nucleating agent is increased, a part of the Cr6+ ions is found to reduce in to Cr3+ ions. Spectroscopic studies have revealed that with an increase in the concentration of Cr2O3 from 0.1 to 0.5 mol%, there is a gradual increase in the intensity of vibrational modes of various asymmetric structural units of silicate, bismuthate and chromate in the glass ceramic network at the expense of symmetrical structural units. The analysis of the results of these studies has indicated that in the samples containing higher concentration of Cr2O3, chromium ions exists predominantly in Cr3+ state and occupy the octahedral positions in glass ceramic matrix and such glass ceramic samples are suitable for lasing action.

  20. Enhancing Nucleation rates using Porous Silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akella, Sathish; Fraden, Seth

    2013-03-01

    The role of nucleants in promoting protein crystal nucleation is an on-going field of research. Porous silica acts as heterogeneous nucleation centers and enhances nucleation rates. For the protein lysozyme there are multiple polymorphs and we demonstrate that porous silica preferentially increases one of the polymorphs. Preliminary studies are presented in which accurate nucleation rates for the different polymorphs as a function of nucleant concentration are obtained through optical microscopy studies of thousands of crystallization trials in identical water-in-oil emulsion drops produced using microfluidics. NSF-IDBR

  1. Heterogeneous nucleation of CdS to enhance visible-light photocatalytic hydrogen evolution of SiC/CdS composite

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Yuan; Guo, Zhongnan E-mail: wxyuanwz@163.com; Wang, Da; Pan, Nanyan; Yuan, Wenxia E-mail: wxyuanwz@163.com

    2015-07-06

    Synthesis of composite photocatalyst is one of the most important strategies to enhance the yield of hydrogen produced by water splitting. However, one photocatalyst usually tends to randomly aggregate on the other's surface, which weakens the electron transport of the heterogeneous interface. Herein, we developed a hydrothermal reaction to synthesize the SiC/CdS composite with a feasible Z-scheme and well-controlled dispersion of CdS on SiC surface. Heterogeneous structure on the catalyst interface is obtained, leading to more light-absorption and effective electron-hole separation between the well-contacted components, which contribute to the doubly enhanced photocatalytic performance of the composite. This work provides a simple and practical route to improve the catalytic activity by optimizing the intrinsic contact of Z-scheme composite semiconductors.

  2. Heterogeneous nucleation of CdS to enhance visible-light photocatalytic hydrogen evolution of SiC/CdS composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yuan; Guo, Zhongnan; Wang, Da; Pan, Nanyan; Yuan, Wenxia

    2015-07-01

    Synthesis of composite photocatalyst is one of the most important strategies to enhance the yield of hydrogen produced by water splitting. However, one photocatalyst usually tends to randomly aggregate on the other's surface, which weakens the electron transport of the heterogeneous interface. Herein, we developed a hydrothermal reaction to synthesize the SiC/CdS composite with a feasible Z-scheme and well-controlled dispersion of CdS on SiC surface. Heterogeneous structure on the catalyst interface is obtained, leading to more light-absorption and effective electron-hole separation between the well-contacted components, which contribute to the doubly enhanced photocatalytic performance of the composite. This work provides a simple and practical route to improve the catalytic activity by optimizing the intrinsic contact of Z-scheme composite semiconductors.

  3. Hydrophobic hydration driven self-assembly of curcumin in water: Similarities to nucleation and growth under large metastability, and an analysis of water dynamics at heterogeneous surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, Milan Kumar; Roy, Susmita; Bagchi, Biman

    2014-11-01

    As the beneficial effects of curcumin have often been reported to be limited to its small concentrations, we have undertaken a study to find the aggregation properties of curcumin in water by varying the number of monomers. Our molecular dynamics simulation results show that the equilibrated structure is always an aggregated state with remarkable structural rearrangements as we vary the number of curcumin monomers from 4 to 16 monomers. We find that the curcumin monomers form clusters in a very definite pattern where they tend to aggregate both in parallel and anti-parallel orientation of the phenyl rings, often seen in the formation of β-sheet in proteins. A considerable enhancement in the population of parallel alignments is observed with increasing the system size from 12 to 16 curcumin monomers. Due to the prevalence of such parallel alignment for large system size, a more closely packed cluster is formed with maximum number of hydrophobic contacts. We also follow the pathway of cluster growth, in particular the transition from the initial segregated to the final aggregated state. We find the existence of a metastable structural intermediate involving a number of intermediate-sized clusters dispersed in the solution. We have constructed a free energy landscape of aggregation where the metatsable state has been identified. The course of aggregation bears similarity to nucleation and growth in highly metastable state. The final aggregated form remains stable with the total exclusion of water from its sequestered hydrophobic core. We also investigate water structure near the cluster surface along with their orientation. We find that water molecules form a distorted tetrahedral geometry in the 1st solvation layer of the cluster, interacting rather strongly with the hydrophilic groups at the surface of the curcumin. The dynamics of such quasi-bound water molecules near the surface of curcumin cluster is considerably slower than the bulk signifying a restricted

  4. Multicomponent mass transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.; Krishna, R.

    1993-01-01

    This is an important book on multicomponent mass transfer, meant for readers already acquainted with the theory of mass transfer and the fundamentals of transport phenomena. Part 1, entitled Molecular Diffusion, contains the following chapters: Preliminary Concepts; The Maxwell-Stefan Relations; Fick's Law; Estimation of Diffusion Coefficients; Solution of multicomponent Diffusion Problems: The Linearized Theory; and Solution of Multicomponent Diffusion Problems: Effective Diffusivity Methods. Part 2, entitled Interphase Transfer, contains the following chapters: Mass-Transfer Coefficients; Film Theory; Unsteady-State Mass-Transfer Models; Mass Transfer in Turbulent Flow; and Simultaneous Mass and Energy Transfer. Part 3, entitled Design, contains the following chapters: Multicomponent Distillation: Mass-Transfer Models; Multicomponent Distillation: Efficiency Models; Multicomponent Distillation: A Nonequilibrium Stage Model; and Condensation of Vapor Mixtures. Appendices are provided on matrix algebra, equation-solving and estimation of a thermodynamic derivative matrix. A computer diskette is provided with the book; the examples in Chapters 1--13 are solvable using this diskette and the commercial package Mathcad which the user must obtain. A separate software package, Chemsep, is needed for some of the exercises in Chapter 14.

  5. Experiments on Nucleation in Different Flow Regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayuzick, R. J.; Hofmeister, W. H.; Morton, C. M.; Robinson, M. B.

    1999-01-01

    The vast majority of metallic engineering materials are solidified from the liquid phase. Understanding the solidification process is essential to control microstructure, which in turn, determines the properties of materials. The genesis of solidification is nucleation, where the first stable solid forms from the liquid phase. Nucleation kinetics determine the degree of undercooling and phase selection. As such, it is important to understand nucleation phenomena in order to control solidification or glass formation in metals and alloys. Early experiments in nucleation kinetics were accomplished by droplet dispersion methods. Dilatometry was used by Turnbull and others, and more recently differential thermal analysis and differential scanning calorimetry have been used for kinetic studies. These techniques have enjoyed success; however, there are difficulties with these experiments. Since materials are dispersed in a medium, the character of the emulsion/metal interface affects the nucleation behavior. Statistics are derived from the large number of particles observed in a single experiment, but dispersions have a finite size distribution which adds to the uncertainty of the kinetic determinations. Even though temperature can be controlled quite well before the onset of nucleation, the release of the latent heat of fusion during nucleation of particles complicates the assumption of isothermality during these experiments. Containerless processing has enabled another approach to the study of nucleation kinetics. With levitation techniques it is possible to undercool one sample to nucleation repeatedly in a controlled manner, such that the statistics of the nucleation process can be derived from multiple experiments on a single sample. The authors have fully developed the analysis of nucleation experiments on single samples following the suggestions of Skripov. The advantage of these experiments is that the samples are directly observable. The nucleation temperature

  6. Ice nucleation activity of polysaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bichler, Magdalena; Felgitsch, Laura; Haeusler, Thomas; Seidl-Seiboth, Verena; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-04-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is an important process in the atmosphere. It shows direct impact on our climate by triggering ice cloud formation and therefore it has much influence on the radiation balance of our planet (Lohmann et al. 2002; Mishchenko et al. 1996). The process itself is not completely understood so far and many questions remain open. Different substances have been found to exhibit ice nucleation activity (INA). Due to their vast differences in chemistry and morphology it is difficult to predict what substance will make good ice nuclei and which will not. Hence simple model substances must be found and be tested regarding INA. Our work aims at gaining to a deeper understanding of heterogeneous ice nucleation. We intend to find some reference standards with defined chemistry, which may explain the mechanisms of heterogeneous ice nucleation. A particular focus lies on biological carbohydrates in regards to their INA. Biological carbohydrates are widely distributed in all kingdoms of life. Mostly they are specific for certain organisms and have well defined purposes, e.g. structural polysaccharides like chitin (in fungi and insects) and pectin (in plants), which has also water-binding properties. Since they are widely distributed throughout our biosphere and mostly safe to use for nutrition purposes, they are well studied and easily accessible, rendering them ideal candidates as proxies. In our experiments we examined various carbohydrates, like the already mentioned chitin and pectin, as well as their chemical modifications. Lohmann U.; A Glaciation Indirect Aerosol Effect Caused by Soot Aerosols; J. Geoph. Res.; Vol. 24 No.4; pp 11-1 - 11-4; 2002 Mishchenko M.I., Rossow W.B., Macke A., Lacis A. A.; Sensitivity of Cirrus Cloud Albedo, Bidirectional Reflectance and Optical Thickness Retrieval Accuracy to Ice Particle Shape, J. Geoph. Res.; Vol. 101, No D12; pp. 16,973 - 16,985; 1996

  7. Efficient multicomponent fuel algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, D. J.; O'Rourke, P. J.; Amsden, A. A.

    2003-03-01

    We derive equations for multicomponent fuel evaporation in airborne fuel droplets and wall films, and implement the model into KIVA-3V. Temporal and spatial variations in liquid droplet composition and temperature are not modelled but solved for by discretizing the interior of the droplet in an implicit and computationally efficient way. We find that an interior discretization is necessary to correctly compute the evolution of the droplet composition. The details of the one-dimensional numerical algorithm are described. Numerical simulations of multicomponent evaporation are performed for single droplets and compared to experimental data.

  8. Ice Nucleation in Deep Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric; Ackerman, Andrew; Stevens, David; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The processes controlling production of ice crystals in deep, rapidly ascending convective columns are poorly understood due to the difficulties involved with either modeling or in situ sampling of these violent clouds. A large number of ice crystals are no doubt generated when droplets freeze at about -40 C. However, at higher levels, these crystals are likely depleted due to precipitation and detrainment. As the ice surface area decreases, the relative humidity can increase well above ice saturation, resulting in bursts of ice nucleation. We will present simulations of these processes using a large-eddy simulation model with detailed microphysics. Size bins are included for aerosols, liquid droplets, ice crystals, and mixed-phase (ice/liquid) hydrometers. Microphysical processes simulated include droplet activation, freezing, melting, homogeneous freezing of sulfate aerosols, and heterogeneous ice nucleation. We are focusing on the importance of ice nucleation events in the upper part of the cloud at temperatures below -40 C. We will show that the ultimate evolution of the cloud in this region (and the anvil produced by the convection) is sensitive to these ice nucleation events, and hence to the composition of upper tropospheric aerosols that get entrained into the convective column.

  9. Multicomponent Implant Releasing Dexamethasone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkola, L.; Vapalahti, K.; Ashammakhi, N.

    2008-02-01

    Several inflammatory conditions are usually treated with corticosteroids. There are various problems like side effects with traditional applications of steroids, e.g. topical, or systemic routes. Local drug delivery systems have been studied and developed to gain more efficient administration with fewer side effects. Earlier, we reported on developing Dexamethasone (DX) releasing biodegradable fibers. However, their drug release properties were not satisfactory in terms of onset of drug release. Thus, we assessed the development of multicomponent (MC) implant to enhance earlier drug release from such biodegradable fibers. Poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and 2 wt-% and 8 wt-% DX were compounded and extruded with twin-screw extruder to form of fibers. Some of the fibers were sterilized to obtain a change in drug release properties. Four different fiber classes were studied: 2 wt-%, 8 wt-%, sterilized 2 wt-%, and sterilized 8 wt-%. 3×4 different DX-releasing fibers were then heat-pressed to form one multicomponent rod. Half of the rods where sterilized. Drug release was measured from initial fibers and multicomponent rods using a UV/VIS spectrometer. Shear strength and changes in viscosity were also measured. Drug release studies showed that drug release commenced earlier from multicomponent rods than from component fibers. Drug release from multicomponent rods lasted from day 30 to day 70. The release period of sterilized rods extended from day 23 to day 57. When compared to the original component fibers, the drug release from MC rods commenced earlier. The initial shear strength of MC rods was 135 MPa and decreased to 105 MPa during four weeks of immersion in phosphate buffer solution. Accordingly, heat pressing has a positive effect on drug release. After four weeks in hydrolysis, no disintegration was observed.

  10. [Effect of nucleation modes on the induced crystallization process for copper contained wastewater treatment].

    PubMed

    Xiong, Ya; Yan, Zhong; Zhang, Guo-Chen; Zheng, Ming-Xia; Wang, Kai-Jun

    2011-10-01

    The effect of nucleation modes on the induced crystallization process for copper contained wastewater treatment was studied. Tests were undertaken to observe the difference of copper removal efficiency and the crystal growth with homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation. When the influent copper concentration was 50 mg x L(-1), copper removal efficiency could achieve 98.0% with the heterogeneous and 26.3% with homogeneous nucleation. And the SEM-EDS showed that the growth of crystals with heterogeneous nucleation was better and the purity of the crystals was higher than that with homogeneous nucleation. It is obvious that the homogeneous nucleation was an unfavorable condition on the induced crystallization process. Then the research devoted to discuss the process of induced crystallization with the two different nucleation mode and analysis the influencing mechanism of the homogeneous nucleation on the induced crystallization. PMID:22279909

  11. Crystal nucleation in Pd-Si alloys. [in containerless environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drehman, A. J.; Turnbull, D.

    1982-01-01

    A study of the crystal phase nucleation in undercooled droplets of Pd-Si alloys with composition near the Pd(84.5)Si(15.5) eutectic composition is reported. Molten droplets are released at the top of a drop tube and solidify (to either a crystalline or glassy state) during descent. This provides a containerless (and nearly gravity free) environment so that nucleation due to container walls or vibrations is eliminated. It is found that crystallization, due to homogeneous nucleation, is bypassed in droplets of 1 mm diameter when cooled at 760 K/sec. From this an upper limit of the homogeneous nucleation rate is estimated. Results are compared with a previously published study of nucleation in 0.06 mm to 0.33 mm diameter droplets, which indicated that nucleation results from heterogeneous surface nucleation and that the number of these nuclei is dependent on the atmosphere in the drop tube.

  12. Hybrid Multicomponent Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xinqiao; Kiick, Kristi L.

    2009-01-01

    Artificial ECMs that not only closely mimic the hybrid nature of the natural ECM but also provide tunable material properties and enhanced biological functions are attractive candidates for tissue engineering applications. This review summarizes recent advances in developing multicomponent hybrid hydrogels by integrating modular and heterogeneous building blocks into well-defined, multifunctional hydrogel composites. The individual building blocks can be chemically, morphologically, and functionally diverse, and the hybridization can occur at molecular level or microscopic scale. The modular nature of the designs, combined with the potential synergistic effects of the hybrid systems, has resulted in novel hydrogel matrices with robust structure and defined functions. PMID:19107720

  13. Nucleation of shear bands in amorphous alloys

    PubMed Central

    Perepezko, John H.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Chen, Ming-Wei; Wang, Jun-Qiang; Gonzalez, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    The initiation and propagation of shear bands is an important mode of localized inhomogeneous deformation that occurs in a wide range of materials. In metallic glasses, shear band development is considered to center on a structural heterogeneity, a shear transformation zone that evolves into a rapidly propagating shear band under a shear stress above a threshold. Deformation by shear bands is a nucleation-controlled process, but the initiation process is unclear. Here we use nanoindentation to probe shear band nucleation during loading by measuring the first pop-in event in the load–depth curve which is demonstrated to be associated with shear band formation. We analyze a large number of independent measurements on four different bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) alloys and reveal the operation of a bimodal distribution of the first pop-in loads that are associated with different shear band nucleation sites that operate at different stress levels below the glass transition temperature, Tg. The nucleation kinetics, the nucleation barriers, and the density for each site type have been determined. The discovery of multiple shear band nucleation sites challenges the current view of nucleation at a single type of site and offers opportunities for controlling the ductility of BMG alloys. PMID:24594599

  14. Transient nucleation in glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelton, K. F.

    1991-01-01

    Nucleation rates in condensed systems are frequently not at their steady state values. Such time dependent (or transient) nucleation is most clearly observed in devitrification studies of metallic and silicate glasses. The origin of transient nucleation and its role in the formation and stability of desired phases and microstructures are discussed. Numerical models of nucleation in isothermal and nonisothermal situations, based on the coupled differential equations describing cluster evolution within the classical theory, are presented. The importance of transient nucleation in glass formation and crystallization is discussed.

  15. Dew nucleation and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beysens, Daniel

    2006-11-01

    Dew is the condensation of water vapor into liquid droplets on a substrate. It is characterized by an initial heterogeneous nucleation on a substrate and a further growth of droplets. The presence of a substrate that geometrically constrains the growth is the origin of the peculiarities and richness of the phenomenon. A key point is the drop interaction through drop fusion or coalescence, which leads to scaling in the growth and gives universality to the process. As a matter of fact, growth dynamics are only dependent on substrate and drop dimensionality. Coalescence events lead to temporal and spatio-temporal fluctuations in the substrate coverage, drop configuration, etc., which give rise to a very peculiar dynamics. When the substrate is a liquid or a liquid crystal, the drop pattern can exhibit special spatial order, such as crystalline, hexatic phases and fractal contours. Condensation on a solid substrate near its melting point can make the drop jump. The applications of monitoring dew formation are manifold. Examples can be found in medicine (sterilization process), agriculture (green houses) and hydrology (production of drinkable water). To cite this article: D. Beysens, C. R. Physique 7 (2006).

  16. New Understandings for Three-Dimensional Nucleation (I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. Y.

    The generic heterogeneous effect of foreign particles on 3D nucleation was examined both theoretically and experimentally. It shows that the nucleation observed under normal conditions includes a sequence of progressive heterogeneous processes, characterized by different interfacial correlation function f(m, x)s. At low supersaturations, nucleation will be controlled by the process with a small interfacial correlation function f(m, x), which results from a strong interaction and good structural match between the foreign bodies and the crystallizing phase. At high supersaturations, nucleation on foreign particles having a weak interaction and poor structural match with the crystallizing phase (f(m, x)-->1) will govern the kinetics. This frequently leads to the false identification of homogeneous nucleation. Genuine homogeneous nucleation, which is the up-limit of heterogeneous nucleation, may not be easily achievable under gravity. In order to check these results, the prediction is confronted with nucleation experiments of some crystals. The results are in excellent agreement with the theory. Apart from this, the implications for epitaxial growth have also been discussed. In order to grow crystals epitaxially, the supersaturation should be kept at a low level, despite a good structural match between the crystal and substrate.

  17. Ice-Nucleating Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Hitoshi

    Since the discovery of ice-nucleating bacteria in 1974 by Maki et al., a large number of studies on the biological characteristics, ice-nucleating substance, ice nucleation gene and frost damage etc. of the bacteria have been carried out. Ice-nucleating bacteria can cause the freezing of water at relatively warm temperature (-2.3°C). Tween 20 was good substrates for ice-nucleating activity of Pseudomonas fluorescens KUIN-1. Major fatty acids of Isolate (Pseudomonas fluorescens) W-11 grown at 30°C were palmitic, cis-9-hexadecenoic and cis-11-octadecenoic which amounted to 90% of the total fatty acids. Sequence analysis shows that an ice nucleation gene from Pseudomonas fluorescens is related to the gene of Pseudomonas syringae.

  18. Electrohydrodynamics Of Multicomponent Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gera, Prerna; Salac, David

    2015-11-01

    The addition of cholesterol into a lipid membrane induces the formation of distinct domains. These domains try to minimize the overall energy of the system by coalescence and migration. The application of electric fields will induce flow of these membrane domains and influence the rate at which they coarsen. In this work the electrohydrodynamics of multicomponent vesicles is numerically modelled. The method uses a Cahn-Hilliard-Cook model of the lipid domains restricted to a deforming three-dimensional vesicle and will be briefly discussed. Sample results will be presented and compared to experimental observations. This work supported by NSF Grant #1253739.

  19. Magnetization of multicomponent ferrofluids.

    PubMed

    Szalai, I; Dietrich, S

    2011-08-17

    The solution of the mean spherical approximation (MSA) integral equation for isotropic multicomponent dipolar hard sphere fluids without external fields is used to construct a density functional theory (DFT), which includes external fields, in order to obtain an analytical expression for the external field dependence of the magnetization of ferrofluidic mixtures. This DFT is based on a second-order Taylor series expansion of the free energy density functional of the anisotropic system around the corresponding isotropic MSA reference system. The ensuing results for the magnetic properties are in quantitative agreement with our canonical ensemble Monte Carlo simulation data presented here. PMID:21795777

  20. Experiments on Nucleation in Different Flow Regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayuzick, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    The vast majority of metallic engineering materials are solidified from the liquid phase. Understanding the solidification process is essential to control microstructure, which in turn, determines the properties of materials. The genesis of solidification is nucleation, where the first stable solid forms from the liquid phase. Nucleation kinetics determine the degree of undercooling and phase selection. As such, it is important to understand nucleation phenomena in order to control solidification or glass formation in metals and alloys. Early experiments in nucleation kinetics were accomplished by droplet dispersion methods [1-6]. Dilitometry was used by Turnbull and others, and more recently differential thermal analysis and differential scanning calorimetry have been used for kinetic studies. These techniques have enjoyed success; however, there are difficulties with these experiments. Since materials are dispersed in a medium, the character of the emulsion/metal interface affects the nucleation behavior. Statistics are derived from the large number of particles observed in a single experiment, but dispersions have a finite size distribution which adds to the uncertainty of the kinetic determinations. Even though temperature can be controlled quite well before the onset of nucleation, the release of the latent heat of fusion during nucleation of particles complicates the assumption of isothermality during these experiments. Containerless processing has enabled another approach to the study of nucleation kinetics [7]. With levitation techniques it is possible to undercool one sample to nucleation repeatedly in a controlled manner, such that the statistics of the nucleation process can be derived from multiple experiments on a single sample. The authors have fully developed the analysis of nucleation experiments on single samples following the suggestions of Skripov [8]. The advantage of these experiments is that the samples are directly observable. The nucleation

  1. Effect of solute on the nucleation and propagation of ice.

    PubMed

    Charoenrein, S; Goddard, M; Reid, D S

    1991-01-01

    Using the emulsion technique, we have studied nucleation of ice in aqueous solutions containing silver iodide or Pseudomonas syringae. Using a Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC), we determined characteristic temperatures of nucleation, and also rates of nucleation at selected temperatures. The freezing point depression induced by added solute is linearly related to the lowering of both homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation temperature. Nucleation kinetics depend on a fifth power function of the temperature. Solute is found to affect the parameters of this relationship in different ways, dependent upon the nature of the catalytic site for ice nucleation. We have also studied the effect of composition on the linear propagation velocity (LPV) of ice in undercooled solutions contained in a U-tube. We have determined velocities in a range of concentrations of sugar solution at the same undercooling, and also as a function of undercooling. The role of added polymer has also been investigated. It is affected by the sugar concentration. PMID:1746327

  2. Kinetic theory of diffusion-limited nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippe, T.; Bonvalet, M.; Blavette, D.

    2016-05-01

    We examine binary nucleation in the size and composition space {R,c} using the formalism of the multivariable theory [N. V. Alekseechkin, J. Chem. Phys. 124, 124512 (2006)]. We show that the variable c drops out of consideration for very large curvature of the new phase Gibbs energy with composition. Consequently nuclei around the critical size have the critical composition, which is derived from the condition of criticality for the canonical variables and is found not to depend on surface tension. In this case, nucleation kinetics can be investigated in the size space only. Using macroscopic kinetics, we determine the general expression for the condensation rate when growth is limited by bulk diffusion, which accounts for both diffusion and capillarity and exhibits a different dependence with the critical size, as compared with the interface-limited regime. This new expression of the condensation rate for bulk diffusion-limited nucleation is the counterpart of the classical interface-limited result. We then extend our analysis to multicomponent solutions.

  3. Kinetic theory of diffusion-limited nucleation.

    PubMed

    Philippe, T; Bonvalet, M; Blavette, D

    2016-05-28

    We examine binary nucleation in the size and composition space {R,c} using the formalism of the multivariable theory [N. V. Alekseechkin, J. Chem. Phys. 124, 124512 (2006)]. We show that the variable c drops out of consideration for very large curvature of the new phase Gibbs energy with composition. Consequently nuclei around the critical size have the critical composition, which is derived from the condition of criticality for the canonical variables and is found not to depend on surface tension. In this case, nucleation kinetics can be investigated in the size space only. Using macroscopic kinetics, we determine the general expression for the condensation rate when growth is limited by bulk diffusion, which accounts for both diffusion and capillarity and exhibits a different dependence with the critical size, as compared with the interface-limited regime. This new expression of the condensation rate for bulk diffusion-limited nucleation is the counterpart of the classical interface-limited result. We then extend our analysis to multicomponent solutions. PMID:27250310

  4. Diamond nucleation using polyethene

    DOEpatents

    Morell, Gerardo; Makarov, Vladimir; Varshney, Deepak; Weiner, Brad

    2013-07-23

    The invention presents a simple, non-destructive and non-abrasive method of diamond nucleation using polyethene. It particularly describes the nucleation of diamond on an electrically viable substrate surface using polyethene via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique in a gaseous environment.

  5. Diamond Nucleation Using Polyethene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morell, Gerardo (Inventor); Makarov, Vladimir (Inventor); Varshney, Deepak (Inventor); Weiner, Brad (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The invention presents a simple, non-destructive and non-abrasive method of diamond nucleation using polyethene. It particularly describes the nucleation of diamond on an electrically viable substrate surface using polyethene via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique in a gaseous environment.

  6. Nucleation of amyloid fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashchiev, Dimo; Auer, Stefan

    2010-06-01

    We consider nucleation of amyloid fibrils in the case when the process occurs by the mechanism of direct polymerization of practically fully extended protein segments, i.e., β-strands, into β-sheets. Applying the classical nucleation theory, we derive a general expression for the work to form a nanosized amyloid fibril (protofilament) constituted of successively layered β-sheets. Analysis of this expression reveals that with increasing its size, the fibril transforms from one-dimensional to two-dimensional aggregate in order to preserve the equilibrium shape corresponding to minimal formation work. We determine the size of the fibril nucleus, the fibril nucleation work, and the fibril nucleation rate as explicit functions of the concentration and temperature of the protein solution. The results obtained are applicable to homogeneous nucleation, which occurs when the solution is sufficiently pure and/or strongly supersaturated.

  7. Liquid Nucleation at Superheated Grain Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, T.; Mishin, Y.

    2011-04-01

    Grain boundaries with relatively low energies can be superheated above the melting temperature and eventually melt by heterogeneous nucleation of liquid droplets. We propose a thermodynamic model of this process based on the sharp-interface approximation with a disjoining potential. The distinct feature of the model is its ability to predict the shape and size of the critical nucleus by using a variational approach. The model reduces to the classical nucleation theory in the limit of large nuclei but is more general and remains valid for small nuclei. Contrary to the classical nucleation theory, the model predicts the existence of a critical temperature of superheating and offers a simple formula for its calculation. The model is tested against molecular dynamic simulations in which liquid nuclei at a superheated boundary were obtained by an adiabatic trapping procedure. The simulation results demonstrate a reassuring consistency with the model.

  8. Homogeneous freezing nucleation of stratospheric solution droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric J.; Toon, Owen B.; Hamill, Patrick

    1991-01-01

    The classical theory of homogeneous nucleation was used to calculate the freezing rate of sulfuric acid solution aerosols under stratospheric conditions. The freezing of stratospheric aerosols would be important for the nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate particles in the Arctic and Antarctic stratospheres. In addition, the rate of heterogeneous chemical reactions on stratospheric aerosols may be very sensitive to their state. The calculations indicate that homogeneous freezing nucleation of pure water ice in the stratospheric solution droplets would occur at temperatures below about 192 K. However, the physical properties of H2SO4 solution at such low temperatures are not well known, and it is possible that sulfuric acid aerosols will freeze out at temperatures ranging from about 180 to 195 K. It is also shown that the temperature at which the aerosols freeze is nearly independent of their size.

  9. Probing Individual Ice Nucleation Events with Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingbing; China, Swarup; Knopf, Daniel; Gilles, Mary; Laskin, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is one of the processes of critical relevance to a range of topics in the fundamental and the applied science and technologies. Heterogeneous ice nucleation initiated by particles proceeds where microscopic properties of particle surfaces essentially control nucleation mechanisms. Ice nucleation in the atmosphere on particles governs the formation of ice and mixed phase clouds, which in turn influence the Earth's radiative budget and climate. Heterogeneous ice nucleation is still insufficiently understood and poses significant challenges in predictive understanding of climate change. We present a novel microscopy platform allowing observation of individual ice nucleation events at temperature range of 193-273 K and relative humidity relevant for ice formation in the atmospheric clouds. The approach utilizes a home built novel ice nucleation cell interfaced with Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (IN-ESEM system). The IN-ESEM system is applied for direct observation of individual ice formation events, determining ice nucleation mechanisms, freezing temperatures, and relative humidity onsets. Reported microanalysis of the ice nucleating particles (INP) include elemental composition detected by the energy dispersed analysis of X-rays (EDX), and advanced speciation of the organic content in particles using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). The performance of the IN-ESEM system is validated through a set of experiments with kaolinite particles with known ice nucleation propensity. We demonstrate an application of the IN-ESEM system to identify and characterize individual INP within a complex mixture of ambient particles.

  10. Homogeneous ice nucleation from aqueous inorganic/organic particles representative of biomass burning: water activity, freezing temperatures, nucleation rates.

    PubMed

    Knopf, Daniel A; Rigg, Yannick J

    2011-02-10

    Homogeneous ice nucleation plays an important role in the formation of cirrus clouds with subsequent effects on the global radiative budget. Here we report on homogeneous ice nucleation temperatures and corresponding nucleation rate coefficients of aqueous droplets serving as surrogates of biomass burning aerosol. Micrometer-sized (NH(4))(2)SO(4)/levoglucosan droplets with mass ratios of 10:1, 1:1, 1:5, and 1:10 and aqueous multicomponent organic droplets with and without (NH(4))(2)SO(4) under typical tropospheric temperatures and relative humidities are investigated experimentally using a droplet conditioning and ice nucleation apparatus coupled to an optical microscope with image analysis. Homogeneous freezing was determined as a function of temperature and water activity, a(w), which was set at droplet preparation conditions. The ice nucleation data indicate that minor addition of (NH(4))(2)SO(4) to the aqueous organic droplets renders the temperature dependency of water activity negligible in contrast to the case of aqueous organic solution droplets. The mean homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient derived from 8 different aqueous droplet compositions with average diameters of ∼60 μm for temperatures as low as 195 K and a(w) of 0.82-1 is 2.18 × 10(6) cm(-3) s(-1). The experimentally derived freezing temperatures and homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficients are in agreement with predictions of the water activity-based homogeneous ice nucleation theory when taking predictive uncertainties into account. However, the presented ice nucleation data indicate that the water activity-based homogeneous ice nucleation theory overpredicts the freezing temperatures by up to 3 K and corresponding ice nucleation rate coefficients by up to ∼2 orders of magnitude. A shift of 0.01 in a(w), which is well within the uncertainty of typical field and laboratory relative humidity measurements, brings experimental and predicted freezing temperatures and homogeneous ice

  11. Dynamics of ice nucleation on water repellent surfaces.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Azar; Yamada, Masako; Li, Ri; Shang, Wen; Otta, Shourya; Zhong, Sheng; Ge, Liehui; Dhinojwala, Ali; Conway, Ken R; Bahadur, Vaibhav; Vinciquerra, A Joseph; Stephens, Brian; Blohm, Margaret L

    2012-02-14

    Prevention of ice accretion and adhesion on surfaces is relevant to many applications, leading to improved operation safety, increased energy efficiency, and cost reduction. Development of passive nonicing coatings is highly desirable, since current antiicing strategies are energy and cost intensive. Superhydrophobicity has been proposed as a lead passive nonicing strategy, yet the exact mechanism of delayed icing on these surfaces is not clearly understood. In this work, we present an in-depth analysis of ice formation dynamics upon water droplet impact on surfaces with different wettabilities. We experimentally demonstrate that ice nucleation under low-humidity conditions can be delayed through control of surface chemistry and texture. Combining infrared (IR) thermometry and high-speed photography, we observe that the reduction of water-surface contact area on superhydrophobic surfaces plays a dual role in delaying nucleation: first by reducing heat transfer and second by reducing the probability of heterogeneous nucleation at the water-substrate interface. This work also includes an analysis (based on classical nucleation theory) to estimate various homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation rates in icing situations. The key finding is that ice nucleation delay on superhydrophobic surfaces is more prominent at moderate degrees of supercooling, while closer to the homogeneous nucleation temperature, bulk and air-water interface nucleation effects become equally important. The study presented here offers a comprehensive perspective on the efficacy of textured surfaces for nonicing applications. PMID:22235939

  12. Molecular Ice Nucleation Activity of Birch Pollen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felgitsch, Laura; Bichler, Magdalena; Häusler, Thomas; Weiss, Victor U.; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Allmaier, Günter; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-04-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation plays a major part in ecosystem and climate. Due to the triggering of ice cloud formation it influences the radiation balance of the earth, but also on the ground it can be found to be important in many processes of nature. So far the process of heterogeneous ice nucleation is not fully understood and many questions remain to be answered. Biological ice nucleation is hereby from great interest, because it shows the highest freezing temperatures. Several bacteria and fungi act as ice nuclei. A famous example is Pseudomonas syringae, a bacterium in commercial use (Snomax®), which increases the freezing from homogeneous freezing temperatures of approx. -40° C (for small volumes as in cloud droplets) to temperatures up to -2° C. In 2001 it was found that birch pollen can trigger ice nucleation (Diehl et al. 2001; Diehl et al. 2002). For a long time it was believed that this is due to macroscopic features of the pollen surface. Recent findings of Bernhard Pummer (2012) show a different picture. The ice nuclei are not attached on the pollen surface directly, but on surface material which can be easily washed off. This shows that not only the surface morphology, but also specific molecules or molecular structures are responsible for the ice nucleation activity of birch pollen. With various analytic methods we work on elucidating the structure of these molecules as well as the mechanism with which they trigger ice nucleation. To solve this we use various instrumental analytic techniques like Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy (NMR), Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-MS), and Gas-phase Electrophoretic Mobility Molecular Analysis (GEMMA). Also standard techniques like various chromatographic separation techniques and solvent extraction are in use. We state here that this feature might be due to the aggregation of small molecules, with agglomerates showing a specific surface structure. Our results

  13. Hydrocarbon nucleation and aerosol formation in Neptune's atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Moses, J I; Allen, M; Yung, Y L

    1992-10-01

    Photodissociation of methane at high altitude levels in Neptune's atmosphere leads to the production of complex hydrocarbon species such as acetylene (C2H2), ethane (C2H6), methylacetylene (CH3C2H), propane (C3H8), diacetylene (C4H2), and butane (C4H8). These gases diffuse to the lower stratosphere where temperatures are low enough to initiate condensation. Particle formation may not occur readily, however, as the vapor species become supersaturated. We present a theoretical analysis of particle formation mechanisms at conditions relevant to Neptune's troposphere and stratosphere and show that hydrocarbon nucleation is very inefficient under Neptunian conditions: saturation ratios much greater than unity are required for aerosol formation by either homogeneous, heterogeneous, or ion-induced nucleation. Homogeneous nucleation will not be important for any of the hydrocarbon species considered; however, both heterogeneous and ion-induced nucleation should be possible on Neptune for most of the above species. The relative effectiveness of heterogeneous and ion-induced nucleation depends on the physical and thermodynamic properties of the particular species, the abundance of the condensable species, the temperature at which the vapor becomes supersaturated, and the number and type of condensation nuclei or ions available. Typical saturation ratios required for observable particle formation rates on Neptune range from approximately 3 for heterogeneous nucleation of methane in the upper troposphere to greater than 1000 for heterogeneous nucleation of methylacetylene, diacetylene, and butane in the lower stratosphere. Thus, methane clouds may form slightly above, and stratospheric hazes far below, their saturation levels. When used in conjunction with the results of detailed models of atmospheric photochemistry, our nucleation models place realistic constraints on the altitude levels at which we expect hydrocarbon hazes or clouds to form on Neptune. PMID:11538166

  14. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of nucleation.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, M; Sagis, L M C

    2014-12-14

    We present a novel approach to nucleation processes based on the GENERIC framework (general equation for the nonequilibrium reversible-irreversible coupling). Solely based on the GENERIC structure of time-evolution equations and thermodynamic consistency arguments of exchange processes between a metastable phase and a nucleating phase, we derive the fundamental dynamics for this phenomenon, based on continuous Fokker-Planck equations. We are readily able to treat non-isothermal nucleation even when the nucleating cores cannot be attributed intensive thermodynamic properties. In addition, we capture the dynamics of the time-dependent metastable phase being continuously expelled from the nucleating phase, and keep rigorous track of the volume corrections to the dynamics. Within our framework the definition of a thermodynamic nuclei temperature is manifest. For the special case of nucleation of a gas phase towards its vapor-liquid coexistence, we illustrate that our approach is capable of reproducing recent literature results obtained by more microscopic considerations for the suppression of the nucleation rate due to nonisothermal effects. PMID:25494727

  15. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Schweizer, M.; Sagis, L. M. C.

    2014-12-14

    We present a novel approach to nucleation processes based on the GENERIC framework (general equation for the nonequilibrium reversible-irreversible coupling). Solely based on the GENERIC structure of time-evolution equations and thermodynamic consistency arguments of exchange processes between a metastable phase and a nucleating phase, we derive the fundamental dynamics for this phenomenon, based on continuous Fokker-Planck equations. We are readily able to treat non-isothermal nucleation even when the nucleating cores cannot be attributed intensive thermodynamic properties. In addition, we capture the dynamics of the time-dependent metastable phase being continuously expelled from the nucleating phase, and keep rigorous track of the volume corrections to the dynamics. Within our framework the definition of a thermodynamic nuclei temperature is manifest. For the special case of nucleation of a gas phase towards its vapor-liquid coexistence, we illustrate that our approach is capable of reproducing recent literature results obtained by more microscopic considerations for the suppression of the nucleation rate due to nonisothermal effects.

  16. Ice nucleation terminology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vali, G.; DeMott, P.; Möhler, O.; Whale, T. F.

    2014-08-01

    Progress in the understanding of ice nucleation is being hampered by the lack of uniformity in how some terms are used in the literature. This even extends to some ambiguity of meanings attached to some terms. Suggestions are put forward here for common use of terms. Some are already well established and clear of ambiguities. Others are less engrained and will need a conscious effort in adoption. Evolution in the range of systems where ice nucleation is being studied enhances the need for a clear nomenclature. The ultimate limit in the clarity of definitions is, of course, the limited degree to which ice nucleation processes are understood.

  17. Nonstationary homogeneous nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, K. G.

    1974-01-01

    The theory of homogeneous condensation is reviewed and equations describing this process are presented. Numerical computer solutions to transient problems in nucleation (relaxation to steady state) are presented and compared to a prior computation.

  18. Critical dynamics in multicomponent lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Haataja, Mikko

    2009-08-01

    The formation and dynamics of spatially extended compositional domains in multicomponent lipid membranes both in vivo and in vitro lie at the heart of many important biological and biophysical phenomena. While the thermodynamic basis for domain formation has been explored extensively in the past, the roles of membrane and exterior fluid hydrodynamics on domain formation kinetics have received less attention. A case in point is the impact of hydrodynamics on the dynamics of compositional heterogeneities in lipid membranes in the vicinity of a critical point. In this Rapid Communication it is argued that the asymptotic dynamic behavior of a lipid membrane system in the vicinity of a critical point is strongly influenced by hydrodynamic interactions. More specifically, a mode-coupling argument is developed which predicts a scaling behavior of lipid transport coefficients near the critical point for both symmetric and asymmetric bilayers immersed in a bulk fluid. PMID:19792068

  19. Direct imaging of quantum wires nucleated at diatomic steps

    SciTech Connect

    Molina, S. I.; Varela, M.; Sales, D. L.; Ben, T.; Pizarro, J.; Galindo, P. L.; Fuster, D.; Gonzalez, Y.; Gonzalez, L.; Pennycook, S. J.

    2007-10-01

    Atomic steps at growth surfaces are important heterogeneous sources for nucleation of epitaxial nano-objects. In the presence of misfit strain, we show that the nucleation process takes place preferentially at the upper terrace of the step as a result of the local stress relaxation. Evidence for strain-induced nucleation comes from the direct observation by postgrowth, atomic resolution, Z-contrast imaging of an InAs-rich region in a nanowire located on the upper terrace surface of an interfacial diatomic step.

  20. Multicomponent aerosol dynamics model UHMA: model development and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, H.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Kulmala, M.

    2004-05-01

    A size-segregated aerosol dynamics model UHMA (University of Helsinki Multicomponent Aerosol model) was developed for studies of multicomponent tropospheric aerosol particles. The model includes major aerosol microphysical processes in the atmosphere with a focus on new particle formation and growth; thus it incorporates particle coagulation and multicomponent condensation, applying a revised treatment of condensation flux onto free molecular regime particles and the activation of nanosized clusters by organic vapours (Nano-Köhler theory), as well as recent parameterizations for binary H2SO4-H2O and ternary H2SO4-NH3-H2O homogeneous nucleation and dry deposition. The representation of particle size distribution can be chosen from three sectional methods: the hybrid method, the moving center method, and the retracking method in which moving sections are retracked to a fixed grid after a certain time interval. All these methods can treat particle emissions and atmospheric transport consistently, and are therefore suitable for use in large scale atmospheric models. In a test simulation against an accurate high resolution solution, all the methods showed reasonable treatment of new particle formation with 20 size sections although the hybrid and the retracking methods suffered from artificial widening of the distribution. The moving center approach, on the other hand, showed extra dents in the particle size distribution and failed to predict the onset of detectable particle formation. In a separate test simulation of an observed nucleation event, the model captured the key qualitative behaviour of the system well. Furthermore, its prediction of the organic volume fraction in newly formed particles, suggesting values as high as 0.5 for 3-4 nm particles and approximately 0.8 for 10 nm particles, agrees with recent indirect composition measurements.

  1. EVALUATING MULTICOMPONENT COMPETITIVE ADSORPTION IN FIXED BEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An equilibrium column model (ECM) was developed to evaluate multicomponent competition in fixed-bed adsorption columns. The model ignores mass transfer resistances and uses ideal adsorbed solution theory to predict the competitive effects in multicomponent mixtures. The bed capac...

  2. Heterogeneous Catalysis: On Bathroom Mirrors and Boiling Stones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philipse, Albert P.

    2011-01-01

    Though heterogeneous nucleation of liquid droplets on a smooth surface (such as a bathroom mirror) is a classical topic in nucleation theory, it is not well-known that this topic is actually a pedagogical example of heterogeneous catalysis: the one and only effect of the surface is to lower the activation Gibbs energy of droplet formation. In…

  3. Colloids and Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerson, Bruce

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of the work funded under this grant were to develop a microphotographic technique and use it to monitor the nucleation and growth of crystals of hard colloidal spheres. Special attention is given to the possible need for microgravity studies in future experiments. A number of persons have been involved in this work. A masters student, Keith Davis, began the project and developed a sheet illumination apparatus and an image processing system for detection and analysis. His work on a segmentation program for image processing was sufficient for his master's research and has been published. A post doctoral student Bernie Olivier and a graduate student Yueming He, who originally suggested the sheet illumination, were funded by another source but along with Keith made photographic series of several samples (that had been made by Keith Davis). Data extraction has been done by Keith, Bernie, Yueming and two undergraduates employed on the grant. Results are published in Langmuir. These results describe the sheet lighting technique as one which illuminates not only the Bragg scattering crystal, but all the crystals. Thus, accurate crystal counts can be made for nucleation rate measurements. The strange crystal length scale reduction, observed in small angle light scattering (SALS) studies, following the initial nucleation and growth period, has been observed directly. The Bragg scattering (and dark) crystal size decreases in the crossover region. This could be an effect due to gravitational forces or due to over- compression of the crystal during growth. Direct observations indicate a complex morphology for the resulting hard sphere crystals. The crystal edges are fairly sharp but the crystals have a large degree of internal structure. This structure is a result of (unstable) growth and not aggregation. As yet unpublished work compares growth exponents data with data obtained by SALS. The nucleation rate density is determined over a broad volume fraction range

  4. Self-assembly protocol design for periodic multicomponent structures.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, William M; Frenkel, Daan

    2015-12-14

    Assembling molecular superstructures with many distinct components will allow unprecedented control over morphology at the nanoscale. Recently, this approach has been used to assemble periodic structures with precisely defined features, such as repeating arrays of pores and channels, using a large number of building blocks. Here we propose a predictive tool that allows us to optimize the nucleation and growth of unbounded, ordered structures. In what follows, we call these structures 'crystals', even though they may only be periodic in one or two dimensions. We find that the nucleation barriers and growth pathways for crystals consisting of many components exhibit generic features that are very different from those of simple crystals. To illustrate the very non-classical nature of the nucleation and growth of such structures, we study the formation of one and two-dimensional crystals with multicomponent unit cells. We find that, whilst the boundaries in the non-periodic dimensions significantly affect the stabilities of these crystals, the nucleation barriers are largely determined by the local connectivity of the associated bulk crystal and are independent of the number of distinct components in the unit cell. We predict that the self-assembly of crystals with complex morphologies can be made to follow specific pathways toward the target structure that successively incorporate key features of the three-dimensional target structure. In contrast with simple crystals, it is possible to tune the kinetics of nucleation and growth separately, thus minimizing defect formation. We show how control over self-assembly pathways can be used to optimize the kinetics of formation of extended structures with arbitrary nanoscale patterns. PMID:26404794

  5. A detailed study of ice nucleation by feldspar minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whale, T. F.; Murray, B. J.; Wilson, T. W.; Carpenter, M. A.; Harrison, A.; Holden, M. A.; Vergara Temprado, J.; Morris, J.; O'Sullivan, D.

