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Sample records for nucleotide binding domains

  1. A Nucleotide Phosphatase Activity in the Nucleotide Binding Domain of an Orphan Resistance Protein from Rice*

    PubMed Central

    Fenyk, Stepan; de San Eustaquio Campillo, Alba; Pohl, Ehmke; Hussey, Patrick J.; Cann, Martin J.

    2012-01-01

    Plant resistance proteins (R-proteins) are key components of the plant immune system activated in response to a plethora of different pathogens. R-proteins are P-loop NTPase superfamily members, and current models describe their main function as ATPases in defense signaling pathways. Here we show that a subset of R-proteins have evolved a new function to combat pathogen infection. This subset of R-proteins possesses a nucleotide phosphatase activity in the nucleotide-binding domain. Related R-proteins that fall in the same phylogenetic clade all show the same nucleotide phosphatase activity indicating a conserved function within at least a subset of R-proteins. R-protein nucleotide phosphatases catalyze the production of nucleoside from nucleotide with the nucleotide monophosphate as the preferred substrate. Mutation of conserved catalytic residues substantially reduced activity consistent with the biochemistry of P-loop NTPases. Kinetic analysis, analytical gel filtration, and chemical cross-linking demonstrated that the nucleotide-binding domain was active as a multimer. Nuclear magnetic resonance and nucleotide analogues identified the terminal phosphate bond as the target of a reaction that utilized a metal-mediated nucleophilic attack by water on the phosphoester. In conclusion, we have identified a group of R-proteins with a unique function. This biochemical activity appears to have co-evolved with plants in signaling pathways designed to resist pathogen attack. PMID:22157756

  2. Insights into how nucleotide-binding domains power ABC transport.

    PubMed

    Newstead, Simon; Fowler, Philip W; Bilton, Paul; Carpenter, Elisabeth P; Sadler, Peter J; Campopiano, Dominic J; Sansom, Mark S P; Iwata, So

    2009-09-01

    The mechanism by which nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of ABC transporters power the transport of substrates across cell membranes is currently unclear. Here we report the crystal structure of an NBD, FbpC, from the Neisseria gonorrhoeae ferric iron uptake transporter with an unusual and substantial domain swap in the C-terminal regulatory domain. This entanglement suggests that FbpC is unable to open to the same extent as the homologous protein MalK. Using molecular dynamics we demonstrate that this is not the case: both NBDs open rapidly once ATP is removed. We conclude from this result that the closed structures of FbpC and MalK have higher free energies than their respective open states. This result has important implications for our understanding of the mechanism of power generation in ABC transporters, because the unwinding of this free energy ensures that the opening of these two NBDs is also powered. PMID:19748342

  3. Proton-translocating nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase. Reconstitution of the extramembranous nucleotide-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, M; Hatefi, Y

    1995-11-24

    The nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase of bovine mitochondria is a homodimer of monomer M(r) = 109,065. The monomer is composed of three domains, an NH2-terminal 430-residue-long hydrophilic domain I that binds NAD(H), a central 400-residue-long hydrophobic domain II that is largely membrane intercalated and carries the enzyme's proton channel, and a COOH-terminal 200-residue-long hydrophilic domain III that binds NADP(H). Domains I and III protrude into the mitochondrial matrix, where they presumably come together to form the enzyme's catalytic site. The two-subunit transhydrogenase of Escherichia coli and the three-subunit transhydrogenase of Rhodospirillum rubrum have each the same overall tridomain hydropathy profile as the bovine enzyme. Domain I of the R. rubrum enzyme (the alpha 1 subunit) is water soluble and easily removed from the chromatophore membranes. We have isolated domain I of the bovine transhydrogenase after controlled trypsinolysis of the purified enzyme and have expressed in E. coli and purified therefrom domain III of this enzyme. This paper shows that an active bidomain transhydrogenase lacking domain II can be reconstituted by the combination of purified bovine domains I plus III or R. rubrum domain I plus bovine domain III. PMID:7499307

  4. The Tomato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat Immune Receptor I-2 Couples DNA-binding to Nucleotide-binding Domain Nucleotide Exchange.

    PubMed

    Fenyk, Stepan; Dixon, Christopher H; Gittens, William H; Townsend, Philip D; Sharples, Gary J; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L W; Cann, Martin J

    2016-01-15

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable plants to recognize and respond to pathogen attack. Previously, we demonstrated that the Rx1 NLR of potato is able to bind and bend DNA in vitro. DNA binding in situ requires its genuine activation following pathogen perception. However, it is unknown whether other NLR proteins are also able to bind DNA. Nor is it known how DNA binding relates to the ATPase activity intrinsic to NLR switch function required to immune activation. Here we investigate these issues using a recombinant protein corresponding to the N-terminal coiled-coil and nucleotide-binding domain regions of the I-2 NLR of tomato. Wild type I-2 protein bound nucleic acids with a preference of ssDNA ≈ dsDNA > ssRNA, which is distinct from Rx1. I-2 induced bending and melting of DNA. Notably, ATP enhanced DNA binding relative to ADP in the wild type protein, the null P-loop mutant K207R, and the autoactive mutant S233F. DNA binding was found to activate the intrinsic ATPase activity of I-2. Because DNA binding by I-2 was decreased in the presence of ADP when compared with ATP, a cyclic mechanism emerges; activated ATP-associated I-2 binds to DNA, which enhances ATP hydrolysis, releasing ADP-bound I-2 from the DNA. Thus DNA binding is a general property of at least a subset of NLR proteins, and NLR activation is directly linked to its activity at DNA. PMID:26601946

  5. The Tomato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat Immune Receptor I-2 Couples DNA-binding to Nucleotide-binding Domain Nucleotide Exchange*

    PubMed Central

    Fenyk, Stepan; Dixon, Christopher H.; Gittens, William H.; Townsend, Philip D.; Sharples, Gary J.; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L. W.; Cann, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable plants to recognize and respond to pathogen attack. Previously, we demonstrated that the Rx1 NLR of potato is able to bind and bend DNA in vitro. DNA binding in situ requires its genuine activation following pathogen perception. However, it is unknown whether other NLR proteins are also able to bind DNA. Nor is it known how DNA binding relates to the ATPase activity intrinsic to NLR switch function required to immune activation. Here we investigate these issues using a recombinant protein corresponding to the N-terminal coiled-coil and nucleotide-binding domain regions of the I-2 NLR of tomato. Wild type I-2 protein bound nucleic acids with a preference of ssDNA ≈ dsDNA > ssRNA, which is distinct from Rx1. I-2 induced bending and melting of DNA. Notably, ATP enhanced DNA binding relative to ADP in the wild type protein, the null P-loop mutant K207R, and the autoactive mutant S233F. DNA binding was found to activate the intrinsic ATPase activity of I-2. Because DNA binding by I-2 was decreased in the presence of ADP when compared with ATP, a cyclic mechanism emerges; activated ATP-associated I-2 binds to DNA, which enhances ATP hydrolysis, releasing ADP-bound I-2 from the DNA. Thus DNA binding is a general property of at least a subset of NLR proteins, and NLR activation is directly linked to its activity at DNA. PMID:26601946

  6. Normal gating of CFTR requires ATP binding to both nucleotide-binding domains and hydrolysis at the second nucleotide-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Berger, Allan L; Ikuma, Mutsuhiro; Welsh, Michael J

    2005-01-11

    ATP interacts with the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of CFTR to control gating. However, it is unclear whether gating involves ATP binding alone, or also involves hydrolysis at each NBD. We introduced phenylalanine residues into nonconserved positions of each NBD Walker A motif to sterically prevent ATP binding. These mutations blocked [alpha-(32)P]8-N(3)-ATP labeling of the mutated NBD and reduced channel opening rate without changing burst duration. Introducing cysteine residues at these positions and modifying with N-ethylmaleimide produced the same gating behavior. These results indicate that normal gating requires ATP binding to both NBDs, but ATP interaction with one NBD is sufficient to support some activity. We also studied mutations of the conserved Walker A lysine residues (K464A and K1250A) that prevent hydrolysis. By combining substitutions that block ATP binding with Walker A lysine mutations, we could differentiate the role of ATP binding vs. hydrolysis at each NBD. The K1250A mutation prolonged burst duration; however, blocking ATP binding prevented the long bursts. These data indicate that ATP binding to NBD2 allowed channel opening and that closing was delayed in the absence of hydrolysis. The corresponding NBD1 mutations showed relatively little effect of preventing ATP hydrolysis but a large inhibition of blocking ATP binding. These data suggest that ATP binding to NBD1 is required for normal activity but that hydrolysis has little effect. Our results suggest that both NBDs contribute to channel gating, NBD1 binds ATP but supports little hydrolysis, and ATP binding and hydrolysis at NBD2 are key for normal gating. PMID:15623556

  7. Normal gating of CFTR requires ATP binding to both nucleotide-binding domains and hydrolysis at the second nucleotide-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Allan L.; Ikuma, Mutsuhiro; Welsh, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    ATP interacts with the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of CFTR to control gating. However, it is unclear whether gating involves ATP binding alone, or also involves hydrolysis at each NBD. We introduced phenylalanine residues into nonconserved positions of each NBD Walker A motif to sterically prevent ATP binding. These mutations blocked [α-32P]8-N3-ATP labeling of the mutated NBD and reduced channel opening rate without changing burst duration. Introducing cysteine residues at these positions and modifying with N-ethylmaleimide produced the same gating behavior. These results indicate that normal gating requires ATP binding to both NBDs, but ATP interaction with one NBD is sufficient to support some activity. We also studied mutations of the conserved Walker A lysine residues (K464A and K1250A) that prevent hydrolysis. By combining substitutions that block ATP binding with Walker A lysine mutations, we could differentiate the role of ATP binding vs. hydrolysis at each NBD. The K1250A mutation prolonged burst duration; however, blocking ATP binding prevented the long bursts. These data indicate that ATP binding to NBD2 allowed channel opening and that closing was delayed in the absence of hydrolysis. The corresponding NBD1 mutations showed relatively little effect of preventing ATP hydrolysis but a large inhibition of blocking ATP binding. These data suggest that ATP binding to NBD1 is required for normal activity but that hydrolysis has little effect. Our results suggest that both NBDs contribute to channel gating, NBD1 binds ATP but supports little hydrolysis, and ATP binding and hydrolysis at NBD2 are key for normal gating. PMID:15623556

  8. Nucleotides regulate the mechanical hierarchy between subdomains of the nucleotide binding domain of the Hsp70 chaperone DnaK.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Daniela; Merz, Dale R; Pelz, Benjamin; Theisen, Kelly E; Yacyshyn, Gail; Mokranjac, Dejana; Dima, Ruxandra I; Rief, Matthias; Žoldák, Gabriel

    2015-08-18

    The regulation of protein function through ligand-induced conformational changes is crucial for many signal transduction processes. The binding of a ligand alters the delicate energy balance within the protein structure, eventually leading to such conformational changes. In this study, we elucidate the energetic and mechanical changes within the subdomains of the nucleotide binding domain (NBD) of the heat shock protein of 70 kDa (Hsp70) chaperone DnaK upon nucleotide binding. In an integrated approach using single molecule optical tweezer experiments, loop insertions, and steered coarse-grained molecular simulations, we find that the C-terminal helix of the NBD is the major determinant of mechanical stability, acting as a glue between the two lobes. After helix unraveling, the relative stability of the two separated lobes is regulated by ATP/ADP binding. We find that the nucleotide stays strongly bound to lobe II, thus reversing the mechanical hierarchy between the two lobes. Our results offer general insights into the nucleotide-induced signal transduction within members of the actin/sugar kinase superfamily. PMID:26240360

  9. Nucleotides regulate the mechanical hierarchy between subdomains of the nucleotide binding domain of the Hsp70 chaperone DnaK

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Daniela; Merz, Dale R.; Pelz, Benjamin; Theisen, Kelly E.; Yacyshyn, Gail; Mokranjac, Dejana; Dima, Ruxandra I.; Rief, Matthias; Žoldák, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of protein function through ligand-induced conformational changes is crucial for many signal transduction processes. The binding of a ligand alters the delicate energy balance within the protein structure, eventually leading to such conformational changes. In this study, we elucidate the energetic and mechanical changes within the subdomains of the nucleotide binding domain (NBD) of the heat shock protein of 70 kDa (Hsp70) chaperone DnaK upon nucleotide binding. In an integrated approach using single molecule optical tweezer experiments, loop insertions, and steered coarse-grained molecular simulations, we find that the C-terminal helix of the NBD is the major determinant of mechanical stability, acting as a glue between the two lobes. After helix unraveling, the relative stability of the two separated lobes is regulated by ATP/ADP binding. We find that the nucleotide stays strongly bound to lobe II, thus reversing the mechanical hierarchy between the two lobes. Our results offer general insights into the nucleotide-induced signal transduction within members of the actin/sugar kinase superfamily. PMID:26240360

  10. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Buey, Rubén M; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M; Revuelta, José L

    2015-01-01

    Inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches. PMID:26558346

  11. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buey, Rubén M.; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M.; Revuelta, José L.

    2015-11-01

    Inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches.

  12. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Buey, Rubén M.; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M.; Revuelta, José L.

    2015-01-01

    Inosine-5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches. PMID:26558346

  13. Differential interactions of nucleotides at the two nucleotide binding domains of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, L; Mengos, A; Chang, X; Aleksandrov, A; Riordan, J R

    2001-04-20

    After phosphorylation by protein kinase A, gating of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is regulated by the interaction of ATP with its nucleotide binding domains (NBDs). Models of this gating regulation have proposed that ATP hydrolysis at NBD1 and NBD2 may drive channel opening and closing, respectively (reviewed in Nagel, G. (1999) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1461, 263-274). However, as yet there has been little biochemical confirmation of the predictions of these models. We have employed photoaffinity labeling with 8-azido-ATP, which supports channel gating as effectively as ATP to evaluate interactions with each NBD in intact membrane-bound CFTR. Mutagenesis of Walker A lysine residues crucial for azido-ATP hydrolysis to generate the azido-ADP that is trapped by vanadate indicated a greater role of NBD1 than NBD2. Separation of the domains by limited trypsin digestion and enrichment by immunoprecipitation confirmed greater and more stable nucleotide trapping at NBD1. This asymmetry of the two domains in interactions with nucleotides was reflected most emphatically in the response to the nonhydrolyzable ATP analogue, 5'-adenylyl-beta,gamma-imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP), which in the gating models was proposed to bind with high affinity to NBD2 causing inhibition of ATP hydrolysis there postulated to drive channel closing. Instead we found a strong competitive inhibition of nucleotide hydrolysis and trapping at NBD1 and a simultaneous enhancement at NBD2. This argues strongly that AMP-PNP does not inhibit ATP hydrolysis at NBD2 and thereby questions the relevance of hydrolysis at that domain to channel closing. PMID:11279083

  14. Crystal structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of mortalin, the mitochondrial Hsp70 chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Amick, Joseph; Schlanger, Simon E; Wachnowsky, Christine; Moseng, Mitchell A; Emerson, Corey C; Dare, Michelle; Luo, Wen-I; Ithychanda, Sujay S; Nix, Jay C; Cowan, J A; Page, Richard C; Misra, Saurav

    2014-01-01

    Mortalin, a member of the Hsp70-family of molecular chaperones, functions in a variety of processes including mitochondrial protein import and quality control, Fe-S cluster protein biogenesis, mitochondrial homeostasis, and regulation of p53. Mortalin is implicated in regulation of apoptosis, cell stress response, neurodegeneration, and cancer and is a target of the antitumor compound MKT-077. Like other Hsp70-family members, Mortalin consists of a nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) and a substrate-binding domain. We determined the crystal structure of the NBD of human Mortalin at 2.8 Å resolution. Although the Mortalin nucleotide-binding pocket is highly conserved relative to other Hsp70 family members, we find that its nucleotide affinity is weaker than that of Hsc70. A Parkinson's disease-associated mutation is located on the Mortalin-NBD surface and may contribute to Mortalin aggregation. We present structure-based models for how the Mortalin-NBD may interact with the nucleotide exchange factor GrpEL1, with p53, and with MKT-077. Our structure may contribute to the understanding of disease-associated Mortalin mutations and to improved Mortalin-targeting antitumor compounds. PMID:24687350

  15. Structural and evolutionary divergence of cyclic nucleotide binding domains in eukaryotic pathogens: Implications for drug design.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Smita; Kennedy, Eileen J; Herberg, Friedrich W; Hui, Raymond; Taylor, Susan S; Langsley, Gordon; Kannan, Natarajan

    2015-10-01

    Many cellular functions in eukaryotic pathogens are mediated by the cyclic nucleotide binding (CNB) domain, which senses second messengers such as cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP. Although CNB domain-containing proteins have been identified in many pathogenic organisms, an incomplete understanding of how CNB domains in pathogens differ from other eukaryotic hosts has hindered the development of selective inhibitors for CNB domains associated with infectious diseases. Here, we identify and classify CNB domain-containing proteins in eukaryotic genomes to understand the evolutionary basis for CNB domain functional divergence in pathogens. We identify 359 CNB domain-containing proteins in 31 pathogenic organisms and classify them into distinct subfamilies based on sequence similarity within the CNB domain as well as functional domains associated with the CNB domain. Our study reveals novel subfamilies with pathogen-specific variations in the phosphate-binding cassette. Analyzing these variations in light of existing structural and functional data provides new insights into ligand specificity and promiscuity and clues for drug design. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Inhibitors of Protein Kinases. PMID:25847873

  16. The nucleotide-binding domain of NLRC5 is critical for nuclear import and transactivation activity

    SciTech Connect

    Meissner, Torsten B.; Li, Amy; Liu, Yuen-Joyce; Gagnon, Etienne; Kobayashi, Koichi S.

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NLRC5 requires an intact NLS for its function as MHC class I transactivator. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear presence of NLRC5 is required for MHC class I induction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nucleotide-binding controls nuclear import and transactivation activity of NLRC5. -- Abstract: Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II are crucial for the function of the human adaptive immune system. A member of the NLR (nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat) protein family, NLRC5, has recently been identified as a transcriptional regulator of MHC class I and related genes. While a 'master regulator' of MHC class II genes, CIITA, has long been known, NLRC5 specifically associates with and transactivates the proximal promoters of MHC class I genes. In this study, we analyzed the molecular requirements of NLRC5 nuclear import and transactivation activity. We show that NLRC5-mediated MHC class I gene induction requires an intact nuclear localization signal and nuclear distribution of NLRC5. In addition, we find that the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) of NLRC5 is critical not only for nuclear translocation but also for the transactivation of MHC class I genes. Changing the cellular localization of NLRC5 is likely to immediately impact MHC class I expression as well as MHC class I-mediated antigen presentation. NLRC5 may thus provide a promising target for the modulation of MHC class I antigen presentation, especially in the setting of transplant medicine.

  17. Probing nucleotide-binding effects on backbone dynamics and folding of the nucleotide-binding domain of the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic-reticulum Ca2+-ATPase.

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Abed, Mona; Millet, Oscar; MacLennan, David H; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2004-01-01

    In muscle cells, SERCA (sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic-reticulum Ca2+-ATPase) plays a key role in restoring cytoplasmic Ca2+ levels to resting concentrations after transient surges caused by excitation-coupling cycles. The mechanism by which Ca2+ is translocated to the lumen of the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) involves major conformational rearrangements among the three cytoplasmic domains: actuator (A), nucleotide-binding (N) and phosphorylation (P) domains; and within the transmembrane Ca2+-binding domain of SERCA. CD, fluorescence spectroscopy and NMR spectroscopy were used in the present study to probe the conformation and stability of the isolated N domain of SERCA (SERCA-N), in the presence and absence of AMP-PNP (adenosine 5'-[beta,gamma-imido]triphosphate). CD and tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy results established that the effects of nucleotide binding were not readily manifested on the global fold and structural stability of SERCA-N. 15N-backbone-relaxation experiments revealed site-specific changes in backbone dynamics that converge on the central beta-sheet domain. Nucleotide binding produced diverse effects on dynamics, with enhanced mobility observed for Ile369, Cys420, Arg467, Asp568, Phe593 and Gly598, whereas rigidifying effects were found for Ser383, Leu419, Thr484 and Thr532. These results demonstrate that the overall fold and backbone motional properties of SERCA-N remained essentially the same in the presence of AMP-PNP, yet revealing evidence for internal counter-balancing effects on backbone dynamics upon binding the nucleotide, which propagate through the central beta-sheet. PMID:14987197

  18. In Silico Screening for Inhibitors of P-Glycoprotein That Target the Nucleotide Binding Domains

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, Frances K.; Follit, Courtney A.; Vogel, Pia D.

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistances and the failure of chemotherapies are often caused by the expression or overexpression of ATP-binding cassette transporter proteins such as the multidrug resistance protein, P-glycoprotein (P-gp). P-gp is expressed in the plasma membrane of many cell types and protects cells from accumulation of toxins. P-gp uses ATP hydrolysis to catalyze the transport of a broad range of mostly hydrophobic compounds across the plasma membrane and out of the cell. During cancer chemotherapy, the administration of therapeutics often selects for cells which overexpress P-gp, thereby creating populations of cancer cells resistant to a variety of chemically unrelated chemotherapeutics. The present study describes extremely high-throughput, massively parallel in silico ligand docking studies aimed at identifying reversible inhibitors of ATP hydrolysis that target the nucleotide-binding domains of P-gp. We used a structural model of human P-gp that we obtained from molecular dynamics experiments as the protein target for ligand docking. We employed a novel approach of subtractive docking experiments that identified ligands that bound predominantly to the nucleotide-binding domains but not the drug-binding domains of P-gp. Four compounds were found that inhibit ATP hydrolysis by P-gp. Using electron spin resonance spectroscopy, we showed that at least three of these compounds affected nucleotide binding to the transporter. These studies represent a successful proof of principle demonstrating the potential of targeted approaches for identifying specific inhibitors of P-gp. PMID:25270578

  19. Structural, biochemical, and functional characterization of the cyclic nucleotide binding homology domain from the mouse EAG1 potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Marques-Carvalho, Maria J; Sahoo, Nirakar; Muskett, Frederick W; Vieira-Pires, Ricardo S; Gabant, Guillaume; Cadene, Martine; Schönherr, Roland; Morais-Cabral, João H

    2012-10-12

    KCNH channels are voltage-gated potassium channels with important physiological functions. In these channels, a C-terminal cytoplasmic region, known as the cyclic nucleotide binding homology (CNB-homology) domain displays strong sequence similarity to cyclic nucleotide binding (CNB) domains. However, the isolated domain does not bind cyclic nucleotides. Here, we report the X-ray structure of the CNB-homology domain from the mouse EAG1 channel. Through comparison with the recently determined structure of the CNB-homology domain from the zebrafish ELK (eag-like K(+)) channel and the CNB domains from the MlotiK1 and HCN (hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated) potassium channels, we establish the structural features of CNB-homology domains that explain the low affinity for cyclic nucleotides. Our structure establishes that the "self-liganded" conformation, where two residues of the C-terminus of the domain are bound in an equivalent position to cyclic nucleotides in CNB domains, is a conserved feature of CNB-homology domains. Importantly, we provide biochemical evidence that suggests that there is also an unliganded conformation where the C-terminus of the domain peels away from its bound position. A functional characterization of this unliganded conformation reveals a role of the CNB-homology domain in channel gating. PMID:22732247

  20. Nucleotide binding and allosteric modulation of the second AAA+ domain of ClpB probed by transient kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Werbeck, Nicolas D; Kellner, Julian N; Barends, Thomas R M; Reinstein, Jochen

    2009-08-01

    The bacterial AAA+ chaperone ClpB provides thermotolerance by disaggregating aggregated proteins in collaboration with the DnaK chaperone system. Like many other AAA+ proteins, ClpB is believed to act as a biological motor converting the chemical energy of ATP into molecular motion. ClpB has two ATPase domains, NBD1 and NBD2, on one polypeptide chain. The functional unit of ClpB is a homohexameric ring, with a total of 12 potential nucleotide binding sites. Previously, two separate constructs, one each containing NBD1 or NBD2, have been shown to form a functional complex with chaperone activity when mixed. Here we aimed to elucidate the nucleotide binding properties of the ClpB complex using pre-steady state kinetics and fluorescent nucleotides. For this purpose, we first disassembled the complex and characterized in detail the binding kinetics of a construct comprising NBD2 and the C-terminal domain of ClpB. The monomeric construct bound nucleotides very tightly. ADP bound 2 orders of magnitude more tightly than ATP; this difference in binding affinity resulted almost exclusively from different dissociation rate constants. The nucleotide binding properties of NBD2 changed when this construct was complemented with a construct comprising NBD1 and the middle domain. Our approach shows how complex formation can influence the binding properties of the individual domains and allows us to assign nucleotide binding features of this highly complex, multimeric enzyme to specific domains. PMID:19594134

  1. Gating of the CFTR Cl- channel by ATP-driven nucleotide-binding domain dimerisation.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Sheppard, David N

    2009-05-15

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) plays a fundamental role in fluid and electrolyte transport across epithelial tissues. Based on its structure, function and regulation, CFTR is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter. These transporters are assembled from two membrane-spanning domains (MSDs) and two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). In the vast majority of ABC transporters, the NBDs form a common engine that utilises the energy of ATP hydrolysis to pump a wide spectrum of substrates through diverse transmembrane pathways formed by the MSDs. By contrast, in CFTR the MSDs form a pathway for passive anion flow that is gated by cycles of ATP binding and hydrolysis by the NBDs. Here, we consider how the interaction of ATP with two ATP-binding sites, formed by the NBDs, powers conformational changes in CFTR structure to gate the channel pore. We explore how conserved sequences from both NBDs form ATP-binding sites at the interface of an NBD dimer and highlight the distinct roles that each binding site plays during the gating cycle. Knowledge of how ATP gates the CFTR Cl- channel is critical for understanding CFTR's physiological role, its malfunction in disease and the mechanism of action of small molecules that modulate CFTR channel gating. PMID:19332488

  2. Gating of the CFTR Cl− channel by ATP-driven nucleotide-binding domain dimerisation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Sheppard, David N

    2009-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) plays a fundamental role in fluid and electrolyte transport across epithelial tissues. Based on its structure, function and regulation, CFTR is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter. These transporters are assembled from two membrane-spanning domains (MSDs) and two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). In the vast majority of ABC transporters, the NBDs form a common engine that utilises the energy of ATP hydrolysis to pump a wide spectrum of substrates through diverse transmembrane pathways formed by the MSDs. By contrast, in CFTR the MSDs form a pathway for passive anion flow that is gated by cycles of ATP binding and hydrolysis by the NBDs. Here, we consider how the interaction of ATP with two ATP-binding sites, formed by the NBDs, powers conformational changes in CFTR structure to gate the channel pore. We explore how conserved sequences from both NBDs form ATP-binding sites at the interface of an NBD dimer and highlight the distinct roles that each binding site plays during the gating cycle. Knowledge of how ATP gates the CFTR Cl− channel is critical for understanding CFTR's physiological role, its malfunction in disease and the mechanism of action of small molecules that modulate CFTR channel gating. PMID:19332488

  3. A stable ATP binding to the nucleotide binding domain is important for reliable gating cycle in an ABC transporter CFTR.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Yu, Ying-Chun; Kono, Koichi; Kubota, Takahiro; Yasui, Masato; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Sohma, Yoshiro

    2010-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel, a member of ABC transporter superfamily, gates following ATP-dependent conformational changes of the nucleotide binding domains (NBD). Reflecting the hundreds of milliseconds duration of the channel open state corresponding to the dimerization of two NBDs, macroscopic WT-CFTR currents usually showed a fast, single exponential relaxation upon removal of cytoplasmic ATP. Mutations of tyrosine1219, a residue critical for ATP binding in second NBD (NBD2), induced a significant slow phase in the current relaxation, suggesting that weakening ATP binding affinity at NBD2 increases the probability of the stable open state. The slow phase was effectively diminished by a higher affinity ATP analogue. These data suggest that a stable binding of ATP to NBD2 is required for normal CFTR gating cycle, andthat the instability of ATP binding frequently halts the gating cycle in the open state presumably through a failure of ATP hydrolysis at NBD2. PMID:20628841

  4. A stable ATP binding to the nucleotide binding domain is important for reliable gating cycle in an ABC transporter CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Yu, Ying-Chun; Kono, Koichi; Kubota, Takahiro; Yasui, Masato; Li, Min

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel, a member of ABC transporter superfamily, gates following ATP-dependent conformational changes of the nucleotide binding domains (NBD). Reflecting the hundreds of milliseconds duration of the channel open state corresponding to the dimerization of two NBDs, macroscopic WT-CFTR currents usually showed a fast, single exponential relaxation upon removal of cytoplasmic ATP. Mutations of tyrosine1219, a residue critical for ATP binding in second NBD (NBD2), induced a significant slow phase in the current relaxation, suggesting that weakening ATP binding affinity at NBD2 increases the probability of the stable open state. The slow phase was effectively diminished by a higher affinity ATP analogue. These data suggest that a stable binding of ATP to NBD2 is required for normal CFTR gating cycle, andthat the instability of ATP binding frequently halts the gating cycle in the open state presumably through a failure of ATP hydrolysis at NBD2. PMID:20628841

  5. Phosphorylation-dependent changes in nucleotide binding, conformation, and dynamics of the first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1) of the sulfonylurea receptor 2B (SUR2B).

    PubMed

    de Araujo, Elvin D; Alvarez, Claudia P; López-Alonso, Jorge P; Sooklal, Clarissa R; Stagljar, Marijana; Kanelis, Voula

    2015-09-11

    The sulfonylurea receptor 2B (SUR2B) forms the regulatory subunit of ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels in vascular smooth muscle. Phosphorylation of the SUR2B nucleotide binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2) by protein kinase A results in increased channel open probability. Here, we investigate the effects of phosphorylation on the structure and nucleotide binding properties of NBD1. Phosphorylation sites in SUR2B NBD1 are located in an N-terminal tail that is disordered. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data indicate that phosphorylation of the N-terminal tail affects multiple residues in NBD1, including residues in the NBD2-binding site, and results in altered conformation and dynamics of NBD1. NMR spectra of NBD1 lacking the N-terminal tail, NBD1-ΔN, suggest that phosphorylation disrupts interactions of the N-terminal tail with the core of NBD1, a model supported by dynamic light scattering. Increased nucleotide binding of phosphorylated NBD1 and NBD1-ΔN, compared with non-phosphorylated NBD1, suggests that by disrupting the interaction of the NBD core with the N-terminal tail, phosphorylation also exposes the MgATP-binding site on NBD1. These data provide insights into the molecular basis by which phosphorylation of SUR2B NBD1 activates KATP channels. PMID:26198630

  6. Novel missense mutation in the cyclic nucleotide-binding domain of HERG causes long QT syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Satler, C.A.; Walsh, E.P.; Vesely, M.R.

    1996-10-02

    Autosomal-dominant long QT syndrome (LQT) is an inherited disorder, predisposing affected individuals to sudden death from tachyarrhythmias. To identify the gene(s) responsible for LQT, we identified and characterized an LQT family consisting of 48 individuals. DNA was screened with 150 microsatellite polymorphic markers encompassing approximately 70% of the genome. We found evidence for linkage of the LQT phenotype to chromosome 7(q35-36). Marker D7S636 yielded a maximum lod score of 6.93 at a recombination fraction ({theta}) of 0.00. Haplotype analysis further localized the LQT gene within a 6-2-cM interval. HERG encodes a potassium channel which has been mapped to this region. Single-strand conformational polymorphism analyses demonstrated aberrant bands that were unique to all affected individuals. DNA sequencing of the aberrant bands demonstrated a G to A substitution in all affected patients; this point mutation results in the substitution of a highly conserved valine residue with a methionine (V822M) in the cyclic nucleotide-binding domain of this potassium channel. The cosegregation of this distinct mutation with LQT demonstrates that HERG is the LQT gene in this pedigree. Furthermore, the location and character of this mutation suggests that the cyclic nucleotide-binding domain of the potassium channel encoded by HERG plays an important role in normal cardiac repolarization and may decrease susceptibility to ventricular tachyarrhythmias. 38 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. In vivo phosphorylation of CFTR promotes formation of a nucleotide-binding domain heterodimer

    PubMed Central

    Mense, Martin; Vergani, Paola; White, Dennis M; Altberg, Gal; Nairn, Angus C; Gadsby, David C

    2006-01-01

    The human ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) is a chloride channel, whose dysfunction causes cystic fibrosis. To gain structural insight into the dynamic interaction between CFTR's nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) proposed to underlie channel gating, we introduced target cysteines into the NBDs, expressed the channels in Xenopus oocytes, and used in vivo sulfhydryl-specific crosslinking to directly examine the cysteines' proximity. We tested five cysteine pairs, each comprising one introduced cysteine in the NH2-terminal NBD1 and another in the COOH-terminal NBD2. Identification of crosslinked product was facilitated by co-expression of NH2-terminal and COOH-terminal CFTR half channels each containing one NBD. The COOH-terminal half channel lacked all native cysteines. None of CFTR's 18 native cysteines was found essential for wild type-like, phosphorylation- and ATP-dependent, channel gating. The observed crosslinks demonstrate that NBD1 and NBD2 interact in a head-to-tail configuration analogous to that in homodimeric crystal structures of nucleotide-bound prokaryotic NBDs. CFTR phosphorylation by PKA strongly promoted both crosslinking and opening of the split channels, firmly linking head-to-tail NBD1–NBD2 association to channel opening. PMID:17036051

  8. A structural model for the nucleotide binding domains of the flavocytochrome b-245 beta-chain.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, W. R.; Jones, D. T.; Segal, A. W.

    1993-01-01

    NADPH is a system in phagocytic cells that generates O2- and hydrogen peroxide in the endocytic vacuole, both of which are important for killing of the engulfed microbe. Dysfunction of this oxidase results in the syndrome of chronic granulomatous disease, characterized by a profound predisposition to bacterial and fungal infections. A flavocytochrome b is the site of most of the mutations causing this syndrome. The FAD and NADPH binding sites have been located on the beta subunit of this molecule, the C-terminal half of which showed weak sequence similarity to other reductases, including the ferredoxin-NADP reductase (FNR) of known structure. This enabled us to build a model of the nucleotide binding domains of the flavocytochrome using this structure as a template. The model was built initially using a novel automatic modeling method based on distance-matrix projection and then refined using energy minimization with appropriate side-chain torsional constraints. The resulting model rationalized much of the observed sequence conservation and identified a large insertion as a potential regulatory domain. It confirms the inclusion of the neutrophil flavocytochrome b-245 (Cb-245) as a member of the FNR family of reductases and strongly supports its function as the proximal electron transporting component of the NADPH oxidase. PMID:8251942

  9. Structural and functional similarities between the nucleotide-binding domains of CFTR and GTP-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Carson, M R; Welsh, M J

    1995-01-01

    The opening and closing of the CFTR Cl- channel are regulated by ATP hydrolysis at its two nucleotide binding domains (NBDs). However, the mechanism and functional significance of ATP hydrolysis are unknown. Sequence similarity between the NBDs of CFTR and GTP-binding proteins suggested the NBDs might have a structure and perhaps a function like that of GTP-binding proteins. Based on this similarity, we predicted that the terminal residue of the LSGGQ motif in the NBDs of CFTR corresponds to a highly conserved glutamine residue in GTP-binding proteins that directly catalyzes the GTPase reaction. Mutations of this residue in NBD1 or NBD2, which were predicted to increase or decrease the rate of hydrolysis, altered the duration of channel closed and open times in a specific manner without altering ion conduction properties or ADP-dependent inhibition. These results suggest that the NBDs of CFTR, and consequently other ABC transporters, may have a structure and a function analogous to those of GTP-binding proteins. We conclude that the rates of ATP hydrolysis at NBD1 and at NBD2 determine the duration of the two states of the channel, closed and open, much as the rate of GTP hydrolysis by GTP-binding proteins determines the duration of their active state. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:8599650

  10. The First Nucleotide Binding Domain of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Is a Site of Stable Nucleotide Interaction, whereas the Second Is a Site of Rapid Turnover.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, Luba; Aleksandrov, Andrei A; Chang, Xiu-Bao; Riordan, John R

    2002-05-01

    As in other adenine nucleotide binding cassette (ABC) proteins the nucleotide binding domains of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) bind and hydrolyze ATP and in some manner regulate CFTR ion channel gating. Unlike some other ABC proteins, however, there are preliminary indications that the two domains of CFTR are nonequivalent in their nucleotide interactions (Szabo, K., Szakacs, G., Hegeds, T., and Sarkadi, B. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 12209-12212; Aleksandrov, L., Mengos, A., Chang, X., Aleksandrov, A., and Riordan, J. R. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 12918-12923). We have now characterized the interactions of the 8-azido-photoactive analogues of ATP, ADP, and 5'-adenyl-beta,gamma-imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP) with the two domains of functional membrane-bound CFTR. The results show that the two domains appear to act independently in the binding and hydrolysis of 8-azido-ATP. At NBD1 binding does not require a divalent cation. This binding is followed by minimal Mg(2+)-dependent hydrolysis and retention of the hydrolysis product, 8-azido-ADP, but not as a vanadate stabilized post-hydrolysis transition state complex. In contrast, at NBD2, MgN(3)ATP is hydrolyzed as rapidly as it is bound and the nucleoside diphosphate hydrolysis product dissociates immediately. Confirming this characterization of NBD1 as a site of more stable nucleotide interaction and NBD2 as a site of fast turnover, the non-hydrolyzable N(3)AMP-PNP bound preferentially to NBD1. This demonstration of NBD2 as the rapid nucleotide turnover site is consistent with the strong effect on channel gating kinetics of inactivation of this domain by mutagenesis. PMID:11861646

  11. Obligate coupling of CFTR pore opening to tight nucleotide-binding domain dimerization.

    PubMed

    Mihályi, Csaba; Töröcsik, Beáta; Csanády, László

    2016-01-01

    In CFTR, the chloride channel mutated in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, ATP-binding-induced dimerization of two cytosolic nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) opens the pore, and dimer disruption following ATP hydrolysis closes it. Spontaneous openings without ATP are rare in wild-type CFTR, but in certain CF mutants constitute the only gating mechanism, stimulated by ivacaftor, a clinically approved CFTR potentiator. The molecular motions underlying spontaneous gating are unclear. Here we correlate energetic coupling between residues across the dimer interface with spontaneous pore opening/closure in single CFTR channels. We show that spontaneous openings are also strictly coupled to NBD dimerization, which may therefore occur even without ATP. Coordinated NBD/pore movements are therefore intrinsic to CFTR: ATP alters the stability, but not the fundamental structural architecture, of open- and closed-pore conformations. This explains correlated effects of phosphorylation, mutations, and drugs on ATP-driven and spontaneous activity, providing insights for understanding CF mutation and drug mechanisms. PMID:27328319

  12. Obligate coupling of CFTR pore opening to tight nucleotide-binding domain dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Mihályi, Csaba; Töröcsik, Beáta; Csanády, László

    2016-01-01

    In CFTR, the chloride channel mutated in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, ATP-binding-induced dimerization of two cytosolic nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) opens the pore, and dimer disruption following ATP hydrolysis closes it. Spontaneous openings without ATP are rare in wild-type CFTR, but in certain CF mutants constitute the only gating mechanism, stimulated by ivacaftor, a clinically approved CFTR potentiator. The molecular motions underlying spontaneous gating are unclear. Here we correlate energetic coupling between residues across the dimer interface with spontaneous pore opening/closure in single CFTR channels. We show that spontaneous openings are also strictly coupled to NBD dimerization, which may therefore occur even without ATP. Coordinated NBD/pore movements are therefore intrinsic to CFTR: ATP alters the stability, but not the fundamental structural architecture, of open- and closed-pore conformations. This explains correlated effects of phosphorylation, mutations, and drugs on ATP-driven and spontaneous activity, providing insights for understanding CF mutation and drug mechanisms. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18164.001 PMID:27328319

  13. Cyclic nucleotide binding and structural changes in the isolated GAF domain of Anabaena adenylyl cyclase, CyaB2

    PubMed Central

    Badireddy, Suguna; Rajendran, Abinaya; Anand, Ganesh Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    GAF domains are a large family of regulatory domains, and a subset are found associated with enzymes involved in cyclic nucleotide (cNMP) metabolism such as adenylyl cyclases and phosphodiesterases. CyaB2, an adenylyl cyclase from Anabaena, contains two GAF domains in tandem at the N-terminus and an adenylyl cyclase domain at the C-terminus. Cyclic AMP, but not cGMP, binding to the GAF domains of CyaB2 increases the activity of the cyclase domain leading to enhanced synthesis of cAMP. Here we show that the isolated GAFb domain of CyaB2 can bind both cAMP and cGMP, and enhanced specificity for cAMP is observed only when both the GAFa and the GAFb domains are present in tandem (GAFab domain). In silico docking and mutational analysis identified distinct residues important for interaction with either cAMP or cGMP in the GAFb domain. Structural changes associated with ligand binding to the GAF domains could not be detected by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) experiments. However, amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDXMS) experiments provided insights into the structural basis for cAMP-induced allosteric regulation of the GAF domains, and differences in the changes induced by cAMP and cGMP binding to the GAF domain. Thus, our findings could allow the development of molecules that modulate the allosteric regulation by GAF domains present in pharmacologically relevant proteins. PMID:25922789

  14. Conformational coupling of the nucleotide-binding and the transmembrane domains in ABC transporters.

    PubMed

    Wen, Po-Chao; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2011-08-01

    Basic architecture of ABC transporters includes two transmembrane domains (TMDs) and two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). Although the transport process takes place in the TMDs, which provide the substrate translocation pathway across the cell membrane and control its accessibility between the two sides of the membrane, the energy required for the process is provided by conformational changes induced in the NBDs by binding and hydrolysis of ATP. Nucleotide-dependent conformational changes in the NBDs, therefore, need to be coupled to structural changes in the TMDs. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we have investigated the structural elements involved in the conformational coupling between the NBDs and the TMDs in the Escherichia coli maltose transporter, an ABC importer for which an intact structure is available both in inward-facing and outward-facing conformations. The prevailing model of coupling is primarily based on a single structural motif, known as the coupling helices, as the main structural element for the NBD-TMD coupling. Surprisingly, we find that in the absence of the NBDs the coupling helices can be conformationally decoupled from the rest of the TMDs, despite their covalent connection. That is, the structural integrity of the coupling helices and their tight coupling to the core of the TMDs rely on the contacts provided by the NBDs. Based on the conformational and dynamical analysis of the simulation trajectories, we propose that the core coupling elements in the maltose transporter involve contributions from several structural motifs located at the NBD-TMD interface, namely, the EAA loops from the TMDs, and the Q-loop and the ENI motifs from the NBDs. These three structural motifs in small ABC importers show a high degree of correlation in motion and mediate the necessary conformational coupling between the core of TMDs and the helical subdomains of NBDs. A comprehensive analysis of the structurally known ABC transporters shows a high degree

  15. Resonance assignment of the ligand-free cyclic nucleotide-binding domain from the murine ion channel HCN2.

    PubMed

    Börger, Claudia; Schünke, Sven; Lecher, Justin; Stoldt, Matthias; Winkhaus, Friederike; Kaupp, U Benjamin; Willbold, Dieter

    2015-10-01

    Hyperpolarization activated and cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) ion channels as well as cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) ion channels are essential for the regulation of cardiac cells, neuronal excitability, and signaling in sensory cells. Both classes are composed of four subunits. Each subunit comprises a transmembrane region, intracellular N- and C-termini, and a C-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD). Binding of cyclic nucleotides to the CNBD promotes opening of both CNG and HCN channels. In case of CNG channels, binding of cyclic nucleotides to the CNBD is sufficient to open the channel. In contrast, HCN channels open upon membrane hyperpolarization and their activity is modulated by binding of cyclic nucleotides shifting the activation potential to more positive values. Although several high-resolution structures of CNBDs from HCN and CNG channels are available, the gating mechanism for murine HCN2 channel, which leads to the opening of the channel pore, is still poorly understood. As part of a structural investigation, here, we report the complete backbone and side chain resonance assignments of the murine HCN2 CNBD with part of the C-linker. PMID:25324217

  16. Evolving nucleotide binding surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieber-Emmons, T.; Rein, R.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the stability and nature of binding of a nucleotide to several known dehydrogenases. The employed approach includes calculation of hydrophobic stabilization of the binding motif and its intermolecular interaction with the ligand. The evolutionary changes of the binding motif are studied by calculating the Euclidean deviation of the respective dehydrogenases. Attention is given to the possible structural elements involved in the origin of nucleotide recognition by non-coded primordial polypeptides.

