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Sample records for nucleocapsid protein-rna decameric

  1. Decameric uracil complexes around Li+.

    PubMed

    Zins, Emilie-Laure; Pepe, Claude; Schröder, Detlef

    2010-07-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) in combination with mass spectrometry (MS) experiments were carried out to study decameric uracil complexes cationized with Li(+) ion. A previous study has shown that, under specific experimental conditions, a particularly intense peak of the decamer U(10)Li(+) is formed, which was referred to as an indication for so-called 'magic number' cluster. In order to gain more insight on the structure of this decameric complex, here, we report experimental studies concerning the kinetics of the fragmentation. In accordance with the new experimental data, structural models were constructed and fully optimized using ab initio and density functional theory quantum chemistry calculations. The theoretical study allowed us to propose a stable gas-phase structure which is compatible with all experimental findings. PMID:20564575

  2. Self-Assembly of Nucleocapsid-Like Particles from Recombinant Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kunkel, Meghan; Lorinczi, Marta; Rijnbrand, René; Lemon, Stanley M.; Watowich, Stanley J.

    2001-01-01

    Little is known about the assembly pathway and structure of hepatitis C virus (HCV) since insufficient quantities of purified virus are available for detailed biophysical and structural studies. Here, we show that bacterially expressed HCV core proteins can efficiently self-assemble in vitro into nucleocapsid-like particles. These particles have a regular, spherical morphology with a modal distribution of diameters of approximately 60 nm. Self-assembly of nucleocapsid-like particles requires structured RNA molecules. The 124 N-terminal residues of the core protein are sufficient for self-assembly into nucleocapsid-like particles. Inclusion of the carboxy-terminal domain of the core protein modifies the core assembly pathway such that the resultant particles have an irregular outline. However, these particles are similar in size and shape to those assembled from the 124 N-terminal residues of the core protein. These results provide novel opportunities to delineate protein-protein and protein-RNA interactions critical for HCV assembly, to study the molecular details of HCV assembly, and for performing high-throughput screening of assembly inhibitors. PMID:11160716

  3. Gel mobility shift assays to detect protein-RNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Yakhnin, Alexander V; Yakhnin, Helen; Babitzke, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The gel mobility shift assay is a powerful technique for detecting and quantifying protein-RNA interactions. While other techniques such as filter binding and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) are available for quantifying protein-RNA interactions, gel shift analysis provides the added advantage that you can visualize the protein-RNA complexes. In the gel shift assay, protein-RNA complexes are typically separated from the unbound RNA using native polyacrylamide gels in Tris/borate/EDTA buffer, although an alternative Tris-glycine buffering system is superior in many situations. Here, we describe both gel shift methods, along with strategies to improve separation of protein-RNA complexes from free RNA, which can be a particular challenge for small RNA binding proteins. PMID:22736005

  4. Vaccinia virions deficient in transcription enzymes lack a nucleocapsid

    SciTech Connect

    McFadden, Baron D.H.; Moussatche, Nissin; Kelley, Karen; Kang, Byung-Ho; Condit, Richard C.

    2012-12-05

    The poxvirus virion contains an inner tubular nucleocapsid structure. The nucleocapsid is apparently labile to conventional electron microscopy fixation procedures and has therefore been largely ignored for decades. Advancements in electron microscopy sample preparation, notably high pressure freezing, better preserve the nucleocapsid structure. Using high pressure freezing and electron microscopy, we have compared the virion structures of wt virus and mutant viruses known to be deficient in packaging of viral transcription enzymes. We show that the mutant viruses lack a defined nucleocapsid. These results support the hypothesis that the nucleocapsid contains the viral DNA genome complexed with viral transcription enzymes and structural proteins. The studies open the door to further investigation of the composition and ultrastructure of the poxvirus nucleocapsid.

  5. Vaccinia Virions Deficient in Transcription Enzymes Lack a Nucleocapsid

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, Baron D.H.; Moussatche, Nissin; Kelley, Karen; Kang, Byung-Ho; Condit, Richard C.

    2012-01-01

    The poxvirus virion contains an inner tubular nucleocapsid structure. The nucleocapsid is apparently labile to conventional electron microscopy fixation procedures and has therefore been largely ignored for decades. Advancements in electron microscopy sample preparation, notably high pressure freezing, better preserve the nucleocapsid structure. Using high pressure freezing and electron microscopy, we have compared the virion structures of wt virus and mutant viruses known to be deficient in packaging of viral transcription enzymes. We show that the mutant viruses lack a defined nucleocapsid. These results support the hypothesis that the nucleocapsid contains the viral DNA genome complexed with viral transcription enzymes and structural proteins. The studies open the door to further investigation of the composition and ultrastructure of the poxvirus nucleocapsid. PMID:22944110

  6. Decameric SelA•tRNA(Sec) ring structure reveals mechanism of bacterial selenocysteine formation.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Yuzuru; Bröcker, Markus J; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Hammond, Gifty; Suetsugu, Shiro; Söll, Dieter; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2013-04-01

    The 21st amino acid, selenocysteine (Sec), is synthesized on its cognate transfer RNA (tRNA(Sec)). In bacteria, SelA synthesizes Sec from Ser-tRNA(Sec), whereas in archaea and eukaryotes SepSecS forms Sec from phosphoserine (Sep) acylated to tRNA(Sec). We determined the crystal structures of Aquifex aeolicus SelA complexes, which revealed a ring-shaped homodecamer that binds 10 tRNA(Sec) molecules, each interacting with four SelA subunits. The SelA N-terminal domain binds the tRNA(Sec)-specific D-arm structure, thereby discriminating Ser-tRNA(Sec) from Ser-tRNA(Ser). A large cleft is created between two subunits and accommodates the 3'-terminal region of Ser-tRNA(Sec). The SelA structures together with in vivo and in vitro enzyme assays show decamerization to be essential for SelA function. SelA catalyzes pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent Sec formation involving Arg residues nonhomologous to those in SepSecS. Different protein architecture and substrate coordination of the bacterial enzyme provide structural evidence for independent evolution of the two Sec synthesis systems present in nature. PMID:23559248

  7. The Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Is a Multifunctional Protein

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Ruth; van Zyl, Marjorie; Fielding, Burtram C.

    2014-01-01

    The coronavirus nucleocapsid (N) is a structural protein that forms complexes with genomic RNA, interacts with the viral membrane protein during virion assembly and plays a critical role in enhancing the efficiency of virus transcription and assembly. Recent studies have confirmed that N is a multifunctional protein. The aim of this review is to highlight the properties and functions of the N protein, with specific reference to (i) the topology; (ii) the intracellular localization and (iii) the functions of the protein. PMID:25105276

  8. Role of ribosomes in Semliki Forest virus nucleocapsid uncoating.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, I; Helenius, A

    1992-01-01

    The mechanism by which Semliki Forest virus nucleocapsids are uncoated was analyzed in living cells and in vitro. In BHK-21 cells, uncoating occurred with virtually complete efficiency within 1 to 2 min after the nucleocapsids entered the cytoplasm. It was inhibited by monensin, which blocks nucleocapsid penetration from endosomes. As previously shown for Sindbis virus (G. Wengler and G. Wengler, Virology 134:435-442, 1984), the capsid proteins from incoming nucleocapsids became associated with ribosomes. The ribosome-bound capsid proteins were distributed throughout the cytoplasm, while the viral RNA remained associated with vacuolar membranes. Using purified nucleocapsids and ribosomes in vitro, we established that ribosomes alone were sufficient for uncoating. Their role was to release the capsid proteins from nucleocapsids and irreversibly sequester them, in a process independent of energy and translation. The process was stoichiometric rather than catalytic, with a maximum of three to six capsid proteins bound to each ribosome. More than 80% of the capsid proteins could thus be removed from the viral RNA, resulting in the formation of nucleocapsid remnants whose sedimentation coefficients progressively decreased from 140S to 80S as uncoating proceeded. Images PMID:1433506

  9. Nucleocapsid Annealing-Mediated Electrophoresis (NAME) Assay Allows the Rapid Identification of HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Sosic, Alice; Cappellini, Marta; Scalabrin, Matteo; Gatto, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    RNA or DNA folded in stable tridimensional folding are interesting targets in the development of antitumor or antiviral drugs. In the case of HIV-1, viral proteins involved in the regulation of the virus activity recognize several nucleic acids. The nucleocapsid protein NCp7 (NC) is a key protein regulating several processes during virus replication. NC is in fact a chaperone destabilizing the secondary structures of RNA and DNA and facilitating their annealing. The inactivation of NC is a new approach and an interesting target for anti-HIV therapy. The Nucleocapsid Annealing-Mediated Electrophoresis (NAME) assay was developed to identify molecules able to inhibit the melting and annealing of RNA and DNA folded in thermodynamically stable tridimensional conformations, such as hairpin structures of TAR and cTAR elements of HIV, by the nucleocapsid protein of HIV-1. The new assay employs either the recombinant or the synthetic protein, and oligonucleotides without the need of their previous labeling. The analysis of the results is achieved by standard polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) followed by conventional nucleic acid staining. The protocol reported in this work describes how to perform the NAME assay with the full-length protein or its truncated version lacking the basic N-terminal domain, both competent as nucleic acids chaperones, and how to assess the inhibition of NC chaperone activity by a threading intercalator. Moreover, NAME can be performed in two different modes, useful to obtain indications on the putative mechanism of action of the identified NC inhibitors. PMID:25650789

  10. Protein-RNA networks revealed through covalent RNA marks.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, Christopher P; Wilinski, Daniel; Saunders, Harriet A J; Wickens, Marvin

    2015-12-01

    Protein-RNA networks are ubiquitous and central in biological control. We present an approach termed RNA Tagging that enables the user to identify protein-RNA interactions in vivo by analyzing purified cellular RNA, without protein purification or cross-linking. An RNA-binding protein of interest is fused to an enzyme that adds uridines to the end of RNA. RNA targets bound by the chimeric protein in vivo are covalently marked with uridines and subsequently identified from extracted RNA via high-throughput sequencing. We used this approach to identify hundreds of RNAs bound by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae PUF protein, Puf3p. The results showed that although RNA-binding proteins productively bind specific RNAs to control their function, they also 'sample' RNAs without exerting a regulatory effect. We used the method to uncover hundreds of new and likely regulated targets for a protein without canonical RNA-binding domains, Bfr1p. RNA Tagging is well suited to detect and analyze protein-RNA networks in vivo. PMID:26524240

  11. Protein-RNA networks revealed through covalent RNA marks

    PubMed Central

    Lapointe, Christopher P.; Wilinski, Daniel; Saunders, Harriet A. J.; Wickens, Marvin

    2015-01-01

    Protein-RNA networks are ubiquitous and central in biological control. We present an approach, termed “RNA Tagging,” that identifies protein-RNA interactions in vivo by analyzing purified cellular RNA, without protein purification or crosslinking. An RNA-binding protein of interest is fused to an enzyme that adds uridines to the end of RNA. RNA targets bound by the chimeric protein in vivo are covalently marked with uridines and subsequently identified from extracted RNA using high-throughput sequencing. We used this approach to identify hundreds of RNAs bound by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae PUF protein, Puf3p. The method revealed that while RNA-binding proteins productively bind specific RNAs to control their function, they also “sample” RNAs without exerting a regulatory effect. We exploited the method to uncover hundreds of new and likely regulated targets for a protein without canonical RNA-binding domains, Bfr1p. The RNA Tagging approach is well-suited to detect and analyze protein-RNA networks in vivo. PMID:26524240

  12. Heterogeneity in Retroviral Nucleocapsid Protein Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landes, Christy

    2009-03-01

    Time-resolved single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy was used to study the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) nucleocapsid protein (NC) chaperone activity as compared to that of the HIV-1 NC protein. HTLV-1 NC contains two zinc fingers with each having a CCHC binding motif similar to HIV-1 NC. HIV-1 NC is required for recognition and packaging of the viral RNA and is also a nucleic acid chaperone protein that facilitates nucleic acid restructuring during reverse transcription. Because of similarities in structures between the two retroviruses, we have used single-molecule fluorescence energy transfer to investigate the chaperoning activity of HTLV-1 NC protein. The results indicate that HTLV-1 NC protein induces structural changes by opening the transactivation response (TAR)-DNA hairpin to an even greater extent than HIV-1 NC. However, unlike HIV-1 NC, HTLV-1 NC does not chaperone the strand-transfer reaction involving TAR-DNA. These results suggest that despite its effective destabilization capability, HTLV-1 NC is not as effective at overall chaperone function as is its HIV-1 counterpart.

  13. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of decameric and monomeric forms of C49S mutant thioredoxin-dependent AhpC from Helicobacter pylori

    SciTech Connect

    Supangat; Seo, Kyung Hye; Furqoni, Ahmad; Kwon, Young-Chul; Cho, Myung-Je; Rhee, Kwang-Ho; Lee, Sang Yeol; Lee, Kon Ho

    2008-05-01

    Decameric and monomeric forms of recombinant C49S mutant AhpC from H. pylori have been crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.8 and 2.25 Å, respectively. Cys49Ser mutant Helicobacter pylori alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (C49S HpAhpC) was purified under reducing conditions in monomeric and decameric forms. The monomeric form was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals diffracted to 2.25 Å resolution and belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 245.8, b = 140.7, c = 189.5 Å, β = 127°, and contained 20 molecules in the asymmetric unit. A crystal of the decameric form was obtained by the microbatch crystallization method and diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution. It belonged to space group C222, with unit-cell parameters a = 257.5, b = 417.5, c = 95.6 Å. The structure of the monomeric form of C49S HpAhpC has been solved by the molecular-replacement method.

  14. Structure of the vesicular stomatitis virus nucleocapsid in complex with the nucleocapsid-binding domain of the small polymerase cofactor, P

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Todd J.; Luo, Ming

    2009-10-05

    The negative-strand RNA viruses (NSRVs) are unique because their nucleocapsid, not the naked RNA, is the active template for transcription and replication. The viral polymerase of nonsegmented NSRVs contains a large polymerase catalytic subunit (L) and a nonenzymatic cofactor, the phosphoprotein (P). Insight into how P delivers the polymerase complex to the nucleocapsid has long been pursued by reverse genetics and biochemical approaches. Here, we present the X-ray crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of P of vesicular stomatitis virus, a prototypic nonsegmented NSRV, bound to nucleocapsid-like particles. P binds primarily to the C-terminal lobe of 2 adjacent N proteins within the nucleocapsid. This binding mode is exclusive to the nucleocapsid, not the nucleocapsid (N) protein in other existing forms. Localization of phosphorylation sites within P and their proximity to the RNA cavity give insight into how the L protein might be oriented to access the RNA template.

  15. Structure of a bacterial virus DNA-injection protein complex reveals a decameric assembly with a constricted molecular channel

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhao, Haiyan; Speir, Jeffrey A.; Matsui, Tsutomu; Lin, Zihan; Liang, Lingfei; Lynn, Anna Y.; Varnado, Brittany; Weiss, Thomas M.; Tang, Liang; Schuch, Raymond

    2016-02-16

    The multi-layered cell envelope structure of Gram-negative bacteria represents significant physical and chemical barriers for short-tailed phages to inject phage DNA into the host cytoplasm. Here we show that a DNA-injection protein of bacteriophage Sf6, gp12, forms a 465-kDa, decameric assembly in vitro. The electron microscopic structure of the gp12 assembly shows a ~150-Å, mushroom-like architecture consisting of a crown domain and a tube-like domain, which embraces a 25-Å-wide channel that could precisely accommodate dsDNA. The constricted channel suggests that gp12 mediates rapid, uni-directional injection of phage DNA into host cells by providing a molecular conduit for DNA translocation. Themore » assembly exhibits a 10-fold symmetry, which may be a common feature among DNA-injection proteins of P22-like phages and may suggest a symmetry mismatch with respect to the 6-fold symmetric phage tail. As a result, the gp12 monomer is highly flexible in solution, supporting a mechanism for translocation of the protein through the conduit of the phage tail toward the host cell envelope, where it assembles into a DNA-injection device.« less

  16. Structure of a Bacterial Virus DNA-Injection Protein Complex Reveals a Decameric Assembly with a Constricted Molecular Channel

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Haiyan; Speir, Jeffrey A.; Matsui, Tsutomu; Lin, Zihan; Liang, Lingfei; Lynn, Anna Y.; Varnado, Brittany; Weiss, Thomas M.; Tang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    The multi-layered cell envelope structure of Gram-negative bacteria represents significant physical and chemical barriers for short-tailed phages to inject phage DNA into the host cytoplasm. Here we show that a DNA-injection protein of bacteriophage Sf6, gp12, forms a 465-kDa, decameric assembly in vitro. The electron microscopic structure of the gp12 assembly shows a ~150-Å, mushroom-like architecture consisting of a crown domain and a tube-like domain, which embraces a 25-Å-wide channel that could precisely accommodate dsDNA. The constricted channel suggests that gp12 mediates rapid, uni-directional injection of phage DNA into host cells by providing a molecular conduit for DNA translocation. The assembly exhibits a 10-fold symmetry, which may be a common feature among DNA-injection proteins of P22-like phages and may suggest a symmetry mismatch with respect to the 6-fold symmetric phage tail. The gp12 monomer is highly flexible in solution, supporting a mechanism for translocation of the protein through the conduit of the phage tail toward the host cell envelope, where it assembles into a DNA-injection device. PMID:26882199

  17. Structure of a Bacterial Virus DNA-Injection Protein Complex Reveals a Decameric Assembly with a Constricted Molecular Channel.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haiyan; Speir, Jeffrey A; Matsui, Tsutomu; Lin, Zihan; Liang, Lingfei; Lynn, Anna Y; Varnado, Brittany; Weiss, Thomas M; Tang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    The multi-layered cell envelope structure of Gram-negative bacteria represents significant physical and chemical barriers for short-tailed phages to inject phage DNA into the host cytoplasm. Here we show that a DNA-injection protein of bacteriophage Sf6, gp12, forms a 465-kDa, decameric assembly in vitro. The electron microscopic structure of the gp12 assembly shows a ~150-Å, mushroom-like architecture consisting of a crown domain and a tube-like domain, which embraces a 25-Å-wide channel that could precisely accommodate dsDNA. The constricted channel suggests that gp12 mediates rapid, uni-directional injection of phage DNA into host cells by providing a molecular conduit for DNA translocation. The assembly exhibits a 10-fold symmetry, which may be a common feature among DNA-injection proteins of P22-like phages and may suggest a symmetry mismatch with respect to the 6-fold symmetric phage tail. The gp12 monomer is highly flexible in solution, supporting a mechanism for translocation of the protein through the conduit of the phage tail toward the host cell envelope, where it assembles into a DNA-injection device. PMID:26882199

  18. Nucleocytoplasmic transport of nucleocapsid proteins of enveloped RNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Wulan, Wahyu N.; Heydet, Deborah; Walker, Erin J.; Gahan, Michelle E.; Ghildyal, Reena

    2015-01-01

    Most viruses with non-segmented single stranded RNA genomes complete their life cycle in the cytoplasm of infected cells. However, despite undergoing replication in the cytoplasm, the structural proteins of some of these RNA viruses localize to the nucleus at specific times in the virus life cycle, primarily early in infection. Limited evidence suggests that this enhances successful viral replication by interfering with or inhibiting the host antiviral response. Nucleocapsid proteins of RNA viruses have a well-established, essential cytoplasmic role in virus replication and assembly. Intriguingly, nucleocapsid proteins of some RNA viruses also localize to the nucleus/nucleolus of infected cells. Their nuclear function is less well understood although significant advances have been made in recent years. This review will focus on the nucleocapsid protein of cytoplasmic enveloped RNA viruses, including their localization to the nucleus/nucleolus and function therein. A greater understanding of the nuclear localization of nucleocapsid proteins has the potential to enhance therapeutic strategies as it can be a target for the development of live-attenuated vaccines or antiviral drugs. PMID:26082769

  19. Endosome-to-cytosol transport of viral nucleocapsids.

    PubMed

    Le Blanc, Isabelle; Luyet, Pierre-Philippe; Pons, Véronique; Ferguson, Charles; Emans, Neil; Petiot, Anne; Mayran, Nathalie; Demaurex, Nicolas; Fauré, Julien; Sadoul, Rémy; Parton, Robert G; Gruenberg, J

    2005-07-01

    During viral infection, fusion of the viral envelope with endosomal membranes and nucleocapsid release were thought to be concomitant events. We show here that for the vesicular stomatitis virus they occur sequentially, at two successive steps of the endocytic pathway. Fusion already occurs in transport intermediates between early and late endosomes, presumably releasing the nucleocapsid within the lumen of intra-endosomal vesicles, where it remains hidden. Transport to late endosomes is then required for the nucleocapsid to be delivered to the cytoplasm. This last step, which initiates infection, depends on the late endosomal lipid lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA) and its putative effector Alix/AIP1, and is regulated by phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PtdIns3P) signalling via the PtdIns3P-binding protein Snx16. We conclude that the nucleocapsid is exported into the cytoplasm after the back-fusion of internal vesicles with the limiting membrane of late endosomes, and that this process is controlled by the phospholipids LBPA and PtdIns3P and their effectors. PMID:15951806

  20. Understanding the isomerization of the HIV-1 dimerization initiation domain by the nucleocapsid protein

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Kevin B.; Hagan, Nathan A.

    2008-01-01

    The specific binding of HIV-1 nucleocapsid (NC) to the hinge region of the kissing-loop (KL) dimer formed by stemloop 1 (SL1) can have significant consequences on its ability to isomerize into the corresponding extended duplex (ED) form. The binding determinants and the effects on the isomerization process were investigated in vitro by a concerted strategy involving ad hoc RNA mutants and electrospray ionization-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (ESI-FTICR) mass spectrometry, which enabled us to characterize the stoichiometry and conformational state of all possible protein-RNA and RNA-RNA assemblies present simultaneously in solution. For the first time, NC-hinge interactions were observed in constructs including at least one unpaired guanine at the 5′-end of the loop-loop duplex, whereas no interactions were detected when the unpaired guanine was placed at its 3′-end. This binding mode is supported by the presence of a grip-like motif described by recent crystal structures, which is formed by the 5′-purines of both hairpins held together by mutual stacking interactions. Using tandem mass spectrometry, hinge interactions were clearly shown to reduce the efficiency of KL/ED isomerization without inducing its complete block. This outcome is consistent with the partial stabilization of the extra-helical grip by the bound protein, which can hamper the purine components from parting ways and initiate the strand exchange process. These findings confirm that the broad binding and chaperone activities of NC induce unique effects that are clearly dependent on the structural context of the cognate nucleic acid substrate. For this reason, the presence of multiple binding sites on the different forms assumed by SL1 can produce seemingly contrasting effects that contribute to a fine modulation of the two-step process of RNA dimerization and isomerization. PMID:17466332

  1. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes that recognize decameric peptide sequences of retinoblastoma binding protein 1 (RBP-1) associated with human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, T; Cao, J; Hoon, D S B; Irie, R F

    1999-01-01

    Retinoblastoma binding protein 1 (RBP-1) is a 143-kDa nuclear phosphoprotein that promotes cell growth by inhibiting the product of retinoblastoma tumour suppressor gene (pRB). We recently found that RBP-1 contains KASIFLK, a heptameric peptide (250–256) recognized by human antibodies and overexpressed by breast cancer cells. In the present study, we demonstrate that human T-cells stimulated with RBP-1 decameric peptides containing KASIFLK can kill human breast cancer cells. These decamers, GLQKASIFLK (247–256) and KASIFLKTRV (250–259), have anchor motifs for both HLA-A2 and HLA-A3. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from 41 normal donors were stimulated by these peptides in culture media containing 15 IU ml−1 interleukin-2, 25 IU ml−1 interleukin-7 and 500 IU ml−1 granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Cytotoxic activity of the T-cells was assessed against autologous B lymphoblastoid cells pulsed with each peptide. Stimulation by GLQKASIFLK generated specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) lines from HLA-A2, A3 donors, HLA-A2 donors and HLA-A3 donors. Stimulation with KASIFLKTRV generated specific CTL lines from HLA-A2 donors. No HLA-A2−, A3− CTL line showed specific cytotoxicity against these target cells. These CTL lines were also cytotoxic against HLA-A2 and HLA-A3 breast cancer cells but not against normal fibroblastoid cell lines, normal epidermal cell lines, or a melanoma cell line. RBP-1 peptide antigens may be of clinical significance as a potential peptide vaccine against human breast cancer. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10496363

  2. Quantifying sequence and structural features of protein-RNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Songling; Yamashita, Kazuo; Amada, Karlou Mar; Standley, Daron M

    2014-09-01

    Increasing awareness of the importance of protein-RNA interactions has motivated many approaches to predict residue-level RNA binding sites in proteins based on sequence or structural characteristics. Sequence-based predictors are usually high in sensitivity but low in specificity; conversely structure-based predictors tend to have high specificity, but lower sensitivity. Here we quantified the contribution of both sequence- and structure-based features as indicators of RNA-binding propensity using a machine-learning approach. In order to capture structural information for proteins without a known structure, we used homology modeling to extract the relevant structural features. Several novel and modified features enhanced the accuracy of residue-level RNA-binding propensity beyond what has been reported previously, including by meta-prediction servers. These features include: hidden Markov model-based evolutionary conservation, surface deformations based on the Laplacian norm formalism, and relative solvent accessibility partitioned into backbone and side chain contributions. We constructed a web server called aaRNA that implements the proposed method and demonstrate its use in identifying putative RNA binding sites. PMID:25063293

  3. [Antigenic relationship between nucleocapsid proteins of phyto- and zoorhabdoviruses].

    PubMed

    Maksymenko, L O; Parkhomenko, N I; Didenko, L F; Diachenko, N S; Olevyns'ka, Z M

    2005-01-01

    The methods of electrophoresis in PAAG and immunological method were used for comparative analysis of structural proteins of phytorhabdovirus of potato curly dwarf (PCDV) and zoorhabdoviruses-vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and fixed rabies Virus (RV). Molecular weight of viral proteins was determined by the method of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. The proteins with molecular weight 45-51 kD, are probably, the major component of the viral nucleocapsid. Nucleocapsid protein 45 kD RV virus was isolated by the method of preparative electrophoresis and then the monospecific serum was obtained. The Ouchterlony and immunoblotting method were used to show, that nucleocapsid proteins with molecular weights 51 and 45 kD both of phytorhabdovirus PCDV and zoorhabdoviruses VSV and RV are serologically related. The obtained data may be used in biotechnology as the basis for creation of a new class of diagnostic preparations with the purpose to detect RV virus using proteins of curly potato dwarf virus and may be also used in serological tests to reveal viruses of Rhabdoviridae family in various eukaryotic objects. PMID:16018215

  4. irCLIP platform for efficient characterization of protein-RNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Zarnegar, Brian J; Flynn, Ryan A; Shen, Ying; Do, Brian T; Chang, Howard Y; Khavari, Paul A

    2016-06-01

    The complexity of transcriptome-wide protein-RNA interaction networks is incompletely understood. While emerging studies are greatly expanding the known universe of RNA-binding proteins, methods for the discovery and characterization of protein-RNA interactions remain resource intensive and technically challenging. Here we introduce a UV-C crosslinking and immunoprecipitation platform, irCLIP, which provides an ultraefficient, fast, and nonisotopic method for the detection of protein-RNA interactions using far less material than standard protocols. PMID:27111506

  5. An alphavirus temperature-sensitive capsid mutant reveals stages of nucleocapsid assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Yan Kielian, Margaret

    2015-10-15

    Alphaviruses have a nucleocapsid core composed of the RNA genome surrounded by an icosahedral lattice of capsid protein. An insertion after position 186 in the capsid protein produced a strongly temperature-sensitive growth phenotype. Even when the structural proteins were synthesized at the permissive temperature (28 °C), subsequent incubation of the cells at the non-permissive temperature (37 °C) dramatically decreased mutant capsid protein stability and particle assembly. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of cytoplasmic nucleocapsids in mutant-infected cells cultured at the permissive temperature, but these nucleocapsids were not stable to sucrose gradient separation. In contrast, nucleocapsids isolated from mutant virus particles had similar stability to that of wildtype virus. Our data support a model in which cytoplasmic nucleocapsids go through a maturation step during packaging into virus particles. The insertion site lies in the interface between capsid proteins in the assembled nucleocapsid, suggesting the region where such a stabilizing transition occurs. - Highlights: • We characterize an alphavirus capsid insertion mutation. • These capsid mutants are highly temperature sensitive for growth. • The insertion affects nucleocapsid stability. • Results suggest that the nucleocapsid is stabilized during virus budding.

  6. Mapping protein-RNA interactions by RCAP, RNA-cross-linking and peptide fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Robert C; Kao, C Cheng

    2015-01-01

    RNA nanotechnology often feature protein RNA complexes. The interaction between proteins and large RNAs are difficult to study using traditional structure-based methods like NMR or X-ray crystallography. RCAP, an approach that uses reversible-cross-linking affinity purification method coupled with mass spectrometry, has been developed to map regions within proteins that contact RNA. This chapter details how RCAP is applied to map protein-RNA contacts within virions. PMID:25896007

  7. Tandem repeats of the extracellular domain of Matrix 2 influenza protein exposed in Brucella lumazine synthase decameric carrier molecule induce protection in mice.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Paula; Zylberman, Vanesa; Ghersi, Giselle; Boado, Lorena; Palacios, Carlos; Goldbaum, Fernando; Mattion, Nora

    2013-01-21

    The antigenic variation of influenza virus represents a major prevention problem. However, the ectodomain of the protein Matrix 2 (M2e) is nearly invariant in all human influenza A strains and has been considered as a promising candidate for a broadly protective vaccine because antibodies to M2e are protective in animal models. In this work we evaluated the possible use of Brucella abortus lumazine synthase protein (BLS), a highly immunogenic decameric protein, as a carrier of the M2e peptide. Chimeric proteins generated by the fusion of one or four in tandem copies of M2e to BLS were efficiently expressed in Escherichia coli and assembled in decameric subunits similarly to the wild type BLS enzyme, as demonstrated by the comparative circular dichroism spectra and size exclusion chromatography and static light scattering analysis. The M2e peptides were stably exposed at the ten N-terminal ends of each BLS molecule. Immunization of mice with purified chimeras carrying only one M2e (BLS-M2e) copy elicited a significant humoral immune response with the addition of different adjuvants. The fusion of four in tandem copies of the M2e peptide (BLS-4M2e) resulted in similar levels of humoral immune response but in the absence of adjuvant. Survival of mice challenged with live influenza virus was 100% after vaccination with BLS-4M2e adjuvanted with Iscomatrix(®) (P<0.001) and 80% when adjuvanted with alum (P<0.01), while the chimera alone protected 60% of the animals (P<0.05). The approach described in this study is intended as a contribution to the generation of universal influenza immunogens, through a simple production and purification process and using safe carriers that might eventually avoid the use of strong adjuvants. PMID:23246552

  8. FastRNABindR: Fast and Accurate Prediction of Protein-RNA Interface Residues.

    PubMed

    El-Manzalawy, Yasser; Abbas, Mostafa; Malluhi, Qutaibah; Honavar, Vasant

    2016-01-01

    A wide range of biological processes, including regulation of gene expression, protein synthesis, and replication and assembly of many viruses are mediated by RNA-protein interactions. However, experimental determination of the structures of protein-RNA complexes is expensive and technically challenging. Hence, a number of computational tools have been developed for predicting protein-RNA interfaces. Some of the state-of-the-art protein-RNA interface predictors rely on position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM)-based encoding of the protein sequences. The computational efforts needed for generating PSSMs severely limits the practical utility of protein-RNA interface prediction servers. In this work, we experiment with two approaches, random sampling and sequence similarity reduction, for extracting a representative reference database of protein sequences from more than 50 million protein sequences in UniRef100. Our results suggest that random sampled databases produce better PSSM profiles (in terms of the number of hits used to generate the profile and the distance of the generated profile to the corresponding profile generated using the entire UniRef100 data as well as the accuracy of the machine learning classifier trained using these profiles). Based on our results, we developed FastRNABindR, an improved version of RNABindR for predicting protein-RNA interface residues using PSSM profiles generated using 1% of the UniRef100 sequences sampled uniformly at random. To the best of our knowledge, FastRNABindR is the only protein-RNA interface residue prediction online server that requires generation of PSSM profiles for query sequences and accepts hundreds of protein sequences per submission. Our approach for determining the optimal BLAST database for a protein-RNA interface residue classification task has the potential of substantially speeding up, and hence increasing the practical utility of, other amino acid sequence based predictors of protein-protein and protein

  9. FastRNABindR: Fast and Accurate Prediction of Protein-RNA Interface Residues

    PubMed Central

    EL-Manzalawy, Yasser; Abbas, Mostafa; Malluhi, Qutaibah; Honavar, Vasant

    2016-01-01

    A wide range of biological processes, including regulation of gene expression, protein synthesis, and replication and assembly of many viruses are mediated by RNA-protein interactions. However, experimental determination of the structures of protein-RNA complexes is expensive and technically challenging. Hence, a number of computational tools have been developed for predicting protein-RNA interfaces. Some of the state-of-the-art protein-RNA interface predictors rely on position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM)-based encoding of the protein sequences. The computational efforts needed for generating PSSMs severely limits the practical utility of protein-RNA interface prediction servers. In this work, we experiment with two approaches, random sampling and sequence similarity reduction, for extracting a representative reference database of protein sequences from more than 50 million protein sequences in UniRef100. Our results suggest that random sampled databases produce better PSSM profiles (in terms of the number of hits used to generate the profile and the distance of the generated profile to the corresponding profile generated using the entire UniRef100 data as well as the accuracy of the machine learning classifier trained using these profiles). Based on our results, we developed FastRNABindR, an improved version of RNABindR for predicting protein-RNA interface residues using PSSM profiles generated using 1% of the UniRef100 sequences sampled uniformly at random. To the best of our knowledge, FastRNABindR is the only protein-RNA interface residue prediction online server that requires generation of PSSM profiles for query sequences and accepts hundreds of protein sequences per submission. Our approach for determining the optimal BLAST database for a protein-RNA interface residue classification task has the potential of substantially speeding up, and hence increasing the practical utility of, other amino acid sequence based predictors of protein-protein and protein

  10. The Nucleocapsid Protein of Human Coronavirus NL63

    PubMed Central

    Zuwała, Kaja; Golda, Anna; Kabala, Wojciech; Burmistrz, Michał; Zdzalik, Michal; Nowak, Paulina; Kedracka-Krok, Sylwia; Zarebski, Mirosław; Dobrucki, Jerzy; Florek, Dominik; Zeglen, Sławomir; Wojarski, Jacek; Potempa, Jan; Dubin, Grzegorz; Pyrc, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Human coronavirus (HCoV) NL63 was first described in 2004 and is associated with respiratory tract disease of varying severity. At the genetic and structural level, HCoV-NL63 is similar to other members of the Coronavirinae subfamily, especially human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E). Detailed analysis, however, reveals several unique features of the pathogen. The coronaviral nucleocapsid protein is abundantly present in infected cells. It is a multi-domain, multi-functional protein important for viral replication and a number of cellular processes. The aim of the present study was to characterize the HCoV-NL63 nucleocapsid protein. Biochemical analyses revealed that the protein shares characteristics with homologous proteins encoded in other coronaviral genomes, with the N-terminal domain responsible for nucleic acid binding and the C-terminal domain involved in protein oligomerization. Surprisingly, analysis of the subcellular localization of the N protein of HCoV-NL63 revealed that, differently than homologous proteins from other coronaviral species except for SARS-CoV, it is not present in the nucleus of infected or transfected cells. Furthermore, no significant alteration in cell cycle progression in cells expressing the protein was observed. This is in stark contrast with results obtained for other coronaviruses, except for the SARS-CoV. PMID:25700263

  11. Measles virus nucleocapsid protein protects rats from encephalitis.

    PubMed Central

    Bankamp, B; Brinckmann, U G; Reich, A; Niewiesk, S; ter Meulen, V; Liebert, U G

    1991-01-01

    Lewis rats immunized with recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the nucleocapsid (N) protein of measles virus were protected from encephalitis when subsequently challenged by intracerebral infection with neurotropic measles virus. Immunized rats revealed polyvalent antibodies to the N protein of measles virus in the absence of any neutralizing antibodies as well as an N protein-specific proliferative lymphocyte response. Depletion of CD8+ T lymphocytes did not abrogate the protective potential of the N protein-specific cell-mediated immune response in rats, while protection could be adoptively transferred with N protein-specific CD4+ T lymphocytes. These results indicate that a CD4+ cell-mediated immune response specific for the N protein of measles virus is sufficient to control measles virus infections of the central nervous system. Images PMID:1825854

  12. Trafficking motifs in the SARS-coronavirus nucleocapsid protein

    SciTech Connect

    You, Jae-Hwan; Reed, Mark L.; Hiscox, Julian A. . E-mail: j.a.hiscox@leeds.ac.uk

    2007-07-13

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus nucleocapsid (N) protein is involved in virus replication and modulation of cell processes. In this latter respect control may in part be achieved through the sub-cellular localisation of the protein. N protein predominately localises in the cytoplasm (the site of virus replication and assembly) but also in the nucleus/nucleolus. Using a combination of live-cell and confocal microscopy coupled to mutagenesis we identified a cryptic nucleolar localisation signal in the central part of the N protein. In addition, based on structural comparison to the avian coronavirus N protein, a nuclear export signal was identified in the C-terminal region of the protein.

  13. Mesodynamics in the SARS nucleocapsid measured by NMR field cycling.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, Michael W; Lei, Ming; Eisenmesser, Elan Z; Labeikovsky, Wladimir; Redfield, Alfred; Kern, Dorothee

    2009-09-01

    Protein motions on all timescales faster than molecular tumbling are encoded in the spectral density. The dissection of complex protein dynamics is typically performed using relaxation rates determined at high and ultra-high field. Here we expand this range of the spectral density to low fields through field cycling using the nucleocapsid protein of the SARS coronavirus as a model system. The field-cycling approach enables site-specific measurements of R (1) at low fields with the sensitivity and resolution of a high-field magnet. These data, together with high-field relaxation and heteronuclear NOE, provide evidence for correlated rigid-body motions of the entire beta-hairpin, and corresponding motions of adjacent loops with a time constant of 0.8 ns (mesodynamics). MD simulations substantiate these findings and provide direct verification of the time scale and collective nature of these motions. PMID:19641854

  14. An improved high pressure freezing and freeze substitution method to preserve the labile vaccinia virus nucleocapsid.

    PubMed

    Jesus, Desyree Murta; Moussatche, Nissin; Condit, Richard C

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, high pressure freezing and freeze substitution have been widely used for electron microscopy to reveal viral and cellular structures that are difficult to preserve. Vaccinia virus, a member of the Poxviridae family, presents one of the most complex viral structures. The classical view of vaccinia virus structure consists of an envelope surrounding a biconcave core, with a lateral body in each concavity of the core. This classical view was challenged by Peters and Muller (1963), who demonstrated the presence of a folded tubular structure inside the virus core and stated the difficulty in visualizing this structure, possibly because it is labile and cannot be preserved by conventional sample preparation. Therefore, this tubular structure, now called the nucleocapsid, has been mostly neglected over the years. Earlier studies were able to preserve the nucleocapsid, but with low efficiency. In this study, we report the protocol (and troubleshooting) that resulted in preservation of the highest numbers of nucleocapsids in several independent preparations. Using this protocol, we were able to demonstrate an interdependence between the formation of the virus core wall and the nucleocapsid, leading to the hypothesis that an interaction exists between the major protein constituents of these compartments, A3 (core wall) and L4 (nucleocapsid). Our results show that high pressure freezing and freeze substitution can be used in more in-depth studies concerning the nucleocapsid structure and function. PMID:27155322

  15. Nucleolin is required for efficient nuclear egress of herpes simplex virus type 1 nucleocapsids.

    PubMed

    Sagou, Ken; Uema, Masashi; Kawaguchi, Yasushi

    2010-02-01

    Herpesvirus nucleocapsids assemble in the nucleus and must cross the nuclear membrane for final assembly and maturation to form infectious progeny virions in the cytoplasm. It has been proposed that nucleocapsids enter the perinuclear space by budding through the inner nuclear membrane, and these enveloped nucleocapsids then fuse with the outer nuclear membrane to enter the cytoplasm. Little is known about the mechanism(s) for nuclear egress of herpesvirus nucleocapsids and, in particular, which, if any, cellular proteins are involved in the nuclear egress pathway. UL12 is an alkaline nuclease encoded by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and has been suggested to be involved in viral DNA maturation and nuclear egress of nucleocapsids. Using a live-cell imaging system to study cells infected by a recombinant HSV-1 expressing UL12 fused to a fluorescent protein, we observed the previously unreported nucleolar localization of UL12 in live infected cells and, using coimmunoprecipitation analyses, showed that UL12 formed a complex with nucleolin, a nucleolus marker, in infected cells. Knockdown of nucleolin in HSV-1-infected cells reduced capsid accumulation, as well as the amount of viral DNA resistant to staphylococcal nuclease in the cytoplasm, which represented encapsidated viral DNA, but had little effect on these viral components in the nucleus. These results indicated that nucleolin is a cellular factor required for efficient nuclear egress of HSV-1 nucleocapsids in infected cells. PMID:19955312

  16. Protein-RNA Complexes and Efficient Automatic Docking: Expanding RosettaDock Possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Guilhot-Gaudeffroy, Adrien; Froidevaux, Christine; Azé, Jérôme; Bernauer, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Protein-RNA complexes provide a wide range of essential functions in the cell. Their atomic experimental structure solving, despite essential to the understanding of these functions, is often difficult and expensive. Docking approaches that have been developed for proteins are often challenging to adapt for RNA because of its inherent flexibility and the structural data available being relatively scarce. In this study we adapted the RosettaDock protocol for protein-RNA complexes both at the nucleotide and atomic levels. Using a genetic algorithm-based strategy, and a non-redundant protein-RNA dataset, we derived a RosettaDock scoring scheme able not only to discriminate but also score efficiently docking decoys. The approach proved to be both efficient and robust for generating and identifying suitable structures when applied to two protein-RNA docking benchmarks in both bound and unbound settings. It also compares well to existing strategies. This is the first approach that currently offers a multi-level optimized scoring approach integrated in a full docking suite, leading the way to adaptive fully flexible strategies. PMID:25268579

  17. Protein-RNA complexes and efficient automatic docking: expanding RosettaDock possibilities.

    PubMed

    Guilhot-Gaudeffroy, Adrien; Froidevaux, Christine; Azé, Jérôme; Bernauer, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Protein-RNA complexes provide a wide range of essential functions in the cell. Their atomic experimental structure solving, despite essential to the understanding of these functions, is often difficult and expensive. Docking approaches that have been developed for proteins are often challenging to adapt for RNA because of its inherent flexibility and the structural data available being relatively scarce. In this study we adapted the RosettaDock protocol for protein-RNA complexes both at the nucleotide and atomic levels. Using a genetic algorithm-based strategy, and a non-redundant protein-RNA dataset, we derived a RosettaDock scoring scheme able not only to discriminate but also score efficiently docking decoys. The approach proved to be both efficient and robust for generating and identifying suitable structures when applied to two protein-RNA docking benchmarks in both bound and unbound settings. It also compares well to existing strategies. This is the first approach that currently offers a multi-level optimized scoring approach integrated in a full docking suite, leading the way to adaptive fully flexible strategies. PMID:25268579

  18. Identification of HIV-1 Inhibitors Targeting The Nucleocapsid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Breuer, Sebastian; Chang, Max W.; Yuan, Jinyun; Torbett, Bruce E.

    2012-01-01

    The HIV-1 nucleocapsid (NC) is a RNA/DNA binding protein encoded within the Gag polyprotein, which is critical for the selection and chaperoning of viral genomic RNA during virion assembly. RNA/DNA binding occurs through a highly conserved zinc-knuckle motif present in NC. Given the necessity of NC-viral RNA/DNA interaction for viral replication, identification of compounds that disrupt the NC-RNA/DNA interaction may have value as an anti-viral strategy. To identify small molecules that disrupt NC-viral RNA/DNA binding a high-throughput fluorescence polarization assay was developed and a library of 14,400 diverse, drug-like compounds was screened. Compounds that disrupted NC binding to a fluorescence-labeled DNA tracer were next evaluated by differential scanning fluorimetry to identify compounds that must bind to NC or Gag to impart their effects. Two compounds were identified that inhibited NC-DNA interaction, specifically bound NC with nM affinity, and showed modest anti-HIV-1 activity in ex vivo cell assays. PMID:22587465

  19. Interactions of normal and mutant vesicular stomatitis virus matrix proteins with the plasma membrane and nucleocapsids.

    PubMed Central

    Chong, L D; Rose, J K

    1994-01-01

    We demonstrated recently that a fraction of the matrix (M) protein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) binds tightly to cellular membranes in vivo when expressed in the absence of other VSV proteins. This membrane-associated M protein was functional in binding purified VSV nucleocapsids in vitro. Here we show that the membrane-associated M protein is largely associated with a membrane fraction having the density of plasma membranes, indicating membrane specificity in the binding. In addition, we analyzed truncated forms of M protein to identify regions responsible for membrane association and nucleocapsid binding. Truncated M protein lacking the amino-terminal basic domain still associated with cellular membranes, although not as tightly as wild-type M protein, and could not bind nucleocapsids. In contrast, deletion of the carboxy-terminal 14 amino acids did not disrupt stable membrane association or nucleocapsid interaction. These results suggest that the amino terminus of M protein either interacts directly with membranes and nucleocapsids or stabilizes a conformation that is required for M protein to mediate both of these interactions. Images PMID:8254754

  20. A new mechanism for nuclear import by actin-based propulsion used by a baculovirus nucleocapsid.

    PubMed

    Au, Shelly; Wu, Wei; Zhou, Lixin; Theilmann, David A; Panté, Nelly

    2016-08-01

    The transport of macromolecules into the nucleus is mediated by soluble cellular receptors of the importin β superfamily and requires the Ran-GTPase cycle. Several studies have provided evidence that there are exceptions to this canonical nuclear import pathway. Here, we report a new unconventional nuclear import mechanism exploited by the baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV). We found that AcMNPV nucleocapsids entered the nucleus of digitonin-permeabilized cells in the absence of exogenous cytosol or under conditions that blocked the Ran-GTPase cycle. AcMNPV contains a protein that activates the Arp2/3 complex and induces actin polymerization at one end of the rod-shaped nucleocapsid. We show that inhibitors of Arp2/3 blocked nuclear import of nucleocapsids in semi-permeabilized cells. Nuclear import of nucleocapsids was also reconstituted in purified nuclei supplemented with G-actin and Arp2/3 under actin polymerization conditions. Thus, we propose that actin polymerization drives not only migration of baculovirus through the cytoplasm but also pushes the nucleocapsid through the nuclear pore complex to enter the cell nucleus. Our findings point to a very distinct role of actin-based motility during the baculovirus infection cycle. PMID:27284005

  1. Estimation of Relative Protein-RNA Binding Strengths from Fluctuations in the Bound State.

    PubMed

    Ghaemi, Zhaleh; Guzman, Irisbel; Baek, Jung-Un Julia; Gruebele, Martin; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2016-09-13

    Protein-RNA complexes are increasingly important in our understanding of cell signaling, metabolism, and transcription. Electrostatic interactions play dominant role in stabilizing such complexes. Using conventional computational approaches, very long simulations of both bound and unbound states are required to obtain accurate estimates of complex dissociation constants (Kd). Here, we derive a simple formula that offers an alternative approach based on the theory of fluctuations. Our method extracts a strong correlate to experimental Kd values using short molecular dynamics simulations of the bound complex only. To test our method, we compared the computed relative Kd values to our experimentally measured values for the U1A-Stem Loop 2 (SL2) RNA complex, which is one of the most-studied protein-RNA complexes. Additionally we also included several experimental values from the literature, to enlarge the data set. We obtain a correlation of r = 0.93 between theoretical and measured estimates of Kd values of the mutated U1A protein-RNA complexes relative to the wild type dissociation constant. The proposed method increases the efficiency of relative Kd values estimation for multiple protein mutants, allowing its applicability to protein engineering projects. PMID:27529183

  2. Features, processing states, and heterologous protein interactions in the modulation of the retroviral nucleocapsid protein function.

    PubMed

    Mirambeau, Gilles; Lyonnais, Sébastien; Gorelick, Robert J

    2010-01-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid (NC) is central to viral replication. Nucleic acid chaperoning is a key function for NC through the action of its conserved basic amino acids and zinc-finger structures. NC manipulates genomic RNA from its packaging in the producer cell to reverse transcription into the infected host cell. This chaperone function, in conjunction with NC's aggregating properties, is up-modulated by successive NC processing events, from the Gag precursor to the fully mature protein, resulting in the condensation of the nucleocapsid within the capsid shell. Reverse transcription also depends on NC processing, whereas this process provokes NC dissociation from double-stranded DNA, leading to a preintegration complex (PIC), competent for host chromosomal integration. In addition NC interacts with cellular proteins, some of which are involved in viral budding, and also with several viral proteins. All of these properties are reviewed here, focusing on HIV-1 as a paradigmatic reference and highlighting the plasticity of the nucleocapsid architecture. PMID:21045549

  3. Trichoplusia ni Kinesin-1 Associates with Autographa californica Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus Nucleocapsid Proteins and Is Required for Production of Budded Virus

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Siddhartha; Blissard, Gary W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mechanism by which nucleocapsids of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) egress from the nucleus to the plasma membrane, leading to the formation of budded virus (BV), is not known. AC141 is a nucleocapsid-associated protein required for BV egress and has previously been shown to be associated with β-tubulin. In addition, AC141 and VP39 were previously shown by fluorescence resonance energy transfer by fluorescence lifetime imaging to interact directly with the Drosophila melanogaster kinesin-1 light chain (KLC) tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain. These results suggested that microtubule transport systems may be involved in baculovirus nucleocapsid egress and BV formation. In this study, we investigated the role of lepidopteran microtubule transport using coimmunoprecipitation, colocalization, yeast two-hybrid, and small interfering RNA (siRNA) analyses. We show that nucleocapsid AC141 associates with the lepidopteran Trichoplusia ni KLC and kinesin-1 heavy chain (KHC) by coimmunoprecipitation and colocalization. Kinesin-1, AC141, and microtubules colocalized predominantly at the plasma membrane. In addition, the nucleocapsid proteins VP39, FP25, and BV/ODV-C42 were also coimmunoprecipitated with T. ni KLC. Direct analysis of the role of T. ni kinesin-1 by downregulation of KLC by siRNA resulted in a significant decrease in BV production. Nucleocapsids labeled with VP39 fused with three copies of the mCherry fluorescent protein also colocalized with microtubules. Yeast two-hybrid analysis showed no evidence of a direct interaction between kinesin-1 and AC141 or VP39, suggesting that either other nucleocapsid proteins or adaptor proteins may be required. These results further support the conclusion that microtubule transport is required for AcMNPV BV formation. IMPORTANCE In two key processes of the replication cycle of the baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV), nucleocapsids are

  4. Crystal structure-based exploration of the important role of Arg106 in the RNA-binding domain of human coronavirus OC43 nucleocapsid protein

    PubMed Central

    Chen, I-Jung; Yuann, Jeu-Ming P.; Chang, Yu-Ming; Lin, Shing-Yen; Zhao, Jincun; Perlman, Stanley; Shen, Yo-Yu; Huang, Tai-Huang; Hou, Ming-Hon

    2013-01-01

    Human coronavirus OC43 (HCoV-OC43) is a causative agent of the common cold. The nucleocapsid (N) protein, which is a major structural protein of CoVs, binds to the viral RNA genome to form the virion core and results in the formation of the ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex. We have solved the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of HCoV-OC43 N protein (N-NTD) (residues 58 to 195) to a resolution of 2.0Å. The HCoV-OC43 N-NTD is a single domain protein composed of a five-stranded β-sheet core and a long extended loop, similar to that observed in the structures of N-NTDs from other coronaviruses. The positively charged loop of the HCoV-OC43 N-NTD contains a structurally well-conserved positively charged residue, R106. To assess the role of R106 in RNA binding, we undertook a series of site-directed mutagenesis experiments and docking simulations to characterize the interaction between R106 and RNA. The results show that R106 plays an important role in the interaction between the N protein and RNA. In addition, we showed that, in cells transfected with plasmids that encoded the mutant (R106A) N protein and infected with virus, the level of the matrix protein gene was decreased by 7-fold compared to cells that were transfected with the wild-type N protein. This finding suggests that R106, by enhancing binding of the N protein to viral RNA plays a critical role in the viral replication. The results also indicate that the strength of N protein/RNA interactions is critical for HCoV-OC43 replication. PMID:23501675

  5. HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress mediated by UL31 in association with UL34 is impeded by cellular transmembrane protein 140

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Ying; Guo, Lei; Yang, Erxia; Liao, Yun; Liu, Longding; Che, Yanchun; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Lichun; Wang, Jingjing; Li, Qihan

    2014-09-15

    During HSV-1 infection, the viral UL31 protein forms a complex with the UL34 protein at the cellular nuclear membrane, where both proteins play important roles in the envelopment of viral nucleocapsids and their egress into the cytoplasm. To characterize the mechanism of HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress, we screened host proteins to identify proteins that interacted with UL31 via yeast two-hybrid analysis. Transmembrane protein 140 (TMEM140), was identified and confirmed to bind to and co-localize with UL31 during viral infection. Further studies indicated that TMEM140 inhibits HSV-1 proliferation through selectively blocking viral nucleocapsid egress during the viral assembly process. The blockage function of TMEM140 is mediated by impeding the formation of the UL31–UL34 complex due to competitive binding to UL31. Collectively, these data suggest the essentiality of the UL31–UL34 interaction in the viral nucleocapsid egress process and provide a new anti-HSV-1 strategy in viral assembly process of nucleocapsid egress. - Highlights: • Cellular TMEM140 protein interacts with HSV-1 UL31 protein during viral infection. • Increasing expression of TMEM140 leads to inhibition of HSV-1 proliferation. • Increasing expression of TMEM140 blocks HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress process. • Binding to UL31 of TMEM140 impedes formation of HSV-1 UL31–UL34 complex.

  6. Structure of a low-population binding intermediate in protein-RNA recognition

    PubMed Central

    Bardaro, Michael F.; Aprile, Francesco A.; Varani, Gabriele; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of the HIV-1 protein transactivator of transcription (Tat) and its cognate transactivation response element (TAR) RNA transactivates viral transcription and represents a paradigm for the widespread occurrence of conformational rearrangements in protein-RNA recognition. Although the structures of free and bound forms of TAR are well characterized, the conformations of the intermediates in the binding process are still unknown. By determining the free energy landscape of the complex using NMR residual dipolar couplings in replica-averaged metadynamics simulations, we observe two low-population intermediates. We then rationally design two mutants, one in the protein and another in the RNA, that weaken specific nonnative interactions that stabilize one of the intermediates. By using surface plasmon resonance, we show that these mutations lower the release rate of Tat, as predicted. These results identify the structure of an intermediate for RNA-protein binding and illustrate a general strategy to achieve this goal with high resolution. PMID:27286828

  7. Effect of seven days of spaceflight on hindlimb muscle protein, RNA and DNA in adult rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, J. M.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1985-01-01

    Effects of seven days of spaceflight on skeletal muscle (soleus, gastrocnemius, EDL) content of protein, RNA and DNA were determined in adult rats. Whereas total protein contents were reduced in parallel with muscle weights, myofibrillar protein appeared to be more affected. There were no significant changes in absolute DNA contents, but a significant (P less than 0.05) increase in DNA concentration (microgram/milligram) in soleus muscles from flight rats. Absolute RNA contents were significantly (P less than 0.025) decreased in the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles of flight rats, with RNA concentrations reduced 15-30 percent. These results agree with previous ground-based observations on the suspended rat with unloaded hindlimbs and support continued use of this model.

  8. Predicting protein-RNA interaction amino acids using random forest based on submodularity subset selection.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaoyong; Zhu, Lin; Fan, Yong-Xian; Yan, Junchi

    2014-11-13

    Protein-RNA interaction plays a very crucial role in many biological processes, such as protein synthesis, transcription and post-transcription of gene expression and pathogenesis of disease. Especially RNAs always function through binding to proteins. Identification of binding interface region is especially useful for cellular pathways analysis and drug design. In this study, we proposed a novel approach for binding sites identification in proteins, which not only integrates local features and global features from protein sequence directly, but also constructed a balanced training dataset using sub-sampling based on submodularity subset selection. Firstly we extracted local features and global features from protein sequence, such as evolution information and molecule weight. Secondly, the number of non-interaction sites is much more than interaction sites, which leads to a sample imbalance problem, and hence biased machine learning model with preference to non-interaction sites. To better resolve this problem, instead of previous randomly sub-sampling over-represented non-interaction sites, a novel sampling approach based on submodularity subset selection was employed, which can select more representative data subset. Finally random forest were trained on optimally selected training subsets to predict interaction sites. Our result showed that our proposed method is very promising for predicting protein-RNA interaction residues, it achieved an accuracy of 0.863, which is better than other state-of-the-art methods. Furthermore, it also indicated the extracted global features have very strong discriminate ability for identifying interaction residues from random forest feature importance analysis. PMID:25462339

  9. Computationally predicting protein-RNA interactions using only positive and unlabeled examples.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhanzhan; Zhou, Shuigeng; Guan, Jihong

    2015-06-01

    Protein-RNA interactions (PRIs) are considerably important in a wide variety of cellular processes, ranging from transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulations of gene expression to the active defense of host against virus. With the development of high throughput technology, large amounts of PRI information is available for computationally predicting unknown PRIs. In recent years, a number of computational methods for predicting PRIs have been developed in the literature, which usually artificially construct negative samples based on verified nonredundant datasets of PRIs to train classifiers. However, such negative samples are not real negative samples, some even may be unknown positive samples. Consequently, the classifiers trained with such training datasets cannot achieve satisfactory prediction performance. In this paper, we propose a novel method PRIPU that employs biased-support vector machine (SVM) for predicting Protein-RNA Interactions using only Positive and Unlabeled examples. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work that predicts PRIs using only positive and unlabeled samples. We first collect known PRIs as our benchmark datasets and extract sequence-based features to represent each PRI. To reduce the dimension of feature vectors for lowering computational cost, we select a subset of features by a filter-based feature selection method. Then, biased-SVM is employed to train prediction models with different PRI datasets. To evaluate the new method, we also propose a new performance measure called explicit positive recall (EPR), which is specifically suitable for the task of learning positive and unlabeled data. Experimental results over three datasets show that our method not only outperforms four existing methods, but also is able to predict unknown PRIs. Source code, datasets and related documents of PRIPU are available at: http://admis.fudan.edu.cn/projects/pripu.htm . PMID:25790785

  10. Structural Analysis of Protein-RNA Complexes in Solution Using NMR Paramagnetic Relaxation Enhancements.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Janosch; Warner, Lisa R; Simon, Bernd; Geerlof, Arie; Mackereth, Cameron D; Sattler, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Biological activity in the cell is predominantly mediated by large multiprotein and protein-nucleic acid complexes that act together to ensure functional fidelity. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the only method that can provide information for high-resolution three-dimensional structures and the conformational dynamics of these complexes in solution. Mapping of binding interfaces and molecular interactions along with the characterization of conformational dynamics is possible for very large protein complexes. In contrast, de novo structure determination by NMR becomes very time consuming and difficult for protein complexes larger than 30 kDa as data are noisy and sparse. Fortunately, high-resolution structures are often available for individual domains or subunits of a protein complex and thus sparse data can be used to define their arrangement and dynamics within the assembled complex. In these cases, NMR can therefore be efficiently combined with complementary solution techniques, such as small-angle X-ray or neutron scattering, to provide a comprehensive description of the structure and dynamics of protein complexes in solution. Particularly useful are NMR-derived paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PREs), which provide long-range distance restraints (ca. 20Å) for structural analysis of large complexes and also report on conformational dynamics in solution. Here, we describe the use of PREs from sample production to structure calculation, focusing on protein-RNA complexes. On the basis of recent examples from our own research, we demonstrate the utility, present protocols, and discuss potential pitfalls when using PREs for studying the structure and dynamic features of protein-RNA complexes. PMID:26068746

  11. Protein, RNA, and DNA synthesis in cultures of skin fibroblasts from healthy subjects and patients with rheumatic diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Abakumova, O.Y.; Kutsenko, N.G.; Panasyuk, A.F.

    1985-07-01

    To study the mechanism of the lasting disturbance of fibroblast function, protein, RNA and DNA synthesis was investigated in skin fibroblasts from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic scleroderma (SS). The labeled precursors used to analyze synthesis of protein, RNA, and DNA were /sup 14/C-protein hydrolysate, (/sup 14/C)uridine, and (/sup 14/C) thymidine. Stimulation was determined by measuring incorporation of (/sup 14/C)proline into fibroblast proteins. During analysis of stability of fast-labeled RNA tests were carried out to discover whether all measurable radioactivity belonged to RNA molecules.

  12. Nucleocapsid assembly in pneumoviruses is regulated by conformational switching of the N protein.

    PubMed

    Renner, Max; Bertinelli, Mattia; Leyrat, Cédric; Paesen, Guido C; Saraiva de Oliveira, Laura Freitas; Huiskonen, Juha T; Grimes, Jonathan M

    2016-01-01

    Non-segmented, (-)RNA viruses cause serious human diseases. Human metapneumovirus (HMPV), an emerging pathogen of this order of viruses (Mononegavirales) is one of the main causes of respiratory tract illness in children. To help elucidate the assembly mechanism of the nucleocapsid (the viral RNA genome packaged by the nucleoprotein N) we present crystallographic structures of HMPV N in its assembled RNA-bound state and in a monomeric state, bound to the polymerase cofactor P. Our structures reveal molecular details of how P inhibits the self-assembly of N and how N transitions between the RNA-free and RNA-bound conformational state. Notably, we observe a role for the C-terminal extension of N in directly preventing premature uptake of RNA by folding into the RNA-binding cleft. Our structures suggest a common mechanism of how the growth of the nucleocapsid is orchestrated, and highlight an interaction site representing an important target for antivirals. PMID:26880565

  13. Expression from baculovirus and serological reactivity of the nucleocapsid protein of dolphin morbillivirus.

    PubMed

    Grant, Rebecca J; Kelley, Karen L; Maruniak, James E; Garcia-Maruniak, Alejandra; Barrett, Tom; Manire, Charles A; Romero, Carlos H

    2010-07-14

    The nucleocapsid (N) protein of dolphin morbillivirus (DMV) was expressed from a baculovirus (Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus) vector and shown by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis to be about 57 kDa. Transmission electron microscopy revealed fully assembled nucleocapsid-like particles (NLPs) exhibiting the typical helical herringbone morphology. These NLPs were approximately 20-22 nm in diameter and varied in length from 50 to 100 nm. Purified DMV-N protein was used as antigen in an indirect ELISA (iELISA) and shown to react with rabbit and human antisera to measles virus (MV) and dog sera with antibodies to canine distemper virus (CDV). The iELISA was used for the demonstration of morbillivirus antibodies in the serum of cetaceans and manatees, showing potential as a serological tool for the mass screening of morbillivirus antibodies in marine mammals. PMID:20005643

  14. Vaccinia Virus Mutations in the L4R Gene Encoding a Virion Structural Protein Produce Abnormal Mature Particles Lacking a Nucleocapsid

    PubMed Central

    Moussatche, Nissin; Condit, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Electron micrographs from the 1960s revealed the presence of an S-shaped tubular structure in the center of the vaccinia virion core. Recently, we showed that packaging of virus transcription enzymes is necessary for the formation of the tubular structure, suggesting that the structure is equivalent to a nucleocapsid. Based on this study and on what is known about nucleocapsids of other viruses, we hypothesized that in addition to transcription enzymes, the tubular structure also contains the viral DNA and a structural protein as a scaffold. The vaccinia virion structural protein L4 stands out as the best candidate for the role of a nucleocapsid structural protein because it is abundant, it is localized in the center of the virion core, and it binds DNA. In order to gain more insight into the structure and relevance of the nucleocapsid, we analyzed thermosensitive and inducible mutants in the L4R gene. Using a cryo-fixation method for electron microscopy (high-pressure freezing followed by freeze-substitution) to preserve labile structures like the nucleocapsid, we were able to demonstrate that in the absence of functional L4, mature particles with defective internal structures are produced under nonpermissive conditions. These particles do not contain a nucleocapsid. In addition, the core wall of these virions is abnormal. This suggests that the nucleocapsid interacts with the core wall and that the nucleocapsid structure might be more complex than originally assumed. IMPORTANCE The vaccinia virus nucleocapsid has been neglected since the 1960s due to a lack of electron microscopy techniques to preserve this labile structure. With the advent of cryo-fixation techniques, like high-pressure freezing/freeze-substitution, we are now able to consistently preserve and visualize the nucleocapsid. Because vaccinia virus early transcription is coupled to the viral core structure, detailing the structure of the nucleocapsid is indispensable for determining the

  15. Pentagalloylglucose Blocks the Nuclear Transport and the Process of Nucleocapsid Egress to Inhibit HSV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Jin, Fujun; Ma, Kaiqi; Chen, Maoyun; Zou, Muping; Wu, Yanting; Li, Feng; Wang, Yifei

    2016-03-23

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), a widespread virus, causes a variety of human viral diseases worldwide. The serious threat of drug-resistance highlights the extreme urgency to develop novel antiviral drugs with different mechanisms of action. Pentagalloylglucose (PGG) is a natural polyphenolic compound with significant anti-HSV activity; however, the mechanisms underlying its antiviral activity need to be defined by further studies. In this study, we found that PGG treatment delays the nuclear transport process of HSV-1 particles by inhibiting the upregulation of dynein (a cellular major motor protein) induced by HSV-1 infection. Furthermore, PGG treatment affects the nucleocapsid egress of HSV-1 by inhibiting the expression and disrupting the cellular localization of pEGFP-UL31 and pEGFP-UL34, which are indispensable for HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress from the nucleus. However, the over-expression of pEGFP-UL31 and pEGFP-UL34 could decrease the antiviral effect of PGG. In this study, for the first time, the antiviral activity of PGG against acyclovir-resistant virus was demonstrated in vitro, and the possible mechanisms of its anti-HSV activities were identified based on the inhibition of nuclear transport and nucleocapsid egress in HSV-1. It was further confirmed that PGG could be a promising candidate for HSV therapy, especially for drug-resistant strains. PMID:26166506

  16. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus PK-1 is essential for nucleocapsid assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Changyong; Li, Min; Dai, Xuejuan; Zhao, Shuling; Hou, Yanling; Zhang, Yongli; Lan, Dandan; Wang, Yun; Chen, Xinwen

    2013-09-01

    PK-1 (Ac10) is a baculovirus-encoded serine/threonine kinase and its function is unclear. Our results showed that a pk-1 knockout AcMNPV failed to produce infectious progeny, while the pk-1 repair virus could rescue this defect. qPCR analysis demonstrated that pk-1 deletion did not affect viral DNA replication. Analysis of the repaired recombinants with truncated pk-1 mutants demonstrated that the catalytic domain of protein kinases of PK-1 was essential to viral infectivity. Moreover, those PK-1 mutants that could rescue the infectious BV production defect exhibited kinase activity in vitro. Therefore, it is suggested that the kinase activity of PK-1 is essential in regulating viral propagation. Electron microscopy revealed that pk-1 deletion affected the formation of normal nucleocapsids. Masses of electron-lucent tubular structures were present in cell transfected with pk-1 knockout bacmid. Therefore, PK-1 appears to phosphorylate some viral or cellular proteins that are essential for DNA packaging to regulate nucleocapsid assembly. - Highlights: • A pk-1 knockout AcMNPV failed to produce infectious progeny. • The pk-1 deletion did not affect viral DNA replication. • The catalytic domain of protein kinases (PKc) of PK-1 was essential to viral infectivity. • The kinase activity of PK-1 is essential in regulating viral propagation. • PK-1 appears to phosphorylate some viral proteins that are essential for DNA packaging to regulate nucleocapsid assembly.

  17. Viral Membrane Fusion and Nucleocapsid Delivery into the Cytoplasm are Distinct Events in Some Flaviviruses

    PubMed Central

    Nour, Adel M.; Li, Yue; Wolenski, Joseph; Modis, Yorgo

    2013-01-01

    Flaviviruses deliver their genome into the cell by fusing the viral lipid membrane to an endosomal membrane. The sequence and kinetics of the steps required for nucleocapsid delivery into the cytoplasm remain unclear. Here we dissect the cell entry pathway of virions and virus-like particles from two flaviviruses using single-particle tracking in live cells, a biochemical membrane fusion assay and virus infectivity assays. We show that the virus particles fuse with a small endosomal compartment in which the nucleocapsid remains trapped for several minutes. Endosomal maturation inhibitors inhibit infectivity but not membrane fusion. We propose a flavivirus cell entry mechanism in which the virus particles fuse preferentially with small endosomal carrier vesicles and depend on back-fusion of the vesicles with the late endosomal membrane to deliver the nucleocapsid into the cytoplasm. Virus entry modulates intracellular calcium release and phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate kinase signaling. Moreover, the broadly cross-reactive therapeutic antibody scFv11 binds to virus-like particles and inhibits fusion. PMID:24039574

  18. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the nucleocapsid protein of Bunyamwera virus

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, John W.; Zhou, Qingxian; Green, Todd J.; Barr, John N.; Luo, Ming

    2006-04-01

    The nucleocapsid protein of Bunyamwera virus, the prototypic member of the Bunyaviridae family of segmented negative-sense RNA viruses, has been expressed and crystallized. Complete X-ray diffraction data sets have been collected. Bunyamwera virus (BUNV) is the prototypic member of the Bunyaviridae family of segmented negative-sense RNA viruses. The BUNV nucleocapsid protein has been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified protein has been crystallized and a complete data set has been collected to 3.3 Å resolution at a synchrotron source. Crystals of the nucleocapsid protein belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 384.7, b = 89.8, c = 89.2 Å, β = 94.4°. Self-rotation function analysis of the X-ray diffraction data has provided insight into the oligomeric state of the protein as well as the orientation of the oligomers in the asymmetric unit. The structure determination of the protein is ongoing.

  19. Amino acid residue doublet propensity in the protein-RNA interface and its application to RNA interface prediction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Oanh T P; Yura, Kei; Go, Nobuhiro

    2006-01-01

    Protein-RNA interactions play essential roles in a number of regulatory mechanisms for gene expression such as RNA splicing, transport, translation and post-transcriptional control. As the number of available protein-RNA complex 3D structures has increased, it is now possible to statistically examine protein-RNA interactions based on 3D structures. We performed computational analyses of 86 representative protein-RNA complexes retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. Interface residue propensity, a measure of the relative importance of different amino acid residues in the RNA interface, was calculated for each amino acid residue type (residue singlet interface propensity). In addition to the residue singlet propensity, we introduce a new residue-based propensity, which gives a measure of residue pairing preferences in the RNA interface of a protein (residue doublet interface propensity). The residue doublet interface propensity contains much more information than the sum of two singlet propensities alone. The prediction of the RNA interface using the two types of propensities plus a position-specific multiple sequence profile can achieve a specificity of about 80%. The prediction method was then applied to the 3D structure of two mRNA export factors, TAP (Mex67) and UAP56 (Sub2). The prediction enables us to point out candidate RNA interfaces, part of which are consistent with previous experimental studies and may contribute to elucidation of atomic mechanisms of mRNA export. PMID:17130160

  20. Sequence of Events in Measles Virus Replication: Role of Phosphoprotein-Nucleocapsid Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Brunel, Joanna; Chopy, Damien; Dosnon, Marion; Bloyet, Louis-Marie; Devaux, Patricia; Urzua, Erica; Cattaneo, Roberto; Longhi, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genome of nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses is tightly embedded within a nucleocapsid made of a nucleoprotein (N) homopolymer. To ensure processive RNA synthesis, the viral polymerase L in complex with its cofactor phosphoprotein (P) binds the nucleocapsid that constitutes the functional template. Measles virus P and N interact through two binding sites. While binding of the P amino terminus with the core of N (NCORE) prevents illegitimate encapsidation of cellular RNA, the interaction between their C-terminal domains, PXD and NTAIL is required for viral RNA synthesis. To investigate the binding dynamics between the two latter domains, the PXD F497 residue that makes multiple hydrophobic intramolecular interactions was mutated. Using a quantitative mammalian protein complementation assay and recombinant viruses, we found that an increase in PXD-to-NTAIL binding strength is associated with a slower transcript accumulation rate and that abolishing the interaction renders the polymerase nonfunctional. The use of a newly developed system allowing conditional expression of wild-type or mutated P genes, revealed that the loss of the PXD-NTAIL interaction results in reduced transcription by preformed transcriptases, suggesting reduced engagement on the genomic template. These intracellular data indicate that the viral polymerase entry into and progression along its genomic template relies on a protein-protein interaction that serves as a tightly controlled dynamic anchor. IMPORTANCE Mononegavirales have a unique machinery to replicate RNA. Processivity of their polymerase is only achieved when the genome template is entirely embedded into a helical homopolymer of nucleoproteins that constitutes the nucleocapsid. The polymerase binds to the nucleocapsid template through the phosphoprotein. How the polymerase complex enters and travels along the nucleocapsid template to ensure uninterrupted synthesis of up to ∼6,700-nucleotide messenger RNAs from six

  1. HITS-CLIP: panoramic views of protein-RNA regulation in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Darnell, Robert B.

    2011-01-01

    The study of gene regulation in cells has recently begun to shift from a period dominated by the study of transcription factor-DNA interactions to a new focus on RNA regulation. This was sparked by the still-emerging recognition of the central role for RNA in cellular complexity emanating from the RNA World hypothesis, and has been facilitated by technologic advances, in particular high throughput RNA sequencing and crosslinking methods (RNA-Seq, CLIP, and HITS-CLIP). This article will place these advances in context, and, focusing on CLIP, will explain the method, what it can be used for, and how to approach using it. Examples of the successes, limitations and future of the technique will be discussed. Crosslinking immunoprecipitation (CLIP), coupled with high throughput sequencing (HITS-CLIP), has caught the attention of the RNA community as a means of achieving a new depth of understanding about how protein-RNA complexes interactions regulate gene expression in living cells1–4. This review will describe the context in which CLIP was developed, and provide an up-to-date review of its uses in developing genome-wide maps of RNA-protein interactions and, more recently, microRNA (miRNA) binding sites. The uses, limitations, and future of CLIP will be discussed. PMID:21935890

  2. The impact of CRISPR repeat sequence on structures of a Cas6 protein-RNA complex

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ruiying; Zheng, Han; Preamplume, Gan; Shao, Yaming; Li, Hong

    2012-03-15

    The repeat-associated mysterious proteins (RAMPs) comprise the most abundant family of proteins involved in prokaryotic immunity against invading genetic elements conferred by the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) system. Cas6 is one of the first characterized RAMP proteins and is a key enzyme required for CRISPR RNA maturation. Despite a strong structural homology with other RAMP proteins that bind hairpin RNA, Cas6 distinctly recognizes single-stranded RNA. Previous structural and biochemical studies show that Cas6 captures the 5' end while cleaving the 3' end of the CRISPR RNA. Here, we describe three structures and complementary biochemical analysis of a noncatalytic Cas6 homolog from Pyrococcus horikoshii bound to CRISPR repeat RNA of different sequences. Our study confirms the specificity of the Cas6 protein for single-stranded RNA and further reveals the importance of the bases at Positions 5-7 in Cas6-RNA interactions. Substitutions of these bases result in structural changes in the protein-RNA complex including its oligomerization state.

  3. Synthesis of human parainfluenza virus 2 nucleocapsid protein in yeast as nucleocapsid-like particles and investigation of its antigenic structure.

    PubMed

    Bulavaitė, Aistė; Lasickienė, Rita; Vaitiekaitė, Aušra; Sasnauskas, Kęstutis; Žvirblienė, Aurelija

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the suitability of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae expression system for the production of human parainfluenza virus type 2 (HPIV2) nucleocapsid (N) protein in the form of nucleocapsid-like particles (NLPs) and to characterize its antigenic structure. The gene encoding HPIV2 N amino acid (aa) sequence RefSeq NP_598401.1 was cloned into the galactose-inducible S. cerevisiae expression vector and its high-level expression was achieved. However, this recombinant HPIV2 N protein did not form NLPs. The PCR mutagenesis was carried out to change the encoded aa residues to the ones conserved across HPIV2 isolates. Synthesis of the modified proteins in yeast demonstrated that the single aa substitution NP_598401.1:p.D331V was sufficient for the self-assembly of NLPs. The significance of certain aa residues in this position was confirmed by analysing HPIV2 N protein structure models. To characterize the antigenic structure of NLP-forming HPIV2 N protein, a panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) was generated. The majority of the MAbs raised against the recombinant NLPs recognized HPIV2-infected cells suggesting the antigenic similarity between the recombinant and virus-derived HPIV2 N protein. Fine epitope mapping revealed the C-terminal part (aa 386-504) as the main antigenic region of the HPIV2 N protein. In conclusion, the current study provides new data on the impact of HPIV2 N protein sequence variants on the NLP self-assembly and demonstrates an efficient production of recombinant HPIV2 N protein in the form of NLPs. PMID:26821928

  4. Virions and intracellular nucleocapsids produced during mixed heterotypic influenza infection of MDCK cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sklyanskaya, E.I.; Varich, N.L.; Amvrosieva, T.V.; Kaverin, N.V.

    1985-02-01

    Phenotypically mixed virus yields, obtained by coinfection of MDCK cells with influenza A/WSN/33 and B/Lee/40 viruses, contained both A/WSN/33 and B/Lee/40 NP proteins, as revealed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the purified /sup 14/C-amino acids-labeled virus. Virions were lysed with 0.6 M KCl-Triton X-100 buffer, and nucleocapsids were immunoprecipitated with antibodies against NP protein of influenza A virus. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the immunoprecipitate revealed NP protein of A/WSN/33 but not of B/Lee/40 virus. However, in similar experiments with the lysates of doubly infected cells, the band of B/Lee/40 NP protein was revealed in the polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis patterns of the immunoprecipitates. In an attempt to analyze the RNA content of the immune complexes, the authors absorbed the lysates of doubly infected (/sup 3/H)uridine-labeled cells with protein A-containing Staphylococcus aureus covered with antibodies against the NP protein of influenza A virus. RNA extracted from the immune complexes contained genomic RNA segments of both A/WSN/33 and B/Lee/40 viruses. In control samples containing an artificial mixture of cell lysates separately infected with each virus, the analysis revealed homologous components (i.e., A/WSN/33 NP protein or RNA segments) in the immune complexes. The results suggest the presence of phenotypically mixed nucleocapsids in the cells doubly infected with influenza A and B viruses; in the course of the virion formation, the nucleocapsids lacking the heterologous NP protein are selected.

  5. Biomolecular interactions in HCV nucleocapsid-like particles as revealed by vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Casado, Arantxa; Molina, Marina; Carmona, Pedro

    2007-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) occurs in the form of 55-65 nm spherical particles, but the structure of the virion remains to be clarified. Structural studies of HCV have been hampered by the lack of an appropriate cell culture system. However, structural analyses of HCV components can provide an essential framework for understanding of the molecular mechanism of virion assembly. This article reviews the potential of vibrational spectroscopy aimed at the knowledge of HCV structural biology, particularly regarding biomolecular interactions in nucleocapsid-like particles obtained in vitro.

  6. Differential Contributions of Tacaribe Arenavirus Nucleoprotein N-Terminal and C-Terminal Residues to Nucleocapsid Functional Activity

    PubMed Central

    D'Antuono, Alejandra; Loureiro, Maria Eugenia; Foscaldi, Sabrina; Marino-Buslje, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The arenavirus nucleoprotein (NP) is the main protein component of viral nucleocapsids and is strictly required for viral genome replication mediated by the L polymerase. Homo-oligomerization of NP is presumed to play an important role in nucleocapsid assembly, albeit the underlying mechanism and the relevance of NP-NP interaction in nucleocapsid activity are still poorly understood. Here, we evaluate the contribution of the New World Tacaribe virus (TCRV) NP self-interaction to nucleocapsid functional activity. We show that alanine substitution of N-terminal residues predicted to be available for NP-NP interaction strongly affected NP self-association, as determined by coimmunoprecipitation assays, produced a drastic inhibition of transcription and replication of a TCRV minigenome RNA, and impaired NP binding to RNA. Mutagenesis and functional analysis also revealed that, while dispensable for NP self-interaction, key amino acids at the C-terminal domain were essential for RNA synthesis. Furthermore, mutations at these C-terminal residues rendered NP unable to bind RNA both in vivo and in vitro but had no effect on the interaction with the L polymerase. In addition, while all oligomerization-defective variants tested exhibited unaltered capacities to sustain NP-L interaction, NP deletion mutants were fully incompetent to bind L, suggesting that, whereas NP self-association is dispensable, the integrity of both the N-terminal and C-terminal domains is required for binding the L polymerase. Overall, our results suggest that NP self-interaction mediated by the N-terminal domain may play a critical role in TCRV nucleocapsid assembly and activity and that the C-terminal domain of NP is implicated in RNA binding. IMPORTANCE The mechanism of arenavirus functional nucleocapsid assembly is still poorly understood. No detailed information is available on the nucleocapsid structure, and the regions of full-length NP involved in binding to viral RNA remain to be

  7. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ac53 plays a role in nucleocapsid assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Chao; Li Zhaofei Wu Wenbi; Li Lingling; Yuan Meijin; Pan Lijing; Yang Kai Pang Yi

    2008-12-05

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) orf53 (ac53) is a highly conserved gene existing in all sequenced Lepidoptera and Hymenoptera baculoviruses, but its function remains unknown. To investigate its role in the baculovirus life cycle, an ac53 deletion virus (vAc{sup ac53KO-PH-GFP}) was generated through homologous recombination in Escherichia coli. Fluorescence and light microscopy and titration analysis revealed that vAc{sup ac53KO-PH-GFP} could not produce infectious budded virus in infected Sf9 cells. Real-time PCR demonstrated that the ac53 deletion did not affect the levels of viral DNA replication. Electron microscopy showed that many lucent tubular shells devoid of the nucleoprotein core are present in the virogenic stroma and ring zone, indicating that the ac53 knockout affected nucleocapsid assembly. With a recombinant virus expressing an Ac53-GFP fusion protein, we observed that Ac53 was distributed within the cytoplasm and nucleus at 24 h post-infection, but afterwards accumulated predominantly near the nucleus-cytoplasm boundary. These data demonstrate that ac53 is involved in nucleocapsid assembly and is an essential gene for virus production.