    2015-12-01

    Immersion mode heterogeneous ice nucleation plays a crucial role in controlling the composition of mixed phase clouds, which contain both supercooled liquid water and ice particles. The amount of ice in mixed phase clouds can affect cloud particle size, lifetime and extent and so affects radiative properties and precipitation. Feldspar minerals are probably the most important minerals for ice nucleation in mixed phase clouds because they nucleate ice more efficiently than other components of atmospheric mineral dust (Atkinson et al. 2013). The feldspar class of minerals is complex, containing numerous chemical compositions, several crystal polymorphs and wide variations in microscopic structure. Here we present the results of a study into ice nucleation by a wide range of different feldspars. We found that, in general, alkali feldspars nucleate ice more efficiently than plagioclase feldspars. However, we also found that particular alkali feldspars nucleate ice relatively inefficiently, suggesting that chemical composition is not the only important factor that dictates the ice nucleation efficiency of feldspar minerals. Ice nucleation by feldspar is described well by the singular model and is probably site specific in nature. The alkali feldspars that do not nucleate ice efficiently possess relatively homogenous structure on the micrometre scale suggesting that the important sites for nucleation are related to surface topography. Ice nucleation active site densities for the majority of tested alkali feldspars are similar to those found by Atkinson et al (2013), meaning that the validity of global aerosol modelling conducted in that study is not affected. Additionally, we have found that ice nucleation by feldspars is strongly influenced, both positively and negatively, by the solute content of droplets. Most other nucleants we have tested are unaffected by solutes. This provides insight into the mechanism of ice nucleation by feldspars and could be of importance

  6. Heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schryer, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    The present conference on heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry considers such topics concerning clusters, particles and microparticles as common problems in nucleation and growth, chemical kinetics, and catalysis, chemical reactions with aerosols, electron beam studies of natural and anthropogenic microparticles, and structural studies employing molecular beam techniques, as well as such gas-solid interaction topics as photoassisted reactions, catalyzed photolysis, and heterogeneous catalysis. Also discussed are sulfur dioxide absorption, oxidation, and oxidation inhibition in falling drops, sulfur dioxide/water equilibria, the evidence for heterogeneous catalysis in the atmosphere, the importance of heterogeneous processes to tropospheric chemistry, soot-catalyzed atmospheric reactions, and the concentrations and mechanisms of formation of sulfate in the atmospheric boundary layer.

  7. Nucleation of Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinero, Valeria

    2009-03-01

    The freezing of water into ice is a ubiquitous transformation in nature, yet the microscopic mechanism of homogeneous nucleation of ice has not yet been elucidated. One of the reasons is that nucleation happens in time scales that are too fast for an experimental characterization and two slow for a systematic study with atomistic simulations. In this work we use coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations with the monatomic model of water mW[1] to shed light into the mechanism of homogeneous nucleation of ice and its relationship to the thermodynamics of supercooled water. Cooling of bulk water produces either crystalline ice or low- density amorphous ice (LDA) depending on the quenching rate. We find that ice crystallization occurs faster at temperatures close to the liquid-liquid transition, defined as the point of maximum inflection of the density with respect to the temperature. At the liquid-liquid transition, the time scale of nucleation becomes comparable to the time scale of relaxation within the liquid phase, determining --effectively- the end of the metastable liquid state. Our results imply that no ultraviscous liquid water can exist at temperatures just above the much disputed glass transition of water. We discuss how the scenario is changed when water is in confinement, and the relationship of the mechanism of ice nucleation to that of other liquids that present the same phase behavior, silicon [2] and germanium [3]. [4pt] [1] Molinero, V. & Moore, E. B. Water modeled as an intermediate element between carbon and silicon. Journal of Physical Chemistry B (2008). Online at http://pubs.acs.org/cgi- bin/abstract.cgi/jpcbfk/asap/abs/jp805227c.html [0pt] [2] Molinero, V., Sastry, S. & Angell, C. A. Tuning of tetrahedrality in a silicon potential yields a series of monatomic (metal-like) glass formers of very high fragility. Physical Review Letters 97, 075701 (2006).

  8. Experimental Studies in Ice Nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Timothy Peter

    Ice nuclei play a critical role in the formation of precipitation in mixed phase clouds. Modification of IN concentrations can lead to changes in cloud lifetimes and precipitation size. Presented in this study are experimental investigations into ice nuclei in an ongoing effort to reduce the uncertainties that ice nuclei have on cloud processes and climate. This research presents a new version of the cold stage drop freezing assay to investigate the time-dependence of heterogeneous nucleation. The temperature range for the instrument spans from the melting point of water to the homogeneous freezing limit of ˜-38 deg C. Temperature stability for the instrument allowed for experimental operation for up to four days while interrogating the same sample. Up to a one hundred fold increase in the number of analyzed drops was accomplished through an in-house written automated drop freezing detection software package. Combined instrument design improvements allow for the analysis of IN concentrations down to ˜10-8 ice nuclei per picoliter of sample water. A new variant of the multiple-component stochastic model for heterogeneous ice nucleation was used to investigate the time dependence of heterogeneous freezing processes. This was accomplished by analyzing how the changes in the cooling rate can impact the observed nucleation rate. The model employed four material-dependent parameters to accurately capture the observed freezing of water drops containing Arizona Test Dust. The parameters were then used to accurately predict the freezing behavior of the drops in time dependent experiments. The time dependence freezing of a wide range of materials was then investigated. These materials included the minerals montmorillonite and kaolinite, the biological proxy ice nuclei contained within the product Icemax, and flame soot generated from the incomplete combustion of ethylene gas. The time dependence for ice nuclei collected from rainwater samples was also investigated. The

  9. Effect of cloud-scale vertical velocity on the contribution of homogeneous nucleation to cirrus formation and radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, X.; Liu, X.

    2016-06-01

    Ice nucleation is a critical process for the ice crystal formation in cirrus clouds. The relative contribution of homogeneous nucleation versus heterogeneous nucleation to cirrus formation differs between measurements and predictions from general circulation models. Here we perform large-ensemble simulations of the ice nucleation process using a cloud parcel model driven by observed vertical motions and find that homogeneous nucleation occurs rather infrequently, in agreement with recent measurement findings. When the effect of observed vertical velocity fluctuations on ice nucleation is considered in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5, the relative contribution of homogeneous nucleation to cirrus cloud occurrences decreases to only a few percent. However, homogeneous nucleation still has strong impacts on the cloud radiative forcing. Hence, the importance of homogeneous nucleation for cirrus cloud formation should not be dismissed on the global scale.

  10. Parameterizations for ice nucleation in biological and atmospheric systems.

    PubMed

    Koop, Thomas; Zobrist, Bernhard

    2009-12-14

    Ice nucleation is an important process in numerous environmental systems such as atmospheric aerosol droplets or biological tissues. Here we analyze two widely used approaches for describing homogeneous ice nucleation in aqueous solutions with respect to their applicability to heterogeneous ice nucleation processes: the lambda approach and the water-activity-based approach. We study experimentally the heterogeneous ice nucleation behaviour of mineral dust particles and biological ice nuclei (Snomax; Pseudomonas syringae) in aqueous solutions as a function of solute concentration for various solutes (sulfuric acid, ammonium sulfate, glucose, and poly(ethylene glycol) with two different molar masses of 400 and 6000 g mol(-1)). We show that the ice nucleation temperature and the corresponding lambda values depend on both the type of ice nucleus and the type of solute, while the water-activity-based approach depends only on the type of ice nucleus when the solution water activity is known. Finally, we employ both approaches to the study of ice nucleation in biological systems such as the supercooling point of living larvae and insects. We show that the behaviour of freeze tolerant and freeze avoiding species can be described using the two approaches and we discuss how the analysis can be used to interpret experimental results of the freezing behaviour of living species. PMID:19924318

  11. Mediating conducting polymer growth within hydrogels by controlling nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, A. J.; Green, R. A.; Poole-Warren, L. A.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the efficacy of primary and secondary nucleation for electrochemical polymerisation of conductive polymers within poly(vinyl alcohol) methacrylate hydrogels. The two methods of nucleation investigated were a primary heterogeneous mechanism via introduction of conductive bulk metallic glass (Mg64Zn30Ca5Na1) particles and a secondary mechanism via introduction of "pre-polymerised" conducting polymer within the hydrogel (PEDOT:PSS). Evidence of nucleation was not seen in the bulk metallic glass loaded gels, however, the PEDOT:PSS loaded gels produced charge storage capacities over 15 mC/cm2 when sufficient polymer was loaded. These studies support the hypothesis that secondary nucleation is an efficient approach to producing stand-alone conducting hydrogels.

  12. Biomaterials-Potential nucleation agents in blood and possible implications.

    PubMed

    Rohnke, Marcus; Henss, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Blood, simulated body fluids, and many cell culture media are supersaturated solutions with respect to several calcium phosphates. Therefore biomaterials can act as nucleation agents and evoke heterogeneous nucleation of salts on the surface of immersed biomaterials. Depending on the field of application, this can be either beneficial or disadvantageous. Although nucleation from supersaturated solutions is an old and well-known scientific phenomenon it is not standard to test new developed materials with surface analytical methods for their ability to initiate nucleation in vitro. Therefore, this communication aims to review the mineralization effect and to emphasize the possible negative implications, especially to functionalized bone implants. Surface coatings with proteins, growth factors, and, etc., can become ineffective due to deposition of a dense calcium phosphate layer. In the case of drug loaded implants, drug release might be inhibited. PMID:27316221

  13. Reconciling disparate views of template-directed nucleation through measurement of calcite nucleation kinetics and binding energies

    PubMed Central

    Hamm, Laura M.; Giuffre, Anthony J.; Han, Nizhou; Tao, Jinhui; Wang, Debin; De Yoreo, James J.; Dove, Patricia M.

    2014-01-01

    The physical basis for how macromolecules regulate the onset of mineral formation in calcifying tissues is not well established. A popular conceptual model assumes the organic matrix provides a stereochemical match during cooperative organization of solute ions. In contrast, another uses simple binding assays to identify good promoters of nucleation. Here, we reconcile these two views and provide a mechanistic explanation for template-directed nucleation by correlating heterogeneous nucleation barriers with crystal–substrate-binding free energies. We first measure the kinetics of calcite nucleation onto model substrates that present different functional group chemistries (carboxyl, thiol, phosphate, and hydroxyl) and conformations (C11 and C16 chain lengths). We find rates are substrate-specific and obey predictions of classical nucleation theory at supersaturations that extend above the solubility of amorphous calcium carbonate. Analysis of the kinetic data shows the thermodynamic barrier to nucleation is reduced by minimizing the interfacial free energy of the system, γ. We then use dynamic force spectroscopy to independently measure calcite–substrate-binding free energies, ΔGb. Moreover, we show that within the classical theory of nucleation, γ and ΔGb should be linearly related. The results bear out this prediction and demonstrate that low-energy barriers to nucleation correlate with strong crystal–substrate binding. This relationship is general to all functional group chemistries and conformations. These findings provide a physical model that reconciles the long-standing concept of templated nucleation through stereochemical matching with the conventional wisdom that good binders are good nucleators. The alternative perspectives become internally consistent when viewed through the lens of crystal–substrate binding. PMID:24434555

  14. High-Precision Nucleation Rate Measurements for Higher Melting Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokeloh, Joachim; Wilde, Gerhard

    2014-08-01

    Nucleation of a crystal in undercooled melts of higher melting face-centered-cubic-metals has often been studied in the past. However, the data available were not of sufficient accuracy and only covered nucleation rates in too small of a range to allow precise conclusions concerning the nature of the underlying process as well as concerning important parameters such as the solid-liquid interface free energy that can in principle be deducted from such analyses. One way to circumvent ambiguities and analyze nucleation kinetics under well-defined conditions experimentally is given by performing statistically significant numbers of repeated single droplet experiments. Application of proper statistics analyses yields nucleation rates that are independent of a specific nucleation model. The first studies that were conducted in accordance with this approach on pure model materials revealed that the approach is valid. The results are comparable to those obtained by classic nucleation theory applied to experimental data, and it was shown that one might need to rethink the common assumption that heterogeneous nucleation is almost always responsible for solidification initiation. The current results also show that often-used models for the solid-liquid interface free energy might lead to overestimated values.

  15. Nucleation at the Contact Line Observed on Nanotextured Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostinski, A. B.; Gurganus, C.; Charnawskas, J. C.; Shaw, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Surface nucleation, and contact nucleation in particular, are important for many physical processes, including pharmaceutical drug synthesis, metallurgy, and heterogeneous ice nucleation. It has been conjectured that roughness plays a role in surface nucleation, the tendency for freezing to begin preferentially at the liquid-gas interface. Using high speed imaging, we sought evidence for freezing at the contact line on catalyst substrates with imposed characteristic length scales (texture). It is found that nano-scale texture causes a shift in the nucleation of ice in super-cooled water to the three-phase contact line, while micro-scale texture does not. The reduction in the Gibbs barrier for nucleation at the droplet triple line suggests that a line tension, inversely proportional to the surface feature length scale, may be the relevant physical mechanism. A survey of line tension values in literature supports this hypothesis. This work suggests that the physical morphology of a particle, and not just its chemical composition, is important for characterizing a nucleation catalyst.

  16. Surface Bubble Nucleation Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seddon, James R. T.; Kooij, E. Stefan; Poelsema, Bene; Zandvliet, Harold J. W.; Lohse, Detlef

    2011-02-01

    Recent research has revealed several different techniques for nanoscopic gas nucleation on submerged surfaces, with findings seemingly in contradiction with each other. In response to this, we have systematically investigated the occurrence of surface nanobubbles on a hydrophobized silicon substrate for various different liquid temperatures and gas concentrations, which we controlled independently. We found that nanobubbles occupy a distinct region of this parameter space, occurring for gas concentrations of approximately 100%-110%. Below the nanobubble region we did not detect any gaseous formations on the substrate, whereas micropancakes (micron wide, nanometer high gaseous domains) were found at higher temperatures and gas concentrations. We moreover find that supersaturation of dissolved gases is not a requirement for nucleation of bubbles.

  17. Scale Reliability Evaluation with Heterogeneous Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raykov, Tenko; Marcoulides, George A.

    2015-01-01

    A latent variable modeling approach for scale reliability evaluation in heterogeneous populations is discussed. The method can be used for point and interval estimation of reliability of multicomponent measuring instruments in populations representing mixtures of an unknown number of latent classes or subpopulations. The procedure is helpful also…

  18. Bleb Nucleation through Membrane Peeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alert, Ricard; Casademunt, Jaume

    2016-02-01

    We study the nucleation of blebs, i.e., protrusions arising from a local detachment of the membrane from the cortex of a cell. Based on a simple model of elastic linkers with force-dependent kinetics, we show that bleb nucleation is governed by membrane peeling. By this mechanism, the growth or shrinkage of a detached membrane patch is completely determined by the linker kinetics, regardless of the energetic cost of the detachment. We predict the critical nucleation radius for membrane peeling and the corresponding effective energy barrier. These may be typically smaller than those predicted by classical nucleation theory, implying a much faster nucleation. We also perform simulations of a continuum stochastic model of membrane-cortex adhesion to obtain the statistics of bleb nucleation times as a function of the stress on the membrane. The determinant role of membrane peeling changes our understanding of bleb nucleation and opens new directions in the study of blebs.

  19. Multi-Component Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2008-11-01

    We explore multi-component dark matter models where the dark sector consists of multiple stable states with different mass scales, and dark forces coupling these states further enrich the dynamics. The multi-component nature of the dark matter naturally arises in supersymmetric models, where both R parity and an additional symmetry, such as a Z{sub 2}, is preserved. We focus on a particular model where the heavier component of dark matter carries lepton number and annihilates mostly to leptons. The heavier component, which is essentially a sterile neutrino, naturally explains the PAMELA, ATIC and synchrotron signals, without an excess in antiprotons which typically mars other models of weak scale dark matter. The lighter component, which may have a mass from a GeV to a TeV, may explain the DAMA signal, and may be visible in low threshold runs of CDMS and XENON, which search for light dark matter.

  20. Multicomponent reactions in nucleoside chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Buchowicz, Włodzimierz

    2014-01-01

    Summary This review covers sixty original publications dealing with the application of multicomponent reactions (MCRs) in the synthesis of novel nucleoside analogs. The reported approaches were employed for modifications of the parent nucleoside core or for de novo construction of a nucleoside scaffold from non-nucleoside substrates. The cited references are grouped according to the usually recognized types of the MCRs. Biochemical properties of the novel nucleoside analogs are also presented (if provided by the authors). PMID:25161730

  1. A Sustainable Multicomponent Pyrimidine Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Deibl, Nicklas; Ament, Kevin; Kempe, Rhett

    2015-10-14

    Since alcohols are accessible from indigestible biomass (lignocellulose), the development of novel preferentially catalytic reactions in which alcohols are converted into important classes of fine chemicals is a central topic of sustainable synthesis. Multicomponent reactions are especially attractive in organic chemistry as they allow the synthesis of large libraries of diversely functionalized products in a short time when run in a combinatorial fashion. Herein, we report a novel, regioselective, iridium-catalyzed multicomponent synthesis of pyrimidines from amidines and up to three (different) alcohols. This reaction proceeds via a sequence of condensation and dehydrogenation steps which give rise to selective C-C and C-N bond formations. While the condensation steps deoxygenate the alcohol components, the dehydrogenations lead to aromatization. Two equiv of hydrogen and water are liberated in the course of the reactions. PN5P-Ir-pincer complexes, recently developed in our laboratory, catalyze this sustainable multicomponent process most efficiently. A total of 38 different pyrimidines were synthesized in isolated yields of up to 93%. Strong points of the new protocol are its regioselectivity and thus the immediate access to pyrimidines that are highly and unsymmetrically decorated with alkyl or aryl substituents. The combination of this novel protocol with established methods for converting alcohols to nitriles now allows to selectively assemble pyrimidines from four alcohol building blocks and 2 equiv of ammonia. PMID:26414993

  2. Crystal nucleation and glass formation in metallic alloy melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaepen, F.

    1984-01-01

    Homogeneous nucleation, containerless solidification, and bulk formation of metallic glasses are discussed. Homogeneous nucleation is not a limiting factor for metallic glass formation at slow cooling rates if the reduced glass transition temperature is high enough. Such glasses can be made in bulk if heterogeneous nucleants are removed. Containerless processing eleminates potential sources of nucleants, but as drop tube experiments on the Pd-Si alloys show, the free surface may still be a very effective heterogeneous nucleant. Combination of etching and heating in vacuum or fluxing can be effective for cleaning fairly large ingots of nucleants. Reduced gravity processing has a potentially useful role in the fluxing technique, for example to keep large metallic ingots surrounded by a low density, low fluidity flux if this proved difficult under ground conditions. For systems where heterogeneous nucleants in the bulk of the ingot need gravity to segregate to the flux-metal interface, reduced gravity processing may not be appropriate for bulk glass formation.

  3. Surface Nanobubbles Nucleate Microdroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuehua; Lhuissier, Henri; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2014-04-01

    When a hydrophobic solid is in contact with water, surface nanobubbles often form at the interface. They have a lifetime many orders of magnitude longer than expected. Here, we show that they even withstand a temperature increase to temperatures close to the boiling point of bulk water; i.e., they do not nucleate larger bubbles ("superstability"). On the contrary, when the vapor-liquid contact line passes a nanobubble, a liquid film remains around it, which, after pinch-off, results in a microdroplet in which the nanobubbles continue to exist. Finally, the microdroplet evaporates and the nanobubble consequently bursts. Our results support that pinning plays a crucial role for nanobubble stability.

  4. Ice Nucleation by High Molecular Weight Organic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantrell, W.

    2003-12-01

    Deep convection in the tropics is frequently associated with biomass burning. Recent work has suggested that the size of ice crystals in the anvils of tropical cumulonimbus clouds may be affected by biomass burning, though the mechanism for such an effect is uncertain (Sherwood, 2002). We will present results of an investigation of the role that high molecular weight organic compounds, known to be produced in biomass burning (Elias et al., 1999), may play in tropical cirrus anvils through heterogeneous nucleation of ice. In particular, we examine the mechanisms underlying heterogeneous nucleation of ice by films of long chain alcohols by studying the interaction of the alcohols and water/ice using temperature controlled, Attenuated Total Reflection - Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy. The mechanisms are interpreted in the context of recent criticisms of some aspects of classical nucleation theory (Seeley and Seidler, 2001; Oxtoby, 1998). References V. Elias, B. Simoneit, A. Pereira, J. Cabral, and J. Cardoso, Detection of high molecular weight organic tracers in vegetation smoke samples by high-temperature gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Environ. Sci. Tecnol., 33, 2369-2376, 1999. D. Oxtoby, Nucleation of first-order phase transitions. Acc. Chem. Res., 31, 91-97, 1998. L. Seeley and G. Seidler, Preactivation in the nucleation of ice by Langmuir films of aliphatic alcohols. J. Chem. Phys., 114, 10464-10470, 2001. S. Sherwood, Aerosols and ice particle size in tropical cumulonimbus. J. Climate, 15, 1051-1063, 2002.

  5. Transient nucleation in condensed systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelton, K. F.; Greer, A. L.; Thompson, C. V.

    1983-01-01

    Using classical nucleation theory we consider transient nucleation occurring in a one-component, condensed system under isothermal conditions. We obtain an exact closed-form expression for the time dependent cluster populations. In addition, a more versatile approach is developed: a numerical simulation technique which models directly the reactions by which clusters are produced. This simulation demonstrates the evolution of cluster populations and nucleation rate in the transient regime. Results from the simulation are verified by comparison with exact analytical solutions for the steady state. Experimental methods for measuring transient nucleation are assessed, and it is demonstrated that the observed behavior depends on the method used. The effect of preexisting cluster distributions is studied. Previous analytical and numerical treatments of transient nucleation are compared to the solutions obtained from the simulation. The simple expressions of Kashchiev are shown to give good descriptions of the nucleation behavior.

  6. Nucleation in a nickel-based superalloy utilizing computational thermodynamics and diffusion kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutwell, Brett Allen Rohrer

    A model for predicting nucleation kinetics of coherent, homogeneous precipitates using thermodynamic and diffusion kinetic data calculated by computer modeling software was developed. The nucleation model incorporated classical nucleation theory along with derivations of the incubation time using the theory of time reversal symmetry. An atomic mobility database was developed for a seven-element nickel-based superalloy to allow for the calculation of multicomponent diffusivities to be used in the incubation time calculations. The seven elements modeled in the database were: nickel (Ni), iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), niobium (Nb), titanium (Ti), aluminum (Al), and carbon (C). The process of assessing an atomic mobility database is discussed, and the difficulties of assembling such a database are reviewed. The nucleation model and atomic mobility database were then applied to modeling the nucleation kinetics of gamma' in two nickel-aluminum binary alloys. The results of the nucleation model were in good agreement with one binary alloy but did not agree well with the results for the second alloy. Enhanced diffusion due to excess vacancy concentrations was identified as the most probable reason for the discrepancy with the second nickel-aluminum alloy. The nucleation model and atomic mobility database were then tested on an industrial, multicomponent nickel-based superalloy, Inconel alloy 706. The precipitation kinetics of two coherent precipitates, gamma' and gamma'', were modeled and compared to Time-Temperature-Transformation diagrams and Time-Temperature-Hardness diagrams for the alloy. The calculated incubation times for gamma ' and gamma'' were faster than the experimentally observed transformation start times. The results of the gamma' incubation time calculations were in close approximation to the experimental data at higher temperatures. The results of the gamma'' calculations did not agree well with the experimental data.

  7. The Ice Nucleation Ability of Selected Atmospherically Abundant Fungal Spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iannone, R.; Chernoff, D. I.; Bertram, A. K.

    2010-12-01

    Ice clouds are widely recognized for their roles in the earth’s radiation budget and climate systems. However, their formation mechanisms are poorly understood thus constituting an uncertainty in the evaluation of the global radiation budget. An important mechanism of ice cloud formation is heterogeneous nucleation on aerosol particles. The surface properties of these particles, called ice nuclei (IN), directly affect the temperature at which ice nucleation occurs. There is a growing emphasis on the study of bioaerosols (e.g., bacteria, fungi, pollen) as IN since they are ubiquitous in the atmosphere. The focus of the current study is to determine the ice nucleation properties of spores obtained from a variety of fungi. Aerosolized spores were impacted onto a hydrophobic glass substrate and immersed in ultrapure water. A technique involving an optical light microscope coupled to a flow cell was used to precisely control temperature and humidity within the cell. A digital camera captured high-resolution video of the particles undergoing ice nucleation, allowing for the analyses of freezing events and particle sizes. The first experimental results using spores obtained from the fungal genera Cladosporium and Penicillium reveal an average temperature increase of ~1-5 K in the ice nucleation temperature compared to homogeneous nucleation (i.e., freezing of pure liquid water). Furthermore, there appears to be a relationship between the amount of spores present per droplet and the freezing temperature of water. These results are presented and discussed, and the potential contribution of these data to further the understanding of heterogeneous nucleation in the atmosphere is provided. Box plot summarizing freezing data for homogeneous nucleation experiments (leftmost box) and binned data from heterogeneous nucleation experiments involving spores of Cladosporium. Freezing data are distributed into 200 µm2 bins that represent the total area of all observable inclusions

  8. Immersion freezing of ice nucleating active protein complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, S.; Augustin, S.; Clauss, T.; Voigtländer, J.; Niedermeier, D.; Wex, H.; Stratmann, F.

    2012-08-01

    Biological particles, e.g. bacteria and their Ice Nucleating Active (INA) protein complexes, might play an important role for the ice formation in atmospheric mixed-phase clouds. Therefore, the immersion freezing behavior of INA protein complexes generated from a SnomaxTM solution/suspension was investigated as function of temperature in a range of -5 °C to -38 °C at the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS). The immersion freezing of droplets containing small numbers of INA protein complexes occurs in a temperature range of -7 °C and -10 °C. The experiments performed in the lower temperature range, where all droplets freeze which contain at least one INA protein complex, are used to determine the average number of INA protein complexes present, assuming that the INA protein complexes are Poisson distributed over the droplet ensemble. Knowing the average number of INA protein complexes, the heterogeneous ice nucleation rate and rate coefficient of a single INA protein complex is determined by using the newly-developed CHESS model (stoCHastic model of idEntical poiSSon distributed ice nuclei). Therefore, we assume the ice nucleation process to be of stochastic nature, and a parameterization of the INA protein complex's nucleation rate. Analyzing the results of immersion freezing experiments from literature (SnomaxTM and Pseudomonas syringae bacteria), to results gained in this study, demonstrates that first, a similar temperature dependence of the heterogeneous ice nucleation rate for a single INA protein complex was found in all experiments, second, the shift of the ice fraction curves to higher temperatures can be explained consistently by a higher average number of INA protein complexes being present in the droplet ensemble, and finally the heterogeneous ice nucleation rate of one single INA protein complex might be also applicable for intact Pseudomonas syringae bacteria cells. The results obtained in this study allow a new perspective on the

  9. Parameterization of the Cloud Nucleating Activity of Fresh, Aged, and Internally-Mixed Organic Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreidenweis, S.; Petters, M.; Demott, P.; Prenni, A.; Ziemann, P.

    2006-12-01

    Carbonaceous particle types affect global climate, visibility, and human health, but their primary and secondary sources, sinks, and tropospheric lifetimes are highly uncertain. The size and hygroscopicity of particles, and in particular their activity as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), plays a large role in determining their atmospheric impacts and lifetimes. However, hygroscopicity is difficult to parameterize for many organic species for which no thermodynamic data exist, and for complex, multicomponent aerosols of undefined composition. We propose a simple method to describe the relationship between dry particle diameter and CCN activity using a single hygroscopicity parameter, κ. We derive values of κ from fitting of experimental CCN-activity data from the literature and from recent experiments, including oxidation-aged organic particles and secondary organic aerosols. Values of κ are between 0.5 and 2 for highly-CCN- active salts such as sodium chloride, between 0.01 and 0.5 for slightly to very hygroscopic organic aerosols such as those produced in biomass burning and as secondary organic aerosols, and 0 for nonhygroscopic components. The hygroscopicity of internal mixtures can be calculated as a volume fraction weighted average of the hygroscopicity parameters of the individual species comprising the mixture. Aging of aerosol, understood as changes in hygroscopicity due to condensation of hydrophilic species, coagulation of aerosol populations, or heterogeneous chemical reactions, are described conveniently by changes in κ. Our studies show that oxidative aging that proceeds by addition of functional groups to the CHx carbon backbone leads to only small changes in κ, and thus the process alone is inefficient at rendering small, initially- hydrophobic primary organic particles capable of being scavenged by cloud-drop nucleation. Other processes, such as coagulation and condensation, control the rate of hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic conversion of primary

  10. Nucleation of mesospheric cloud particles: Sensitivities and limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilms, Henrike; Rapp, Markus; Kirsch, Annekatrin

    2016-03-01

    Nucleation of mesospheric ice particles is thought to occur via heterogeneous nucleation on meteor smoke particles. However, several factors determining the nucleation rate are poorly known. To study the effect of uncertainties in the nucleation rate on cloud properties, we use the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres and systematically vary the nucleation rate over ±10 orders of magnitude. In one set of simulations, the background state of the atmosphere is described by climatological conditions. In a second set, gravity wave-perturbed profiles from the Kühlungsborn Mechanistic general Circulation Model (KMCM) are used with typical temperature (vertical wind) perturbations at the mesopause on the order of 9 K (0.45 m/s). The resulting noctilucent cloud (NLC) characteristics are compared to lidar and satellite measurements. Realistic NLCs compared to the lidar measurements can only be modeled if the nucleation rate is reduced by up to 3 orders of magnitude compared to standard assumptions. For the same cases, the simulated NLCs compare best to the satellite measurements if the nucleation rate is reduced by 2 orders of magnitude or more. Dynamical processes at the mesopause strongly influence the NLC development. In a gravity wave-perturbed atmosphere, the ice particles have only limited time for nucleation and growth. The growth time is limited by the vertical wind, because the vertical wind determines the residence time of the ice particles in the supersaturated region. Since the vertical wind amplitudes reach 1.5 m/s in KMCM (compared to a mean upwelling of ˜4 cm/s in the climatology), the ice particles remain significantly smaller in a gravity wave-perturbed atmosphere than in climatological background conditions.

  11. A Multicomponent Latent Trait Model for Diagnosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Embretson, Susan E.; Yang, Xiangdong

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a noncompensatory latent trait model, the multicomponent latent trait model for diagnosis (MLTM-D), for cognitive diagnosis. In MLTM-D, a hierarchical relationship between components and attributes is specified to be applicable to permit diagnosis at two levels. MLTM-D is a generalization of the multicomponent latent trait…

  12. Dynamics of vortex nucleation in sup 3 He- A flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kopnin, N.B.; Soininen, P.I.; Salomaa, M.M. )

    1992-03-01

    Quantum phase slippage in superfluid {sup 3}He flow is simulated numerically in rectangular slab geometries. Assuming that the flow is confined to a channel having horizontal surfaces close to each other, the spatial problem reduces to the two transverse dimensions; we report time-dependent computer simulations of superfluid {sup 3}He flow in 2+1 dimensions using the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations. The quantum-dynamic processes of phase slippage in {sup 3}He are demonstrated to be associated with superfluid vortex nucleation; we thus confirm Anderson's assumption for phase slippage through vortex motion in superfluids. We also find several other phase-slip scenarios involving vortices, phase-slip lines, and combinations thereof for the coupled multicomponent order-parameter amplitudes. We consider both diffuse and specular boundary conditions at the side walls and demonstrate that our results are essentially independent of the boundaries. We compute the critical current for vortex nucleation as a function of the channel width, and compare it with existing theories of vortex nucleation; we also discuss our calculations in connection with experiments on phase slippage in {sup 3}He flow. One of our most important results is that the superfluid order parameter for the vortices generated in the computer simulations does not vanish anywhere; i.e., the vortices possess superfluid core structures; hence the processes of phase slip for superfluid {sup 3}He are nonlocal in space-time.

  13. Surface nanobubbles nucleate microdroplets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuehua; Lhuissier, Henri; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2014-04-11

    When a hydrophobic solid is in contact with water, surface nanobubbles often form at the interface. They have a lifetime many orders of magnitude longer than expected. Here, we show that they even withstand a temperature increase to temperatures close to the boiling point of bulk water; i.e., they do not nucleate larger bubbles ("superstability"). On the contrary, when the vapor-liquid contact line passes a nanobubble, a liquid film remains around it, which, after pinch-off, results in a microdroplet in which the nanobubbles continue to exist. Finally, the microdroplet evaporates and the nanobubble consequently bursts. Our results support that pinning plays a crucial role for nanobubble stability. PMID:24765973

  14. On Capillary Rise and Nucleation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasad, R.

    2008-01-01

    A comparison of capillary rise and nucleation is presented. It is shown that both phenomena result from a balance between two competing energy factors: a volume energy and a surface energy. Such a comparison may help to introduce nucleation with a topic familiar to the students, capillary rise. (Contains 1 table and 3 figures.)

  15. Nucleation rate in monotectic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, F.

    Cooling a melt of a monotectic system into the miscibility gap results in nucleation of fluid droplets in a fluid matrix prior to solidification. For homogeneous nucleation the temperature dependence of the nucleation rate is calculated. As material parameters the chemical potential of the species involved, the diffusion constant of the fluid, and the surface tension between adjacent phases are important. Since their temperature dependence is not well known from experiments, different theoretical models are used and their influence is discussed. The surface tension turns out to be the most crucial parameter in determining the nucleation rate. For AlIn numerical results are presented. In this system the undercooling with respect to homogeneous nucleation increases from zero at the critical point to 100 K at a composition near the monotectic point.

  16. Preferential Nucleation during Polymorphic Transformations

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, H.; Sietsma, J.; Offerman, S. E.

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one phase or crystal structure. Polymorphism may occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, minerals, polymers, and pharmaceutical substances. Unresolved are the conditions for preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations in which structural relationships or special crystallographic orientation relationships (OR’s) form between the nucleus and surrounding matrix grains. We measured in-situ and simultaneously the nucleation rates of grains that have zero, one, two, three and four special OR’s with the surrounding parent grains. These experiments show a trend in which the activation energy for nucleation becomes smaller – and therefore nucleation more probable - with increasing number of special OR’s. These insights contribute to steering the processing of polymorphic materials with tailored properties, since preferential nucleation affects which crystal structure forms, the average grain size and texture of the material, and thereby - to a large extent - the final properties of the material. PMID:27484579

  17. Preferential Nucleation during Polymorphic Transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, H.; Sietsma, J.; Offerman, S. E.

    2016-08-01

    Polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one phase or crystal structure. Polymorphism may occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, minerals, polymers, and pharmaceutical substances. Unresolved are the conditions for preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations in which structural relationships or special crystallographic orientation relationships (OR’s) form between the nucleus and surrounding matrix grains. We measured in-situ and simultaneously the nucleation rates of grains that have zero, one, two, three and four special OR’s with the surrounding parent grains. These experiments show a trend in which the activation energy for nucleation becomes smaller – and therefore nucleation more probable - with increasing number of special OR’s. These insights contribute to steering the processing of polymorphic materials with tailored properties, since preferential nucleation affects which crystal structure forms, the average grain size and texture of the material, and thereby - to a large extent - the final properties of the material.

  18. Preferential Nucleation during Polymorphic Transformations.

    PubMed

    Sharma, H; Sietsma, J; Offerman, S E

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one phase or crystal structure. Polymorphism may occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, minerals, polymers, and pharmaceutical substances. Unresolved are the conditions for preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations in which structural relationships or special crystallographic orientation relationships (OR's) form between the nucleus and surrounding matrix grains. We measured in-situ and simultaneously the nucleation rates of grains that have zero, one, two, three and four special OR's with the surrounding parent grains. These experiments show a trend in which the activation energy for nucleation becomes smaller - and therefore nucleation more probable - with increasing number of special OR's. These insights contribute to steering the processing of polymorphic materials with tailored properties, since preferential nucleation affects which crystal structure forms, the average grain size and texture of the material, and thereby - to a large extent - the final properties of the material. PMID:27484579

  19. Phase nucleation in curved space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Leopoldo; García, Nicolás; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Lorenzana, José; Daniel, Vega

    Nucleation and growth is the dominant relaxation mechanism driving first-order phase transitions. In two-dimensional flat systems, nucleation has been applied to a wide range of problems in physics, chemistry and biology. Here we study nucleation and growth of two-dimensional phases lying on curved surfaces and show that curvature modifies both critical sizes of nuclei and paths towards the equilibrium phase. In curved space, nucleation and growth becomes inherently inhomogeneous and critical nuclei form faster on regions of positive Gaussian curvature. Substrates of varying shape display complex energy landscapes with several geometry-induced local minima, where initially propagating nuclei become stabilized and trapped by the underlying curvature (Gómez, L. R. et al. Phase nucleation in curved space. Nat. Commun. 6:6856 doi: 10.1038/ncomms7856 (2015).).

  20. Immersion freezing of ice nucleation active protein complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, S.; Augustin, S.; Clauss, T.; Wex, H.; Šantl-Temkiv, T.; Voigtländer, J.; Niedermeier, D.; Stratmann, F.

    2013-06-01

    Utilising the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS), the immersion freezing behaviour of droplet ensembles containing monodisperse particles, generated from a Snomax™ solution/suspension, was investigated. Thereto ice fractions were measured in the temperature range between -5 °C to -38 °C. Snomax™ is an industrial product applied for artificial snow production and contains Pseudomonas syringae} bacteria which have long been used as model organism for atmospheric relevant ice nucleation active (INA) bacteria. The ice nucleation activity of such bacteria is controlled by INA protein complexes in their outer membrane. In our experiments, ice fractions increased steeply in the temperature range from about -6 °C to about -10 °C and then levelled off at ice fractions smaller than one. The plateau implies that not all examined droplets contained an INA protein complex. Assuming the INA protein complexes to be Poisson distributed over the investigated droplet populations, we developed the CHESS model (stoCHastic modEl of similar and poiSSon distributed ice nuclei) which allows for the calculation of ice fractions as function of temperature and time for a given nucleation rate. Matching calculated and measured ice fractions, we determined and parameterised the nucleation rate of INA protein complexes exhibiting class III ice nucleation behaviour. Utilising the CHESS model, together with the determined nucleation rate, we compared predictions from the model to experimental data from the literature and found good agreement. We found that (a) the heterogeneous ice nucleation rate expression quantifying the ice nucleation behaviour of the INA protein complex is capable of describing the ice nucleation behaviour observed in various experiments for both, Snomax™ and P. syringae bacteria, (b) the ice nucleation rate, and its temperature dependence, seem to be very similar regardless of whether the INA protein complexes inducing ice nucleation are attached

  1. Main features of nucleation in model solutions of oral cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovanova, O. A.; Chikanova, E. S.; Punin, Yu. O.

    2015-05-01

    The regularities of nucleation in model solutions of oral cavity have been investigated, and the induction order and constants have been determined for two systems: saliva and dental plaque fluid (DPF). It is shown that an increase in the initial supersaturation leads to a transition from the heterogeneous nucleation of crystallites to a homogeneous one. Some additives are found to enhance nucleation: HCO{3/-} > C6H12O6 > F-, while others hinder this process: protein (casein) > Mg2+. It is established that crystallization in DPF occurs more rapidly and the DPF composition is favorable for the growth of small (52.6-26.1 μm) crystallites. On the contrary, the conditions implemented in the model saliva solution facilitate the formation of larger (198.4-41.8 μm) crystals.

  2. Molecular theory of vapor phase nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusaka, Isamu

    1998-06-01

    An attempt has been made to establish the foundation of molecular level theory of vapor phase nucleation. We have focused on evaluating the reversible work of cluster formation and followed two major trends in this direction, namely, statistical mechanical density functional theory and molecular level simulation. We applied density functional theory to heterogeneous nucleation onto an ion. Our prime interest is to predict a sign preference of nucleation rate, which has been experimentally observed yet remained inexplicable in the classical framework. The theory indicates that asymmetry in ion-molecule interaction is directly responsible for the sign preference. The predicted sign dependence decreases as the supersaturation is increased. Our results from density functional theory agree well with the existing experimental observations. Molecular simulation offers an alternative to molecular level approach. A long-standing issue of fundamental importance in cluster simulation is the precise definition of a cluster. Thus far, all attempts of defining a cluster had introduced ad hoc criteria to determine unambiguously whether a given molecule in the system belongs to vapor or to a cluster for any instantaneous configuration of molecules. From a careful examination of the context in which a cluster should be introduced into nucleation theory, we conclude that such a criterion is unnecessary. Then, we present a new approach to cluster simulation which is free of any arbitrariness involved in the definition of a cluster. Instead, it preferentially and automatically generates the physical clusters, defined as the density fluctuations that lead to nucleation, and determines their equilibrium distribution in a single simulation. The latter feature permits one to completely bypass the computationally demanding free energy evaluation that is necessary in a conventional simulation. The method is applied first to water using the SPC/E model. We then turn to H2SO4/H2O binary

  3. Ice Nucleation and Droplet Formation by Bare and Coated Soot Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Beth J.; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Beranek, Josef; Zelenyuk, Alla; Thornton, Joel A.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2011-09-13

    We have studied ice formation at temperatures relevant to homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation, as well as droplet activation and hygroscopicity, of soot particles of variable size and composition. Coatings of adipic, malic, and oleic acid were applied to span an atmospherically relevant range of solubility, and both uncoated and oleic acid coated soot particles were exposed to ozone to simulate atmospheric oxidation. The results are interpreted in terms of onset ice nucleation, with a comparison to a mineral dust particle that acts as an efficient ice nucleus, and particle hygroscopicity. At 253K and 243K, we found no evidence of heterogeneous ice nucleation occurring above the level of detection for our experimental conditions. Above water saturation, only droplet formation was observed. At 233K, we observe the occurrence of homogeneous ice nucleation for all particles studied. Coatings also did not significantly alter the ice nucleation behavior of soot particles, but aided in the uptake of water. Hygroscopicity studies confirmed that pure soot particles were hydrophobic, and coated soot particles activated as droplets at high water supersaturations. A small amount of heterogeneous ice nucleation either below the detection limit of our instrument or concurrent with droplet formation and/or homogeneous freezing cannot be precluded, but we are able to set limits for its frequency. We conclude that both uncoated and coated soot particles representative of those generated in our studies are unlikely to significantly contribute to the global budget of heterogeneous ice nuclei at temperatures between 233K and 253K.

  4. Metadynamics studies of crystal nucleation

    PubMed Central

    Giberti, Federico; Salvalaglio, Matteo; Parrinello, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Crystallization processes are characterized by activated events and long timescales. These characteristics prevent standard molecular dynamics techniques from being efficiently used for the direct investigation of processes such as nucleation. This short review provides an overview on the use of metadynamics, a state-of-the-art enhanced sampling technique, for the simulation of phase transitions involving the production of a crystalline solid. In particular the principles of metadynamics are outlined, several order parameters are described that have been or could be used in conjunction with metadynamics to sample nucleation events and then an overview is given of recent metadynamics results in the field of crystal nucleation. PMID:25866662

  5. Enthalpy Diffusion in Multicomponent Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, A W

    2008-11-12

    The enthalpy diffusion flux in the multicomponent energy equation is a well known yet frequently neglected term. It accounts for energy changes, associated with compositional changes, resulting from species diffusion. Enthalpy diffusion is important in flows where significant mixing occurs between species of dissimilar molecular weight. The term plays a critical role in preventing local violations of the entropy condition. In simulations of nonpremixed combustion, omission of the enthalpy flux can lead to anomalous temperature gradients, which may cause mixing regions to exceed ignition conditions. The term can also play a role in generating acoustic noise in turbulent mixing layers. Euler solvers that rely on numerical diffusion to mix fluids cannot accurately predict the temperature in mixed regions. On the other hand, Navier-Stokes solvers that incorporate enthalpy diffusion can provide much more accurate results.

  6. Multi-component assembly casting

    SciTech Connect

    James, Allister W.

    2015-10-13

    Multi-component vane segment and method for forming the same. Assembly includes: positioning a pre-formed airfoil component (12) and a preformed shroud heat resistant material (18) in a mold, wherein the airfoil component (12) and the shroud heat resistant material (18) each comprises an interlocking feature (24); preheating the mold; introducing molten structural material (46) into the mold; and solidifying the molten structural material such that it interlocks the pre-formed airfoil component (12) with respect to the preformed shroud heat resistant material (18) and is effective to provide structural support for the shroud heat resistant material (18). Surfaces between the airfoil component (12) and the structural material (46), between the airfoil component (12) and the shroud heat resistant material (18), and between the shroud heat resistant material (18) and the structural material (46) are free of metallurgical bonds.

  7. Uphill diffusion in multicomponent mixtures.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Rajamani

    2015-05-21

    Molecular diffusion is an omnipresent phenomena that is important in a wide variety of contexts in chemical, physical, and biological processes. In the majority of cases, the diffusion process can be adequately described by Fick's law that postulates a linear relationship between the flux of any species and its own concentration gradient. Most commonly, a component diffuses down the concentration gradient. The major objective of this review is to highlight a very wide variety of situations that cause the uphill transport of one constituent in the mixture. Uphill diffusion may occur in multicomponent mixtures in which the diffusion flux of any species is strongly coupled to that of its partner species. Such coupling effects often arise from strong thermodynamic non-idealities. For a quantitative description we need to use chemical potential gradients as driving forces. The transport of ionic species in aqueous solutions is coupled with its partner ions because of the electro-neutrality constraints; such constraints may accelerate or decelerate a specific ion. When uphill diffusion occurs, we observe transient overshoots during equilibration; the equilibration process follows serpentine trajectories in composition space. For mixtures of liquids, alloys, ceramics and glasses the serpentine trajectories could cause entry into meta-stable composition zones; such entry could result in phenomena such as spinodal decomposition, spontaneous emulsification, and the Ouzo effect. For distillation of multicomponent mixtures that form azeotropes, uphill diffusion may allow crossing of distillation boundaries that are normally forbidden. For mixture separations with microporous adsorbents, uphill diffusion can cause supra-equilibrium loadings to be achieved during transient uptake within crystals; this allows the possibility of over-riding adsorption equilibrium for achieving difficult separations. PMID:25761383

  8. Biomineralization: Ion binding and nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröger, Roland

    2015-04-01

    The visualization of organic-acid-induced crystal growth by means of liquid-cell transmission electron microscopy can provide key insights into the nucleation of calcium carbonate in an organic matrix.

  9. Bubble nucleation in stout beers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. T.; McKechnie, J. S.; Devereux, M. G.

    2011-05-01

    Bubble nucleation in weakly supersaturated solutions of carbon dioxide—such as champagne, sparkling wines, and carbonated beers—is well understood. Bubbles grow and detach from nucleation sites: gas pockets trapped within hollow cellulose fibers. This mechanism appears not to be active in stout beers that are supersaturated solutions of nitrogen and carbon dioxide. In their canned forms these beers require additional technology (widgets) to release the bubbles which will form the head of the beer. We extend the mathematical model of bubble nucleation in carbonated liquids to the case of two gases and show that this nucleation mechanism is active in stout beers, though substantially slower than in carbonated beers and confirm this by observation. A rough calculation suggests that despite the slowness of the process, applying a coating of hollow porous fibers to the inside of a can or bottle could be a potential replacement for widgets.