  17. Investigating the role of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors in bacterial lung infection.

    PubMed

    Leissinger, Mary; Kulkarni, Ritwij; Zemans, Rachel L; Downey, Gregory P; Jeyaseelan, Samithamby

    2014-06-15

    Lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) are a persistent and pervasive public health problem worldwide. Pneumonia and other LRTIs will be among the leading causes of death in adults, and pneumonia is the single largest cause of death in children. LRTIs are also an important cause of acute lung injury and acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Because innate immunity is the first line of defense against pathogens, understanding the role of innate immunity in the pulmonary system is of paramount importance. Pattern recognition molecules (PRMs) that recognize microbial-associated molecular patterns are an integral component of the innate immune system and are located in both cell membranes and cytosol. Toll-like receptors and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors (NLRs) are the major sensors at the forefront of pathogen recognition. Although Toll-like receptors have been extensively studied in host immunity, NLRs have diverse and important roles in immune and inflammatory responses, ranging from antimicrobial properties to adaptive immune responses. The lung contains NLR-expressing immune cells such as leukocytes and nonimmune cells such as epithelial cells that are in constant and close contact with invading microbes. This pulmonary perspective addresses our current understanding of the structure and function of NLR family members, highlighting advances and gaps in knowledge, with a specific focus on immune responses in the respiratory tract during bacterial infection. Further advances in exploring cellular and molecular responses to bacterial pathogens are critical to develop improved strategies to treat and prevent devastating infectious diseases of the lung. PMID:24707903

  18. Concerted but Noncooperative Activation of Nucleotide and Actuator Domains of the Ca-ATPase Upon Calcium Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Baowei; Mahaney, James E.; Mayer, M. Uljana; Bigelow, Diana J.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2008-11-25

    Calcium-dependent domain movements of the nucleotide (N) and actuator (A) domains of the SERCA2a isoform of the Ca-ATPase were assessed using constructs containing engineered tetracysteine binding motifs, which were expressed in insect High-Five cells and subsequently labeled with the biarsenical fluorophore 4’,5’-bis(1,3,2-dithoarsolan-2-yl)fluorescein (FlAsH-EDT2). Maximum catalytic function is retained in microsomes isolated from High-Five cells and labeled with FlAsH-EDT2. Distance measurements using the nucleotide analog TNP-ATP, which acts as a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) acceptor from FlAsH, identify a 2.4 Å increase in the spatial separation between the N- and A-domains induced by high-affinity calcium binding; this structural change is comparable to that observed in crystal structures. No significant distance changes occur across the N-domain between FlAsH and TNP-ATP, indicating that calcium activation induces rigid body domain movements rather than intradomain conformational changes. Calcium-dependent decreases in the fluorescence of FlAsH bound respectively to either the N- or A-domains indicate coordinated and noncooperative domain movements, where both N- and A-domains domains display virtually identical calcium dependencies (i.e., Kd = 4.8 ± 0.4 μM). We suggest that occupancy of a single high-affinity calcium binding site induces the rearrangement of the A- and N-domains of the Ca-ATPase to form an intermediate state, which facilitates ATP utilization upon occupancy of the second high-affinity calcium site to enhance transport efficiency.

  19. On the interactions between nucleotide binding domains and membrane spanning domains in cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator: A molecular dynamic study.

    PubMed

    Belmonte, Luca; Moran, Oscar

    2015-04-01

    The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator (CFTR) is a membrane protein whose mutations cause cystic fibrosis, a lethal genetic disease. We performed a molecular dynamic (MD) study of the properties of the nucleotide binding domains (NBD) whose conformational changes, upon ATP binding, are the direct responsible of the gating mechanisms of CFTR. This study was done for the wild type (WT) CFTR and for the two most common mutations, ΔF508, that produces a traffic defect of the protein, and the mutation G551D, that causes a gating defect on CFTR. Using an homology model of the open channel conformation of the CFTR we thus introduced the mutations to the structure. Although the overall structures of the G551D and ΔF508 are quite well conserved, the NBD1-NBD2 interactions are severely modified in both mutants. NBD1 and NBD2 are indeed destabilized with a higher internal energy (Ei) in the ΔF508-CFTR. Differently, Ei does not change in the NBDs of G551D but, while the number of close contacts between NBD1 and NBD2 in ΔF508 is increased, a significant reduction of close contacts is found in the G551D mutated form. Hydrogen bonds formation between NBDs of the two mutated forms is also altered and it is slightly increased for the ΔF508, while are severely reduced in G551D. A consequent modification of the NBDs-ICLs interactions between residues involved in the transduction of the ATP binding and the channel gating is also registered. Indeed, while a major interaction is noticed between NBDs interface and ICL2 and ICL4 in the WT, this interaction is somehow altered in both mutated forms plausibly with effect on channel gating. Thus, single point mutations of the CFTR protein can reasonably results in channel gating defects due to alteration of the interaction mechanisms between the NBDs and NBDs-ICLs interfaces upon ATP-binding process. PMID:25640670

  20. Water-mediated forces between the nucleotide binding domains generate the power stroke in an ABC transporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa-Hagiya, Tomoka; Yoshida, Norio; Chiba, Shuntaro; Hayashi, Tomohiko; Furuta, Tadaomi; Sohma, Yoshiro; Sakurai, Minoru

    2014-11-01

    ATP binding cassette proteins shuttle a variety of molecules across cell membranes. The substrate transportation process is initiated by the ATP-driven dimerization of nucleotide binding domains (NBDs). Here, the integral-equation theory of liquids was applied to simulated NBD structures to analyze their dimerization process from the viewpoint of thermodynamics and the water-mediated interaction between the NBDs. It was found that a long-range hydration force of enthalpic origin drives the two NBDs to approach from a large separation. In the subsequent step, the water-mediated attraction of entropic origin brings about a structural adjustment between the two NBDs and their tighter contact.

  1. Nucleotide binding by the widespread high-affinity cyclic di-GMP receptor MshEN domain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Chuan; Chin, Ko-Hsin; Tu, Zhi-Le; He, Jin; Jones, Christopher J; Sanchez, David Zamorano; Yildiz, Fitnat H; Galperin, Michael Y; Chou, Shan-Ho

    2016-01-01

    C-di-GMP is a bacterial second messenger regulating various cellular functions. Many bacteria contain c-di-GMP-metabolizing enzymes but lack known c-di-GMP receptors. Recently, two MshE-type ATPases associated with bacterial type II secretion system and type IV pilus formation were shown to specifically bind c-di-GMP. Here we report crystal structure of the MshE N-terminal domain (MshEN1-145) from Vibrio cholerae in complex with c-di-GMP at a 1.37 Å resolution. This structure reveals a unique c-di-GMP-binding mode, featuring a tandem array of two highly conserved binding motifs, each comprising a 24-residue sequence RLGxx(L/V/I)(L/V/I)xxG(L/V/I)(L/V/I)xxxxLxxxLxxQ that binds half of the c-di-GMP molecule, primarily through hydrophobic interactions. Mutating these highly conserved residues markedly reduces c-di-GMP binding and biofilm formation by V. cholerae. This c-di-GMP-binding motif is present in diverse bacterial proteins exhibiting binding affinities ranging from 0.5 μM to as low as 14 nM. The MshEN domain contains the longest nucleotide-binding motif reported to date. PMID:27578558

  2. Drugs Modulate Interactions between the First Nucleotide-Binding Domain and the Fourth Cytoplasmic Loop of Human P-Glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Loo, Tip W; Clarke, David M

    2016-05-24

    Drug substrates stimulate ATPase activity of the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) ATP-binding cassette drug pump by an unknown mechanism. Cross-linking analysis was performed to test if drug substrates stimulate P-gp ATPase activity by altering cross-talk at the first transmission interface linking the drug-binding [intracellular loop 4 (S909C)] and first nucleotide-binding domains [NBD1 (V472C or L443C)]. In the absence of lipid (inactive P-gp), only V472C/S909C showed cross-linking. Drugs blocked V472C/S909C cross-linking. In the presence of lipids (active P-gp), drug substrates promoted only L443C/S909C cross-linking. This suggests that drug substrates stimulate ATPase activity through a conformational change that shifts Ser909 away from Val472 and toward Leu443. PMID:27159830

  3. Structural architecture and interplay of the nucleotide- and erythrocyte binding domain of the reticulocyte binding protein Py235 from Plasmodium yoelii.

    PubMed

    Grüber, Ardina; Manimekalai, Malathy S S; Preiser, Peter R; Grüber, Gerhard

    2012-11-01

    Human malaria is caused by the cyclical invasion of the host's red blood cells (RBCs) by the invasive form of the parasite, the merozoite. The invasion of the RBC involves a range of parasite ligand receptor interactions, a process which is under intensive investigation. Two protein families are known to be important in the recognition and invasion of the human erythrocyte, the erythrocyte-binding like (EBL) proteins and the reticulocyte binding like proteins, of which the Py235 family in Plasmodium yoelii is a member. Recently the nucleotide binding domain (NBD94), that plays a role in ATP sensing, and the erythrocyte binding domain (EBD) of Py235, called EBD(1-194), have been identified. Binding of ATP leads to conformational changes within Py235 from P. yoelli and results in enhanced binding of the protein to the RBC. Structural features of these domains have been obtained, providing the platform to discuss how the structural architecture creates the basis for an interplay of the sensing NBD and the EBD domain in Py235. In analogy to the receptor-mediated ligand-dimerization model of the EBL proteins PvDBP and PfEBA-175 from Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum, respectively, we hypothesise that Py235 of P. yoelii binds via its EBD(1-194) domain to the RBC receptor, thereby inducing dimerization of the Py235-receptor complex. PMID:22878128

  4. Correctors Rescue CFTR Mutations in Nucleotide-Binding Domain 1 (NBD1) by Modulating Proteostasis.

    PubMed

    Lopes-Pacheco, Miquéias; Sabirzhanova, Inna; Rapino, Daniele; Morales, Marcelo M; Guggino, William B; Cebotaru, Liudmila

    2016-03-15

    We evaluated whether small molecule correctors could rescue four nucleotide-binding domain 1 (NBD1) mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene (A455E, S492F, ΔI507, and R560T). We first transfected Cos-7 cells (green monkey kidney cells) with A455E, S492F, ΔI507, or R560T and created HEK-293 (human embryonic kidney cells) cell lines stably expressing these CFTR mutations. The mutants showed lowered protein expression, instability at physiological temperature, and rapid degradation. After treatment with correctors CFFT-002, CFFT-003, C3, C4, and/or C18, the combination of C18+C4 showed the most correction and resulted in increased CFTR residing in the plasma membrane. We found a profound decrease in binding of CFTR to histone deacetylases (HDAC) 6 and 7 and heat shock proteins (Hsps) 27 and 40. Silencing Hsp27 or 40 rescued the mutants, but no additional amount of CFTR was rescued when both proteins were knocked down simultaneously. Thus, CFTR mutations in NBD1 can be rescued by a combination of correctors, and the treatment alters the interaction between mutated CFTR and the endoplasmic reticulum machinery. PMID:26864378

  5. Role of Nucleotide Binding and GTPase Domain Dimerization in Dynamin-like Myxovirus Resistance Protein A for GTPase Activation and Antiviral Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Alexej; Graf, Laura; Olal, Daniel; von der Malsburg, Alexander; Gao, Song; Kochs, Georg; Daumke, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Myxovirus resistance (Mx) GTPases are induced by interferon and inhibit multiple viruses, including influenza and human immunodeficiency viruses. They have the characteristic domain architecture of dynamin-related proteins with an N-terminal GTPase (G) domain, a bundle signaling element, and a C-terminal stalk responsible for self-assembly and effector functions. Human MxA (also called MX1) is expressed in the cytoplasm and is partly associated with membranes of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum. It shows a protein concentration-dependent increase in GTPase activity, indicating regulation of GTP hydrolysis via G domain dimerization. Here, we characterized a panel of G domain mutants in MxA to clarify the role of GTP binding and the importance of the G domain interface for the catalytic and antiviral function of MxA. Residues in the catalytic center of MxA and the nucleotide itself were essential for G domain dimerization and catalytic activation. In pulldown experiments, MxA recognized Thogoto virus nucleocapsid proteins independently of nucleotide binding. However, both nucleotide binding and hydrolysis were required for the antiviral activity against Thogoto, influenza, and La Crosse viruses. We further demonstrate that GTP binding facilitates formation of stable MxA assemblies associated with endoplasmic reticulum membranes, whereas nucleotide hydrolysis promotes dynamic redistribution of MxA from cellular membranes to viral targets. Our study highlights the role of nucleotide binding and hydrolysis for the intracellular dynamics of MxA during its antiviral action. PMID:25829498

  6. Role of nucleotide binding and GTPase domain dimerization in dynamin-like myxovirus resistance protein A for GTPase activation and antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Dick, Alexej; Graf, Laura; Olal, Daniel; von der Malsburg, Alexander; Gao, Song; Kochs, Georg; Daumke, Oliver

    2015-05-15

    Myxovirus resistance (Mx) GTPases are induced by interferon and inhibit multiple viruses, including influenza and human immunodeficiency viruses. They have the characteristic domain architecture of dynamin-related proteins with an N-terminal GTPase (G) domain, a bundle signaling element, and a C-terminal stalk responsible for self-assembly and effector functions. Human MxA (also called MX1) is expressed in the cytoplasm and is partly associated with membranes of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum. It shows a protein concentration-dependent increase in GTPase activity, indicating regulation of GTP hydrolysis via G domain dimerization. Here, we characterized a panel of G domain mutants in MxA to clarify the role of GTP binding and the importance of the G domain interface for the catalytic and antiviral function of MxA. Residues in the catalytic center of MxA and the nucleotide itself were essential for G domain dimerization and catalytic activation. In pulldown experiments, MxA recognized Thogoto virus nucleocapsid proteins independently of nucleotide binding. However, both nucleotide binding and hydrolysis were required for the antiviral activity against Thogoto, influenza, and La Crosse viruses. We further demonstrate that GTP binding facilitates formation of stable MxA assemblies associated with endoplasmic reticulum membranes, whereas nucleotide hydrolysis promotes dynamic redistribution of MxA from cellular membranes to viral targets. Our study highlights the role of nucleotide binding and hydrolysis for the intracellular dynamics of MxA during its antiviral action. PMID:25829498

  7. Allosteric Coupling between the Intracellular Coupling Helix 4 and Regulatory Sites of the First Nucleotide-binding Domain of CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Jennifer E.; Farber, Patrick J.; Forman-Kay, Julie D.

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is caused by mutations in CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator), leading to folding and processing defects and to chloride channel gating misfunction. CFTR is regulated by ATP binding to its cytoplasmic nucleotide-binding domains, NBD1 and NBD2, and by phosphorylation of the NBD1 regulatory insert (RI) and the regulatory extension (RE)/R region. These regulatory effects are transmitted to the rest of the channel via NBD interactions with intracellular domain coupling helices (CL), particularly CL4. Using a sensitive method for detecting inter-residue correlations between chemical shift changes in NMR spectra, an allosteric network was revealed within NBD1, with a construct lacking RI. The CL4-binding site couples to the RI-deletion site and the C-terminal residues of NBD1 that precede the R region in full-length CFTR. Titration of CL4 peptide into NBD1 perturbs the conformational ensemble in these sites with similar titration patterns observed in F508del, the major CF-causing mutant, and in suppressor mutants F494N, V510D and Q637R NBD1, as well as in a CL4-NBD1 fusion construct. Reciprocally, the C-terminal mutation, Q637R, perturbs dynamics in these three sites. This allosteric network suggests a mechanism synthesizing diverse regulatory NBD1 interactions and provides biophysical evidence for the allosteric coupling required for CFTR function. PMID:24058550

  8. Molecular modeling of the heterodimer of human CFTR's nucleotide-binding domains using a protein-protein docking approach.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sheng-You; Bolser, Diana; Liu, Hao-Yang; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Zou, Xiaoqin

    2009-04-01

    We have presented a new protein-protein docking approach to model heterodimeric structures based on the conformations of the monomeric units. The conventional modeling method relies on superimposing two monomeric structures onto the crystal structure of a homologous protein dimer. The resulting structure may exhibit severe backbone clashes at the dimeric interface depending on the backbone dissimilarity between the target and template proteins. Our method overcomes the backbone clashing problem and requires no a priori knowledge of the dimeric structure of a homologous protein. Here we used human Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR), a chloride channel whose dysfunction causes cystic fibrosis, for illustration. The two intracellular nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of CFTR control the opening and closing of the channel. Yet, the structure of the CFTR's NBD1-NBD2 complex has not been experimentally determined. Thus, correct modeling of this heterodimeric structure is valuable for understanding CFTR functions and would have potential applications for drug design for cystic fibrosis treatment. Based on the crystal structure of human CFTR's NBD1, we constructed a model of the NBD1-NBD2 complex. The constructed model is consistent with the dimeric mode observed in the crystal structures of other ABC transporters. To verify our structural model, an ATP substrate was docked into the nucleotide-binding site. The predicted binding mode shows consistency with related crystallographic findings and CFTR functional studies. Finally, genistein, an agent that enhances CFTR activity, though the mechanism for such enhancement is unclear, was docked to the model. Our predictions agreed with genistein's bell-shaped dose-response relationship. Potential mutagenesis experiments were proposed for understanding the potentiation mechanism of genistein and for providing insightful information for drug design targeting at CFTR. The method used in this study can be

  9. First Structural View of a Peptide Interacting with the Nucleotide Binding Domain of Heat Shock Protein 90

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Swetha; Singh, Meetali; Tatu, Utpal; Suguna, Kaza

    2015-01-01

    The involvement of Hsp90 in progression of diseases like cancer, neurological disorders and several pathogen related conditions is well established. Hsp90, therefore, has emerged as an attractive drug target for many of these diseases. Several small molecule inhibitors of Hsp90, such as geldanamycin derivatives, that display antitumor activity, have been developed and are under clinical trials. However, none of these tested inhibitors or drugs are peptide-based compounds. Here we report the first crystal structure of a peptide bound at the ATP binding site of the N-terminal domain of Hsp90. The peptide makes several specific interactions with the binding site residues, which are comparable to those made by the nucleotide and geldanamycin. A modified peptide was designed based on these interactions. Inhibition of ATPase activity of Hsp90 was observed in the presence of the modified peptide. This study provides an alternative approach and a lead peptide molecule for the rational design of effective inhibitors of Hsp90 function. PMID:26599366

  10. Genome-wide comparative analysis reveals possible common ancestors of nucleotide-binding sites domain containing genes in hybrid Citrus sinensis genome and original Citrus clementina genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We identified and re-annotated candidate disease resistance (R) genes with nucleotide-binding sites (NBS) domain from a Citrus clementina genome and two complete Citrus sinensis genome sequences (one from the USA and one from China). We found similar numbers of NBS genes from three citrus genomes, r...

  11. Calmodulin Regulates Human Ether à Go-Go 1 (hEAG1) Potassium Channels through Interactions of the Eag Domain with the Cyclic Nucleotide Binding Homology Domain.

    PubMed

    Lörinczi, Eva; Helliwell, Matthew; Finch, Alina; Stansfeld, Phillip J; Davies, Noel W; Mahaut-Smith, Martyn; Muskett, Frederick W; Mitcheson, John S

    2016-08-19

    The ether à go-go family of voltage-gated potassium channels is structurally distinct. The N terminus contains an eag domain (eagD) that contains a Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain that is preceded by a conserved sequence of 25-27 amino acids known as the PAS-cap. The C terminus contains a region with homology to cyclic nucleotide binding domains (cNBHD), which is directly linked to the channel pore. The human EAG1 (hEAG1) channel is remarkably sensitive to inhibition by intracellular calcium (Ca(2+) i) through binding of Ca(2+)-calmodulin to three sites adjacent to the eagD and cNBHD. Here, we show that the eagD and cNBHD interact to modulate Ca(2+)-calmodulin as well as voltage-dependent gating. Sustained elevation of Ca(2+) i resulted in an initial profound inhibition of hEAG1 currents, which was followed by a phase when current amplitudes partially recovered, but activation gating was slowed and shifted to depolarized potentials. Deletion of either the eagD or cNBHD abolished the inhibition by Ca(2+) i However, deletion of just the PAS-cap resulted in a >15-fold potentiation in response to elevated Ca(2+) i Mutations of residues at the interface between the eagD and cNBHD have been linked to human cancer. Glu-600 on the cNBHD, when substituted with residues with a larger volume, resulted in hEAG1 currents that were profoundly potentiated by Ca(2+) i in a manner similar to the ΔPAS-cap mutant. These findings provide the first evidence that eagD and cNBHD interactions are regulating Ca(2+)-dependent gating and indicate that the binding of the PAS-cap with the cNBHD is required for the closure of the channels upon CaM binding. PMID:27325704

  12. Critical role of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor 3 in vascular repair

    SciTech Connect

    Schlaweck, Sebastian; Zimmer, Sebastian; Struck, Rafael; Werner, Nikos; Latz, Eicke; Nickenig, Georg; Ghanem, Alexander

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} NLRP3 is not required for systemic cardiovascular function in healthy mice. {yields} NLRP3 deficiency itself does not affect the functional cardiovascular phenotype and that it does not alter peripheral differential blood counts. {yields} NLRP3 is critical in neointima formation following vascular injury. -- Abstract: Vascular remodeling characterized by hyperproliferative neointima formation is an unfavorable repair process that is triggered by vascular damage. This process is characterized by an increased local inflammatory and proliferative response that critically involves the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}). IL-1{beta} is expressed and cytosolically retained as a procytokine that requires additional processing prior to exerting its pro-inflammatory function. Maturation and release of pro IL-1{beta} is governed by a cytosolic protein scaffold that is known as the inflammasome. Here we show that NLRP3 (NOD-like receptor family, pryin domain containing 3), an important activating component of the inflammasome, is involved in neointima formation after vascular injury. NLRP3 deficiency itself does not affect the functional cardiovascular phenotype and does not alter peripheral differential blood counts. However, neointima development following wire injury of the carotid artery was significantly decreased in NLRP3-deficient mice as compared to wild-type controls. In all, NLRP3 plays a non-redundant role in vascular damage mediated neointima formation. Our data establish NLRP3 as a key player in the response to vascular damage, which could open new avenues to therapeutic intervention.

  13. Nucleotide-Binding Oligomerization Domain-1 and -2 Play No Role in Controlling Brucella abortus Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Fernanda S.; Carvalho, Natalia B.; Zamboni, Dario S.; Oliveira, Sergio C.

    2012-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain proteins (NODs) are modular cytoplasmic proteins implicated in the recognition of peptidoglycan-derived molecules. Further, several in vivo studies have demonstrated a role for Nod1 and Nod2 in host defense against bacterial pathogens. Here, we demonstrated that macrophages from NOD1-, NOD2-, and Rip2-deficient mice produced lower levels of TNF-α following infection with live Brucella abortus compared to wild-type mice. Similar reduction on cytokine synthesis was not observed for IL-12 and IL-6. However, NOD1, NOD2, and Rip2 knockout mice were no more susceptible to infection with virulent B. abortus than wild-type mice. Additionally, spleen cells from NOD1-, NOD2-, and Rip2-deficient mice showed unaltered production of IFN-γ compared to C57BL/6 mice. Taken together, this study demonstrates that NOD1, NOD2 and Rip2 are dispensable for the control of B. abortus during in vivo infection. PMID:22203860

  14. Role of Nucleotide-Binding Oligomerization Domain-Containing (NOD) 2 in Host Defense during Pneumococcal Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Hommes, Tijmen J.; van Lieshout, Miriam H.; van ‘t Veer, Cornelis; Florquin, Sandrine; Bootsma, Hester J.; Hermans, Peter W.; de Vos, Alex F.; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus (S.) pneumoniae is the most common causative pathogen in community-acquired pneumonia. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing (NOD) 2 is a pattern recognition receptor located in the cytosol of myeloid cells that is able to detect peptidoglycan fragments of S. pneumoniae. We here aimed to investigate the role of NOD2 in the host response during pneumococcal pneumonia. Phagocytosis of S. pneumoniae was studied in NOD2 deficient (Nod2-/-) and wild-type (Wt) alveolar macrophages and neutrophils in vitro. In subsequent in vivo experiments Nod2-/- and Wt mice were inoculated with serotype 2 S. pneumoniae (D39), an isogenic capsule locus deletion mutant (D39Δcps) or serotype 3 S. pneumoniae (6303) via the airways, and bacterial growth and dissemination and the lung inflammatory response were evaluated. Nod2-/- alveolar macrophages and blood neutrophils displayed a reduced capacity to internalize pneumococci in vitro. During pneumonia caused by S. pneumoniae D39 Nod2-/- mice were indistinguishable from Wt mice with regard to bacterial loads in lungs and distant organs, lung pathology and neutrophil recruitment. While Nod2-/- and Wt mice also had similar bacterial loads after infection with the more virulent S. pneumoniae 6303 strain, Nod2-/- mice displayed a reduced bacterial clearance of the normally avirulent unencapsulated D39Δcps strain. These results suggest that NOD2 does not contribute to host defense during pneumococcal pneumonia and that the pneumococcal capsule impairs recognition of S. pneumoniae by NOD2. PMID:26673231

  15. Role of Nucleotide-binding and Oligomerization Domain 2 Protein (NOD2) in the Development of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    NOD2 (nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain 2) was initially reported as a susceptibility gene for Crohn's disease, with several studies focused on elucidating its molecular mechanism in the progression of Crohn's disease. We now know that NOD2 is an intracellular bacterial sensing receptor, and that MDP-mediated NOD2 activation drives inflammatory signaling. Various mutations in NOD2 have been reported, with NOD2 loss of function being associated with the development of Crohn's disease and other autoimmune diseases. These results suggest that NOD2 not only has an immune stimulatory function, but also an immune regulatory function. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial wall; its pathologic progression is highly dependent on the immune balance. This immune balance is regulated by infiltrating monocytes and macrophages, both of which express NOD2. These findings indicate a potential role of NOD2 in atherosclerosis. The purpose of this review is to outline the known roles of NOD2 signaling in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. PMID:26557013

  16. The most common cystic fibrosis-associated mutation destabilizes the dimeric state of the nucleotide-binding domains of CFTR.

    PubMed

    Jih, Kang-Yang; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Bompadre, Silvia G

    2011-06-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel that belongs to the ATP binding cassette (ABC) superfamily. The deletion of the phenylalanine 508 (ΔF508-CFTR) is the most common mutation among cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The mutant channels present a severe trafficking defect, and the few channels that reach the plasma membrane are functionally impaired. Interestingly, an ATP analogue, N6-(2-phenylethyl)-2′-deoxy-ATP (P-dATP), can increase the open probability (Po) to ∼0.7, implying that the gating defect of ΔF508 may involve the ligand binding domains, such as interfering with the formation or separation of the dimeric states of the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). To test this hypothesis, we employed two approaches developed for gauging the stability of the NBD dimeric states using the patch-clamp technique. We measured the locked-open time induced by pyrophosphate (PPi), which reflects the stability of the full NBD dimer state, and the ligand exchange time for ATP/N6-(2-phenylethyl)-ATP (P-ATP), which measures the stability of the partial NBD dimer state wherein the head of NBD1 and the tail of NBD2 remain associated. We found that both the PPi-induced locked-open time and the ATP/P-ATP ligand exchange time of ΔF508-CFTR channels are dramatically shortened, suggesting that the ΔF508 mutation destabilizes the full and partial NBD dimer states. We also tested if mutations that have been shown to improve trafficking of ΔF508-CFTR, namely the solubilizing mutation F494N/Q637R and ΔRI (deletion of the regulatory insertion), exert any effects on these newly identified functional defects associated with ΔF508-CFTR. Our results indicate that although these mutations increase the membrane expression and function of ΔF508-CFTR, they have limited impact on the stability of both full and partial NBD dimeric states for ΔF508 channels. The structure-function insights gained from this mechanism may provide clues for future

  17. The most common cystic fibrosis-associated mutation destabilizes the dimeric state of the nucleotide-binding domains of CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Jih, Kang-Yang; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Bompadre, Silvia G

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel that belongs to the ATP binding cassette (ABC) superfamily. The deletion of the phenylalanine 508 (ΔF508-CFTR) is the most common mutation among cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The mutant channels present a severe trafficking defect, and the few channels that reach the plasma membrane are functionally impaired. Interestingly, an ATP analogue, N6-(2-phenylethyl)-2′-deoxy-ATP (P-dATP), can increase the open probability (Po) to ∼0.7, implying that the gating defect of ΔF508 may involve the ligand binding domains, such as interfering with the formation or separation of the dimeric states of the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). To test this hypothesis, we employed two approaches developed for gauging the stability of the NBD dimeric states using the patch-clamp technique. We measured the locked-open time induced by pyrophosphate (PPi), which reflects the stability of the full NBD dimer state, and the ligand exchange time for ATP/N6-(2-phenylethyl)-ATP (P-ATP), which measures the stability of the partial NBD dimer state wherein the head of NBD1 and the tail of NBD2 remain associated. We found that both the PPi-induced locked-open time and the ATP/P-ATP ligand exchange time of ΔF508-CFTR channels are dramatically shortened, suggesting that the ΔF508 mutation destabilizes the full and partial NBD dimer states. We also tested if mutations that have been shown to improve trafficking of ΔF508-CFTR, namely the solubilizing mutation F494N/Q637R and ΔRI (deletion of the regulatory insertion), exert any effects on these newly identified functional defects associated with ΔF508-CFTR. Our results indicate that although these mutations increase the membrane expression and function of ΔF508-CFTR, they have limited impact on the stability of both full and partial NBD dimeric states for ΔF508 channels. The structure–function insights gained from this mechanism may provide clues

  18. Thermal unfolding studies show the disease causing F508del mutation in CFTR thermodynamically destabilizes nucleotide-binding domain 1

    PubMed Central

    Protasevich, Irina; Yang, Zhengrong; Wang, Chi; Atwell, Shane; Zhao, Xun; Emtage, Spencer; Wetmore, Diana; Hunt, John F; Brouillette, Christie G

    2010-01-01

    Misfolding and degradation of CFTR is the cause of disease in patients with the most prevalent CFTR mutation, an in-frame deletion of phenylalanine (F508del), located in the first nucleotide-binding domain of human CFTR (hNBD1). Studies of (F508del)CFTR cellular folding suggest that both intra- and inter-domain folding is impaired. (F508del)CFTR is a temperature-sensitive mutant, that is, lowering growth temperature, improves both export, and plasma membrane residence times. Yet, paradoxically, F508del does not alter the fold of isolated hNBD1 nor did it seem to perturb its unfolding transition in previous isothermal chemical denaturation studies. We therefore studied the in vitro thermal unfolding of matched hNBD1 constructs ±F508del to shed light on the defective folding mechanism and the basis for the thermal instability of (F508del)CFTR. Using primarily differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and circular dichroism, we show for all hNBD1 pairs studied, that F508del lowers the unfolding transition temperature (Tm) by 6–7°C and that unfolding occurs via a kinetically-controlled, irreversible transition in isolated monomers. A thermal unfolding mechanism is derived from nonlinear least squares fitting of comprehensive DSC data sets. All data are consistent with a simple three-state thermal unfolding mechanism for hNBD1 ± F508del: N(±MgATP) ⇄ IT(±MgATP) → AT → (AT)n. The equilibrium unfolding to intermediate, IT, is followed by the rate-determining, irreversible formation of a partially folded, aggregation-prone, monomeric state, AT, for which aggregation to (AT)n and further unfolding occur with no detectable heat change. Fitted parameters indicate that F508del thermodynamically destabilizes the native state, N, and accelerates the formation of AT. PMID:20687133

  19. Structure of the Cyclic Nucleotide-Binding Homology Domain of the hERG Channel and Its Insight into Type 2 Long QT Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Ng, Hui Qi; Li, Qingxin; Kang, CongBao

    2016-01-01

    The human ether-à-go-go related gene (hERG) channel is crucial for the cardiac action potential by contributing to the fast delayed-rectifier potassium current. Mutations in the hERG channel result in type 2 long QT syndrome (LQT2). The hERG channel contains a cyclic nucleotide-binding homology domain (CNBHD) and this domain is required for the channel gating though molecular interactions with the eag domain. Here we present solution structure of the CNBHD of the hERG channel. The structural study reveals that the CNBHD adopts a similar fold to other KCNH channels. It is self-liganded and it contains a short β-strand that blocks the nucleotide-binding pocket in the β-roll. Folding of LQT2-related mutations in this domain was shown to be affected by point mutation. Mutations in this domain can cause protein aggregation in E. coli cells or induce conformational changes. One mutant-R752W showed obvious chemical shift perturbation compared with the wild-type, but it still binds to the eag domain. The helix region from the N-terminal cap domain of the hERG channel showed unspecific interactions with the CNBHD. PMID:27025590

  20. Structure of the Cyclic Nucleotide-Binding Homology Domain of the hERG Channel and Its Insight into Type 2 Long QT Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Ng, Hui Qi; Li, Qingxin; Kang, CongBao

    2016-01-01

    The human ether-à-go-go related gene (hERG) channel is crucial for the cardiac action potential by contributing to the fast delayed-rectifier potassium current. Mutations in the hERG channel result in type 2 long QT syndrome (LQT2). The hERG channel contains a cyclic nucleotide-binding homology domain (CNBHD) and this domain is required for the channel gating though molecular interactions with the eag domain. Here we present solution structure of the CNBHD of the hERG channel. The structural study reveals that the CNBHD adopts a similar fold to other KCNH channels. It is self-liganded and it contains a short β-strand that blocks the nucleotide-binding pocket in the β-roll. Folding of LQT2-related mutations in this domain was shown to be affected by point mutation. Mutations in this domain can cause protein aggregation in E. coli cells or induce conformational changes. One mutant-R752W showed obvious chemical shift perturbation compared with the wild-type, but it still binds to the eag domain. The helix region from the N-terminal cap domain of the hERG channel showed unspecific interactions with the CNBHD. PMID:27025590

  1. Efficacy of the nucleotide-binding oligomerzation domain 1 inhibitor Nodinhibit-1 on corneal alkali burns in rats

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xu; Han, Yun; Shao, Yi; Yi, Jing-Lin

    2015-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the therapeutic effect of Nodinhibit-1 on alkali-burn-induced corneal neovascularization (CNV) and inflammation. The nucleotide-binding oligomerzation domain 1 (NOD1) is a potent angiogenic gene. METHODS The alkali-burned rat corneas (32 right eyes) were treated with eye drops containing Nodinhibit-1 or phosphate buffered solution (PBS, PH 7.4) only, four times per day. CNV and inflammation were monitored using slit lamp microscopy, and the area of CNV was measured by formula. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) was determined by Western blot analysis. The TUNEL assay was used to assess the corneal apoptosis cells. RESULTS Alkali-burn-induced progressive CNV and inflammation in the cornea. After treatment for 7d and 14d, there were statistically significant differences in the CNV areas and inflammatory index on that between two group(P<0.05, respectively). Epithelial defect quantification showed a significant difference between the two groups at days 4 and 7 after the alkali burns (P<0.05). The apoptotic cells on days 1, 4, and 7 between the two groups showed significant differences at all time points (P<0.05, respectively). Compared to that in control group, the protein level of VEGF expression was significantly reduced whereas the PEDF expression was increase in the Nodinhibit-1 groups on day 14 (P<0.05, respectively) CONCLUSION Topical application of 10.0 µg/mL Nodinhibit-1 may have potential effect for the alkali burn-induced CNV and inflammation. The effect of Nodinhibit-1 on CNV may be by regulation the equilibrium of VEGF and PEDF in the wounded cornea. PMID:26558192

  2. Regulation and Function of the Nucleotide Binding Domain Leucine-Rich Repeat-Containing Receptor, Pyrin Domain-Containing-3 Inflammasome in Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seonmin; Suh, Gee-Young; Ryter, Stefan W; Choi, Augustine M K

    2016-02-01

    Inflammasomes are specialized inflammatory signaling platforms that govern the maturation and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1β and IL-18, through the regulation of caspase-1-dependent proteolytic processing. Several nucleotide binding domain leucine-rich repeat-containing receptor (NLR) family members (i.e., NLR family, pyrin domain containing [NLRP] 1, NLRP3, and NLR family, caspase recruitment domain containing-4 [NLRC4]) as well as the pyrin and hemopoietic expression, interferon-inducibility, nuclear localization domain-containing family member, absent in melanoma 2, can form inflammasome complexes in human cells. In particular, the NLRP3 inflammasome is activated in response to cellular stresses through a two-component pathway, involving Toll-like receptor 4-ligand interaction (priming) followed by a second signal, such as ATP-dependent P2X purinoreceptor 7 receptor activation. Emerging studies suggest that the NLRP3 inflammasome can exert pleiotropic effects in human diseases with potentially both pro- and antipathogenic sequelae. Whereas NLRP3 inflammasome activation can serve as a vital component of host defense against invading bacteria and pathogens, excessive activation of the inflammasome can lead to inflammation-associated tissue injury in the setting of chronic disease. In addition, pyroptosis, an inflammasome-associated mode of cell death, contributes to host defense. Recent research has described the regulation and function of the NLRP3 inflammasome in various pulmonary diseases, including acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, sepsis, respiratory infections, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, pulmonary hypertension, cystic fibrosis, and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. The NLRP3 and related inflammasomes, and their regulated cytokines or receptors, may represent novel diagnostic or therapeutic targets in pulmonary diseases and other diseases in which inflammation contributes to pathogenesis. PMID

  3. Impact of the [delta]F508 Mutation in First Nucleotide-binding Domain of Human Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator on Domain Folding and Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Hal A.; Zhao, Xun; Wang, Chi; Sauder, J. Michael; Rooney, Isabelle; Noland, Brian W.; Lorimer, Don; Kearins, Margaret C.; Conners, Kris; Condon, Brad; Maloney, Peter C.; Guggino, William B.; Hunt, John F.; Emtage, Spencer

    2010-07-19

    Cystic fibrosis is caused by defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), commonly the deletion of residue Phe-508 (DeltaF508) in the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1), which results in a severe reduction in the population of functional channels at the epithelial cell surface. Previous studies employing incomplete NBD1 domains have attributed this to aberrant folding of DeltaF508 NBD1. We report structural and biophysical studies on complete human NBD1 domains, which fail to demonstrate significant changes of in vitro stability or folding kinetics in the presence or absence of the DeltaF508 mutation. Crystal structures show minimal changes in protein conformation but substantial changes in local surface topography at the site of the mutation, which is located in the region of NBD1 believed to interact with the first membrane spanning domain of CFTR. These results raise the possibility that the primary effect of DeltaF508 is a disruption of proper interdomain interactions at this site in CFTR rather than interference with the folding of NBD1. Interestingly, increases in the stability of NBD1 constructs are observed upon introduction of second-site mutations that suppress the trafficking defect caused by the DeltaF508 mutation, suggesting that these suppressors might function indirectly by improving the folding efficiency of NBD1 in the context of the full-length protein. The human NBD1 structures also solidify the understanding of CFTR regulation by showing that its two protein segments that can be phosphorylated both adopt multiple conformations that modulate access to the ATPase active site and functional interdomain interfaces.

  4. Conserved Distal Loop Residues in the Hsp104 and ClpB Middle Domain Contact Nucleotide-binding Domain 2 and Enable Hsp70-dependent Protein Disaggregation*

    PubMed Central

    DeSantis, Morgan E.; Sweeny, Elizabeth A.; Snead, David; Leung, Eunice H.; Go, Michelle S.; Gupta, Kushol; Wendler, Petra; Shorter, James

    2014-01-01

    The homologous hexameric AAA+ proteins, Hsp104 from yeast and ClpB from bacteria, collaborate with Hsp70 to dissolve disordered protein aggregates but employ distinct mechanisms of intersubunit collaboration. How Hsp104 and ClpB coordinate polypeptide handover with Hsp70 is not understood. Here, we define conserved distal loop residues between middle domain (MD) helix 1 and 2 that are unexpectedly critical for Hsp104 and ClpB collaboration with Hsp70. Surprisingly, the Hsp104 and ClpB MD distal loop does not contact Hsp70 but makes intrasubunit contacts with nucleotide-binding domain 2 (NBD2). Thus, the MD does not invariably project out into solution as in one structural model of Hsp104 and ClpB hexamers. These intrasubunit contacts as well as those between MD helix 2 and NBD1 are different in Hsp104 and ClpB. NBD2-MD contacts dampen disaggregase activity and must separate for protein disaggregation. We demonstrate that ClpB requires DnaK more stringently than Hsp104 requires Hsp70 for protein disaggregation. Thus, we reveal key differences in how Hsp104 and ClpB coordinate polypeptide handover with Hsp70, which likely reflects differential tuning for yeast and bacterial proteostasis. PMID:24280225

  5. Thermal unfolding studies show the disease causing F508del mutation in CFTR thermodynamically destabilizes nucleotide-binding domain 1.

