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Sample records for nucleotide substitution pattern

  1. Patterns of Nucleotide Substitution in Mitochondrial Protein Coding Genes of Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S.

    1996-01-01

    Maximum likelihood methods were used to study the differences in substitution rates among the four nucleotides and among different nucleotide sites in mitochondrial protein-coding genes of vertebrates. In the 1st+2nd codon position data, the frequency of nucleotide G is negatively correlated with evolutionary rates of genes, substitution rates vary substantially among sites, and the transition/transversion rate bias (R) is two to five times larger than that expected at random. Generally, largest transition biases and greatest differences in substitution rates among sites are found in the highly conserved genes. The 3rd positions in placental mammal genes exhibit strong nucleotide composition biases and the transitional rates exceed transversional rates by one to two orders of magnitude. Tamura-Nei and Hasegawa-Kishino-Yano models with gamma distributed variable rates among sites (gamma parameter, α) adequately describe the nucleotide substitution process in 1st+2nd position data. In these data, ignoring differences in substitution rates among sites leads to largest biases while estimating substitution rates. Kimura's two-parameter model with variable-rates among sites performs satisfactorily in likelihood estimation of R, α, and overall amount of evolution for 1st+2nd position data. It can also be used to estimate pairwise distances with appropriate values of α for a majority of genes. PMID:8722802

  2. DNA replication timing and higher-order nuclear organization determine single nucleotide substitution patterns in cancer genomes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lin; De, Subhajyoti; Michor, Franziska

    2013-01-01

    Single nucleotide substitutions (SNS) are a defining characteristic of cancer genomes. Many SNS in cancer genomes arise due to errors in DNA replication, which is spatio-temporally stratified. Here we propose that DNA replication patterns help shape the mutational landscapes of normal and cancer genomes. Using data on five fully sequenced cancer types and two personal genomes, we determined that the frequency of intergenic SNS is significantly higher in late DNA replication timing regions, even after controlling for a number of genomic features. Furthermore, some substitution signatures are more frequent in certain DNA replication timing zones. Finally, integrating data on higher-order nuclear organization, we found that genomic regions in close spatial proximity to late replicating domains display similar mutation spectra as the late replicating regions themselves. These data suggest that DNA replication timing together with higher-order genomic organization contribute to the patterns of SNS in normal and cancer genomes. PMID:23422670

  3. Grid selection of models of nucleotide substitution

    PubMed Central

    Loureiro, Marta; Pan, Miguel; Rodríguez-Pascual, Manuel; Posada, David; Mayo, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    jModelTest is a Java program for the statistical selection of models of nucleotide substitution with thousands of users around the world. For large data sets, the calculations carried out by this program can be too expensive for many users. Here we describe the port of the jModeltest code for Grid computing using DRMAA. This work should facilitate the use of jModelTest on a broad scale. PMID:20543444

  4. Nucleotide Substitution and Recombination at Orthologous Loci in Staphylococcus aureus†

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Austin L.; Friedman, Robert

    2005-01-01

    The pattern of nucleotide substitution was examined at 2,129 orthologous loci among five genomes of Staphylococcus aureus, which included two sister pairs of closely related genomes (MW2/MSSA476 and Mu50/N315) and the more distantly related MRSA252. A total of 108 loci were unusual in lacking any synonymous differences among the five genomes; most of these were short genes encoding proteins highly conserved at the amino acid sequence level (including many ribosomal proteins) or unknown predicted genes. In contrast, 45 genes were identified that showed anomalously high divergence at synonymous sites. The latter genes were evidently introduced by homologous recombination from distantly related genomes, and in many cases, the pattern of nucleotide substitution made it possible to reconstruct the most probable recombination event involved. These recombination events introduced genes encoding proteins that differed in amino acid sequence and thus potentially in function. Several of the proteins are known or likely to be involved in pathogenesis (e.g., staphylocoagulase, exotoxin, Ser-Asp fibrinogen-binding bone sialoprotein-binding protein, fibrinogen and keratin-10 binding surface-anchored protein, fibrinogen-binding protein ClfA, and enterotoxin P). Therefore, the results support the hypothesis that exchange of homologous genes among S. aureus genomes can play a role in the evolution of pathogenesis in this species. PMID:15805516

  5. Estimation of evolutionary distances under stationary and nonstationary models of nucleotide substitution

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xun; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    1998-01-01