  8. Antibody study in canine distemper virus nucleocapsid protein gene-immunized mice.

    PubMed

    Yuan, B; Li, X Y; Zhu, T; Yuan, L; Hu, J P; Chen, J; Gao, W; Ren, W Z

    2015-01-01

    The gene for the nucleocapsid (N) protein of canine distemper virus was cloned into the pMD-18T vector, and positive recombinant plasmids were obtained by enzyme digestion and sequencing. After digestion by both EcoRI and KpnI, the plasmid was directionally cloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA; the positive clone pcDNA-N was screened by electrophoresis and then transfected into COS-7 cells. Immunofluorescence analysis results showed that the canine distemper virus N protein was expressed in the cytoplasm of transfected COS-7 cells. After emulsification in Freund's adjuvant, the recombinant plasmid pcDNA-N was injected into the abdominal cavity of 8-week-old BABL/c mice, with the pcDNA original vector used as a negative control. Mice were immunized 3 times every 2 weeks. The blood of immunized mice was drawn 2 weeks after completing the immunizations to measure titer levels. The antibody titer in the pcDNA-N test was 10(1.62 ± 0.164), while in the control group this value was 10(0.52 ± 0.56), indicating that specific humoral immunity was induced in canine distemper virus nucleocapsid protein-immunized mice. PMID:25966074

  9. Nucleocapsid assembly in pneumoviruses is regulated by conformational switching of the N protein

    PubMed Central

    Renner, Max; Bertinelli, Mattia; Leyrat, Cédric; Paesen, Guido C; Saraiva de Oliveira, Laura Freitas; Huiskonen, Juha T; Grimes, Jonathan M

    2016-01-01

    Non-segmented, (-)RNA viruses cause serious human diseases. Human metapneumovirus (HMPV), an emerging pathogen of this order of viruses (Mononegavirales) is one of the main causes of respiratory tract illness in children. To help elucidate the assembly mechanism of the nucleocapsid (the viral RNA genome packaged by the nucleoprotein N) we present crystallographic structures of HMPV N in its assembled RNA-bound state and in a monomeric state, bound to the polymerase cofactor P. Our structures reveal molecular details of how P inhibits the self-assembly of N and how N transitions between the RNA-free and RNA-bound conformational state. Notably, we observe a role for the C-terminal extension of N in directly preventing premature uptake of RNA by folding into the RNA-binding cleft. Our structures suggest a common mechanism of how the growth of the nucleocapsid is orchestrated, and highlight an interaction site representing an important target for antivirals. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12627.001 PMID:26880565

  10. Structural studies on the authentic mumps virus nucleocapsid showing uncoiling by the phosphoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Robert; Pickar, Adrian; Qiu, Shihong; Tsao, Jun; Rodenburg, Cynthia; Dokland, Terje; Elson, Andrew; He, Biao; Luo, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Mumps virus (MuV) is a highly contagious pathogen, and despite extensive vaccination campaigns, outbreaks continue to occur worldwide. The virus has a negative-sense, single-stranded RNA genome that is encapsidated by the nucleocapsid protein (N) to form the nucleocapsid (NC). NC serves as the template for both transcription and replication. In this paper we solved an 18-Å–resolution structure of the authentic MuV NC using cryo-electron microscopy. We also observed the effects of phosphoprotein (P) binding on the MuV NC structure. The N-terminal domain of P (PNTD) has been shown to bind NC and appeared to induce uncoiling of the helical NC. Additionally, we solved a 25-Å–resolution structure of the authentic MuV NC bound with the C-terminal domain of P (PCTD). The location of the encapsidated viral genomic RNA was defined by modeling crystal structures of homologous negative strand RNA virus Ns in NC. Both the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of MuV P bind NC to participate in access to the genomic RNA by the viral RNA-dependent-RNA polymerase. These results provide critical insights on the structure-function of the MuV NC and the structural alterations that occur through its interactions with P. PMID:25288750

  11. Development of a novel hepatitis B virus encapsidation detection assay by viral nucleocapsid-captured quantitative RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Dong-Kyun; Ahn, Yeji; Ryu, Wang-Shick; Windisch, Marc P

    2015-11-01

    After encapsidation, where pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) is packaged into viral nucleocapsids, hepatitis B virus (HBV) uses the pgRNA as a template to replicate its DNA genome by reverse transcription. To date, there are only two encapsidation detection methods for evaluating the amount of pgRNA packaged into nucleocapsids: (i) the RNase protection assay and (ii) the native agarose gel electrophoresis assay. However, these methods are complex and laborious because they require multiple pgRNA purification steps followed by detection via an isotope-labeled probe. Moreover, both assays are unsuitable for evaluating a large number of antiviral agents in a dose-dependent manner. To overcome these limitations, we devised a novel HBV encapsidation assay in a 96-well plate format using nucleocapsid capture plates coated with an anti-HBV core (HBc) antibody, usually employed in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, to immobilize viral nucleocapsids. Viral pgRNA is then detected by quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR). This strategy allows fast, convenient, and quantitative analysis of multiple viral RNA samples to evaluate encapsidation inhibitors. Furthermore, our protocol is potentially suitable for high-throughput screening (HTS) of compounds targeting HBV pgRNA encapsidation. PMID:26554506

  12. HLA class I-restricted human cytotoxic T cells recognize endogenously synthesized hepatitis B virus nucleocapsid antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Bertoletti, A; Ferrari, C; Fiaccadori, F; Penna, A; Margolskee, R; Schlicht, H J; Fowler, P; Guilhot, S; Chisari, F V

    1991-01-01

    Knowledge of the immune effector mechanisms responsible for clearance of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected cells has been severely limited by the absence of reproducible systems to selectively expand and to characterize HBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in the peripheral blood of patients with viral hepatitis. By using a strategy involving sequential stimulation with HBV nucleocapsid synthetic peptides followed by autologous, or HLA class I-matched, HBV nucleocapsid transfectants, we now report the existence of CTLs able to lyse target cells that express endogenously synthesized HBV nucleocapsid antigen in the peripheral blood of patients with acute viral hepatitis B. The CTL response is HLA-A2 restricted, mediated by CD8-positive T cells, and specific for a single epitope, located between amino acid residues 11 and 27 of HBV core protein; these residues are shared with the secretable precore-derived hepatitis B e antigen. Equivalent lysis of target cells that express each of these proteins suggests that their intracellular trafficking pathways may intersect. The current report provides definitive evidence that HLA class I-restricted, CD8-positive CTLs that recognize endogenously synthesized HBV nucleocapsid antigen are induced during acute HBV infection in humans and establishes a strategy that should permit a detailed analysis of the role played by HBV-specific CTLs in the immunopathogenesis of viral hepatitis. PMID:1660137

  13. Identification of a region in the Sindbis virus nucleocapsid protein that is involved in specificity of RNA encapsidation.

    PubMed Central

    Owen, K E; Kuhn, R J

    1996-01-01

    The specific encapsidation of genomic RNA by an alphavirus requires recognition of the viral RNA by the nucleocapsid protein. In an effort to identify individual residues of the Sindbis virus nucleocapsid protein which are essential for this recognition event, a molecular genetic analysis of a domain of the protein previously suggested to be involved in RNA binding in vitro was undertaken. The experiments presented describe the generation of a panel of viruses which contain mutations in residues 97 through 111 of the nucleocapsid protein. All of the viruses generated were viable, and the results suggest that, individually, the residues mutated do not play a critical role in encapsidation. However, one mutant which had lost the ability to specifically encapsidate the genomic RNA was identified. This mutant virus, which contained a deletion of residues 97 to 106, encapsidated both the genomic RNA and the subgenomic mRNA of the virus. It is proposed that the encapsidation of this second species of RNA, which is not present in wild-type virions, is the result of the loss of a domain of the nucleocapsid protein required for specific recognition of the genomic RNA packaging signal. The results suggest that this region of the protein is important in dictating specificity in the encapsidation reaction in vivo. The isolation and preliminary characterization of two independent second-site revertants to this deletion mutant are also described. PMID:8627749

  14. Evolution of an archaeal virus nucleocapsid protein from the CRISPR-associated Cas4 nuclease.

    PubMed

    Krupovic, Mart; Cvirkaite-Krupovic, Virginija; Prangishvili, David; Koonin, Eugene V

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins of viruses infecting hyperthermophilic Crenarchaeota have no detectable homologs in current databases, hampering our understanding of viral evolution. We used sensitive database search methods and structural modeling to show that a nucleocapsid protein (TP1) of Thermoproteus tenax virus 1 (TTV1) is a derivative of the Cas4 nuclease, a component of the CRISPR-Cas adaptive immunity system that is encoded also by several archaeal viruses. In TTV1, the Cas4 gene was split into two, with the N-terminal portion becoming TP1, and lost some of the catalytic amino acid residues, apparently resulting in the inactivation of the nuclease. To our knowledge, this is the first described case of exaptation of an enzyme for a virus capsid protein function. PMID:26514828

  15. A NEW ROLE FOR HIV NUCLEOCAPSID PROTEIN IN MODULATING THE SPECIFICITY OF PLUS STRAND PRIMING

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Deena T.; DeStefano, Jeffrey J.

    2008-01-01

    The current study indicates a new role for HIV nucleocapsid protein (NC) in modulating the specificity of plus strand priming. RNase H cleavage by reverse transcriptase (RT) during minus strand synthesis gives rise to RNA fragments that could potentially be used as primers for synthesis of the plus strand, leading to the initiation of priming from multiple points as has been observed for other retroviruses. For HIV, the central and 3′ polypurine tracts (PPTs) are the major sites of plus strand initiation. Using reconstituted in vitro assays, results showed that NC greatly reduced the efficiency of extension of non-PPT RNA primers, but not PPT. Experiments mimicking HIV replication showed that RT generated and used both PPT and non-PPT RNAs to initiate “plus strand” synthesis, but non-PPT usage was strongly inhibited by NC. The results support a role for NC in specifying primer usage during plus strand synthesis. PMID:18632127

  16. Modulation of apoptosis and immune signaling pathways by the Hantaan virus nucleocapsid protein

    SciTech Connect

    Ontiveros, Steven J.; Li Qianjun; Jonsson, Colleen B.

    2010-06-05

    Herein, we show a direct relationship between the Hantaan virus (HTNV) nucleocapsid (N) protein and the modulation of apoptosis. We observed an increase in caspase-7 and -8, but not -9 in cells expressing HTNV N protein mutants lacking amino acids 270-330. Similar results were observed for the New World hantavirus, Andes virus. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) was sequestered in the cytoplasm after tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) stimulation in cells expressing HTNV N protein. Further, TNFR stimulated cells expressing HTNV N protein inhibited caspase activation. In contrast, cells expressing N protein truncations lacking the region from amino acids 270-330 were unable to inhibit nuclear import of NF-kappaB and the mutants also triggered caspase activity. These results suggest that the HTNV circumvents host antiviral signaling and apoptotic response mediated by the TNFR pathway through host interactions with the N protein.

  17. Self-Assembly of Measles Virus Nucleocapsid-like Particles: Kinetics and RNA Sequence Dependence.

    PubMed

    Milles, Sigrid; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Communie, Guillaume; Maurin, Damien; Schoehn, Guy; Ruigrok, Rob W H; Blackledge, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Measles virus RNA genomes are packaged into helical nucleocapsids (NCs), comprising thousands of nucleo-proteins (N) that bind the entire genome. N-RNA provides the template for replication and transcription by the viral polymerase and is a promising target for viral inhibition. Elucidation of mechanisms regulating this process has been severely hampered by the inability to controllably assemble NCs. Here, we demonstrate self-organization of N into NC-like particles in vitro upon addition of RNA, providing a simple and versatile tool for investigating assembly. Real-time NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy reveals biphasic assembly kinetics. Remarkably, assembly depends strongly on the RNA-sequence, with the genomic 5' end and poly-Adenine sequences assembling efficiently, while sequences such as poly-Uracil are incompetent for NC formation. This observation has important consequences for understanding the assembly process. PMID:27270664

  18. Identification of a single-nucleocapsid baculovirus isolated from Clanis bilineata tsingtauica (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Liqun; Yi, Jianping; Zhu, Shanying; Li, Bing; Chen, Yan; Shen, Weide; Wang, Wenbing

    2008-01-01

    A nucleopolyhedrovirus isolated from infected larvae of Clanis bilineata tsingtauica was characterized. Electron microscopical studies on the ultrastructure of C. bilineata nucleopolyhedrovirus (ClbiSNPV) occlusion bodies (OBs) showed several virions (up to 16) with a single nucleocapsid packaged within a single viral envelope. The diameter of the OBs was 0.77-1.7 mum with a mean of 1.13 +/- 0.19 mum. The complete sequence of the ClbiSNPV polyhedrin (polh) gene contained 741 nucleotides, predicting a protein of 246 amino acids. Phylogenetic analyses using the complete sequence of the polh genes indicated that ClbiSNPV clusters with Group II NPVs. This is the first record of a baculovirus from C. bilineata. PMID:18584114

  19. HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein localizes efficiently to the nucleus and nucleolus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kyung Lee; Lee, Sun Hee; Lee, Eun Soo; You, Ji Chang

    2016-05-01

    The HIV-1 nucleocapsid (NC) is an essential viral protein containing two highly conserved retroviral-type zinc finger (ZF) motifs, which functions in multiple stages of the HIV-1 life cycle. Although a number of functions for NC either in its mature form or as a domain of Gag have been revealed, little is known about the intracellular localization of NC and, moreover, its role in Gag protein trafficking. Here, we have investigated various forms of HIV-1 NC protein for its cellular localization and found that the NC has a strong nuclear and nucleolar localization activity. The linker region, composed of a stretch of basic amino acids between the two ZF motifs, was necessary and sufficient for the activity. PMID:26967976

  20. Characterization of a single-nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus of Thysanoplusia orichalcea L. (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) from Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Cheng, X W; Carner, G R

    2000-05-01

    A single-nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV) isolated from Thysanoplusia orichalcea L. (Lepidoptera:Noctuidae) (ThorNPV) in Indonesia has tetrahedral occlusion bodies (OBs) with a width of 1. 22 microm (range = 0.803-1.931 microm). The length of the virion with an envelope averaged 0.29 and 0.23 microm without an envelope. ThorNPV was propagated in Pseudoplusia includens (Walker) and its authenticity was confirmed by sequence analysis of the polyhedrin gene of the ThorNPV produced in T. orichalcea and P. includens. Polyhedrin amino acid sequence analysis revealed that ThorNPV belongs to Group II of baculoviruses and is closely related to Trichoplusia ni single nucleocapsid NPV, sharing 97.6% sequence identity. Infectivity of ThorNPV against third instar P. includens was low, with a LD(50) value of 65,636 OBs/larva. Electron microscopy of infected tissues showed many polyhedra without virions embedded, which might explain the low virulence against P. includens. Differences in virion occlusion rates between individual cells in the same tissue suggested that the inoculum consisted of at least two variants that differed in the gene(s) controlling virion occlusion. In a host range test using the LD(50) value to P. includens against Spodoptera exigua, S. frugiperda, S. eridania, Anticarsia gemmatalis, Helicoverpa zea, Trichoplusia ni, and P. includens, P. includens was the only species infected. The virus infected primarily the fat body, tracheal epithelium, and hypodermis. The genomic size of the ThorNPV is 135 kb. PMID:10843835

  1. Quantitative Characterization of Configurational Space Sampled by HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Using Solution NMR, X-ray Scattering and Protein Engineering.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Lalit; Schwieters, Charles D; Grishaev, Alexander; Clore, G Marius

    2016-06-01

    Nucleic-acid-related events in the HIV-1 replication cycle are mediated by nucleocapsid, a small protein comprising two zinc knuckles connected by a short flexible linker and flanked by disordered termini. Combining experimental NMR residual dipolar couplings, solution X-ray scattering and protein engineering with ensemble simulated annealing, we obtain a quantitative description of the configurational space sampled by the two zinc knuckles, the linker and disordered termini in the absence of nucleic acids. We first compute the conformational ensemble (with an optimal size of three members) of an engineered nucleocapsid construct lacking the N- and C-termini that satisfies the experimental restraints, and then validate this ensemble, as well as characterize the disordered termini, using the experimental data from the full-length nucleocapsid construct. The experimental and computational strategy is generally applicable to multidomain proteins. Differential flexibility within the linker results in asymmetric motion of the zinc knuckles which may explain their functionally distinct roles despite high sequence identity. One of the configurations (populated at a level of ≈40 %) closely resembles that observed in various ligand-bound forms, providing evidence for conformational selection and a mechanistic link between protein dynamics and function. PMID:26946052

  2. A major antigenic domain of hantaviruses is located on the aminoproximal site of the viral nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Gött, P; Zöller, L; Darai, G; Bautz, E K

    1997-01-01

    Hantavirus nucleocapsid protein has recently been shown to be an immunodominant antigen in hemorrhagic with renal syndrome (HFRS) inducing an early and long-lasting immune response. Recombinant proteins representing various regions of the nucleocapsid proteins as well as segments of the G1 and the G2 glycoproteins of hantavirus strains CG18-20 (Puumala serotype) and Hantaan 76-118 have been expressed in E. coli. The antigenicity of these proteins was tested in enzyme immunoassays and immunoblots. These studies revealed that human IgG immune response is primarily directed against epitopes located within the amino acid residues 1 to 119 of the amino terminus of viral nucleocapsid proteins. This fragment was recognized by all HFRS patient sera tested (n = 128). The corresponding enzyme immunoassays proved to be more sensitive than the indirect immunofluorescence assays. Furthermore, the majority of bank vole monoclonal antibodies raised against Puumala virus reacted specifically with this site. A recombinant G1 protein (aa 59 to 401) derived from the CG 18-20 strain was recognized by 19 out of 20 sera from HFRS patients. PMID:9208453

  3. Nucleocapsid Protein from Fig Mosaic Virus Forms Cytoplasmic Agglomerates That Are Hauled by Endoplasmic Reticulum Streaming

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Kazuya; Miura, Chihiro; Maejima, Kensaku; Komatsu, Ken; Hashimoto, Masayoshi; Tomomitsu, Tatsuya; Fukuoka, Misato; Yusa, Akira; Yamaji, Yasuyuki

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although many studies have demonstrated intracellular movement of viral proteins or viral replication complexes, little is known about the mechanisms of their motility. In this study, we analyzed the localization and motility of the nucleocapsid protein (NP) of Fig mosaic virus (FMV), a negative-strand RNA virus belonging to the recently established genus Emaravirus. Electron microscopy of FMV-infected cells using immunogold labeling showed that NPs formed cytoplasmic agglomerates that were predominantly enveloped by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, while nonenveloped NP agglomerates also localized along the ER. Likewise, transiently expressed NPs formed agglomerates, designated NP bodies (NBs), in close proximity to the ER, as was the case in FMV-infected cells. Subcellular fractionation and electron microscopic analyses of NP-expressing cells revealed that NBs localized in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, we found that NBs moved rapidly with the streaming of the ER in an actomyosin-dependent manner. Brefeldin A treatment at a high concentration to disturb the ER network configuration induced aberrant accumulation of NBs in the perinuclear region, indicating that the ER network configuration is related to NB localization. Dominant negative inhibition of the class XI myosins, XI-1, XI-2, and XI-K, affected both ER streaming and NB movement in a similar pattern. Taken together, these results showed that NBs localize in the cytoplasm but in close proximity to the ER membrane to form enveloped particles and that this causes passive movements of cytoplasmic NBs by ER streaming. IMPORTANCE Intracellular trafficking is a primary and essential step for the cell-to-cell movement of viruses. To date, many studies have demonstrated the rapid intracellular movement of viral factors but have failed to provide evidence for the mechanism or biological significance of this motility. Here, we observed that agglomerates of nucleocapsid protein (NP) moved rapidly

  4. Solution structure and backbone dynamics of Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV) nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Y.; Kaluarachchi, K.; Giedroc, D. P.

    1998-01-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid proteins (NCPs) are CCHC-type zinc finger proteins that mediate virion RNA binding activities associated with retrovirus assembly and genomic RNA encapsidation. Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV), a type D retrovirus, encodes a 96-amino acid nucleocapsid protein, which contains two Cys-X2-Cys-X4-His-X4-Cys (CCHC) zinc fingers connected by an unusually long 15-amino acid linker. Homonuclear, two-dimensional sensitivity-enhanced 15N-1H, three-dimensional 15N-1H, and triple resonance NMR spectroscopy have been used to determine the solution structure and residue-specific backbone dynamics of the structured core domain of MPMV NCP containing residues 21-80. Structure calculations and spectral density mapping of N-H bond vector mobility reveal that MPMV NCP 21-80 is best described as two independently folded, rotationally uncorrelated globular domains connected by a seven-residue flexible linker consisting of residues 42-48. The N-terminal CCHC zinc finger domain (residues 24-37) appears to adopt a fold like that described previously for HIV-1 NCP; however, residues within this domain and the immediately adjacent linker region (residues 38-41) are characterized by extensive conformational averaging on the micros-ms time scale at 25 degrees C. In contrast to other NCPs, residues 49-77, which includes the C-terminal CCHC zinc-finger (residues 53-66), comprise a well-folded globular domain with the Val49-Pro-Gly-Leu52 sequence and C-terminal tail residues 67-77 characterized by amide proton exchange properties and 15N R1, R2, and (1H-15N) NOE values indistinguishable to residues in the core C-terminal finger. Twelve refined structural models of MPMV NCP residues 49-80 (pairwise backbone RMSD of 0.77 A) reveal that the side chains of the conserved Pro50 and Trp62 are in van der Waals contact with one another. Residues 70-73 in the C-terminal tail adopt a reverse turn-like structure. Ile77 is involved in extensive van der Waals contact with the core

  5. Nucleocapsid zinc fingers detected in retroviruses: EXAFS studies of intact viruses and the solution-state structure of the nucleocapsid protein from HIV-1.

    PubMed Central

    Summers, M. F.; Henderson, L. E.; Chance, M. R.; Bess, J. W.; South, T. L.; Blake, P. R.; Sagi, I.; Perez-Alvarado, G.; Sowder, R. C.; Hare, D. R.

    1992-01-01

    All retroviral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins contain one or two copies of an invariant 3Cys-1His array (CCHC = C-X2-C-X4-H-X4-C; C = Cys, H = His, X = variable amino acid) that are essential for RNA genome packaging and infectivity and have been proposed to function as zinc-binding domains. Although the arrays are capable of binding zinc in vitro, the physiological relevance of zinc coordination has not been firmly established. We have obtained zinc-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra for intact retroviruses in order to determine if virus-bound zinc, which is present in quantities nearly stoichiometric with the CCHC arrays (Bess, J.W., Jr., Powell, P.J., Issaq, H.J., Schumack, L.J., Grimes, M.K., Henderson, L.E., & Arthur, L.O., 1992, J. Virol. 66, 840-847), exists in a unique coordination environment. The viral EXAFS spectra obtained are remarkably similar to the spectrum of a model CCHC zinc finger peptide with known 3Cys-1His zinc coordination structure. This finding, combined with other biochemical results, indicates that the majority of the viral zinc is coordinated to the NC CCHC arrays in mature retroviruses. Based on these findings, we have extended our NMR studies of the HIV-1 NC protein and have determined its three-dimensional solution-state structure. The CCHC arrays of HIV-1 NC exist as independently folded, noninteracting domains on a flexible polypeptide chain, with conservatively substituted aromatic residues forming hydrophobic patches on the zinc finger surfaces. These residues are essential for RNA genome recognition, and fluorescence measurements indicate that at least one residue (Trp37) participates directly in binding to nucleic acids in vitro. The NC is only the third HIV-1 protein to be structurally characterized, and the combined EXAFS, structural, and nucleic acid-binding results provide a basis for the rational design of new NC-targeted antiviral agents and vaccines for the control of AIDS. PMID:1304355

  6. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus gene ac81 is required for nucleocapsid envelopment.

    PubMed

    Dong, Fang; Wang, Jinwen; Deng, Riqiang; Wang, Xunzhang

    2016-08-01

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) is a highly pathogenic Baculoviridae that targets insects, whose core gene, ac81, has an unknown function. To determine the role of ac81 in the life cycle of AcMNPV, an ac81-knockout (Ac-81KO-GP) was constructed through homologous recombination in Escherichia coli. We determined that no budded virions were produced in Ac-81KO-GP-transfected Sf9 cells, while there was no effect on viral DNA replication. Electron microscopy (EM) analysis revealed that occlusion-derived virions (ODVs) envelopment and the subsequent embedding of virions into occlusion bodies (OBs) were aborted due to ac81 deletion. Interestingly, confocal microscopy and immunofluorescence analysis revealed that Ac81 was predominantly localized to the ring zone of nuclei during the late phase of infection. In addition, Ac81 was localized to the mature and premature ODVs in virus-infected cells within the ring zone as revealed by immuno-electron microscopy (IEM) analysis. Furthermore, we determined that Ac81 contained a functional hydrophobic transmembrane (TM) domain, whose deletion resulted in a phenotype similar to that of Ac-81KO-GP. These results suggest that Ac81 might be a TM protein that played an important role in nucleocapsid envelopment. PMID:27212683

  7. Importance of Basic Residues in Binding of Rous Sarcoma Virus Nucleocapsid to the RNA Packaging Signal

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-gyung; Alidina, Annie; May, Cynthia; Linial, Maxine L.

    2003-01-01

    In the context of the Rous sarcoma virus Gag polyprotein, only the nucleocapsid (NC) domain is required to mediate the specificity of genomic RNA packaging. We have previously showed that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae three-hybrid system provides a rapid genetic assay to analyze the RNA and protein components of the avian retroviral RNA-Gag interactions necessary for specific encapsidation. In this study, using both site-directed mutagenesis and in vivo random screening in the yeast three-hybrid binding assay, we have examined the amino acids in NC required for genomic RNA binding. We found that we could delete either of the two Cys-His boxes without greatly abrogating either RNA binding or packaging, although the two Cys-His boxes are likely to be required for efficient viral assembly and release. In contrast, substitutions for the Zn-coordinating residues within the boxes did prevent RNA binding, suggesting changes in the overall conformation of the protein. In the basic region between the two Cys-His boxes, three positively charged residues, as well as basic residues flanking the two boxes, were necessary for both binding and packaging. Our results suggest that the stretches of positively charged residues within NC that need to be in a proper conformation appear to be responsible for selective recognition and binding to the packaging signal (Ψ)-containing RNAs. PMID:12525635

  8. Importance of basic residues in binding of rous sarcoma virus nucleocapsid to the RNA packaging signal.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-gyung; Alidina, Annie; May, Cynthia; Linial, Maxine L

    2003-02-01

    In the context of the Rous sarcoma virus Gag polyprotein, only the nucleocapsid (NC) domain is required to mediate the specificity of genomic RNA packaging. We have previously showed that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae three-hybrid system provides a rapid genetic assay to analyze the RNA and protein components of the avian retroviral RNA-Gag interactions necessary for specific encapsidation. In this study, using both site-directed mutagenesis and in vivo random screening in the yeast three-hybrid binding assay, we have examined the amino acids in NC required for genomic RNA binding. We found that we could delete either of the two Cys-His boxes without greatly abrogating either RNA binding or packaging, although the two Cys-His boxes are likely to be required for efficient viral assembly and release. In contrast, substitutions for the Zn-coordinating residues within the boxes did prevent RNA binding, suggesting changes in the overall conformation of the protein. In the basic region between the two Cys-His boxes, three positively charged residues, as well as basic residues flanking the two boxes, were necessary for both binding and packaging. Our results suggest that the stretches of positively charged residues within NC that need to be in a proper conformation appear to be responsible for selective recognition and binding to the packaging signal (Psi)-containing RNAs. PMID:12525635

  9. Mechanisms of HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein Inhibition by Lysyl-Peptidyl-Anthraquinone Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Sosic, Alice; Sinigaglia, Laura; Cappellini, Marta; Carli, Ilaria; Parolin, Cristina; Zagotto, Giuseppe; Sabatino, Giuseppina; Rovero, Paolo; Fabris, Dan; Gatto, Barbara

    2016-01-20

    The Nucleocapsid protein NCp7 (NC) is a nucleic acid chaperone responsible for essential steps of the HIV-1 life cycle and an attractive candidate for drug development. NC destabilizes nucleic acid structures and promotes the formation of annealed substrates for HIV-1 reverse transcription elongation. Short helical nucleic acid segments bordered by bulges and loops, such as the Trans-Activation Response element (TAR) of HIV-1 and its complementary sequence (cTAR), are nucleation elements for helix destabilization by NC and also preferred recognition sites for threading intercalators. Inspired by these observations, we have recently demonstrated that 2,6-disubstituted peptidyl-anthraquinone-conjugates inhibit the chaperone activities of recombinant NC in vitro, and that inhibition correlates with the stabilization of TAR and cTAR stem-loop structures. We describe here enhanced NC inhibitory activity by novel conjugates that exhibit longer peptidyl chains ending with a conserved N-terminal lysine. Their efficient inhibition of TAR/cTAR annealing mediated by NC originates from the combination of at least three different mechanisms, namely, their stabilizing effects on nucleic acids dynamics by threading intercalation, their ability to target TAR RNA substrate leading to a direct competition with the protein for the same binding sites on TAR, and, finally, their effective binding to the NC protein. Our results suggest that these molecules may represent the stepping-stone for the future development of NC-inhibitors capable of targeting the protein itself and its recognition site in RNA. PMID:26666402

  10. Identification of the interaction between vimentin and nucleocapsid protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Shi, HongYan; Chen, JianFei; Shi, Da; Dong, Hui; Feng, Li

    2015-03-16

    Nucleocapsid (N) protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) packages viral RNA genome to form a ribonucleoprotein complex. In addition to its function as a structural protein, N protein is involved in cell apoptosis or cell-cycle regulation. N protein possibly interacts with host factors to modulate cellular functions. To identify cellular proteins that interacted with N protein of TGEV, methods of GST pull-down and Co-IP were utilized to precipitate cellular proteins of swine testicular (ST). Bound cellular proteins were resolved by SDS-PAGE. Analysis of interacting proteins by mass spectrometry allowed identification of 15 cellular protein bands representative of 12 cellular proteins including vimentin that bound to N protein. Furthermore, the function of vimentin cytoskeleton in ST cells during TGEV infection was examined. Vimentin cytoskeleton was required for virus replication. The present study thus provides protein-related information about interaction of TGEV N protein with host cell that should be useful for understanding host cell response to coronavirus pathogenesis infection and the underlying mechanism of coronavirus replication. PMID:25533531

  11. Use of recombinant nucleocapsid proteins for serological diagnosis of Feline coronavirus infection by three immunochromatographic tests.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tomomi; Ishihara, Yuka; Matsuoka, Masafumi; Yokota, Shoko; Matsuoka-Kobayashi, Yukie; Doki, Tomoyoshi; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2013-10-26

    Three types of immunochromatographic assays (ICAs) were designed to detect anti-feline coronavirus (FCoV) antibodies. Recombinant FCoV nucleocapsid protein (rNP) was used as a conjugate or test line in all 3 ICA kits (CJIgG/TNP, CJNP/TNP, and CJNP/TPA). All three ICA kits were capable of detecting anti-FCoV antibodies; however, non-specific positive reactions of anti-FCoV antibody-negative plasma samples with the test line were observed in 2 ICA kits (CJIgG/TNP and CJNP/TNP), in which rNP was used as the test line. On the other hand, the specific detection of anti-FCoV antibodies was possible in all plasma, serum, whole blood, and ascitic fluid samples using the ICA kit with protein A blotted as the test line (CJNP/TPA). In addition, the specificity and sensitivity of ICA (CJNP/TPA) were equivalent to those of the reference ELISA. The development of simple antibody test methods using the principle of ICA (CJNP/TPA) for other coronavirus and feline viral infections is expected in the future. PMID:24513291

  12. Phenotypic mixing between different hepadnavirus nucleocapsid proteins reveals C protein dimerization to be cis preferential.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, C; Zhou, S; Ganem, D; Standring, D N

    1994-01-01

    Hepadnaviruses encode a single core (C) protein which assembles into a nucleocapsid containing the polymerase (P) protein and pregenomic RNA during viral replication in hepatocytes. We examined the ability of heterologous hepadnavirus C proteins to cross-oligomerize. Using a two-hybrid assay in HepG2 cells, we observed cross-oligomerization among the core proteins from hepatitis B virus (HBV), woodchuck hepatitis virus, and ground squirrel hepatitis virus. When expressed in Xenopus oocytes, in which hepadnavirus C proteins form capsids, the C polypeptides from woodchuck hepatitis virus and ground squirrel hepatitis virus, but not duck hepatitis B virus, can efficiently coassemble with an epitope-tagged HBV core polypeptide to form mixed capsids. However, when two different core mRNAs are coexpressed in oocytes the core monomers show a strong preference for forming homodimers rather than heterodimers. This holds true even for coexpression of two HBV C proteins differing only by an epitope tag, suggesting that core monomers are not free to diffuse and associate with other monomers. Thus, mixed capsids result from aggregation of different species of homodimers. Images PMID:7518533

  13. Observation of HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein induced TAR DNA melting at the single molecule level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosa, Gonzalo; Harbron, Elizabeth; O'Connor, Donald; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Barbara, Paul

    2003-03-01

    Reverse transcription of the HIV-1 RNA genome involves several nucleic acid rearrangement steps, and the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC) plays a key role in this process. NC is a nucleic acid chaperone protein, which facilitates the formation of the most stable nucleic acid structures. Single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (SM-FRET) measurements enable us to observe the NC-induced conformational fluctuations of a transactivation response region (TAR) DNA hairpin, which is part of the initial product of reverse transcription known as minus-strand strong-stop DNA. SM-FRET studies show that the majority of conformational fluctuations of the fluorescently-labeled TAR DNA hairpin in the presence of NC occur in <100 ms. A single molecule explores a wide range of confomations unpon NC binding, with fluctuations encompassing as many as 40 bases in both arms of the hairpin. No conformational fluctuations are observed with the dye-labeled TAR DNA hairpin in the absence of NC or when a labeled TAR DNA hairpin variant lacking bulges and internal loops is analyzed in the presence of NC. This study represents the first real-time observation of NC-mediated nucleic acid conformational fluctuations, revealing new insights into NC's nucleic acid chaperone activity.

  14. Inhibition of Rift Valley Fever Virus Replication and Perturbation of Nucleocapsid-RNA Interactions by Suramin

    PubMed Central

    Ellenbecker, Mary; Lanchy, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an emerging infectious pathogen that causes severe disease in humans and livestock and has the potential for global spread. There are currently no proven safe and effective treatment options for RVFV infection. Inhibition of RNA binding to RVFV nucleocapsid protein (N) represents an attractive antiviral therapeutic strategy because several essential steps in the RVFV replication cycle involve N binding to viral RNA. In this study, we demonstrate the therapeutic potential of the drug suramin by showing that it functions well as an inhibitor of RVFV replication at multiple stages in human cell culture. Suramin has been used previously to treat trypanosomiasis in Africa. We characterize the dynamic and cooperative nature of N-RNA binding interactions and the dissociation of high-molecular-mass ribonucleoprotein complexes using suramin, which we previously identified as an N-RNA binding inhibitor in a high-throughput screen. Finally, we elucidate the molecular mechanism used by suramin in vitro to disrupt both specific and nonspecific binding events important for ribonucleoprotein formation. PMID:25267680

  15. Characterization of cross-reactive and serotype-specific epitopes on the nucleocapsid proteins of hantaviruses.

    PubMed

    Tischler, Nicole D; Rosemblatt, Mario; Valenzuela, Pablo D T

    2008-07-01

    The hantavirus nucleocapsid (N) protein fulfills several key roles in virus replication and assembly and is the major antigen in humoral immune responses in humans and mice. Here we report on epitopes involved in serotype-specific and cross-reactive recognition of the N proteins of hantaviruses using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the N proteins of Andes virus (ANDV) and Sin Nombre virus (SNV). The mAbs define at least twelve different epitopic patterns which span eight sequences, including amino acids 17-59, 66-78, 79-91, 157-169, 222-234, 244-263, 274-286 and 326-338 on the SNV and ANDV N proteins. Studies on the cross-reactivity of these mAbs with different hantavirus N proteins indicated that epitopes located within amino acids 244-286 are related to serotype specificity. We analyzed further the location of epitopes with available three-dimensional structure information including the N-terminal coiled-coil and derived exposed and hidden residues of these epitopes. The generated recombinant N proteins and the characterized mAbs are functional tools being now available for hantavirus diagnostics and replication studies. PMID:18342973

  16. Intrinsic Nucleic Acid Dynamics Modulates HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein Binding to Its Targets

    PubMed Central

    Bazzi, Ali; Zargarian, Loussiné; Chaminade, Françoise; De Rocquigny, Hugues; René, Brigitte; Mély, Yves; Fossé, Philippe; Mauffret, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC) is involved in the rearrangement of nucleic acids occurring in key steps of reverse transcription. The protein, through its two zinc fingers, interacts preferentially with unpaired guanines in single-stranded sequences. In mini-cTAR stem-loop, which corresponds to the top half of the cDNA copy of the transactivation response element of the HIV-1 genome, NC was found to exhibit a clear preference for the TGG sequence at the bottom of mini-cTAR stem. To further understand how this site was selected among several potential binding sites containing unpaired guanines, we probed the intrinsic dynamics of mini-cTAR using 13C relaxation measurements. Results of spin relaxation time measurements have been analyzed using the model-free formalism and completed by dispersion relaxation measurements. Our data indicate that the preferentially recognized guanine in the lower part of the stem is exempt of conformational exchange and highly mobile. In contrast, the unrecognized unpaired guanines of mini-cTAR are involved in conformational exchange, probably related to transient base-pairs. These findings support the notion that NC preferentially recognizes unpaired guanines exhibiting a high degree of mobility. The ability of NC to discriminate between close sequences through their dynamic properties contributes to understanding how NC recognizes specific sites within the HIV genome. PMID:22745685

  17. Intrinsic nucleic acid dynamics modulates HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein binding to its targets.

    PubMed

    Bazzi, Ali; Zargarian, Loussiné; Chaminade, Françoise; De Rocquigny, Hugues; René, Brigitte; Mély, Yves; Fossé, Philippe; Mauffret, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC) is involved in the rearrangement of nucleic acids occurring in key steps of reverse transcription. The protein, through its two zinc fingers, interacts preferentially with unpaired guanines in single-stranded sequences. In mini-cTAR stem-loop, which corresponds to the top half of the cDNA copy of the transactivation response element of the HIV-1 genome, NC was found to exhibit a clear preference for the TGG sequence at the bottom of mini-cTAR stem. To further understand how this site was selected among several potential binding sites containing unpaired guanines, we probed the intrinsic dynamics of mini-cTAR using (13)C relaxation measurements. Results of spin relaxation time measurements have been analyzed using the model-free formalism and completed by dispersion relaxation measurements. Our data indicate that the preferentially recognized guanine in the lower part of the stem is exempt of conformational exchange and highly mobile. In contrast, the unrecognized unpaired guanines of mini-cTAR are involved in conformational exchange, probably related to transient base-pairs. These findings support the notion that NC preferentially recognizes unpaired guanines exhibiting a high degree of mobility. The ability of NC to discriminate between close sequences through their dynamic properties contributes to understanding how NC recognizes specific sites within the HIV genome. PMID:22745685

  18. Sin Nombre hantavirus nucleocapsid protein exhibits a metal-dependent DNA-specific endonucleolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Möncke-Buchner, Elisabeth; Szczepek, Michal; Bokelmann, Marcel; Heinemann, Patrick; Raftery, Martin J; Krüger, Detlev H; Reuter, Monika

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate that the nucleocapsid protein of Sin Nombre hantavirus (SNV-N) has a DNA-specific endonuclease activity. Upon incubation of SNV-N with DNA in the presence of magnesium or manganese, we observed DNA digestion in sequence-unspecific manner. In contrast, RNA was not affected under the same conditions. Moreover, pre-treatment of SNV-N with RNase before DNA cleavage increased the endonucleolytic activity. Structure-based protein fold prediction using known structures from the PDB database revealed that Asp residues in positions 88 and 103 of SNV-N show sequence similarity with the active site of the restriction endonuclease HindIII. Crystal structure of HindIII predicts that residues Asp93 and Asp108 are essential for coordination of the metal ions required for HindIII DNA cleavage. Therefore, we hypothesized that homologous residues in SNV-N, Asp88 and Asp103, may have a similar function. Replacing Asp88 and Asp103 by alanine led to an SNV-N protein almost completely abrogated for endonuclease activity. PMID:27261891

  19. Targeted binding of nucleocapsid protein transforms the folding landscape of HIV-1 TAR RNA

    PubMed Central

    McCauley, Micah J.; Rouzina, Ioulia; Manthei, Kelly A.; Gorelick, Robert J.; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Williams, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins are nucleic acid chaperones that play a key role in the viral life cycle. During reverse transcription, HIV-1 NC facilitates the rearrangement of nucleic acid secondary structure, allowing the transactivation response (TAR) RNA hairpin to be transiently destabilized and annealed to a cDNA hairpin. It is not clear how NC specifically destabilizes TAR RNA but does not strongly destabilize the resulting annealed RNA–DNA hybrid structure, which must be formed for reverse transcription to continue. By combining single-molecule optical tweezers measurements with a quantitative mfold-based model, we characterize the equilibrium TAR stability and unfolding barrier for TAR RNA. Experiments show that adding NC lowers the transition state barrier height while also dramatically shifting the barrier location. Incorporating TAR destabilization by NC into the mfold-based model reveals that a subset of preferential protein binding sites is responsible for the observed changes in the unfolding landscape, including the unusual shift in the transition state. We measure the destabilization induced at these NC binding sites and find that NC preferentially targets TAR RNA by binding to specific sequence contexts that are not present on the final annealed RNA–DNA hybrid structure. Thus, specific binding alters the entire RNA unfolding landscape, resulting in the dramatic destabilization of this specific structure that is required for reverse transcription. PMID:26483503

  20. Use of recombinant nucleocapsid proteins for serological diagnosis offeline coronavirus infection by three immunochromatographic tests.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tomomi; Ishihara, Yuka; Matsuoka, Masafumi; Yokota, Shoko; Matsuoka-Kobayashi, Yukie; Doki, Tomoyoshi; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2014-02-01

    Three types of immunochromatographic assays (ICAs) were designed to detect anti-feline coronavirus (FCoV) antibodies. Recombinant FCoV nucleocapsid protein (rNP) was used as a conjugate or test line in all 3 ICA kits (CJIgG/TNP, CJNP/TNP, and CJNP/TPA). All three ICA kits were capable of detecting anti-FCoV antibodies; however, non-specific positive reactions of anti-FCoV antibody-negative plasma samples with the test line were observed in 2 ICA kits (CJIgG/TNP and CJNP/TNP), in which rNP was used as the test line. On the other hand, the specific detection of anti-FCoV antibodies was possible in all plasma, serum, whole blood, and ascitic fluid samples using the ICA kit with protein A blotted as the test line (CJNP/TPA). In addition, the specificity and sensitivity of ICA (CJNP/TPA) were equivalent to those of the reference ELISA. The development of simple antibody test methods using the principle of ICA (CJNP/TPA) for other coronavirus and feline viral infections is expected in the future. PMID:24516876

  1. The RNA Binding Specificity of Human APOBEC3 Proteins Resembles That of HIV-1 Nucleocapsid.

    PubMed

    York, Ashley; Kutluay, Sebla B; Errando, Manel; Bieniasz, Paul D

    2016-08-01

    The APOBEC3 (A3) cytidine deaminases are antiretroviral proteins, whose targets include human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). Their incorporation into viral particles is critical for antiviral activity and is driven by interactions with the RNA molecules that are packaged into virions. However, it is unclear whether A3 proteins preferentially target RNA molecules that are destined to be packaged and if so, how. Using cross-linking immunoprecipitation sequencing (CLIP-seq), we determined the RNA binding preferences of the A3F, A3G and A3H proteins. We found that A3 proteins bind preferentially to RNA segments with particular properties, both in cells and in virions. Specifically, A3 proteins target RNA sequences that are G-rich and/or A-rich and are not scanned by ribosomes during translation. Comparative analyses of HIV-1 Gag, nucleocapsid (NC) and A3 RNA binding to HIV-1 RNA in cells and virions revealed the striking finding that A3 proteins partially mimic the RNA binding specificity of the HIV-1 NC protein. These findings suggest a model for A3 incorporation into HIV-1 virions in which an NC-like RNA binding specificity is determined by nucleotide composition rather than sequence. This model reconciles the promiscuity of A3 RNA binding that has been observed in previous studies with a presumed advantage that would accompany selective binding to RNAs that are destined to be packaged into virions. PMID:27541140

  2. Identification of a binding site for the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, K; Zambrano, N; Baldwin, E T; Shapiro, B A; Erickson, J W; Omichinski, J G; Clore, G M; Gronenborn, A M; Appella, E

    1993-06-01

    The nucleocapsid (NC) protein NCp7 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is important for encapsidation of the virus genome, RNA dimerization, and primer tRNA annealing in vitro. Here we present evidence from gel mobility-shift experiments indicating that NCp7 binds specifically to an RNA sequence. Two complexes were identified in native gels. The more slowly migrating complex contained two RNA molecules and one peptide, while the more rapidly migrating one is composed of one RNA and one peptide. Further, mutational analysis of the RNA shows that the predicted stem and loop structure of stem-loop 1 plays a critical role. Our results show that NCp7 binds to a unique RNA structure within the psi region; in addition, this structure is necessary for RNA dimerization. We propose that NCp7 binds to the RNA via a direct interaction of one zinc-binding motif to stem-loop 1 followed by binding of the other zinc-binding motif to stem-loop 1, stem-loop 2, or the linker region of the second RNA molecule, forming a bridge between the two RNAs. PMID:8506369

  3. Structure of the nucleocapsid protein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Doan, Danny N P; Dokland, Terje

    2003-11-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is an enveloped RNA virus of the Arteriviridae family, genomically related to the coronaviruses. PRRSV is the causative agent of both severe and persistent respiratory disease and reproductive failure in pigs worldwide. The PRRSV virion contains a core made of the 123 amino acid nucleocapsid (N) protein, a product of the ORF7 gene. We have determined the crystal structure of the capsid-forming domain of N. The structure was solved to 2.6 A resolution by SAD methods using the anomalous signal from sulfur. The N protein exists in the crystal as a tight dimer forming a four-stranded beta sheet floor superposed by two long alpha helices and flanked by two N- and two C-terminal alpha helices. The structure of N represents a new class of viral capsid-forming domains, distinctly different from those of other known enveloped viruses, but reminiscent of the coat protein of bacteriophage MS2. PMID:14604534

  4. Nucleocapsid protein structures from orthobunyaviruses reveal insight into ribonucleoprotein architecture and RNA polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Ariza, Antonio; Tanner, Sian J.; Walter, Cheryl T.; Dent, Kyle C.; Shepherd, Dale A.; Wu, Weining; Matthews, Susan V.; Hiscox, Julian A.; Green, Todd J.; Luo, Ming; Elliott, Richard M.; Fooks, Anthony R.; Ashcroft, Alison E.; Stonehouse, Nicola J.; Ranson, Neil A.; Barr, John N.; Edwards, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    All orthobunyaviruses possess three genome segments of single-stranded negative sense RNA that are encapsidated with the virus-encoded nucleocapsid (N) protein to form a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex, which is uncharacterized at high resolution. We report the crystal structure of both the Bunyamwera virus (BUNV) N–RNA complex and the unbound Schmallenberg virus (SBV) N protein, at resolutions of 3.20 and 2.75 Å, respectively. Both N proteins crystallized as ring-like tetramers and exhibit a high degree of structural similarity despite classification into different orthobunyavirus serogroups. The structures represent a new RNA-binding protein fold. BUNV N possesses a positively charged groove into which RNA is deeply sequestered, with the bases facing away from the solvent. This location is highly inaccessible, implying that RNA polymerization and other critical base pairing events in the virus life cycle require RNP disassembly. Mutational analysis of N protein supports a correlation between structure and function. Comparison between these crystal structures and electron microscopy images of both soluble tetramers and authentic RNPs suggests the N protein does not bind RNA as a repeating monomer; thus, it represents a newly described architecture for bunyavirus RNP assembly, with implications for many other segmented negative-strand RNA viruses. PMID:23595147

  5. Single DNA molecule stretching measures the activity of chemicals that target the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein

    PubMed Central

    Cruceanu, Margareta; Stephen, Andrew G.; Beuning, Penny J.; Gorelick, Robert J.; Fisher, Robert J.; Williams, Mark C.

    2006-01-01

    We develop a biophysical method for investigating chemical compounds that target the nucleic acid chaperone activity of HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NCp7). We used an optical tweezers instrument to stretch single λ-DNA molecules through the helix-to-coil transition in the presence of NCp7 and various chemical compounds. The change in the helix-coil transition width induced by wild-type NCp7 and its zinc finger variants correlates with in vitro nucleic acid chaperone activity measurements and in vivo assays. The compound-NC interaction measured here reduces NCp7’s capability to alter the transition width. Purified compounds from the NCI Diversity set, 119889, 119911, and 119913 reduce the chaperone activity of 5 nM NC in aqueous solution at 10 nM, 25 nM, and 100 nM concentration, respectively. Similarly, gallein reduced the activity of 4 nM NC at 100 nM concentration. Further analysis allows us to dissect the impact of each compound on both sequence-specific and non-sequence-specific DNA binding of NC, two of the main components of NC’s nucleic acid chaperone activity. These results suggest that DNA stretching experiments can be used to screen chemical compounds targeting NC proteins, and to further explore the mechanisms by which these compounds interact with NC and alter its nucleic acid chaperone activity. PMID:17034752

  6. The RNA Binding Specificity of Human APOBEC3 Proteins Resembles That of HIV-1 Nucleocapsid

    PubMed Central

    Errando, Manel; Bieniasz, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    The APOBEC3 (A3) cytidine deaminases are antiretroviral proteins, whose targets include human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). Their incorporation into viral particles is critical for antiviral activity and is driven by interactions with the RNA molecules that are packaged into virions. However, it is unclear whether A3 proteins preferentially target RNA molecules that are destined to be packaged and if so, how. Using cross-linking immunoprecipitation sequencing (CLIP-seq), we determined the RNA binding preferences of the A3F, A3G and A3H proteins. We found that A3 proteins bind preferentially to RNA segments with particular properties, both in cells and in virions. Specifically, A3 proteins target RNA sequences that are G-rich and/or A-rich and are not scanned by ribosomes during translation. Comparative analyses of HIV-1 Gag, nucleocapsid (NC) and A3 RNA binding to HIV-1 RNA in cells and virions revealed the striking finding that A3 proteins partially mimic the RNA binding specificity of the HIV-1 NC protein. These findings suggest a model for A3 incorporation into HIV-1 virions in which an NC-like RNA binding specificity is determined by nucleotide composition rather than sequence. This model reconciles the promiscuity of A3 RNA binding that has been observed in previous studies with a presumed advantage that would accompany selective binding to RNAs that are destined to be packaged into virions. PMID:27541140

  7. Phylogenetic analysis of Puumala virus subtype Bavaria, characterization and diagnostic use of its recombinant nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Marc; Kindler, Eveline; Emmerich, Petra; Esser, Jutta; Wagner-Wiening, Christiane; Wölfel, Roman; Petraityte-Burneikiene, Rasa; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Zvirbliene, Aurelija; Groschup, Martin H; Dobler, Gerhard; Pfeffer, Martin; Heckel, Gerald; Ulrich, Rainer G; Essbauer, Sandra S

    2011-10-01

    Puumala virus (PUUV) is the predominant hantavirus species in Germany causing large numbers of mild to moderate cases of haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS). During an outbreak in South-East Germany in 2004 a novel PUUV subtype designated Bavaria was identified as the causative agent of HFRS in humans [1]. Here we present a molecular characterization of this PUUV strain by investigating novel partial and almost entire nucleocapsid (N) protein-encoding small (S-) segment sequences and partial medium (M-) segment sequences from bank voles (Myodes glareolus) trapped in Lower Bavaria during 2004 and 2005. Phylogenetic analyses confirmed their classification as subtype Bavaria, which is further subdivided into four geographical clusters. The entire N protein, harbouring an amino-terminal hexahistidine tag, of the Bavarian strain was produced in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and showed a slightly different reactivity with N-specific monoclonal antibodies, compared to the yeast-expressed N protein of the PUUV strain Vranica/Hällnäs. Endpoint titration of human sera from different parts of Germany and from Finland revealed only very slight differences in the diagnostic value of the different recombinant proteins. Based on the novel N antigen indirect and monoclonal antibody capture IgG-ELISAs were established. By using serum panels from Germany and Finland their validation demonstrated a high sensitivity and specificity. In summary, our investigations demonstrated the Bavarian PUUV strain to be genetically divergent from other PUUV strains and the potential of its N protein for diagnostic applications. PMID:21598005

  8. Flexible segments modulate co-folding of dUTPase and nucleocapsid proteins.

    PubMed

    Németh-Pongrácz, Veronika; Barabás, Orsolya; Fuxreiter, Mónika; Simon, István; Pichová, Iva; Rumlová, Michalea; Zábranská, Helena; Svergun, Dmitri; Petoukhov, Maxim; Harmat, Veronika; Klement, Eva; Hunyadi-Gulyás, Eva; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Kónya, Emese; Vértessy, Beáta G

    2007-01-01

    The homotrimeric fusion protein nucleocapsid (NC)-dUTPase combines domains that participate in RNA/DNA folding, reverse transcription, and DNA repair in Mason-Pfizer monkey betaretrovirus infected cells. The structural organization of the fusion protein remained obscured by the N- and C-terminal flexible segments of dUTPase and the linker region connecting the two domains that are invisible in electron density maps. Small-angle X-ray scattering reveals that upon oligonucleotide binding the NC domains adopt the trimeric symmetry of dUTPase. High-resolution X-ray structures together with molecular modeling indicate that fusion with NC domains dramatically alters the conformation of the flexible C-terminus by perturbing the orientation of a critical beta-strand. Consequently, the C-terminal segment is capable of double backing upon the active site of its own monomer and stabilized by non-covalent interactions formed with the N-terminal segment. This co-folding of the dUTPase terminal segments, not observable in other homologous enzymes, is due to the presence of the fused NC domain. Structural and genomic advantages of fusing the NC domain to a shortened dUTPase in betaretroviruses and the possible physiological consequences are envisaged. PMID:17169987

  9. Flexible segments modulate co-folding of dUTPase and nucleocapsid proteins

    PubMed Central

    Németh-Pongrácz, Veronika; Barabás, Orsolya; Fuxreiter, Mónika; Simon, István; Pichová, Iva; Rumlová, Michalea; Zábranská, Helena; Svergun, Dmitri; Petoukhov, Maxim; Harmat, Veronika; Klement, Éva; Hunyadi-Gulyás, Éva; Medzihradszky, Katalin F.; Kónya, Emese; Vértessy, Beáta G.

    2007-01-01

    The homotrimeric fusion protein nucleocapsid (NC)-dUTPase combines domains that participate in RNA/DNA folding, reverse transcription, and DNA repair in Mason-Pfizer monkey betaretrovirus infected cells. The structural organization of the fusion protein remained obscured by the N- and C-terminal flexible segments of dUTPase and the linker region connecting the two domains that are invisible in electron density maps. Small-angle X-ray scattering reveals that upon oligonucleotide binding the NC domains adopt the trimeric symmetry of dUTPase. High-resolution X-ray structures together with molecular modeling indicate that fusion with NC domains dramatically alters the conformation of the flexible C-terminus by perturbing the orientation of a critical β-strand. Consequently, the C-terminal segment is capable of double backing upon the active site of its own monomer and stabilized by non-covalent interactions formed with the N-terminal segment. This co-folding of the dUTPase terminal segments, not observable in other homologous enzymes, is due to the presence of the fused NC domain. Structural and genomic advantages of fusing the NC domain to a shortened dUTPase in betaretroviruses and the possible physiological consequences are envisaged. PMID:17169987

  10. Diagnostic Potential of Puumala Virus Nucleocapsid Protein Expressed in Drosophila melanogaster Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brus Sjölander, Katarina; Golovljova, Irina; Plyusnin, Alexander; Lundkvist, Åke

    2000-01-01

    Puumala virus (PUU) nucleocapsid protein (N) was expressed in insect cells by using the Drosophila Expression System (DES; Invitrogen BV, Groningen, The Netherlands). Stable transfectants were established by hygromycin B selection and showed continuous expression of the recombinant protein (DES-PUU-N) for at least 5 months. The antigenic property of DES-PUU-N was shown to be identical to that of native PUU N when examined with a panel of hantavirus-specific monoclonal antibodies. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for detection of human immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG antibodies were established by using DES-PUU-N as antigen and were compared to assays based on native N. The ELISAs were evaluated for patient diagnosis and seroepidemiological purposes with panels of sera collected from patients with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and from healthy blood donors. Equally high sensitivities and specificities for detection of PUU-specific IgM in acute-phase HFRS patient sera were obtained by the ELISA based on DES-PUU-N and the assay based on the native antigen. For detection of PUU-specific IgG, the ELISA based on monoclonal antibody-captured DES-PUU-N antigen showed optimal sensitivity and specificity. PMID:10834996

  11. Characterization of the nucleocapsid protein of Hantaan virus strain 76-118 using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Yoshimatsu, K; Arikawa, J; Tamura, M; Yoshida, R; Lundkvist, A; Niklasson, B; Kariwa, H; Azuma, I

    1996-04-01

    We characterized the antigenic sites on the nucleocapsid protein (NP) of Hantaan virus (HTN) using 10 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). At least seven antigenic sites were revealed by a competitive binding assay and divided into three partially overlapping antigenic regions (I, II and III). Regions I [amino acids (aa) 1-103], II (aa 104-204) and III (aa 205-402) were mapped on NP by examining the reactivity of truncated gene products. Those that corresponded to region I reacted with immune mouse serum, indicating that the region contained major linear epitopes as reported with Four corners virus (FCV) and Puumala virus (PUU) NP. At least one MAb to each region inhibited viral growth when they were introduced into cells by scrape-loading. In addition, they conferred protection from a lethal HTN challenge to newborn mice. A PEPSCAN assay localized the epitope of MAb E5/G6 between aa 166-175. Since E5/G6, which had the highest inhibitory effect both in cells and in mice, showed no virus neutralization activity by ordinary neutralization test, this region is suggested to be important for the virus growth after entry into the cells. PMID:8627258

  12. Antigenic properties and diagnostic potential of puumala virus nucleocapsid protein expressed in insect cells.

    PubMed Central

    Vapalahti, O; Lundkvist, A; Kallio-Kokko, H; Paukku, K; Julkunen, I; Lankinen, H; Vaheri, A

    1996-01-01

    Puumala virus (PUU) is a member of the genus Hantavirus in the family Bunyaviridae and the causative agent of nephropathia epidemica, a European form of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. Sera of nephropathia epidemica patients react specifically with PUU nucleocapsid (N) protein. In order to safely provide large quantities of antigen for diagnostic purposes, PUU Sotkamo strain N protein was expressed by using the baculovirus system in Sf9 insect cells to up to 30 to 50% of the total cellular protein. The recombinant N protein (bac-PUU-N) was solubilized with 6 M urea, dialyzed, and purified by anion-exchange liquid chromatography. In an immunoglobulin M mu-capture assay purified and unpurified bac-PUU-N antigen showed identical results compared with the results of a similar assay based on native PUU antigen grown in Vero E6 cells. An immunoglobulin G monoclonal antibody-capture assay based on unpurified bac-PUU-N also showed results identical to those of an assay with native PUU-N antigen. Moreover, a panel of monoclonal antibodies reactive with eight different epitopes showed identical reactivity patterns with both natural and bac-PUU-N antigen, while two epitopes in PUU-N expressed as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli were not recognized. Puumala hantavirus N protein expressed by the baculovirus system offers a safe and inexpensive source of specific antigen for large-scale diagnostic and seroepidemiological purposes. PMID:8748286

  13. A MOTIF-BASED METHOD FOR PREDICTING INTERFACIAL RESIDUES IN BOTH THE RNA AND PROTEIN COMPONENTS OF PROTEIN-RNA COMPLEXES

    PubMed Central

    MANN, CARLA M.; DOBBS, DRENA

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to predict interfacial residues in protein-RNA complexes have largely focused on predicting RNA-binding residues in proteins. Computational methods for predicting protein-binding residues in RNA sequences, however, are a problem that has received relatively little attention to date. Although the value of sequence motifs for classifying and annotating protein sequences is well established, sequence motifs have not been widely applied to predicting interfacial residues in macromolecular complexes. Here, we propose a novel sequence motif-based method for “partner-specific” interfacial residue prediction. Given a specific protein-RNA pair, the goal is to simultaneously predict RNA binding residues in the protein sequence and protein-binding residues in the RNA sequence. In 5-fold cross validation experiments, our method, PS-PRIP, achieved 92% Specificity and 61% Sensitivity, with a Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.58 in predicting RNA-binding sites in proteins. The method achieved 69% Specificity and 75% Sensitivity, but with a low MCC of 0.13 in predicting protein binding sites in RNAs. Similar performance results were obtained when PS-PRIP was tested on two independent “blind” datasets of experimentally validated protein-RNA interactions, suggesting the method should be widely applicable and valuable for identifying potential interfacial residues in protein-RNA complexes for which structural information is not available. The PS-PRIP webserver and datasets are available at: http://pridb.gdcb.iastate.edu/PSPRIP/. PMID:26776208

  14. Vaccinia virus protein A3 is required for the production of normal immature virions and for the encapsidation of the nucleocapsid protein L4

    PubMed Central

    Jesus, Desyree Murta; Moussatche, Nissin; McFadden, Baron D.; Nielsen, Casey Paulasue; D’Costa, Susan M.; Condit, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    Maturation of the vaccinia virion is an intricate process that results in the organization of the viroplasm contained in immature virions into the lateral bodies, core wall and nucleocapsid observed in the mature particles. It is unclear how this organization takes place and studies with mutants are indispensable in understanding this process. By characterizing an inducible mutant in the A3L gene, we revealed that A3, an inner core wall protein, is important for formation of normal immature viruses and also for the correct localization of L4, a nucleocapsid protein. L4 did not accumulate in the viral factories in the absence of A3 and was not encapsidated in the particles that do not contain A3. These data strengthen our previously suggested hypothesis that A3 and L4 interact and that this interaction is critical for proper formation of the core wall and nucleocapsid. PMID:25765002

  15. Vaccinia virus protein A3 is required for the production of normal immature virions and for the encapsidation of the nucleocapsid protein L4.

    PubMed

    Jesus, Desyree Murta; Moussatche, Nissin; McFadden, Baron B D; Nielsen, Casey Paulasue; D'Costa, Susan M; Condit, Richard C

    2015-07-01

    Maturation of the vaccinia virion is an intricate process that results in the organization of the viroplasm contained in immature virions into the lateral bodies, core wall and nucleocapsid observed in the mature particles. It is unclear how this organization takes place and studies with mutants are indispensable in understanding this process. By characterizing an inducible mutant in the A3L gene, we revealed that A3, an inner core wall protein, is important for formation of normal immature viruses and also for the correct localization of L4, a nucleocapsid protein. L4 did not accumulate in the viral factories in the absence of A3 and was not encapsidated in the particles that do not contain A3. These data strengthen our previously suggested hypothesis that A3 and L4 interact and that this interaction is critical for proper formation of the core wall and nucleocapsid. PMID:25765002

  16. Improved Accuracy from Joint X-ray and NMR Refinement of a Protein-RNA Complex Structure.

    PubMed

    Carlon, Azzurra; Ravera, Enrico; Hennig, Janosch; Parigi, Giacomo; Sattler, Michael; Luchinat, Claudio

    2016-02-10

    Integrated experimental approaches play an increasingly important role in structural biology, taking advantage of the complementary information provided by different techniques. In particular, the combination of NMR data with X-ray diffraction patterns may provide accurate and precise information about local conformations not available from average-resolution X-ray structures alone. Here, we refined the structure of a ternary protein-protein-RNA complex comprising three domains, Sxl and Unr, bound to a single-stranded region derived in the msl2 mRNA. The joint X-ray and NMR refinement reveals that-despite the poor quality of the fit found for the original structural model-the NMR data can be largely accommodated within the uncertainty in the atom positioning (structural noise) from the primary X-ray data and that the overall domain arrangements and binding interfaces are preserved on passing from the crystalline state to the solution. The refinement highlights local conformational differences, which provide additional information on specific features of the structure. For example, conformational dynamics and heterogeneity observed at the interface between the CSD1 and the Sxl protein components in the ternary complex are revealed by the combination of NMR and crystallographic data. The joint refinement protocol offers unique opportunities to detect structural differences arising from various experimental conditions and reveals static or dynamic differences in the conformation of the biomolecule between the solution and the crystals. PMID:26761154

  17. Preparation of probe-modified RNA with 5-mercapto-UTP for analysis of protein-RNA interactions.

    PubMed Central

    He, B; Riggs, D L; Hanna, M M

    1995-01-01

    We report a modified synthesis for 5-mercapto-UTP (5-SH-UTP) and its use for analysis of protein-RNA interactions utilizing Escherichia coli and T7 RNA polymerases and yeast RNA polymerases I and III. 5-SH-UTP did not affect transcriptional pausing, Rho-independent termination or recognition of the E. coli transcription complex by NusA. RNA containing 5-SH-UMP did not crosslink to polymerase when irradiation was 302 or 337 nm. Transcription complexes containing RNA substituted with 5-SH-UMP were post-transcriptionally modified to attach a photocross-linking group to thiol-tagged nucleotides in the RNA on the surface of the polymerase of free in solution. The pKa for 5-SH-UTP was determined to be 5.6, so modification of the thiol groups in the RNA with p-azidophenacyl bromide could be carried out at pH 7. Addition of the transcription termination factor Rho, a RNA binding protein, to E. coli transcription complexes resulted in RNA crosslinking to Rho and to the beta and beta' subunits of polymerase. Using 5-SH-UTP, one can distinguish RNA binding domains on the surface of RNA polymerases or other RNA binding proteins from those buried within the protein. Images PMID:7537876

  18. Chemical modification of nucleotide bases and mRNA editing depend on hexamer or nucleoprotein phase in Sendai virus nucleocapsids.

    PubMed Central

    Iseni, Frédéric; Baudin, Florence; Garcin, Dominique; Marq, Jean-Baptiste; Ruigrok, Rob W H; Kolakofsky, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    The minus-strand genome of Sendai virus is an assembly of the nucleocapsid protein (N) and RNA, in which each N subunit is associated with precisely 6 nt. Only genomes that are a multiple of 6 nt long replicate efficiently or are found naturally, and their replication promoters contain sequence elements with hexamer repeats. Paramyxoviruses that are governed by this hexamer rule also edit their P gene mRNA during its synthesis, by G insertions, via a controlled form of viral RNA polymerase "stuttering" (pseudo-templated transcription). This stuttering is directed by a cis-acting sequence (3' UNN UUUUUU CCC), whose hexamer phase is conserved within each virus group. To determine whether the hexamer phase of a given nucleotide sequence within nucleocapsids affected its sensitivity to chemical modification, and whether hexamer phase of the mRNA editing site was important for the editing process, we prepared a matched set of viruses in which a model editing site was displaced 1 nt at a time relative to the genome ends. The relative abilities of these Sendai viruses to edit their mRNAs in cell culture infections were examined, and the ability of DMS to chemically modify the nucleotides of this cis-acting signal within resting viral nucleocapsids was also studied. Cytidines at hexamer phases 1 and 6 were the most accessible to chemical modification, whereas mRNA editing was most extensive when the stutter-site C was in positions 2 to 5. Apparently, the N subunit imprints the nucleotide sequence it is associated with, and affects both the initiation of viral RNA synthesis and mRNA editing. The N-subunit assembly thus appears to superimpose another code upon the genetic code. PMID:12212849

  19. A highly conserved region of the Sendai virus nucleocapsid protein contributes to the NP-NP binding domain.

    PubMed

    Myers, T M; Pieters, A; Moyer, S A

    1997-03-17

    The nucleocapsid protein (NP) of Sendai virus is an essential component of both the nucleocapsid template and the NP-NP and NP0-P protein complexes required for viral RNA replication. When expressed alone in mammalian cells NP self-assembles into nucleocapsid-like particles which appear to contain cellular RNA. To identify putative NP-NP binding domains, fusions between the monomeric maltose-binding protein (MBP) and portions of NP were constructed. The fusion proteins which contain the central conserved region (CCR) (amino acids 258-357, MBP-NP1) and the N-terminal 255 amino acids (MBP-NP2) of NP both oligomerized, suggesting that these regions contain sequences important for NP-NP self-assembly. In addition, the MBP-NP1 fusion protein can function as an inhibitor of viral RNA replication. Complementary studies involving site-directed mutagenesis of the full-length NP protein have identified specific residues in the CCR which are essential for viral RNA replication in vitro. Two such replication-negative mutants, F324V and F324I, were defective in self-assembly, suggesting that the Phe residue at amino acid 324 is essential for the NP-NP interaction. A third mutant, NP260-1 (Y260D), self-assembled to form aberrant oligomers which exhibit an unusual helical structure and appear to lack any associated RNA. The mutants NP299-5 (L299I and I300V) and NP313-2 (I313F), in contrast, appear to form all the required protein complexes, but were inactive in viral RNA replication, suggesting that interactions specifically with Sendai RNA were disrupted. These data have thus identified specific residues in the CCR of the native NP protein which appear to be important for NP-NP or NP-RNA interactions and for genome replication. PMID:9126246

  20. Human B-cell epitopes of Puumala virus nucleocapsid protein, the major antigen in early serological response.

    PubMed

    Vapalahti, O; Kallio-Kokko, H; Närvänen, A; Julkunen, I; Lundkvist, A; Plyusnin, A; Lehväslaiho, H; Brummer-Korvenkontio, M; Vaheri, A; Lankinen, H

    1995-08-01

    Puumala virus (PUU) is a member of the Hantavi rus genus in the family Bunyaviridae and the etiologic agent of nephropathia epidemica (NE), a form of haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS). In this study we compared the immunofluorescence patterns of NE sera and antibodies raised against recombinant PUU proteins and confirm that the nucleocapsid protein is the major target in the early IgG response of NE patients and provides the molecular basis for simple and rapid differentiation between acute illness and old immunity by granular vs. diffuse fluorescence staining in the indirect immunofluorescence test. The differential kinetics of B-cell responses to PUU nucleocapsid vs. envelope proteins was emphasized further by the endpoint titres of IgG antibodies to N, G1 and G2 proteins in NE patients. The granular fluorescence correlated with low IgG avidity in 99.8%, and diffuse fluorescence with high avidity in 100% of 617 NE sera studied. Epitope scanning with overlapping 14-mer peptides covering the whole nucleocapsid protein by a shift of 3 amino acids revealed six major antigenic epitopes recognized by sera from acute-phase NE patients. The epitopes clustered mainly in the hydrophilic regions, and two of them in a highly variable region which could probably serve as an antigen to distinguish serologically between infections of closely related hantaviruses, some apparently apathogenic, some causing lethal infections. The anti-peptide epitope pattern varied between different individuals and a collection of several pin-bound peptides was needed to be recognised by most NE sera studied. PMID:7595404

  1. Biophysical characterisation of the nucleocapsid protein from a highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus strain.

    PubMed

    Jourdan, Stefanie S; Osorio, Fernando A; Hiscox, Julian A

    2012-03-01

    The arterivirus nucleocapsid (N) protein is a multifunctional protein that binds viral RNA for encapsidation and has potential roles in host cell processes. This study characterised the N protein from a highly virulent North American strain of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). The association with viral RNA was mapped to defined motifs on the N protein. The results indicated that disulphide bridge formation played a key role in RNA binding, offering an explanation why infectious virus cannot be rescued if cysteine residues are mutated, and that multiple sites may promote RNA binding. PMID:22306009

  2. Bovine leukemia virus nucleocapsid protein is an efficient nucleic acid chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Qualley, Dominic F. Sokolove, Victoria L.; Ross, James L.

    2015-03-13

    Nucleocapsid proteins (NCs) direct the rearrangement of nucleic acids to form the most thermodynamically stable structure, and facilitate many steps throughout the life cycle of retroviruses. NCs bind strongly to nucleic acids (NAs) and promote NA aggregation by virtue of their cationic nature; they also destabilize the NA duplex via highly structured zinc-binding motifs. Thus, they are considered to be NA chaperones. While most retroviral NCs are structurally similar, differences are observed both within and between retroviral genera. In this work, we compare the NA binding and chaperone activity of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) NC to that of two other retroviral NCs: human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC, which is structurally similar to BLV NC but from a different retrovirus genus, and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC, which possesses several key structural differences from BLV NC but is from the same genus. Our data show that BLV and HIV-1 NCs bind to NAs with stronger affinity in relation to HTLV-1 NC, and that they also accelerate the annealing of complementary stem-loop structures to a greater extent. Analysis of kinetic parameters derived from the annealing data suggests that while all three NCs stimulate annealing by a two-step mechanism as previously reported, the relative contributions of each step to the overall annealing equilibrium are conserved between BLV and HIV-1 NCs but are different for HTLV-1 NC. It is concluded that while BLV and HTLV-1 belong to the same genus of retroviruses, processes that rely on NC may not be directly comparable. - Highlights: • BLV NC binds strongly to DNA and RNA. • BLV NC promotes mini-TAR annealing as well as HIV-1 NC. • Annealing kinetics suggest a low degree of similarity between BLV NC and HTLV-1 NC.

  3. TGEV nucleocapsid protein induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through activation of p53 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Li; Huang, Yong; Du, Qian; Dong, Feng; Zhao, Xiaomin; Zhang, Wenlong; Xu, Xingang; Tong, Dewen

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • TGEV N protein reduces cell viability by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. • TGEV N protein induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by regulating p53 signaling. • TGEV N protein plays important roles in TGEV-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. - Abstract: Our previous studies showed that TGEV infection could induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via activation of p53 signaling in cultured host cells. However, it is unclear which viral gene causes these effects. In this study, we investigated the effects of TGEV nucleocapsid (N) protein on PK-15 cells. We found that TGEV N protein suppressed cell proliferation by causing cell cycle arrest at the S and G2/M phases and apoptosis. Characterization of various cellular proteins that are involved in regulating cell cycle progression demonstrated that the expression of N gene resulted in an accumulation of p53 and p21, which suppressed cyclin B1, cdc2 and cdk2 expression. Moreover, the expression of TGEV N gene promoted translocation of Bax to mitochondria, which in turn caused the release of cytochrome c, followed by activation of caspase-3, resulting in cell apoptosis in the transfected PK-15 cells following cell cycle arrest. Further studies showed that p53 inhibitor attenuated TGEV N protein induced cell cycle arrest at S and G2/M phases and apoptosis through reversing the expression changes of cdc2, cdk2 and cyclin B1 and the translocation changes of Bax and cytochrome c induced by TGEV N protein. Taken together, these results demonstrated that TGEV N protein might play an important role in TGEV infection-induced p53 activation and cell cycle arrest at the S and G2/M phases and apoptosis occurrence.

  4. Development of an immunochromatography strip test based on truncated nucleocapsid antigens of three representative hantaviruses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hantaviruses are causative agents of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and nephropathia epidemica (NE) in the Old World and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in the New World. There is a need for time-saving diagnostic methods. In the present study, recombinant N antigens were used as antigens in an immunochromatography strip (ICG) test to detect specific IgG antibodies. Methods The N-terminal 103 amino acids (aa) of Hantaan virus (HTNV), Puumala virus (PUUV) and Andes virus (ANDV) nucleocapsid (N) protein were expressed in E. coli as representative antigens of three groups (HFRS, NE and HPS-causing viruses) of hantavirus. Five different types of ICG test strips, one antigen line on one strip for each of the three selected hantaviruses (HTNV, PUUV and ANDV), three antigen lines on one strip and a mixed antigen line on one strip, were developed and sensitivities were compared. Results A total of 87 convalescent-phase patient sera, including sera from 35 HFRS patients, 36 NE patients and 16 HPS patients, and 25 sera from healthy seronegative people as negative controls were used to evaluate the ICG test. Sensitivities of the three-line strip and mixed-line strip were similar to those of the single antigen strip (97.2 to 100%). On the other hand, all of the ICG test strips showed high specificities to healthy donors. Conclusion These results indicated that the ICG test with the three representative antigens is an effective serodiagnostic tool for screening and typing of hantavirus infection in humans. PMID:24885901

  5. The Multimerization of Hantavirus Nucleocapsid Protein Depends on Type-Specific Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimatsu, Kumiko; Lee, Byoung-Hee; Araki, Koichi; Morimatsu, Masami; Ogino, Michiko; Ebihara, Hideki; Arikawa, Jiro

    2003-01-01

    Multimerization of the Hantaan virus nucleocapsid protein (NP) in Hantaan virus-infected Vero E6 cells was observed in a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Recombinant and truncated NPs of Hantaan, Seoul, and Dobrava viruses lacking the N-terminal 49 amino acids were also detected as multimers. Although truncated NPs of Hantaan virus lacking the N-terminal 154 amino acids existed as a monomer, those of Seoul and Dobrava formed multimers. The multimerized truncated NP antigens of Seoul and Dobrava viruses could detect serotype-specific antibodies, whereas the monomeric truncated NP antigen of Hantaan virus lacking the N-terminal 154 amino acids could not, suggesting that a hantavirus serotype-specific epitope on the NP results in multimerization. The NP-NP interaction was also detected by using a yeast two-hybrid assay. Two regions, amino acids 100 to 125 (region 1) and amino acids 404 to 429 (region 2), were essential for the NP-NP interaction in yeast. The NP of Seoul virus in which the tryptophan at amino acid number 119 was replaced by alanine (W119A mutation) did not multimerize in the yeast two-hybrid assay, indicating that tryptophan 119 in region 1 is important for the NP-NP interaction in yeast. However, W119A mutants expressed in mammalian cells were detected as the multimer by using competitive ELISA. Similarly, the truncated NP of Seoul virus expressing amino acids 155 to 429 showed a homologous interaction in a competitive ELISA but not in the yeast two-hybrid assay, indicating that the C-terminal region is important for the multimerization detected by competitive ELISA. Combined, the results indicate that several steps and regions are involved in multimerization of hantavirus NP. PMID:12502810

  6. Structural requirements for nucleocapsid protein-mediated dimerization of avian leukosis virus RNA.

    PubMed

    Ali, Moez Ben; Chaminade, Françoise; Kanevsky, Igor; Ennifar, Eric; Josset, Laurence; Ficheux, Damien; Darlix, Jean-Luc; Fossé, Philippe

    2007-09-28

    The avian leukosis virus (ALV) belongs to the alpha group of retroviruses that are widespread in nature. The 5'-untranslated region of ALV genome contains the L3 element that is important for virus infectivity and the formation of an unstable RNA dimer in vitro. The L3 sequence is predicted to fold into a long stem-loop structure with two internal loops and an apical one. Phylogenetic analysis predicts that the L3 stem-loop is conserved in alpharetroviruses. Furthermore, a significant selection mechanism maintains a palindrome in the apical loop. The nucleocapsid protein of the alpharetroviruses (NCp12) is required for RNA dimer formation and replication in vivo. It is not known whether L3 can be an NCp12-mediated RNA dimerization site able to bind NCp12 with high affinity. Here, we report that NCp12 chaperones formation of a stable ALV RNA dimer through L3. To investigate the NCp12-mediated L3 dimerization reaction, we performed site-directed mutagenesis, gel retardation and heterodimerization assays and analysis of thermostability of dimeric RNAs. We show that the affinity of NCp12 for L3 is lower than its affinity for the microPsi RNA packaging signal. Results show that conservation of a long stem-loop structure and a loop-loop interaction are not required for NCp12-mediated L3 dimerization. We show that the L3 apical stem-loop is sufficient to form an extended duplex and the whole stem-loop L3 cannot be converted by NCp12 into a duplex extending throughout L3. Three-dimensional modelling of the stable L3 dimer supports the notion that the extended duplex may represent the minimal dimer linkage structure found in the genomic RNA. PMID:17706668

  7. Specific interactions between HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein and the TAR element.

    PubMed

    Kanevsky, Igor; Chaminade, Françoise; Ficheux, Damien; Moumen, Abdeladim; Gorelick, Robert; Negroni, Matteo; Darlix, Jean-Luc; Fossé, Philippe

    2005-05-20

    During retroviral reverse transcription, the minus-strand strong-stop DNA (ss-cDNA) is transferred to the 3' end of the genomic RNA and this requires the repeat (R) sequences present at both ends of the genome. In vitro, the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) R sequence can promote DNA strand transfer when present in ectopic internal positions. Using HIV-1 model systems, the R sequences and nucleocapsid protein (NC) were found to be key determinants of ss-cDNA transfer. To gain insights into specific interactions between HIV-1 NC and RNA and the influence of NC on R folding, we investigated the secondary structures of R in two natural contexts, namely at the 5' or 3' end of RNAs representing the terminal regions of the genome, and in two ectopic internal positions that also support efficient minus-strand transfer. To investigate the roles of NC zinc fingers and flanking basic domains in the NC/RNA interactions, we used NC mutants. Analyses of the viral RNA/NC complexes by chemical and enzymatic probings, and gel retardation assays were performed under conditions allowing ss-cDNA transfer by reverse transcriptase. We report that NC binds the TAR apical loop specifically in the four genetic contexts without changing the folding of the TAR hairpin and R region significantly, and this requires the NC zinc fingers. In addition, we show that efficient annealing of cTAR DNA to the 3' R relies on sequence complementarities between TAR and cTAR terminal loops. These findings suggest that the TAR apical loop in the acceptor RNA is the initiation site for the annealing reaction that is chaperoned by NC during the minus-strand transfer. PMID:15854644

  8. Nucleocapsid Protein: A Desirable Target for Future Therapies Against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Mori, Mattia; Kovalenko, Lesia; Lyonnais, Sébastien; Antaki, Danny; Torbett, Bruce E; Botta, Maurizio; Mirambeau, Gilles; Mély, Yves

    2015-01-01

    The currently available anti-HIV-1 therapeutics is highly beneficial to infected patients. However, clinical failures occur as a result of the ability of HIV-1 to rapidly mutate. One approach to overcome drug resistance is to target HIV-1 proteins that are highly conserved among phylogenetically distant viral strains and currently not targeted by available therapies. In this respect, the nucleocapsid (NC) protein, a zinc finger protein, is particularly attractive, as it is highly conserved and plays a central role in virus replication, mainly by interacting with nucleic acids. The compelling rationale for considering NC as a viable drug target is illustrated by the fact that point mutants of this protein lead to noninfectious viruses and by the inability to select viruses resistant to a first generation of anti-NC drugs. In our review, we discuss the most relevant properties and functions of NC, as well as recent developments of small molecules targeting NC. Zinc ejectors show strong antiviral activity, but are endowed with a low therapeutic index due to their lack of specificity, which has resulted in toxicity. Currently, they are mainly being investigated for use as topical microbicides. Greater specificity may be achieved by using non-covalent NC inhibitors (NCIs) targeting the hydrophobic platform at the top of the zinc fingers or key nucleic acid partners of NC. Within the last few years, innovative methodologies have been developed to identify NCIs. Though the antiviral activity of the identified NCIs needs still to be improved, these compounds strongly support the druggability of NC and pave the way for future structure-based design and optimization of efficient NCIs. PMID:25749978

  9. Sequence-Specific Binding of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Nucleocapsid Protein to Short Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Robert J.; Rein, Alan; Fivash, Matthew; Urbaneja, Maria A.; Casas-Finet, José R.; Medaglia, Maxine; Henderson, Louis E.