    PubMed

    Protasevich, Irina; Yang, Zhengrong; Wang, Chi; Atwell, Shane; Zhao, Xun; Emtage, Spencer; Wetmore, Diana; Hunt, John F; Brouillette, Christie G

    2010-10-01

    Misfolding and degradation of CFTR is the cause of disease in patients with the most prevalent CFTR mutation, an in-frame deletion of phenylalanine (F508del), located in the first nucleotide-binding domain of human CFTR (hNBD1). Studies of (F508del)CFTR cellular folding suggest that both intra- and inter-domain folding is impaired. (F508del)CFTR is a temperature-sensitive mutant, that is, lowering growth temperature, improves both export, and plasma membrane residence times. Yet, paradoxically, F508del does not alter the fold of isolated hNBD1 nor did it seem to perturb its unfolding transition in previous isothermal chemical denaturation studies. We therefore studied the in vitro thermal unfolding of matched hNBD1 constructs ±F508del to shed light on the defective folding mechanism and the basis for the thermal instability of (F508del)CFTR. Using primarily differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and circular dichroism, we show for all hNBD1 pairs studied, that F508del lowers the unfolding transition temperature (T(m)) by 6-7°C and that unfolding occurs via a kinetically-controlled, irreversible transition in isolated monomers. A thermal unfolding mechanism is derived from nonlinear least squares fitting of comprehensive DSC data sets. All data are consistent with a simple three-state thermal unfolding mechanism for hNBD1 ± F508del: N(±MgATP) <==> I(T)(±MgATP) → A(T) → (A(T))(n). The equilibrium unfolding to intermediate, I(T), is followed by the rate-determining, irreversible formation of a partially folded, aggregation-prone, monomeric state, A(T), for which aggregation to (A(T))(n) and further unfolding occur with no detectable heat change. Fitted parameters indicate that F508del thermodynamically destabilizes the native state, N, and accelerates the formation of A(T). PMID:20687133

  6. Mutations in the nucleotide binding domain 1 signature motif region rescue processing and functional defects of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator delta f508.

    PubMed

    DeCarvalho, Ana C V; Gansheroff, Lisa J; Teem, John L

    2002-09-27

    The gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter that functions as a phosphorylation- and nucleotide-regulated chloride channel, is mutated in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Deletion of a phenylalanine at amino acid position 508 (DeltaF508) in the first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1) is the most prevalent CF-causing mutation and results in defective protein processing and reduced CFTR function, leading to chloride impermeability in CF epithelia and heterologous systems. Using a STE6/CFTRDeltaF508 chimera system in yeast, we isolated two novel DeltaF508 revertant mutations, I539T and G550E, proximal to and within the conserved ABC signature motif of NBD1, respectively. Western blot and functional analysis in mammalian cells indicate that mutations I539T and G550E each partially rescue the CFTRDeltaF508 defect. Furthermore, a combination of both revertant mutations resulted in a 38-fold increase in CFTRDeltaF508-mediated chloride current, representing 29% of wild type channel activity. The G550E mutation increased the sensitivity of CFTRDeltaF508 and wild type CFTR to activation by cAMP agonists and blocked the enhancement of CFTRDeltaF508 channel activity by 2 mm 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine. The data show that the DeltaF508 defect can be significantly rescued by second-site mutations in the nucleotide binding domain 1 region, that includes the LSGGQ consensus motif. PMID:12110684

  7. Mutations that change the position of the putative gamma-phosphate linker in the nucleotide binding domains of CFTR alter channel gating.

    PubMed

    Berger, Allan L; Ikuma, Mutsuhiro; Hunt, John F; Thomas, Philip J; Welsh, Michael J

    2002-01-18

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel is an ATP-binding cassette transporter that contains conserved nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). In CFTR, the NBDs bind and hydrolyze ATP to open and close the channel. Crystal structures of related NBDs suggest a structural model with an important signaling role for a gamma-phosphate linker peptide that couples bound nucleotide to movement of an alpha-helical subdomain. We mutated two residues in CFTR that the structural model predicts will uncouple effects of nucleotide binding from movement of the alpha-helical subdomain. These residues are Gln-493 and Gln-1291, which may directly connect the ATP gamma-phosphate to the gamma-phosphate linker, and residues Asn-505 and Asn-1303, which may form hydrogen bonds that stabilize the linker. In NBD1, Q493A reduced the frequency of channel opening, suggesting a role for this residue in coupling ATP binding to channel opening. In contrast, N505C increased the frequency of channel opening, consistent with a role for Asn-505 in stabilizing the inactive state of the NBD. In NBD2, Q1291A decreased the effects of pyrophosphate without altering other functions. Mutations of Asn-1303 decreased the rate of channel opening and closing, suggesting an important role for NBD2 in controlling channel burst duration. These findings are consistent with both the bacterial NBD structural model and gating models for CFTR. Our results extend models of nucleotide-induced structural changes from bacterial NBDs to a functional mammalian ATP-binding cassette transporter. PMID:11788611

  8. The specialized Hsp70 (HscA) interdomain linker binds to its nucleotide-binding domain and stimulates ATP hydrolysis in both cis and trans configurations.

    PubMed

    Alderson, T Reid; Kim, Jin Hae; Cai, Kai; Frederick, Ronnie O; Tonelli, Marco; Markley, John L

    2014-11-25

    Proteins from the isc operon of Escherichia coli constitute the machinery used to synthesize iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters for delivery to recipient apoproteins. Efficient and rapid [2Fe-2S] cluster transfer from the holo-scaffold protein IscU depends on ATP hydrolysis in the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) of HscA, a specialized Hsp70-type molecular chaperone with low intrinsic ATPase activity (0.02 min(-1) at 25 °C, henceforth reported in units of min(-1)). HscB, an Hsp40-type cochaperone, binds to HscA and stimulates ATP hydrolysis to promote cluster transfer, yet while the interactions between HscA and HscB have been investigated, the role of HscA's interdomain linker in modulating ATPase activity has not been explored. To address this issue, we created three variants of the 40 kDa NBD of HscA: NBD alone (HscA386), NBD with a partial linker (HscA389), and NBD with the full linker (HscA395). We found that the rate of ATP hydrolysis of HscA395 (0.45 min(-1)) is nearly 15-fold higher than that of HscA386 (0.035 min(-1)), although their apparent affinities for ATP are equivalent. HscA395, which contains the full covalently linked linker peptide, exhibited intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence emission and basal thermostability that were higher than those of HscA386. Furthermore, HscA395 displayed narrower (1)H(N) line widths in its two-dimensional (1)H-(15)N TROSY-HSQC spectrum in comparison to HscA386, indicating that the peptide in the cis configuration binds to and stabilizes the structure of the NBD. The addition to HscA386 of a synthetic peptide with a sequence identical to that of the interdomain linker (L(387)LLDVIPLS(395)) stimulated its ATPase activity and induced widespread NMR chemical shift perturbations indicative of a binding interaction in the trans configuration. PMID:25372495

  9. Structural Basis for the Failure of the C1 Domain of Ras Guanine Nucleotide Releasing Protein 2 (RasGRP2) to Bind Phorbol Ester with High Affinity.

    PubMed

    Czikora, Agnes; Lundberg, Daniel J; Abramovitz, Adelle; Lewin, Nancy E; Kedei, Noemi; Peach, Megan L; Zhou, Xiaoling; Merritt, Raymond C; Craft, Elizabeth A; Braun, Derek C; Blumberg, Peter M

    2016-05-20

    The C1 domain represents the recognition module for diacylglycerol and phorbol esters in protein kinase C, Ras guanine nucleotide releasing protein (RasGRP), and related proteins. RasGRP2 is exceptional in that its C1 domain has very weak binding affinity (Kd = 2890 ± 240 nm for [(3)H]phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate. We have identified four amino acid residues responsible for this lack of sensitivity. Replacing Asn(7), Ser(8), Ala(19), and Ile(21) with the corresponding residues from RasGRP1/3 (Thr(7), Tyr(8), Gly(19), and Leu(21), respectively) conferred potent binding affinity (Kd = 1.47 ± 0.03 nm) in vitro and membrane translocation in response to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate in LNCaP cells. Mutant C1 domains incorporating one to three of the four residues showed intermediate behavior with S8Y making the greatest contribution. Binding activity for diacylglycerol was restored in parallel. The requirement for anionic phospholipid for [(3)H]phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate binding was determined; it decreased in going from the single S8Y mutant to the quadruple mutant. The full-length RasGRP2 protein with the mutated C1 domains also showed strong phorbol ester binding, albeit modestly weaker than that of the C1 domain alone (Kd = 8.2 ± 1.1 nm for the full-length protein containing all four mutations), and displayed translocation in response to phorbol ester. RasGRP2 is a guanyl exchange factor for Rap1. Consistent with the ability of phorbol ester to induce translocation of the full-length RasGRP2 with the mutated C1 domain, phorbol ester enhanced the ability of the mutated RasGRP2 to activate Rap1. Modeling confirmed that the four mutations helped the binding cleft maintain a stable conformation. PMID:27022025

  10. Structures of a minimal human CFTR first nucleotide-binding domain as a monomer, head-to-tail homodimer, and pathogenic mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Atwell, Shane; Brouillette, Christie G.; Conners, Kris; Emtage, Spencer; Gheyi, Tarun; Guggino, William B.; Hendle, Jorg; Hunt, John F.; Lewis, Hal A.; Lu, Frances; Protasevich, Irina I.; Rodgers, Logan A.; Romero, Rich; Wasserman, Stephen R.; Weber, Patricia C.; Wetmore, Diana; Zhang, Feiyu F.; Zhao, Xun

    2010-04-26

    Upon removal of the regulatory insert (RI), the first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1) of human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) can be heterologously expressed and purified in a form that remains stable without solubilizing mutations, stabilizing agents or the regulatory extension (RE). This protein, NBD1 387-646({Delta}405-436), crystallizes as a homodimer with a head-to-tail association equivalent to the active conformation observed for NBDs from symmetric ATP transporters. The 1.7-{angstrom} resolution X-ray structure shows how ATP occupies the signature LSGGQ half-site in CFTR NBD1. The {Delta}F508 version of this protein also crystallizes as a homodimer and differs from the wild-type structure only in the vicinity of the disease-causing F508 deletion. A slightly longer construct crystallizes as a monomer. Comparisons of the homodimer structure with this and previously published monomeric structures show that the main effect of ATP binding at the signature site is to order the residues immediately preceding the signature sequence, residues 542-547, in a conformation compatible with nucleotide binding. These residues likely interact with a transmembrane domain intracellular loop in the full-length CFTR channel. The experiments described here show that removing the RI from NBD1 converts it into a well-behaved protein amenable to biophysical studies yielding deeper insights into CFTR function.

  11. An atomistic view of Hsp70 allosteric crosstalk: from the nucleotide to the substrate binding domain and back

    PubMed Central

    Chiappori, Federica; Merelli, Ivan; Milanesi, Luciano; Colombo, Giorgio; Morra, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    The Hsp70 is an allosterically regulated family of molecular chaperones. They consist of two structural domains, NBD and SBD, connected by a flexible linker. ATP hydrolysis at the NBD modulates substrate recognition at the SBD, while peptide binding at the SBD enhances ATP hydrolysis. In this study we apply Molecular Dynamics (MD) to elucidate the molecular determinants underlying the allosteric communication from the NBD to the SBD and back. We observe that local structural and dynamical modulation can be coupled to large-scale rearrangements, and that different combinations of ligands at NBD and SBD differently affect the SBD domain mobility. Substituting ADP with ATP in the NBD induces specific structural changes involving the linker and the two NBD lobes. Also, a SBD-bound peptide drives the linker docking by increasing the local dynamical coordination of its C-terminal end: a partially docked DnaK structure is achieved by combining ATP in the NBD and peptide in the SBD. We propose that the MD-based analysis of the inter domain dynamics and structure modulation could be used as a tool to computationally predict the allosteric behaviour and functional response of Hsp70 upon introducing mutations or binding small molecules, with potential applications for drug discovery. PMID:27025773

  12. The Nucleotide-Free State of the Multidrug Resistance ABC Transporter LmrA: Sulfhydryl Cross-Linking Supports a Constant Contact, Head-to-Tail Configuration of the Nucleotide-Binding Domains

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Peter M.; George, Anthony M.

    2015-01-01

    ABC transporters are integral membrane pumps that are responsible for the import or export of a diverse range of molecules across cell membranes. ABC transporters have been implicated in many phenomena of medical importance, including cystic fibrosis and multidrug resistance in humans. The molecular architecture of ABC transporters comprises two transmembrane domains and two ATP-binding cassettes, or nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs), which are highly conserved and contain motifs that are crucial to ATP binding and hydrolysis. Despite the improved clarity of recent structural, biophysical, and biochemical data, the seemingly simple process of ATP binding and hydrolysis remains controversial, with a major unresolved issue being whether the NBD protomers separate during the catalytic cycle. Here chemical cross-linking data is presented for the bacterial ABC multidrug resistance (MDR) transporter LmrA. These indicate that in the absence of nucleotide or substrate, the NBDs come into contact to a significant extent, even at 4°C, where ATPase activity is abrogated. The data are clearly not in accord with an inward-closed conformation akin to that observed in a crystal structure of V. cholerae MsbA. Rather, they suggest a head-to-tail configuration ‘sandwich’ dimer similar to that observed in crystal structures of nucleotide-bound ABC NBDs. We argue the data are more readily reconciled with the notion that the NBDs are in proximity while undergoing intra-domain motions, than with an NBD ‘Switch’ mechanism in which the NBD monomers separate in between ATP hydrolysis cycles. PMID:26120849

  13. Biochemical characterization and NMR studies of the nucleotide-binding domain 1 of multidrug-resistance-associated protein 1: evidence for interaction between ATP and Trp653.

    PubMed Central

    Ramaen, Odile; Masscheleyn, Sandrine; Duffieux, Francis; Pamlard, Olivier; Oberkampf, Marine; Lallemand, Jean-Yves; Stoven, Véronique; Jacquet, Eric

    2003-01-01

    Multidrug-resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) is a human ATP-binding cassette transporter that confers cell resistance to antitumour drugs. Its NBDs (nucleotide-binding domains) bind/hydrolyse ATP, a key step in the activation of MRP1 function. To relate its intrinsic functional features to the mechanism of action of the full-size transporter, we expressed the N-terminal NBD1 domain (Asn(642) to Ser(871)) in Escherichia coli. NBD1 was highly purified under native conditions and was characterized as a soluble monomer. (15)N-labelling allowed recording of the first two-dimensional NMR spectra of this domain. The NMR study showed that NBD1 was folded, and that Trp(653) was a key residue in the NBD1-ATP interaction. Thus, interaction of NBD1 with ATP/ADP was studied by intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence. The affinity for ATP and ADP were in the same range (K (d(ATP))=118 microM and K (d(ADP))=139 microM). Binding of nucleotides did not influence the monomeric state of NBD1. The ATPase activity of NBD1 was magnesium-dependent and very low [V (max) and K (m) values of 5x10(-5) pmol of ATP x (pmol NBD1)(-1) x s(-1) and 833 microM ATP respectively]. The present study suggests that NBD1 has a low contribution to the ATPase activity of full-length MRP1 and/or that this activity requires NBD1-NBD2 heterodimer formation. PMID:12954082

  14. Biochemical characterization and NMR studies of the nucleotide-binding domain 1 of multidrug-resistance-associated protein 1: evidence for interaction between ATP and Trp653.

    PubMed

    Ramaen, Odile; Masscheleyn, Sandrine; Duffieux, Francis; Pamlard, Olivier; Oberkampf, Marine; Lallemand, Jean-Yves; Stoven, Véronique; Jacquet, Eric

    2003-12-15

    Multidrug-resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) is a human ATP-binding cassette transporter that confers cell resistance to antitumour drugs. Its NBDs (nucleotide-binding domains) bind/hydrolyse ATP, a key step in the activation of MRP1 function. To relate its intrinsic functional features to the mechanism of action of the full-size transporter, we expressed the N-terminal NBD1 domain (Asn(642) to Ser(871)) in Escherichia coli. NBD1 was highly purified under native conditions and was characterized as a soluble monomer. (15)N-labelling allowed recording of the first two-dimensional NMR spectra of this domain. The NMR study showed that NBD1 was folded, and that Trp(653) was a key residue in the NBD1-ATP interaction. Thus, interaction of NBD1 with ATP/ADP was studied by intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence. The affinity for ATP and ADP were in the same range (K (d(ATP))=118 microM and K (d(ADP))=139 microM). Binding of nucleotides did not influence the monomeric state of NBD1. The ATPase activity of NBD1 was magnesium-dependent and very low [V (max) and K (m) values of 5x10(-5) pmol of ATP x (pmol NBD1)(-1) x s(-1) and 833 microM ATP respectively]. The present study suggests that NBD1 has a low contribution to the ATPase activity of full-length MRP1 and/or that this activity requires NBD1-NBD2 heterodimer formation. PMID:12954082

  15. The Roles of the RIIβ Linker and N-terminal Cyclic Nucleotide-binding Domain in Determining the Unique Structures of the Type IIβ Protein Kinase A

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, Donald K.; Copps, Jeffrey; Smith-Nguyen, Eric V.; Zhang, Ping; Heller, William T.; Taylor, Susan S.

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is ubiquitously expressed and is responsible for regulating many important cellular functions in response to changes in intracellular cAMP concentrations. The PKA holoenzyme is a tetramer (R2:C2), with a regulatory subunit homodimer (R2) that binds and inhibits two catalytic (C) subunits; binding of cAMP to the regulatory subunit homodimer causes activation of the catalytic subunits. Four different R subunit isoforms exist in mammalian cells, and these confer different structural features, subcellular localization, and biochemical properties upon the PKA holoenzymes they form. The holoenzyme containing RIIβ is structurally unique in that the type IIβ holoenzyme is much more compact than the free RIIβ homodimer. We have used small angle x-ray scattering and small angle neutron scattering to study the solution structure and subunit organization of a holoenzyme containing an RIIβ C-terminal deletion mutant (RIIβ(1–280)), which is missing the C-terminal cAMP-binding domain to better understand the structural organization of the type IIβ holoenzyme and the RIIβ domains that contribute to stabilizing the holoenzyme conformation. Our results demonstrate that compaction of the type IIβ holoenzyme does not require the C-terminal cAMP-binding domain but rather involves large structural rearrangements within the linker and N-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain of the RIIβ homodimer. The structural rearrangements are significantly greater than seen previously with RIIα and are likely to be important in mediating short range and long range interdomain and intersubunit interactions that uniquely regulate the activity of the type IIβ isoform of PKA. PMID:25112875

  16. Functional analysis of the C-terminal boundary of the second nucleotide binding domain of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and structural implications.

    PubMed

    Gentzsch, Martina; Aleksandrov, Andrei; Aleksandrov, Luba; Riordan, John R

    2002-09-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) contains two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) or ATP-binding cassettes (ABCs) that characterize a large family of membrane transporters. Although the three-dimensional structures of these domains from several ABC proteins have been determined, this is not the case for CFTR, and hence the domains are defined simply on the basis of sequence alignment. The functional C-terminal boundary of NBD1 of CFTR was located by analysis of chloride channel function [Chan, Csanady, Seto-Young, Nairn and Gadsby (2000) J. Gen. Physiol. 116, 163-180]. However, the boundary between the C-terminal end of NBD2 and sequences further downstream in the whole protein, that are important for its cellular localization and endocytotic turnover, has not been defined. We have now done this by assaying the influence of progressive C-terminal truncations on photolabelling of NBD2 by 8-azido-ATP, which reflects hydrolysis, as well as binding, at that domain, and on NBD2-dependent channel gating itself. The boundary defined in this way is between residues 1420 and 1424, which corresponds to the final beta-strand in aligned NBDs whose structures have been determined. Utilization of this information should facilitate the generation of monodisperse NBD2 polypeptides for structural analysis, which until now has not been possible. The established boundary includes within NBD2 a hydrophobic patch of four residues (1413-1416) previously shown to be essential for CFTR maturation and stability [Gentzsch and Riordan (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 1291-1298]. This hydrophobic cluster is conserved in most ABC proteins, and on alignment with ones of known structure constitutes the penultimate beta-strand of the domain which is likely to participate in essential structure-stabilizing beta-sheet formation. PMID:12020354

  17. Functional analysis of the C-terminal boundary of the second nucleotide binding domain of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and structural implications.

    PubMed Central

    Gentzsch, Martina; Aleksandrov, Andrei; Aleksandrov, Luba; Riordan, John R

    2002-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) contains two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) or ATP-binding cassettes (ABCs) that characterize a large family of membrane transporters. Although the three-dimensional structures of these domains from several ABC proteins have been determined, this is not the case for CFTR, and hence the domains are defined simply on the basis of sequence alignment. The functional C-terminal boundary of NBD1 of CFTR was located by analysis of chloride channel function [Chan, Csanady, Seto-Young, Nairn and Gadsby (2000) J. Gen. Physiol. 116, 163-180]. However, the boundary between the C-terminal end of NBD2 and sequences further downstream in the whole protein, that are important for its cellular localization and endocytotic turnover, has not been defined. We have now done this by assaying the influence of progressive C-terminal truncations on photolabelling of NBD2 by 8-azido-ATP, which reflects hydrolysis, as well as binding, at that domain, and on NBD2-dependent channel gating itself. The boundary defined in this way is between residues 1420 and 1424, which corresponds to the final beta-strand in aligned NBDs whose structures have been determined. Utilization of this information should facilitate the generation of monodisperse NBD2 polypeptides for structural analysis, which until now has not been possible. The established boundary includes within NBD2 a hydrophobic patch of four residues (1413-1416) previously shown to be essential for CFTR maturation and stability [Gentzsch and Riordan (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 1291-1298]. This hydrophobic cluster is conserved in most ABC proteins, and on alignment with ones of known structure constitutes the penultimate beta-strand of the domain which is likely to participate in essential structure-stabilizing beta-sheet formation. PMID:12020354

  18. Mg2+ -dependent ATP occlusion at the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1) of CFTR does not require the second (NBD2).

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, Luba; Aleksandrov, Andrei; Riordan, John R

    2008-11-15

    ATP binding to the first and second NBDs (nucleotide-binding domains) of CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) are bivalent-cation-independent and -dependent steps respectively [Aleksandrov, Aleksandrov, Chang and Riordan (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 15419-15425]. Subsequent to the initial binding, Mg(2+) drives rapid hydrolysis at the second site, while promoting non-exchangeable trapping of the nucleotide at the first site. This occlusion at the first site of functional wild-type CFTR is somewhat similar to that which occurs when the catalytic glutamate residues in both of the hydrolytic sites of P-glycoprotein are mutated, which has been proposed to be the result of dimerization of the two NBDs and represents a transient intermediate formed during ATP hydrolysis [Tombline and Senior (2005) J. Bioenerg. Biomembr. 37, 497-500]. To test the possible relevance of this interpretation to CFTR, we have now characterized the process by which NBD1 occludes [(32)P]N(3)ATP (8-azido-ATP) and [(32)P]N(3)ADP (8-azido-ADP). Only N(3)ATP, but not N(3)ADP, can be bound initially at NBD1 in the absence of Mg(2+). Despite the lack of a requirement for Mg(2+) for ATP binding, retention of the NTP at 37 degrees C was dependent on the cation. However, at reduced temperature (4 degrees C), N(3)ATP remains locked in the binding pocket with virtually no reduction over a 1 h period, even in the absence of Mg(2+). Occlusion occurred identically in a DeltaNBD2 construct, but not in purified recombinant NBD1, indicating that the process is dependent on the influence of regions of CFTR in addition to NBD1, but not NBD2. PMID:18605986

  19. Quaternary structure of K[ssubscript ATP] channel SUR2A nucleotide binding domains resolved by synchrotron radiation X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sungjo; Terzic, Andre

    2010-05-25

    Heterodimeric nucleotide binding domains NBD1/NBD2 distinguish the ATP-binding cassette protein SUR2A, a recognized regulatory subunit of cardiac ATP-sensitive K{sup +} (K{sub ATP}) channels. The tandem function of these core domains ensures metabolism-dependent gating of the Kir6.2 channel pore, yet their structural arrangement has not been resolved. Here, purified monodisperse and interference-free recombinant particles were subjected to synchrotron radiation small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) in solution. Intensity function analysis of SAXS profiles resolved NBD1 and NBD2 as octamers. Implemented by ab initio simulated annealing, shape determination prioritized an oblong envelope wrapping NBD1 and NBD2 with respective dimensions of 168 x 80 x 37 {angstrom}{sup 3} and 175 x 81 x 37 {angstrom}{sup 3} based on symmetry constraints, validated by atomic force microscopy. Docking crystal structure homology models against SAXS data reconstructed the NBD ensemble surrounding an inner cleft suitable for Kir6.2 insertion. Human heart disease-associated mutations introduced in silico verified the criticality of the mapped protein-protein interface. The resolved quaternary structure delineates thereby a macromolecular arrangement of K{sub ATP} channel SUR2A regulatory domains.

  20. Non-Coding Polymorphisms in Nucleotide Binding Domain 1 in ABCC1 Gene Associate with Transcript Level and Survival of Patients with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kunická, Tereza; Václavíková, Radka; Hlaváč, Viktor; Vrána, David; Pecha, Václav; Rauš, Karel; Trnková, Markéta; Kubáčková, Kateřina; Ambruš, Miloslav; Vodičková, Ludmila; Vodička, Pavel; Souček, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Objectives ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporters may cause treatment failure by transporting of anticancer drugs outside of the tumor cells. Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 coded by the ABCC1 gene has recently been suggested as a potential prognostic marker in breast cancer patients. This study aimed to explore tagged haplotype covering nucleotide binding domain 1 of ABCC1 in relation with corresponding transcript levels in tissues and clinical phenotype of breast cancer patients. Methods The distribution of twelve ABCC1 polymorphisms was assessed by direct sequencing in peripheral blood DNA (n = 540). Results Tumors from carriers of the wild type genotype in rs35623 or rs35628 exhibited significantly lower levels of ABCC1 transcript than those from carriers of the minor allele (p = 0.003 and p = 0.004, respectively). The ABCC1 transcript levels significantly increased in the order CT-GT>CC-GT>CC-GG for the predicted rs35626-rs4148351 diplotype. Chemotherapy-treated patients carrying the T allele in rs4148353 had longer disease-free survival than those with the GG genotype (p = 0.043). On the other hand, hormonal therapy-treated patients with the AA genotype in rs35628 had significantly longer disease-free survival than carriers of the G allele (p = 0.012). Conclusions Taken together, our study shows that genetic variability in the nucleotide binding domain 1 has a significant impact on the ABCC1 transcript level in the target tissue and may modify survival of breast cancer patients. PMID:25078270

  1. l-Ala-γ-d-Glu-meso-diaminopimelic Acid (DAP) Interacts Directly with Leucine-rich Region Domain of Nucleotide-binding Oligomerization Domain 1, Increasing Phosphorylation Activity of Receptor-interacting Serine/Threonine-protein Kinase 2 and Its Interaction with Nucleotide-binding Oligomerization Domain 1*

    PubMed Central

    Laroui, Hamed; Yan, Yutao; Narui, Yoshie; Ingersoll, Sarah A.; Ayyadurai, Saravanan; Charania, Moiz A.; Zhou, Feimeng; Wang, Binghe; Salaita, Khalid; Sitaraman, Shanthi V.; Merlin, Didier

    2011-01-01

    The oligopeptide transporter PepT1 expressed in inflamed colonic epithelial cells transports small bacterial peptides, such as muramyl dipeptide (MDP) and l-Ala-γ-d-Glu-meso-diaminopimelic acid (Tri-DAP) into cells. The innate immune system uses various proteins to sense pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors of which there are more than 20 related family members are present in the cytosol and recognize intracellular ligands. NOD proteins mediate NF-κB activation via receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 2 (RICK or RIPK). The specific ligands for some NOD-like receptors have been identified. NOD type 1 (NOD1) is activated by peptides that contain a diaminophilic acid, such as the PepT1 substrate Tri-DAP. In other words, PepT1 transport activity plays an important role in controlling intracellular loading of ligands for NOD1 in turn determining the activation level of downstream inflammatory pathways. However, no direct interaction between Tri-DAP and NOD1 has been identified. In the present work, surface plasmon resonance and atomic force microscopy experiments showed direct binding between NOD1 and Tri-DAP with a Kd value of 34.5 μm. In contrast, no significant binding was evident between muramyl dipeptide and NOD1. Furthermore, leucine-rich region (LRR)-truncated NOD1 did not interact with Tri-DAP, indicating that Tri-DAP interacts with the LRR domain of NOD1. Next, we examined binding between RICK and NOD1 proteins and found that such binding was significant with a Kd value of 4.13 μm. However, NOD1/RICK binding was of higher affinity (Kd of 3.26 μm) when NOD1 was prebound to Tri-DAP. Furthermore, RICK phosphorylation activity was increased when NOD was prebound to Tri-DAP. In conclusion, we have shown that Tri-DAP interacts directly with the LRR domain of NOD1 and consequently increases RICK/NOD1 association and RICK phosphorylation activity. PMID:21757725

  2. Characterization of the Catalytic and Nucleotide Binding Properties of the α-Kinase Domain of Dictyostelium Myosin-II Heavy Chain Kinase A.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yidai; Ye, Qilu; Jia, Zongchao; Côté, Graham P

    2015-09-25

    The α-kinases are a widely expressed family of serine/threonine protein kinases that exhibit no sequence identity with conventional eukaryotic protein kinases. In this report, we provide new information on the catalytic properties of the α-kinase domain of Dictyostelium myosin-II heavy chain kinase-A (termed A-CAT). Crystallization of A-CAT in the presence of MgATP yielded structures with AMP or adenosine in the catalytic cleft together with a phosphorylated Asp-766 residue. The results show that the β- and α-phosphoryl groups are transferred either directly or indirectly to the catalytically essential Asp-766. Biochemical assays confirmed that A-CAT hydrolyzed ATP, ADP, and AMP with kcat values of 1.9, 0.6, and 0.32 min(-1), respectively, and showed that A-CAT can use ADP to phosphorylate peptides and proteins. Binding assays using fluorescent 2'/3'-O-(N-methylanthraniloyl) analogs of ATP and ADP yielded Kd values for ATP, ADP, AMP, and adenosine of 20 ± 3, 60 ± 20, 160 ± 60, and 45 ± 15 μM, respectively. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that Glu-713, Leu-716, and Lys-645, all of which interact with the adenine base, were critical for nucleotide binding. Mutation of the highly conserved Gln-758, which chelates a nucleotide-associated Mg(2+) ion, eliminated catalytic activity, whereas loss of the highly conserved Lys-722 and Arg-592 decreased kcat values for kinase and ATPase activities by 3-6-fold. Mutation of Asp-663 impaired kinase activity to a much greater extent than ATPase, indicating a specific role in peptide substrate binding, whereas mutation of Gln-768 doubled ATPase activity, suggesting that it may act to exclude water from the active site. PMID:26260792

  3. Molecular modeling of the heterodimer of human CFTR’s nucleotide-binding domains using a protein–protein docking approach

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Sheng-You; Bolser, Diana; Liu, Hao-Yang; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Zou, Xiaoqin

    2009-01-01

    We have presented a new protein–protein docking approach to model heterodimeric structures based on the conformations of the monomeric units. The conventional modeling method relies on superimposing two monomeric structures onto the crystal structure of a homologous protein dimer. The resulting structure may exhibit severe backbone clashes at the dimeric interface depending on the backbone dissimilarity between the target and template proteins. Our method overcomes the backbone clashing problem and requires no a priori knowledge of the dimeric structure of a homologous protein. Here we used human Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR), a chloride channel whose dysfunction causes cystic fibrosis, for illustration. The two intracellular nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of CFTR control the opening and closing of the channel. Yet, the structure of the CFTR’s NBD1–NBD2 complex has not been experimentally determined. Thus, correct modeling of this heterodimeric structure is valuable for understanding CFTR functions and would have potential applications for drug design for cystic fibrosis treatment. Based on the crystal structure of human CFTR’s NBD1, we constructed a model of the NBD1–NBD2 complex. The constructed model is consistent with the dimeric mode observed in the crystal structures of other ABC transporters. To verify our structural model, an ATP substrate was docked into the nucleotide-binding site. The predicted binding mode shows consistency with related crystallographic findings and CFTR functional studies. Finally, genistein, an agent that enhances CFTR activity, though the mechanism for such enhancement is unclear, was docked to the model. Our predictions agreed with genistein’s bell-shaped dose-response relationship. Potential mutagenesis experiments were proposed for understanding the potentiation mechanism of genistein and for providing insightful information for drug design targeting at CFTR. The method used in this

  4. The nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 1 (NOD1) polymorphism S7N does not affect receptor function

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Activation and signal transduction in the Nucleotide binding, leucine-rich repeat containing receptor (NLR) family needs to be tightly regulated in order to control the inflammatory response to exogenous and endogenous danger signals. Phosphorylation is a common cellular mechanism of regulation that has recently been shown to be important in signalling in another family of cytoplasmic pattern recognition receptors, the RIG-I like receptors. In addition, single nucleotide polymorphisms can alter receptor activity, potentially leading to dysfunction and/or a predisposition to inflammatory barrier diseases. Findings We have computationally analysed the N-terminus of NOD1 and found seven theoretical phosphorylation sites in, or immediately before, the NOD1 Caspase Activation Domain (CARD). Two of these, serine 7 and tyrosine 49 are also found as rare polymorphisms in the African-American population and European-American populations respectively. Mutating serine 7 to either an aspartic acid or an asparagine to mimic the potential impact of phosphorylation or the polymorphism respectively did not affect the response of NOD1 to ligand-mediated NFκB signalling. Conclusions The NOD1 polymorphism S7N does not interfere with receptor function in response to ligand stimulation. PMID:24598002

  5. Potassium Acts as a GTPase-Activating Element on Each Nucleotide-Binding Domain of the Essential Bacillus subtilis EngA

    PubMed Central

    Foucher, Anne-Emmanuelle; Reiser, Jean-Baptiste; Ebel, Christine; Housset, Dominique; Jault, Jean-Michel

    2012-01-01

    EngA proteins form a unique family of bacterial GTPases with two GTP-binding domains in tandem, namely GD1 and GD2, followed by a KH (K-homology) domain. They have been shown to interact with the bacterial ribosome and to be involved in its biogenesis. Most prokaryotic EngA possess a high GTPase activity in contrast to eukaryotic GTPases that act mainly as molecular switches. Here, we have purified and characterized the GTPase activity of the Bacillus subtilis EngA and two shortened EngA variants that only contain GD1 or GD2-KH. Interestingly, the GTPase activity of GD1 alone is similar to that of the whole EngA, whereas GD2-KH has a 150-fold lower GTPase activity. At physiological concentration, potassium strongly stimulates the GTPase activity of each protein construct. Interestingly, it affects neither the affinities for nucleotides nor the monomeric status of EngA or the GD1 domain. Thus, potassium likely acts as a chemical GTPase-activating element as proposed for another bacterial GTPase like MnmE. However, unlike MnmE, potassium does not promote dimerization of EngA. In addition, we solved two crystal structures of full-length EngA. One of them contained for the first time a GTP-like analogue bound to GD2 while GD1 was free. Surprisingly, its overall fold was similar to a previously solved structure with GDP bound to both sites. Our data indicate that a significant structural change must occur upon K+ binding to GD2, and a comparison with T. maritima EngA and MnmE structures allowed us to propose a model explaining the chemical basis for the different GTPase activities of GD1 and GD2. PMID:23056455

  6. Conformational Changes Relevant to Channel Activity and Folding within the first Nucleotide Binding Domain of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator*

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Rhea P.; Chong, P. Andrew; Protasevich, Irina I.; Vernon, Robert; Noy, Efrat; Bihler, Hermann; An, Jian Li; Kalid, Ori; Sela-Culang, Inbal; Mense, Martin; Senderowitz, Hanoch; Brouillette, Christie G.; Forman-Kay, Julie D.

    2012-01-01

    Deletion of Phe-508 (F508del) in the first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) leads to defects in folding and channel gating. NMR data on human F508del NBD1 indicate that an H620Q mutant, shown to increase channel open probability, and the dual corrector/potentiator CFFT-001 similarly disrupt interactions between β-strands S3, S9, and S10 and the C-terminal helices H8 and H9, shifting a preexisting conformational equilibrium from helix to coil. CFFT-001 appears to interact with β-strands S3/S9/S10, consistent with docking simulations. Decreases in Tm from differential scanning calorimetry with H620Q or CFFT-001 suggest direct compound binding to a less thermostable state of NBD1. We hypothesize that, in full-length CFTR, shifting the conformational equilibrium to reduce H8/H9 interactions with the uniquely conserved strands S9/S10 facilitates release of the regulatory region from the NBD dimerization interface to promote dimerization and thereby increase channel open probability. These studies enabled by our NMR assignments for F508del NBD1 provide a window into the conformational fluctuations within CFTR that may regulate function and contribute to folding energetics. PMID:22722932

  7. Conformational changes relevant to channel activity and folding within the first nucleotide binding domain of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Rhea P; Chong, P Andrew; Protasevich, Irina I; Vernon, Robert; Noy, Efrat; Bihler, Hermann; An, Jian Li; Kalid, Ori; Sela-Culang, Inbal; Mense, Martin; Senderowitz, Hanoch; Brouillette, Christie G; Forman-Kay, Julie D

    2012-08-17

    Deletion of Phe-508 (F508del) in the first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) leads to defects in folding and channel gating. NMR data on human F508del NBD1 indicate that an H620Q mutant, shown to increase channel open probability, and the dual corrector/potentiator CFFT-001 similarly disrupt interactions between β-strands S3, S9, and S10 and the C-terminal helices H8 and H9, shifting a preexisting conformational equilibrium from helix to coil. CFFT-001 appears to interact with β-strands S3/S9/S10, consistent with docking simulations. Decreases in T(m) from differential scanning calorimetry with H620Q or CFFT-001 suggest direct compound binding to a less thermostable state of NBD1. We hypothesize that, in full-length CFTR, shifting the conformational equilibrium to reduce H8/H9 interactions with the uniquely conserved strands S9/S10 facilitates release of the regulatory region from the NBD dimerization interface to promote dimerization and thereby increase channel open probability. These studies enabled by our NMR assignments for F508del NBD1 provide a window into the conformational fluctuations within CFTR that may regulate function and contribute to folding energetics. PMID:22722932

  8. Molecular cloning and functional analysis of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 1 in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ju Hye; Kim, Hyun; Kim, Yu Jin; Cho, Ju Hyun

    2016-04-01

    NOD1 has important roles in innate immunity as sensor of microbial components derived from bacterial peptidoglycan. In this study, we identified genes encoding components of the NOD1 signaling pathway, including NOD1 (OmNOD1) and RIP2 (OmRIP2) from rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, and investigated whether OmNOD1 has immunomodulating activity in a rainbow trout hepatoma cell line RTH-149 treated with NOD1-specific ligand (iE-DAP). The deduced amino acid sequence of OmNOD1 contained conserved CARD, NOD and LRR domains. Loss-of-function and gain-of-function experiments indicated that OmNOD1 is involved in the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Silencing of OmNOD1 in RTH-149 cells treated with iE-DAP decreased the expression of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α. Conversely, overexpression of OmNOD1 resulted in up-regulation of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α expression. In addition, RIP2 inhibitor (gefitinib) significantly decreased the expression of these pro-inflammatory cytokines induced by iE-DAP in RTH-149 cells. These findings highlight the important role of NOD1 signaling pathway in fish in eliciting innate immune response. PMID:26876355

  9. A role for the human nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat-containing family member NLRC5 in antiviral responses.