    Estimation of evolutionary distances has always been a major issue in the study of molecular evolution because evolutionary distances are required for estimating the rate of evolution in a gene, the divergence dates between genes or organisms, and the relationships among genes or organisms. Other closely related issues are the estimation of the pattern of nucleotide substitution, the estimation of the degree of rate variation among sites in a DNA sequence, and statistical testing of the molecular clock hypothesis. Mathematical treatments of these problems are considerably simplified by the assumption of a stationary process in which the nucleotide compositions of the sequences under study have remained approximately constant over time, and there now exist fairly extensive studies of stationary models of nucleotide substitution, although some problems remain to be solved. Nonstationary models are much more complex, but significant progress has been recently made by the development of the paralinear and LogDet distances. This paper reviews recent studies on the above issues and reports results on correcting the estimation bias of evolutionary distances, the estimation of the pattern of nucleotide substitution, and the estimation of rate variation among the sites in a sequence. PMID:9600890

  6. Hotspots of Biased Nucleotide Substitutions in Human Genes

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, Jonas; Pollard, Katherine S; Webster, Matthew T

    2009-01-01

    Genes that have experienced accelerated evolutionary rates on the human lineage during recent evolution are candidates for involvement in human-specific adaptations. To determine the forces that cause increased evolutionary rates in certain genes, we analyzed alignments of 10,238 human genes to their orthologues in chimpanzee and macaque. Using a likelihood ratio test, we identified protein-coding sequences with an accelerated rate of base substitutions along the human lineage. Exons evolving at a fast rate in humans have a significant tendency to contain clusters of AT-to-GC (weak-to-strong) biased substitutions. This pattern is also observed in noncoding sequence flanking rapidly evolving exons. Accelerated exons occur in regions with elevated male recombination rates and exhibit an excess of nonsynonymous substitutions relative to the genomic average. We next analyzed genes with significantly elevated ratios of nonsynonymous to synonymous rates of base substitution (dN/dS) along the human lineage, and those with an excess of amino acid replacement substitutions relative to human polymorphism. These genes also show evidence of clusters of weak-to-strong biased substitutions. These findings indicate that a recombination-associated process, such as biased gene conversion (BGC), is driving fixation of GC alleles in the human genome. This process can lead to accelerated evolution in coding sequences and excess amino acid replacement substitutions, thereby generating significant results for tests of positive selection. PMID:19175294

  7. Nucleotide substitutions revealing specific functions of Polycomb group genes.

    PubMed

    Bajusz, Izabella; Sipos, László; Pirity, Melinda K

    2015-04-01

    POLYCOMB group (PCG) proteins belong to the family of epigenetic regulators of genes playing important roles in differentiation and development. Mutants of PcG genes were isolated first in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, resulting in spectacular segmental transformations due to the ectopic expression of homeotic genes. Homologs of Drosophila PcG genes were also identified in plants and in vertebrates and subsequent experiments revealed the general role of PCG proteins in the maintenance of the repressed state of chromatin through cell divisions. The past decades of gene targeting experiments have allowed us to make significant strides towards understanding how the network of PCG proteins influences multiple aspects of cellular fate determination during development. Being involved in the transmission of specific expression profiles of different cell lineages, PCG proteins were found to control wide spectra of unrelated epigenetic processes in vertebrates, such as stem cell plasticity and renewal, genomic imprinting and inactivation of X-chromosome. PCG proteins also affect regulation of metabolic genes being important for switching programs between pluripotency and differentiation. Insight into the precise roles of PCG proteins in normal physiological processes has emerged from studies employing cell culture-based systems and genetically modified animals. Here we summarize the findings obtained from PcG mutant fruit flies and mice generated to date with a focus on PRC1 and PRC2 members altered by nucleotide substitutions resulting in specific alleles. We also include a compilation of lessons learned from these models about the in vivo functions of this complex protein family. With multiple knockout lines, sophisticated approaches to study the consequences of peculiar missense point mutations, and insights from complementary gain-of-function systems in hand, we are now in a unique position to significantly advance our understanding of the molecular basis of