    1998-01-01

    We have analyzed the binding of recombinant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 nucleocapsid protein (NC) to very short oligonucleotides by using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology. Our experiments, which were conducted at a moderate salt concentration (0.15 M NaCl), showed that NC binds more stably to runs of d(G) than to other DNA homopolymers. However, it exhibits far more stable binding with the alternating base sequence d(TG)n than with any homopolymeric oligodeoxyribonucleotide; thus, it shows a strong sequence preference under our experimental conditions. We found that the minimum length of an alternating d(TG) sequence required for stable binding was five nucleotides. Stable binding to the tetranucleotide d(TG)2 was observed only under conditions where two tetranucleotide molecules were held in close spatial proximity. The stable, sequence-specific binding to d(TG)n required that both zinc fingers be present, each in its proper position in the NC protein, and was quite salt resistant, indicating a large hydrophobic contribution to the binding. Limited tests with RNA oligonucleotides indicated that the preferential sequence-specific binding observed with DNA also occurs with RNA. Evidence was also obtained that NC can bind to nucleic acid molecules in at least two distinct modes. The biological significance of the specific binding we have detected is not known; it may reflect the specificity with which the parent Gag polyprotein packages genomic RNA or may relate to the functions of NC after cleavage of the polyprotein, including its role as a nucleic acid chaperone. PMID:9499042

  10. Structure of the Rift Valley fever virus nucleocapsid protein reveals another architecture for RNA encapsidation

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, Donald D.; Piper, Mary E.; Gerrard, Sonja R.; Smith, Janet L.

    2010-07-13

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a negative-sense RNA virus (genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae) that infects livestock and humans and is endemic to sub-Saharan Africa. Like all negative-sense viruses, the segmented RNA genome of RVFV is encapsidated by a nucleocapsid protein (N). The 1.93-{angstrom} crystal structure of RVFV N and electron micrographs of ribonucleoprotein (RNP) reveal an encapsidated genome of substantially different organization than in other negative-sense RNA virus families. The RNP polymer, viewed in electron micrographs of both virus RNP and RNP reconstituted from purified N with a defined RNA, has an extended structure without helical symmetry. N-RNA species of {approx}100-kDa apparent molecular weight and heterogeneous composition were obtained by exhaustive ribonuclease treatment of virus RNP, by recombinant expression of N, and by reconstitution from purified N and an RNA oligomer. RNA-free N, obtained by denaturation and refolding, has a novel all-helical fold that is compact and well ordered at both the N and C termini. Unlike N of other negative-sense RNA viruses, RVFV N has no positively charged surface cleft for RNA binding and no protruding termini or loops to stabilize a defined N-RNA oligomer or RNP helix. A potential protein interaction site was identified in a conserved hydrophobic pocket. The nonhelical appearance of phlebovirus RNP, the heterogeneous {approx}100-kDa N-RNA multimer, and the N fold differ substantially from the RNP and N of other negative-sense RNA virus families and provide valuable insights into the structure of the encapsidated phlebovirus genome.

  11. Serologic Cross-Reactions between Nucleocapsid Proteins of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Human Metapneumovirus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yange; Pohl, Jan; Brooks, W. Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) share virologic and epidemiologic features and cause clinically similar respiratory illness predominantly in young children. In a previous study of acute febrile respiratory illness in Bangladesh, we tested paired serum specimens from 852 children presenting fever and cough for diagnostic increases in titers of antibody to hRSV and hMPV by enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Unexpectedly, of 93 serum pairs that showed a ≥4-fold increase in titers of antibody to hRSV, 24 (25.8%) showed a concurrent increase in titers of antibody to hMPV; of 91 pairs showing an increase to hMPV, 13 (14.3%) showed a concurrent increase to hRSV. We speculated that common antigens shared by these viruses explain this finding. Since the nucleocapsid (N) proteins of these viruses show the greatest sequence homology, we tested hyperimmune antisera prepared for each virus against baculovirus-expressed recombinant N (recN) proteins for potential cross-reactivity. The antisera were reciprocally reactive with both proteins. To localize common antigenic regions, we first expressed the carboxy domain of the hMPV N protein that was the most highly conserved region within the hRSV N protein. Although reciprocally reactive with antisera by Western blotting, this truncated protein did not react with hMPV IgG-positive human sera by EIA. Using 5 synthetic peptides that spanned the amino-terminal portion of the hMPV N protein, we identified a single peptide that was cross-reactive with human sera positive for either virus. Antiserum prepared for this peptide was reactive with recN proteins of both viruses, indicating that a common immunoreactive site exists in this region. PMID:25740767

  12. Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus Antigen Detection Using Monoclonal Antibodies to the Nucleocapsid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Fukuma, Aiko; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Yoshikawa, Tomoki; Tani, Hideki; Taniguchi, Satoshi; Kurosu, Takeshi; Egawa, Kazutaka; Suda, Yuto; Singh, Harpal; Nomachi, Taro; Gokuden, Mutsuyo; Ando, Katsuyuki; Kida, Kouji; Kan, Miki; Kato, Nobuyuki; Yoshikawa, Akira; Kitamoto, Hiroaki; Sato, Yuko; Suzuki, Tadaki; Hasegawa, Hideki; Morikawa, Shigeru; Shimojima, Masayuki; Saijo, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is a tick-borne infectious disease with a high case fatality rate, and is caused by the SFTS virus (SFTSV). SFTS is endemic to China, South Korea, and Japan. The viral RNA level in sera of patients with SFTS is known to be strongly associated with outcomes. Virological SFTS diagnosis with high sensitivity and specificity are required in disease endemic areas. Methodology/Principal Findings We generated novel monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the SFTSV nucleocapsid (N) protein and developed a sandwich antigen (Ag)-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of N protein of SFTSV using MAb and polyclonal antibody as capture and detection antibodies, respectively. The Ag-capture system was capable of detecting at least 350–1220 TCID50/100 μl/well from the culture supernatants of various SFTSV strains. The efficacy of the Ag-capture ELISA in SFTS diagnosis was evaluated using serum samples collected from patients suspected of having SFTS in Japan. All 24 serum samples (100%) containing high copy numbers of viral RNA (>105 copies/ml) showed a positive reaction in the Ag-capture ELISA, whereas 12 out of 15 serum samples (80%) containing low copy numbers of viral RNA (<105 copies/ml) showed a negative reaction in the Ag-capture ELISA. Among these Ag-capture ELISA-negative 12 samples, 9 (75%) were positive for IgG antibodies against SFTSV. Conclusions The newly developed Ag-capture ELISA is useful for SFTS diagnosis in acute phase patients with high levels of viremia. PMID:27045364

  13. Mutations in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Nucleocapsid Protein Zinc Fingers Cause Premature Reverse Transcription ▿

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, James A.; Bosche, William J.; Shatzer, Teresa L.; Johnson, Donald G.; Gorelick, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) requires that its genome be reverse transcribed into double-stranded DNA for productive infection of cells. This process requires not only reverse transcriptase but also the nucleocapsid protein (NC), which functions as a nucleic acid chaperone. Reverse transcription generally begins once the core of the virion enters the cytoplasm of a newly infected cell. However, some groups have reported the presence of low levels of viral DNA (vDNA) within particles prior to infection, the significance and function of which is controversial. We report here that several HIV-1 NC mutants, which we previously identified as being replication defective, contain abnormally high levels of intravirion DNA. These findings were further reinforced by the inability of these NC mutants to perform endogenous reverse transcription (ERT), in contrast to the readily measurable ERT activity in wild-type HIV-1. When either of the NC mutations is combined with a mutation that inactivates the viral protease, we observed a significant reduction in the amount of intravirion DNA. Interestingly, we also observed high levels of intravirion DNA in the context of wild-type NC when we delayed budding by means of a PTAP(−) (Pro-Thr-Ala-Pro) mutation. Premature reverse transcription is most probably occurring before these mutant virions bud from producer cells, but we fail to see any evidence that the NC mutations alter the timing of Pr55Gag processing. Critically, our results also suggest that the presence of intravirion vDNA could serve as a diagnostic for identifying replication-defective HIV-1. PMID:18667500

  14. Disulfide Linkages Mediating Nucleocapsid Protein Dimerization Are Not Required for Porcine Arterivirus Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rong; Chen, Chunyan; Sun, Zhi; Tan, Feifei; Zhuang, Jinshan; Tian, Debin; Tong, Guangzhi

    2012-01-01

    The nucleocapsid (N) proteins of the North American (type II) and European (type I) genotypes of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) share only approximately 60% genetic identity, and the functionality of N in both genotypes, especially its role in virion assembly, is still poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrated that the ORF7 3′ untranslated region or ORF7 of type I is functional in the type II PRRSV background. Based on these results, we postulated that the cysteine at position 90 (Cys90) of the type II N protein, which corresponds to an alanine in the type I protein, is nonessential for virus infectivity. The replacement of Cys90 with alanine confirmed this hypothesis. We then hypothesized that all of the cysteines in the N protein could be replaced by alanines. Mutational analysis revealed that, in contradiction to previously reported findings, the replacement of all of the cysteines, either singly or in combination, did not impair the growth of either type II or type I PRRSV. Treatment with the alkylating agent N-ethylmaleimide inhibited cysteine-mediated N dimerization in living cells but not in released virions. Additionally, bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays revealed noncovalent interactions in living cells among the N and C termini and between the N-terminal and C-terminal regions of the N proteins of both genotypes of PRRSV. These results demonstrate that the disulfide linkages mediating the N dimerization are not required for PRRSV viability and help to promote our understanding of the mechanism underlying arterivirus particle assembly. PMID:22301142

  15. Specificity of Rous sarcoma virus nucleocapsid protein in genomic RNA packaging.

    PubMed Central

    Dupraz, P; Spahr, P F

    1992-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis has shown that the nucleocapsid (NC) protein of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) is required for packaging and dimerization of viral RNA. However, it has not been possible to demonstrate, in vivo or in vitro, specific binding of viral RNA sequences by NC. To determine whether specific packaging of viral RNA is mediated by NC in vivo, we have constructed RSV mutants carrying sequences of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMuLV). Either the NC coding region alone, the psi RNA packaging sequence, or both the NC and psi sequences of MoMuLV were substituted for the corresponding regions of a full-length RSV clone to yield chimeric plasmid pAPrcMNC, pAPrc psi M, or pAPrcM psi M, respectively. In addition, a mutant of RSV in which the NC is completely deleted was tested as a control. Upon transfection, each of the chimeric mutants produced viral particles containing processed core proteins but were noninfectious. Thus, MoMuLV NC can replace RSV NC functionally in the assembly and release of mature virions but not in infectivity. Surprisingly, the full-deletion mutant showed a strong block in virus release, suggesting that NC is involved in virus assembly. Mutant PrcMNC packaged 50- to 100-fold less RSV RNA than did the wild type; in cotransfection experiments, MoMuLV RNA was preferentially packaged. This result suggests that the specific recognition of viral RNA during virus assembly involves, at least in part, the NC protein. Images PMID:1378506

  16. Cross-Protection against Challenge with Puumala Virus after Immunization with Nucleocapsid Proteins from Different Hantaviruses

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho Nicacio, Cristina; Gonzalez Della Valle, Marcelo; Padula, Paula; Björling, Ewa; Plyusnin, Alexander; Lundkvist, Åke

    2002-01-01

    Hantaviruses are rodent-borne agents that cause hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome or hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in humans. The nucleocapsid protein (N) is relatively conserved among hantaviruses and highly immunogenic in both laboratory animals and humans, and it has been shown to induce efficient protective immunity in animal models. To investigate the ability of recombinant N (rN) from different hantaviruses to elicit cross-protection, we immunized bank voles with rN from Puumala (PUUV), Topografov (TOPV), Andes (ANDV), and Dobrava (DOBV) viruses and subsequently challenged them with PUUV. All animals immunized with PUUV and TOPV rN were completely protected. In the group immunized with DOBV rN, 7 of 10 animals were protected, while only 3 of 8 animals were protected in the group immunized with ANDV rN, which is more closely related to PUUV rN than DOBV rN. Humoral and cellular immune responses after rN immunization were also investigated. The highest cross-reactive humoral responses against PUUV antigen were detected in sera from ANDV rN-immunized animals, followed by those from TOPV rN-immunized animals, and only very low antibody cross-reactivity was observed in sera from DOBV rN-immunized animals. In proliferation assays, T lymphocytes from animals immunized with all heterologous rNs were as efficiently recalled in vitro by PUUV rN as were T lymphocytes from animals immunized with homologous protein. In summary, this study has shown that hantavirus N can elicit cross-protective immune responses against PUUV, and the results suggest a more important role for the cellular arm of the immune response than for the humoral arm in cross-protection elicited by rN. PMID:12050380

  17. Mapping of B-cell epitopes in the nucleocapsid protein of Puumala hantavirus.

    PubMed

    Lundkvist, A; Meisel, H; Koletzki, D; Lankinen, H; Cifire, F; Geldmacher, A; Sibold, C; Gött, P; Vaheri, A; Krüger, D H; Ulrich, R

    2002-01-01

    Hantavirus nucleocapsid protein (N) has been proven to induce highly protective immune responses in animal models. The knowledge on the mechanisms behind N-induced protection is still limited, although recent data suggest that both cellular and humoral immune responses are of importance. For a detailed B-cell epitope mapping of Puumala hantavirus (PUUV) N, we used recombinant N derivatives of the Russian strain CG18-20 and the Swedish strain Vranica/Hällnäs, as well as overlapping synthetic peptides corresponding to the Finnish prototype strain Sotkamo. The majority of a panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) reacted with proteins derived from all included PUUV strains demonstrating the antigenic similarity of these proteins. In line with previous results, the epitopes of most mAbs were mapped within the 80 N-terminal amino acids of N. The present study further revealed that the epitopes of four mAbs raised against native viral N were located within amino acids 14-45, whereas one mAb raised against recombinant N was mapped to amino acids 14-39. Differences between the reactivity of the PUUV strains Vranica/Hällnäs and CG18-20 N suggested the importance of amino acid position 35 for the integrity of the epitopes. In line with the patterns obtained by the truncated recombinant proteins, mapping by overlapping peptides (PEPSCAN) confirmed a complex recognition pattern for most analyzed mAbs. Together, the results revealed the existence of several, partially overlapping, and discontinuous B-cell epitopes. In addition, based on differences within the same competition group, novel epitopes were defined. PMID:11952140

  18. Synergy between NMR measurements and MD simulations of protein/RNA complexes: application to the RRMs, the most common RNA recognition motifs.

    PubMed

    Krepl, Miroslav; Cléry, Antoine; Blatter, Markus; Allain, Frederic H T; Sponer, Jiri

    2016-07-27

    RNA recognition motif (RRM) proteins represent an abundant class of proteins playing key roles in RNA biology. We present a joint atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) and experimental study of two RRM-containing proteins bound with their single-stranded target RNAs, namely the Fox-1 and SRSF1 complexes. The simulations are used in conjunction with NMR spectroscopy to interpret and expand the available structural data. We accumulate more than 50 μs of simulations and show that the MD method is robust enough to reliably describe the structural dynamics of the RRM-RNA complexes. The simulations predict unanticipated specific participation of Arg142 at the protein-RNA interface of the SRFS1 complex, which is subsequently confirmed by NMR and ITC measurements. Several segments of the protein-RNA interface may involve competition between dynamical local substates rather than firmly formed interactions, which is indirectly consistent with the primary NMR data. We demonstrate that the simulations can be used to interpret the NMR atomistic models and can provide qualified predictions. Finally, we propose a protocol for 'MD-adapted structure ensemble' as a way to integrate the simulation predictions and expand upon the deposited NMR structures. Unbiased μs-scale atomistic MD could become a technique routinely complementing the NMR measurements of protein-RNA complexes. PMID:27193998

  19. The Nucleocapsid Protein of Coronaviruses Acts as a Viral Suppressor of RNA Silencing in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Lei; Wang, Haiying; Ji, Yanxi; Yang, Jie; Xu, Shan; Huang, Xingyu; Wang, Zidao; Qin, Lei; Tien, Po; Zhou, Xi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT RNA interference (RNAi) is a process of eukaryotic posttranscriptional gene silencing that functions in antiviral immunity in plants, nematodes, and insects. However, recent studies provided strong supports that RNAi also plays a role in antiviral mechanism in mammalian cells. To combat RNAi-mediated antiviral responses, many viruses encode viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSR) to facilitate their replication. VSRs have been widely studied for plant and insect viruses, but only a few have been defined for mammalian viruses currently. We identified a novel VSR from coronaviruses, a group of medically important mammalian viruses including Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), and showed that the nucleocapsid protein (N protein) of coronaviruses suppresses RNAi triggered by either short hairpin RNAs or small interfering RNAs in mammalian cells. Mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) is closely related to SARS-CoV in the family Coronaviridae and was used as a coronavirus replication model. The replication of MHV increased when the N proteins were expressed in trans, while knockdown of Dicer1 or Ago2 transcripts facilitated the MHV replication in mammalian cells. These results support the hypothesis that RNAi is a part of the antiviral immunity responses in mammalian cells. IMPORTANCE RNAi has been well known to play important antiviral roles from plants to invertebrates. However, recent studies provided strong supports that RNAi is also involved in antiviral response in mammalian cells. An important indication for RNAi-mediated antiviral activity in mammals is the fact that a number of mammalian viruses encode potent suppressors of RNA silencing. Our results demonstrate that coronavirus N protein could function as a VSR through its double-stranded RNA binding activity. Mutational analysis of N protein allowed us to find out the critical residues for the VSR activity. Using the MHV-A59 as the coronavirus replication model, we showed that ectopic

  20. Andes Virus Nucleocapsid Protein Interrupts Protein Kinase R Dimerization To Counteract Host Interference in Viral Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zekun

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pathogenic hantaviruses delay the type I interferon response during early stages of viral infection. However, the robust interferon response and induction of interferon-stimulated genes observed during later stages of hantavirus infection fail to combat the virus replication in infected cells. Protein kinase R (PKR), a classical interferon-stimulated gene product, phosphorylates the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF2α and causes translational shutdown to create roadblocks for the synthesis of viral proteins. The PKR-induced translational shutdown helps host cells to establish an antiviral state to interrupt virus replication. However, hantavirus-infected cells do not undergo translational shutdown and fail to establish an antiviral state during the course of viral infection. In this study, we showed for the first time that Andes virus infection induced PKR overexpression. However, the overexpressed PKR was not active due to a significant inhibition of autophosphorylation. Further studies revealed that Andes virus nucleocapsid protein inhibited PKR dimerization, a critical step required for PKR autophosphorylation to attain activity. The studies reported here establish a hantavirus nucleocapsid protein as a new PKR inhibitor. These studies provide mechanistic insights into hantavirus resistance to the host interferon response and solve the puzzle of the lack of translational shutdown observed in hantavirus-infected cells. The sensitivity of hantavirus replication to PKR has likely imposed a selective evolutionary pressure on hantaviruses to evade the PKR antiviral response for survival. We envision that evasion of the PKR antiviral response by NP has likely helped hantaviruses to exist during evolution and to survive in infected hosts with a multifaceted antiviral defense. IMPORTANCE Protein kinase R (PKR), a versatile antiviral host factor, shuts down the translation machinery upon activation in virus-infected cells to create hurdles for the

  1. A key role for the carboxy-terminal tail of the murine coronavirus nucleocapsid protein in coordination of genome packaging.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Lili; Koetzner, Cheri A; Masters, Paul S

    2016-07-01

    The prototype coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) exhibits highly selective packaging of its genomic positive-stranded RNA into assembled virions, despite the presence in infected cells of a large excess of subgenomic viral mRNAs. One component of this selectivity is the MHV packaging signal (PS), an RNA structure found only in genomic RNA and not in subgenomic RNAs. It was previously shown that a major determinant of PS recognition is the second of the two RNA-binding domains of the viral nucleocapsid (N) protein. We have now found that PS recognition additionally depends upon a segment of the carboxy-terminal tail (domain N3) of the N protein. Since domain N3 is also the region of N protein that interacts with the membrane (M) protein, this finding suggests a mechanism by which selective genome packaging is accomplished, through the coupling of genome encapsidation to virion assembly. PMID:27105451

  2. Cloning and characterization of DNA complementary to the canine distemper virus mRNA encoding matrix, phosphoprotein, and nucleocapsid protein

    SciTech Connect

    Rozenblatt, S.; Eizenberg, O.; Englund, G.; Bellini, W.J.

    1985-02-01

    Double-stranded cDNA synthesized from total polyadenylate-containing mRNA, extracted from monkey kidney cells infected with canine distemper virus (CDV), has been cloned into the PstI site of Escherichia coli plasmid pBR322. Clones containing canine distemper virus DNA were identified by hybridization to a canine distemper virus-specific, /sup 32/P-labeled cDNA. Four specific clones containing different classes of sequences have been identified. The cloned plasmids contain inserts of 800 (clone 44-80), 960 (clone 74-16), 1700 (clone 364), and 950 (clone 40-9) base pairs. The sizes of the mRNA species complementary to these inserts are 1500, 1850, 1850 and 2500 nucleotides, respectively, as determined by the Northern technique. Three of the cloned DNA fragments were further identified as the reverse transcripts of the mRNA coding for the matrix, phosphoprotein, and nucleocapsid protein of CDV.

  3. Identification of functionally important negatively charged residues in the carboxy end of mouse hepatitis coronavirus A59 nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sandhya; Bednar, Valerie; Blount, Andrew; Hogue, Brenda G

    2006-05-01

    The coronavirus nucleocapsid (N) protein is a multifunctional viral gene product that encapsidates the RNA genome and also plays some as yet not fully defined role in viral RNA replication and/or transcription. A number of conserved negatively charged amino acids are located within domain III in the carboxy end of all coronavirus N proteins. Previous studies suggested that the negatively charged residues are involved in virus assembly by mediating interaction between the membrane (M) protein carboxy tail and nucleocapsids. To determine the importance of these negatively charged residues, a series of alanine and other charged-residue substitutions were introduced in place of those in the N gene within a mouse hepatitis coronavirus A59 infectious clone. Aspartic acid residues 440 and 441 were identified as functionally important. Viruses could not be isolated when both residues were replaced by positively charged amino acids. When either amino acid was replaced by a positively charged residue or both were changed to alanine, viruses were recovered that contained second-site changes within N, but not in the M or envelope protein. The compensatory role of the new changes was confirmed by the construction of new viruses. A few viruses were recovered that retained the D441-to-arginine change and no compensatory changes. These viruses exhibited a small-plaque phenotype and produced significantly less virus. Overall, results from our analysis of a large panel of plaque-purified recovered viruses indicate that the negatively charged residues at positions 440 and 441 are key residues that appear to be involved in virus assembly. PMID:16611893

  4. The Baculovirus Core Gene ac83 Is Required for Nucleocapsid Assembly and Per Os Infectivity of Autographa californica Nucleopolyhedrovirus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shimao; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yan; Yuan, Meijin

    2013-01-01

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) ac83 is a baculovirus core gene whose function in the AcMNPV life cycle is unknown. In the present study, an ac83-knockout AcMNPV (vAc83KO) was constructed to investigate the function of ac83 through homologous recombination in Escherichia coli. No budded virions were produced in vAc83KO-transfected Sf9 cells, although viral DNA replication was unaffected. Electron microscopy revealed that nucleocapsid assembly was aborted due to the ac83 deletion. Domain-mapping studies revealed that the expression of Ac83 amino acid residues 451 to 600 partially rescued the ability of AcMNPV to produce infectious budded virions. Bioassays indicated that deletion of the chitin-binding domain of Ac83 resulted in the failure of oral infection of Trichoplusia ni larvae by AcMNPV, but AcMNPV remained infectious following intrahemocoelic injection, suggesting that the domain is involved in the binding of occlusion-derived virions to the peritrophic membrane and/or to other chitin-containing insect tissues. It has been demonstrated that Ac83 is the only component with a chitin-binding domain in the per os infectivity factor complex on the occlusion-derived virion envelope. Interestingly, a functional inner nuclear membrane sorting motif, which may facilitate the localization of Ac83 to the envelopes of occlusion-derived virions, was identified by immunofluorescence analysis. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Ac83 plays an important role in nucleocapsid assembly and the establishment of oral infection. PMID:23864639

  5. Roles of Phosphorylation of the Nucleocapsid Protein of Mumps Virus in Regulating Viral RNA Transcription and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Zengel, James; Pickar, Adrian; Xu, Pei; Lin, Alita

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mumps virus (MuV) is a paramyxovirus with a negative-sense nonsegmented RNA genome. The viral RNA genome is encapsidated by the nucleocapsid protein (NP) to form the ribonucleoprotein (RNP), which serves as a template for transcription and replication. In this study, we investigated the roles of phosphorylation sites of NP in MuV RNA synthesis. Using radioactive labeling, we first demonstrated that NP was phosphorylated in MuV-infected cells. Using both liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and in silico modeling, we identified nine putative phosphorylated residues within NP. We mutated these nine residues to alanine. Mutation of the serine residue at position 439 to alanine (S439A) was found to reduce the phosphorylation of NP in transfected cells by over 90%. The effects of these mutations on the MuV minigenome system were examined. The S439A mutant was found to have higher activity, four mutants had lower activity, and four mutants had similar activity compared to wild-type NP. MuV containing the S439A mutation had 90% reduced phosphorylation of NP and enhanced viral RNA synthesis and viral protein expression at early time points after infection, indicating that S439 is the major phosphorylation site of NP and its phosphorylation plays an important role in downregulating viral RNA synthesis. IMPORTANCE Mumps virus (MuV), a paramyxovirus, is an important human pathogen that is reemerging in human populations. Nucleocapsid protein (NP) of MuV is essential for viral RNA synthesis. We have identified the major phosphorylation site of NP. We have found that phosphorylation of NP plays a critical role in regulating viral RNA synthesis. The work will lead to a better understanding of viral RNA synthesis and possible novel targets for antiviral drug development. PMID:25948749

  6. A model for the dynamic nuclear/nucleolar/cytoplasmic trafficking of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) nucleocapsid protein based on live cell imaging

    SciTech Connect

    You, Jae-Hwan; Howell, Gareth; Pattnaik, Asit K.; Osorio, Fernando A.; Hiscox, Julian A.

    2008-08-15

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), an arterivirus, in common with many other positive strand RNA viruses, encodes a nucleocapsid (N) protein which can localise not only to the cytoplasm but also to the nucleolus in virus-infected cells and cells over-expressing N protein. The dynamic trafficking of positive strand RNA virus nucleocapsid proteins and PRRSV N protein in particular between the cytoplasm and nucleolus is unknown. In this study live imaging of permissive and non-permissive cell lines, in conjunction with photo-bleaching (FRAP and FLIP), was used to investigate the trafficking of fluorescent labeled (EGFP) PRRSV-N protein. The data indicated that EGFP-PRRSV-N protein was not permanently sequestered to the nucleolus and had equivalent mobility to cellular nucleolar proteins. Further the nuclear import of N protein appeared to occur faster than nuclear export, which may account for the observed relative distribution of N protein between the cytoplasm and the nucleolus.

  7. Fractionation of protein, RNA, and plasmid DNA in centrifugal precipitation chromatography using cationic surfactant CTAB containing inorganic salts NaCl and NH(4)Cl.

    PubMed

    Tomanee, Panarat; Hsu, James T; Ito, Yoichiro

    2004-10-01

    Centrifugal precipitation chromatography (CPC) is a separation system that mainly employs a moving concentration gradient of precipitating agent along a channel and solutes of interest undergo repetitive precipitation-dissolution, fractionate at different locations, and elute out from the channel according to their solubility in the precipitating agent solution. We report here for the first time the use of a CPC system for fractionation of protein, RNA, and plasmid DNA in clarified lysate produced from bacterial culture. The cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) was initially used as a precipitating agent; however, all biomolecules showed no differential solubility in the moving concentration gradient of this surfactant and, as a result, no separation of protein, RNA, and plasmid DNA occurred. To overcome this problem, inorganic salts such as NaCl and NH(4)Cl were introduced into solution of CTAB. The protein and RNA were found to have higher solubility with the addition of these salts and separated from the plasmid DNA. Decreasing surface charge density of CTAB upon addition of NaCl and NH(4)Cl was believed to lead to lower surfactant complexation, and therefore caused differential solubility and fractionation of these biomolecules. Addition of CaCl(2) did not improve solubility and separation of RNA from plasmid DNA. PMID:15384057

  8. An interactome map of the nucleocapsid protein from a highly pathogenic North American porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus strain generated using SILAC-based quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Jourdan, Stefanie S; Osorio, Fernando; Hiscox, Julian A

    2012-04-01

    Positive strand RNA viruses replicate in the cytoplasm of an infected cell and encode nucleocapsid proteins. These proteins function to promote encapsidation of the RNA genome and virus particle assembly as well as playing potential roles in viral RNA synthesis. Nucleocapsid proteins can also associate with cellular proteins and signaling cascades. The arterivirus nucleocapsid (N) protein is no exception and localizes to both the cytoplasm and the nucleolus in virus-infected cells. This study generated an interactome map of the N protein from a highly virulent North American strain of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). This is a major pathogen of swine resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Crucial to the study was the use of SILAC coupled to affinity purification using GFP-traps and LC-MS/MS. This approach has not been applied before to the investigation of host/viral protein interactomes and this study revealed that the PRRSV N protein interacts with the host cell protein synthesis machinery especially at the level of translation initiation as well as with the RNA post-transcriptional modification machinery. Applications of the dataset can include studies of virus/host interactions and the design of live attenuated recombinant vaccines. PMID:22522808

  9. The localization of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus nucleocapsid protein to the nucleolus of infected cells and identification of a potential nucleolar localization signal sequence.

    PubMed

    Rowland, R R; Kervin, R; Kuckleburg, C; Sperlich, A; Benfield, D A

    1999-10-01

    The nucleocapsid (N) protein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) possesses two regions in the N-terminal half of the protein that are enriched in basic amino acids. Presumably, these basic regions are important for packaging the RNA genome within the nucleocapsid of the virus. The PSORT computer program identified the same regions as nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequence motifs. N protein localization to the nucleus of infected MARC-145 and porcine pulmonary macrophages was observed following staining with SDOW-17 and SR-30 anti-N monoclonal antibodies. Furthermore, the co-localization of SR-30 antibody with human ANA-N autoimmune serum identified the nucleolus as the primary site for N protein localization within the nucleus. The localization of the N protein in the absence of infection was studied by following fluorescence in MARC-145 cells transfected with a plasmid, which expressed the nucleocapsid protein fused to an enhanced green fluorescent protein (N-EGFP). Similar to infected cells, N-EGFP localized to the cytoplasm and the nucleolus. Results following the transfection of cells with pEGFP fused to truncated portions of the N gene identified a region containing the second basic stretch of amino acids as the nucleolar localization signal (NoLS) sequence. Another outcome following transfection was the rapid disappearance of cells that expressed high levels of N-EGFP. However, cell death did not correlate with localization of N-EGFP to the nucleolus. PMID:10500278

  10. The ϕ6 Cystovirus Protein P7 Becomes Accessible to Antibodies in the Transcribing Nucleocapsid: A Probe for Viral Structural Elements

    PubMed Central

    Alimova, Alexandra; Wei, Hui; Katz, Al; Spatz, Linda; Gottlieb, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Protein P7 is a component of the cystovirus viral polymerase complex. In the unpackaged procapsid, the protein is situated in close proximity to the viral directed RNA polymerase, P2. Cryo-electron microscopy difference maps from the species ϕ6 procapsid have demonstrated that P7 and P2 likely interact prior to viral RNA packaging. The location of P7 in the post-packaged nucleocapsid (NC) remains unknown. P7 may translocate closer to the five-fold axis of a filled procapsid but this has not been directly visualized. We propose that monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) can be selected that serve as probe- reagents for viral assembly and structure. A set of Mabs have been isolated that recognize and bind to the ϕ6 P7. The antibody set contains five unique Mabs, four of which recognize a linear epitope and one which recognizes a conformational epitope. The four unique Mabs that recognize a linear epitope display restricted utilization of Vκ and VH genes. The restricted genetic range among 4 of the 5 antibodies implies that the antibody repertoire is limited. The limitation could be the consequence of a paucity of exposed antigenic sites on the ϕ6 P7 surface. It is further demonstrated that within ϕ6 nucleocapsids that are primed for early-phase transcription, P7 is partially accessible to the Mabs, indicating that the nucleocapsid shell (protein P8) has undergone partial disassembly exposing the protein’s antigenic sites. PMID:25799314

  11. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ac66 is required for the efficient egress of nucleocapsids from the nucleus, general synthesis of preoccluded virions and occlusion body formation

    SciTech Connect

    Ke Jianhao Wang Jinwen; Deng Riqiang; Wang Xunzhang

    2008-05-10

    Although orf66 (ac66) of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) is conserved in all sequenced lepidopteran baculovirus genomes, its function is not known. This paper describes generation of an ac66 knockout AcMNPV bacmid mutant and analyses of the influence of ac66 deletion on the virus replication in Sf-9 cells so as to determine the role of ac66 in the viral life cycle. Results indicated that budded virus (BV) yields were reduced over 99% in ac66-null mutant infected cells in comparison to that in wild-type virus infected cells. Optical microscopy revealed that occlusion body synthesis was significantly reduced in the ac66 knockout bacmid-transfected cells. In addition, ac66 deletion interrupted preoccluded virion synthesis. The mutant phenotype was rescued by an ac66 repair bacmid. On the other hand, real-time PCR analysis indicated that ac66 deletion did not affect the levels of viral DNA replication. Electron microscopy revealed that ac66 is not essential for nucleocapsid assembly, but for the efficient transport of nucleocapsids from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. These results suggested that ac66 plays an important role for the efficient exit of nucleocapsids from the nucleus to the cytoplasm for BV synthesis as well as for preoccluded virion and occlusion synthesis.

  12. DNA vaccination of mice with a plasmid encoding Puumala hantavirus nucleocapsid protein mimics the B-cell response induced by virus infection.

    PubMed

    Koletzki, D; Schirmbeck, R; Lundkvist, A; Meisel, H; Krüger, D H; Ulrich, R

    2001-11-17

    Inoculation of naked DNA has been applied for the development of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines against different viral infections. To study the humoral immune response induced by DNA vaccination we cloned the entire nucleocapsid protein-encoding sequence of the Puumala hantavirus strain Vranica/Hällnäs into the CMV promoter-driven expression unit of the plasmid pcDNA3, generating pcDNA3-VR1. A single dose injection of 50 microg of plasmid DNA into each M. tibialis anterior of BALB/c mice induced a high-titered antibody response against the nucleocapsid protein as documented 6 and 11 weeks after immunisation. PEPSCAN analysis of a serum pool of the pcDNA3-VR1-vaccinated animals revealed antibodies reacting with epitopes covering the whole nucleocapsid protein. The epitope-specificity of the immune response induced by DNA vaccination seems to reflect the antibody response in experimentally virus-infected bank voles (the natural host of the Puumala virus) and humans. The data suggest that DNA vaccination could be used for the identification of highly immunogenic epitopes in viral proteins. PMID:11035190

  13. An Eriophyid Mite-Transmitted Plant Virus Contains Eight Genomic RNA Segments with Unusual Heterogeneity in the Nucleocapsid Protein

    PubMed Central

    McMechan, Anthony J.; Wosula, Everlyne N.; Wegulo, Stephen N.; Graybosch, Robert A.; French, Roy; Hein, Gary L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Eriophyid mite-transmitted, multipartite, negative-sense RNA plant viruses with membrane-bound spherical virions are classified in the genus Emaravirus. We report here that the eriophyid mite-transmitted Wheat mosaic virus (WMoV), an Emaravirus, contains eight genomic RNA segments, the most in a known negative-sense RNA plant virus. Remarkably, two RNA 3 consensus sequences, encoding the nucleocapsid protein, were found with 12.5% sequence divergence, while no heterogeneity was observed in the consensus sequences of additional genomic RNA segments. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, glycoprotein precursor, nucleocapsid, and P4 proteins of WMoV exhibited limited sequence homology with the orthologous proteins of other emaraviruses, while proteins encoded by additional genomic RNA segments displayed no significant homology with proteins reported in GenBank, suggesting that the genus Emaravirus evolved further with a divergent octapartite genome. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that WMoV formed an evolutionary link between members of the Emaravirus genus and the family Bunyaviridae. Furthermore, genomic-length virus- and virus-complementary (vc)-sense strands of all WMoV genomic RNAs accumulated asymmetrically in infected wheat, with 10- to 20-fold more virus-sense genomic RNAs than vc-sense RNAs. These data further confirm the octapartite negative-sense polarity of the WMoV genome. In WMoV-infected wheat, subgenomic-length mRNAs of vc sense were detected for genomic RNAs 3, 4, 7, and 8 but not for other RNA species, suggesting that the open reading frames present in the complementary sense of genomic RNAs are expressed through subgenomic- or near-genomic-length vc-sense mRNAs. IMPORTANCE Wheat mosaic virus (WMoV), an Emaravirus, is the causal agent of High Plains disease of wheat and maize. In this study, we demonstrated that the genome of WMoV comprises eight negative-sense RNA segments with an unusual sequence polymorphism in an RNA encoding the nucleocapsid

  14. Autographa californica Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus orf132 Encodes a Nucleocapsid-Associated Protein Required for Budded-Virus and Multiply Enveloped Occlusion-Derived Virus Production

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ming; Wang, Shuo; Yue, Xiu-Li

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus orf132 (named ac132) has homologs in all genome-sequenced group I nucleopolyhedroviruses. Its role in the viral replication cycle is unknown. In this study, ac132 was shown to express a protein of around 28 kDa, which was determined to be associated with the nucleocapsids of both occlusion-derived virus and budded virus. Confocal microscopy showed that AC132 protein appeared in central region of the nucleus as early as 12 h postinfection with the virus. It formed a ring zone at the periphery of the nucleus by 24 h postinfection. To investigate its role in virus replication, ac132 was deleted from the viral genome by using a bacmid system. In the Sf9 cell culture transfected by the ac132 knockout bacmid, infection was restricted to single cells, and the titer of infectious budded virus was reduced to an undetectable level. However, viral DNA replication and the expression of late genes vp39 and odv-e25 and a reporter gene under the control of the very late gene p10 promoter were unaffected. Electron microscopy showed that nucleocapsids, virions, and occlusion bodies were synthesized in the cells transfected by an ac132 knockout bacmid, but the formation of the virogenic stroma and occlusion bodies was delayed, the numbers of enveloped nucleocapsids were reduced, and the occlusion bodies contained mainly singly enveloped nucleocapsids. AC132 was found to interact with envelope protein ODV-E18 and the viral DNA-binding protein P6.9. The data from this study suggest that ac132 possibly plays an important role in the assembly and envelopment of nucleocapsids. IMPORTANCE To our knowledge, this is the first report on a functional analysis of ac132. The data presented here demonstrate that ac132 is required for production of the budded virus and multiply enveloped occlusion-derived virus of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus. This article reveals unique phenotypic changes induced by ac132

  15. The humoral immune response to recombinant nucleocapsid antigen of canine distemper virus in dogs vaccinated with attenuated distemper virus or DNA encoding the nucleocapsid of wild-type virus.

    PubMed

    Griot-Wenk, M E; Cherpillod, P; Koch, A; Zurbriggen, R; Bruckner, L; Wittek, R; Zurbriggen, A

    2001-06-01

    This study compared the humoral immune response against the nucleocapsid-(N) protein of canine distemper virus (CDV) of dogs vaccinated with a multivalent vaccine against parvo-, adeno-, and parainfluenza virus and leptospira combined with either the attenuated CDV Onderstepoort strain (n = 15) or an expression plasmid containing the N-gene of CDV (n = 30). The vaccinations were applied intramuscularly three times at 2-week intervals beginning at the age of 6 weeks. None of the pre-immune sera recognized the recombinant N-protein, confirming the lack of maternal antibodies at this age. Immunization with DNA vaccine for CDV resulted in positive serum N-specific IgG response. However, their IgG (and IgA) titres were lower than those of CDV-vaccinated dogs. Likewise, DNA-vaccinated dogs did not show an IgM peak. There was no increase in N-specific serum IgE titres in either group. Serum titres to the other multivalent vaccine components were similar in both groups. PMID:11475904

  16. Deletion of a Cys-His motif from the Alpharetrovirus nucleocapsid domain reveals late domain mutant-like budding defects.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Gyung; Linial, Maxine L

    2006-03-30

    The Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) Gag polyprotein is the only protein required for virus assembly and release. We previously found that deletion of either one of the two Cys-His (CH) motifs in the RSV nucleocapsid (NC) protein did not abrogate Gag-Gag interactions, RNA binding, or packaging but greatly reduced virus production (E-G. Lee, A. Alidina et al., J. Virol. 77: 2010-2020, 2003). In this report, we have further investigated the effects of mutations in the CH motifs on virus assembly and release. Precise deletion of either CH motif, without affecting surrounding basic residues, reduced virus production by approximately 10-fold, similar to levels seen for late (L) domain mutants. Strikingly, transmission electron microscopy revealed that virions of both DeltaCH1 and DeltaCH2 mutants were assembled normally at the plasma membrane but were arrested in budding. Virus particles remained tethered to the membrane or to each other, reminiscent of L domain mutants, although the release defect appears to be independent of the L domain functions. Therefore, two CH motifs are likely to be required for budding independent of a requirement for either Gag-Gag interactions or RNA packaging. PMID:16406458

  17. Deletion of a Cys-His motif from the Alpharetrovirus nucleocapsid domain reveals late domain mutant-like budding defects

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eun-Gyung; Linial, Maxine L. . E-mail: mlinial@fhcrc.org

    2006-03-30

    The Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) Gag polyprotein is the only protein required for virus assembly and release. We previously found that deletion of either one of the two Cys-His (CH) motifs in the RSV nucleocapsid (NC) protein did not abrogate Gag-Gag interactions, RNA binding, or packaging but greatly reduced virus production (E-G. Lee, A. Alidina et al., J. Virol. 77: 2010-2020, 2003). In this report, we have further investigated the effects of mutations in the CH motifs on virus assembly and release. Precise deletion of either CH motif, without affecting surrounding basic residues, reduced virus production by approximately 10-fold, similar to levels seen for late (L) domain mutants. Strikingly, transmission electron microscopy revealed that virions of both {delta}CH1 and {delta}CH2 mutants were assembled normally at the plasma membrane but were arrested in budding. Virus particles remained tethered to the membrane or to each other, reminiscent of L domain mutants, although the release defect appears to be independent of the L domain functions. Therefore, two CH motifs are likely to be required for budding independent of a requirement for either Gag-Gag interactions or RNA packaging.

  18. HIV-1 nucleocapsid and ESCRT-component Tsg101 interplay prevents HIV from turning into a DNA-containing virus.

    PubMed

    Chamontin, Célia; Rassam, Patrice; Ferrer, Mireia; Racine, Pierre-Jean; Neyret, Aymeric; Lainé, Sébastien; Milhiet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Mougel, Marylène

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1, the agent of the AIDS pandemic, is an RNA virus that reverse transcribes its RNA genome (gRNA) into DNA, shortly after its entry into cells. Within cells, retroviral assembly requires thousands of structural Gag proteins and two copies of gRNA as well as cellular factors, which converge to the plasma membrane in a finely regulated timeline. In this process, the nucleocapsid domain of Gag (GagNC) ensures gRNA selection and packaging into virions. Subsequent budding and virus release require the recruitment of the cellular ESCRT machinery. Interestingly, mutating GagNC results into the release of DNA-containing viruses, by promo-ting reverse transcription (RTion) prior to virus release, through an unknown mechanism. Therefore, we explored the biogenesis of these DNA-containing particles, combining live-cell total internal-reflection fluorescent microscopy, electron microscopy, trans-complementation assays and biochemical characterization of viral particles. Our results reveal that DNA virus production is the consequence of budding defects associated with Gag aggregation at the plasma membrane and deficiency in the recruitment of Tsg101, a key ESCRT-I component. Indeed, targeting Tsg101 to virus assembly sites restores budding, restricts RTion and favors RNA packaging into viruses. Altogether, our results highlight the role of GagNC in the spatiotemporal control of RTion, via an ESCRT-I-dependent mechanism. PMID:25488808

  19. A single zinc finger optimizes the DNA interactions of the nucleocapsid protein of the yeast retrotransposon Ty3

    PubMed Central

    Chaurasiya, Kathy R.; Geertsema, Hylkje; Cristofari, Gaël; Darlix, Jean-Luc; Williams, Mark C.

    2012-01-01

    Reverse transcription in retroviruses and retrotransposons requires nucleic acid chaperones, which drive the rearrangement of nucleic acid conformation. The nucleic acid chaperone properties of the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) nucleocapsid (NC) protein have been extensively studied, and nucleic acid aggregation, duplex destabilization and rapid binding kinetics have been identified as major components of its activity. However, the properties of other nucleic acid chaperone proteins, such as retrotransposon Ty3 NC, a likely ancestor of HIV-1 NC, are not well understood. In addition, it is unclear whether a single zinc finger is sufficient to optimize the properties characteristic of HIV-1 NC. We used single-molecule DNA stretching as a method for detailed characterization of Ty3 NC chaperone activity. We found that wild type Ty3 NC aggregates single- and double-stranded DNA, weakly stabilizes dsDNA, and exhibits rapid binding kinetics. Single-molecule studies in the presence of Ty3 NC mutants show that the N-terminal basic residues and the unique zinc finger at the C-terminus are required for optimum chaperone activity in this system. While the single zinc finger is capable of optimizing Ty3 NC's DNA interaction kinetics, two zinc fingers may be necessary in order to facilitate the DNA destabilization exhibited by HIV-1 NC. PMID:21917850

  20. A single zinc finger optimizes the DNA interactions of the nucleocapsid protein of the yeast retrotransposon Ty3.

    PubMed

    Chaurasiya, Kathy R; Geertsema, Hylkje; Cristofari, Gaël; Darlix, Jean-Luc; Williams, Mark C

    2012-01-01

    Reverse transcription in retroviruses and retrotransposons requires nucleic acid chaperones, which drive the rearrangement of nucleic acid conformation. The nucleic acid chaperone properties of the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) nucleocapsid (NC) protein have been extensively studied, and nucleic acid aggregation, duplex destabilization and rapid binding kinetics have been identified as major components of its activity. However, the properties of other nucleic acid chaperone proteins, such as retrotransposon Ty3 NC, a likely ancestor of HIV-1 NC, are not well understood. In addition, it is unclear whether a single zinc finger is sufficient to optimize the properties characteristic of HIV-1 NC. We used single-molecule DNA stretching as a method for detailed characterization of Ty3 NC chaperone activity. We found that wild type Ty3 NC aggregates single- and double-stranded DNA, weakly stabilizes dsDNA, and exhibits rapid binding kinetics. Single-molecule studies in the presence of Ty3 NC mutants show that the N-terminal basic residues and the unique zinc finger at the C-terminus are required for optimum chaperone activity in this system. While the single zinc finger is capable of optimizing Ty3 NC's DNA interaction kinetics, two zinc fingers may be necessary in order to facilitate the DNA destabilization exhibited by HIV-1 NC. PMID:21917850

  1. Activation of NF-κB by nucleocapsid protein of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Luo, Rui; Fang, Liurong; Jiang, Yunbo; Jin, Hui; Wang, Yanwei; Wang, Dang; Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo

    2011-02-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) is a critical transcription factor in innate and adaptive immune response as well as cell proliferation and survival. Previous studies have demonstrated that porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection activated NF-κB pathways through IκB degradation in MARC-145 cells and alveolar macrophages. To evaluate the mechanisms behind this, we investigated the role of PRRSV structural proteins in the regulation of NF-κB. In this study, we screened the structural proteins of PRRSV by NF-κB DNA-binding assay and luciferase activity assay and demonstrated that PRRSV nucleocapsid (N) protein could activate NF-κB in MARC-145 cells. Furthermore, we revealed that the region between aa 30 and 73 of N protein was essential for its function in the activation of NF-κB. These results presented here provide a basis for understanding molecular mechanism of PRRSV infection and inflammation response. PMID:21063763

  2. Requirements for nucleocapsid-mediated regulation of reverse transcription during the late steps of HIV-1 assembly

    PubMed Central

    Racine, Pierre-Jean; Chamontin, Célia; de Rocquigny, Hugues; Bernacchi, Serena; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Mougel, Marylène

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 is a retrovirus replicating within cells by reverse transcribing its genomic RNA (gRNA) into DNA. Within cells, virus assembly requires the structural Gag proteins with few accessory proteins, notably the viral infectivity factor (Vif) and two copies of gRNA as well as cellular factors to converge to the plasma membrane. In this process, the nucleocapsid (NC) domain of Gag binds to the packaging signal of gRNA which consists of a series of stem-loops (SL1-SL3) ensuring gRNA selection and packaging into virions. Interestingly, mutating NC activates a late-occurring reverse transcription (RT) step in producer cells, leading to the release of DNA-containing HIV-1 particles. In order to decipher the molecular mechanism regulating this late RT, we explored the role of several key partners of NC, such as Vif, gRNA and the cellular cytidine deaminase APOBEC3G that restricts HIV-1 infection by targeting the RT. By studying combinations of deletions of these putative players, we revealed that NC, SL1-SL3 and in lesser extent Vif, but not APOBEC3G, interplay regulates the late RT. PMID:27273064

  3. Structure and Function Analysis of Nucleocapsid Protein of Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus Interacting with RNA Using Homology Modeling*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia; Feng, Zhike; Wu, Jianyan; Huang, Ying; Lu, Gang; Zhu, Min; Wang, Bi; Mao, Xiang; Tao, Xiaorong

    2015-01-01

    The nucleocapsid (N) protein of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) plays key roles in assembling genomic RNA into ribonucleoprotein (RNP), which serves as a template for both viral gene transcription and genome replication. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism of how TSWV N interacts with genomic RNA. In this study, we demonstrated that TSWV N protein forms a range of higher ordered oligomers. Analysis of the RNA binding behavior of N protein revealed that no specific oligomer binds to RNA preferentially, instead each type of N oligomer is able to bind RNA. To better characterize the structure and function of N protein interacting with RNA, we constructed homology models of TSWV N and N-RNA complexes. Based on these homology models, we demonstrated that the positively charged and polar amino acids in its predicted surface cleft of TSWV N are critical for RNA binding. Moreover, by N-RNA homology modeling, we found that the RNA component is deeply embedded in the predicted protein cleft; consistently, TSWV N-RNA complexes are relatively resistant to digestion by RNase. Collectively, using homology modeling, we determined the RNA binding sites on N and found a new protective feature for N protein. Our findings also provide novel insights into the molecular details of the interaction of TSWV N with RNA components. PMID:25540203

  4. Distinct nucleic acid interaction properties of HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein precursor NCp15 explain reduced viral infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Naiyer, Nada; Mitra, Mithun; Li, Jialin; Williams, Mark C.; Rouzina, Ioulia; Gorelick, Robert J.; Wu, Zhengrong; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2014-01-01

    During human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) maturation, three different forms of nucleocapsid (NC) protein—NCp15 (p9 + p6), NCp9 (p7 + SP2) and NCp7—appear successively. A mutant virus expressing NCp15 shows greatly reduced infectivity. Mature NCp7 is a chaperone protein that facilitates remodeling of nucleic acids (NAs) during reverse transcription. To understand the strict requirement for NCp15 processing, we compared the chaperone function of the three forms of NC. NCp15 anneals tRNA to the primer-binding site at a similar rate as NCp7, whereas NCp9 is the most efficient annealing protein. Assays to measure NA destabilization show a similar trend. Dynamic light scattering studies reveal that NCp15 forms much smaller aggregates relative to those formed by NCp7 and NCp9. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies suggest that the acidic p6 domain of HIV-1 NCp15 folds back and interacts with the basic zinc fingers. Neutralizing the acidic residues in p6 improves the annealing and aggregation activity of NCp15 to the level of NCp9 and increases the protein–NA aggregate size. Slower NCp15 dissociation kinetics is observed by single-molecule DNA stretching, consistent with the formation of electrostatic inter-protein contacts, which likely contribute to the distinct aggregate morphology, irregular HIV-1 core formation and non-infectious virus. PMID:24813443

  5. An engineered non-toxic superantigen increases cross presentation of hepatitis B virus nucleocapsids by human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Julie D; Manning, Kristy; Chokshi, Shilpa; Naoumov, Nikolai V; Fraser, John D; Dunbar, P Rod; Taylor, John A

    2014-01-01

    Virus like particles (VLPs) are potent immunogens capable of priming strong protective antibody responses due to their repetitive structural arrangement and affinity for specific B cell receptors. By contrast, T cell responses to VLPs can be weak due to inefficient uptake and processing by antigen presenting cells. We report here a novel strategy for increasing the T cell reactivity of a VLP, the nucleocapsid of hepatitis B virus, through covalent coupling of M1, an engineered form of the Streptococcal superantigen SMEZ2, that binds MHC II with high affinity but lacks its T cell mitogenic capability. M1:HBcAg conjugates bound to dendritic cells and were efficiently endocytosed into late endosomes. Human dendritic cells pulsed with M1:HBcAgs stimulated HBV-specific CD8(+) T cells more effectively than cells pulsed with native capsids indicating that the modified VLP was more effectively cross presented by APCs. Coupling of M1 was also able to induce significantly greater reactivity of human CD4(+) T cells specific for a common T-helper epitope. These studies indicate the potential of recombinant superantigens to act as flexible molecular adjuvants that can be incorporated into various subunit vaccine platforms leading to enhanced T cell reactivity in humans. PMID:24690680

  6. Differential contribution of basic residues to HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein’s nucleic acid chaperone function and retroviral replication

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hao; Mitra, Mithun; Naufer, M. Nabuan; McCauley, Micah J.; Gorelick, Robert J.; Rouzina, Ioulia; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Williams, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nucleocapsid (NC) protein contains 15 basic residues located throughout its 55-amino acid sequence, as well as one aromatic residue in each of its two CCHC-type zinc finger motifs. NC facilitates nucleic acid (NA) rearrangements via its chaperone activity, but the structural basis for this activity and its consequences in vivo are not completely understood. Here, we investigate the role played by basic residues in the N-terminal domain, the N-terminal zinc finger and the linker region between the two zinc fingers. We use in vitro ensemble and single-molecule DNA stretching experiments to measure the characteristics of wild-type and mutant HIV-1 NC proteins, and correlate these results with cell-based HIV-1 replication assays. All of the cationic residue mutations lead to NA interaction defects, as well as reduced HIV-1 infectivity, and these effects are most pronounced on neutralizing all five N-terminal cationic residues. HIV-1 infectivity in cells is correlated most strongly with NC’s NA annealing capabilities as well as its ability to intercalate the DNA duplex. Although NC’s aromatic residues participate directly in DNA intercalation, our findings suggest that specific basic residues enhance these interactions, resulting in optimal NA chaperone activity. PMID:24293648

  7. Development and Evaluation of Recombinant Nucleocapsid Protein Based Diagnostic ELISA for Detection of Nipah Virus Infection in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Diwakar D; Venkatesh, Govindarajalu; Tosh, Chakradhar; Patel, Priyanka; Mashoria, Anita; Gupta, Vandana; Gupta, Sourabh; D, Senthilkumar

    2016-01-01

    The recombinant viral protein-based indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is a cost-effective, safe, specific, and rapid tool to diagnose the viral infection. Nipah virus nucleocapsid (NiV-N) protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by histidine tag-based affinity chromatography. The N protein was selected based on its immuno dominance and conservation among different NiV strains. An indirect immunoglobulin G (IgG) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for swine sera was optimized using the recombinant NiV-N protein as an antigen along with negative and positive controls. The background reading was blocked using skim milk powder and chicken serum. A total number of 1709 swine serum samples from various states of India were tested with indirect ELISA and Western blot. The test was considered positive only when its total reactivity reading was higher than 0.2 cut-off value and the ratio of the total reactivity to the background reading was more than 2.0. Since specificity is high for Western blotting it was used as standard test for comparison of results of indirect ELISA. Sensitivity and specificity of indirect ELISA was 100% and 98.7%, respectively, in comparison with Western blotting. Recombinant N protein-based ELISA can be used in screening large number of serum samples for epidemiological investigations in developing countries where high containment laboratories are not available to handle this zoonotic virus. PMID:26327601

  8. Structural determinants of TAR RNA-DNA annealing in the absence and presence of HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein

    PubMed Central

    Kanevsky, Igor; Chaminade, Françoise; Chen, Yingying; Godet, Julien; René, Brigitte; Darlix, Jean-Luc; Mély, Yves; Mauffret, Olivier; Fossé, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Annealing of the TAR RNA hairpin to the cTAR DNA hairpin is required for the minus-strand transfer step of HIV-1 reverse transcription. HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC) plays a crucial role by facilitating annealing of the complementary hairpins. To gain insight into the mechanism of NC-mediated TAR RNA–DNA annealing, we used structural probes (nucleases and potassium permanganate), gel retardation assays, fluorescence anisotropy and cTAR mutants under conditions allowing strand transfer. In the absence of NC, cTAR DNA-TAR RNA annealing depends on nucleation through the apical loops. We show that the annealing intermediate of the kissing pathway is a loop–loop kissing complex involving six base-pairs and that the apical stems are not destabilized by this loop–loop interaction. Our data support a dynamic structure of the cTAR hairpin in the absence of NC, involving equilibrium between both the closed conformation and the partially open ‘Y’ conformation. This study is the first to show that the apical and internal loops of cTAR are weak and strong binding sites for NC, respectively. NC slightly destabilizes the lower stem that is adjacent to the internal loop and shifts the equilibrium toward the ‘Y’ conformation exhibiting at least 12 unpaired nucleotides in its lower part. PMID:21724607

  9. Structural determinants of TAR RNA-DNA annealing in the absence and presence of HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Kanevsky, Igor; Chaminade, Françoise; Chen, Yingying; Godet, Julien; René, Brigitte; Darlix, Jean-Luc; Mély, Yves; Mauffret, Olivier; Fossé, Philippe

    2011-10-01

    Annealing of the TAR RNA hairpin to the cTAR DNA hairpin is required for the minus-strand transfer step of HIV-1 reverse transcription. HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC) plays a crucial role by facilitating annealing of the complementary hairpins. To gain insight into the mechanism of NC-mediated TAR RNA-DNA annealing, we used structural probes (nucleases and potassium permanganate), gel retardation assays, fluorescence anisotropy and cTAR mutants under conditions allowing strand transfer. In the absence of NC, cTAR DNA-TAR RNA annealing depends on nucleation through the apical loops. We show that the annealing intermediate of the kissing pathway is a loop-loop kissing complex involving six base-pairs and that the apical stems are not destabilized by this loop-loop interaction. Our data support a dynamic structure of the cTAR hairpin in the absence of NC, involving equilibrium between both the closed conformation and the partially open 'Y' conformation. This study is the first to show that the apical and internal loops of cTAR are weak and strong binding sites for NC, respectively. NC slightly destabilizes the lower stem that is adjacent to the internal loop and shifts the equilibrium toward the 'Y' conformation exhibiting at least 12 unpaired nucleotides in its lower part. PMID:21724607

  10. Resistance of human T cell leukemia virus type 1 to APOBEC3G restriction is mediated by elements in nucleocapsid

    PubMed Central

    Derse, David; Hill, Shawn A.; Princler, Gerald; Lloyd, Patricia; Heidecker, Gisela

    2007-01-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) has evolved a remarkable strategy to thwart the antiviral effects of the cellular cytidine deaminase APOBEC3G (hA3G). HTLV-1 infects T lymphocytes in vivo, where, like HIV-1, it is likely to encounter hA3G. HIV-1 counteracts the innate antiviral activity of hA3G by producing an accessory protein, Vif, which hastens the degradation of hA3G. In contrast, HTLV-1 does not encode a Vif homologue; instead, HTLV-1 has evolved a cis-acting mechanism to prevent hA3G restriction. We demonstrate here that a peptide motif in the C terminus of the HTLV-1 nucleocapsid (NC) domain inhibits hA3G packaging into nascent virions. Mutation of amino acids within this region resulted in increased levels of hA3G incorporation into virions and increased susceptibility to hA3G restriction. Elements within the C-terminal extension of the NC domain are highly conserved among the primate T cell leukemia viruses, but this extension is absent in all other retroviral NC proteins. PMID:17299050

  11. Cloning and expression of a codon-optimized gene encoding the influenza A virus nucleocapsid protein in Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Suebwongsa, Namfon; Panya, Marutpong; Namwat, Wises; Sookprasert, Saovaluk; Redruello, Begoña; Mayo, Baltasar; Alvarez, Miguel A; Lulitanond, Viraphong

    2013-06-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) species are envisioned as promising vehicles for the mucosal delivery of therapeutic and prophylactic molecules, including the development of oral vaccines. In this study, we report on the expression of a synthetic nucleocapsid (NP) gene of influenza A virus in Lactobacillus casei. The NP gene was re-designed based on the tRNA pool and the codon usage preference of L. casei BL23. The codon-optimized NP gene was then cloned and expressed in L. casei RCEID02 under the control of a constitutive promoter, that of the lactate dehydrogenase (ldh) gene. The synthetic NP gene was further expressed in L. casei EM116 under the control of an inducible promoter, that of the structural gene of nisin (nisA) from Lactococcus lactis. Based on Western blot analysis, the specific protein band of NP, with a molecular mass of 56.0 kDa, was clearly detected in both expression systems. Thus, our study demonstrates the success of expressing a codon-optimized influenza A viral gene in L. casei. The suitability of the recombinant LAB strains for immunization purposes is currently under evaluation. PMID:24400527

  12. A recombinant nucleocapsid protein-based indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect antibodies against porcine deltacoronavirus

    PubMed Central

    SU, Mingjun; LI, Chunqiu; GUO, Donghua; WEI, Shan; WANG, Xinyu; GENG, Yufei; YAO, Shuang; GAO, Jing; WANG, Enyu; ZHAO, Xiwen; WANG, Zhihui; WANG, Jianfa; WU, Rui; FENG, Li; SUN, Dongbo

    2015-01-01

    Recently, porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV) has been proven to be associated with enteric disease in piglets. Diagnostic tools for serological surveys of PDCoV remain in the developmental stage when compared with those for other porcine coronaviruses. In our study, an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (rPDCoV-N-ELISA) was developed to detect antibodies against PDCoV using a histidine-tagged recombinant nucleocapsid (N) protein as an antigen. The rPDCoV-N-ELISA did not cross-react with antisera against porcine epidemic diarrhea virus, swine transmissible gastroenteritis virus, porcine group A rotavirus, classical swine fever virus, porcine circovirus-2, porcine pseudorabies virus, and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus; the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis revealed 100% sensitivity and 90.4% specificity of the rPDCoV-N-ELISA based on samples of known status (n=62). Analyses of field samples (n=319) using the rPDCoV-N-ELISA indicated that 11.59% of samples were positive for antibodies against PDCoV. These data demonstrated that the rPDCoV-N-ELISA can be used for epidemiological investigations of PDCoV and that PDCoV had a low serum prevalence in pig population in Heilongjiang province, northeast China. PMID:26668175

  13. A recombinant nucleocapsid protein-based indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect antibodies against porcine deltacoronavirus.

    PubMed

    Su, Mingjun; Li, Chunqiu; Guo, Donghua; Wei, Shan; Wang, Xinyu; Geng, Yufei; Yao, Shuang; Gao, Jing; Wang, Enyu; Zhao, Xiwen; Wang, Zhihui; Wang, Jianfa; Wu, Rui; Feng, Li; Sun, Dongbo

    2016-05-01

    Recently, porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV) has been proven to be associated with enteric disease in piglets. Diagnostic tools for serological surveys of PDCoV remain in the developmental stage when compared with those for other porcine coronaviruses. In our study, an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (rPDCoV-N-ELISA) was developed to detect antibodies against PDCoV using a histidine-tagged recombinant nucleocapsid (N) protein as an antigen. The rPDCoV-N-ELISA did not cross-react with antisera against porcine epidemic diarrhea virus, swine transmissible gastroenteritis virus, porcine group A rotavirus, classical swine fever virus, porcine circovirus-2, porcine pseudorabies virus, and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus; the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis revealed 100% sensitivity and 90.4% specificity of the rPDCoV-N-ELISA based on samples of known status (n=62). Analyses of field samples (n=319) using the rPDCoV-N-ELISA indicated that 11.59% of samples were positive for antibodies against PDCoV. These data demonstrated that the rPDCoV-N-ELISA can be used for epidemiological investigations of PDCoV and that PDCoV had a low serum prevalence in pig population in Heilongjiang province, northeast China. PMID:26668175

  14. Identification of a novel canine distemper virus B-cell epitope using a monoclonal antibody against nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Yi, Li; Cheng, Yuening; Zhang, Miao; Cao, Zhigang; Tong, Mingwei; Wang, Jianke; Zhao, Hang; Lin, Peng; Cheng, Shipeng

    2016-02-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is a member of the genus Morbillivirus within the family Paramyxoviridae and has caused severe economic losses in China. Nucleocapsid protein (N) is the major structural viral protein and can be used to diagnose CDV and other morbilliviruses. In this study, a specific monoclonal antibody, 1N8, was produced against the CDV N protein (amino acids 277-471). A linear N protein epitope was identified by subjecting a series of partially overlapping synthesized peptides to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis. The results indicated that (350)LNFGRSYFDPA(360) was the minimal linear epitope that could be recognized by mAb 1N8. ELISA assays revealed that mouse anti-CDV sera could also recognize the minimal linear epitope. Alignment analysis of the amino acid sequences indicated that the epitope was highly conserved among CDV strains. Furthermore, the epitope was conserved among other morbilliviruses, which was confirmed with PRRV using western blotting. Taken together, the results of this study may have potential applications in the development of suitable diagnostic techniques for CDV or other morbilliviruses. PMID:26514066

  15. Requirements for nucleocapsid-mediated regulation of reverse transcription during the late steps of HIV-1 assembly.

    PubMed

    Racine, Pierre-Jean; Chamontin, Célia; de Rocquigny, Hugues; Bernacchi, Serena; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Mougel, Marylène

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 is a retrovirus replicating within cells by reverse transcribing its genomic RNA (gRNA) into DNA. Within cells, virus assembly requires the structural Gag proteins with few accessory proteins, notably the viral infectivity factor (Vif) and two copies of gRNA as well as cellular factors to converge to the plasma membrane. In this process, the nucleocapsid (NC) domain of Gag binds to the packaging signal of gRNA which consists of a series of stem-loops (SL1-SL3) ensuring gRNA selection and packaging into virions. Interestingly, mutating NC activates a late-occurring reverse transcription (RT) step in producer cells, leading to the release of DNA-containing HIV-1 particles. In order to decipher the molecular mechanism regulating this late RT, we explored the role of several key partners of NC, such as Vif, gRNA and the cellular cytidine deaminase APOBEC3G that restricts HIV-1 infection by targeting the RT. By studying combinations of deletions of these putative players, we revealed that NC, SL1-SL3 and in lesser extent Vif, but not APOBEC3G, interplay regulates the late RT. PMID:27273064

  16. Nucleocapsid protein N of Lelystad virus: expression by recombinant baculovirus, immunological properties, and suitability for detection of serum antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Meulenberg, J J; Bende, R J; Pol, J M; Wensvoort, G; Moormann, R J

    1995-01-01

    The ORF7 gene, encoding the nucleocapsid protein N of Lelystad virus (LV), was inserted downstream of the P10 promoter into Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (baculovirus). The resulting recombinant baculovirus, designated bac-ORF7, expressed a 15-kDa protein in insect cells. This protein was similar in size to the N protein expressed by LV in CL2621 cells when it was analyzed on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. The N protein expressed by bac-ORF7 was immunoprecipitated with anti-ORF7 was immunoprecipitated with anti-ORF7 peptide serum, porcine convalescent-phase anti-LV serum, and N protein-specific monoclonal antibodies, indicating that this N protein had retained its native antigenic structure. The recombinant N protein was immunogenic in pigs, and the porcine antibodies raised against this protein recognized LV in an immunoperoxidase monolayer assay. However, pigs vaccinated twice with approximately 20 micrograms of N protein were not protected against a challenge with 10(5) 50% tissue culture infective doses of LV. Experimental and field sera directed against various European and North American isolates reacted with the N protein expressed by bac-ORF7 in a blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Therefore, the recombinant N protein may be useful for developing diagnostic assays for the detection of serum antibodies directed against different isolates of LV. PMID:8574824

  17. Critical Epitopes in the Nucleocapsid Protein of SFTS Virus Recognized by a Panel of SFTS Patients Derived Human Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Li; Zhang, Li; Sun, Lina; Lu, Jing; Wu, Wei; Li, Chuan; Zhang, Quanfu; Zhang, Fushun; Jin, Cong; Wang, Xianjun; Bi, Zhenqiang; Li, Dexin; Liang, Mifang

    2012-01-01

    Background SFTS virus (SFTSV) is a newly discovered pathogen to cause severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) in human. Successful control of SFTSV epidemic requires better understanding of the antigen target in humoral immune responses to the new bunyavirus infection. Methodology/Principal Findings We have generated a combinatorial Fab antibody phage library from two SFTS patients recovered from SFTSV infection. To date, 94 unique human antibodies have been generated and characterized from over 1200 Fab antibody clones obtained by screening the library with SFTS purified virions. All those monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) recognized the nucleocapsid (N) protein of SFTSV while none of them were reactive to the viral glycoproteins Gn or Gc. Furthermore, over screening 1000 mouse monoclonal antibody clones derived from SFTSV virions immunization, 462 clones reacted with N protein, while only 16 clones were reactive to glycoprotein. Furthermore, epitope mapping of SFTSV N protein was performed through molecular simulation, site mutation and competitive ELISA, and we found that at least 4 distinct antigenic epitopes within N protein were recognized by those human and mouse MAbs, in particular mutation of Glu10 to Ala10 abolished or significantly reduced the binding activity of nearly most SFTS patients derived MAbs. Conclusions/Significance The large number of human recombinant MAbs derived from SFTS patients recognized the viral N protein indicated the important role of the N protein in humoral responses to SFTSV infection, and the critical epitopes we defined in this study provided molecular basis for detection and diagnosis of SFTSV infection. PMID:22719874

  18. Characterization of Puumala virus nucleocapsid protein: identification of B-cell epitopes and domains involved in protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Lundkvist, A; Kallio-Kokko, H; Sjölander, K B; Lankinen, H; Niklasson, B; Vaheri, A; Vapalahti, O

    1996-02-15

    B-cell epitopes in the nucleocapsid protein (N) of Puumala (PUU) virus were investigated by use of truncated recombinant proteins and overlapping peptides. Six of seven epitopes, recognized by bank vole monoclonal antibodies, were localized within the amino-terminal region of the protein (aa 1-79). Polyclonal antibodies from wild-trapped or experimentally infected bank voles identified epitopes located over the entire protein. Antibody end-point titers to different N fragments indicated that the amino-terminal region is the major antigenic target in PUU virus-infected bank voles. To investigate the role of PUU virus N in protective immunity, we analyzed the immunogenicity of truncated recombinant N and developed an animal model based on colonized bank voles. No PUU virus N antigen, nor any glycoprotein-specific antibodies, could be detected after virus challenge in animals immunized with an amino-terminal fragment (aa 1-118), a fragment covering two thirds of the animals immunized with shorter N fragments displayed either N antigen, or glycoprotein-specific antibodies, suggestive of partial protection. Prechallenge sera from all groups of immunized animals were found negative or only weakly positive for neutralizing antibodies when assayed by focus reduction neutralization test, which indicated an important role for cell-mediated immunity in protection. PMID:8607269

  19. Cross-reactive and serospecific epitopes of nucleocapsid proteins of three hantaviruses: prospects for new diagnostic tools.

    PubMed

    Lindkvist, Marie; Näslund, Jonas; Ahlm, Clas; Bucht, Göran

    2008-10-01

    The diagnosis of infectious diseases is sometimes difficult because of extensive immunological cross-reactivity between related viral antigens. On the path of constructing sero-specific antigens, we have identified residues involved in sero-specific and cross-reactive recognition of the nucleocapsid proteins (NPs) of Puumala virus (PUUV), Seoul virus (SEOV), and Sin Nombre virus (SNV) using serum samples from 17 Nephropathia epidemica patients. The mapping was performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blot analysis on a panel of N protein derivatives and alanine-substitution mutants in the three different hantavirus backgrounds. Four regions with different serological profiles were identified encompassing the amino acids (aa) 14-17, 22-24, 26, and 35-38. One of the regions showed strong cross-reactivity and was important for the recognition of SEOV and SNV antigens, but not the PUUV antigen (aa 35-38). Two regions displayed perceivable SEOV characteristics (aa 14-17 and aa 22-24 and 26) and the combined result of the alanine replacements resulted in a synergetic effect against the PUUV antigen (aa 14-17, 22-24, 26). PMID:18620010

  20. Characterization of Tula virus antigenic determinants defined by monoclonal antibodies raised against baculovirus-expressed nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Lundkvist, A; Vapalahti, O; Plyusnin, A; Sjölander, K B; Niklasson, B; Vaheri, A

    1996-11-01

    Tula virus was recently discovered by RT-PCR in lung samples from European common voles (Microtus arvalis and M. rossiaemeridionalis). Since virus isolation attempts had been unsuccessful, no antigen was available for analysis or for use in immunoassays. To circumvent this, complete Tula virus nucleocapsid protein (bac-TUL-N) was expressed in recombinant baculovirus. Rodent antibody end-point titers to bac-TUL-N and to truncated N fragments indicated that the NH2-terminal region is the major antigenic target and revealed a high cross-reactivity to Puumala virus N. Immunizations with crude bac-TUL-N preparations evoked high antibody responses to native hantavirus N in Balb/c mice and six monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) were generated. Epitope mapping of the Mabs, based on a competitive assay, reactivities to truncated recombinant N fragments, and reactivity patterns to different hantavirus strains, identified five recognition sites on Tula virus N. One epitope, which was identified as specific for Tula virus, was located in a region of N which is highly variable among the hantaviruses (aa 226-293), and four epitopes were mapped to the NH2-terminal region of the protein (aa 1-61). One epitope was expressed only in Tula and Prospect Hill viruses, one epitope in Tula, Prospect Hill, Khabarovsk, and Sin Nombre viruses, while two epitopes were conserved in all examined hantaviruses carried by rodents within the subfamily Arvicolinae of the Muridae family. PMID:8896239

  1. Proteomics Analysis of Helicoverpa armigera Single Nucleocapsid Nucleopolyhedrovirus Identified Two New Occlusion-Derived Virus-Associated Proteins, HA44 and HA100▿

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Fei; Wang, Ranran; Fang, Minggang; Jiang, Yue; Xu, Xushi; Wang, Hanzhong; Chen, Xinwen; Arif, Basil M.; Guo, Lin; Wang, Hualin; Hu, Zhihong

    2007-01-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were used to analyze the structural proteins of the occlusion-derived virus (ODV) of Helicoverpa armigera single nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (HearNPV), a group II NPV. Twenty-three structural proteins of HearNPV ODV were identified, 21 of which have been reported previously as structural proteins or ODV-associated proteins in other baculoviruses. These include polyhedrin, P78/83, P49, ODV-E18, ODV-EC27, ODV-E56, P74, LEF-3, HA66 (AC66), DNA polymerase, GP41, VP39, P33, ODV-E25, helicase, P6.9, ODV/BV-C42, VP80, ODV-EC43, ODV-E66, and PIF-1. Two proteins encoded by HearNPV ORF44 (ha44) and ORF100 (ha100) were discovered as ODV-associated proteins for the first time. ha44 encodes a protein of 378 aa with a predicted mass of 42.8 kDa. ha100 encodes a protein of 510 aa with a predicted mass of 58.1 kDa and is a homologue of the gene for poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (parg). Western blot analysis and immunoelectron microscopy confirmed that HA44 is associated with the nucleocapsid and HA100 is associated with both the nucleocapsid and the envelope of HearNPV ODV. HA44 is conserved in group II NPVs and granuloviruses but does not exist in group I NPVs, while HA100 is conserved only in group II NPVs. PMID:17581982

  2. [Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of antibodies to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, by using recombinant nucleocapsid protein N].

    PubMed

    Bogdanova, V S; Tsibezov, V V; Grabovetskiĭ, V V; Eliseeva, O V; Grebennikova, T V; Verkhovskiĭ, O A; Zabereshchnyĭ, A D; Aliper, T I

    2007-01-01

    Recombinant nucleocapsid (rN) protein N of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) was prepared, by using the E. coli expressiom system. Insertion of a polyhistidine marker into the structure of the protein allowed the latter to be purified by metal-chelate affinity chromatography. The purity of protein was confirmed by PAAG electrophoresis and its immunospecificity was verified by immunoblotting using rN-specific monoclonal antibodies. The protein was used as an antigen to develop indirect ELISA of PRRSV antibodies. ELISA was shown to be highly sensitive and specific. PMID:17500240

  3. The Herpes Simplex Virus Protein pUL31 Escorts Nucleocapsids to Sites of Nuclear Egress, a Process Coordinated by Its N-Terminal Domain.

    PubMed

    Funk, Christina; Ott, Melanie; Raschbichler, Verena; Nagel, Claus-Henning; Binz, Anne; Sodeik, Beate; Bauerfeind, Rudolf; Bailer, Susanne M

    2015-06-01

    Progeny capsids of herpesviruses leave the nucleus by budding through the nuclear envelope. Two viral proteins, the membrane protein pUL34 and the nucleo-phosphoprotein pUL31 form the nuclear egress complex that is required for capsid egress out of the nucleus. All pUL31 orthologs are composed of a diverse N-terminal domain with 1 to 3 basic patches and a conserved C-terminal domain. To decipher the functions of the N-terminal domain, we have generated several Herpes simplex virus mutants and show here that the N-terminal domain of pUL31 is essential with basic patches being critical for viral propagation. pUL31 and pUL34 entered the nucleus independently of each other via separate routes and the N-terminal domain of pUL31 was required to prevent their premature interaction in the cytoplasm. Unexpectedly, a classical bipartite nuclear localization signal embedded in this domain was not required for nuclear import of pUL31. In the nucleus, pUL31 associated with the nuclear envelope and newly formed capsids. Viral mutants lacking the N-terminal domain or with its basic patches neutralized still associated with nucleocapsids but were unable to translocate them to the nuclear envelope. Replacing the authentic basic patches with a novel artificial one resulted in HSV1(17+)Lox-UL31-hbpmp1mp2, that was viable but delayed in nuclear egress and compromised in viral production. Thus, while the C-terminal domain of pUL31 is sufficient for the interaction with nucleocapsids, the N-terminal domain was essential for capsid translocation to sites of nuclear egress and a coordinated interaction with pUL34. Our data indicate an orchestrated sequence of events with pUL31 binding to nucleocapsids and escorting them to the inner nuclear envelope. We propose a common mechanism for herpesviral nuclear egress: pUL31 is required for intranuclear translocation of nucleocapsids and subsequent interaction with pUL34 thereby coupling capsid maturation with primary envelopment. PMID:26083367

  4. The Herpes Simplex Virus Protein pUL31 Escorts Nucleocapsids to Sites of Nuclear Egress, a Process Coordinated by Its N-Terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Claus-Henning; Binz, Anne; Sodeik, Beate; Bauerfeind, Rudolf; Bailer, Susanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Progeny capsids of herpesviruses leave the nucleus by budding through the nuclear envelope. Two viral proteins, the membrane protein pUL34 and the nucleo-phosphoprotein pUL31 form the nuclear egress complex that is required for capsid egress out of the nucleus. All pUL31 orthologs are composed of a diverse N-terminal domain with 1 to 3 basic patches and a conserved C-terminal domain. To decipher the functions of the N-terminal domain, we have generated several Herpes simplex virus mutants and show here that the N-terminal domain of pUL31 is essential with basic patches being critical for viral propagation. pUL31 and pUL34 entered the nucleus independently of each other via separate routes and the N-terminal domain of pUL31 was required to prevent their premature interaction in the cytoplasm. Unexpectedly, a classical bipartite nuclear localization signal embedded in this domain was not required for nuclear import of pUL31. In the nucleus, pUL31 associated with the nuclear envelope and newly formed capsids. Viral mutants lacking the N-terminal domain or with its basic patches neutralized still associated with nucleocapsids but were unable to translocate them to the nuclear envelope. Replacing the authentic basic patches with a novel artificial one resulted in HSV1(17+)Lox-UL31-hbpmp1mp2, that was viable but delayed in nuclear egress and compromised in viral production. Thus, while the C-terminal domain of pUL31 is sufficient for the interaction with nucleocapsids, the N-terminal domain was essential for capsid translocation to sites of nuclear egress and a coordinated interaction with pUL34. Our data indicate an orchestrated sequence of events with pUL31 binding to nucleocapsids and escorting them to the inner nuclear envelope. We propose a common mechanism for herpesviral nuclear egress: pUL31 is required for intranuclear translocation of nucleocapsids and subsequent interaction with pUL34 thereby coupling capsid maturation with primary envelopment. PMID:26083367

  5. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the structural domain of the nucleocapsid N protein from porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV).

    PubMed

    Doan, Danny N P; Dokland, Terje

    2003-08-01

    The structural domain of the PRRSV nucleocapsid N protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Crystals of the expressed protein, designated His-Ndelta(57), were obtained by hanging-drop vapour diffusion using PEG 3350 as precipitant at pH 6.5. A native data set from a frozen crystal was collected to 2.7 A resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystals belong to space group P3(1)21 or P3(2)21, with unit-cell parameters a = 44.41, c = 125.05, and contain a dimer in the asymmetric unit. PMID:12876367

  6. Genetic and antigenic characterization of recombinant nucleocapsid proteins derived from canine coronavirus and canine respiratory coronavirus in China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shuai; Chen, Yingzhu; Qin, Kun; Zhou, Jianfang; Lou, Yongliang; Tan, Wenjie

    2016-06-01

    To characterize the antigenicity of nucleocapsid proteins (NP) derived from canine coronavirus (CCoV) and canine respiratory coronavirus (CRCoV) in China, the N genes of CCoV (CCoV-BJ70) and CRCoV (CRCoV-BJ202) were cloned from swabs obtained from diseased pet dogs in Beijing and then sequenced. The recombinant NPs (rNPs) were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by nickel-affinity column and size exclusion chromatography. Sequencing data indicated that the N genes of CCoV-BJ70 and CRCoV-BJ202 belonging to two distinctly different groups were relatively conserved within each subgroup. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) results showed that rNPs of CCoV and CRCoV were expressed efficiently and isolated with a final purity of over 95%. Western blot analysis revealed the rNP from CRCoV could cross-react with mice antisera against human coronavirus (HCoV-229E, NL63, OC43, HKU1), while rNP of CCoV had cross-reactivity with only anti-sera against viruses belonging to the same group (HCoV-229E and NL63). In summary, CCoV and CRCoV rNPs were successfully expressed in E. coli and showed antigenic cross-reactivity with antisera raised against human coronaviruses. These findings indicate that further serologic studies on coronavirus infections at the animal-human interface are needed. PMID:27084706

  7. Retrovirus-Specific Differences in Matrix and Nucleocapsid Protein-Nucleic Acid Interactions: Implications for Genomic RNA Packaging

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Meng; Grigsby, Iwen F.; Gorelick, Robert J.; Mansky, Louis M.