    PubMed

    Neerincx, Andreas; Lautz, Katja; Menning, Maureen; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Zigrino, Paola; Hösel, Marianna; Büning, Hildegard; Schwarzenbacher, Robert; Kufer, Thomas A

    2010-08-20

    Proteins of the nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat (NLR)-containing family recently gained attention as important components of the innate immune system. Although over 20 of these proteins are present in humans, only a few members including the cytosolic pattern recognition receptors NOD1, NOD2, and NLRP3 have been analyzed extensively. These NLRs were shown to be pivotal for mounting innate immune response toward microbial invasion. Here we report on the characterization of human NLRC5 and provide evidence that this NLR has a function in innate immune responses. We found that NLRC5 is a cytosolic protein expressed predominantly in hematopoetic cells. NLRC5 mRNA and protein expression was inducible by the double-stranded RNA analog poly(I.C) and Sendai virus. Overexpression of NLRC5 failed to trigger inflammatory responses such as the NF-kappaB or interferon pathways in HEK293T cells. However, knockdown of endogenous NLRC5 reduced Sendai virus- and poly(I.C)-mediated type I interferon pathway-dependent responses in THP-1 cells and human primary dermal fibroblasts. Taken together, this defines a function for NLRC5 in anti-viral innate immune responses. PMID:20538593

  10. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 acts in concert with the cholecystokinin receptor agonist, cerulein, to induce IL-33-dependent chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T; Sadakane, Y; Yagama, N; Sakurai, T; Ezoe, H; Kudo, M; Chiba, T; Strober, W

    2016-09-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1) fulfills important host-defense functions via its responses to a variety of gut pathogens. Recently, however, we showed that in acute pancreatitis caused by administration of cholecystokinin receptor (CCKR) agonist (cerulein) NOD1 also has a role in inflammation via its responses to gut commensal organisms. In the present study, we explored the long-term outcome of such NOD1 responsiveness in a new model of chronic pancreatitis induced by repeated administration of low doses of cerulein in combination with NOD1 ligand. We found that the development of chronic pancreatitis in this model requires intact NOD1 and type I IFN signaling and that such signaling mediates a macrophage-mediated inflammatory response that supports interleukin (IL)-33 production by acinar cells. The IL-33, in turn, has a necessary role in the induction of IL-13 and TGF-β1, factors causing the fibrotic reaction characteristic of chronic pancreatitis. Interestingly, the Th2 effects of IL-33 were attenuated by the concomitant type I IFN response since the inflammation was marked by clear increases in IFN-γ and TNF-α production but only marginal increases in IL-4 production. These studies establish chronic pancreatitis as an IL-33-dependent inflammation resulting from synergistic interactions between the NOD1 and CCKR signaling pathways. PMID:26813347

  11. Fish oil attenuates liver injury caused by LPS in weaned pigs associated with inhibition of TLR4 and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain protein signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Liu, Yulan; Zhu, Huiling; Hong, Yu; Wu, Zhifeng; Hou, Yongqing; Li, Quan; Ding, Binying; Yi, Dan; Chen, Hongbo

    2013-10-01

    This study evaluated whether fish oil exerted a hepatoprotective effect in a LPS-induced liver injury model via regulation of TLR4 and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain protein (NOD) signaling pathways. Twenty-four piglets were used in a 2 × 2 factorial design, and the main factors included diet (5% corn oil or 5% fish oil) and immunological challenge (LPS or saline). Fish oil resulted in enrichment of eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid and total (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids in liver. Less severe liver injury was observed in pigs fed fish oil, as evidenced by improved serum biochemical parameters and less severe histological liver damage. In addition, higher expression of liver tight junction proteins, and lower hepatocyte proliferation and higher hepatocyte apoptosis were observed in pigs fed fish oil. The improved liver integrity in pigs fed fish oil was concurrent with reduced hepatic mRNA expression of TLR4, myeloid differentiation factor 88, IL-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 and TNF-α receptor-associated factor 6, and NOD1, NOD2 and receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 2, as well as reduced hepatic protein expression of NF-κB p65, leading to reduced hepatic pro-inflammatory mediators. These results indicate that fish oil improves liver integrity partially via inhibition of TLR4 and NOD signaling pathways under an inflammatory condition. PMID:23339927

  12. Mutation of Walker-A lysine 464 in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator reveals functional interaction between its nucleotide-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Powe, Allan C; Al-Nakkash, Layla; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2002-03-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel bears two nucleotide-binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2) that control its ATP-dependent gating. Exactly how these NBDs control gating is controversial. To address this issue, we examined channels with a Walker-A lysine mutation in NBD1 (K464A) using the patch clamp technique. K464A mutants have an ATP dependence (EC(50) approximate 60 microM) and opening rate at 2.75 mM ATP (approximately 2.1 s(-1)) similar to wild type (EC(50) approximate 97 microM; approximately 2.0 s(-1)). However, K464A's closing rate at 2.75 mM ATP (approximately 3.6 s(-1)) is faster than that of wild type (approximately 2.1 s(-1)), suggesting involvement of NBD1 in nucleotide-dependent closing. Delay of closing in wild type by adenylyl imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP), a non-hydrolysable ATP analogue, is markedly diminished in K464A mutants due to reduction in AMP-PNP's apparent on-rate and acceleration of its apparent off-rate (approximately 2- and approximately 10-fold, respectively). Since the delay of closing by AMP-PNP is thought to occur via NBD2, K464A's effect on the NBD2 mutant K1250A was examined. In sharp contrast to K464A, K1250A single mutants exhibit reduced opening (approximately 0.055 s(-1)) and closing (approximately 0.006 s(-1)) rates at millimolar [ATP], suggesting a role for K1250 in both opening and closing. At millimolar [ATP], K464A-K1250A double mutants close approximately 5-fold faster (approximately 0.029 s(-1)) than K1250A but open with a similar rate (approximately 0.059 s(-1)), indicating an effect of K464A on NBD2 function. In summary, our results reveal that both of CFTR's functionally asymmetric NBDs participate in nucleotide-dependent closing, which provides important constraints for NBD-mediated gating models. PMID:11882668

  13. Mutation of Walker-A lysine 464 in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator reveals functional interaction between its nucleotide-binding domains

    PubMed Central

    Powe, Allan C; Al-Nakkash, Layla; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2002-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel bears two nucleotide-binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2) that control its ATP-dependent gating. Exactly how these NBDs control gating is controversial. To address this issue, we examined channels with a Walker-A lysine mutation in NBD1 (K464A) using the patch clamp technique. K464A mutants have an ATP dependence (EC50 ≈ 60 μm) and opening rate at 2.75 mm ATP (∼ 2.1 s−1) similar to wild type (EC50 ≈ 97 μm; ∼ 2.0 s−1). However, K464A's closing rate at 2.75 mm ATP (∼ 3.6 s−1) is faster than that of wild type (∼ 2.1 s−1), suggesting involvement of NBD1 in nucleotide-dependent closing. Delay of closing in wild type by adenylyl imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP), a non-hydrolysable ATP analogue, is markedly diminished in K464A mutants due to reduction in AMP-PNP's apparent on-rate and acceleration of its apparent off-rate (∼ 2- and ∼ 10-fold, respectively). Since the delay of closing by AMP-PNP is thought to occur via NBD2, K464A's effect on the NBD2 mutant K1250A was examined. In sharp contrast to K464A, K1250A single mutants exhibit reduced opening (∼ 0.055 s−1) and closing (∼ 0.006 s−1) rates at millimolar [ATP], suggesting a role for K1250 in both opening and closing. At millimolar [ATP], K464A-K1250A double mutants close ∼ 5-fold faster (∼ 0.029 s−1) than K1250A but open with a similar rate (∼ 0.059 s−1), indicating an effect of K464A on NBD2 function. In summary, our results reveal that both of CFTR's functionally asymmetric NBDs participate in nucleotide-dependent closing, which provides important constraints for NBD-mediated gating models. PMID:11882668

  14. Docking and 3D-QSAR (quantitative structure activity relationship) studies of flavones, the potent inhibitors of p-glycoprotein targeting the nucleotide binding domain.

    PubMed

    Kothandan, Gugan; Gadhe, Changdev G; Madhavan, Thirumurthy; Choi, Cheol Hee; Cho, Seung Joo

    2011-09-01

    In order to explore the interactions between flavones and P-gp, in silico methodologies such as docking and 3D-QSAR were performed. CoMFA and CoMSIA analyses were done using ligand based and receptor guided alignment schemes. Validation statistics include leave-one-out cross-validated R(2) (q(2)), internal prediction parameter by progressive scrambling (Q(*2)), external prediction with test set. They show that models derived from this study are quite robust. Ligand based CoMFA (q(2) = 0.747, Q(*2) = 0.639, r(pred)(2)=0.802) and CoMSIA model (q(2) = 0.810, Q(*2) = 0.676, r(pred)(2)=0.785) were developed using atom by atom matching. Receptor guided CoMFA (q(2) = 0.712, Q(*2) = 0.497, r(pred)(2) = 0.841) and for CoMSIA (q(2) = 0.805, Q(*2) = 0.589, r(pred)(2) = 0.937) models were developed by docking of highly active flavone into the proposed NBD (nucleotide binding domain) of P-gp. The 3D-QSAR models generated here predicted that hydrophobic and steric parameters are important for activity toward P-gp. Our studies indicate the important amino acid in NBD crucial for binding in accordance with the previous results. This site forms a hydrophobic site. Since flavonoids have potential without toxicity, we propose to inspect this hydrophobic site including Asn1043 and Asp1049 should be considered for future inhibitor design. PMID:21723648

  15. DNA sequence polymorphisms within the bovine guanine nucleotide-binding protein Gs subunit alpha (Gsα)-encoding (GNAS) genomic imprinting domain are associated with performance traits

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Genes which are epigenetically regulated via genomic imprinting can be potential targets for artificial selection during animal breeding. Indeed, imprinted loci have been shown to underlie some important quantitative traits in domestic mammals, most notably muscle mass and fat deposition. In this candidate gene study, we have identified novel associations between six validated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning a 97.6 kb region within the bovine guanine nucleotide-binding protein Gs subunit alpha gene (GNAS) domain on bovine chromosome 13 and genetic merit for a range of performance traits in 848 progeny-tested Holstein-Friesian sires. The mammalian GNAS domain consists of a number of reciprocally-imprinted, alternatively-spliced genes which can play a major role in growth, development and disease in mice and humans. Based on the current annotation of the bovine GNAS domain, four of the SNPs analysed (rs43101491, rs43101493, rs43101485 and rs43101486) were located upstream of the GNAS gene, while one SNP (rs41694646) was located in the second intron of the GNAS gene. The final SNP (rs41694656) was located in the first exon of transcripts encoding the putative bovine neuroendocrine-specific protein NESP55, resulting in an aspartic acid-to-asparagine amino acid substitution at amino acid position 192. Results SNP genotype-phenotype association analyses indicate that the single intronic GNAS SNP (rs41694646) is associated (P ≤ 0.05) with a range of performance traits including milk yield, milk protein yield, the content of fat and protein in milk, culled cow carcass weight and progeny carcass conformation, measures of animal body size, direct calving difficulty (i.e. difficulty in calving due to the size of the calf) and gestation length. Association (P ≤ 0.01) with direct calving difficulty (i.e. due to calf size) and maternal calving difficulty (i.e. due to the maternal pelvic width size) was also observed at the rs43101491 SNP. Following

  16. Organic dust augments nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain expression via an NF-κB pathway to negatively regulate inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Kielian, Tammy; Wyatt, Todd A.; Gleason, Angela M.; Stone, Jeremy; Palm, Kelsey; West, William W.; Romberger, Debra J.

    2011-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2) is involved in innate immune responses to peptidoglycan degradation products. Peptidoglycans are important mediators of organic dust-induced airway diseases in exposed agriculture workers; however, the role of NOD2 in response to complex organic dust is unknown. Monocytes/macrophages were exposed to swine facility organic dust extract (ODE), whereupon NOD2 expression was evaluated by real-time PCR and Western blot. ODE induced significant NOD2 mRNA and protein expression at 24 and 48 h, respectively, which was mediated via a NF-κB signaling pathway as opposed to a TNF-α autocrine/paracrine mechanism. Specifically, NF-κB translocation increased rapidly following ODE stimulation as demonstrated by EMSA, and inhibition of the NF-κB pathway significantly reduced ODE-induced NOD2 expression. However, there was no significant reduction in ODE-induced NOD2 gene expression when TNF-α was inhibited or absent. Next, it was determined whether NOD2 regulated ODE-induced inflammatory cytokine production. Knockdown of NOD2 expression by small interfering RNA resulted in increased CXCL8 and IL-6, but not TNF-α production in response to ODE. Similarly, primary lung macrophages from NOD2 knockout mice demonstrated increased IL-6, CXCL1, and CXCL1, but not TNF-α, expression. Lastly, a higher degree of airway inflammation occurred in the absence of NOD2 following acute (single) and repetitive (3 wk) ODE exposure in an established in vivo murine model. In summary, ODE-induced NOD2 expression is directly dependent on NF-κB signaling, and NOD2 is a negative regulator of complex, organic dust-induced inflammatory cytokine/chemokine production in mononuclear phagocytes. PMID:21665963

  17. The microbiota protects against ischemia/reperfusion-induced intestinal injury through nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2) signaling.

    PubMed

    Perez-Chanona, Ernesto; Mühlbauer, Marcus; Jobin, Christian

    2014-11-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2), an intracellular pattern recognition receptor, induces autophagy on detection of muramyl dipeptide (MDP), a component of microbial cell walls. The role of bacteria and NOD2 signaling toward ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced intestinal injury response is unknown. Herein, we report that I/R-induced intestinal injury in germ-free (GF) C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) mice is worse than in conventionally derived mice. More important, microbiota-mediated protection against I/R-induced intestinal injury is abrogated in conventionally derived Nod2(-/-) mice and GF Nod2(-/-) mice. Also, WT mice raised in specific pathogen-free (SPF) conditions fared better against I/R-induced injury than SPF Nod2(-/-) mice. Moreover, SPF WT mice i.p. administered 10 mg/kg MDP were protected against injury compared with mice administered the inactive enantiomer, l-MDP, an effect lost in Nod2(-/-) mice. However, MDP administration failed to protect GF mice from I/R-induced intestinal injury compared with control, a phenomenon correlating with undetectable Nod2 mRNA level in the epithelium of GF mice. More important, the autophagy-inducer rapamycin protected Nod2(-/-) mice against I/R-induced injury and increased the levels of LC3(+) puncta in injured tissue of Nod2(-/-) mice. These findings demonstrate that NOD2 protects against I/R and promotes wound healing, likely through the induction of the autophagy response. PMID:25204845

  18. Regulation of hERG and hEAG channels by Src and by SHP-1 tyrosine phosphatase via an ITIM region in the cyclic nucleotide binding domain.

    PubMed

    Schlichter, Lyanne C; Jiang, Jiahua; Wang, John; Newell, Evan W; Tsui, Florence W L; Lam, Doris

    2014-01-01

    Members of the EAG K(+) channel superfamily (EAG/Kv10.x, ERG/Kv11.x, ELK/Kv12.x subfamilies) are expressed in many cells and tissues. In particular, two prototypes, EAG1/Kv10.1/KCNH1 and ERG1/Kv11.1/KCNH2 contribute to both normal and pathological functions. Proliferation of numerous cancer cells depends on hEAG1, and in some cases, hERG. hERG is best known for contributing to the cardiac action potential, and for numerous channel mutations that underlie 'long-QT syndrome'. Many cells, particularly cancer cells, express Src-family tyrosine kinases and SHP tyrosine phosphatases; and an imbalance in tyrosine phosphorylation can lead to malignancies, autoimmune diseases, and inflammatory disorders. Ion channel contributions to cell functions are governed, to a large degree, by post-translational modulation, especially phosphorylation. However, almost nothing is known about roles of specific tyrosine kinases and phosphatases in regulating K(+) channels in the EAG superfamily. First, we show that tyrosine kinase inhibitor, PP1, and the selective Src inhibitory peptide, Src40-58, reduce the hERG current amplitude, without altering its voltage dependence or kinetics. PP1 similarly reduces the hEAG1 current. Surprisingly, an 'immuno-receptor tyrosine inhibitory motif' (ITIM) is present within the cyclic nucleotide binding domain of all EAG-superfamily members, and is conserved in the human, rat and mouse sequences. When tyrosine phosphorylated, this ITIM directly bound to and activated SHP-1 tyrosine phosphatase (PTP-1C/PTPN6/HCP); the first report that a portion of an ion channel is a binding site and activator of a tyrosine phosphatase. Both hERG and hEAG1 currents were decreased by applying active recombinant SHP-1, and increased by the inhibitory substrate-trapping SHP-1 mutant. Thus, hERG and hEAG1 currents are regulated by activated SHP-1, in a manner opposite to their regulation by Src. Given the widespread distribution of these channels, Src and SHP-1, this work

  19. Regulation of hERG and hEAG Channels by Src and by SHP-1 Tyrosine Phosphatase via an ITIM Region in the Cyclic Nucleotide Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Schlichter, Lyanne C.; Jiang, Jiahua; Wang, John; Newell, Evan W.; Tsui, Florence W. L.; Lam, Doris

    2014-01-01

    Members of the EAG K+ channel superfamily (EAG/Kv10.x, ERG/Kv11.x, ELK/Kv12.x subfamilies) are expressed in many cells and tissues. In particular, two prototypes, EAG1/Kv10.1/KCNH1 and ERG1/Kv11.1/KCNH2 contribute to both normal and pathological functions. Proliferation of numerous cancer cells depends on hEAG1, and in some cases, hERG. hERG is best known for contributing to the cardiac action potential, and for numerous channel mutations that underlie ‘long-QT syndrome’. Many cells, particularly cancer cells, express Src-family tyrosine kinases and SHP tyrosine phosphatases; and an imbalance in tyrosine phosphorylation can lead to malignancies, autoimmune diseases, and inflammatory disorders. Ion channel contributions to cell functions are governed, to a large degree, by post-translational modulation, especially phosphorylation. However, almost nothing is known about roles of specific tyrosine kinases and phosphatases in regulating K+ channels in the EAG superfamily. First, we show that tyrosine kinase inhibitor, PP1, and the selective Src inhibitory peptide, Src40-58, reduce the hERG current amplitude, without altering its voltage dependence or kinetics. PP1 similarly reduces the hEAG1 current. Surprisingly, an ‘immuno-receptor tyrosine inhibitory motif’ (ITIM) is present within the cyclic nucleotide binding domain of all EAG-superfamily members, and is conserved in the human, rat and mouse sequences. When tyrosine phosphorylated, this ITIM directly bound to and activated SHP-1 tyrosine phosphatase (PTP-1C/PTPN6/HCP); the first report that a portion of an ion channel is a binding site and activator of a tyrosine phosphatase. Both hERG and hEAG1 currents were decreased by applying active recombinant SHP-1, and increased by the inhibitory substrate-trapping SHP-1 mutant. Thus, hERG and hEAG1 currents are regulated by activated SHP-1, in a manner opposite to their regulation by Src. Given the widespread distribution of these channels, Src and SHP-1, this

  20. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.; Doi, R.

    1998-11-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  1. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc; Doi, Roy

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  2. Rotations of the 2B Sub-domain of E. coli UvrD Helicase/Translocase Coupled to Nucleotide and DNA Binding

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Haifeng; Korolev, Sergey; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Maluf, Nasib K.; Gauss, George H.; Myong, Sua; Ha, Taekjip; Waksman, Gabriel; Lohman, Timothy M.

    2011-01-01

    E. coli UvrD is a superfamily 1 (SF1) DNA helicase and single stranded (ss) DNA translocase that functions in DNA repair, plasmid replication and as an anti-recombinase by removing RecA protein from ssDNA. UvrD couples ATP binding and hydrolysis to unwind double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and translocate along ssDNA with 3′ to 5′ directionality. Although a UvrD monomer is able to translocate along ssDNA rapidly and processively, DNA helicase activity in vitro requires a minimum of a UvrD dimer. Previous crystal structures of UvrD bound to a ss-duplex DNA junction show that its 2B sub-domain exists in a “closed” state and interacts with the duplex DNA. Here we report a crystal structure of an apo form of UvrD in which the 2B sub-domain is in an “open” state that differs by a ~160° rotation of the 2B sub-domain. To study the rotational conformational states of the 2B sub-domain in various ligation states, a series of double cysteine UvrD mutants were constructed and labeled with fluorophores such that rotation of the 2B sub-domain results in changes in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). These studies show that the open and closed forms can interconvert in solution with low salt favoring the closed conformation and high salt favoring the open conformation in the absence of DNA. Binding of UvrD to DNA as well as ATP binding and hydrolysis also affect the rotational conformational state of the 2B sub-domain suggesting that 2B sub-domain rotation is coupled to the function of this nucleic acid motor enzyme. PMID:21704638

  3. Rotations of the 2B sub-domain of E. coli UvrD helicase/translocase coupled to nucleotide and DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Jia, Haifeng; Korolev, Sergey; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Maluf, Nasib K; Gauss, George H; Myong, Sua; Ha, Taekjip; Waksman, Gabriel; Lohman, Timothy M

    2011-08-19

    Escherichia coli UvrD is a superfamily 1 DNA helicase and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) translocase that functions in DNA repair and plasmid replication and as an anti-recombinase by removing RecA protein from ssDNA. UvrD couples ATP binding and hydrolysis to unwind double-stranded DNA and translocate along ssDNA with 3'-to-5' directionality. Although a UvrD monomer is able to translocate along ssDNA rapidly and processively, DNA helicase activity in vitro requires a minimum of a UvrD dimer. Previous crystal structures of UvrD bound to a ssDNA/duplex DNA junction show that its 2B sub-domain exists in a "closed" state and interacts with the duplex DNA. Here, we report a crystal structure of an apo form of UvrD in which the 2B sub-domain is in an "open" state that differs by an ∼160° rotation of the 2B sub-domain. To study the rotational conformational states of the 2B sub-domain in various ligation states, we constructed a series of double-cysteine UvrD mutants and labeled them with fluorophores such that rotation of the 2B sub-domain results in changes in fluorescence resonance energy transfer. These studies show that the open and closed forms can interconvert in solution, with low salt favoring the closed conformation and high salt favoring the open conformation in the absence of DNA. Binding of UvrD to DNA and ATP binding and hydrolysis also affect the rotational conformational state of the 2B sub-domain, suggesting that 2B sub-domain rotation is coupled to the function of this nucleic acid motor enzyme. PMID:21704638

  4. Rotations of the 2B Sub-domain of E. coli UvrD Helicase/Translocase Coupled to Nucleotide and DNA Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Haifeng; Korolev, Sergey; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Maluf, Nasib K.; Gauss, George H.; Myong, Sua; Ha, Taekjip; Waksman, Gabriel; Lohman, Timothy M.

    2011-11-02

    Escherichia coli UvrD is a superfamily 1 DNA helicase and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) translocase that functions in DNA repair and plasmid replication and as an anti-recombinase by removing RecA protein from ssDNA. UvrD couples ATP binding and hydrolysis to unwind double-stranded DNA and translocate along ssDNA with 3'-to-5' directionality. Although a UvrD monomer is able to translocate along ssDNA rapidly and processively, DNA helicase activity in vitro requires a minimum of a UvrD dimer. Previous crystal structures of UvrD bound to a ssDNA/duplex DNA junction show that its 2B sub-domain exists in a 'closed' state and interacts with the duplex DNA. Here, we report a crystal structure of an apo form of UvrD in which the 2B sub-domain is in an 'open' state that differs by an {approx} 160{sup o} rotation of the 2B sub-domain. To study the rotational conformational states of the 2B sub-domain in various ligation states, we constructed a series of double-cysteine UvrD mutants and labeled them with fluorophores such that rotation of the 2B sub-domain results in changes in fluorescence resonance energy transfer. These studies show that the open and closed forms can interconvert in solution, with low salt favoring the closed conformation and high salt favoring the open conformation in the absence of DNA. Binding of UvrD to DNA and ATP binding and hydrolysis also affect the rotational conformational state of the 2B sub-domain, suggesting that 2B sub-domain rotation is coupled to the function of this nucleic acid motor enzyme.

  5. Nucleotide-binding mechanisms in pseudokinases

    PubMed Central

    Hammarén, Henrik M.; Virtanen, Anniina T.; Silvennoinen, Olli

    2015-01-01

    Pseudokinases are classified by the lack of one or several of the highly conserved motifs involved in nucleotide (nt) binding or catalytic activity of protein kinases (PKs). Pseudokinases represent ∼10% of the human kinome and they are found in all evolutionary classes of kinases. It has become evident that pseudokinases, which were initially considered somewhat peculiar dead kinases, are important components in several signalling cascades. Furthermore, several pseudokinases have been linked to human diseases, particularly cancer, which is raising interest for therapeutic approaches towards these proteins. The ATP-binding pocket is a well-established drug target and elucidation of the mechanism and properties of nt binding in pseudokinases is of significant interest and importance. Recent studies have demonstrated that members of the pseudokinase family are very diverse in structure as well as in their ability and mechanism to bind nts or perform phosphoryl transfer reactions. This diversity also precludes prediction of pseudokinase function, or the importance of nt binding for said function, based on primary sequence alone. Currently available data indicate that ∼40% of pseudokinases are able to bind nts, whereas only few are able to catalyse occasional phosphoryl transfer. Pseudokinases employ diverse mechanisms to bind nts, which usually occurs at low, but physiological, affinity. ATP binding serves often a structural role but in most cases the functional roles are not precisely known. In the present review, we discuss the various mechanisms that pseudokinases employ for nt binding and how this often low-affinity binding can be accurately analysed. PMID:26589967

  6. The roles of the RIIβ linker and N-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain in determining the unique structures of the type IIβ protein kinase A: a small angle x-ray and neutron scattering study.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, Donald K; Copps, Jeffrey; Smith-Nguyen, Eric V; Zhang, Ping; Heller, William T; Taylor, Susan S

    2014-10-10

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is ubiquitously expressed and is responsible for regulating many important cellular functions in response to changes in intracellular cAMP concentrations. The PKA holoenzyme is a tetramer (R2:C2), with a regulatory subunit homodimer (R2) that binds and inhibits two catalytic (C) subunits; binding of cAMP to the regulatory subunit homodimer causes activation of the catalytic subunits. Four different R subunit isoforms exist in mammalian cells, and these confer different structural features, subcellular localization, and biochemical properties upon the PKA holoenzymes they form. The holoenzyme containing RIIβ is structurally unique in that the type IIβ holoenzyme is much more compact than the free RIIβ homodimer. We have used small angle x-ray scattering and small angle neutron scattering to study the solution structure and subunit organization of a holoenzyme containing an RIIβ C-terminal deletion mutant (RIIβ(1-280)), which is missing the C-terminal cAMP-binding domain to better understand the structural organization of the type IIβ holoenzyme and the RIIβ domains that contribute to stabilizing the holoenzyme conformation. Our results demonstrate that compaction of the type IIβ holoenzyme does not require the C-terminal cAMP-binding domain but rather involves large structural rearrangements within the linker and N-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain of the RIIβ homodimer. The structural rearrangements are significantly greater than seen previously with RIIα and are likely to be important in mediating short range and long range interdomain and intersubunit interactions that uniquely regulate the activity of the type IIβ isoform of PKA. PMID:25112875

  7. The roles of RIIbeta linker and N-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain in determining the unique structures of Type IIbeta Protein Kinase A. A small angle X-ray and neutron scattering study

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Blumenthal, Donald K.; Copps, Jeffrey; Smith-Nguyen, Eric V.; Zhang, Ping; Heller, William T.; Taylor, Susan S.

    2014-08-11

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is ubiquitously expressed and is responsible for regulating many important cellular functions in response to changes in intracellular cAMP concentrations. Moreover, the PKA holoenzyme is a tetramer (R2:C2), with a regulatory subunit homodimer (R2) that binds and inhibits two catalytic (C) subunits; binding of cAMP to the regulatory subunit homodimer causes activation of the catalytic subunits. Four different R subunit isoforms exist in mammalian cells, and these confer different structural features, subcellular localization, and biochemical properties upon the PKA holoenzymes they form. The holoenzyme containing RIIβ is structurally unique in that the type IIβ holoenzyme ismore » much more compact than the free RIIβ homodimer. We have used small angle x-ray scattering and small angle neutron scattering to study the solution structure and subunit organization of a holoenzyme containing an RIIβ C-terminal deletion mutant (RIIβ(1–280)), which is missing the C-terminal cAMP-binding domain to better understand the structural organization of the type IIβ holoenzyme and the RIIβ domains that contribute to stabilizing the holoenzyme conformation. These results demonstrate that compaction of the type IIβ holoenzyme does not require the C-terminal cAMP-binding domain but rather involves large structural rearrangements within the linker and N-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain of the RIIβ homodimer. The structural rearrangements are significantly greater than seen previously with RIIα and are likely to be important in mediating short range and long range interdomain and intersubunit interactions that uniquely regulate the activity of the type IIβ isoform of PKA.« less

  8. The roles of RIIbeta linker and N-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain in determining the unique structures of Type IIbeta Protein Kinase A. A small angle X-ray and neutron scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenthal, Donald K.; Copps, Jeffrey; Smith-Nguyen, Eric V.; Zhang, Ping; Heller, William T.; Taylor, Susan S.

    2014-08-11

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is ubiquitously expressed and is responsible for regulating many important cellular functions in response to changes in intracellular cAMP concentrations. Moreover, the PKA holoenzyme is a tetramer (R2:C2), with a regulatory subunit homodimer (R2) that binds and inhibits two catalytic (C) subunits; binding of cAMP to the regulatory subunit homodimer causes activation of the catalytic subunits. Four different R subunit isoforms exist in mammalian cells, and these confer different structural features, subcellular localization, and biochemical properties upon the PKA holoenzymes they form. The holoenzyme containing RIIβ is structurally unique in that the type IIβ holoenzyme is much more compact than the free RIIβ homodimer. We have used small angle x-ray scattering and small angle neutron scattering to study the solution structure and subunit organization of a holoenzyme containing an RIIβ C-terminal deletion mutant (RIIβ(1–280)), which is missing the C-terminal cAMP-binding domain to better understand the structural organization of the type IIβ holoenzyme and the RIIβ domains that contribute to stabilizing the holoenzyme conformation. These results demonstrate that compaction of the type IIβ holoenzyme does not require the C-terminal cAMP-binding domain but rather involves large structural rearrangements within the linker and N-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain of the RIIβ homodimer. The structural rearrangements are significantly greater than seen previously with RIIα and are likely to be important in mediating short range and long range interdomain and intersubunit interactions that uniquely regulate the activity of the type IIβ isoform of PKA.

  9. Mechanism of dysfunction of two nucleotide binding domain mutations in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator that are associated with pancreatic sufficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, D N; Ostedgaard, L S; Winter, M C; Welsh, M J

    1995-01-01

    Variability in the severity of cystic fibrosis (CF) is in part due to specific mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. To understand better how mutations in CFTR disrupt Cl- channel function and to learn about the relationship between genotype and phenotype, we studied two CF mutants, A455E and P574H, that are associated with pancreatic sufficiency. A455E and P574H are located close to conserved ATP binding motifs in CFTR. Both mutants generated cAMP-stimulated apical membrane Cl- currents in heterologous epithelial cells, but current magnitudes were reduced compared with wild-type. Patch-clamp analysis revealed that both mutants had normal conductive properties and regulation by phosphorylation and nucleotides. These mutants had normal or increased Cl- channel activity: A455E had an open-state probability (Po) similar to wild-type, and P574H had an increased Po because bursts of activity were prolonged. However, both mutants produced less mature glycosylated protein, although levels were greater than observed with the delta F508 mutant. These changes in channel activity and processing provide a quantitative explanation for the reduced apical Cl- current. These data also dissociate structural requirements for channel function from features that determine processing. Finally, the results suggest that the residual function associated with these two mutants is sufficient to confer a milder clinical phenotype and infer approaches to developing treatments. Images PMID:7534226

  10. Activation of Autophagy and Nucleotide-Binding Domain Leucine-Rich Repeat–Containing-Like Receptor Family, Pyrin Domain–Containing 3 Inflammasome during Leishmania infantum–Associated Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Esch, Kevin J.; Schaut, Robert G.; Lamb, Ian M.; Clay, Gwendolyn; Morais Lima, Ádila L.; do Nascimento, Paulo R.P.; Whitley, Elizabeth M.; Jeronimo, Selma M.B.; Sutterwala, Fayyaz S.; Haynes, Joseph S.; Petersen, Christine A.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a major contributor to human and companion animal morbidity and mortality. Renal complications are sequelae of canine and human visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Despite the high incidence of infection-mediated glomerulonephritis, little is known about pathogenesis of VL-associated renal disease. Leishmania infantum–infected dogs are a naturally occurring model of VL-associated glomerulonephritis. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis type I [24 of 25 (96%)], with interstitial lymphoplasmacytic nephritis [23 of 25 (92%)], and glomerular and interstitial fibrosis [12 of 25 (48%)] were predominant lesions. An ultrastructural evaluation of glomeruli from animals with VL identified mesangial cell proliferation and interposition. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated significant Leishmania antigen, IgG, and C3b deposition in VL dog glomeruli. Asymptomatic and symptomatic dogs had increased glomerular nucleotide-binding domain leucine-rich repeat–containing-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 and autophagosome-associated microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 associated with glomerular lesion severity. Transcriptional analyses from symptomatic dogs confirmed induction of autophagy and inflammasome genes within glomeruli and tubules. On the basis of temporal VL staging, glomerulonephritis was initiated by IgG and complement deposition. This deposition preceded presence of nucleotide-binding domain leucine-rich repeat–containing-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3–associated inflammasomes and increased light chain 3 puncta indicative of autophagosomes in glomeruli from dogs with clinical VL and renal failure. These findings indicate potential roles for inflammasome complexes in glomerular damage during VL and autophagy in ensuing cellular responses. PMID:26079813

  11. Signal transduction by guanine nucleotide binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, A M

    1987-01-01

    High affinity binding of guanine nucleotides and the ability to hydrolyze bound GTP to GDP are characteristics of an extended family of intracellular proteins. Subsets of this family include cytosolic initiation and elongation factors involved in protein synthesis, and cytoskeletal proteins such as tubulin (Hughes, S.M. (1983) FEBS Lett. 164, 1-8). A distinct subset of guanine nucleotide binding proteins is membrane-associated; members of this subset include the ras gene products (Ellis, R.W. et al. (1981) Nature 292, 506-511) and the heterotrimeric G-proteins (also termed N-proteins) (Gilman, A.G. (1984) Cell 36, 577-579). Substantial evidence indicates that G-proteins act as signal transducers by coupling receptors (R) to effectors (E). A similar function has been suggested but not proven for the ras gene products. Known G-proteins include Gs and Gi, the G-proteins associated with stimulation and inhibition, respectively, of adenylate cyclase; transducin (TD), the G-protein coupling rhodopsin to cGMP phosphodiesterase in rod photoreceptors (Bitensky, M.W. et al. (1981) Curr. Top. Membr. Transp. 15, 237-271; Stryer, L. (1986) Annu. Rev. Neurosci. 9, 87-119), and Go, a G-protein of unknown function that is highly abundant in brain (Sternweis, P.C. and Robishaw, J.D. (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 13806-13813; Neer, E.J. et al. (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 14222-14229). G-proteins also participate in other signal transduction pathways, notably that involving phosphoinositide breakdown. In this review, I highlight recent progress in our understanding of the structure, function, and diversity of G-proteins. PMID:2435586

  12. Nucleotide-binding flexibility in ultrahigh-resolution structures of the SRP GTPase Ffh

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, Ursula D.; Focia, Pamela J.; Freymann, Douglas M.

    2008-10-01

    Crystal structures of the Ffh NG GTPase domain at < 1.24 Å resolution reveal multiple overlapping nucleotide binding modes. Two structures of the nucleotide-bound NG domain of Ffh, the GTPase subunit of the bacterial signal recognition particle (SRP), have been determined at ultrahigh resolution in similar crystal forms. One is GDP-bound and one is GMPPCP-bound. The asymmetric unit of each structure contains two protein monomers, each of which exhibits differences in nucleotide-binding conformation and occupancy. The GDP-bound Ffh NG exhibits two binding conformations in one monomer but not the other and the GMPPCP-bound protein exhibits full occupancy of the nucleotide in one monomer but only partial occupancy in the other. Thus, under the same solution conditions, each crystal reveals multiple binding states that suggest that even when nucleotide is bound its position in the Ffh NG active site is dynamic. Some differences in the positioning of the bound nucleotide may arise from differences in the crystal-packing environment and specific factors that have been identified include the relative positions of the N and G domains, small conformational changes in the P-loop, the positions of waters buried within the active site and shifts in the closing loop that packs against the guanine base. However, ‘loose’ binding may have biological significance in promoting facile nucleotide exchange and providing a mechanism for priming the SRP GTPase prior to its activation in its complex with the SRP receptor.

  13. Closing of the nucleotide pocket of kinesin-family motors upon binding to microtubules.

    PubMed

    Naber, Nariman; Minehardt, Todd J; Rice, Sarah; Chen, Xiaoru; Grammer, Jean; Matuska, Marija; Vale, Ronald D; Kollman, Peter A; Car, Roberto; Yount, Ralph G; Cooke, Roger; Pate, Edward

    2003-05-01

    We have used adenosine diphosphate analogs containing electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin moieties and EPR spectroscopy to show that the nucleotide-binding site of kinesin-family motors closes when the motor.diphosphate complex binds to microtubules. Structural analyses demonstrate that a domain movement in the switch 1 region at the nucleotide site, homologous to domain movements in the switch 1 region in the G proteins [heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding proteins], explains the EPR data. The switch movement primes the motor both for the free energy-yielding nucleotide hydrolysis reaction and for subsequent conformational changes that are crucial for the generation of force and directed motion along the microtubule. PMID:12730601

  14. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1998-02-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  15. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  16. Crystal structure of cyclic nucleotide-binding-like protein from Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    He, Zheng; Gao, Yuan; Dong, Jing; Ke, Yuehua; Li, Xuemei; Chen, Zeliang; Zhang, Xuejun C

    2015-12-25

    The cyclic nucleotide-binding (CNB)-like protein (CNB-L) from Brucella abortus shares sequence homology with CNB domain-containing proteins. We determined the crystal structure of CNB-L at 2.0 Å resolution in the absence of its C-terminal helix and nucleotide. The 3D structure of CNB-L is in a two-fold symmetric form. Each protomer shows high structure similarity to that of cGMP-binding domain-containing proteins, and likely mimics their nucleotide-free conformation. A key residue, Glu17, mediates the dimerization and prevents binding of cNMP to the canonical ligand-pocket. The structurally observed dimer of CNB-L is stable in solution, and thus is likely to be biologically relevant. PMID:26549229

  17. Conformational changes of P-glycoprotein by nucleotide binding.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, G; Pincheira, R; Zhang, M; Zhang, J T

    1997-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) is a membrane protein that transports chemotherapeutic drugs, causing multidrug resistance in human cancer cells. Pgp is a member of the ATP-binding cassette superfamily and functions as a transport ATPase. It has been suggested that the conformation of Pgp changes in the catalytic cycle. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by using limited proteolysis as a tool to detect different conformational states trapped by binding of nucleotide ligands and inhibitors. Pgp has high basal ATPase activity; that is, ATP hydrolysis by Pgp is not rigidly associated with drug transport. This activity provides a convenient method for studying the conformational change of Pgp induced by nucleotide ligands, in the absence of drug substrates which may generate complications due to their own binding. Inside-out membrane vesicles containing human Pgp were isolated from multidrug-resistant SKOV/VLB cells and treated with trypsin in the absence or presence of MgATP, Mg-adenosine 5'-[beta,gamma-imido]triphosphate (Mg-p[NH]ppA) and MgADP. Changes in the proteolysis profile of Pgp owing to binding of nucleotides were used to indicate the conformational changes in Pgp. We found that generation of tryptic fragments, including the loop linking transmembrane (TM) regions TM8 and TM9 of Pgp, were stimulated by the binding of Mg-p[NH]ppA, MgATP and MgADP, indicating that the Pgp conformation was changed by the binding of these nucleotides. The effects of nucleotides on Pgp conformation are directly associated with the binding and/or hydrolysis of these ligands. Four conformational states of Pgp were stabilized under different conditions with various ligands and inhibitors. We propose that cycling through these four states couples the Pgp-mediated MgATP hydrolysis to drug transport. PMID:9396736

  18. Probing the nucleotide-binding site of Escherichia coli succinyl-CoA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Joyce, M A; Fraser, M E; Brownie, E R; James, M N; Bridger, W A; Wolodko, W T

    1999-06-01

    Succinyl-CoA synthetase (SCS) catalyzes the reversible interchange of purine nucleoside diphosphate, succinyl-CoA, and Pi with purine nucleoside triphosphate, succinate, and CoA via a phosphorylated histidine (H246alpha) intermediate. Two potential nucleotide-binding sites were predicted in the beta-subunit, and have been differentiated by photoaffinity labeling with 8-N3-ATP and by site-directed mutagenesis. It was demonstrated that 8-N3-ATP is a suitable analogue for probing the nucleotide-binding site of SCS. Two tryptic peptides from the N-terminal domain of the beta-subunit were labeled with 8-N3-ATP. These corresponded to residues 107-119beta and 121-146beta, two regions lying along one side of an ATP-grasp fold. A mutant protein with changes on the opposite side of the fold (G53betaV/R54betaE) was unable to be phosphorylated using ATP or GTP, but could be phosphorylated by succinyl-CoA and Pi. A mutant protein designed to probe nucleotide specificity (P20betaQ) had a Km(app) for GTP that was more than 5 times lower than that of wild-type SCS, whereas parameters for the other substrates remained unchanged. Mutations of residues in the C-terminal domain of the beta-subunit designed to distrupt one loop of the Rossmann fold (I322betaA, and R324betaN/D326betaA) had the greatest effect on the binding of succinate and CoA. They did not disrupt the phosphorylation of SCS with nucleotides. It was concluded that the nucleotide-binding site is located in the N-terminal domain of the beta-subunit. This implies that there are two active sites approximately 35 A apart, and that the H246alpha loop moves between them during catalysis. PMID:10353839

  19. Two nucleotide binding sites modulate ( sup 3 H) glyburide binding to rat cortex membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.E.; Gopalakrishnan, M.; Triggle, D.J.; Janis, R.A. State Univ. of New York, Buffalo )

    1991-03-11

    The effects of nucleotides on the binding of the ATP-dependent K{sup +}-channel antagonist ({sup 3}H)glyburide (GLB) to rat cortex membranes were examined. Nucleotide triphosphates (NTPs) and nucleotide diphosphate (NDPs) inhibited the binding of GLB. This effect was dependent on the presence of dithiothreitol (DTT). Inhibition of binding by NTPs, with the exception of ATP{gamma}S, was dependent on the presence of Mg{sup 2+}. GLB binding showed a biphasic response to ADP: up to 3 mM, ADP inhibited binding, and above this concentration GLB binding increased rapidly, and was restored to normal levels by 10 mM ADP. In the presence of Mg{sup 2+}, ADP did not stimulate binding. Saturation analysis in the presence of Mg{sup 2+} and increasing concentrations of ADP showed that ADP results primarily in a change of the B{sub max} for GLB binding. The differential effects of NTPS and NDPs indicate that two nucleotide binding sites regulate GLB binding.