  8. Correlated evolution of nucleotide substitution rates and allelic variation in Mhc-DRB lineages of primates

    PubMed Central

    Garamszegi, László Z; de Groot, Natasja G; Bontrop, Ronald E

    2009-01-01

    Background The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a key model of genetic polymorphism. Selection pressure by pathogens or other microevolutionary forces may result in a high rate of non-synonymous substitutions at the codons specifying the contact residues of the antigen binding sites (ABS), and the maintenance of extreme MHC allelic variation at the population/species level. Therefore, selection forces favouring MHC variability for any reason should cause a correlated evolution between substitution rates and allelic polymorphism. To investigate this prediction, we characterised nucleotide substitution rates and allelic polymorphism (i.e. the number of alleles detected in relation to the number of animals screened) of several Mhc class II DRB lineages in 46 primate species, and tested for a correlation between them. Results First, we demonstrate that species-specific and lineage-specific evolutionary constraints favour species- and lineage-dependent substitution rate at the codons specifying the ABS contact residues (i.e. certain species and lineages can be characterised by high substitution rate, while others have low rate). Second, we show that although the degree of the non-synonymous substitution rate at the ABS contact residues was systematically higher than the degree of the synonymous substitution rate, these estimates were strongly correlated when we controlled for species-specific and lineage-specific effects, and also for the fact that different studies relied on different sample size. Such relationships between substitution rates of different types could even be extended to the non-contact residues of the molecule. Third, we provide statistical evidence that increased substitution rate along a MHC gene may lead to allelic variation, as a high substitution rate can be observed in those lineages in which many alleles are maintained. Fourth, we show that the detected patterns were independent of phylogenetic constraints. When we used phylogenetic

  9. Estimating a nucleotide substitution rate for maize from polymorphism at a major domestication locus.

    PubMed

    Clark, Richard M; Tavaré, Simon; Doebley, John

    2005-11-01

    To estimate a rate for single nucleotide substitutions for maize (Zea mays ssp. mays), we have taken advantage of data from genetic and archaeological studies of the domestication of maize from its wild ancestor, teosinte (Z. mays ssp. parviglumis). Genetic studies have shown that the teosinte branched1 (tb1) gene was a major target of human selection during maize domestication, and sequence diversity in the intergenic region 5' to the tb1-coding sequence is extraordinarily low. We show that polymorphism in this region is consistent with new mutation following fixation for a small number of tb1 haplotypes during domestication. Archeological studies suggest that maize was domesticated approximately 6,250-10,000 years ago and subsequently the size of the maize population is thought to have expanded rapidly. Using the observed number of mutations within the region of selection at tb1, the approximate age of maize domestication, and approximations for the maize genealogy, we have derived estimates for the nucleotide substitution rate for the tb1 intergenic region. Using two approaches, one of which is a coalescent approach, we obtain rate estimates of approximately 2.9 x 10(-8) and 3.3 x 10(-8) substitutions per site per year. We also show that the pattern of polymorphism in the tb1 intergenic region appears to have been strongly affected by the mutagenic effect of DNA methylation. Excluding target sites of symmetric DNA methylation (CG and CNG sites) from analysis, the mutation rate estimates are reduced by approximately 50%-60%, while the rates for CG and CNG sites are nearly an order of magnitude higher. We use rate estimates from the tb1 region to estimate the timing of expansion of transposable elements in the maize genome and suggest that this expansion occurred primarily within the last million years. PMID:16079248

  10. Genome Hotspots for Nucleotide Substitutions and the Evolution of Influenza A (H1N1) Human Strains

    PubMed Central

    Civetta, Alberto; Ostapchuk, David Cecil Murphy; Nwali, Basil

    2016-01-01

    In recent years a number of studies have brought attention to the role of positive selection during the evolution of antigenic escape by influenza strains. Particularly, the identification of positively selected sites within antigenic domains of viral surface proteins has been used to suggest that the evolution of viral–host receptor binding specificity is driven by selection. Here we show that, following the 1918 outbreak, the antigenic sites of the hemagglutinin (HA) viral surface protein and the stalk region of neuraminidase became substitution hotspots. The hotspots show similar patterns of nucleotide substitution bias at synonymous and nonsynonymous sites. Such bias imposes directionality in amino acid replacements that can influence signals of selection at antigenic sites. Our results suggest that the high accumulation of substitutions within the antigenic sites of HA can explain not only cases of antigenic escape by antigenic drift but also lead to occasional episodes of viral extinction. PMID:26988249

  11. The evolution of lineage-specific clusters of single nucleotide substitutions in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ke; Wang, Jianrong; Elango, Navin; Yi, Soojin V