    2014-01-01

    Retroviral RNA encapsidation involves a recognition event between genomic RNA (gRNA) and one or more domains in Gag. In HIV-1, the nucleocapsid (NC) domain is involved in gRNA packaging and displays robust nucleic acid (NA) binding and chaperone functions. In comparison, NC of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), a deltaretrovirus, displays weaker NA binding and chaperone activity. Mutation of conserved charged residues in the deltaretrovirus bovine leukemia virus (BLV) matrix (MA) and NC domains affects virus replication and gRNA packaging efficiency. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that the MA domain may generally contribute to NA binding and genome encapsidation in deltaretroviruses. Here, we examined the interaction between HTLV-2 and HIV-1 MA proteins and various NAs in vitro. HTLV-2 MA displays higher NA binding affinity and better chaperone activity than HIV-1 MA. HTLV-2 MA also binds NAs with higher affinity than HTLV-2 NC and displays more robust chaperone function. Mutation of two basic residues in HTLV-2 MA α-helix II, previously implicated in BLV gRNA packaging, reduces NA binding affinity. HTLV-2 MA binds with high affinity and specificity to RNA derived from the putative packaging signal of HTLV-2 relative to nonspecific NA. Furthermore, an HIV-1 MA triple mutant designed to mimic the basic character of HTLV-2 MA α-helix II dramatically improves binding affinity and chaperone activity of HIV-1 MA in vitro and restores RNA packaging to a ΔNC HIV-1 variant in cell-based assays. Taken together, these results are consistent with a role for deltaretrovirus MA proteins in viral RNA packaging. PMID:24227839

  8. A Chrysodeixis chalcites Single-Nucleocapsid Nucleopolyhedrovirus Population from the Canary Islands Is Genotypically Structured To Maximize Survival

    PubMed Central

    Bernal, Alexandra; Simón, Oihane; Williams, Trevor; Muñoz, Delia

    2013-01-01

    A Chrysodeixis chalcites single-nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus wild-type isolate from the Canary Islands, Spain, named ChchSNPV-TF1 (ChchTF1-wt), appears to have great potential as the basis for a biological insecticide for control of the pest. An improved understanding of the genotypic structure of this wild-type strain population should facilitate the selection of genotypes for inclusion in a bioinsecticidal product. Eight genetically distinct genotypes were cloned in vitro: ChchTF1-A to ChchTF1-H. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analysis confirmed that ChchTF1-A accounted for 36% of the genotypes in the wild-type population. In bioassays, ChchTF1-wt occlusion bodies (OBs) were significantly more pathogenic than any of the component single-genotype OBs, indicating that genotype interactions were likely responsible for the pathogenicity phenotype of wild-type OBs. However, the wild-type population was slower killing and produced higher OB yields than any of the single genotypes alone. These results strongly suggested that the ChchTF1-wt population is structured to maximize its transmission efficiency. Experimental OB mixtures and cooccluded genotype mixtures containing the most abundant and the rarest genotypes, at frequencies similar to those at which they were isolated, revealed a mutualistic interaction that restored the pathogenicity of OBs. In OB and cooccluded mixtures containing only the most abundant genotypes, ChchTF1-ABC, OB pathogenicity was even greater than that of wild-type OBs. The ChchTF1-ABC cooccluded mixture killed larvae 33 h faster than the wild-type population and remained genotypically and biologically stable throughout five successive passages in vivo. In conclusion, the ChchTF1-ABC mixture shows great potential as the active ingredient of a bioinsecticide to control C. chalcites in the Canary Islands. PMID:24096419

  9. Solution Structure of Mouse Hepatitis Virus (MHV) nsp3a and Determinants of the Interaction with MHV Nucleocapsid (N) Protein

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Sarah C.

    2013-01-01

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) are positive-sense, single-stranded, enveloped RNA viruses that infect a variety of vertebrate hosts. The CoV nucleocapsid (N) protein contains two structurally independent RNA binding domains, designated the N-terminal domain (NTD) and the dimeric C-terminal domain (CTD), joined by a charged linker region rich in serine and arginine residues (SR-rich linker). An important goal in unraveling N function is to molecularly characterize N-protein interactions. Recent genetic evidence suggests that N interacts with nsp3a, a component of the viral replicase. Here we present the solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) nsp3a and show, using isothermal titration calorimetry, that MHV N219, an N construct that extends into the SR-rich linker (residues 60 to 219), binds cognate nsp3a with high affinity (equilibrium association constant [Ka], [1.4 ± 0.3] × 106 M−1). In contrast, neither N197, an N construct containing only the folded NTD (residues 60 to 197), nor the CTD dimer (residues 260 to 380) binds nsp3a with detectable affinity. This indicates that the key nsp3a binding determinants localize to the SR-rich linker, a finding consistent with those of reverse genetics studies. NMR chemical shift perturbation analysis reveals that the N-terminal region of an MHV N SR-rich linker peptide (residues 198 to 230) binds to the acidic face of MHV nsp3a containing the acidic α2 helix with an affinity (expressed as Ka) of 8.1 × 103 M−1. These studies reveal that the SR-rich linker of MHV N is necessary but not sufficient to maintain this high-affinity binding to N. PMID:23302895

  10. Preparation and characterization of a stable BHK-21 cell line constitutively expressing the Schmallenberg virus nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongning; Wu, Shaoqiang; Song, Shanshan; Lv, Jizhou; Feng, Chunyan; Lin, Xiangmei

    2015-08-01

    Schmallenberg virus (SBV) is a newly emerged orthobunyavirus that predominantly infects livestock such as cattle, sheep, and goats. Its nucleocapsid (N) protein is an ideal target antigen for SBV diagnosis. In this study, a stable BHK-21 cell line, BHK-21-EGFP-SBV-N, constitutively expressing the SBV N protein was obtained using a lentivector-mediated gene transfer system combined with puromycin selection. To facilitate the purification of recombinant SBV N protein, the coding sequence for a hexa-histidine tag was introduced into the C-terminus of the SBV N gene during construction of the recombinant lentivirus vector pLV-EGFP-SBV-N. The BHK-21-EGFP-SBV-N cell line was demonstrated to spontaneously emit strong enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) signals that exhibited a discrete punctate distribution throughout the cytoplasm. SBV N mRNA and protein expression in this cell line were detected by real-time RT-PCR and western blot, respectively. The expressed recombinant SBV N protein carried an N-terminal EGFP tag, and was successfully purified using Ni-NTA agarose by means of its C-terminal His tag. The purified SBV N protein could be recognized by SBV antisera and an anti-SBV monoclonal antibody (mAb) 2C8 in an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and western blot analyses. Indirect immunofluorescence assays further demonstrated that the stable cell line reacts with SBV antisera and mAb 2C8. These results suggest that the generated cell line has the potential to be used in the serological diagnosis of SBV. PMID:26013296

  11. Development of Monoclonal Antibody and Diagnostic Test for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Using Cell-Free Synthesized Nucleocapsid Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Yamaoka, Yutaro; Matsuyama, Shutoku; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Matsunaga, Satoko; Matsushima, Yuki; Kuroyama, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Hirokazu; Takeda, Makoto; Chimuro, Tomoyuki; Ryo, Akihide

    2016-01-01

    Protein nativity is one of the most critical factors for the quality of antigens used as immunogens and the reactivities of the resultant antibodies. The preparation and purification of native viral antigens in conventional cell-based protein expression systems are often accompanied by technical hardships. These challenges are attributable mainly to protein aggregation and insolubility during expression and purification, as well as to very low expression levels associated with the toxicity of some viral proteins. Here, we describe a novel approach for the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against nucleocapsid protein (NP) of the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). Using a wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system, we successfully prepared large amounts of MERS-CoV NP antigen in a state that was highly soluble and intact for immunization. Following mouse immunization and hybridoma generation, we selected seven hybridoma clones that produced mAbs with exclusive reactivity against MERS-CoV NP. Epitope mapping and subsequent bioinformatic analysis revealed that these mAbs recognized epitopes located within relatively highly conserved regions of the MERS-CoV amino-acid sequence. Consistently, the mAbs exhibited no obvious cross-reactivity with NPs derived from other related viruses, including SARS coronavirus. After determining the optimal combinations of these mAbs, we developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a rapid immunochromatographic antigen detection test that can be reliably used for laboratory diagnosis of MERS-CoV. Thus, this study provides strong evidence that the wheat germ cell-free system is useful for the production of diagnostic mAbs against emerging pathogens. PMID:27148198

  12. Expression of the nucleocapsid protein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in soybean seed yields an immunogenic antigenic protein.

    PubMed

    Vimolmangkang, Sornkanok; Gasic, Ksenija; Soria-Guerra, Ruth; Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio; Moreno-Fierros, Leticia; Korban, Schuyler S

    2012-03-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS), caused by the PRRS virus (PRRSV), is a serious disease of swine and contributes to severe worldwide economic losses in swine production. Current vaccines against PRRS rely on the use of an attenuated-live virus; however, these are unreliable. Thus, alternative effective vaccines against PRRS are needed. Plant-based subunit vaccines offer viable, safe, and environmentally friendly alternatives to conventional vaccines. In this study, efforts have been undertaken to develop a soybean-based vaccine against PRRSV. A construct carrying a synthesized PRRSV-ORF7 antigen, nucleocapsid N protein of PRRSV, has been introduced into soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merrill. cvs. Jack and Kunitz, using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Transgenic plants carrying the sORF7 transgene have been successfully generated. Molecular analyses of T(0) plants confirmed integration of the transgene and transcription of the PRRSV-ORF7. Presence of a 15-kDa protein in seeds of T(1) transgenic lines was confirmed by Western blot analysis using PRRSV-ORF7 antisera. The amount of the antigenic protein accumulating in seeds of these transgenic lines was up to 0.65% of the total soluble protein (TSP). A significant induction of a specific immune response, both humoral and mucosal, against PRRSV-ORF7 was observed following intragastric immunization of BALB/c female mice with transgenic soybean seeds. These findings provide a 'proof of concept', and serve as a critical step in the development of a subunit plant-based vaccine against PRRS. PMID:21971995

  13. Development of Monoclonal Antibody and Diagnostic Test for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Using Cell-Free Synthesized Nucleocapsid Antigen.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Yutaro; Matsuyama, Shutoku; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Matsunaga, Satoko; Matsushima, Yuki; Kuroyama, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Hirokazu; Takeda, Makoto; Chimuro, Tomoyuki; Ryo, Akihide

    2016-01-01

    Protein nativity is one of the most critical factors for the quality of antigens used as immunogens and the reactivities of the resultant antibodies. The preparation and purification of native viral antigens in conventional cell-based protein expression systems are often accompanied by technical hardships. These challenges are attributable mainly to protein aggregation and insolubility during expression and purification, as well as to very low expression levels associated with the toxicity of some viral proteins. Here, we describe a novel approach for the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against nucleocapsid protein (NP) of the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). Using a wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system, we successfully prepared large amounts of MERS-CoV NP antigen in a state that was highly soluble and intact for immunization. Following mouse immunization and hybridoma generation, we selected seven hybridoma clones that produced mAbs with exclusive reactivity against MERS-CoV NP. Epitope mapping and subsequent bioinformatic analysis revealed that these mAbs recognized epitopes located within relatively highly conserved regions of the MERS-CoV amino-acid sequence. Consistently, the mAbs exhibited no obvious cross-reactivity with NPs derived from other related viruses, including SARS coronavirus. After determining the optimal combinations of these mAbs, we developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a rapid immunochromatographic antigen detection test that can be reliably used for laboratory diagnosis of MERS-CoV. Thus, this study provides strong evidence that the wheat germ cell-free system is useful for the production of diagnostic mAbs against emerging pathogens. PMID:27148198

  14. Structure of Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus Nucleocapsid Protein in Complex with Suramin Reveals Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Lianying; Ouyang, Songying; Liang, Mifang; Niu, Fengfeng; Shaw, Neil; Wu, Wei; Ding, Wei; Jin, Cong; Peng, Yao; Zhu, Yanping; Zhang, Fushun; Wang, Tao; Li, Chuan; Zuo, Xiaobing; Luan, Chi-Hao; Li, Dexin

    2013-01-01

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome is an emerging infectious disease caused by a novel bunyavirus (SFTSV). Lack of vaccines and inadequate therapeutic treatments have made the spread of the virus a global concern. Viral nucleocapsid protein (N) is essential for its transcription and replication. Here, we present the crystal structures of N from SFTSV and its homologs from Buenaventura (BUE) and Granada (GRA) viruses. The structures reveal that phleboviral N folds into a compact core domain and an extended N-terminal arm that mediates oligomerization, such as tetramer, pentamer, and hexamer of N assemblies. Structural superimposition indicates that phleboviral N adopts a conserved architecture and uses a similar RNA encapsidation strategy as that of RVFV-N. The RNA binding cavity runs along the inner edge of the ring-like assembly. A triple mutant of SFTSV-N, R64D/K67D/K74D, almost lost its ability to bind RNA in vitro, is deficient in its ability to transcribe and replicate. Structural studies of the mutant reveal that both alterations in quaternary assembly and the charge distribution contribute to the loss of RNA binding. In the screening of inhibitors Suramin was identified to bind phleboviral N specifically. The complex crystal structure of SFTSV-N with Suramin was refined to a 2.30-Å resolution. Suramin was found sitting in the putative RNA binding cavity of SFTSV-N. The inhibitory effect of Suramin on SFTSV replication was confirmed in Vero cells. Therefore, a common Suramin-based therapeutic approach targeting SFTSV-N and its homologs could be developed for containing phleboviral outbreaks. PMID:23576501

  15. A phenyl-thiadiazolylidene-amine derivative ejects zinc from retroviral nucleocapsid zinc fingers and inactivates HIV virions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sexual acquisition of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) through mucosal transmission may be prevented by using topically applied agents that block HIV transmission from one individual to another. Therefore, virucidal agents that inactivate HIV virions may be used as a component in topical microbicides. Results Here, we have identified 2-methyl-3-phenyl-2H-[1,2,4]thiadiazol-5-ylideneamine (WDO-217) as a low-molecular-weight molecule that inactivates HIV particles. Both HIV-1 and HIV-2 virions pretreated with this compound were unable to infect permissive cells. Moreover, WDO-217 was able to inhibit infections of a wide spectrum of wild-type and drug-resistant HIV-1, including clinical isolates, HIV-2 and SIV strains. Whereas the capture of virus by DC-SIGN was unaffected by the compound, it efficiently prevented the transmission of DC-SIGN-captured virus to CD4+ T-lymphocytes. Interestingly, exposure of virions to WDO-217 reduced the amount of virion-associated genomic RNA as measured by real-time RT-qPCR. Further mechanism-of-action studies demonstrated that WDO-217 efficiently ejects zinc from the zinc fingers of the retroviral nucleocapsid protein NCp7 and inhibits the cTAR destabilization properties of this protein. Importantly, WDO-217 was able to eject zinc from both zinc fingers, even when NCp7 was bound to oligonucleotides, while no covalent interaction between NCp7 and WDO-217 could be observed. Conclusion This compound is a new lead structure that can be used for the development of a new series of NCp7 zinc ejectors as candidate topical microbicide agents. PMID:23146561

  16. Studies on the mechanism of inactivation of the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein NCp7 with 2-mercaptobenzamide thioesters.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Lisa M Miller; Byrd, J Calvin; Hara, Toshiaki; Srivastava, Pratibha; Mazur, Sharlyn J; Stahl, Stephen J; Inman, John K; Appella, Ettore; Omichinski, James G; Legault, Pascale

    2005-04-21

    The HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NCp7) is a small basic protein with two CysCysHisCys zinc-binding domains that specifically recognizes the Psi-site of the viral RNA. NCp7 plays a number of crucial roles in the viral lifecycle, including reverse transcription and RNA encapsidation. Several classes of potential anti-HIV compounds have been designed to inactivate NCp7 through zinc ejection, including a special class of thioester compounds. We have investigated the mechanism of action of two N-substituted-S-acyl-2-mercaptobenzamide compounds (compounds 1 and 2) that target NCp7. UV/Visible spectroscopy studies demonstrated that both thioesters were able to eject metal from NCp7. NMR and mass spectroscopy studies showed that the thioester compounds specifically ejected zinc from the carboxyl-terminal zinc-binding domain of NCp7 by covalent modification of Cys(39). Exposure of NCp7 to compounds 1 and 2 destroyed its ability to specifically bind RNA, whereas NCp7 already bound to RNA was protected from zinc ejection by the thioesters. The thiol component of the thioesters (compound 3, 2-mercaptobenzoyl-beta-alaninamide) did not eject zinc from NCp7, but when compound 3 was incubated with acetyl CoA prior to incubation with NCp7, we observed extensive metal ejection. Thus, the thiol released by the reaction of compounds 1 and 2 could be re-acylated in vivo by acyl CoA to form a new thioester compound that is able to react with NCp7. These studies provide a better understanding of the mechanism of action of thioester compounds, which is important for future design of anti-HIV-1 compounds that target NCp7. PMID:15828823

  17. Zinc Finger Structures in the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Nucleocapsid Protein Facilitate Efficient Minus- and Plus-Strand Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jianhui; Wu, Tiyun; Anderson, Jada; Kane, Bradley F.; Johnson, Donald G.; Gorelick, Robert J.; Henderson, Louis E.; Levin, Judith G.

    2000-01-01

    The nucleocapsid protein (NC) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has two zinc fingers, each containing the invariant metal ion binding residues CCHC. Recent reports indicate that mutations in the CCHC motifs are deleterious for reverse transcription in vivo. To identify reverse transcriptase (RT) reactions affected by such changes, we have probed zinc finger functions in NC-dependent RT-catalyzed HIV-1 minus- and plus-strand transfer model systems. Our approach was to examine the activities of wild-type NC and a mutant in which all six cysteine residues were replaced by serine (SSHS NC); this mutation severely disrupts zinc coordination. We find that the zinc fingers contribute to the role of NC in complete tRNA primer removal from minus-strand DNA during plus-strand transfer. Annealing of the primer binding site sequences in plus-strand strong-stop DNA [(+) SSDNA] to its complement in minus-strand acceptor DNA is not dependent on NC zinc fingers. In contrast, the rate of annealing of the complementary R regions in (−) SSDNA and 3′ viral RNA during minus-strand transfer is approximately eightfold lower when SSHS NC is used in place of wild-type NC. Moreover, unlike wild-type NC, SSHS NC has only a small stimulatory effect on minus-strand transfer and is essentially unable to block TAR-induced self-priming from (−) SSDNA. Our results strongly suggest that NC zinc finger structures are needed to unfold highly structured RNA and DNA strand transfer intermediates. Thus, it appears that in these cases, zinc finger interactions are important components of NC nucleic acid chaperone activity. PMID:10982342

  18. Structural characterization by transmission electron microscopy and immunoreactivity of recombinant Hendra virus nucleocapsid protein expressed and purified from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lesley A; Yu, Meng; Waddington, Lynne J; Barr, Jennifer A; Scoble, Judith A; Crameri, Gary S; McKinstry, William J

    2015-12-01

    Hendra virus (family Paramyxoviridae) is a negative sense single-stranded RNA virus (NSRV) which has been found to cause disease in humans, horses, and experimentally in other animals, e.g. pigs and cats. Pteropid bats commonly known as flying foxes have been identified as the natural host reservoir. The Hendra virus nucleocapsid protein (HeV N) represents the most abundant viral protein produced by the host cell, and is highly immunogenic with naturally infected humans and horses producing specific antibodies towards this protein. The purpose of this study was to express and purify soluble, functionally active recombinant HeV N, suitable for use as an immunodiagnostic reagent to detect antibodies against HeV. We expressed both full-length HeV N, (HeV NFL), and a C-terminal truncated form, (HeV NCORE), using a bacterial heterologous expression system. Both HeV N constructs were engineered with an N-terminal Hisx6 tag, and purified using a combination of immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) and size exclusion chromatography (SEC). Purified recombinant HeV N proteins self-assembled into soluble higher order oligomers as determined by SEC and negative-stain transmission electron microscopy. Both HeV N proteins were highly immuno-reactive with sera from animals and humans infected with either HeV or the closely related Nipah virus (NiV), but displayed no immuno-reactivity towards sera from animals infected with a non-pathogenic paramyxovirus (CedPV), or animals receiving Equivac® (HeV G glycoprotein subunit vaccine), using a Luminex-based multiplexed microsphere assay. PMID:26196500

  19. Epitope mapping of the nucleocapsid protein of European and North American isolates of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, M J; Sarraseca, J; Garcia, J; Sanz, A; Plana-Durán, J; Ignacio Casal, J

    1997-09-01

    Two major genotypes of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) have been described, which correspond to the European and North American isolates. PRRSV nucleocapsid (N) protein has been identified as the most immunodominant viral protein. The N genes from two PRRSV isolates, Olot/91 (European) and Québec 807/94 (North American), were cloned and expressed in: (i) baculovirus under the control of the polyhedrin promoter and (ii) Escherichia coli using the pET3x system. The N protein from both isolates was expressed much more efficiently in E. coli as a fusion protein than in baculovirus. The antigenicity of the protein was similar in both systems and it was recognized by a collection of 48 PRRSV-positive pig sera. The antigenic structure of the PRRSV N protein was investigated using seven monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and overlapping fragments of the protein expressed in E. coli. Four MAbs recognized two discontinuous epitopes that were present in the partially folded protein, or at least a large fragment comprising the first 78 residues. The other three MAbs revealed the presence of a common antigenic site localized in the central region of the protein (amino acids 50-66). This region is well conserved among different isolates of European and North American origin and is the most hydrophilic region of the protein. However, this epitope, although recognized by the MAbs and many pig sera, is not useful for diagnostic purposes. Moreover, none of the N protein fragments were able to mimic the antigenicity of the entire protein. PMID:9292014

  20. Recombinant nucleocapsid protein-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of antibody to turkey coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Abdelwahab, Mohamed; Loa, Chien Chang; Wu, Ching Ching; Lin, Tsang Long

    2015-06-01

    Nucleocapsid (N) protein gene of turkey coronavirus (TCoV) was expressed in a prokaryotic system and used to develop an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detection of antibody to TCoV. Anti-TCoV hyperimmune turkey serum and normal turkey serum were used as positive or negative controls for optimization of the ELISA. Goat anti-turkey IgG (H+L) conjugated with horseradish peroxidase was used as detector antibody. Three hundred and twenty two turkey sera from the field were used to evaluate the performance of ELISA and determine the cut-off point of ELISA. The established ELISA was also examined with serum samples obtained from turkeys experimentally infected with TCoV. Those serum samples were collected at various time intervals from 1 to 63 days post-infection. The optimum conditions for differentiation between anti-TCoV hyperimmune serum and normal turkey serum were recombinant TCoV N protein concentration at 20 μg/ml, serum dilution at 1:800, and conjugate dilution at 1:10,000. Of the 322 sera from the field, 101 were positive for TCoV by immunofluorescent antibody assay (IFA). The sensitivity and specificity of the ELISA relative to IFA test were 86.0% and 96.8%, respectively, using the optimum cut-off point of 0.2 as determined by logistic regression method. Reactivity of anti-rotavirus, anti-reovirus, anti-adenovirus, or anti-enterovirus antibodies with the recombinant N protein coated on the ELISA plates was not detected. These results indicated that the established antibody-capture ELISA in conjunction with recombinant TCoV N protein as the coating protein can be utilized for detection of antibodies to TCoV in turkey flocks. PMID:25745958

  1. Facilitation of hammerhead ribozyme catalysis by the nucleocapsid protein of HIV-1 and the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1.

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, E L; Rossi, J J

    1994-01-01

    In order to improve the activity of hammerhead ribozymes in vivo, we have analyzed the effect of several prototypical RNA binding proteins on the ribozyme cleavage reaction: bacteriophage T4 gene 32 protein (gp32), hnRNP A1 (A1) and the nucleocapsid protein of HIV-1 (NCp7). We show that, while gp32 has no effect on the cleavage reaction, A1 and NCp7 affect different steps of the reaction. Moreover, some of these effects depend upon the ribozyme-substrate hybrid length. A1 and NCp7 inhibit the reaction of the least stable ribozyme-substrate complexes, which have 12 bp of duplex. NCp7, but not A1, inhibits the cleavage of substrates that have long ribozyme-substrate duplexes (17 or 20 bp), while cleavage of complexes having shorter duplexes (13 or 14 bp) is not affected. NCp7 and A1 enhance the turnover of ribozymes by increasing the rate of product dissociation, but only when both cleavage products are bound with < or = 7 bp. A1 and NCp7 enhance ribozyme binding to long substrates, such as mRNAs, the structure of which otherwise limits ribozyme binding. Therefore, the effects of A1 or NCp7 on the different steps of the cleavage reaction define a length of the ribozyme-substrate duplex which allows enhancement of the rate of binding and product release without inhibiting the cleavage step. Interestingly, this duplex length (14 bases, or 7 on each side of the cleavage site) is identical for A1 and NCp7. Since A1 is thought to interact with most, if not all mRNAs in vivo, it may enhance the intracellular activity of ribozymes targeted against any mRNA.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:8026475

  2. Analysis of protein-RNA interactions in CRISPR proteins and effector complexes by UV-induced cross-linking and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Kundan; Hrle, Ajla; Kramer, Katharina; Sachsenberg, Timo; Staals, Raymond H J; Randau, Lennart; Marchfelder, Anita; van der Oost, John; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Conti, Elena; Urlaub, Henning

    2015-11-01

    Ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes play important roles in the cell by mediating basic cellular processes, including gene expression and its regulation. Understanding the molecular details of these processes requires the identification and characterization of protein-RNA interactions. Over the years various approaches have been used to investigate these interactions, including computational analyses to look for RNA binding domains, gel-shift mobility assays on recombinant and mutant proteins as well as co-crystallization and NMR studies for structure elucidation. Here we report a more specialized and direct approach using UV-induced cross-linking coupled with mass spectrometry. This approach permits the identification of cross-linked peptides and RNA moieties and can also pin-point exact RNA contact sites within the protein. The power of this method is illustrated by the application to different single- and multi-subunit RNP complexes belonging to the prokaryotic adaptive immune system, CRISPR-Cas (CRISPR: clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats; Cas: CRISPR associated). In particular, we identified the RNA-binding sites within three Cas7 protein homologs and mapped the cross-linking results to reveal structurally conserved Cas7 - RNA binding interfaces. These results demonstrate the strong potential of UV-induced cross-linking coupled with mass spectrometry analysis to identify RNA interaction sites on the RNA binding proteins. PMID:26071038

  3. Three of the four nucleocapsid proteins of Marburg virus, NP, VP35, and L, are sufficient to mediate replication and transcription of Marburg virus-specific monocistronic minigenomes.

    PubMed

    Mühlberger, E; Lötfering, B; Klenk, H D; Becker, S

    1998-11-01

    This paper describes the first reconstituted replication system established for a member of the Filoviridae, Marburg virus (MBGV). MBGV minigenomes containing the leader and trailer regions of the MBGV genome and the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene were constructed. In MBGV-infected cells, these minigenomes were replicated and encapsidated and could be passaged. Unlike most other members of the order Mononegavirales, filoviruses possess four proteins presumed to be components of the nucleocapsid (NP, VP35, VP30, and L). To determine the protein requirements for replication and transcription, a reverse genetic system was established for MBGV based on the vaccinia virus T7 expression system. Northern blot analysis of viral RNA revealed that three nucleocapsid proteins (NP, VP35, and L) were essential and sufficient for transcription as well as replication and encapsidation. These data indicate that VP35, rather than VP30, is the functional homologue of rhabdo- and paramyxovirus P proteins. The reconstituted replication system was profoundly affected by the NP-to-VP35 expression ratio. To investigate whether CAT gene expression was achieved entirely by mRNA or in part by full-length plus-strand minigenomes, a copy-back minireplicon containing the CAT gene but lacking MBGV-specific transcriptional start sites was employed in the artificial replication system. This construct was replicated without accompanying CAT activity. It was concluded that the CAT activity reflected MBGV-specific transcription and not replication. PMID:9765419

  4. A sandwich-ELISA for the diagnosis of Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) infection in small ruminants using anti-nucleocapsid protein monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Singh, R P; Sreenivasa, B P; Dhar, P; Bandyopadhyay, S K

    2004-11-01

    A sandwich ELISA test using PPR specific monoclonal antibody (clone 4G6) to an epitope of nucleocapsid protein has been developed. The test uses polyclonal sera to capture the antigen from clinical samples (swabs and tissues). Captured antigens from clinical samples are detected using PPR specific monoclonal antibody. The test is specific to PPR as it failed to detect rinderpest vaccine virus (RBOK strain). Varieties of clinical samples originating from laboratory experiments (n = 231) and from field (n = 259) were employed to test the efficacy of sandwich-ELISA test. The test compared very well with an internationally accepted commercial Immune-capture ELISA kit, which uses biotinylated monoclonal antibody against the nucleocapsid protein. On a parallel testing using 490 clinical samples, 4G6 MAb based sandwich ELISA had an overall relative diagnostic specificity of 92.8% and diagnostic sensitivity of 88.9% compared to the commercial kit. The newly developed test is free from prozone phenomenon. PPR outbreaks from various parts of India have been confirmed using the test. Findings suggested that the newly developed ELISA is suitable for PPR diagnosis under field conditions. PMID:15503204

  5. A model for the dynamic nuclear/nucleolar/cytoplasmic trafficking of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) nucleocapsid protein based on live cell imaging.

    PubMed

    You, Jae-Hwan; Howell, Gareth; Pattnaik, Asit K; Osorio, Fernando A; Hiscox, Julian A

    2008-08-15

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), an arterivirus, in common with many other positive strand RNA viruses, encodes a nucleocapsid (N) protein which can localise not only to the cytoplasm but also to the nucleolus in virus-infected cells and cells over-expressing N protein. The dynamic trafficking of positive strand RNA virus nucleocapsid proteins and PRRSV N protein in particular between the cytoplasm and nucleolus is unknown. In this study live imaging of permissive and non-permissive cell lines, in conjunction with photo-bleaching (FRAP and FLIP), was used to investigate the trafficking of fluorescent labeled (EGFP) PRRSV-N protein. The data indicated that EGFP-PRRSV-N protein was not permanently sequestered to the nucleolus and had equivalent mobility to cellular nucleolar proteins. Further the nuclear import of N protein appeared to occur faster than nuclear export, which may account for the observed relative distribution of N protein between the cytoplasm and the nucleolus. PMID:18550142

  6. Monoclonal Antibodies Directed against Conserved Epitopes on the Nucleocapsid Protein and the Major Envelope Glycoprotein of Equine Arteritis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Weiland, Emilie; Bolz, Sylvia; Weiland, Frank; Herbst, Werner; Raamsman, Martin J. B.; Rottier, Peter J. M.; De Vries, Antoine A. F.

    2000-01-01

    We recently developed a highly effective immunization procedure for the generation of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (E. Weiland, M. Wieczorek-Krohmer, D. Kohl, K. K. Conzelmann, and F. Weiland, Vet. Microbiol. 66:171–186, 1999). The same method was used to produce a panel of 16 MAbs specific for the equine arteritis virus (EAV). Ten MAbs were directed against the EAV nucleocapsid (N) protein, and five MAbs recognized the major viral envelope glycoprotein (GL). Two of the EAV GL-specific MAbs and one antibody of unknown specificity neutralized virus infectivity. A comparison of the reactivities of the MAbs with 1 U.S. and 22 newly obtained European field isolates of EAV demonstrated that all N-specific MAbs, the three nonneutralizing anti-GL MAbs, and the weakest neutralizing MAb (MAb E7/d15-c9) recognized conserved epitopes. In contrast, the two MAbs with the highest neutralization titers bound to 17 of 23 (MAb E6/A3) and 10 of 23 (MAb E7/d15-c1) of the field isolates. Ten of the virus isolates reacted with only one of these two MAbs, indicating that they recognized different epitopes. The GL-specific MAbs and the strongly neutralizing MAb of unknown specificity (MAb E6/A3) were used for the selection of neutralization-resistant (NR) virus variants. The observation that the E6/A3-specific NR virus variants were neutralized by MAb E7/d15-c1 and that MAb E6/A3 blocked the infectivity of the E7/d15-c1-specific NR escape mutant confirmed that these antibodies reacted with distinct antigenic sites. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed for the first time that the antigenic determinants recognized by the anti-GL MAbs were localized on the virion surface. Surprisingly, although the immunofluorescence signal obtained with the neutralizing antibodies was relatively weak, they mediated binding of about three times as much gold granules to the viral envelope than the nonneutralizing anti-GL MAbs. PMID

  7. The expression and antigenicity of a truncated spike-nucleocapsid fusion protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Feng; Niu, Dongsheng; Mu, Jingsong; He, Bo; Han, Weiguo; Fan, Baoxing; Huang, Shengyong; Qiu, Yan; You, Bo; Chen, Weijun

    2008-01-01

    Background In the absence of effective drugs, controlling SARS relies on the rapid identification of cases and appropriate management of the close contacts, or effective vaccines for SARS. Therefore, developing specific and sensitive laboratory tests for SARS as well as effective vaccines are necessary for national authorities. Results Genes encoding truncated nucleocapsid (N) and spike (S) proteins of SARSCoV were cloned into the expression vector pQE30 and fusionally expressed in Escherichia coli M15. The fusion protein was analyzed for reactivity with SARS patients' sera and with anti-sera against the two human coronaviruses HCoV 229E and HCoV OC43 by ELISA, IFA and immunoblot assays. Furthermore, to evaluate the antigen-specific humoral antibody and T-cell responses in mice, the fusion protein was injected into 6-week-old BALB/c mice and a neutralization test as well as a T-cell analysis was performed. To evaluate the antiviral efficacy of immunization, BALB/c mice were challenged intranasally with SARSCoV at day 33 post injection and viral loads were determined by fluorescent quantitative RT-PCR. Serological results showed that the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the truncated S-N fusion protein derived the SARS virus were > 99% (457/460) and 100.00% (650/650), respectively. Furthermore there was no cross-reactivity with other two human coronaviruses. High titers of antibodies to SRASCoV appeared in the immunized mice and the neutralization test showed that antibodies to the fusion protein could inhibit SARSCoV. The T cell proliferation showed that the fusion protein could induce an antigen-specific T-cell response. Fluorescent quantitative RT-PCR showed that BALB/c mice challenged intranasally with SARSCoV at day 33 post injection were completely protected from virus replication. Conclusion The truncated S-N fusion protein is a suitable immunodiagnostic antigen and vaccine candidate. PMID:19038059

  8. Crystal Structure of the Core Region of Hantavirus Nucleocapsid Protein Reveals the Mechanism for Ribonucleoprotein Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yu; Wang, Wenming; Sun, Yuna; Ma, Chao; Wang, Xu; Wang, Xin; Liu, Pi; Shen, Shu; Li, Baobin; Lin, Jianping; Deng, Fei

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hantaviruses, which belong to the genus Hantavirus in the family Bunyaviridae, infect mammals, including humans, causing either hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) or hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) in humans with high mortality. Hantavirus encodes a nucleocapsid protein (NP) to encapsidate the genome and form a ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP) together with viral polymerase. Here, we report the crystal structure of the core domains of NP (NPcore) encoded by Sin Nombre virus (SNV) and Andes virus (ANDV), which are two representative members that cause HCPS in the New World. The constructs of SNV and ANDV NPcore exclude the N- and C-terminal portions of full polypeptide to obtain stable proteins for crystallographic study. The structure features an N lobe and a C lobe to clamp RNA-binding crevice and exhibits two protruding extensions in both lobes. The positively charged residues located in the RNA-binding crevice play a key role in RNA binding and virus replication. We further demonstrated that the C-terminal helix and the linker region connecting the N-terminal coiled-coil domain and NPcore are essential for hantavirus NP oligomerization through contacts made with two adjacent protomers. Moreover, electron microscopy (EM) visualization of native RNPs extracted from the virions revealed that a monomer-sized NP-RNA complex is the building block of viral RNP. This work provides insight into the formation of hantavirus RNP and provides an understanding of the evolutionary connections that exist among bunyaviruses. IMPORTANCE Hantaviruses are distributed across a wide and increasing range of host reservoirs throughout the world. In particular, hantaviruses can be transmitted via aerosols of rodent excreta to humans or from human to human and cause HFRS and HCPS, with mortalities of 15% and 50%, respectively. Hantavirus is therefore listed as a category C pathogen. Hantavirus encodes an NP that plays essential roles both in RNP formation and

  9. Mutations within the nuclear localization signal of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus nucleocapsid protein attenuate virus replication

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Changhee; Hodgins, Douglas; Calvert, Jay G.; Welch, Siao-Kun W.; Jolie, Rika; Yoo, Dongwan . E-mail: dyoo@uoguelph.ca

    2006-03-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is an RNA virus replicating in the cytoplasm, but the nucleocapsid (N) protein is specifically localized to the nucleus and nucleolus in virus-infected cells. A 'pat7' motif of 41-PGKK(N/S)KK has previously been identified in the N protein as the functional nuclear localization signal (NLS); however, the biological consequences of N protein nuclear localization are unknown. In the present study, the role of N protein nuclear localization during infection was investigated in pigs using an NLS-null mutant virus. When two lysines at 43 and 44 at the NLS locus were substituted to glycines, the modified NLS with 41-PGGGNKK restricted the N protein to the cytoplasm. This NLS-null mutation was introduced into a full-length infectious cDNA clone of PRRSV. Upon transfection of cells, the NLS-null full-length clone induced cytopathic effects and produced infectious progeny. The NLS-null virus grew to a titer 100-fold lower than that of wild-type virus. To examine the response to NLS-null PRRSV in the natural host, three groups of pigs, consisting of seven animals per group, were intranasally inoculated with wild-type, placebo, or NLS-null virus, and the animals were maintained for 4 weeks. The NLS-null-infected pigs had a significantly shorter mean duration of viremia than wild-type-infected pigs but developed significantly higher titers of neutralizing antibodies. Mutations occurred at the NLS locus in one pig during viremia, and four types of mutations were identified: 41-PGRGNKK, 41-PGGRNKK, and 41-PGRRNKK, and 41-PGKKSKK. Both wild-type and NLS-null viruses persisted in the tonsils for at least 4 weeks, and the NLS-null virus persisting in the tonsils was found to be mutated to either 41-PGRGNKK or 41-PGGRNKK in all pigs. No other mutation was found in the N gene. All types of reversions which occurred during viremia and persistence were able to translocate the mutated N proteins to the nucleus, indicating a

  10. Isolation of a nucleocapsid polypeptide of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 possessing immunologically type-specific and cross-reactive determinants.

    PubMed

    Heilman, C J; Zweig, M; Stephenson, J R; Hampar, B

    1979-01-01

    A polypeptide (p40) of approximately 40,000 molecular weight was isolated from herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2 nucleocapsids by gel filtration and ion exchange chromatography. This protein appears to be the same as protein 22a described previously (Gibson and Roizman, J. Virol. 10:1044--1052, 1972). Competition immunoassays were developed by using purified p40 and antisera prepared in guinea pigs. The assays indicated that the p40's from herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 possess both type-specific and cross-reactive antigenic determinants. Antibodies to the p40 cross-reactive determinant reacted with antigens in simian herpes virus SA8-infected cells, but not with antigens induced by pseudorabies virus. Preliminary results indicated that a radioimmunoprecipitation test can be used to detect type-specific herpes simplex virus p40 antibodies in human sera. PMID:85720

  11. Antibody responses to Four Corners hantavirus infections in the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus): identification of an immunodominant region of the viral nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, T; Hjelle, B; Lanzi, R; Morris, C; Anderson, B; Jenison, S

    1995-01-01

    Antibody responses to Four Corners hantavirus (FCV) infections in the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) were characterized by using FCV nucleocapsid protein (N), glycoprotein 1 (G1), and glycoprotein 2 (G2) recombinant polypeptides in Western immunoblot assays. Strong immunoglobulin G reactivities to FCV N were observed among FCV-infected wild P. maniculatus mice (n = 34) and in laboratory-infected P. maniculatus mice (n = 11). No immunoglobulin G antibody reactivities to FCV G1 or G2 linear determinants were detected. The strongest N responses were mapped to an amino-proximal segment between amino acids 17 and 59 (QLVTARQKLKDAERAVELDPDDVNKSTLQSRRAAVSALETKLG). FCV N antibodies cross-reacted with recombinant N proteins encoded by Puumala, Seoul, and Hantaan viruses. PMID:7853538

  12. Antibody responses to Four Corners hantavirus infections in the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus): identification of an immunodominant region of the viral nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Yamada, T; Hjelle, B; Lanzi, R; Morris, C; Anderson, B; Jenison, S

    1995-03-01

    Antibody responses to Four Corners hantavirus (FCV) infections in the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) were characterized by using FCV nucleocapsid protein (N), glycoprotein 1 (G1), and glycoprotein 2 (G2) recombinant polypeptides in Western immunoblot assays. Strong immunoglobulin G reactivities to FCV N were observed among FCV-infected wild P. maniculatus mice (n = 34) and in laboratory-infected P. maniculatus mice (n = 11). No immunoglobulin G antibody reactivities to FCV G1 or G2 linear determinants were detected. The strongest N responses were mapped to an amino-proximal segment between amino acids 17 and 59 (QLVTARQKLKDAERAVELDPDDVNKSTLQSRRAAVSALETKLG). FCV N antibodies cross-reacted with recombinant N proteins encoded by Puumala, Seoul, and Hantaan viruses. PMID:7853538

  13. Fundamental differences between the nucleic acid chaperone activities of HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein and Gag or Gag-derived proteins: Biological implications

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tiyun; Datta, Siddhartha A.K.; Mitra, Mithun; Gorelick, Robert J.; Rein, Alan; Levin, Judith G.

    2010-01-01

    The HIV-1 Gag polyprotein precursor has multiple domains including nucleocapsid (NC). Although mature NC and NC embedded in Gag are nucleic acid chaperones (proteins that remodel nucleic acid structure), few studies include detailed analysis of the chaperone activity of partially processed Gag proteins and comparison with NC and Gag. Here we address this issue by using a reconstituted minus-strand transfer system. NC and NC-containing Gag proteins exhibited annealing and duplex destabilizing activities required for strand transfer. Surprisingly, unlike NC, with increasing concentrations, Gag proteins drastically inhibited the DNA elongation step. This result is consistent with “nucleic acid-driven multimerization” of Gag and the reported slow dissociation of Gag from bound nucleic acid, which prevent reverse transcriptase from traversing the template (“roadblock” mechanism). Our findings illustrate one reason why NC (and not Gag) has evolved as a critical cofactor in reverse transcription, a paradigm that might also extend to other retrovirus systems. PMID:20655566

  14. Characterization of hepatitis G virus (GB-C virus) particles: evidence for a nucleocapsid and expression of sequences upstream of the E1 protein.

    PubMed

    Xiang, J; Klinzman, D; McLinden, J; Schmidt, W N; LaBrecque, D R; Gish, R; Stapleton, J T

    1998-04-01

    Hepatitis G virus (HGV or GB-C virus) is a newly described virus that is closely related to hepatitis C virus (HCV). Based on sequence analysis and by evaluation of translational initiation codon preferences utilized during in vitro translation, HGV appears to have a truncated or absent core protein at the amino terminus of the HGV polyprotein. Consequently, the biophysical properties of HGV may be very different from those of HCV. To characterize HGV particle types, we evaluated plasma from chronically infected individuals with and without concomitant HCV infection by using sucrose gradient centrifugation, isopycnic banding in cesium chloride, and saline density flotation centrifugation. Similar to HCV, HGV particles included an extremely-low-density virion particle (1.07 to 1.09 g/ml) and a nucleocapsid of approximately 1.18 g/ml. One major difference between the particle types was that HGV was consistently more stable in cesium chloride than HCV. Plasma samples from chronically HGV-infected individuals and controls were assessed by a synthetic peptide-based immunoassay to determine if they contained HGV antibody specific for a conserved region in the coding region upstream of the E1 protein. Chronically HGV-infected individuals contained antibody to the HGV core protein peptide, whereas no binding to a hepatitis A virus peptide control was observed. Competitive inhibition of binding to the HGV peptide confirmed the specificity of the assay. These data indicate that HGV has a nucleocapsid and that at least part of the putative core region of HGV is expressed in vivo. PMID:9525592

  15. Site-selective probing of cTAR destabilization highlights the necessary plasticity of the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein to chaperone the first strand transfer

    PubMed Central

    Godet, Julien; Kenfack, Cyril; Przybilla, Frédéric; Richert, Ludovic; Duportail, Guy; Mély, Yves

    2013-01-01

    The HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NCp7) is a nucleic acid chaperone required during reverse transcription. During the first strand transfer, NCp7 is thought to destabilize cTAR, the (−)DNA copy of the TAR RNA hairpin, and subsequently direct the TAR/cTAR annealing through the zipping of their destabilized stem ends. To further characterize the destabilizing activity of NCp7, we locally probe the structure and dynamics of cTAR by steady-state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. NC(11–55), a truncated NCp7 version corresponding to its zinc-finger domain, was found to bind all over the sequence and to preferentially destabilize the penultimate double-stranded segment in the lower part of the cTAR stem. This destabilization is achieved through zinc-finger–dependent binding of NC to the G10 and G50 residues. Sequence comparison further revealed that C•A mismatches close to the two G residues were critical for fine tuning the stability of the lower part of the cTAR stem and conferring to G10 and G50 the appropriate mobility and accessibility for specific recognition by NC. Our data also highlight the necessary plasticity of NCp7 to adapt to the sequence and structure variability of cTAR to chaperone its annealing with TAR through a specific pathway. PMID:23511968

  16. Poly(A)-binding protein interacts with the nucleocapsid protein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and participates in viral replication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoye; Bai, Juan; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Xianwei; Li, Yufeng; Jiang, Ping

    2012-12-01

    Interactions between host factors and the viral protein play important roles in host adaptation and regulation of virus replication. Poly(A)-binding protein (PABP), a host cellular protein that enhances translational efficiency by circularizing mRNAs, was identified by yeast two-hybrid screening as a cellular partner for PRRSV nucleocapsid (N) protein in porcine alveolar macrophages. The specific interaction of PRRSV N protein with PABP was confirmed in infected cells by co-immunoprecipitation and in vitro by GST pull-down assay. We showed by confocal microscopy that the PABP co-localized with the PRRSV N protein. Using a series of deletion mutants, the interactive domain of N protein with PABP was mapped to a region of amino acids 52-69. For PABP, C-terminal half, which interestingly interacts other translation regulators, was determined to be the domain interactive with N protein. Short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated silencing of PABP in cells resulted in significantly reduced PRRSV RNA synthesis, viral encoded protein expression and viral titer. Overall, the results presented here point toward an important role for PABP in regulating PRRSV replication. PMID:22985629

  17. C terminal retroviral-type zinc finger domain from the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein is structurally similar to the N-terminal zinc finger domain

    SciTech Connect

    South, T.L.; Blake, P.R. ); Hare, D.R.; Summers, M.F. )

    1991-06-25

    Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopic and computational methods were employed for the structure determination of an 18-residue peptide with the amino acid sequence of the C-terminal retriviral-type (r.t.) zinc finger domain from the nucleocapsid protein (NCP) of HIV-1 (Zn(HIV1-F2)). Unlike results obtained for the first retroviral-type zinc finger peptide, Zn (HIV1-F1) broad signals indicative of confomational lability were observed in the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of An(HIV1-F2) at 25 C. The NMR signals narrowed upon cooling to {minus}2 C, enabling complete {sup 1}H NMR signal assignment via standard two-dimensional (2D) NMR methods. Distance restraints obtained from qualitative analysis of 2D nuclear Overhauser effect (NOESY) data were sued to generate 30 distance geometry (DG) structures with penalties in the range 0.02-0.03 {angstrom}{sup 2}. All structures were qualitatively consistent with the experimental NOESY spectrum based on comparisons with 2D NOESY back-calculated spectra. These results indicate that the r.t. zinc finger sequences observed in retroviral NCPs, simple plant virus coat proteins, and in a human single-stranded nucleic acid binding protein share a common structural motif.

  18. Detection of IgM antibodies against a recombinant nucleocapsid protein of canine distemper virus in dog sera using a dot-blot assay.

    PubMed

    Barben, G; Stettler, M; Jaggy, A; Vandevelde, M; Zurbriggen, A

    1999-03-01

    A dot-blot assay for the detection of IgM antibodies (ABs) against canine distemper virus (CDV) in canine serum is described. The diagnostic potential of this technique was evaluated by analysing sera from three test groups: (i) specific pathogen-free (SPF) beagle dogs experimentally infected with virulent CDV; (ii) SPF dogs immunized with a combined vaccine containing CDV, and (iii) SPF dogs immunized with a CDV-free vaccine. As antigen for the dot-blot assay we used the recombinant nucleocapsid protein (N protein) of the virulent A75/17 CDV strain. All 12 dogs of group 1, infected with virulent CDV, showed detectable CDV-specific IgM levels in their serum. All dogs of group 2 were also positive for anti-CDV IgM after the first immunization with the CDV-containing vaccine. The four dogs immunized with a CDV-free vaccine (group iii) remained negative throughout the course of the experiment. From these results, we conclude that the IgM detection test, which requires only a single serum sample, is a useful method for diagnosing current or recent CDV infection in CDV-infected or CDV-immunized dogs under experimental conditions. PMID:10216448

  19. Fine level epitope mapping and conservation analysis of two novel linear B-cell epitopes of the avian infectious bronchitis coronavirus nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Han, Zongxi; Zhao, Fei; Shao, Yuhao; Liu, Xiaoli; Kong, Xiangang; Song, Yang; Liu, Shengwang

    2013-01-01

    The nucleocapsid (N) protein of the infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) may play an essential role in the replication and translation of viral RNA. The N protein can also induce high titers of cross-reactive antibodies and cell-mediated immunity, which protects chickens from acute infection. In this study, we generated two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), designated as 6D10 and 4F10, which were directed against the N protein of IBV using the whole viral particles as immunogens. Both of the mAbs do not cross react with Newcastle disease virus (NDV), infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) and subtype H9 avian influenza virus (AIV). After screening a phage display peptide library and peptide scanning, we identified two linear B-cell epitopes that were recognized by the mAbs 6D10 and 4F10, which corresponded to the amino acid sequences (242)FGPRTK(247) and (195)DLIARAAKI(203), respectively, in the IBV N protein. Alignments of amino acid sequences from a large number of IBV isolates indicated that the two epitopes, especially (242)FGPRTK(247), were well conserved among IBV strains. This conclusion was further confirmed by the relationships of 18 heterologous sequences to the 2 mAbs. The novel mAbs and the epitopes identified will be useful for developing diagnostic assays for IBV infections. PMID:23123213

  20. Structural insights into the cTAR DNA recognition by the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein: role of sugar deoxyriboses in the binding polarity of NC

    PubMed Central

    Bazzi, Ali; Zargarian, Loussiné; Chaminade, Françoise; Boudier, Christian; De Rocquigny, Hughes; René, Brigitte; Mély, Yves; Fossé, Philippe; Mauffret, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    An essential step of the reverse transcription of the HIV-1 genome is the first strand transfer that requires the annealing of the TAR RNA hairpin to the cTAR DNA hairpin. HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC) plays a crucial role by facilitating annealing of the complementary hairpins. Using nuclear magnetic resonance and gel retardation assays, we investigated the interaction between NC and the top half of the cTAR DNA (mini-cTAR). We show that NC(11-55) binds the TGG sequence in the lower stem that is destabilized by the adjacent internal loop. The 5′ thymine interacts with residues of the N-terminal zinc knuckle and the 3′ guanine is inserted in the hydrophobic plateau of the C-terminal zinc knuckle. The TGG sequence is preferred relative to the apical and internal loops containing unpaired guanines. Investigation of the DNA–protein contacts shows the major role of hydrophobic interactions involving nucleobases and deoxyribose sugars. A similar network of hydrophobic contacts is observed in the published NC:DNA complexes, whereas NC contacts ribose differently in NC:RNA complexes. We propose that the binding polarity of NC is related to these contacts that could be responsible for the preferential binding to single-stranded nucleic acids. PMID:21227929

  1. Structural insights into the cTAR DNA recognition by the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein: role of sugar deoxyriboses in the binding polarity of NC.

    PubMed

    Bazzi, Ali; Zargarian, Loussiné; Chaminade, Françoise; Boudier, Christian; De Rocquigny, Hughes; René, Brigitte; Mély, Yves; Fossé, Philippe; Mauffret, Olivier

    2011-05-01

    An essential step of the reverse transcription of the HIV-1 genome is the first strand transfer that requires the annealing of the TAR RNA hairpin to the cTAR DNA hairpin. HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC) plays a crucial role by facilitating annealing of the complementary hairpins. Using nuclear magnetic resonance and gel retardation assays, we investigated the interaction between NC and the top half of the cTAR DNA (mini-cTAR). We show that NC(11-55) binds the TGG sequence in the lower stem that is destabilized by the adjacent internal loop. The 5' thymine interacts with residues of the N-terminal zinc knuckle and the 3' guanine is inserted in the hydrophobic plateau of the C-terminal zinc knuckle. The TGG sequence is preferred relative to the apical and internal loops containing unpaired guanines. Investigation of the DNA-protein contacts shows the major role of hydrophobic interactions involving nucleobases and deoxyribose sugars. A similar network of hydrophobic contacts is observed in the published NC:DNA complexes, whereas NC contacts ribose differently in NC:RNA complexes. We propose that the binding polarity of NC is related to these contacts that could be responsible for the preferential binding to single-stranded nucleic acids. PMID:21227929

  2. Design and Synthesis of DiselenoBisBenzamides (DISeBAs) as Nucleocapsid Protein 7 (NCp7) Inhibitors with anti-HIV Activity.

    PubMed

    Sancineto, Luca; Mariotti, Alice; Bagnoli, Luana; Marini, Francesca; Desantis, Jenny; Iraci, Nunzio; Santi, Claudio; Pannecouque, Christophe; Tabarrini, Oriana

    2015-12-24

    The interest in the synthesis of Se-containing compounds is growing with the discovery of derivatives exhibiting various biological activities. In this manuscript, we have identified a series of 2,2'-diselenobisbenzamides (DISeBAs) as novel HIV retroviral nucleocapsid protein 7 (NCp7) inhibitors. Because of its pleiotropic functions in the whole viral life cycle and its mutation intolerant nature, NCp7 represents a target of great interest which is not reached by any anti-HIV agent in clinical use. Using the diselenobisbenzoic scaffold, amino acid, and benzenesulfonamide derivatives were prepared and biologically profiled against different models of HIV infection. The incorporation of amino acids such as glycine and glutamate into DISeBAs 7 and 8 resulted in selective anti-HIV activity against both acutely and chronically infected cells as well as an interesting virucidal effect. DISeBAs demonstrated broad antiretroviral activity, encompassing HIV-1 drug-resistant strains including clinical isolates, as well as simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). Time of addition experiments, along with the observed dose dependent inhibition of the Gag precursor proper processing, confirmed that their mechanism of action is based on NCp7 inhibition. PMID:26613134

  3. Structural characterization of a 39-residue synthetic peptide containing the two zinc binding domains from the HIV-1 p7 nucleocapsid protein by CD and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Omichinski, J G; Clore, G M; Sakaguchi, K; Appella, E; Gronenborn, A M

    1991-11-01

    A 39-residue peptide (p7-DF) containing the two zinc binding domains of the p7 nucleocapsid protein was prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis. The solution structure of the peptide was characterized using circular dichroic and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in both the presence and absence of zinc ions. Circular dichroic spectroscopy indicates that the peptide exhibits a random coil conformation in the absence of zinc but appears to form an ordered structure in the presence of zinc. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy indicates that the two zinc binding domains within the peptide form stable, but independent, units upon the addition of 2 equivalents of ZnCl2 per equivalent of peptide. Structure calculations on the basis of nuclear Overhauser (NOE) data indicate that the two zinc binding domains have the same polypeptide fold within the errors of the coordinates (approximately 0.5 A for the backbone atoms, the zinc atoms and the coordinating cysteine and histidine ligands). The linker region (Arg17-Gly23) is characterized by a very limited number of sequential NOEs and the absence of any non-sequential NOEs suggest that this region of polypeptide chain is highly flexible. The latter coupled with the occurrence of a large number of basic residues (four out of seven) in the linker region suggests that it may serve to allow adaptable positioning of the nucleic acid recognition sequences within the protein. PMID:1959614

  4. A novel double recognition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on the nucleocapsid protein for early detection of European porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection.

    PubMed

    Venteo, A; Rebollo, B; Sarraseca, J; Rodriguez, M J; Sanz, A

    2012-04-01

    Precise and rapid detection of porcine reproductive respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection in swine farms is critical. Improvement of control procedures, such as testing incoming gilt and surveillance of seronegative herds requires more rapid and sensitive methods. However, standard serological techniques detect mainly IgG antibodies. A double recognition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DR-ELISA) was developed for detection of antibodies specific to European PRRSV. This new assay can recognize both IgM and IgG antibodies to PRSSV which might be useful for detecting in routine surveillance assays pigs that are in the very early stages of infection and missed by conventional assays detecting only IgG antibodies. DR-ELISA is based on the double recognition of antigen by antibody. In this study, the recombinant nucleocapsid protein (N) of PRRSV was used both as the coating and the enzyme-conjugated antigen. To evaluate the sensitivity of the assay at early stages of the infection, sera from 69 pigs infected with PRRSV were collected during successive days post infection (pi) and tested. While standard methods showed low sensitivity rates before day 14 pi, DR-ELISA detected 88.4% seropositive samples at day 7 showing greater sensitivity at early stages of the infection. Further studies were carried out to assess the efficiency of the new assay, and the results showed DR-ELISA to be a sensitive and accurate method for early diagnosis of EU-PRRSV infection. PMID:22342444

  5. Identification of a common antigenic site in the nucleocapsid protein of European and North American isolates of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Casal, J I; Rodriguez, M J; Sarraseca, J; Garcia, J; Plana-Duran, J; Sanz, A

    1998-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) nucleocapsid (N) protein has been identified as the most immunodominant viral protein. The N protein genes from two PRRSV isolates Olot/91 (European) and Quebec 807/94 (North American) were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli using the pET3x system. The antigenic structure of the PRRSV N protein was dissected using seven monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and overlapping fragments of the protein expressed in E.coli. Three antigenic sites were found. Four MAbs recognized two discontinuous epitopes that were present in the partially folded protein or at least a large fragment comprising the first 78 residues, respectively. The other three MAbs revealed the presence of a common antigenic site localized in the central region of the protein (amino acids 50 to 66). This hydrophillic region is well conserved among different isolates of European and North American origin. However, since this epitope is not recognized by many pig sera, it is not adequate for diagnostic purposes. Moreover, none of the N protein fragments were able to mimic the antigenicity of the entire N protein. PMID:9782317

  6. Specific binding of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gag polyprotein and nucleocapsid protein to viral RNAs detected by RNA mobility shift assays.

    PubMed Central

    Berkowitz, R D; Luban, J; Goff, S P

    1993-01-01

    Packaging of retroviral genomic RNA during virion assembly is thought to be mediated by specific interactions between the gag polyprotein and RNA sequences (often termed the psi or E region) near the 5' end of the genome. For many retroviruses, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the portions of the gag protein and the RNA that are required for this interaction remain poorly defined. We have used an RNA gel mobility shift assay to measure the in vitro binding of purified glutathione S-transferase-HIV-1 gag fusion proteins to RNA riboprobes. Both the complete gag polyprotein and the nucleocapsid (NC) protein alone were found to bind specifically to an HIV-1 riboprobe. Either Cys-His box of NC could be removed without eliminating specific binding to the psi riboprobe, but portions of gag containing only the MA and CA proteins without NC did not bind to RNA. There were at least two binding sites in HIV-1 genomic RNA that bound to the gag polyprotein: one entirely 5' to gag and one entirely within gag. The HIV-1 NC protein bound to riboprobes containing other retroviral psi sequences almost as well as to the HIV-1 psi riboprobe. Images PMID:8230441

  7. Investigation by two-photon fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of the interaction of the nucleocapsid protein of HIV-1 with hairpin loop DNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mely, Yves; Azoulay, Joel; Beltz, Herve; Clamme, Jean-Pierre; Bernacchi, Serena; Ficheux, Damien; Roques, Bernard P.; Darlix, Jean-Luc

    2004-09-01

    The nucleocapsid protein NCp7 of HIV-1 possesses nucleic acid chaperone properties that are critical for the two strand transfer reactions required during reverse transcription. The first DNA strand transfer relies on the destabilization by NCp7 of double-stranded segments of the transactivation response element, TAR sequence, at the 3' end of the genomic RNA and the complementary sequence cTAR at the 3" terminus of the early product of reverse transcription. To characterize NCp7-mediated nucleic acid destabilization, we investigated by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and two photon fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, the interaction of a doubly-labelled cTAR sequence with NCp7. The conformational fluctuations observed in the absence of NCp7 were associated with the rapid opening and closing (fraying) of the double stranded terminal segment of cTAR. NCp7 destabilizes cTAR mainly through a large increase of the opening rate constant. Additionally, the various destabilizing structures (bulges, internal loop, mismatches) spread all over cTAR secondary structure were found to be critical for NCp7 chaperone activity. Taken together, our data enabled us to propose a molecular mechanism for the destabilizing activity of NCp7 on cTAR which is crucial for the formation of the cTAR-TAR complex during the first strand transfer reaction.

  8. A LINE-like transposable element in Drosophila, the I factor, encodes a protein with properties similar to those of retroviral nucleocapsids.

    PubMed

    Dawson, A; Hartswood, E; Paterson, T; Finnegan, D J

    1997-07-16

    I factors are members of the LINE-like family of transposable elements and move by reverse transcription of an RNA intermediate. Complete I factors contain two open reading frames. The amino acid sequence encoded by the first of these, ORF1, includes the motif CX2CX4HX4C that is characteristic of the nucleocapsid domain of retroviral gag polypeptides followed by a copy of the slightly different sequences CX2CX4HX6C and CX2CX9HX6C. The function of this protein is unknown. We have expressed this protein in Escherichia coli and Spodoptera frugiperda cells and have shown that it binds both DNA and RNA but without any evidence for sequence specificity. The properties of deletion derivatives of the protein indicate that more than one region is responsible for DNA binding and that the CCHC motif is not essential for this. The ORF1 protein expressed in either E. coli or Spodoptera cells forms high molecular weight structures that require the region of the protein including the CCHC motif for their formation. This protein can also accelerate the annealing of complementary single-stranded oligonucleotides. These results suggest that this protein may associate with the RNA transposition intermediates of the I factor to form particles that enter the nucleus during transposition and that it may stimulate both the priming of reverse transcription and integration. This may be generally true for the product of the first open reading frame of LINE-like elements. PMID:9250689

  9. T-helper and humoral responses to Puumala hantavirus nucleocapsid protein: identification of T-helper epitopes in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho Nicacio, C; Sällberg, M; Hultgren, C; Lundkvist, A

    2001-01-01

    Puumala hantavirus (PUUV) is a rodent-borne agent causing nephropathia epidemica in humans, a milder form of haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome occurring in Fennoscandia, central Europe and western Russia. In this study we characterized the immunogenicity of an E. coli-expressed nucleocapsid (N) protein of PUUV (strain Kazan-E6) in inbred mice (BALB/c, CBA and C57/BL6). The recombinant N (rN) protein raised PUUV-specific antibodies in all three tested murine haplotypes, and all IgG subclasses were detected. Epitope mapping using peptides spanning the N protein revealed that the B-cell recognition sites were mainly located at the amino-terminal part of the protein. Proliferative T-helper (Th) lymphocyte responses were detected in all haplotypes after a single immunization with rN. Several Th-recognition sites, spanning amino acids 6-27, 96-117, 211-232 and 256-277, were identified using overlapping peptides. Peptides representing the identified sites could also prime Th-lymphocytes to proliferate in response to recall with rN protein, thereby confirming the authenticity of the identified sites. The rN-primed Th-lymphocytes produced predominantly interleukin (IL)-2 and gamma interferon, together with lower levels of IL-4 and IL-6, indicating a mixed Th1/Th2 response. PMID:11125166

  10. The RING Domain and the L79 Residue of Z Protein Are Involved in both the Rescue of Nucleocapsids and the Incorporation of Glycoproteins into Infectious Chimeric Arenavirus-Like Particles ▿

    PubMed Central

    Casabona, Juan Cruz; Levingston Macleod, Jesica M.; Loureiro, Maria Eugenia; Gomez, Guillermo A.; Lopez, Nora

    2009-01-01

    Arenaviruses, such as Tacaribe virus (TacV) and its closely related pathogenic Junin virus (JunV), are enveloped viruses with a bipartite negative-sense RNA genome that encodes the nucleocapsid protein (N), the precursor of the envelope glycoprotein complex (GP), the polymerase (L), and a RING finger protein (Z), which is the driving force of arenavirus budding. We have established a plasmid-based system which allowed the successful packaging of TacV-like nucleocapsids along with Z and GP of JunV into infectious virus-like particles (VLPs). By coexpressing different combinations of the system components, followed by biochemical analysis of the VLPs, the requirements for the assembly of both N and GP into particles were defined. We found that coexpression of N with Z protein in the absence of minigenome and other viral proteins was sufficient to recruit N within lipid-enveloped Z-containing VLPs. In addition, whereas GP was not required for the incorporation of N, coexpression of N substantially enhanced the ratio of GP to Z into VLPs. Disruption of the RING structure or mutation of residue L79 to alanine within Z protein, although it had no effect on Z self-budding, severely impaired VLP infectivity. These mutations drastically altered intracellular Z-N interactions and the incorporation of both N and GP into VLPs. Our results support the conclusion that the interaction between Z and N is required for assembly of both the nucleocapsids and the glycoproteins into infectious arenavirus budding particles. PMID:19420075

  11. The RING domain and the L79 residue of Z protein are involved in both the rescue of nucleocapsids and the incorporation of glycoproteins into infectious chimeric arenavirus-like particles.

    PubMed

    Casabona, Juan Cruz; Levingston Macleod, Jesica M; Loureiro, Maria Eugenia; Gomez, Guillermo A; Lopez, Nora

    2009-07-01

    Arenaviruses, such as Tacaribe virus (TacV) and its closely related pathogenic Junin virus (JunV), are enveloped viruses with a bipartite negative-sense RNA genome that encodes the nucleocapsid protein (N), the precursor of the envelope glycoprotein complex (GP), the polymerase (L), and a RING finger protein (Z), which is the driving force of arenavirus budding. We have established a plasmid-based system which allowed the successful packaging of TacV-like nucleocapsids along with Z and GP of JunV into infectious virus-like particles (VLPs). By coexpressing different combinations of the system components, followed by biochemical analysis of the VLPs, the requirements for the assembly of both N and GP into particles were defined. We found that coexpression of N with Z protein in the absence of minigenome and other viral proteins was sufficient to recruit N within lipid-enveloped Z-containing VLPs. In addition, whereas GP was not required for the incorporation of N, coexpression of N substantially enhanced the ratio of GP to Z into VLPs. Disruption of the RING structure or mutation of residue L79 to alanine within Z protein, although it had no effect on Z self-budding, severely impaired VLP infectivity. These mutations drastically altered intracellular Z-N interactions and the incorporation of both N and GP into VLPs. Our results support the conclusion that the interaction between Z and N is required for assembly of both the nucleocapsids and the glycoproteins into infectious arenavirus budding particles. PMID:19420075

  12. Expression and purification of the nucleocapsid protein of Schmallenberg virus, and preparation and characterization of a monoclonal antibody against this protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongning; Wu, Shaoqiang; Wang, Jianchang; Wernike, Kerstin; Lv, Jizhou; Feng, Chunyan; Zhang, Jihong; Wang, Caixia; Deng, Junhua; Yuan, Xiangfen; Lin, Xiangmei

    2013-11-01

    Schmallenberg virus (SBV) is a novel orthobunyavirus that primarily infects ruminants such as cattle, sheep and goats. The nucleocapsid (N) protein of SBV has been shown to be an ideal target antigen for serological detection. To prepare a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against the N protein, the full-length coding sequence of the SBV N gene was cloned into pET-28a-c(+) and pMAL-c5X vectors to generate two recombinant plasmids, which were expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 as histidine (His)-tagged (His-SBV-N) and maltose-binding protein (MBP)-tagged (MBP-SBV-N) fusion proteins, respectively. After affinity purification of His-SBV-N with Ni-NTA agarose and MBP-SBV-N with amylose resin, His-SBV-N was used to immunize BALB/c mice, while MBP-SBV-N was utilized to screen for mAb-secreting hybridomas. Six hybridoma cell lines stably secreting mAbs against N were obtained. Clone 2C8 was selected for further study because of its rapid growth characteristics in vitro and good reactivity with recombinant SBV N proteins in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The epitope recognized by 2C8 is located at amino acids 51-76 of the SBV N protein. Western blot analyses showed that 2C8 reacts with both recombinant SBV N proteins and SBV isolates. It is also cross-reactive with the N proteins of genetically related Shamonda, Douglas and Akabane viruses, but not with the Rift Valley fever virus N protein. The successful preparation of recombinant N proteins and mAbs provides valuable materials that can be used in the serological diagnosis of SBV. PMID:23988909

  13. SARS coronavirus nucleocapsid immunodominant T-cell epitope cluster is common to both exogenous recombinant and endogenous DNA-encoded immunogens.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vandana; Tabiin, Tani M; Sun, Kai; Chandrasekaran, Ananth; Anwar, Azlinda; Yang, Kun; Chikhlikar, Priya; Salmon, Jerome; Brusic, Vladimir; Marques, Ernesto T A; Kellathur, Srinivasan N; August, Thomas J

    2006-03-30

    Correspondence between the T-cell epitope responses of vaccine immunogens and those of pathogen antigens is critical to vaccine efficacy. In the present study, we analyzed the spectrum of immune responses of mice to three different forms of the SARS coronavirus nucleocapsid (N): (1) exogenous recombinant protein (N-GST) with Freund's adjuvant; (2) DNA encoding unmodified N as an endogenous cytoplasmic protein (pN); and (3) DNA encoding N as a LAMP-1 chimera targeted to the lysosomal MHC II compartment (p-LAMP-N). Lysosomal trafficking of the LAMP/N chimera in transfected cells was documented by both confocal and immunoelectron microscopy. The responses of the immunized mice differed markedly. The strongest T-cell IFN-gamma and CTL responses were to the LAMP-N chimera followed by the pN immunogen. In contrast, N-GST elicited strong T cell IL-4 but minimal IFN-gamma responses and a much greater antibody response. Despite these differences, however, the immunodominant T-cell ELISpot responses to each of the three immunogens were elicited by the same N peptides, with the greatest responses being generated by a cluster of five overlapping peptides, N76-114, each of which contained nonameric H2d binding domains with high binding scores for both class I and, except for N76-93, class II alleles. These results demonstrate that processing and presentation of N, whether exogenously or endogenously derived, resulted in common immunodominant epitopes, supporting the usefulness of modified antigen delivery and trafficking forms and, in particular, LAMP chimeras as vaccine candidates. Nevertheless, the profiles of T-cell responses were distinctly different. The pronounced Th-2 and humoral response to N protein plus adjuvant are in contrast to the balanced IFN-gamma and IL-4 responses and strong memory CTL responses to the LAMP-N chimera. PMID:16387339

  14. Spatial proximity of the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein zinc fingers investigated by time-resolved fluorescence and fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Mély, Y; Jullian, N; Morellet, N; De Rocquigny, H; Dong, C Z; Piémont, E; Roques, B P; Gérard, D

    1994-10-11

    The three-dimensional structure of peptides encompassing the two zinc-saturated finger motifs of the nucleocapsid protein NCp7 of HIV-1 has been reported by several groups. Whereas the folded structures of the finger motifs were in good agreement, discrepancies existed concerning their spatial relationship since the fingers were found either close to each other [Morellet, N., Jullian, N., De Rocquigny, H., Maigret, B., Darlix, J. L., & Roques, B. P. (1992) Embo J. 11, 3059-3065] or independently folded [Omichinski, J. G., Clore, G. M., Sakaguchi, K., Appella, E., & Gronenborn, A. M. (1991) FEBS Lett. 292, 25-30, Summers, M. F., Henderson, L. E., Chance, M. R., Bess, J. W., Jr., South, T. L., Blake, P. R., Sagi, I., Perez-Alvarado, G., Sowder, R.C., III, Hare, D.R., & Arthur, L. O. (1992) Protein Sci. 1, 563-574]. As in the interacting finger model, Phe16 in the NH2-terminal finger and Trp37 in the COOH-terminal finger were found to be spatially close, the fluorescence properties of the aromatic residues at positions 16 and 37 in the wild-type and two conservatively substituted (12-53) NCp7 peptides were investigated and compared with those of three negative control derivatives where the finger motifs were not in close contact. Direct distance measurements by Tyr-Trp fluorescence resonance energy transfer of the former derivatives yielded a 7-12 A interchromophore distance range which is clearly inconsistent with the 12.5-18 A range measured for the negative controls and thus a random orientation of the zinc finger motifs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7918429

  15. Nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of the nucleocapsid protein of the virulent A75/17-CDV strain of canine distemper virus.

    PubMed

    Stettler, M; Zurbriggen, A

    1995-05-01

    Virus persistence is essential in the chronic inflammatory canine distemper virus (CDV)-induced demyelinating disease. In the case of CDV there is a close association between persistence and virulence. Virulent CDV isolated from dogs with distemper shows immediate persistence in primary dog brain cell cultures (DBCC) and in different cell lines. We have evidence that the nucleocapsid (NP) protein plays an important role in the development of persistence. The NP-protein, the most abundant structural virus protein, also influences virus assembly and has some regulatory functions in virus transcription and replication. In this study we compared the nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence of a virulent CDV strain (A75/17-CDV) to a culture-attenuated non-virulent strain (OP-CDV). Viral RNA was extracted from DBCC infected with virulent CDV. Virulent CDV retains its in vivo properties, such as virulence and ability to cause demyelination, when propagated in these DBCC. The viral RNA was reverse transcribed and the resulting cDNA amplified by polymerase chain reaction for subsequent cloning. The nucleotide sequences of these clones were determined by the dideoxy chain termination method. The number of nucleotides and the putative NP-protein of the virulent strain matched the attenuated CDV strain. We observed a total of 105 nucleotide differences. Three were localised within the 3' and five within the 5' non-coding region of the NP-gene. The 97 nucleotide changes within the coding region resulted in 22 amino acid differences. 10 of these amino acid (AA) modifications were within the N-terminal region (AA 1 to 159) and 12 within the C-terminal area (AA 351 to 523).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8588315

  16. Mapping of B-cell determinants in the nucleocapsid protein of Puumala virus: definition of epitopes specific for acute immunoglobulin G recognition in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Lundkvist, A; Björsten, S; Niklasson, B; Ahlborg, N

    1995-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of the Puumala (PUU) virus nucleocapsid protein (N), deduced from the genome of the prototype strain Sotkamo, was synthesized as decapeptides with 5-amino-acid overlaps. By use of the PEPSCAN method, 86 peptides were examined for reactivity with sera from serologically confirmed nephropathia epidemica (NE) patients and 11 PUU virus N-specific bank vole monoclonal antibodies. The human sera showed reactivity with several different regions, while only one of the monoclonal antibodies reacted with one single peptide. Sequences were selected by this PEPSCAN analysis of human antibody reactivities, and five 15-amino-acid peptides were synthesized and evaluated as antigens by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Peptide-reactive antibodies of the immunoglobulin M (IgM) class were measured in serum samples drawn from patients with acute NE. In comparison with the results of a mu-capture IgM ELISA using native PUU virus antigen, only a few serum samples were found positive (sensitivity, 2 to 10%). Interestingly, when antibodies of the IgG class were measured, the sensitivities of the five peptide ELISAs were found to be 79, 46, 2, 100, and 40%, respectively, as compared with the sensitivity of an IgG ELISA based on native viral antigen. The IgG reactivities of sequentially drawn sera from NE patients with the two peptides giving the highest assay sensitivities were analyzed and compared with their reactivities with native viral antigen. All patients had detectable anti-peptide IgG in the acute-phase sample, which, however, had totally declined in samples drawn after 2 years. The opposite pattern was seen with native viral antigen, in which case all patients showed the highest levels of specific IgG after 2 years. The results suggest the presence of epitopes specific for the acute IgG response. PMID:7536616

  17. HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein activates transient melting of least stable parts of the secondary structure of TAR and its complementary sequence.

    PubMed

    Bernacchi, Serena; Stoylov, Stoyl; Piémont, Etienne; Ficheux, Damien; Roques, Bernard P; Darlix, Jean Luc; Mély, Yves

    2002-03-29

    The nucleocapsid protein NCp7 of HIV-1 possesses a nucleic acid chaperone activity that is critical in minus and plus strand transfer during reverse transcription. The minus strand transfer notably relies on the ability of NCp7 to destabilize the stable stem with five contiguous, double-stranded segments of both the TAR sequence at the 3' end of the viral genome and the complementary sequence, cTAR, in minus strong-stop DNA. In order to examine the nature and the extent of NCp7 destabilizing activity, we investigated, by absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy, the interaction of TAR and cTAR with a (12-55)NCp7 peptide containing the zinc-finger motifs but lacking the ability to aggregate the oligonucleotides. The absorbance changes in the UV band of cTAR show that seven to eight base-pairs, on average, are melted per oligonucleotide at a ratio of one peptide to 7.5 nucleotides. In contrast, the melting of TAR does not exceed an average of one base-pair per oligonucleotide. This may be linked to the greater stability of TAR, since a strong correlation between NCp7 destabilizing effect and oligonucleotide stability was observed. The effect of (12-55)NCp7 on the stem terminus was investigated by using a cTAR molecule doubly labeled at the 3' and 5' ends by a donor/acceptor couple. In the absence of the peptide, about 80 % of the oligonucleotides are in a dark non-fluorescent state, having a close proximity of the two dyes. The remaining 20 % are distributed between three fluorescent species, having either the terminal segment, the two terminal segments or all segments of the stem melted. This is in line with a fraying mechanism wherein the stem terminus fluctuates rapidly between open and closed states. Addition of (12-55)NCp7 shifts the equilibrium toward the open species, suggesting that NC enhances fraying of the stem terminus. Taken together, our data suggest that NCp7 activates the transient opening of base-pairs in the least stable parts of the stem. Also

  18. Impact of the terminal bulges of HIV-1 cTAR DNA on its stability and the destabilizing activity of the nucleocapsid protein NCp7.

    PubMed

    Beltz, Hervé; Azoulay, Joel; Bernacchi, Serena; Clamme, Jean-Pierre; Ficheux, Damien; Roques, Bernard; Darlix, Jean-Luc; Mély, Yves

    2003-04-18

    Reverse transcription of HIV-1 genomic RNA to double-stranded DNA by reverse transcriptase (RT) is a critical step in HIV-1 replication. This process relies on two viral proteins, the RT enzyme and nucleocapsid protein NCp7 that has well documented nucleic acid chaperone properties. At the beginning of the linear DNA synthesis, the newly made minus-strand strong-stop DNA ((-)ssDNA) is transferred to the 3'end of the genomic RNA by means of an hybridization reaction between transactivation response element (TAR) RNA and cTAR DNA sequences. Since both TAR sequences exhibit stable hairpin structures, NCp7 needs to destabilize the TAR structures in order to chaperone their hybridization. To further characterize the relationships between TAR stability and NC-mediated destabilization, the role of the A(49) and G(52) bulged residues in cTAR DNA stability was investigated. The stability of cTAR and mutants where one or the two terminal bulges were replaced by base-pairs as well as the NCp7-mediated destabilization of these cTAR sequences were examined. Thermodynamic data indicate that the two bulges cooperatively destabilize cTAR by reducing the stacking interactions between the bases. This causes a free energy change of about 6.4 kcal/mol and seems to be critical for NC activity. Time-resolved fluorescence data of doubly labelled cTAR derivatives suggest that NC-mediated melting of cTAR ends propagates up to the 10C.A(44) mismatch or T(40) bulge. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy using two-photon excitation was also used to monitor cTAR ends fraying by NC. Results show that NC causes a very significant increase of cTAR ends fraying, probably limited to the terminal base-pair in the case of cTAR mutants. Since the TAR RNA and cTAR DNA bulges or mismatches appear well conserved among all HIV-1 strains, the present data support the notion of a co-evolutionary relationship between TAR and NC activity. PMID:12684000

  19. In silico prediction and ex vivo evaluation of potential T-cell epitopes in glycoproteins 4 and 5 and nucleocapsid protein of genotype-I (European) of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Ivan; Pujols, Joan; Ganges, Llilianne; Gimeno, Mariona; Darwich, Laila; Domingo, Mariano; Mateu, Enric

    2009-09-18

    T-cell epitopes of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) glycoproteins 4 (GP4), 5 (GP5) and nucleocapsid (N) were predicted using bioinformatics and later tested by IFN-gamma ELISPOT in pigs immunized with either a modified live vaccine (MLV) or DNA (open reading frames 4, 5 or 7). For MLV-vaccinated pigs, immunodominant epitopes were found in N but T-epitopes were also found in GP4 and GP5. For DNA-immunized pigs, some peptides were differently recognized. Using a large set of PRRSV sequences it was shown that N contains a conserved epitope and that for GP5, the genotype-I counterparts of previously reported epitopes of genotype-II strains were also immunogenic. PMID:19646408

  20. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis of the predicted rRNA-binding domain of ErmC' redefines the substrate-binding site and suggests a model for protein-RNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Maravić, Gordana; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Feder, Marcin; Pongor, Sándor; Flögel, Mirna

    2003-08-15

    The Erm family of adenine-N(6) methyltransferases (MTases) is responsible for the development of resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B antibiotics through the methylation of 23S ribosomal RNA. Hence, these proteins are important potential drug targets. Despite the availability of the NMR and crystal structures of two members of the family (ErmAM and ErmC', respectively) and extensive studies on the RNA substrate, the substrate-binding site and the amino acids involved in RNA recognition by the Erm MTases remain unknown. It has been proposed that the small C-terminal domain functions as a target-binding module, but this prediction has not been tested experimentally. We have undertaken structure-based mutational analysis of 13 charged or polar residues located on the predicted rRNA-binding surface of ErmC' with the aim to identify the area of protein-RNA interactions. The results of in vivo and in vitro analyses of mutant protein suggest that the key RNA-binding residues are located not in the small domain, but in the large catalytic domain, facing the cleft between the two domains. Based on the mutagenesis data, a preliminary three-dimensional model of ErmC' complexed with the minimal substrate was constructed. The identification of the RNA-binding site of ErmC' may be useful for structure-based design of novel drugs that do not necessarily bind to the cofactor-binding site common to many S-adenosyl-L- methionine-dependent MTases, but specifically block the substrate-binding site of MTases from the Erm family. PMID:12907737

  1. Vaccination of calves using the BRSV nucleocapsid protein in a DNA prime-protein boost strategy stimulates cell-mediated immunity and protects the lungs against BRSV replication and pathology.