  20. Architecture of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein and structural changes associated with phosphorylation and nucleotide binding.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Aleksandrov, Luba A; Zhao, Zhefeng; Birtley, James R; Riordan, John R; Ford, Robert C

    2009-09-01

    We describe biochemical and structural studies of the isolated cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. Using electron cryomicroscopy, low resolution three-dimensional structures have been obtained for the non-phosphorylated protein in the absence of nucleotide and for the phosphorylated protein with ATP. In the latter state, the cytosolic nucleotide-binding domains move closer together, forming a more compact packing arrangement. Associated with this is a reorganization within the cylindrical transmembrane domains, consistent with a shift from an inward-facing to outward-facing configuration. A region of density in the non-phosphorylated protein that extends from the bottom of the cytosolic regions up to the transmembrane domains is hypothesised to represent the unique regulatory region of CFTR. These data offer insights into the architecture of this ATP-binding cassette protein, and shed light on the global motions associated with nucleotide binding and priming of the chloride channel via phosphorylation of the regulatory region. PMID:19524678

  1. Bioenergetics and Gene Silencing Approaches for Unraveling Nucleotide Recognition by the Human EIF2C2/Ago2 PAZ Domain

    PubMed Central

    Kandeel, Mahmoud; Al-Taher, Abdullah; Nakashima, Remi; Sakaguchi, Tomoya; Kandeel, Ali; Nagaya, Yuki; Kitamura, Yoshiaki; Kitade, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    Gene silencing and RNA interference are major cellular processes that control gene expression via the cleavage of target mRNA. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2C2 (EIF2C2, Argonaute protein 2, Ago2) is considered to be the major player of RNAi as it is the core component of RISC complexes. While a considerable amount of research has focused on RNA interference and its associated mechanisms, the nature and mechanisms of nucleotide recognition by the PAZ domain of EIF2C2/Ago2 have not yet been characterized. Here, we demonstrate that the EIF2C2/Ago2 PAZ domain has an inherent lack of binding to adenine nucleotides, a feature that highlights the poor binding of 3′-adenylated RNAs with the PAZ domain as well as the selective high trimming of the 3′-ends of miRNA containing adenine nucleotides. We further show that the PAZ domain selectively binds all ribonucleotides (except adenosine), whereas it poorly recognizes deoxyribonucleotides. In this context, the modification of dTMP to its ribonucleotide analogue gave a drastic improvement of binding enthalpy and, hence, binding affinity. Additionally, higher in vivo gene silencing efficacy was correlated with the stronger PAZ domain binders. These findings provide new insights into the nature of the interactions of the EIF2C2/Ago2 PAZ domain. PMID:24788663

  2. Binding of nucleotides to nucleoside diphosphate kinase: a calorimetric study.

    PubMed

    Cervoni, L; Lascu, I; Xu, Y; Gonin, P; Morr, M; Merouani, M; Janin, J; Giartosio, A

    2001-04-17

    The source of affinity for substrates of human nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinases is particularly important in that its knowledge could be used to design more effective antiviral nucleoside drugs (e.g., AZT). We carried out a microcalorimetric study of the binding of enzymes from two organisms to various nucleotides. Isothermal titration calorimetry has been used to characterize the binding in terms of Delta G degrees, Delta H degrees and Delta S degrees. Thermodynamic parameters of the interaction of ADP with the hexameric NDP kinase from Dictyostelium discoideum and with the tetrameric enzyme from Myxococcus xanthus, at 20 degrees C, were similar and, in both cases, binding was enthalpy-driven. The interactions of ADP, 2'deoxyADP, GDP, and IDP with the eukaryotic enzyme differed in enthalpic and entropic terms, whereas the Delta G degrees values obtained were similar due to enthalpy--entropy compensation. The binding of the enzyme to nonphysiological nucleotides, such as AMP--PNP, 3'deoxyADP, and 3'-deoxy-3'-amino-ADP, appears to differ in several respects. Crystallography of the protein bound to 3'-deoxy-3'-amino-ADP showed that the drug was in a distorted position, and was unable to interact correctly with active site side chains. The interaction of pyrimidine nucleoside diphosphates with the hexameric enzyme is characterized by a lower affinity than that with purine nucleotides. Titration showed the stoichiometry of the interaction to be abnormal, with 9--12 binding sites/hexamer. The presence of supplementary binding sites might have physiological implications. PMID:11294625

  3. Dual Effects of Adp and Adenylylimidodiphosphate on Cftr Channel Kinetics Show Binding to Two Different Nucleotide Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Weinreich, Frank; Riordan, John R.; Nagel, Georg

    1999-01-01

    The CFTR chloride channel is regulated by phosphorylation by protein kinases, especially PKA, and by nucleotides interacting with the two nucleotide binding domains, NBD-A and NBD-B. Giant excised inside-out membrane patches from Xenopus oocytes expressing human epithelial cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) were tested for their chloride conductance in response to the application of PKA and nucleotides. Rapid changes in the concentration of ATP, its nonhydrolyzable analogue adenylylimidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP), its photolabile derivative ATP-P3-[1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethyl]ester, or ADP led to changes in chloride conductance with characteristic time constants, which reflected interaction of CFTR with these nucleotides. The conductance changes of strongly phosphorylated channels were slower than those of partially phosphorylated CFTR. AMP-PNP decelerated relaxations of conductance increase and decay, whereas ATP-P3-[1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethyl]ester only decelerated the conductance increase upon ATP addition. ADP decelerated the conductance increase upon ATP addition and accelerated the conductance decay upon ATP withdrawal. The results present the first direct evidence that AMP-PNP binds to two sites on the CFTR. The effects of ADP also suggest two different binding sites because of the two different modes of inhibition observed: it competes with ATP for binding (to NBD-A) on the closed channel, but it also binds to channels opened by ATP, which might either reflect binding to NBD-A (i.e., product inhibition in the hydrolysis cycle) or allosteric binding to NBD-B, which accelerates the hydrolysis cycle at NBD-A. PMID:10398692

  4. Dual effects of ADP and adenylylimidodiphosphate on CFTR channel kinetics show binding to two different nucleotide binding sites.

    PubMed

    Weinreich, F; Riordan, J R; Nagel, G

    1999-07-01

    The CFTR chloride channel is regulated by phosphorylation by protein kinases, especially PKA, and by nucleotides interacting with the two nucleotide binding domains, NBD-A and NBD-B. Giant excised inside-out membrane patches from Xenopus oocytes expressing human epithelial cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) were tested for their chloride conductance in response to the application of PKA and nucleotides. Rapid changes in the concentration of ATP, its nonhydrolyzable analogue adenylylimidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP), its photolabile derivative ATP-P3-[1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethyl]ester, or ADP led to changes in chloride conductance with characteristic time constants, which reflected interaction of CFTR with these nucleotides. The conductance changes of strongly phosphorylated channels were slower than those of partially phosphorylated CFTR. AMP-PNP decelerated relaxations of conductance increase and decay, whereas ATP-P3-[1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethyl]ester only decelerated the conductance increase upon ATP addition. ADP decelerated the conductance increase upon ATP addition and accelerated the conductance decay upon ATP withdrawal. The results present the first direct evidence that AMP-PNP binds to two sites on the CFTR. The effects of ADP also suggest two different binding sites because of the two different modes of inhibition observed: it competes with ATP for binding (to NBD-A) on the closed channel, but it also binds to channels opened by ATP, which might either reflect binding to NBD-A (i.e., product inhibition in the hydrolysis cycle) or allosteric binding to NBD-B, which accelerates the hydrolysis cycle at NBD-A. PMID:10398692

  5. Prediction of Nucleotide Binding Peptides Using Star Graph Topological Indices.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Munteanu, Cristian R; Fernández Blanco, Enrique; Tan, Zhiliang; Santos Del Riego, Antonino; Pazos, Alejandro

    2015-11-01

    The nucleotide binding proteins are involved in many important cellular processes, such as transmission of genetic information or energy transfer and storage. Therefore, the screening of new peptides for this biological function is an important research topic. The current study proposes a mixed methodology to obtain the first classification model that is able to predict new nucleotide binding peptides, using only the amino acid sequence. Thus, the methodology uses a Star graph molecular descriptor of the peptide sequences and the Machine Learning technique for the best classifier. The best model represents a Random Forest classifier based on two features of the embedded and non-embedded graphs. The performance of the model is excellent, considering similar models in the field, with an Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve (AUROC) value of 0.938 and true positive rate (TPR) of 0.886 (test subset). The prediction of new nucleotide binding peptides with this model could be useful for drug target studies in drug development. PMID:27491034

  6. CFTR gating II: Effects of nucleotide binding on the stability of open states.

    PubMed

    Bompadre, Silvia G; Cho, Jeong Han; Wang, Xiaohui; Zou, Xiaoqin; Sohma, Yoshiro; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2005-04-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that ADP inhibits cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) opening by competing with ATP for a binding site presumably in the COOH-terminal nucleotide binding domain (NBD2). We also found that the open time of the channel is shortened in the presence of ADP. To further study this effect of ADP on the open state, we have used two CFTR mutants (D1370N and E1371S); both have longer open times because of impaired ATP hydrolysis at NBD2. Single-channel kinetic analysis of DeltaR/D1370N-CFTR shows unequivocally that the open time of this mutant channel is decreased by ADP. DeltaR/E1371S-CFTR channels can be locked open by millimolar ATP with a time constant of approximately 100 s, estimated from current relaxation upon nucleotide removal. ADP induces a shorter locked-open state, suggesting that binding of ADP at a second site decreases the locked-open time. To test the functional consequence of the occupancy of this second nucleotide binding site, we changed the [ATP] and performed similar relaxation analysis for E1371S-CFTR channels. Two locked-open time constants can be discerned and the relative distribution of each component is altered by changing [ATP] so that increasing [ATP] shifts the relative distribution to the longer locked-open state. Single-channel kinetic analysis for DeltaR/E1371S-CFTR confirms an [ATP]-dependent shift of the distribution of two locked-open time constants. These results support the idea that occupancy of a second ATP binding site stabilizes the locked-open state. This binding site likely resides in the NH2-terminal nucleotide binding domain (NBD1) because introducing the K464A mutation, which decreases ATP binding affinity at NBD1, into E1371S-CFTR shortens the relaxation time constant. These results suggest that the binding energy of nucleotide at NBD1 contributes to the overall energetics of the open channel conformation. PMID:15767296

  7. Identification of widespread adenosine nucleotide binding in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ansong, Charles; Ortega, Corrie; Payne, Samuel H.; Haft, Daniel H.; Chauvigne-Hines, Lacie M.; Lewis, Michael P.; Ollodart, Anja R.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Shukla, Anil K.; Fortuin, Suereta; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Grundner, Christoph; Wright, Aaron T.

    2013-01-24

    The annotation of protein function is almost completely performed by in silico approaches. However, computational prediction of protein function is frequently incomplete and error prone. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), ~25% of all genes have no predicted function and are annotated as hypothetical proteins. This lack of functional information severely limits our understanding of Mtb pathogenicity. Current tools for experimental functional annotation are limited and often do not scale to entire protein families. Here, we report a generally applicable chemical biology platform to functionally annotate bacterial proteins by combining activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) and quantitative LC-MS-based proteomics. As an example of this approach for high-throughput protein functional validation and discovery, we experimentally annotate the families of ATP-binding proteins in Mtb. Our data experimentally validate prior in silico predictions of >250 ATPases and adenosine nucleotide-binding proteins, and reveal 73 hypothetical proteins as novel ATP-binding proteins. We identify adenosine cofactor interactions with many hypothetical proteins containing a diversity of unrelated sequences, providing a new and expanded view of adenosine nucleotide binding in Mtb. Furthermore, many of these hypothetical proteins are both unique to Mycobacteria and essential for infection, suggesting specialized functions in mycobacterial physiology and pathogenicity. Thus, we provide a generally applicable approach for high throughput protein function discovery and validation, and highlight several ways in which application of activity-based proteomics data can improve the quality of functional annotations to facilitate novel biological insights.

  8. GATING OF HCN CHANNELS BY CYCLIC NUCLEOTIDES: RESIDUE CONTACTS THAT UNDERLIE LIGAND BINDING, SELECTIVITY AND EFFICACY

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lei; Siegelbaum, Steven A.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Cyclic nucleotides regulate the activity of various proteins by interacting with a conserved cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD). Although X-ray crystallographic studies have revealed the structures of several CNBDs, the residues responsible for generating the high efficacy with which ligand binding leads to protein activation remain unknown. Here we combine molecular dynamics simulations with mutagenesis to identify ligand contacts important for the regulation of the hyperpolarization-activated HCN2 channel by cyclic nucleotides. Surprisingly, out of seven residues that make strong contacts with ligand, only R632 in the C-helix of the CNBD is essential for high ligand efficacy, due to its selective stabilization of cNMP binding to the open state of the channel. Principle component analysis suggests that a local movement of the C-helix upon ligand binding propagates through the CNBD of one subunit to the C-linker of a neighboring subunit to apply force to the gate of the channel. PMID:17562313

  9. Structural basis of nucleotide exchange and client binding by the novel Hsp70-cochaperone Bag2

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhen; Page, Richard C; Gomes, Michelle M; Kohli, Ekta; Nix, Jay C; Herr, Andrew B; Patterson, Cam; Misra, Saurav

    2009-01-01

    Cochaperones are essential for Hsp70/Hsc70-mediated folding of proteins and include nucleotide exchange factors (NEF) that assist protein folding by accelerating ADP/ATP exchange on Hsp70. The cochaperone Bag2 binds misfolded Hsp70 clients and also acts as a NEF, but the molecular basis of its functions is unclear. We show that, rather than being a member of the Bag domain family, Bag2 contains a new type of Hsp70 NEF domain, which we call the “Brand New Bag” (BNB) domain. Free and Hsc70-bound crystal structures of Bag2-BNB show its dimeric structure in which a flanking linker helix and loop bind to Hsc70 to promote nucleotide exchange. NMR analysis demonstrates that the client-binding sites and Hsc70 interaction sites of Bag2-BNB overlap, and that Hsc70 can displace clients from Bag2-BNB, indicating a distinct mechanism for the regulation of Hsp-70-mediated protein folding by Bag2. PMID:19029896

  10. Global discovery of protein kinases and other nucleotide-binding proteins by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yongsheng; Wang, Yinsheng

    2016-09-01

    Nucleotide-binding proteins, such as protein kinases, ATPases and GTP-binding proteins, are among the most important families of proteins that are involved in a number of pivotal cellular processes. However, global study of the structure, function, and expression level of nucleotide-binding proteins as well as protein-nucleotide interactions can hardly be achieved with the use of conventional approaches owing to enormous diversity of the nucleotide-binding protein family. Recent advances in mass spectrometry (MS) instrumentation, coupled with a variety of nucleotide-binding protein enrichment methods, rendered MS-based proteomics a powerful tool for the comprehensive characterizations of the nucleotide-binding proteome, especially the kinome. Here, we review the recent developments in the use of mass spectrometry, together with general and widely used affinity enrichment approaches, for the proteome-wide capture, identification and quantification of nucleotide-binding proteins, including protein kinases, ATPases, GTPases, and other nucleotide-binding proteins. The working principles, advantages, and limitations of each enrichment platform in identifying nucleotide-binding proteins as well as profiling protein-nucleotide interactions are summarized. The perspectives in developing novel MS-based nucleotide-binding protein detection platform are also discussed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mass Spec Rev 35:601-619, 2016. PMID:25376990

  11. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the DNA binding region of the chicken fibronectin gene.

    PubMed

    Karasaki, Y; Gotoh, S; Kubomura, S; Higashi, K; Hirano, H

    1988-12-01

    We have determined the nucleotide sequence of 2.0 kb EcoRI segment from the clone lambda FC32 of the genomic chicken fibronectin gene, which is called DNA binding domain. This segment overlapped another clone lambda FC36 and contained three exons which were 16, 17 and 18. They were classified as Type III repeat as originally shown in bovine plasma fibronectin. The average homologies of these three exons among the chicken, rat and human fibronectins in amino acid level are very high (87-98%) compared with that (79-88%) of the exons in the cell binding domain, indicating that this region is highly conservative during the evolution. PMID:3212295

  12. Conformational dynamics of a G-protein α subunit is tightly regulated by nucleotide binding.

    PubMed

    Goricanec, David; Stehle, Ralf; Egloff, Pascal; Grigoriu, Simina; Plückthun, Andreas; Wagner, Gerhard; Hagn, Franz

    2016-06-28

    Heterotrimeric G proteins play a pivotal role in the signal-transduction pathways initiated by G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activation. Agonist-receptor binding causes GDP-to-GTP exchange and dissociation of the Gα subunit from the heterotrimeric G protein, leading to downstream signaling. Here, we studied the internal mobility of a G-protein α subunit in its apo and nucleotide-bound forms and characterized their dynamical features at multiple time scales using solution NMR, small-angle X-ray scattering, and molecular dynamics simulations. We find that binding of GTP analogs leads to a rigid and closed arrangement of the Gα subdomain, whereas the apo and GDP-bound forms are considerably more open and dynamic. Furthermore, we were able to detect two conformational states of the Gα Ras domain in slow exchange whose populations are regulated by binding to nucleotides and a GPCR. One of these conformational states, the open state, binds to the GPCR; the second conformation, the closed state, shows no interaction with the receptor. Binding to the GPCR stabilizes the open state. This study provides an in-depth analysis of the conformational landscape and the switching function of a G-protein α subunit and the influence of a GPCR in that landscape. PMID:27298341

  13. STRUCTURAL FOLD, CONSERVATION AND FE(II) BINDING OF THE INTRACELLULAR DOMAIN OF PROKARYOTE FEOB

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Kuo-Wei; Chang, Yi-Wei; Eng, Edward T.; Chen, Jai-Hui; Chen, Yi-Chung; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng; Dong, Gang; Spasov, Krasimir A.; Unger, Vinzenz M.; Huang, Tai-huang

    2010-01-01

    FeoB is a G-protein coupled membrane protein essential for Fe(II) uptake in prokaryotes. Here, we report the crystal structures of the intracellular domain of FeoB (NFeoB) from Klebsiella pneumoniae (KpNFeoB) and Pyrococcus furiosus (PfNFeoB) with and without bound ligands. In the structures, a canonical G-protein domain (G domain) is followed by a helical bundle domain (S-domain), which despite its lack of sequence similarity between species is structurally conserved. In the nucleotide-free state, the G-domain’s two switch regions point away from the binding site. This gives rise to an open binding pocket whose shallowness is likely to be responsible for the low nucleotide binding affinity. Nucleotide binding induced significant conformational changes in the G5 motif which in the case of GMPPNP binding was accompanied by destabilization of the switch I region. In addition to the structural data, we demonstrate that Fe(II)-induced foot printing cleaves the protein close to a putative Fe(II)-binding site at the tip of switch I, and we identify functionally important regions within the S-domain. Moreover, we show that NFeoB exists as a monomer in solution, and that its two constituent domains can undergo large conformational changes. The data show that the S-domain plays important roles in FeoB function. PMID:20123128

  14. Binding of sodium and potassium to the sodium pump of pig kidney evaluated from nucleotide-binding behaviour.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, J; Nørby, J G; Ottolenghi, P

    1984-01-01

    Using a rate-dialysis technique at 0-2 degrees C, the affinities of Na+ and K+ for the sodium pump of pig kidney outer medulla were determined from their effects on the binding of ADP to the enzyme. Since all experiments were carried out in the presence of Tris, the enzyme in absence of its specific ligands was assumed to be in a 'sodium-like' conformation. The model used in the analysis of the results assumed the enzyme to be a dimeric structure with two identical high-affinity nucleotide-binding sites. It is concluded from the data that the effects of Na+ and K+ on the binding of nucleotide to either subunit of a nucleotide-free enzyme are identical. The two subunits, taken together, have five identical and non-interacting K+-binding sites (Kdiss = 0.5 mM) whose occupation antagonizes nucleotide binding. The binding of a nucleotide molecule to a nucleotide-free enzyme results in the abolition of K+ binding to two of the five K+-binding sites. The binding of the second molecule of nucleotide prevents the binding of three more K+ ions to the enzyme. These results can explain the K+-induced curvature observed in nucleotide-binding isotherms in Scatchard plots. The two subunits, taken together, have five identical and non-interacting Na+-binding sites (Kdiss = 0.5 mM) whose occupation antagonizes the effects of K+ on nucleotide binding, but does not affect nucleotide binding directly. A few experiments carried out at 18 degrees C indicate that the model applies also at this temperature. It is likely that the cation sites investigated are intracellular ones and it is concluded that the binding of each cation to its site induces a specific conformational change in the neighbourhood of the site itself without affecting the regions around the remaining cation binding sites. PMID:6321716

  15. Relationship between nucleotide binding and ion channel gating in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, Andrei A; Cui, Liying; Riordan, John R

    2009-06-15

    We have employed rate-equilibrium free energy relationship (REFER) analysis to characterize the dynamic events involved in the allosteric regulation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function. A wide range of different hydrolysable and poorly hydrolysable nucleoside triphosphates were used to elucidate the role of ATP hydrolysis in CFTR function. The linearity of the REFER plots and Phi values near unity for all ligands tested implies that CFTR channel gating is a reversible thermally driven process with all structural reorganization in the binding site(s) completed prior to channel opening. This is consistent with the requirement for nucleotide binding for channel opening. However, the channel structural transition from the open to the closed state occurs independently of any events in the binding sites. Similar results were obtained on substitution of amino acids at coupling joints between both nucleotide binding domains (NBD) and cytoplasmic loops (CL) in opposite halves of the protein, indicating that any structural reorganization there also had occurred in the channel closed state. The fact that fractional Phi values were not observed in either of these distant sites suggests that there may not be a deterministic 'lever-arm' mechanism acting between nucleotide binding sites and the channel gate. These findings favour a stochastic coupling between binding and gating in which all structural transitions are thermally driven processes. We speculate that increase of channel open state probability is due to reduction of the number of the closed state configurations available after physical interaction between ligand bound NBDs and the channel. PMID:19403599

  16. Relationship between nucleotide binding and ion channel gating in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

    PubMed Central

    Aleksandrov, Andrei A; Cui, Liying; Riordan, John R

    2009-01-01

    We have employed rate-equilibrium free energy relationship (REFER) analysis to characterize the dynamic events involved in the allosteric regulation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function. A wide range of different hydrolysable and poorly hydrolysable nucleoside triphosphates were used to elucidate the role of ATP hydrolysis in CFTR function. The linearity of the REFER plots and Φ values near unity for all ligands tested implies that CFTR channel gating is a reversible thermally driven process with all structural reorganization in the binding site(s) completed prior to channel opening. This is consistent with the requirement for nucleotide binding for channel opening. However, the channel structural transition from the open to the closed state occurs independently of any events in the binding sites. Similar results were obtained on substitution of amino acids at coupling joints between both nucleotide binding domains (NBD) and cytoplasmic loops (CL) in opposite halves of the protein, indicating that any structural reorganization there also had occurred in the channel closed state. The fact that fractional Φ values were not observed in either of these distant sites suggests that there may not be a deterministic ‘lever-arm’ mechanism acting between nucleotide binding sites and the channel gate. These findings favour a stochastic coupling between binding and gating in which all structural transitions are thermally driven processes. We speculate that increase of channel open state probability is due to reduction of the number of the closed state configurations available after physical interaction between ligand bound NBDs and the channel. PMID:19403599

  17. Caffeine inhibits glucose transport by binding at the GLUT1 nucleotide-binding site

    PubMed Central

    Sage, Jay M.; Cura, Anthony J.; Lloyd, Kenneth P.

    2015-01-01

    Glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) is the primary glucose transport protein of the cardiovascular system and astroglia. A recent study proposes that caffeine uncompetitive inhibition of GLUT1 results from interactions at an exofacial GLUT1 site. Intracellular ATP is also an uncompetitive GLUT1 inhibitor and shares structural similarities with caffeine, suggesting that caffeine acts at the previously characterized endofacial GLUT1 nucleotide-binding site. We tested this by confirming that caffeine uncompetitively inhibits GLUT1-mediated 3-O-methylglucose uptake in human erythrocytes [Vmax and Km for transport are reduced fourfold; Ki(app) = 3.5 mM caffeine]. ATP and AMP antagonize caffeine inhibition of 3-O-methylglucose uptake in erythrocyte ghosts by increasing Ki(app) for caffeine inhibition of transport from 0.9 ± 0.3 mM in the absence of intracellular nucleotides to 2.6 ± 0.6 and 2.4 ± 0.5 mM in the presence of 5 mM intracellular ATP or AMP, respectively. Extracellular ATP has no effect on sugar uptake or its inhibition by caffeine. Caffeine and ATP displace the fluorescent ATP derivative, trinitrophenyl-ATP, from the GLUT1 nucleotide-binding site, but d-glucose and the transport inhibitor cytochalasin B do not. Caffeine, but not ATP, inhibits cytochalasin B binding to GLUT1. Like ATP, caffeine renders the GLUT1 carboxy-terminus less accessible to peptide-directed antibodies, but cytochalasin B and d-glucose do not. These results suggest that the caffeine-binding site bridges two nonoverlapping GLUT1 endofacial sites—the regulatory, nucleotide-binding site and the cytochalasin B-binding site. Caffeine binding to GLUT1 mimics the action of ATP but not cytochalasin B on sugar transport. Molecular docking studies support this hypothesis. PMID:25715702

  18. The monocyte binding domain(s) on human immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Woof, J M; Nik Jaafar, M I; Jefferis, R; Burton, D R

    1984-06-01

    Monocyte binding has previously been assigned to the C gamma 3 domain of human immunoglobulin G (IgG) largely on the ability of the pFc' fragment to inhibit the monocyte-IgG interaction. This ability is markedly reduced compared to the intact parent IgG. We find this result with a conventional pFc' preparation but this preparation is found to contain trace contamination of parent IgG as demonstrated by reactivity with monoclonal antibodies directed against C gamma 2 domain and light-chain epitopes of human IgG. Extensive immunoaffinity purification of the pFc' preparation removes its inhibitory ability indicating that this originates in the trace contamination of parent IgG (or Fc). Neither of the human IgG1 paraproteins TIM, lacking the C gamma 2 domain, or SIZ, lacking the C gamma 3 domain, are found to inhibit the monocyte-IgG interaction. The hinge-deleted IgG1 Dob protein shows little or no inhibitory ability. Indirect evidence for the involvement of the C gamma 2 domain in monocyte binding is considered. We suggest finally that the site of interaction is found either on the C gamma 2 domain alone or between the C gamma 2 and C gamma 3 domains. PMID:6235444

  19. A study into the effects of protein binding on nucleotide conformation.

    PubMed Central

    Moodie, S L; Thornton, J M

    1993-01-01

    In this study, we examine the effects of binding to protein upon nucleotide conformation, by the comparison of X-ray crystal structures of free and protein-bound nucleotides. A dataset of structurally non-homologous protein-nucleotide complexes was derived from the Brookhaven Protein Data Bank by a novel protocol of dual sequential and structural alignments, and a dataset of native nucleotide structures was obtained from the Cambridge Structural Database. The nucleotide torsion angles and sugar puckers, which describe nucleotide conformation, were analysed in both datasets and compared. Differences between them are described and discussed. Overall, the nucleotides were found to bind in low energy conformations, not significantly different from their 'free' conformations except that they adopted an extended conformation in preference to the 'closed' structure predominantly observed by free nucleotide. The archetypal conformation of a protein-bound nucleotide is derived from these observations. PMID:8464727

  20. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator: the NBF1+R (nucleotide-binding fold 1 and regulatory domain) segment acting alone catalyses a Co2+/Mn2+/Mg2+-ATPase activity markedly inhibited by both Cd2+ and the transition-state analogue orthovanadate.

    PubMed

    Annereau, Jean Philippe; Ko, Young Hee; Pedersen, Peter L

    2003-04-15

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the gene encoding CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator), a regulated anion channel and member of the ATP-binding-cassette transporter (ABC transporter) superfamily. Of CFTR's five domains, the first nucleotide-binding fold (NBF1) has been of greatest interest both because it is the major 'hotspot' for mutations that cause CF, and because it is connected to a unique regulatory domain (R). However, attempts have failed to obtain a catalytically active NBF1+R protein in the absence of a fusion partner. Here, we report that such a protein can be obtained following its overexpression in bacteria. The pure NBF1+R protein exhibits significant ATPase activity [catalytic-centre activity (turnover number) 6.7 min(-1)] and an apparent affinity for ATP ( K (m), 8.7 microM) higher than reported previously for CFTR or segments thereof. As predicted, the ATPase activity is inhibited by mutations in the Walker A motif. It is also inhibited by vanadate, a transition-state analogue. Surprisingly, however, the best divalent metal activator is Co(2+), followed by Mn(2+) and Mg(2+). In contrast, Ca(2+) is ineffective and Cd(2+) is a potent inhibitor. These novel studies, while demonstrating clearly that CFTR's NBF1+R segment can act independently as an active, vanadate-sensitive ATPase, also identify its unique cation activators and a new inhibitor, thus providing insight into the nature of its active site. PMID:12523935

  1. DEAD-box RNA helicase domains exhibit a continuum between complete functional independence and high thermodynamic coupling in nucleotide and RNA duplex recognition

    PubMed Central

    Samatanga, Brighton; Klostermeier, Dagmar

    2014-01-01

    DEAD-box helicases catalyze the non-processive unwinding of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) at the expense of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis. Nucleotide and RNA binding and unwinding are mediated by the RecA domains of the helicase core, but their cooperation in these processes remains poorly understood. We therefore investigated dsRNA and nucleotide binding by the helicase cores and the isolated N- and C-terminal RecA domains (RecA_N, RecA_C) of the DEAD-box proteins Hera and YxiN by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence methods. Both helicases bind nucleotides predominantly via RecA_N, in agreement with previous studies on Mss116, and with a universal, modular function of RecA_N in nucleotide recognition. In contrast, dsRNA recognition is different: Hera interacts with dsRNA in the absence of nucleotide, involving both RecA domains, whereas for YxiN neither RecA_N nor RecA_C binds dsRNA, and the complete core only interacts with dsRNA after nucleotide has been bound. DEAD-box proteins thus cover a continuum from complete functional independence of their domains, exemplified by Mss116, to various degrees of inter-domain cooperation in dsRNA binding. The different degrees of domain communication and of thermodynamic linkage between dsRNA and nucleotide binding have important implications on the mechanism of dsRNA unwinding, and may help direct RNA helicases to their respective cellular processes. PMID:25123660

  2. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1996-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  3. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1996-03-05

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 15 figs.

  4. Severe MgADP Inhibition of Bacillus subtilis F1-ATPase Is Not Due to the Absence of Nucleotide Binding to the Noncatalytic Nucleotide Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Toru; Kato-Yamada, Yasuyuki

    2014-01-01

    F1-ATPase from Bacillus subtilis (BF1) is severely suppressed by the MgADP inhibition. Here, we have tested if this is due to the loss of nucleotide binding to the noncatalytic site that is required for the activation. Measurements with a tryptophan mutant of BF1 indicated that the noncatalytic sites could bind ATP normally. Furthermore, the mutant BF1 that cannot bind ATP to the noncatalytic sites showed much lower ATPase activity. It was concluded that the cause of strong MgADP inhibition of BF1 is not the weak nucleotide binding to the noncatalytic sites but the other steps required for the activation. PMID:25244289

  5. Isoprenoid modification permits 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase to bind to membranes.

    PubMed

    Braun, P E; De Angelis, D; Shtybel, W W; Bernier, L

    1991-11-01

    The myelination-related enzyme 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP), a relatively abundant protein in the CNS possesses the C-terminal isoprenylation consensus domain found in a small family that includes the ras oncoproteins and their relatives, some G-proteins, and nuclear lamins. We found that CNP, like these other proteins, is modified posttranslationally by an isoprenoid derived from mevalonic acid. It appears that only the smaller of the two CNP isoforms (CNP1) is isoprenylated, but similar modification of CNP2 cannot be excluded. Inhibition of isoprenoid synthesis by Lovastatin blocks the binding of newly synthesized CNP to cell membranes; binding is restored upon addition of mevalonate to the culture medium. This shows that isoprenylation is permissive for the well-known avid association of CNP with membranes. PMID:1666129

  6. The binding of vinca domain agents to tubulin: structural and biochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Cormier, Anthony; Knossow, Marcel; Wang, Chunguang; Gigant, Benoît

    2010-01-01

    Vinca domain ligands are small molecules that interfere with the binding of vinblastine to tubulin and inhibit microtubule assembly. Many such compounds cause isodesmic association which results in difficulties in biochemical or structural studies of their interaction with tubulin. The complex of two tubulins with the stathmin-like domain of the RB3 protein (T(2)R) is a protofilament-like short assembly that does not assemble further. This has allowed structural studies of the binding of several vinca domain ligands by X-ray crystallography as crystals of the corresponding complexes diffract to near atomic resolution. This proved that their sites are located at the interface of two tubulin molecules arranged as in a curved protofilament. These sites overlap with that of vinblastine. Structural data are generally consistent with the results of available structure-function studies, though subtle differences exist. Binding in solution to the vinca domain displayed in T(2)R is conveniently studied by fluorescence spectroscopy or by monitoring inhibition of the T(2)R GTPase activity. In addition, inhibition of nucleotide exchange allows characterization of the binding to the vinca domain moiety displayed by the beta-subunit of an isolated tubulin molecule. T(2)R is therefore a useful tool to characterize and dissect the binding of vinca domain ligands to tubulin. In addition, these studies have provided new information on the interaction of tubulin with guanine nucleotides, namely on the mechanisms of nucleotide exchange and hydrolysis. PMID:20466145

  7. Cytoplasmic dynein regulates its attachment to microtubules via nucleotide state-switched mechanosensing at multiple AAA domains.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Matthew P; Berger, Florian; Rao, Lu; Brenner, Sibylle; Cho, Carol; Gennerich, Arne

    2015-05-19

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a homodimeric microtubule (MT) motor protein responsible for most MT minus-end-directed motility. Dynein contains four AAA+ ATPases (AAA: ATPase associated with various cellular activities) per motor domain (AAA1-4). The main site of ATP hydrolysis, AAA1, is the only site considered by most dynein motility models. However, it remains unclear how ATPase activity and MT binding are coordinated within and between dynein's motor domains. Using optical tweezers, we characterize the MT-binding strength of recombinant dynein monomers as a function of mechanical tension and nucleotide state. Dynein responds anisotropically to tension, binding tighter to MTs when pulled toward the MT plus end. We provide evidence that this behavior results from an asymmetrical bond that acts as a slip bond under forward tension and a slip-ideal bond under backward tension. ATP weakens MT binding and reduces bond strength anisotropy, and unexpectedly, so does ADP. Using nucleotide binding and hydrolysis mutants, we show that, although ATP exerts its effects via binding AAA1, ADP effects are mediated by AAA3. Finally, we demonstrate "gating" of AAA1 function by AAA3. When tension is absent or applied via dynein's C terminus, ATP binding to AAA1 induces MT release only if AAA3 is in the posthydrolysis state. However, when tension is applied to the linker, ATP binding to AAA3 is sufficient to "open" the gate. These results elucidate the mechanisms of dynein-MT interactions, identify regulatory roles for AAA3, and help define the interplay between mechanical tension and nucleotide state in regulating dynein motility. PMID:25941405

  8. Structure of the nucleotide-binding subunit B of the energy producer A1A0 ATP synthase in complex with adenosine diphosphate.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Manimekalai, Malathy Sony Subramanian; Grüber, Gerhard

    2008-11-01

    A1A0 ATP synthases are the major energy producers in archaea. Like the related prokaryotic and eukaryotic F1F0 ATP synthases, they are responsible for most of the synthesis of adenosine triphosphate. The catalytic events of A1A0 ATP synthases take place inside the A3B3 hexamer of the A1 domain. Recently, the crystallographic structure of the nucleotide-free subunit B of Methanosarcina mazei Gö1 A1A0 ATP synthase has been determined at 1.5 A resolution. To understand more about the nucleotide-binding mechanism, a protocol has been developed to crystallize the subunit B-ADP complex. The crystallographic structure of this complex has been solved at 2.7 A resolution. The ADP occupies a position between the essential phosphate-binding loop and amino-acid residue Phe149, which are involved in the binding of the antibiotic efrapeptin in the related F1F0 ATP synthases. This trapped ADP location is about 13 A distant from its final binding site and is therefore called the transition ADP-binding position. In the trapped ADP position the structure of subunit B adopts a different conformation, mainly in its C-terminal domain and also in the final nucleotide-binding site of the central alphabeta-domain. This atomic model provides insight into how the substrate enters into the nucleotide-binding protein and thereby into the catalytic A3B3 domain. PMID:19020348

  9. Structure and nucleotide sequence of the rat intestinal vitamin D-dependent calcium binding protein gene.

    PubMed Central

    Krisinger, J; Darwish, H; Maeda, N; DeLuca, H F

    1988-01-01

    The vitamin D-dependent intestinal calcium binding protein (ICaBP, 9 kDa) is under transcriptional regulation by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25-(OH)2D3], the hormonal active form of the vitamin. To study the mechanism of gene regulation by 1,25-(OH)2D3, we isolated the rat ICaBP gene by using a cDNA probe. Its nucleotide sequence revealed 3 exons separated by 2 introns within approximately 3 kilobases. The first exon represents only noncoding sequences, while the second and third encode the two calcium binding domains of the protein. The gene contains a 15-base-pair imperfect palindrome in the first intron that shows high homology to the estrogen-responsive element. This sequence may represent the vitamin D-responsive element involved in the regulation of the ICaBP gene. The second intron shows an 84-base-pair-long simple nucleotide repeat that implicates Z-DNA formation. Genomic Southern analysis shows that the rat gene is represented as a single copy. Images PMID:3194402

  10. Functional roles of the nucleotide-binding folds in the activation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed Central

    Smit, L S; Wilkinson, D J; Mansoura, M K; Collins, F S; Dawson, D C

    1993-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a member of the traffic ATPase superfamily, possesses two putative nucleotide-binding folds (NBFs). The NBFs are sufficiently similar that sequence alignment of highly conserved regions can be used to identify analogous residues in the two domains. To determine whether this structural homology is paralleled in function, we compared the activation of chloride conductance by forskolin and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine in Xenopus oocytes expressing CFTRs bearing mutations in NBF1 or NBF2. Mutation of a conserved glycine in the putative linker domain in either NBF produced virtually identical changes in the sensitivity of chloride conductance to activating conditions, and mutation of this site in both NBFs produced additive effects, suggesting that in the two NBFs this region plays a similar and critical role in the activation process. In contrast, amino acid substitutions in the Walker A and B motifs, thought to form an integral part of the nucleotide-binding pockets, produced strikingly different effects in NBF1 and NBF2. Substitutions for the conserved lysine (Walker A) or aspartate (Walker B) in NBF1 resulted in a marked decrease in sensitivity to activation, whereas the same changes in NBF2 produced an increase in sensitivity. These results are consistent with a model for the activation of CFTR in which both NBF1 and NBF2 are required for normal function but in which either the nature or the exact consequences of nucleotide binding differ for the two domains. PMID:7694298

  11. Mg2+ dependence of guanine nucleotide binding to tubulin.

    PubMed

    Correia, J J; Baty, L T; Williams, R C

    1987-12-25

    The relationship between the concentration of Mg2+ and the binding of GDP and GTP to tubulin dimers was investigated by measuring the displacement of the nucleotide bound at the exchangeable site (E-site) by radiolabeled GDP and GTP. A wide range of concentrations of GTP, GDP, and Mg2+ was explored. In the near absence of Mg2+, the affinity of tubulin for GDP was found to be much greater than its affinity for GTP. In the presence of 1.0 mM Mg2+, however, its affinity for GDP was slightly less than for GTP. The results could be quantitatively described in terms of a small number of reversible equilibria. Equilibrium constants, pertaining to measurements at 0 degrees C, in 0.1 M piperazine-N,N'-bis(2-ethanesulfonic acid), 0.2 mM dithioerythritol, 2 mM EGTA, pH 6.9, were obtained by nonlinear least squares fitting of the data. When the association constant of tubulin for GDP uncomplexed with Mg2+ was taken to be 1.6 X 10(7) M-1, that for uncomplexed GTP was found to be no larger than 1.4 x 10(4) M-1, at least 1100-fold smaller. The association constant of tubulin for the GDP.Mg2+ complex was found to be 2.5-2.7 x 10(7) M-1, while that for the GTP.Mg2+ complex is 6.4-9.0 x 10(7) M-1. PMID:2826416

  12. Cellulose-binding domains: biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Levy, Ilan; Shoseyov, Oded

    2002-11-01

    Many researchers have acknowledged the fact that there exists an immense potential for the application of the cellulose-binding domains (CBDs) in the field of biotechnology. This becomes apparent when the phrase "cellulose-binding domain" is used as the key word for a computerized patent search; more then 150 hits are retrieved. Cellulose is an ideal matrix for large-scale affinity purification procedures. This chemically inert matrix has excellent physical properties as well as low affinity for nonspecific protein binding. It is available in a diverse range of forms and sizes, is pharmaceutically safe, and relatively inexpensive. Present studies into the application of CBDs in industry have established that they can be applied in the modification of physical and chemical properties of composite materials and the development of modified materials with improved properties. In agro-biotechnology, CBDs can be used to modify polysaccharide materials both in vivo and in vitro. The CBDs exert nonhydrolytic fiber disruption on cellulose-containing materials. The potential applications of "CBD technology" range from modulating the architecture of individual cells to the modification of an entire organism. Expressing these genes under specific promoters and using appropriate trafficking signals, can be used to alter the nutritional value and texture of agricultural crops and their final products. PMID:14550028

  13. Structural fold, conservation and Fe(II) binding of the intracellular domain of prokaryote FeoB

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, Kuo-Wei; Chang, Yi-Wei; Eng, Edward T.; Chen, Jai-Hui; Chen, Yi-Chung; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng; Dong, Gang; Spasov, Krasimir A.; Unger, Vinzenz M.; Huang, Tai-huang

    2010-09-17

    FeoB is a G-protein coupled membrane protein essential for Fe(II) uptake in prokaryotes. Here, we report the crystal structures of the intracellular domain of FeoB (NFeoB) from Klebsiella pneumoniae (KpNFeoB) and Pyrococcus furiosus (PfNFeoB) with and without bound ligands. In the structures, a canonical G-protein domain (G domain) is followed by a helical bundle domain (S-domain), which despite its lack of sequence similarity between species is structurally conserved. In the nucleotide-free state, the G-domain's two switch regions point away from the binding site. This gives rise to an open binding pocket whose shallowness is likely to be responsible for the low nucleotide-binding affinity. Nucleotide binding induced significant conformational changes in the G5 motif which in the case of GMPPNP binding was accompanied by destabilization of the switch I region. In addition to the structural data, we demonstrate that Fe(II)-induced foot printing cleaves the protein close to a putative Fe(II)-binding site at the tip of switch I, and we identify functionally important regions within the S-domain. Moreover, we show that NFeoB exists as a monomer in solution, and that its two constituent domains can undergo large conformational changes. The data show that the S-domain plays important roles in FeoB function.

  14. The BEN domain is a novel sequence-specific DNA-binding domain conserved in neural transcriptional repressors

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Qi; Ren, Aiming; Westholm, Jakub O.; Serganov, Artem A.; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Lai, Eric C.