  10. Containerless Liquid to Solid Nucleation Pathways in Two Representative Grades of Commercially Available Zirconium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rulison, A. J.; Rhim, W.-K.; Bayuzick, R.; Hofmeister, W.; Morton, C.

    1997-01-01

    Experimental measurements were conducted to determine the solid metal nucleation pathways of radiatively cooling, molten zirconium spheres of two different commercially available purity grades in a high-vacuum, high-temperature electrostatic levitator. The ensemble distribution of maximum undercooling temperatures was interpreted using Poisson statistics to determine the temperature dependence of the solid metal nucleation rate. For a sample of nominally 99.95% pure zirconium, the results are consistent with heterogeneous solid metal nucleation either on static catalyst particles at least approx. 30 nm diameter or on a surface coating. For a sample of nominally 99% pure zirconium, however, it appears that heterogeneous solid metal nucleation occurred either on a polydispersion of approx. 10 nm (mean diameter) static catalyst particles or on dynamic catalyst particles that precipitated from a solution that became supersaturated as the melt cooled.

  11. Observations on the nucleation of ice VII in shock compressed water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafford, Samuel J. P.; Chapman, David J.; Eakins, Daniel E.; Bland, Simon N.

    2015-06-01

    The ability of water to freeze into the ice VII phase under dynamic compression is a good example of a liquid to solid phase change. The ice VII is thought to nucleate and grow from the window surfaces in a relatively slow process (on the order of 100ns) that can be seen in wave profiles and a visible darkening of the sample. On silica windows the process is evident but from sapphire surfaces the heterogeneous nucleation appears to be entirely absent and the water remains metastable. To investigate the influence of silica, and under what conditions sapphire might heterogeneously nucleate ice VII, we present an experimental technique incorporating multiple liquid targets diagnosed with PDV and high speed imaging of the nucleation process from a variety of surfaces and additives. The Institute of Shock Physics acknowledges the continued support of AWE and Imperial College London.

  12. Laser ultrasonic multi-component imaging

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Thomas K.; Telschow, Kenneth

    2011-01-25

    Techniques for ultrasonic determination of the interfacial relationship of multi-component systems are discussed. In implementations, a laser energy source may be used to excite a multi-component system including a first component and a second component at least in partial contact with the first component. Vibrations resulting from the excitation may be detected for correlation with a resonance pattern indicating if discontinuity exists at the interface of the first and second components.

  13. Multicomponent fuel vaporization at high pressures.

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, D. J.; O'Rourke, P. J.

    2002-01-01

    We extend our multicomponent fuel model to high pressures using a Peng-Robinson equation of state, and implement the model into KIVA-3V. Phase equilibrium is achieved by equating liquid and vapor fugacities. The latent heat of vaporization and fuel enthalpies are also corrected for at high pressures. Numerical simulations of multicomponent evaporation are performed for single droplets for a diesel fuel surrogate at different pressures.

  14. Determining whether metals nucleate homogeneously on graphite: A case study with copper

    SciTech Connect

    Appy, David; Lei, Huaping; Han, Yong; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Tringides, Michael C; Shao, Dahai; Kwolek, Emma J; Evans, J W; Thiel, P A

    2014-11-01

    We observe that Cu clusters grow on surface terraces of graphite as a result of physical vapor deposition in ultrahigh vacuum. We show that the observation is incompatible with a variety of models incorporating homogeneous nucleation and calculations of atomic-scale energetics. An alternative explanation, ion-mediated heterogeneous nucleation, is proposed and validated, both with theory and experiment. This serves as a case study in identifying when and whether the simple, common observation of metal clusters on carbon-rich surfaces can be interpreted in terms of homogeneous nucleation. We describe a general approach for making system-specific and laboratory-specific predictions.

  15. Determining whether metals nucleate homogeneously on graphite: A case study with copper

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Appy, David; Lei, Huaping; Han, Yong; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Tringides, Michael C.; Shao, Dahai; Kwolek, Emma J.; Evans, J. W.; Thiel, P. A.

    2014-11-05

    In this study, we observe that Cu clusters grow on surface terraces of graphite as a result of physical vapor deposition in ultrahigh vacuum. We show that the observation is incompatible with a variety of models incorporating homogeneous nucleation and calculations of atomic-scale energetics. An alternative explanation, ion-mediated heterogeneous nucleation, is proposed and validated, both with theory and experiment. This serves as a case study in identifying when and whether the simple, common observation of metal clusters on carbon-rich surfaces can be interpreted in terms of homogeneous nucleation. We describe a general approach for making system-specific and laboratory-specific predictions.

  16. Rest frame of bubble nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Garriga, Jaume; Kanno, Sugumi; Tanaka, Takahiro E-mail: sugumi@cosmos.phy.tufts.edu

    2013-06-01

    Vacuum bubbles nucleate at rest with a certain critical size and subsequently expand. But what selects the rest frame of nucleation? This question has been recently addressed in [1] in the context of Schwinger pair production in 1+1 dimensions, by using a model detector in order to probe the nucleated pairs. The analysis in [1] showed that, for a constant external electric field, the adiabatic ''in'' vacuum of charged particles is Lorentz invariant, (and in this) case pairs tend to nucleate preferentially at rest with respect to the detector. Here, we sharpen this picture by showing that the typical relative velocity between the frame of nucleation and that of the detector is at most of order Δv ∼ S{sub E}{sup −1/3} << 1. Here, S{sub E} >> 1 is the action of the instanton describing pair creation. The bound Δv coincides with the minimum uncertainty in the velocity of a non-relativistic charged particle embedded in a constant electric field. A velocity of order Δv is reached after a time interval of order Δt ∼ S{sub E}{sup −1/3}r{sub 0} << r{sub 0} past the turning point in the semiclassical trajectory, where r{sub 0} is the size of the instanton. If the interaction takes place in the vicinity of the turning point, the semiclassical description of collision does not apply. Nonetheless, we find that even in this case there is still a strong asymmetry in the momentum transferred from the nucleated particles to the detector, in the direction of expansion after the turning point. We conclude that the correlation between the rest frame of nucleation and that of the detector is exceedingly sharp.

  17. Transport-induced shifts in condensate dew-point and composition in multicomponent systems with chemical reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.; Nagarajan, R.

    1985-01-01

    Partial heterogeneous condensation phenomena in multicomponent reacting systems are analyzed taking into consideration the chemical element transport phenomena. It is demonstrated that the dew-point surface temperature in chemically reactive systems is not a purely thermodynamic quantity, but is influenced by the multicomponent diffusion and Soret-mass diffusion phenomena. Several distinct dew-points are shown to exist in such systems and, as a result of transport constraints, the 'sharp' locus between two chemically distinct condensates is systematically moved to a difference mainstream composition.

  18. Ice Nucleation and Droplet Formation by Bare and Coated Black Carbon Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Beth J.; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Beranek, Josef; Zelenyuk, Alla; Thornton, Joel A.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2011-10-13

    We have studied the ice formation at heterogeneous and homogeneous temperatures, as well as droplet activation and hygroscopicity of soot particles of variable size and composition. Coatings of adipic, malic, and oleic acid were applied to span a relevant range of solubility, and both uncoated and oleic acid coated soot particles were exposed to ozone to simulate atmospheric oxidation. The results are interpreted in terms of onset ice nucleation with a comparison to a well characterized mineral dust particle that acts as an efficient ice nucleus, as well as particle hygroscopicity. At 253K and 243K, we found no evidence of heterogeneous ice nucleation occurring above the level of detection for our experimental conditions. Above water saturation, droplet formation was observed. At 233K, we observe the occurrence of homogeneous ice nucleation for all particles studied. Coatings also did not significantly alter the ice nucleation behavior of soot particles, but aided in the uptake of water. Hygroscopicity studies confirmed that pure soot particles were hydrophobic, and coated soot particles activated as droplets at high water supersaturations. A small amount of heterogeneous ice nucleation either below the detection limit of our instrument or concurrent with droplet formation and/or homogeneous freezing cannot be precluded, but we are able to set limits for its frequency. We conclude from our studies that both uncoated and coated soot particles are unlikely to contribute to the global budget of heterogeneous ice nuclei at temperatures between 233K and 253K.

  19. Nucleation of polymorphic amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Auer, Stefan

    2015-03-10

    One and the same protein can self-assemble into amyloid fibrils with different morphologies. The phenomenon of fibril polymorphism is relevant biologically because different fibril polymorphs can have different toxicity, but there is no tool for predicting which polymorph forms and under what conditions. Here, we consider the nucleation of polymorphic amyloid fibrils occurring by direct polymerization of monomeric proteins into fibrils. We treat this process within the framework of our newly developed nonstandard nucleation theory, which allows prediction of the concentration dependence of the nucleation rate for different fibril polymorphs. The results highlight that the concentration dependence of the nucleation rate is closely linked with the protein solubility and a threshold monomer concentration below which fibril formation becomes biologically irrelevant. The relation between the nucleation rate, the fibril solubility, the threshold concentration, and the binding energies of the fibril building blocks within fibrils might prove a valuable tool for designing new experiments to control the formation of particular fibril polymorphs. PMID:25762329

  20. Diclofenac Sodium Loaded Multicomponent Implant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkola, Lila; Viitanen, Petrus; Ashammakhi, Nureddin

    2008-02-01

    Earlier we have reported on developing DS releasing bioabsorbable rods for inhibition of osteolysis [l]. Due to their unsatisfactory drug release profiles we assessed the use of sintering technique of enhancement of drug release in the current study. Melt extruded PLGA 80/20 rods were compounded 8 wt-% DS. Some rods were self reinforced (SR) and some of them were sterilized to get three different components with different drug release profiles. Different rods were sintered together with heat and pressure. Three different specimen groups with different construction were studied. Thermal properties were analyzed using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Changes of IV were performed with capillary analysis and drug release measurements with UV-Vis spectrophotometer. Mechanical strength were measured two weeks, when disintegration occurred. Release rate consisted of 1) sharp jump start peak, 2) second smoother peak, and 3) third smooth peak. Released DS concentrations reached local therapeutic levels and maintained at that stage for 24-36 days. All DS was released during 50-70 days. The drug release from multicomponent implant was more stable and commenced earlier than from initial rods. Such properties were favored ones. Initial shear strength was 82 MPa and it decreased to 15 MPa. The mechanical bonding was sufficient although the components disintegrated relatively fast. By sintering different PLGA/DS components with different release rates it is possible to construct a truly controlled release implant for bone fixation with anti-inflammatory properties.

  1. Dynamics in Multicomponent Polyelectrolyte Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Michihiro

    2010-03-01

    Double-network hydrogels (DN-gel) prepared from the combination of a moderately cross-linked anionic polyelectrolyte (poly(2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid), PAMPS) and an un-cross-linked linear polymer (polyacrylamide, PAAm) solution show strong mechanical properties far superior to that of their individual constituents [1]. To determine the origin of the superior properties of DN-gels, we investigated the structure and the chain dynamics of model PAMPS/PAAm solution blends using small-angle neutron scattering and neutron spin-echo measurements [2]. Akcasu's dynamic scattering theory for a multicomponent system [3] is modified to include polyelectrolytes, and the resulting equation describes well the neutron spin-echo results over the entire wavevector range covered in our experiments. Parameters such as effective solvent viscosity were deduced from the measured data using the modified Akcasu equation. Both the relaxation time at large length scales (10-100 nm) and the segmental diffusion coefficient at short length scales (0.1-1 nm) or the effective solvent viscosity show good accordance with the macroscopic rheological behavior of the solution blends. [4pt] [1] J.P. Gong et al., Adv. Mater. 15, 1155 (2003). [0pt] [2] S. Lee et al., Macromolecules 42, 1293 (2009). [0pt] [2] A.Z. Akcasu, in Dynamic Liht Scattering, The Method and Some Applications; W. Brown Ed. (Oxford University Press, London 1992).

  2. Crystallization of classical multicomponent plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Medin, Zach; Cumming, Andrew

    2010-03-15

    We develop a method for calculating the equilibrium properties of the liquid-solid phase transition in a classical, ideal, multicomponent plasma. Our method is a semianalytic calculation that relies on extending the accurate fitting formulas available for the one-, two-, and three-component plasmas to the case of a plasma with an arbitrary number of components. We compare our results to those of C. J. Horowitz et al. [Phys. Rev. E 75, 066101 (2007)], who used a molecular-dynamics simulation to study the chemical properties of a 17-species mixture relevant to the ocean-crust boundary of an accreting neutron star at the point where half the mixture has solidified. Given the same initial composition as Horowitz et al., we are able to reproduce to good accuracy both the liquid and solid compositions at the half-freezing point; we find abundances for most species within 10% of the simulation values. Our method allows the phase diagram of complex mixtures to be explored more thoroughly than possible with numerical simulations. We briefly discuss the implications for the nature of the liquid-solid boundary in accreting neutron stars.

  3. Multicomponent Therapeutics of Berberine Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jiaoyang; Yan, Dan; Yang, Meihua; Dong, Xiaoping; Xiao, Xiaohe

    2013-01-01

    Although berberine alkaloids (BAs) are reported to be with broad-spectrum antibacterial and antiviral activities, the interactions among BAs have not been elucidated. In the present study, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was chosen as a model organism, and modified broth microdilution was applied for the determination of the fluorescence absorption values to calculate the anti-MRSA activity of BAs. We have initiated four steps to seek the optimal combination of BAs that are (1) determining the anti-MRSA activity of single BA, (2) investigating the two-component combination to clarify the interactions among BAs by checkerboard assay, (3) investigating the multicomponent combination to determine the optimal ratio by quadratic rotation-orthogonal combination design, and (4) in vivo and in vitro validation of the optimal combination. The results showed that the interactions among BAs are related to their concentrations. The synergetic combinations included “berberine and epiberberine,” “jatrorrhizine and palmatine” and “jatrorrhizine and coptisine”; the antagonistic combinations included “coptisine and epiberberine”. The optimal combination was berberine : coptisine : jatrorrhizine : palmatine : epiberberine = 0.702 : 0.863 : 1 : 0.491 : 0.526, and the potency of the optimal combination on cyclophosphamide-immunocompromised mouse model was better than the natural combinations of herbs containing BAs. PMID:23634170

  4. A computationally efficient description of heterogeneous freezing: A simplified version of the Soccer ball model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermeier, Dennis; Ervens, Barbara; Clauss, Tina; Voigtländer, Jens; Wex, Heike; Hartmann, Susan; Stratmann, Frank

    2014-01-01

    In a recent study, the Soccer ball model (SBM) was introduced for modeling and/or parameterizing heterogeneous ice nucleation processes. The model applies classical nucleation theory. It allows for a consistent description of both apparently singular and stochastic ice nucleation behavior, by distributing contact angles over the nucleation sites of a particle population assuming a Gaussian probability density function. The original SBM utilizes the Monte Carlo technique, which hampers its usage in atmospheric models, as fairly time-consuming calculations must be performed to obtain statistically significant results. Thus, we have developed a simplified and computationally more efficient version of the SBM. We successfully used the new SBM to parameterize experimental nucleation data of, e.g., bacterial ice nucleation. Both SBMs give identical results; however, the new model is computationally less expensive as confirmed by cloud parcel simulations. Therefore, it is a suitable tool for describing heterogeneous ice nucleation processes in atmospheric models.

  5. Homogeneous ice nucleation at moderate supercooling from molecular simulation.

    PubMed

    Sanz, E; Vega, C; Espinosa, J R; Caballero-Bernal, R; Abascal, J L F; Valeriani, C

    2013-10-01

    Among all of the freezing transitions, that of water into ice is probably the most relevant to biology, physics, geology, or atmospheric science. In this work, we investigate homogeneous ice nucleation by means of computer simulations. We evaluate the size of the critical cluster and the nucleation rate for temperatures ranging between 15 and 35 K below melting. We use the TIP4P/2005 and the TIP4P/ice water models. Both give similar results when compared at the same temperature difference with the model's melting temperature. The size of the critical cluster varies from ∼8000 molecules (radius = 4 nm) at 15 K below melting to ∼600 molecules (radius = 1.7 nm) at 35 K below melting. We use Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT) to estimate the ice-water interfacial free energy and the nucleation free-energy barrier. We obtain an interfacial free energy of 29(3) mN/m from an extrapolation of our results to the melting temperature. This value is in good agreement both with experimental measurements and with previous estimates from computer simulations of TIP4P-like models. Moreover, we obtain estimates of the nucleation rate from simulations of the critical cluster at the barrier top. The values we get for both models agree within statistical error with experimental measurements. At temperatures higher than 20 K below melting, we get nucleation rates slower than the appearance of a critical cluster in all water of the hydrosphere during the age of the universe. Therefore, our simulations predict that water freezing above this temperature must necessarily be heterogeneous. PMID:24010583

  6. Theory and Simulation of Nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuipers, Jan

    2009-09-01

    Nucleation is the process where a stable nucleus spontaneously emerges in a metastable environment. Examples of nucleation abound, for instance the formation of droplets in undercooled gasses and of crystals in undercooled liquids. The process is thermally activated and is key to understanding various subjects in biophysics, polymer physics and chemistry. The physics behind it has long been studied and the simplest version is known as classical nucleation theory. This thesis reveals a serious shortcoming of this classical theory, namely the assumption that nucleation is described by a memoryless stochastic process. A method to test for this so-called Markov property is developed and is applied to the nucleation process in the Ising model. To overcome this shortcoming, a non-Markovian theory for droplet growth is developed. This theory is validated with simulation results of the mass of growing droplets in the Ising model. More interesting quantities, of course, include the time scale and rate at which stable droplets arise. These times are typically very long, so that brute force simulations do not give useful results. Therefore, an efficient Monte Carlo method, called pathway recombination, is developed to measure transition times over large energy barriers. An adapted version of this method is used to determine nucleation rates of Ising models with various dynamics. These rates are then compared to the rates predicted by both the non-Markovian droplet theory and the classical one. Finally, a different activated process is discussed, namely the reversal of the Earth's magnetic field. Various time series of geomagnetic dipole moments are analyzed and theoretical, simulation and experimental results are compared.

  7. Conscientiousness increases efficiency of multicomponent behavior

    PubMed Central

    Stock, Ann-Kathrin; Beste, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Many everyday situations require the flexible interruption and changing of different actions to achieve a goal. Several strategies can be applied to do so, but those requiring high levels of cognitive control seem to confer an efficiency (speed) advantage in situations requiring multi-component behavior. However, it is elusive in how far personality traits affect performance in such situations. Given that top-down control is an important aspect of personality and furthermore correlates with conscientiousness, N = 163 participants completed the NEO-FFI and performed an experimental (stop-change) paradigm assessing multicomponent behavior. Applying mathematical constraints to the behavioral data, we estimated the processing strategy of each individual. The results show that multicomponent behavior is selectively affected by conscientiousness which explained approximately 19% of the measured inter-individual behavioral variance. Conscientiousness should hence be seen as a major personality dimension modulating multicomponent behavior. Highly conscientious people showed a more effective, step-by-step processing strategy of different actions necessary to achieve a goal. In situations with simultaneous requirements, this strategy equipped them with an efficiency (speed) advantage towards individuals with lower conscientiousness. In sum, the results show that strategies and the efficiency with which people cope with situations requiring multicomponent behavior are strongly influenced by their personality. PMID:26503352

  8. Multicomponent liquid ion exchange with chabazite zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, S.M.; Arnold, W.D. Jr.; Byers, C.W.

    1993-10-01

    In spite of the increasing commercial use of zeolites for binary and multicomponent sorption, the understanding of the basic mass-transfer processes associated with multicomponent zeolite ion-exchange systems is quite limited. This study was undertaken to evaluate Na-Ca-Mg-Cs-Sr ion exchange from an aqueous solution using a chabazite zeolite. Mass-transfer coefficients and equilibrium equations were determined from experimental batch-reactor data for single and multicomponent systems. The Langmuir isotherm was used to represent the equilibrium relationship for binary systems, and a modified Dubinin-Polyani model was used for the multicomponent systems. The experimental data indicate that diffusion through the microporous zeolite crystals is the primary diffusional resistance. Macropore diffusion also significantly contributes to the mass-transfer resistance. Various mass-transfer models were compared to the experimental data to determine mass-transfer coefficients. Effective diffusivities were obtained which accurately predicted experimental data using a variety of models. Only the model which accounts for micropore and macropore diffusion occurring in series accurately predicted multicomponent data using single-component diffusivities. Liquid and surface diffusion both contribute to macropore diffusion. Surface and micropore diffusivities were determined to be concentration dependent.

  9. Nucleation processes of nanobubbles at a solid/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Chung-Kai; Ko, Hsien-Chen; Yang, Chih-Wen; Lu, Yi-Hsien; Hwang, Ing-Shouh

    2016-04-01

    Experimental investigations of hydrophobic/water interfaces often return controversial results, possibly due to the unknown role of gas accumulation at the interfaces. Here, during advanced atomic force microscopy of the initial evolution of gas-containing structures at a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite/water interface, a fluid phase first appeared as a circular wetting layer ~0.3 nm in thickness and was later transformed into a cap-shaped nanostructure (an interfacial nanobubble). Two-dimensional ordered domains were nucleated and grew over time outside or at the perimeter of the fluid regions, eventually confining growth of the fluid regions to the vertical direction. We determined that interfacial nanobubbles and fluid layers have very similar mechanical properties, suggesting low interfacial tension with water and a liquid-like nature, explaining their high stability and their roles in boundary slip and bubble nucleation. These ordered domains may be the interfacial hydrophilic gas hydrates and/or the long-sought chemical surface heterogeneities responsible for contact line pinning and contact angle hysteresis. The gradual nucleation and growth of hydrophilic ordered domains renders the original homogeneous hydrophobic/water interface more heterogeneous over time, which would have great consequence for interfacial properties that affect diverse phenomena, including interactions in water, chemical reactions, and the self-assembly and function of biological molecules.

  10. Nucleation processes of nanobubbles at a solid/water interface.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chung-Kai; Ko, Hsien-Chen; Yang, Chih-Wen; Lu, Yi-Hsien; Hwang, Ing-Shouh

    2016-01-01

    Experimental investigations of hydrophobic/water interfaces often return controversial results, possibly due to the unknown role of gas accumulation at the interfaces. Here, during advanced atomic force microscopy of the initial evolution of gas-containing structures at a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite/water interface, a fluid phase first appeared as a circular wetting layer ~0.3 nm in thickness and was later transformed into a cap-shaped nanostructure (an interfacial nanobubble). Two-dimensional ordered domains were nucleated and grew over time outside or at the perimeter of the fluid regions, eventually confining growth of the fluid regions to the vertical direction. We determined that interfacial nanobubbles and fluid layers have very similar mechanical properties, suggesting low interfacial tension with water and a liquid-like nature, explaining their high stability and their roles in boundary slip and bubble nucleation. These ordered domains may be the interfacial hydrophilic gas hydrates and/or the long-sought chemical surface heterogeneities responsible for contact line pinning and contact angle hysteresis. The gradual nucleation and growth of hydrophilic ordered domains renders the original homogeneous hydrophobic/water interface more heterogeneous over time, which would have great consequence for interfacial properties that affect diverse phenomena, including interactions in water, chemical reactions, and the self-assembly and function of biological molecules. PMID:27090291

  11. Nucleation processes of nanobubbles at a solid/water interface

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Chung-Kai; Ko, Hsien-Chen; Yang, Chih-Wen; Lu, Yi-Hsien; Hwang, Ing-Shouh

    2016-01-01

    Experimental investigations of hydrophobic/water interfaces often return controversial results, possibly due to the unknown role of gas accumulation at the interfaces. Here, during advanced atomic force microscopy of the initial evolution of gas-containing structures at a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite/water interface, a fluid phase first appeared as a circular wetting layer ~0.3 nm in thickness and was later transformed into a cap-shaped nanostructure (an interfacial nanobubble). Two-dimensional ordered domains were nucleated and grew over time outside or at the perimeter of the fluid regions, eventually confining growth of the fluid regions to the vertical direction. We determined that interfacial nanobubbles and fluid layers have very similar mechanical properties, suggesting low interfacial tension with water and a liquid-like nature, explaining their high stability and their roles in boundary slip and bubble nucleation. These ordered domains may be the interfacial hydrophilic gas hydrates and/or the long-sought chemical surface heterogeneities responsible for contact line pinning and contact angle hysteresis. The gradual nucleation and growth of hydrophilic ordered domains renders the original homogeneous hydrophobic/water interface more heterogeneous over time, which would have great consequence for interfacial properties that affect diverse phenomena, including interactions in water, chemical reactions, and the self-assembly and function of biological molecules. PMID:27090291

  12. Crystal nucleation in lithium borate glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Gary L.; Neilson, George F.; Weinberg, Michael C.

    1988-01-01

    Crystal nucleation measurements were made on three lithium borate compositions in the vicinity of Li2O-2Br2O3. All nucleation measurements were performed at 500 C. Certain aspects of the nucleation behavior indicated (tentatively) that it proceeded by a homogeneous mechanism. The steady state nucleation rate was observed to have the largest value when the Li2O concentration was slightly in excess of the diborate composition. The change in nucleation rate with composition is controlled by the variation of viscosity as well as the change in free energy with composition. The variation of nucleation rate is explained qualitatively in these terms.

  13. The ice nucleation temperature determines the primary drying rate of lyophilization for samples frozen on a temperature-controlled shelf.

    PubMed

    Searles, J A; Carpenter, J F; Randolph, T W

    2001-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the influence of ice nucleation temperature on the primary drying rate during lyophilization for samples in vials that were frozen on a lyophilizer shelf. Aqueous solutions of 10% (w/v) hydroxyethyl starch were frozen in vials with externally mounted thermocouples and then partially lyophilized to determine the primary drying rate. Low- and high-particulate-containing samples, ice-nucleating additives silver iodide and Pseudomonas syringae, and other methods were used to obtain a wide range of nucleation temperatures. In cases where the supercooling exceeded 5 degrees C, freezing took place in the following three steps: (1) primary nucleation, (2) secondary nucleation encompassing the entire liquid volume, and (3) final solidification. The primary drying rate was dependent on the ice nucleation temperature, which is stochastic in nature but is affected by particulate content and the presence of ice nucleators. Sample cooling rates of 0.05 to 1 degrees C/min had no effect on nucleation temperatures and drying rate. We found that the ice nucleation temperature is the primary determinant of the primary drying rate. However, the nucleation temperature is not under direct control, and its stochastic nature and sensitivity to difficult-to-control parameters result in drying rate heterogeneity. Nucleation temperature heterogeneity may also result in variation in other morphology-related parameters such as surface area and secondary drying rate. Overall, these results document that factors such as particulate content and vial condition, which influence ice nucleation temperature, must be carefully controlled to avoid, for example, lot-to-lot variability during cGMP production. In addition, if these factors are not controlled and/or are inadvertently changed during process development and scaleup, a lyophilization cycle that was successful on the research scale may fail during large-scale production. PMID:11458335

  14. Nucleation and growth studies of polycrystalline covalent materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Jungheum

    The chemical vapor deposition of different covalent polycrystalline materials---including diamond, silicon carbide, and carbon nitride---in stagnation flow reactors was rigorously simulated to determine the nucleation and growth mechanisms of these materials. Kinetic models were used to predict the rates of gas-phase and surface chemistry, the temperature and velocity profiles, potential gaseous film growth precursors, the time evolution of nucleation and intermediate layer formation, and the morphological evolution of continuous polycrystalline films. Numerical studies were also carried out to determine the dependence of the kinetics of nucleation and subsequent polycrystalline film growth on operating conditions. The calculated results for carbon nitride deposition indicate that the experimentally measured bond types in the carbon nitride films must result from chemical bond rearrangement occurring on the deposition surface or in the bulk phase once gaseous film growth precursors, including C, CH2 , CH3, C2H2, N, NH, NH2, HCN, and H2CN, are adsorbed. Of these precursors, C and CH 3 dominate the carbon contribution to carbon nitride film growth, and atomic nitrogen is the principal nitrogen bearing species. When the evolution rates of a silicon carbide intermediate layer and diamond clusters are calculated by accounting for gas-phase and surface reactions, surface and bulk diffusion, the mechanism for intermediate layer formation, and heterogeneous diamond nucleation kinetics, it is predicted that higher adsorption energies, in the range of 3.7 to 4.5 eV, lead to larger surface adatom densities, lower saturated nucleation densities, and larger silicon carbide intermediate layer thicknesses. The intermediate layer thickness becomes saturated while the growing diamond nuclei still cover a very small fraction of the silicon carbide. Reports of heteroepitaxial diamond nucleation without silicon carbide intermediate layer formation may be readily explained by a

  15. New Findings on Ice Nucleation in Mid-latitude Cirrus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S.; Mitchell, D. L.; Lawson, P.; Baker, B. A.

    2011-12-01

    Recent GCM simulations (CESM1) show a global aerosol indirect effect of -1.39 W m-2 with -2.02 W m-2 from shortwave and +0.63 W m-2 from longwave cloud forcing, the longwave being due to homogeneous nucleation of ice crystals. However, the extent of homogeneous nucleation in ice clouds is poorly understood. This study uses results from a recent field campaign, SPARTICUS (Small PARTicles In CirrUS), to evaluate the impact of homogeneous nucleation on the ice particle size distribution (PSD) shape, as well as ice particle concentration, shape, PSD effective size and fall speed. While earlier measurements were difficult to evaluate for ice nucleation effects due to the problem of ice particle shattering, recent in-situ measurements using the 2 dimensional-stereo (2D-S) probe have greatly reduced this problem resulting in provocative findings for both synoptic and anvil cirrus sampled during SPARTICUS. For mid-latitude synoptic and anvil cirrus around -40°C, these new measurements show that clear changes in the ice PSD and its properties occur regarding (1) PSD shape, (2) total number concentration-to-ice water content ratio (N/IWC), (3) PSD mean size, (4) PSD mean area ratio and (5) the mass-weighted fall velocity (Vm). These changes are consistent with a change in ice nucleation mechanism, with heterogeneous nucleation processes active at temperatures warmer than -40°C and homogeneous freezing nucleation at temperatures colder than -40°C. The change in Vm implies that cirrus colder than -40°C will have longer lifetimes and greater cloud coverage than warmer cirrus clouds, all other relevant factors remaining equal. The increase in N/IWC with colder temperatures (T < -40°C) appears consistent with homogeneous nucleation theory. Figure 1 shows normalized frequency distribution of PSD area ratios for temperatures above and below -40°C. Area ratios (ice particle projected area/area of circle defined by particle maximum dimension) are a measure of ice particle shape

  16. Multicomponent Transport in Polyatomic Reactive Gas Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovangigli, Vincent

    2011-05-01

    We investigate multicomponent reactive flow models derived from the kinetic theory of gases. We discuss in particular the conservation equations, the transport fluxes and the transport coefficients in weak and strong magnetic fields. The mathematical properties of the resulting hyperbolic-parabolic systems of partial differential equations modeling multicomponent flows are deduced from the underlying kinetic framework. The structure and solution of the transport linear systems associated with the evaluation of transport coefficients are also addressed. In particular, the convergence of iterative techniques is deduced from the properties of the linearized Boltzmann collision operator. The impact of multicomponent transport is also discussed, notably the importance of Soret effects in various flows and the impact of volume viscosity.

  17. Multicomponent Transport in Polyatomic Reactive Gas Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Giovangigli, Vincent

    2011-05-20

    We investigate multicomponent reactive flow models derived from the kinetic theory of gases. We discuss in particular the conservation equations, the transport fluxes and the transport coefficients in weak and strong magnetic fields. The mathematical properties of the resulting hyperbolic-parabolic systems of partial differential equations modeling multicomponent flows are deduced from the underlying kinetic framework. The structure and solution of the transport linear systems associated with the evaluation of transport coefficients are also addressed. In particular, the convergence of iterative techniques is deduced from the properties of the linearized Boltzmann collision operator. The impact of multicomponent transport is also discussed, notably the importance of Soret effects in various flows and the impact of volume viscosity.

  18. Aminoazoles as Key Reagents in Multicomponent Heterocyclizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chebanov, Valentin A.; Gura, Katerina A.; Desenko, Sergey M.

    Because of the significant role in biological processes in living cells and the diverse types of physiological activities, heterocyclic compounds are in focus of intense investigations by academic and applied-oriented chemists. Considerably, a scientific renaissance of heterocycles during the last decades is closely related to the development of multicomponent approaches to their synthesis. Multicomponent methodology fundamentally different from two-component or sequential processes together with other innovative synthetic methods like microwave- and ultrasonic-assisted reactions offer some new possibilities in constructing heterocyclic systems with high level of molecular diversity and complexity. An overview of known multicomponent heterocyclizations using aminoazoles as a key reagent and their rich synthetic potential for obtaining five-, six-, and seven-membered heterocycles is presented. A special attention is paid to the tuning of chemo- and regio- and positional selectivity of some reactions as well as to the application of nonclassical activation methods based on microwave and ultrasonic irradiation.

  19. Automatic apparatus for nucleation investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, Mark; Vonnegut, Bernard

    1982-12-01

    An automated apparatus serves repeatedly to detect and record the repeated formation of the crystalline phase in a single sample of a supercooled liquid. The technique is successfully applied to investigations of the nucleation of ice formation with silver iodide by repeatedly freezing and thawing a small volume of water in a U-shaped capillary tube.

  20. Foam nucleation system for fluoropolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Buckmaster, M.D.; Randa, S.K.

    1988-08-16

    A foamable composition is described comprising a melt-processible fluoropolymer containing a nucleating amount of boron nitride and a synergistic amount of at least one inorganic salt that is thermally stable at the fluoropolymer extrusion temperature, and consists of a metal cation and a polyatomic anion.

  1. Upscaling multi-component reactive transport in presence of connected subsurface structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willmann, M.; Mañé, R.; Tyukhova, A.

    2015-12-01

    Heterogeneity in hydraulic conductivity leads to incomplete mixing. Upscaling using the dispersion tensor in the advection-dispersion equation overestimates local mixing. Modelling multi-component reactive transport leads to an overestimation of reaction rates and overall reactions. Multi-rate mass transfer was shown previously to better represent mixing. But it is still unclear under what conditions this linear model is able to represent the underlying non-linear process. We study explicit multi-component transport in heterogeneous aquifers for the example of calcite-dissolution. We compare different types of heterogeneity from intermediately well connected (multigaussian) fields to very well connected fields. The fundamental difference stems from their connectivity structure. We observe for the well connected field different dominating channels with an almost uniform advective velocity while the multigaussian fields show dominating channels with a varying advective velocity. Then, we compare our results with an effective reactive mass transfer model where the distribution of exchanges rates or the memory function are derived from information of the hydraulic conductivity field only. We see that reactive multi-rate models show a good agreement for the well connected fields where the connected channels are more or less homogeneous and the immobile inclusions are of more or less equal size. We find connectivity important for upscaling reactive transport in highly heterogeneous conductivity fields.

  2. Deposition of thin films of multicomponent materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Sarita (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Composite films of multicomponent materials, such as oxides and nitrides, e.g., lead zirconate titanate, are deposited by dc magnetron sputtering, employing a rotating substrate holder, which rotates relative to a plurality of targets, one target for each metal element of the multicomponent material. The sputtering is carried out in a reactive atmosphere. The substrates on which the layers are deposited are at ambient temperature. Following deposition of the composite film, the film is heated to a temperature sufficient to initiate a solid state reaction and form the final product, which is substantially single phase and substantially homogeneous.

  3. Multi-Component Reactions in Heterocyclic Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Thomas J. J.; Orru, Romano V. A.; Chebanov, Valentin A.; Sakhno, Yana I.; Saraev, Vyacheslav E.; Muravyova, Elena A.; Andrushchenko, Anastasia Yu.; Desenko, Sergey M.; Akhmetova, V. R.; Khabibullina, G. R.; Rakhimova, E. B.; Vagapov, R. A.; Khairullina, R. R.; Niatshina, Z. T.; Murzakova, N. N.; Maslivets, Andrey N.; Voskressensky, Leonid G.; Danagulyan, Gevorg G.; Murtchyan, Armen D.; Tumanyan, Araksya K.; Banfi, Luca; Basso, Andrea; de Moliner, Fabio; Guanti, Giuseppe; Petricci, Elena; Riva, Renata; Taddei, Maurizio; Naimi-Jamal, M. Reza; Mashkouri, Sara; Sharifi, Ali; Przhevalski, Nikolai M.; Rozhkova, Elena N.; Tokmakov, Gennadii P.; Magedov, Igor V.; Armisheva, M. N.; Rassudihina, N. A.; Vahrin, M. I.; Gein, V. L.; Shaabani, Ahmad; Rezayan, Ali Hossein; Sarvary, Afshin; Heidary, Marjan; Ng, Seik Weng; Beliaev, Nikolai A.; Mokrushin, Vladimir S.; Paramonov, Igor V.; Ilyin, Alexey; Garkushenko, Anna K.; Dushek, Maria A.; Sagitullina, Galina P.; Sagitullin, Reva S.; Kysil, Volodymyr; Khvat, Alexander; Tsirulnikov, Sergey; Tkachenko, Sergey; Ivachtchenko, Alexandre; Gein, Vladimir L.; Panova, Olga S.; Ilyn, Alexey P.; Kravchenko, Dmitri V.; Potapov, Victor V.; Ivachtchenko, Alexandre V.; Vichegjanina, V. N.; Levandovskaya, E. B.; Gein, V. L.; Vahrin, M. I.; Vladimirov, I. N.; Zorina, A. A.; Nosova, N. V.; Gein, V. L.; Fedorova, O. V.; Vahrin, M. I.

    Multi-component and domino reactions are efficient and effective methods in the sustainable and diversity-oriented synthesis of heterocycles. In particular, transition metal-catalyzed multi-component sequences have recently gained considerable interest. Based upon the Sonogashira entry to alkynones, alkenones, and intermediate allenes, we have opened new avenues to the one-pot synthesis of numerous classes of heterocyclic frameworks in an MCR fashion. This methodological approach has now found various applications in one-pot syntheses of functional chromophores, pharmaceutically active compounds, and marine alkaloids and derivatives.

  4. Nucleation of bubbles on a solidification front—experiment and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, P. S.; Huang, C. C.; Lee, K. W.

    2003-06-01

    The heterogeneous nucleation of bubbles on an advancing solidification front during the freezing of water containing a dissolved gas has been experimentally and analytically studied. The formation of bubbles resulting from supersaturation of liquids is commonly encountered in different fields such as heat transfer, manufacturing, and bioscience. In this work, the sizes of nucleating bubbles and the concentration profiles of dissolved oxygen and carbon dioxide gases in the water ahead of the solidification front have been measured. From successful comparisons between the measured and predicted critical radii of nucleating bubbles and distributions of dissolved gas content, the phenomena of heterogeneous nucleation in a binary weak solution during the freezing process are quantitatively confirmed. The results show that an increase in gas content at the solidification front in the liquid decreases the free-energy barrier and critical radii of bubbles that are formed on the solidification front. The sizes of the critical radii decrease and the number of nucleating bubbles increase in the early stage of solidification. As the solidification rates decrease at longer times, the content of the dissolved gas in the liquid on the advancing interface decreases and the critical radii of nucleating bubbles increase.

  5. On the usage of classical nucleation theory in quantification of the impact of bacterial INP on weather and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahyoun, Maher; Wex, Heike; Gosewinkel, Ulrich; Šantl-Temkiv, Tina; Nielsen, Niels W.; Finster, Kai; Sørensen, Jens H.; Stratmann, Frank; Korsholm, Ulrik S.

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial ice-nucleating particles (INP) are present in the atmosphere and efficient in heterogeneous ice-nucleation at temperatures up to -2 °C in mixed-phase clouds. However, due to their low emission rates, their climatic impact was considered insignificant in previous modeling studies. In view of uncertainties about the actual atmospheric emission rates and concentrations of bacterial INP, it is important to re-investigate the threshold fraction of cloud droplets containing bacterial INP for a pronounced effect on ice-nucleation, by using a suitable parameterization that describes the ice-nucleation process by bacterial INP properly. Therefore, we compared two heterogeneous ice-nucleation rate parameterizations, denoted CH08 and HOO10 herein, both of which are based on classical-nucleation-theory and measurements, and use similar equations, but different parameters, to an empirical parameterization, denoted HAR13 herein, which considers implicitly the number of bacterial INP. All parameterizations were used to calculate the ice-nucleation probability offline. HAR13 and HOO10 were implemented and tested in a one-dimensional version of a weather-forecast-model in two meteorological cases. Ice-nucleation-probabilities based on HAR13 and CH08 were similar, in spite of their different derivation, and were higher than those based on HOO10. This study shows the importance of the method of parameterization and of the input variable, number of bacterial INP, for accurately assessing their role in meteorological and climatic processes.

  6. Liquid-to-crystal nucleation: Automated lag-time apparatus to study supercooled liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heneghan, A. F.; Wilson, P. W.; Wang, Genmiao; Haymet, A. D. J.

    2001-10-01

    The statistics of liquid-to-crystal nucleation are studied using an automated lag-time apparatus. A single 500 μL sample of distilled water is repeatedly supercooled to a fixed temperature below its equilibrium freezing temperature, held until freezing occurred, and then thawed. Our raw data is then a set of approximately 300 lag-times for each of three set supercooling temperatures. In each case, a small insoluble AgI crystal was added to ensure heterogeneous nucleation and average nucleation temperatures around ΔT=8 K. The distribution of lag-times is analyzed, and shown to be well approximated by a single exponential decay, with average lag-times in the range of 1000-3000 seconds. This average lag-time decreases markedly at deeper levels of supercooling, and for the present data, this decrease is fit equally well by exponential, power law decay, and classical nucleation functional forms.

  7. Kinetics of crystal nucleation and growth in Pd(40)Ni(40)P(20) glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drehman, A. J.; Greer, A. L.

    1984-01-01

    Samples of Pd(40)Ni(40)P(20) glass, produced by cooling the melt at 1 or 800 K/s, are heated in a differential scanning calorimeter to determine the crystallization kinetics. Optical microscopy shows that eutectic crystallization proceeds both by growth from the surface of the samples and by the growth of spherical regions around preexisting nuclei in the interior. A modified Kissinger (1957) analysis is used to obtain the activation energy for crystal growth (3.49 eV). The steady state homogeneous nucleation frequency at 590 K is about 10 million/cu m per sec. This is estimated to be the maximum nucleation frequency: it is too low to account for the observed population of quenched-in nuclei, which are therefore presumed to be heterogeneous. The major practical obstacle to glass formation in this system is heterogeneous nucleation.

  8. Identification and quantification of ice nucleation active microorganisms by digital droplet PCR (ddPCR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linden, Martin; Pöschl, Ulrich; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine

    2015-04-01

    Several bioaerosol types, including bacteria, fungi, pollen and lichen, have been identified as sources of biological ice nucleators (IN) which induce ice formation already at temperatures as high as -10 °C or above. Accordingly, they potentially contribute widely to environmental ice nucleation in the atmosphere and are of great interest in the study of natural heterogenous ice nucleation processes. Ice nucleation active microorganisms have been found and studied among bacteria (Proteobacteria) and fungi (phyla Basidiomycota and Ascomycota). The mechanisms enabling the microorganisms to ice nucleation are subject to ongoing research. While it has been demonstrated that whole cells can act as ice nucleators in the case of bacteria due to the presence of specific membrane proteins, cell-free ice nucleation active particles seem to be responsible for this phenomenon in fungi and lichen. The identification and quantification of these ice nucleation active microorganisms and their IN in atmospheric samples is crucial to understand their contribution to the pool of atmospheric IN. This is not a trivial task since the respective microorganisms are often prevalent in lowest concentrations and a variety of states, be it viable cells, spores or cell debris from dead cells. Molecular biology provides tools to identify and quantify ice nucleation active microorganisms independent of their state by detecting genetic markers specific for the organism of interest. Those methods are not without their drawbacks in terms of sample material concentration required or reliable standardization. Digital Droplet Polymerase Chain Reaction (ddPCR) was chosen for our demands as a more elegant, quick and specific method in the investigation of ice nucleation active microorganisms in atmospheric samples. The advantages of ddPCR lie in the simultaneous detection and quantification of genetic markers and their original copy numbers in a sample. This is facilitated by the fractionation of the

  9. Single Particle Laser Mass Spectrometry Applied to Differential Ice Nucleation Experiments at the AIDA Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Gallavardin, S. J.; Froyd, Karl D.; Lohmann, U.; Moehler, Ottmar; Murphy, Daniel M.; Cziczo, Dan

    2008-08-26

    Experiments conducted at the Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) chamber located in Karlsruhe, Germany permit investigation of particle properties that affect the nucleation of ice at temperature and water vapor conditions relevant to cloud microphysics and climate issues. Ice clouds were generated by heterogeneous nucleation of Arizona test dust (ATD), illite, and hematite and homogeneous nucleation of sulfuric acid. Ice crystals formed in the chamber were inertially separated from unactivated, or ‘interstitial’ aerosol particles with a pumped counterflow virtual impactor (PCVI), then evaporated. The ice residue (i.e., the aerosol which initiated ice nucleation plus any material which was scavenged from the gas- and/or particle-phase), was chemically characterized at the single particle level using a laser ionization mass spectrometer. In this manner the species that first nucleated ice could be identified out of a mixed aerosol population in the chamber. Bare mineral dust particles were more effective ice nuclei (IN) than similar particles with a coating. Metallic particles from contamination in the chamber initiated ice nucleation before other species but there were few enough that they did not compromise the experiments. Nitrate, sulfate, and organics were often detected on particles and ice residue, evidently from scavenging of trace gas-phase species in the chamber. Hematite was a more effective ice nucleus than illite. Ice residue was frequently larger than unactivated test aerosol due to the formation of aggregates due to scavenging, condensation of contaminant gases, and the predominance of larger aerosol in nucleation.

  10. D Multicomponent Time Domain Elastic Full Waveform Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, R. U.; De Basabe, J. D.; Gallardo, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    The search of hydrocarbon reservoirs between the finest stratigraphic and structural traps relies on the detailed surveying and interpretation of multicomponent seismic waves. This need makes Full Waveform Inversion (FWI) one of the most active topics in seismic exploration research and there are a limited number of FWI algorithms that undertake the elastic approach required to model these multicomponent data. We developed an iterative Gauss-Newton 2D time-domain elastic FWI scheme that reproduces the vertical and horizontal particle velocity as measured by common seismic surveys and obtains simultaneously the distribution of three elastic parameters of our subsurface model (density ρ and the Lame parameters λ and μ). The elastic wave is propagated in a heterogeneous elastic media using a time domain 2D velocity-stress staggered grid finite difference method. Our code observes the necessary stability conditions and includes absorbing boundary conditions and basic multi-thread parallelization. The same forward modeling code is also used to calculate the Frechet's derivatives with respect to the three parameters of our model following the sensitivity equation approach and perturbation theory. We regularized our FWI algorithm applying two different criteria: (1) First order Tikhonov regularization (maximum smoothness) and (2) Minimum Gradient Support (MGS) that adopts an approximate zero-norm of the several property gradients. We applied our algorithm to various test models and demonstrated that their structural information resemble closely those of the original three synthetic model parameters (λ, µ and ρ). Finally, we compared the role of both regularization criteria in terms of data fit, model stability and structural resemblance.