    PubMed

    Letellier, Carine; Boxus, Mathieu; Rosar, Laurent; Toussaint, Jean-François; Walravens, Karl; Roels, Stefan; Meyer, Gilles; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Kerkhofs, Pierre

    2008-09-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of respiratory disease in both cattle and young children. Despite the development of vaccines against bovine (B)RSV, incomplete protection and exacerbation of subsequent RSV disease have occurred. In order to circumvent these problems, calves were vaccinated with the nucleocapsid protein, known to be a major target of CD8(+) T cells in cattle. This was performed according to a DNA prime-protein boost strategy. The results showed that DNA vaccination primed a specific T-cell-mediated response, as indicated by both a lymphoproliferative response and IFN-gamma production. These responses were enhanced after protein boost. After challenge, mock-vaccinated calves displayed gross pneumonic lesions and viral replication in the lungs. In contrast, calves vaccinated by successive administrations of plasmid DNA and protein exhibited protection against the development of pneumonic lesions and the viral replication in the BAL fluids and the lungs. The protection correlated to the cell-mediated immunity and not to the antibody response. PMID:18644416

  2. Resolution of the cellular proteome of the nucleocapsid protein from a highly pathogenic isolate of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus identifies PARP-1 as a cellular target whose interaction is critical for virus biology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Long; Lear, Zoe; Hughes, David J; Wu, Weining; Zhou, En-min; Whitehouse, Adrian; Chen, Hongying; Hiscox, Julian A

    2015-03-23

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a major threat to the swine industry and food security worldwide. The nucleocapsid (N) protein is a major structural protein of PRRSV. The primary function of this protein is to encapsidate the viral RNA genome, and it is also thought to participate in the modulation of host cell biology and recruitment of cellular factors to facilitate virus infection. In order to the better understand these latter roles the cellular interactome of PRRSV N protein was defined using label free quantitative proteomics. This identified several cellular factors that could interact with the N protein including poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase 1 (PARP-1), a cellular protein, which can add adenosine diphosphate ribose to a protein. Use of the PARP-1 small molecule inhibitor, 3-AB, in PRRSV infected cells demonstrated that PARP-1 was required and acted as an enhancer factor for virus biology. Serial growth of PRRSV in different concentrations of 3-AB did not yield viruses that were able to grow with wild type kinetics, suggesting that by targeting a cellular protein crucial for virus biology, resistant phenotypes did not emerge. This study provides further evidence that cellular proteins, which are critical for virus biology, can also be targeted to ablate virus growth and provide a high barrier for the emergence of drug resistance. PMID:25614100

  3. Serological diagnosis of hantavirus infections by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on detection of immunoglobulin G and M responses to recombinant nucleocapsid proteins of five viral serotypes.

    PubMed

    Elgh, F; Lundkvist, A; Alexeyev, O A; Stenlund, H; Avsic-Zupanc, T; Hjelle, B; Lee, H W; Smith, K J; Vainionpää, R; Wiger, D; Wadell, G; Juto, P

    1997-05-01

    Worldwide, hantaviruses cause more than 100,000 human infections annually. Rapid and accurate methods are important both in monitoring acute infections and for epidemiological studies. We and others have shown that the amino termini of hantavirus nucleocapsid proteins (Ns) are sensitive tools for the detection of specific antibodies in hantavirus disease. Accordingly, we expressed truncated Ns (amino acids 1 to 117) in Escherichia coli from the five hantaviruses known to be pathogenic to man; Hantaan (HTN), Seoul (SEO), Dobrava (DOB), Sin Nombre (SN), and Puumala (PUU) viruses. In order to obtain pure antigens for use in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the recombinant proteins were purified by polyhistidine-metal chelate affinity chromatography. Polyclonal animal antisera and a panel of serum specimens from hantavirus-infected individuals from Scandinavia, Slovenia, Russia, Korea, China, and the United States were used to evaluate the usefulness of the method. With both human and animal sera, it was possible to designate the antibody response into two groups: those with HTN, SEO, and DOB virus reactivity on the one hand and those with SN and PUU virus reactivity on the other. In sera from Scandinavia, European Russia, and the United States, the antibody response was directed mainly to the PUU and SN virus group. The sera from Asia reacted almost exclusively with the HTN, SEO, and DOB types of viruses. This was true for both the immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG antibody responses, indicating that this type of discrimination can be done during the acute phase of hantavirus infections. Both the HTN, SEO, and DOB virus and the PUU and SN virus types of antibody response patterns were found in patients from the Balkan region (Solvenia). PMID:9114393

  4. Rapid and sensitive detection of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG antibodies against canine distemper virus by a new recombinant nucleocapsid protein-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    von Messling, V; Harder, T C; Moennig, V; Rautenberg, P; Nolte, I; Haas, L

    1999-04-01

    Canine distemper morbillivirus (CDV) infection causes a frequently fatal systemic disease in a broad range of carnivore species, including domestic dogs. In CDV infection, classical serology provides data of diagnostic and prognostic values (kinetics of seroconversion) and is also used to predict the optimal vaccination age of pups. Routine CDV serology is still based on time- and cost-intensive virus neutralization assays (V-NA). Here, we describe a new capture-sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that uses recombinant baculovirus-expressed nucleocapsid (N) protein of a recent CDV wild-type isolate (2544/Han95) for the detection of CDV-specific antibodies in canine sera. Recombinant antigen was produced with high efficacy in Heliothis virescens larvae. The capture-sandwich ELISA enabled a clear-cut qualitative evaluation of the CDV-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM serostatuses of 196 and 35 dog sera, respectively. Inter-rater agreement analysis (kappa = 0.988) indicated that the ELISA can be used unrestrictedly as a substitute for the V-NA for the qualitative determination of CDV-specific IgG serostatus. In an attempt to semiquantify N-specific antibodies, a one-step-dilution (alpha method) IgG-specific ELISA was implemented. Alpha values of >/=50% showed very good inter-rater agreement (kappa = 0.968) with V-NA titers of >/=1/100 50% neutralizing dose (ND50) as measured against the central European CDV wild-type isolate 2544/Han95 in canine sera originating from northern Germany. An ND50 titer of 1/100 is considered a threshold, and titers of >/=1/100 indicate a resilient, protective immunity. CDV N-specific antibodies of the IgM class were detected by the newly developed ELISA in 9 of 15 sera obtained from dogs with symptoms of acute distemper. In leucocytes of 5 of the 15 dogs (all of which were also IgM positive) CDV RNA was detected by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. The recombinant capture-sandwich ELISA detecting N-specific antibodies

  5. Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG Antibodies against Canine Distemper Virus by a New Recombinant Nucleocapsid Protein-Based Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    PubMed Central

    von Messling, Veronika; Harder, Timm C.; Moennig, Volker; Rautenberg, Peter; Nolte, Ingo; Haas, Ludwig

    1999-01-01

    Canine distemper morbillivirus (CDV) infection causes a frequently fatal systemic disease in a broad range of carnivore species, including domestic dogs. In CDV infection, classical serology provides data of diagnostic and prognostic values (kinetics of seroconversion) and is also used to predict the optimal vaccination age of pups. Routine CDV serology is still based on time- and cost-intensive virus neutralization assays (V-NA). Here, we describe a new capture-sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that uses recombinant baculovirus-expressed nucleocapsid (N) protein of a recent CDV wild-type isolate (2544/Han95) for the detection of CDV-specific antibodies in canine sera. Recombinant antigen was produced with high efficacy in Heliothis virescens larvae. The capture-sandwich ELISA enabled a clear-cut qualitative evaluation of the CDV-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM serostatuses of 196 and 35 dog sera, respectively. Inter-rater agreement analysis (κ = 0.988) indicated that the ELISA can be used unrestrictedly as a substitute for the V-NA for the qualitative determination of CDV-specific IgG serostatus. In an attempt to semiquantify N-specific antibodies, a one-step-dilution (alpha method) IgG-specific ELISA was implemented. Alpha values of ≥50% showed very good inter-rater agreement (κ = 0.968) with V-NA titers of ≥1/100 50% neutralizing dose (ND50) as measured against the central European CDV wild-type isolate 2544/Han95 in canine sera originating from northern Germany. An ND50 titer of 1/100 is considered a threshold, and titers of ≥1/100 indicate a resilient, protective immunity. CDV N-specific antibodies of the IgM class were detected by the newly developed ELISA in 9 of 15 sera obtained from dogs with symptoms of acute distemper. In leucocytes of 5 of the 15 dogs (all of which were also IgM positive) CDV RNA was detected by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. The recombinant capture-sandwich ELISA detecting N-specific antibodies of the

  6. Excitation-dependent visible fluorescence in decameric nanoparticles with monoacylglycerol cluster chromophores.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang-Ming; Cheng, Wan-Yin; Chen, Cheng-Yu; Shyue, Jing-Jong; Nieh, Chih-Chun; Chou, Chen-Fu; Lee, Jia-Rong; Lee, Ya-Yun; Cheng, Chih-Yang; Chang, Sarah Y; Yang, Thomas C; Cheng, Mei-Ching; Lin, Bi-Yun

    2013-01-01

    Organic fluorescent nanoparticles, excitation-dependent photoluminescence, hydrogen-bonded clusters and lysobisphosphatidic acid are four interesting individual topics in materials and biological sciences. They have attracted much attention not only because of their unique properties and important applications, but also because the nature of their intriguing phenomena remained unclear. Here we report a new type of organic fluorescent nanoparticles with intense blue and excitation-dependent visible fluorescence in the range of 410-620 nm. The nanoparticles are composed of ten bis(monoacylglycerol)bisphenol-A molecules and the self-assembly occurs only in elevated concentrations of 2-monoacylglycerol via radical-catalysed 3,2-acyl migration from 3-monoacylglycerol in neat conditions. The excitation-dependent fluorescence behaviour is caused by chromophores composed of hydrogen-bonded monoacylglycerol clusters, which are linked by an extensive hydrogen-bonding network between the ester carbonyl groups and the protons of the alcohols with collective proton motion and HO···C=O (n→π) interactions. PMID:23443572

  7. Neurodegenerative diseases: quantitative predictions of protein-RNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Davide; Agostini, Federico; Klus, Petr; Marchese, Domenica; Rodriguez, Silvia; Bolognesi, Benedetta; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano

    2013-02-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that RNA plays an active role in a number of neurodegenerative diseases. We recently introduced a theoretical framework, catRAPID, to predict the binding ability of protein and RNA molecules. Here, we use catRAPID to investigate ribonucleoprotein interactions linked to inherited intellectual disability, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Creutzfeuld-Jakob, Alzheimer's, and Parkinson's diseases. We specifically focus on (1) RNA interactions with fragile X mental retardation protein FMRP; (2) protein sequestration caused by CGG repeats; (3) noncoding transcripts regulated by TAR DNA-binding protein 43 TDP-43; (4) autogenous regulation of TDP-43 and FMRP; (5) iron-mediated expression of amyloid precursor protein APP and α-synuclein; (6) interactions between prions and RNA aptamers. Our results are in striking agreement with experimental evidence and provide new insights in processes associated with neuronal function and misfunction. PMID:23264567

  8. False-Positive Results in a Recombinant Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome-Associated Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) Nucleocapsid-Based Western Blot Assay Were Rectified by the Use of Two Subunits (S1 and S2) of Spike for Detection of Antibody to SARS-CoV

    PubMed Central

    Maache, Mimoun; Komurian-Pradel, Florence; Rajoharison, Alain; Perret, Magali; Berland, Jean-Luc; Pouzol, Stéphane; Bagnaud, Audrey; Duverger, Blandine; Xu, Jianguo; Osuna, Antonio; Paranhos-Baccalà, Glaucia

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the reactivity of the recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21(DE3), a Western blot assay was performed by using a panel of 78 serum samples obtained, respectively, from convalescent-phase patients infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) (30 samples) and from healthy donors (48 samples). As antigen for detection of SARS-CoV, the nucleocapsid protein (N) showed high sensitivity and strong reactivity with all samples from SARS-CoV patients and cross-reacted with all serum samples from healthy subjects, with either those obtained from China (10 samples) or those obtained from France (38 serum samples), giving then a significant rate of false positives. Specifically, our data indicated that the two subunits, S1 (residues 14 to 760) and S2 (residues 761 to 1190), resulted from the divided spike reacted with all samples from SARS-CoV patients and without any cross-reactivity with any of the healthy serum samples. Consequently, these data revealed the nonspecific nature of N protein in serodiagnosis of SARS-CoV compared with the S1 and S2, where the specificity is of 100%. Moreover, the reported results indicated that the use of one single protein as a detection antigen of SARS-CoV infection may lead to false-positive diagnosis. These may be rectified by using more than one protein for the serodiagnosis of SARS-CoV. PMID:16522785

  9. The nucleocapsid protein of measles virus blocks host interferon response

    SciTech Connect

    Takayama, Ikuyo; Sato, Hiroki; Watanabe, Akira; Omi-Furutani, Mio; Sugai, Akihiro; Kanki, Keita; Yoneda, Misako; Kai, Chieko

    2012-03-01

    Measles virus (MV) belongs to the genus Morbillivirus of the family Paramyxoviridae. A number of paramyxoviruses inhibit host interferon (IFN) signaling pathways in host immune systems by various mechanisms. Inhibition mechanisms have been described for many paramyxoviruses. Although there are inconsistencies among previous reports concerning MV, it appears that P/V/C proteins interfere with the pathways. In this study, we confirmed the effects of MV P gene products of a wild MV strain on IFN pathways and examined that of other viral proteins on it. Interestingly, we found that N protein acts as an IFN-{alpha}/{beta} and {gamma}-antagonist as strong as P gene products. We further investigated the mechanisms of MV-N inhibition, and revealed that MV-N blocks the nuclear import of activated STAT without preventing STAT and Jak activation or STAT degradation, and that the nuclear translocation of MV-N is important for the inhibition. The inhibitory effect of the N protein was observed as a common feature of other morbilliviruses. The results presented in this report suggest that N protein of MV as well as P/V/C proteins is involved in the inhibition of host IFN signaling pathways.

  10. DOMMINO 2.0: integrating structurally resolved protein-, RNA-, and DNA-mediated macromolecular interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Xingyan; Dhroso, Andi; Han, Jing Ginger; Shyu, Chi-Ren; Korkin, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    Macromolecular interactions are formed between proteins, DNA and RNA molecules. Being a principle building block in macromolecular assemblies and pathways, the interactions underlie most of cellular functions. Malfunctioning of macromolecular interactions is also linked to a number of diseases. Structural knowledge of the macromolecular interaction allows one to understand the interaction’s mechanism, determine its functional implications and characterize the effects of genetic variations, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms, on the interaction. Unfortunately, until now the interactions mediated by different types of macromolecules, e.g. protein–protein interactions or protein–DNA interactions, are collected into individual and unrelated structural databases. This presents a significant obstacle in the analysis of macromolecular interactions. For instance, the homogeneous structural interaction databases prevent scientists from studying structural interactions of different types but occurring in the same macromolecular complex. Here, we introduce DOMMINO 2.0, a structural Database Of Macro-Molecular INteractiOns. Compared to DOMMINO 1.0, a comprehensive database on protein-protein interactions, DOMMINO 2.0 includes the interactions between all three basic types of macromolecules extracted from PDB files. DOMMINO 2.0 is automatically updated on a weekly basis. It currently includes ∼1 040 000 interactions between two polypeptide subunits (e.g. domains, peptides, termini and interdomain linkers), ∼43 000 RNA-mediated interactions, and ∼12 000 DNA-mediated interactions. All protein structures in the database are annotated using SCOP and SUPERFAMILY family annotation. As a result, protein-mediated interactions involving protein domains, interdomain linkers, C- and N- termini, and peptides are identified. Our database provides an intuitive web interface, allowing one to investigate interactions at three different resolution levels: whole subunit network, binary interaction and interaction interface. Database URL: http://dommino.org PMID:26827237

  11. Formation and fate of a complete 31-protein RNA polymerase II transcription preinitiation complex.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Kenji; Calero, Guillermo; Brown, Christopher R; Liu, Xin; Davis, Ralph E; Boeger, Hinrich; Kornberg, Roger D

    2013-03-01

    Whereas individual RNA polymerase II (pol II)-general transcription factor (GTF) complexes are unstable, an assembly of pol II with six GTFs and promoter DNA could be isolated in abundant homogeneous form. The resulting complete pol II transcription preinitiation complex (PIC) contained equimolar amounts of all 31 protein components. An intermediate in assembly, consisting of four GTFs and promoter DNA, could be isolated and supplemented with the remaining components for formation of the PIC. Nuclease digestion and psoralen cross-linking mapped the PIC between positions -70 and -9, centered on the TATA box. Addition of ATP to the PIC resulted in quantitative conversion to an open complex, which retained all 31 proteins, contrary to expectation from previous studies. Addition of the remaining NTPs resulted in run-off transcription, with an efficiency that was promoter-dependent and was as great as 17.5% with the promoters tested. PMID:23303183

  12. Protein-RNA linkage and posttranslational modifications of feline calicivirus and murine norovirus VPg proteins

    PubMed Central

    Olspert, Allan; Hosmillo, Myra; Chaudhry, Yasmin; Peil, Lauri; Truve, Erkki

    2016-01-01

    Members of the Caliciviridae family of positive sense RNA viruses cause a wide range of diseases in both humans and animals. The detailed characterization of the calicivirus life cycle had been hampered due to the lack of robust cell culture systems and experimental tools for many of the members of the family. However, a number of caliciviruses replicate efficiently in cell culture and have robust reverse genetics systems available, most notably feline calicivirus (FCV) and murine norovirus (MNV). These are therefore widely used as representative members with which to examine the mechanistic details of calicivirus genome translation and replication. The replication of the calicivirus RNA genome occurs via a double-stranded RNA intermediate that is then used as a template for the production of new positive sense viral RNA, which is covalently linked to the virus-encoded protein VPg. The covalent linkage to VPg occurs during genome replication via the nucleotidylylation activity of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Using FCV and MNV, we used mass spectrometry-based approach to identify the specific amino acid linked to the 5′ end of the viral nucleic acid. We observed that both VPg proteins are covalently linked to guanosine diphosphate (GDP) moieties via tyrosine positions 24 and 26 for FCV and MNV respectively. These data fit with previous observations indicating that mutations introduced into these specific amino acids are deleterious for viral replication and fail to produce infectious virus. In addition, we also detected serine phosphorylation sites within the FCV VPg protein with positions 80 and 107 found consistently phosphorylated on VPg-linked viral RNA isolated from infected cells. This work provides the first direct experimental characterization of the linkage of infectious calicivirus viral RNA to the VPg protein and highlights that post-translational modifications of VPg may also occur during the viral life cycle. PMID:27375966

  13. Versatile control of Plasmodium falciparum gene expression with an inducible protein-RNA interaction

    PubMed Central

    Goldfless, Stephen J.; Wagner, Jeffrey C.; Niles, Jacquin C.

    2014-01-01

    The available tools for conditional gene expression in Plasmodium falciparum are limited. Here, to enable reliable control of target gene expression, we build a system to efficiently modulate translation. We overcame several problems associated with other approaches for regulating gene expression in P. falciparum. Specifically, our system functions predictably across several native and engineered promoter contexts, and affords control over reporter and native parasite proteins irrespective of their subcellular compartmentalization. Induction and repression of gene expression are rapid, homogeneous, and stable over prolonged periods. To demonstrate practical application of our system, we used it to reveal direct links between antimalarial drugs and their native parasite molecular target. This is an important out come given the rapid spread of resistance, and intensified efforts to efficiently discover and optimize new antimalarial drugs. Overall, the studies presented highlight the utility of our system for broadly controlling gene expression and performing functional genetics in P. falciparum. PMID:25370483

  14. Protein-RNA Dynamics in the Central Junction Control 30S Ribosome Assembly.

    PubMed

    Baker, Kris Ann; Lamichhane, Rajan; Lamichhane, Tek; Rueda, David; Cunningham, Philip R

    2016-09-11

    Interactions between ribosomal proteins (rproteins) and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) facilitate the formation of functional ribosomes. S15 is a central domain primary binding protein that has been shown to trigger a cascade of conformational changes in 16S rRNA, forming the functional structure of the central domain. Previous biochemical and structural studies in vitro have revealed that S15 binds a three-way junction of helices 20, 21, and 22, including nucleotides 652-654 and 752-754. All junction nucleotides except 653 are highly conserved among the Bacteria. To identify functionally important motifs within the junction, we subjected nucleotides 652-654 and 752-754 to saturation mutagenesis and selected and analyzed functional mutants. Only 64 mutants with greater than 10% ribosome function in vivo were isolated. S15 overexpression complemented mutations in the junction loop in each of the partially active mutants, although mutations that produced inactive ribosomes were not complemented by overexpression of S15. Single-molecule Förster or fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) was used to study the Mg(2+)- and S15-induced conformational dynamics of selected junction mutants. Comparison of the structural dynamics of these mutants with the wild type in the presence and absence of S15 revealed specific sequence and structural motifs in the central junction that are important in ribosome function. PMID:27192112

  15. Recoding Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases for Synthetic Biology by Rational Protein-RNA Engineering

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We have taken a rational approach to redesigning the amino acid binding and aminoacyl–tRNA pairing specificities of bacterial glutaminyl–tRNA synthetase. The four-stage engineering incorporates generalizable design principles and improves the pairing efficiency of noncognate glutamate with tRNAGln by over 105-fold compared to the wild-type enzyme. Better optimized designs of the protein–RNA complex include substantial reengineering of the globular core region of the tRNA, demonstrating a role for specific tRNA nucleotides in specifying the identity of the genetically encoded amino acid. Principles emerging from this engineering effort open new prospects for combining rational and genetic selection approaches to design novel aminoacyl–tRNA synthetases that ligate noncanonical amino acids onto tRNAs. This will facilitate reconstruction of the cellular translation apparatus for applications in synthetic biology. PMID:25310879

  16. Protein-RNA cross-linking in the ribosomes of yeast under oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Hamid; Regnier, Fred

    2006-12-01

    Living systems have efficient degradative pathways for dealing with the fact that reactive oxygen species (ROS) derived from cellular metabolism and the environment oxidatively damage proteins and DNA. But aggregation and cross-linking can occur as well, leading to a series of problems including disruption of cellular regulation, mutations, and even cell death. The mechanism(s) by which protein aggregation occurs and the macromolecular species involved are poorly understood. In the study reported here, evidence is provided for a new type of aggregate between proteins and RNA in ribosomes. While studying the effect of oxidative stress induced in the yeast proteome it was noted that ribosomal proteins were widely oxidized. Eighty six percent of the proteins in yeast ribosomes were found to be carbonylated after stressing yeast cell cultures with hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, many of these proteins appeared to be cross-linked based on their coelution patterns during RPC separation. Since they were not in direct contact, it was not clear how this could occur unless it was through the RNA separating them in the ribosome. This was confirmed in a multiple-step process, the first being derivatization of all carbonylated proteins in cell lysates with biotin hydrazide through Schiff base formation. Following reduction of Schiff bases with sodium cyanoborohydride, biotinylated proteins were selected from cell lysates with avidin affinity chromatography. Oxidized proteins thus captured were then selected again using boronate affinity chromatography to capture vicinal diol-containing proteins. This would include proteins cross-linked to an RNA fragment containing a ribose residue with 2',3'-hydroxyl groups. Some glycoproteins would also be selected by this process. LC/MS/MS analyses of tryptic peptides derived from proteins captured by this process along with MASCOT searches resulted in the identification of 37 ribosomal proteins that appear to be cross-linked to RNA. Aggregation of proteins with ribosomal RNA has not been previously reported. The probable impact of this phenomenon cells is to diminish the protein synthesis capacity. PMID:17137326

  17. Rapid agarose gel electrophoretic mobility shift assay for quantitating protein: RNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Ream, Jennifer A; Lewis, L Kevin; Lewis, Karen A

    2016-10-15

    Interactions between proteins and nucleic acids are frequently analyzed using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs). This technique separates bound protein:nucleic acid complexes from free nucleic acids by electrophoresis, most commonly using polyacrylamide gels. The current study utilizes recent advances in agarose gel electrophoresis technology to develop a new EMSA protocol that is simpler and faster than traditional polyacrylamide methods. Agarose gels are normally run at low voltages (∼10 V/cm) to minimize heating and gel artifacts. In this study we demonstrate that EMSAs performed using agarose gels can be run at high voltages (≥20 V/cm) with 0.5 × TB (Tris-borate) buffer, allowing for short run times while simultaneously yielding high band resolution. Several parameters affecting band and image quality were optimized for the procedure, including gel thickness, agarose percentage, and applied voltage. Association of the siRNA-binding protein p19 with its target RNA was investigated using the new system. The agarose gel and conventional polyacrylamide gel methods generated similar apparent binding constants in side-by-side experiments. A particular advantage of the new approach described here is that the short run times (5-10 min) reduce opportunities for dissociation of bound complexes, an important concern in non-equilibrium nucleic acid binding experiments. PMID:27495142

  18. Analysis of Protein-RNA and Protein-Peptide Interactions in Equine Infectious Anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae-Hyung

    2007-01-01

    Macromolecular interactions are essential for virtually all cellular functions including signal transduction processes, metabolic processes, regulation of gene expression and immune responses. This dissertation focuses on the characterization of two important macromolecular interactions involved in the relationship between Equine Infectious Anemia Virus (EIAV) and its host cell in horse: (1) the interaction between the EIAV Rev protein and its binding site, the Rev-responsive element (RRE) and (2) interactions between equine MHC class I molecules and epitope peptides derived from EIAV proteins. EIAV, one of the most divergent members of the lentivirus family, has a single-stranded RNA genome and carries several regulatory and structural proteins within its viral particle. Rev is an essential EIAV regulatory encoded protein that interacts with the viral RRE, a specific binding site in the viral mRNA. Using a combination of experimental and computational methods, the interactions between EIAV Rev and RRE were characterized in detail. EIAV Rev was shown to have a bipartite RNA binding domain contain two arginine rich motifs (ARMs). The RRE secondary structure was determined and specific structural motifs that act as cis-regulatory elements for EIAV Rev-RRE interaction were identified. Interestingly, a structural motif located in the high affinity Rev binding site is well conserved in several diverse lentiviral genoes, including HIV-1. Macromolecular interactions involved in the immune response of the horse to EIAV infection were investigated by analyzing complexes between MHC class I proteins and epitope peptides derived from EIAV Rev, Env and Gag proteins. Computational modeling results provided a mechanistic explanation for the experimental finding that a single amino acid change in the peptide binding domain of the quine MHC class I molecule differentially affectes the recognitino of specific epitopes by EIAV-specific CTL. Together, the findings in this dissertation provide novel insights into the strategy used by EIAV to replicate itself, and provide new details about how the host cell responds to and defends against EIAV upon the infection. Moreover, they have contributed to the understanding of the macromolecular recognition events that regulate these processes.

  19. Decameric GTP cyclohydrolase I forms complexes with two pentameric GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory proteins in the presence of phenylalanine or of a combination of tetrahydrobiopterin and GTP.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, T; Hatakeyama, K

    1998-08-01

    The activity of GTP cyclohydrolase I is inhibited by (6R)-L-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) and stimulated by phenylalanine through complex formation with GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). Gel filtration experiments as well as enzyme activity measurements showed that the number of subunits of GFRP in both the inhibitory and stimulatory complexes is equal to that of GTP cyclohydrolase I. Because GFRP is a pentamer and GTP cyclohydrolase I was shown here by cross-linking experiments to be a decamer, the results indicate that two molecules of a pentameric GFRP associate with one molecule of GTP cyclohydrolase I. Gel filtration analysis suggested that the complex has a radius of gyration similar to that of the enzyme itself. These observations support our model that one molecule of GFRP binds to each of the two outer faces of the torus-shaped GTP cyclohydrolase I. For formation of the inhibitory protein complex, both BH4 and GTP were required; the median effective concentrations of BH4 and GTP were 2 and 26 microM, respectively. BH4 was the most potent of biopterins with different oxidative states. Among GTP analogues, dGTP as well as guanosine 5'-O-(3'-thiotriphosphate) exhibited similar inducibility compared with GTP, whereas other nucleotide triphosphates had no effect. On the other hand, phenylalanine alone was enough for formation of the stimulatory protein complex, and positive cooperativity was found for the phenylalanine-induced protein complex formation. Phenylalanine was the most potent of the aromatic amino acids. PMID:9685352

  20. Crystal structure of decameric fructose-6-phosphate aldolase from Escherichia coli reveals inter-subunit helix swapping as a structural basis for assembly differences in the transaldolase family.

    PubMed

    Thorell, Stina; Schürmann, Melanie; Sprenger, Georg A; Schneider, Gunter

    2002-05-24

    Fructose-6-phosphate aldolase from Escherichia coli is a member of a small enzyme subfamily (MipB/TalC family) that belongs to the class I aldolases. The three-dimensional structure of this enzyme has been determined at 1.93 A resolution by single isomorphous replacement and tenfold non-crystallographic symmetry averaging and refined to an R-factor of 19.9% (R(free) 21.3%). The subunit folds into an alpha/beta barrel, with the catalytic lysine residue on barrel strand beta 4. It is very similar in overall structure to that of bacterial and mammalian transaldolases, although more compact due to extensive deletions of additional secondary structural elements. The enzyme forms a decamer of identical subunits with point group symmetry 52. Five subunits are arranged as a pentamer, and two ring-like pentamers pack like a doughnut to form the decamer. A major interaction within the pentamer is through the C-terminal helix from one monomer, which runs across the active site of the neighbouring subunit. In classical transaldolases, this helix folds back and covers the active site of the same subunit and is involved in dimer formation. The inter-subunit helix swapping appears to be a major determinant for the formation of pentamers rather than dimers while at the same time preserving importing interactions of this helix with the active site of the enzyme. The active site lysine residue is covalently modified, by forming a carbinolamine with glyceraldehyde from the crystallisation mixture. The catalytic machinery is very similar to that of transaldolase, which together with the overall structural similarity suggests that enzymes of the MipB/TALC subfamily are evolutionary related to the transaldolase family. PMID:12051943

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a decameric form of cytosolic thioredoxin peroxidase 1 (Tsa1), C47S mutant, from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, Marcos Antonio de Genu, Victor; Discola, Karen Fulan; Alves, Simone Vidigal; Netto, Luis Eduardo Soares; Guimarães, Beatriz Gomes

    2007-08-01

    A recombinant mutant (C47S) of cytosolic thioredoxin peroxidase 1 from S. cerevisiae was expressed, purified and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method from protein previously treated with 1,4-dithiothreitol. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group C2 and diffraction data were collected to 2.8 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. Saccharomyces cerevisiae cytosolic thioredoxin peroxidase 1 (cTPxI or Tsa1) is a bifunctional enzyme with protective roles in cellular defence against oxidative and thermal stress that exhibits both peroxidase and chaperone activities. Protein overoxidation and/or high temperatures induce great changes in its quaternary structure and lead to its assembly into large complexes that possess chaperone activity. A recombinant mutant of Tsa1 from S. cerevisiae, with Cys47 substituted by serine, was overexpressed in Escherichia coli as a His{sub 6}-tagged fusion protein and purified by nickel-affinity chromatography. Crystals were obtained from protein previously treated with 1,4-dithiothreitol by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 3000 as precipitant and sodium fluoride as an additive. Diffraction data were collected to 2.8 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. The crystal structure was solved by molecular-replacement methods and structure refinement is currently in progress.

  2. Enhanced CLIP uncovers IMP protein-RNA targets in human pluripotent stem cells important for cell adhesion and survival

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Anne E.; Van Nostrand, Eric L.; Pratt, Gabriel A.; Aigner, Stefan; Wilbert, Melissa L.; Sundararaman, Balaji; Freese, Peter; Lambert, Nicole J.; Sathe, Shashank; Liang, Tiffany Y.; Essex, Anthony; Landais, Severine; Burge, Christopher B.; Jones, D. Leanne; Yeo, Gene W.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) require precise control of post-transcriptional RNA networks to maintain proliferation and survival. Using enhanced UV crosslinking and immunoprecipitation (eCLIP), we identify RNA targets of the IMP/IGF2BP family of RNA-binding proteins in hPSCs. At the broad region- and binding site-level IMP1 and IMP2 show reproducible binding to a large and overlapping set of 3′UTR-enriched targets. RNA Bind-N-Seq applied to recombinant full-length IMP1 and IMP2 reveals CA-rich motifs that are enriched in eCLIP-defined binding sites. We observe that IMP1 loss in hPSCs recapitulates IMP1 phenotypes, including a reduction in cell adhesion and an increase in cell death. For cell adhesion, in hPSCs we find IMP1 maintains levels of integrin mRNA, specifically regulating RNA stability of ITGB5. Additionally, we show IMP1 can be linked to hPSC survival via direct target BCL2. Thus, transcriptome-wide binding profiles identify hPSC targets modulating well-characterized IMP1 roles. PMID:27068461

  3. Optimized RNA ISH, RNA FISH and protein-RNA double labeling (IF/FISH) in Drosophila ovaries

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Sandra G; Peters, Nathaniel C; Altaras, Ariel E; Berg, Celeste A

    2014-01-01

    In situ hybridization (ISH) is a powerful technique for detecting nucleic acids in cells and tissues. Here we describe three ISH procedures that are optimized for Drosophila ovaries: whole-mount, digoxigenin-labeled RNA ISH; RNA fluorescent ISH (FISH); and protein immunofluorescence (IF)–RNA FISH double labeling (IF/FISH). Each procedure balances conflicting requirements for permeabilization, fixation and preservation of antigenicity to detect RNA and protein expression with high resolution and sensitivity. The ISH protocol uses alkaline phosphatase–conjugated digoxigenin antibodies followed by a color reaction, whereas FISH detection involves tyramide signal amplification (TSA). To simultaneously preserve antigens for protein detection and enable RNA probe penetration for IF/FISH, we perform IF before FISH and use xylenes and detergents to permeabilize the tissue rather than proteinase K, which can damage the antigens. ISH and FISH take 3 d to perform, whereas IF/FISH takes 5 d. Probe generation takes 1 or 2 d to perform. PMID:24113787

  4. Identification of phosphorylation sites in the nucleocapsid protein (N protein) of SARS-coronavirus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liang; Shao, Jianmin; Sun, Maomao; Liu, Jinxiu; Xu, Gongjin; Zhang, Xumin; Xu, Ningzhi; Wang, Rong; Liu, Siqi

    2007-12-01

    After decoding the genome of SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV), next challenge is to understand how this virus causes the illness at molecular bases. Of the viral structural proteins, the N protein plays a pivot role in assembly process of viral particles as well as viral replication and transcription. The SARS-CoV N proteins expressed in the eukaryotes, such as yeast and HEK293 cells, appeared in the multiple spots on two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE), whereas the proteins expressed in E. coli showed a single 2DE spotE These 2DE spots were further examined by Western blot and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS, and identified as the N proteins with differently apparent pI values and similar molecular mass of 50 kDa. In the light of the observations and other evidences, a hypothesis was postulated that the SARS-CoV N protein could be phosphorylated in eukaryotes. To locate the plausible regions of phosphorylation in the N protein, two truncated N proteins were generated in E. coli and treated with PKC[alpha]. The two truncated N proteins after incubation of PKC[alpha] exhibited the differently electrophoretic behaviors on 2DE, suggesting that the region of 1-256 aa in the N protein was the possible target for PKC[alpha] phosphorylation. Moreover, the SARS-CoV N protein expressed in yeast were partially digested with trypsin and carefully analyzed by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. In contrast to the completely tryptic digestion, these partially digested fragments generated two new peptide mass signals with neutral loss, and MS/MS analysis revealed two phosphorylated peptides located at the "dense serine" island in the N protein with amino acid sequences, GFYAEGSRGGSQASSRSSSR and GNSGNSTPGSSRGNSPARMASGGGK. With the PKC[alpha] phosphorylation treatment and the partially tryptic digestion, the N protein expressed in E. coli released the same peptides as observed in yeast cells. Thus, this investigation provided the preliminary data to determine the phosphorylation sites in the SARS-CoV N protein, and partially clarified the argument regarding the phosphorylation possibility of the N protein during the infection process of SARS-CoV to human host.

  5. A Druggable Pocket at the Nucleocapsid/Phosphoprotein Interaction Site of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ouizougun-Oubari, Mohamed; Pereira, Nelson; Tarus, Bogdan; Galloux, Marie; Lassoued, Safa; Fix, Jenna; Tortorici, M. Alejandra; Hoos, Sylviane; Baron, Bruno; England, Patrick; Desmaële, Didier; Couvreur, Patrick; Bontems, François; Rey, Félix A.; Eléouët, Jean-François; Slama-Schwok, Anny

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Presently, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), the main cause of severe respiratory infections in infants, cannot be treated efficiently with antivirals. However, its RNA-dependent polymerase complex offers potential targets for RSV-specific drugs. This includes the recognition of its template, the ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP), consisting of genomic RNA encapsidated by the RSV nucleoprotein, N. This recognition proceeds via interaction between the phosphoprotein P, which is the main polymerase cofactor, and N. The determinant role of the C terminus of P, and more particularly of the last residue, F241, in RNP binding and viral RNA synthesis has been assessed previously. Here, we provide detailed structural insight into this crucial interaction for RSV polymerase activity. We solved the crystallographic structures of complexes between the N-terminal domain of N (N-NTD) and C-terminal peptides of P and characterized binding by biophysical approaches. Our results provide a rationale for the pivotal role of F241, which inserts into a well-defined N-NTD pocket. This primary binding site is completed by transient contacts with upstream P residues outside the pocket. Based on the structural information of the N-NTD:P complex, we identified inhibitors of this interaction, selected by in silico screening of small compounds, that efficiently bind to N and compete with P in vitro. One of the compounds displayed inhibitory activity on RSV replication, thereby strengthening the relevance of N-NTD for structure-based design of RSV-specific antivirals. IMPORTANCE Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a widespread pathogen that is a leading cause of acute lower respiratory infections in infants worldwide. RSV cannot be treated efficiently with antivirals, and no vaccine is presently available, with the development of pediatric vaccines being particularly challenging. Therefore, there is a need for new therapeutic strategies that specifically target RSV. The interaction between the RSV phosphoprotein P and the ribonucleoprotein complex is critical for viral replication. In this study, we identified the main structural determinants of this interaction, and we used them to screen potential inhibitors in silico. We found a family of molecules that were efficient competitors of P in vitro and showed inhibitory activity on RSV replication in cellular assays. These compounds provide a basis for a pharmacophore model that must be improved but that holds promises for the design of new RSV-specific antivirals. PMID:26246564

  6. Point mutations in the proximal Cys-His box of Rous sarcoma virus nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed Central

    Dupraz, P; Oertle, S; Meric, C; Damay, P; Spahr, P F

    1990-01-01

    To extend our previous studies of the function of the Cys-His box of Rous sarcoma virus NC protein, we have constructed a series of point mutations of the conserved or nonconserved amino acids of the proximal Cys-His box and a one-amino-acid deletion. All mutants were characterized for production of viral proteins and particles, for packaging and maturation of viral RNA, for reverse transcriptase activity, and for infectivity. Our results indicated the following. (i) Mutations affecting the strictly conserved amino acids cysteine 21, cysteine 24, and histidine 29 were lethal; only the mutant His-29----Pro was still able to package viral RNA, most of it in an immature form. (ii) Mutation of the highly conserved glycine 28 to valine reduced viral RNA packaging by 90% and infectivity 30-fold, whereas mutant Gly-28----Ala was fully infectious. This suggests a steric hindrance limit at this position. (iii) Shortening the distance between cysteine 24 and histidine 29 by deleting one amino acid abolished the maturation of viral RNA and yielded noninfectious particles. (iv) Substitution of tyrosine 22 by serine lowered viral RNA packaging efficiency and yielded particles that were 400-fold less infectious; double mutant Tyr-22Thr-23----SerSer had the same infectivity as Tyr-22----Ser, whereas mutant Thr-23----Ser was fully infectious. (v) Changing glutamine 33 to a charged glutamate residue did not affect virus infectivity. Similarities and differences between our avian mutants and those in murine retroviruses are discussed. Images PMID:2168981

  7. Screening and identification of severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus-specific CTL epitopes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Minghai; Xu, Dongping; Li, Xiaojuan; Li, Hongtao; Shan, Ming; Tang, Jiaren; Wang, Min; Wang, Fu-Sheng; Zhu, Xiaodong; Tao, Hua; He, Wei; Tien, Po; Gao, George F

    2006-08-15

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a highly contagious and life-threatening disease that emerged in China in November 2002. A novel SARS-associated coronavirus was identified as its principal etiologic agent; however, the immunopathogenesis of SARS and the role of special CTLs in virus clearance are still largely uncharacterized. In this study, potential HLA-A*0201-restricted spike (S) and nucleocapsid protein-derived peptides were selected from an online database and screened for potential CTL epitopes by in vitro refolding and T2 cell-stabilization assays. The antigenicity of nine peptides which could refold with HLA-A*0201 molecules was assessed with an IFN-gamma ELISPOT assay to determine the capacity to stimulate CTLs from PBMCs of HLA-A2(+) SARS-recovered donors. A novel HLA-A*0201-restricted decameric epitope P15 (S411-420, KLPDDFMGCV) derived from the S protein was identified and found to localize within the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 receptor-binding region of the S1 domain. P15 could significantly enhance the expression of HLA-A*0201 molecules on the T2 cell surface, stimulate IFN-gamma-producing CTLs from the PBMCs of former SARS patients, and induce specific CTLs from P15-immunized HLA-A2.1 transgenic mice in vivo. Furthermore, significant P15-specific CTLs were induced from HLA-A2.1-transgenic mice immunized by a DNA vaccine encoding the S protein; suggesting that P15 was a naturally processed epitope. Thus, P15 may be a novel SARS-associated coronavirus-specific CTL epitope and a potential target for characterization of virus control mechanisms and evaluation of candidate SARS vaccines. PMID:16887973

  8. Enhancement of the basal-level activity of HIV-1 long terminal repeat by HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J L; Sharma, P L; Crumpacker, C S

    2000-03-15

    Two HIV-1 proteins, Tat and NCp7 (NC), have zinc finger-like structures. NC is a virion protein and has been shown to accumulate in the nucleus 8 h postinfection. Since transcription factors with zinc fingers assist the transcriptional activity of both RNA polymerases II and III, we examined the effect of NC on HIV-1 LTR-directed gene expression. The HIV-1 NC binds to the HIV-1 LTR and results in a mobility shift in polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Competition assays with cold probes revealed that the binding of NC and formation of a DNA-protein complex could be prevented by the addition of excess unlabeled LTR self-probe, but not the HIV-1 V3 envelope gene. The DNase I footprint analysis showed that NC binds to six regions within HIV-1 LTR, four of which are near the transcription start site. The NC alone enhances LTR basal-level activity in RNA runoff experiments. When the general transcription factors (GTFs) were added in the assay, NC enhances NF-kappaB, Sp1, and TFIIB-induced HIV-1 LTR-directed RNA transcription. RNA transcription directed by the adenovirus major late promoter, however, is not significantly affected by NC in the cell-free system. Transient transfection of human T lymphocytes with the plasmids containing HIV-1 nc or gag showed enhancement of LTR-CAT activity. Moreover, transfection of HIV-1 provirus containing mutations in NC zinc-finger domains dramatically decreases the enhancement activity in human T cells, in which HIV-1 LTR is stably integrated into the cellular genome. These observations show that NC binds to HIV-1 LTR and cooperatively enhances GTFs and NF-kappaB induced HIV-1 LTR basal-level activity. NC may play the role of a nucleation protein, which binds to LTR and enhances basal-level transcription by recruiting cellular transcription factors to the HIV-1 promoter in competition with cellular promoters. PMID:10704334

  9. HLA-A*0201 T-cell epitopes in severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus nucleocapsid and spike proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Tsao, Y.-P.; Lin, J.-Y.; Jan, J.-T.; Leng, C.-H.; Chu, C.-C.; Yang, Y.-C.; Chen, S.-L. . E-mail: showlic@ha.mc.ntu.edu.tw

    2006-05-26

    The immunogenicity of HLA-A*0201-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) peptide in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) nuclear capsid (N) and spike (S) proteins was determined by testing the proteins' ability to elicit a specific cellular immune response after immunization of HLA-A2.1 transgenic mice and in vitro vaccination of HLA-A2.1 positive human peripheral blood mononuclearcytes (PBMCs). First, we screened SARS N and S amino acid sequences for allele-specific motif matching those in human HLA-A2.1 MHC-I molecules. From HLA peptide binding predictions (http://thr.cit.nih.gov/molbio/hla{sub b}ind/), ten each potential N- and S-specific HLA-A2.1-binding peptides were synthesized. The high affinity HLA-A2.1 peptides were validated by T2-cell stabilization assays, with immunogenicity assays revealing peptides N223-231, N227-235, and N317-325 to be First identified HLA-A*0201-restricted CTL epitopes of SARS-CoV N protein. In addition, previous reports identified three HLA-A*0201-restricted CTL epitopes of S protein (S978-986, S1203-1211, and S1167-1175), here we found two novel peptides S787-795 and S1042-1050 as S-specific CTL epitopes. Moreover, our identified N317-325 and S1042-1050 CTL epitopes could induce recall responses when IFN-{gamma} stimulation of blood CD8{sup +} T-cells revealed significant difference between normal healthy donors and SARS-recovered patients after those PBMCs were in vitro vaccinated with their cognate antigen. Our results would provide a new insight into the development of therapeutic vaccine in SARS.

  10. An eriophyid mite-transmitted plant virus contains eight genomic RNA segments with unusual heterogeneity in the nucleocapsid protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eriophyid mite-transmitted, multipartite, negative-sense plant RNA viruses with membrane-bound spherical virions are classified in the genus Emaravirus. The relatively dissimilar emaraviruses evolved with 4 to 6 genomic RNAs with one open reading frame (ORF) in each genomic RNA segment. We report he...

  11. Molecular Insights into the Coding Region Determinant-binding Protein-RNA Interaction through Site-directed Mutagenesis in the Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein-K-homology Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Mark; van Rensburg, Gerrit; Li, Wai-Ming; Mehmood, Kashif; Mackedenski, Sebastian; Chan, Ching-Man; King, Dustin T.; Miller, Andrew L.; Lee, Chow H.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of its four heterogeneous nuclear RNP-K-homology (KH) domains to physically associate with oncogenic mRNAs is a major criterion for the function of the coding region determinant-binding protein (CRD-BP). However, the particular RNA-binding role of each of the KH domains remains largely unresolved. Here, we mutated the first glycine to an aspartate in the universally conserved GXXG motif of the KH domain as an approach to investigate their role. Our results show that mutation of a single GXXG motif generally had no effect on binding, but the mutation in any two KH domains, with the exception of the combination of KH3 and KH4 domains, completely abrogated RNA binding in vitro and significantly retarded granule formation in zebrafish embryos, suggesting that any combination of at least two KH domains cooperate in tandem to bind RNA efficiently. Interestingly, we found that any single point mutation in one of the four KH domains significantly impacted CRD-BP binding to mRNAs in HeLa cells, suggesting that the dynamics of the CRD-BP-mRNA interaction vary over time in vivo. Furthermore, our results suggest that different mRNAs bind preferentially to distinct CRD-BP KH domains. The novel insights revealed in this study have important implications on the understanding of the oncogenic mechanism of CRD-BP as well as in the future design of inhibitors against CRD-BP function. PMID:25389298

  12. Protein-RNA and Protein-Protein Recognition by Dual KH1/2 Domains of the Neuronal Splicing Factor Nova-1

    SciTech Connect

    M Teplova; L Malinina; J Darnell; J Song; M Lu; R Abagyan; K Musunuru; A Teplov; S Burley; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Nova onconeural antigens are neuron-specific RNA-binding proteins implicated in paraneoplastic opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia (POMA) syndrome. Nova harbors three K-homology (KH) motifs implicated in alternate splicing regulation of genes involved in inhibitory synaptic transmission. We report the crystal structure of the first two KH domains (KH1/2) of Nova-1 bound to an in vitro selected RNA hairpin, containing a UCAG-UCAC high-affinity binding site. Sequence-specific intermolecular contacts in the complex involve KH1 and the second UCAC repeat, with the RNA scaffold buttressed by interactions between repeats. Whereas the canonical RNA-binding surface of KH2 in the above complex engages in protein-protein interactions in the crystalline state, the individual KH2 domain can sequence-specifically target the UCAC RNA element in solution. The observed antiparallel alignment of KH1 and KH2 domains in the crystal structure of the complex generates a scaffold that could facilitate target pre-mRNA looping on Nova binding, thereby potentially explaining Nova's functional role in splicing regulation.

  13. Protein-protein, protein-RNA and protein-lipid interactions of signal-recognition particle components in the hyperthermoacidophilic archaeon Acidianus ambivalens.

    PubMed Central

    Moll, Ralf G

    2003-01-01

    The signal-recognition particle (SRP) of one of the most acidophilic and hyperthermophilic archaeal cells, Acidianus ambivalens, and its putative receptor component, FtsY (prokaryotic SRP receptor), were investigated in detail. A. ambivalens Ffh (fifty-four-homologous protein) was shown to be a soluble protein with strong affinity to membranes. In its membrane-residing form, Ffh was extracted from plasma membranes with chaotropic agents like urea, but not with agents diminishing electrostatic interactions. Using unilamellar tetraether phospholipid vesicles, both Ffh and FtsY associate independently from each other in the absence of other factors, suggesting an equilibrium of soluble and membrane-bound protein forms under in vivo conditions. The Ffh protein precipitated from cytosolic cell supernatants with anti-Ffh antibodies, together with an 7 S-alike SRP-RNA, suggesting a stable core ribonucleoprotein composed of both components under native conditions. The SRP RNA of A. ambivalens depicted a size of about 309 nucleotides like the SRP RNA of the related organism Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. A stable heterodimeric complex composed of Ffh and FtsY was absent in cytosolic supernatants, indicating a transiently formed complex during archaeal SRP targeting. The FtsY protein precipitated in cytosolic supernatants with anti-FtsY antisera as a homomeric protein lacking accessory protein components. However, under in vitro conditions, recombinantly generated Ffh and FtsY associate in a nucleotide-independent manner, supporting a structural receptor model with two interacting apoproteins. PMID:12775213

  14. Whole-mount MeFISH: a novel technique for simultaneous visualization of specific DNA methylation and protein/RNA expression.

    PubMed

    Shiura, Hirosuke; Okamoto, Akimitsu; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Abe, Kuniya

    2014-01-01

    To understand the spatiotemporal changes in cellular status that occur during embryonic development, it is desirable to detect simultaneously the expression of genes, proteins, and epigenetic modifications in individual embryonic cells. A technique termed methylation-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization (MeFISH) was developed recently that can visualize the methylation status of specific DNA sequences in cells fixed on a glass slide. Here, we adapted this glass slide-based MeFISH to the study of intact embryos, and established a method called whole-mount MeFISH. This method can be applied to any DNA sequences in theory and, as a proof-of-concept experiment, we examined the DNA methylation status of satellite repeats in developing mouse primordial germ cells, in which global DNA demethylation is known to take place, and obtained a result that was consistent with previous findings, thus validating the MeFISH method. We also succeeded in combining whole-mount MeFISH with immunostaining or RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (RNA-FISH) techniques by adopting steps to retain signals of RNA-FISH or immunostaining after harsh denaturation step of MeFISH. The combined methods enabled the simultaneous visualization of DNA methylation and protein or RNA expression at single-cell resolution without destroying embryonic and nuclear structures. This whole-mount MeFISH technique should facilitate the study of the dynamics of DNA methylation status during embryonic development with unprecedented resolution. PMID:24755742

  15. Whole-Mount MeFISH: A Novel Technique for Simultaneous Visualization of Specific DNA Methylation and Protein/RNA Expression

    PubMed Central

    Shiura, Hirosuke; Okamoto, Akimitsu; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Abe, Kuniya

    2014-01-01

    To understand the spatiotemporal changes in cellular status that occur during embryonic development, it is desirable to detect simultaneously the expression of genes, proteins, and epigenetic modifications in individual embryonic cells. A technique termed methylation-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization (MeFISH) was developed recently that can visualize the methylation status of specific DNA sequences in cells fixed on a glass slide. Here, we adapted this glass slide-based MeFISH to the study of intact embryos, and established a method called whole-mount MeFISH. This method can be applied to any DNA sequences in theory and, as a proof-of-concept experiment, we examined the DNA methylation status of satellite repeats in developing mouse primordial germ cells, in which global DNA demethylation is known to take place, and obtained a result that was consistent with previous findings, thus validating the MeFISH method. We also succeeded in combining whole-mount MeFISH with immunostaining or RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (RNA-FISH) techniques by adopting steps to retain signals of RNA-FISH or immunostaining after harsh denaturation step of MeFISH. The combined methods enabled the simultaneous visualization of DNA methylation and protein or RNA expression at single-cell resolution without destroying embryonic and nuclear structures. This whole-mount MeFISH technique should facilitate the study of the dynamics of DNA methylation status during embryonic development with unprecedented resolution. PMID:24755742

  16. Persistence of the protective immunity and kinetics of the isotype specific antibody response against the viral nucleocapsid protein after experimental Schmallenberg virus infection of sheep.

    PubMed

    Poskin, Antoine; Verite, Stephanie; Comtet, Loic; Van der Stede, Yves; Cay, Brigitte; De Regge, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Schmallenberg virus (SBV) is an Orthobunyavirus that induces abortion, stillbirths and congenital malformations in ruminants. SBV infection induces a long lasting seroconversion under natural conditions. The persistence of the protective immunity and the isotype specific antibody response upon SBV infection of sheep has however not been studied in detail. Five sheep were kept in BSL3 facilities for more than 16 months and subjected to repeated SBV infections. Blood was regularly sampled and organs were collected at euthanasia. The presence of SBV RNA in serum and organs was measured with quantitative real-time PCR. The appearance and persistence of neutralizing and SBV nucleoprotein (N) isotype specific antibodies was determined with virus neutralization tests (VNT) and ELISAs. The primo SBV infection protected ewes against clinical signs, viraemia and virus replication in organs upon challenge infections more than 15 months later. Production of neutralizing SBV specific antibodies was first detected around 6 days post primo-inoculation with VNT and correlated with the appearance of SBV-N specific IgM antibodies. These IgM antibodies remained present for 2 weeks. SBV-N specific IgG antibodies were first detected between 10 and 21 dpi and reached a plateau at 28 dpi. This plateau remained consistently high and no significant decrease in titre was found over a period of more than 1 year. Similar results were found for the neutralising antibody response. In conclusion, the SBV specific IgM response probably eliminates SBV from the blood and the protective immunity induced by SBV infection protects sheep against reinfection for at least 16 months. PMID:26472116

  17. Synthesis and in Vitro Screening of New Series of 2,6-Dipeptidyl-anthraquinones: Influence of Side Chain Length on HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Frecentese, Francesco; Sosic, Alice; Saccone, Irene; Gamba, Elia; Link, Kristina; Miola, Angelica; Cappellini, Marta; Cattelan, Massimiliano Gianni; Severino, Beatrice; Fiorino, Ferdinando; Magli, Elisa; Corvino, Angela; Perissutti, Elisa; Fabris, Dan; Gatto, Barbara; Caliendo, Giuseppe; Santagada, Vincenzo

    2016-03-10

    2,6-Dipeptidyl-anthraquinones are a promising class of nucleic acid-binding compounds that act as NC inhibitors in vitro. We designed, synthesized, and tested new series of 2,6-disubstituted-anthraquinones, which are able to bind viral nucleic acid substrates of NC. We demonstrate here that these novel derivatives interact preferentially with noncanonical structures of TAR and cTAR, stabilize their dynamics, and interfere with NC chaperone activity. PMID:26797100

  18. The 15N and 46R Residues of Highly Pathogenic Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Nucleocapsid Protein Enhance Regulatory T Lymphocytes Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Juan; Li, Yufeng; Zhang, Qiaoya; Jiang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) negatively modulates host immune responses, resulting in persistent infection and immunosuppression. PRRSV infection increases the number of PRRSV-specific regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs) in infected pigs. However, the target antigens for Tregs proliferation in PRRSV infection have not been fully understood. In this study, we demonstrated that the highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV) induced more CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Tregs than classical PRRSV (C-PRRSV) strain. Of the recombinant GP5, M and N proteins of HP-PRRSV expressed in baculovirus expression systems, only N protein induced Tregs proliferation. The Tregs assays showed that three amino-acid regions, 15–21, 42–48 and 88–94, in N protein played an important role in induction of Tregs proliferation with synthetic peptides covering the whole length of N protein. By using reverse genetic methods, it was firstly found that the 15N and 46R residues in PRRSV N protein were critical for induction of Tregs proliferation. The phenotype of induced Tregs closely resembled that of transforming-growth-factor-β-secreting T helper 3 Tregs in swine. These data should be useful for understanding the mechanism of immunity to PRRSV and development of infection control strategies in the future. PMID:26397116

  19. Site-specific cleavage/packaging of herpes simplex virus DNA and the selective maturation of nucleocapsids containing full-length viral DNA

    PubMed Central

    Vlazny, Donald A.; Kwong, Ann; Frenkel, Niza

    1982-01-01

    Defective genomes present in serially passaged herpes simplex virus (HSV) stocks have been shown to consist of tandemly arranged repeat units containing limited sets of the standard virus DNA sequences. Invariably, the HSV defective genomes terminate with the right (S component) terminus of HSV DNA. Because the oligomeric forms can arise from a single repeat unit, it has been concluded that the defective genomes arise by a rolling circle mechanism of replication. We now report on our studies of defective genomes packaged in viral capsids accumulating in the nuclei and in mature virions (enveloped capsids) translocated into the cytoplasm of cells infected with serially passaged virus. These studies have revealed that, upon electrophoresis in agarose gels, the defective genomes prepared from cytoplasmic virions comigrated with nondefective standard virus DNA (Mr 100 × 106). In contrast, DNA prepared from capsids accumulating in nuclei consisted of both full-length defective virus DNA molecules and smaller DNA molecules of discrete sizes, ranging in Mr from 5.5 to 100 × 106. These smaller DNA species were shown to consist of different integral numbers (from 1 to approximately 18) of defective genome repeat units and to terminate with sequences corresponding to the right terminal sequences of HSV DNA. We conclude on the basis of these studies that (i) sequences from the right end of standard virus DNA contain a recognition signal for the cleavage and packaging of concatemeric viral DNA, (ii) the sequence-specific cleavage is either a prerequisite for or occurs during the entry of viral DNA into capsid structures, and (iii) DNA molecules significantly shorter than full-length standard viral DNA can become encapsidated within nuclear capsids provided they contain the cleavage/packaging signal. However, capsids containing DNA molecules significantly shorter than standard virus DNA are not translocated into the cytoplasm. Images PMID:6280181

  20. Ultrastructural Localization of the Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 UL31, UL34, and US3 Proteins Suggests Specific Roles in Primary Envelopment and Egress of Nucleocapsids

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Ashley E.; Wills, Elizabeth G.; Roller, Richard J.; Ryckman, Brent J.; Baines, Joel D.

    2002-01-01

    The wild-type UL31, UL34, and US3 proteins localized on nuclear membranes and perinuclear virions; the US3 protein was also on cytoplasmic membranes and extranuclear virions. The UL31 and UL34 proteins were not detected in extracellular virions. US3 deletion caused (i) virion accumulation in nuclear membrane invaginations, (ii) delayed virus production onset, and (iii) reduced peak virus titers. These data support the herpes simplex virus type 1 deenvelopment-reenvelopment model of virion egress and suggest that the US3 protein plays an important, but nonessential, role in the egress pathway. PMID:12163613

  1. Structural characterization of the N-terminal part of the MERS-CoV nucleocapsid by X-ray diffraction and small-angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, Nicolas; Lichière, Julie; Baklouti, Amal; Ferron, François; Sévajol, Marion; Canard, Bruno; Coutard, Bruno

    2016-02-01

    The N protein of coronaviruses is a multifunctional protein that is organized into several domains. The N-terminal part is composed of an intrinsically disordered region (IDR) followed by a structured domain called the N-terminal domain (NTD). In this study, the structure determination of the N-terminal region of the MERS-CoV N protein via X-ray diffraction measurements is reported at a resolution of 2.4 Å. Since the first 30 amino acids were not resolved by X-ray diffraction, the structural study was completed by a SAXS experiment to propose a structural model including the IDR. This model presents the N-terminal region of the MERS-CoV as a monomer that displays structural features in common with other coronavirus NTDs. PMID:26894667

  2. Protein-RNA crosslinking in Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunits. Identification of a 16S rRNA fragment crosslinked to protein S12 by the use of the chemical crosslinking reagent 1-ethyl-3-dimethyl-aminopropylcarbodiimide.

    PubMed Central

    Chiaruttini, C; Expert-Bezançon, A; Hayes, D; Ehresmann, B

    1982-01-01

    1-ethyl-3-dimethyl aminopropylcarbodiimide (EDC) was used to cross-link 30S ribosomal proteins to 16S rRNA within the E. coli 3OS ribosomal subunit. Covalently linked complexes containing 30S proteins and 16S rRNA, isolated by sedimentation of dissociated crosslinked 30S subunits through SDS containing sucrose gradients, were digested with RNase T1, and the resulting oligonucleotide-protein complexes were fractionated on SDS containing polyacrylamide gels. Eluted complexes containing 30S proteins S9 and S12 linked to oligonucleotides were obtained in pure form. Oligonucleotide 5'terminal labelling was successful in the case of S12 containing but not of the S9 containing complex and led to identification of the S12 bound oligonucleotide as CAACUCG which is located at positions 1316-1322 in the 16S rRNA sequence. Protein S12 is crosslinked to the terminal G of this heptanucleotide. Images PMID:6760129

  3. Probing Bunyavirus N protein oligomerisation using mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Dale A; Ariza, Antonio; Edwards, Thomas A; Barr, John N; Stonehouse, Nicola J; Ashcroft, Alison E

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE Bunyaviruses have become a major threat to both humans and livestock in Europe and the Americas. The nucleocapsid (N) protein of these viruses is key to the replication cycle and knowledge of the N oligomerisation state is central to understanding the viral lifecycle and for development of therapeutic strategies. METHODS Bunyamwera virus and Schmallenberg virus N proteins (BUNV-N and SBV-N) were expressed recombinantly in E. coli as hexahistidine-SUMO-tagged fusions, and the tag removed subsequently. Noncovalent nano-electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry was conducted in the presence and absence of short RNA oligonucleotides. Instrumental conditions were optimised for the transmission of intact protein complexes into the gas phase. The resulting protein-protein and protein-RNA complexes were identified and their stoichiometries verified by their mass. Collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry was used in cases of ambiguity. RESULTS Both BUNV-N and SBV-N proteins reassembled into N-RNA complexes in the presence of RNA; however, SBV-N formed a wider range of complexes with varying oligomeric states. The N:RNA oligomers observed were consistent with a model of assembly via stepwise addition of N proteins. Furthermore, upon mixing the two proteins in the presence of RNA no heteromeric complexes were observed, thus revealing insights into the specificity of oligomerisation. CONCLUSIONS Noncovalent mass spectrometry has provided the first detailed analysis of the co-populated oligomeric species formed by these important viral proteins and revealed insights into their assembly pathways. Using this technique has also enabled comparisons to be made between the two N proteins. PMID:24573811

  4. An SH3 binding motif within the nucleocapsid protein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus interacts with the host cellular signaling proteins STAMI, TXK, Fyn, Hck, and cortactin.

    PubMed

    Kenney, Scott P; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2015-06-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) causes an economically important global swine disease, and has a complicated virus-host immunomodulation that often leads to a weak Th2 immune response and viral persistence. In this study, we identified a Src homology 3 (SH3) binding motif, PxxPxxP, that is conserved within the N protein of PRRSV strains. Subsequently, we identified five host cellular proteins [signal transducing adaptor molecule (STAM)I, TXK tyrosine kinase (TXK), protein tyrosine kinase fyn (Fyn), hematopoietic cell kinase (Hck), and cortactin] that interact with this SH3 motif. We demonstrated that binding of SH3 proteins with PRRSV N protein depends on at least one intact PxxP motif as disruption of P53 within the motif significantly reduced interaction of each of the 5 proteins. The first PxxP motif appears to be more important for STAMI-N protein interactions whereas the second PxxP motif was more important for Hck interaction. Both STAMI and Hck interactions with PRRSV N protein required an unhindered C-terminal domain as the interaction was only observed with STAMI and Hck proteins with N-terminal but not C-terminal fluorescent tags. We showed that the P56 residue within the SH3 motif is critical for virus lifecycle as mutation resulted in a loss of virus infectivity, however the P50 and P53 mutations did not abolish virus infectivity suggesting that these highly conserved proline residues within the SH3 motif may provide a selective growth advantage through interactions with the host rather than a vital functional element. These results have important implications in understanding PRRSV-host interactions. PMID:25882913

  5. Structure of a Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus assembly intermediate isolated from infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, Kristen; Lokesh, G.L.; Sherman, Michael; Watowich, Stanley

    2010-10-25

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is a prototypical enveloped ssRNA virus of the family Togaviridae. To better understand alphavirus assembly, we analyzed newly formed nucleocapsid particles (termed pre-viral nucleocapsids) isolated from infected cells. These particles were intermediates along the virus assembly pathway, and ultimately bind membrane-associated viral glycoproteins to bud as mature infectious virus. Purified pre-viral nucleocapsids were spherical with a unimodal diameter distribution. The structure of one class of pre-viral nucleocapsids was determined with single particle reconstruction of cryo-electron microscopy images. These studies showed that pre-viral nucleocapsids assembled into an icosahedral structure with a capsid stoichiometry similar to the mature nucleocapsid. However, the individual capsomers were organized significantly differently within the pre-viral and mature nucleocapsids. The pre-viral nucleocapsid structure implies that nucleocapsids are highly plastic and undergo glycoprotein and/or lipid-driven rearrangements during virus self-assembly. This mechanism of self-assembly may be general for other enveloped viruses.

  6. Solution Structure of an Archaeal RNase P Binary Protein Complex. Formation of the 30-kDa Complex Between Pyrococcus furiosus RPP21 and RPP29 is Accompanied by Coupled Protein Folding, and Highlights Critical Features for Protein-Protein and Protein-RNA Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yiren; Amero, Carlos D.; Pulukkunat, Dileep K.; Gopalan, Venkat; Foster, Mark P.

    2009-01-01

    RNase P is a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) enzyme that catalyzes the Mg2+-dependent 5’ maturation of precursor tRNAs. In all domains of life, it is a ribozyme: the RNase P RNA (RPR) component has been demonstrated to be responsible for catalysis. However, the number of RNase P protein subunits (RPPs) varies from one in bacteria to nine or ten in eukarya. The archaeal RPR is associated with at least four RPPs, which function in pairs (RPP21–RPP29 and RPP30-POP5). We used solution NMR spectroscopy to determine the three-dimensional structure of the protein-protein complex comprising Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu) RPP21 and RPP29. We found that the protein-protein interaction is characterized by coupled folding of secondary structural elements that participate in interface formation. In addition to detailing the intermolecular contacts that stabilize this 30-kDa binary complex, the structure identifies surfaces rich in conserved basic residues likely vital for recognition of the RPR and/or precursor tRNA. Furthermore, enzymatic footprinting experiments allowed us to localize the RPP21–RPP29 complex to the specificity domain of the RPR. These findings provide valuable new insights into mechanisms of RNP assembly and serve as important steps towards a three-dimensional model of this ancient RNP enzyme. PMID:19733182

  7. In vitro selection of RNAs that bind to the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 gag polyprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Lochrie, M A; Waugh, S; Pratt, D G; Clever, J; Parslow, T G; Polisky, B

    1997-01-01

    RNA ligands that bind to the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) gag polyprotein with 10(-9) M affinity were isolated from a complex pool of RNAs using an in vitro selection method. The ligands bind to two different regions within gag, either to the matrix protein or to the nucleocapsid protein. Binding of a matrix ligand to gag did not interfere with the binding of a nucleocapsid ligand, and binding of a nucleocapsid ligand to gag did not interfere with the binding of a matrix ligand. However, binding of a nucleocapsid ligand to gag did interfere with binding of an RNA containing the HIV-1 RNA packaging element (psi), even though the sequence of the nucleocapsid ligand is not similar topsi. The minimal sequences required for the ligands to bind to matrix or nucleocapsid were determined. Minimal nucleocapsid ligands are predicted to form a stem-loop structure that has a self-complementary sequence at one end. Minimal matrix ligands are predicted to form a different stem-loop structure that has a CAARU loop sequence. The properties of these RNA ligands may provide tools for studying RNA interactions with matrix and nucleocapsid, and a novel method for inhibiting HIV replication. PMID:9207041

  8. Structure of Hepatitis E Virion-Sized Particle Reveals an RNA-Dependent Viral Assembly Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, L.; Wall, J.; Li, T.-C.; Mayazaki, N.; Simon, M. N.; Moore, M.; Wang, C.-Y.; Takeda, N.; Wakita, T.; Miyamura, T.; Cheng, R. H.

    2010-10-22

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) induces acute hepatitis in humans with a high fatality rate in pregnant women. There is a need for anti-HEV research to understand the assembly process of HEV native capsid. Here, we produced a large virion-sized and a small T=1 capsid by expressing the HEV capsid protein in insect cells with and without the N-terminal 111 residues, respectively, for comparative structural analysis. The virion-sized capsid demonstrates a T=3 icosahedral lattice and contains RNA fragment in contrast to the RNA-free T=1 capsid. However, both capsids shared common decameric organization. The in vitro assembly further demonstrated that HEV capsid protein had the intrinsic ability to form decameric intermediate. Our data suggest that RNA binding is the extrinsic factor essential for the assembly of HEV native capsids.

  9. Non-covalent probes for the investigation of structure and dynamics of protein-nucleic acid assemblies: the case of NC-mediated dimerization of genomic RNA in HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Kevin B.; Kohlway, Andrew S.; Hagan, Nathan A.; Fabris, Daniele

    2009-01-01

    The nature of specific RNA-RNA and protein-RNA interactions involved in the process of genome dimerization and isomerization in HIV-1, which is mediated in vitro by the stemloop 1 (SL1) of the packaging signal and by the nucleocapsid (NC) domain of the viral Gag polyprotein, was investigated by using archetypical nucleic acid ligands as non-covalent probes. Small-molecule ligands make contact with their target substrates through complex combinations of H-bonds, salt bridges, and hydrophobic interactions. Therefore, their binding patterns assessed by electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry can provide valuable insights into the factors determining specific recognition between species involved in biopolymer assemblies. In the case of SL1, dimerization and isomerization create unique structural features capable of sustaining stable interactions with classic nucleic acid ligands. The binding modes exhibited by intercalators and minor groove binders were adversely affected by the significant distortion of the duplex formed by palindrome annealing in the kissing-loop (KL) dimer, whereas the modes observed for the corresponding extended duplex (ED) confirmed a more regular helical structure. Consistent with the ability to establish electrostatic interactions with highly negative pockets typical of helix anomalies, polycationic aminoglycosides bound to the stem-bulge motif conserved in all SL1 conformers, to the unpaired nucleotides located at the hinge between kissing hairpins in KL, and to the exposed bases flanking the palindrome duplex in ED. The patterns afforded by intercalators and minor groove binders did not display detectable variations when the corresponding NC-SL1 complexes were submitted to probing. In contrast, aminoglycosides displayed the ability to compete with the protein for overlapping sites, producing opposite effects on the isomerization process. Indeed, displacing NC from the stem-bulges of the KL dimer induced inhibition of stem melting and

  10. Herpesvirus nuclear egress: Pseudorabies Virus can simultaneously induce nuclear envelope breakdown and exit the nucleus via the envelopment-deenvelopment-pathway.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Katharina S; Klupp, Barbara G; Granzow, Harald; Passvogel, Lars; Mettenleiter, Thomas C

    2015-11-01

    Herpesvirus replication takes place in the nucleus and in the cytosol. After entering the cell, nucleocapsids are transported to nuclear pores where viral DNA is released into the nucleus. After gene expression and DNA replication new nucleocapsids are assembled which have to exit the nucleus for virion formation in the cytosol. Since nuclear pores are not wide enough to allow passage of the nucleocapsid, nuclear egress occurs by vesicle-mediated transport through the nuclear envelope. To this end, nucleocapsids bud at the inner nuclear membrane (INM) recruiting a primary envelope which then fuses with the outer nuclear membrane (ONM). In the absence of this regulated nuclear egress, mutants of the alphaherpesvirus pseudorabies virus have been described that escape from the nucleus after virus-induced nuclear envelope breakdown. Here we review these exit pathways and demonstrate that both can occur simultaneously under appropriate conditions. PMID:25678269

  11. The protective antigens of equine herpesvirus type 1.

    PubMed

    Papp-Vid, G; Derbyshire, J B

    1978-04-01

    Equine herpesvirus type 1 was cultivated in swine testis cell cultures and partially purified by differential centrifugation and centrifugation in a linear sucrose density gradient. The viral envelope was separated from the nucleocapsid by treatment with Rexol 25J followed by sucrose gradient centrifugation. The envelope and nucleocapsid preparations were then electrophoresed in polyacrylamide gel after solubilization with sodium dodecyl sulphate. Hamsters were immunized with various preparations of the partially purified virus, including live or inactivated equine herpesvirus type 1 and viral envelope and nucleocapsid, all derived from the Kentucky D strain of the virus. Challenge of the immunized hamsters, with a hamster-adapted strain of equine herpesvirus type 1 demonstrated protection only in those animals which had been vaccinated with envelope-containing materials. When vaccination was carried out with fractions of electrophoresed envelope or nucleocapsid, protection was induced only by polypeptides of high molecular weight containing a glycoprotein component of the envelope of equine herpesvirus type 1. PMID:208736

  12. 3D Reconstruction of VZV Infected Cell Nuclei and PML Nuclear Cages by Serial Section Array Scanning Electron Microscopy and Electron Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Reichelt, Mike; Joubert, Lydia; Perrino, John; Koh, Ai Leen; Phanwar, Ibanri; Arvin, Ann M.

    2012-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a human alphaherpesvirus that causes varicella (chickenpox) and herpes zoster (shingles). Like all herpesviruses, the VZV DNA genome is replicated in the nucleus and packaged into nucleocapsids that must egress across the nuclear membrane for incorporation into virus particles in the cytoplasm. Our recent work showed that VZV nucleocapsids are sequestered in nuclear cages formed from promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) in vitro and in human dorsal root ganglia and skin xenografts in vivo. We sought a method to determine the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of nucleocapsids in the nuclei of herpesvirus-infected cells as well as the 3D shape, volume and ultrastructure of these unique PML subnuclear domains. Here we report the development of a novel 3D imaging and reconstruction strategy that we term Serial Section Array-Scanning Electron Microscopy (SSA-SEM) and its application to the analysis of VZV-infected cells and these nuclear PML cages. We show that SSA-SEM permits large volume imaging and 3D reconstruction at a resolution sufficient to localize, count and distinguish different types of VZV nucleocapsids and to visualize complete PML cages. This method allowed a quantitative determination of how many nucleocapsids can be sequestered within individual PML cages (sequestration capacity), what proportion of nucleocapsids are entrapped in single nuclei (sequestration efficiency) and revealed the ultrastructural detail of the PML cages. More than 98% of all nucleocapsids in reconstructed nuclear volumes were contained in PML cages and single PML cages sequestered up to 2,780 nucleocapsids, which were shown by electron tomography to be embedded and cross-linked by an filamentous electron-dense meshwork within these unique subnuclear domains. This SSA-SEM analysis extends our recent characterization of PML cages and provides a proof of concept for this new strategy to investigate events during virion assembly at the single cell

  13. Structural studies on the polyhedral inclusion bodies, virions, and DNA of the nuclear polyhedrosis virus of the cotton bollworm Heliothis zea.

    PubMed Central

    Scharnhorst, D W; Saving, K L; Vuturo, S B; Cooke, P H; Weaver, R F

    1977-01-01

    The polyhedral inclusion body of the cotton bollworm nuclear polyhedrosis virus contains virions occluded in an orthogonal crystalline matrix. The virions appear as rods or, more frequently, as oval structures that form upon bending of the nucleocapsid within the viral membrane. The nucleocapsid consists at least of DNA surrounded by a capsid composed of subunits, possibly helically arranged. The viral DNA is circular and supercoiled. It is heterogenous in size with contour lengths ranging from 15 to 45 mum. Images PMID:319251

  14. Morphological Variants of Sindbis Virus Obtained from Infected Mosquito Tissue Culture Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Dennis T.; Gliedman, Jeffrey B.

    1973-01-01

    Tissue-cultured Aedes albopictus cells infected with morphologically homogeneous Sindbis virus were found to produce progeny virions which could be divided into three classes based on size. The thickness of the envelope was constant on all three sizes of progeny virions suggesting that the variability in size rested with the viral nucleocapsid. It is suggested that the three classes of virions have icosahedral nucleocapsids composed of common subunits organized in decreasing triangulation numbers. Images PMID:4128381

  15. Label Free Detection of White Spot Syndrome Virus Using Lead Magnesium Niobate-Lead Titanate Piezoelectric Microcantilever Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Capobianco, Joseph; Shih, Wei-Heng; Leu, Jiann-Horng; Lo, Grace Chu-Fang; Shih, Wan Y.

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated rapid, label free detection of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) using the first longitudinal extension resonance peak of five lead-magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) piezoelectric microcantilever sensors (PEMS) 1050-700 μm long and 850-485 μm wide constructed from 8 μm thick PMN-PT freestanding films. The PMN-PT PEMS were encapsulated with a 3-mercaptopropltrimethoxysilane (MPS) insulation layer and further coated with anti-VP28 and anti-VP664 antibodies to target the WSSV virions and nucleocapsids, respectively. By inserting the antibody-coated PEMS in a flowing virion or nucleocapsid suspension, label-free detection of the virions and nucleocapsids were respectively achieved by monitoring the PEMS resonance frequency shift. We showed that positive label-free detection of both the virion and the nucleocapsid could be achieved at a concentration of 100 virions (nucleocapsids)/ml or 10 virions (nucleocapsids)/100μl, comparable to the detection sensitivity of polymerase chain reaction (PCR). However, in contrast to PCR, PEMS detection was label-free, in-situ and rapid (less than 30 min), potentially requiring minimal or no sample preparation. PMID:20863681

  16. How pH Modulates the Dimer-Decamer Interconversion of 2-Cys Peroxiredoxins from the Prx1 Subfamily*

    PubMed Central

    Morais, Mariana A. B.; Giuseppe, Priscila O.; Souza, Tatiana A. C. B.; Alegria, Thiago G. P.; Oliveira, Marcos A.; Netto, Luis E. S.; Murakami, Mario T.

    2015-01-01

    2-Cys peroxiredoxins belonging to the Prx1 subfamily are Cys-based peroxidases that control the intracellular levels of H2O2 and seem to assume a chaperone function under oxidative stress conditions. The regulation of their peroxidase activity as well as the observed functional switch from peroxidase to chaperone involves changes in their quaternary structure. Multiple factors can modulate the oligomeric transitions of 2-Cys peroxiredoxins such as redox state, post-translational modifications, and pH. However, the molecular basis for the pH influence on the oligomeric state of these enzymes is still elusive. Herein, we solved the crystal structure of a typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxin from Leishmania in the dimeric (pH 8.5) and decameric (pH 4.4) forms, showing that conformational changes in the catalytic loop are associated with the pH-induced decamerization. Mutagenesis and biophysical studies revealed that a highly conserved histidine (His113) functions as a pH sensor that, at acidic conditions, becomes protonated and forms an electrostatic pair with Asp76 from the catalytic loop, triggering the decamerization. In these 2-Cys peroxiredoxins, decamer formation is important for the catalytic efficiency and has been associated with an enhanced sensitivity to oxidative inactivation by overoxidation of the peroxidatic cysteine. In eukaryotic cells, exposure to high levels of H2O2 can trigger intracellular pH variations, suggesting that pH changes might act cooperatively with H2O2 and other oligomerization-modulator factors to regulate the structure and function of typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxins in response to oxidative stress. PMID:25666622

  17. Determination of cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinase substrate specificity by the use of peptide libraries on cellulose paper.