    2013-01-01

    We recently reported that Drosophila Insensitive (Insv) promotes sensory organ development and has activity as a nuclear corepressor for the Notch transcription factor Suppressor of Hairless [Su(H)]. Insv lacks domains of known biochemical function but contains a single BEN domain (i.e., a “BEN-solo” protein). Our chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) sequencing (ChIP-seq) analysis confirmed binding of Insensitive to Su(H) target genes in the Enhancer of split gene complex [E(spl)-C]; however, de novo motif analysis revealed a novel site strongly enriched in Insv peaks (TCYAATHRGAA). We validate binding of endogenous Insv to genomic regions bearing such sites, whose associated genes are enriched for neural functions and are functionally repressed by Insv. Unexpectedly, we found that the Insv BEN domain binds specifically to this sequence motif and that Insv directly regulates transcription via this motif. We determined the crystal structure of the BEN–DNA target complex, revealing homodimeric binding of the BEN domain and extensive nucleotide contacts via α helices and a C-terminal loop. Point mutations in key DNA-contacting residues severely impair DNA binding in vitro and capacity for transcriptional regulation in vivo. We further demonstrate DNA-binding and repression activities by the mammalian neural BEN-solo protein BEND5. Altogether, we define novel DNA-binding activity in a conserved family of transcriptional repressors, opening a molecular window on this extensive gene family. PMID:23468431

  15. Functional Linkage of Adenine Nucleotide Binding Sites in Mammalian Muscle 6-Phosphofructokinase*

    PubMed Central

    Brüser, Antje; Kirchberger, Jürgen; Kloos, Marco; Sträter, Norbert; Schöneberg, Torsten

    2012-01-01

    6-Phosphofructokinases (Pfk) are homo- and heterooligomeric, allosteric enzymes that catalyze one of the rate-limiting steps of the glycolysis: the phosphorylation of fructose 6-phosphate at position 1. Pfk activity is modulated by a number of regulators including adenine nucleotides. Recent crystal structures from eukaryotic Pfk revealed several adenine nucleotide binding sites. Herein, we determined the functional relevance of two adenine nucleotide binding sites through site-directed mutagenesis and enzyme kinetic studies. Subsequent characterization of Pfk mutants allowed the identification of the activating (AMP, ADP) and inhibitory (ATP, ADP) allosteric binding sites. Mutation of one binding site reciprocally influenced the allosteric regulation through nucleotides interacting with the other binding site. Such reciprocal linkage between the activating and inhibitory binding sites is in agreement with current models of allosteric enzyme regulation. Because the allosteric nucleotide binding sites in eukaryotic Pfk did not evolve from prokaryotic ancestors, reciprocal linkage of functionally opposed allosteric binding sites must have developed independently in prokaryotic and eukaryotic Pfk (convergent evolution). PMID:22474333

  16. Degenerate specificity of PDZ domains from RhoA-specific nucleotide exchange factors PDZRhoGEF and LARG.

    PubMed

    Smietana, Katarzyna; Kasztura, Monika; Paduch, Marcin; Derewenda, Urszula; Derewenda, Zygmunt S; Otlewski, Jacek

    2008-01-01

    PDZ domains are ubiquitous protein-protein interaction modules which bind short, usually carboxyterminal fragments of receptors, other integral or membrane-associated proteins, and occasionally cytosolic proteins. Their role in organizing multiprotein complexes at the cellular membrane is crucial for many signaling pathways, but the rules defining their binding specificity are still poorly understood and do not readily explain the observed diversity of their known binding partners. Two homologous RhoA-specific, multidomain nucleotide exchange factors PDZRhoGEF and LARG contain PDZ domains which show a particularly broad recognition profile, as suggested by the identification of five diverse biological targets. To investigate the molecular roots of this phenomenon, we constructed a phage display library of random carboxyterminal hexapeptides. Peptide variants corresponding to the sequences identified in library selection were synthesized and their affinities for both PDZ domains were measured and compared with those of peptides derived from sequences of natural partners. Based on the analysis of the binding sequences identified for PDZRhoGEF, we propose a sequence for an 'optimal' binding partner. Our results support the hypothesis that PDZ-peptide interactions may be best understood when one considers the sum of entropic and dynamic effects for each peptide as a whole entity, rather than preferences for specific residues at a given position. PMID:18542831

  17. Profiling the Binding Sites of RNA-Binding Proteins with Nucleotide Resolution Using iCLIP.

    PubMed

    Sutandy, F X Reymond; Hildebrandt, Andrea; König, Julian

    2016-01-01

    The importance of posttranscriptional regulation in cellular metabolism has recently gone beyond what was previously appreciated. The regulatory mechanisms are controlled by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), which form complexes with RNA and regulate RNA processing, stability, and localization, among others. Consistently, mutations in RBPs result in defects in developmental processes, diseases, and cancer. Gaining deeper insights into the biology of RNA-RBP interactions will lead to a better understanding of regulatory processes and disease development. Several techniques have been developed to capture the properties of RNA-RBP interactions. Furthermore, the development of high-throughput sequencing has broadened the capability of these methods. Here, we summarize individual-nucleotide resolution UV cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (iCLIP), a powerful technique that provides genome-wide information on RNA-RBP interactions at nucleotide resolution. In this chapter, we outline the iCLIP protocol and list possible controls that allow a targeted and cost-minimizing optimization of the protocol for an RBP-of-interest. Moreover, we provide notes on experimental design and a troubleshooting guideline for common problems that can occur during iCLIP library preparation. PMID:26463384

  18. Crystal structure of a dynamin GTPase domain in both nucleotide-free and GDP-bound forms

    PubMed Central

    Niemann, Hartmut H.; Knetsch, Menno L.W.; Scherer, Anna; Manstein, Dietmar J.; Kull, F.Jon

    2001-01-01

    Dynamins form a family of multidomain GTPases involved in endocytosis, vesicle trafficking and maintenance of mitochondrial morphology. In contrast to the classical switch GTPases, a force-generating function has been suggested for dynamins. Here we report the 2.3 Å crystal structure of the nucleotide-free and GDP-bound GTPase domain of Dictyostelium discoideum dynamin A. The GTPase domain is the most highly conserved region among dynamins. The globular structure contains the G-protein core fold, which is extended from a six-stranded β-sheet to an eight-stranded one by a 55 amino acid insertion. This topologically unique insertion distinguishes dynamins from other subfamilies of GTP-binding proteins. An additional N-terminal helix interacts with the C-terminal helix of the GTPase domain, forming a hydrophobic groove, which could be occupied by C-terminal parts of dynamin not present in our construct. The lack of major conformational changes between the nucleotide-free and the GDP-bound state suggests that mechanochemical rearrangements in dynamin occur during GTP binding, GTP hydrolysis or phosphate release and are not linked to loss of GDP. PMID:11689422

  19. Structural and Histone Binding Ability Characterizations of Human PWWP Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Lam, Robert; Tempel, Wolfram; Amaya, Maria F.; Xu, Chao; Dombrovski, Ludmila; Qiu, Wei; Wang, Yanming; Min, Jinrong

    2013-09-25

    The PWWP domain was first identified as a structural motif of 100-130 amino acids in the WHSC1 protein and predicted to be a protein-protein interaction domain. It belongs to the Tudor domain 'Royal Family', which consists of Tudor, chromodomain, MBT and PWWP domains. While Tudor, chromodomain and MBT domains have long been known to bind methylated histones, PWWP was shown to exhibit histone binding ability only until recently. The PWWP domain has been shown to be a DNA binding domain, but sequence analysis and previous structural studies show that the PWWP domain exhibits significant similarity to other 'Royal Family' members, implying that the PWWP domain has the potential to bind histones. In order to further explore the function of the PWWP domain, we used the protein family approach to determine the crystal structures of the PWWP domains from seven different human proteins. Our fluorescence polarization binding studies show that PWWP domains have weak histone binding ability, which is also confirmed by our NMR titration experiments. Furthermore, we determined the crystal structures of the BRPF1 PWWP domain in complex with H3K36me3, and HDGF2 PWWP domain in complex with H3K79me3 and H4K20me3. PWWP proteins constitute a new family of methyl lysine histone binders. The PWWP domain consists of three motifs: a canonical {beta}-barrel core, an insertion motif between the second and third {beta}-strands and a C-terminal {alpha}-helix bundle. Both the canonical {beta}-barrel core and the insertion motif are directly involved in histone binding. The PWWP domain has been previously shown to be a DNA binding domain. Therefore, the PWWP domain exhibits dual functions: binding both DNA and methyllysine histones.

  20. Nucleotide Interdependency in Transcription Factor Binding Sites in the Drosophila Genome

    PubMed Central

    Dresch, Jacqueline M.; Zellers, Rowan G.; Bork, Daniel K.; Drewell, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    A long-standing objective in modern biology is to characterize the molecular components that drive the development of an organism. At the heart of eukaryotic development lies gene regulation. On the molecular level, much of the research in this field has focused on the binding of transcription factors (TFs) to regulatory regions in the genome known as cis-regulatory modules (CRMs). However, relatively little is known about the sequence-specific binding preferences of many TFs, especially with respect to the possible interdependencies between the nucleotides that make up binding sites. A particular limitation of many existing algorithms that aim to predict binding site sequences is that they do not allow for dependencies between nonadjacent nucleotides. In this study, we use a recently developed computational algorithm, MARZ, to compare binding site sequences using 32 distinct models in a systematic and unbiased approach to explore nucleotide dependencies within binding sites for 15 distinct TFs known to be critical to Drosophila development. Our results indicate that many of these proteins have varying levels of nucleotide interdependencies within their DNA recognition sequences, and that, in some cases, models that account for these dependencies greatly outperform traditional models that are used to predict binding sites. We also directly compare the ability of different models to identify the known KRUPPEL TF binding sites in CRMs and demonstrate that a more complex model that accounts for nucleotide interdependencies performs better when compared with simple models. This ability to identify TFs with critical nucleotide interdependencies in their binding sites will lead to a deeper understanding of how these molecular characteristics contribute to the architecture of CRMs and the precise regulation of transcription during organismal development. PMID:27330274

  1. Examination of ClpB Quaternary Structure and Linkage to Nucleotide Binding.

    PubMed

    Lin, JiaBei; Lucius, Aaron L

    2016-03-29

    Escherichia coli caseinolytic peptidase B (ClpB) is a molecular chaperone with the unique ability to catalyze protein disaggregation in collaboration with the KJE system of chaperones. Like many AAA+ molecular motors, ClpB assembles into hexameric rings, and this reaction is thermodynamically linked to nucleotide binding. Here we show that ClpB exists in a dynamic equilibrium of monomers, dimers, tetramers, and hexamers in the presence of both limiting and excess ATPγS. We find that ClpB monomer is only able to bind one nucleotide, whereas all 12 sites in the hexameric ring are bound by nucleotide at saturating concentrations. Interestingly, dimers and tetramers exhibit stoichiometries of ∼3 and 7, respectively, which is one fewer than the maximum number of binding sites in the formed oligomer. This observation suggests an open conformation for the intermediates based on the need for an adjacent monomer to fully form the binding pocket. We also report the protein-protein interaction constants for dimers, tetramers, and hexamers and their dependencies on nucleotide. These interaction constants make it possible to predict the concentration of hexamers present and able to bind to cochaperones and polypeptide substrates. Such information is essential for the interpretation of many in vitro studies. Finally, the strategies presented here are broadly applicable to a large number of AAA+ molecular motors that assemble upon nucleotide binding and interact with partner proteins. PMID:26891079

  2. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in porcine mannan-binding lectin A.

    PubMed

    Lillie, Brandon N; Keirstead, Natalie D; Squires, E James; Hayes, M Anthony

    2006-12-01

    The MBL1 and MBL2 genes encode mannan-binding lectins (MBL) A and C, respectively, that are collagenous lectins (collectins) produced mainly by the liver. Several single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the human MBL2 gene are responsible for various innate immune dysfunctions due to abnormal structure or expression of human MBL-C. The MBL1 gene encodes MBL-A, which has bacteria-binding properties in pigs and rodents but is mutated to a pseudogene in humans and chimpanzees. In these studies, we surveyed both porcine MBL genes for SNPs that might impair disease resistance. Single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of MBL cDNAs from porcine liver revealed three SNPs within the coding region of MBL1 in various breeds of pigs. One nonsynonymous SNP that substituted cysteine for glycine in the collagen-like domain of pig MBL-A was found by a multiplex PCR test in all European pig breeds examined, with allele frequencies ranging from 1.4 to 46.4%. No SNPs were identified in the coding region of porcine MBL2 but the expression of MBL-C in the liver was widely variable in comparison to the expression of MBL-A, GAPDH, PigMAP, and haptoglobin. These results indicate that some pigs have a miscoding defect in MBL-A and a possible expression defect in MBL-C, which are analogous to coding and promoter polymorphisms that affect human MBL-C. PMID:17089118

  3. DNA binding site characterization by means of Rényi entropy measures on nucleotide transitions.

    PubMed

    Perera, A; Vallverdu, M; Claria, F; Soria, J M; Caminal, P

    2008-06-01

    In this work, parametric information-theory measures for the characterization of binding sites in DNA are extended with the use of transitional probabilities on the sequence. We propose the use of parametric uncertainty measures such as Rényi entropies obtained from the transition probabilities for the study of the binding sites, in addition to nucleotide frequency-based Rényi measures. Results are reported in this work comparing transition frequencies (i.e., dinucleotides) and base frequencies for Shannon and parametric Rényi entropies for a number of binding sites found in E. Coli, lambda and T7 organisms. We observe that the information provided by both approaches is not redundant. Furthermore, under the presence of noise in the binding site matrix we observe overall improved robustness of nucleotide transition-based algorithms when compared with nucleotide frequency-based method. PMID:18556261

  4. A Nucleotide Binding Motif in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) NS4B Mediates HCV RNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Einav, Shirit; Elazar, Menashe; Danieli, Tsafi; Glenn, Jeffrey S.

    2004-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of viral hepatitis. There is no effective therapy for most patients. We have identified a nucleotide binding motif (NBM) in one of the virus's nonstructural proteins, NS4B. This structural motif binds and hydrolyzes GTP and is conserved across HCV isolates. Genetically disrupting the NBM impairs GTP binding and hydrolysis and dramatically inhibits HCV RNA replication. These results have exciting implications for the HCV life cycle and novel antiviral strategies. PMID:15452248

  5. The Potato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat (NLR) Immune Receptor Rx1 Is a Pathogen-dependent DNA-deforming Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Fenyk, Stepan; Townsend, Philip D.; Dixon, Christopher H.; Spies, Gerhard B.; de San Eustaquio Campillo, Alba; Slootweg, Erik J.; Westerhof, Lotte B.; Gawehns, Fleur K. K.; Knight, Marc R.; Sharples, Gary J.; Goverse, Aska; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L. W.; Cann, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable cells to respond to pathogen attack. Several NLRs act in the nucleus; however, conserved nuclear targets that support their role in immunity are unknown. Previously, we noted a structural homology between the nucleotide-binding domain of NLRs and DNA replication origin-binding Cdc6/Orc1 proteins. Here we show that the NB-ARC (nucleotide-binding, Apaf-1, R-proteins, and CED-4) domain of the Rx1 NLR of potato binds nucleic acids. Rx1 induces ATP-dependent bending and melting of DNA in vitro, dependent upon a functional P-loop. In situ full-length Rx1 binds nuclear DNA following activation by its cognate pathogen-derived effector protein, the coat protein of potato virus X. In line with its obligatory nucleocytoplasmic distribution, DNA binding was only observed when Rx1 was allowed to freely translocate between both compartments and was activated in the cytoplasm. Immune activation induced by an unrelated NLR-effector pair did not trigger an Rx1-DNA interaction. DNA binding is therefore not merely a consequence of immune activation. These data establish a role for DNA distortion in Rx1 immune signaling and define DNA as a molecular target of an activated NLR. PMID:26306038

  6. The first nucleotide binding fold of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator can function as an active ATPase.

    PubMed

    Ko, Y H; Pedersen, P L

    1995-09-22

    Cystic fibrosis is caused by mutations in the cell membrane protein called CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) which functions as a regulated Cl- channel. Although it is known that CFTR contains two nucleotide domains, both of which exhibit the capacity to bind ATP, it has not been demonstrated directly whether one or both domains can function as an active ATPase. To address this question, we have studied the first CFTR nucleotide binding fold (NBF1) in fusion with the maltose-binding protein (MBP), which both stabilizes NBF1 and enhances its solubility. Three different ATPase assays conducted on MBP-NBF1 clearly demonstrate its capacity to catalyze the hydrolysis of ATP. Significantly, the mutations K464H and K464L in the Walker A consensus motif of NBF1 markedly impair its catalytic capacity. MBP alone exhibits no ATPase activity and MBP-NBF1 fails to catalyze the release of phosphate from AMP or ADP. The Vmax of ATP hydrolysis (approximately 30 nmol/min/mg of protein) is significant and is markedly inhibited by azide and by the ATP analogs 2'-(3')-O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)-adenosine-5'-triphosphate and adenosine 5'-(beta, gamma-imido)triphosphate. As inherited mutations within NBF1 account for most cases of cystic fibrosis, results reported here are fundamental to our understanding of the molecular basis of the disease. PMID:7545672

  7. High-Throughput Screening for Small Molecule Inhibitors of LARG-Stimulated RhoA Nucleotide Binding via a Novel Fluorescence Polarization Assay

    PubMed Central

    Evelyn, Chris R.; Ferng, Timothy; Rojas, Rafael J.; Larsen, Martha J.; Sondek, John; Neubig, Richard R.

    2009-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide-exchange factors (GEFs) stimulate guanine nucleotide exchange and the subsequent activation of Rho-family proteins in response to extracellular stimuli acting upon cytokine, tyrosine kinase, adhesion, integrin, and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Upon Rho activation, several downstream events occur, such as morphological and cytokskeletal changes, motility, growth, survival, and gene transcription. The RhoGEF Leukemia-Associated RhoGEF (LARG) is a member of the Regulators of G-protein Signaling Homology Domain (RH) family of GEFs originally identified as a result of chromosomal translocation in acute myeloid leukemia. Using a novel fluorescence polarization guanine nucleotide binding assay utilizing BODIPY-Texas Red-GTPγS (BODIPY-TR-GTPγS), we performed a ten-thousand compound high-throughput screen for inhibitors of LARG-stimulated RhoA nucleotide binding. Five compounds identified from the high-throughput screen were confirmed in a non-fluorescent radioactive guanine nucleotide binding assay measuring LARG-stimulated [35S] GTPγS binding to RhoA, thus ruling out non-specific fluorescent effects. All five compounds selectively inhibited LARG-stimulated RhoA [35S] GTPγS binding, but had little to no effect upon RhoA or Gαo [35S] GTPγS binding. Therefore, these five compounds should serve as promising starting points for the development of small molecule inhibitors of LARG-mediated nucleotide exchange as both pharmacological tools and therapeutics. In addition, the fluorescence polarization guanine nucleotide binding assay described here should serve as a useful approach for both high-throughput screening and general biological applications. PMID:19196702

  8. Nucleotide Binding Site Communication in Arabidopsis thaliana Adenosine 5;-Phosphosulfate Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Ravilious, Geoffrey E.; Jez, Joseph M.

    2012-08-31

    Adenosine 5{prime}-phosphosulfate kinase (APSK) catalyzes the ATP-dependent synthesis of adenosine 3{prime}-phosphate 5{prime}-phosphosulfate (PAPS), which is an essential metabolite for sulfur assimilation in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Using APSK from Arabidopsis thaliana, we examine the energetics of nucleotide binary and ternary complex formation and probe active site features that coordinate the order of ligand addition. Calorimetric analysis shows that binding can occur first at either nucleotide site, but that initial interaction at the ATP/ADP site was favored and enhanced affinity for APS in the second site by 50-fold. The thermodynamics of the two possible binding models (i.e. ATP first versus APS first) differs and implies that active site structural changes guide the order of nucleotide addition. The ligand binding analysis also supports an earlier suggestion of intermolecular interactions in the dimeric APSK structure. Crystallographic, site-directed mutagenesis, and energetic analyses of oxyanion recognition by the P-loop in the ATP/ADP binding site and the role of Asp136, which bridges the ATP/ADP and APS/PAPS binding sites, suggest how the ordered nucleotide binding sequence and structural changes are dynamically coordinated for catalysis.

  9. Proteome-wide Discovery and Characterizations of Nucleotide-binding Proteins with Affinity-labeled Chemical Probes

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yongsheng; Guo, Lei; Jiang, Xinning; Wang, Yinsheng

    2013-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding proteins play pivotal roles in many cellular processes including cell signaling. However, targeted study of sub-proteome of nucleotide-binding proteins, especially protein kinases and GTP-binding proteins, remained challenging. Here, we reported a general strategy in using affinity-labeled chemical probes to enrich, identify, and quantify ATP- and GTP-binding proteins in the entire human proteome. Our results revealed that the ATP/GTP affinity probes facilitated the identification of 100 GTP-binding proteins and 206 kinases with the use of low mg quantities of lysate of HL-60 cells. In combination with the use of SILAC-based quantitative proteomics method, we assessed the ATP/GTP binding selectivities of nucleotide-binding proteins at the global proteome scale. Our results confirmed known and, more importantly, unveiled new ATP/GTP-binding preferences of hundreds of nucleotide-binding proteins. Additionally, our strategy led to the identification of three and one unique nucleotide-binding motifs for kinases and GTP-binding proteins, respectively, and the characterizations of the nucleotide binding selectivities of individual motifs. Our strategy for capturing and characterizing ATP/GTP-binding proteins should be generally applicable for those proteins that can interact with other nucleotides. PMID:23413923

  10. Thermodynamics of nucleotide binding to actomyosin V and VI: a positive heat capacity change accompanies strong ADP binding.

    PubMed

    Robblee, James P; Cao, Wenxiang; Henn, Arnon; Hannemann, Diane E; De La Cruz, Enrique M

    2005-08-01

    We have measured the energetics of ATP and ADP binding to single-headed actomyosin V and VI from the temperature dependence of the rate and equilibrium binding constants. Nucleotide binding to actomyosin V and VI can be modeled as two-step binding mechanisms involving the formation of collision complexes followed by isomerization to states with high nucleotide affinity. Formation of the actomyosin VI-ATP collision complex is much weaker and slower than for actomyosin V. A three-step binding mechanism where actomyosin VI isomerizes between two conformations, one competent to bind ATP and one not, followed by rapid ATP binding best accounts for the data. ADP binds to actomyosin V more tightly than actomyosin VI. At 25 degrees C, the strong ADP-binding equilibria are comparable for actomyosin V and VI, and the different overall ADP affinities arise from differences in the ADP collision complex affinity. The actomyosin-ADP isomerization leading to strong ADP binding is entropy driven at >15 degrees C and occurs with a large, positive change in heat capacity (DeltaC(P) degrees ) for both actomyosin V and VI. Sucrose slows ADP binding and dissociation from actomyosin V and VI but not the overall equilibrium constants for strong ADP binding, indicating that solvent viscosity dampens ADP-dependent kinetic transitions, presumably a tail swing that occurs with ADP binding and release. We favor a mechanism where strong ADP binding increases the dynamics and flexibility of the actomyosin complex. The heat capacity (DeltaC(P) degrees ) and entropy (DeltaS degrees ) changes are greater for actomyosin VI than actomyosin V, suggesting different extents of ADP-induced structural rearrangement. PMID:16042401

  11. Classification of doubly wound nucleotide binding topologies using automated loop searches.

    PubMed Central

    Swindells, M. B.

    1993-01-01

    A classification is presented of doubly wound alpha/beta nucleotide binding topologies, whose binding sites are located in the cleft formed by a topological switch point. In particular, the switch point loop nearest the N-terminus is used to identify specific structural classes of binding protein. This yields seven structurally distinct loop conformations, which are subsequently used as motifs for scanning the Protein Data Bank. The searches, which are effective at identifying functional relationships within a large database of structures, reveal a remarkable and previously unnoticed similarity between the coenzyme binding sites of flavodoxin and tryptophan synthetase, even though there is no sequence or topological similarity between them. PMID:8298462

  12. ATP half-sites in RadA and RAD51 recombinases bind nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Marsh, May E; Scott, Duncan E; Ehebauer, Matthias T; Abell, Chris; Blundell, Tom L; Hyvönen, Marko

    2016-05-01

    Homologous recombination is essential for repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Central to this process is a family of recombinases, including archeal RadA and human RAD51, which form nucleoprotein filaments on damaged single-stranded DNA ends and facilitate their ATP-dependent repair. ATP binding and hydrolysis are dependent on the formation of a nucleoprotein filament comprising RadA/RAD51 and single-stranded DNA, with ATP bound between adjacent protomers. We demonstrate that truncated, monomeric Pyrococcus furiosus RadA and monomerised human RAD51 retain the ability to bind ATP and other nucleotides with high affinity. We present crystal structures of both apo and nucleotide-bound forms of monomeric RadA. These structures reveal that while phosphate groups are tightly bound, RadA presents a shallow, poorly defined binding surface for the nitrogenous bases of nucleotides. We suggest that RadA monomers would be constitutively bound to nucleotides in the cell and that the bound nucleotide might play a structural role in filament assembly. PMID:27419043

  13. Determinants of Nucleotide-Binding Selectivity of Malic Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Hui-Chih

    2011-01-01

    Malic enzymes have high cofactor selectivity. An isoform-specific distribution of residues 314, 346, 347 and 362 implies that they may play key roles in determining the cofactor specificity. Currently, Glu314, Ser346, Lys347 and Lys362 in human c-NADP-ME were changed to the corresponding residues of human m-NAD(P)-ME (Glu, Lys, Tyr and Gln, respectively) or Ascaris suum m-NAD-ME (Ala, Ile, Asp and His, respectively). Kinetic data demonstrated that the S346K/K347Y/K362Q c-NADP-ME was transformed into a debilitated NAD+-utilizing enzyme, as shown by a severe decrease in catalytic efficiency using NADP+ as the cofactor without a significant increase in catalysis using NAD+ as the cofactor. However, the S346K/K347Y/K362H enzyme displayed an enhanced value for kcat,NAD, suggesting that His at residue 362 may be more beneficial than Gln for NAD+ binding. Furthermore, the S346I/K347D/K362H mutant had a very large Km,NADP value compared to other mutants, suggesting that this mutant exclusively utilizes NAD+ as its cofactor. Since the S346K/K347Y/K362Q, S346K/K347Y/K362H and S346I/K347D/K362H c-NADP-ME mutants did not show significant reductions in their Km,NAD values, the E314A mutation was then introduced into these triple mutants. Comparison of the kinetic parameters of each triple-quadruple mutant pair (for example, S346K/K347Y/K362Q versus E314A/S346K/K347Y/K362Q) revealed that all of the Km values for NAD+ and NADP+ of the quadruple mutants were significantly decreased, while either kcat,NAD or kcat,NADP was substantially increased. By adding the E314A mutation to these triple mutant enzymes, the E314A/S346K/K347Y/K362Q, E314A/S346K/K347Y/K362H and E314A/S346I/K347D/K362H c-NADP-ME variants are no longer debilitated but become mainly NAD+-utilizing enzymes by a considerable increase in catalysis using NAD+ as the cofactor. These results suggest that abolishing the repulsive effect of Glu314 in these quadruple mutants increases the binding affinity of NAD+. Here, we

  14. Role of cysteine residues in the redox-regulated oligomerization and nucleotide binding to EhRabX3.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Mintu; Datta, Sunando

    2016-08-01

    The enteric protozoan parasite, Entamoeba histolytica, an etiological agent of amebiasis, is involved in the adhesion and destruction of human tissues. Worldwide, the parasite causes about 50 million cases of amebiasis and 100,000 deaths annually. EhRabX3, a unique amoebic Rab GTPase with tandem G-domains, possesses an unusually large number of cysteine residues in its N-terminal domain. Crystal structure of EhRabX3 revealed an intra-molecular disulfide bond between C39 and C163 which is critical for maintaining the 3-dimensional architecture and biochemical function of this protein. The remaining six cysteine residues were found to be surface exposed and predicted to be involved in inter-molecular disulfide bonds. In the current study, using biophysical and mutational approaches, we have investigated the role of the cysteine residues in the assembly of EhRabX3 oligomer. The self-association of EhRabX3 is found to be redox sensitive, in vitro. Furthermore, the oligomeric conformation of EhRabX3 failed to bind and exchange the guanine nucleotide, indicating structural re-organization of the active site. Altogether, our results provide valuable insights into the redox-dependent oligomerization of EhRabX3 and its implication on nucleotide binding. PMID:27485554

  15. Specific binding of nucleotides and NAD+ to Clostridium difficile toxin A.

    PubMed

    Lobban, M D; Borriello, S P

    1992-02-24

    Binding of nucleotides, a tetrapolyphosphate, and NAD+ to purified toxin A of Clostridium difficile was determined by monitoring changes in intrinsic fluorescence following excitation at 280 nm, and recording emissions at 340 nm. Binding was specific for concentrations over the range 5 to 100 microM for ATP, GTP, and their respective non-hydrolysable analogues AMP-PNP and Gpp(NH)p, tetrapolyphosphate and NAD+. PMID:1544441

  16. Genetic analysis of the cell binding domain region of the chicken fibronectin gene.

    PubMed

    Kubomura, S; Obara, M; Karasaki, Y; Taniguchi, H; Gotoh, S; Tsuda, T; Higashi, K; Ohsato, K; Hirano, H

    1987-11-20

    We have determined the nucleotide sequence of the cell binding domain region of the chicken fibronectin gene and analyzed it evolutionaly. We present here the complete nucleotide sequence of 4.3 kb HindIII/EcoRI segment from the clone lambda FC23 of the chicken fibronectin gene. There were five exons in this segment. When we lined up the amino acid of exons 28, 29 and 31, three alignments, known as the Type III repeat, appeared. Tetrapeptide, -RGDS-, called the cell binding domain, existed in the second repeat, coding exon 30. It was presumed that the Type III repeats were composed of two exons in the chicken gene, the same as in the rat and humans. We found repeatedly appearing amino-acid sequences such as -TIT- (three arrays in these Type III repeats) but also found one of the amino acids substituted in the tripeptide in these Type III repeats (seven arrays). We analyzed these repeats from the point of view of evolution. We used three of the nucleotide sequences (12-18 bp) coding such -TIT- repeats as a unit length for comparing the various homologies after dividing the coding region into 56 segments. The mutual homology of the divided segments to each one of three showed 53% on average. On the other hand, the mutual nucleotide homology of the Type III repeat was 44%. This suggested that the Type III repeat may have been developed by frequent duplication of small gene units. PMID:2823899

  17. Structural and evolutionary division of phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domains.

    PubMed

    Uhlik, Mark T; Temple, Brenda; Bencharit, Sompop; Kimple, Adam J; Siderovski, David P; Johnson, Gary L

    2005-01-01

    Proteins encoding phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domains function as adaptors or scaffolds to organize the signaling complexes involved in wide-ranging physiological processes including neural development, immunity, tissue homeostasis and cell growth. There are more than 200 proteins in eukaryotes and nearly 60 human proteins having PTB domains. Six PTB domain encoded proteins have been found to have mutations that contribute to inherited human diseases including familial stroke, hypercholesteremia, coronary artery disease, Alzheimer's disease and diabetes, demonstrating the importance of PTB scaffold proteins in organizing critical signaling complexes. PTB domains bind both peptides and headgroups of phosphatidylinositides, utilizing two distinct binding motifs to mediate spatial organization and localization within cells. The structure of PTB domains confers specificity for binding peptides having a NPXY motif with differing requirements for phosphorylation of the tyrosine within this recognition sequence. In this review, we use structural, evolutionary and functional analysis to divide PTB domains into three groups represented by phosphotyrosine-dependent Shc-like, phosphotyrosine-dependent IRS-like and phosphotyrosine-independent Dab-like PTBs, with the Dab-like PTB domains representing nearly 75% of proteins encoding PTB domains. In addition, we further define the binding characteristics of the cognate ligands for each group of PTB domains. The signaling complexes organized by PTB domain encoded proteins are largely unknown and represents an important challenge in systems biology for the future. PMID:15567406

  18. Identification and mapping of nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat resistance gene analogs in bermudagrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty-one bermudagrass (Cynodon spp.) disease resistance gene homologs (BRGH) were cloned and sequenced from diploid, triploid, and hexaploid bermudagrass using degenerate primers to target the nucleotide binding site (NBS) of the NBS- leucine rich repeat (LRR) resistance gene family. Alignment of ...

  19. Determinants of ligand binding and catalytic activity in the myelin enzyme 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase.

    PubMed

    Raasakka, Arne; Myllykoski, Matti; Laulumaa, Saara; Lehtimäki, Mari; Härtlein, Michael; Moulin, Martine; Kursula, Inari; Kursula, Petri

    2015-01-01

    2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase) is an enzyme highly abundant in the central nervous system myelin of terrestrial vertebrates. The catalytic domain of CNPase belongs to the 2H phosphoesterase superfamily and catalyzes the hydrolysis of nucleoside 2',3'-cyclic monophosphates to nucleoside 2'-monophosphates. The detailed reaction mechanism and the essential catalytic amino acids involved have been described earlier, but the roles of many amino acids in the vicinity of the active site have remained unknown. Here, several CNPase catalytic domain mutants were studied using enzyme kinetics assays, thermal stability experiments, and X-ray crystallography. Additionally, the crystal structure of a perdeuterated CNPase catalytic domain was refined at atomic resolution to obtain a detailed view of the active site and the catalytic mechanism. The results specify determinants of ligand binding and novel essential residues required for CNPase catalysis. For example, the aromatic side chains of Phe235 and Tyr168 are crucial for substrate binding, and Arg307 may affect active site electrostatics and regulate loop dynamics. The β5-α7 loop, unique for CNPase in the 2H phosphoesterase family, appears to have various functions in the CNPase reaction mechanism, from coordinating the nucleophilic water molecule to providing a binding pocket for the product and being involved in product release. PMID:26563764

  20. Human Sos1: A guanine nucleotide exchange factor for ras that binds to GRB2

    SciTech Connect

    Chardin, P. ); Camonis, J.; Gale, N.W.; Aelst, L. Van; Wigler, M.H.; Bar-Sagi, D. ); Schlessinger, J. )

    1993-05-28

    A human complementary DNA was isolated that encodes a widely expressed protein, hSos1, that is closely related to Sos, the product of the Drosophila son of sevenless gene. The hSos1 protein contains a region of significant sequence similarity to CDC25, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ras from yeast. A fragment of hSos1 encoding the CDC25-related domain complemented loss of CDC25 function in yeast. This hSos1 domain specifically stimulated guanine nucleotide exchange on mammalian Ras proteins in vitro. Mammalian cells overexpressing full-length hSos1 had increased guanine nucleotide exchange activity. Thus hSos1 is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ras. The hSos1 interacted with growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (GRB2) in vivo and in vitro. This interaction was mediated by the carboxyl-terminal domain of hSos1 and the Src homology 3 (SH3) domains of GRB2. These results suggest that the coupling of receptor tyrosine kinases to Ras signaling is mediated by a molecular complex consisting of GRB2 and hSos1. 42 refs., 5 figs.

  1. ATP binding to the pseudokinase domain of JAK2 is critical for pathogenic activation.

    PubMed

    Hammarén, Henrik M; Ungureanu, Daniela; Grisouard, Jean; Skoda, Radek C; Hubbard, Stevan R; Silvennoinen, Olli

    2015-04-14

    Pseudokinases lack conserved motifs typically required for kinase activity. Nearly half of pseudokinases bind ATP, but only few retain phosphotransfer activity, leaving the functional role of nucleotide binding in most cases unknown. Janus kinases (JAKs) are nonreceptor tyrosine kinases with a tandem pseudokinase-kinase domain configuration, where the pseudokinase domain (JAK homology 2, JH2) has important regulatory functions and harbors mutations underlying hematological and immunological diseases. JH2 of JAK1, JAK2, and TYK2 all bind ATP, but the significance of this is unclear. We characterize the role of nucleotide binding in normal and pathogenic JAK signaling using comprehensive structure-based mutagenesis. Disruption of JH2 ATP binding in wild-type JAK2 has only minor effects, and in the presence of type I cytokine receptors, the mutations do not affect JAK2 activation. However, JH2 mutants devoid of ATP binding ameliorate the hyperactivation of JAK2 V617F. Disrupting ATP binding in JH2 also inhibits the hyperactivity of other pathogenic JAK2 mutants, as well as of JAK1 V658F, and prevents induction of erythrocytosis in a JAK2 V617F myeloproliferative neoplasm mouse model. Molecular dynamic simulations and thermal-shift analysis indicate that ATP binding stabilizes JH2, with a pronounced effect on the C helix region, which plays a critical role in pathogenic activation of JAK2. Taken together, our results suggest that ATP binding to JH2 serves a structural role in JAKs, which is required for aberrant activity of pathogenic JAK mutants. The inhibitory effect of abrogating JH2 ATP binding in pathogenic JAK mutants may warrant novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:25825724

  2. Transcription profiling of guanine nucleotide binding proteins during developmental regulation, and pesticide response in Solenopsis invicta (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Guanine nucleotide binding proteins (GNBP or G-protein) are glycoproteins anchored on the cytoplasmic cell membrane, and are mediators for many cellular processes. Complete cDNA of guanine nucleotide-binding protein gene ß-subunit (SiGNBP) was cloned and sequenced from S. invicta workers. To detect ...

  3. Intragenic suppressors of Hsp70 mutants: Interplay between the ATPase- and peptide-binding domains

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Julie E.; Voisine, Cindy; Craig, Elizabeth A.

    1999-01-01

    ATP hydrolysis and polypeptide binding, the two key activities of Hsp70 molecular chaperones, are inherent properties of different domains of the protein. The coupling of these two activities is critical because the bound nucleotide determines, in part, the affinity of Hsp70s for protein substrate. In addition, cochaperones of the Hsp40 (DnaJ) class, which stimulate Hsp70 ATPase activity, have been proposed to play an important role in promoting efficient Hsp70 substrate binding. Because little is understood about this functional interaction between domains of Hsp70s, we investigated mutations in the region encoding the ATPase domain that acted as intragenic suppressors of a lethal mutation (I485N) mapping to the peptide-binding domain of the mitochondrial Hsp70 Ssc1. Analogous amino acid substitution in the ATPase domain of the Escherichia coli Hsp70 DnaK had a similar intragenic suppressive effect on the corresponding I462T temperature-sensitive peptide-binding domain mutation. I462T protein had a normal basal ATPase activity and was capable of nucleotide-dependent conformation changes. However, the reduced affinity of I462T for substrate peptide (and DnaJ) is likely responsible for the inability of I462T to function in vivo. The suppressor mutation (D79A) appears to partly alleviate the defect in DnaJ ATPase stimulation caused by I462T, suggesting that alteration in the interaction with DnaJ may alter the chaperone cycle to allow productive interaction with polypeptide substrates. Preservation of the intragenic suppression phenotypes between eukaryotic mitochondrial and bacterial Hsp70s suggests that the phenomenon studied here is a fundamental aspect of the function of Hsp70:Hsp40 chaperone machines. PMID:10430932

  4. A Competitive Nucleotide Binding Inhibitor: In vitro Characterization of Rab7 GTPase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Agola, Jacob O.; Hong, Lin; Surviladze, Zurab; Ursu, Oleg; Waller, Anna; Strouse, J. Jacob; Simpson, Denise S.; Schroeder, Chad E.; Oprea, Tudor I.; Golden, Jennifer E.; Aubé, Jeffrey; Buranda, Tione; Sklar, Larry A.; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Mapping the functionality of GTPases through small molecule inhibitors represents an underexplored area in large part due to the lack of suitable compounds. Here we report on the small chemical molecule 2-(benzoylcarbamothioylamino)-5,5-dimethyl-4,7-dihydrothieno[2,3-c]pyran-3-carboxylic acid (PubChem CID 1067700) as an inhibitor of nucleotide binding by Ras-related GTPases. The mechanism of action of this pan-GTPase inhibitor was characterized in the context of the Rab7 GTPase as there are no known inhibitors of Rab GTPases. Bead-based flow cytometry established that CID 1067700 has significant inhibitory potency on Rab7 nucleotide binding with nanomolar inhibitor (Ki) values and an inhibitory response of ≥97% for BODIPY-GTP and BODIPY-GDP binding. Other tested GTPases exhibited significantly lower responses. The compound behaves as a competitive inhibitor of Rab7 nucleotide binding based on both equilibrium binding and dissociation assays. Molecular docking analyses are compatible with CID 1067700 fitting into the nucleotide binding pocket of the GTP-conformer of Rab7. On the GDP-conformer, the molecule has greater solvent exposure and significantly less protein interaction relative to GDP, offering a molecular rationale for the experimental results. Structural features pertinent to CID 1067700 inhibitory activity have been identified through initial structure activity analyses and identified a molecular scaffold that may serve in the generation of more selective probes for Rab7 and other GTPases. Taken together, our study has identified the first competitive GTPase inhibitor and demonstrated the potential utility of the compound for dissecting the enzymology of the Rab7 GTPase as well as serving as a model for other small molecular weight GTPase inhibitors. PMID:22486388

  5. Structural Dynamics of the Cereblon Ligand Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Marcus D.; Boichenko, Iuliia; Coles, Murray; Lupas, Andrei N.; Hernandez Alvarez, Birte

    2015-01-01

    Cereblon, a primary target of thalidomide and its derivatives, has been characterized structurally from both bacteria and animals. Especially well studied is the thalidomide binding domain, CULT, which shows an invariable structure across different organisms and in complex with different ligands. Here, based on a series of crystal structures of a bacterial representative, we reveal the conformational flexibility and structural dynamics of this domain. In particular, we follow the unfolding of large fractions of the domain upon release of thalidomide in the crystalline state. Our results imply that a third of the domain, including the thalidomide binding pocket, only folds upon ligand binding. We further characterize the structural effect of the C-terminal truncation resulting from the mental-retardation linked R419X nonsense mutation in vitro and offer a mechanistic hypothesis for its irresponsiveness to thalidomide. At 1.2Å resolution, our data provide a view of thalidomide binding at atomic resolution. PMID:26024445

  6. The Intimin periplasmic domain mediates dimerisation and binding to peptidoglycan.

    PubMed

    Leo, Jack C; Oberhettinger, Philipp; Chaubey, Manish; Schütz, Monika; Kühner, Daniel; Bertsche, Ute; Schwarz, Heinz; Götz, Friedrich; Autenrieth, Ingo B; Coles, Murray; Linke, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Intimin and Invasin are prototypical inverse (Type Ve) autotransporters and important virulence factors of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and Yersinia spp. respectively. In addition to a C-terminal extracellular domain and a β-barrel transmembrane domain, both proteins also contain a short N-terminal periplasmic domain that, in Intimin, includes a lysin motif (LysM), which is thought to mediate binding to peptidoglycan. We show that the periplasmic domain of Intimin does bind to peptidoglycan both in vitro and in vivo, but only under acidic conditions. We were able to determine a dissociation constant of 0.8 μM for this interaction, whereas the Invasin periplasmic domain, which lacks a LysM, bound only weakly in vitro and failed to bind peptidoglycan in vivo. We present the solution structure of the Intimin LysM, which has an additional α-helix conserved within inverse autotransporter LysMs but lacking in others. In contrast to previous reports, we demonstrate that the periplasmic domain of Intimin mediates dimerisation. We further show that dimerisation and peptidoglycan binding are general features of LysM-containing inverse autotransporters. Peptidoglycan binding by the periplasmic domain in the infection process may aid in resisting mechanical and chemical stress during transit through the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:25353290

  7. DNA Bending is Induced in an Enhancer by the DNA-Binding Domain of the Bovine Papillomavirus E2 Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskaluk, Christopher; Bastia, Deepak

    1988-03-01

    The E2 gene of bovine papillomavirus type 1 has been shown to encode a DNA-binding protein and to trans-activate the viral enhancer. We have localized the DNA-binding domain of the E2 protein to the carboxyl-terminal 126 amino acids of the E2 open reading frame. The DNA-binding domain has been expressed in Escherichia coli and partially purified. Gel retardation and DNase I ``footprinting'' on the bovine papillomavirus type 1 enhancer identify the sequence motif ACCN6GGT (in which N = any nucleotide) as the E2 binding site. Using electrophoretic methods we have shown that the DNA-binding domain changes conformation of the enhancer by inducing significant DNA bending.