  11. Recent developments in asymmetric multicomponent reactions.

    PubMed

    de Graaff, Corien; Ruijter, Eelco; Orru, Romano V A

    2012-05-21

    Multicomponent reactions (MCRs) receive increasing attention because they address both diversity and complexity in organic synthesis. Thus, in principle diverse sets of relatively complex structures can be generated from simple starting materials in a single reaction step. The ever increasing need for optically pure compounds for pharmaceutical and agricultural applications as well as for catalysis promotes the development of asymmetric multicomponent reactions. In recent years, asymmetric multicomponent reactions have been applied to the total synthesis of various enantiopure natural products and commercial drugs, reducing the number of required reaction steps significantly. Although many developments in diastereoselective MCRs have been reported, the field of catalytic enantioselective MCRs has just started to blossom. This critical review describes developments in both diastereoselective and catalytic enantioselective multicomponent reactions since 2004. Significantly broadened scopes, new techniques, more environmentally benign methods and entirely novel MCRs reflect the increasingly inventive paths that synthetic chemist follow in this field. Until recently, enantioselective transition metal-catalyzed MCRs represented the majority of catalytic enantioselective MCRs. However, metal contamination is highly undesirable for drug synthesis. The emergence of organocatalysis greatly influences the quest for new asymmetric MCRs. PMID:22546840

  12. Fractional crystallization and homogeneous nucleation of confined PEG microdomains in PBS-PEG multiblock copolymers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cai-Li; Jiao, Ling; Zeng, Jian-Bing; Zhang, Jing-Jing; Yang, Ke-Ke; Wang, Yu-Zhong

    2013-09-12

    Fractional crystallization, homogeneous nucleation of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) segment, and self-nucleation behavior of PEG segment within miscible double crystalline poly(butylene succinate)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PBSEG) multiblock copolymers with different composition and segment chain length were studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Surface morphology of PBSEG10K with different PEG content was investigated by atomic force microscope (AFM). Different from di- or triblock copolymers, the microstructure and confinement of PEG dispersed phase in PBS matrix phase highly depends on chain length and sequence as well as segment content. The transition point of the PEG segment content from heterogeneous to homogeneous nucleation mechanism decreased from 50 to 39 wt % with PEG segment chain length increasing from 1000 to 2000 g/mol. When PEG segment chain length increased further to 6000 and 10000 g/mol, homogeneous nucleation phenomenon took place at much lower PEG content and fractional crystallization was observed at 29 and 24 wt %, respectively. Homogeneous nucleation mechanism of PBSEG(1K-36), PBSEG(2K-26), PBSEG(6K-19), and PBSEG(10K-12) was evidenced by the large supercoolings needed for crystallization, as well as first-order crystallization kinetics obtained. Self-nucleation behaviors of PEG segment still rely on the composition of PBSEGs. In the case of heterogeneous nucleation crystallization, self-nucleation behaviors of PEG segment showed standard self-nucleation behavior with classical three self-nucleation domains. When the crystallizable chains were confined into isolated microdomains, however, self-nucleation domain (domain II) disappeared. The absence of III(A) was observed in PBSEG(2K-39), while PBSEG(6K-29) had both III(A) and III(SA). Furthermore, AFM morphology studies still indicated the confined degree of PEG segment by previous PBS crystals was profoundly influenced by segment fraction. The confinement of the PEG segment by

  13. Understanding the Chemical Physics of Nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Kathmann, Shawn M.

    2006-08-01

    Observation and theory have steadily progressed our understanding of nucleation phenomena over the past 280 years. However, even more questions remain concerning the governing processes and mechanisms. The inherent instability and sensitivity of nucleation places a high premium on theoretical accuracy and experimental purity and similarly makes interpretation of both more challenging. The objective of the present paper is to contribute to the understanding of nucleation kinetics and thermodynamics with emphasis on cluster chemical physics within the context of Dynamical Nucleation Theory. Our hope is to share some insights that we've gained over the past several years concerning rate constants, molecular interactions, statistical mechanics and their consequences on nucleation.

  14. Effect of an alpha-phase nucleating agent on the crystallization kinetics of a propylene/ethylene random copolymer at largely different supercooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Androsch, René; Monami, Andrea; Kucera, Jaroslav

    2014-12-01

    The effect of addition of 0.1 wt% phosphate-ester based alpha-phase nucleating agent on the crystallization of a random propylene-based copolymer with 3.9 mol% ethylene has been investigated by fast scanning chip calorimetry (FSC). Main purpose of the work was the evaluation of the effect of the nucleating agent on the bimodal temperature dependence of the crystallization rate of propylene-based polymers caused by a change of the nucleation mechanism from heterogeneous to homogeneous nucleation on lowering the temperature to below about 60 °C. Presence of the nucleation agent in the copolymer of the present study accelerates crystallization only in the high-temperature range of predominant heterogeneous nucleation, but does not affect the crystallization rate in the low-temperature range of homogeneous nucleation. The observed decrease of the minimum crystallization half-time due to the addition of the nucleation agent, from 0.2 s in case of the unmodified copolymer to 0.04 s in case of the copolymer containing the nucleating agent, is paralleled by an increase of the critical cooling rate required to inhibit crystallization on continuous cooling to below the glass transition temperature from 102 to 103 K s-1. The study is completed by an analysis of the effect of addition of the nucleation agent on the spherulitic superstructure.

  15. Numerical Modeling of Plasmas in which Nanoparticles Nucleate and Grow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Pulkit

    consistently simulate the dynamics and charging of particles during afterglow. It was found that dusty plasma afterglow is dominated by different time scales for electron and ion dynamics. Particle size and charge distribution changes significantly during the afterglow. Finally, a simplified chemistry model was included in dusty plasma numerical model to simulate the dynamics of argon-silane dusty plasma. The chemistry model treats silane dissociation and reactions of silicon hydrides containing up to two silicon atoms. The nucleation rate is equated to rate of formation of anions containing two Si atoms, and a heterogeneous reaction model is used to model particle surface growth. Evolution of particle size and concentration is explained and the importance of variable surface growth rate and nucleation rate is discussed.

  16. Misfit dislocation nucleation in heteroepitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trushin, Oleg; Ying, See Chen; Granato, Enzo; Ala-Nissila, Tapio

    2001-03-01

    We have studied atomic mechanisms of misfit dislocation nucleation in heteroepitaxy with semiempirical potentials. Many-body mechanisms of stress relaxation are systematically investigated with Lennard-Jones potential in 2D and 3D cases. Energy barriers for dislocation nucleation are estimated using modern methods for saddle point search (Nudged Elastic Band [1], Eigenvector Following [2] and others). Moreover, new simple and effective method for transition paths searching is proposed. Based on the data the critical thickness of film is estimated as a function of film-substrate lattice misfit. Moreover, to make the study more realistic we used EAM [3] potentials in simulations of Pd/Cu and Cu/Pd systems. We show that the dislocations nucleate more easily in compressive than tensile strained films, and in fcc(111) orientation rather than in fcc(100). These findings are in agreement with recent experimental and theoretical works. 1. H. Jonsson, G. Mills and K. W. Jacobsen, in Classical and Quantum Dynamics in Condensed Phase Simulations, ed. by B. J. Berne, G. Ciccotti, and D. F. Coker (World Scientific, Singapore, 1998). 2. L. J. Munro and D. J. Wales, Phys. Rev. B v59, 3969 (1999), and references therein. 3. S. M. Foiles, M. I. Baskes, and M. S. Daw, Phys. Rev. B v33, 7983 (1986).

  17. Nucleation precursors in protein crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Vekilov, Peter G.; Vorontsova, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Protein crystal nucleation is a central problem in biological crystallography and other areas of science, technology and medicine. Recent studies have demonstrated that protein crystal nuclei form within crucial precursors. Here, methods of detection and characterization of the precursors are reviewed: dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy and Brownian microscopy. Data for several proteins provided by these methods have demonstrated that the nucleation precursors are clusters consisting of protein-dense liquid, which are metastable with respect to the host protein solution. The clusters are several hundred nanometres in size, the cluster population occupies from 10−7 to 10−3 of the solution volume, and their properties in solutions supersaturated with respect to crystals are similar to those in homogeneous, i.e. undersaturated, solutions. The clusters exist owing to the conformation flexibility of the protein molecules, leading to exposure of hydrophobic surfaces and enhanced intermolecular binding. These results indicate that protein conformational flexibility might be the mechanism behind the metastable mesoscopic clusters and crystal nucleation. Investigations of the cluster properties are still in their infancy. Results on direct imaging of cluster behaviors and characterization of cluster mechanisms with a variety of proteins will soon lead to major breakthroughs in protein biophysics. PMID:24598910

  18. Analysis of nucleation modelling in ductile cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moumeni, E.; Tutum, C. C.; Tiedje, N. S.; Hattel, J. H.

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneous nucleation of nodular graphite at inclusions in ductile iron during eutectic solidification has been investigated. The experimental part of this work deals with casting of ductile iron samples with two different inoculants in four different thicknesses. Chemical analysis, metallographic investigation and thermal analysis of the specimens have been carried out. A numerical model has been implemented and the results (i.e. cooling curve, cooling rate, nodule count and solid fraction) have shown a good agreement with experimental studies; following this, inoculation parameters in the model have been studied and discussed.

  19. Nucleation in Al Alloys Processed By MCDC Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasada Rao, A. K.

    2015-06-01

    Present work confines itself to discuss the mechanism responsible for the grain refinement of the melt conditioned direct-chill cast aluminum alloys. It has been found that the Al alloys processed by this process undergo grain refinement irrespective of their chemical composition. The forced convection caused during this process led to dendrite fragmentation which enhances the heterogeneous nucleation and result in grain refinement. It is suggested that owing to their favorable lattice matching with α-Al, these fragments serve as potent nuclei for α-Al grains.

  20. NAT nucleation and denitrification in the polar stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grooß, Jens-Uwe; Engel, Ines; Hoyle, Christopher R.; Luo, Beiping; Peter, Thomas; Frey, Wiebke; Molleker, Sergej; Borrmann, Stephan; Schlager, Hans; Vömel, Holger; Kivi, Rigel; Walker, Kaley A.; Santee, Michelle L.; Stiller, Gabriele; Pitts, Michael; Müller, Rolf

    2013-04-01

    Nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) particles in the polar stratosphere are known to influence the chemistry of ozone depletion. NAT particles, along with other liquid and crystalline particles, provide heterogeneous surfaces for chlorine activation. More importantly, they can take up significant amounts of HNO3 from the gas phase and transport HNO3 downward by sedimentation. This can lead to denitrification, in the Arctic typically at altitudes above about 20 km, and a re-nitrification below, at the level where the NAT particles evaporate. The nucleation rate of NAT particles is a critical parameter for the simulation of this process. Very low NAT nucleation rates around 2?10-9cm-3s-1 have been deduced for low NAT supersaturations from observations. In previous studies, vertical HNO3 transport has been successfully simulated by Lagrangian 3-D simulations using a constant NAT nucleation rate of around 2?10-9cm-3s-1, for the Arctic winters in the years 2003 and 2005. However, for winter 2009/2010, this approach does not generate satisfying results. Here, saturation dependent NAT nucleation rates were derived from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO), observations under the assumption that NAT nucleates heterogeneously on dust particles that are characterized by active sites with a certain occurrence probability distribution depending on the contact angle. Simulations with the Zurich Optical and Microphysical box Model (ZOMM) along back-trajectories starting from points where PSCs were observed by CALIPSO allow the parametrisation of heterogeneous nucleation rates for NAT and ice on dust, and the reproduction of the different PSC classes observed. We present simulations by the Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere (CLaMS) of the winter 2009/2010 applying this new parametrisation of heterogeneous NAT nucleation rates. The CLaMS simulation is initialized using a combination of MLS, MIPAS-ENVISAT and ACE-FTS data. The simulation

  1. Role of nucleation in nanodiamond film growth

    SciTech Connect

    Lifshitz, Y.; Lee, C.H.; Wu, Y.; Zhang, W.J.; Bello, I.; Lee, S.T.

    2006-06-12

    Nanodiamond films were deposited using different microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition schemes following several nucleation pretreatment methods. The nucleation efficiency and the films structure were investigated using scanning and transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. C{sub 2} dimer growth (CH{sub 4} and H{sub 2} in 90% Ar) cannot nucleate diamond and works only on existing diamond surfaces. The methyl radical process (up to 20% CH{sub 4} in H{sub 2}) allows some nucleation probability on appropriate substrates. Prolonged bias enhanced nucleation initiates both diamond nucleation and growth. C{sub 2} dimer growth results in pure nanodiamond free of amorphous carbon, while prolonged bias enhanced nucleation forms an amorphous carbon/nanodiamond composite.

  2. Sigmoid kinetics of protein crystal nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanev, Christo N.; Tonchev, Vesselin D.

    2015-10-01

    A non-linear differential equation expressing the new phase nucleation rate in the different steps of the process (non-stationary and stationary nucleation and in the plateau region) is derived from basic principles of the nucleation theory. It is shown that one and the same sigmoid (logistic) function describes both nucleation scenarios: the one according to the classical theory, and the other according to the modern two-stage mechanism of protein crystal formation. Comparison to experimental data on both insulin crystal nucleation kinetics and on bovine β-lactoglobulin crystallization indicates a good agreement with the sigmoidal prediction. Experimental data for electrochemical nucleation and glass crystallization obey the same sigmoid time dependence, and suggest universality of this nucleation kinetics law.

  3. Nucleation and interfacial adsorption in ternary systems.

    PubMed

    Philippe, T

    2015-03-01

    Nucleation is studied in incompressible ternary fluids by examining the topology of the overall landscape of the energy surface. Minimum free energy paths for nucleation (MFEPs) of a single nucleus in an infinite matrix are computed with the string method in the framework of the continuum theory of nucleation for the regular solution. Properties of the critical nucleus are compared with the predictions of the classical nucleation theory. MFEPs are found to exhibit complex nucleation pathways with non-monotonic variations of compositions in the interfacial region, specifically adsorption of a component. In the symmetric regular solution, the minority component is found to segregate at the interface during nucleation with a concomitant depletion of the nucleus core, resulting in unpredicted partition of the non-selective component. Despite increasing the gradient energy, such inhomogeneity in composition is shown to lower the nucleation barrier. PMID:25747088

  4. Ice nucleation properties of agricultural soil dusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinke, Isabelle; Funk, Roger; Busse, Jacqueline; Iturri, Antonela; Kirchen, Silke; Leue, Martin; Möhler, Ottmar; Schwartz, Thomas; Sierau, Berko; Toprak, Emre; Ulrich, Andreas; Hoose, Corinna; Leisner, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Soil dust particles emitted from agricultural areas contain large amounts of organic material such as fungi, bacteria and plant debris. Being carrier for potentially highly ice-active biological particles, agricultural soil dusts are candidates for being very ice-active as well. In this work, we present ice nucleation experiments conducted in the AIDA cloud chamber. We investigated the ice nucleation efficiency of four types of soil dust from different regions of the world. Results are presented for the immersion freezing and the deposition nucleation mode: all soil dusts show higher ice nucleation efficiencies than desert dusts, especially at temperatures above 254 K. For one soil dust sample, the effect of heat treatments was investigated. Heat treatments did not affect the ice nucleation efficiency which presumably excludes primary biological particles as the only source of the increased ice nucleation efficiency. Therefore, organo-mineral complexes or organic compounds may contribute substantially to the high ice nucleation activity of agricultural soil dusts.

  5. Heterogeneous Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda, R.

    1989-01-01

    Described is a heterogeneous catalysis course which has elements of materials processing embedded in the classical format of catalytic mechanisms and surface chemistry. A course outline and list of examples of recent review papers written by students are provided. (MVL)

  6. Role of the electric double layer in the ice nucleation of water droplets under an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiang-Xiong; Li, Xin-Hao; Chen, Min

    2016-09-01

    Figuring out the mechanism of ice nucleation on charged aerosols or in thunderstorms is of fundamental importance in atmospheric science. However, findings on whether the electric field promotes or suppresses heterogeneous ice nucleation are conflicting. In this work, we design an apparatus and test the influence of the electric field on ice nucleation by freezing a series of deionized water droplets resting on solid surfaces with an electric field perpendicular to the substrates. Results show that ice nucleation is obviously promoted under the electric field and is independent of the field direction. Theoretic analyses show that the promotion is due to the reduction of Gibbs free energy which can be partially rationalized by the electric field sustained in the electric double layer at the solid-water interface, with strength about two orders higher than that of the external electric field. Moreover, water-droplet deformation under the electric field is not expected to be the cause of the ice-nucleation promotion.

  7. Bacterial Ice Nucleation in Monodisperse D2O and H2O-in-Oil Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Weng, Lindong; Tessier, Shannon N; Smith, Kyle; Edd, Jon F; Stott, Shannon L; Toner, Mehmet

    2016-09-13

    Ice nucleation is of fundamental significance in many areas, including atmospheric science, food technology, and cryobiology. In this study, we investigated the ice-nucleation characteristics of picoliter-sized drops consisting of different D2O and H2O mixtures with and without the ice-nucleating bacteria Pseudomonas syringae. We also studied the effects of commonly used cryoprotectants such as ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, and trehalose on the nucleation characteristics of D2O and H2O mixtures. The results show that the median freezing temperature of the suspension containing 1 mg/mL of a lyophilized preparation of P. syringae is as high as -4.6 °C for 100% D2O, compared to -8.9 °C for 100% H2O. As the D2O concentration increases every 25% (v/v), the profile of the ice-nucleation kinetics of D2O + H2O mixtures containing 1 mg/mL Snomax shifts by about 1 °C, suggesting an ideal mixing behavior of D2O and H2O. Furthermore, all of the cryoprotectants investigated in this study are found to depress the freezing phenomenon. Both the homogeneous and heterogeneous freezing temperatures of these aqueous solutions depend on the water activity and are independent of the nature of the solute. These findings enrich our fundamental knowledge of D2O-related ice nucleation and suggest that the combination of D2O and ice-nucleating agents could be a potential self-ice-nucleating formulation. The implications of self-nucleation include a higher, precisely controlled ice seeding temperature for slow freezing that would significantly improve the viability of many ice-assisted cryopreservation protocols. PMID:27495973

  8. Atomistic theory of amyloid fibril nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabriolu, Raffaela; Kashchiev, Dimo; Auer, Stefan

    2010-12-01

    We consider the nucleation of amyloid fibrils at the molecular level when the process takes place by a direct polymerization of peptides or protein segments into β-sheets. Employing the atomistic nucleation theory (ANT), we derive a general expression for the work to form a nanosized amyloid fibril (protofilament) composed of successively layered β-sheets. The application of this expression to a recently studied peptide system allows us to determine the size of the fibril nucleus, the fibril nucleation work, and the fibril nucleation rate as functions of the supersaturation of the protein solution. Our analysis illustrates the unique feature of ANT that the size of the fibril nucleus is a constant integer in a given supersaturation range. We obtain the ANT nucleation rate and compare it with the rates determined previously in the scope of the classical nucleation theory (CNT) and the corrected classical nucleation theory (CCNT). We find that while the CNT nucleation rate is orders of magnitude greater than the ANT one, the CCNT and ANT nucleation rates are in very good quantitative agreement. The results obtained are applicable to homogeneous nucleation, which occurs when the protein solution is sufficiently pure and/or strongly supersaturated.

  9. Homogeneous Nucleation Rate for Highly Supercooled Cirrus Cloud Droplets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Dodd, Gregory C.

    1988-04-01

    A mixed-phase hydrometer growth model has been applied to determining the nucleation mode and rate responsible for the glaciation of a highly supercooled liquid cloud studied jointly by ground-based polarization lidar and aircraft in situ probes. The cloud droplets were detected at the base of an orographically induced cirrus cloud at temperatures between 34.3° and 37.3°C. The vertical distribution above cloud base of two independent data quantities, the aircraft-measured water and ice particle concentrations and the lidar linear depolarization ratio, have been compared to model predictions for both the homogeneous and heterogeneous drop-freezing. modes. It is concluded that, although activated ice nuclei may have contributed to the glaciation of the cloud, homogeneous nucleation was the dominant mode. Accordingly, a homogeneous nucleation rate 106 times greater than that predicted by classical theory, but 103 times less than laboratory measurements would suggest is found to be appropriate at the measured cloud temperatures.

  10. Stochastic analysis of nucleation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Jonas

    2016-02-01

    We show that approximating the Becker-Döring equations with a Langevin equation results in multiplicative noise, which in turn leads to a family of possible Fokker-Planck equations according to the Ito-Stratonovich dilemma. Using a simple and general model for the attachment and detachment rates, we find that the Ito choice approximates the nucleation rate best and also coincides with the Fokker-Planck equation resulting from the common way to Taylor expand the original set of rate equations.

  11. Fundamentals of microcrack nucleation mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, L. S.; Sheu, Y. C.; Co, C. M.; Zhong, W. F.; Shen, H. D.

    1985-01-01

    A foundation for ultrasonic evaluation of microcrack nucleation mechanics is identified in order to establish a basis for correlations between plane strain fracture toughness and ultrasonic factors through the interaction of elastic waves with material microstructures. Since microcracking is the origin of (brittle) fracture, it is appropriate to consider the role of stress waves in the dynamics of microcracking. Therefore, the following topics are discussed: (1) microstress distributions with typical microstructural defects located in the stress field; (2) elastic wave scattering from various idealized defects; and (3) dynamic effective-properties of media with randomly distributed inhomogeneities.

  12. Stochastic analysis of nucleation rates.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Jonas

    2016-02-01

    We show that approximating the Becker-Döring equations with a Langevin equation results in multiplicative noise, which in turn leads to a family of possible Fokker-Planck equations according to the Ito-Stratonovich dilemma. Using a simple and general model for the attachment and detachment rates, we find that the Ito choice approximates the nucleation rate best and also coincides with the Fokker-Planck equation resulting from the common way to Taylor expand the original set of rate equations. PMID:26986388

  13. Silver and gold-catalyzed multicomponent reactions

    PubMed Central

    Abbiati, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Summary Silver and gold salts and complexes mainly act as soft and carbophilic Lewis acids even if their use as σ-activators has been rarely reported. Recently, transformations involving Au(I)/Au(III)-redox catalytic systems have been reported in the literature. In this review we highlight all these aspects of silver and gold-mediated processes and their application in multicomponent reactions. PMID:24605168

  14. Diffusion Of Mass In Evaporating Multicomponent Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth G.

    1992-01-01

    Report summarizes study of diffusion of mass and related phenomena occurring in evaporation of dense and dilute clusters of drops of multicomponent liquids intended to represent fuels as oil, kerosene, and gasoline. Cluster represented by simplified mathematical model, including global conservation equations for entire cluster and conditions on boundary between cluster and ambient gas. Differential equations of model integrated numerically. One of series of reports by same authors discussing evaporation and combustion of sprayed liquid fuels.

  15. Multiphase, Multicomponent Compressibility in Geothermal Reservoir Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Macias-Chapa, L.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

    1987-01-20

    Coefficients of compressibilities below the bubble point were computer with a thermodynamic model for single and multicomponent systems. Results showed coefficients of compressibility below the bubble point larger than the gas coefficient of compressibility at the same conditions. Two-phase compressibilities computed in the conventional way are underestimated and may lead to errors in reserve estimation and well test analysis. 10 refs., 9 figs.

  16. Novel Reagents for Multi-Component Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanguang; Basso, Andrea; Nenajdenko, Valentine G.; Gulevich, Anton V.; Krasavin, Mikhail; Bushkova, Ekaterina; Parchinsky, Vladislav; Banfi, Luca; Basso, Andrea; Cerulli, Valentina; Guanti, Giuseppe; Riva, Renata; Rozentsveig, Igor B.; Rozentsveig, Gulnur N.; Popov, Aleksandr V.; Serykh, Valeriy J.; Levkovskaya, Galina G.; Cao, Song; Shen, Li; Liu, Nianjin; Wu, Jingjing; Li, Lina; Qian, Xuhong; Chen, Xiaopeng; Wang, Hongbo; Feng, Jinwu; Wang, Yanguang; Lu, Ping; Heravi, Majid M.; Sadjadi, Samaheh; Kazemizadeh, Ali Reza; Ramazani, Ali; Kudyakova, Yulia S.; Goryaeva, Marina V.; Burgart, Yanina V.; Saloutin, Victor I.; Mossetti, Riccardo; Pirali, Tracey; Tron, Gian Cesare; Rozhkova, Yulia S.; Mayorova, Olga A.; Shklyaev, Yuriy V.; Zhdanko, Alexander G.; Nenajdenko, Valentine G.; Stryapunina, Olga G.; Plekhanova, Irina V.; Glushkov, Vladimir A.; Shklyaev, Yurii V.

    Ketenimines are a class of versatile and highly reactive intermediates that can participate in a variety of organic reactions, such as nucleophilic additions, radical additions, [2 + 2] and [2 + 4] cycloadditions, and sigmatropic rearrangements. In this presentation, we report on a series of multi-component reactions that involve a ketenimine intermediate. These reactions could furnish diverse heterocyclic compounds, including functionalized iminocoumarin, iminodihydroqunolines, iminothiochromens, pyrrolines, isoquinolines, pyridines, β-lactams, imino-1,2-dihydrocoumarins, and benzimidazoles.

  17. Stratospheric Heterogeneous Chemistry and Microphysics: Model Development, Validation and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, Richard P.

    1996-01-01

    being systematically evaluated to identify the principal relationships between ozone loss and aerosol state. Under this project, we formulated a detailed quantitative model that predicts the multicomponent composition of sulfate aerosols under stratospheric conditions, including sulfuric, nitric, hydrochloric, hydrofluoric and hydrobromic acids. This work defined for the first time the behavior of liquid ternary-system type-1b PSCS. The model also allows the compositions and reactivities of sulfate aerosols to be calculated over the entire range of environmental conditions encountered in the stratosphere (and has been incorporated into a trajectory/microphysics model-see above). Important conclusions that derived from this work over the last few years include the following: the HNO3 content of liquid-state aerosols dominate PSCs below about 195 K; the freezing of nitric acid ice from sulfate aerosol solutions is likely to occur within a few degrees K of the water vapor frost point; the uptake and reactions of HCl in liquid aerosols is a critical component of PSC heterogeneous chemistry. In a related application of this work, the inefficiency of chlorine injection into the stratosphere during major volcanic eruptions was explained on the basis of nucleation of sulfuric acid aerosols in rising volcanic plumes leading to the formation of supercooled water droplets on these aerosols, which efficiently scavenges HCl via precipitation.

  18. Predicting phase behavior in multicomponent mixtures.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, William M; Frenkel, Daan

    2013-07-14

    Mixtures with a large number of components can undergo phase transitions of a hybrid character, with both condensation and demixing contributions. We describe a robust Monte Carlo simulation method for calculating phase coexistence in multicomponent mixtures. We use this approach to study the phase behavior of lattice models of multicomponent mixtures with strongly varying pair interactions. Such a system can be thought of as a simplified model of the cytosol, with both specific and nonspecific interactions. We show that mapping a multicomponent mixture onto an approximately equivalent one-component system yields both upper and lower bounds on the maximum solute volume fraction of a stable, homogeneous phase. By following the minimum excess-free-energy path from the dilute phase free-energy minimum, we predict the difference in composition between the condensed and dilute phases at the boundary of the homogeneous phase. We find that this "direction" of phase separation rarely aligns with the dominant direction of density fluctuations in the dilute phase. We also show that demixing transitions tend to lower the maximum solute volume fraction at which the homogeneous phase is stable. By considering statistical ensembles of mixtures with random interactions, we show that the demixing contribution to phase separation is self-averaging and dependent only on the mean and variance of the distribution of interactions. PMID:23862930

  19. Multicomponent gas sorption Joule-Thomson refrigeration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor); Petrick, S. Walter (Inventor); Bard, Steven (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The present invention relates to a cryogenic Joule-Thomson refrigeration capable of pumping multicomponent gases with a single stage sorption compressor system. Alternative methods of pumping a multicomponent gas with a single stage compressor are disclosed. In a first embodiment, the sorbent geometry is such that a void is defined near the output of the sorption compressor. When the sorbent is cooled, the sorbent primarily adsorbs the higher boiling point gas such that the lower boiling point gas passes through the sorbent to occupy the void. When the sorbent is heated, the higher boiling point gas is desorbed at high temperature and pressure and thereafter propels the lower boiling point gas out of the sorption compressor. A mixing chamber is provided to remix the constituent gases prior to expansion of the gas through a Joule-Thomson valve. Other methods of pumping a multicomponent gas are disclosed. For example, where the sorbent is porous and the low boiling point gas does not adsorb very well, the pores of the sorbent will act as a void space for the lower boiling point gas. Alternatively, a mixed sorbent may be used where a first sorbent component physically adsorbs the high boiling point gas and where the second sorbent component chemically absorbs the low boiling point gas.

  20. Experiments on Nucleation in Different Flow Regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayuzick, Robert J.; Hofmeister, W. H.; Morton, C. M.; Robinson, M. B.

    1998-01-01

    The vast majority of metallic engineering materials are solidified from the liquid phase. Understanding the solidification process is essential to control microstructure, which in turn, determines the properties of materials. The genesis of solidification is nucleation, where the first stable solid forms from the liquid phase. Nucleation kinetics determine the degree of undercooling and phase selection. As such, it is important to understand nucleation phenomena in order to control solidification or glass formation in metals and alloys.

  1. Non-extensive treatment of surface nucleation on glass particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, Marcio Luis Ferreira

    2012-12-01

    Experimental data of phase transformation kinetics was used to fit a new model based on a non-extensive formalism derived from Tsallis thermostatistics and another based on the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Yerofeyev-Kolmogorov (JMAYK) theory. For this we considered the same experimental parameters such as crystal geometric factor g, the density of nucleation sites, NS and crystal growth rates U on glass powders. The kinetics of nucleation and growth of diopside crystals (MgOṡCaOṡ2SiO2) on the glass surface at 825 °C (Tg˜727 °C) were studied. Treatments for sinter-crystallization were performed in compacts of diopside glass particles by varying the treatment time. The crystallized fraction of the samples subjected to such treatments, which develop from the particles’ surface toward their volume, was characterized by means of optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The two models were then fitted to the measured crystallized fraction data and compared to each other. It was found that surface nucleation occurs very rapidly from a random number of active sites. The JMAYK theory describes the case of fast heterogeneous nucleation from a constant number of sites on the glass surface. The Tsallis approach is better than the JMAYK model considering that the q factor equals 1.268±0.062 and does not require taking into account the change in crystallization mode from three dimensional to one dimensional as JMAYK predicts, and this is advantageous. Furthermore, Tsallis thermostatistics contains the Austin-Rickett model as a special and limiting case study for this system. A generalized Avrami plot is also presented.

  2. Nucleation and growth transformation kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erukhimovitch, V.; Baram, J.

    1995-03-01

    As a result of the reassessment of the Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (KJMA) theory for the kinetics of nucleation and growth transformations, an integral-equation formulation has been developed instead of the well-known and widely used Avrami equation. The presented formulation considers interfacial and diffusional growths, in one, two, and three dimensions, with both time-dependent and time-invariant nucleation and growth rates. The integral-equation model corrects reported inadequacies of the KJMA theory when applied in numerous experiments and various solid-state transformations. It is shown that in the example cases examined in this paper, crystallization from the amorphous state in melt-spun ribbons, isothermal aging of CuAlZn, pearlitic transition in an eutectoid steel, and crystallization in a PEKK polymer, the thermodynamic and kinetic interpretation and parameters extracted from best fits of the Avrami equations to the experimental data are erroneous. The KJMA formulation is a simplification of the real physical conditions. The main limitation of the new model is that almost all the integral equations representing the kinetics of solid-state transformations have no analytical solutions.

  3. Binary Nucleation of Water and Sodium Chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Nemec, Thomas; Marsik, Frantisek; Palmer, Donald

    2005-01-01

    Nucleation processes in the binary water-sodium chloride system are investigated in the sense of the classical nucleation theory (CNT). The CNT is modified to be able to handle the electrolytic nature of the system and is employed to investigate the acceleration of the nucleation process due to the presence of sodium chloride in the steam. This phenomenon, frequently observed in the Wilson zone of steam turbines, is called early condensation. Therefore, the nucleation rates of the water-sodium chloride mixture are of key importance in the power cycle industry.

  4. A method to determine the active particle nucleation undercooling distribution in a refined alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangelinck-Noël, N.; Spinelli, J. E.; Gandin, Ch-A.; Reinhart, G.; Nguyen-Thi, H.; Billia, B.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a method to determine the active particle distribution of nucleation undercooling in a refined alloy. The experimental data used in this work are inferred from solidification experiments on a refined Al-3.5 wt% Ni alloy performed with X-ray radiography at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. These in situ and real time observations allow the accurate and direct determination of the grain origin (heterogeneous nucleation on particles or fragmentation), of the density and of the equiaxed front growth rate. The LGK classical dendrite growth model is used to evaluate the front undercooling (ΔTC) corresponding to the measured equiaxed front growth rate. Then, the corresponding cumulative distribution of active refining particles is determined. From this cumulative distribution, we derive the corresponding Gaussian and log-normal laws to obtain the nucleation undercooling distribution of active particles. Results are discussed and compared to available measurements in the literature. The standard particle distribution parameters (density of nuclei, mean nucleation undercooling and standard deviation) are determined. We plan to use the determined nucleation undercooling particle distribution in a stochastic CAFE model for the grain structure without preliminary adjustment of the nucleation undercooling.

  5. Simulations of Ice Nucleation by Kaolinite (001) with Rigid and Flexible Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zielke, Stephen A; Bertram, Allan K; Patey, G N

    2016-03-01

    Nucleation of ice by airborne particles is a process vital to weather and climate, yet our understanding of the mechanisms underlying this process is limited. Kaolinite is a clay that is a significant component of airborne particles and is an effective ice nucleus. Despite receiving considerable attention, the microscopic mechanism(s) by which kaolinite nucleates ice is not known. We report molecular dynamics simulations of heterogeneous ice nucleation by kaolinite (001) surfaces. Both the Al-surface and the Si-surface nucleate ice. For the Al-surface, reorientation of the surface hydroxyl groups is essential for ice nucleation. This flexibility allows the Al-surface to adopt a structure which is compatible with hexagonal ice, Ih, at the atomic level. On the rigid Si-surface, ice nucleates via an unusual structure that consists of an ordered arrangement of hexagonal and cubic ice layers, joined at their basal planes where the interfacial energy cost is low. This ice structure provides a good match to the atomistic structure of the Si-surface. This example is important and may have far-reaching implications because it demonstrates that potential ice nuclei need not be good atomic-level matches to particular planes of ice Ih or cubic ice, Ic. It suggests that surfaces can act as effective ice nuclei by matching one of the much larger set of planes that can be constructed by regular arrangements of hexagonal and cubic ice. PMID:26524230

  6. The nucleation and growth of calcium phosphate onto self-assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasevich, Barbara J.

    The nucleation and growth of calcium phosphate is of great importance to the formation of mammalian hard tissue structures such as bone and teeth and for unwanted, ectopic calcium phosphate deposition on arteries and implants. In spite of its importance, the mechanisms of nucleation and growth of calcium phosphate are not well known, but are believed to involve an organic template. The nucleation and growth of calcium phosphate was studied onto model nucleation templates composed of alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers on gold that were developed and tailored to have various surface functionalities, various surface site densities composed of mixtures of two thiols, and various degrees of conformational disorder composed of mixtures of SAMs of various chain lengths. The quartz crystal microbalance was developed as an in-situ technique to study the nucleation and growth kinetics and ex-situ techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy were used to assess adsorbate molecular chemistry in the initial stages of deposition. Significant nucleation and growth of calcium phosphate onto SAMs involved the adsorption of solution-formed critical nuclei. This mechanism is in contrast to heterogeneous nucleation and may have important implications for bone formation. An initial slow growth region occurred which involved the adsorption and assembly of solution-formed nanometer-sized particles. A second fast growth period occurred which involved the adsorption and growth of solution-formed critical nuclei or the assembly of supercritical particles. There was evidence for the heterogeneous nucleation of a very low density of crystals at low solution supersaturation. Heterogeneous nucleation may be limited due to the use of planar surfaces and to limits on phosphate adsorption due to electrostatic double layer anisotropy at the charged interfaces. Surface selective deposition was found in the initial slow growth region with

  7. Particle Characterization and Ice Nucleation Efficiency of Field-Collected Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Gilles, M. K.; Laskin, A.; Moffet, R.; Nizkorodov, S.; Roedel, T.; Sterckx, L.; Tivanski, A.; Knopf, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric ice formation by heterogeneous nucleation is one of the least understood processes resulting in cirrus and mixed-phase clouds which affect the global radiation budget, the hydrological cycle, and water vapor distribution. In particular, how organic aerosol affect ice nucleation is not well understood. Here we report on heterogeneous ice nucleation from particles collected during the CalNex campaign at the Caltech campus site, Pasadena, on May 19, 2010 at 6am-12pm (A2) and 12pm-6pm (A3) and May 23 at 6am-12pm (B2) and 6pm-12am (B4). The ice nucleation onsets and water uptake were determined as a function of temperature (200-273 K) and relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice). The ice nucleation efficiency was related to the particle chemical composition. Single particle characterization was provided by using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). The STXM/NEXAFS analysis indicates that the morning sample (A2) constitutes organic particles and organic particles with soot and inorganic inclusions. The afternoon sample (A3) is dominated by organic particles with a potentially higher degree of oxidation associated with soot. The B2 sample shows a higher number fraction of magnesium-containing particle indicative of a marine source and ~93% of the particles contained sulfur besides oxygen and carbon as derived from CCSEM/EDX analysis. The B4 sample lacks the strong marine influence and shows higher organic content. Above 230 K, we observed water uptake followed by condensation freezing at mean RH of 93-100% and 89-95% for A2 and A3, respectively. This indicates that the aged A3 particles are efficient ice nuclei (IN) for condensation freezing. Below 230 K A2 and A3 induced deposition ice nucleation between 125-155% RHice (at mean values of 134-150% RHice). The B2 and B4

  8. Binary nucleation at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahoransky, R. A.; Peters, F.

    1985-01-01

    The onset of homogeneous condensation of binary vapors in the supersaturated state is studied in ethanol/n-propanol and water/ethanol via their unsteady expansion in a shock tube at temperatures below 273 K. Ethanol/n-propanol forms a nearly ideal solution, whereas water/ethanol is an example of a strongly nonideal mixture. Vapor mixtures of various compositions are diluted in dry air at small mole fractions and expanded in the driver section from room temperature. The onset of homogeneous condensation is detected optically and the corresponding thermodynamic state is evaluated. The experimental results are compared with the binary nucleation theory, and the particular problems of theoretical evaluation at low temperatures are discussed.

  9. Simple improvements to classical bubble nucleation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Angélil, Raymond; Diemand, Jürg

    2015-08-01

    We revisit classical nucleation theory (CNT) for the homogeneous bubble nucleation rate and improve the classical formula using a correct prefactor in the nucleation rate. Most of the previous theoretical studies have used the constant prefactor determined by the bubble growth due to the evaporation process from the bubble surface. However, the growth of bubbles is also regulated by the thermal conduction, the viscosity, and the inertia of liquid motion. These effects can decrease the prefactor significantly, especially when the liquid pressure is much smaller than the equilibrium one. The deviation in the nucleation rate between the improved formula and the CNT can be as large as several orders of magnitude. Our improved, accurate prefactor and recent advances in molecular dynamics simulations and laboratory experiments for argon bubble nucleation enable us to precisely constrain the free energy barrier for bubble nucleation. Assuming the correction to the CNT free energy is of the functional form suggested by Tolman, the precise evaluations of the free energy barriers suggest the Tolman length is ≃0.3 σ independently of the temperature for argon bubble nucleation, where σ is the unit length of the Lennard-Jones potential. With this Tolman correction and our prefactor one gets accurate bubble nucleation rate predictions in the parameter range probed by current experiments and molecular dynamics simulations.

  10. Simple improvements to classical bubble nucleation models.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kyoko K; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Angélil, Raymond; Diemand, Jürg

    2015-08-01

    We revisit classical nucleation theory (CNT) for the homogeneous bubble nucleation rate and improve the classical formula using a correct prefactor in the nucleation rate. Most of the previous theoretical studies have used the constant prefactor determined by the bubble growth due to the evaporation process from the bubble surface. However, the growth of bubbles is also regulated by the thermal conduction, the viscosity, and the inertia of liquid motion. These effects can decrease the prefactor significantly, especially when the liquid pressure is much smaller than the equilibrium one. The deviation in the nucleation rate between the improved formula and the CNT can be as large as several orders of magnitude. Our improved, accurate prefactor and recent advances in molecular dynamics simulations and laboratory experiments for argon bubble nucleation enable us to precisely constrain the free energy barrier for bubble nucleation. Assuming the correction to the CNT free energy is of the functional form suggested by Tolman, the precise evaluations of the free energy barriers suggest the Tolman length is ≃0.3σ independently of the temperature for argon bubble nucleation, where σ is the unit length of the Lennard-Jones potential. With this Tolman correction and our prefactor one gets accurate bubble nucleation rate predictions in the parameter range probed by current experiments and molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:26382410

  11. Fatigue crack nucleation in metallic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Peralta, P.; Laird, C.; Ramamurty, U.; Suresh, S.; Campbell, G.H.; King, W.E.; Mitchell, T.E.

    1999-04-01

    The process of fatigue crack nucleation in metallic materials is reviewed placing emphasis in results derived for pure FCC metals with wavy slip behavior. The relationship between Persistent Slip Bands (PSB`s) and crack initiation will be examined for both single crystals and polycrystals, including the conditions for inter- and transgranular crack nucleation and their connection to type of loading, crystallography and slip geometry. The latter has been found to be an important parameter in the nucleation of intergranular cracks in polycrystals subjected to high strain fatigue, whereby primary slip bands with long slip lengths impinging on a grain boundary produce intergranular crack nucleation under the right conditions. Recent results related to intergranular crack nucleation in copper bicrystals and crack nucleation in Cu/Sapphire interfaces indicate that this mechanism controls crack nucleation in those simpler systems as well. Furthermore, it is found that under multiple slip conditions the crack nucleation location is controlled by the presence of local single slip conditions and long slip lengths for a particular Burgers vector that does not have to be in the primary slip system.

  12. LDRD final report: Physical simulation of nonisothermal multiphase multicomponent flow in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, M.J.; Hopkins, P.L.; Shadid, J.N.

    1997-07-01

    This document reports on the accomplishments of a laboratory-directed research and development (LDRD) project whose objective was to initiate a research program for developing a fundamental understanding of multiphase multicomponent subsurface transport in heterogeneous porous media and to develop parallel processing computational tools for numerical simulation of such problems. The main achievement of this project was the successful development of a general-purpose, unstructured grid, multiphase thermal simulator for subsurface transport in heterogeneous porous media implemented for use on massively parallel (MP) computers via message-passing and domain decomposition techniques. The numerical platform provides an excellent base for new and continuing project development in areas of current interest to SNL and the DOE complex including, subsurface nuclear waste disposal and cleanup, groundwater availability and contamination studies, fuel-spill transport for accident analysis, and DNAPL transport and remediation.

  13. Nucleation pressure threshold in acoustic droplet vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Christopher J.; Doering, Charles R.; Kripfgans, Oliver D.

    2016-07-01

    We combine classical nucleation theory with superharmonic focusing to predict necessary pressures to induce nucleation in acoustic droplet vaporization. We show that linear acoustics is a valid approximation to leading order when particle displacements in the sound field are small relative to the radius of the droplet. This is done by perturbation analysis of an axisymmetric compressible inviscid flow about a droplet with small surface perturbations relative to the mean radius subjected to an incoming ultrasonic wave. The necessary nucleation pressure threshold inside the droplet is calculated to be -9.33 ± 0.30 MPa for typical experimental parameters by employing results from classical homogeneous nucleation theory. As a result, we are able to predict if a given incident pressure waveform will induce nucleation.

  14. Simulation of paraequilibrium growth in multicomponent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, G.; Olson, G. B.

    2001-03-01

    A methodology to simulate paraequilibrium (PE) growth in multicomponent systems using the DIC-TRA (Diffusion-Controlled Transformation) software is presented. For any given multicomponent system containing substitutional and interstitial elements, the basic approach is to define a hypothetical element Z, whose thermodynamic and mobility parameters are expressed in terms of the weighted average (with respect to site fraction) of the thermodynamic parameters and mobilities of the substitutional alloying elements. This procedure facilitates the calculation of PE phase diagrams and the PE growth simulations directly in the Thermo-Calc and DICTRA software, respectively. The results of two distinct case studies in multicomponent alloys are presented. In the first example, we simulate the isothermal growth of PE cementite in an Fe-C-Co-Cr-Mo-Ni secondary hardening steel during tempering. This is of practical importance in modeling the carbide precipitation kinetics during secondary hardening. In the second example, we have presented the results of PE ferrite growth during continuous cooling from an intercritical temperature in an Fe-Al-C-Mn-Si low-alloy steel. This is of importance to the design of triple-phase steels containing an austenite that has optimum stability, to facilitate stress-induced transformation under dynamic loading. The results of both simulations are in good accord with experimental results. The model calculations do not consider any resistive or dissipative forces, such as the interfacial energy, strain energy, or solute drag, and, as a result, the interface velocities represent an upper limit under the available chemical driving force.

  15. How important is biological ice nucleation in clouds on a global scale?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoose, C.; Kristjánsson, J. E.; Burrows, S. M.

    2010-04-01

    The high ice nucleating ability of some biological particles has led to speculations about living and dead organisms being involved in cloud ice and precipitation formation, exerting a possibly significant influence on weather and climate. In the present study, the role of primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs) as heterogeneous ice nuclei is investigated with a global model. Emission parametrizations for bacteria, fungal spores and pollen based on recent literature are introduced, as well as an immersion freezing parametrization based on classical nucleation theory and laboratory measurements. The simulated contribution of PBAPs to the global average ice nucleation rate is only 10 - 5%, with an uppermost estimate of 0.6%. At the same time, observed PBAP concentrations in air and biological ice nucleus concentrations in snow are reasonably well captured by the model. This implies that 'bioprecipitation' processes (snow and rain initiated by PBAPs) are of minor importance on the global scale.

  16. Re-evaluating the Frankfurt isothermal static diffusion chamber for ice nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrod, Jann; Danielczok, Anja; Weber, Daniel; Ebert, Martin; Thomson, Erik S.; Bingemer, Heinz G.