    2013-10-01

    Genomic regions harboring large numbers of human-specific single nucleotide substitutions are of significant interest since they are potential genomic foci underlying the evolution of human-specific traits as well as human adaptive evolution. Previous studies aimed to identify such regions either used pre-defined genomic locations such as coding sequences and conserved genomic elements or employed sliding window methods. Such approaches may miss clusters of substitutions occurring in regions other than those pre-defined locations, or not be able to distinguish human-specific clusters of substitutions from regions of generally high substitution rates. Here, we conduct a 'maximal segment' analysis to scan the whole human genome to identify clusters of human-specific substitutions that occurred since the divergence of the human and the chimpanzee genomes. This method can identify species-specific clusters of substitutions while not relying on pre-defined regions. We thus identify thousands of clusters of human-specific single nucleotide substitutions. The evolution of such clusters is driven by a combination of several different evolutionary processes including increased regional mutation rate, recombination-associated processes, and positive selection. These newly identified regions of human-specific substitution clusters include large numbers of previously identified human accelerated regions, and exhibit significant enrichments of genes involved in several developmental processes. Our study provides a useful tool to study the evolution of the human genome. PMID:23770436

  12. Evolutionary constraints and the neutral theory. [mutation-caused nucleotide substitutions in DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jukes, T. H.; Kimura, M.

    1984-01-01

    The neutral theory of molecular evolution postulates that nucleotide substitutions inherently take place in DNA as a result of point mutations followed by random genetic drift. In the absence of selective constraints, the substitution rate reaches the maximum value set by the mutation rate. The rate in globin pseudogenes is about 5 x 10 to the -9th substitutions per site per year in mammals. Rates slower than this indicate the presence of constraints imposed by negative (natural) selection, which rejects and discards deleterious mutations.

  13. Genome-Wide Patterns of Nucleotide Polymorphism in Domesticated Rice

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Ryan D; Boyko, Adam; Fledel-Alon, Adi; York, Thomas L; Polato, Nicholas R; Olsen, Kenneth M; Nielsen, Rasmus; McCouch, Susan R; Bustamante, Carlos D; Purugganan, Michael D

    2007-01-01

    Domesticated Asian rice (Oryza sativa) is one of the oldest domesticated crop species in the world, having fed more people than any other plant in human history. We report the patterns of DNA sequence variation in rice and its wild ancestor, O. rufipogon, across 111 randomly chosen gene fragments, and use these to infer the evolutionary dynamics that led to the origins of rice. There is a genome-wide excess of high-frequency derived single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in O. sativa varieties, a pattern that has not been reported for other crop species. We developed several alternative models to explain contemporary patterns of polymorphisms in rice, including a (i) selectively neutral population bottleneck model, (ii) bottleneck plus migration model, (iii) multiple selective sweeps model, and (iv) bottleneck plus selective sweeps model. We find that a simple bottleneck model, which has been the dominant demographic model for domesticated species, cannot explain the derived nucleotide polymorphism site frequency spectrum in rice. Instead, a bottleneck model that incorporates selective sweeps, or a more complex demographic model that includes subdivision and gene flow, are more plausible explanations for patterns of variation in domesticated rice varieties. If selective sweeps are indeed the explanation for the observed nucleotide data of domesticated rice, it suggests that strong selection can leave its imprint on genome-wide polymorphism patterns, contrary to expectations that selection results only in a local signature of variation. PMID:17907810

  14. Selective Constraints on Amino Acids Estimated by a Mechanistic Codon Substitution Model with Multiple Nucleotide Changes