    PubMed

    Tegge, W; Frank, R; Hofmann, F; Dostmann, W R

    1995-08-22

    An iterative approach to the a priori determination of the substrate specificity of cAMP- and cGMP-dependent protein kinases (PKA and PKG) by the use of peptide libraries on cellulose paper is described. The starting point of the investigation was an octamer library with the general structure Ac-XXX12XXX, where X represents mixtures of all 20 natural amino acids and 1 and 2 represent individual amino acid residues. The library thus contained all possible 2.56 x 10(10) octamers, divided into 400 sublibraries with defined amino acids 1 and 2 each consisting of 6.4 x 10(7) sequences. After phosphorylation with the kinases in the presence of [gamma-32P]ATP, the sublibrarys Ac-XXXRRXXX and Ac-XXXRKXXX were identified as the best substrates for PKA and PKG, respectively. The second-generation libraries had the structures Ac-XXXRR12X and Ac-XXXRK12X for PKA and PKG and resulted in the most active sequence pools Ac-XXXRRASX and Ac-XXXRKKSX. After delineation of every position in the octameric sequence and extension of the investigation to decameric peptides, the best sequences, Ac-KRAERKASIY and Ac-TQKARKKSNA, were obtained for PKA and PKG, respectively. Promising octameric and decameric peptides were assembled 5 or 10 times each and assayed in order to determine the experimental scatter inherent in the approach. The kinetic data of several octameric and decameric sequences were determined in solution and compared to data for known substrates. The recognition motif of PKA was confirmed by this approach, and a novel substrate sequence for PKG was identified.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7654713

  18. The structures of cytosolic and plastid-located glutamine synthetases from Medicago truncatula reveal a common and dynamic architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Torreira, Eva; Seabra, Ana Rita; Marriott, Hazel; Zhou, Min; Llorca, Óscar; Robinson, Carol V.; Carvalho, Helena G.; Fernández-Tornero, Carlos; Pereira, Pedro José Barbosa

    2014-04-01

    The experimental models of dicotyledonous cytoplasmic and plastid-located glutamine synthetases unveil a conserved eukaryotic-type decameric architecture, with subtle structural differences in M. truncatula isoenzymes that account for their distinct herbicide resistance. The first step of nitrogen assimilation in higher plants, the energy-driven incorporation of ammonia into glutamate, is catalyzed by glutamine synthetase. This central process yields the readily metabolizable glutamine, which in turn is at the basis of all subsequent biosynthesis of nitrogenous compounds. The essential role performed by glutamine synthetase makes it a prime target for herbicidal compounds, but also a suitable intervention point for the improvement of crop yields. Although the majority of crop plants are dicotyledonous, little is known about the structural organization of glutamine synthetase in these organisms and about the functional differences between the different isoforms. Here, the structural characterization of two glutamine synthetase isoforms from the model legume Medicago truncatula is reported: the crystallographic structure of cytoplasmic GSII-1a and an electron cryomicroscopy reconstruction of plastid-located GSII-2a. Together, these structural models unveil a decameric organization of dicotyledonous glutamine synthetase, with two pentameric rings weakly connected by inter-ring loops. Moreover, rearrangement of these dynamic loops changes the relative orientation of the rings, suggesting a zipper-like mechanism for their assembly into a decameric enzyme. Finally, the atomic structure of M. truncatula GSII-1a provides important insights into the structural determinants of herbicide resistance in this family of enzymes, opening new avenues for the development of herbicide-resistant plants.

  19. How pH modulates the dimer-decamer interconversion of 2-Cys peroxiredoxins from the Prx1 subfamily.

    PubMed

    Morais, Mariana A B; Giuseppe, Priscila O; Souza, Tatiana A C B; Alegria, Thiago G P; Oliveira, Marcos A; Netto, Luis E S; Murakami, Mario T

    2015-03-27

    2-Cys peroxiredoxins belonging to the Prx1 subfamily are Cys-based peroxidases that control the intracellular levels of H2O2 and seem to assume a chaperone function under oxidative stress conditions. The regulation of their peroxidase activity as well as the observed functional switch from peroxidase to chaperone involves changes in their quaternary structure. Multiple factors can modulate the oligomeric transitions of 2-Cys peroxiredoxins such as redox state, post-translational modifications, and pH. However, the molecular basis for the pH influence on the oligomeric state of these enzymes is still elusive. Herein, we solved the crystal structure of a typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxin from Leishmania in the dimeric (pH 8.5) and decameric (pH 4.4) forms, showing that conformational changes in the catalytic loop are associated with the pH-induced decamerization. Mutagenesis and biophysical studies revealed that a highly conserved histidine (His(113)) functions as a pH sensor that, at acidic conditions, becomes protonated and forms an electrostatic pair with Asp(76) from the catalytic loop, triggering the decamerization. In these 2-Cys peroxiredoxins, decamer formation is important for the catalytic efficiency and has been associated with an enhanced sensitivity to oxidative inactivation by overoxidation of the peroxidatic cysteine. In eukaryotic cells, exposure to high levels of H2O2 can trigger intracellular pH variations, suggesting that pH changes might act cooperatively with H2O2 and other oligomerization-modulator factors to regulate the structure and function of typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxins in response to oxidative stress. PMID:25666622

  20. High-level hepatitis B virus replication in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Guidotti, L G; Matzke, B; Schaller, H; Chisari, F V

    1995-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) transgenic mice whose hepatocytes replicate the virus at levels comparable to that in the infected livers of patients with chronic hepatitis have been produced, without any evidence of cytopathology. High-level viral gene expression was obtained in the liver and kidney tissues in three independent lineages. These animals were produced with a terminally redundant viral DNA construct (HBV 1.3) that starts just upstream of HBV enhancer I, extends completely around the circular viral genome, and ends just downstream of the unique polyadenylation site in HBV. In these animals, the viral mRNA is more abundant in centrilobular hepatocytes than elsewhere in the hepatic lobule. High-level viral DNA replication occurs inside viral nucleocapsid particles that preferentially form in the cytoplasm of these centrilobular hepatocytes, suggesting that an expression threshold must be reached for nucleocapsid assembly and viral replication to occur. Despite the restricted distribution of the viral replication machinery in centrilobular cytoplasmic nucleocapsids, nucleocapsid particles are detectable in the vast majority of hepatocyte nuclei throughout the hepatic lobule. The intranuclear nucleocapsid particles are empty, however, suggesting that viral nucleocapsid particle assembly occurs independently in the nucleus and the cytoplasm of the hepatocyte and implying that cytoplasmic nucleocapsid particles do not transport the viral genome across the nuclear membrane into the nucleus during the viral life cycle. This model creates the opportunity to examine the influence of viral and host factors on HBV pathogenesis and replication and to assess the antiviral potential of pharmacological agents and physiological processes, including the immune response. PMID:7666518

  1. Atomic resolution description of the interaction between the nucleoprotein and phosphoprotein of Hendra virus.

    PubMed

    Communie, Guillaume; Habchi, Johnny; Yabukarski, Filip; Blocquel, David; Schneider, Robert; Tarbouriech, Nicolas; Papageorgiou, Nicolas; Ruigrok, Rob W H; Jamin, Marc; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Longhi, Sonia; Blackledge, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) is a recently emerged severe human pathogen that belongs to the Henipavirus genus within the Paramyxoviridae family. The HeV genome is encapsidated by the nucleoprotein (N) within a helical nucleocapsid. Recruitment of the viral polymerase onto the nucleocapsid template relies on the interaction between the C-terminal domain, N(TAIL), of N and the C-terminal X domain, XD, of the polymerase co-factor phosphoprotein (P). Here, we provide an atomic resolution description of the intrinsically disordered N(TAIL) domain in its isolated state and in intact nucleocapsids using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Using electron microscopy, we show that HeV nucleocapsids form herringbone-like structures typical of paramyxoviruses. We also report the crystal structure of XD of P that consists of a three-helix bundle. We study the interaction between N(TAIL) and XD using NMR titration experiments and provide a detailed mapping of the reciprocal binding sites. We show that the interaction is accompanied by α-helical folding of the molecular recognition element of N(TAIL) upon binding to a hydrophobic patch on the surface of XD. Finally, using solution NMR, we investigate the interaction between intact nucleocapsids and XD. Our results indicate that monomeric XD binds to N(TAIL) without triggering an additional unwinding of the nucleocapsid template. The present results provide a structural description at the atomic level of the protein-protein interactions required for transcription and replication of HeV, and the first direct observation of the interaction between the X domain of P and intact nucleocapsids in Paramyxoviridae. PMID:24086133

  2. The matrix proteins of neurovirulent subacute sclerosing panencephalitis virus and its acute measles virus progenitor are functionally different.

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, A; Wang, A H; Gombart, A F; Wong, T C

    1992-01-01

    Persistence of measles virus in the brains of patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is accompanied by changes in the viral matrix (M) protein. To understand the significance of these changes, cell culture and cell-free assays were developed to compare the functions of the M proteins of an SSPE virus Biken strain and its acute measles virus progenitor Nagahata strain. The Nagahata viral M protein is associated with the intracellular viral nucleocapsids and the plasma membrane, whereas the Biken viral M protein is localized mainly in the cytosol. The lack of M protein in the Biken viral nucleocapsids is due to a failure of the Biken M protein to bind to the viral nucleocapsids. The Biken M protein also fails to bind to the Nagahata viral nucleocapsids. Conversely, the Nagahata M protein can bind to the Biken viral nucleocapsids, although this association is not as stable at physiological salt concentration. These results offer concrete evidence that the M protein of an SSPE virus is functionally different from that of its progenitor acute measles virus. Images PMID:1528889

  3. Phosphate cycling on the basic protein of Plodia interpunctella granulosis virus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, C. J.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The presence of infected cell-specific phosphoproteins was investigated in Plodia interpunctella granulosis virus (PiGV)-infected fat body using [32P]orthophosphoric acid labeling. One infected cell-specific phosphoprotein had a mobility similar to that of the basic protein (VP12) of PiGV. Further analysis, using immunoblotting and acid-urea gel analysis of infected fat body, confirmed that this phosphoprotein was VP12. However we did not detect phosphorylated VP12 in 32P-labeled nucleocapsids. Phosphoamino acid analysis of 32P-labeled VP12 revealed that phosphoserine was present in the basic protein. Since VP12 is phosphorylated in the infected cell, but not in the nucleocapsid, it appears that dephosphorylation of VP12 is a critical event in the life cycle of the virus. We therefore assayed virus nucleocapsids and infected fat body for the presence of phosphatase activity. Phosphatase activity was not detected in the virus, but the infected fat body had more activity than uninfected fat body. A model for nucleocapsid assembly and uncoating is presented which takes into account the phosphorylation state of VP12, the role of Zn2+ in the nucleocapsid, and the role of the capsid-associated kinase.

  4. Interaction of serum amyloid P component with hexanoyl bis(d-proline) (CPHPC)

    SciTech Connect

    Kolstoe, Simon E.; Jenvey, Michelle C.; Purvis, Alan; Light, Mark E.; Thompson, Darren; Hughes, Peter; Pepys, Mark B.; Wood, Stephen P.

    2014-08-01

    Serum amyloid P component is a pentameric plasma glycoprotein that recognizes and binds to amyloid fibres in a calcium-dependent fashion and is likely to contribute to their deposition and persistence in vivo. Five molecules of the drug CPHPC avidly cross-link pairs of protein pentamers and the decameric complex is rapidly cleared in vivo. Crystal structures of the protein in complex with a bivalent drug and cadmium ions, which improve crystal quality, allow the definition of the preferred bound drug isomers. Under physiological conditions, the pentameric human plasma protein serum amyloid P component (SAP) binds hexanoyl bis(d-proline) (R-1-(6-[R-2-carboxy-pyrrolidin-1-yl]-6-oxo-hexanoyl) pyrrolidine-2-carboxylic acid; CPHPC) through its d-proline head groups in a calcium-dependent interaction. Cooperative effects in binding lead to a substantial enhancement of affinity. Five molecules of the bivalent ligand cross-link and stabilize pairs of SAP molecules, forming a decameric complex that is rapidly cleared from the circulation by the liver. Here, it is reported that X-ray analysis of the SAP complex with CPHPC and cadmium ions provides higher resolution detail of the interaction than is observed with calcium ions. Conformational isomers of CPHPC observed in solution by HPLC and by X-ray analysis are compared with the protein-bound form. These are discussed in relation to the development of CPHPC to provide SAP depletion for the treatment of amyloidosis and other indications.

  5. Investigating interactions of the pentraxins serum amyloid P component and C-reactive protein by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Aquilina, J Andrew; Robinson, Carol V

    2003-10-15

    The oligomeric state of human SAP (serum amyloid P component) in the absence and presence of known ligands has been investigated using nanoelectrospray ionization MS. At pH 8.0, in the absence of Ca2+, SAP has been shown to consist of pentameric and decameric forms. In the presence of physiological levels of Ca2+, SAP was observed to exist primarily as a pentamer, reflecting its in vivo state. dAMP was shown not only to promote decamerization, but also to lead to decamer stacking involving up to 30 monomers. A mechanism for this finding is proposed. CRP (C-reactive protein), a pentraxin closely related to SAP, exists as a pentamer in the presence or absence of Ca2+. Pentamers of CRP and SAP were shown to form mixed decamers in Ca2+-free buffer; however, in the presence of Ca2+, this interaction was not observed. Furthermore, no exchange of monomeric subunits was observed between the SAP and CRP oligomers, suggesting a remarkable stability of the individual pentameric complexes. PMID:12892563

  6. Structure of the paramyxovirus parainfluenza virus 5 nucleoprotein-RNA complex

    SciTech Connect

    Alayyoubi, Maher; Leser, George P.; Kors, Christopher A.; Lamb, Robert A.

    2015-05-20

    Parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) is a member of the Paramyxoviridae family of membrane-enveloped viruses with a negative-sense RNA genome that is packaged and protected by long filamentous nucleocapsid-helix structures (RNPs). These RNPs, consisting of ~2,600 protomers of nucleocapsid (N) protein, form the template for viral transcription and replication. We have determined the 3D X-ray crystal structure of the nucleoprotein (N)-RNA complex from PIV5 to 3.11-Å resolution. The structure reveals a 13-mer nucleocapsid ring whose diameter, cavity, and pitch/height dimensions agree with EM data from early studies on the Paramyxovirinae subfamily of native RNPs, indicating that it closely represents one-turn in the building block of the RNP helices. The PIV5-N nucleocapsid ring encapsidates a nuclease resistant 78-nt RNA strand in its positively charged groove formed between the N-terminal (NTD) and C-terminal (CTD) domains of its successive N protomers. Six nucleotides precisely are associated with each N protomer, with alternating three-base-in three-base-out conformation. The binding of six nucleotides per protomer is consistent with the "rule of six" that governs the genome packaging of the Paramyxovirinae subfamily of viruses. PIV5-N protomer subdomains are very similar in structure to the previously solved Nipah-N structure, but with a difference in the angle between NTD/CTD at the RNA hinge region. Based on the Nipah-N structure we modeled a PIV5-N open conformation in which the CTD rotates away from the RNA strand into the inner spacious nucleocapsid-ring cavity. This rotation would expose the RNA for the viral polymerase activity without major disruption of the nucleocapsid structure.

  7. Structure of the paramyxovirus parainfluenza virus 5 nucleoprotein–RNA complex

    PubMed Central

    Alayyoubi, Maher; Leser, George P.; Kors, Christopher A.; Lamb, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) is a member of the Paramyxoviridae family of membrane-enveloped viruses with a negative-sense RNA genome that is packaged and protected by long filamentous nucleocapsid-helix structures (RNPs). These RNPs, consisting of ∼2,600 protomers of nucleocapsid (N) protein, form the template for viral transcription and replication. We have determined the 3D X-ray crystal structure of the nucleoprotein (N)-RNA complex from PIV5 to 3.11-Å resolution. The structure reveals a 13-mer nucleocapsid ring whose diameter, cavity, and pitch/height dimensions agree with EM data from early studies on the Paramyxovirinae subfamily of native RNPs, indicating that it closely represents one-turn in the building block of the RNP helices. The PIV5-N nucleocapsid ring encapsidates a nuclease resistant 78-nt RNA strand in its positively charged groove formed between the N-terminal (NTD) and C-terminal (CTD) domains of its successive N protomers. Six nucleotides precisely are associated with each N protomer, with alternating three-base-in three-base-out conformation. The binding of six nucleotides per protomer is consistent with the “rule of six” that governs the genome packaging of the Paramyxovirinae subfamily of viruses. PIV5-N protomer subdomains are very similar in structure to the previously solved Nipah-N structure, but with a difference in the angle between NTD/CTD at the RNA hinge region. Based on the Nipah-N structure we modeled a PIV5-N open conformation in which the CTD rotates away from the RNA strand into the inner spacious nucleocapsid-ring cavity. This rotation would expose the RNA for the viral polymerase activity without major disruption of the nucleocapsid structure. PMID:25831513

  8. Vesicular stomatitis virus M protein may be inside the ribonucleocapsid coil.

    PubMed Central

    Barge, A; Gaudin, Y; Coulon, P; Ruigrok, R W

    1993-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus is an enveloped virus with an external glycoprotein G and a nucleocapsid that form, together with the M protein, a tight helically coiled structure: the skeleton. Negative staining and immunoelectron microscopy studies on skeleton preparations were performed to determine the localization of the M protein. These studies have resulted in a new model for the structure of rhabdoviruses in which the nucleocapsid is wound around a core containing the M protein. This model predicts contact between M and lipid only at the extreme ends of the skeleton, which is confirmed by skeleton-liposome binding studies. Images PMID:8230447

  9. Evidence for zinc binding by two structural proteins of Plodia interpunctella granulosis virus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, C. J.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Workers in our laboratory previously reported the possibility of cation involvement in the in vitro dissociation of the Plodia interpunctella granulosis virus nucleocapsids (K. A. Tweeten, L. A. Bulla, Jr., and R. A. Consigli, J. Virol. 33:866-876, 1980; M. E. Wilson and R. A. Consigli, Virology 143:516-525, 1985). The current study found zinc associated with both granulosis virus nucleocapsids and granulin by atomic absorption analysis. A blotting assay with 65Zn2+ specifically identified the radioactive cation as binding to two viral structural proteins, granulin and VP12. These findings indicate that zinc may have a critical role in maintaining virus stability.

  10. [Production of the monoclonal antibodies to the rabies virus nucleoprotein].

    PubMed

    Gribencha, S V; Kozlov, A Iu; Kostina, L V; Elakov, A L; Losich, M A; Tsibezov, V V; Zaberezhnyĭ, A D; Aliper, T I

    2013-01-01

    Five hybridomas secreting monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for the nucleocapsid protein of the rabies virus were obtained through the fusion of the SP2/0 murine myeloma cells with splenocytes of BALB/c mice immunized with fixed rabies virus (CVS strain). All hybridomas secret MAbs of the IgG class that display different specificity to the nucleocapsids of rabies and rabies-related viruses. MAbs 2ell showed the specificity for the prevalent in Russia rabies viruses that are similar to commercially available anti-rabies conjugate. PMID:24640170

  11. Measles virus was present in the inner cell of the acrosyringium in the skin rash.

    PubMed

    Yanagihara, M; Fujii, T; Mochizuki, T; Ishizaki, H; Sata, T

    1998-01-01

    A case of measles in a 26-year-old Japanese man is reported. A skin specimen taken on the third eruptive day from a maculopapular eruption on his chest was immunohistopathologically and electron microscopically examined using a rabbit polyclonal antibody against the nucleocapsid protein of the measles virus. The measles virus antigen was found in the inner cells of the acrosyringium and hair follicles. The measles virus nucleocapsid was electron microscopically identified in the nuclei of the inner cells of the acrosyringium. The findings suggest that the sweat from skin lesions might contain the measles virus. PMID:9875969

  12. Association Between Preovulatory Concentrations of Estradiol and Expression of Uterine Milk Protein Precursor, Inhibin Beta A, Period 1, Proenkephalin, and Receptors for Oxytocin, Progesterone, and Estradiol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eliminating the preovulatory surge of estradiol decreased uterine weight, uterine protein, RNA to DNA ratio, rate of protein synthesis, and embryo survival following embryo transfer in sheep. Furthermore, cows that did not exhibit standing estrus (decreased preovulatory concentrations of estradiol) ...

  13. 78 FR 13860 - Application(s) for Duty-Free Entry of Scientific Instruments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-01

    ... cryogenically frozen soluble and membrane proteins, protein complexes, protein/DNA and protein/RNA complexes... production, signal transduction, and DNA repair. Justification for Duty-Free Entry: There are no...

  14. A novel M RNA reassortant of Groundnut ringspot virus and Tomato chlorotic spot virus infecting vegetables in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV) was recently identified using serology and nucleocapsid gene sequence from tomato plants with severe tospovirus symptoms in south Florida, which extends the geographic range of this virus from South America and South Africa to now include North America. Full genome s...

  15. Phylogenetic Relationship of Necoclí Virus to Other South American Hantaviruses (Bunyaviridae: Hantavirus)

    PubMed Central

    Montoya-Ruiz, Carolina; Cajimat, Maria N. B.; Milazzo, Mary Louise; Diaz, Francisco J.; Rodas, Juan David; Valbuena, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The results of a previous study suggested that Cherrie's cane rat (Zygodontomys cherriei) is the principal host of Necoclí virus (family Bunyaviridae, genus Hantavirus) in Colombia. Bayesian analyses of complete nucleocapsid protein gene sequences and complete glycoprotein precursor gene sequences in this study confirmed that Necoclí virus is phylogenetically closely related to Maporal virus, which is principally associated with the delicate pygmy rice rat (Oligoryzomys delicatus) in western Venezuela. In pairwise comparisons, nonidentities between the complete amino acid sequence of the nucleocapsid protein of Necoclí virus and the complete amino acid sequences of the nucleocapsid proteins of other hantaviruses were ≥8.7%. Likewise, nonidentities between the complete amino acid sequence of the glycoprotein precursor of Necoclí virus and the complete amino acid sequences of the glycoprotein precursors of other hantaviruses were ≥11.7%. Collectively, the unique association of Necoclí virus with Z. cherriei in Colombia, results of the Bayesian analyses of complete nucleocapsid protein gene sequences and complete glycoprotein precursor gene sequences, and results of the pairwise comparisons of amino acid sequences strongly support the notion that Necoclí virus represents a novel species in the genus Hantavirus. Further work is needed to determine whether Calabazo virus (a hantavirus associated with Z. brevicauda cherriei in Panama) and Necoclí virus are conspecific. PMID:26186516

  16. Effects of the interactions of classical swine fever virus core protein with proteins of SUMOylation pathway on virulence in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The classical swine fever virus (CSFV) nucleocapsid or Core protein serves a protective function for the viral RNA, and acts as a transcriptional regulator. However studies involving the CSFV Core protein have been limited. To gain insight into other functions of the Core protein, particularly into ...

  17. Signals for Bidirectional Nucleocytoplasmic Transport in the Duck Hepatitis B Virus Capsid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Mabit, Helene; Breiner, Klaus M.; Knaust, Andreas; Zachmann-Brand, Beate; Schaller, Heinz

    2001-01-01

    Hepadnavirus genome replication involves cytoplasmic and nuclear stages, requiring balanced targeting of cytoplasmic nucleocapsids to the nuclear compartment. In this study, we analyze the signals determining capsid compartmentalization in the duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) animal model, as this system also allows us to study hepadnavirus infection of cultured primary hepatocytes. Using fusions to the green fluorescent protein as a functional assay, we have identified a nuclear localization signal (NLS) that mediates nuclear pore association of the DHBV nucleocapsid and nuclear import of DHBV core protein (DHBc)-derived polypeptides. The DHBc NLS mapped is unique. It bears homology to repetitive NLS elements previously identified near the carboxy terminus of the capsid protein of hepatitis B virus, the human prototype of the hepadnavirus family, but it maps to a more internal position. In further contrast to the hepatitis B virus core protein NLS, the DHBc NLS is not positioned near phosphorylation target sites that are generally assumed to modulate nucleocytoplasmic transport. In functional assays with a knockout mutant, the DHBc NLS was found to be essential for nuclear pore association of the nucleocapsid. The NLS was found to be also essential for virus production from the full-length DHBV genome in transfected cells and from hepatocytes infected with transcomplemented mutant virus. Finally, the DHBc additionally displayed activity indicative of a nuclear export signal, presumably counterbalancing NLS function in the productive state of the infected cell and thereby preventing nucleoplasmic accumulation of nucleocapsids. PMID:11160696

  18. Newcastle disease virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV), a member of the Avulavirus genus in the Paramyxoviridae family, has a ribonucleic acid (RNA) genome that is negative sense, non-segmented, and single-stranded. The genome codes for six structural proteins: nucleocapsid, phosphoprotein, matrix, fusion, hemagglutinin-neu...

  19. Herpes Simplex Virus Products in Productive and Abortive Infection

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Susan B.; Roizman, Bernard; Schwartz, Jerome

    1968-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus strain MPdk− multiplies in HEp-2 cells, but not in dog kidney (DK) cells. Strain MPdk+sp, a multistep mutant of MPdk−, multiplies in both HEp-2 and DK cells. Stabilized lysates of productively infected cells yield three macromolecular aggregates of viral deoxyribonucleic acid and protein banding in CsCl gradients at densities of 1.285 g/cm3 (α), 1.325 g/cm3 (β), and 1.37 to 1.45 g/cm3 (γ). Similar lysates from abortively infected cells yield only the β and γ bands. Electron microscopic examination revealed that (i) the α band contained enveloped nucleocapsids, whereas the β band contained naked nucleocapsids and particles tentatively identified as internal components of the nucleocapsids, and that (ii) the enveloped virions and reduplication of cellular membranes observed in thin sections of productively infected cells were absent from abortively infected cells. Studies of the surface antigens of infected cells in a cytolytic system described previously revealed that abortively infected cells contained approximately 10-fold less virus-induced surface antigen than did productively infected cells. From these and other data published previously, we concluded that infectious MPdk− virions are not made in DK cells because (i) functional viral products necessary for the envelopment of the nucleocapsid are not made, and (ii) capsid proteins and some nonstructural products specified by the virus malfunction. Images PMID:4316018

  20. Solanaceous vegetables in Florida infected with a novel M RNA reassortant of Groundnut ringspot virus and Tomato chlorotic spot virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We recently identified Groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV) using serology and nucleocapsid gene sequence from tomato plants with severe tospovirus symptoms in south Florida. This extends the geographic range of this virus from South America and South Africa to now include North America. Full genome se...

  1. Bunyaviridae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bunyaviruses are enveloped, pleomorphic viruses that are 80–120 nm in diameter with surface projections (spikes) emanating from the envelope surface of mature virions. The virions consist of four structural proteins, including two external glycoproteins in the envelope, a nucleocapsid protein that e...

  2. Axonal transport of herpes simplex virions to epidermal cells: evidence for a specialized mode of virus transport and assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Penfold, M E; Armati, P; Cunningham, A L

    1994-01-01

    To examine the transmission of herpes simplex virus (HSV) from axon to epidermal cell, an in vitro model was constructed consisting of human fetal dorsal root ganglia cultured in the central chamber of a dual-chamber tissue culture system separated from autologous skin explants in an exterior chamber by concentric steel cylinders adhering to the substratum through silicon grease and agarose. Axons grew through the agarose viral diffusion barrier and terminated on epidermal cells in the exterior chamber. After inoculation of HSV onto dorsal root ganglia, anterograde axonal transport of glycoprotein and nucleocapsid antigen was observed by confocal microscopy to appear in exterior chamber axons within 12 h and in epidermal cells within 16 h, moving at 2-3 mm/h. Although both enveloped and unenveloped nucleocapsids were observed in the neuronal soma by transmission electron microscopy, only nucleocapsids were observed in the axons, closely associated with microtubules. Nodule formation at the surface of HSV-infected axons, becoming more dense at the axon terminus on epidermal cells, and patches of axolemmal HSV glycoprotein D expression were observed by scanning (immuno)electron microscopy, probably representing virus emerging from the axolemma. These findings strongly suggest a specialized mode of viral transport, assembly, and egress in sensory neurons: microtubule-associated intermediate-fast anterograde axonal transport of unenveloped nucleocapsids with separate transport of glycoproteins to the distal regions of the axon and assembly prior to virus emergence at the axon terminus. Images PMID:7517552

  3. Sumoylation of the Core Protein in Classical Swine Fever Virus is Essential for Virulence in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The classical swine fever virus core protein makes up the nucleocapsid of the virus, and is serves both as a protective function for the viral RNA and a transcriptional regulator in the host cell. To identify host proteins that interact with the viral Core protein we utilized the yeast two-hybrid to...

  4. Attempt to modify the immune response developed against FIV gp120 protein by preliminary FIV DNA injection.

    PubMed

    Cuisinier, A M; Meyer, A; Chatrenet, B; Verdier, A S; Aubert, A

    1999-02-01

    Following inactivated virus vaccination trials, the surface glycoprotein gp120 (SU) of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) was considered as one of the determinants for protection. However, several vaccination trials using recombinant Env protein or some Env-derived peptides failed to induce protection. To study the influence of the environment in which the surface protein (SU) is injected. we analyzed the impact of a nucleocapsid (NC) DNA immunization on the presentation of the recSU protein to the immune system. Cats were vaccinated either with the recSU protein alone or with NC DNA followed by the recSU protein. Two routes of nucleocapsid DNA vaccination were tested: intramuscular and mucosal injections. Cats immunized with the recSU protein showed a facilitation of infection, since they presented the earliest and the highest humoral response correlating with the highest proviral load. They also showed an acceleration of the appearance of IL4 mRNA signal. Preliminary injection of the DNA coding for NC protein, regardless the route of inoculation, seemed to inhibit the facilitation induced by vaccination with the recSU protein alone. The previously nucleocapsid DNA immunized cats had infectious status similar to those of the control cats, but with lower proviral load and less developed anti-FIV humoral response. Cat No. 2, belonging to the group vaccinated with NC protein by the mucosal route, had a protected-like status which did not correlate with the humoral response. This cat was the only one to have a persisting IFN mRNA signal after challenge specific for the p10 nucleocapsid and recSU proteins. However, no NC specific cytotoxic cells were observed throughout the experiment in this cat. The role of nucleocapsid DNA vaccination is still unknown nevertheless we did demonstrate that the facilitation observed in vaccination trial with recombinant proteins could be modified and that recombinant proteins could be a component of an effective vaccine. PMID

  5. Structural characterization of encapsulated ferritin provides insight into iron storage in bacterial nanocompartments.

    PubMed

    He, Didi; Hughes, Sam; Vanden-Hehir, Sally; Georgiev, Atanas; Altenbach, Kirsten; Tarrant, Emma; Mackay, C Logan; Waldron, Kevin J; Clarke, David J; Marles-Wright, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Ferritins are ubiquitous proteins that oxidise and store iron within a protein shell to protect cells from oxidative damage. We have characterized the structure and function of a new member of the ferritin superfamily that is sequestered within an encapsulin capsid. We show that this encapsulated ferritin (EncFtn) has two main alpha helices, which assemble in a metal dependent manner to form a ferroxidase center at a dimer interface. EncFtn adopts an open decameric structure that is topologically distinct from other ferritins. While EncFtn acts as a ferroxidase, it cannot mineralize iron. Conversely, the encapsulin shell associates with iron, but is not enzymatically active, and we demonstrate that EncFtn must be housed within the encapsulin for iron storage. This encapsulin nanocompartment is widely distributed in bacteria and archaea and represents a distinct class of iron storage system, where the oxidation and mineralization of iron are distributed between two proteins. PMID:27529188

  6. Preparation and crystallization of the stimulatory and inhibitory complexes of GTP cyclohydrolase I and its feedback regulatory protein GFRP.

    PubMed

    Maita, N; Okada, K; Hirotsu, S; Hatakeyama, K; Hakoshima, T

    2001-08-01

    Mammalian GTP cyclohydrolase I is a decameric enzyme in the first and rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin, which is an essential cofactor for enzymes producing neurotransmitters such as catecholamines and for nitric oxide synthases. The enzyme is dually regulated by its feedback regulatory protein GFRP in the presence of its stimulatory effector phenylalanine and its inhibitory effector biopterin. Here, both the stimulatory and inhibitory complexes of rat GTP cyclohydrolase I bound to GFRP were crystallized by vapour diffusion. Diffraction data sets at resolutions of 3.0 and 2.64 A were collected for the stimulatory and inhibitory complexes, respectively. Each complex consists of two GTPCHI pentamer rings and two GFRP pentamer rings, with pseudo-52 point-group symmetry. PMID:11468403

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the inducible lysine decarboxylase from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Alexopoulos, E.; Kanjee, U.; Snider, J.; Houry, W.A.; Pai, E.F.

    2010-02-11

    The decameric inducible lysine decarboxylase (LdcI) from Escherichia coli has been crystallized in space groups C2 and C222{sub 1}; the Ta{sub 6}Br{sub 12}{sup 2+} cluster was used to derivatize the C2 crystals. The method of single isomorphous replacement with anomalous scattering (SIRAS) as implemented in SHELXD was used to solve the Ta{sub 6}Br{sub 12}{sup 2+}-derivatized structure to 5 {angstrom} resolution. Many of the Ta{sub 6}Br{sub 12}{sup 2+}-binding sites had twofold and fivefold noncrystallographic symmetry. Taking advantage of this feature, phase modification was performed in DM. The electron-density map of LdcI displays many features in agreement with the low-resolution negative-stain electron-density map [Snider et al. (2006), J. Biol. Chem. 281, 1532-1546].

  8. High-resolution structure of HLA-A*0201 in complex with a tumour-specific antigenic peptide encoded by the MAGE-A4 gene.

    PubMed

    Hillig, R C; Coulie, P G; Stroobant, V; Saenger, W; Ziegler, A; Hülsmeyer, M

    2001-07-27

    The heterotrimeric complex of the human major histocompatibity complex (MHC) molecule HLA-A*0201, beta2-microglobulin and the decameric peptide GVYDGREHTV derived from the melanoma antigen (MAGE-A4 protein has been determined by X-ray crystallography at 1.4 A resolution. MAGE-A4 belongs to a family of genes that are specifically expressed in a variety of tumours. MAGE-A4-derived peptides are presented by MHC molecules at the cell surface to cytotoxic T-lymphocytes. As the HLA-A*0201:MAGE-A4 complex occurs only on tumour cells, it is considered to be an appropriate target for immunotherapy. The structure presented here reveals potential epitopes specific to the complex and indicates which peptide residues could be recognised by T-cell receptors. In addition, as the structure could be refined anisotropically, it was possible to describe the movements of the bound peptide in more detail. PMID:11502003

  9. Computational design of the affinity and specificity of a therapeutic T cell receptor.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Brian G; Hellman, Lance M; Hossain, Moushumi; Singh, Nishant K; Vander Kooi, Craig W; Weng, Zhiping; Baker, Brian M

    2014-02-01

    T cell receptors (TCRs) are key to antigen-specific immunity and are increasingly being explored as therapeutics, most visibly in cancer immunotherapy. As TCRs typically possess only low-to-moderate affinity for their peptide/MHC (pMHC) ligands, there is a recognized need to develop affinity-enhanced TCR variants. Previous in vitro engineering efforts have yielded remarkable improvements in TCR affinity, yet concerns exist about the maintenance of peptide specificity and the biological impacts of ultra-high affinity. As opposed to in vitro engineering, computational design can directly address these issues, in theory permitting the rational control of peptide specificity together with relatively controlled increments in affinity. Here we explored the efficacy of computational design with the clinically relevant TCR DMF5, which recognizes nonameric and decameric epitopes from the melanoma-associated Melan-A/MART-1 protein presented by the class I MHC HLA-A2. We tested multiple mutations selected by flexible and rigid modeling protocols, assessed impacts on affinity and specificity, and utilized the data to examine and improve algorithmic performance. We identified multiple mutations that improved binding affinity, and characterized the structure, affinity, and binding kinetics of a previously reported double mutant that exhibits an impressive 400-fold affinity improvement for the decameric pMHC ligand without detectable binding to non-cognate ligands. The structure of this high affinity mutant indicated very little conformational consequences and emphasized the high fidelity of our modeling procedure. Overall, our work showcases the capability of computational design to generate TCRs with improved pMHC affinities while explicitly accounting for peptide specificity, as well as its potential for generating TCRs with customized antigen targeting capabilities. PMID:24550723

  10. L Protein Requirement for In Vitro RNA Synthesis by Vesicular Stomatitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, Suzanne U.; Wagner, Robert R.

    1973-01-01

    The endogenous transcriptase present in purified vesicular stomatitis (VS) virions was solubilized with a Triton X-100 high-salt solution. The polymerase activity was purified on glycerol gradients and by phosphocellulose column chromatography; the viral proteins present in the active enzyme fractions were identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. It was demonstrated that L protein, but not NS protein, was required for in vitro RNA synthesis on the VS viral nucleocapsid template. Solubilized L protein rebinds to the ribonucleoprotein template when the transcription complex is reconstituted, and the RNA synthesized in vitro by purified L protein hybridizes to virion RNA. Cyanogen bromide peptide fingerprints indicate that the large L protein is a unique polypeptide chain. It is concluded that the L protein functions as the transcriptase, and the nucleocapsid NS protein is not essential for in vitro RNA synthesis. PMID:4357510

  11. Phosphate acceptor amino acid residues in structural proteins of rhabdoviruses.

    PubMed

    Sokol, F; Tan, K B; McFalls, M L; Madore, P

    1974-07-01

    Partial acid hydrolysates of the [(32)P]phosphate- or [(3)H]serine-labeled proteins of purified vesicular stomatitis, rabies, Lagos bat, Mokola, or spring viremia of carp virions and of purified intracellular nucleocapsids of these viruses have been analyzed by paper electrophoresis for the presence of phosphorylated amino acids. Both phosphoserine and phosphothreonine, with the former predominant, were present in virion and nucleocapsid preparations that contained phosphoproteins. An exception was the fish rhabdovirus, which contained only phosphoserine. When vesicular stomatitis or rabies virus proteins were phosphorylated in a cell-free system by the virion-associated protein kinase and analyzed for the presence of phosphorylated amino acid residues, phosphoserine was again found to be more abundant than phosphothreonine. After in vitro protein phosphorylation, another phospho-compound, possibly a third phosphoamino acid, was detected in the partial acid hydrolysates of these viruses. PMID:4365328

  12. Development of antibody to measles virus polypeptides during complicated and uncomplicated measles virus infections.

    PubMed Central

    Graves, M; Griffin, D E; Johnson, R T; Hirsch, R L; de Soriano, I L; Roedenbeck, S; Vaisberg, A

    1984-01-01

    Immune precipitation of 181 sera from 152 patients with natural measles was studied to determine the temporal course and frequency of antibody responses to nucleocapsid, fusion, hemagglutinin, and matrix proteins of measles virus. Large amounts of antibody to nucleocapsid protein developed in all patients by day one of the rash. Antibody to hemagglutinin and fusion proteins developed in all patients over the next 3 weeks, the former to high levels and the latter to low levels. Antibody to matrix protein developed to very low levels and was detectable in only 41% of the patients; this poor response to matrix protein was not correlated with the age of the patient or the acute neurological complications of measles. PMID:6694263

  13. Biochemical and structural studies of the oligomerization domain of the Nipah virus phosphoprotein: evidence for an elongated coiled-coil homotrimer.

    PubMed

    Blocquel, David; Beltrandi, Matilde; Erales, Jenny; Barbier, Pascale; Longhi, Sonia

    2013-11-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a recently emerged severe human pathogen that belongs to the Henipavirus genus within the Paramyxoviridae family. The NiV genome is encapsidated by the nucleoprotein (N) within a helical nucleocapsid that is the substrate used by the polymerase for transcription and replication. The polymerase is recruited onto the nucleocapsid via its cofactor, the phosphoprotein (P). The NiV P protein has a modular organization, with alternating disordered and ordered domains. Among these latter, is the P multimerization domain (PMD) that was predicted to adopt a coiled-coil conformation. Using both biochemical and biophysical approaches, we show that NiV PMD forms a highly stable and elongated coiled-coil trimer, a finding in striking contrast with respect to the PMDs of Paramyxoviridae members investigated so far that were all found to tetramerize. The present results therefore represent the first report of a paramyxoviral P protein forming trimers. PMID:24074578

  14. Putative site for the acquisition of human herpesvirus 6 virion tegument.

    PubMed Central

    Roffman, E; Albert, J P; Goff, J P; Frenkel, N

    1990-01-01

    The virion of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) contains a very distinct tegument layer, occupying the space between the nucleocapsid and the virion envelope. Ultrastructural analyses of thymocytes infected with HHV-6 revealed the presence of intranuclear spherical compartments, approximately 1.5 microns in diameter, in which tegumentation seems to take place. These compartments, termed tegusomes, were bounded by two membranes and contained ribosomes, consistent with their derivation by cytoplasmic invagination into the nucleus. Capsids located within the nucleus outside the tegusomes were all naked, while those located in the cytoplasm were uniformly tegumented. In contrast, capsids present inside the tegusomes contains teguments of variable thicknesses. In addition, nucleocapsids were documented in the process of budding into the tegusomes. We thus suggest that the tegusomes represent a cellular site in which HHV-6 virions acquire their tegument. Images PMID:2173796

  15. Peptide-mediated broad-spectrum plant resistance to tospoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Christoph; Schreier, Peter H.; Uhrig, Joachim F.

    2003-01-01

    Plant viruses have a significant impact on agronomic losses worldwide. A new strategy for engineering virus-resistant plants by transgenic expression of a dominant interfering peptide is presented here. This peptide of 29 aa strongly interacts with the nucleocapsid proteins (N) of different tospoviruses. Transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana lines expressing the peptide fused to a carrier protein were challenged with five different tospoviruses that have a nucleocapsid protein interacting with the peptide. In the transgenic plants, strong resistance to tomato spotted wilt virus, tomato chlorotic spot virus, groundnut ring spot virus, and chrysanthemum stem necrosis virus was observed. This therefore demonstrates the feasibility of using peptide “aptamers” as an in vivo tool to control viral infection in higher plants. PMID:12682295

  16. Herpes simplex virus 1 induces egress channels through marginalized host chromatin.

    PubMed

    Myllys, Markko; Ruokolainen, Visa; Aho, Vesa; Smith, Elizabeth A; Hakanen, Satu; Peri, Piritta; Salvetti, Anna; Timonen, Jussi; Hukkanen, Veijo; Larabell, Carolyn A; Vihinen-Ranta, Maija

    2016-01-01

    Lytic infection with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) induces profound modification of the cell nucleus including formation of a viral replication compartment and chromatin marginalization into the nuclear periphery. We used three-dimensional soft X-ray tomography, combined with cryogenic fluorescence, confocal and electron microscopy, to analyse the transformation of peripheral chromatin during HSV-1 infection. Our data showed an increased presence of low-density gaps in the marginalized chromatin at late infection. Advanced data analysis indicated the formation of virus-nucleocapsid-sized (or wider) channels extending through the compacted chromatin of the host. Importantly, confocal and electron microscopy analysis showed that these gaps frequently contained viral nucleocapsids. These results demonstrated that HSV-1 infection induces the formation of channels penetrating the compacted layer of cellular chromatin and allowing for the passage of progeny viruses to the nuclear envelope, their site of nuclear egress. PMID:27349677

  17. Case report: epithelial intracytoplasmic herpes viral inclusions associated with an outbreak of duck virus enteritis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barr, B.C.; Jessup, David A.; Docherty, Douglas E.; Lownestine, L.J.

    1992-01-01

    Several muscovy ducks from a free-roaming flock of 65 muscovy and mallard ducks died over a 3-week period. Three muscovy ducks were necropsied. Gross and microscopic changes were compatible with duck virus enteritis, and the virus was isolated. In addition to intranuclear viral inclusion bodies in several tissues, intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies were present in esophageal and cloacal epithelium, By electron microscopy, the membrane-bound intracytoplasmic inclusions were found to contain enveloped herpesvirus, and nuclei contained herpes viral nucleocapsids.

  18. A Thermodynamic Model for Genome Packaging in Hepatitis B Virus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jehoon; Wu, Jianzhong

    2015-10-20

    Understanding the fundamentals of genome packaging in viral capsids is important for finding effective antiviral strategies and for utilizing benign viral particles for gene therapy. While the structure of encapsidated genomic materials has been routinely characterized with experimental techniques such as cryo-electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction, much less is known about the molecular driving forces underlying genome assembly in an intracellular environment and its in vivo interactions with the capsid proteins. Here we study the thermodynamic basis of the pregenomic RNA encapsidation in human Hepatitis B virus in vivo using a coarse-grained molecular model that captures the essential components of nonspecific intermolecular interactions. The thermodynamic model is used to examine how the electrostatic interaction between the packaged RNA and the highly charged C-terminal domains (CTD) of capsid proteins regulate the nucleocapsid formation. The theoretical model predicts optimal RNA content in Hepatitis B virus nucleocapsids with different CTD lengths in good agreement with mutagenesis measurements, confirming the predominant role of electrostatic interactions and molecular excluded-volume effects in genome packaging. We find that the amount of encapsidated RNA is not linearly correlated with the net charge of CTD tails as suggested by earlier theoretical studies. Our thermodynamic analysis of the nucleocapsid structure and stability indicates that ∼10% of the CTD residues are free from complexation with RNA, resulting in partially exposed CTD tails. The thermodynamic model also predicts the free energy of complex formation between macromolecules, which corroborates experimental results for the impact of CTD truncation on the nucleocapsid stability. PMID:26488660

  19. Crystal Structure of the Nipah Virus Phosphoprotein Tetramerization Domain

    PubMed Central

    Bruhn, Jessica F.; Barnett, Katherine C.; Bibby, Jaclyn; Thomas, Jens M. H.; Keegan, Ronan M.; Rigden, Daniel J.; Bornholdt, Zachary A.

    2014-01-01

    The Nipah virus phosphoprotein (P) is multimeric and tethers the viral polymerase to the nucleocapsid. We present the crystal structure of the multimerization domain of Nipah virus P: a long, parallel, tetrameric, coiled coil with a small, α-helical cap structure. Across the paramyxoviruses, these domains share little sequence identity yet are similar in length and structural organization, suggesting a common requirement for scaffolding or spatial organization of the functions of P in the virus life cycle. PMID:24155387

  20. The structure of the C-terminal domain of the Zaire ebolavirus nucleoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Dziubańska, Paulina J.; Derewenda, Urszula; Ellena, Jeffrey F.; Engel, Daniel A.; Derewenda, Zygmunt S.

    2014-01-01

    Ebolavirus (EBOV) causes severe hemorrhagic fever with a mortality rate of up to 90%. EBOV is a member of the order Mononegavirales and, like other viruses in this taxonomic group, contains a negative-sense single-stranded (ss) RNA. The EBOV ssRNA encodes seven distinct proteins. One of them, the nucleoprotein (NP), is the most abundant viral protein in the infected cell and within the viral nucleocapsid. Like other EBOV proteins, NP is multifunctional. It is tightly associated with the viral genome and is essential for viral transcription, RNA replication, genome packaging and nucleocapsid assembly prior to membrane encapsulation. NP is unusual among the Mononegavirales in that it contains two distinct regions, or putative domains, the C-terminal of which shows no homology to any known proteins and is purported to be a hub for protein–protein interactions within the nucleocapsid. The atomic structure of NP remains unknown. Here, the boundaries of the N- and C-terminal domains of NP from Zaire EBOV are defined, it is shown that they can be expressed as highly stable recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli, and the atomic structure of the C-terminal domain (residues 641–739) derived from analysis of two distinct crystal forms at 1.98 and 1.75 Å resolution is described. The structure reveals a novel tertiary fold that is distantly reminiscent of the β-grasp architecture. PMID:25195755

  1. A baculovirus alkaline nuclease knockout construct produces fragmented DNA and aberrant capsids

    SciTech Connect

    Okano, Kazuhiro; Vanarsdall, Adam L.; Rohrmann, George F. . E-mail: rohrmanng@orst.edu

    2007-03-01

    DNA replication of bacmid-derived constructs of the Autographa californica multiple nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) was analyzed by field inversion gel electrophoresis (FIGE) in combination with digestion at a unique Eco81I restriction enzyme site. Three constructs were characterized: a parental bacmid, a bacmid deleted for the alkaline nuclease gene, and a bacmid from which the gp64 gene had been deleted. The latter was employed as a control for comparison with the alkaline nuclease knockout because neither yields infectious virus and their replication is limited to the initially transfected cells. The major difference between DNA replicated by the different constructs was the presence in the alkaline nuclease knockout of high concentrations of relatively small, subgenome length DNA in preparations not treated with Eco81I. Furthermore, upon Eco81I digestion, the alkaline nuclease knockout bacmid also yielded substantially more subgenome size DNA than the other constructs. Electron microscopic examination of cells transfected with the alkaline nuclease knockout indicated that, in addition to a limited number of normal-appearing electron-dense nucleocapsids, numerous aberrant capsid-like structures were observed indicating a defect in nucleocapsid maturation or in a DNA processing step that is necessary for encapsidation. Because of the documented role of the baculovirus alkaline nuclease and its homologs from other viruses in homologous recombination, these data suggest that DNA recombination may play a major role in the production of baculovirus genomes.

  2. The Interaction between tRNALys3 and the Primer Activation Signal Deciphered by NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Brachet, Franck; Tisne, Carine

    2013-01-01

    The initiation of reverse transcription of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) requires the opening of the three-dimensional structure of the primer tRNALys3 for its annealing to the viral RNA at the primer binding site (PBS). Despite the fact that the result of this rearrangement is thermodynamically more stable, there is a high-energy barrier that requires the chaperoning activity of the viral nucleocapsid protein. In addition to the nucleotide complementarity to the PBS, several regions of tRNALys3 have been described as interacting with the viral genomic RNA. Among these sequences, a sequence of the viral genome called PAS for “primer activation signal” was proposed to interact with the T-arm of tRNALys3, this interaction stimulating the initiation of reverse transcription. In this report, we investigate the formation of this additional interaction with NMR spectroscopy, using a simple system composed of the primer tRNALys3, the 18 nucleotides of the PBS, the PAS (8 nucleotides) encompassed or not in a hairpin structure, and the nucleocapsid protein. Our NMR study provides molecular evidence of the existence of this interaction and highlights the role of the nucleocapsid protein in promoting this additional RNA-RNA annealing. This study presents the first direct observation at a single base-pair resolution of the PAS/anti-PAS association, which has been proposed to be involved in the chronological regulation of the reverse transcription. PMID:23762248

  3. Characterization of novel hepadnaviral RNA species accumulated in hepatoma cells treated with viral DNA polymerase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pinghu; Liu, Fei; Guo, Fang; Zhao, Qiong; Chang, Jinhong; Guo, Ju-Tao

    2016-07-01

    Inhibitors of hepadnaviral DNA polymerases are predicted to inhibit both minus and plus strand of viral DNA synthesis and arrest viral DNA replication at the stage of pregenomic (pg) RNA-containing nucleocapsids. However, analyses of the RNA species of human and duck hepatitis B viruses (HBV and DHBV, respectively) in hepatoma cells treated with viral DNA polymerase inhibitors revealed the genesis of novel RNA species migrating slightly faster than the full-length pgRNA. The DNA polymerase inhibitor-induced accumulation of these RNA species were abolished in the presence of alpha-interferon or HBV nucleocapsid assembly inhibitors. Moreover, they were protected from microccocal nuclease digestion and devoid of a poly-A tail. These characteristics suggest that the novel RNA species are most likely generated from RNase H cleavage of encapsidated pgRNA, after primer translocation and synthesis of the 5' terminal portion of minus strand DNA. In support of this hypothesis, DNA polymerase inhibitor treatment of chicken hepatoma cells transfected with a DHBV genome encoding an RNase H inactive DNA polymerase (E696H) failed to produce such RNA species. Our results thus suggest that the currently available DNA polymerase inhibitors do not efficiently arrest minus strand DNA synthesis at the early stage in hepatocytes. Hence, development of novel antiviral agents that more potently suppress viral DNA synthesis or viral nucleocapsid assembly inhibitors that are mechanistically complementary to the currently available DNA polymerase inhibitors are warranted. PMID:27083116

  4. [Importance of cooling after death for restoration of metabolism during resuscitation].

    PubMed

    Pogosova, A V; Petukhova, L M; Nikulin, V I; Konikova, A S

    1978-01-01

    Incorporation of labelled metabolites into proteins, RNA and DNA was completely inhibited in rabbit tissues under conditions of prolonged hypothermia (10 degrees). The incorporation of labelled metabolites into all the biopolymers studied was restored after subsequent warming up to 38 degrees. Within 60-90 min after death of the animals due to acute anoxia, the labelled metabolites did not incorporate into protein, RNA and DNA. Artificial postmortal hypothermia (20 degrees) increased (by about 2.5-3-fold) the period of viability, during which reanimation is possible. The hypothermia enables subsequent restoration of the anabolic processes from the zero level. PMID:734984

  5. The UL31 and UL34 Gene Products of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Are Required for Optimal Localization of Viral Glycoproteins D and M to the Inner Nuclear Membranes of Infected Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Wills, Elizabeth; Mou, Fan; Baines, Joel D.

    2009-01-01

    UL31 and UL34 of herpes simplex virus type 1 form a complex necessary for nucleocapsid budding at the inner nuclear membrane (INM). Previous examination by immunogold electron microscopy and electron tomography showed that pUL31, pUL34, and glycoproteins D and M are recruited to perinuclear virions and densely staining regions of the INM where nucleocapsids bud into the perinuclear space. We now show by quantitative immunogold electron microscopy coupled with analysis of variance that gD-specific immunoreactivity is significantly reduced at both the INM and outer nuclear membrane (ONM) of cells infected with a UL34 null virus. While the amount of gM associated with the nuclear membrane (NM) was only slightly (P = 0.027) reduced in cells infected with the UL34 null virus, enrichment of gM in the INM at the expense of that in the ONM was greatly dependent on UL34 (P < 0.0001). pUL34 also interacted directly or indirectly with immature forms of gD (species expected to reside in the endoplasmic reticulum or nuclear membrane) in lysates of infected cells and with the cytosolic tail of gD fused to glutathione S-transferase in rabbit reticulocyte lysates, suggesting a role for the pUL34/gD interaction in recruiting gD to the NM. The effects of UL34 on gD and gM localization were not a consequence of decreased total expression of gD and gM, as determined by flow cytometry. Separately, pUL31 was dispensable for targeting gD and gM to the two leaflets of the NM but was required for (i) the proper INM-versus-ONM ratio of gD and gM in infected cells and (ii) the presence of electron-dense regions in the INM, representing nucleocapsid budding sites. We conclude that in addition to their roles in nucleocapsid envelopment and lamina alteration, UL31 and UL34 play separate but related roles in recruiting appropriate components to nucleocapsid budding sites at the INM. PMID:19279119

  6. FLOW CYTOMETRIC DISCRIMINATION OF MITOTIC NUCLEI BY RIGHT-ANGLE LIGHT SCATTER (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Flow cytometry has been used to demonstrate alterations in protein, RNA, and DNA content of cells as they traverse the cell cycle. Employing fluorescein isothiocynate (FITC) to stain protein and propidium iodide (PI) to stain nucleic acids, multiple regions within the G1 and G2 p...

  7. PHYSIOLOGICAL AND BIOCHEMICAL EFFECTS OF AIR POLLUTANTS ON SOYBEAN PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of NO2 and SO2 on soybeans which may cause irreversible damage. The effects of NO2 and SO2 on total protein, RNA, DNA and protein synthesis were determined. Also, the effects of NO2 on alpha-amylase, acid phosphatase, perox...

  8. ChIP-Seq and RNA-Seq analyses identify components of the Wnt and Fgf signaling pathways as Prep1 target genes in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Audrey; Calabrese, Manuela; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Tkachuk, Vsevolod; Torres, Miguel; Blasi, Francesco; Penkov, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    The Prep1 (Pknox1) homeodomain transcription factor is essential at multiple stages of embryo development. In the E11.5 embryo trunk, we previously estimated that Prep1 binds about 3,300 genomic sites at a highly specific decameric consensus sequence, mainly governing basal cellular functions. We now show that in embryonic stem (ES) cells Prep1 binding pattern only partly overlaps that of the embryo trunk, with about 2,000 novel sites. Moreover, in ES cells Prep1 still binds mostly to promoters, as in total embryo trunk but, among the peaks bound exclusively in ES cells, the percentage of enhancers was three-fold higher. RNA-seq identifies about 1800 genes down-regulated in Prep1-/- ES cells which belong to gene ontology categories not enriched in the E11.5 Prep1i/i differentiated embryo, including in particular essential components of the Wnt and Fgf pathways. These data agree with aberrant Wnt and Fgf expression levels in the Prep1-/- ES cells with a deficient embryoid bodies (EBs) formation and differentiation. Re-establishment of the Prep1 level rescues the phenotype. PMID:25875616

  9. X-Ray Solution Scattering Study of Four Escherichia coli Enzymes Involved in Stationary-Phase Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Dadinova, Liubov A.; Shtykova, Eleonora V.; Konarev, Petr V.; Rodina, Elena V.; Snalina, Natalia E.; Vorobyeva, Natalia N.; Kurilova, Svetlana A.; Nazarova, Tatyana I.; Jeffries, Cy M.; Svergun, Dmitri I.

    2016-01-01

    The structural analyses of four metabolic enzymes that maintain and regulate the stationary growth phase of Escherichia coli have been performed primarily drawing on the results obtained from solution small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and other structural techniques. The proteins are (i) class I fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (FbaB); (ii) inorganic pyrophosphatase (PPase); (iii) 5-keto-4-deoxyuronate isomerase (KduI); and (iv) glutamate decarboxylase (GadA). The enzyme FbaB, that until now had an unknown structure, is predicted to fold into a TIM-barrel motif that form globular protomers which SAXS experiments show associate into decameric assemblies. In agreement with previously reported crystal structures, PPase forms hexamers in solution that are similar to the previously reported X-ray crystal structure. Both KduI and GadA that are responsible for carbohydrate (pectin) metabolism and acid stress responses, respectively, form polydisperse mixtures consisting of different oligomeric states. Overall the SAXS experiments yield additional insights into shape and organization of these metabolic enzymes and further demonstrate the utility of hybrid methods, i.e., solution SAXS combined with X-ray crystallography, bioinformatics and predictive 3D-structural modeling, as tools to enrich structural studies. The results highlight the structural complexity that the protein components of metabolic networks may adopt which cannot be fully captured using individual structural biology techniques. PMID:27227414

  10. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis and demonstration of genetic variability among bifidobacteria isolated from rats fed with raw kidney beans.

    PubMed

    Fanedl, L; Nekrep, F V; Avgustin, G

    1998-11-01

    A rise in bifidobacterial numbers resembling the Escherichia coli overgrowth phenomenon was observed in the rat small intestine in a feeding experiment with kidney beans. Bifidobacterial colony counts increased from 7.6 x 10(6) to 1.7 x 10(8) cfu.g-1 of intestinal tissue in the anterior part and from less than 1 x 10(5) to 2.65 x 10(8) cfu.g-1 in posterior part of the intestine. Fifteen bifidobacterial strains were purified and further analysed. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) assays were used to genetically differentiate bifidobacterial isolates from rat gut and compare them with type strains of 20 different species from the genus Bifidobacterium. A total of 80 arbitrary decamere primers were screened with 6 isolates, and 7 primers were chosen for the final analysis. The amplified DNA bands were scored and analysed by the unweighted pair-group method using arithmetic averages clustering. The isolates were not identical to each other nor to the screened type strains. Whereas it was possible to group 12 of the isolates into 2 separate clusters, 3 strains showed no significant relatedness to any strain. The results of the RAPD analysis indicated that there was a large degree variability among the bifidobacteria in the rat gut and demonstrated the potential applicability of such an approach in the investigation of microbial diversity in complex ecosystems. PMID:10030004

  11. Expression of the Multimeric and Highly Immunogenic Brucella spp. Lumazine Synthase Fused to Bovine Rotavirus VP8d as a Scaffold for Antigen Production in Tobacco Chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Alfano, E. Federico; Lentz, Ezequiel M.; Bellido, Demian; Dus Santos, María J.; Goldbaum, Fernando A.; Wigdorovitz, Andrés; Bravo-Almonacid, Fernando F.

    2015-01-01

    Lumazine synthase from Brucella spp. (BLS) is a highly immunogenic decameric protein which can accommodate foreign polypeptides or protein domains fused to its N-termini, markedly increasing their immunogenicity. The inner core domain (VP8d) of VP8 spike protein from bovine rotavirus is responsible for viral adhesion to sialic acid residues and infection. It also displays neutralizing epitopes, making it a good candidate for vaccination. In this work, the BLS scaffold was assessed for the first time in plants for recombinant vaccine development by N-terminally fusing BLS to VP8d and expressing the resulting fusion (BLSVP8d) in tobacco chloroplasts. Transplastomic plants were obtained and characterized by Southern, northern and western blot. BLSVP8d was highly expressed, representing 40% of total soluble protein (4.85 mg/g fresh tissue). BLSVP8d remained soluble and stable during all stages of plant development and even in lyophilized leaves stored at room temperature. Soluble protein extracts from fresh and lyophilized leaves were able to induce specific neutralizing IgY antibodies in a laying hen model. This work presents BLS as an interesting platform for highly immunogenic injectable, or even oral, subunit vaccines. Lyophilization of transplastomic leaves expressing stable antigenic fusions to BLS would further reduce costs and simplify downstream processing, purification and storage, allowing for more practical vaccines. PMID:26779198

  12. ChIP-Seq and RNA-Seq Analyses Identify Components of the Wnt and Fgf Signaling Pathways as Prep1 Target Genes in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Audrey; Calabrese, Manuela; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Tkachuk, Vsevolod; Torres, Miguel; Blasi, Francesco; Penkov, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    The Prep1 (Pknox1) homeodomain transcription factor is essential at multiple stages of embryo development. In the E11.5 embryo trunk, we previously estimated that Prep1 binds about 3,300 genomic sites at a highly specific decameric consensus sequence, mainly governing basal cellular functions. We now show that in embryonic stem (ES) cells Prep1 binding pattern only partly overlaps that of the embryo trunk, with about 2,000 novel sites. Moreover, in ES cells Prep1 still binds mostly to promoters, as in total embryo trunk but, among the peaks bound exclusively in ES cells, the percentage of enhancers was three-fold higher. RNA-seq identifies about 1800 genes down-regulated in Prep1-/- ES cells which belong to gene ontology categories not enriched in the E11.5 Prep1i/i differentiated embryo, including in particular essential components of the Wnt and Fgf pathways. These data agree with aberrant Wnt and Fgf expression levels in the Prep1-/- ES cells with a deficient embryoid bodies (EBs) formation and differentiation. Re-establishment of the Prep1 level rescues the phenotype. PMID:25875616

  13. A 1-Cys Peroxiredoxin from a Thermophilic Archaeon Moonlights as a Molecular Chaperone to Protect Protein and DNA against Stress-Induced Damage

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Bang Phuong; Kwak, Jae Myeong; Xuan, Yuan Hu; Cheong, Gang-Won

    2015-01-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prxs) act against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), organic peroxides, and peroxynitrite. Thermococcus kodakaraensis KOD1, an anaerobic archaeon, contains many antioxidant proteins, including three Prxs (Tk0537, Tk0815, and Tk1055). Only Tk0537 has been found to be induced in response to heat, osmotic, and oxidative stress. Tk0537 was found to belong to a 1-Cys Prx6 subfamily based on sequence analysis and was named 1-Cys TkPrx. Using gel filtration chromatography, electron microscopy, and blue-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, we observed that 1-Cys TkPrx exhibits oligomeric forms with reduced peroxide reductase activity as well as decameric and dodecameric forms that can act as molecular chaperones by protecting both proteins and DNA from oxidative stress. Mutational analysis showed that a cysteine residue at the N-terminus (Cys46) was responsible for the peroxide reductase activity, and cysteine residues at the C-terminus (Cys205 and Cys211) were important for oligomerization. Based on our results, we propose that interconversion between different oligomers is important for regulating the different functions of 1-Cys TkPrx. PMID:25933432

  14. Characterization of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv alkyl hydroperoxidase AhpC points to the importance of ionic interactions in oligomerization and activity.

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, R; Mande, S C

    2001-01-01

    An alkyl hydroperoxidase (AhpC) has been found frequently to be overexpressed in isoniazid-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These strains have an inactivated katG gene encoding a catalase peroxidase, which might render mycobacteria susceptible to the toxic peroxide radicals, thus leading to the concomitant overexpression of the AhpC. Although the overexpressed AhpC in isoniazid-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis may not directly participate in isoniazid action, AhpC might still assist M. tuberculosis in combating oxidative damage in the absence of the catalase. Here we have attempted to characterize the AhpC protein biochemically and report its functional and oligomerization properties. The alkyl hydroperoxidase of M. tuberculosis is unique in many ways compared with its well-characterized homologues from enteric bacteria. We show that AhpC is a decameric protein, composed of five identical dimers held together by ionic interactions. Dimerization of individual subunits takes place through an intersubunit disulphide linkage. The ionic interactions play a significant role in enzymic activity of the AhpC protein. The UV absorption spectrum and three-dimensional model of AhpC suggest that interesting conformational changes may take place during oxidation and reduction of the intersubunit disulphide linkage. In the absence of the partner AhpF subunit in M. tuberculosis, the mycobacterial AhpC might use small-molecule reagents, such as mycothiol, for completing its enzymic cycle. PMID:11171096

  15. Homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence assays for the detection of activity and inhibition of phosphatase enzymes employing phosphorescently labeled peptide substrates.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Desmond J; O'Riordan, Tomás C; O'Sullivan, Paul J; Papkovsky, Dmitri B

    2007-02-01

    A rapid, homogenous, antibody-free assay for phosphatase enzymes was developed using the phosphorescent platinum (II)-coproporphyrin label (PtCP) and time-resolved fluorescent detection. An internally quenched decameric peptide substrate containing a phospho-tyrosine residue, labeled with PtCP-maleimide and dabcyl-NHS at its termini was designed. Phosphatase catalysed dephosphorylation of the substrate resulted in a minor increase in PtCP signal, while subsequent cleavage by chymotrypsin at the dephosphorylated Tyr-Leu site provided a 3.5 fold enhancement of PtCP phosphorescence. This phosphorescence phosphatase enhancement assay was optimized to a 96 well plate format with detection on a commercial TR-F plate reader, and applied to measure the activity and inhibition of alkaline phosphatase, recombinant human CD45, and tyrosine phosphatases in Jurkat cell lysates within 40 min. Parameters of these enzymatic reactions such as Km's, limits of detection (L.O.D's) and IC50 values for the non-specific inhibitor sodium orthovanadate were also determined. PMID:17386566

  16. Influence of decavanadate on rat synaptic plasma membrane ATPases activity.

    PubMed

    Krstić, Danijela; Colović, Mirjana; Bosnjaković-Pavlović, Nada; Spasojević-De Bire, Anne; Vasić, Vesna

    2009-09-01

    The in vitro influence of decameric vanadate species on Na+/K+-ATPase, plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase (PMCA)-calcium pump and ecto-ATPase activity, using rat synaptic plasma membrane (SPM) as model system was investigated, whereas the commercial porcine cerebral cortex Na+/K+-ATPase served as a reference. The thermal behaviour of the synthesized decavanadate (V10) has been studied by differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis, while the type of polyvanadate anion was identified using the IR spectroscopy. The concentration-dependent responses to V10 of all enzymes were obtained. The half-maximum inhibitory concentration (IC50) of the enzyme activity was achieved at (4.74 +/- 1.15) x 10(-7) mol/l for SPM Na+/K+-ATPase, (1.30 +/- 0.10) x 10(-6) mol/l for commercial Na+/K+-ATPase and (3.13 +/- 1.70) x 10(-8) mol/l for Ca2+-ATPase, while ecto-ATPase is significantly less sensitive toward V10 (IC50 = (1.05 +/- 0.10) x 10(-4) mol/l) than investigated P-type ATPases. Kinetic analysis showed that V10 inhibited Na+/K+-ATPase by reducing the maximum enzymatic velocity and apparent affinity for ATP (increasing K(m) value), implying a mixed mode of interaction between V10 and P-type ATPases. PMID:20037196

  17. Enhancement of the Chaperone Activity of Alkyl Hydroperoxide Reductase C from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Resulting from a Point-Specific Mutation Confers Heat Tolerance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Taek; Lee, Seung Sik; Mondal, Suvendu; Tripathi, Bhumi Nath; Kim, Siu; Lee, Keun Woo; Hong, Sung Hyun; Bai, Hyoung-Woo; Cho, Jae-Young; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2016-08-31

    Alkyl hydroperoxide reductase subunit C from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (PaAhpC) is a member of the 2-Cys peroxiredoxin family. Here, we examined the peroxidase and molecular chaperone functions of PaAhpC using a site-directed mutagenesis approach by substitution of Ser and Thr residues with Cys at positions 78 and 105 located between two catalytic cysteines. Substitution of Ser with Cys at position 78 enhanced the chaperone activity of the mutant (S78C-PaAhpC) by approximately 9-fold compared with that of the wild-type protein (WT-PaAhpC). This increased activity may have been associated with the proportionate increase in the high-molecular-weight (HMW) fraction and enhanced hydrophobicity of S78C-PaAhpC. Homology modeling revealed that mutation of Ser(78) to Cys(78) resulted in a more compact decameric structure than that observed in WT-PaAhpC and decreased the atomic distance between the two neighboring sulfur atoms of Cys(78) in the dimer-dimer interface of S78C-PaAhpC, which could be responsible for the enhanced hydrophobic interaction at the dimer-dimer interface. Furthermore, complementation assays showed that S78C-PaAhpC exhibited greatly improved the heat tolerance, resulting in enhanced survival under thermal stress. Thus, addition of Cys at position 78 in PaAhpC modulated the functional shifting of this protein from a peroxidase to a chaperone. PMID:27457208

  18. Unprecedented {Fe14 }/{Fe10 } Polyoxotungstate-Based Nanoclusters with Efficient Photocatalytic H2 Evolution Activity: Synthesis, Structure, Magnetism, and Electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vikram; Chen, Zhiyuan; Ma, Pengtao; Zhang, Dongdi; Drew, Michael G B; Niu, Jingyang; Wang, Jingping

    2016-07-25

    Novel Fe10 and Fe14 clusters [Rb9 Cs4 H37 Fe10 O34 (A-α-PW9 O31 )3 (OH)3 ]⋅36 H2 O (1) and [H3 Rb3 Fe14 (OH)12 (PO4 )6 (B-α-PW9 O34 )2 ]⋅21 H2 O (2) were synthesized and characterized in the solid state by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and magnetic studies, and in solution by electrochemistry. Cluster 1 is a decameric Fe(III) polyanionic cluster encapsulating a cesium atom in the center. Cluster 2 is a unique tetradecanuclear Fe(III) sandwich structure with phosphate-linked units featuring two quasicubic Fe4 O4 moieties. Apparently, 2 has the highest nuclearity of all known Fe(III) sandwich-type polyoxometalate clusters. Clusters 1 and 2 also act as photocatalysts with platinum as cocatalyst for H2 evolution from light-driven water splitting. Changes in the cyclovoltammetric patterns with variations in pH were observed for 1 and 2, most likely due to intermolecular interactions among the high-nuclearity Fe(III) cluster cores and subsequent changes in the acid-base properties of the two reduced POMs. Magnetic studies provide evidence of antiferromagnetic interactions in 1 and 2. TGA showed that complexes 1 and 2 decompose between 580 and 590 °C. PMID:27345965

  19. X-Ray Solution Scattering Study of Four Escherichia coli Enzymes Involved in Stationary-Phase Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dadinova, Liubov A; Shtykova, Eleonora V; Konarev, Petr V; Rodina, Elena V; Snalina, Natalia E; Vorobyeva, Natalia N; Kurilova, Svetlana A; Nazarova, Tatyana I; Jeffries, Cy M; Svergun, Dmitri I

    2016-01-01

    The structural analyses of four metabolic enzymes that maintain and regulate the stationary growth phase of Escherichia coli have been performed primarily drawing on the results obtained from solution small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and other structural techniques. The proteins are (i) class I fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (FbaB); (ii) inorganic pyrophosphatase (PPase); (iii) 5-keto-4-deoxyuronate isomerase (KduI); and (iv) glutamate decarboxylase (GadA). The enzyme FbaB, that until now had an unknown structure, is predicted to fold into a TIM-barrel motif that form globular protomers which SAXS experiments show associate into decameric assemblies. In agreement with previously reported crystal structures, PPase forms hexamers in solution that are similar to the previously reported X-ray crystal structure. Both KduI and GadA that are responsible for carbohydrate (pectin) metabolism and acid stress responses, respectively, form polydisperse mixtures consisting of different oligomeric states. Overall the SAXS experiments yield additional insights into shape and organization of these metabolic enzymes and further demonstrate the utility of hybrid methods, i.e., solution SAXS combined with X-ray crystallography, bioinformatics and predictive 3D-structural modeling, as tools to enrich structural studies. The results highlight the structural complexity that the protein components of metabolic networks may adopt which cannot be fully captured using individual structural biology techniques. PMID:27227414

  20. UDP-galactopyranose mutase, a potential drug target against human pathogenic nematode Brugia malayi.

    PubMed

    Misra, Sweta; Valicherla, Guru R; Mohd Shahab; Gupta, Jyoti; Gayen, Jiaur R; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2016-08-01

    Lymphatic filariasis, a vector-borne neglected tropical disease affects millions of population in tropical and subtropical countries. Vaccine unavailability and emerging drug resistance against standard antifilarial drugs necessitate search of novel drug targets for developing alternate drugs. Recently, UDP-galactopyranose mutases (UGM) have emerged as a promising drug target playing an important role in parasite virulence and survival. This study deals with the cloning and characterization of Brugia malayi UGM and further exploring its antifilarial drug target potential. The recombinant protein was actively involved in conversion of UDP-galactopyranose (substrate) to UDP-galactofuranose (product) revealing Km and Vmax to be ∼51.15 μM and ∼1.27 μM/min, respectively. The purified protein appeared to be decameric in native state and its 3D homology modeling using Aspergillus fumigatus UGM enzyme as template revealed conservation of active site residues. Two specific prokaryotic inhibitors (compounds A and B) of the enzyme inhibited B. malayi UGM enzymatic activity competitively depicting Ki values ∼22.68 and ∼23.0 μM, respectively. These compounds were also active in vitro and in vivo against B. malayi The findings suggest that B. malayi UGM could be a potential antifilarial therapeutic drug target. PMID:27465638

  1. Structural characterization of encapsulated ferritin provides insight into iron storage in bacterial nanocompartments

    PubMed Central

    He, Didi; Hughes, Sam; Vanden-Hehir, Sally; Georgiev, Atanas; Altenbach, Kirsten; Tarrant, Emma; Mackay, C Logan; Waldron, Kevin J; Clarke, David J; Marles-Wright, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Ferritins are ubiquitous proteins that oxidise and store iron within a protein shell to protect cells from oxidative damage. We have characterized the structure and function of a new member of the ferritin superfamily that is sequestered within an encapsulin capsid. We show that this encapsulated ferritin (EncFtn) has two main alpha helices, which assemble in a metal dependent manner to form a ferroxidase center at a dimer interface. EncFtn adopts an open decameric structure that is topologically distinct from other ferritins. While EncFtn acts as a ferroxidase, it cannot mineralize iron. Conversely, the encapsulin shell associates with iron, but is not enzymatically active, and we demonstrate that EncFtn must be housed within the encapsulin for iron storage. This encapsulin nanocompartment is widely distributed in bacteria and archaea and represents a distinct class of iron storage system, where the oxidation and mineralization of iron are distributed between two proteins. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18972.001 PMID:27529188

  2. Structure of the Sulphiredoxin-Peroxiredoxin Complex Reveals an Essential Repair Embrace

    SciTech Connect

    Jonsson,T.; Johnson, L.; Lowther, W.

    2008-01-01

    Typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxins (Prxs) have an important role in regulating hydrogen peroxide-mediated cell signalling1. In this process, Prxs can become inactivated through the hyperoxidation of an active site Cys residue to Cys sulphinic acid. The unique repair of this moiety by sulphiredoxin (Srx) restores peroxidase activity and terminates the signal2. The hyperoxidized form of Prx exists as a stable decameric structure with each active site buried. Therefore, it is unclear how Srx can access the sulphinic acid moiety. Here we present the 2.6 Angstroms crystal structure of the human Srx-PrxI complex. This complex reveals the complete unfolding of the carboxy terminus of Prx, and its unexpected packing onto the backside of Srx away from the Srx active site. Binding studies and activity analyses of site-directed mutants at this interface show that the interaction is required for repair to occur. Moreover, rearrangements in the Prx active site lead to a juxtaposition of the Prx Gly-Gly-Leu-Gly and Srx ATP-binding motifs, providing a structural basis for the first step of the catalytic mechanism. The results also suggest that the observed interactions may represent a common mode for other proteins to bind to Prxs.

  3. Enhancement of the Chaperone Activity of Alkyl Hydroperoxide Reductase C from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Resulting from a Point-Specific Mutation Confers Heat Tolerance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Taek; Lee, Seung Sik; Mondal, Suvendu; Tripathi, Bhumi Nath; Kim, Siu; Lee, Keun Woo; Hong, Sung Hyun; Bai, Hyoung-Woo; Cho, Jae-Young; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2016-01-01

    Alkyl hydroperoxide reductase subunit C from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (PaAhpC) is a member of the 2-Cys peroxiredoxin family. Here, we examined the peroxidase and molecular chaperone functions of PaAhpC using a site-directed mutagenesis approach by substitution of Ser and Thr residues with Cys at positions 78 and 105 located between two catalytic cysteines. Substitution of Ser with Cys at position 78 enhanced the chaperone activity of the mutant (S78C-PaAhpC) by approximately 9-fold compared with that of the wild-type protein (WT-PaAhpC). This increased activity may have been associated with the proportionate increase in the high-molecular-weight (HMW) fraction and enhanced hydrophobicity of S78C-PaAhpC. Homology modeling revealed that mutation of Ser78 to Cys78 resulted in a more compact decameric structure than that observed in WT-PaAhpC and decreased the atomic distance between the two neighboring sulfur atoms of Cys78 in the dimer-dimer interface of S78C-PaAhpC, which could be responsible for the enhanced hydrophobic interaction at the dimer-dimer interface. Furthermore, complementation assays showed that S78C-PaAhpC exhibited greatly improved the heat tolerance, resulting in enhanced survival under thermal stress. Thus, addition of Cys at position 78 in PaAhpC modulated the functional shifting of this protein from a peroxidase to a chaperone. PMID:27457208

  4. A spectroscopic and calorimetric study of the melting behaviors of a "bent" and a "normal" DNA duplex: [d(GA4T4C)]2 versus [d(GT4A4C)]2.

    PubMed Central

    Park, Y W; Breslauer, K J

    1991-01-01

    We have calorimetrically detected and energetically characterized a premelting event in the "bent" duplex [d(GA4T4C)]2 that is absent in the "normal" duplex [d(GT4A4C)]2. This premelting may correspond to the thermally induced "unbending" of the duplex. Specifically, we have used a combination of spectroscopic and calorimetric techniques to evaluate whether differences in the electrophoretic and hydrogen exchange properties of the bent duplex, [d(GA4T4C)]2, and the normal duplex, [d(GT4A4C)]2, are paralleled by differences in the equilibrium melting properties of these duplexes. Our results reveal that the bimolecular global meltings of both duplexes exhibit two-state behavior and are characterized by the expected thermodynamic changes, as well as the expected salt-dependencies. Significantly, however, at temperatures below duplex melting and over a similar temperature range in which the aberrant electrophoretic mobility is observed (approximately less than 35 degrees C), the bent duplex exhibits calorimetric premelting behavior absent in the normal duplex. Analysis of the calorimetric data in this preglobal melting domain (approximately less than 35 degrees C) allows us to estimate a lower-limit value of 1.6 kcal/(mol-base pair) for the thermally induced unbending of the decameric duplex. PMID:1996356

  5. Varicella-zoster virus p32/p36 complex is present in both the viral capsid and the nuclear matrix of the infected cell.

    PubMed Central

    Friedrichs, W E; Grose, C

    1986-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) directs the synthesis of numerous glycosylated and nonglycosylated infected-cell-specific proteins, many of which are later incorporated into the virion as structural components. In this study, we characterized a nonglycosylated polypeptide complex with the aid of a VZV-specific murine monoclonal antibody clone, 251D9. As detected by indirect immunofluorescence, the antibody bound mainly to antigens located within the nuclei of infected cells and did not attach to an uninfected cell substrate. The polypeptide specificity of the monoclonal antibody was determined by immunoblot analysis of electrophoretically separated infected cell extracts to react with a 32,000-molecular-weight VZV-specific protein (p32); in addition, the antibody also bound to a 36,000-molecular-weight polypeptide. The synthesis of these antigens was unaffected by inhibitors of glycosylation. Nonionic or ionic detergents were only marginally effective in solubilization of the p32-p36 complex, and relatively small amounts were eluted from nuclei by high salt concentrations (2 M NaCl). The same proteins remained associated with the nuclear matrix of VZV-infected cells. We also demonstrated that the protein complex was a major component of purified VZV nucleocapsids; p32 was especially prominent in both full and empty capsids. Immunoblot analysis of the nucleocapsid preparation revealed two additional species (p34 and p38) in the p32-p36 complex. Phosphorylation was a distinctive feature of some of the constituents. In summary, these results indicate that the p32-p36 complex represents a family of structural proteins closely associated with the assembly of VZV nucleocapsids and the encapsidation of viral DNA. Images PMID:3001341

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of dUTPase from Mason–Pfizer monkey retrovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Barabás, Orsolya; Németh, Veronika; Vértessy, Beáta G.

    2006-04-01

    Deoxyuridine 5′-triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase from Mason–Pfizer monkey retrovirus (M-PMV dUTPase) is a betaretroviral member of the dUTPase enzyme family. The nucleocapsid-free dUTPase (48426 Da) was co-crystallized with a dUTP substrate analogue using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Deoxyuridine 5′-triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase from Mason–Pfizer monkey retrovirus (M-PMV dUTPase) is a betaretroviral member of the dUTPase enzyme family. In the mature M-PMV virion, this enzyme is present as the C-terminal domain of the fusion protein nucleocapsid-dUTPase. The homotrimeric organization characteristic of dUTPases is retained in this bifunctional fusion protein. The fusion protein supposedly plays a role in adequate localization of dUTPase activity in the vicinity of nucleic acids during reverse transcription and integration. Here, the nucleocapsid-free dUTPase (48 426 Da) was cocrystallized with a dUTP substrate analogue using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The obtained crystals belong to the primitive hexagonal space group P6{sub 3}, with unit-cell parameters a = 60.6, b = 60.6, c = 63.6 Å, α = 90, β = 90, γ = 120°. Native and PtCl{sub 4}-derivative data sets were collected using synchrotron radiation to 1.75 and 2.3 Å, respectively. Phasing was successfully performed by isomorphous replacement combined with anomalous scattering.