    2016-03-01

    Recently significant advances have been made in the collection, detection and characterization of ice nucleating particles (INPs). Ice nuclei are particles that facilitate the heterogeneous formation of ice within the atmospheric aerosol by lowering the free energy barrier to spontaneous nucleation and growth of ice from atmospheric water and/or vapor. The Frankfurt isostatic diffusion chamber (FRankfurt Ice nucleation Deposition freezinG Experiment: FRIDGE) is an INP collection and offline detection system that has become widely deployed and shows additional potential for ambient measurements. Since its initial development FRIDGE has gone through several iterations and improvements. Here we describe improvements that have been made in the collection and analysis techniques. We detail the uncertainties inherent in the measurement method and suggest a systematic method of error analysis for FRIDGE measurements. Thus what is presented herein should serve as a foundation for the dissemination of all current and future measurements using FRIDGE instrumentation.

  17. Regularized Grad equations for multicomponent plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magin, Thierry E.; Martins, Gérald; Torrilhon, Manuel

    2011-05-01

    The moment method of Grad is used to derive macroscopic conservation equations for multicomponent plasmas for small and moderate Knudsen numbers, accounting for the electromagnetic field influence and thermal nonequilibrium. In the low Knudsen number limit, the equations derived are fully consistent with those obtained by means of the Chapman-Enskog method. In particular, we have retieved the Kolesnikov effect coupling electrons and heavy particles in the case of the Boltzmann moment systems. Finally, a regularization procedure is proposed to achieve continuous shock structures at all Mach numbers.

  18. Statistical Model of Evaporating Multicomponent Fuel Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, Kenneth; LeClercq, Patrick; Bellan, Josette

    2007-01-01

    An improved statistical model has been developed to describe the chemical composition of an evaporating multicomponent- liquid drop and of the mixture of gases surrounding the drop. The model is intended for use in computational simulations of the evaporation and combustion of sprayed liquid fuels, which are typically mixtures of as many as hundreds of different hydrocarbon compounds. The present statistical model is an approximation designed to afford results that are accurate enough to contribute to understanding of the simulated physical and chemical phenomena, without imposing an unduly large computational burden.

  19. General Model for Multicomponent Ablation Thermochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Marschall, Jochen; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A previous paper (AIAA 94-2042) presented equations and numerical procedures for modeling the thermochemical ablation and pyrolysis of thermal protection materials which contain multiple surface species. This work describes modifications and enhancements to the Multicomponent Ablation Thermochemistry (MAT) theory and code for application to the general case which includes surface area constraints, rate limited surface reactions, and non-thermochemical mass loss (failure). Detailed results and comparisons with data are presented for the Shuttle Orbiter reinforced carbon-carbon oxidation protection system which contains a mixture of sodium silicate (Na2SiO3), silica (SiO2), silicon carbide (SiC), and carbon (C).

  20. Multicomponent glass fiber optic integrated structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pysz, Dariusz; Kujawa, Ireneusz; Szarniak, Przemyslaw; Franczyk, Marcin; Stepien, Ryszard; Buczynski, Ryszard

    2005-09-01

    A range of integrated fiber optic structures - lightguides, image guides, multicapillary arrays, microstructured (photonic) fibers - manufactured in the Institute of Electronic Materials Technology (ITME) is described. All these structures are made of multicomponent glasses (a part of them melted in ITME). They can be manufactured in similar multistep process that involves drawing glass or lightguide rods and tubes preparing glass performs, stacking a bundle with rods and (or) tubes, drawing multifiber or multicapillary performs. Structure formation, technological process, characterization and applications of different integrated structures are presented.

  1. Corrections to scaling in multicomponent polymer solutions.

    PubMed

    Pelissetto, Andrea; Vicari, Ettore

    2006-05-01

    We calculate the correction-to-scaling exponent omegaT that characterizes the approach to the scaling limit in multicomponent polymer solutions. A direct Monte Carlo determination of omegaT in a system of interacting self-avoiding walks gives omegaT=0.415+/-0.020. A field-theory analysis based on five- and six-loop perturbative series leads to omegaT=0.41+/-0.04. We also verify the renormalization-group predictions for the scaling behavior close to the ideal-mixing point. PMID:16802958

  2. Bubble nucleation on nano- to micro-size cavities and posts: An experimental validation of classical theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witharana, S.; Phillips, B.; Strobel, S.; Kim, H. D.; McKrell, T.; Chang, J.-B.; Buongiorno, J.; Berggren, K. K.; Chen, L.; Ding, Y.

    2012-09-01

    Recently reported data suggest that bubble nucleation on surfaces with nano-sized features (cavities and posts) may occur close to the thermodynamic saturation temperature. However, according to the traditional theory of heterogeneous bubble nucleation, such low nucleation temperatures are possible only for surfaces with micro-scale cavities. Motivated by this apparent contradiction, we have used infrared thermometry to measure the nucleation temperature of water on custom-fabricated nano- to micro-scale cavities (from 90 nm to 4.5 μm in diameter) and posts (from 60 nm to 5 μm in diameter), machined on ultra-smooth and clean silicon wafers using electron beam lithography. Our cavity data are in agreement with the predictions of the Young-Laplace equation, thus re-affirming the correctness of the classic view of heterogeneous bubble nucleation, at least for the water-silicon system investigated here. The data also suggest that individual posts of any size have an insignificant effect on bubble nucleation, as expected from theory.

  3. Laboratory Investigations into Micromechanical Mechanisms Controlling Earthquake Nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvadurai, P. A.; Glaser, S. D.; Kiwan, R. H.

    2013-12-01

    Improving our understanding of factors controlling spontaneous shear rupture nucleation on a frictional fault would help better define the important physical processes contributing to earthquake rupture and faulting. Our current laboratory investigations quantify the local stress states on a laboratory fault, which control the transition of sliding from stable (quasi-static) to unstable (dynamic), commonly referred to as earthquake nucleation. A fault is experimentally modeled using two Poly(methyl methacrylate) samples in a direct shear configuration. During nucleation, we observed sudden, elastodynamic stress changes using an array of 16 acoustic emission (AE) sensors. Measurements of absolute displacement from these sensors allowed us to characterize general source mechanics using moment tensor inversion. This technique is widely used in seismology and we observe double-couple (DC) focal mechanisms; a source commonly used to characterize in situ earthquakes. During nucleation, we sometimes observe swarms of smaller, ';foreshock' earthquakes (Mw ~ -7), localized in time and space, prior to the incipient mainshock (Mw ~ -3.25). In general, the local perturbations in the stress field induced by the stress drop (Δσ) from a single foreshock was insufficient to cause the subsequent foreshock at the spatial distances recorded experimentally. This implied that the underlying process driving the foreshock sequence (and eventual mainshock) was aseismic slip over the nucleation zone recorded using non-contact sensors. Spatio-temporal distributions of the foreshocks and the near-fault aseismic motions were shown to be directly related to: i) the rate at which the average bulk stress accumulates across the fault (dτf /dt) and ii) the heterogeneity of normal stress caused by the irregular distribution of asperities, respectively. (A) Locations of the foreshocks (FS1-FS9) determined using p-wave travel times from multiple AE sensors. The locations were superimposed on

  4. Investigating ice nucleation in cirrus clouds with an aerosol-enabled Multiscale Modeling Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Chengzhu; Wang, Minghuai; Morrison, H.; Somerville, Richard C.; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Xiaohong; Li, J-L F.

    2014-11-06

    In this study, an aerosol-dependent ice nucleation scheme [Liu and Penner, 2005] has been implemented in an aerosol-enabled multi-scale modeling framework (PNNL MMF) to study ice formation in upper troposphere cirrus clouds through both homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation. The MMF model represents cloud scale processes by embedding a cloud-resolving model (CRM) within each vertical column of a GCM grid. By explicitly linking ice nucleation to aerosol number concentration, CRM-scale temperature, relative humidity and vertical velocity, the new MMF model simulates the persistent high ice supersaturation and low ice number concentration (10 to 100/L) at cirrus temperatures. The low ice number is attributed to the dominance of heterogeneous nucleation in ice formation. The new model simulates the observed shift of the ice supersaturation PDF towards higher values at low temperatures following homogeneous nucleation threshold. The MMF models predict a higher frequency of midlatitude supersaturation in the Southern hemisphere and winter hemisphere, which is consistent with previous satellite and in-situ observations. It is shown that compared to a conventional GCM, the MMF is a more powerful model to emulate parameters that evolve over short time scales such as supersaturation. Sensitivity tests suggest that the simulated global distribution of ice clouds is sensitive to the ice nucleation schemes and the distribution of sulfate and dust aerosols. Simulations are also performed to test empirical parameters related to auto-conversion of ice crystals to snow. Results show that with a value of 250 μm for the critical diameter, Dcs, that distinguishes ice crystals from snow, the model can produce good agreement to the satellite retrieved products in terms of cloud ice water path and ice water content, while the total ice water is not sensitive to the specification of Dcs value.

  5. Investigating ice nucleation in cirrus clouds with an aerosol-enabled Multiscale Modeling Framework

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Chengzhu; Wang, Minghuai; Morrison, H.; Somerville, Richard C.; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Xiaohong; Li, J-L F.

    2014-11-06

    In this study, an aerosol-dependent ice nucleation scheme [Liu and Penner, 2005] has been implemented in an aerosol-enabled multi-scale modeling framework (PNNL MMF) to study ice formation in upper troposphere cirrus clouds through both homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation. The MMF model represents cloud scale processes by embedding a cloud-resolving model (CRM) within each vertical column of a GCM grid. By explicitly linking ice nucleation to aerosol number concentration, CRM-scale temperature, relative humidity and vertical velocity, the new MMF model simulates the persistent high ice supersaturation and low ice number concentration (10 to 100/L) at cirrus temperatures. The low ice numbermore » is attributed to the dominance of heterogeneous nucleation in ice formation. The new model simulates the observed shift of the ice supersaturation PDF towards higher values at low temperatures following homogeneous nucleation threshold. The MMF models predict a higher frequency of midlatitude supersaturation in the Southern hemisphere and winter hemisphere, which is consistent with previous satellite and in-situ observations. It is shown that compared to a conventional GCM, the MMF is a more powerful model to emulate parameters that evolve over short time scales such as supersaturation. Sensitivity tests suggest that the simulated global distribution of ice clouds is sensitive to the ice nucleation schemes and the distribution of sulfate and dust aerosols. Simulations are also performed to test empirical parameters related to auto-conversion of ice crystals to snow. Results show that with a value of 250 μm for the critical diameter, Dcs, that distinguishes ice crystals from snow, the model can produce good agreement to the satellite retrieved products in terms of cloud ice water path and ice water content, while the total ice water is not sensitive to the specification of Dcs value.« less

  6. Competition between water uptake and ice nucleation by glassy organic aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkemeier, T.; Shiraiwa, M.; Pöschl, U.; Koop, T.

    2014-11-01

    Organic aerosol particles play a key role in climate by serving as nuclei for clouds and precipitation. Their sources and composition are highly variable, and their phase state ranges from liquid to solid under atmospheric conditions, affecting the pathway of activation to cloud droplets and ice crystals. Due to slow diffusion of water in the particle phase, organic particles may deviate in phase and morphology from their thermodynamic equilibrium state, hampering the prediction of their influence on cloud formation. We overcome this problem by combining a novel semi-empirical method for estimation of water diffusivity with a kinetic flux model that explicitly treats water diffusion. We estimate timescales for particle deliquescence as well as various ice nucleation pathways for a wide variety of organic substances, including secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from the oxidation of isoprene, α-pinene, naphthalene, and dodecane. The simulations show that, in typical atmospheric updrafts, glassy states and solid/liquid core-shell morphologies can persist for long enough that heterogeneous ice nucleation in the deposition and immersion mode can dominate over homogeneous ice nucleation. Such competition depends strongly on ambient temperature and relative humidity as well as humidification rate and particle size. Due to differences in glass transition temperature, hygroscopicity and atomic O / C ratio of the different SOA, naphthalene SOA particles have the highest potential to act as heterogeneous ice nuclei. Our findings demonstrate that kinetic limitations of water diffusion into organic aerosol particles are likely to be encountered under atmospheric conditions and can strongly affect ice nucleation pathways. For the incorporation of ice nucleation by organic aerosol particles into atmospheric models, our results demonstrate a demand for model formalisms that account for the effects of molecular diffusion and not only describe ice nucleation onsets as a function of

  7. Change of supercooling capability in solutions containing different kinds of ice nucleators by flavonol glycosides from deep supercooling xylem parenchyma cells in trees.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Chikako; Kasuga, Jun; Wang, Donghui; Fukushi, Yukiharu; Arakawa, Keita; Koyama, Toshie; Inada, Takaaki; Fujikawa, Seizo

    2011-12-01

    Deep supercooling xylem parenchyma cells (XPCs) in Katsura tree contain flavonol glycosides with high supercooling-facilitating capability in solutions containing the ice nucleation bacterium (INB) Erwinia ananas, which is thought to have an important role in deep supercooling of XPCs. The present study, in order to further clarify the roles of these flavonol glycosides in deep supercooling of XPCs, the effects of these supercooling-facilitating (anti-ice nucleating) flavonol glycosides, kaempferol 3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (K3Glc), kaempferol 7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (K7Glc) and quercetin 3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (Q3Glc), in buffered Milli-Q water (BMQW) containing different kinds of ice nucleators, including INB Xanthomonas campestris, silver iodide and phloroglucinol, were examined by a droplet freezing assay. The results showed that all of the flavonol glycosides promoted supercooling in all solutions containing different kinds of ice nucleators, although the magnitudes of supercooling capability of each flavonol glycoside changed in solutions containing different kinds of ice nucleators. On the other hand, these flavonol glycosides exhibited complicated nucleating reactions in BMQW, which did not contain identified ice nucleators but contained only unidentified airborne impurities. Q3Glc exhibited both supercooling-facilitating and ice nucleating capabilities depending on the concentrations in such water. Both K3Glc and K7Glc exhibited only ice nucleation capability in such water. It was also shown by an emulsion freezing assay in BMQW that K3Glc and Q3Glc had no effect on homogeneous ice nucleation temperature, whereas K7Glc increased ice nucleation temperature. The results indicated that each flavonol glycoside affected ice nucleation by very complicated and varied reactions. More studies are necessary to determine the exact roles of these flavonol glycosides in deep supercooling of XPCs in which unidentified heterogeneous ice nucleators may exist. PMID

  8. Modeling phase transitions during the crystallization of a multicomponent fat under shear

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzanti, Gianfranco; Marangoni, Alejandro G.; Idziak, Stefan H.J.

    2005-04-01

    The crystallization of multicomponent systems involves several competing physicochemical processes that depend on composition, temperature profiles, and shear rates applied. Research on these mechanisms is necessary in order to understand how natural materials form crystalline structures. Palm oil was crystallized in a Couette cell at 17 and 22 deg. C under shear rates ranging from 0 to 2880 s{sup -1} at a synchrotron beamline. Two-dimensional x-ray diffraction patterns were captured at short time intervals during the crystallization process. Radial analysis of these patterns showed shear-induced acceleration of the phase transition from {alpha} to {beta}{sup '}. This effect can be explained by a simple model where the {alpha} phase nucleates from the melt, a process which occurs independently of shear rate. The {alpha} phase grows according to an Avrami growth model. The {beta}{sup '} phase nucleates on the {alpha} crystallites, with the amount of {beta}{sup '} crystal formation dependent on the rate of transformation of {alpha} to {beta}{sup '} as well as the growth rate of the {beta}{sup '} phase from the melt. The shear induced {alpha}-{beta}{sup '} phase transition acceleration occurs because under shear, the {alpha} nuclei form many distinct small crystallites which can easily transform to the {beta}{sup '} form, while at lower shear rates, the {alpha} nuclei tend to aggregate, thus retarding the nucleation of the {beta}{sup '} crystals. The displacement of the diffraction peak positions revealed that increased shear rate promotes the crystallization of the higher melting fraction, affecting the composition of the crystallites. Crystalline orientation was observed only at shear rates above 180 s{sup -1} at 17 deg. C and 720 s{sup -1} at 22 deg. C.

  9. Rational design of self-assembly pathways for complex multicomponent structures.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, William M; Reinhardt, Aleks; Frenkel, Daan

    2015-05-19

    The field of complex self-assembly is moving toward the design of multiparticle structures consisting of thousands of distinct building blocks. To exploit the potential benefits of structures with such "addressable complexity," we need to understand the factors that optimize the yield and the kinetics of self-assembly. Here we use a simple theoretical method to explain the key features responsible for the unexpected success of DNA-brick experiments, which are currently the only demonstration of reliable self-assembly with such a large number of components. Simulations confirm that our theory accurately predicts the narrow temperature window in which error-free assembly can occur. Even more strikingly, our theory predicts that correct assembly of the complete structure may require a time-dependent experimental protocol. Furthermore, we predict that low coordination numbers result in nonclassical nucleation behavior, which we find to be essential for achieving optimal nucleation kinetics under mild growth conditions. We also show that, rather surprisingly, the use of heterogeneous bond energies improves the nucleation kinetics and in fact appears to be necessary for assembling certain intricate 3D structures. This observation makes it possible to sculpt nucleation pathways by tuning the distribution of interaction strengths. These insights not only suggest how to improve the design of structures based on DNA bricks, but also point the way toward the creation of a much wider class of chemical or colloidal structures with addressable complexity. PMID:25941388

  10. Rational design of self-assembly pathways for complex multicomponent structures

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, William M.; Reinhardt, Aleks; Frenkel, Daan

    2015-01-01

    The field of complex self-assembly is moving toward the design of multiparticle structures consisting of thousands of distinct building blocks. To exploit the potential benefits of structures with such “addressable complexity,” we need to understand the factors that optimize the yield and the kinetics of self-assembly. Here we use a simple theoretical method to explain the key features responsible for the unexpected success of DNA-brick experiments, which are currently the only demonstration of reliable self-assembly with such a large number of components. Simulations confirm that our theory accurately predicts the narrow temperature window in which error-free assembly can occur. Even more strikingly, our theory predicts that correct assembly of the complete structure may require a time-dependent experimental protocol. Furthermore, we predict that low coordination numbers result in nonclassical nucleation behavior, which we find to be essential for achieving optimal nucleation kinetics under mild growth conditions. We also show that, rather surprisingly, the use of heterogeneous bond energies improves the nucleation kinetics and in fact appears to be necessary for assembling certain intricate 3D structures. This observation makes it possible to sculpt nucleation pathways by tuning the distribution of interaction strengths. These insights not only suggest how to improve the design of structures based on DNA bricks, but also point the way toward the creation of a much wider class of chemical or colloidal structures with addressable complexity. PMID:25941388

  11. Lattice Boltzmann algorithm for continuum multicomponent flow.

    PubMed

    Halliday, I; Hollis, A P; Care, C M

    2007-08-01

    We present a multicomponent lattice Boltzmann simulation for continuum fluid mechanics, paying particular attention to the component segregation part of the underlying algorithm. In the principal result of this paper, the dynamics of a component index, or phase field, is obtained for a segregation method after U. D'Ortona [Phys. Rev. E 51, 3718 (1995)], due to Latva-Kokko and Rothman [Phys. Rev. E 71 056702 (2005)]. The said dynamics accord with a simulation designed to address multicomponent flow in the continuum approximation and underwrite improved simulation performance in two main ways: (i) by reducing the interfacial microcurrent activity considerably and (ii) by facilitating simulational access to regimes of flow with a low capillary number and drop Reynolds number [I. Halliday, R. Law, C. M. Care, and A. Hollis, Phys. Rev. E 73, 056708 (2006)]. The component segregation method studied, used in conjunction with Lishchuk's method [S. V. Lishchuk, C. M. Care, and I. Halliday, Phys. Rev. E 67, 036701 (2003)], produces an interface, which is distributed in terms of its component index; however, the hydrodynamic boundary conditions which emerge are shown to support the notion of a sharp, unstructured, continuum interface. PMID:17930175

  12. Theory of margination in confined multicomponent suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriquez Rivera, Rafael; Sinha, Kushal; Graham, Michael

    2015-11-01

    In blood flow, leukocytes and platelets tend to segregate near the vessel walls; this is known as margination. Margination of leukocytes and platelets is important in physiological processes, medical diagnostics and drug delivery. A mechanistic theory is developed to describe flow-induced segregation in confined multicomponent suspensions of deformable particles such as blood. The theory captures the essential features of margination by describing it in terms of two key competing processes in these systems at low Reynolds number: wall-induced migration and hydrodynamic pair collisions. The theory also includes the effect of physical properties of the deformable particles and molecular diffusion. Several regimes of segregation are identified, depending on the value of a ``margination parameter'' M. Moreover, there is a critical value of M below which a sharp ``drainage transition'' occurs: one component is completely depleted from the bulk flow to the vicinity of the walls. Direct hydrodynamic simulations also display this transition in suspensions where the components differ in size or flexibility. The developed mechanistic theory leads to substantial insight into the origins of margination and will help in guiding development of new technologies involving multicomponent suspensions. This work was supported by NSF grant CBET-1436082.

  13. Containerless Liquid to Solid Nucleation Pathways in Two Representative Grades of Commercially Available Zirconium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rulison, Aaron

    1995-01-01

    Experimental measurements were conducted to determine the solid metal nucleation pathways of radiatively cooling, molten zirconium spheres of two different commercially available purity grades in a high-vacuum, high-temperature electrostatic levitator. The ensemble distribution of maximum undercooling temperatures was interpreted using Poisson statistics to determine the temperature dependence of the solid metal nucleation rate. For a sample of nominally 99.95% pure zirconium, the results are consistent with heterogeneous solid metal nucleation either on static catalyst particles at least 30 nm diameter or on a surface coating. For a sample of nominally 99% pure zirconium, however, it appears that heterogeneous solid metal nucleation occurred either on a polydispersion of 10 nm (mean diameter) static catalyst particles or on dynamic catalyst particles which precipitated from a solution which became supersaturated as the melt cooled. A quantitative analysis of the compositions of both samples suggests that the catalysts probably consisted of one or more of the following elements: niobium, molybdenum, hafnium, and oxygen.

  14. Crystal nucleation in glass-forming alloy and pure metal melts under containerless and vibrationless conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaepen, F.; Turnbull, D.

    1982-01-01

    The undercooling behavior of large spheroids of Pd40Ni40P40 was investigated. By surface etching, supporting the specimens on a fused silica substrate, and successive heating and cooling, crystallization can be eliminated, presumable due to the removal of surface heterogeneities. By this method samples up to 3.2g with a 0.53 mm minor diameter, were made entirely glassy, except for some superficial crystals comprising less than 0.5% of the volume. These experiments show that a cooling rate of approximately 1 K/sec is adequate to avoid copious homogeneous nucleation in the alloy, and that by eliminating or reducing the effectiveness of heterogeneous nucleation sites, it is possible to form bulk samples of this metallic glass with virtually unlimited dimensions.

  15. Temperature Gradient Field Theory of Nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S.; Ain, W. Q.; Azhari, A.; Prasada Rao, A. K.

    2016-02-01

    According to the proposed theory, ceramic particles present in molten metal, lose heat at a slower rate than the metallic liquid during cooling. Such condition results in the formation of a spherical thermal gradient field (TGF) around each particle. Hence, the interstitials (low temperature) of such TGFs are the regions to reach the nucleation temperature first, owing to low energy barrier than the liquid-particle interface (higher temperature). Analytics also indicate that the nucleation rate is higher at the TGF interstitials, than at the liquid-particle interface. Such TGF network results in simultaneous nucleation throughout the system, resulting in grain refinement.

  16. Viscosity of interfacial water regulates ice nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Kaiyong; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Qiaolan; Zhang, Yifan; Xu, Shun; Zhou, Xin; Cui, Dapeng; Wang, Jianjun Song, Yanlin

    2014-03-10

    Ice formation on solid surfaces is an important phenomenon in many fields, such as cloud formation and atmospheric icing, and a key factor for applications in preventing freezing. Here, we report temperature-dependent nucleation rates of ice for hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. The results show that hydrophilic surface presents a lower ice nucleation rate. We develop a strategy to extract the thermodynamic parameters, J{sub 0} and Γ, in the context of classical nucleation theory. From the extracted J{sub 0} and Γ, we reveal the dominant role played by interfacial water. The results provide an insight into freezing mechanism on solid surfaces.

  17. Anti-ice nucleation activity in xylem extracts from trees that contain deep supercooling xylem parenchyma cells.

    PubMed

    Kasuga, Jun; Mizuno, Kaoru; Arakawa, Keita; Fujikawa, Seizo

    2007-12-01

    Boreal hardwood species, including Japanese white birch (Betula platyphylla Sukat. var. japonica Hara), Japanese chestnut (Castanea crenata Sieb. et Zucc.), katsura tree (Cercidiphyllum japonicum Sieb. et Zucc.), Siebold's beech (Fagus crenata Blume), mulberry (Morus bombycis Koidz.), and Japanese rowan (Sorbus commixta Hedl.), had xylem parenchyma cells (XPCs) that adapt to subfreezing temperatures by deep supercooling. Crude extracts from xylem in all these trees were found to have anti-ice nucleation activity that promoted supercooling capability of water as measured by a droplet freezing assay. The magnitude of increase in supercooling capability of water droplets in the presence of ice-nucleation bacteria, Erwinia ananas, was higher in the ranges from 0.1 to 1.7 degrees C on addition of crude xylem extracts than freezing temperature of water droplets on addition of glucose in the same concentration (100 mosmol/kg). Crude xylem extracts from C. japonicum provided the highest supercooling capability of water droplets. Our additional examination showed that crude xylem extracts from C. japonicum exhibited anti-ice nucleation activity toward water droplets containing a variety of heterogeneous ice nucleators, including ice-nucleation bacteria, not only E. ananas but also Pseudomonas syringae (NBRC3310) or Xanthomonas campestris, silver iodide or airborne impurities. However, crude xylem extracts from C. japonicum did not affect homogeneous ice nucleation temperature as analyzed by emulsified micro-water droplets. The possible role of such anti-ice nucleation activity in crude xylem extracts in deep supercooling of XPCs is discussed. PMID:17936742

  18. The SPectrometer for Ice Nuclei (SPIN): an instrument to investigate ice nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garimella, Sarvesh; Bjerring Kristensen, Thomas; Ignatius, Karolina; Welti, Andre; Voigtländer, Jens; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Sagan, Frank; Kok, Gregory Lee; Dorsey, James; Nichman, Leonid; Rothenberg, Daniel Alexander; Rösch, Michael; Kirchgäßner, Amélie Catharina Ruth; Ladkin, Russell; Wex, Heike; Wilson, Theodore W.; Ladino, Luis Antonio; Abbatt, Jon P. D.; Stetzer, Olaf; Lohmann, Ulrike; Stratmann, Frank; Cziczo, Daniel James

    2016-07-01

    The SPectrometer for Ice Nuclei (SPIN) is a commercially available ice nucleating particle (INP) counter manufactured by Droplet Measurement Technologies in Boulder, CO. The SPIN is a continuous flow diffusion chamber with parallel plate geometry based on the Zurich Ice Nucleation Chamber and the Portable Ice Nucleation Chamber. This study presents a standard description for using the SPIN instrument and also highlights methods to analyze measurements in more advanced ways. It characterizes and describes the behavior of the SPIN chamber, reports data from laboratory measurements, and quantifies uncertainties associated with the measurements. Experiments with ammonium sulfate are used to investigate homogeneous freezing of deliquesced haze droplets and droplet breakthrough. Experiments with kaolinite, NX illite, and silver iodide are used to investigate heterogeneous ice nucleation. SPIN nucleation results are compared to those from the literature. A machine learning approach for analyzing depolarization data from the SPIN optical particle counter is also presented (as an advanced use). Overall, we report that the SPIN is able to reproduce previous INP counter measurements.

  19. Aluminum hydroxide nucleation kinetics and mechanism during the electrodialysis decomposition of aluminate solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lainer, Yu. A.; Gorichev, I. G.; Todorov, S. A.

    2008-08-01

    The kinetic laws of the electrodialysis decomposition of strong aluminate solutions are considered. Mathematical simulation is performed using the equations of the heterogeneous kinetics of aluminum hydroxide precipitation for the electrodialysis of aluminate solutions, and this simulation shows that the nature of the limiting stage is related to the instantaneous nucleation during the three-dimensional coalescence of particles. The electrodialysis precipitate is analyzed, and the possible commercial application of the decomposition of strong aluminate solutions by electrodialysis is considered.

  20. Depression of the ice-nucleation temperature of rapidly cooled mouse embryos by glycerol and dimethyl sulfoxide.

    PubMed Central

    Rall, W F; Mazur, P; McGrath, J J

    1983-01-01

    The temperature at which ice formation occurs in supercooled cytoplasm is an important element in predicting the likelihood of intracellular freezing of cells cooled by various procedures to subzero temperatures. We have confirmed and extended prior indications that permeating cryoprotective additives decrease the ice nucleation temperature of cells, and have determined some possible mechanisms for the decrease. Our experiments were carried out on eight-cell mouse embryos equilibrated with various concentrations (0-2.0 M) of dimethyl sulfoxide or glycerol and then cooled rapidly. Two methods were used to assess the nucleation temperature. The first, indirect, method was to determine the in vitro survival of the rapidly cooled embryos as a function of temperature. The temperatures over which an abrupt drop in survival occurs are generally diagnostic of the temperature range for intracellular freezing. The second, direct, method was to observe the microscopic appearance during rapid cooling and note the temperature at which nucleation occurred. Both methods showed that the nucleation temperature decreased from - 10 to - 15 degrees C in saline alone to between - 38 degrees and - 44 degrees C in 1.0-2.0 M glycerol and dimethyl sulfoxide. The latter two temperatures are close to the homogeneous nucleation temperatures of the solutions in the embryo cytoplasm, and suggest that embryos equilibrated in these solutions do not contain heterogeneous nucleating agents and are not accessible to any extracellular nucleating agents, such as extracellular ice. The much higher freezing temperatures of cells in saline or in low concentrations of additive indicate that they are being nucleated by heterogeneous agents or, more likely, by extracellular ice. Images FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:6824748

  1. Crystal Orientation Dynamics of Collective Zn dots before Preferential Nucleation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chun-Chu; Huang, Jun-Han; Ku, Ching-Shun; Chiu, Shang-Jui; Ghatak, Jay; Brahma, Sanjaya; Liu, Chung-Wei; Liu, Chuan-Pu; Lo, Kuang-Yao

    2015-01-01

    The island nucleation in the context of heterogeneous thin film growth is often complicated by the growth kinetics involved in the subsequent thermodynamics. We show how the evolution of sputtered Zn island nucleation on Si(111) by magnetron sputtering in a large area can be completely understood as a model system by combining reflective second harmonic generation (RSHG), a 2D pole figure with synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Zn dots are then oxidized on the surfaces when exposed to the atmosphere as Zn/ZnO dots. Derived from the RSHG patterns of Zn dots at different growth times, the Zn dots grow following a unique transition from kinetic to thermodynamic control. Under kinetic-favoring growth, tiny Zn dots prefer arranging themselves with a tilted c-axis to the Si(111) substrate toward any of the sixfold in-plane Si<110> directions. Upon growth, the Zn dots subsequently evolve themselves to a metastable state with a smaller tilting angle toward selective <110> directions. As the Zn dots grow over a critical size, they become most thermodynamically stable with the c-axis vertical to the Si(111) substrate. For a system with large lattice mismatch, small volume dots take kinetic pathways with insignificant deviations in energy barriers. PMID:26211998

  2. Crystal Orientation Dynamics of Collective Zn dots before Preferential Nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chun-Chu; Huang, Jun-Han; Ku, Ching-Shun; Chiu, Shang-Jui; Ghatak, Jay; Brahma, Sanjaya; Liu, Chung-Wei; Liu, Chuan-Pu; Lo, Kuang-Yao

    2015-07-01

    The island nucleation in the context of heterogeneous thin film growth is often complicated by the growth kinetics involved in the subsequent thermodynamics. We show how the evolution of sputtered Zn island nucleation on Si(111) by magnetron sputtering in a large area can be completely understood as a model system by combining reflective second harmonic generation (RSHG), a 2D pole figure with synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Zn dots are then oxidized on the surfaces when exposed to the atmosphere as Zn/ZnO dots. Derived from the RSHG patterns of Zn dots at different growth times, the Zn dots grow following a unique transition from kinetic to thermodynamic control. Under kinetic-favoring growth, tiny Zn dots prefer arranging themselves with a tilted c-axis to the Si(111) substrate toward any of the sixfold in-plane Si<110> directions. Upon growth, the Zn dots subsequently evolve themselves to a metastable state with a smaller tilting angle toward selective <110> directions. As the Zn dots grow over a critical size, they become most thermodynamically stable with the c-axis vertical to the Si(111) substrate. For a system with large lattice mismatch, small volume dots take kinetic pathways with insignificant deviations in energy barriers.

  3. Tuning ice nucleation with counterions on polyelectrolyte brush surfaces.

    PubMed

    He, Zhiyuan; Xie, Wen Jun; Liu, Zhenqi; Liu, Guangming; Wang, Zuowei; Gao, Yi Qin; Wang, Jianjun

    2016-06-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation (HIN) on ionic surfaces is ubiquitous in a wide range of atmospheric aerosols and at biological interfaces. Despite its great importance in cirrus cloud formation and cryopreservation of cells, organs, and tissues, it remains unclear whether the ion-specific effect on ice nucleation exists. Benefiting from the fact that ions at the polyelectrolyte brush (PB)/water interface can be reversibly exchanged, we report the effect of ions on HIN on the PB surface, and we discover that the distinct efficiency of ions in tuning HIN follows the Hofmeister series. Moreover, a large HIN temperature window of up to 7.8°C is demonstrated. By establishing a correlation between the fraction of ice-like water molecules and the kinetics of structural transformation from liquid- to ice-like water molecules at the PB/water interface with different counterions, we show that our molecular dynamics simulation analysis is consistent with the experimental observation of the ion-specific effect on HIN. PMID:27386581

  4. Tuning ice nucleation with counterions on polyelectrolyte brush surfaces

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhiyuan; Xie, Wen Jun; Liu, Zhenqi; Liu, Guangming; Wang, Zuowei; Gao, Yi Qin; Wang, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation (HIN) on ionic surfaces is ubiquitous in a wide range of atmospheric aerosols and at biological interfaces. Despite its great importance in cirrus cloud formation and cryopreservation of cells, organs, and tissues, it remains unclear whether the ion-specific effect on ice nucleation exists. Benefiting from the fact that ions at the polyelectrolyte brush (PB)/water interface can be reversibly exchanged, we report the effect of ions on HIN on the PB surface, and we discover that the distinct efficiency of ions in tuning HIN follows the Hofmeister series. Moreover, a large HIN temperature window of up to 7.8°C is demonstrated. By establishing a correlation between the fraction of ice-like water molecules and the kinetics of structural transformation from liquid- to ice-like water molecules at the PB/water interface with different counterions, we show that our molecular dynamics simulation analysis is consistent with the experimental observation of the ion-specific effect on HIN. PMID:27386581

  5. Pólya distribution and its asymptotics in nucleation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovskii, V. G.

    2014-02-01

    A model of condensation-decay rate constants that are linear with respect to the number of monomers in the nucleus is considered. In a particular case of stable growth, this model leads to an exact solution of discrete kinetic equations of the theory of heterogeneous nucleation in the form of the Pólya distribution function. An asymptotic solution in the region of large nucleus sizes that satisfies the normalization condition and provides correct mean nucleus size has been found. It is shown that, in terms of the logarithmic invariant size, the obtained distribution has a universal time-independent form. The obtained solution, being more general than the double-exponent distribution used previously, describes both Gaussian and asymmetric distributions depending on the rate constant of condensation on a bare core. The obtained results are useful for modeling processes in some systems, in particular, the growth of linear chains, two-dimensional clusters, and filamentary nanocrystals.

  6. Zinc Nucleation and Growth in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, B. Patrick; Nuth, J. A., III; Lilleleht, L. U.; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We report our experiences with zinc nucleation in a microgravity environment aboard NASA's Reduced Gravity Research Facility. Zinc vapor is produced by a heater in a vacuum chamber containing argon gas. Nucleation is induced by cooling and its onset is easily detected visually by the appearance of a cloud of solid, at least partially crystalline zinc particles. Size distribution of these particles is monitored in situ by photon correlation spectroscopy. Samples of particles are also extracted for later analysis by SEM. The initially rapid increase in particle size is followed by a slower period of growth. We apply Scaled Nucleation Theory to our data and find that the derived critical temperature of zinc, the critical cluster size at nucleation, and the surface tension values are all in reasonably good agreement with their accepted literature values.

  7. Quasihomogeneous nucleation of amyloid beta yields numerical bounds for the critical radius, the surface tension, and the free energy barrier for nucleus formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garai, K.; Sahoo, B.; Sengupta, P.; Maiti, S.

    2008-01-01

    Amyloid aggregates are believed to grow through a nucleation mediated pathway, but important aggregation parameters, such as the nucleation radius, the surface tension of the aggregate, and the free energy barrier toward aggregation, have remained difficult to measure. Homogeneous nucleation theory, if applicable, can directly relate these parameters to measurable quantities. We employ fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to measure the particle size distribution in an aggregating solution of Alzheimer's amyloid beta molecule (Aβ1-40) and analyze the data from a homogeneous nucleation theory perspective. We observe a reproducible saturation concentration and a critical dependence of various aspects of the aggregation process on this saturation concentration, which supports the applicability of the nucleation theory to Aβ aggregation. The measured size distributions show a valley between two peaks ranging from 5to50nm, which defines a boundary for the value of the nucleation radius. By carefully controlling the conditions to inhibit heterogeneous nucleation, we can hold off nucleation in a 25 times supersaturated solution for at least up to 3h at room temperature. This quasi-homogeneous kinetics implies that at room temperature, the surface energy of the Aβ /water interface is ⩾4.8mJ/m2, the free energy barrier to nucleation (at 25 times supersaturation) is ⩾1.93×10-19J, and the number of monomers in the nucleus is ⩾29.

  8. Enhanced high-temperature ice nucleation ability of crystallized aerosol particles after preactivation at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Robert; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Schnaiter, Martin

    2014-07-01

    In cloud chamber experiments with crystallized aqueous ammonium sulfate, oxalic acid, and succinic acid solution droplets, we have studied a preactivation mechanism that markedly enhances the particles' heterogeneous ice nucleation ability. First cloud expansion experiments were performed at a high temperature (267-244 K) where the crystallized particles did not promote any heterogeneous ice nucleation. Ice nucleation at this temperature, however, could be triggered by temporarily cooling the crystallized particles to a lower temperature. This is because upon crystallization, residuals of the aqueous solution are trapped within the crystals. These captured liquids can freeze when cooled below their respective homogeneous or heterogeneous freezing temperature, leading to the formation of ice pockets in the crystalline particles. When warmed again to the higher temperature, ice formation by the preactivated particles occurred via depositional and deliquescence-induced ice growth, with ice active fractions ranging from 1 to 4% and from 4 to 20%, respectively. Preactivation disappeared above the eutectic temperature, which for the organic acids are close to the melting point of ice. This mechanism could therefore contribute to the very small fraction of atmospheric aerosol particles that are still ice active well above 263 K.

  9. Ice nucleation by water-soluble macromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pummer, B. G.; Budke, C.; Augustin-Bauditz, S.; Niedermeier, D.; Felgitsch, L.; Kampf, C. J.; Huber, R. G.; Liedl, K. R.; Loerting, T.; Moschen, T.; Schauperl, M.; Tollinger, M.; Morris, C. E.; Wex, H.; Grothe, H.; Pöschl, U.; Koop, T.; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, J.

    2015-04-01

    Cloud glaciation is critically important for the global radiation budget (albedo) and for initiation of precipitation. But the freezing of pure water droplets requires cooling to temperatures as low as 235 K. Freezing at higher temperatures requires the presence of an ice nucleator, which serves as a template for arranging water molecules in an ice-like manner. It is often assumed that these ice nucleators have to be insoluble particles. We point out that also free macromolecules which are dissolved in water can efficiently induce ice nucleation: the size of such ice nucleating macromolecules (INMs) is in the range of nanometers, corresponding to the size of the critical ice embryo. As the latter is temperature-dependent, we see a correlation between the size of INMs and the ice nucleation temperature as predicted by classical nucleation theory. Different types of INMs have been found in a wide range of biological species and comprise a variety of chemical structures including proteins, saccharides, and lipids. Our investigation of the fungal species Acremonium implicatum, Isaria farinosa, and Mortierella alpina shows that their ice nucleation activity is caused by proteinaceous water-soluble INMs. We combine these new results and literature data on INMs from fungi, bacteria, and pollen with theoretical calculations to develop a chemical interpretation of ice nucleation and water-soluble INMs. This has atmospheric implications since many of these INMs can be released by fragmentation of the carrier cell and subsequently may be distributed independently. Up to now, this process has not been accounted for in atmospheric models.

  10. Fluorescence Studies of Lysozyme Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Smith, Lori

    1998-01-01

    Fluorescence is one of the most powerful tools available for the study of macromolecules. For example, fluorescence can be used to study self association through methods such as anisotropy (the rotational rate of the molecule in solution), quenching (the accessibility of a bound probe to the bulk solution), and resonance energy transfer (measurement of the distance between two species). Fluorescence can also be used to study the local environment of the probe molecules, and the changes in that environment which accompany crystal nucleation and growth. However fluorescent techniques have been very much underutilized in macromolecular growth studies. One major advantage is that the fluorescent species generally must be at low concentration, typically ca 10-5 to 10-6 M. Thus one can study a very wide range of solution conditions, ranging from very high to very low protein concentration, he latter of which are not readily accessible to scattering techniques. We have prepared a number of fluorescent derivatives of chicken egg white lysozyme (CEWL). Fluorescent probes have been attached to two different sites, ASP 101 and the N-terrninal amine, with a sought for use in different lines of study. Preliminary resonance energy transfer studies have been -carried out using pyrene acetic acid (Ex 340 mn, Em 376 nm) lysozyme as a donor and cascade blue (Ex 377 run, Em 423 nm) labeled lysozyme as an acceptor. The emission of both the pyrene and cascade blue probes was followed as a function of the salt protein concentrations. The data show an increase in cascade blue and a concomitant decrease in the pyrene fluorescence as either the salt or protein concentrations are increased, suggesting that the two species are approaching each other close enough for resonance energy transfer to occur. This data can be analyzed to measure the distance between the probe molecules and, knowing their locations on the protein molecule their distances from and orientations with respect to each

  11. Deposition nucleation viewed as homogeneous or immersion freezing in pores and cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcolli, C.

    2014-02-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is an important mechanism for the glaciation of mixed phase clouds and may also be relevant for cloud formation and dehydration at the cirrus cloud level. It is thought to proceed through different mechanisms, namely contact, condensation, immersion and deposition nucleation. Conceptually, deposition nucleation is the only pathway that does not involve liquid water, but occurs by direct water vapor deposition onto a surface. This study challenges this classical view by putting forward the hypothesis that what is called deposition nucleation is in fact pore condensation and freezing (PCF) occurring in voids and cavities that may form between aggregated primary particles and host water at relative humidity RHw < 100% because of the inverse Kelvin effect. Homogeneous ice nucleation is expected to occur below 235 K when at least one pore is filled with water. Ice nucleation in pores may also happen in immersion mode but with a lower probability because it requires at least one active site in a water filled pore. Therefore a significant enhancement in ice nucleation efficiency is expected when temperature falls below 235 K. For a deposition nucleation process from water vapor no discontinuous change in ice nucleation efficiency should occur at T = 235 K because no liquid water is involved in this process. Studies on freezing in confinement carried out on mesoporous silica materials such as SBA-15, SBA-16, MCM-41, zeolites and KIT have shown that homogeneous ice nucleation occurs abruptly at T = 230-235 K in pores with diameters (D) of 3.5-4 nm or larger but only gradually at T = 210-230 K in pores with D = 2.5-3.5 nm. Pore analysis of clay minerals shows that kaolinites exhibit pore structures with pore diameters (Dp) of 20-50 nm. The mesoporosity of illites and montmorillonites is characterized by pores with Dp = 2-5 nm. The number and size of pores is distinctly increased in acid treated montmorillonites like K10. Water adsorption

  12. Inferred Differences in Ice Crystal Nucleation Rates between Continental and Maritime Deep Convective Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, D. L.; Avery, M. A.; Garnier, A.

    2014-12-01

    We present in situ and remotely sensed evidence for the following working hypothesis: Heterogeneous nucleation dominates during deep continental convection until ice nuclei in the updraft cannot prevent supersaturation from increasing. As it increases, homogeneous nucleation eventually occurs near cloud top (T < -60°C), with much faster ice crystal production rates. This is not the case in maritime anvil cirrus, where updrafts associated with deep convection are slower, promoting heterogeneous nucleation. We hypothesize that differences in updraft velocities and their effect on supersaturation might create a difference in the N/IWC ratios. Based on In situ measurements of the ice particle size distribution (PSD) from two aircraft field campaigns (SPARTICUS & TC4) and MODIS satellite retrievals of the temperature dependence of the 12/11 μm effective absorption optical depth ratio or βeff, ice crystal nucleation rates appear to be anomalously high near the tops of continental thunderstorms relative to maritime thunderstorms. The ice crystal nucleation rate, having units of g-1 s-1, is more related to the ratio of ice particle number concentration/ice water content (or N/IWC, with units of g-1) than to N. A surprisingly tight relationship was discovered between βeff and N/IWC, allowing N/IWC to be estimated from satellite retrievals of βeff. These retrievals verified that deep convection during TC4 over water did not produce the much higher N/IWC ratios observed during SPARTICUS in continental anvil cirrus. The imaging infrared radiometer (IIR) aboard CALIPSO has channels at 8, 10 and 12 μm and provides a data record of βeff dating back to 2006, as well as vertical profiles of IWC, extinction, depolarization and 1064/532 nm backscatter ratio from the CALIOP lidar. We will compare the MODIS-derived βeff and N/IWC relationship with that derived using the IIR data. We will also investigate the relationship between N/IWC, βeff and the vertically-resolved lidar

  13. Gauge transformation and symmetries of the commutative multicomponent BKP hierarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuanzhong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we defined a new multi-component B type Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (BKP) hierarchy that takes values in a commutative subalgebra of {gl}(N,{{C}}). After this, we give the gauge transformation of this commutative multicomponent BKP (CMBKP) hierarchy. Meanwhile, we construct a new constrained CMBKP hierarchy that contains some new integrable systems, including coupled KdV equations under a certain reduction. After this, the quantum torus symmetry and quantum torus constraint on the tau function of the commutative multi-component BKP hierarchy will be constructed.

  14. Multicomponent processing of channel waves for anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Macbeth, C.; Liu, E.; Horne, S.

    1994-12-31

    Combining information derived from mode polarization and dispersion may help to limit inherent non-uniquenesses when interpreting channel wave data in anisotropic waveguides. However, estimates of these attributes require careful processing and cannot be fully understood by direct inspection of the time-series. A multicomponent analysis method is developed to separate these frequency-dependent attributes when data containing no more than a few overlapping modes is excited by several source directions. The method, a complex similarity transformation,may be viewed as the channel wave equivalent of real rotation algorithms currently employed for use with body waves. The analysis is illustrated by application to field data from an in-seam seismic survey in the U.K. displaying a dominant second generalized mode (Love-type motion). A favorable comparison is made between the observed and synthetic eigenmode dispersion, and the polarization ellipticity, sense of rotation and orientation.