    PubMed Central

    Miyazawa, Sanzo

    2011-01-01

    Background Empirical substitution matrices represent the average tendencies of substitutions over various protein families by sacrificing gene-level resolution. We develop a codon-based model, in which mutational tendencies of codon, a genetic code, and the strength of selective constraints against amino acid replacements can be tailored to a given gene. First, selective constraints averaged over proteins are estimated by maximizing the likelihood of each 1-PAM matrix of empirical amino acid (JTT, WAG, and LG) and codon (KHG) substitution matrices. Then, selective constraints specific to given proteins are approximated as a linear function of those estimated from the empirical substitution matrices. Results Akaike information criterion (AIC) values indicate that a model allowing multiple nucleotide changes fits the empirical substitution matrices significantly better. Also, the ML estimates of transition-transversion bias obtained from these empirical matrices are not so large as previously estimated. The selective constraints are characteristic of proteins rather than species. However, their relative strengths among amino acid pairs can be approximated not to depend very much on protein families but amino acid pairs, because the present model, in which selective constraints are approximated to be a linear function of those estimated from the JTT/WAG/LG/KHG matrices, can provide a good fit to other empirical substitution matrices including cpREV for chloroplast proteins and mtREV for vertebrate mitochondrial proteins. Conclusions/Significance The present codon-based model with the ML estimates of selective constraints and with adjustable mutation rates of nucleotide would be useful as a simple substitution model in ML and Bayesian inferences of molecular phylogenetic trees, and enables us to obtain biologically meaningful information at both nucleotide and amino acid levels from codon and protein sequences. PMID:21445250

  15. Characterization of Nucleotide Misincorporation Patterns in the Iceman's Mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Olivieri, Cristina; Ermini, Luca; Rizzi, Ermanno; Corti, Giorgio; Bonnal, Raoul; Luciani, Stefania; Marota, Isolina; De Bellis, Gianluca; Rollo, Franco

    2010-01-01

    Background The degradation of DNA represents one of the main issues in the genetic analysis of archeological specimens. In the recent years, a particular kind of post-mortem DNA modification giving rise to nucleotide misincorporation (“miscoding lesions”) has been the object of extensive investigations. Methodology/Principal Findings To improve our knowledge regarding the nature and incidence of ancient DNA nucleotide misincorporations, we have utilized 6,859 (629,975 bp) mitochondrial (mt) DNA sequences obtained from the 5,350–5,100-years-old, freeze-desiccated human mummy popularly known as the Tyrolean Iceman or Ötzi. To generate the sequences, we have applied a mixed PCR/pyrosequencing procedure allowing one to obtain a particularly high sequence coverage. As a control, we have produced further 8,982 (805,155 bp) mtDNA sequences from a contemporary specimen using the same system and starting from the same template copy number of the ancient sample. From the analysis of the nucleotide misincorporation rate in ancient, modern, and putative contaminant sequences, we observed that the rate of misincorporation is significantly lower in modern and putative contaminant sequence datasets than in ancient sequences. In contrast, type 2 transitions represent the vast majority (85%) of the observed nucleotide misincorporations in ancient sequences. Conclusions/Significance This study provides a further contribution to the knowledge of nucleotide misincorporation patterns in DNA sequences obtained from freeze-preserved archeological specimens. In the Iceman system, ancient sequences can be clearly distinguished from contaminants on the basis of nucleotide misincorporation rates. This observation confirms a previous identification of the ancient mummy sequences made on a purely phylogenetical basis. The present investigation provides further indication that the majority of ancient DNA damage is reflected by type 2 (cytosine→thymine/guanine→adenine) transitions and

  16. Evolution of nucleotide substitutions and gene regulation in the amylase multigenes in Drosophila kikkawai and its sibling species.

    PubMed

    Inomata, N; Yamazaki, T

    2000-04-01

    In order to determine evolutionary changes in gene regulation and the nucleotide substitution pattern in a multigene family, the amylase multigenes were characterized in Drosophila kikkawai and its sibling species. The nucleotide substitution pattern was investigated. Drosophila kikkawai has four amylase genes. The Amy1 and Amy2 genes are a head-to-head duplication in the middle of the B arm of the second chromosome, while the Amy3 and Amy4 genes are a tail-to-tail duplication near the centromere of the same chromosome. In the sibling species of D. kikkawai (Drosophila bocki, Drosophila leontia, and Drosophila lini), sequencing of the Amy1, Amy2, Amy3, and Amy4 genes revealed that the Amy1 and Amy2 gene group diverged from Amy3 and Amy4 after duplication. In the Amy1 and Amy2 genes, the divergent evolution occurred in the flanking regions; in contrast, the coding regions have evolved in concerted fashion. The electrophoretic pattern of AMY isozymes was also examined. In D. kikkawai and its siblings, two or three electrophoretically different isozymes are encoded by the Amy1 and Amy2 genes (S isozyme) and by the Amy3 and Amy4 genes (F (M) isozymes). The S and F (M) isozymes show different patterns of band intensity when larvae and flies were fed in different media. Amy1 and Amy2, which encode the S isozyme, are more strikingly regulated than Amy3 and Amy4, which encode the F (M) isozyme. The GC content and codon usage bias were higher for the Amy1 and Amy2 genes than for the Amy3 and Amy4 genes. Although the ratio of synonymous and replacement substitutions within the Amy1 and Amy2 gene group was not significantly different from that within the Amy3 and Amy4 gene group, the synonymous substitution rate in the lineage of Amy1 and Amy2 was lower than that of Amy3 and Amy4. In conclusion, after the first duplication but before speciation of four species, the synonymous substitution rate between the two lineages and the electrophoretic pattern of the isozymes encoded by