  8. Phospholamban Modulates the Functional Coupling between Nucleotide Domains in Ca-ATPase Oligomeric Complexes in Cardiac Sarcoplasmic Reticulum

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.; Yao, Qing; Soares, Thereza A.; Squier, Thomas C.; Bigelow, Diana J.

    2009-03-24

    Oligomeric interactions between Ca-ATPase polypeptide chains and their modulation by phospholamban (PLB) were measured in native cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) microsomes. Progressive modification of Lys514 with fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate (FITC), which physically blocks access to the nucleotide binding site by ATP, demonstrates that Ca-ATPase active sites function independently of one another prior to the phosphorylation of PLB. However, upon PKA-dependent phosphorylation of PLB, a second-order dependence between enzyme activity and the fraction of active sites is observed, consistent with a dimeric functional complex. Complementary distance measurements were made using FITC or 5-iodoacetamido-fluorescein (IAF) bound to Cys674 within the N- or P-domains respectively, to detect structural coupling within oligomeric complexes. Accompanying the phosphorylation of PLB, neighboring Ca-ATPase polypeptide chains exhibit a 4 ± 2 Å decrease in the proximity between FITC sites within the N-domain and a 9 ± 3 Å increase in the proximity between IAF sites within P-domains. Thus, the phosphorylation of PLB induces spatial rearrangements between the N- and P-domain elements of proximal Ca-ATPase polypeptide chains which restore functional interactions between neighboring polypeptide chains and, in turn, result in increased rates of catalytic turnover. These results are interpreted in terms of a structural model, calculated through optimization of shape complementarity, desolvation, and electrostatic energies, which suggests a dimeric arrangement of Ca-ATPase polypeptide chains through the proximal association of N-domains. We suggest that the phosphorylation of PLB acts to release constraints involving interdomain subunit interactions that enhance catalytically important N-domain motions.

  9. Predicting protein-binding RNA nucleotides using the feature-based removal of data redundancy and the interaction propensity of nucleotide triplets.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sungwook; Han, Kyungsook

    2013-11-01

    Several learning approaches have been used to predict RNA-binding amino acids in a protein sequence, but there has been little attempt to predict protein-binding nucleotides in an RNA sequence. One of the reasons is that the differences between nucleotides in their interaction propensity are much smaller than those between amino acids. Another reason is that RNA exhibits less diverse sequence patterns than protein. Therefore, predicting protein-binding RNA nucleotides is much harder than predicting RNA-binding amino acids. We developed a new method that removes data redundancy in a training set of sequences based on their features. The new method constructs a larger and more informative training set than the standard redundancy removal method based on sequence similarity, and the constructed dataset is guaranteed to be redundancy-free. We computed the interaction propensity (IP) of nucleotide triplets by applying a new definition of IP to an extensive dataset of protein-RNA complexes, and developed a support vector machine (SVM) model to predict protein binding sites in RNA sequences. In a 5-fold cross-validation with 812 RNA sequences, the SVM model predicted protein-binding nucleotides with an accuracy of 86.4%, an F-measure of 84.8%, and a Matthews correlation coefficient of 0.66. With an independent dataset of 56 RNA sequences that were not used in training, the resulting accuracy was 68.1% with an F-measure of 71.7% and a Matthews correlation coefficient of 0.35. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to predict protein-binding RNA nucleotides in a given RNA sequence from the sequence data alone. The SVM model and datasets are freely available for academics at http://bclab.inha.ac.kr/primer. PMID:24209914

  10. Analysis of a nucleotide-binding site of 5-lipoxygenase by affinity labelling: binding characteristics and amino acid sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y Y; Hammarberg, T; Radmark, O; Samuelsson, B; Ng, C F; Funk, C D; Loscalzo, J

    2000-01-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (5LO) catalyses the first two steps in the biosynthesis of leukotrienes, which are inflammatory mediators derived from arachidonic acid. 5LO activity is stimulated by ATP; however, a consensus ATP-binding site or nucleotide-binding site has not been found in its protein sequence. In the present study, affinity and photoaffinity labelling of 5LO with 5'-p-fluorosulphonylbenzoyladenosine (FSBA) and 2-azido-ATP showed that 5LO bound to the ATP analogues quantitatively and specifically and that the incorporation of either analogue inhibited ATP stimulation of 5LO activity. The stoichiometry of the labelling was 1.4 mol of FSBA/mol of 5LO (of which ATP competed with 1 mol/mol) or 0.94 mol of 2-azido-ATP/mol of 5LO (of which ATP competed with 0.77 mol/mol). Labelling with FSBA prevented further labelling with 2-azido-ATP, indicating that the same binding site was occupied by both analogues. Other nucleotides (ADP, AMP, GTP, CTP and UTP) also competed with 2-azido-ATP labelling, suggesting that the site was a general nucleotide-binding site rather than a strict ATP-binding site. Ca(2+), which also stimulates 5LO activity, had no effect on the labelling of the nucleotide-binding site. Digestion with trypsin and peptide sequencing showed that two fragments of 5LO were labelled by 2-azido-ATP. These fragments correspond to residues 73-83 (KYWLNDDWYLK, in single-letter amino acid code) and 193-209 (FMHMFQSSWNDFADFEK) in the 5LO sequence. Trp-75 and Trp-201 in these peptides were modified by the labelling, suggesting that they were immediately adjacent to the C-2 position of the adenine ring of ATP. Given the stoichiometry of the labelling, the two peptide sequences of 5LO were probably near each other in the enzyme's tertiary structure, composing or surrounding the ATP-binding site of 5LO. PMID:11042125

  11. Identification of Intersubunit Domain Interactions within Eukaryotic Initiation Factor (eIF) 2B, the Nucleotide Exchange Factor for Translation Initiation*

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Peter J.; Mohammad-Qureshi, Sarah S.; Pavitt, Graham D.

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotic translation initiation, eIF2B is the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) required for reactivation of the G protein eIF2 between rounds of protein synthesis initiation. eIF2B is unusually complex with five subunits (α–ϵ) necessary for GEF activity and its control by phosphorylation of eIF2α. In addition, inherited mutations in eIF2B cause a fatal leukoencephalopathy. Here we describe experiments examining domains of eIF2Bγ and ϵ that both share sequence and predicted tertiary structure similarity with a family of phospho-hexose sugar nucleotide pyrophosphorylases. Firstly, using a genetic approach, we find no evidence to support a significant role for a potential nucleotide-binding region within the pyrophosphorylase-like domain (PLD) of eIF2Bϵ for nucleotide exchange. These findings are at odds with one mechanism for nucleotide exchange proposed previously. By using a series of constructs and a co-expression and precipitation strategy, we find that the eIF2Bϵ and -γ PLDs and a shared second domain predicted to form a left-handed β helix are all critical for interprotein interactions between eIF2B subunits necessary for eIF2B complex formation. We have identified extensive interactions between the PLDs and left-handed β helix domains that form the eIF2Bγϵ subcomplex and propose a model for domain interactions between eIF2B subunits. PMID:22238343

  12. Alpha-amylase starch binding domains: cooperative effects of binding to starch granules of multiple tandemly arranged domains.

    PubMed

    Guillén, D; Santiago, M; Linares, L; Pérez, R; Morlon, J; Ruiz, B; Sánchez, S; Rodríguez-Sanoja, R

    2007-06-01

    The Lactobacillus amylovorus alpha-amylase starch binding domain (SBD) is a functional domain responsible for binding to insoluble starch. Structurally, this domain is dissimilar from other reported SBDs because it is composed of five identical tandem modules of 91 amino acids each. To understand adsorption phenomena specific to this SBD, the importance of their modular arrangement in relationship to binding ability was investigated. Peptides corresponding to one, two, three, four, or five modules were expressed as His-tagged proteins. Protein binding assays showed an increased capacity of adsorption as a function of the number of modules, suggesting that each unit of the SBD may act in an additive or synergic way to optimize binding to raw starch. PMID:17468268

  13. Fused protein domains inhibit DNA binding by LexA.

    PubMed Central

    Golemis, E A; Brent, R

    1992-01-01

    Many studies of transcription activation employ fusions of activation domains to DNA binding domains derived from the bacterial repressor LexA and the yeast activator GAL4. Such studies often implicitly assume that DNA binding by the chimeric proteins is equivalent to that of the protein donating the DNA binding moiety. To directly investigate this issue, we compared operator binding by a series of LexA-derivative proteins to operator binding by native LexA, by using both in vivo and in vitro assays. We show that operator binding by many proteins such as LexA-Myc, LexA-Fos, and LexA-Bicoid is severely impaired, while binding of other LexA-derivative proteins, such as those that carry bacterially encoded acidic sequences ("acid blobs"), is not. Our results also show that DNA binding by LexA derivatives that contain the LexA carboxy-terminal dimerization domain (amino acids 88 to 202) is considerably stronger than binding by fusions that lack it and that heterologous dimerization motifs cannot substitute for the LexA88-202 function. These results suggest the need to reevaluate some previous studies of activation that employed LexA derivatives and modifications to recent experimental approaches that use LexA and GAL4 derivatives to detect and study protein-protein interactions. Images PMID:1620111

  14. Interactions of. beta. -adrenergic receptors with guanine nucleotide-binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Abramson, S.N.

    1985-01-01

    The properties of ..beta..-adrenergic receptors were investigated with radioligand binding assays using the agonists (/sup 3/H)hydroxybenzyl-isoproterenol (/sup 3/H-HBI) and (/sup 3/H)epinephrine (/sup 3/H-EPI), and the antagonist (/sup 125/I)iodopindolol (/sup 125/I-IPIN). Membranes prepared from L6 myoblasts bound (/sup 3/H)HBI, (/sup 3/H)EPI, and (/sup 125/I)IPIN with high affinity and Scatchard plots revealed densities of 222 +/- 23, 111 +/- 7, and 325 +/- 37 fmol/mg of protein, respectively. Binding of (/sup 3/H)HBI and (/sup 3/H)EPI was inhibited allosterically by guanine nucleotides. Membranes prepared from wild-type S49 lymphoma cells bound (/sup 3/H)HBI and (/sup 125/I)IPIN with high affinity and Scatchard plots revealed densities of 48.9 +/- 7.1 and 196 +/- 29 fmol/mg of protein, respectively. Binding of (/sup 3/H)HBI was inhibited allosterically by GTP. Similar results were obtained with membranes prepared from the adenylate cyclase deficient variant of S49 lymphoma cells (cyc-), which does not contain a functional stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding protein (N/sub s/), but does contain a functional inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding protein (N/sub i/). Binding of (/sup 3/H)HBI to membranes prepared from cyc- S49 cells was inhibited by pretreatment of cells with pertussis toxin. These results suggest that ..beta..-adrenergic receptors on membranes prepared from cyc- S49 cells interact with N/sub i/ to form a ternary complex composed of agonist, receptor, and N/sub i/.

  15. Anion Transport or Nucleotide Binding by Ucp2 Is Indispensable for Ucp2-Mediated Efferocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Suho; Moon, Hyunji; Kim, Gayoung; Cho, Jeong Hoon; Dae-Hee, Lee; Ye, Michael B.; Park, Daeho

    2015-01-01

    Rapid and efficient engulfment of apoptotic cells is an essential property of phagocytes for removal of the large number of apoptotic cells generated in multicellular organisms. To achieve this, phagocytes need to be able to continuously uptake apoptotic cells. It was recently reported that uncoupling protein 2 (Ucp2) promotes engulfment of apoptotic cells by increasing the phagocytic capacity, thereby allowing cells to continuously ingest apoptotic cells. However, the functions of Ucp2, beyond its possible role in dissipating the mitochondrial membrane potential, that contribute to elevation of the phagocytic capacity have not been determined. Here, we report that the anion transfer or nucleotide binding activity of Ucp2, as well as its dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential, is necessary for Ucp2-mediated engulfment of apoptotic cells. To study these properties, we generated Ucp2 mutations that affected three different functions of Ucp2, namely, dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential, transfer of anions, and binding of purine nucleotides. Mutations of Ucp2 that affected the proton leak did not enhance the engulfment of apoptotic cells. Although anion transfer and nucleotide binding mutations did not affect the mitochondrial membrane potential, they exerted a dominant-negative effect on Ucp2-mediated engulfment. Furthermore, none of our Ucp2 mutations increased the phagocytic capacity. We conclude that dissipation of the proton gradient by Ucp2 is not the only determinant of the phagocytic capacity and that anion transfer or nucleotide binding by Ucp2 is also essential for Ucp2-mediated engulfment of apoptotic cells. PMID:26082030

  16. Computational Analysis of the Binding Specificities of PH Domains

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhi; Liang, Zhongjie; Shen, Bairong; Hu, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Pleckstrin homology (PH) domains share low sequence identities but extremely conserved structures. They have been found in many proteins for cellular signal-dependent membrane targeting by binding inositol phosphates to perform different physiological functions. In order to understand the sequence-structure relationship and binding specificities of PH domains, quantum mechanical (QM) calculations and sequence-based combined with structure-based binding analysis were employed in our research. In the structural aspect, the binding specificities were shown to correlate with the hydropathy characteristics of PH domains and electrostatic properties of the bound inositol phosphates. By comparing these structure properties with sequence-based profiles of physicochemical properties, PH domains can be classified into four functional subgroups according to their binding specificities and affinities to inositol phosphates. The method not only provides a simple and practical paradigm to predict binding specificities for functional genomic research but also gives new insight into the understanding of the basis of diseases with respect to PH domain structures. PMID:26881206

  17. Solubilization and characterization of guanine nucleotide-sensitive muscarinic agonist binding sites from rat myocardium.

    PubMed Central

    Berrie, C. P.; Birdsall, N. J.; Hulme, E. C.; Keen, M.; Stockton, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    Muscarinic receptors from rat myocardial membranes may be solubilized by digitonin in good yield at low temperatures in the presence of Mg2+. Under these conditions, up to 60% of the soluble receptors show high affinity binding for the potent agonist [3H]-oxotremorine-M (KA = 10(9)M-1), which is inhibited by 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate. The muscarinic binding site labelled with [3H]-oxotremorine-M has a higher sedimentation coefficient (13.4 s) than sites labelled with a 3H antagonist in the presence of guanylylimidodiphosphate (11.6 s) and probably represents a complex between the ligand binding subunit of the receptor and a guanine nucleotide binding protein. PMID:6478115

  18. Comprehensive Identification of RNA-Binding Domains in Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Castello, Alfredo; Fischer, Bernd; Frese, Christian K; Horos, Rastislav; Alleaume, Anne-Marie; Foehr, Sophia; Curk, Tomaz; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; Hentze, Matthias W

    2016-08-18

    Mammalian cells harbor more than a thousand RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), with half of these employing unknown modes of RNA binding. We developed RBDmap to determine the RNA-binding sites of native RBPs on a proteome-wide scale. We identified 1,174 binding sites within 529 HeLa cell RBPs, discovering numerous RNA-binding domains (RBDs). Catalytic centers or protein-protein interaction domains are in close relationship with RNA-binding sites, invoking possible effector roles of RNA in the control of protein function. Nearly half of the RNA-binding sites map to intrinsically disordered regions, uncovering unstructured domains as prevalent partners in protein-RNA interactions. RNA-binding sites represent hot spots for defined posttranslational modifications such as lysine acetylation and tyrosine phosphorylation, suggesting metabolic and signal-dependent regulation of RBP function. RBDs display a high degree of evolutionary conservation and incidence of Mendelian mutations, suggestive of important functional roles. RBDmap thus yields profound insights into native protein-RNA interactions in living cells. PMID:27453046

  19. The binding of glucose and nucleotides to hexokinase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Woolfitt, A R; Kellett, G L; Hoggett, J G

    1988-01-29

    The binding of glucose, ADP and AdoPP[NH]P, to the native PII dimer and PII monomer and the proteolytically-modified SII monomer of hexokinase (ATP:D-hexose 6-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.1) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was monitored at pH 6.7 by the concomitant quenching of protein fluorescence. The data were analysed in terms of Qmax, the maximal quenching of fluorescence at saturating concentrations of ligand, and [L]0.5, the concentration of ligand at half-maximal quenching. No changes in fluorescence were observed with free enzyme and nucleotide alone. In the presence of saturating levels of glucose, Qmax induced by nucleotide was between 2 and 7%, and [L]0.5 was between 0.12 and 0.56 mM, depending on the nucleotide and enzyme species. Qmax induced by glucose alone was between 22 and 25%, while [L]0.5 was approx. 0.4 mM for either of the monomeric hexokinase forms and 3.4 for PII dimer. In the presence of 6 mM ADP or 2 mM AdoPP[NH]P, Qmax for glucose was increased by up to 4% and [L]0.5 was diminished 3-fold for hexokinase PII monomer, 6-fold for SII monomer, and 15-fold for PII dimer. The results are interpreted in terms of nucleotide-induced conformational change of hexokinase in the presence of glucose and synergistic binding interactions between glucose and nucleotide. PMID:3276353

  20. Conformational States of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase for Nucleotide Incorporation vs Pyrophosphorolysis-Binding of Foscarnet.

    PubMed

    Das, Kalyan; Balzarini, Jan; Miller, Matthew T; Maguire, Anita R; DeStefano, Jeffrey J; Arnold, Eddy

    2016-08-19

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) catalytically incorporates individual nucleotides into a viral DNA strand complementing an RNA or DNA template strand; the polymerase active site of RT adopts multiple conformational and structural states while performing this task. The states associated are dNTP binding at the N site, catalytic incorporation of a nucleotide, release of a pyrophosphate, and translocation of the primer 3'-end to the P site. Structural characterization of each of these states may help in understanding the molecular mechanisms of drug activity and resistance and in developing new RT inhibitors. Using a 38-mer DNA template-primer aptamer as the substrate mimic, we crystallized an RT/dsDNA complex that is catalytically active, yet translocation-incompetent in crystals. The ability of RT to perform dNTP binding and incorporation in crystals permitted obtaining a series of structures: (I) RT/DNA (P-site), (II) RT/DNA/AZTTP ternary, (III) RT/AZT-terminated DNA (N-site), and (IV) RT/AZT-terminated DNA (N-site)/foscarnet complexes. The stable N-site complex permitted the binding of foscarnet as a pyrophosphate mimic. The Mg(2+) ions dissociated after catalytic addition of AZTMP in the pretranslocated structure III, whereas ions A and B had re-entered the active site to bind foscarnet in structure IV. The binding of foscarnet involves chelation with the Mg(2+) (B) ion and interactions with K65 and R72. The analysis of interactions of foscarnet and the recently discovered nucleotide-competing RT inhibitor (NcRTI) α-T-CNP in two different conformational states of the enzyme provides insights for developing new classes of polymerase active site RT inhibitors. PMID:27192549

  1. Binding dynamics and energetic insight into the molecular forces driving nucleotide binding by guanylate kinase.

    PubMed

    Kandeel, Mahmoud; Kitade, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    Plasmodium deoxyguanylate pathways are an attractive area of investigation for future metabolic and drug discovery studies due to their unique substrate specificities. We investigated the energetic contribution to guanylate kinase substrate binding and the forces underlying ligand recognition. In the range from 20 to 35°C, the thermodynamic profiles displayed marked decrease in binding enthalpy, while the free energy of binding showed little changes. GMP produced a large binding heat capacity change of -356 cal mol(-1) K(-1), indicating considerable conformational changes upon ligand binding. Interestingly, the calculated ΔCp was -32 cal mol(-1) K(-1), indicating that the accessible surface area is not the central change in substrate binding, and that other entropic forces, including conformational changes, are more predominant. The thermodynamic signature for GMP is inconsistent with rigid-body association, while dGMP showed more or less rigid-body association. These binding profiles explain the poor catalytic efficiency and low affinity for dGMP compared with GMP. At low temperature, the ligands bind to the receptor site under the effect of hydrophobic forces. Interestingly, by increasing the temperature, the entropic forces gradually vanish and proceed to a nonfavorable contribution, and the interaction occurs mainly through bonding, electrostatic forces, and van der Waals interactions. PMID:21360614

  2. Molecular Evolution of the Oxygen-Binding Hemerythrin Domain

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Carreño, Claudia; Becerra, Arturo; Lazcano, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background The evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis during Precambrian times entailed the diversification of strategies minimizing reactive oxygen species-associated damage. Four families of oxygen-carrier proteins (hemoglobin, hemerythrin and the two non-homologous families of arthropodan and molluscan hemocyanins) are known to have evolved independently the capacity to bind oxygen reversibly, providing cells with strategies to cope with the evolutionary pressure of oxygen accumulation. Oxygen-binding hemerythrin was first studied in marine invertebrates but further research has made it clear that it is present in the three domains of life, strongly suggesting that its origin predated the emergence of eukaryotes. Results Oxygen-binding hemerythrins are a monophyletic sub-group of the hemerythrin/HHE (histidine, histidine, glutamic acid) cation-binding domain. Oxygen-binding hemerythrin homologs were unambiguously identified in 367/2236 bacterial, 21/150 archaeal and 4/135 eukaryotic genomes. Overall, oxygen-binding hemerythrin homologues were found in the same proportion as single-domain and as long protein sequences. The associated functions of protein domains in long hemerythrin sequences can be classified in three major groups: signal transduction, phosphorelay response regulation, and protein binding. This suggests that in many organisms the reversible oxygen-binding capacity was incorporated in signaling pathways. A maximum-likelihood tree of oxygen-binding hemerythrin homologues revealed a complex evolutionary history in which lateral gene transfer, duplications and gene losses appear to have played an important role. Conclusions Hemerythrin is an ancient protein domain with a complex evolutionary history. The distinctive iron-binding coordination site of oxygen-binding hemerythrins evolved first in prokaryotes, very likely prior to the divergence of Firmicutes and Proteobacteria, and spread into many bacterial, archaeal and eukaryotic species. The later

  3. BIND - an algorithm for loss-less compression of nucleotide sequence data.

    PubMed

    Bose, Tungadri; Mohammed, Monzoorul Haque; Dutta, Anirban; Mande, Sharmila S

    2012-09-01

    Recent advances in DNA sequencing technologies have enabled the current generation of life science researchers to probe deeper into the genomic blueprint. The amount of data generated by these technologies has been increasing exponentially since the last decade. Storage, archival and dissemination of such huge data sets require efficient solutions, both from the hardware as well as software perspective. The present paper describes BIND-an algorithm specialized for compressing nucleotide sequence data. By adopting a unique 'block-length' encoding for representing binary data (as a key step), BIND achieves significant compression gains as compared to the widely used general purpose compression algorithms (gzip, bzip2 and lzma). Moreover, in contrast to implementations of existing specialized genomic compression approaches, the implementation of BIND is enabled to handle non-ATGC and lowercase characters. This makes BIND a loss-less compression approach that is suitable for practical use. More importantly, validation results of BIND (with real-world data sets) indicate reasonable speeds of compression and decompression that can be achieved with minimal processor/ memory usage. BIND is available for download at http://metagenomics.atc.tcs.com/compression/BIND. No license is required for academic or non-profit use. PMID:22922203

  4. A novel p53-binding domain in CUL7.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Jocelyn S; Arai, Takehiro; DeCaprio, James A

    2006-09-15

    CUL7 is a member of the cullin RING ligase family and forms an SCF-like complex with SKP1 and FBXW8. CUL7 is required for normal mouse embryonic development and cellular proliferation, and is highly homologous to PARC, a p53-associated, parkin-like cytoplasmic protein. We determined that CUL7, in a manner similar to PARC, can bind directly to p53 but does not affect p53 expression. We identified a discrete, co-linear domain in CUL7 that is conserved in PARC and HERC2, and is necessary and sufficient for p53-binding. The presence of p53 stabilized expression of this domain and we demonstrate that this p53-binding domain of CUL7 contributes to the cytoplasmic localization of CUL7. The results support the model that p53 plays a role in regulation of CUL7 activity. PMID:16875676

  5. A novel p53-binding domain in CUL7

    SciTech Connect

    Kasper, Jocelyn S.; Arai, Takehiro; De Caprio, James A. . E-mail: james_decaprio@dfci.harvard.edu

    2006-09-15

    CUL7 is a member of the cullin RING ligase family and forms an SCF-like complex with SKP1 and FBXW8. CUL7 is required for normal mouse embryonic development and cellular proliferation, and is highly homologous to PARC, a p53-associated, parkin-like cytoplasmic protein. We determined that CUL7, in a manner similar to PARC, can bind directly to p53 but does not affect p53 expression. We identified a discrete, co-linear domain in CUL7 that is conserved in PARC and HERC2, and is necessary and sufficient for p53-binding. The presence of p53 stabilized expression of this domain and we demonstrate that this p53-binding domain of CUL7 contributes to the cytoplasmic localization of CUL7. The results support the model that p53 plays a role in regulation of CUL7 activity.

  6. Structural stabilization of GTP-binding domains in circularly permuted GTPases: Implications for RNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Baskaran; Verma, Sunil Kumar; Prakash, Balaji

    2006-01-01

    GTP hydrolysis by GTPases requires crucial residues embedded in a conserved G-domain as sequence motifs G1–G5. However, in some of the recently identified GTPases, the motif order is circularly permuted. All possible circular permutations were identified after artificially permuting the classical GTPases and subjecting them to profile Hidden Markov Model searches. This revealed G4–G5–G1–G2–G3 as the only possible circular permutation that can exist in nature. It was also possible to recognize a structural rationale for the absence of other permutations, which either destabilize the invariant GTPase fold or disrupt regions that provide critical residues for GTP binding and hydrolysis, such as Switch-I and Switch-II. The circular permutation relocates Switch-II to the C-terminus and leaves it unfastened, thus affecting GTP binding and hydrolysis. Stabilizing this region would require the presence of an additional domain following Switch-II. Circularly permuted GTPases (cpGTPases) conform to such a requirement and always possess an ‘anchoring’ C-terminal domain. There are four sub-families of cpGTPases, of which three possess an additional domain N-terminal to the G-domain. The biochemical function of these domains, based on available experimental reports and domain recognition analysis carried out here, are suggestive of RNA binding. The features that dictate RNA binding are unique to each subfamily. It is possible that RNA-binding modulates GTP binding or vice versa. In addition, phylogenetic analysis indicates a closer evolutionary relationship between cpGTPases and a set of universally conserved bacterial GTPases that bind the ribosome. It appears that cpGTPases are RNA-binding proteins possessing a means to relate GTP binding to RNA binding. PMID:16648363

  7. DNA binding sites characterization by means of Rényi entropy measures on nucleotide transitions.

    PubMed

    Perera, Alexandre; Vallverdu, Montserrat; Claria, Francesc; Soria, José Manuel; Caminal, Pere

    2006-01-01

    In this work, parametric information-theory measures for the characterization of binding sites in DNA are extended with the use of transitional probabilities on the sequence. We propose the use of parametric uncertainty measure such as Renyi entropies obtained from the transition probabilities for the study of the binding sites, in addition to nucleotide frequency based Renyi measures. Results are reported in this manuscript comparing transition frequencies (i.e. dinucelotides) and base frequencies for Shannon and parametric Renyi for a number of binding sites found in E. Coli, lambda and T7 organisms. We observe that, for the evaluated datasets, the information provided by both approaches is not redundant, as they evolve differently under increasing Renyi orders. PMID:17946719

  8. PDZ Domain Binding Selectivity Is Optimized Across the Mouse Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Stiffler, Michael A.; Chen, Jiunn R.; Grantcharova, Viara P.; Lei, Ying; Fuchs, Daniel; Allen, John E.; Zaslavskaia, Lioudmila A.; MacBeath, Gavin

    2009-01-01

    PDZ domains have long been thought to cluster into discrete functional classes defined by their peptide-binding preferences. We used protein microarrays and quantitative fluorescence polarization to characterize the binding selectivity of 157 mouse PDZ domains with respect to 217 genome-encoded peptides. We then trained a multidomain selectivity model to predict PDZ domain–peptide interactions across the mouse proteome with an accuracy that exceeds many large-scale, experimental investigations of protein-protein interactions. Contrary to the current paradigm, PDZ domains do not fall into discrete classes; instead, they are evenly distributed throughout selectivity space, which suggests that they have been optimized across the proteome to minimize cross-reactivity. We predict that focusing on families of interaction domains, which facilitates the integration of experimentation and modeling, will play an increasingly important role in future investigations of protein function. PMID:17641200

  9. 2',3'-Cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase: a novel RNA-binding protein that inhibits protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Gravel, Michel; Robert, Francis; Kottis, Vicky; Gallouzi, Imed-Eddine; Pelletier, Jerry; Braun, Peter E

    2009-04-01

    2',3'-Cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP) is one of the earliest myelin-related proteins to be specifically expressed in differentiating oligodendrocytes (ODCs) in the central nervous system (CNS) and is implicated in myelin biogenesis. CNP possesses an in vitro enzymatic activity, whose in vivo relevance remains to be defined, because substrates with 2',3,-cyclic termini have not yet been identified. To characterize CNP function better, we previously determined the structure of the CNP catalytic domain by NMR. Interestingly, the structure is remarkably similar to the plant cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (CPDase) from A. thaliana and the bacterial 2'-5' RNA ligase from T. thermophilus, which are known to play roles in RNA metabolism. Here we show that CNP is an RNA-binding protein. Furthermore, by using precipitation analyses, we demonstrate that CNP associates with poly(A)(+) mRNAs in vivo and suppresses translation in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. With SELEX, we isolated RNA aptamers that can suppress the inhibitory effect of CNP on translation. We also demonstrate that CNP1 can bridge an association between tubulin and RNA. These results suggest that CNP1 may regulate expression of mRNAs in ODCs of the CNS. PMID:19021295

  10. Binding of 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase to myelin: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, D A; Braun, P E

    1996-06-01

    The binding of 2', 3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase isoform 1 (CNP1) to myelin and its association with cytoskeletal elements of the sheath have been characterized with in vitro synthesized polypeptides and purified myelin. We have previously shown that the cysteine residue present in the carboxy-terminal CXXX box of CNP1 is isoprenylated, and that both C15 farnesyl and C20 geranylgeranyl isoprenoids can serve as substrates for the modification. Here, we have mutated the CXXX box to obtain selectively farnesylated CNP1 or geranyl- geranylated CNP1 and found that these two modified forms of CNP1 behave identically in all of the assays performed. Isoprenylation is essential but not sufficient for the binding of in vitro synthesized CNP1 to purified myelin, because a control nonmyelin protein is isoprenylated, yet unable to bind to myelin. In our assay, membrane-bound CNP1 partitions quantitatively into the nonionic detergent-insoluble phase of myelin, suggesting that CNP1 binds to cytoskeletal elements within myelin. However, isoprenylated CNP1 fails to bind to the cytoskeletal matrix isolated from myelin by detergent treatment, implying that both detergent-soluble and insoluble myelin components are involved in the binding of CNP1. A model for the interactions between CNP1 and myelin is presented, consistent with models proposed for other isoprenylated proteins. PMID:8632178

  11. Functional connectivity between tRNA binding domains in glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Sherman, J M; Thomann, H U; Söll, D

    1996-03-15

    The structure of Escherichia coli glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase (GlnRS) in complex with tRNAGln and ATP has identified a number a sequence-specific protein-tRNA interactions. The contribution to glutamine identity has previously been determined for the nucleotides in tRNAGln. Here, we report the mutational analysis of residues in all three tRNA recognition domains of GlnRS, thus completing a survey of the major sequence-specific contacts between GlnRS and tRNAGln. Specifically, we analyzed the GlnRS determinants involved in recognition of the anticodon which is essential for glutamine identity and in the communication of anticodon recognition to the acceptor binding domain in GlnRS. A combined in vivo and in vitro approach has demonstrated that Arg341, which makes a single sequence-specific hydrogen bond with U35 in the anticodon of tRNAGln, is involved in initial RNA recognition and is an important positive determinant for this base in both cognate and non- cognate tRNA contexts. However, Arg341, as well as Arg402, which interacts with G36 in the anticodon, are negative determinants for non-cognate nucleotides at their respective positions. Analysis of acceptor-anticodon binding double mutants and of a mutation of Glu323 in the loop-strand-helix connectivity subdomain in GlnRS has further implicated this domain in the functional communication of anticodon recognition. The better than expected activity (anticooperativity) of these double mutants has led us to propose an "anticodon-independent" mechanism, in which the removal of certain synthetase interactions with the anticodon eliminates structural constraints, thus allowing the relaxed specificity mutants in the acceptor binding domain ot make more productive interactions. PMID:8601833

  12. A Low Affinity Ground State Conformation for the Dynein Microtubule Binding Domain*

    PubMed Central

    McNaughton, Lynn; Tikhonenko, Irina; Banavali, Nilesh K.; LeMaster, David M.; Koonce, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    Dynein interacts with microtubules through a dedicated binding domain that is dynamically controlled to achieve high or low affinity, depending on the state of nucleotide bound in a distant catalytic pocket. The active sites for microtubule binding and ATP hydrolysis communicate via conformational changes transduced through a ∼10-nm length antiparallel coiled-coil stalk, which connects the binding domain to the roughly 300-kDa motor core. Recently, an x-ray structure of the murine cytoplasmic dynein microtubule binding domain (MTBD) in a weak affinity conformation was published, containing a covalently constrained β+ registry for the coiled-coil stalk segment (Carter, A. P., Garbarino, J. E., Wilson-Kubalek, E. M., Shipley, W. E., Cho, C., Milligan, R. A., Vale, R. D., and Gibbons, I. R. (2008) Science 322, 1691–1695). We here present an NMR analysis of the isolated MTBD from Dictyostelium discoideum that demonstrates the coiled-coil β+ registry corresponds to the low energy conformation for this functional region of dynein. Addition of sequence encoding roughly half of the coiled-coil stalk proximal to the binding tip results in a decreased affinity of the MTBD for microtubules. In contrast, addition of the complete coiled-coil sequence drives the MTBD to the conformationally unstable, high affinity binding state. These results suggest a thermodynamic coupling between conformational free energy differences in the α and β+ registries of the coiled-coil stalk that acts as a switch between high and low affinity conformations of the MTBD. A balancing of opposing conformations in the stalk and MTBD enables potentially modest long-range interactions arising from ATP binding in the motor core to induce a relaxation of the MTBD into the stable low affinity state. PMID:20351100

  13. A Primary Survey on Bryophyte Species Reveals Two Novel Classes of Nucleotide-Binding Site (NBS) Genes

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Jia-Yu; Wang, Yue; Wu, Ping; Wang, Qiang; Yang, Le-Tian; Pan, Xiao-Han; Wang, Bin; Chen, Jian-Qun

    2012-01-01

    Due to their potential roles in pathogen defense, genes encoding nucleotide-binding site (NBS) domain have been particularly surveyed in many angiosperm genomes. Two typical classes were found: one is the TIR-NBS-LRR (TNL) class and the other is the CC-NBS-LRR (CNL) class. It is seldom known, however, what kind of NBS-encoding genes are mainly present in other plant groups, especially the most ancient groups of land plants, that is, bryophytes. To fill this gap of knowledge, in this study, we mainly focused on two bryophyte species: the moss Physcomitrella patens and the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha, to survey their NBS-encoding genes. Surprisingly, two novel classes of NBS-encoding genes were discovered. The first novel class is identified from the P. patens genome and a typical member of this class has a protein kinase (PK) domain at the N-terminus and a LRR domain at the C-terminus, forming a complete structure of PK-NBS-LRR (PNL), reminiscent of TNL and CNL classes in angiosperms. The second class is found from the liverwort genome and a typical member of this class possesses an α/β-hydrolase domain at the N-terminus and also a LRR domain at the C-terminus (Hydrolase-NBS-LRR, HNL). Analysis on intron positions and phases also confirmed the novelty of HNL and PNL classes, as reflected by their specific intron locations or phase characteristics. Phylogenetic analysis covering all four classes of NBS-encoding genes revealed a closer relationship among the HNL, PNL and TNL classes, suggesting the CNL class having a more divergent status from the others. The presence of specific introns highlights the chimerical structures of HNL, PNL and TNL genes, and implies their possible origin via exon-shuffling during the quick lineage separation processes of early land plants. PMID:22615795

  14. PTEN-PDZ domain interactions: binding of PTEN to PDZ domains of PTPN13.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Natalia S; Schepens, Jan T G; Valiente, Miguel; Hendriks, Wiljan J A J; Pulido, Rafael

    2015-05-01

    Protein modular interactions mediated by PDZ domains are essential for the establishment of functional protein networks controlling diverse cellular functions. The tumor suppressor PTEN possesses a C-terminal PDZ-binding motif (PDZ-BM) that is recognized by a specific set of PDZ domains from scaffolding and regulatory proteins. Here, we review the current knowledge on PTEN-PDZ domain interactions and tumor suppressor networks, describe methodology suitable to analyze these interactions, and report the binding of PTEN and the PDZ domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPN13. Yeast two-hybrid and GST pull-down analyses showed that PTEN binds to PDZ2/PTPN13 domain in a manner that depends on the specific PTPN13 PDZ domain arrangement involving the interdomain region between PDZ1 and PDZ2. Furthermore, a specific binding profile of PTEN to PDZ2/PTPN13 domain was observed by mutational analysis of the PTEN PDZ-BM. Our results disclose a PDZ-mediated physical interaction of PTEN and PTPN13 with potential relevance in tumor suppression and cell homeostasis. PMID:25448478

  15. A conformational analysis of mouse Nalp3 domain structures by molecular dynamics simulations, and binding site analysis.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Bikash R; Maharana, Jitendra; Bhoi, Gopal K; Lenka, Santosh K; Patra, Mahesh C; Dikhit, Manas R; Dubey, Praveen K; Pradhan, Sukanta K; Behera, Bijay K

    2014-05-01

    Scrutinizing various nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor (NLR) genes in higher eukaryotes is very important for understanding the intriguing mechanism of the host defense against pathogens. The nucleotide-binding domain (NACHT), leucine-rich repeat (LRR), and pyrin domains (PYD)-containing protein 3 (Nalp3), is an intracellular innate immune receptor and is associated with several immune system related disorders. Despite Nalp3's protective role during a pathogenic invasion, the molecular features and structural organization of this crucial protein is poorly understood. Using comparative modeling and molecular dynamics simulations, we have studied the structural architecture of Nalp3 domains, and characterized the dynamic and energetic parameters of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding in NACHT, and pathogen-derived ligands muramyl dipeptide (MDP) and imidazoquinoline with LRR domains. The results suggested that walker A, B and extended walker B motifs were the key ATP binding regions in NACHT that mediate self-oligomerization. The analysis of the binding sites of MDP and imidazoquinoline revealed LRR 7-9 to be the most energetically favored site for imidazoquinoline interaction. However, the binding free energy calculations using the Molecular Mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area (MM/PBSA) method indicated that MDP is incompatible for activating the Nalp3 molecule in its monomeric form, and suggest its complex interaction with NOD2 or other NLRs accounts for MDP recognition. The high binding affinity of ATP with NACHT was correlated to the experimental data for human NLRs. Our binding site prediction for imidazoquinoline in LRR warrants further investigation via in vivo models. This is the first study that provides ligand recognition in mouse Nalp3 and its spatial structural arrangements. PMID:24595807

  16. Identification of Novel Anionic Phospholipid Binding Domains in Neutral Sphingomyelinase 2 with Selective Binding Preference*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bill X.; Clarke, Christopher J.; Matmati, Nabil; Montefusco, David; Bartke, Nana; Hannun, Yusuf A.

    2011-01-01

    Sphingolipids such as ceramide are recognized as vital regulators of many biological processes. Neutral sphingomyelinase 2 (nSMase2) is one of the key enzymes regulating ceramide production. It was previously shown that the enzymatic activity of nSMase2 was dependent on anionic phospholipids (APLs). In this study, the structural requirements for APL-selective binding of nSMase2 were determined and characterized. Using lipid-protein overlay assays, nSMase2 interacted specifically and directly with several APLs, including phosphatidylserine and phosphatidic acid. Lipid-protein binding studies of deletion mutants identified two discrete APL binding domains in the N terminus of nSMase2. Further, mutagenesis experiments pinpointed the core sequences and major cationic amino acids in the domains that are necessary for the cooperative activation of nSMase2 by APLs. The first domain included the first amino-terminal hydrophobic segment and Arg-33, which were essential for nSMase2 to interact with APLs. The second binding domain was comprised of the second hydrophobic segment and Arg-92 and Arg-93. Moreover, mutation of one or both domains decreased APL binding and APL-dependent catalytic activity of nSMase2. Further, mutation of both domains in nSMase2 reduced its plasma membrane localization. Finally, these binding domains are also important for the capability of nSMase2 to rescue the defects of yeast lacking the nSMase homologue, ISC1. In conclusion, these data have identified the APL binding domains of nSMase2 for the first time. The analysis of interactions between nSMase2 and APLs will contribute to our understanding of signaling pathways mediated by sphingolipid metabolites. PMID:21550973

  17. Methods of detection using a cellulose binding domain fusion product

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1999-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  18. Methods of use of cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1997-09-23

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  19. Methods of use of cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1997-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  20. Methods of detection using a cellulose binding domain fusion product

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1999-01-05

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 34 figs.