  15. Multicomponent diffusion—A brief review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, R. Byron; Klingenberg, Daniel J.

    2013-12-01

    After a brief summary of previous work on multicomponent diffusion theory, we review how the thermodynamics of irreversible processes leads us to an expression for the generalized driving force for diffusion. We then give the generalized Fick's law expression containing the diffusivities D; then we show how this may be turned "wrong-side out" using Merk's method to give the generalized Maxwell-Stefan equations containing the diffusivities Ð12≡x1x2/C12. Finally, we show how the latter are related to the diffusivities D12 that are usually reported in the literature. All results are applicable to gases or liquids. This review is restricted to presenting the basic theory in a consistent notation, and not to the applications of the theory.

  16. Determination of Stability from Multicomponent Pesticide Mixes.

    PubMed

    Dorweiler, Kelly J; Gurav, Jagdish N; Walbridge, James S; Ghatge, Vishwas S; Savant, Rahul H

    2016-08-10

    A study was conducted to evaluate the stability of 528 pesticides, metabolites, and contaminants prepared in large multicomponent mixes to enhance laboratory efficiency by allowing maximum use of the useful shelf life of the mixtures. Accelerated aging at 50 °C simulated 6 month, 1 year, and 2 year storage periods at -20 °C. Initial mixture composition was based on the instrument of analysis. After preliminary stability data had been obtained, mixtures were reformulated and re-evaluated. In all, 344 compounds showed satisfactory stability across all treatment groups, 100 compounds showed statistically significant changes between the control and the 6 month simulated storage period (27 with losses >20%), and the remainder showed borderline stability or were tested in one protocol. Stability behavior for organophosphates agreed with the proposed reaction mechanism responsible for acetylcholinesterase inhibition. A small number of compounds increased in response over time, suggesting the occurrence of degradation of precursor pesticides into these respective compounds. PMID:26937779

  17. Design of Multi-Component Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jieping; Kaïm, Laurent El; Tron, Gian Cesare; Lavilla, Rodolfo; Banfi, Luca; Basso, Andrea; Cerulli, Valentina; Guanti, Giuseppe; Lecinska, Paulina; Riva, Renata; Arévalo, M. J.; Kielland, N.; Masdeu, C.; Miguel, M.; Isambert, N.; Lavilla, R.; Medvedeva, Alevtina S.; Novokshonov, Vladimir V.; Novokshonova, Irina A.; Demina, Maria M.; Kon'kova, Tatyana V.; Shklyaev, Yurii V.; Rozhkova, Yulia S.; Vshivkova, Tatiana S.; Stryapunina, Olga G.; Glushkov, Vladimir A.; Kharitonova, Anastasia V.; Fisyuk, Alexander S.; Mukanov, Aleksey Y.; Poendaev, Nicolay V.; Gulevich, Anton V.; Nenajdenko, Valentine G.; Ivantsova, Maria N.; Tokareva, Maria I.; Mironov, Maxim A.; Mokrushin, Vladimir S.; Pirali, Tracey; Tron, Gian Cesare; Zhu, Jieping; Rozentsveig, Igor B.; Popov, Aleksandr V.; Levkovskaya, Galina G.; Chernyshev, Kirill A.; Krivdin, Leonid B.; Tomilov, Yury V.; Platonov, Dmitry N.; Rulev, Alexander Y.; Ushakov, Igor A.; Vorobyeva, Alexandra; Ilyin, Alexey; Kysil, Volodimir; Ivachtchenko, Alexandre

    Multi-component reactions (MCRs) have now been well established as a powerful synthetic tool for creating molecular complexity and diversity and are undoubtedly well suited for the drug discovery program. Another potential that has probably received less attention among synthetic chemists is the opportunity offered by MCRs for the development of new fundamentally important transformations (reactions). Indeed, although an MCR is composed of a series of known bimolecular reactions, the overall transformation could be novel. Consequently, it provides chemists the opportunities to uncover transformations that were otherwise difficult to realize. In this talk, we will present our recent work in this field, including: (1) the oxidative homologation of aldehydes to amides, (2) the oxidative coupling of aldehydes and isocyanides to α-ketoamides, (3) oxidative isocyanide-based MCRs, and (4) the enantioselective Passerini reaction.

  18. Simulations of Evaporating Multicomponent Fuel Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Le Clercq, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    A paper presents additional information on the subject matter of Model of Mixing Layer With Multicomponent Evaporating Drops (NPO-30505), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 3 (March 2004), page 55. To recapitulate: A mathematical model of a three-dimensional mixing layer laden with evaporating fuel drops composed of many chemical species has been derived. The model is used to perform direct numerical simulations in continuing studies directed toward understanding the behaviors of sprays of liquid petroleum fuels in furnaces, industrial combustors, and engines. The model includes governing equations formulated in an Eulerian and a Lagrangian reference frame for the gas and drops, respectively, and incorporates a concept of continuous thermodynamics, according to which the chemical composition of a fuel is described by use of a distribution function. In this investigation, the distribution function depends solely on the species molar weight. The present paper reiterates the description of the model and discusses further in-depth analysis of the previous results as well as results of additional numerical simulations assessing the effect of the mass loading. The paper reiterates the conclusions reported in the cited previous article, and states some new conclusions. Some new conclusions are: 1. The slower evaporation and the evaporation/ condensation process for multicomponent-fuel drops resulted in a reduced drop-size polydispersity compared to their single-component counterpart. 2. The inhomogeneity in the spatial distribution of the species in the layer increases with the initial mass loading. 3. As evaporation becomes faster, the assumed invariant form of the molecular- weight distribution during evaporation becomes inaccurate.

  19. Characterization and Optimization Multiscale and Multicomponent Nanosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nash, Kelly

    2012-10-01

    Materials with new combinations of properties are increasingly needed to meet the requirements of energy, transportation, and medical applications. The use of multi-component systems, with potentially complementary properties, represent a unique path to improve materials properties for a variety of applications. Among the most interesting applications of these materials is in the development of contrast agents in biological imaging and dynamic sensing applications. Although a variety of techniques to characterize these materials exist, noninvasive characterization methods, such as optical-based techniques, are ideal for studying these materials in their native states and for monitoring dynamic changes. The proposition becomes even more attractive when at least one of the components carries an optical signature.The use of optoacoustic (OA) is an emerging technology based on studying optically absorbing nano and microstructures in the sample by recording transit pressure waves generated from laser-induced thermal expansion. More recently OA has been developed as a vibrant technology for medical applications and some growing applications is for material characterization in research and industrial applications. Specifically, OA can assist in the characterization and optimization of composite materials containing nanoparticles when paired with other characterization techniques. The present work illustrates an overview of select hybrid nanomaterials, including their unique optoacoustic signatures utilizing an all optical OA technique. The results of this work show that optical based techniques such as OA, provide a noninvasive, nondestructive means to study multi-material, multi-scale, multi-functional materials are important in the development of novel multi-component nanomaterial schemes and elucidating the structure-function relationship in these materials.

  20. Effect of Pt Doping on Nucleation and Crystallization in Li2O.2SiO2 Glass: Experimental Measurements and Computer Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayan, K. Lakshmi; Kelton, K. F.; Ray, C. S.

    1996-01-01

    Heterogeneous nucleation and its effects on the crystallization of lithium disilicate glass containing small amounts of Pt are investigated. Measurements of the nucleation frequencies and induction times with and without Pt are shown to be consistent with predictions based on the classical nucleation theory. A realistic computer model for the transformation is presented. Computed differential thermal analysis data (such as crystallization rates as a function of time and temperature) are shown to be in good agreement with experimental results. This modeling provides a new, more quantitative method for analyzing calorimetric data.

  1. Viscous organic aerosol particles in the upper troposphere: diffusivity-controlled water uptake and ice nucleation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lienhard, D. M.; Huisman, A. J.; Krieger, U. K.; Rudich, Y.; Marcolli, C.; Luo, B. P.; Bones, D. L.; Reid, J. P.; Lambe, A. T.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Davidovits, P.; Onasch, T. B.; Worsnop, D. R.; Steimer, S. S.; Koop, T.; Peter, T.

    2015-09-01

    New measurements of water diffusion in aerosol particles produced from secondary organic aerosol (SOA) material and from a number of organic/inorganic model mixtures (3-methylbutane-1,2,3-tricarboxylic acid (3-MBTCA), levoglucosan, levoglucosan/NH4HSO4, raffinose) indicate that water diffusion coefficients are determined by several properties of the aerosol substance and cannot be inferred from the glass transition temperature or bouncing properties. Our results suggest that water diffusion in SOA particles is faster than often assumed and imposes no significant kinetic limitation on water uptake and release at temperatures above 220 K. The fast diffusion of water suggests that heterogeneous ice nucleation on a glassy core is very unlikely in these systems. At temperatures below 220 K, model simulations of SOA droplets suggest that heterogeneous ice nucleation may occur in the immersion mode on glassy cores which remain embedded in a liquid shell when experiencing fast updraft velocities. The particles absorb significant quantities of water during these updrafts which plasticize their outer layers such that these layers equilibrate readily with the gas phase humidity before the homogeneous ice nucleation threshold is reached. Glass formation is thus unlikely to restrict homogeneous ice nucleation. Only under most extreme conditions near the very high tropical tropopause may the homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient be reduced as a consequence of slow condensed-phase water diffusion. Since the differences between the behavior limited or non limited by diffusion are small even at the very high tropical tropopause, condensed-phase water diffusivity is unlikely to have significant consequences on the direct climatic effects of SOA particles under tropospheric conditions.

  2. Viscous organic aerosol particles in the upper troposphere: diffusivity-controlled water uptake and ice nucleation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lienhard, D. M.; Huisman, A. J.; Krieger, U. K.; Rudich, Y.; Marcolli, C.; Luo, B. P.; Bones, D. L.; Reid, J. P.; Lambe, A. T.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Davidovits, P.; Onasch, T. B.; Worsnop, D. R.; Steimer, S. S.; Koop, T.; Peter, T.

    2015-12-01

    New measurements of water diffusion in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) material produced by oxidation of α-pinene and in a number of organic/inorganic model mixtures (3-methylbutane-1,2,3-tricarboxylic acid (3-MBTCA), levoglucosan, levoglucosan/NH4HSO4, raffinose) are presented. These indicate that water diffusion coefficients are determined by several properties of the aerosol substance and cannot be inferred from the glass transition temperature or bouncing properties. Our results suggest that water diffusion in SOA particles is faster than often assumed and imposes no significant kinetic limitation on water uptake and release at temperatures above 220 K. The fast diffusion of water suggests that heterogeneous ice nucleation on a glassy core is very unlikely in these systems. At temperatures below 220 K, model simulations of SOA particles suggest that heterogeneous ice nucleation may occur in the immersion mode on glassy cores which remain embedded in a liquid shell when experiencing fast updraft velocities. The particles absorb significant quantities of water during these updrafts which plasticize their outer layers such that these layers equilibrate readily with the gas phase humidity before the homogeneous ice nucleation threshold is reached. Glass formation is thus unlikely to restrict homogeneous ice nucleation. Only under most extreme conditions near the very high tropical tropopause may the homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient be reduced as a consequence of slow condensed-phase water diffusion. Since the differences between the behavior limited or non limited by diffusion are small even at the very high tropical tropopause, condensed-phase water diffusivity is unlikely to have significant consequences on the direct climatic effects of SOA particles under tropospheric conditions.

  3. How important is biological ice nucleation in clouds on a global scale? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoose, C.; Kristjansson, J. E.; Burrows, S. M.; Chen, J.; Hazra, A.

    2010-12-01

    The high ice nucleating ability of some biological particles has led to speculations about living and dead organisms being involved in cloud ice and precipitation formation, exerting a possibly significant influence on weather and climate. In the present study, the role of primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs) in competition with mineral dust and soot as heterogeneous ice nuclei is investigated with the global climate model CAM-Oslo. Emission parameterizations for bacteria, fungal spores and pollen based on recent literature are introduced, as well as heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterizations based on classical nucleation theory and laboratory measurements. The simulated PBAP number concentrations are compared to data from various locations. The agreement between measurements and observations is overall satisfactory for bacteria and fungal spore concentrations, but the model tends to underestimate total PBAP number. This likely indicates that either pollen or other (possibly submicron) PBAP that are not considered here contribute significantly to the total PBAP number at the measurement locations. The simulated contribution of PBAPs to the global average ice nucleation rate is only 10-5 %, with an uppermost estimate of 0.6% when the emission strengths and ice nucleation efficiencies are varied within the uncertainty ranges. At the same time, observed PBAP concentrations in air and biological ice nucleus concentrations in snow are reasonably well captured by the model. This implies that ‘bioprecipitation’ processes (snow and rain initiated by PBAPs) are of minor importance on the global scale. However, our results do not rule out local, regional or seasonal importance of biological ice nuclei. We will discuss the uncertainties in the underlying model assumptions, compare to results of previous modeling studies and suggest directions for future work.

  4. A laboratory study of the nucleation kinetics of nitric acid hydrates under stratospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Alexander D.; Murray, Benjamin J.; Plane, John M. C.

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of the kinetics of crystallisation of ternary H2O-H2SO4-HNO3 mixtures to produce nitric acid hydrate phases, as occurs in the lower stratosphere, have been a long-standing challenge for investigators in the laboratory. Understanding polar stratospheric chlorine chemistry and thereby ozone depletion is increasingly limited by descriptions of nucleation processes. Meteoric smoke particles have been considered in the past as heterogeneous nuclei, however recent studies suggest that these particles will largely dissolve, leaving mainly silica and alumina as solid inclusions. In this study the nucleation kinetics of nitric acid hydrate phases have been measured in microliter droplets at polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) temperatures, using a droplet freezing assay. A clear heterogeneous effect was observed when silica particles were added. A parameterisation based on the number of droplets activated per nuclei surface area (ns) has been developed and compared to global model data. Nucleation experiments on identical droplets have been performed in an X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD) to determine the nature of the phase which formed. β-Nitric Acid Trihydrate (NAT) was observed alongside a mixture of Nitric Acid Dihydrate (NAD) phases. It is not possible to determine whether NAT nucleates directly or is formed by a phase transition from NAD (likely requiring the presence of a mediating liquid phase). Regardless, these results demonstrate the possibility of forming NAT on laboratory timescales. In the polar stratosphere, sulfuric acid (present at several weight percent of the liquid under equilibrium conditions) could provide such a liquid phase. This study therefor provides insight into previous discrepancies between phases formed in the laboratory and those observed in the atmosphere. It also provides a basis for future studies into atmospheric nucleation of solid PSCs.

  5. Modelling of micro- and macrosegregation for industrial multicomponent aluminium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellingsen, K.; Mortensen, D.; M'Hamdi, M.

    2015-06-01

    Realistic predictions of macrosegregation formation during casting of aluminium alloys requires an accurate modeling of solute microsegregation accounting for multicomponent phase diagrams and secondary phase formation. In the present work, the stand alone Alstruc model, a microsegregation model for industrial multicomponent aluminium alloys, is coupled with the continuum model ALSIM which calculates the macroscopic transport of mass, enthalpy, momentum, and solutes as well as stresses and deformation during solidification of aluminium. Alstruc deals with multicomponent alloys accounting for temperature dependent partition coefficients, liquidus slopes and the precipitation of secondary phases. The challenge associated with computation of microsegregation for multicomponent alloys is solved in Alstruc by approximating the phase diagram data by simple, analytical expressions which allows for a CPU-time efficient coupling with the macroscopic transport model. In the present work, the coupled model has been applied in a study of macrosegregation including thermal and solutal convection, solidification shrinkage and surface exudation on an industrial DC-cast billet.

  6. A METHOD FOR COMPARING MULTICOMPONENT, MULTIMEDIA POLLUTION ABATEMENT PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes a comparison of the cost-effectiveness of four multicomponent, multimedia pollution abatement options: coal cleaning, limestone, limestone plus adipic acid, and coal cleaning plus limestone plus adipic acid. The comparison makes cost-effectiveness evaluations ...

  7. MPH: A library for distributed multi-component environment

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Chris H.Q.; He, Yun

    2001-06-01

    Many current large and complex HPC applications are based on semi-independent program components developed by different groups or for different purposes. On distributed memory parallel supercomputers, how to perform component-name registration and initialize communications between independent components are among the first critical steps in establishing a distributed multi-component environment. Here we describe MPH, a multi-component handshaking library that resolves these tasks in a convenient and consistent way. MPH uses MPI for high performance and supports many PVM functionality. It supports two major parallel integration mechanism: multi-component multi-executable (MCME) and multi-component single-executable (MCME). It is a simple, easy-to-use module for developing practical codes, or as basis for larger software tools/frameworks.

  8. Observations of Nucleation and Early Stage Growth of Amorphous Silica on Carboxyl-Terminated Model Biosubstrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, A. F.; Dove, P. M.

    2005-12-01

    Over Earth history, organisms have developed the ability to control the nucleation and growth of a broad range of nanocrystalline and amorphous materials. The formation of amorphous biosilica is of particular interest because silicifiers sequester gigatons of silica annually, and suppress dissolved silica levels in the ocean to current low levels. The ecological success of marine diatoms, which are arguably the most important silicifiers, places them alongside marine calcifiers as major players in the sequestration of organic carbon. Thus, the biologically mediated formation of amorphous silica plays a key role in the global cycling of silicon and carbon. During controlled biomineralization, nucleation typically occurs in designated locations. There is a substantial body of evidence suggesting that macromolecules in the cellular environment determine these locations by acting as templates to provide energetically favorable sites for the onset of mineral and amorphous material nucleation. In diatoms, silica formation is likely initiated through heterogeneous nucleation on functional portions of macromolecules inside the Silica Deposition Vesicle (SDV). Previous studies of silica nucleation have implicated multiple chemical moieties associated with the constituent amino acids and sugars of polysaccharides, proteins, and glycoproteins as probable sites for in vivo surface nucleation and patterning. These investigations have usually employed complex macromolecules that exhibit multiple functionalities, and un-characterized solution compositions, thus rendering a quantitative analysis of kinetic and thermodynamic processes impossible. The objective of this research is to experimentally test kinetic and thermodynamic controls exercised by surface moieties on silica nucleation. Our experimental model system uses synthetic organic substrates designed to mimic key features of the interfacial regions between the surrounding cellular environment and the amorphous silica

  9. Modulated decay in the multi-component Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Enomoto, Seishi; Kohri, Kazunori; Matsuda, Tomohiro E-mail: kohri@post.kek.jp

    2013-08-01

    The early Universe after inflation may have oscillations, kinations (nonoscillatory evolution of a field), topological defects, relativistic and non-relativistic particles at the same time. The Universe whose energy density is a sum of those components can be called the multi-component Universe. The components, which may have distinguishable density scalings, may decay modulated. In this paper we study generation of the curvature perturbations caused by the modulated decay in the multi-component Universe.

  10. Multicomponent reactions: A simple and efficient route to heterocyclic phosphonates.

    PubMed

    Haji, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Multicomponent reactions (MCRs) are one of the most important processes for the preparation of highly functionalized organic compounds in modern synthetic chemistry. As shown in this review, they play an important role in organophosphorus chemistry where phosphorus reagents are used as substrates for the synthesis of a wide range of phosphorylated heterocycles. In this article, an overview about multicomponent reactions used for the synthesis of heterocyclic compounds bearing a phosphonate group on the ring is given. PMID:27559377

  11. Multicomponent reactions: A simple and efficient route to heterocyclic phosphonates

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary Multicomponent reactions (MCRs) are one of the most important processes for the preparation of highly functionalized organic compounds in modern synthetic chemistry. As shown in this review, they play an important role in organophosphorus chemistry where phosphorus reagents are used as substrates for the synthesis of a wide range of phosphorylated heterocycles. In this article, an overview about multicomponent reactions used for the synthesis of heterocyclic compounds bearing a phosphonate group on the ring is given. PMID:27559377

  12. A Weibull characterization for tensile fracture of multicomponent brittle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrows, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    A statistical characterization for multicomponent brittle fibers in presented. The method, which is an extension of usual Weibull distribution procedures, statistically considers the components making up a fiber (e.g., substrate, sheath, and surface) as separate entities and taken together as in a fiber. Tensile data for silicon carbide fiber and for an experimental carbon-boron alloy fiber are evaluated in terms of the proposed multicomponent Weibull characterization.

  13. Vapour–to–liquid nucleation: Nucleation theorems for nonisothermal–nonideal case

    SciTech Connect

    Malila, J.; McGraw, R.; Napari, I.; Laaksonen, A.

    2010-08-29

    Homogeneous vapour-to-liquid nucleation, a basic process of aerosol formation, is often considered as a type example of nucleation phenomena, while most treatment of the subject introduce several simplifying assumptions (ideal gas phase, incompressible nucleus, isothermal kinetics, size-independent surface free energy...). During last decades, nucleation theorems have provided new insights into properties of critical nuclei facilitating direct comparison between laboratory experiments and molecular simulations. These theorems are, despite of their generality, often applied in forms where the aforementioned assumptions are made. Here we present forms of nucleation theorems that explicitly take into account these effects and allow direct estimation of their importance. Only assumptions are Arrhenius-type kinetics of nucleation process and exclusion carrier gas molecules from the critical nucleus.

  14. Nucleation of protein fibrillation by nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Linse, Sara; Cabaleiro-Lago, Celia; Xue, Wei-Feng; Lynch, Iseult; Lindman, Stina; Thulin, Eva; Radford, Sheena E.; Dawson, Kenneth A.

    2007-01-01

    Nanoparticles present enormous surface areas and are found to enhance the rate of protein fibrillation by decreasing the lag time for nucleation. Protein fibrillation is involved in many human diseases, including Alzheimer's, Creutzfeld-Jacob disease, and dialysis-related amyloidosis. Fibril formation occurs by nucleation-dependent kinetics, wherein formation of a critical nucleus is the key rate-determining step, after which fibrillation proceeds rapidly. We show that nanoparticles (copolymer particles, cerium oxide particles, quantum dots, and carbon nanotubes) enhance the probability of appearance of a critical nucleus for nucleation of protein fibrils from human β2-microglobulin. The observed shorter lag (nucleation) phase depends on the amount and nature of particle surface. There is an exchange of protein between solution and nanoparticle surface, and β2-microglobulin forms multiple layers on the particle surface, providing a locally increased protein concentration promoting oligomer formation. This and the shortened lag phase suggest a mechanism involving surface-assisted nucleation that may increase the risk for toxic cluster and amyloid formation. It also opens the door to new routes for the controlled self-assembly of proteins and peptides into novel nanomaterials. PMID:17485668

  15. Microtubule nucleation and organization in dendrites.

    PubMed

    Delandre, Caroline; Amikura, Reiko; Moore, Adrian W

    2016-07-01

    Dendrite branching is an essential process for building complex nervous systems. It determines the number, distribution and integration of inputs into a neuron, and is regulated to create the diverse dendrite arbor branching patterns characteristic of different neuron types. The microtubule cytoskeleton is critical to provide structure and exert force during dendrite branching. It also supports the functional requirements of dendrites, reflected by differential microtubule architectural organization between neuron types, illustrated here for sensory neurons. Both anterograde and retrograde microtubule polymerization occur within growing dendrites, and recent studies indicate that branching is enhanced by anterograde microtubule polymerization events in nascent branches. The polarities of microtubule polymerization events are regulated by the position and orientation of microtubule nucleation events in the dendrite arbor. Golgi outposts are a primary microtubule nucleation center in dendrites and share common nucleation machinery with the centrosome. In addition, pre-existing dendrite microtubules may act as nucleation sites. We discuss how balancing the activities of distinct nucleation machineries within the growing dendrite can alter microtubule polymerization polarity and dendrite branching, and how regulating this balance can generate neuron type-specific morphologies. PMID:27097122

  16. Cellulose and Their Characteristic Ice Nucleation Activity- Freezing on a Chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häusler, Thomas; Felgitsch, Laura; Grothe, Hinrich

    2016-04-01

    The influence of clouds on the Earth's climate system is well known (IPCC, 2013). Cloud microphysics determines for example cloud lifetime and precipitation properties. Clouds are cooling the climate system by reflecting incoming solar radiation and warm its surface by trapping outgoing infrared radiation (Baker and Peter, 2008). In all these processes, aerosol particles play a crucial role by acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) for liquid droplets and as an ice nucleation particle (INP) for the formation of ice particles. Freezing processes at higher temperatures than -38°C occur heterogeneously (Pruppacher and Klett 1997). Therefore aerosol particles act like a catalyst, which reduces the energy barrier for nucleation. The nucleation mechanisms, especially the theory of functional sites are not entirely understood. It remains unclear which class of compound nucleates ice. Here we present a unique technique to perform drop- freezing experiments in a more efficient way. A self-made freezing- chip will be presented. Measurements done to proof the efficiency of our setup as well as advantages compared with other setups will be discussed. Furthermore we present a proxy for biological INPs, microcrystalline cellulose. Cellulose is the main component of herbal cell walls (about 50 wt%). It is a polysaccharide consisting of a linear chain of several hundred to many thousands of β(1→4) linked D-glucose units. Cellulose can contribute to the diverse spectrum of ice nucleation particles. We present results of the nucleation activity measurements of MCCs as well as the influence of concentration, preparation or chemical modification.

  17. Role of Dynamic Nucleation at Moving Boundaries in Phase and Microstructure Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karma, Alain; Trivedi, Rohit

    1999-01-01

    Solidification microstructures that form under steady-state growth conditions (cells, dendrites, regular eutectics, etc.) are reasonably well understood in comparison to other, more complex microstructures, which form under intrinsically non-steady-state growth conditions due to the competition between the nucleation and growth of several phases. Some important practical examples in this latter class include microstructures forming in peritectic systems in highly undercooled droplets, and in strip cast stainless steels. Prediction of phase and microstructure selection in these systems has been traditionally based on (1) heterogeneous nucleation on a static interface, and (2) comparing the relative growth rate of different phase/microstructures under steady-state growth conditions. The formation of new phases, however, occurs via nucleation on, or ahead of, a moving boundary. In addition, the actual selection process is controlled by a complex interaction between the nucleation process and the growth competition between the nuclei and the pre-existing phase under non-steady-state conditions. As a result, it is often difficult to predict which microstructure will form and which phases will be selected under prescribed processing conditions. This research addresses this critical role of nucleation at moving boundaries in the selection of phases and solidification microstructures through quantitative experiments and numerical modeling in peritectic systems. In order to create a well characterized system in which to study this problem, we focus on the directional solidification of hypo- and hyper-peritectic alloys in the two-phase region, imposing a large enough ratio of temperature gradient/growth rate (G/V(sub p)) to suppress the morphological instability of both the parent (alpha) and peritectic (Beta) phases, i.e. each phase alone would grow as a planar front. Our combined experimental and theoretical results show that, already in this simplified case, the growth

  18. Modeling of metallic aerosol formation in a multicomponent system at high temperatures using a discrete-sectional model. Appendix 7

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    A multicomponent discrete-sectional model was used to simulate the fate of lead in a high temperature system. The results show the ability of the developed model to simulate metallic aerosol systems at high temperatures. The PbO reaction and nucleation rate can be determined by comparing the simulations and the experimental data. Condensation on SiO{sub 2} particle surfaces is found important for removing the PbO vapor. The value of the accommodation factor that is applied to account for nonidealities in the condensation process are determined. The differences between the nanosized particles and the bulk particles are elucidated. The use of such a model helped to understand the effects of various mechanisms in determining the metal oxide vapor concentration profile and in establishing the ultimate particle size distribution.

  19. Impact of heterogeneous ice nuclei on homogeneous freezing events in cirrus clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Spichtinger, Peter; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2010-07-29

    The influence of initial heterogeneous nucleation on subsequent homogeneous nucleation events in cirrus clouds is investigated using a box model which includes the explicit impact of aerosols on the nucleation of ice crystals and sedimentation. Different effects are discussed, namely the impact of external mixtures of heterogeneous ice nuclei and the influence of size-dependent freezing thresholds. Several idealized experiments are carried out, which show that the treatment of external mixtures of ice nuclei can strongly change later homogeneous nucleation events (i.e., the ice crystal number densities) in different matters. The use of size-dependent freezing thresholds can also change the cloud prop erties when compared to more simple parameterizations. This size effect is most important for large IN concentrations. Based upon these findings, recommendations for future modeling and measurement efforts are presented.

  20. Deposition nucleation viewed as homogeneous or immersion freezing in pores and cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcolli, C.

    2013-06-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is an important mechanism for the glaciation of mixed phase clouds and may also be relevant for cloud formation and dehydration at the cirrus cloud level. It is thought to proceed through different mechanisms, namely contact, condensation, immersion and deposition nucleation. Supposedly, deposition nucleation is the only pathway which does not involve liquid water but occurs by direct water vapor deposition on a surface. This study challenges this classical view by putting forward the hypothesis that what is called deposition nucleation is in fact homogeneous or immersion nucleation occurring in pores and cavities that may form between aggregated primary particles and fill with water at relative humidity RHw < 100% because of the inverse Kelvin effect. Evidence for this hypothesis of pore condensation and freezing (PCF) originates from a number of only loosely connected scientific areas. The prime example for PCF is ice nucleation in clay minerals and mineral dusts, for which the data base is best. Studies on freezing in confinement carried out on mesoporous silica materials such as SBA-15, SBA-16, MCM-41, zeolites and KIT have shown that homogeneous ice nucleation occurs abruptly at T=230-235 K in pores with diameters (D) of 3.5-4 nm or larger but only gradually at T=210-230 K in pores with D=2.5-3.5 nm. Melting temperatures in pores are depressed by an amount that can be described by the Gibbs-Thomson equation. Water adsorption isotherms of MCM-41 show that pores with D=3.5-4 nm fill with water at RHw = 56-60% in accordance with an inverse Kelvin effect. Water in such pores should freeze homogeneously for T < 235 K even before relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi) reaches ice saturation. Ice crystal growth by water vapor deposition from the gas phase is therefore expected to set in as soon as RHw > 100%. Pores with D > 7.5 nm fill with water at RHi > 100% for T < 235 K and are likely to freeze homogeneously as soon as they are

  1. Quantitative surface spectroscopic analysis of multicomponent polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Hengzhong

    Angle-dependent electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) has been successfully used to examine the surface compositional gradient of a multicomponent polymer. However, photoelectron intensities detected at each take-off angle of ESCA measurements are convoluted signals. The convoluted nature of the signal distorts depth profiles for samples having compositional gradients. To recover the true concentration profiles for the samples, a deconvolution program has been described in Chapter 2. The compositional profiles of two classes of important multicomponent polymers, i.e., poly(dimethysiloxane urethane) (PU-DMS) segmented copolymers and fluorinated poly(amide urethane) block copolymers, are achieved using this program. The effects of the polymer molecular structure and the processing variation on its surface compositional profile have been studied. Besides surface composition, it is desirable to know whether the distribution of segment or block lengths at the surface is different than in the bulk, because this aspect of surface structure may lead to properties different than that predicted simply by knowledge of the surface composition and the bulk structure. In Chapter 3, we pioneered the direct determination of the distribution of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) segment lengths at the surface of PU-DMS using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (SUMS). Exciting preliminary results are provided: for the thick film of PU-DMS with nominal MW of PDMS = 1000, the distribution of the PDMS segment lengths at the surface is nearly identical to that in the bulk, whereas in the case of the thick films of PU-DMS with nominal MW of PDMS = 2400, only those PDMS segments with MW of ca. 1000 preferentially segregated at the surface. As a potential minimal fouling coating or biocompatible cardio-vascular materials, PU-DMS copolymers eventually come into contact with water once in use. Could such an environmental change (from air to aqueous) induce any undesirable

  2. Size matters in the water uptake and hygroscopic growth of atmospherically relevant multicomponent aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Laskina, Olga; Morris, Holly S; Grandquist, Joshua R; Qin, Zhen; Stone, Elizabeth A; Tivanski, Alexei V; Grassian, Vicki H

    2015-05-14

    Understanding the interactions of water with atmospheric aerosols is crucial for determining the size, physical state, reactivity, and climate impacts of this important component of the Earth's atmosphere. Here we show that water uptake and hygroscopic growth of multicomponent, atmospherically relevant particles can be size dependent when comparing 100 nm versus ca. 6 μm sized particles. It was determined that particles composed of ammonium sulfate with succinic acid and of a mixture of chlorides typical of the marine environment show size-dependent hygroscopic behavior. Microscopic analysis of the distribution of components within the aerosol particles show that the size dependence is due to differences in the mixing state, that is, whether particles are homogeneously mixed or phase separated, for different sized particles. This morphology-dependent hygroscopicity has consequences for heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry as well as aerosol interactions with electromagnetic radiation and clouds. PMID:25521409

  3. Homogeneous crystal nucleation in binary metallic melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, C. V.; Spaepen, F.

    1983-01-01

    A method for calculating the homogeneous crystal nucleation frequency in binary metallic melts is developed. The free energy of crystallization is derived from regular solution models for the liquid and solid and is used, together with model-based estimates of the interfacial tension, to calculate the nucleation frequency from the classical theory. The method can account for the composition dependence of the maximum undercooling observed in a number of experiments on small droplet dispersions. It can also be used to calculate the driving force for crystal growth and to obtain more precise estimates of the homogeneous crystal nucleation frequency in glass-forming alloys. This method, although approximate, is simple to apply, and requires only knowledge of the phase diagram and a few readily available thermodynamic quantities as input data.

  4. Nonlinear Acoustical Assessment of Precipitate Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the present work is to show that measurements of the acoustic nonlinearity parameter in heat treatable alloys as a function of heat treatment time can provide quantitative information about the kinetics of precipitate nucleation and growth in such alloys. Generally, information on the kinetics of phase transformations is obtained from time-sequenced electron microscopical examination and differential scanning microcalorimetry. The present nonlinear acoustical assessment of precipitation kinetics is based on the development of a multiparameter analytical model of the effects on the nonlinearity parameter of precipitate nucleation and growth in the alloy system. A nonlinear curve fit of the model equation to the experimental data is then used to extract the kinetic parameters related to the nucleation and growth of the targeted precipitate. The analytical model and curve fit is applied to the assessment of S' precipitation in aluminum alloy 2024 during artificial aging from the T4 to the T6 temper.

  5. A parameterization of cloud droplet nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, S.J. ); Chuang, C.; Penner, J.E. )

    1993-01-01

    Droplet nucleation is a fundamental cloud process. The number of aerosols activated to form cloud droplets influences not only the number of aerosols scavenged by clouds but also the size of the cloud droplets. Cloud droplet size influences the cloud albedo and the conversion of cloud water to precipitation. Global aerosol models are presently being developed with the intention of coupling with global atmospheric circulation models to evaluate the influence of aerosols and aerosol-cloud interactions on climate. If these and other coupled models are to address issues of aerosol-cloud interactions, the droplet nucleation process must be adequately represented. Here we introduce a droplet nucleation parametrization that offers certain advantages over the popular Twomey (1959) parameterization.

  6. Simulation of cloud microphysical and chemical processes using a multicomponent framework. Part 2: Microphysical evolution of a wintertime orographic cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.P. . Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences); Lamb, D. . Dept. of Meteorology)

    1999-07-15

    A detailed microphysical model is used to simulate the formation of wintertime orographic clouds in a two-dimensional domain under steady-state conditions. Mass contents and number concentrations of both liquid- and ice-phase cloud particles are calculated to be in reasonable agreement with observations. The ice particles in the cloud, as well as those precipitated to the surface, are classified into small cloud ice, planar crystals, columnar crystals, heavily rimed crystals, and crystal aggregates. Detailed examination of the results reveals that contact nucleation and rime splintering are the major ice-production mechanisms functioning in the warmer part of the cloud, whereas deposition/condensation-freezing nucleation is dominant at the upper levels. Surface precipitation, either in the form of rain or snow, develops mainly through riming and aggregation, removing over 17% of the total water vapor that entered the cloud. The spectral distributions of cloud particles in a multicomponent framework provide information not only on particle sizes but also on their solute contents and, for ice particles, their shapes. Examination of these multicomponent distributions reveals the mechanisms of particle formation and interaction, as well as the adaptation of crystal habits to the ambient conditions. Additional simulations were done to test the sensitivity of cloud and precipitation formation to the size distribution of aerosol particles. It is found that the size distribution of aerosol particles has significant influence on not only the warm-cloud processes, but also the cold-cloud processes. A reduction in aerosol particle concentration not only causes an earlier precipitation development but also an increase in the amount of total precipitation from the orographic clouds.

  7. Cavitation Bubble Nucleation by Energetic Particles

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    1998-12-01

    In the early sixties, experimental measurements using a bubble chamber confirmed quantitatively the thermal spike theory of bubble nucleation by energetic particles: the energy of the slow, heavy alpha decay recoils used in those experiments matched the calculated bubble nucleation energy to within a few percent. It was a triumph, but was soon to be followed by a puzzle. Within a couple of years, experiments on similar liquids, but well below their normal boiling points, placed under tensile stress showed that the calculated bubble nucleation energy was an order of magnitude less than the recoil energy. Why should the theory work so well in the one case and so badly in the other? How did the liquid, or the recoil particle, "know" the difference between the two experiments? Another mathematical model of the same physical process, introduced in 1967, showed qualitatively why different analyses would be needed for liquids with high and low vapor pressures under positive or negative pressures. But, the quantitative agreement between the calculated nucleation energy and the recoil energy was still poor--the former being smaller by a factor of two to three. In this report, the 1967 analysis is extended and refined: the qualitative understanding of the difference between positive and negative pressure nucleation, "boiling" and "cavitation" respectively, is retained, and agreement between the negative pressure calculated to be needed for nucleation and the energy calculated to be available is much improved. A plot of the calculated negative pressure needed to induce bubble formation against the measured value now has a slope of 1.0, although there is still considerable scatter in the individual points.

  8. Enhancing the design of in situ chemical barriers with multicomponent reactive transport modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Sevougian, S.D.; Steefel, C.I.; Yabusaki, S.B.

    1994-11-01

    This paper addresses the need for systematic control of field-scale performance in the emplacement and operation of in situ chemical treatment barriers; in particular, it addresses the issue of how the local coupling of reaction kinetics and material heterogeneities at the laboratory or bench scale can be accurately upscaled to the field. The authors have recently developed modeling analysis tools that can explicitly account for all relevant chemical reactions that accompany the transport of reagents and contaminants through a chemically and physically heterogeneous subsurface rock or soil matrix. These tools are incorporated into an enhanced design methodology for in situ chemical treatment technologies, and the new methodology is demonstrated in the ongoing design of a field experiment for the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) project at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. The ISRM design approach, which systematically integrates bench-scale and site characterization information, provides an ideal test for the new reactive transport techniques. The need for the enhanced chemistry capability is demonstrated by an example that shows how intra-aqueous redox kinetics can affect the transport of reactive solutes. Simulations are carried out on massively parallel computer architectures to resolve the influence of multiscale heterogeneities on multicomponent, multidimensional reactive transport. The technology will soon be available to design larger-scale remediation schemes.

  9. Anomaly nucleation constrains SU(2) gauge theories.

    PubMed

    Halverson, James

    2013-12-27

    We argue for the existence of additional constraints on SU(2) gauge theories in four dimensions when realized in ultraviolet completions admitting an analog of D-brane nucleation. In type II string compactifications these constraints are necessary and sufficient for the absence of cubic non-Abelian anomalies in certain nucleated SU(N>2) theories. It is argued that they appear quite broadly in the string landscape. Implications for particle physics are discussed; most realizations of the standard model in this context are inconsistent, unless extra electroweak fermions are added. PMID:24483790

  10. High performance computations using dynamical nucleation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windus, T. L.; Kathmann, S. M.; Crosby, L. D.

    2008-07-01

    Chemists continue to explore the use of very large computations to perform simulations that describe the molecular level physics of critical challenges in science. In this paper, we describe the Dynamical Nucleation Theory Monte Carlo (DNTMC) model - a model for determining molecular scale nucleation rate constants - and its parallel capabilities. The potential for bottlenecks and the challenges to running on future petascale or larger resources are delineated. A 'master-slave' solution is proposed to scale to the petascale and will be developed in the NWChem software. In addition, mathematical and data analysis challenges are described.

  11. Ti Multicomponent Alloy Bulks by Powder Metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kuibao; Wen, Guanjun; Dai, Hongchuan; Teng, Yuancheng; Li, Yuxiang

    2014-10-01

    In this study, CrCuFeMnMo0.5Ti multicomponent alloy bulks were prepared by powder metallurgy of mechanical alloying and sintering. A simple body-centered cubic (bcc) solid solution was prepared after 40 h ball milling of the raw CrCuFeMnMo0.5Ti metallic powder. Particles of the alloyed powder are in microsized structures, which are actually a soft agglomeration of lamellar grains with thicknesses less than 1 μm. Meanwhile, the lamellar granules are consisted of nanosized grains under rigid cold welding. The 80-h ball-milled powder was consolidated by cold pressing and subsequent sintering at 800°C. The observed main phase in the consolidated sample after milling for 80 h is still a bcc solid solution. The solidified sample of 80-h ball-milled powder exhibits a Vickers hardness of 468 HV, which is much higher than 171 HV of the counterpart prepared from the raw metallic powder.

  12. Mineral Selection for Multicomponent Equilibrium Geothermometry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Plamer, C. D.; Ohly, S. R.; Smith, R. W.; Neupane, G.; McLing, T.; Mattson, E.

    2015-04-01

    Multicomponent geothermometry requires knowledge of the mineral phases in the reservoir with which the geothermal fluids may be equilibrated. These minerals phases are most often alteration products rather than primary minerals. We have reviewed the literature on geothermal systems representing most major geologic environments typically associated with geothermal activity and identified potential alteration products in various environments. We have included this information in RTEst, a code we have developed to estimate reservoir conditions (temperature, CO2 fugacity) from the geochemistry of near-surface geothermal waters. The information has been included in RTEst through the addition of filters that decrease the potential numbermore » of minerals from all possibilities based on the basis species to those that are more relevant to the particular conditions in which the user is interested. The three groups of filters include host rock type (tholeiitic, calc-alkaline, silicic, siliciclastic, carbonate), water type (acidic, neutral), and the temperature range over which the alteration minerals were formed (low, medium, high). The user-chosen mineral assemblage is checked to make sure that it does not violate the Gibbs phase rule. The user can select one of three mineral saturation weighting schemes that decrease the chance the optimization from being skewed by reaction stoichiometry or analytical uncertainty.« less

  13. Mineral Selection for Multicomponent Equilibrium Geothermometry

    SciTech Connect

    Plamer, C. D.; Ohly, S. R.; Smith, R. W.; Neupane, G.; McLing, T.; Mattson, E.

    2015-04-01

    Multicomponent geothermometry requires knowledge of the mineral phases in the reservoir with which the geothermal fluids may be equilibrated. These minerals phases are most often alteration products rather than primary minerals. We have reviewed the literature on geothermal systems representing most major geologic environments typically associated with geothermal activity and identified potential alteration products in various environments. We have included this information in RTEst, a code we have developed to estimate reservoir conditions (temperature, CO2 fugacity) from the geochemistry of near-surface geothermal waters. The information has been included in RTEst through the addition of filters that decrease the potential number of minerals from all possibilities based on the basis species to those that are more relevant to the particular conditions in which the user is interested. The three groups of filters include host rock type (tholeiitic, calc-alkaline, silicic, siliciclastic, carbonate), water type (acidic, neutral), and the temperature range over which the alteration minerals were formed (low, medium, high). The user-chosen mineral assemblage is checked to make sure that it does not violate the Gibbs phase rule. The user can select one of three mineral saturation weighting schemes that decrease the chance the optimization from being skewed by reaction stoichiometry or analytical uncertainty.

  14. An evaporation model of multicomponent solution drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, Silvana; Liñán, Amable; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2010-11-01

    Solutions of polymers are widely used in the pharmaceutical industry as tablets coatings. These allow controlling the rate at which the drug is delivered, taste or appearance. The coating is performed by spraying and drying the tablets at moderate temperatures. The wetting of the coating solution on the pill's surface depends on the droplet Webber and Re numbers, angle of impact and on the rheological properties of the droplet. We present a model for the evaporation of multicomponent solutions droplets in a hot air environment with temperatures substantially lower than the boiling temperature of the solvent. As the liquid vaporizes from the surface the fluid in the drop increases in concentration, until reaching its saturation point. After saturation, precipitation occurs uniformly within the drop. As the surface regresses, a compacting front formed by the precipitate at its maximum packing density advances into the drop, while the solute continues precipitating uniformly. This porous shell grows fast due to the double effect of surface regression and precipitation. The evaporation rate is determined by the rates at which heat is transported to the droplet surface and at which liquid vapor diffuses away from it. When the drop is fully compacted, the evaporation is drastically reduced.

  15. Multicomponent assessment and treatment of cigarette pica.

    PubMed Central

    Goh, H L; Iwata, B A; Kahng, S W

    1999-01-01

    We conducted a multicomponent assessment and treatment for 4 individuals who engaged in cigarette pica. During Phase 1, three stimulus preference assessments were conducted to identify (a) the reinforcing component of the cigarette, (b) potential alternative reinforcers that may be used during treatment, and (c) whether the alternative reinforcer would compete effectively with cigarettes. Results were successful in identifying the reinforcing component of the cigarette and suggested the feasibility of using alternative reinforcers during treatment to eliminate cigarette pica. During Phase 2, the effects of two treatment procedures were evaluated. Noncontingent reinforcement (NCR) with the alternative edible reinforcer reduced the pica of 2 of the participants, but effects were not maintained when the initial dense schedule of NCR was thinned. Subsequently, differential reinforcement of alternative behavior with the alternative edible reinforcer was effective in reducing pica for 3 participants. An evaluation of nine treatment procedures failed to identify an effective intervention for the remaining participant; consequently, preventive measures were designed to minimize occurrences of cigarette pica. PMID:10513026

  16. Principles of Transport in Multicomponent Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaganovich, Igor D.; Franklin, Raoul N.; Demidov, Vladimir I.

    The main principles of transport in multicomponent plasmas are described. Because the bulk plasma is charged positively to keep electrons together with positive ions, negative ions are confined by electrostatic fields inside the plasma and they flow from the plasma periphery toward the center. It is shown that the flow velocity of negative ions is a nonlinear function of the negative ion density. Increasing the negative ion density makes the electron density profile flatter and leads to a decrease of the electric field. Such a nonlinear dependence of the negative ion flow velocity on their density results in the formation of steep gradients of negative ion density, or negative ion fronts. Addition of negative ions makes the plasma afterglow a complex process as well. Typically, two stages of afterglow appear. In the first stage, the negative ions are trapped inside the plasma and only electrons and positive ions can reach the walls. However, at a later time, electrons quickly leave the plasma, and the second stage of afterglow begins, in which electrons are totally absent and an ion-ion plasma forms. During this stage, only the negative and positive ions contribute to the wall fluxes. The complex structure of the radio frequency sheath in strongly electronegative gases is also reviewed. Similar phenomena are observed in dusty plasmas. A possible relevance to ball lightning is discussed.