  7. Physicochemical Study of Viral Nanoparticles at the Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Torres-Salgado, Jose F; Comas-Garcia, Mauricio; Villagrana-Escareño, Maria V; Durán-Meza, Ana L; Ruiz-García, Jaime; Cadena-Nava, Ruben D

    2016-07-01

    The assembly of most single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) viruses into icosahedral nucleocapsids is a spontaneous process driven by protein-protein and RNA-protein interactions. The precise nature of these interactions results in the assembly of extremely monodisperse and structurally indistinguishable nucleocapsids. In this work, by using a ssRNA plant virus (cowpea chlorotic mottle virus [CCMV]) as a charged nanoparticle we show that the diffusion of these nanoparticles from the bulk solution to the air/water interface is an irreversible adsorption process. By using the Langmuir technique, we measured the diffusion and adsorption of viral nucleocapsids at the air/water interface at different pH conditions. The pH changes, and therefore in the net surface charge of the virions, have a great influence in the diffusion rate from the bulk solution to the air/water interface. Moreover, assembly of mesoscopic and microscopic viral aggregates at this interface depends on the net surface charge of the virions and the surface pressure. By using Brewster's angle microscopy we characterized these structures at the interface. Most common structures observed were clusters of virions and soap-frothlike micron-size structures. Furthermore, the CCMV films were compressed to form monolayers and multilayers from moderate to high surface pressures, respectively. After transferring the films from the air/water interface onto mica by using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique, their morphology was characterized by atomic force microscopy. These viral monolayers showed closed-packing nano- and microscopic arrangements. PMID:26999022

  8. Detection of infectious bronchitis virus strains similar to Japan in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    TSAI, Cheng-Ta; TSAI, Hsin-Fu; WANG, Ching-Ho

    2016-01-01

    A total of 1,320 tracheal samples from 66 broiler flocks sent to slaughterhouses and 42 tracheal samples from 42 flocks of local chickens in the field were collected for infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) gene detection by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction using nucleocapsid-specific primers and spike-specific primers. Prevalence in broiler flocks was 39.4% (26/66) and in local chicken flocks was 11.9% (5/42). Several IBVs similar to Japan were detected in Taiwan. One-direction neutralization revealed that the reference antisera did not offer protection against the IBVs similar to those from Japan. PMID:26822119

  9. Population structure of blueberry mosaic associated virus: Evidence of reassortment in geographically distinct isolates.

    PubMed

    Thekke-Veetil, Thanuja; Polashock, James J; Marn, Mojca V; Plesko, Irena M; Schilder, Annemiek C; Keller, Karen E; Martin, Robert R; Tzanetakis, Ioannis E

    2015-04-01

    The population structure of blueberry mosaic associated virus (BlMaV), a putative member of the family Ophioviridae, was examined using 61 isolates collected from North America and Slovenia. The studied isolates displayed low diversity in the movement and nucleocapsid proteins and low ratios of non-synonymous to synonymous nucleotide substitutions, indicative of strong purifying selection. Phylogenetic analyses revealed grouping primarily based on geography with some isolates deviating from this rule. Phylogenetic incongruence in the two regions, coupled with detection of reassortment events, indicated the possible role of genetic exchange in the evolution of BlMaV. PMID:25733053

  10. Use of mouse anti-rabies monoclonal antibodies in postexposure treatment of rabies.

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, C L; Dietzschold, B; Ertl, H C; Niu, H S; Rupprecht, C E; Koprowski, H

    1989-01-01

    Immunization of mice and hamsters with a cocktail of mouse MAbs specific for rabies virus nucleocapsid protein and glycoprotein protected animals not only when challenged with a lethal dose of rabies virus after immunization, but also in post-exposure situations. Hamsters treated with the MAb cocktail 3 h after virus inoculation were completely protected from lethal rabies virus infection, and 80% of the animals survived when the MAb cocktail was given 36 h after virus challenge. The potential usefulness of this MAb cocktail for the postexposure treatment of human rabies is discussed. PMID:2760222

  11. Cell entry mechanisms of HSV: what we have learned in recent years

    PubMed Central

    Agelidis, Alex M; Shukla, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    HSV type-1 and -2 are widespread pathogens producing lifelong infection with multiple sequelae, including oral, ocular and genital disease. The process of herpesvirus entry is a highly complex process involving numerous viral and cellular factors. Entry begins with attachment of virus to the cell surface followed by interactions between viral glycoproteins and cellular receptors to facilitate capsid penetration. The nucleocapsid is then transported along microtubules to the nuclear membrane, where viral DNA is released for replication in the nucleus. The work reviewed here comprises the most recent advancements in our understanding of the mechanism involved in the herpesvirus entry process. PMID:27066105

  12. Structures of giant icosahedral eukaryotic dsDNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Chuan; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    In the last twenty years, numerous giant, dsDNA, icosahedral viruses have been discovered and assigned to the nucleocytoplasmic large dsDNA virus (NCLDV) clade. The major capsid proteins of these viruses consist of two consecutive jelly-roll domains, assembled into trimers, with pseudo 6-fold symmetry. The capsomers are assembled into arrays that have either p6 (as in Paramecium bursaria Chlorella virus-1) or p3 symmetry (as in Mimivirus). Most of the NCLDV viruses have a membrane that separates the nucleocapsid from the external capsid. PMID:21909343

  13. Detection of infectious bronchitis virus strains similar to Japan in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Ta; Tsai, Hsin-Fu; Wang, Ching-Ho

    2016-06-01

    A total of 1,320 tracheal samples from 66 broiler flocks sent to slaughterhouses and 42 tracheal samples from 42 flocks of local chickens in the field were collected for infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) gene detection by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction using nucleocapsid-specific primers and spike-specific primers. Prevalence in broiler flocks was 39.4% (26/66) and in local chicken flocks was 11.9% (5/42). Several IBVs similar to Japan were detected in Taiwan. One-direction neutralization revealed that the reference antisera did not offer protection against the IBVs similar to those from Japan. PMID:26822119

  14. New Mexico and the southwestern US are affected by a unique population of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) strains.

    PubMed

    French, J M; Goldberg, N P; Randall, J J; Hanson, S F

    2016-04-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is an important pathogen of many ornamental, greenhouse and agronomic crops worldwide. TSWV also causes sporadic problems in a number of crops in New Mexico (NM). Nucleocapsid gene sequences obtained from six different crop species across the state over four different years were used to characterize the NM TSWV population. This analysis shows that NM is affected by a unique TSWV population that is part of larger independent population present in the southwestern US. This population likely arose due to geographic isolation and is related to other TSWV populations from the US, Spain, and Italy. PMID:26721573

  15. Cytomegalovirus Primary Envelopment Occurs at Large Infoldings of the Inner Nuclear Membrane▿

    PubMed Central

    Buser, Christopher; Walther, Paul; Mertens, Thomas; Michel, Detlef

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the morphogenesis of human and murine cytomegalovirus by transmission electron microscopy after high-pressure freezing, freeze substitution, and plastic embedding. We observed large tubular infoldings of the inner nuclear membrane that were free of lamina and active in primary envelopment and subsequent transport of capsids to the nuclear periphery. Semiquantitative determinations of the enlarged inner nuclear membrane area and the location of the primary envelopment of nucleocapsids demonstrated that this structure represents a virus-induced specialized membrane domain at which the particles are preferentially enveloped. This is a previously undescribed structural element relevant in cytomegalovirus morphogenesis. PMID:17192309

  16. The Cys3-His1 Motif of the Respiratory Syncytial Virus M2-1 Protein Is Essential for Protein Function

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Richard W.; Wertz, Gail W.

    2000-01-01

    The M2 gene of respiratory syncytial (RS) virus has two open reading frames (ORFs). ORF1 encodes a 22-kDa protein termed M2-1. The M2-1 protein contains a Cys3-His1 motif (C-X7-C-X5-C-X3-H) near the amino terminus. This motif is conserved in all human, bovine, and ovine strains of RS virus. A similar motif found in the mammalian transcription factor Nup475 has been shown to bind zinc. The M2-1 protein of human RS virus functions as a transcription factor which increases polymerase processivity, and it enhances readthrough of intergenic junctions during RS virus transcription, thereby acting as a transcription antiterminator. The M2-1 protein also interacts with the nucleocapsid protein. We examined the effects of mutations of cysteine and histidine residues predicted to coordinate zinc in the Cys3-His1 motif on transcription antitermination and N protein binding. We found that mutating the predicted zinc-coordinating residues, the cysteine residues at amino acid positions 7 and 15 and the histidine residue at position 25, prevented M2-1 from enhancing transcriptional readthrough. In contrast, mutations of amino acids within this motif not predicted to coordinate zinc had no effect. Mutations of the predicted zinc-coordinating residues in the Cys3-His1 motif also prevented M2-1 from interacting with the nucleocapsid protein. One mutation of a noncoordinating residue in the motif which did not affect readthrough during transcription, E10G, prevented interaction with the nucleocapsid protein. This suggests that M2-1 does not require interaction with the nucleocapsid protein in order to function during transcription. Analysis of the M2-1 protein in reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels revealed two major forms distinguished by their mobilities. The slower migrating form was shown to be phosphorylated, whereas the faster migrating form was not. Mutations in the Cys3-His1 motif caused a change in distribution of the M2-1 protein from the slower to the

  17. Measurements and models of synchronous growth of fission yeast induced by temperature oscillations. [Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Agar, D.W.; Bailey, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    Pulsing of temperature in a fermentor at intervals coincident with cell generation time was used to induce synchrony in a population of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Measurements of culture protein, RNA, and DNA during synchronous growth confirm continuous synthesis of protein and RNA and discontinuous synthesis of DNA as previously reported. Flow microfluorometry of populations at different times during the synchrony cycle was used to monitor the changes in single-cell protein, RNA, and DNA frequency functions. These measurements illustrate very clearly the degree of synchrony and patterns of macromolecular synthesis and also confirm previous estimates of the cellular protein contents characteristic of dividing cells. Additional insights into single-cell kinetics and division controls are provided by two-parameter flow microfluorometry measurements and by mathematical modeling of population dynamics. Such data are necessary foundations for robust population balance models of microbial processes. (Refs. 31).

  18. Studies on the kinetic sequence of in vitro ribosome assembly using cibacron blue F3GA as a general assembly inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Datta, D; Changchien, L M; Craven, G R

    1986-01-01

    We have found that all E. coli ribosomal proteins strongly bind to an agarose affinity column derivatized with the dye Cibacron Blue F3GA. We have also shown that the capacity to bind the dye is lost when the proteins are organized within the structure of the ribosome or are members of pre-formed protein-RNA complexes. We conclude that the binding of ribosomal proteins to this dye involves specific protein-RNA recognition sites. These observations led us to discover that Cibacron Blue can be used to inhibit in vitro ribosome assembly at any stage of the assembly process. This has allowed us to determine a kinetic order of ribosome assembly. Images PMID:3520481

  19. Total Cellular RNA Modulates Protein Activity.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Subhabrata; DeMott, Christopher M; Reverdatto, Sergey; Burz, David S; Shekhtman, Alexander

    2016-08-16

    RNA constitutes up to 20% of a cell's dry weight, corresponding to ∼20 mg/mL. This high concentration of RNA facilitates low-affinity protein-RNA quinary interactions, which may play an important role in facilitating and regulating biological processes. In the yeast Pichia pastoris, the level of ubiquitin-RNA colocalization increases when cells are grown in the presence of dextrose and methanol instead of methanol as the sole carbon source. Total RNA isolated from cells grown in methanol increases β-galactosidase activity relative to that seen with RNA isolated from cells grown in the presence of dextrose and methanol. Because the total cellular RNA content changes with growth medium, protein-RNA quinary interactions can alter in-cell protein biochemistry and may play an important role in cell adaptation, critical to many physiological and pathological states. PMID:27456029

  20. Structural Basis for the Coevolution of a Viral RNA-Protein Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Chao,J.; Patskovsky, Y.; Almo, S.; Singer, R.

    2008-01-01

    The cocrystal structure of the PP7 bacteriophage coat protein in complex with its translational operator identifies a distinct mode of sequence-specific RNA recognition when compared to the well-characterized MS2 coat protein-RNA complex. The structure reveals the molecular basis of the PP7 coat protein's ability to selectively bind its cognate RNA, and it demonstrates that the conserved beta-sheet surface is a flexible architecture that can evolve to recognize diverse RNA hairpins.

  1. Immuno-gold labelling of turkey rhinotracheitis virus.

    PubMed

    O'Loan, C J; Curran, W L; McNulty, M S

    1992-08-01

    The morphology and morphogenesis of five viruses isolated in Great Britain, France and South Africa from turkeys with rhinotracheitis were examined. The five isolates were antigenically related by immunofluorescence and were indistinguishable by negative contrast and thin section electron microscopy. Negative contrast electron microscopy of infected Vero cell cultures revealed ortho- or paramyxovirus-like particles and helical nucleocapsids 14 nm in diameter with a pitch of 6 nm. The viral nature of these structures was confirmed by immuno-gold labelling, using a hyperimmune rabbit antiserum to TRT virus and 15 nm gold-labelled goat anti-rabbit IgG. Ultrastructural changes characteristics of paramyxovirus infection were observed in Vero cell cultures infected with each of the five TRT virus isolates. These alterations, which included areas of localised thickening of plasma membrane, associated cytoplasmic inclusions of nucleocapsids and budding virus particles also labelled specifically following immunogold staining. These observations are in accord with the suggestion that TRT virus is an avian pneumovirus. PMID:1414097

  2. Isolation of carboxyl-termini and blocked amino-termini of viral proteins by high-performance cation-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gorman, J J; Shiell, B J

    1993-08-27

    The strong cation-exchanger, PolySulfoethyl Aspartamide, has been assessed as a medium for isolation of carboxyl-terminal and blocked amino-terminal peptides from tryptic digests of small quantities of viral proteins. Peptides with a single positive charge, the blocked amino-terminal peptides of ovalbumin and the Newcastle disease virus (NDV) matrix protein and carboxyl-terminal peptides of ovalbumin and the NDV nucleocapsid protein, eluted in early ion-exchange fractions and were readily isolated in homogeneous form by subsequent reversed-phase HPLC. Some early ion-exchange fractions also contained singly charged peptides derived by "chymotryptic-like" cleavage, whilst other peptides eluted in these fractions due to their highly acidic character. Terminal sequences with additional basic residues were isolated from later eluting ion-exchange fractions. Peptides with this property included the blocked amino-terminus of the NDV nucleocapsid protein and a portion of the carboxyl-terminus of the NDV matrix protein. Hitherto undescribed polymorphism in the amino-terminal region of ovalbumin was revealed in this study. Truncated peptides from the carboxyl-terminus of the NDV matrix protein were also detected. The presence of these peptides could be a reflection of carboxyl-terminal processing of the matrix protein. The strategy described herein should be of general utility for selective microisolation of carboxyl-terminal peptides and blocked amino-terminal peptides from tryptic digests of proteins. PMID:8408428

  3. Isolation and molecular characterization of herpesvirus from cultured European eels Anguilla anguilla in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pen Heng; Pan, Yie Hour; Wu, Chein Ming; Kuo, Shu Ting; Chung, Huu Yun

    2002-07-01

    A herpesvirus has been isolated for the first time from a population of European eels Anguilla anguilla cultured in a recirculated system in Taiwan. Syncytia formation was detected in EP-1 (eel epidermis) cell cultures inoculated with cell-free homogenates prepared from both integument and visceral organs of moribund fish. Inoculation of homogenates onto EK (eel kidney) cell cultures induced giant cell formation. Subsequent passages produced a consistent and progressive cytopathic effect (CPE) in cell cultures. In this study, EP-1 cell cultures infected with EEHV (European eel herpesvirus) were examined using an electron microscope. Numerous nucleocapsids of about 100 nm in diameter were found within the nucleus of infected cells, whereas enveloped particles were observed within the cytoplasm. The mature viral particle, about 235 nm in diameter, had an electron-dense core with a hexagonal nucleocapsid surrounded by a coarse capsule. Histopathological examination of moribund fish showed epithelial hyperplasia with intracytoplasmic metabolic inclusions in the skin. Macrophage aggregates were found in liver, spleen, and kidney. A pair of primers designed from channel catfish virus and salmonid herpesvirus 1 was used in a polymerase chain reaction. A 402 bp fragment was amplified and cloned from genomic DNA of EEHV. The nucleotide homology was 99% (298 of 300) with DNA polymerase of eel herpesvirus (anguillid herpesvirus). EEHV nucleic acids were detected within melanomacrophages in the skin, liver, spleen and kidney by in situ hybridization (ISH). PMID:12180701

  4. The Trichoplusia ni single nucleopolyhedrovirus tn79 gene encodes a functional sulfhydryl oxidase enzyme that is able to support the replication of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus lacking the sulfhydryl oxidase ac92 gene

    PubMed Central

    Clem, Stian A.; Wu, Wenbi; Lorena Passarelli, A.

    2014-01-01

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ac92 is a conserved baculovirus gene with homology to flavin adenine dinucleotide-linked sulfhydryl oxidases. Its product, Ac92, is a functional sulfhydryl oxidase. Deletion of ac92 results in almost negligible levels of budded virus (BV) production, defects in occlusion-derived virus (ODV) co-envelopment and their inefficient incorporation into occlusion bodies. To determine the role of sulfhydryl oxidation in the production of BV, envelopment of nucleocapsids, and nucleocapsid incorporation into occlusion bodies, the Trichoplusia ni single nucleopolyhedrovirus ortholog, Tn79, was substituted for ac92. Tn79 was found to be an active sulfhydryl oxidase that substituted for Ac92, resulting in the production of infectious BV, albeit about 10-fold less than an ac92-containing virus. Tn79 rescued defects in ODV morphogenesis caused by a lack of ac92. Active Tn79 sulfhydryl oxidase activity is required for efficient BV production, ODV envelopment, and their subsequent incorporation into occlusion bodies in the absence of ac92. PMID:25010286

  5. Reassortment of Avian Influenza A/H6N6 Viruses from Live Poultry Markets in Guangdong, China.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Runyu; Zou, Lirong; Kang, Yinfeng; Wu, Jie; Zeng, Xianqiao; Lu, Jing; Liang, Lijun; Song, Yingchao; Zhang, Xin; Ni, Hanzhong; Lin, Jinyan; Liao, Ming; Ke, Changwen

    2016-01-01

    Since early 2013, H7N9-subtype avian influenza virus (AIV) has caused human infection in eastern China. To evaluate AIV contamination and the public risk of infection, we systematically implemented environmental sampling from live poultry markets in Guangdong Province. Through real-time polymerase chain reaction assays and next-generation sequencing, we generated full nucleotide sequences of all 10 H6N6 AIVs isolated during sampling. Focusing on sequence analyses of hemagglutinin genes of the 10 H6N6 AIVs revealed that the viruses were low pathogenic AIVs with the typical hemagglutinin cleavage site of P-Q-I-E-T-R-G. The hemagglutinin, neuraminidase, and nucleocapsid genes of nine AIVs were of ST2853-like (H6-subtype) lineage, ST192-like (N6-subtype) lineage, and HN573-like (H6-subtype) lineage, respectively; whereas the other five genes were of ST339-like (H6-subtype) lineage. However, the polymerase PB2 and nucleocapsid genes of one strain (HZ057) were of GS/GD-like (H5N1-subtype) and ST339-like lineages. Phylogenic analysis revealed that all eight genes of the 10 viruses belonged to Eurasian avian lineage. Altogether, the 10 AIVs were reassortants of different genetic groups of exchanges with the same virus subtype, thus illustrating the genetic diversity and complexity of H6N6-subtype AIVs in Guangdong Province. PMID:26903958

  6. Characterization of the endogenous protein kinase activity of the hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Kann, M; Thomssen, R; Köchel, H G; Gerlich, W H

    1993-01-01

    During the assembly of the nucleocapsid of the hepatitis B virus a protein kinase, probably of cellular origin, is encapsidated. This enzyme phosphorylates serine residue(s) localized within the lumen of the particle. By using purified, liver-derived core particles, we characterized the protein kinase activity in the presence of different ions and inhibitors. Controls were performed with cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and protein kinase C (PKC) and recombinant core particles. We showed that the endogenous protein kinase of the core particles was not inhibited by H89, a specific inhibitor of PKA. Staurosporine, a selective inhibitor of PKC inhibited the endogenous kinase activity only within the first minutes of the reaction. In contrast, quercetine, a selective inhibitor of the protein kinase M (PKM) did not inhibit during the first minutes but inhibited efficiently during later phases of incubation. PKM represents an enzymatically active proteolytic fragment of PKC. These results suggest that PKC is encapsidated into human core particles and is converted to PKM during the in vitro reaction. This conclusion implies the association of a protease activity localized with the HBV nucleocapsid inside liver-derived core particles. PMID:8260877

  7. Use of viral lysate antigen combined with recombinant protein in Western immunoblot assay as confirmatory test for serodiagnosis of severe acute respiratory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guan, Ming; Chen, Hsiao Ying; Tan, Phuay Heng; Shen, Shuo; Goh, Phuay-Yee; Tan, Yee-Joo; Pang, Peow Hoon; Lu, Yang; Fong, Priscilla Yiquan; Chin, Daria

    2004-11-01

    A Western immunoblot assay for confirmatory serodiagnosis of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) was developed utilizing viral lysate antigens combined with a recombinant nucleocapsid protein, GST-N (glutathione S-transferase-nucleocapsid) of the SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). The viral lysate antigens were separated by electrophoresis and transblotted onto nitrocellulose membranes. The resultant membrane was subsequently added with the GST-N recombinant protein at a specific location. The positions of bands corresponding to some of the structural proteins immobilized on the membrane were then located and verified with mouse or rabbit antisera specific to the respective proteins. The Western immunoblot assay was able to detect antibodies to SARS-CoV in all 40 serum specimens from SARS patients and differentiate the SARS-positive samples from those of the healthy donor or non-SARS patient controls (150 samples) when set criteria were followed. In addition, when the immunoblot was used to test samples considered falsely positive by an in-house-developed SARS-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, band patterns different from those with samples from SARS patients were obtained. PMID:15539520

  8. Production of the virus-like particles of nipah virus matrix protein in Pichia pastoris as diagnostic reagents.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Narcisse Ms; Ho, Kok Lian; Tey, Beng Ti; Tan, Chon Seng; Shafee, Norazizah; Tan, Wen Siang

    2016-07-01

    The matrix (M) protein of Nipah virus (NiV) is a peripheral protein that plays a vital role in the envelopment of nucleocapsid protein and acts as a bridge between the viral surface and the nucleocapsid proteins. The M protein is also proven to play an important role in production of virus-like particles (VLPs) and is essential for assembly and budding of NiV particles. The recombinant M protein produced in Escherichia coli assembled into VLPs in the absence of the viral surface proteins. However, the E. coli produced VLPs are smaller than the native virus particles. Therefore, the aims of this study were to produce NiV M protein in Pichia pastoris, to examine the structure of the VLPs formed, and to assess the potential of the VLPs as a diagnostic reagent. The M protein was successfully expressed in P. pastoris and was detected with anti-myc antibody using Western blotting. The VLPs formed by the recombinant M protein were purified with sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography (IMAC). Immunogold staining and transmission electron microscopy confirmed that the M protein assembled into VLPs as large as 200 nm. ELISA revealed that the NiV M protein produced in P. pastoris reacted strongly with positive NiV sera demonstrating its potential as a diagnostic reagent. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1038-1045, 2016. PMID:27088434

  9. Epizootiology of Tacaribe Serocomplex Viruses (Arenaviridae) Associated with Neotomine Rodents (Cricetidae, Neotominae) in Southern California

    PubMed Central

    Milazzo, Mary Louise; Cajimat, Maria N. B.; Mauldin, Matthew R.; Bennett, Stephen G.; Hess, Barry D.; Rood, Michael P.; Conlan, Christopher A.; Nguyen, Kiet; Wekesa, J. Wakoli; Ramos, Ronald D.; Bradley, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to advance our knowledge of the epizootiology of Bear Canyon virus and other Tacaribe serocomplex viruses (Arenaviridae) associated with wild rodents in California. Antibody (immunoglobulin G [IgG]) to a Tacaribe serocomplex virus was found in 145 (3.6%) of 3977 neotomine rodents (Cricetidae: Neotominae) captured in six counties in southern California. The majority (122 or 84.1%) of the 145 antibody-positive rodents were big-eared woodrats (Neotoma macrotis) or California mice (Peromyscus californicus). The 23 other antibody-positive rodents included a white-throated woodrat (N. albigula), desert woodrat (N. lepida), Bryant's woodrats (N. bryanti), brush mice (P. boylii), cactus mice (P. eremicus), and deer mice (P. maniculatus). Analyses of viral nucleocapsid protein gene sequence data indicated that Bear Canyon virus is associated with N. macrotis and/or P. californicus in Santa Barbara County, Los Angeles County, Orange County, and western Riverside County. Together, analyses of field data and antibody prevalence data indicated that N. macrotis is the principal host of Bear Canyon virus. Last, the analyses of viral nucleocapsid protein gene sequence data suggested that the Tacaribe serocomplex virus associated with N. albigula and N. lepida in eastern Riverside County represents a novel species (tentatively named “Palo Verde virus”) in the genus Arenavirus. PMID:25700047

  10. Antiviral Indolosesquiterpenoid Xiamycins C-E from a Halophilic Actinomycete.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong-Hwan; Ha, Thi-Kim-Quy; Oh, Won Keun; Shin, Jongheon; Oh, Dong-Chan

    2016-01-22

    New metabolites, xiamycins C-E (1-3), were isolated from a Streptomyces. sp (#HK18) culture inhabiting the topsoil in a Korean solar saltern. The planar structures of the xiamycins C-E were elucidated as carbazole-bearing indolosesquiterpenoids using a combined analysis of NMR, MS, UV, and IR spectroscopic data. The absolute configurations of these new compounds were determined by analyses of NOESY and ECD data. When the xiamycins were tested for inhibitory activity on porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), xiamycin D (2) showed the strongest inhibitory effect on PEDV replication (EC50 = 0.93 μM) with low cytotoxicity (CC50 = 56.03 μM), thus displaying a high selective index (60.31). Quantitative real-time PCR data revealed the inhibitory effect of 2 on genes encoding essential structural proteins (GP6 nucleocapsid, GP2 spike, and GP5 membrane) for PEDV replication in a dose-dependent manner. The antiviral activity of xiamycin D (2) was also supported by both Western blotting of the GP2 spike and GP6 nucleocapsid protein synthesis of PEDV. Therefore, xiamycin D shows the potential of indolosesquiterpenoids as new and promising chemical skeletons against PEDV-related viruses. PMID:26698879

  11. Viral infection controlled by a calcium-dependent lipid-binding module in ALIX.

    PubMed

    Bissig, Christin; Lenoir, Marc; Velluz, Marie-Claire; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael; Gruenberg, Jean

    2013-05-28

    ALIX plays a role in nucleocapsid release during viral infection, as does lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA). However, the mechanism remains unclear. Here we report that LBPA is recognized within an exposed site in ALIX Bro1 domain predicted by MODA, an algorithm for discovering membrane-docking areas in proteins. LBPA interactions revealed a strict requirement for a structural calcium tightly bound near the lipid interaction site. Unlike other calcium- and phospholipid-binding proteins, the all-helical triangle-shaped fold of the Bro1 domain confers selectivity for LBPA via a pair of hydrophobic residues in a flexible loop, which undergoes a conformational change upon membrane association. Both LBPA and calcium binding are necessary for endosome association and virus infection, as are ALIX ESCRT binding and dimerization capacity. We conclude that LBPA recruits ALIX onto late endosomes via the calcium-bound Bro1 domain, triggering a conformational change in ALIX to mediate the delivery of viral nucleocapsids to the cytosol during infection. PMID:23664863

  12. Structural and dynamic characterization of the upper part of the HIV-1 cTAR DNA hairpin.

    PubMed

    Zargarian, Loussiné; Kanevsky, Igor; Bazzi, Ali; Boynard, Jonathan; Chaminade, Françoise; Fossé, Philippe; Mauffret, Olivier

    2009-07-01

    First strand transfer is essential for HIV-1 reverse transcription. During this step, the TAR RNA hairpin anneals to the cTAR DNA hairpin; this annealing reaction is promoted by the nucleocapsid protein and involves an initial loop-loop interaction between the apical loops of TAR and cTAR. Using NMR and probing methods, we investigated the structural and dynamic properties of the top half of the cTAR DNA (mini-cTAR). We show that the upper stem located between the apical and the internal loops is stable, but that the lower stem of mini-cTAR is unstable. The residues of the internal loop undergo slow motions at the NMR time-scale that are consistent with conformational exchange phenomena. In contrast, residues of the apical loop undergo fast motions. The lower stem is destabilized by the slow interconversion processes in the internal loop, and thus the internal loop is responsible for asymmetric destabilization of mini-cTAR. These findings are consistent with the functions of cTAR in first strand transfer: its apical loop is suitably exposed to interact with the apical loop of TAR RNA and its lower stem is significantly destabilized to facilitate the subsequent action of the nucleocapsid protein which promotes the annealing reaction. PMID:19417069

  13. Structural and dynamic characterization of the upper part of the HIV-1 cTAR DNA hairpin

    PubMed Central

    Zargarian, Loussiné; Kanevsky, Igor; Bazzi, Ali; Boynard, Jonathan; Chaminade, Françoise; Fossé, Philippe; Mauffret, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    First strand transfer is essential for HIV-1 reverse transcription. During this step, the TAR RNA hairpin anneals to the cTAR DNA hairpin; this annealing reaction is promoted by the nucleocapsid protein and involves an initial loop–loop interaction between the apical loops of TAR and cTAR. Using NMR and probing methods, we investigated the structural and dynamic properties of the top half of the cTAR DNA (mini-cTAR). We show that the upper stem located between the apical and the internal loops is stable, but that the lower stem of mini-cTAR is unstable. The residues of the internal loop undergo slow motions at the NMR time-scale that are consistent with conformational exchange phenomena. In contrast, residues of the apical loop undergo fast motions. The lower stem is destabilized by the slow interconversion processes in the internal loop, and thus the internal loop is responsible for asymmetric destabilization of mini-cTAR. These findings are consistent with the functions of cTAR in first strand transfer: its apical loop is suitably exposed to interact with the apical loop of TAR RNA and its lower stem is significantly destabilized to facilitate the subsequent action of the nucleocapsid protein which promotes the annealing reaction. PMID:19417069

  14. Antigenic determinants and functional domains in core antigen and e antigen from hepatitis B virus

    SciTech Connect

    Salfeld, J.; Pfaff, E.; Noah, M.; Schaller, H.

    1989-02-01

    The precore/core gene of hepatitis B virus directs the synthesis of two polypeptides, the 21-kilodalton subunit (p21c) forming the viral nucleocapsid (serologically defined as core antigen (HBcAg)) and a secreted processed protein (p17e, serologically defined as HBe antigen (HBeAg)). Although most of their primary amino acid sequences are identical, HBcAg and HBeAg display different antigenic properties that are widely used in hepatitis B virus diagnosis. To locate and to characterize the corresponding determinants, segments of the core gene were expressed in Escherichia coli and probed with a panel of polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies in radioimmunoassays or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, Western blots, and competition assays. Three distinct major determinants were characterized. It is postulated that HBcAg and HBeAg share common basic three-dimensional structure exposing the common linear determinant HBe1 but that they differ in the presentation of two conformational determinants that are either introduced (HBc) or masked (HBe2) in the assembled core. The simultaneous presentation of HBe1 and HBc, two distinctly different antigenic determinants with overlapping amino acid sequences, is interpreted to indicate the presence of slightly differently folded, stable conformational states of p21c in the hepatitis virus nucleocapsid.

  15. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ac142, a core gene that is essential for BV production and ODV envelopment

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, Christina B.; Da, Xiaojiang; Donly, Cam; Theilmann, David A.

    2008-03-15

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) ac142 is a baculovirus core gene and encodes a protein previously shown to associate with occlusion-derived virus (ODV). To determine its role in the baculovirus life cycle, we used the AcMNPV bacmid system to generate an ac142 deletion virus (AcBAC{sup ac142KO-PH-GFP}). Fluorescence and light microscopy revealed that AcBAC{sup ac142KO-PH-GFP} exhibits a single-cell infection phenotype. Titration assays and Western blot confirmed that AcBAC{sup ac142KO-PH-GFP} is unable to produce budded virus (BV). However, viral DNA replication is unaffected and the development of occlusion bodies in AcBAC{sup ac142KO-PH-GFP}-transfected cells evidenced progression to very late phases of the viral infection. Western blot analysis showed that AC142 is expressed in the cytoplasm and nucleus throughout infection and that it is a structural component of BV and ODV which localizes to nucleocapsids. Electron microscopy indicates that ac142 is required for nucleocapsid envelopment to form ODV and their subsequent occlusion, a fundamental process to all baculoviruses.

  16. A new nidovirus (NamDinh virus NDiV): Its ultrastructural characterization in the C6/36 mosquito cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Thuy, Nguyen Thanh; Huy, Tran Quang; Nga, Phan Thi; Morita, Kouichi; Dunia, Irene; Benedetti, Lucio

    2013-09-15

    We describe the ultrastructure of the NamDinh virus (NDiV), a new member of the order Nidovirales grown in the C6/36 mosquito cell line. Uninfected and NDiV-infected cells were investigated by electron microscopy 24–48 h after infection. The results show that the viral nucleocapsid-like particles form clusters concentrated in the vacuoles, the endoplasmic reticulum, and are scattered in the cytoplasm. Mature virions of NDiV were released as budding particles on the cell surface where viral components appear to lie beneath and along the plasma membrane. Free homogeneous virus particles were obtained by ultracentrifugation on sucrose gradients of culture fluids. The size of the round-shaped particles with a complete internal structure was 80 nm in diameter. This is the first study to provide information on the morphogenesis and ultrastructure of the first insect nidovirus NDiV, a missing evolutionary link in the emergence of the viruses with the largest RNA genomes. - Highlights: • NamDinh virus (NDiV), a new member of the order Nidovirales was tested in cultured cell line. • The morphogenesis and ultrastructure of NDiV were investigated by electron microscopy. • The viral nucleocapsid-like particles clustered and scattered in the cytoplasm. • NDiVs were released as budding particles on the cell surface. • The size of the viral particles with a complete internal structure was 80 nm in diameter.

  17. Occurrence of different types of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in fish.

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Y L; Engelking, H M; Leong, J C

    1986-01-01

    The virion protein patterns of 71 isolates of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) from the Pacific Northwest were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of [35S]-methionine-labeled virus. This analysis led to the classification of these virus isolates into four or more types. Type 1 virus was characterized by a nucleocapsid protein with an approximate molecular weight of 40,500. Type 2 and type 3 viruses have nucleocapsid proteins with molecular weights of 42,800 and 43,250, respectively. Type 2 virus was responsible for the recent epizootics of IHNV among fish in the lower Columbia River. The California IHNV isolates were type 3 with the exception of some of those isolated from fish at the Coleman Hatchery on the Sacramento River. These Coleman Hatchery isolates belonged to a type 4 virus group characterized by a larger glycoprotein of approximately 70,000 molecular weight. All other viruses examined had glycoproteins of 67,000 molecular weight. The "type 5" virus isolates were grouped together because they were not sufficiently distinct to warrant classification into a separate type. These findings have been useful in determining that a particular virus type is characteristic for a geographic area and will infect many different salmonid species in that area and the same type isolated from parental fish is responsible for the subsequent outbreak of the diseases in progeny. Images PMID:3789723

  18. The structural biology of PRRSV.

    PubMed

    Dokland, Terje

    2010-12-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is an enveloped, positive-sense single-stranded RNA virus belonging to the Arteriviridae family. Arteriviruses and coronaviruses are grouped together in the order Nidovirales, based on similarities in genome organization and expression strategy. Over the past decade, crystal structures of several viral proteins, electron microscopic studies of the virion, as well as biochemical and in vivo studies on protein-protein interactions have led to a greatly increased understanding of PRRSV structural biology. At this point, crystal structures are available for the viral proteases NSP1α, NSP1β and NSP4 and the nucleocapsid protein, N. The NSP1α and NSP1β structures have revealed additional non-protease domains that may be involved in modulation of host functions. The N protein forms a dimer with a novel fold so far only seen in PRRSV and other nidoviruses. Cryo-electron tomographic studies have shown the three-dimensional organization of the PRRSV virion and suggest that the viral nucleocapsid has an asymmetric, linear arrangement, rather than the isometric core previously described. Together, these studies have revealed a closer structural relationship between arteri- and coronaviruses than previously anticipated. PMID:20692304

  19. Topoisomerase I activity associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) particles and equine infectious anemia virus core.

    PubMed Central

    Priel, E; Showalter, S D; Roberts, M; Oroszlan, S; Segal, S; Aboud, M; Blair, D G

    1990-01-01

    In the present study, we found a topoisomerase I (topo I) activity in two strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) particles. The topo I activity was located in the EIAV cores and differed from the cellular topo I in its ionic requirements and response to ATP, indicating that these were two distinct forms of this enzyme. Topo I activity was removed from the viral lysates and viral cores by anti-topo I antiserum. The only protein recognized by this antiserum was an 11.5 kd protein in HIV lysate and 11 kd in EIAV lysate. We showed that the 11 kd protein recognized by the anti-topo I antiserum is the EIAV p11 nucleocapsid protein. Furthermore, purified topo I protein blocked the binding of the antibodies to the p11 protein and vice versa, purified p11 protein blocked the binding of these antibodies to the cellular topo I. These results suggest that the EIAV p11 nucleocapsid protein and the cellular topo I share similar epitopes. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:2174357

  20. Intracellular transport and egress of hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Blondot, Marie-Lise; Bruss, Volker; Kann, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) replicates its genomic information in the nucleus via transcription and therefore has to deliver its partially double stranded DNA genome into the nucleus. Like other viruses with a nuclear replication phase, HBV genomes are transported inside the viral capsids first through the cytoplasm towards the nuclear envelope. Following the arrival at the nuclear pore, the capsids are transported through, using classical cellular nuclear import pathways. The arrest of nuclear import at the nucleoplasmic side of the nuclear pore is unique, however, and is where the capsids efficiently disassemble leading to genome release. In the latter phase of the infection, newly formed nucleocapsids in the cytosol have to move to budding sites at intracellular membranes carrying the three viral envelope proteins. Capsids containing single stranded nucleic acid are not enveloped, in contrast to empty and double stranded DNA containing capsids. A small linear domain in the large envelope protein and two areas on the capsid surface have been mapped, where point mutations strongly block nucleocapsid envelopment. It is possible that these domains are involved in the envelope - with capsid interactions driving the budding process. Like other enveloped viruses, HBV also uses the cellular endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) machinery for catalyzing budding through the membrane and away from the cytosol. PMID:27084037

  1. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus Ac92 (ORF92, P33) is required for budded virus production and multiply enveloped occlusion-derived virus formation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenbi; Passarelli, A Lorena

    2010-12-01

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus orf92 (p33), ac92, is one of 31 genes carried in all sequenced baculovirus genomes, thus suggesting an essential function. Ac92 has homology to the family of flavin adenine dinucleotide-linked sulfhydryl oxidases and is related to the ERV/ALR family of sulfhydryl oxidases. The role of ac92 during virus replication is unknown. Ac92 was associated with the envelope of both budded and occlusion-derived virus (ODV). To investigate the role of Ac92 during virus replication, an ac92-knockout bacmid was generated through homologous recombination in Escherichia coli. Titration and plaque assays showed no virus spread in ac92-knockout bacmid DNA-transfected insect cells. Deletion of ac92 did not affect viral DNA replication. However, ac92-knockout bacmid DNA-transfected cells lacked multiply enveloped occlusion-derived nucleocapsids; instead, singly enveloped nucleocapsids were detected. To gain insight into the requirement for sulfhydryl oxidation during virus replication, a virus was constructed in which the Ac92 C(155)XXC(158) amino acids, important for sulfhydryl oxidase activity, were mutated to A(155)XXA(158). The mutant virus exhibited a phenotype similar to that of the knockout virus, suggesting that the C-X-X-C motif was essential for sulfhydryl oxidase activity and responsible for the altered ODV phenotype. PMID:20861245

  2. Apical Budding of a Recombinant Influenza A Virus Expressing a Hemagglutinin Protein with a Basolateral Localization Signal

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Rosalia; Rodriguez-Boulan, Enrique; Palese, Peter; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2002-01-01

    Influenza virions bud preferentially from the apical plasma membrane of infected epithelial cells, by enveloping viral nucleocapsids located in the cytosol with its viral integral membrane proteins, i.e., hemagglutinin (HA), neuraminidase (NA), and M2 proteins, located at the plasma membrane. Because individually expressed HA, NA, and M2 proteins are targeted to the apical surface of the cell, guided by apical sorting signals in their transmembrane or cytoplasmic domains, it has been proposed that the polarized budding of influenza virions depends on the interaction of nucleocapsids and matrix proteins with the cytoplasmic domains of HA, NA, and/or M2 proteins. Since HA is the major protein component of the viral envelope, its polarized surface delivery may be a major force that drives polarized viral budding. We investigated this hypothesis by infecting MDCK cells with a transfectant influenza virus carrying a mutant form of HA (C560Y) with a basolateral sorting signal in its cytoplasmic domain. C560Y HA was expressed nonpolarly on the surface of infected MDCK cells. Interestingly, viral budding remained apical in C560Y virus-infected cells, and so did the location of NP and M1 proteins at late times of infection. These results are consistent with a model in which apical viral budding is a shared function of various viral components rather than a role of the major viral envelope glycoprotein HA. PMID:11884578

  3. Characterization of Nuclear Polyhedrosis Virus DNAs

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Max D.; Anderson, David L.

    1973-01-01

    The nuclear polyhedrosis virus DNAs characterized and compared in this study consist of the singly-enveloped nucleocapsids (SNPV) of Trichoplusia ni and the bundles of nucleocapsids common to a single envelope (MNPV) from Spodoptera frugiperda and Rachiplusia ou. The SNPV and MNPV DNAs are very similar in hydrodynamic properties and molecular weights. In addition, the NPV DNAs are similar in size to those extracted from the granulosis viruses that infect T. ni and S. frugiperda. As isolated from purified virus or directly from occluded virus, the nuclear polyhedrosis virus DNAs consist of a mixture of about 20 to 30% double-stranded covalently closed molecules and approximately 60% relaxed circles, with less than 10% in linear duplex form. The molecular weights of all nuclear polyhedrosis virus DNAs as compared in this study are slightly smaller than those of T4 bacteriophage DNA and perhaps slightly smaller than those of the granulosis virus DNAs. The best estimates of these molecular weights by neutral sucrose sedimentation for the nuclear polyhedrosis viruses range from 90 to 100 × 106 relative to a size of 108 × 106 for T4 DNA. The base compositions of the nuclear polyhedrosis viruses that infect T. ni and S. frugiperda are compared with the respective insect host DNAs. Images PMID:4761726

  4. Characterization of a Nuclear Polyhedrosis Virus Isolated from Diseased Gonometa podocarpi (Lepidoptera:Lasiocampidae)

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Norman F.; Armstrong, Terry; Green, Bernadette; Brown, David; Hibbin, Jill; Kelly, David C.; Tinsley, Thomas W.; Aloo, Theresa C.

    1981-01-01

    Gonometa podocarpi is an important pest of several species of pine in East Africa, and large numbers of trees in plantations in Kenya were partially or completely defoliated by the larval stage of this insect. After the infestation in the Mt. Elgon region, large numbers of dead and moribund larvae were found on the ground. Examination of extracts of these larvae demonstrated the presence of an occluded virus. Electron microscopy of purified sectioned polyhedra demonstrated the presence of virus particles containing from 1 to 12 nucleocapsids. Purification of virus particles from polyhedra was accomplished by using alkali solubilization and sucrose gradient centrifugation. Virus particles contained 15 proteins as determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Detergent solubilization of the virus particles released polyhedra containing one major structural protein. Electron microscopy of purified virus particles and nucleocapsids demonstrated them to be similar in structure to previously recorded nuclear polyhedrosis viruses. The viral deoxyribonucleic acid was extracted and spread for electron microscopy and was determined to have a size of approximately 80 × 106 daltons. Images PMID:16345830

  5. Replication of parainfluenza (Sendai) virus in isolated rat pulmonary type II alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Castleman, W. L.; Northrop, P. J.; McAllister, P. K.

    1989-01-01

    The major objectives of this study were to determine whether alveolar type II epithelial cells isolated from rat lung and maintained in tissue culture would support productive replication of parainfluenza type 1 (Sendai) virus and to determine whether isolated type II cells from neonatal (5-day-old) rats that are more susceptible to viral-induced alveolar dysplasia supported viral replication to a greater extent than those from weanling (25-day-old) rats. Isolated and cultured type II cells from neonatal and weanling rats that were inoculated with Sendai virus supported productive replication as indicated by ultrastructural identification of budding virions and viral nucleocapsids in type II cells and by demonstration of rising titers of infectious virus from inoculated type II cell cultures. Alveolar macrophages from neonatal and weanling rats also supported viral replication, although infectious viral titers in macrophage cultures were lower than those from type II cell cultures. Only minor differences were detected between viral titers from neonatal and weanling type II epithelial cell cultures. Higher densities of viral nucleocapsids were observed in neonatal type II cells than in those from weanling rats. The results indicate that isolated type II alveolar epithelial cells support productive replication of parainfluenza virus and that type II cells are probably more efficient in supporting productive viral replication than are alveolar macrophages. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2541612

  6. Structural requirements for assembly and homotypic interactions of the hepatitis C virus core protein.

    PubMed

    Kim, Meehyein; Ha, Youngju; Park, Hae-Joon

    2006-12-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is involved in the assembly of nucleocapsid particles, as well as regulation of cellular and viral gene expression. To investigate the biological properties of the viral core protein and viral RNA assembly, two recombinant core proteins, the mature core protein (named C179) and a C-terminal truncated protein (named C124), were expressed and purified. To confirm their ability to generate viral particles, the production of nucleocapsid-like particles was monitored using transmission electron microscopy (EM). The EM analysis revealed that exposure of these proteins to the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of the viral RNA resulted in generation of spherical particles of 30-140nm in diameter. Interestingly, a cross-linking analysis revealed that C124 required an RNA component for homotypic interactions. In contrast, C179 successfully assembled in the absence of nucleic acids. Additionally, RNA-mediated conversion of the C124 structure into a more stable state was maintained even after RNase treatment. Therefore, our results indicate that the basic N-terminal domain of the viral core protein utilizes RNA components to induce conformational changes or efficient homotypic interactions, while the C-terminal domain may contain key peptide sequences for initiating spontaneous multimerization at the early stages of viral assembly. PMID:16949699

  7. A virus of hyperthermophilic archaea with a unique architecture among DNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Rensen, Elena Ilka; Mochizuki, Tomohiro; Quemin, Emmanuelle; Schouten, Stefan; Krupovic, Mart; Prangishvili, David

    2016-03-01

    Viruses package their genetic material in diverse ways. Most known strategies include encapsulation of nucleic acids into spherical or filamentous virions with icosahedral or helical symmetry, respectively. Filamentous viruses with dsDNA genomes are currently associated exclusively with Archaea. Here, we describe a filamentous hyperthermophilic archaeal virus, Pyrobaculum filamentous virus 1 (PFV1), with a type of virion organization not previously observed in DNA viruses. The PFV1 virion, 400 ± 20 × 32 ± 3 nm, contains an envelope and an inner core consisting of two structural units: a rod-shaped helical nucleocapsid formed of two 14-kDa major virion proteins and a nucleocapsid-encompassing protein sheath composed of a single major virion protein of 18 kDa. The virion organization of PFV1 is superficially similar to that of negative-sense RNA viruses of the family Filoviridae, including Ebola virus and Marburg virus. The linear dsDNA of PFV1 carries 17,714 bp, including 60-bp-long terminal inverted repeats, and contains 39 predicted ORFs, most of which do not show similarities to sequences in public databases. PFV1 is a lytic virus that completely disrupts the host cell membrane at the end of the infection cycle. PMID:26884161

  8. In Vitro Assembly of Virus-Like Particles of a Gammaretrovirus, the Murine Leukemia Virus XMRV

    PubMed Central

    Hadravová, Romana; de Marco, Alex; Ulbrich, Pavel; Štokrová, Jitka; Doležal, Michal; Pichová, Iva; Ruml, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    Immature retroviral particles are assembled by self-association of the structural polyprotein precursor Gag. During maturation the Gag polyprotein is proteolytically cleaved, yielding mature structural proteins, matrix (MA), capsid (CA), and nucleocapsid (NC), that reassemble into a mature viral particle. Proteolytic cleavage causes the N terminus of CA to fold back to form a β-hairpin, anchored by an internal salt bridge between the N-terminal proline and the inner aspartate. Using an in vitro assembly system of capsid-nucleocapsid protein (CANC), we studied the formation of virus-like particles (VLP) of a gammaretrovirus, the xenotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV)-related virus (XMRV). We show here that, unlike other retroviruses, XMRV CA and CANC do not assemble tubular particles characteristic of mature assembly. The prevention of β-hairpin formation by the deletion of either the N-terminal proline or 10 initial amino acids enabled the assembly of ΔProCANC or Δ10CANC into immature-like spherical particles. Detailed three-dimensional (3D) structural analysis of these particles revealed that below a disordered N-terminal CA layer, the C terminus of CA assembles a typical immature lattice, which is linked by rod-like densities with the RNP. PMID:22090120

  9. A virus of hyperthermophilic archaea with a unique architecture among DNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Rensen, Elena Ilka; Mochizuki, Tomohiro; Quemin, Emmanuelle; Schouten, Stefan; Krupovic, Mart; Prangishvili, David

    2016-01-01

    Viruses package their genetic material in diverse ways. Most known strategies include encapsulation of nucleic acids into spherical or filamentous virions with icosahedral or helical symmetry, respectively. Filamentous viruses with dsDNA genomes are currently associated exclusively with Archaea. Here, we describe a filamentous hyperthermophilic archaeal virus, Pyrobaculum filamentous virus 1 (PFV1), with a type of virion organization not previously observed in DNA viruses. The PFV1 virion, 400 ± 20 × 32 ± 3 nm, contains an envelope and an inner core consisting of two structural units: a rod-shaped helical nucleocapsid formed of two 14-kDa major virion proteins and a nucleocapsid-encompassing protein sheath composed of a single major virion protein of 18 kDa. The virion organization of PFV1 is superficially similar to that of negative-sense RNA viruses of the family Filoviridae, including Ebola virus and Marburg virus. The linear dsDNA of PFV1 carries 17,714 bp, including 60-bp-long terminal inverted repeats, and contains 39 predicted ORFs, most of which do not show similarities to sequences in public databases. PFV1 is a lytic virus that completely disrupts the host cell membrane at the end of the infection cycle. PMID:26884161

  10. Characterisation of immune responses and protective efficacy in mice after immunisation with Rift Valley Fever virus cDNA constructs

    PubMed Central

    Lagerqvist, Nina; Näslund, Jonas; Lundkvist, Åke; Bouloy, Michèle; Ahlm, Clas; Bucht, Göran

    2009-01-01

    Background Affecting both livestock and humans, Rift Valley Fever is considered as one of the most important viral zoonoses in Africa. However, no licensed vaccines or effective treatments are yet available for human use. Naked DNA vaccines are an interesting approach since the virus is highly infectious and existing attenuated Rift Valley Fever virus vaccine strains display adverse effects in animal trials. In this study, gene-gun immunisations with cDNA encoding structural proteins of the Rift Valley Fever virus were evaluated in mice. The induced immune responses were analysed for the ability to protect mice against virus challenge. Results Immunisation with cDNA encoding the nucleocapsid protein induced strong humoral and lymphocyte proliferative immune responses, and virus neutralising antibodies were acquired after vaccination with cDNA encoding the glycoproteins. Even though complete protection was not achieved by genetic immunisation, four out of eight, and five out of eight mice vaccinated with cDNA encoding the nucleocapsid protein or the glycoproteins, respectively, displayed no clinical signs of infection after challenge. In contrast, all fourteen control animals displayed clinical manifestations of Rift Valley Fever after challenge. Conclusion The appearance of Rift Valley Fever associated clinical signs were significantly decreased among the DNA vaccinated mice and further adjustment of this strategy may result in full protection against Rift Valley Fever. PMID:19149901

  11. A novel mu-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on recombinant proteins for sensitive and specific diagnosis of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Zöller, L G; Yang, S; Gött, P; Bautz, E K; Darai, G

    1993-01-01

    Hantavirus nucleocapsid protein has recently been identified as a major antigen inducing an early and long-lasting humoral immune response in patients with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. A mu-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay utilizing recombinant nucleocapsid proteins of Hantavirus strains Hantaan 76-118 (Hantaan serotype) and CG 18-20 (Puumala serotype) as diagnostic antigens and specific monoclonal antibodies as the detection system has been developed. Histidine-tailed recombinant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified in a single step by affinity chromatography on a nickel-chelate resin. The assay was evaluated with a panel of sera from patients with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome originating from various geographic regions. The overall sensitivity of the mu-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (both recombinant antigens) was 100%, and its specificity was also found to be 100%. Immunoglobulin M antibodies were detected as early as on day 3, and maximum titers were obtained between days 8 and 25 after onset of the disease. The assay was regularly found to be positive within 3 to 4 months but in some cases up to 2 years after the acute phase of the disease. Images PMID:8099085

  12. Mapping of the Regions Involved in Homotypic Interactions of Tula Hantavirus N Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kaukinen, Pasi; Vaheri, Antti; Plyusnin, Alexander

    2003-01-01

    Hantavirus nucleocapsid (N) protein has been suggested to form homodimers and homotrimers that are further integrated into the nucleocapsid filaments around the viral RNA. Here we report detailed mapping of the regions involved in the homotypic N protein interactions in Tula hantavirus (TULV). Peptide scan screening was used to define the interaction regions, and the mammalian two-hybrid assay was used for the functional analysis of N protein mutants. To study linear regions responsible for N protein interaction(s), we used peptide scanning in which N peptides synthesized on membranes recognize recombinant TULV N protein. The data showed that the N protein bound to membrane-bound peptides comprising amino acids 13 to 30 and 41 to 57 in the N-terminal part and 340 to 379, 391 to 407, and 410 to 419 in the C-terminal part of the molecule. Further mapping of the interaction regions by alanine scanning indicated the importance of basic amino acids along the N protein and especially asparagine-394, histidine-395, and phenyalanine-396 in forming the binding interface. Analysis of truncated mutants in the mammalian two-hybrid assay showed that N-terminal amino acids 1 to 43 are involved in and C-terminal amino acids 393 to 398 (VNHFHL) are absolutely crucial for the homotypic interactions. Furthermore, our data suggested a tail-to-tail and head-to-head binding scheme for the N proteins. PMID:14512541

  13. Measles virus genetic evolution throughout an imported epidemic outbreak in a highly vaccinated population.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Alía, Miguel Ángel; Fernández-Muñoz, Rafael; Casasnovas, José María; Porras-Mansilla, Rebeca; Serrano-Pardo, Ángela; Pagán, Israel; Ordobás, María; Ramírez, Rosa; Celma, María Luisa

    2015-01-22

    Measles virus circulates endemically in African and Asian large urban populations, causing outbreaks worldwide in populations with up-to-95% immune protection. We studied the natural genetic variability of genotype B3.1 in a population with 95% vaccine coverage throughout an imported six month measles outbreak. From first pass viral isolates of 47 patients we performed direct sequencing of genomic cDNA. Whilst no variation from index case sequence occurred in the Nucleocapsid gene hyper-variable carboxy end, in the Hemagglutinin gene, main target for neutralizing antibodies, we observed gradual nucleotide divergence from index case along the outbreak (0% to 0.380%, average 0.138%) with the emergence of transient and persistent non-synonymous and synonymous mutations. Little or no variation was observed between the index and last outbreak cases in Phosphoprotein, Nucleocapsid, Matrix and Fusion genes. Most of the H non-synonymous mutations were mapped on the protein surface near antigenic and receptors binding sites. We estimated a MV-Hemagglutinin nucleotide substitution rate of 7.28 × 10-6 substitutions/site/day by a Bayesian phylogenetic analysis. The dN/dS analysis did not suggest significant immune or other selective pressures on the H gene during the outbreak. These results emphasize the usefulness of MV-H sequence analysis in measles epidemiological surveillance and elimination programs, and in detection of potentially emergence of measles virus neutralization-resistant mutants. PMID:25445338

  14. Reassortment of Avian Influenza A/H6N6 Viruses from Live Poultry Markets in Guangdong, China

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Runyu; Zou, Lirong; Kang, Yinfeng; Wu, Jie; Zeng, Xianqiao; Lu, Jing; Liang, Lijun; Song, Yingchao; Zhang, Xin; Ni, Hanzhong; Lin, Jinyan; Liao, Ming; Ke, Changwen

    2016-01-01

    Since early 2013, H7N9-subtype avian influenza virus (AIV) has caused human infection in eastern China. To evaluate AIV contamination and the public risk of infection, we systematically implemented environmental sampling from live poultry markets in Guangdong Province. Through real-time polymerase chain reaction assays and next-generation sequencing, we generated full nucleotide sequences of all 10 H6N6 AIVs isolated during sampling. Focusing on sequence analyses of hemagglutinin genes of the 10 H6N6 AIVs revealed that the viruses were low pathogenic AIVs with the typical hemagglutinin cleavage site of P-Q-I-E-T-R-G. The hemagglutinin, neuraminidase, and nucleocapsid genes of nine AIVs were of ST2853-like (H6-subtype) lineage, ST192-like (N6-subtype) lineage, and HN573-like (H6-subtype) lineage, respectively; whereas the other five genes were of ST339-like (H6-subtype) lineage. However, the polymerase PB2 and nucleocapsid genes of one strain (HZ057) were of GS/GD-like (H5N1-subtype) and ST339-like lineages. Phylogenic analysis revealed that all eight genes of the 10 viruses belonged to Eurasian avian lineage. Altogether, the 10 AIVs were reassortants of different genetic groups of exchanges with the same virus subtype, thus illustrating the genetic diversity and complexity of H6N6-subtype AIVs in Guangdong Province. PMID:26903958

  15. Epizootiology of Tacaribe serocomplex viruses (Arenaviridae) associated with neotomine rodents (Cricetidae, Neotominae) in southern California.

    PubMed

    Milazzo, Mary Louise; Cajimat, Maria N B; Mauldin, Matthew R; Bennett, Stephen G; Hess, Barry D; Rood, Michael P; Conlan, Christopher A; Nguyen, Kiet; Wekesa, J Wakoli; Ramos, Ronald D; Bradley, Robert D; Fulhorst, Charles F

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to advance our knowledge of the epizootiology of Bear Canyon virus and other Tacaribe serocomplex viruses (Arenaviridae) associated with wild rodents in California. Antibody (immunoglobulin G [IgG]) to a Tacaribe serocomplex virus was found in 145 (3.6%) of 3977 neotomine rodents (Cricetidae: Neotominae) captured in six counties in southern California. The majority (122 or 84.1%) of the 145 antibody-positive rodents were big-eared woodrats (Neotoma macrotis) or California mice (Peromyscus californicus). The 23 other antibody-positive rodents included a white-throated woodrat (N. albigula), desert woodrat (N. lepida), Bryant's woodrats (N. bryanti), brush mice (P. boylii), cactus mice (P. eremicus), and deer mice (P. maniculatus). Analyses of viral nucleocapsid protein gene sequence data indicated that Bear Canyon virus is associated with N. macrotis and/or P. californicus in Santa Barbara County, Los Angeles County, Orange County, and western Riverside County. Together, analyses of field data and antibody prevalence data indicated that N. macrotis is the principal host of Bear Canyon virus. Last, the analyses of viral nucleocapsid protein gene sequence data suggested that the Tacaribe serocomplex virus associated with N. albigula and N. lepida in eastern Riverside County represents a novel species (tentatively named "Palo Verde virus") in the genus Arenavirus. PMID:25700047

  16. HITS-CLIP yields genome-wide insights into brain alternative RNA processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licatalosi, Donny D.; Mele, Aldo; Fak, John J.; Ule, Jernej; Kayikci, Melis; Chi, Sung Wook; Clark, Tyson A.; Schweitzer, Anthony C.; Blume, John E.; Wang, Xuning; Darnell, Jennifer C.; Darnell, Robert B.

    2008-11-01

    Protein-RNA interactions have critical roles in all aspects of gene expression. However, applying biochemical methods to understand such interactions in living tissues has been challenging. Here we develop a genome-wide means of mapping protein-RNA binding sites in vivo, by high-throughput sequencing of RNA isolated by crosslinking immunoprecipitation (HITS-CLIP). HITS-CLIP analysis of the neuron-specific splicing factor Nova revealed extremely reproducible RNA-binding maps in multiple mouse brains. These maps provide genome-wide in vivo biochemical footprints confirming the previous prediction that the position of Nova binding determines the outcome of alternative splicing; moreover, they are sufficiently powerful to predict Nova action de novo. HITS-CLIP revealed a large number of Nova-RNA interactions in 3' untranslated regions, leading to the discovery that Nova regulates alternative polyadenylation in the brain. HITS-CLIP, therefore, provides a robust, unbiased means to identify functional protein-RNA interactions in vivo.

  17. Prediction of RNA binding proteins comes of age from low resolution to high resolution.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huiying; Yang, Yuedong; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2013-10-01

    Networks of protein-RNA interactions is likely to be larger than protein-protein and protein-DNA interaction networks because RNA transcripts are encoded tens of times more than proteins (e.g. only 3% of human genome coded for proteins), have diverse function and localization, and are controlled by proteins from birth (transcription) to death (degradation). This massive network is evidenced by several recent experimental discoveries of large numbers of previously unknown RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Meanwhile, more than 400 non-redundant protein-RNA complex structures (at 25% sequence identity or less) have been deposited into the protein databank. These sequences and structural resources for RBPs provide ample data for the development of computational techniques dedicated to RBP prediction, as experimentally determining RNA-binding functions is time-consuming and expensive. This review compares traditional machine-learning based approaches with emerging template-based methods at several levels of prediction resolution ranging from two-state binding/non-binding prediction, to binding residue prediction and protein-RNA complex structure prediction. The analysis indicates that the two approaches are complementary and their combinations may lead to further improvements. PMID:23872922

  18. Structural and Kinetic Properties of Lumazine Synthase Isoenzymes in the Order Rhizobiales

    SciTech Connect

    Klinke,S.; Zylberman, V.; Bonomi, H.; Haase, I.; Guimaraes, B.; Braden, B.; Bacher, A.; Fischer, M.; Goldbaum, F.

    2007-01-01

    6, 7-Dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine synthase (lumazine synthase; LS) catalyzes the penultimate step in the biosynthesis of riboflavin in plants and microorganisms. This protein is known to exhibit different quaternary assemblies between species, existing as free pentamers, decamers (dimers of pentamers) and icosahedrally arranged dodecamers of pentamers. A phylogenetic analysis on eubacterial, fungal and plant LSs allowed us to classify them into two categories: Type I LSs (pentameric or icosahedral) and Type II LSs (decameric). The Rhizobiales represent an order of ?-proteobacteria that includes, among others, the genera Mesorhizobium, Agrobacterium and Brucella. Here, we present structural and kinetic studies on several LSs from Rhizobiales. Interestingly, Mesorhizobium and Brucella encode both a Type-I LS and a Type-II LS called RibH1 and RibH2, respectively. We show that Type II LSs appear to be almost inactive, whereas Type I LSs present a highly variable catalytic activity according to the genus. Additionally, we have solved four RibH1/RibH2 crystallographic structures from the genera Mesorhizobium and Brucella. The relationship between the active-site architecture and catalytic properties in these isoenzymes is discussed, and a model that describes the enzymatic behavior is proposed. Furthermore, sequence alignment studies allowed us to extend our results to the genus Agrobacterium. Our results suggest that the selective pressure controlling the riboflavin pathway favored the evolution of catalysts with low reaction rates, since the excess of flavins in the intracellular pool in Rhizobiales could act as a negative factor when these bacteria are exposed to oxidative or nitrosative stress.

  19. Kinetic analysis of structural influences on the susceptibility of peroxiredoxins 2 and 3 to hyperoxidation.

    PubMed

    Poynton, Rebecca A; Peskin, Alexander V; Haynes, Alexina C; Lowther, W Todd; Hampton, Mark B; Winterbourn, Christine C

    2016-02-15

    Mammalian 2-cysteine peroxiredoxins (Prxs) are susceptible to hyperoxidation by excess H2O2. The cytoplasmic family member Prx2 hyperoxidizes more readily than mitochondrial Prx3 due to slower dimerization of the sulfenic acid (SpOH) intermediate. Four variant amino acids near the C-terminus have been shown to contribute to this difference. We have performed kinetic analysis of the relationship between hyperoxidation and disulfide formation, using whole-protein MS and comparing wild-type (WT) Prx2 and Prx3 with tail-swap mutants in which the four amino acids were reversed. These changes make Prx3 more sensitive and Prx2 less sensitive to hyperoxidation and accounted for ∼70% of the difference between the two proteins. The tail swap mutant of Prx3 was also more susceptible when expressed in the mitochondria of HeLa cells. The hyperoxidized product at lower excesses of H2O2 was a semi-hyperoxidized dimer with one active site disulfide and the other a sulfinic acid. For Prx2, increasing the H2O2 concentration resulted in complete hyperoxidation. In contrast, only approximately half the Prx3 active sites underwent hyperoxidation and, even with high H2O2, the predominant product was the hyperoxidized dimer. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) showed that the oligomeric forms of all redox states of Prx3 dissociated more readily into dimeric units than their Prx2 counterparts. Notably the species with one disulfide and one hyperoxidized active site was decameric for Prx2 and dimeric for Prx3. Reduction and re-oxidation of the hyperoxidized dimer of Prx3 produced hyperoxidized monomers, implying dissociation and rearrangement of the subunits of the functional homodimer. PMID:26614766

  20. Functional properties and structural characterization of rice δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase

    PubMed Central

    Forlani, Giuseppe; Bertazzini, Michele; Zarattini, Marco; Funck, Dietmar; Ruszkowski, Milosz; Nocek, Bogusław

    2015-01-01

    The majority of plant species accumulate high intracellular levels of proline to cope with hyperosmotic stress conditions. Proline synthesis from glutamate is tightly regulated at both the transcriptional and the translational levels, yet little is known about the mechanisms for post-translational regulation of the enzymatic activities involved. The gene coding in rice (Oryza sativa L.) for δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) reductase, the enzyme that catalyzes the second and final step in this pathway, was isolated and expressed in Escherichia coli. The structural and functional properties of the affinity-purified protein were characterized. As for most species, rice P5C reductase was able to use in vitro either NADH or NADPH as the electron donor. However, strikingly different effects of cations and anions were found depending on the pyridine nucleotide used, namely inhibition of NADH-dependent activity and stimulation of NADPH-dependent activity. Moreover, physiological concentrations of proline and NADP+ were strongly inhibitory for the NADH-dependent reaction, whereas the NADPH-dependent activity was mildly affected. Our results suggest that only NADPH may be used in vivo and that stress-dependent variations in ion homeostasis and NADPH/NADP+ ratio could modulate enzyme activity, being functional in promoting proline accumulation and potentially also adjusting NADPH consumption during the defense against hyperosmotic stress. The apparent molecular weight of the native protein observed in size exclusion chromatography indicated a high oligomerization state. We also report the first crystal structure of a plant P5C reductase at 3.40-Å resolution, showing a decameric quaternary assembly. Based on the structure, it was possible to identify dynamic structural differences among rice, human, and bacterial enzymes. PMID:26284087

  1. Functional properties and structural characterization of rice δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase.

    PubMed

    Forlani, Giuseppe; Bertazzini, Michele; Zarattini, Marco; Funck, Dietmar; Ruszkowski, Milosz; Nocek, Bogusław

    2015-01-01

    The majority of plant species accumulate high intracellular levels of proline to cope with hyperosmotic stress conditions. Proline synthesis from glutamate is tightly regulated at both the transcriptional and the translational levels, yet little is known about the mechanisms for post-translational regulation of the enzymatic activities involved. The gene coding in rice (Oryza sativa L.) for δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) reductase, the enzyme that catalyzes the second and final step in this pathway, was isolated and expressed in Escherichia coli. The structural and functional properties of the affinity-purified protein were characterized. As for most species, rice P5C reductase was able to use in vitro either NADH or NADPH as the electron donor. However, strikingly different effects of cations and anions were found depending on the pyridine nucleotide used, namely inhibition of NADH-dependent activity and stimulation of NADPH-dependent activity. Moreover, physiological concentrations of proline and NADP(+) were strongly inhibitory for the NADH-dependent reaction, whereas the NADPH-dependent activity was mildly affected. Our results suggest that only NADPH may be used in vivo and that stress-dependent variations in ion homeostasis and NADPH/NADP(+) ratio could modulate enzyme activity, being functional in promoting proline accumulation and potentially also adjusting NADPH consumption during the defense against hyperosmotic stress. The apparent molecular weight of the native protein observed in size exclusion chromatography indicated a high oligomerization state. We also report the first crystal structure of a plant P5C reductase at 3.40-Å resolution, showing a decameric quaternary assembly. Based on the structure, it was possible to identify dynamic structural differences among rice, human, and bacterial enzymes. PMID:26284087

  2. Synthesis, crystal structures and characterization of four coordination polymers based on 5-amino-2,4,6-triiodoisophthalic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Koulin; Chang Yan; Zhang Jingbo; Yuan Limin; Deng Ye; Diao Guowang; Ng, Seik Weng

    2011-05-15

    One homochiral 1D coordination polymer [Cu(ATIBDC)(2,2'-bipy)].3H{sub 2}O.CH{sub 3}OH (1) and three achiral 1D coordination polymers: [Cd(ATIBDC)(2,2'-bipy)(H{sub 2}O)].3H{sub 2}O (2), [Cd(ATIBDC)(phen)(H{sub 2}O)].4H{sub 2}O (3), and [Mn(ATIBDC)(phen){sub 2}].5H{sub 2}O (4) have been synthesized and characterized (H{sub 2}ATIBDC=5-amino-2,4,6-triiodoisophthalic acid, 2,2'-bipy=2,2'-bipyridine, and phen=1,10-phenanthroline). Extended high dimensional network architectures are further constructed with the help of weak secondary interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, aromatic stacking, and halogen bonding (C-I..{pi} and C-I...N/O). Complex 1 crystallizes in the monoclinic system with chiral space group P2(1) and exhibits a right-handed 2{sub 1} helical chain structure. The homochirality of 1 was confirmed by CD spectrum. Interestingly, two new configurations of decameric water cluster are found in 3 and 4. The acyclic tetrameric cluster (H{sub 2}O){sub 3}(CH{sub 3}OH) in 1 and (H{sub 2}O){sub 4} in 2 array into highly ordered helical infinite chains. Thermal stabilities of all the complexes have been studied. Solid state fluorescent properties of the Cd(II) complexes have been explored. -- Graphical abstract: The synthesis, crystal structures and characterization of one 1D homochiral coordination polymer and three achiral 1D coordination polymers with 5-amino-2,4,6-triiodoisophthalic acid (H{sub 2}ATIBDC) are reported. Display Omitted highlights: > Four 1D coordination polymers with 5-amino-2,4,6-triiodoisophthalate are reported. > The halogen bonds play important roles in the supramolecular assembly. > Solid state fluorescent properties of the Cd(II) complexes are explored.

  3. The N-terminal peptide of mammalian GTP cyclohydrolase I is an autoinhibitory control element and contributes to binding the allosteric regulatory protein GFRP.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Christina E; Gross, Steven S

    2011-04-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is the rate-limiting enzyme for biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), an obligate cofactor for NO synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. BH4 can limit its own synthesis by triggering decameric GTPCH to assemble in an inhibitory complex with two GTPCH feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) pentamers. Subsequent phenylalanine binding to the GTPCH·GFRP inhibitory complex converts it to a stimulatory complex. An N-terminal inhibitory peptide in GTPCH may also contribute to autoregulation of GTPCH activity, but mechanisms are undefined. To characterize potential regulatory actions of the N-terminal peptide in rat GTPCH, we expressed, purified, and characterized a truncation mutant, devoid of 45 N-terminal amino acids (Δ45-GTPCH) and contrasted its catalytic and GFRP binding properties to wild type GTPCH (wt-GTPCH). Contrary to prior reports, we show that GFRP binds wt-GTPCH in the absence of any small molecule effector, resulting in allosteric stimulation of GTPCH activity: a 20% increase in Vmax, 50% decrease in KmGTP, and increase in Hill coefficient to 1.6, from 1.0. These features of GFRP-stimulated wt-GTPCH activity were phenocopied by Δ45-GTPCH in the absence of bound GFRP. Addition of GFRP to Δ45-GTPCH failed to elicit complex formation or a substantial further increase in GTPCH catalytic activity. Expression of Δ45-GTPCH in HEK-293 cells elicited 3-fold greater BH4 accumulation than an equivalent of wt-GTPCH. Together, results indicate that the N-terminal peptide exerts autoinhibitory control over rat GTPCH and is required for GFRP binding on its own. Displacement of the autoinhibitory peptide provides a molecular mechanism for physiological up-regulation of GTPCH activity. PMID:21163945

  4. The N-terminal Peptide of Mammalian GTP Cyclohydrolase I Is an Autoinhibitory Control Element and Contributes to Binding the Allosteric Regulatory Protein GFRP*

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Christina E.; Gross, Steven S.

    2011-01-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is the rate-limiting enzyme for biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), an obligate cofactor for NO synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. BH4 can limit its own synthesis by triggering decameric GTPCH to assemble in an inhibitory complex with two GTPCH feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) pentamers. Subsequent phenylalanine binding to the GTPCH·GFRP inhibitory complex converts it to a stimulatory complex. An N-terminal inhibitory peptide in GTPCH may also contribute to autoregulation of GTPCH activity, but mechanisms are undefined. To characterize potential regulatory actions of the N-terminal peptide in rat GTPCH, we expressed, purified, and characterized a truncation mutant, devoid of 45 N-terminal amino acids (Δ45-GTPCH) and contrasted its catalytic and GFRP binding properties to wild type GTPCH (wt-GTPCH). Contrary to prior reports, we show that GFRP binds wt-GTPCH in the absence of any small molecule effector, resulting in allosteric stimulation of GTPCH activity: a 20% increase in Vmax, 50% decrease in KmGTP, and increase in Hill coefficient to 1.6, from 1.0. These features of GFRP-stimulated wt-GTPCH activity were phenocopied by Δ45-GTPCH in the absence of bound GFRP. Addition of GFRP to Δ45-GTPCH failed to elicit complex formation or a substantial further increase in GTPCH catalytic activity. Expression of Δ45-GTPCH in HEK-293 cells elicited 3-fold greater BH4 accumulation than an equivalent of wt-GTPCH. Together, results indicate that the N-terminal peptide exerts autoinhibitory control over rat GTPCH and is required for GFRP binding on its own. Displacement of the autoinhibitory peptide provides a molecular mechanism for physiological up-regulation of GTPCH activity. PMID:21163945

  5. Functional properties and structural characterization of rice δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Forlani, Giuseppe; Bertazzini, Michele; Zarattini, Marco; Funck, Dietmar; Ruszkowski, Milosz; Nocek, Bogusław

    2015-07-28

    The majority of plant species accumulate high intracellular levels of proline to cope with hyperosmotic stress conditions. Proline synthesis from glutamate is tightly regulated at both the transcriptional and the translational levels, yet little is known about the mechanisms for post-translational regulation of the enzymatic activities involved. The gene coding in rice (Oryza sativa L.) for δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) reductase, the enzyme that catalyzes the second and final step in this pathway, was isolated and expressed in Escherichia coli. The structural and functional properties of the affinity-purified protein were characterized. As for most species, rice P5C reductase was able to use in vitro either NADH or NADPH as the electron donor. However, strikingly different effects of cations and anions were found depending on the pyridine nucleotide used, namely inhibition of NADH-dependent activity and stimulation of NADPH-dependent activity. Moreover, physiological concentrations of proline and NADP+ were strongly inhibitory for the NADH-dependent reaction, whereas the NADPH-dependent activity was mildly affected. Our results suggest that only NADPH may be used in vivo and that stress-dependent variations in ion homeostasis and NADPH/NADP+ ratio could modulate enzyme activity, being functional in promoting proline accumulation and potentially also adjusting NADPH consumption during the defense against hyperosmotic stress. The apparent molecular weight of the native protein observed in size exclusion chromatography indicated a high oligomerization state. We also report the first crystal structure of a plant P5C reductase at 3.40-Å resolution, showing a decameric quaternary assembly. It was possible to identify dynamic structural differences among rice, human, and bacterial enzymes.

  6. Vanadate induces necrotic death in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes through mitochondrial membrane depolarization.

    PubMed

    Soares, Sandra Sofia; Henao, Fernando; Aureliano, Manuel; Gutiérrez-Merino, Carlos

    2008-03-01

    Besides the well-known inotropic effects of vanadium in cardiac muscle, previous studies have shown that vanadate can stimulate cell growth or induce cell death. In this work, we studied the toxicity to neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (cardiomyocytes) of two vanadate solutions containing different oligovanadates distribution, decavanadate (containing decameric vanadate, V 10) and metavanadate (containing monomeric vanadate and also di-, tetra-, and pentavanadate). Incubation for 24 h with decavanadate or metavanadate induced necrotic cell death of cardiomyocytes, without significant caspase-3 activation. Only 10 microM total vanadium of either decavanadate (1 microM V 10) or metavanadate (10 microM total vanadium) was needed to produce 50% loss of cell viability after 24 h (assessed with MTT and propidium iodide assays). Atomic absorption spectroscopy showed that vanadium accumulation in cardiomyocytes after 24 h was the same when incubation was done with decavanadate or metavanadate. A decrease of 75% of the rate of mitochondrial superoxide anion generation, monitored with dihydroethidium, and a sustained rise of cytosolic calcium (monitored with Fura-2-loaded cardiomyocytes) was observed after 24 h of incubation of cardiomyocytes with decavanadate or metavanadate concentrations close to those inducing 50% loss of cell viability produced. In addition, mitochondrial membrane depolarization within cardiomyocytes, monitored with tetramethylrhodamine ethyl esther or with 3,3',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolcarbocyanine iodide, were observed after only 6 h of incubation with decavanadate or metavanadate. The concentration needed for 50% mitochondrial depolarization was 6.5 +/- 1 microM total vanadium for both decavanadate (0.65 microM V 10) and metavanadate. In conclusion, mitochondrial membrane depolarization was an early event in decavanadate- and monovanadate-induced necrotic cell death of cardiomyocytes. PMID:18251508

  7. Subunit Conformations and Assembly States of a DNA Translocating Motor: The Terminase of Bacteriophage P22

    PubMed Central

    Němeček, Daniel; Gilcrease, Eddie B.; Kang, Sebyung; Prevelige, Peter E.; Casjens, Sherwood; Thomas, George J.

    2007-01-01

    Bacteriophage P22, a podovirus infecting strains of Salmonella typhimurium, packages a 42 kbp genome using a headful mechanism. DNA translocation is accomplished by the phage terminase, a powerful molecular motor consisting of large and small subunits. Although many of the structural proteins of the P22 virion have been well characterized, little is known about the terminase subunits and their molecular mechanism of DNA translocation. We report here structural and assembly properties of ectopically expressed and highly purified terminase large and small subunits. The large subunit (gp2), which contains the nuclease and ATPase activities of terminase, exists as a stable monomer with an α/β fold. The small subunit (gp3), which recognizes DNA for packaging and may regulate gp2 activity, exhibits a highly α-helical secondary structure and self-associates to form a stable oligomeric ring in solution. For wildtype gp3, the ring contains nine subunits, as demonstrated by hydrodynamic measurements, electron microscopy and native mass spectrometry. We have also characterized a gp3 mutant (Ala 112 → Thr) that forms a ten subunit ring, despite a subunit fold indistinguishable from wildtype. Both the nonameric and decameric gp3 rings exhibit nonspecific DNA binding activity, and gp2 is able to bind strongly to the DNA/gp3 complex but not to DNA alone. We propose a scheme for the roles of P22 terminase large and small subunits in the recruitment and packaging of viral DNA and discuss the model in relation to proposals for terminase-driven DNA translocation in other phages. PMID:17945256

  8. Functional properties and structural characterization of rice δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Forlani, Giuseppe; Bertazzini, Michele; Zarattini, Marco; Funck, Dietmar; Ruszkowski, Milosz; Nocek, Bogusław

    2015-07-28

    The majority of plant species accumulate high intracellular levels of proline to cope with hyperosmotic stress conditions. Proline synthesis from glutamate is tightly regulated at both the transcriptional and the translational levels, yet little is known about the mechanisms for post-translational regulation of the enzymatic activities involved. The gene coding in rice (Oryza sativa L.) for δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) reductase, the enzyme that catalyzes the second and final step in this pathway, was isolated and expressed in Escherichia coli. The structural and functional properties of the affinity-purified protein were characterized. As for most species, rice P5C reductase was able to usemore » in vitro either NADH or NADPH as the electron donor. However, strikingly different effects of cations and anions were found depending on the pyridine nucleotide used, namely inhibition of NADH-dependent activity and stimulation of NADPH-dependent activity. Moreover, physiological concentrations of proline and NADP+ were strongly inhibitory for the NADH-dependent reaction, whereas the NADPH-dependent activity was mildly affected. Our results suggest that only NADPH may be used in vivo and that stress-dependent variations in ion homeostasis and NADPH/NADP+ ratio could modulate enzyme activity, being functional in promoting proline accumulation and potentially also adjusting NADPH consumption during the defense against hyperosmotic stress. The apparent molecular weight of the native protein observed in size exclusion chromatography indicated a high oligomerization state. We also report the first crystal structure of a plant P5C reductase at 3.40-Å resolution, showing a decameric quaternary assembly. It was possible to identify dynamic structural differences among rice, human, and bacterial enzymes.« less

  9. Control of water molecule aggregations in copper 1,4-cyclohexanedicarboxylate coordination polymers containing pyridyl-piperazine type ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiblawi, Sultan H.; LaDuca, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    A series of layered divalent copper coordination polymers containing 1,4-cyclohexanedicarboxylate and long-spanning pyridyl-piperazine type ligands exhibits greatly different co-crystallized water molecule aggregations depending on the specific ligands used. Both [Cu(t-14cdc)(4-bpmp)]n (1, t-14cdc = trans-1,4-cyclohexanedicarboxylate, 4-bpmp = bis(4-pyridylmethyl)piperazine) and {[Cu(t-14cdc)(4-bpfp)(H2O)2]·6H2O}n (2, 4-bpfp = bis(4-pyridylformyl)piperazine) possess 2D (4,4) coordination polymer grids. However 1 lacks any co-crystallized water and has pinched grid apertures, while 2 manifests infinite water tapes with T6(2)4(2) classification and rectangular grid apertures. {[Cu2(c-14cdc)2(4-bpmp)]·2H2O}n (3, c-14cdc = cis-1,4-cyclohexanedicarboxylate) has [Cu2(c-14cdc)]2 ribbons with paddlewheel dimeric units linked into 2D slabs by 4-bpmp tethers, along with isolated water molecule pairs. In contrast, {[Cu2(c-14cdc)2(4-bpfp)]·10H2O}n (4) shows a very similar underlying coordination polymer topology but entrains unique decameric water molecule clusters. The minor product {[Cu2(c-14cdcH)2(t-1,4-cdc)(4-bpfp)2(H2O)2]·2H2O}n (5) was isolated along with 4; this compound underwent some in situ cis to trans cyclohexane-dicarboxylate ligand isomerization and exhibits a ladder polymer motif.