  1. Ubiquitin binding by the CUE domain promotes endosomal localization of the Rab5 GEF Vps9

    PubMed Central

    Shideler, Tess; Nickerson, Daniel P.; Merz, Alexey J.; Odorizzi, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Vps9 and Muk1 are guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that regulate membrane trafficking in the endolysosomal pathway by activating Rab5 GTPases. We show that Vps9 is the primary Rab5 GEF required for biogenesis of late endosomal multivesicular bodies (MVBs). However, only Vps9 (but not Muk1) is required for the formation of aberrant class E compartments that arise upon dysfunction of endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs). ESCRT dysfunction causes ubiquitinated transmembrane proteins to accumulate at endosomes, and we demonstrate that endosomal recruitment of Vps9 is promoted by its ubiquitin-binding CUE domain. Muk1 lacks ubiquitin-binding motifs, but its fusion to the Vps9 CUE domain allows Muk1 to rescue endosome morphology, cargo trafficking, and cellular stress-tolerance phenotypes that result from loss of Vps9 function. These results indicate that ubiquitin binding by the CUE domain promotes Vps9 function in endolysosomal membrane trafficking via promotion of localization. PMID:25673804

  2. Metal binding mediated conformational change of XPA protein:a potential cytotoxic mechanism of nickel in the nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianping; Hu, Ziheng; Zhang, Yan; Gou, Xiaojun; Mu, Ying; Wang, Lirong; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2016-07-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a pivotal life process for repairing DNA nucleotide mismatch caused by chemicals, metal ions, radiation, and other factors. As the initiation step of NER, the xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A protein (XPA) recognizes damaged DNA molecules, and recruits the replication protein A (RPA), another important player in the NER process. The stability of the Zn(2+)-chelated Zn-finger domain of XPA center core portion (i.e., XPA98-210) is the foundation of its biological functionality, while the displacement of the Zn(2+) by toxic metal ions (such as Ni(2+), a known human carcinogen and allergen) may impair the effectiveness of NER and hence elevate the chance of carcinogenesis. In this study, we first calculated the force field parameters for the bonded model in the metal center of the XPA98-210 system, showing that the calculated results, including charges, bonds, angles etc., are congruent with previously reported results measured by spectrometry experiments and quantum chemistry computation. Then, comparative molecular dynamics simulations using these parameters revealed the changes in the conformation and motion mode of XPA98-210 Zn-finger after the substitution of Zn(2+) by Ni(2+). The results showed that Ni(2+) dramatically disrupted the relative positions of the four Cys residues in the Zn-finger structure, forcing them to collapse from a tetrahedron into an almost planar structure. Finally, we acquired the binding mode of XPA98-210 with its ligands RPA70N and DNA based on molecular docking and structural alignment. We found that XPA98-210's Zn-finger domain primarily binds to a V-shaped cleft in RPA70N, while the cationic band in its C-terminal subdomain participates in the recognition of damaged DNA. In addition, this article sheds light on the multi-component interaction pattern among XPA, DNA, and other NER-related proteins (i.e., RPA70N, RPA70A, RPA70B, RPA70C, RPA32, and RPA14) based on previously reported

  3. Cytosolic Na+ Controls an Epithelial Na+ Channel Via the Go Guanine Nucleotide-Binding Regulatory Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komwatana, P.; Dinudom, A.; Young, J. A.; Cook, D. I.

    1996-07-01

    In tight Na+-absorbing epithelial cells, the rate of Na+ entry through amiloride-sensitive apical membrane Na+ channels is matched to basolateral Na+ extrusion so that cell Na+ concentration and volume remain steady. Control of this process by regulation of apical Na+ channels has been attributed to changes in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration or pH, secondary to changes in cytosolic Na+ concentration, although cytosolic Cl- seems also to be involved. Using mouse mandibular gland duct cells, we now demonstrate that increasing cytosolic Na+ concentration inhibits apical Na+ channels independent of changes in cytosolic Ca2+, pH, or Cl-, and the effect is blocked by GDP-β -S, pertussis toxin, and antibodies against the α -subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (Go). In contrast, the inhibitory effect of cytosolic anions is blocked by antibodies to inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (Gi1/Gi2. It thus appears that apical Na+ channels are regulated by Go and Gi proteins, the activities of which are controlled, respectively, by cytosolic Na+ and Cl-.

  4. Functions of nucleotide binding subunits in the tonoplast ATPase from Beta vulgaris L

    SciTech Connect

    Manolson, M.F.; Poole, R.J.

    1986-04-01

    Partial purification of NO/sub 3/ sensitive H/sup +/-ATPases from the vacuolar membranes of high plants reveal two prominent polypeptides of approximately 60 and 70 kDa. Both polypeptides appear to contain nucleotide binding sites. The photoactive affinity analog of ATP, BzATP, cannot be hydrolyzed by the tonoplast ATPase but is a potential inhibitor (apparent K/sub I/ = 11 ..mu..M). /sup 32/P-BzATP was shown to specifically photolabel the 60 kDa polypeptide. In contrast, Mandala and Taiz have shown the photoincorporation of /sup 32/P-azidoATP to the 70 kDa polypeptide. This sterically different photoaffinity probe can be hydrolyzed although with a low affinity. Azido and benzophenone derivatives of the product, ADP, are currently being examined with respect to their inhibition kinetics of, and their photoincorporation into, the tonoplast ATPase from Beta vulgaris L. Kinetic data will be integrated with patterns of photoincorporation using analogs of both substrate and product, in order to illuminate the functions of the two nucleotide binding subunits.

  5. Chromosomal localization of genes encoding guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunits in mouse and human.

    PubMed

    Blatt, C; Eversole-Cire, P; Cohn, V H; Zollman, S; Fournier, R E; Mohandas, L T; Nesbitt, M; Lugo, T; Jones, D T; Reed, R R

    1988-10-01

    A variety of genes have been identified that specify the synthesis of the components of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins). Eight different guanine nucleotide-binding alpha-subunit proteins, two different beta subunits, and one gamma subunit have been described. Hybridization of cDNA clones with DNA from human-mouse somatic cell hybrids was used to assign many of these genes to human chromosomes. The retinal-specific transducin subunit genes GNAT1 and GNAT2 were on chromosomes 3 and 1; GNAI1, GNAI2, and GNAI3 were assigned to chromosomes 7, 3, and 1, respectively; GNAZ and GNAS were found on chromosomes 22 and 20. The beta subunits were also assigned--GNB1 to chromosome 1 and GNB2 to chromosome 7. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms were used to map the homologues of some of these genes in the mouse. GNAT1 and GNAI2 were found to map adjacent to each other on mouse chromosome 9 and GNAT2 was mapped on chromosome 17. The mouse GNB1 gene was assigned to chromosome 19. These mapping assignments will be useful in defining the extent of the G alpha gene family and may help in attempts to correlate specific genetic diseases with genes corresponding to G proteins. PMID:2902634

  6. Tubulin exchanges divalent cations at both guanine nucleotide-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Correia, J J; Beth, A H; Williams, R C

    1988-08-01

    The tubulin heterodimer binds a molecule of GTP at the nonexchangeable nucleotide-binding site (N-site) and either GDP or GTP at the exchangeable nucleotide-binding site (E-site). Mg2+ is known to be tightly linked to the binding of GTP at the E-site (Correia, J. J., Baty, L. T., and Williams, R. C., Jr. (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 17278-17284). Measurements of the exchange of Mn2+ for bound Mg2+ (as monitored by atomic absorption and EPR) demonstrate that tubulin which has GDP at the E-site possesses one high affinity metal-binding site and that tubulin which has GTP at the E-site possesses two such sites. The apparent association constants are 0.7-1.1 x 10(6) M-1 for Mg2+ and approximately 4.1-4.9 x 10(7) M-1 for Mn2+. Divalent cations do bind to GDP at the E-site, but with much lower affinity (2.0-2.3 x 10(3) M-1 for Mg2+ and 3.9-6.6 x 10(3) M-1 for Mn2+). These data suggest that divalent cations are involved in GTP binding to both the N- and E-sites of tubulin. The N-site metal exchanges slowly (kapp = 0.020 min-1), suggesting a mechanism involving protein "breathing" or heterodimer dissociation. The N-site metal exchange rate is independent of the concentration of protein and metal, an observation consistent with the possibility that a dynamic breathing process is the rate-limiting step. The exchange of Mn2+ for Mg2+ has no effect on the secondary structure of tubulin at 4 degrees C or on the ability of tubulin to form microtubules. These results have important consequences for the interpretation of distance measurements within the tubulin dimer using paramagnetic ions. They are also relevant to the detailed mechanism of divalent cation release from microtubules after GTP hydrolysis. PMID:3392036

  7. The receptor binding domain of botulinum neurotoxin serotype C binds phosphoinositides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Varnum, Susan M

    2012-03-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most toxic proteins known for humans and animals with an extremely low LD(50) of ∼1 ng/kg. BoNTs generally require a protein and a ganglioside on the cell membrane surface for binding, which is known as a "dual receptor" mechanism for host intoxication. Recent studies have suggested that in addition to gangliosides, other membrane lipids such as phosphoinositides may be involved in the interactions with the receptor binding domain (HCR) of BoNTs for better membrane penetration. Using two independent lipid-binding assays, we tested the interactions of BoNT/C-HCR with lipids in vitro domain. BoNT/C-HCR was found to bind negatively charged phospholipids, preferentially phosphoinositides in both assays. Interactions with phosphoinositides may facilitate tighter binding between neuronal membranes and BoNT/C. PMID:22120109

  8. The evolution of putative starch-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Machovic, Martin; Janecek, Stefan

    2006-11-27

    The present bioinformatics analysis was focused on the starch-binding domains (SBDs) and SBD-like motifs sequentially related to carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) families CBM20 and CBM21. Originally, these SBDs were known from microbial amylases only. At present homologous starch- and glycogen-binding domains (or putative SBD sequences) have been recognised in various plant and animal proteins. The sequence comparison clearly showed that the SBD-like sequences in genethonin-1, starch synthase III and glucan branching enzyme should possess the real SBD function since the two tryptophans (or at least two aromatics) of the typical starch-binding site 1 are conserved in their sequences. The same should apply also for the sequences corresponding with the so-called KIS-domain of plant AKINbetagamma protein that is a homologue of the animal AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). The evolutionary tree classified the compared SBDs into three distinct groups: (i) the family CBM20 (the motifs from genethonins, laforins, starch excess 4 protein, beta-subunits of the animal AMPK and all plant and yeast homologues, and eventually from amylopullulanases); (ii) the family CBM21 (the motifs from regulatory subunits of protein phosphatase 1 together with those from starch synthase III); and (iii) the (CBM20+CBM21)-related group (the motifs from the pullulanase subfamily consisting of pullulanase, branching enzyme, isoamylase and maltooligosyl trehalohydrolase). PMID:17084392

  9. Structural Basis for Viral Late-Domain Binding to Alix

    SciTech Connect

    Lee,S.; Joshi, A.; Nagashima, K.; Freed, E.; Hurley, J.

    2007-01-01

    The modular protein Alix is a central node in endosomal-lysosomal trafficking and the budding of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1. The Gag p6 protein of HIV-1 contains a LYPx{sub n}LxxL motif that is required for Alix-mediated budding and binds a region of Alix spanning residues 360-702. The structure of this fragment of Alix has the shape of the letter 'V' and is termed the V domain. The V domain has a topologically complex arrangement of 11 {alpha}-helices, with connecting loops that cross three times between the two arms of the V. The conserved residue Phe676 is at the center of a large hydrophobic pocket and is crucial for binding to a peptide model of HIV-1 p6. Overexpression of the V domain inhibits HIV-1 release from cells. This inhibition of release is reversed by mutations that block binding of the Alix V domain to p6.

  10. Structures of the spectrin-ankyrin interaction binding domains

    SciTech Connect

    Ipsaro, Jonathan J.; Huang, Lei; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2010-01-07

    As key components of the erythrocyte membrane skeleton, spectrin and ankyrin specifically interact to tether the spectrin cytoskeleton to the cell membrane. The structure of the spectrin binding domain of ankyrin and the ankyrin binding domain of spectrin have been solved to elucidate the structural basis for ankyrin-spectrin recognition. The structure of repeats 14 and 15 of spectrin shows that these repeats are similar to all other spectrin repeats. One feature that could account for the preference of ankyrin for these repeats is the presence of a conserved, negatively charged patch on one side of repeat 14. The structure of the ankyrin ZU5 domain shows a novel structure containing a {beta} core. The structure reveals that the canonical ZU5 consensus sequence is likely to be missing an important region that codes for a {beta} strand that forms part of the core of the domain. In addition, a positively charged region is suggestive of a binding surface for the negatively charged spectrin repeat 14. Previously reported mutants of ankyrin that map to this region lie mostly on the surface of the protein, although at least one is likely to be part of the core.

  11. Rab5-family guanine nucleotide exchange factors bind retromer and promote its recruitment to endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Bean, Bjorn D. M.; Davey, Michael; Snider, Jamie; Jessulat, Matthew; Deineko, Viktor; Tinney, Matthew; Stagljar, Igor; Babu, Mohan; Conibear, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The retromer complex facilitates the sorting of integral membrane proteins from the endosome to the late Golgi. In mammalian cells, the efficient recruitment of retromer to endosomes requires the lipid phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI3P) as well as Rab5 and Rab7 GTPases. However, in yeast, the role of Rabs in recruiting retromer to endosomes is less clear. We identified novel physical interactions between retromer and the Saccharomyces cerevisiae VPS9-domain Rab5-family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) Muk1 and Vps9. Furthermore, we identified a new yeast VPS9 domain-containing protein, VARP-like 1 (Vrl1), which is related to the human VARP protein. All three VPS9 domain–containing proteins show localization to endosomes, and the presence of any one of them is necessary for the endosomal recruitment of retromer. We find that expression of an active VPS9-domain protein is required for correct localization of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase Vps34 and the production of endosomal PI3P. These results suggest that VPS9 GEFs promote retromer recruitment by establishing PI3P-enriched domains at the endosomal membrane. The interaction of retromer with distinct VPS9 GEFs could thus link GEF-dependent regulatory inputs to the temporal or spatial coordination of retromer assembly or function. PMID:25609093

  12. Structural Basis for Nucleotide Binding and Reaction Catalysis in Mevalonate Diphosphate Decarboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Barta, Michael L.; McWhorter, William J.; Miziorko, Henry M.; Geisbrecht, Brian V.

    2012-09-17

    Mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (MDD) catalyzes the final step of the mevalonate pathway, the Mg{sup 2+}-ATP dependent decarboxylation of mevalonate 5-diphosphate (MVAPP), producing isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP). Synthesis of IPP, an isoprenoid precursor molecule that is a critical intermediate in peptidoglycan and polyisoprenoid biosynthesis, is essential in Gram-positive bacteria (e.g., Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and Enterococcus spp.), and thus the enzymes of the mevalonate pathway are ideal antimicrobial targets. MDD belongs to the GHMP superfamily of metabolite kinases that have been extensively studied for the past 50 years, yet the crystallization of GHMP kinase ternary complexes has proven to be difficult. To further our understanding of the catalytic mechanism of GHMP kinases with the purpose of developing broad spectrum antimicrobial agents that target the substrate and nucleotide binding sites, we report the crystal structures of wild-type and mutant (S192A and D283A) ternary complexes of Staphylococcus epidermidis MDD. Comparison of apo, MVAPP-bound, and ternary complex wild-type MDD provides structural information about the mode of substrate binding and the catalytic mechanism. Structural characterization of ternary complexes of catalytically deficient MDD S192A and D283A (k{sub cat} decreased 10{sup 3}- and 10{sup 5}-fold, respectively) provides insight into MDD function. The carboxylate side chain of invariant Asp{sup 283} functions as a catalytic base and is essential for the proper orientation of the MVAPP C3-hydroxyl group within the active site funnel. Several MDD amino acids within the conserved phosphate binding loop ('P-loop') provide key interactions, stabilizing the nucleotide triphosphoryl moiety. The crystal structures presented here provide a useful foundation for structure-based drug design.

  13. Targeting of nucleotide-binding proteins by HAMLET--a conserved tumor cell death mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ho, J C S; Nadeem, A; Rydström, A; Puthia, M; Svanborg, C

    2016-02-18

    HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) kills tumor cells broadly suggesting that conserved survival pathways are perturbed. We now identify nucleotide-binding proteins as HAMLET binding partners, accounting for about 35% of all HAMLET targets in a protein microarray comprising 8000 human proteins. Target kinases were present in all branches of the Kinome tree, including 26 tyrosine kinases, 10 tyrosine kinase-like kinases, 13 homologs of yeast sterile kinases, 4 casein kinase 1 kinases, 15 containing PKA, PKG, PKC family kinases, 15 calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinases and 13 kinases from CDK, MAPK, GSK3, CLK families. HAMLET acted as a broad kinase inhibitor in vitro, as defined in a screen of 347 wild-type, 93 mutant, 19 atypical and 17 lipid kinases. Inhibition of phosphorylation was also detected in extracts from HAMLET-treated lung carcinoma cells. In addition, HAMLET recognized 24 Ras family proteins and bound to Ras, RasL11B and Rap1B on the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane. Direct cellular interactions between HAMLET and activated Ras family members including Braf were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. As a consequence, oncogenic Ras and Braf activity was inhibited and HAMLET and Braf inhibitors synergistically increased tumor cell death in response to HAMLET. Unlike most small molecule kinase inhibitors, HAMLET showed selectivity for tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. The results identify nucleotide-binding proteins as HAMLET targets and suggest that dysregulation of the ATPase/kinase/GTPase machinery contributes to cell death, following the initial, selective recognition of HAMLET by tumor cells. The findings thus provide a molecular basis for the conserved tumoricidal effect of HAMLET, through dysregulation of kinases and oncogenic GTPases, to which tumor cells are addicted. PMID:26028028

  14. Structures of 5-Methylthioribose Kinase Reveal Substrate Specificity and Unusual Mode of Nucleotide Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Ku,S.; Yip, P.; Cornell, K.; Riscoe, M.; Behr, J.; Guillerm, G.; Howell, P.

    2007-01-01

    The methionine salvage pathway is ubiquitous in all organisms, but metabolic variations exist between bacteria and mammals. 5-Methylthioribose (MTR) kinase is a key enzyme in methionine salvage in bacteria and the absence of a mammalian homolog suggests that it is a good target for the design of novel antibiotics. The structures of the apo-form of Bacillus subtilis MTR kinase, as well as its ADP, ADP-PO4, AMPPCP, and AMPPCP-MTR complexes have been determined. MTR kinase has a bilobal eukaryotic protein kinase fold but exhibits a number of unique features. The protein lacks the DFG motif typically found at the beginning of the activation loop and instead coordinates magnesium via a DXE motif (Asp{sup 250}-Glu{sup 252}). In addition, the glycine-rich loop of the protein, analogous to the 'Gly triad' in protein kinases, does not interact extensively with the nucleotide. The MTR substrate-binding site consists of Asp{sup 233} of the catalytic HGD motif, a novel twin arginine motif (Arg{sup 340}/Arg{sup 341}), and a semi-conserved W-loop, which appears to regulate MTR binding specificity. No lobe closure is observed for MTR kinase upon substrate binding. This is probably because the enzyme lacks the lobe closure/inducing interactions between the C-lobe of the protein and the ribosyl moiety of the nucleotide that are typically responsible for lobe closure in protein kinases. The current structures suggest that MTR kinase has a dissociative mechanism.

  15. Activation of immobilized, biotinylated choleragen AI protein by a 19-kilodalton guanine nucleotide-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Noda, M; Tsai, S C; Adamik, R; Bobak, D A; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1989-09-19

    Cholera toxin catalyzes the ADP-ribosylation that results in activation of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding protein of the adenylyl cyclase system, known as Gs. The toxin also ADP-ribosylates other proteins and simple guanidino compounds and auto-ADP-ribosylates its AI protein (CTA1). All of the ADP-ribosyltransferase activities of CTAI are enhanced by 19-21-kDa guanine nucleotide-binding proteins known as ADP-ribosylation factors, or ARFs. CTAI contains a single cysteine located near the carboxy terminus. CTAI was immobilized through this cysteine by reaction with iodoacetyl-N-biotinyl-hexylenediamine and binding of the resulting biotinylated protein to avidin-agarose. Immobilized CTAI catalyzed the ARF-stimulated ADP-ribosylation of agmatine. The reaction was enhanced by detergents and phospholipid, but the fold stimulation by purified sARF-II from bovine brain was considerably less than that observed with free CTA. ADP-ribosylation of Gsa by immobilized CTAI, which was somewhat enhanced by sARF-II, was much less than predicted on the basis of the NAD:agmatine ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. Immobilized CTAI catalyzed its own auto-ADP-ribosylation as well as the ADP-ribosylation of the immobilized avidin and CTA2, with relatively little stimulation by sARF-II. ADP-ribosylation of CTA2 by free CTAI is minimal. These observations are consistent with the conclusion that the cysteine near the carboxy terminus of the toxin is not critical for ADP-ribosyltransferase activity or for its regulation by sARF-II. Biotinylation and immobilization of the toxin through this cysteine may, however, limit accessibility to Gsa or SARF-II, or perhaps otherwise reduce interaction with these proteins whether as substrates or activator. PMID:2514798

  16. Mapping of the Signal Peptide-Binding Domain of Escherichia coli SecA Using Förster Resonance Energy Transfer†

    PubMed Central

    Auclair, Sarah M.; Moses, Julia P.; Musial-Siwek, Monika; Kendall, Debra A.; Oliver, Donald B.; Mukerji, Ishita

    2010-01-01

    Identification of the signal peptide-binding domain within SecA ATPase is an important goal for understanding the molecular basis of SecA preprotein recognition as well as elucidating the chemo-mechanical cycle of this nanomotor during protein translocation. In this study, Förster resonance energy transfer methodology was employed to map the location of the SecA signal peptide-binding domain using a collection of functional monocysteine SecA mutants and alkaline phosphatase signal peptides labeled with appropriate donor–acceptor fluorophores. Fluorescence anisotropy measurements yielded an equilibrium binding constant of 1.4 or 10.7 μM for the alkaline phosphatase signal peptide labeled at residue 22 or 2, respectively, with SecA, and a binding stoichiometry of one signal peptide bound per SecA monomer. Binding affinity measurements performed with a monomer-biased mutant indicate that the signal peptide binds equally well to SecA monomer or dimer. Distance measurements determined for 13 SecA mutants show that the SecA signal peptide-binding domain encompasses a portion of the preprotein cross-linking domain but also includes regions of nucleotide-binding domain 1 and particularly the helical scaffold domain. The identified region lies at a multidomain interface within the heart of SecA, surrounded by and potentially responsive to domains important for binding nucleotide, mature portions of the preprotein, and the SecYEG channel. Our FRET-mapped binding domain, in contrast to the domain identified by NMR spectroscopy, includes the two-helix finger that has been shown to interact with the preprotein during translocation and lies at the entrance to the protein-conducting channel in the recently determined SecA–SecYEG structure. PMID:20025247

  17. Structure of the RNA-Binding Domain of Telomerase: Implications For RNA Recognition and Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Rouda,S.; Skordalakes, E.

    2007-01-01

    Telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein complex, replicates the linear ends of eukaryotic chromosomes, thus taking care of the 'end of replication problem.' TERT contains an essential and universally conserved domain (TRBD) that makes extensive contacts with the RNA (TER) component of the holoenzyme, and this interaction is thought to facilitate TERT/TER assembly and repeat-addition processivity. Here, we present a high-resolution structure of TRBD from Tetrahymena thermophila. The nearly all-helical structure comprises a nucleic acid-binding fold suitable for TER binding. An extended pocket on the surface of the protein, formed by two conserved motifs (CP and T motifs) comprises TRBD's RNA-binding pocket. The width and the chemical nature of this pocket suggest that it binds both single- and double-stranded RNA, possibly stem I, and the template boundary element (TBE). Moreover, the structure provides clues into the role of this domain in TERT/TER stabilization and telomerase repeat-addition processivity.

  18. SARS Coronavirus-unique Domain (SUD): Three-domain Molecular Architecture in Solution and RNA Binding

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Margaret A.; Chatterjee, Amarnath; Neuman, Benjamin W.; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    The nonstructural protein 3 (nsp3) of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) includes a “SARS-unique region” (SUD) consisting of three globular domains separated by short linker peptide segments. This paper reports NMR structure determinations of the C-terminal domain (SUD-C) and of a two-domain construct (SUD-MC) containing the middle domain (SUD-M) and the C-terminal domain, and NMR data on the conformational states of the N-terminal domain (SUD-N) and the SUD-NM two-domain construct. Both SUD-N and SUD-NM are monomeric and globular in solution, and in SUD-NM there is high mobility in the two-residue interdomain linking sequence, with no preferred relative orientation of the two domains. SUD-C adopts a frataxin-like fold and has structural similarity to DNA-binding domains of DNA-modifying enzymes. The structures of both SUD-M (previously determined) and SUD-C (from the present study) are maintained in SUD-MC, where the two domains are flexibly linked. Gel shift experiments showed that both SUD-C and SUD-MC bind to single-stranded RNA and recognize purine bases more strongly than pyrimidine bases, whereby SUD-MC binds to a more restricted set of purine-containing RNA sequences than SUD-M. NMR chemical shift perturbation experiments with observation of the 15N-labeled proteins further resulted in the delineation of the RNA binding sites, i.e., in SUD-M a positively charged surface area with a pronounced cavity, and in SUD-C several residues of an antiparallel β-sheet. Overall, the present data provide evidence for molecular mechanisms involving concerted actions of SUD-M and SUD-C, which result in specific RNA-binding that might be unique to the SUD, and thus to the SARS-CoV. PMID:20493876

  19. Guanine nucleotide-binding protein regulation of melatonin receptors in lizard brain

    SciTech Connect

    Rivkees, S.A.; Carlson, L.L.; Reppert, S.M. )

    1989-05-01

    Melatonin receptors were identified and characterized in crude membrane preparations from lizard brain by using {sup 125}I-labeled melatonin ({sup 125}I-Mel), a potent melatonin agonist. {sup 125}I-Mel binding sites were saturable; Scatchard analysis revealed high-affinity and lower affinity binding sites, with apparent K{sub d} of 2.3 {plus minus} 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} M and 2.06 {plus minus} 0.43 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} M, respectively. Binding was reversible and inhibited by melatonin and closely related analogs but not by serotonin or norepinephrine. Treatment of crude membranes with the nonhydrolyzable GTP analog guanosine 5{prime}-({gamma}-thio)triphosphate (GTP({gamma}S)), significantly reduced the number of high-affinity receptors and increased the dissociation rate of {sup 125}I-Mel from its receptor. Furthermore, GTP({gamma}S) treatment of ligand-receptor complexes solubilized by Triton X-100 also led to a rapid dissociation of {sup 125}I-Mel from solubilized ligand-receptor complexes. Gel filtration chromatography of solubilized ligand-receptor complexes revealed two major peaks of radioactivity corresponding to M{sub r} > 400,000 and M{sub r} ca. 110,000. This elution profile was markedly altered by pretreatment with GTP({gamma}S) before solubilization; only the M{sub r} 110,000 peak was present in GTP({gamma}S)-pretreated membranes. The results strongly suggest that {sup 125}I-mel binding sites in lizard brain are melatonin receptors, with agonist-promoted guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein) coupling and that the apparent molecular size of receptors uncoupled from G proteins is about 110,000.

  20. Nucleotide excision repair is impaired by binding of transcription factors to DNA.

    PubMed

    Sabarinathan, Radhakrishnan; Mularoni, Loris; Deu-Pons, Jordi; Gonzalez-Perez, Abel; López-Bigas, Núria

    2016-04-14

    Somatic mutations are the driving force of cancer genome evolution. The rate of somatic mutations appears to be greatly variable across the genome due to variations in chromatin organization, DNA accessibility and replication timing. However, other variables that may influence the mutation rate locally are unknown, such as a role for DNA-binding proteins, for example. Here we demonstrate that the rate of somatic mutations in melanomas is highly increased at active transcription factor binding sites and nucleosome embedded DNA, compared to their flanking regions. Using recently available excision-repair sequencing (XR-seq) data, we show that the higher mutation rate at these sites is caused by a decrease of the levels of nucleotide excision repair (NER) activity. Our work demonstrates that DNA-bound proteins interfere with the NER machinery, which results in an increased rate of DNA mutations at the protein binding sites. This finding has important implications for our understanding of mutational and DNA repair processes and in the identification of cancer driver mutations. PMID:27075101

  1. Flow Cytometry for Real-Time Measurement of Guanine Nucleotide Binding and Exchange by Ras-like GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Samantha L.; Tessema, Mathewos; Buranda, Tione; Phlypenko, Olena; Rak, Alexey; Simons, Peter C.; Surviladze, Zurab; Sklar, Larry A.; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2008-01-01

    Ras-like small GTPases cycle between GTP-bound active and GDP-bound inactive conformational states to regulate diverse cellular processes. Despite their importance, detailed kinetic or comparative studies of family members are rarely undertaken due to the lack of real-time assays measuring nucleotide binding or exchange. Here, we report a bead-based, flow cytometric assay that quantitatively measures the nucleotide binding properties of GST-chimeras for prototypical Ras-family members Rab7 and Rho. Measurements are possible in the presence or absence of Mg2+, with magnesium cations principally increasing affinity and slowing nucleotide dissociation rate 8- to 10-fold. GST-Rab7 exhibited a 3-fold higher affinity for GDP relative to GTP that is consistent with a 3-fold slower dissociation rate of GDP. Strikingly, GST-Rab7 had a marked preference for GTP with ribose ring-conjugated BODIPY FL. The more commonly used γ-NH-conjugated BODIPY FL GTP analogue failed to bind to GST-Rab7. In contrast, both BODIPY analogues bound equally well to GST-RhoA and GST-RhoC. Comparisons of the GST-Rab7 and GST-RhoA GTP-binding pockets provide a structural basis for the observed binding differences. In sum, the flow cytometric assay can be used to measure nucleotide binding properties of GTPases in real-time and quantitatively assess differences between GTPases. PMID:18638444

  2. Occupation of nucleotide in the binding pocket is critical to the stability of Rab11A.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young-Cheul; Kim, Chang Min; Choi, Jae Young; Jeon, Ju-Hong; Park, Hyun Ho

    2016-04-01

    The Ras superfamily of small G proteins is a family of guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) and each GTPase has conserved amino acid sequences in the enzymatic active site that are responsible for specific interactions with GDP and GTP molecules. Rab GTPases, which belong to the Ras superfamily, are key regulators of intracellular vesicle trafficking via the recruitment of effector molecules. Here, we purified wild type, active mutant and inactive mutant of Rab11A. In this process, we found that the inactive mutant (Rab11A S25N) had low stability compared with wild type and other mutants. Further analysis revealed that the stability of Rab11A S25N is dependent on the occupation of GDP in the nucleotide binding pocket of the protein. We found that the stability of Rab11A S25N is affected by the presence of GDP, not other nucleotides, and is independent of pH or salt in FPLC buffer. Our results provide a better understanding of how GTPase can be stable under in vitro conditions without effector proteins and how proper substrate/cofactor coordination is crucial to the stability of Rab11A. Successful purification and proposed purification methods will provide a valuable guide for investigation of other small GTPase proteins. PMID:26767484

  3. BuD, a helix–loop–helix DNA-binding domain for genome modification

    PubMed Central

    Stella, Stefano; Molina, Rafael; López-Méndez, Blanca; Juillerat, Alexandre; Bertonati, Claudia; Daboussi, Fayza; Campos-Olivas, Ramon; Duchateau, Phillippe; Montoya, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    DNA editing offers new possibilities in synthetic biology and biomedicine for modulation or modification of cellular functions to organisms. However, inaccuracy in this process may lead to genome damage. To address this important problem, a strategy allowing specific gene modification has been achieved through the addition, removal or exchange of DNA sequences using customized proteins and the endogenous DNA-repair machinery. Therefore, the engineering of specific protein–DNA interactions in protein scaffolds is key to providing ‘toolkits’ for precise genome modification or regulation of gene expression. In a search for putative DNA-binding domains, BurrH, a protein that recognizes a 19 bp DNA target, was identified. Here, its apo and DNA-bound crystal structures are reported, revealing a central region containing 19 repeats of a helix–loop–helix modular domain (BurrH domain; BuD), which identifies the DNA target by a single residue-to-nucleotide code, thus facilitating its redesign for gene targeting. New DNA-binding specificities have been engineered in this template, showing that BuD-derived nucleases (BuDNs) induce high levels of gene targeting in a locus of the human haemoglobin β (HBB) gene close to mutations responsible for sickle-cell anaemia. Hence, the unique combination of high efficiency and specificity of the BuD arrays can push forward diverse genome-modification approaches for cell or organism redesign, opening new avenues for gene editing. PMID:25004980

  4. Guanyl nucleotide interactions with dopaminergic binding sites labeled by (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol in human caudate and putamen: guanyl nucleotides enhance ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation and cause an apparent loss of high affinity binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Andorn, A.C.; Bacon, B.R.; Nguyen-Hunh, A.T.; Parlato, S.J.; Stitts, J.A.

    1988-02-01

    The human caudate and putamen contain two high affinity binding sites for (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol. Both of these affinity states exhibit dopaminergic selectivity. Ascorbic acid, at 0.1 mM, induces a slow loss of the low affinity component of (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol binding in these tissues. The addition of guanyl nucleotides to the ascorbate produces a more rapid loss of (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol binding which includes a loss of the highest affinity state for (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol. Ascorbate induces lipid peroxidation in human caudate and putamen, an effect that is further enhanced by guanyl and inosine nucleotides. In the absence of ascorbate, guanyl nucleotides have no effect on (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol binding but do decrease the affinity of dopamine at each affinity state greater than 60-fold. In the absence of ascorbate, guanyl nucleotides apparently decrease agonist affinity at human brain dopamine2-binding sites without causing an interconversion of agonist affinity states.

  5. Predicting binding within disordered protein regions to structurally characterised peptide-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Khan, Waqasuddin; Duffy, Fergal; Pollastri, Gianluca; Shields, Denis C; Mooney, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Disordered regions of proteins often bind to structured domains, mediating interactions within and between proteins. However, it is difficult to identify a priori the short disordered regions involved in binding. We set out to determine if docking such peptide regions to peptide binding domains would assist in these predictions.We assembled a redundancy reduced dataset of SLiM (Short Linear Motif) containing proteins from the ELM database. We selected 84 sequences which had an associated PDB structures showing the SLiM bound to a protein receptor, where the SLiM was found within a 50 residue region of the protein sequence which was predicted to be disordered. First, we investigated the Vina docking scores of overlapping tripeptides from the 50 residue SLiM containing disordered regions of the protein sequence to the corresponding PDB domain. We found only weak discrimination of docking scores between peptides involved in binding and adjacent non-binding peptides in this context (AUC 0.58).Next, we trained a bidirectional recurrent neural network (BRNN) using as input the protein sequence, predicted secondary structure, Vina docking score and predicted disorder score. The results were very promising (AUC 0.72) showing that multiple sources of information can be combined to produce results which are clearly superior to any single source.We conclude that the Vina docking score alone has only modest power to define the location of a peptide within a larger protein region known to contain it. However, combining this information with other knowledge (using machine learning methods) clearly improves the identification of peptide binding regions within a protein sequence. This approach combining docking with machine learning is primarily a predictor of binding to peptide-binding sites, and is not intended as a predictor of specificity of binding to particular receptors. PMID:24019881

  6. A rat brain mRNA encoding a transcriptional activator homologous to the DNA binding domain of retroviral integrases.

    PubMed Central

    Duilio, A; Zambrano, N; Mogavero, A R; Ammendola, R; Cimino, F; Russo, T

    1991-01-01

    We have isolated a rat cDNA, named FE65, hybridizing to an mRNA of about 2,300 nucleotides present in rat brain, undetectable in rat liver and very poorly represented in other tissues. An mRNA of the same size is present in human neuroblastoma cells and is absent from other human cell lines. The FE65 cDNA contains an open reading frame (ORF) coding for a polypeptide of 499 amino acids in which 143 residues can be aligned with the DNA binding domain of the integrases encoded by mammalian immunodeficiency viruses. The remaining part of the FE65 ORF is not homologous with the correspondent regions of the integrases; the first 206 residues of the FE65 ORF show numerous negative charges and a short sequence not dispensable for the function of the transactivating acidic domain of the jun family transcriptional factors. A plasmid which expresses FE65 amino acids 1-232 fused to the yeast GAL4 DNA binding domain was co-transfected with a plasmid containing five GAL4 binding sites upstream of a minimal Adenovirus promoter controlling the expression of the CAT gene. This experiment showed that the fused protein GAL4-FE65 is able to obtain a 30-40 fold increase of the CAT gene expression compared to the expression observed in the presence of the GAL4 DNA binding domain alone. Two types of FE65 mRNA are present in rat brain, differing only for six nucleotides. We demonstrate that this is the consequence of a neuron-specific alternative splicing of a six-nucleotide miniexon, which is also present in the human genome, in an intron/exon context very similar to that of the rat FE65 gene. Images PMID:1923810

  7. ARNO3, a Sec7-domain guanine nucleotide exchange factor for ADP ribosylation factor 1, is involved in the control of Golgi structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Michel; Boretto, Joëlle; Robineau, Sylviane; Monier, Solange; Goud, Bruno; Chardin, Pierre; Chavrier, Philippe

    1998-01-01

    Budding of transport vesicles in the Golgi apparatus requires the recruitment of coat proteins and is regulated by ADP ribosylation factor (ARF) 1. ARF1 activation is promoted by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), which catalyze the transition to GTP-bound ARF1. We recently have identified a human protein, ARNO (ARF nucleotide-binding-site opener), as an ARF1-GEF that shares a conserved domain with the yeast Sec7 protein. We now describe a human Sec7 domain-containing GEF referred to as ARNO3. ARNO and ARNO3, as well as a third GEF called cytohesin-1, form a family of highly related proteins with identical structural organization that consists of a central Sec7 domain and a carboxy-terminal pleckstrin homology domain. We show that all three proteins act as ARF1 GEF in vitro, whereas they have no effect on ARF6, an ARF protein implicated in the early endocytic pathway. Substrate specificity of ARNO-like GEFs for ARF1 depends solely on the Sec7 domain. Overexpression of ARNO3 in mammalian cells results in (i) fragmentation of the Golgi apparatus, (ii) redistribution of Golgi resident proteins as well as the coat component β-COP, and (iii) inhibition of SEAP transport (secreted form of alkaline phosphatase). In contrast, the distribution of endocytic markers is not affected. This study indicates that Sec7 domain-containing GEFs control intracellular membrane compartment structure and function through the regulation of specific ARF proteins in mammalian cells. PMID:9707577

  8. Ubiquitin binds to and regulates a subset of SH3 domains

    PubMed Central

    Stamenova, Svetoslava D.; French, Michael E.; He, Yuan; Francis, Smitha A.; Kramer, Zachary B.; Hicke, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Summary SH3 domains are modules of 50-70 amino acids that promote interactions among proteins, often participating in the assembly of large dynamic complexes. These domains bind to peptide ligands, which usually contain a core Pro-X-X-Pro (PXXP) sequence. Here we identify a class of SH3 domains that binds to ubiquitin. The yeast endocytic protein Sla1, as well as the mammalian proteins CIN85 and amphiphysin, carry ubiquitin-binding SH3 domains. Ubiquitin and peptide ligands bind to the same hydrophobic groove on the SH3 domain surface, and ubiquitin and a PXXP-containing protein fragment compete for binding to SH3 domains. We conclude that a subset of SH3 domains constitutes a distinct type of ubiquitin-binding domain, and that ubiquitin-binding can negatively regulate interaction of SH3 domains with canonical proline-rich ligands. PMID:17244534

  9. Escherichia coli lipoprotein binds human plasminogen via an intramolecular domain

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Tammy; Gaultney, Robert A.; Floden, Angela M.; Brissette, Catherine A.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli lipoprotein (Lpp) is a major cellular component that exists in two distinct states, bound-form and free-form. Bound-form Lpp is known to interact with the periplasmic bacterial cell wall, while free-form Lpp is localized to the bacterial cell surface. A function for surface-exposed Lpp has yet to be determined. We hypothesized that the presence of C-terminal lysinses in the surface-exposed region of Lpp would facilitate binding to the host zymogen plasminogen (Plg), a protease commandeered by a number of clinically important bacteria. Recombinant Lpp was synthesized and the binding of Lpp to Plg, the effect of various inhibitors on this binding, and the effects of various mutations of Lpp on Lpp–Plg interactions were examined. Additionally, the ability of Lpp-bound Plg to be converted to active plasmin was analyzed. We determined that Lpp binds Plg via an atypical domain located near the center of mature Lpp that may not be exposed on the surface of intact E. coli according to the current localization model. Finally, we found that Plg bound by Lpp can be converted to active plasmin. While the consequences of Lpp binding Plg are unclear, these results prompt further investigation of the ability of surface exposed Lpp to interact with host molecules such as extracellular matrix components and complement regulators, and the role of these interactions in infections caused by E. coli and other bacteria. PMID:26500634

  10. Control of domain swapping in bovine odorant-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Ramoni, Roberto; Vincent, Florence; Ashcroft, Alison E; Accornero, Paolo; Grolli, Stefano; Valencia, Christel; Tegoni, Mariella; Cambillau, Christian

    2002-01-01

    As revealed by the X-ray structure, bovine odorant-binding protein (OBPb) is a domain swapped dimer [Tegoni, Ramoni, Bignetti, Spinelli and Cambillau (1996) Nat. Struct. Biol. 3, 863-867; Bianchet, Bains, Petosi, Pevsner, Snyder, Monaco and Amzel (1996) Nat. Struct. Biol. 3, 934-939]. This contrasts with all known mammalian OBPs, which are monomers, and in particular with porcine OBP (OBPp), sharing 42.3% identity with OBPb. By the mechanism of domain swapping, monomers are proposed to evolve into dimers and oligomers, as observed in human prion. Comparison of bovine and porcine OBP sequences pointed at OBPp glycine 121, in the hinge linking the beta-barrel to the alpha-helix. The absence of this residue in OBPb might explain why the normal lipocalin beta-turn is not formed. In order to decipher the domain swapping determinants we have produced a mutant of OBPb in which a glycine residue was inserted after position 121, and a mutant of OBPp in which glycine 121 was deleted. The latter mutation did not result in dimerization, while OBPb-121Gly+ became monomeric, suggesting that domain swapping was reversed. Careful structural analysis revealed that besides the presence of a glycine in the hinge, the dimer interface formed by the C-termini and by the presence of the lipocalins conserved disulphide bridge may also control domain swapping. PMID:11931632