  17. Single Pass Multi-component Harvester

    SciTech Connect

    Reed Hoskinson; J. Richard Hess

    2004-08-01

    Abstract. In order to meet the U. S. government’s goal of supplementing the energy available from petroleum by increasing the production of energy from renewable resources, increased production of bioenergy has become one of the new goals of the United States government and our society. U.S. Executive Orders and new Federal Legislation have mandated changes in government procedures and caused reorganizations within the government to support these goals. The Biomass Research and Development Initiative is a multi-agency effort to coordinate and accelerate all U.S. Federal biobased products and bioenergy research and development. The Initiative is managed by the National Biomass Coordination Office, which is staffed by both the DOE and the USDA. One of the most readily available sources of biomass from which to produce bioenergy is an agricultural crop residue, of which straw from small grains is the most feasible residue with which to start. For the straw residue to be used its collection must be energy efficient and its removal must not impact the sustainability of the growing environment. In addition, its collection must be economically advantageous to the producer. To do all that, a single pass multi-component harvester system is most desirable. Results from our first prototype suggest that current combines probably do adequate threshing and that a separate chassis can be developed that does additional separation and that is economically feasible.

  18. Impact of multicomponent ionic transport on pH fronts propagation in saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muniruzzaman, Muhammad; Rolle, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    the transported ions in the flow-through system. The results of purely forward simulations show a very good agreement with the high-resolution measurements performed at the outlet of the flow-through setup and illustrate the importance of charge effects on pH fronts propagation in porous media. [1] Giambalvo, E. R., C. I. Steefel, A. T. Fisher, N. D. Rosenberg, and C. G. Wheat (2002), Effect of fluid-sediment reaction on hydrothermal fluxes of major elements, eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 66, 1739-1757. [2] Appelo, C. A. J., and P. Wersin (2007), Multicomponent diffusion modeling in clay systems with application to the diffusion of tritium, iodide, and sodium in opalinus clay, Environ. Sci. Technol., 41, 5002-5007. [3] Rolle, M., M. Muniruzzaman, C. M. Haberer, and P. Grathwohl (2013), Coulombic effects in advection-dominated transport of electrolytes in porous media: Multicomponent ionic dispersion, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 120, 195-205. [4] Muniruzzaman, M., C. M. Haberer, P. Grathwohl, and M. Rolle (2014), Multicomponent ionic dispersion during transport of electrolytes in heterogeneous porous media: Experiments and model-based interpretation, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 141, 656-669. [5] Rolle, M., G. Chiogna, D. L. Hochstetler, and P. K. Kitanidis (2013), On the importance of diffusion and compound-specific mixing for groundwater transport: An investigation from pore to field scale, J. Contam. Hydrol., 153, 51-68.

  19. Polysaccharide chemistry regulates kinetics of calcite nucleation through competition of interfacial energies

    PubMed Central

    Hamm, Laura M.; Han, Nizhou; De Yoreo, James J.; Dove, Patricia M.

    2013-01-01

    Calcified skeletons are produced within complex assemblages of proteins and polysaccharides whose roles in mineralization are not well understood. Here we quantify the kinetics of calcite nucleation onto a suite of high-purity polysaccharide (PS) substrates under controlled conditions. The energy barriers to nucleation are PS-specific by a systematic relationship to PS charge density and substrate structure that is rooted in minimization of the competing substrate–crystal and substrate–liquid interfacial energies. Chitosan presents a low-energy barrier to nucleation because its near-neutral charge favors formation of a substrate–crystal interface, thus reducing substrate interactions with water. Progressively higher barriers are measured for negatively charged alginates and heparin that favor contact with the solution over the formation of new substrate–crystal interfaces. The findings support a directing role for PS in biomineral formation and demonstrate that substrate–crystal interactions are one end-member in a larger continuum of competing forces that regulate heterogeneous crystal nucleation. PMID:23690577

  20. Probing ice-nucleation processes on the molecular level using second harmonic generation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelmonem, A.; Lützenkirchen, J.; Leisner, T.

    2015-08-01

    We present and characterize a novel setup to apply second harmonic generation (SHG) spectroscopy in total internal reflection geometry (TIR) to heterogeneous freezing research. It allows to monitor the evolution of water structuring at solid surfaces at low temperatures prior to heterogeneous ice nucleation. Apart from the possibility of investigating temperature dependence, a major novelty in our setup is the ability of measuring sheet-like samples in TIR geometry in a direct way. As a main experimental result, we find that our method can discriminate between good and poor ice nucleating surfaces. While at the sapphire basal plane, which is known to be a poor ice nucleator, no structural rearrangement of the water molecules is found prior to freezing, the basal plane surface of mica, an analogue to ice active mineral dust surfaces, exhibits a strong change in the nonlinear optical properties at temperatures well above the freezing transition. This is interpreted as a pre-activation, i.e. an increase in the local ordering of the interfacial water which is expected to facilitate the crystallization of ice at the surface. The results are in line with recent predictions by molecular dynamics simulations on a similar system.

  1. Cyclic silicate active site and stereochemical match for apatite nucleation on pseudowollastonite bioceramic-bone interfaces.

    PubMed

    Sahai, Nita; Anseau, Michel

    2005-10-01

    Hydroxyapatite (Ca5(PO4)3(OH)) forms on pseudowollastonite (psW) (alpha-CaSiO3) in vitro in simulated body fluid, human parotid saliva and cell-culture medium, and in vivo in implanted rat tibias. We used crystallographic constraints with ab initio molecular orbital calculations to identify the active site and reaction mechanism for heterogeneous nucleation of the earliest calcium phosphate oligomer/phase. The active site is the planar, cyclic, silicate trimer (Si3O9) on the (001) face of psW. The trimer has three silanol groups (>SiOH) arranged at 60 degrees from each other, providing a stereochemical match for O atoms bonded to Ca2+ on the (001) face of hydroxyapatite. Calcium phosphate nucleation is modeled in steps as hydrolysis of surface Ca-O bonds with leaching of Ca2+ into solution, protonation of the surface Si-O groups to form silanols, calcium sorption as an inner-sphere surface complex and, attachment of HPO4(2-). Our model explains the experimental solution and high resolution transmission electron microscopy data for epitaxial hydroxyapatite growth on psW in vitro and in vivo. We propose that the cyclic silicate trimer is the universal active site for heterogeneous, stereochemically promoted nucleation on silicate-based bioactive ceramics. A critical active site-density and a point of zero charge of the bioceramic less than physiological pH are required for bioactivity. PMID:15949543

  2. A Nucleator Arms Race: Cellular Control of Actin Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Campellone, Kenneth G.; Welch, Matthew D.

    2010-01-01

    For more than a decade the Arp2/3 complex, a handful of nucleation-promoting factors, and formins were the only molecules known to directly nucleate actin filament formation de novo. However, the past several years have brought a surge in the discovery of mammalian proteins with roles in actin nucleation and dynamics. Newly recognized nucleation-promoting factors, such as WASH, WHAMM, and JMY stimulate Arp2/3 complex activity at distinct cellular locations. Formin nucleators with additional biochemical and cellular activities have also been uncovered. Finally, the Spire, Cordon-bleu, and Leiomodin nucleators have revealed new ways of overcoming the kinetic barriers to actin polymerization. PMID:20237478

  3. A multigrid method for N-component nucleation.

    PubMed

    van Putten, Dennis S; Glazenborg, Simon P; Hagmeijer, Rob; Venner, Cornelis H

    2011-07-01

    A multigrid algorithm has been developed enabling more efficient solution of the cluster size distribution for N-component nucleation from the Becker-Döring equations. The theoretical derivation is valid for an arbitrary number of condensing components, making the simulation of many-component nucleating systems feasible. A steady state ternary nucleation problem is defined to demonstrate its efficiency. The results are used as a validation for existing nucleation theories. The non-steady state ternary problem provides useful insight into the initial stages of the nucleation process. We observe that for the ideal mixture the main nucleation flux bypasses the saddle point. PMID:21744895

  4. Direct Numerical Simulation of Transitional Multicomponent-Species Gaseous and Multicomponent-Liquid Drop-Laden Mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selle, Laurent C.; Bellan, Josette

    2006-01-01

    A model of multicomponent-liquid (MC-liquid) drop evaporation in a three-dimensional mixing layer is here exercised at larger Reynolds numbers than in a previous study, and transitional states are obtained. The gas phase is followed in an Eulerian frame and the multitude of drops is described in a Lagrangian frame. Complete coupling between phases is included with source terms in the gas conservation equations accounting for the drop/flow interaction in terms of drop drag, drop heating and species evaporation. The liquid composition, initially specified as a single-Gamma (SG) probability distribution function (PDF) depending on the molar mass is allowed to evolve into a linear combination of two SGPDFs, called the double-Gamma PDF (DGPDF). The compositions of liquid and vapor emanating from the drops are calculated through four moments of the DGPDFs, which are drop-specific and location-specific, respectively. The mixing layer is initially excited to promote the double pairing of its four initial spanwise vortices into an ultimate vortex in which small scales proliferate. Simulations are performed for four liquids of different compositions and the effect of the initial mass loading and initial free-stream gas temperature are explored. For reference, Simulations are also performed for gaseous multicomponent mixing layers for which the effect of Reynolds number is investigated. The results encompass examination of the global layer characteristics, flow visualizations and homogeneous-plane statistics at transition. Comparisons are performed with previous pre-transitional MC-liquid simulations and with transitional single-component (SC) liquid studies. It is found that MCC flows at transition, the classical energy cascade is of similar strength, but that the smallest scales contain orders of magnitude less energy than SC flows, which is confirmed by the larger viscous dissipation in the former case. Contrasting to pre-transitional MC flows, the vorticity and drop

  5. Multicomponent Protein Cage Architectures for Photocatalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, Trevor

    2014-11-21

    The central focus of the work performed under this award has been to develop the bacteriophage P22 viral capsid as a vehicle for the encapsulation of catalyticaly active cargo materials and study their utility towards economic energy harvesting systems. We have demonstrated that the capsid of the bacteriophage P22 can be used to genetically program the assembly and encapsulation of a range of inorganic nanoparticles and protein cargoes. The P22 capsid uses a scaffold protein (SP) to direct the assembly of its coat protein (CP) into icosahedral capsids. By creating a genetic fusion of a desired cargo enzyme or a small peptide that can act as a nucleation site for subsequent NP growth, we have demonstrated the co-assembly of these SP-fusions and CP into stable “nano-reactors”. The cargo is sequestered inside the engineered capsid and can either be used directly as a nanocatalyst or for the nucleation and growth of inorganic or organic nanoparticles or polymers. The synthetic cargos (NP or polymers) were shown to have photocatalytic activity. The time dependent photophysics of a select few of these systems were studied to determine the underlying mechanisms and efficiency of light harversting. Enzyme cargos encapsulated within the P22 were thermally activated catalysts and their kinetic behavior was characterized. During the course of this work we have demonstrated that the method is a robust means to harness biology for materials applications and have initiated work into assembling the P22 nanoreactors into hierarchically ordered materials. The successful implementation of the work performed under this DOE grant provides us with a great deal of knowledge and a library of components to go forward towards the development of bioinspired catalytic materials for energy harvesting.

  6. Immersion Condensation on Oil-Infused Heterogeneous Surfaces for Enhanced Heat Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Rong; Miljkovic, Nenad; Enright, Ryan; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2013-01-01

    Enhancing condensation heat transfer is important for broad applications from power generation to water harvesting systems. Significant efforts have focused on easy removal of the condensate, yet the other desired properties of low contact angles and high nucleation densities for high heat transfer performance have been typically neglected. In this work, we demonstrate immersion condensation on oil-infused micro and nanostructured surfaces with heterogeneous coatings, where water droplets nucleate immersed within the oil. The combination of surface energy heterogeneity, reduced oil-water interfacial energy, and surface structuring enabled drastically increased nucleation densities while maintaining easy condensate removal and low contact angles. Accordingly, on oil-infused heterogeneous nanostructured copper oxide surfaces, we demonstrated approximately 100% increase in heat transfer coefficient compared to state-of-the-art dropwise condensation surfaces in the presence of non-condensable gases. This work offers a distinct approach utilizing surface chemistry and structuring together with liquid-infusion for enhanced condensation heat transfer. PMID:23759735

  7. Microgravity nucleation and particle coagulation experiments support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilleleht, L. U.; Lass, T. J.

    1987-01-01

    A hollow sphere model is developed to predict the range of supersaturation ratio values for refractory metal vapors in a proposed experimental nucleation apparatus. Since the experiments are to be carried out in a microgravity environment, the model neglects the effects of convection and assumes that the only transfer of vapors through an inert gas atmosphere is by conduction and molecular diffusion. A consistent set of physical properties data is assembled for the various candidate metals and inert ambient gases expected to be used in the nucleation experiments. Transient partial pressure profiles are computed for the diffusing refractory species for two possible temperature distributions. The supersaturation ratio values from both candidate temperature profiles are compared with previously obtained experimetnal data on a silver-hydrogen system. The model is used to simulate the diffusion of magnesium vapor through argon and other inert gas atmospheres over ranges of initial and boundary conditions. These results identify different combinations of design and operating parameters which are liekly to produce supersaturation ratio values high enough to induce homogeneous nucleation in the apparatus being designed for the microgravity nucleation experiments.

  8. Microgravity nucleation and particle coagulation experiments support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilleleht, L. U.; Ferguson, F. T.; Stephens, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    Modifications to the nucleation apparatus suggested by our first microgravity flight campaign are complete. These included a complete 'repackaging' of the equipment into three racks along with an improved vapor spout shutter mechanism and additional thermocouples for gas temperature measurements. The 'repackaged' apparatus was used in two KC-135 campaigns: one during the week of June 3, 1991 consisting of two flights with Mg and two with Zn, and another series consisting of three flights with Zn during the week of September 23, 1991. Our effort then was focused on the analysis of these data, including further development of the mathematical models to generate the values of temperature and supersaturation at the observed points of nucleation. The efforts to apply Hale's Scaled Nucleation Theory to our experimental data have met with only limited success, most likely due to still inadequate temperature field determination. Work on the development of a preliminary particle collector system designed to capture particles from the region of nucleation and condensation, as well as from other parts of the chamber, are discussed.

  9. Forest canopy interactions with nucleation mode particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryor, S. C.; Hornsby, K. E.; Novick, K. A.

    2014-11-01

    Ultrafine particle size distributions through a deciduous forest canopy indicate that nucleation mode particle concentrations decline with depth into the canopy, such that number concentrations at the bottom of the canopy are an average of 16% lower than those at the top. However, growth rates of nucleation mode particles (diameters 6-30 nm) are invariant with height within the canopy, which implies that the semi-volatile gases contributing to their growth are comparatively well-mixed through the canopy. Growth rates of nucleation mode particles during a meteorological drought year (2012) were substantially lower than during a meteorologically normal year with high soil water potential (2013). This may reflect suppression of actual biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions by drought and thus a reduction in the production of condensable products during the drought-affected vegetation season. This hypothesis is supported by evidence that growth rates during the normal year exhibit a positive correlation with emissions of BVOC modeled on observed forest composition, leaf area index, temperature and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), but particle growth rates during the drought-affected vegetation season are not correlated with modeled BVOC emissions. These data thus provide indirect evidence that drought stress in forests may reduce BVOC emissions and limit growth of nucleation mode particles to climate-relevant sizes.

  10. Atmospheric Measurements of Neutral Nucleating Clusters (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J.; Eisele, F. L.; Smith, J. N.; Chen, M.; Jiang, J.; Kuang, C.; McMurry, P. H.

    2010-12-01

    Nanoparticles produced by nucleation can subsequently grow to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) within one or two days and hence affect cloud formation, precipitation, and atmospheric radiation budgets. As an intermediate stage between molecules and nanoparticles, neutral molecular clusters are believed to play an important role in processes that lead to boundary layer nucleation. Therefore, knowledge of chemical composition, concentrations, thermodynamic properties, and evolution of neutral molecular clusters is essential to better elucidate the nucleation mechanism and to reduce the uncertainty in nucleation rates used in global climate models. Here we present laboratory and field measurements from a recently developed chemical ionization mass spectrometer (the Cluster-CIMS) designed to measure atmospheric neutral clusters (Zhao et al., 2010). The sensitivity of the Cluster-CIMS was significantly improved by using a unique conical octopole device in the first vacuum stage for transmitting and focusing ions, which was further confirmed by ion trajectory simulations using SIMION. The ion cluster formation in the atmospheric-pressure inlet was controlled by two processes: neutral ionization and ion-induced clustering (IIC), which can be differentiated from the time independency of the intensity ratio between the cluster and monomer ions. Two methods were employed to separate neutral clusters from the ion-induced clustering. The concentrations and distribution of the neutral nucleating clusters containing up to 4 H2SO4 are estimated from the above methods at three measurement sites in the US (NCAR foothill laboratory, Manitou Forest Observatory, and Atlanta). Typically, the molecular cluster concentrations are well correlated with the concentrations of nanoparticles measured simultaneously during the nucleation event periods. The Cluster-CIMS was employed to measure clusters containing both sulfuric acid and amines in summer 2010 at NCAR foothill laboratory

  11. Deciphering the energetic barriers to calcium carbonate nucleation as a continuum of competing interfacial forces between polysaccharide chemistry and ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuffre, A. J.; De Yoreo, J. J.; Dove, P. M.

    2013-12-01

    Calcified skeletons are produced within complex assemblages of proteins and polysaccharides whose roles in mineralization are not well understood. Researchers have long-postulated that living organisms utilize organic matrices to actively guide the formation and growth of crystalline structures. The timing and placement of these features are most easily controlled during the nucleation stage. Our recent kinetic study of heterogeneous calcite nucleation found the energy barrier to formation is regulated by a systematic relationship to the competing interfacial energies between the substrate, crystal, and liquid (Giuffre et al., 2013). Chitosan presents a low energy barrier to nucleation because its near-neutral charge favors formation of a substrate-crystal interface, thus reducing substrate interactions with water. Progressively higher barriers are measured for negatively charged alginates and heparin that favor contact with the solution over the formation of new substrate-crystal interfaces. These results showed calcite nucleation is regulated by substrate-crystal interactions but could not quantify the larger continuum of competing forces that must regulate calcite nucleation. To determine these relationships, we estimate the energy barriers to nucleation and crystal-liquid interfacial energies by measuring the kinetics of homogeneous calcite nucleation in NaCl solutions at ionic strengths that extend to seawater salinity (0.6 M). The data show that solutions of greater ionic strength produce faster nucleation rates, smaller crystal-liquid interfacial energies, and lower barriers to nucleation, which concurs with recent theoretical and experimental findings that background electrolytes promote ion desolvation during nucleation. By applying this relationship to heterogeneous nucleation on chitosan and heparin in future work, we will quantify the relative contributions of substrate-crystal-liquid interfacial energies. The findings reiterate a directing role for PS

  12. Expanding Conventional Seismic Stratigrphy into the Multicomponent Seismic Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Innocent Aluka

    2008-08-31

    Multicomponent seismic data are composed of three independent vector-based seismic wave modes. These wave modes are, compressional mode (P), and shear modes SV and SH. The three modes are generated using three orthogonal source-displacement vectors and then recorded using three orthogonal vector sensors. The components travel through the earth at differing velocities and directions. The velocities of SH and SV as they travel through the subsurface differ by only a few percent, but the velocities of SV and SH (Vs) are appreciably lower than the P-wave velocity (Vp). The velocity ratio Vp/Vs varies by an order of magnitude in the earth from a value of 15 to 1.5 depending on the degree of sedimentary lithification. The data used in this study were acquired by nine-component (9C) vertical seismic profile (VSP), using three orthogonal vector sources. The 9C vertical seismic profile is capable of generating P-wave mode and the fundamental S-wave mode (SH-SH and SV-SV) directly at the source station and permits the basic components of elastic wavefield (P, SH-SH and SV-SV) to be separated from one another for the purposes of imaging. Analysis and interpretations of data from the study area show that incident full-elastic seismic wavefield is capable of reflecting four different wave modes, P, SH , SV and C which can be utilized to fully understand the architecture and heterogeneities of geologic sequences. The conventional seismic stratigraphy utilizes only reflected P-wave modes. The notation SH mode is the same as SH-SH; SV mode means SV-SV and C mode which is a converted shear wave is a special SV mode and is the same as P-SV. These four wave modes image unique geologic stratigraphy and facies and at the same time reflect independent stratal surfaces because of the unique orientation of their particle-displacement vectors. As a result of the distinct orientation of individual mode's particle-displacement vector, one mode may react to a critical subsurface sequence more

  13. MPH: A Library for Distributed Multi-Component Environment

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2001-05-01

    A growing trend in developing large and complex applications on today's Teraflops compyters is to integrate stand-alone and/or semi-independent program components into a comprehensive simulation package. We develop MPH, a multi-component handshaking library that allows component models recognize and talk to each other in a convenient and consisten way, thus to run multi-component ulti-executable applications effectively on distributed memory architectures. MPH provides the following capabilities: component name registration, resource allocation, inter-component communication, inquiry on themore » multi-component environment, standard in/out redirect. It supports the following four integration mechanisms: Multi-Component Single-Executable (MCSE); Single-Component Multi-Executable (SCME); Multi-Component Multi-Executable (MCME); Multi-instance Multi-Executable (MIME). MPH currently works on IBM SP, SGI Origin, Compaq AlphaSC, Cray T3E, and PC clusters. It is being adopted in NCAR's CCSM and Colorado State University's icosahedra grid coupled model. A joint communicator between any two components could be created. MPI communication between local processors and remote processors are invoked through component names and the local id. More functions are available to inquire the global-id, local-id, number of executales, etc.« less

  14. Amine-phenyl multi-component gradient stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Dewoolkar, Veeren C; Kannan, Balamurali; Ashraf, Kayesh M; Higgins, Daniel A; Collinson, Maryanne M

    2015-09-01

    Continuous multi-component gradients in amine and phenyl groups were fabricated using controlled rate infusion (CRI). Solutions prepared from either 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTEOS) or phenyltrimethoxysilane (PTMOS) were infused, in a sequential fashion, at a controlled rate into an empty graduated cylinder housing a vertically aligned thin layer chromatography (TLC) plate. The hydrolyzed precursors reacted with an abundance of silanol (SiOH) groups on the TLC plates, covalently attaching the functionalized silane to its surface. The extent of modification by phenyl and amine was determined by the kinetics of each reaction and the exposure time at each point along the TLC plate. The local concentrations of phenyl and amine were measured using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The profile of the multi-component gradients strongly depended on the order of infusion, the direction of the gradient and the presence of available surface silanol groups. A slightly higher amount of phenyl can be deposited on the TLC plate by first modifying its surface with amine groups as they serve as a catalyst, enhancing condensation. Separation of water- and fat-soluble vitamins and the control of retention factors were demonstrated on the multi-component gradient TLC plates. Uniformly modified and single-component TLC plates gave different separations compared to the multi-component gradient plates. The retention factors of the individual vitamins depended on the order of surface modification, the spotting end, and whether the multi-component gradients align or oppose each other. PMID:26255112

  15. Forest canopy interactions with nucleation mode particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryor, S. C.; Hornsby, K. E.; Novick, K. A.

    2014-07-01

    Forests play a key role in removal of particles from the atmosphere but may also significantly contribute to formation and growth of ultrafine particles. Ultrafine particle size distributions through a deciduous forest canopy indicate substantial capture of nucleation mode particles by the foliage. Concentrations decline with depth into the canopy, such that nucleation mode number concentrations at the bottom of the canopy are an average of 16% lower than those at the top. However, growth rates of nucleation mode particles (diameters 6-30 nm) are invariant with height within the canopy, which implies that the semi-volatile gases contributing to their growth are comparatively well-mixed through the canopy. Growth rates of nucleation mode particles during a meteorological drought year (2012) were substantially lower than during a meteorologically normal year with high soil water potential (2013). This may reflect suppression of actual BVOC emissions by drought and thus reduced production of condensable products (and thus particle growth) during the drought-affected vegetation season. This hypothesis is supported by evidence that growth rates during the normal year exhibit a positive correlation with emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) modeled based on observed forest composition, leaf area index, temperature and PAR, but particle growth rates during the drought-affected vegetation season are not correlated with modeled BVOC emissions. These data thus provide direct evidence for the importance of canopy capture in atmospheric particle budgets and indirect evidence that drought-stress in forests may reduce BVOC emissions and limit growth of nucleation mode particles to climate-relevant sizes.

  16. State transformations and ice nucleation in amorphous (semi-)solid organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baustian, K. J.; Wise, M. E.; Jensen, E. J.; Schill, G. P.; Freedman, M. A.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2013-06-01

    Amorphous (semi-)solid organic aerosol particles have the potential to serve as surfaces for heterogeneous ice nucleation in cirrus clouds. Raman spectroscopy and optical microscopy have been used in conjunction with a cold stage to examine water uptake and ice nucleation on individual amorphous (semi-)solid particles at atmospherically relevant temperatures (200-273 K). Three organic compounds considered proxies for atmospheric secondary organic aerosol (SOA) were used in this investigation: sucrose, citric acid and glucose. Internally mixed particles consisting of each organic and ammonium sulfate were also investigated. Results from water uptake experiments followed the shape of a humidity-induced glass transition (Tg(RH)) curve and were used to construct state diagrams for each organic and corresponding mixture. Experimentally derived Tg(RH) curves are in good agreement with theoretical predictions of Tg(RH) following the approach of Koop et al. (2011). A unique humidity-induced glass transition point on each state diagram, Tg'(RH), was used to quantify and compare results from this study to previous works. Values of Tg'(RH) determined for sucrose, glucose and citric acid glasses were 236, 230 and 220 K, respectively. Values of Tg'(RH) for internally mixed organic/sulfate particles were always significantly lower; 210, 207 and 215 K for sucrose/sulfate, glucose/sulfate and citric acid/sulfate, respectively. All investigated SOA proxies were observed to act as heterogeneous ice nuclei at tropospheric temperatures. Heterogeneous ice nucleation on pure organic particles occurred at Sice = 1.1-1.4 for temperatures below 235 K. Particles consisting of 1:1 organic-sulfate mixtures took up water over a greater range of conditions but were in some cases also observed to heterogeneously nucleate ice at temperatures below 202 K (Sice= 1.25-1.38). Polynomial curves were fitted to experimental water uptake data and then incorporated into the Community Aerosol Radiation

  17. Nucleation of pentacene thin films on silicon dioxide modified with hexamethyldisilazane

    SciTech Connect

    Killampalli, Aravind S.; Engstrom, J.R.

    2006-04-03

    Nucleation and growth of pentacene on silicon dioxide surfaces modified with hexamethyldisilazane, HN[Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}]{sub 2}, has been examined using supersonic molecular beam techniques and atomic force microscopy. Similar to growth on clean SiO{sub 2} surfaces, the rate of deposition at a fixed incident flux decreases with increasing kinetic energy of incident pentacene, indicative of trapping mediated adsorption. Unlike clean, unmodified SiO{sub 2} surfaces, however, growth on the modified surface exhibits characteristics of heterogeneous nucleation, where the maximum island density is independent of deposition rate. Further, islands in the submonolayer regime are two molecules high, unlike the one molecule high islands observed on clean SiO{sub 2}.

  18. Investigation of nucleation and crystal growth kinetics of nickel manganese oxalates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoun-Habbache, Montaha; Guillemet-Fritsch, Sophie; Lemaître, Jacques; Jones, Alan

    2005-06-01

    The nucleation and the crystal growth rates of mixed nickel manganese oxalates have been determined from the changes of the ionic concentration of the solution and the crystal size distribution during the precipitation process within a supersaturation range 0-0.1 M. Thermodynamic solubility calculations have been used to identify the different species contributing the precipitation reaction and for estimation of the thermodynamic constant. Experimental data show that the nucleation rate of mixed nickel manganese oxalate in this supersaturation range is consistent with a primary heterogeneous mechanism and was found to obey to an exponential law. The crystal growth rates indicate a surface-integration-controlled mechanism with a first-order law with respect to the supersaturation.

  19. Re-evaluating the Frankfurt isothermal static diffusion chamber for ice nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrod, J.; Danielczok, A.; Weber, D.; Ebert, M.; Thomson, E. S.; Bingemer, H. G.

    2015-12-01

    Recently significant advances have been made in the collection, detection, and characterization of ice nucleating particles (INP). Ice nuclei are particles that facilitate the heterogeneous formation of ice within the atmospheric aerosol by lowering the free energy barrier to spontaneous nucleation and growth of ice from atmospheric water and/or vapor. The Frankfurt isostatic diffusion chamber (FRIDGE) is an INP collection and offline detection system that has become widely deployed and shows additional potential for ambient measurements. Since its initial development FRIDGE has gone through several iterations and improvements. Here we describe improvements that have been made in the collection and analysis techniques. We detail the uncertainties inherent in the measurement method, and suggest a systematic method of error analysis for FRIDGE measurements. Thus what is presented herein should serve as a foundation for the dissemination of all current and future measurements using FRIDGE instrumentation.

  20. Micromechanisms of Twin Nucleation in TiAl: Effects of Neutron Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hishinuma, A.; Yoo, M.H.

    1999-01-28

    The so-called radiation-induced ductility (RID) reported in neutron-irradiated 47at%Al alloys is attributed to the formation of effective twin embryos in the presence of interstitial-type Frank loops in {gamma}-TiAl and the subsequent nucleation and growth of microtwins during post-irradiation tensile deformation. The stability of large faulted Frank loops is explained in terms of the repulsive interaction between Shockley and Frank partials. Interaction of only six ordinary slip dislocations with a Frank loop can facilitate a pole mechanism for twin formation to work. The relative ease of heterogeneous twin nucleation is the reason for the RID and the lack of changes in yield strength and work hardening.

  1. Nucleation Pathways For Freezing Of Two Grades Of Zirconium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu; Rulison, Aaron; Bayuzick, Robert; Hofmeister, William; Morton, Craig

    1996-01-01

    Report discusses classical nucleation theory of freezing and describes experimental study of nucleation mechanisms that predominate during freezing of spherical specimens of initially molten zirconium levitated electrostatically in vacuum.

  2. Cyclic Peptidomimetics and Pseudopeptides from Multicomponent Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessjohann, Ludger A.; Rhoden, Cristiano R. B.; Rivera, Daniel G.; Vercillo, Otilie Eichler

    Multicomponent reactions (MCRs) that provide in the final product amides are suitable to produce peptides and peptide-like moieties. The Passerini and Staudinger reactions provide one amide bond, and the Ugi-four-component reaction generates two amides from three or even four (or more) components, respectively. The Ugi-reaction thus is most important to produce peptides and peptoids while the Passerini reaction is useful to generate depsipeptoid moieties. In order to produce cyclic peptides and pseudopeptides, the linear peptidic MCR products have to be cyclized, usually with the help of bifunctional or activatable building blocks. Orthogonal but cyclizable secondary functionalities that need no protection in isonitrile MCRs commonly include alkenes (for ring closing metathesis), azide/alkyne (for Huisgen click reactions) or dienes and enoates (Diels-Alder) etc. If MCR-reactive groups are to be used also for the cyclisation, monoprotected bifunctional building blocks are used and deprotected after the MCR, e.g. for Ugi reactions as Ugi-Deprotection-Cyclisation (UDC). Alternatively one of the former building blocks or functional groups generated by the MCR can be activated. Most commonly these are activated amides (from so-called convertible isonitriles) which can be used e.g. for Ugi-Activation-Cyclisation (UAC) protocols, or most recently for a simultaneous use of both strategies Ugi-Deprotection/Activation-Cyclisation (UDAC). These methods mostly lead to small, medicinally relevant peptide turn mimics. In an opposing strategy, the MCR is rather used as ring-closing reaction, thereby introducing a (di-)peptide moiety. Most recently these processes have been combined to use MCRs for both, linear precursor synthesis and cyclisation. These multiple MCR approaches allow the most efficient and versatile one pot synthesis of macrocyclic pseudopeptides known to date.

  3. Nucleation and growth of combustion flame deposited diamond coatings on silicon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozbicki, Robert T.

    An investigation has been performed on the kinetics of diamond nucleation on silicon nitride (Si3N4) based materials during oxy-acetylene combustion flame chemical vapor deposition. The deposits were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. Kinetic parameters of the nucleation process, such as nucleation rate (I), period of initial nuclei formation (tng), and maximum nucleation density (Nd) were experimentally determined. It was concluded that at low temperatures (Ts < 875°C), the observed nucleation density is due to epitaxial or pseudo-epitaxial growth on residual particles on the substrate surface. At higher temperatures (Ts > 875°C), heterogeneous nucleation of diamond on Si3N4 occurs with an apparent activation energy ( Eahet ) of ˜ 18 kcal/mol. From an Arrhenius plot of particle growth rate, the activation energy (Ea) for diamond growth was calculated to be ˜ 9 kcal/mol. These results suggest that the energy barrier associated with the heterogeneous nucleation process ( Eahet > Ea) may in fact be responsible for the observed low nucleation densities on Si3N4 substrates. Consequently, nucleation density on Si3N4 is limited by the concentration of available sites for nuclei formation. As surface diffusion to those sites was determined to be negligible, growth of stable nuclei occurs via direct impingement of gas phase species. Based on these conclusions, a multistage deposition technique was developed to deposit continuous diamond coatings on untreated Si3N4 substrates. This two stage technique consisted of (i) an in situ flame pretreatment of the substrate to enhance nucleation through the formation of SiC and (ii) subsequent growth on the flame pretreated surface under optimized parameters. Using a previously developed compression test for brittle coating/substrate systems, the adhesion of multistage deposited coatings was compared

  4. Nucleation of Ammonia Species under the Atmospheric Conditions of Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebauer, S.; Patzer, A. B. C.

    The visual appearance of giant planets is mainly determined by their outer atmospheric cloud layers. Therefore, it is important to know which chemical species might condense and how the condensate, solid or maybe liquid, nucleate in detail to finally form cloudy structures in such planetary atmospheres. In case of Jupiter thermodynamic considerations reveal ammonia ice to be the outermost condensate to form a cloud deck at less than one bar, followed by a second cloud layer between approximately one and two bar, which is proposed to be formed by solid ammonium hydrogensulfide particles (cf. e.g. Ackerman & Marley (2001), Atreya et al. (1999), Burrows & Sharp (1998), Rossow (1978), Sudarsky et al. (2003), Weidenschilling & Lewis (1973)). Based on the so-called scaled nucleation theory (Hale (1986)) a theoretical description for the heterogeneous deposition nucleation of ammonia species has been derived here in analogy to the heterogeneous nucleation concept for water ice in the terrestrial atmosphere by Pruppacher & Klett (1996). This approach is applied to typical Jovian atmospheric conditions and first results are discussed e.g. in comparison to the observed depletion of NH3 molecules in the troposphere of Jupiter. References: Ackerman A.S. & Marley M.S. 2001, ApJ, 556, 872 Atreya S.K., Wong M.H., Owen T.C., Mahaffy P.R., Niemann H.B., de Pater I. , Drossart P. & Encrenaz Th. 1999, P&SS, 47, 1243 Burrows A. & Sharp C.M. 1999, ApJ, 512, 843 Hale B. 1986, Phys. Rev. A, 33,4156 Pruppacher H.R. & Klett J.D., Microphysics of Clouds and Precipitation, Atmos. and Ocean. Scie. Lib., 2nd ed., 1996 Rossow W.B. 1978, Icar. 36, 1 Sudarsky D., Burrows A. & Hubeny I. 2003, ApJ, 588, 1121 Weidenschilling S.J. & Lewis J.S. 1973, Icar. 20, 405

  5. Impacts of Ice Nucleation Parameterizations and Dust on Deep Convective C louds and Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, K. S. S.; Fan, J.; Leung, L. Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhang, K.; Ma, P. L.; Phillips, V. T.; Liu, X.; Yang, Q.

    2014-12-01

    Ice nucleation plays a critical role in the formation of ice clouds and converting liquid to ice in mixed-phase clouds. Many past heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterizations (INPs) were developed based on field measurements with the artifacts of shattering, and also not connected with aerosol particles. Recent laboratory and field measurements have led to a few new ice nucleation parameterizations connecting with aerosols, which should be implemented to models and evaluated by observations. In this study, we evaluated three very recently developed heterogeneous INPs linked with dust particles: Niemand et al. (2012), DeMott et al. (2013), and Phillips et al. (2013), using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled with the physics and aerosol packages from the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5). Results from the three new schemes and the default scheme by Meyers et al. (1992) are compared with available observations including aircraft measurements of cloud anvil properties of a storm case from the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) field campaign. The Meyers scheme simulates higher ice number concentrations (Ni), while the Phillips scheme simulates lower Ni and shows the best agreement with aircraft measurements in the anvil area. Although the total precipitation amount and evolution of convection are not sensitive to different INPs, the probability density functions of both precipitation and reflectivity are considerably affected by the selected INPs. Simulation with the Phillips scheme shows higher ice nucleation rate at the warmer temperatures of the mixed-phase clouds regime, leading to much smaller ice formation in the upper levels. Reduced ice formation in the upper levels is caused by changes in droplet freezing, which is affected by convection and cloud morphology. Given relatively high dust concentration in the simulated case, sensitivity experiment is performed to examine dust impact with different INPs by reducing dust

  6. Monte Carlo tests of nucleation concepts in the lattice gas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Fabian; Virnau, Peter; Binder, Kurt

    2013-05-01

    The conventional theory of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation in a supersaturated vapor is tested by Monte Carlo simulations of the lattice gas (Ising) model with nearest-neighbor attractive interactions on the simple cubic lattice. The theory considers the nucleation process as a slow (quasistatic) cluster (droplet) growth over a free energy barrier ΔF*, constructed in terms of a balance of surface and bulk term of a critical droplet of radius R*, implying that the rates of droplet growth and shrinking essentially balance each other for droplet radius R=R*. For heterogeneous nucleation at surfaces, the barrier is reduced by a factor depending on the contact angle. Using the definition of physical clusters based on the Fortuin-Kasteleyn mapping, the time dependence of the cluster size distribution is studied for quenching experiments in the kinetic Ising model and the cluster size ℓ* where the cluster growth rate changes sign is estimated. These studies of nucleation kinetics are compared to studies where the relation between cluster size and supersaturation is estimated from equilibrium simulations of phase coexistence between droplet and vapor in the canonical ensemble. The chemical potential is estimated from a lattice version of the Widom particle insertion method. For large droplets it is shown that the physical clusters have a volume consistent with the estimates from the lever rule. Geometrical clusters (defined such that each site belonging to the cluster is occupied and has at least one occupied neighbor site) yield valid results only for temperatures less than 60% of the critical temperature, where the cluster shape is nonspherical. We show how the chemical potential can be used to numerically estimate ΔF* also for nonspherical cluster shapes.

  7. Nucleation of earthquakes and its implication to precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shi-Yu; Teng, Chun-Kai; Lu, Zhen-Ye; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Liu, Qi-Liang; He, Xue-Song

    2000-03-01

    The recent argument about nucleation phase of earthquakes reminds us to completely study the concept of earthquake nucleation. The original meaning of nucleation includes concentration, nucleation and initiation of the eruptive processes. Thus, it is needed to discuss how to exactly translate the word “nucleation” into Chinese in different fields. The basic concept of earthquake nucleation refers to microcrack concentration in rock. It causes local weakening and instability of the rock. The narrow sense of nucleation theory of friction constitutive is significant in friction of fault surfaces, but should not abuse everywhere unconditionally. In terms of thermodynamics, nucleation actually means the variety processes of multiple state parameters of rock. The nucleation is a project that covers multiple courses. In this paper, the studies of damage theory, fracture, earthquake rupture dynamics and constitutive of friction and their implication to earthquake nucleation are remarked. The recently developments are introduced, including the influence of tectonic on the earthquake nucleation process, the method of measuring medium anisotropy, especially shear wave splitting led by concentration and orientation of microcracks, and the experimental study of remote sensing of infrared and microwave radiation related to the nucleation, etc. This paper also discusses the characteristic of large earthquake nucleation, and the implication of above studies to precursors of strong earthquakes.

  8. Sensor arrays from multicomponent micropatterned nanoparticles and graphene.

    PubMed

    Nagelli, Enoch; Naik, Rajesh; Xue, Yuhua; Gao, Yunxiang; Zhang, Mei; Dai, Liming

    2013-11-01

    A novel approach for multicomponent patterning metal/metal oxide nanoparticles on graphene was developed, which involves region-specific plasma treatment, followed by region-selective substrate-enhanced electroless deposition of Au nanoparticles and solution alkalization of ferrous chloride tetrahydrate in the presence of ammonia into Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The resultant Fe3O4/Au multicomponent micropatterned-graphene films were found to be highly selective sensor arrays for detecting low levels of chemical vapor molecules at ppm levels. This novel concept could be applied to the development of various multicomponent patterned nanomaterials for many potential applications, ranging from nanoscale region-specific chemical-/bio-sensor arrays to multifunctional optoelectronic devices. PMID:24113252

  9. Surface-slip equations for multicomponent nonequilibrium air flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R. N.; Scott, C. D.; Moss, J. N.

    1985-01-01

    Equations are presented for the surface-slip (or jump) values of species concentration, pressure, velocity, and temperature in the low-Reynolds number, high-altitude flight regime of a space vehicle. The equations are obtained from closed form solutions of the mass, momentum, and energy flux equations using the Chapman-Enskog velocity distribution function. This function represents a solution of the Boltzmann equation in the Navier-Stokes approximation. The analysis, obtained for nonequilibrium multicomponent air flow, includes the finite-rate surface catalytic recombination and changes in the internal energy during reflection from the surface. Expressions for the various slip quantities were obtained in a form which can be employed in flowfield computations. A consistent set of equations is provided for multicomponent, binary, and single species mixtures. Expression is also provided for the finite-rate, species-concentration boundary condition for a multicomponent mixture in absence of slip.

  10. Opportunities for Multicomponent Hybrid Hydrogels in Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogels provide mechanical support and a hydrated environment that offer good cytocompatibility and controlled release of molecules, and myriad hydrogels thus have been studied for biomedical applications. In the past few decades, research in these areas has shifted increasingly to multicomponent hydrogels that better capture the multifunctional nature of native biological environments and that offer opportunities to selectively tailor materials properties. This review summarizes recent approaches aimed at producing multicomponent hydrogels, with descriptions of contemporary chemical and physical approaches for forming networks, and of the use of both synthetic and biologically derived molecules to impart desired properties. Specific multicomponent materials with enhanced mechanical properties are presented, as well as materials in which multiple biological functions are imparted for applications in tissue engineering, cancer treatment, and gene therapies. The progress in the field suggests significant promise for these approaches in the development of biomedically relevant materials. PMID:25426888

  11. Surface-slip equations for multicomponent, nonequilibrium air flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Roop N.; Scott, Carl D.; Moss, James N.; Goglia, Gene

    1985-01-01

    Equations are presented for the surface slip (or jump) values of species concentration, pressure, velocity, and temperature in the low-Reynolds-number, high-altitude flight regime of a space vehicle. These are obtained from closed-form solutions of the mass, momentum, and energy flux equations using the Chapman-Enskog velocity distribution function. This function represents a solution of the Boltzmann equation in the Navier-Stokes approximation. The analysis, obtained for nonequilibrium multicomponent air flow, includes the finite-rate surface catalytic recombination and changes in the internal energy during reflection from the surface. Expressions for the various slip quantities have been obtained in a form which can readily be employed in flow-field computations. A consistent set of equations is provided for multicomponent, binary, and single species mixtures. Expression is also provided for the finite-rate species-concentration boundary condition for a multicomponent mixture in absence of slip.

  12. Mechanisms for the generation of compositional heterogeneities in magma chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trial, Alain F.; Spera, Frank J.

    1990-01-01

    The two main hypotheses concerning the origin of compositional heterogeneities in magma chambers are discussed: (1) models in which the development of compositional zonation is simultaneous with the birth and growth of the magma body and (2) models in which zonation develops within an initially homogeneous batch of magma. The paper presents an overview of the geological possibilities and evaluates them on the basis of current research. Calculations are presented for boundary-layer flow in isothermal ternary component systems, and it is demonstrated that multicomponent diffusion effects may be very significant, as was earlier suggested by Trial and Spera (1988).

  13. Investigating ice nucleation in cirrus clouds with an aerosol-enabled Multiscale Modeling Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chengzhu; Wang, Minghuai; Morrison, Hugh; Somerville, Richard C. J.; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Xiaohong; Li, Jui-Lin F.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, an aerosol-dependent ice nucleation scheme has been implemented in an aerosol-enabled Multiscale Modeling Framework (PNNL MMF) to study ice formation in upper troposphere cirrus clouds through both homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation. The MMF model represents cloud scale processes by embedding a cloud-resolving model (CRM) within each vertical column of a GCM grid. By explicitly linking ice nucleation to aerosol number concentration, CRM-scale temperature, relative humidity and vertical velocity, the new MMF model simulates the persistent high ice supersaturation and low ice number concentration (10-100/L) at cirrus temperatures. The new model simulates the observed shift of the ice supersaturation PDF toward higher values at low temperatures following the homogeneous nucleation threshold. The MMF model predicts a higher frequency of midlatitude supersaturation in the Southern Hemisphere and winter hemisphere, which is consistent with previous satellite and in situ observations. It is shown that compared to a conventional GCM, the MMF is a more powerful model to simulate parameters that evolve over short time scales such as supersaturation. Sensitivity tests suggest that the simulated global distribution of ice clouds is sensitive to the ice nucleation scheme and the distribution of sulfate and dust aerosols. Simulations are also performed to test empirical parameters related to auto-conversion of ice crystals to snow. Results show that with a value of 250 μm for the critical diameter, Dcs, that distinguishes ice crystals from snow, the model can produce good agreement with the satellite-retrieved products in terms of cloud ice water path and ice water content, while the total ice water is not sensitive to the specification of Dcs value.

  14. Exploring Silica Chemistry at Biological Interfaces: Kinetic and Thermodynamic Drivers of Surface Nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, A. F.; Dove, P. M.

    2006-12-01

    Biochemical investigations have begun to yield information about structural and chemical properties of organic macromolecules involved in biosilicification processes. However, the mechanisms by which these molecules mediate biosilica formation remain unclear. The formation of mineralized structures in organisms is rooted in processes taking place at the nanoscale, and therefore, molecular level investigative probes are required. Insights into how mineral formation occurs within living organisms can be gained by conducting experimental studies with simple model systems that emulate key features of biological systems. Our approach utilizes a novel AFM-based approach to measure the dependence of amorphous silica nucleation kinetics on the chemical and structural nature of the underlying substrate. Model biological surfaces terminated with carboxyl, hydroxyl, and amine moieties were generated through the spontaneous adsorption of {ω}-alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers onto ultra-flat (111) surfaces of gold. Silica nucleation experiments used supersaturated solutions of silicic acid that were produced by the acid catalyzed hydrolysis of tetramethyl orthosilicate. Measurements of surface nucleation rate were conducted under conditions that simulate current views of conditions within silica deposition vesicles of major diatom species, (e.g. ambient temperature, pH = 5.0, NaCl = 0.1 mol/kg). Aqueous silicate levels were varied to examine dependencies on saturation state. Analysis of the kinetic data within the framework of nucleation theory quantifies the height of the kinetic barrier to silica formation, and the net energy of silica-substrate solution interfaces. By conducting experiments for COOH, NH3+, and OH-functionalized substrates, we determine the kinetic and thermodynamic controls of functional chemistry on heterogeneous nucleation of amorphous silica. The findings are providing new insights into how biochemical interfaces mediate the onset of silica formation.