  10. An Aptamer against the Matrix Binding Domain on the Hepatitis B Virus Capsid Impairs Virion Formation

    PubMed Central

    Orabi, Ahmed; Bieringer, Maria; Geerlof, Arie

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The hepatitis B virus (HBV) particle is an icosahedral nucleocapsid surrounded by a lipid envelope containing viral surface proteins. A small domain (matrix domain [MD]) in the large surface protein L and a narrow region (matrix binding domain [MBD]) including isoleucine 126 on the capsid surface have been mapped, in which point mutations such as core I126A specifically blocked nucleocapsid envelopment. It is possible that the two domains interact with each other during virion morphogenesis. By the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) method, we evolved DNA aptamers from an oligonucleotide library binding to purified recombinant capsids but not binding to the corresponding I126A mutant capsids. Aptamers bound to capsids were separated from unbound molecules by filtration. After 13 rounds of selections and amplifications, 16 different aptamers were found among 73 clones. The four most frequent aptamers represented more than 50% of the clones. The main aptamer, AO-01 (13 clones, 18%), showed the lowest dissociation constant (Kd) of 180 ± 82 nM for capsid binding among the four molecules. Its Kd for I126A capsids was 1,306 ± 503 nM. Cotransfection of Huh7 cells with AO-01 and an HBV genomic construct resulted in 47% inhibition of virion production at 3 days posttransfection, but there was no inhibition by cotransfection of an aptamer with a random sequence. The half-life of AO-01 in cells was 2 h, which might explain the incomplete inhibition. The results support the importance of the MBD for nucleocapsid envelopment. Inhibiting the MD-MBD interaction with a low-molecular-weight substance might represent a new approach for an antiviral therapy. IMPORTANCE Approximately 240 million people are persistently infected with HBV. To date, antiviral therapies depend on a single target, the viral reverse transcriptase. Future additional targets could be viral protein-protein interactions. We selected a 55-base-long single-stranded DNA

  11. Viral DNA-Dependent Induction of Innate Immune Response to Hepatitis B Virus in Immortalized Mouse Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiuji; Clark, Daniel N.; Liu, Kuancheng; Xu, Xiao-Dong; Guo, Ju-Tao

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infects hundreds of millions of people worldwide and causes acute and chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. HBV is an enveloped virus with a relaxed circular (RC) DNA genome. In the nuclei of infected human hepatocytes, conversion of RC DNA from the incoming virion or cytoplasmic mature nucleocapsid (NC) to the covalently closed circular (CCC) DNA, which serves as the template for producing all viral transcripts, is essential to establish and sustain viral replication. A prerequisite for CCC DNA formation is the uncoating (disassembly) of NCs to expose their RC DNA content for conversion to CCC DNA. We report here that in an immortalized mouse hepatocyte cell line, AML12HBV10, in which RC DNA exposure is enhanced, the exposed viral DNA could trigger an innate immune response that was able to modulate viral gene expression and replication. When viral gene expression and replication were low, the innate response initially stimulated these processes but subsequently acted to shut off viral gene expression and replication after they reached peak levels. Inhibition of viral DNA synthesis or cellular DNA sensing and innate immune signaling diminished the innate response. These results indicate that HBV DNA, when exposed in the host cell cytoplasm, can function to trigger an innate immune response that, in turn, modulates viral gene expression and replication. IMPORTANCE Chronic infection by hepatitis B virus (HBV) afflicts hundreds of millions worldwide and is sustained by the episomal covalently closed circular (CCC) DNA in the nuclei of infected hepatocytes. Release of viral genomic DNA from cytoplasmic nucleocapsids (NCs) (NC disassembly or uncoating) is a prerequisite for its conversion to CCC DNA, which can also potentially expose the viral DNA to host DNA sensors and trigger an innate immune response. We have found that in an immortalized mouse hepatocyte cell line in which efficient CCC DNA formation was

  12. SLAM- and Nectin-4-Independent Noncytolytic Spread of Canine Distemper Virus in Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Lisa; Khosravi, Mojtaba; Avila, Mislay; Ader-Ebert, Nadine; Bringolf, Fanny; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Vandevelde, Marc

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Measles and canine distemper viruses (MeV and CDV, respectively) first replicate in lymphatic and epithelial tissues by using SLAM and nectin-4 as entry receptors, respectively. The viruses may also invade the brain to establish persistent infections, triggering fatal complications, such as subacute sclerosis pan-encephalitis (SSPE) in MeV infection or chronic, multiple sclerosis-like, multifocal demyelinating lesions in the case of CDV infection. In both diseases, persistence is mediated by viral nucleocapsids that do not require packaging into particles for infectivity but are directly transmitted from cell to cell (neurons in SSPE or astrocytes in distemper encephalitis), presumably by relying on restricted microfusion events. Indeed, although morphological evidence of fusion remained undetectable, viral fusion machineries and, thus, a putative cellular receptor, were shown to contribute to persistent infections. Here, we first showed that nectin-4-dependent cell-cell fusion in Vero cells, triggered by a demyelinating CDV strain, remained extremely limited, thereby supporting a potential role of nectin-4 in mediating persistent infections in astrocytes. However, nectin-4 could not be detected in either primary cultured astrocytes or the white matter of tissue sections. In addition, a bioengineered “nectin-4-blind” recombinant CDV retained full cell-to-cell transmission efficacy in primary astrocytes. Combined with our previous report demonstrating the absence of SLAM expression in astrocytes, these findings are suggestive for the existence of a hitherto unrecognized third CDV receptor expressed by glial cells that contributes to the induction of noncytolytic cell-to-cell viral transmission in astrocytes. IMPORTANCE While persistent measles virus (MeV) infection induces SSPE in humans, persistent canine distemper virus (CDV) infection causes chronic progressive or relapsing demyelination in carnivores. Common to both central nervous system (CNS

  13. Molecular characterization of Capim and Enseada orthobunyaviruses.

    PubMed

    de Souza, William Marciel; Acrani, Gustavo Olszanski; Romeiro, Marilia Farignoli; Reis, Osvaldo; Tolardo, Aline Lavado; da Silva, Sandro Patroca; de Almeida Medeiros, Daniele Barbosa; Varela, Mariana; Nunes, Márcio Roberto Teixeira; Figueiredo, Luiz Tadeu Moraes

    2016-06-01

    Capim and Enseada viruses are members of the genus Orthobunyavirus isolated from mosquitoes and mammals in Brazil. Despite seroprevalence studies indicating human infections in Latin America, these viruses remain relatively unknown and unstudied. In order to better understand the genetic and evolutionary relationships among orthobunyaviruses, we sequenced the three genomic segments of Capim and Enseada orthobunyaviruses. Based on phylogenetic analysis, we demonstrated that these viruses depicted two new distinct clades, one represented by Enseada and another composed of Capim virus. In general, the genome organization and genetic traits of these viruses are similar to other orthobunyaviruses however, the open reading frame (ORF) of the putative nonstructural NSs protein of Enseada orthobunyavirus precedes the nucleocapsid ORF. Overall, our study provides details on the molecular characteristics of the prototype species of two groups within the Orthobunyavirus genus, revealing novel features into the genetic diversity and evolution of this genus. PMID:26921797

  14. Serological Survey of Hantavirus in Inhabitants from Tropical and Subtropical Areas of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Alexandre; Santo Pietro Pereira, Aparecida; Lazaro Moreli, Marcos; Marcelo Aranha Camargo, Luís; Schiavo Nardi, Marcello; Farah Tófoli, Cristina; Araujo, Jansen; Mara Dutra, Lilia; Lopes Ometto, Tatiana; Hurtado, Renata; Carmona de Jesus Maués, Fábio; Zingano Hinke, Tiene; Jaber Mahmud, Sati; Correia Lima, Monica; Tadeu Moraes Figueiredo, Luiz; Luiz Durigon, Edison

    2016-01-01

    Brazil has reported more than 1,600 cases of hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HPS) since 1993, with a 39% rate of reported fatalities. Using a recombinant nucleocapsid protein of Araraquara virus, we performed ELISA to detect IgG antibodies against hantavirus in human sera. The aim of this study was to analyze hantavirus antibody levels in inhabitants from a tropical area (Amazon region) in Rondônia state and a subtropical (Atlantic Rain Forest) region in São Paulo state, Brazil. A total of 1,310 serum samples were obtained between 2003 and 2008 and tested by IgG-ELISA, and 82 samples (6.2%), of which 62 were from the tropical area (5.8%) and 20 from the subtropical area (8.3%), tested positive. Higher levels of hantavirus antibody were observed in inhabitants of the populous subtropical areas compared with those from the tropical areas in Brazil. PMID:27034670

  15. Quantum chemical modelling of reactivity and selectivity of 1,2-dithiolanes towards retroviral and cellular zinc fingers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topol, Igor A.; Nemukhin, Alexander V.; Burt, Stanley K.

    Interactions of 1,2-dithiolane species with zinc-containing sites, which mimic the zinc finger domains of retroviral and the cellular zinc finger proteins, have been investigated by quantum chemistry tools. According to the calculations, the immediate domains of zinc binding sites in the cellular and retroviral zinc fingers interact differently with such agents of the disulphide family. Thus, when approaching the model cellular-type domains, the molecules of 1,2-dithiolanes experience considerable potential barriers along the reaction path. However, these species react practically barrier-less with the model retroviral-type domains at the correlated DFT level. The results of the quantum chemical modelling provide firm support to the selectivity of 1,2-dithiolanes towards retroviral and cellular zinc fingers. This can be of great practical importance for the design of therapeutics that accomplish functional inactivation of the zinc fingers of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) retroviral type nucleocapsid protein NCp7.

  16. Live-cell observation of cytosolic HIV-1 assembly onset reveals RNA-interacting Gag oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Hendrix, Jelle; Baumgärtel, Viola; Schrimpf, Waldemar; Ivanchenko, Sergey; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Müller, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Assembly of the Gag polyprotein into new viral particles in infected cells is a crucial step in the retroviral replication cycle. Currently, little is known about the onset of assembly in the cytosol. In this paper, we analyzed the cytosolic HIV-1 Gag fraction in real time in live cells using advanced fluctuation imaging methods and thereby provide detailed insights into the complex relationship between cytosolic Gag mobility, stoichiometry, and interactions. We show that Gag diffuses as a monomer on the subsecond timescale with severely reduced mobility. Reduction of mobility is associated with basic residues in its nucleocapsid (NC) domain, whereas capsid (CA) and matrix (MA) domains do not contribute significantly. Strikingly, another diffusive Gag species was observed on the seconds timescale that oligomerized in a concentration-dependent manner. Both NC- and CA-mediated interactions strongly assist this process. Our results reveal potential nucleation steps of cytosolic Gag fractions before membrane-assisted Gag assembly. PMID:26283800

  17. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase specifically interacts with the anticodon domain of its cognate primer tRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Barat, C; Lullien, V; Schatz, O; Keith, G; Nugeyre, M T; Grüninger-Leitch, F; Barré-Sinoussi, F; LeGrice, S F; Darlix, J L

    1989-01-01

    The virion cores of the replication competent type 1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1), a retrovirus, contain and RNA genome associated with nucleocapsid (NC) and reverse transcriptase (RT p66/p51) molecules. In vitro reconstructions of these complexes with purified components show that NC is required for efficient annealing of the primer tRNALys,3. In the absence of NC, HIV-1 RT is unable to retrotranscribe the viral RNA template from the tRNA primer. We demonstrate that the HIV-1 RT p66/p51 specifically binds to its cognate primer tRNALys,3 even in the presence of a 100-fold molar excess of other tRNAs. Cross-linking analysis of this interaction locates the contact site to a region within the heavily modified anti-codon domain of tRNALys,3. Images PMID:2479543

  18. Development of Primer Pairs from Molecular Typing of Rabies Virus Variants Present in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Hernández, Dolores G.; Lara-Padilla, Eleazar; Zárate-Segura, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Nucleoprotein (N) gene from rabies virus (RABV) is a useful sequence target for variant studies. Several specific RABV variants have been characterized in different mammalian hosts such as skunk, dog, and bats by using anti-nucleocapsid monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) via indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) test, a technique not available in many laboratories in Mexico. In the present study, a total of 158 sequences of N gene from RABV were used to design eight pairs of primers (four external and four internal primers), for typing four different RABV variants (dog, skunk, vampire bat, and nonhematophagous bat) which are most common in Mexico. The results indicate that the primer and the typing variant from the brain samples, submitted to nested and/or real-time PCR, are in agreement in all four singleplex reactions, and the designed primer pairs are an alternative for use in specific variant RABV typing. PMID:27563666

  19. Serological diagnosis of feline coronavirus infection by immunochromatographic test.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tomomi; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    The immunochromatographic assay (ICA) is a simple antibody-antigen detection method, the results of which can be rapidly obtained at a low cost. We designed an ICA to detect anti-feline coronavirus (FCoV) antibodies. A colloidal gold-labeled recombinant FCoV nucleocapsid protein (rNP) is used as a conjugate. The Protein A and affinity-purified cat anti-FCoV IgG are blotted on the test line and the control line, respectively, of the nitrocellulose membrane. The specific detection of anti-FCoV antibodies was possible in all heparin-anticoagulated plasma, serum, whole blood, and ascitic fluid samples from anti-FCoV antibody positive cats, and nonspecific reaction was not noted in samples from anti-FCoV antibody negative cats. PMID:25720468

  20. Timing is everything: Fine-tuned molecular machines orchestrate paramyxovirus entry

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Sayantan; Jardetzky, Theodore S.; Lamb, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    The Paramyxoviridae include some of the great and ubiquitous disease-causing viruses of humans and animals. In most paramyxoviruses, two viral membrane glycoproteins, fusion protein (F) and receptor binding protein (HN, H or G) mediate a concerted process of recognition of host cell surface molecules followed by fusion of viral and cellular membranes, resulting in viral nucleocapsid entry into the cytoplasm. The interactions between the F and HN, H or G viral glycoproteins and host molecules are critical in determining host range, virulence and spread of these viruses. Recently, atomic structures, together with biochemical and biophysical studies, have provided major insights into how these two viral glycoproteins successfully interact with host receptors on cellular membranes and initiate the membrane fusion process to gain entry into cells. These studies highlight the conserved core mechanisms of paramyxovirus entry that provide the fundamental basis for rational anti-viral drug design and vaccine development. PMID:25771804

  1. Shimoni bat virus, a new representative of the Lyssavirus genus.

    PubMed

    Kuzmin, Ivan V; Mayer, Anne E; Niezgoda, Michael; Markotter, Wanda; Agwanda, Bernard; Breiman, Robert F; Rupprecht, Charles E

    2010-05-01

    During 2009, 616 bats representing at least 22 species were collected from 10 locations throughout Kenya. A new lyssavirus, named Shimoni bat virus (SHIBV), was isolated from the brain of a dead Commerson's leaf-nosed bat (Hipposideros commersoni), found in a cave in the coastal region of Kenya. Genetic distances and phylogenetic reconstructions, implemented for each gene and for the concatenated alignment of all five structural genes (N, P, M, G and L), demonstrated that SHIBV cannot be identified with any of the existing species, but rather should be considered an independent species within phylogroup II of the Lyssavirus genus, most similar to Lagos bat virus (LBV). Antigenic reaction patterns with anti-nucleocapsid monoclonal antibodies corroborated these distinctions. In addition, new data on the diversity of LBV suggests that this species may be subdivided quantitatively into three separate genotypes. However, the identity values alone are not considered sufficient criteria for demarcation of new species within LBV. PMID:20138934

  2. Development and evaluation of a blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and virus neutralization assay to detect antibodies to viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Anna; Goldberg, Tony; Marcquenski, Susan; Olson, Wendy; Goetz, Frederick; Hershberger, Paul; Hart, Lucas M.; Toohey-Kurth, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is a target of surveillance by many state and federal agencies in the United States. Currently, the detection of VHSV relies on virus isolation, which is lethal to fish and indicates only the current infection status. A serological method is required to ascertain prior exposure. Here, we report two serologic tests for VHSV that are nonlethal, rapid, and species independent, a virus neutralization (VN) assay and a blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results show that the VN assay had a specificity of 100% and sensitivity of 42.9%; the anti-nucleocapsid-blocking ELISA detected nonneutralizing VHSV antibodies at a specificity of 88.2% and a sensitivity of 96.4%. The VN assay and ELISA are valuable tools for assessing exposure to VHSV.

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Ebola VP35 interferon inhibitory domain mutant proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Daisy W.; Borek, Dominika; Farahbakhsh, Mina; Ramanan, Parameshwaran; Nix, Jay C.; Wang, Tianjiao; Prins, Kathleen C.; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Honzatko, Richard B.; Helgeson, Luke A.; Basler, Christopher F.; Amarasinghe, Gaya K.

    2010-06-21

    VP35 is one of seven structural proteins encoded by the Ebola viral genome and mediates viral replication, nucleocapsid formation and host immune suppression. The C-terminal interferon inhibitory domain (IID) of VP35 is critical for dsRNA binding and interferon inhibition. The wild-type VP35 IID structure revealed several conserved residues that are important for dsRNA binding and interferon antagonism. Here, the expression, purification and crystallization of recombinant Zaire Ebola VP35 IID mutants R312A, K319A/R322A and K339A in space groups P6{sub 1}22, P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and P2{sub 1}, respectively, are described. Diffraction data were collected using synchrotron sources at the Advanced Light Source and the Advanced Photon Source.

  4. Development and Evaluation of a Blocking Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay and Virus Neutralization Assay To Detect Antibodies to Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Anna; Goldberg, Tony; Marcquenski, Susan; Olson, Wendy; Goetz, Frederick; Hershberger, Paul; Hart, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is a target of surveillance by many state and federal agencies in the United States. Currently, the detection of VHSV relies on virus isolation, which is lethal to fish and indicates only the current infection status. A serological method is required to ascertain prior exposure. Here, we report two serologic tests for VHSV that are nonlethal, rapid, and species independent, a virus neutralization (VN) assay and a blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results show that the VN assay had a specificity of 100% and sensitivity of 42.9%; the anti-nucleocapsid-blocking ELISA detected nonneutralizing VHSV antibodies at a specificity of 88.2% and a sensitivity of 96.4%. The VN assay and ELISA are valuable tools for assessing exposure to VHSV. PMID:24429071

  5. Assembly of the Ebola Virus Nucleoprotein from a Chaperoned VP35 Complex.

    PubMed

    Kirchdoerfer, Robert N; Abelson, Dafna M; Li, Sheng; Wood, Malcolm R; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2015-07-01

    Ebolavirus NP oligomerizes into helical filaments found at the core of the virion, encapsidates the viral RNA genome, and serves as a scaffold for additional viral proteins within the viral nucleocapsid. We identified a portion of the phosphoprotein homolog VP35 that binds with high affinity to nascent NP and regulates NP assembly and viral genome binding. Removal of the VP35 peptide leads to NP self-assembly via its N-terminal oligomerization arm. NP oligomerization likely causes a conformational change between the NP N- and C-terminal domains, facilitating RNA binding. These functional data are complemented by crystal structures of the NP°-VP35 complex at 2.4 Å resolution. The interactions between NP and VP35 illuminated by these structures are conserved among filoviruses and provide key targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26119732

  6. Improvement of the Trivalent Inactivated Flu Vaccine Using PapMV Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Savard, Christian; Guérin, Annie; Drouin, Karine; Bolduc, Marilène; Laliberté-Gagné, Marie-Eve; Dumas, Marie-Christine; Majeau, Nathalie; Leclerc, Denis

    2011-01-01

    Commercial seasonal flu vaccines induce production of antibodies directed mostly towards hemaglutinin (HA). Because HA changes rapidly in the circulating virus, the protection remains partial. Several conserved viral proteins, e.g., nucleocapsid (NP) and matrix proteins (M1), are present in the vaccine, but are not immunogenic. To improve the protection provided by these vaccines, we used nanoparticles made of the coat protein of a plant virus (papaya mosaic virus; PapMV) as an adjuvant. Immunization of mice and ferrets with the adjuvanted formulation increased the magnitude and breadth of the humoral response to NP and to highly conserved regions of HA. They also triggered a cellular mediated immune response to NP and M1, and long-lasting protection in animals challenged with a heterosubtypic influenza strain (WSN/33). Thus, seasonal flu vaccine adjuvanted with PapMV nanoparticles can induce universal protection to influenza, which is a major advancement when facing a pandemic. PMID:21747909

  7. Development of Primer Pairs from Molecular Typing of Rabies Virus Variants Present in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Bastida-González, Fernando; Ramírez-Hernández, Dolores G; Chavira-Suárez, Erika; Lara-Padilla, Eleazar; Zárate-Segura, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Nucleoprotein (N) gene from rabies virus (RABV) is a useful sequence target for variant studies. Several specific RABV variants have been characterized in different mammalian hosts such as skunk, dog, and bats by using anti-nucleocapsid monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) via indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) test, a technique not available in many laboratories in Mexico. In the present study, a total of 158 sequences of N gene from RABV were used to design eight pairs of primers (four external and four internal primers), for typing four different RABV variants (dog, skunk, vampire bat, and nonhematophagous bat) which are most common in Mexico. The results indicate that the primer and the typing variant from the brain samples, submitted to nested and/or real-time PCR, are in agreement in all four singleplex reactions, and the designed primer pairs are an alternative for use in specific variant RABV typing. PMID:27563666

  8. A distinct tospovirus causing necrotic streak on Alstroemeria sp. in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Hassani-Mehraban, Afshin; Botermans, Marleen; Verhoeven, J Th J; Meekes, Ellis; Saaijer, Janneke; Peters, Dick; Goldbach, Rob; Kormelink, Richard

    2010-03-01

    A tospovirus causing necrotic streaks on leaves was isolated from Alstroemeria sp. in Colombia. Infected samples reacted positively with tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) antiserum during preliminary serological tests. Further analysis revealed a close serological relationship to tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV) and groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV). A major part of the S-RNA segment, encompassing the nucleocapsid (N) protein gene, the 5' untranslated region and a part of the intergenic region 3' of the N gene, was cloned and sequenced. The deduced N protein sequence showed highest amino acid identity (82%) to that of TCSV, indicating that the virus represents a new tospovirus species, for which the name Alstroemeria necrotic streak virus (ANSV) is coined. Phylogenetic analysis based on the N protein sequence revealed that this Alstroemeria-infecting tospovirus clustered with tospoviruses from the American continent. Frankliniella occidentalis was identified as potential vector species for ANSV. PMID:20151164

  9. The vaccinia virus E6 protein influences virion protein localization during virus assembly.

    PubMed

    Condit, Richard C; Moussatche, Nissin

    2015-08-01

    Vaccinia virus mutants in which expression of the virion core protein gene E6R is repressed are defective in virion morphogenesis. E6 deficient infections fail to properly package viroplasm into viral membranes, resulting in an accumulation of empty immature virions and large aggregates of viroplasm. We have used immunogold electron microscopy and immunofluorescence confocal microscopy to assess the intracellular localization of several virion structural proteins and enzymes during E6R mutant infections. We find that during E6R mutant infections virion membrane proteins and virion transcription enzymes maintain a normal localization within viral factories while several major core and lateral body proteins accumulate in aggregated virosomes. The results support a model in which vaccinia virions are assembled from at least three substructures, the membrane, the viroplasm and a "pre-nucleocapsid", and that the E6 protein is essential for maintaining proper localization of the seven-protein complex and the viroplasm during assembly. PMID:25863879

  10. Detecting Newcastle disease virus in combination of RT-PCR with red blood cell absorption.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jianzhong; Liu, Chengqian

    2011-01-01

    Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) has limited sensitivity when treating complicated samples, such as feces, waste-water in farms, and nucleic acids, protein rich tissue samples, all the factors may interfere with the sensitivity of PCR test or generate false results. In this study, we developed a sensitive RT-PCR, combination of red blood cell adsorption, for detecting Newcastle disease virus (NDV). One pair of primers which was highly homologous to three NDV pathotypes was designed according to the consensus nucleocapsid protein (NP) gene sequence. To eliminate the interfere of microbes and toxic substances, we concentrated and purified NDV from varied samples utilizing the ability of NDV binding red blood cells (RBCs). The RT-PCR coupled with red blood cell adsorption was much more sensitive in comparison with regular RT-PCR. The approach could also be used to detect other viruses with the property of hemagglutination, such as influenza viruses. PMID:21535888

  11. Development and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies Directed Against the Nucleoprotein of Heartland Virus.

    PubMed

    Calvert, Amanda E; Brault, Aaron C

    2015-12-01

    Heartland virus (HRTV), a phlebovirus first isolated from two Missouri farmers in 2009, has been proposed to be transmitted to humans by the bite of infected Amblyomma americanum ticks. It is closely related to severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) from China, another previously unrecognized phlebovirus that has subsequently been associated with hundreds of cases of severe disease in humans. To expand diagnostic capacity to detect HRTV infections, 20 hybridoma clones secreting anti-HRTV murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were developed using splenocytes from HRTV-inoculated AG129 alpha/beta and gamma interferon receptor-deficient mice. Nine of these MAbs were characterized herein for inclusion in future HRTV diagnostic assay development. All of the MAbs developed were found to be non-neutralizing and reactive to linear epitopes on HRTV nucleocapsid protein. MAb 2AF11 was found to be cross-reactive with SFTSV. PMID:26503274

  12. Completely assembled virus particles detected by transmission electron microscopy in proximal and mid-axons of neurons infected with herpes simplex virus type 1, herpes simplex virus type 2 and pseudorabies virus

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Jialing Lazear, Helen M. Friedman, Harvey M.

    2011-01-05

    The morphology of alphaherpesviruses during anterograde axonal transport from the neuron cell body towards the axon terminus is controversial. Reports suggest that transport of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) nucleocapsids and envelope proteins occurs in separate compartments and that complete virions form at varicosities or axon termini (subassembly transport model), while transport of a related alphaherpesvirus, pseudorabies virus (PRV) occurs as enveloped capsids in vesicles (assembled transport model). Transmission electron microscopy of proximal and mid-axons of primary superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons was used to compare anterograde axonal transport of HSV-1, HSV-2 and PRV. SCG cell bodies were infected with HSV-1 NS and 17, HSV-2 2.12 and PRV Becker. Fully assembled virus particles were detected intracellularly within vesicles in proximal and mid-axons adjacent to microtubules after infection with each virus, indicating that assembled virions are transported anterograde within axons for all three alphaherpesviruses.

  13. The Stanford Nanocharacterization Laboratory (SNL) and Recent Applications of an Aberration-Corrected Environmental Transmission Electron Microscope**

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Robert; Kempen, Paul Joseph; Chin, Richard; Koh, Ai Leen

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the establishment, over a period of ten years or so, of a multi-user, institution-wide facility for the characterization of materials and devices at the nano-scale. Emphasis is placed on the type of equipment that we have found to be most useful for our users, and the business strategy that maintains its operations. A central component of our facility is an aberration-corrected environmental transmission electron microscope and its application is summarized in the studies of plasmon energies of silver nanoparticles, the band gap of PbS quantum dots, atomic site occupancy near grain boundaries in yttria stabilized zirconia, the lithiation of silicon nanoparticles, in situ observations on carbon nanotube oxidation and the electron tomography of varicella zoster virus nucleocapsids. PMID:25364299

  14. Modeling nucleic acid structure in the presence of single-stranded binding proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forties, Robert; Bundschuh, Ralf

    2009-03-01

    There are many important proteins which bind single-stranded nucleic acids, such as the nucleocapsid protein in HIV, the RecA DNA repair protein in bacteria, and all proteins involved in mRNA splicing and translation. We extend the Vienna Package for quantitatively modeling the secondary structure of nucleic acids to include proteins which bind to unpaired portions of the nucleic acid. All parameters needed to model nucleic acid secondary structures in the absence of proteins have been previously measured. This leaves the footprint and sequence dependent binding affinity of the protein as adjustable parameters of our model. Using this model we are able to predict the probability of the protein binding at any position in the nucleic acid sequence, the impact of the protein on nucleic acid base pairing, the end-to-end distance distribution for the nucleic acid, and FRET distributions for fluorophores attached to the nucleic acid.

  15. Isolation and partial characterization of a novel virus from different carp species suffering gill necrosis - ultrastructure and morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Granzow, H; Fichtner, D; Schütze, H; Lenk, M; Dresenkamp, B; Nieper, H; Mettenleiter, T C

    2014-06-01

    Two isolates of a novel enveloped RNA virus were obtained from carp and koi carp with gill necrosis. Both isolates behaved identically and could be propagated in different cyprinid cell lines forming large syncytia. The virus was sensitive to lipid solvents and neither exhibited haemadsorption/haemagglutination nor reverse transcriptase activity. Mature virus particles displayed a spherical shape with diameter of 100-350 nm after negative staining and 100-300 nm in ultrathin sections, covered by short projections of 8-10 nm in length. Maturation of virus progeny was shown to occur by budding and envelopment of the filamentous helical nucleocapsids at the cell surface. A detailed comparison of ultrastructure and morphogenesis of the novel virus isolates with selected arena-, ortho- and paramyxoviruses as possible candidates for evaluation of taxonomic classification yielded no consistency in all phenotypic features. Thus, on the basis of ultrastructure the novel virus isolates could not be assigned unequivocally to any established virus family. PMID:23865968

  16. Serological Survey of Hantavirus in Inhabitants from Tropical and Subtropical Areas of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Alves Morais, Felipe; Pereira, Alexandre; Santo Pietro Pereira, Aparecida; Lazaro Moreli, Marcos; Marcelo Aranha Camargo, Luís; Schiavo Nardi, Marcello; Farah Tófoli, Cristina; Araujo, Jansen; Mara Dutra, Lilia; Lopes Ometto, Tatiana; Hurtado, Renata; Carmona de Jesus Maués, Fábio; Zingano Hinke, Tiene; Jaber Mahmud, Sati; Correia Lima, Monica; Tadeu Moraes Figueiredo, Luiz; Luiz Durigon, Edison

    2016-01-01

    Brazil has reported more than 1,600 cases of hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HPS) since 1993, with a 39% rate of reported fatalities. Using a recombinant nucleocapsid protein of Araraquara virus, we performed ELISA to detect IgG antibodies against hantavirus in human sera. The aim of this study was to analyze hantavirus antibody levels in inhabitants from a tropical area (Amazon region) in Rondônia state and a subtropical (Atlantic Rain Forest) region in São Paulo state, Brazil. A total of 1,310 serum samples were obtained between 2003 and 2008 and tested by IgG-ELISA, and 82 samples (6.2%), of which 62 were from the tropical area (5.8%) and 20 from the subtropical area (8.3%), tested positive. Higher levels of hantavirus antibody were observed in inhabitants of the populous subtropical areas compared with those from the tropical areas in Brazil. PMID:27034670

  17. New Genetic Lineage of Tula Hantavirus in Microtus arvalis obscurus in Eastern Kazakhstan

    PubMed Central

    Plyusnina, Angelina; Laakkonen, Juha; Niemimaa, Jukka; Henttonen, Heikki; Plyusnin, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Genomic sequences of Tula (TULV) hantavirus were recovered from tissue samples of European common voles Microtus arvalis (subspecies obscurus) captured in Kazakhstan, Central Asia. Phylogenetic analysis of the S genomic segment of Kazakh TULV strains showed that they form distinct, well supported genetic lineage and share a more ancient common ancestor with two Russian lineages of TULV. The deduced sequence of the nucleocapsid (N) protein of Kazakh TULV strains carried specific amino acid signature: T274Q276T281. The Microtus arvalis group includes several sibling species and/or subspecies in Eurasia, indicating recent and ongoing evolutionary radiation. Our data on TULV lineages in Central Asia, the region not studied for hantaviruses earlier, highlight the diversity of both Microtus host and the virus and also their co-evolution. PMID:19440462

  18. Reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification for the rapid detection of infectious bronchitis virus in infected chicken tissues.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao-tai; Zhang, Jie; Ma, Yan-ping; Ma, Li-Na; Ding, Yao-zhong; Liu, Xiang-tao; Cai, Xue-peng; Ma, Li-qing; Zhang, Yong-guang; Liu, Yong-sheng

    2010-04-01

    A reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay targeting the nucleocapsid phosphoprotein gene of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) was developed. The detection limits for the IBV RT-LAMP assay were 10(1) 50% egg infection dose (EID(50)) per 50 microl of titrated viruses and no cross-reaction of IBV RT-LAMP was found when tested with other viruses including Newcastle disease virus (NDV), avian reovirus (ARV), and infectious laryngotrachietis virus (ILTV) due to their mismatch with IBV RT-LAMP primers. A total of 187 clinical tissues samples (88 blood, 62 kidney and 37 lung) were evaluated and compared to conventional RT-PCR. The sensitivity of RT-LAMP and RT-PCR assays for detecting IBV RNA in clinical specimens was 99.5% and 98.4%, respectively. These findings showed that the RT-LAMP assay has potential usefulness for rapid and sensitive diagnosis in outbreak of IBV. PMID:19835950

  19. Isolation and purification of a granulosis virus from infected larvae of the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella.

    PubMed Central

    Tweeten, K A; Bulla, L A; Consigli, R A

    1977-01-01

    A procedure was developed for purification of a granulosis virus inclusion body produced in vivo in the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Hübner). Purification was accomplished by differential centrifugation, treatment with sodium deoxycholate, and velocity sedimentation in sucrose gradients. The adequacy of the procedure was confirmed by mixing experiments in which uninfected, radioactively labeled larvae were mixed with infected, unlabeled larvae. After purification, the virus was shown to be free of host tissue, to retain its physical integrity, and to be highly infectious per os. Preparations of purified virus consisted of homogeneous populations of intact inclusion bodies (210 by 380 nm) whose buoyant density was 1.271 g/cm3 when centrifuged to equilibrium in sucrose gradients. Electron microscopy of thin-sectioned virus or of virus sequentially disrupted on electron microscope grids demonstrated three components: protein matrix, envelope, and nucleocapsid. Images PMID:334076

  20. RNA sequence and transcriptional properties of the 3' end of the Newcastle disease virus genome

    SciTech Connect

    Kurilla, M.G.; Stone, H.O.; Keene, J.D.

    1985-09-01

    The 3' end of the genomic RNA of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) has been sequenced and the leader RNA defined. Using hybridization to a 3'-end-labeled genome, leader RNA species from in vitro transcription reactions and from infected cell extracts were found to be 47 and 53 nucleotides long. In addition, the start site of the 3'-proximal mRNA was determined by sequence analysis of in vitro (beta-32P)GTP-labeled transcription products. The genomic sequence extending beyond the leader region demonstrated an open reading frame for at least 42 amino acids and probably represents the amino terminus of the nucleocapsid protein (NP). The terminal 8 nucleotides of the NDV genome were identical to those of measles virus and Sendai virus while the sequence of the distal half of the leader region was more similar to that of vesicular stomatitis virus. These data argue for strong evolutionary relatedness between the paramyxovirus and rhabdovirus groups.

  1. The crystal structure of ORF-9b, a lipid binding protein from the SARS coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Meier, Christoph; Aricescu, A Radu; Assenberg, Rene; Aplin, Robin T; Gilbert, Robert J C; Grimes, Jonathan M; Stuart, David I

    2006-07-01

    To achieve the greatest output from their limited genomes, viruses frequently make use of alternative open reading frames, in which translation is initiated from a start codon within an existing gene and, being out of frame, gives rise to a distinct protein product. These alternative protein products are, as yet, poorly characterized structurally. Here we report the crystal structure of ORF-9b, an alternative open reading frame within the nucleocapsid (N) gene from the SARS coronavirus. The protein has a novel fold, a dimeric tent-like beta structure with an amphipathic surface, and a central hydrophobic cavity that binds lipid molecules. This cavity is likely to be involved in membrane attachment and, in mammalian cells, ORF-9b associates with intracellular vesicles, consistent with a role in the assembly of the virion. Analysis of ORF-9b and other overlapping genes suggests that they provide snapshots of the early evolution of novel protein folds. PMID:16843897

  2. Detection of Nipah virus RNA in fruit bat (Pteropus giganteus) from India.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Pragya D; Raut, Chandrashekhar G; Shete, Anita M; Mishra, Akhilesh C; Towner, Jonathan S; Nichol, Stuart T; Mourya, Devendra T

    2012-09-01

    The study deals with the survey of different bat populations (Pteropus giganteus, Cynopterus sphinx, and Megaderma lyra) in India for highly pathogenic Nipah virus (NiV), Reston Ebola virus, and Marburg virus. Bats (n = 140) from two states in India (Maharashtra and West Bengal) were tested for IgG (serum samples) against these viruses and for virus RNAs. Only NiV RNA was detected in a liver homogenate of P. giganteus captured in Myanaguri, West Bengal. Partial sequence analysis of nucleocapsid, glycoprotein, fusion, and phosphoprotein genes showed similarity with the NiV sequences from earlier outbreaks in India. A serum sample of this bat was also positive by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for NiV-specific IgG. This is the first report on confirmation of Nipah viral RNA in Pteropus bat from India and suggests the possible role of this species in transmission of NiV in India. PMID:22802440

  3. Herpes simplex virus amplicon: cleavage of concatemeric DNA is linked to packaging and involves amplification of the terminally reiterated a sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Deiss, L P; Frenkel, N

    1986-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus-infected cells contain large concatemeric DNA molecules arising from replication of the viral genome. The large concatemers are cleaved to generate unit-length molecules terminating at both ends with the a sequence. We have used constructed defective virus vectors (amplicons) derived from herpes simplex virus to study the mechanism of cleavage of viral DNA concatemers and the packaging of viral DNA into nucleocapsids. These studies revealed that (i) a 248-base-pair a sequence contained the signal(s) required for cleavage-packaging, (ii) the cleavage of viral DNA concatemers was coupled to packaging, (iii) the a sequence contained the information required for its own amplification, and (iv) cleavage-packaging occurred by a novel process involving the amplification of the a sequence. Images PMID:3005637

  4. Viral and host control of cytomegalovirus maturation

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Ritesh; Mocarski, Edward S.

    2012-01-01

    Maturation in herpesviruses initiates in the nucleus of the infected cell with encapsidation of viral DNA to form nucleocapsids and concludes with envelopment in the cytoplasm to form infectious virions that egress the cell. The entire process of virus maturation is orchestrated by protein-protein interactions and enzymatic activities of viral and host origin. Viral tegument proteins play important roles in maintaining the structural stability of capsids and directing the acquisition of virus envelope. Envelopment occurs at modified host membranes and exploits host vesicular trafficking. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge and concepts in human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) maturation and their parallels in other herpesviruses with an emphasis on viral and host factors regulating this process. PMID:22633075

  5. SARS Antibody Test for Serosurveillance

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Po-Ren; Kao, Chuan-Liang; Lee, Chun-Nan; Chen, Li-Kuan; Ho, Mei-Shang; Sia, Charles; De Fang, Xin; Lynn, Shugene; Chang, Tseng Yuan; Liu, Shi Kau; Walfield, Alan M.

    2004-01-01

    A peptide-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) can be used for retrospective serosurveillance of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) by helping identify undetected chains of disease transmission. The assay was developed by epitope mapping, using synthetic peptides from the spike, membrane, and nucleocapsid protein sequences of SARS-associated coronavirus. The new peptide ELISA consistently detected seroconversion by week 2 of onset of fever, and seropositivity remained through day 100. Specificity was 100% on normal blood donor samples, on serum samples associated with infection by other pathogens, and on an interference panel. The peptide-based test has advantages of safety, standardization, and automation over previous immunoassays for SARS. The assay was used for a retrospective survey of healthy healthcare workers in Taiwan who treated SARS patients. Asymptomatic seroconversions were detected in two hospitals that had nosocomial disease. PMID:15498156

  6. [Research Progress in the Core Proteins of the Classical Swine Fever Virus].

    PubMed

    Hou, Yuzhen; Zhao, Dantong; Liu, Guoying; He, Fan; Liu, Bin; Fu, Shaoyin; Hao, Yongqing; Zhang, Wenguang

    2015-09-01

    The core protein (CP) of the classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is one of its structural proteins. Apart from forming the nucleocapsid to protect internal viral genomic RNA, this protein is involved in transcriptional regulation. Also, during viral infection, the CP is involved in interactions with many host proteins. In this review, we combine study of this protein with its disorders, structural/functional characteristics, as well as its interactions with the non-structural proteins NS3, NS5B and host proteins such as SUMO-1, UBC9, OS9 and IQGAP1. We also summarize the important part played by the CP in CSFV pathogenicity, virulence and replication of genomic RNA. We also provide guidelines for further studies in the CP of the CSFV. PMID:26738299

  7. Plant viruses of the Amalgaviridae family evolved via recombination between viruses with double-stranded and negative-strand RNA genomes.

    PubMed

    Krupovic, Mart; Dolja, Valerian V; Koonin, Eugene V

    2015-01-01

    Plant viruses of the recently recognized family Amalgaviridae have monopartite double-stranded (ds) RNA genomes and encode two proteins: an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) and a putative capsid protein (CP). Whereas the RdRp of amalgaviruses has been found to be most closely related to the RdRps of dsRNA viruses of the family Partitiviridae, the provenance of their CP remained obscure. Here we show that the CP of amalgaviruses is homologous to the nucleocapsid proteins of negative-strand RNA viruses of the genera Phlebovirus (Bunyaviridae) and Tenuivirus. The chimeric genomes of amalgaviruses are a testament to the effectively limitless gene exchange between viruses that shaped the evolution of the virosphere. PMID:25886840

  8. HIV-1 Integrase Binds the Viral RNA Genome and Is Essential during Virion Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kessl, Jacques J; Kutluay, Sebla B; Townsend, Dana; Rebensburg, Stephanie; Slaughter, Alison; Larue, Ross C; Shkriabai, Nikoloz; Bakouche, Nordine; Fuchs, James R; Bieniasz, Paul D; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2016-08-25

    While an essential role of HIV-1 integrase (IN) for integration of viral cDNA into human chromosome is established, studies with IN mutants and allosteric IN inhibitors (ALLINIs) have suggested that IN can also influence viral particle maturation. However, it has remained enigmatic as to how IN contributes to virion morphogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that IN directly binds the viral RNA genome in virions. These interactions have specificity, as IN exhibits distinct preference for select viral RNA structural elements. We show that IN substitutions that selectively impair its binding to viral RNA result in eccentric, non-infectious virions without affecting nucleocapsid-RNA interactions. Likewise, ALLINIs impair IN binding to viral RNA in virions of wild-type, but not escape mutant, virus. These results reveal an unexpected biological role of IN binding to the viral RNA genome during virion morphogenesis and elucidate the mode of action of ALLINIs. PMID:27565348

  9. Insights into the function of tegument proteins from the varicella zoster virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Cheng, Tong; Zhu, Hua; Xia, NingShao

    2015-08-01

    Chickenpox (varicella) is caused by primary infection with varicella zoster virus (VZV), which can establish long-term latency in the host ganglion. Once reactivated, the virus can cause shingles (zoster) in the host. VZV has a typical herpesvirus virion structure consisting of an inner DNA core, a capsid, a tegument, and an outer envelope. The tegument is an amorphous layer enclosed between the nucleocapsid and the envelope, which contains a variety of proteins. However, the types and functions of VZV tegument proteins have not yet been completely determined. In this review, we describe the current knowledge on the multiple roles played by VZV tegument proteins during viral infection. Moreover, we discuss the VZV tegument protein-protein interactions and their impact on viral tissue tropism in SCID-hu mice. This will help us develop a better understanding of how the tegument proteins aid viral DNA replication, evasion of host immune response, and pathogenesis. PMID:26208824

  10. Human recombinant Puumala virus antibodies: cross-reaction with other hantaviruses and use in diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Salonen, E M; Parren, P W; Graus, Y F; Lundkvist, A; Fisicaro, P; Vapalahti, O; Kallio-Kokko, H; Vaheri, A; Burton, D R

    1998-04-01

    A panel of seven human monoclonal Fabs against Puumala virus (PUU) nucleocapsid protein (N) was obtained by panning an antibody phage-display library prepared from the spleen of a PUU-immune individual. Three antibodies reacted in immunoblotting and cross-reacted strongly with Tula and Sin Nombre virus recombinant N proteins. These antibodies mapped to the amino terminus of the N protein. One PUU glycoprotein 2 (G2)-specific Fab obtained against a novel epitope (G2c) cross-reacted with Khabarovsk virus but not with the other hantavirus serotypes. An N protein-specific Fab was successfully used as capture antibody to detect PUU-specific serum IgG and IgM antibodies in an enzyme immunoassay. The result demonstrates the usefulness of recombinant human Fabs as potential diagnostic tools. PMID:9568958

  11. Tula virus: a newly detected hantavirus carried by European common voles.

    PubMed Central

    Plyusnin, A; Vapalahti, O; Lankinen, H; Lehväslaiho, H; Apekina, N; Myasnikov, Y; Kallio-Kokko, H; Henttonen, H; Lundkvist, A; Brummer-Korvenkontio, M

    1994-01-01

    A novel hantavirus has been discovered in European common voles, Microtus arvalis and Microtus rossiaemeridionalis. According to sequencing data for the genomic RNA S segment and nucleocapsid protein and data obtained by immunoblotting with a panel of monoclonal antibodies, the virus, designated Tula virus, is a distinct novel member of the genus Hantavirus. Phylogenetic analyses of Tula virus indicate that it is most closely related to Prospect Hill, Puumala, and Muerto Canyon viruses. The results support the view that the evolution of hantaviruses follows that of their primary carriers. Comparison of strains circulating within a local rodent population revealed a genetic drift via accumulation of base substitutions and deletions or insertions. The Tula virus population from individual animals is represented by quasispecies, indicating the potential for rapid evolution of the agent. Images PMID:7966573

  12. Isla Vista virus: a genetically novel hantavirus of the California vole Microtus californicus.

    PubMed

    Song, W; Torrez-Martinez, N; Irwin, W; Harrison, F J; Davis, R; Ascher, M; Jay, M; Hjelle, B

    1995-12-01

    Prospect Hill virus (PH) was isolated from a meadow vole (Microtus pennsylvanicus) in 1982, and much of its genome has been sequenced. Hantaviruses of other New World microtine rodents have not been genetically characterized. We show that another Microtus species (the California vole M. californicus) from the United States is host to a genetically distinct PH-like hantavirus, Isla Vista virus (ILV). The nucleocapsid protein of ILV differs from that of PH by 11.1% and a portion of the G2 glycoprotein differs from that of PH by 19.6%. ILV antibodies were identified in five of 33 specimens of M. californicus collected in 1975 and 1994-1995. Enzymatic amplification studies showed that 1975 and 1994-1995 ILV genomes were highly similar. Secondary infection of Peromyscus californicus was identified in Santa Barbara County, California. A long-standing enzootic of a genetically distinct hantavirus lineage is present in California voles. PMID:8847529

  13. Inactivation of Retinoblastoma Protein Does Not Overcome the Requirement for Human Cytomegalovirus UL97 in Lamina Disruption and Nuclear Egress

    PubMed Central

    Reim, Natalia I.; Wang, Depeng; Lin, Alison; Sharma, Mayuri; Ericsson, Maria; Pesola, Jean M.; Golan, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) encodes one conventional protein kinase, UL97. During infection, UL97 phosphorylates the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (pRb) on sites ordinarily phosphorylated by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK), inactivating the ability of pRb to repress host genes required for cell cycle progression to S phase. UL97 is important for viral DNA synthesis in quiescent cells, but this function can be replaced by human papillomavirus type 16 E7, which targets pRb for degradation. However, viruses in which E7 replaces UL97 are still defective for virus production. UL97 is also required for efficient nuclear egress of viral nucleocapsids, which is associated with disruption of the nuclear lamina during infection, and phosphorylation of lamin A/C on serine 22, which antagonizes lamin polymerization. We investigated whether inactivation of pRb might overcome the requirement of UL97 for these roles, as pRb inactivation induces CDK1, and CDK1 phosphorylates lamin A/C on serine 22. We found that lamin A/C serine 22 phosphorylation during HCMV infection correlated with expression of UL97 and was considerably delayed in UL97-null mutants, even when E7 was expressed. E7 failed to restore gaps in the nuclear lamina seen in wild-type but not UL97-null virus infections. In electron microscopy analyses, a UL97-null virus expressing E7 was as impaired as a UL97-null mutant in cytoplasmic accumulation of viral nucleocapsids. Our results demonstrate that pRb inactivation is insufficient to restore efficient viral nuclear egress of HCMV in the absence of UL97 and instead argue further for a direct role of UL97 in this stage of the infectious cycle. PMID:23427156

  14. Evidence from the anti-idiotypic network that the acetylcholine receptor is a rabies virus receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Hanham, C A; Zhao, F; Tignor, G H

    1993-01-01

    We have developed idiotype-anti-idiotype monoclonal antibodies that provide evidence for rabies virus binding to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR). Hybridoma cell lines 7.12 and 7.25 resulted after fusion of NS-1 myeloma cells with spleen cells from a BALB/c mouse immunized with rabies virus strain CVS. Antibody 7.12 reacted with viral glycoprotein and neutralized virus infectivity in vivo. It also neutralized infectivity in vitro when PC12 cells, which express neuronal AChR, but not CER cells or neuroblastoma cells (clone N18), which have no AChR, were used. Antibody 7.25 reacted with nucleocapsid protein. Anti-idiotypic monoclonal antibody B9 was produced from fusion of NS-1 cells with spleen cells from a mouse immunized with 7.12 Fab. In an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoprecipitation, B9 reacted with 7.12, polyclonal rabies virus immune dog serum, and purified AChR. The binding of B9 to 7.12 and immune dog serum was inhibited by AChR. B9 also inhibited the binding of 7.12 to rabies virus both in vitro and in vivo. Indirect immunofluorescence revealed that B9 reacted at neuromuscular junctions of mouse tissue. B9 also reacted in indirect immunofluorescence with distinct neurons in mouse and monkey brain tissue as well as with PC12 cells. B9 staining of neuronal elements in brain tissue of rabies virus-infected mice was greatly reduced. Rabies virus inhibited the binding of B9 to PC12 cells. Mice immunized with B9 developed low-titer rabies virus-neutralizing antibody. These mice were protected from lethal intramuscular rabies virus challenge. In contrast, anti-idiotypic antibody raised against nucleocapsid antibody 7.25 did not react with AChR. Images PMID:7677960

  15. Identification and ultrastructural characterization of a novel virus from fish.

    PubMed

    Granzow, H; Weiland, F; Fichtner, D; Schütze, H; Karger, A; Mundt, E; Dresenkamp, B; Martin, P; Mettenleiter, T C

    2001-12-01

    During routine investigations on fish, a virus (isolate DF 24/00) with novel morphological features and hitherto undescribed morphogenesis was isolated from a white bream (Blicca bjoerkna L.; Teleostei, order Cypriniformes). Cell-free virions consist of a rod-shaped nucleocapsid (120-150x19-22 nm) similar to that seen in baculoviruses. The virion has a bacilliform shape (170-200x75-88 nm) reminiscent of rhabdoviruses with an envelope containing coronavirus-like spikes (20-25 nm). DF 24/00 replicated well in various fish cell lines. Inhibitor studies with 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine indicated that the viral genome consists of RNA and chloroform sensitivity correlated with ultrastructural demonstration of enveloped virions. The buoyant density of the virus determined in sucrose was 1.17-1.19 g/ml. Preliminary biochemical characterization revealed the presence of six antigenic glycoproteins, three of which contain sugars with concanavalin-A specificity. Ultrastructurally, morphogenesis of virus progeny was detected only in the cytoplasm. Nucleocapsids were observed to bud through membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum and/or Golgi apparatus into dilated vesicles. Egress of mature virions occurs primarily by exocytosis and, only very rarely, by budding directly at the plasma membrane. Morphologically similar viruses had previously been isolated from grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella), blue crab (Callinectis sapidus), European shore crab (Carcinus maenas) and shrimp (Penaeus monodon). To date, none of them has been classified. In summary, the first characterization of a new virus that might represent a member of a novel virus family that has morphological features resembling those found in rhabdo-, corona- and baculoviruses is presented. PMID:11714959

  16. Ensemble Structure of the Highly Flexible Complex Formed between Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Unassembled Nucleoprotein and its Phosphoprotein Chaperone.

    PubMed

    Yabukarski, Filip; Leyrat, Cedric; Martinez, Nicolas; Communie, Guillaume; Ivanov, Ivan; Ribeiro, Euripedes A; Buisson, Marlyse; Gerard, Francine C; Bourhis, Jean-Marie; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Bernadó, Pau; Blackledge, Martin; Jamin, Marc

    2016-07-01

    Nucleocapsid assembly is an essential process in the replication of the non-segmented, negative-sense RNA viruses (NNVs). Unassembled nucleoprotein (N(0)) is maintained in an RNA-free and monomeric form by its viral chaperone, the phosphoprotein (P), forming the N(0)-P complex. Our earlier work solved the structure of vesicular stomatitis virus complex formed between an N-terminally truncated N (NΔ21) and a peptide of P (P60) encompassing the N(0)-binding site, but how the full-length P interacts with N(0) remained unknown. Here, we combine several experimental biophysical methods including size exclusion chromatography with detection by light scattering and refractometry, small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy with molecular dynamics simulation and computational modeling to characterize the NΔ21(0)-PFL complex formed with dimeric full-length P. We show that for multi-molecular complexes, simultaneous multiple-curve fitting using small-angle neutron scattering data collected at varying contrast levels provides additional information and can help refine structural ensembles. We demonstrate that (a) vesicular stomatitis virus PFL conserves its high flexibility within the NΔ21(0)-PFL complex and interacts with NΔ21(0) only through its N-terminal extremity; (b) each protomer of P can chaperone one N(0) client protein, leading to the formation of complexes with stoichiometries 1N:P2 and 2N:P2; and (c) phosphorylation of residues Ser60, Thr62 and Ser64 provides no additional interactions with N(0) but creates a metal binding site in PNTR. A comparison with the structures of Nipah virus and Ebola virus N(0)-P core complex suggests a mechanism for the control of nucleocapsid assembly that is common to all NNVs. PMID:27107640

  17. Proteomic Analysis of Interaction between a Plant Virus and Its Vector Insect Reveals New Functions of Hemipteran Cuticular Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenwen; Gray, Stewart; Huo, Yan; Li, Li; Wei, Taiyun; Wang, Xifeng

    2015-01-01

    Numerous viruses can be transmitted by their corresponding vector insects; however, the molecular mechanisms enabling virus transmission by vector insects have been poorly understood, especially the identity of vector components interacting with the virus. Here, we used the yeast two-hybrid system to study proteomic interactions of a plant virus (Rice stripe virus, RSV, genus Tenuivirus) with its vector insect, small brown planthopper (Laodelphax striatellus). Sixty-six proteins of L. striatellus that interacted with the nucleocapsid protein (pc3) of RSV were identified. A virus–insect interaction network, constructed for pc3 and 29 protein homologs of Drosophila melanogaster, suggested that nine proteins might directly interact with pc3. Of the 66 proteins, five (atlasin, a novel cuticular protein, jagunal, NAC domain protein, and vitellogenin) were most likely to be involved in viral movement, replication, and transovarial transmission. This work also provides evidence that the novel cuticular protein, CPR1, from L. striatellus is essential for RSV transmission by its vector insect. CPR1 binds the nucleocapsid protein (pc3) of RSV both in vivo and in vitro and colocalizes with RSV in the hemocytes of L. striatellus. Knockdown of CPR1 transcription using RNA interference resulted in a decrease in the concentration of RSV in the hemolymph, salivary glands and in viral transmission efficiency. These data suggest that CPR1 binds RSV in the insect and stabilizes the viral concentration in the hemolymph, perhaps to protect the virus or to help move the virus to the salivary tissues. Our studies provide direct experimental evidence that viruses can use existing vector proteins to aid their survival in the hemolymph. Identifying these putative vector molecules should lead to a better understanding of the interactions between viruses and vector insects. PMID:26091699

  18. The Lymantria dispar Nucleopolyhedrovirus Enhancins Are Components of Occlusion-Derived Virus

    PubMed Central

    Slavicek, James M.; Popham, Holly J. R.

    2005-01-01

    Enhancins are metalloproteinases, first identified in granuloviruses, that can enhance nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV) potency. We had previously identified two enhancin genes (E1 and E2) in the Lymantria dispar multinucleocapsid NPV (LdMNPV) and showed that both were functional. For this study, we have extended our analysis of LdMNPV enhancin genes through an immunocytochemical analysis of E1 and E2 expression and localization. E1 and E2 peptide antibodies recognized proteins of ∼84 kDa and 90 kDa, respectively, on Western blots of extracts from L. dispar 652Y cells infected with wild-type virus. The 84- and 90-kDa proteins were first detected at 48 h postinfection (p.i.) and were present through 96 h p.i. E1 and E2 peptide antibodies detected E1 and E2 in polyhedron extracts, and the antibodies were shown to be specific for E1 and E2, respectively, through the use of recombinant virus strains lacking the enhancin genes. E1 and E2 were further localized to occlusion-derived virus (ODV). The enhancins were not found in budded virus. Immunoelectron microscopy indicated that E1 and E2 were present in ODV envelopes and possibly in nucleocapsids. Fractionation studies with several detergents suggested that the enhancins were present in ODV envelopes in association with nucleocapsids. In contrast, enhancins in granuloviruses are located within the granulin matrix. The presence of LdMNPV enhancins within ODV provides a position for the proteins to interact directly on the peritrophic membrane as ODV traverses this host defense barrier. PMID:16051850

  19. Persistent infections of fish cell lines by paramyxovirus isolates from Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tschawytscha)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lannan, C.N.

    1989-01-01

    We have reported the isolation of a paramyxovirus from stocks of adult chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to coastal rivers of Oregon, USA (Winton et al 1985). The isolates were obtained from kidney and spleen tissues using the chinook salmon embryo cell line, CHSE-214. Initial cytopathic effect (CPE) was slow to develop, requiring 28 days incubation at 18°C. The virus replicated in CHSE-214, chum heart (CHH-1), kokanee ovary (K0-6), coho salmon embryo (CSE-119), and fathead minnow (FHM) cell lines where it produced a lytic type of CPE.The virus was stable at pH 3-11 and iodo-deoxyuridine did not inhibit wiral replication. Infectivity was lost after treatment with chloroform indicating the presence of essential lipids. The density of virions in CsCl was 1.2 g/ml. The virus hemagglutinated cells of 11 of 14 species of birds, mammals, and fish tested. Electron microscopy of infected cells revealed enveloped particles 125-250 nm in dia. containing coiled nucleocapsids and examination of freon-treated virions showed the nucleocapsid was a helix approximately 18 nm in dia. and > 1000 nm in length (Winton et al 1985).In addition to causing hemagglutination, members of the Paramyxoviridae are known for the ability to establish persistent infections of cell lines (Choppin and Compans 1975). The purpose of this study was to determine if the paramyxovirus isolates from salmon were able to establish persistent infections in fish cell lines and to study the nature of the infection.

  20. Development of a duplex Fluorescent Microsphere Immunoassay (FMIA) for the detection of antibody responses to influenza A and newcastle disease viruses.

    PubMed

    Pinette, Mathieu M; Rodriguez-Lecompte, Juan C; Pasick, John; Ojkic, Davor; Leith, Marsha; Suderman, Matthew; Berhane, Yohannes

    2014-03-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAI) and virulent forms of avian paramyxovirus-1 (APMV-1) cause serious illnesses in domestic poultry, both of which are reportable to the World Organization of Animal Health (OIE). The clinical presentation of avian influenza (AI) and APMV-1 infections are difficult to differentiate, emphasizing the importance of rapid and sensitive serologic assays that are able to distinguish them. Currently, a variety of serological assays are used for the serologic diagnosis of both diseases, but these assays are not used in multiplex formats. In this study, development of a duplex fluorescent microsphere immunoassay (FMIA) based on Luminex xMAP Technology is described. The assay employs MagPlex magnetic microspheres that are covalently coated with recombinant avian influenza virus nucleoprotein and APMV-1 nucleocapsid antigens produced in a baculovirus insect cell expression system. The assay is able to detect AIV antibodies against all existing hemagglutinin (H1-H16) subtypes and simultaneously detect antibodies against APMV-1. In the process of this assay development different bead coupling conditions were compared. The assay has the capability of detecting serum antibodies from chickens and turkeys and optimization was accomplished by using 2462 chicken and 446 turkey field and experimental sera and had a comparable detection capability with currently used assays in the laboratory. Assay threshold values were calculated with Receiver Operating Characteristic Analysis (ROC) in non-parametric analysis due to a highly skewed data distribution; this analysis resulted in AIV nucleoprotein relative diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of 99.7%, and 97.3% respectively. The APMV-1 nucleocapsid relative diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were 95.4%, and 98.5% respectively. PMID:24556589

  1. Proteomic Analysis of Interaction between a Plant Virus and Its Vector Insect Reveals New Functions of Hemipteran Cuticular Protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenwen; Gray, Stewart; Huo, Yan; Li, Li; Wei, Taiyun; Wang, Xifeng

    2015-08-01

    Numerous viruses can be transmitted by their corresponding vector insects; however, the molecular mechanisms enabling virus transmission by vector insects have been poorly understood, especially the identity of vector components interacting with the virus. Here, we used the yeast two-hybrid system to study proteomic interactions of a plant virus (Rice stripe virus, RSV, genus Tenuivirus) with its vector insect, small brown planthopper (Laodelphax striatellus). Sixty-six proteins of L. striatellus that interacted with the nucleocapsid protein (pc3) of RSV were identified. A virus-insect interaction network, constructed for pc3 and 29 protein homologs of Drosophila melanogaster, suggested that nine proteins might directly interact with pc3. Of the 66 proteins, five (atlasin, a novel cuticular protein, jagunal, NAC domain protein, and vitellogenin) were most likely to be involved in viral movement, replication, and transovarial transmission. This work also provides evidence that the novel cuticular protein, CPR1, from L. striatellus is essential for RSV transmission by its vector insect. CPR1 binds the nucleocapsid protein (pc3) of RSV both in vivo and in vitro and colocalizes with RSV in the hemocytes of L. striatellus. Knockdown of CPR1 transcription using RNA interference resulted in a decrease in the concentration of RSV in the hemolymph, salivary glands and in viral transmission efficiency. These data suggest that CPR1 binds RSV in the insect and stabilizes the viral concentration in the hemolymph, perhaps to protect the virus or to help move the virus to the salivary tissues. Our studies provide direct experimental evidence that viruses can use existing vector proteins to aid their survival in the hemolymph. Identifying these putative vector molecules should lead to a better understanding of the interactions between viruses and vector insects. PMID:26091699

  2. Ribonucleocapsid Formation of SARS-COV Through Molecular Action of the N-Terminal Domain of N Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Saikatendu, K.S.; Joseph, J.S.; Subramanian, V.; Neuman, B.W.; Buchmeier, M.J.; Stevens, R.C.; Kuhn, P.; /Scripps Res. Inst.

    2007-07-12

    Conserved amongst all coronaviruses are four structural proteins, the matrix (M), small envelope (E) and spike (S) that are embedded in the viral membrane and the nucleocapsid phosphoprotein (N), which exists in a ribonucleoprotein complex in their lumen. The N terminal domain of coronaviral N proteins (N-NTD) provides a scaffold for RNA binding while the C-terminal domain (N-CTD) mainly acts as oligomerization modules during assembly. The C-terminus of N protein anchors it to the viral membrane by associating with M protein. We characterized the structures of N-NTD from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) in two crystal forms, at 1.17A (monoclinic) and 1.85 A (cubic) respectively, solved by molecular replacement using the homologous avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) structure. Flexible loops in the solution structure of SARS-CoV N-NTD are now shown to be well ordered around the beta-sheet core. The functionally important positively charged beta-hairpin protrudes out of the core and is oriented similar to that in the IBV N-NTD and is involved in crystal packing in the monoclinic form. In the cubic form, the monomers form trimeric units that stack in a helical array. Comparison of crystal packing of SARS-CoV and IBV N-NTDs suggest a common mode of RNA recognition, but probably associate differently in vivo during the formation of the ribonucleoprotein complex. Electrostatic potential distribution on the surface of homology models of related coronaviral N-NTDs hints that they employ different modes of both RNA recognition as well as oligomeric assembly, perhaps explaining why their nucleocapsids have different morphologies.

  3. Involvement of ESCRT-II in Hepatitis B Virus Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Stieler, Jens T.; Prange, Reinhild

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) is an enveloped DNA virus that replicates via reverse transcription of its pregenomic RNA (pgRNA). Budding of HBV is supposed to occur at intracellular membranes and requires scission functions of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) provided by ESCRT-III and VPS4. Here, we have investigated the impact of the upstream-acting ESCRT-I and ESCRT-II complexes in HBV morphogenesis. RNA interference knockdown of the ESCRT-I subunits TSG101 and VPS28 did not block, but rather stimulate virus release. In contrast, RNAi-mediated depletion of the ESCRT-II components EAP20, EAP30 and EAP45 greatly reduced virus egress. By analyzing different steps of the HBV maturation pathway, we find that the knockdown of ESCRT-II not only inhibited the production and/or release of enveloped virions, but also impaired intracellular nucleocapsid formation. Transcription/translation studies revealed that the depletion of ESCRT-II neither affected the synthesis and nuclear export of HBV-specific RNAs nor the expression of the viral core and envelope proteins. Moreover, the absence of ESCRT-II had no effects on the assembly capability and integrity of HBV core/capsids. However, the level of encapsidated pgRNA was significantly reduced in ESCRT-II-depleted cells, implicating that ESCRT-II directs steps accompanying the formation of replication-competent nucleocapsids, like e.g. assisting in RNA trafficking and encapsidation. In support of this, the capsid protein was found to interact and colocalize with ESCRT-II subunits in virus-producing cells. Together, these results indicate an essential role for ESCRT-II in the HBV life cycle and suggest that ESCRT-II functions prior to the final HBV budding reaction. PMID:24614091

  4. Role of Vif in Stability of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Core

    PubMed Central

    Öhagen, Åsa; Gabuzda, Dana

    2000-01-01

    The Vif protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is important for virion infectivity. Previous studies have shown that vif-defective virions exhibit structural abnormalities in the virus core and are defective in the ability to complete proviral DNA synthesis in acutely infected cells. We developed novel assays to assess the relative stability of the core in HIV-1 virions. Using these assays, we examined the role of Vif in the stability of the HIV-1 core. The integrity of the core was examined following virion permeabilization or removal of the lipid envelope and treatment with various triggers, including S100 cytosol, deoxynucleoside triphosphates, detergents, NaCl, and buffers of different pH to mimic aspects of the uncoating and disassembly process which occurs after virus entry but preceding or during reverse transcription. vif mutant cores were more sensitive to disruption by all triggers tested than wild-type cores, as determined by endogenous reverse transcriptase (RT) assays, biochemical analyses, and electron microscopy. RT and the p7 nucleocapsid protein were released more readily from vif mutant virions than from wild-type virions, suggesting that the internal nucleocapsid is less stably packaged in the absence of Vif. Purified cores could be isolated from wild-type but not vif mutant virions by sedimentation through detergent-treated gradients. These results demonstrate that Vif increases the stability of virion cores. This may permit efficient viral DNA synthesis by preventing premature degradation or disassembly of viral nucleoprotein complexes during early events after virus entry. PMID:11070000

  5. Proteins associated with human parainfluenza virus type 3.

    PubMed Central

    Jambou, R C; Elango, N; Venkatesan, S

    1985-01-01

    The polypeptides associated with human parainfluenza virus type 3 were identified. Five proteins were present in detergent- and salt-resistant viral cores. Of these, three proteins designated NP0, NP1, and NP2 of 68,000, 58,000, and 52,000 daltons, respectively, were stably associated with 50S RNA in CsCl gradient-purified nucleocapsids. The amounts of NP1 and NP2 were variable, and these proteins were shown to be structurally related to the major nucleocapsid protein (NP0) by partial Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease mapping. The other core proteins included a 240K protein designated L (candidate for the viral polymerase) and an 84K protein designated as the phosphoprotein (P) on the basis of a predominant incorporation of Pi. The viral envelope had four prominent proteins (72, 53, 40, and 12K) under reducing conditions of electrophoresis. The 72 and 53K proteins were specifically labeled with [3H]glucosamine and [3H]mannose. When sulfhydryl reagents were removed, a new 62K protein was visualized in place of the 72, 53, and 12K proteins. The 53 and 12K proteins were interpreted to be the two subunits (F1 and F2) of the fusion protein, and the 72K protein was designated as the HN (hemagglutinin-neuraminidase) glycoprotein. The unglycosylated 40K protein represented the viral matrix protein (M). Immunoprecipitation of infected cell lysates with rabbit hyperimmune antiserum against purified virus confirmed the viral origin of these polypeptides. Images PMID:2993658

  6. Egress of Alphaherpesviruses: Comparative Ultrastructural Study

    PubMed Central

    Granzow, Harald; Klupp, Barbara G.; Fuchs, Walter; Veits, Jutta; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.

    2001-01-01

    Egress of four important alphaherpesviruses, equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1), herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV), and pseudorabies virus (PrV), was investigated by electron microscopy of infected cell lines of different origins. In all virus-cell systems analyzed, similar observations were made concerning the different stages of virion morphogenesis. After intranuclear assembly, nucleocapsids bud at the inner leaflet of the nuclear membrane, resulting in enveloped particles in the perinuclear space that contain a sharply bordered rim of tegument and a smooth envelope surface. Egress from the perinuclear cisterna primarily occurs by fusion of the primary envelope with the outer leaflet of the nuclear membrane, which has been visualized for HSV-1 and EHV-1 for the first time. The resulting intracytoplasmic naked nucleocapsids are enveloped at membranes of the trans-Golgi network (TGN), as shown by immunogold labeling with a TGN-specific antiserum. Virions containing their final envelope differ in morphology from particles within the perinuclear cisterna by visible surface projections and a diffuse tegument. Particularly striking was the addition of a large amount of tegument material to ILTV capsids in the cytoplasm. Extracellular virions were morphologically identical to virions within Golgi-derived vesicles, but distinct from virions in the perinuclear space. Studies with gB- and gH-deleted PrV mutants indicated that these two glycoproteins, which are essential for virus entry and direct cell-to-cell spread, are dispensable for egress. Taken together, our studies indicate that the deenvelopment-reenvelopment process of herpesvirus maturation also occurs in EHV-1, HSV-1, and ILTV and that membrane fusion processes occurring during egress are substantially different from those during entry and direct viral cell-to-cell spread. PMID:11264357

  7. Comparison of the specificity of interaction of cellular and viral zinc-binding domains with 2-mercaptobenzamide thioesters.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Lisa M Miller; Durell, Stewart R; Maynard, Andrew T; Stahl, Stephen J; Inman, John K; Appella, Ettore; Legault, Pascale; Omichinski, James G

    2006-09-13

    The interactions of two 2-mercaptobenzamide thioester compounds with six diverse zinc-binding domains (ZBDs) have been analyzed by UV/visible spectroscopy, NMR spectroscopy, and nucleic acid binding assays. These thioester compounds serve as useful tools for probing the intrinsic chemical stability of ZBDs that exist within a variety of cellular and viral proteins. In our studies, the classical (Cys(2)His(2)) zinc finger ZBDs, the interleaved RING like ZBDs of protein kinase C delta (Cys(2)HisCys and HisCys(3)), and the carboxyl-terminal (Cys(2)HisCys) ZBD of Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus nucleocapsid protein (MMTV NCp10) were resistant to reaction with the thioester compounds. In contrast, the thioester compounds were able to efficiently eject zinc from the amino-terminal (Cys(2)HisCys) ZBD of MMTV NCp10, a Cys(2)HisCys ZBD from Friend of GATA-1 (FOG-1), and from both Cys(4) ZBDs of GATA-1. In all cases, zinc ejection led to a loss of protein structure. Interestingly, GATA-1 was resistant to reaction with the thioester compounds when bound to its target DNA sequence. The electronic and steric screening was calculated for select ZBDs to further explore their reactivity. Based on these results, it appears that both first and second zinc-coordination shell interactions within ZBDs, as well as nucleic acid binding, play important roles in determining the chemical stability and reactivity of ZBDs. These studies not only provide information regarding the relative reactivity of cysteine residues within structural ZBDs but also are crucial for the design of future therapeutic agents that selectively target ZBDs, such as those that occur in the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein. PMID:16953638

  8. Occluded and nonoccluded nuclear polyhedrosis virus grown in Trichoplusia ni: comparative neutralization comparative infectivity, and in vitro growth studies.

    PubMed Central

    Volkman, L E; Summers, M D; Hsieh, C H

    1976-01-01

    Nuclear polyhedrosis virus infections of lepidopteran cells often result in the production of both occluded and nonoccluded virus. The characterization of these two different forms has been the subject of several papers. We have divided the nonoccluded virus (NOV) category further into plasma membrane-budded non-occluded virus (PMB-NOV), intracellular NOV, and hemolymph-derived NOV, and have done additional studies investigating the differences between these nonoccluded forms and the alkali-liberated forms from occlusions of the nuclear polyhedrosis viruses of Autographa californica and Rachiplusa ou. The methods used to discern differences and similarities among the forms were serological, biochemical, and visual, all related to their biological acitivity. Neutralization studies revealed that alkali-liberated virus and PMB-NOV had both similar and different antigens. Antisera raised against alkali-liberated virus from occlusions neutralized the alkali-liberated form of the virus, but did not neutralize the intracellular or extracellular nonoccluded forms. Antisera raised against the TN-368-13 PMB-NOV, however, neutralized the alkali-liberated forms as well as all forms of the NOV. Adsorption of this antisera with alkali-liberated virus did not diminish the neutralization titer against the nonoccluded forms, thus confirming the antigenic differences between the alkali-liberated and nonoccluded forms of the virus. Physical-infectious particle ratio calculations indicated that the PMB-NOV of Autographa californica are about 1,900-fold more infectious than the single-nucleocapsid-per-envelope alkali-liberated particles and about 1,700-fold more infectious than the multiple-nucleocapsid-per-envelope particles, as assayed in vitro. In addition, a study of viral growth kinetics monitored concurrently with the appearance of polyhedra showed that PMB-NOV production is shut down with the onset of polyhedron formation. PMID:787558

  9. Fatal systemic necrotizing infections associated with a novel paramyxovirus, anaconda paramyxovirus, in green anaconda juveniles.

    PubMed

    Woo, Patrick C Y; Lau, Susanna K P; Martelli, Paolo; Hui, Suk-Wai; Lau, Candy C Y; Fan, Rachel Y Y; Groff, Joseph M; Tam, Emily W T; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2014-10-01

    Beginning in July 2011, 31 green anaconda (Eunectes murinus) juveniles from an oceanarium in Hong Kong died over a 12-month period. Necropsy revealed at least two of the following features in 23 necropsies: dermatitis, severe pan-nephritis, and/or severe systemic multiorgan necrotizing inflammation. Histopathological examination revealed severe necrotizing inflammation in various organs, most prominently the kidneys. Electron microscopic examination of primary tissues revealed intralesional accumulations of viral nucleocapsids with diameters of 10 to 14 nm, typical of paramyxoviruses. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR results were positive for paramyxovirus (viral loads of 2.33 × 10(4) to 1.05 × 10(8) copies/mg tissue) in specimens from anaconda juveniles that died but negative in specimens from the two anaconda juveniles and anaconda mother that survived. None of the other snakes in the park was moribund, and RT-PCR results for surveillance samples collected from other snakes were negative. The virus was isolated from BHK21 cells, causing cytopathic effects with syncytial formation. The virus could also replicate in 25 of 27 cell lines of various origins, in line with its capability for infecting various organs. Electron microscopy with cell culture material revealed enveloped virus with the typical "herringbone" appearance of helical nucleocapsids in paramyxoviruses. Complete genome sequencing of five isolates confirmed that the infections originated from the same clone. Comparative genomic and phylogenetic analyses and mRNA editing experiments revealed a novel paramyxovirus in the genus Ferlavirus, named anaconda paramyxovirus, with a typical Ferlavirus genomic organization of 3'-N-U-P/V/I-M-F-HN-L-5'. Epidemiological and genomic analyses suggested that the anaconda juveniles acquired the virus perinatally from the anaconda mother rather than from other reptiles in the park, with subsequent interanaconda juvenile transmission. PMID:25078906

  10. Insights into the Hendra virus NTAIL-XD complex: Evidence for a parallel organization of the helical MoRE at the XD surface stabilized by a combination of hydrophobic and polar interactions.

    PubMed

    Erales, Jenny; Beltrandi, Matilde; Roche, Jennifer; Maté, Maria; Longhi, Sonia

    2015-08-01

    The Hendra virus is a member of the Henipavirus genus within the Paramyxoviridae family. The nucleoprotein, which consists of a structured core and of a C-terminal intrinsically disordered domain (N(TAIL)), encapsidates the viral genome within a helical nucleocapsid. N(TAIL) partly protrudes from the surface of the nucleocapsid being thus capable of interacting with the C-terminal X domain (XD) of the viral phosphoprotein. Interaction with XD implies a molecular recognition element (MoRE) that is located within N(TAIL) residues 470-490, and that undergoes α-helical folding. The MoRE has been proposed to be embedded in the hydrophobic groove delimited by helices α2 and α3 of XD, although experimental data could not discriminate between a parallel and an antiparallel orientation of the MoRE. Previous studies also showed that if the binding interface is enriched in hydrophobic residues, charged residues located close to the interface might play a role in complex formation. Here, we targeted for site directed mutagenesis two acidic and two basic residues within XD and N(TAIL). ITC studies showed that electrostatics plays a crucial role in complex formation and pointed a parallel orientation of the MoRE as more likely. Further support for a parallel orientation was afforded by SAXS studies that made use of two chimeric constructs in which XD and the MoRE were covalently linked to each other. Altogether, these studies unveiled the multiparametric nature of the interactions established within this complex and contribute to shed light onto the molecular features of protein interfaces involving intrinsically disordered regions. PMID:25960280

  11. A phylogenetically distinct Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus detected in a dromedary calf from a closed dairy herd in Dubai with rising seroprevalence with age

    PubMed Central

    Wernery, Ulrich; Rasoul, IHassab El; Wong, Emily YM; Joseph, Marina; Chen, Yixin; Jose, Shanty; Tsang, Alan KL; Patteril, Nissy Annie Georgy; Chen, Honglin; Elizabeth, Shyna K; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Joseph, Sunitha; Xia, Ningshao; Wernery, Renate; Lau, Susanna KP; Woo, Patrick CY

    2015-01-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) was detected by monoclonal antibody-based nucleocapsid protein-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), RNA detection, and viral culture from the nasal sample of a 1-month-old dromedary calf in Dubai with sudden death. Whole genome phylogeny showed that this MERS-CoV strain did not cluster with the other MERS-CoV strains from Dubai that we reported recently. Instead, it formed a unique branch more closely related to other MERS-CoV strains from patients in Qatar and Hafr-Al-Batin in Saudi Arabia, as well as the MERS-CoV strains from patients in the recent Korean outbreak, in which the index patient acquired the infection during travel in the eastern part of the Arabian Peninsula. Non-synonymous mutations, resulting in 11 unique amino acid differences, were observed between the MERS-CoV genome from the present study and all the other available MERS-CoV genomes. Among these 11 unique amino acid differences, four were found in ORF1ab, three were found in the S1 domain of the spike protein, and one each was found in the proteins encoded by ORF4b, ORF5, envelope gene, and ORF8. MERS-CoV detection for all other 254 dromedaries in this closed dairy herd was negative by nucleocapsid protein-capture ELISA and RNA detection. MERS-CoV IgG sero-positivity gradually increased in dromedary calves with increasing age, with positivity rates of 75% at zero to three months, 79% at four months, 89% at five to six months, and 90% at seven to twelve months. The development of a rapid antigen detection kit for instantaneous diagnosis is warranted. PMID:26632876

  12. Rapid and specific detection of Sin Nombre virus antibodies in patients with hantavirus pulmonary syndrome by a strip immunoblot assay suitable for field diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Hjelle, B; Jenison, S; Torrez-Martinez, N; Herring, B; Quan, S; Polito, A; Pichuantes, S; Yamada, T; Morris, C; Elgh, F; Lee, H W; Artsob, H; Dinello, R

    1997-01-01

    To develop a rapid antibody test for Sin Nombre hantavirus (SNV) infection for diagnosis of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in field settings where advanced instrumentation is not available, a strip immunoblot assay bearing four immobilized antigens for SNV and a recombinant nucleocapsid protein antigen of Seoul hantavirus (SEOV) was prepared. The SNV antigens included a full-length recombinant-expressed nucleocapsid (N) protein (rN), a recombinant-expressed G1 protein (residues 35 to 117), and synthetic peptides derived from N (residues 17 to 59) and G1 (residues 55 to 88). On the basis of the observed reactivities of hantavirus-infected patient and control sera, we determined that a positive assay requires reactivity with SNV or SEOV rN antigen and at least one other antigen. Isolated reactivity to either viral rN antigen is indeterminate, and any pattern of reactivity that does not include reactivity to an rN antigen is considered indeterminate but is unlikely to represent hantavirus infection. Fifty-eight of 59 samples from patients with acute SNV-associated HPS were positive according to these criteria, and one was initially indeterminate. Four of four samples from patients with HPS due to other hantaviruses were positive, as were most samples from patients with SEOV and Puumala virus infections. Of 192 control serum samples, 2 (1%) were positive and 2 were indeterminate. Acute SNV infection was distinguishable from remote SNV infection or infection with hantaviruses other than SNV by the presence of G1 peptide antigen reactivities in the former. The strip immunoblot assay shows promise for the detection of SNV antibodies early in the course of HPS. PMID:9041397

  13. Susceptibility to measles virus-induced encephalitis in mice correlates with impaired antigen presentation to cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Niewiesk, S; Brinckmann, U; Bankamp, B; Sirak, S; Liebert, U G; ter Meulen, V

    1993-01-01

    In measles virus (MV) infection in humans, meningitis and encephalitis are important complications. However, little is known of the pathogenesis of MV encephalitis, in particular about the role of the immune response. We have examined the role of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) in a mouse model of MV-induced encephalitis. We report here that the resistance of inbred strains of mice to MV-induced encephalitis correlated with the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotype and that only resistant mouse strains mounted an effective CTL response to MV. Mice with low susceptibility to MV infection, such as the BALB/c strain (H-2d), generated CTL, whereas the highly susceptible strains, C3H (H-2k) and C57BL/6 (H-2b), revealed very poor CTL responses. MV-induced CTL were usually CD8+, and the generation of these cells was independent of the route of inoculation or the time postinfection. CD4+ T cells were generally only weakly lytic. The nucleocapsid protein was the major target antigen for CTL in BALB/c mice, although in some experiments the hemagglutinin was also recognized. CTL from C3H and C57BL/6 mice did not lyse MV-infected target cells. However, targets infected with vaccinia virus recombinants expressing the nucleocapsid protein or hemagglutinin were lysed, but levels of cytotoxicity were still low. Experiments using target cells transfected with single MHC class I genes suggested inefficient antigen presentation of MV proteins by the MHC molecules of t