  15. Pre-activation of ice-nucleating particles by the pore condensation and freezing mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Robert; Kiselev, Alexei; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Steinke, Isabelle

    2016-02-01

    In spite of the resurgence in ice nucleation research a comparatively small number of studies deal with the phenomenon of pre-activation in heterogeneous ice nucleation. Fifty years ago, it was shown that various mineral dust and volcanic ash particles can be pre-activated to become nuclei for ice crystal formation even at temperatures as high as 270-271 K. Pre-activation was achieved under ice-subsaturated conditions without any preceding macroscopic ice growth by just temporarily cooling the particles to temperatures below 228 K. A two-step mechanism involving capillary condensation of supercooled water and subsequent homogeneous freezing was proposed to account for the particles' enhanced ice nucleation ability at high temperatures. This work reinvestigates the efficiency of the proposed pre-activation mechanism in temperature-cycling experiments performed in a large cloud chamber with suspended particles. We find the efficiency to be highest for the clay mineral illite as well as for highly porous materials like zeolite and diatomaceous earth, whereas most aerosols generated from desert dust surface samples did not reveal a measurable pre-activation ability. The pre-activation efficiency is linked to particle pores in a certain size range. As estimated by model calculations, only pores with diameters between about 5 and 8 nm contribute to pre-activation under ice-subsaturated conditions. This range is set by a combination of requirements from the negative Kelvin effect for condensation and a critical size of ice embryos for ice nucleation and melting. In contrast to the early study, pre-activation is only observed for temperatures below 260 K. Above that threshold, the particles' improved ice nucleation ability disappears due to the melting of ice in the pores.

  16. Nucleation in a Sheared Liquid Binary Mixture.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Kyung-Yang

    When a binary liquid mixture of lutidine plus water (LW) is quenched to a temperature T and is exposed to a continuous shear rate S, the result is a steady-state droplet distribution. This steady state can be probed by measuring the unscattered intensity I_{f}, or the scattered intensity I_{s}, as a function of delta T and S. In the experiments described here, S is fixed and delta T is varied in a step-wise fashion. The absence of hysteresis was probed in two separate experiments: First, I_{f} was measured as a function of S for a given delta T. Next, I_{f} was measured as a function of delta T for a given S. In either case, the hysteresis associated with the shear-free nucleation is absent. In addition, a flow-history dependent hysteresis was studied. In the 2-dimensional parameter space consisting of S and delta T, the onset of nucleation uniquely determines a cloud point line. A plot of the cloud point line exhibits two segments of different slopes with a cross-over near the temperature corresponding to the Becker-Doring limit. The classical picture of a free energy barrier was reformulated to explain this cross-over behavior. Next, photon correlation spectroscopy was used to study the dependence of the transient nucleation behavior on the initial states. A unique feature of this study is that this initial state can be conveniently adjusted by varying the shear rate S to which the mixture is initially exposed. The shear is then turned off, and the number density N(t), as well as the mean radius of the growing droplets, is monitored as a function of time. It was possible to measure the droplet density at a very early stage of phase separation where the nucleation rate J was close to zero. The measurement reveals that N(t) depends critically on the initial state of the metastable system. When the shear is large enough to rupture the droplets as small as the critical size, N(t) increases very slowly. Measurements of the nucleation rates vs. the square of the

  17. Experimental and theoretical investigation of nucleation and growth of atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jun

    Aerosol particles have profound impacts on human health, atmospheric radiation, and cloud microphysics and these impacts are strongly dependent on particle sizes. However, formation and growth of atmospheric particles are currently not well understood. In this work, laboratory and theoretical studies have been performed to investigate the formation and growth of atmospheric particles. The first two parts of the dissertation are a laboratory investigation of new particle formation and growth, and a theoretical study of atmospheric molecular complexes and clusters. The nucleation rate was considerably enhanced in the presence of cis-pinonic acid and ammonia. The composition of the critical cluster was estimated from the dependence of the nucleation rate on the precursor concentration and the time evolution of the clusters was then simulated using molecular dynamic simulations. Results from quantum chemical calculations and quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) reveal that formation of strong hydrogen bonding between an organic acid and sulfuric acid is likely responsible for a reduction of the nucleation barrier by modifying the hydrophobic properties of the organic acid and allowing further addition of hydrophilic species (e.g., H2SO4, H2O, and possibly NH 3) to the hydrophilic side of the clusters. This promotes growth of the nascent cluster to overcome the nucleation barrier and thus enhances the nucleation in the atmosphere. The last part of this dissertation is the laboratory investigation of heterogeneous interactions of atmospheric carbonyls with sulfuric acid. Direct measurement has been performed to investigate the heterogeneous uptake of atmospheric carbonyls on sulfuric acid. Important parameters have been obtained from the time-dependent or time-independent uptake profiles. The results indicated that the acid-catalyzed reactions of larger aldehydes (e.g. octanal and 2, 4-hexadienal) in sulfuric acid solution were attributed to aldol condensation in

  18. Ionic Strength-Controlled Mn (Hydr)oxide Nanoparticle Nucleation on Quartz: Effect of Aqueous Mn(OH)2.

    PubMed

    Jung, Haesung; Jun, Young-Shin

    2016-01-01

    The early formation of manganese (hydr)oxide nanoparticles at mineral-water interfaces is crucial in understanding how Mn oxides control the fate and transport of heavy metals and the cycling of nutrients. Using atomic force microscopy, we investigated the heterogeneous nucleation and growth of Mn (hydr)oxide under varied ionic strengths (IS; 1-100 mM NaNO3). Experimental conditions (i.e., 0.1 mM Mn(2+) (aq) concentration and pH 10.1) were chosen to be relevant to Mn remediation sites. We found that IS controls Mn(OH)2 (aq) formation, and that the controlled Mn(OH)2 (aq) formation can affect the system's saturation and subsequent Mn(OH)2 (s) and further Mn3O4 (s) nanoparticle formation. In 100 mM IS system, nucleated Mn (hydr)oxide particles had more coverage on the quartz substrate than those in 1 mM and 10 mM IS systems. This high IS also resulted in low supersaturation ratio and thus favor heterogeneous nucleation, having better structural matching between nucleating Mn (hydr)oxides and quartz. The unique information obtained in this work improves our understanding of Mn (hydr)oxide formation in natural as well as engineered aqueous environments, such as groundwater contaminated by natural leachate and acid mine drainage remediation. PMID:26588858

  19. The Influence of the Ion-Plasma Synthesis Regimes on the Features of Structural-Phase State of Multi-Component Nanocomposite Al-Cr-Si-Ti-Cu-N Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotaev, A. D.; Ditenberg, I. A.; Berezovskaya, V. R.; Denisov, K. I.; Pinzhin, Yu. P.; Borisov, D. P.

    2015-02-01

    Within the concept of formation of multi-component, nanocomposite coatings, which assumes a simultaneous nucleation of islands of mutually insoluble or slightly-soluble phases under conditions of self-assembling microstructure during their synthesis, Al-Cr-Si-Ti-Cu-N coatings are designed and formed. Using the methods of X-ray diffraction analysis, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, a comprehensive investigation is performed of the influence of the operating modes of an ion-plasma synthesis of the resulting coatings on the features of their microstructure, microhardness, and elemental and phase composition. The procedures for optimization of the regimes of formation of multi-component, nanocomposite coatings of the above system are discussed.

  20. Virasoro symmetry of the constrained multicomponent Kadomtsev-Petviashvili hierarchy and its integrable discretization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuanzhong; He, Jingsong

    2016-06-01

    We construct Virasoro-type additional symmetries of a kind of constrained multicomponent Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) hierarchy and obtain the Virasoro flow equation for the eigenfunctions and adjoint eigenfunctions. We show that the algebraic structure of the Virasoro symmetry is retained under discretization from the constrained multicomponent KP hierarchy to the discrete constrained multicomponent KP hierarchy.

  1. Thermal response of integral multicomponent composite thermal protection systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, D. A.; Leiser, D. B.; Smith, M.; Kolodziej, P.

    1985-01-01

    Integral-multicomponent thermal-protection materials are discussed in terms of their thermal response to an arc-jet airstream. In-depth temperature measurements are compared with predictions from a one-dimensional, finite-difference code using calculated thermal conductivity values derived from an engineering model. The effect of composition, as well as the optical properties of the bonding material between components, on thermal response is discussed. The performance of these integral-multicomponent composite materials is compared with baseline Space Shuttle insulation.

  2. Rapid correction of electron microprobe data for multicomponent metallic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, K. P.; Sivakumar, R.

    1973-01-01

    This paper describes an empirical relation for the correction of electron microprobe data for multicomponent metallic systems. It evaluates the empirical correction parameter, a for each element in a binary alloy system using a modification of Colby's MAGIC III computer program and outlines a simple and quick way of correcting the probe data. This technique has been tested on a number of multicomponent metallic systems and the agreement with the results using theoretical expressions is found to be excellent. Limitations and suitability of this relation are discussed and a model calculation is also presented in the Appendix.

  3. Fast Rotating Scalar and Multi-component Bose Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, TIn-Lun Jason

    2003-01-01

    We show that in the limit of large angular momentum, many equilibrium and dynamical phenomena of scalar and multi-component Bose gases can be accounted for by approximating the system to reside in an effective lowest Landau level. This method explains the origin of the mysterious stripe formation in fast rotating Bose gas recently observed at JILA, and accounts for all the dynamical details observed in this experiment. To further demonstrate the usefulness of this method, we present its predictions of the interference patterns of two vortex lattices, and rich vortex lattice structures in multi-component Bose gases.

  4. A Weibull characterization for tensile fracture of multicomponent brittle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrows, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    Necessary to the development and understanding of brittle fiber reinforced composites is a means to statistically describe fiber strength and strain-to-failure behavior. A statistical characterization for multicomponent brittle fibers is presented. The method, which is an extension of usual Weibull distribution procedures, statistically considers the components making up a fiber (e.g., substrate, sheath, and surface) as separate entities and taken together as in a fiber. Tensile data for silicon carbide fiber and for an experimental carbon-boron alloy fiber are evaluated in terms of the proposed multicomponent Weibull characterization.

  5. The Single Pass Multi-component Harvester

    SciTech Connect

    Reed Hoskinson; John R. Hess

    2004-08-01

    collection must be economically advantageous to the producer. To do all that, a single pass multi-component harvester system is most desirable. Results from our first prototype suggest that current combines probably do adequate threshing and that a separate chassis can be developed that does additional separation and that is economically feasible.

  6. Strategies for innovation in multicomponent reaction design.

    PubMed

    Ganem, Bruce

    2009-03-17

    By generating structural complexity in a single step from three or more reactants, multicomponent reactions (MCRs) make it possible to synthesize target compounds with greater efficiency and atom economy. The history of such reactions can be traced to the mid-19th century when Strecker first produced alpha-aminonitriles from the condensation of aldehydes with ammonia and hydrogen cyanide. Recently, academic chemists have renewed their interest in MCRs. In part, the pharmaceutical industry has fueled this resurgence because of the growing need to assemble libraries of structurally complex substances for evaluation as lead compounds in drug discovery and development programs. The application of MCRs to that increasingly important objective remains limited by the relatively small number of such reactions that can be broadly applied to prepare biologically relevant or natural-product-like molecular frameworks. We were interested in applying logic-based approaches, such as our single reactant replacement (SRR) approach, as a way both to improve known MCRs and to design new multiple-component routes to bioactive structures. This Account provides several examples that illustrate the use of SRR with known MCRs as starting points for synthetic innovation in this area. As part of our working hypothesis, we initially explored strategies for engineering improvements into known MCRs, either by increasing the dimensionality--that is, changing an n-component to an (n + 1)-component reaction--or broadening the scope of useful input structures, or both. By exhaustively applying retrosynthetic analysis to the cognate MCR to identify and exploit alternative entry points into the overall reaction manifold, we have devised several such re-engineered MCRs. Serendipitous findings have also augmented the yield of useful developments from our logic-inspired approach. In some cases, we have identified surprising links between different compound families that provide useful new entry points

  7. Ion-induced nucleation in solution: promotion of solute nucleation in charged levitated droplets.

    PubMed

    Draper, Neil D; Bakhoum, Samuel F; Haddrell, Allen E; Agnes, George R

    2007-09-19

    We have investigated the nucleation and growth of sodium chloride in both single quiescent charged droplets and charged droplet populations that were levitated in an electrodynamic levitation trap (EDLT). In both cases, the magnitude of a droplet's net excess charge (ions(DNEC)) influenced NaCl nucleation and growth, albeit in different capacities. We have termed the phenomenon ion-induced nucleation in solution. For single quiescent levitated droplets, an increase in ions(DNEC) resulted in a significant promotion of NaCl nucleation, as determined by the number of crystals observed. For levitated droplet populations, a change in NaCl crystal habit, from regular cubic shapes to dome-shaped dendrites, was observed once a surface charge density threshold of -9 x 10(-4) e.nm(-2) was surpassed. Although promotion of NaCl nucleation was observed for droplet population experiments, this can be attributed in part to the increased rate of solvent evaporation observed for levitated droplet populations having a high net charge. Promotion of nucleation was also observed for two organic acids, 2,4,6-trihydroxyacetophenone monohydrate (THAP) and alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA). These results are of direct relevance to processes that occur in both soft-ionization techniques for mass spectrometry and to a variety of industrial processes. To this end, we have demonstrated the use of ion-induced nucleation in solution to form ammonium nitrate particles from levitated droplets to be used in in vitro toxicology studies of ambient particle types. PMID:17718487

  8. Nucleation and growth of tin whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jing; Vianco, Paul T.; Zhang, Bei; Li, James C. M.

    2011-06-01

    Pure tin film of one micron thick was evaporated onto a silicon substrate with chromium and nickel underlayers. The tinned silicon disk was bent by applying a dead load at the center and supported below around the edge to apply biaxial compressive stresses to the tin layer. After 180 C vacuum annealing for 1,2,4,6, and 8 weeks, tin whiskers/hillocks grew. A quantitative method revealed that the overall growth rate decreased with time with a tendency for saturation. A review of the literature showed in general, tin whisker growth has a nucleation period, a growth period and a period of saturation, very similar to recrystallization or phase transformation. In fact we found our data fit Avrami equation very well. This equation shows that the nucleation period was the first week.

  9. Onset of runaway nucleation in aerosol reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jin Jwang; Flagan, Richard C.

    1987-01-01

    The onset of homogeneous nucleation of new particles from the products of gas phase chemical reactions was explored using an aerosol reactor in which seed particles of silicon were grown by silane pyrolysis. The transition from seed growth by cluster deposition to catastrophic nucleation was extremely abrupt, with as little as a 17 percent change in the reactant concentration leading to an increase in the concentration of measurable particles of four orders of magnitude. From the structure of the particles grown near this transition, it is apparent that much of the growth occurs by the accumulation of clusters on the growing seed particles. The time scale for cluster diffusion indicates, however, that the clusters responsible for growth must be much smaller than the apparent fine structure of the product particles.

  10. Grain nucleation and growth during phase transformations.

    PubMed

    Offerman, S E; van Dijk, N H; Sietsma, J; Grigull, S; Lauridsen, E M; Margulies, L; Poulsen, H F; Rekveldt, M Th; van der Zwaag, S

    2002-11-01

    The mechanical properties of polycrystalline materials are largely determined by the kinetics of the phase transformations during the production process. Progress in x-ray diffraction instrumentation at synchrotron sources has created an opportunity to study the transformation kinetics at the level of individual grains. Our measurements show that the activation energy for grain nucleation is at least two orders of magnitude smaller than that predicted by thermodynamic models. The observed growth curves of the newly formed grains confirm the parabolic growth model but also show three fundamentally different types of growth. Insight into the grain nucleation and growth mechanisms during phase transformations contributes to the development of materials with optimal mechanical properties. PMID:12411699

  11. High performance computations using dynamical nucleation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Windus, Theresa L.; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Crosby, Lonnie D.

    2008-07-14

    Chemists continue to explore the use of very large computations to perform simulations that describe the molecular level physics of critical challenges in science. In this paper, the Dynamical Nucleation Theory Monte Carlo (DNTMC) model - a model for determining molecular scale nucleation rate constants - and its parallel capabilities are described. The potential for bottlenecks and the challenges to running on future petascale or larger resources are delineated. A "master-slave" solution is proposed to scale to the petascale and will be developed in the NWChem software. In addition, mathematical and data analysis challenges are also described. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences program. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for DOE.

  12. Microgravity nucleation and particle coagulation experiments support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilleleht, L. U.; Ferguson, F. T.; Stephens, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center have embarked on a program to study the formation and growth of cosmic grains. This includes experiments on the homogeneous nucleation of refractory vapors of materials such as magnesium, lead, tin, and silicon oxides. As part of this program, the Chemical Engineering Department of the University of Virginia has undertaken to develop a math model for these experiments, to assist in the design and construction of the apparatus, and to analyze the data once the experiments have begun. Status Reports 1 and 2 addressed the design of the apparatus and the development of math models for temperature and concentration fields. The bulk of this report discusses the continued refinement of these models, and the assembly and testing of the nucleation chamber along with its ancillary equipment, which began in the spring of 1988.

  13. A stochastic simulation of nonisothermal nucleation.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Jonathan C

    2008-04-28

    The results of stochastic simulations of growth and evaporation of small clusters in vapor are reported. Energy dependent growth rates are determined from the monomer-cluster collision rate and decay rates are found from a detailed balance, with the equilibrium size and energy distribution of clusters calculated using the capillarity approximation and the equilibrium vapor pressure. These rates are used in simulations of two-dimensional random walks in size and energy space to determine the fraction of clusters in supersaturated vapor of size (i(min)+1) that reach a size i(max). By assuming that clusters of size i(min) are in equilibrium, this fraction can be related to the nonisothermal nucleation rate. The simulated rates show good agreement with the previously published analytical results. In the absence of an inert carrier gas, the nonisothermal nucleation rates are typically between 1% and 5% of the isothermal rates. PMID:18447471

  14. Buckyball Nucleation of HiPco Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this innovation is to enhance nucleation of single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) in the HiPco process, selectively producing 10,10 tubes, something which until now has not been thought possible. This is accomplished by injecting C60, or a derivative of C60, solubilized in supercritical CO2 together with a transition metal carboneal cocatalyst into the HiPco reactor. This is a variant on the supercritical disclosure. C60 has never been used to nucleate carbon nanotubes in the gas phase. C60 itself may not have adequate solubility in supercritical CO2. However, fluorinated C60, e.g., C60F36, is easy to make cheaply and should have much enhanced solubility.

  15. How does surface wettability influence nucleate boiling?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Hai Trieu; Caney, Nadia; Marty, Philippe; Colasson, Stéphane; Gavillet, Jérôme

    2009-05-01

    Although the boiling process has been a major subject of research for several decades, its physics still remain unclear and require further investigation. This study aims at highlighting the effects of surface wettability on pool boiling heat transfer. Nanocoating techniques were used to vary the water contact angle from 20° to 110° by modifying nanoscale surface topography and chemistry. The experimental results obtained disagree with the predictions of the classical models. A new approach of nucleation mechanism is established to clarify the nexus between the surface wettability and the nucleate boiling heat transfer. In this approach, we introduce the concept of macro- and micro-contact angles to explain the observed phenomenon. To cite this article: H.T. Phan et al., C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  16. Displacement barrier heights from experimental nucleation rate data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malila, Jussi; Hyvärinen, Antti-Pekka; Viisanen, Yrjö; Laaksonen, Ari

    2008-11-01

    Nucleation phenomena have a great importance in many areas of science. However, the main theoretical tool to analyse these phenomena, the classical nucleation theory (CNT), has known weaknesses. A decade ago a nucleation theorem based correction to CNT was developed [McGraw, R., Laaksonen, A., 1996. Scaling properties of the critical nucleus in classical and molecular-based theories of vapor-liquid nucleation. Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 2754-2757]. We have analysed experimental nucleation rate data of two homologous series of molecular fluids in terms of this scaling relation. Our first results suggest possible universal functional form for correction to the temperature dependence of CNT.

  17. Nucleation and Heat Transfer in Liquid Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Eric Warner

    1993-01-01

    With the advent of the new high Tc superconductors as well as the increasing use of cryo-cooled conventional electronics, liquid nitrogen will be one of the preferred cryogens used to cool these materials. Consequently, a more thorough understanding of the heat transfer characteristics of liquid nitrogen is required. In these investigations the transient heating characteristics of liquid nitrogen to states of nucleate and film boiling under different liquid flow conditions are examined. Using a metal hot wire/plate technique, it is verified that there is a premature transition to film boiling in the transient case at power levels as much as 30 percent lower than under steady state nucleate boiling conditions. It is also shown that the premature transition can be reduced or eliminated depending on the flow velocity. The second part of this research analyses the nucleation (boiling) process from a dynamical systems point of view. By observing how the boiling system variables evolve and fluctuate over time, it is hoped that physical insight and predictive information can be gained. One goal is to discover some indicator or signature in the data that anticipates the transition from nucleate boiling to film boiling. Some of the important variables that make up the boiling system are the temperature of the heater and the heat flux through the heater surface into the liquid nitrogen. The result, gained by plotting the system's trajectory in the heat flux-temperature plane, is that on average the system follows a counterclockwise trajectory. A physical model is constructed that explains this behavior. Also, as the applied heater power approaches levels at which the transition to film is known to occur, the area per unit time swept out in the heat flux-temperature plane is seen to reach a maximum. This could be of practical interest as the threshold to film boiling can be anticipated and possibly prevented.

  18. The Nucleation and Growth of Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc

    2004-01-01

    Obtaining crystals of suitable size and high quality continues to be a major bottleneck in macromolecular crystallography. Currently, structural genomics efforts are achieving on average about a 10% success rate in going from purified protein to a deposited crystal structure. Growth of crystals in microgravity was proposed as a means of overcoming size and quality problems, which subsequently led to a major NASA effort in microgravity crystal growth, with the agency also funding research into understanding the process. Studies of the macromolecule crystal nucleation and growth process were carried out in a number of labs in an effort to understand what affected the resultant crystal quality on Earth, and how microgravity improved the process. Based upon experimental evidence, as well as simple starting assumptions, we have proposed that crystal nucleation occurs by a series of discrete self assembly steps, which 'set' the underlying crystal symmetry. This talk will review the model developed, and its origins, in our laboratory for how crystals nucleate and grow, and will then present, along with preliminary data, how we propose to use this model to improve the success rate for obtaining crystals from a given protein.

  19. Images and properties of individual nucleated particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Németh, Zoltán; Pósfai, Mihály; Nyirő-Kósa, Ilona; Aalto, Pasi; Kulmala, Markku; Salma, Imre

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles were collected in Budapest, Hungary in April-June onto lacey Formvar substrates by using an electrostatic precipitator during the beginning phase of the particle growth process in ten nucleation and growth events. Median contribution of the nucleated particles - expressed as the concentration of particles with a diameter between 6 and 25 nm to the total particle number concentration - was 55%, and the median electrical mobility diameter of the particles was approximately 20 nm. The sample was investigated using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. Major types of individual particles such as soot, sulphate/organic and tar ball particles were identified in the sample. In addition, particles with an optical diameter range of 10-30 nm were also observed. They clearly differed from the other particle types, showed homogeneous contrast in the bright-field TEM images, and evaporated within tens of seconds when exposed to the electron beam. They were interpreted as representatives of freshly nucleated particles.

  20. Images and properties of individual nucleated particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Németh, Zoltán; Pósfai, Mihály; Nyirő-Kósa, Ilona; Aalto, Pasi; Kulmala, Markku; Salma, Imre

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles were collected in Budapest, Hungary in April-June onto lacey Formvar substrates by using an electrostatic precipitator during the beginning phase of the particle growth process in ten nucleation and growth events. Median contribution of the nucleated particles - expressed as the concentration of particles with a diameter between 6 and 25 nm to the total particle number concentration - was 55%, and the median electrical mobility diameter of the particles was approximately 20 nm. The sample was investigated using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. Major types of individual particles such as soot, sulphate/organic and tar ball particles were identified in the sample. In addition, particles with an optical diameter range of 10-30 nm were also observed. They clearly differed from the other particle types, showed homogeneous contrast in the bright-field TEM images, and evaporated within tens of seconds when exposed to the electron beam. They were interpreted as representatives of freshly nucleated particles.

  1. Systematic coarse-graining in nucleation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Schweizer, M.; Sagis, L. M. C.

    2015-08-21

    In this work, we show that the standard method to obtain nucleation rate-predictions with the aid of atomistic Monte Carlo simulations leads to nucleation rate predictions that deviate 3 − 5 orders of magnitude from the recent brute-force molecular dynamics simulations [Diemand et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 074309 (2013)] conducted in the experimental accessible supersaturation regime for Lennard-Jones argon. We argue that this is due to the truncated state space the literature mostly relies on, where the number of atoms in a nucleus is considered the only relevant order parameter. We here formulate the nonequilibrium statistical mechanics of nucleation in an extended state space, where the internal energy and momentum of the nuclei are additionally incorporated. We show that the extended model explains the lack in agreement between the molecular dynamics simulations by Diemand et al. and the truncated state space. We demonstrate additional benefits of using the extended state space; in particular, the definition of a nucleus temperature arises very naturally and can be shown without further approximation to obey the fluctuation law of McGraw and LaViolette. In addition, we illustrate that our theory conveniently allows to extend existing theories to richer sets of order parameters.

  2. Systematic coarse-graining in nucleation theory.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, M; Sagis, L M C

    2015-08-21

    In this work, we show that the standard method to obtain nucleation rate-predictions with the aid of atomistic Monte Carlo simulations leads to nucleation rate predictions that deviate 3 - 5 orders of magnitude from the recent brute-force molecular dynamics simulations [Diemand et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 074309 (2013)] conducted in the experimental accessible supersaturation regime for Lennard-Jones argon. We argue that this is due to the truncated state space the literature mostly relies on, where the number of atoms in a nucleus is considered the only relevant order parameter. We here formulate the nonequilibrium statistical mechanics of nucleation in an extended state space, where the internal energy and momentum of the nuclei are additionally incorporated. We show that the extended model explains the lack in agreement between the molecular dynamics simulations by Diemand et al. and the truncated state space. We demonstrate additional benefits of using the extended state space; in particular, the definition of a nucleus temperature arises very naturally and can be shown without further approximation to obey the fluctuation law of McGraw and LaViolette. In addition, we illustrate that our theory conveniently allows to extend existing theories to richer sets of order parameters. PMID:26298141

  3. Systematic coarse-graining in nucleation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweizer, M.; Sagis, L. M. C.

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we show that the standard method to obtain nucleation rate-predictions with the aid of atomistic Monte Carlo simulations leads to nucleation rate predictions that deviate 3 - 5 orders of magnitude from the recent brute-force molecular dynamics simulations [Diemand et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 074309 (2013)] conducted in the experimental accessible supersaturation regime for Lennard-Jones argon. We argue that this is due to the truncated state space the literature mostly relies on, where the number of atoms in a nucleus is considered the only relevant order parameter. We here formulate the nonequilibrium statistical mechanics of nucleation in an extended state space, where the internal energy and momentum of the nuclei are additionally incorporated. We show that the extended model explains the lack in agreement between the molecular dynamics simulations by Diemand et al. and the truncated state space. We demonstrate additional benefits of using the extended state space; in particular, the definition of a nucleus temperature arises very naturally and can be shown without further approximation to obey the fluctuation law of McGraw and LaViolette. In addition, we illustrate that our theory conveniently allows to extend existing theories to richer sets of order parameters.

  4. Crystallization of Nucleator Nanofibrils in Polypropylene Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipp, J.; Cohen, Y.; Khalfin, R. L.; Shuster, M.; Terry, A. E.

    2007-03-01

    Self-associating molecules act as nucleating agents in polypropylene (PP) in order to increase the crystallization rate and decrease the crystallite size, by forming a fine network of nanofibrils within the polymer melt. The thermodynamic and kinetic basis for formation of this structure is not clear. Current models usually invoke a spinodal decomposition mechanism, as temperature is lowered into an immiscibility gap. This presentation deals with 1,3:2,4-Di(3,4-dimethylbenzylidene)sorbitol [dMdBS] in PP. The kinetics of structure formation was evaluated using small angle x-ray scattering, including synchrotron measurements. The results indicate a crystallization process by means of a nucleation and growth mechanism, which is controlled by the rate of homogeneous nucleation. The thermodynamic temperature of this process, determined for two different dMdBS concentrations from the temperature dependence of the crystallization half-time, agrees with that obtained by group-contribution calculation of the solubility parameters. dMdBS nanofibril formation has a remarkable effect on PP crystallization in melt-spun fibers. Just 0.4% additive at a moderate spin-draw ratio yields a crystalline morphology comprised of parallel chain-folded lamellae, with the lamellar normal highly aligned along the fiber axis.

  5. Nucleation and particle coagulation experiments in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, J.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of the conditions under which carbon, aluminum oxide, and silicon carbide smokes condense and of the morphology and crystal structure of the resulting grains are essential if the nature of the materials ejected into the interstellar medium and the nature of the grains which eventually became part of the proto solar nebular are to be understood. Little information is currently available on the vapor-solid phase transitions of refractory metals and solids. What little experimental data do exist are, however, not in agreement with currently accepted models of the nucleation process for more volatile materials. The major obstacle to performing such experiments in earth-based laboratories is the susceptibility of these systems to convection. Evaporation of refractory materials into a low-pressure environment with a carefully controlled temperature gradient will produce refractory smokes when the critical supersaturation of the system is exceeded. Measurement of the point at which nucleation occurs, via light scattering or extinction, can not only yield nucleation data but also, information on the chemical composition and crystal structure of the condensate. Experimental requirements are presented.

  6. Enhancements of Nucleate Boiling Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Nengli; Chao, David F.; Yang, W. J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents two means for enhancing nucleate boiling and critical heat flux under microgravity conditions: using micro-configured metal-graphite composites as the boiling surface and dilute aqueous solutions of long-chain alcohols as the working fluid. In the former, thermocapillary force induced by temperature difference between the graphite-fiber tips and the metal matrix plays an important role in bubble detachment. Thus boiling-heat transfer performance does not deteriorate in a reduced-gravity environment. In the latter cases, the surface tension-temperature gradient of the long-chain alcohol solutions turns positive as the temperature exceeds a certain value. Consequently, the Marangoni effect does not impede, but rather aids in bubble departure from the heating surface. This feature is most favorable in microgravity. As a result, the bubble size of departure is substantially reduced at higher frequencies. Based on the existing experimental data, and a two-tier theoretical model, correlation formulas are derived for nucleate boiling on the copper-graphite and aluminum-graphite composite surfaces, in both the isolated and coalesced bubble regimes. In addition, performance equations for nucleate boiling and critical heat flux in dilute aqueous solutions of long-chain alcohols are obtained.

  7. Ice nucleation of bioaerosols - a resumee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pummer, Bernhard G.; Atanasova, Lea; Bauer, Heidi; Bernardi, Johannes; Chazallon, Bertrand; Druzhinina, Irina S.; Grothe, Hinrich

    2013-04-01

    The role of biological particles for ice nucleation (IN) is still debated. Here, we present a summary of investigation and comparison of different ice nuclei. Apart from the bacterial ice nucleation proteins in Snomax, we further investigated a broad spectrum of pollen and fungal spores in the search for ice nucleation activity. Apart from Snomax, only few samples showed vital IN activity, like Fusarium avenaceum spores and Betula pendula pollen. Chemical characterization accentuated the differences between bacterial and pollen ice nuclei. Exposure to natural stresses, like UV and NOx, led to a significant decrease in IN activity. Furthermore, the releasable fraction of the pollen material, which includes the ice nuclei, was extracted with water and dried up. These residues were investigated with Raman spectroscopy and compared with the spectra of whole pollen grains. Measurements clearly demonstrated that the aqueous fraction contained mainly saccharides, lipids and proteins, but no sporopollenin, which is the bulk material of the outer pollen wall. Fungal spores of ecologically, economically or otherwise relevant species were also investigated. Most species showed no significant IN activity at all. A few species showed a slight increase in freezing temperature, but still significantly below the activity of the most active pollen or mineral dusts. Only Fusarium avenaceum showed strong IN activity. Cultivation of Fusarium and Trichoderma (close relatives of Fusarium) at different temperatures showed changes in total protein expression, but no impact on the IN activity.

  8. Microgravity nucleation and particle coagulation experiments support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilleleht, L. U.; Ferguson, F. T.; Stephens, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    This project is a part of a program at GSFC to study to formation and growth of cosmic dust grain analogs under terrestrial as well as microgravity conditions. Its primary scientific objective is to study the homogeneous nucleation of refractory metal vapors and a variety of their oxides among others, while the engineering, and perhaps a more immediate objective is to develop a system capable of producing mono-dispersed, homogeneous suspensions of well-characterized refractory particles for various particle interaction experiments aboard the Space Shuttle and Space Station Freedom. Both of these objectives are to be met by a judicious combination of laboratory experiments on the ground and aboard NASA's KC-135 experimental research aircraft. Major effort during the current reporting period was devoted to the evaluation of our very successful first series of microgravity test runs in Feb. 1990. Although the apparatus performed well, it was decided to 'repackage' the equipment for easier installation on the KC-135 and access to various components. It will now consist of three separate racks: one each for the nucleation chamber, the power subsystem, and the electronic packages. The racks were fabricated at the University of Virginia and the assembly of the repackaged units is proceeding well. Preliminary analysis of the video data from the first microgravity flight series was performed and the results appear to display some trends expected from Hale's Scaled Nucleation Theory of 1986. The data acquisition system is currently being refined.

  9. Nonequilibrium statistical mechanics of nanotube nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artyukhov, Vasilii I.; Yakobson, Boris I.

    A key problem that advanced carbon nanotube applications face is the difficulty of producing pure single-helicity samples. As the elementary processes of nanotube growth are difficult to observe in situ, theoretical understanding of the process is especially important. Direct molecular dynamics simulations offer limited insight due to computational intractability of space- and time-scales involved. We formulated a theory that explains a class of helicity-selective growth experiments, based on classical nucleation theory and crystal growth kinetics.1 However, a general theory of nanotube growth must also include fast irreversible growth beyond the classical near-equilibrium assumption. Here we construct a coarse-grained model allowing us to rigorously investigate the statistical mechanics of nanotube nucleation and trace how helicity emerges from the global nucleation trajectory ensemble. Importantly, our model can handle the whole range of conditions from perfect reversibility driven by energetics to perfect irreversibility driven by configurational entropy of nanotube caps and edges. Our theory generalizes earlier models in a large advance towards ultimate understanding of helicity-selective synthesis. 1 V.I. Artyukhov, E.S. Penev, and B.I. Yakobson, Nat. Commun. 5, 4892 (2014)

  10. Nucleation and structural growth of cluster crystals.

    PubMed

    Leitold, Christian; Dellago, Christoph

    2016-08-21

    We study the nucleation of crystalline cluster phases in the generalized exponential model with exponent n = 4. Due to the finite value of this pair potential for zero separation, at high densities the system forms cluster crystals with multiply occupied lattice sites. Here, we investigate the microscopic mechanisms that lead to the formation of cluster crystals from a supercooled liquid in the low-temperature region of the phase diagram. Using molecular dynamics and umbrella sampling, we calculate the free energy as a function of the size of the largest crystalline nucleus in the system, and compare our results with predictions from classical nucleation theory. Employing bond-order parameters based on a Voronoi tessellation to distinguish different crystal structures, we analyze the average composition of crystalline nuclei. We find that even for conditions where a multiply occupied fcc crystal is the thermodynamically stable phase, the nucleation into bcc cluster crystals is strongly preferred. Furthermore, we study the particle mobility in the supercooled liquid and in the cluster crystal. In the cluster crystal, the motion of individual particles is captured by a simple reaction-diffusion model introduced previously to model the kinetics of hydrogen bonds. PMID:27544116

  11. Ice Nucleation properties of Air-Plane Soot Surrogates Using Vibrational Micro-spectroscopy: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirim, Claire; Ikhenazene, Raouf; Ortega, Ismael; Carpentier, Yvain; Focsa, Cristian; Chazallon, Bertrand

    2015-04-01

    Aircraft emissions have been studied extensively since the late 1960s and the interest was mainly driven by their direct and indirect effects on climate and the generation of contrails [1-4]. Emissions of solid-state particles (soots) from engine exhausts due to incomplete fuel combustion are considered to influence ice and liquid water cloud droplet activation [4]. The activity of these aerosols would originate from their ability to be important centers of ice-particle nucleation by promoting ice formation above water homogeneous freezing point. While some experiments focused on ice nucleation on soot particles did not yet reach definitive conclusions, soot are reported to be generally worse ice nuclei than mineral dust, nucleating at higher ice-supersaturations for deposition nucleation and at lower temperatures for immersion freezing. However, there are still numerous opened questions on the ice nucleation properties of soot particles [5], most likely due to the lack of information on the abundance, on the physico-chemical properties (structure and chemical compositions) of these aerosols, competition between different ice nucleation modes and dynamical factors that affect ice nucleation. Furthermore, the soot emitted from aircraft may be associated with soluble components like sulphate that can act as heterogeneous ice nuclei and initiate freezing at supersaturation of only 120-130% [6]. Therefore, more detailed studies of aerosol nucleation activity combined with throughout structural and compositional analyzes are needed in order to establish any association between the particles' hygroscopicity and their physico-chemical properties. In the present preliminary work, nucleation activity of air-plane soot particle surrogates is monitored using a temperature-controlled reactor in which the sample's relative humidity is precisely measured with a cryo-hygrometer. Formation of water/ice onto the particles is followed both optically and spectroscopically, using a

  12. Structural Basis of Actin Filament Nucleation by Tandem W Domains

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaorui; Ni, Fengyun; Tian, Xia; Kondrashkina, Elena; Wang, Qinghua; Ma, Jianpeng

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Spontaneous nucleation of actin is very inefficient in cells. To overcome this barrier, cells have evolved a set of actin filament nucleators to promote rapid nucleation and polymerization in response to specific stimuli. However, the molecular mechanism of actin nucleation remains poorly understood. This is hindered largely by the fact that actin nucleus, once formed, rapidly polymerizes into filament, thus making it impossible to capture stable multisubunit actin nucleus. Here, we report an effective double-mutant strategy to stabilize actin nucleus by preventing further polymerization. Employing this strategy, we solved the crystal structure of AMPPNP-actin in complex with the first two tandem W domains of Cordon-bleu (Cobl), a potent actin filament nucleator. Further sequence comparison and functional studies suggest that the nucleation mechanism of Cobl is probably shared by the p53 cofactor JMY, but not Spire. Moreover, the double-mutant strategy opens the way for atomic mechanistic study of actin nucleation and polymerization. PMID:23727244

  13. Understanding ice nucleation characteristics of selective mineral dusts suspended in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Anand; Marcolli, Claudia; Kaufmann, Lukas; Krieger, Ulrich; Peter, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Introduction & Objectives Freezing of liquid droplets and subsequent ice crystal growth affects optical properties of clouds and precipitation. Field measurements show that ice formation in cumulus and stratiform clouds begins at temperatures much warmer than those associated with homogeneous ice nucleation in pure water, which is ascribed to heterogeneous ice nucleation occurring on the foreign surfaces of ice nuclei (IN). Various insoluble particles such as mineral dust, soot, metallic particles, volcanic ash, or primary biological particles have been suggested as IN. Among these the suitability of mineral dusts is best established. The ice nucleation ability of mineral dust particles may be modified when secondary organic or inorganic substances are accumulating on the dust during atmospheric transport. If the coating is completely wetting the mineral dust particles, heterogeneous ice nucleation occurs in immersion mode also below 100 % RH. A previous study by Kaufmann (PhD Thesis 2015, ETHZ) with Hoggar Mountain dust suspensions in various solutes (ammonium sulfate, PEG, malonic acid and glucose) showed reduced ice nucleation efficiency (in immersion mode) of the particles. Though it is still quite unclear of how surface modifications and coatings influence the ice nucleation activity of the components present in natural dust samples. In view of these results we run freezing experiments using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) with the following mineral dust particles suspended in pure water and ammonium sulfate solutions: Arizona Test Dust (ATD), microcline, and kaolinite (KGa-2, Clay Mineral Society). Methodology Suspensions of mineral dust samples (ATD: 2 weight%, microcline: 5% weight, KGa-2: 5% weight) are prepared in pure water with varying solute concentrations (ammonium sulfate: 0 - 10% weight). 20 vol% of this suspension plus 80 vol% of a mixture of 95 wt% mineral oil (Aldrich Chemical) and 5 wt% lanolin (Fluka Chemical) is emulsified with a

  14. Inorganic Nanoparticle Nucleation on Polymer Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosteleski, Adrian John

    The introduction of inorganic nanoparticles into organic materials enhances both the mechanical and chemical properties of the material. Metallic nanoparticles, like silver and gold, have been introduced into polymers for use as antimicrobial coatings or dielectric materials, respectively. The challenge in creating these materials currently is the difficulty to homogeneously disperse the particles throughout the polymer matrix. The uneven dispersion of nanoparticles can lead to less than optimal quality and undesired properties. By creating a polymer nanocomposite material with well-controlled size inorganic materials that are evenly dispersed throughout the polymer matrix; we can improve the materials performance and properties. The objective for this research is to use polymer networks for the in situ mineralization of silver and other metallic materials to create intricate inorganic structures. The work performed here studied the ability to nucleate silver nanoparticles using poly (acrylic acid) (PAA) as the templating agent. Ionic silver was chemically reduced by sodium borohydride (NaBH4) in the presence of PAA. The effect of varying reactant concentrations of silver, NaBH 4, and PAA on particle size was studied. Reaction conditions in terms of varying temperature and pH levels of the reaction solution were monitored to observe the effect of silver nanoparticle size, shape, and concentration. By monitoring the UV spectra over time the reaction mechanism of the silver reduction process was determined to be an autocatalytic process: a period of slow, continuous nucleation followed by rapid, autocatalytic growth. The reaction kinetics for this autocatalytic process is also reported. PAA was crosslinked both chemically and physically to 3 biopolymers; ELP, an elastin like peptide, cotton fabrics, and calcium alginate hydrogels. Various compositions of PAA were physically crosslinked with calcium alginate gels to design an antimicrobial hydrogel for use in wound

  15. Synchronizing Substrate Activation Rates in Multicomponent Reactions with Metal-Organic Framework Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Díaz, Lina María; Iglesias, Marta; Snejko, Natalia; Gutiérrez-Puebla, Enrique; Monge, M Ángeles

    2016-05-01

    A study on the influence of the cation coordination number, number of Lewis acid centers, concurrent existence of Lewis base sites, and structure topology on the catalytic activity of six new indium MOFs, has been carried out for multicomponent reactions (MCRs). The new indium polymeric frameworks, namely [In8 (OH)6 (popha)6 (H2 O)4 ]⋅3 H2 O (InPF-16), [In(popha)(2,2'-bipy)]⋅3 H2 O (InPF-17), [In3 (OH)3 (popha)2 (4,4'-bipy)]⋅4 H2 O (InPF-18), [In2 (popha)2 (4,4'-bipy)2 ]⋅3 H2 O (InPF-19), [In(OH)(Hpopha)]⋅0.5 (1,7-phen) (InPF-20), and [In(popha)(1,10-phen)]⋅4 H2 O (InPF-21) (InPF=indium polymeric framework, H3 popha=5-(4-carboxy-2-nitrophenoxy)isophthalic acid, phen=phenanthroline, bipy=bipyridine), have been hydrothermally obtained by using both conventional heating (CH) and microwave (MW) procedures. These indium frameworks show efficient Lewis acid behavior for the solvent-free cyanosilylation of carbonyl compounds, the one pot Passerini 3-component (P-3CR) and the Ugi 4-component (U-4CR) reactions. In addition, InPF-17 was found to be a highly reactive, recyclable, and environmentally benign catalyst, which allows the efficient synthesis of α-aminoacyl amides. The relationship between the Lewis base/acid active site and the catalytic performance is explained by the 2D seven-coordinated indium framework of the catalyst InPF-17. This study is an attempt to highlight the main structural and synthetic factors that have to be taken into account when planning a new, effective MOF-based heterogeneous catalyst for multicomponent reactions. PMID:27010759

  16. A Review of Clinical Trials Conducted With Oral, Multicomponent Dietary Supplements for Improving Photoaged Skin.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, Jay; Le Moigne, Anne; Dispensa, Lisa; Buchner, Larry

    2015-12-01

    Although the FDA does not require documentation of efficacy of dietary supplements, prospective clinical studies, including randomized controlled trials, have been conducted with individual micronutrients alone and in combination with other ingredients for promoting skin health. Proposed mechanisms include antioxidation, anti-inflammation, photoprotection, collagen formation, reductions in matrix metalloproteinases, and other effects on photoaging. Literature searches were conducted to identify clinical trials assessing multicomponent dietary supplement formulations on photoaging outcomes. Sixteen studies of various nutrient and non-nutrient ingredients, including essential micronutrients (vitamins, minerals), plant extracts (polyphenols, carotenoids), and marine- or animal-derived ingredients, were identified. Studies were single center, 2-12 months in duration, primarily enrolled women, and evaluated numerous outcomes, including investigator/subject assessments and instrumental/objective measures. Methods to control for potential confounders were implemented in some studies, including limiting sun exposure, cosmetic procedures, and changes in dietary habits/body weight. Given the range of different products, clinical/methodologic heterogeneity, insufficient detail in reporting, and lack of comparable outcome measures, quantitative analysis of results was not possible. Results of individual studies revealed significant improvements from baseline for the dietary supplement group(s) on ≥ 1 endpoint across all studies; significant differences from placebo were observed in 7 of 12 controlled studies (although only 1 study designated a prospectively defined primary endpoint). Most products had only been tested in 1 study; confirmatory studies were rarely conducted per the publicly available literature. Meaningful assessment of dietary supplements, which typically contain nutrients found in the diet, requires unique methodologic considerations and endpoints

  17. GROUNDWATER MASS TRANSPORT AND EQUILIBRIUM CHEMISTRY MODEL FOR MULTICOMPONENT SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A mass transport model, TRANQL, for a multicomponent solution system has been developed. The equilibrium interaction chemistry is posed independently of the mass transport equations which leads to a set of algebraic equations for the chemistry coupled to a set of differential equ...

  18. Optimal Multicomponent Analysis Using the Generalized Standard Addition Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raymond, Margaret; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes an experiment on the simultaneous determination of chromium and magnesium by spectophotometry modified to include the Generalized Standard Addition Method computer program, a multivariate calibration method that provides optimal multicomponent analysis in the presence of interference and matrix effects. Provides instructions for…