  17. Effects of 2′-O-Methyl Nucleotide Substitution on EcoRI Endonuclease Cleavage Activities

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guojie; Zhao, Bin; Tong, Zhaoxue; Mu, Runqing; Guan, Yifu

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effect of sugar pucker conformation on DNA-protein interactions, we used 2′-O-methyl nucleotide (2′-OMeN) to modify the EcoRI recognition sequence -TGAATTCT-, and monitored the enzymatic cleavage process using FRET method. The 2′-O-methyl nucleotide has a C3′-endo sugar pucker conformation different from the C2′-endo sugar pucker conformation of native DNA nucleotides. The initial reaction velocities were measured and the kinetic parameters, Km and Vmax were derived using Michaelis-Menten equation. Experimental results showed that 2′-OMeN substitutions for the EcoRI recognition sequence decreased the cleavage efficiency for A2, A3 and T4 substitutions significantly, and 2′-OMeN substitution for T5 residue inhibited the enzymatic activity completely. In contrast, substitutions for G1 and C6 could maintain the original activity. 2′-fluoro nucleic acid (2′-FNA) and locked nucleic acid (LNA) having similar C3′-endo sugar pucker conformation also demonstrated similar enzymatic results. This position-dependent enzymatic cleavage property might be attributed to the phosphate backbone distortion caused by the switch from C2′-endo to C3′-endo sugar pucker conformation, and was interpreted on the basis of the DNA-EcoRI structure. These 2′-modified nucleotides could behave as a regulatory element to modulate the enzymatic activity in vitro, and this property will have potential applications in genetic engineering and biomedicine. PMID:24194862

  18. Using Digital Polymerase Chain Reaction to Detect Single-Nucleotide Substitutions Induced by Genome Editing.

    PubMed

    Miyaoka, Yuichiro; Chan, Amanda H; Conklin, Bruce R

    2016-01-01

    This protocol is designed to detect single-nucleotide substitutions generated by genome editing in a highly sensitive and quantitative manner. It uses a combination of allele-specific hydrolysis probes and a new digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) technology called droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). ddPCR partitions a reaction into more than 10,000 nanoliter-scale water-in-oil droplets. As a result, each droplet contains only a few copies of the genome so that ddPCR is able to detect rare genome-editing events without missing them. PMID:27250210

  19. Enzymatic cleavage of type II restriction endonucleases on the 2'-O-methyl nucleotide and phosphorothioate substituted DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guojie; Li, Jun; Tong, Zhaoxue; Zhao, Bin; Mu, Runqing; Guan, Yifu

    2013-01-01

    The effects of nucleotide analogue substitution on the cleavage efficiencies of type II restriction endonucleases have been investigated. Six restriction endonucleases (EcoRV, SpeI, XbaI, XhoI, PstI and SphI) were investigated respectively regarding their cleavage when substrates were substituted by 2'-O-methyl nucleotide (2'-OMeN) and phosphorothioate (PS). Substitutions were made in the recognition sequence and the two nucleotides flanking the recognition sequence for each endonuclease. The endonuclease cleavage efficiencies were determined using FRET-based assay. Results demonstrated a position-dependent inhibitory effect of substitution on the cleavage efficiency for all the six endonucleases. In general, the 2'-OMeN substitutions had greater impact than the PS substitutions on the enzymatic activities. Nucleotides of optimal substitutions for protection against RE cleavage were identified. Experimental results and conclusions in this study facilitate our insight into the DNA-protein interactions and the enzymatic cleavage mechanism, particularly for those whose detailed structure information is not available. In addition, the information could benefit the development of bioengineering and synthetic biology. PMID:24260216

  20. Distribution of Fitness Effects Caused by Single-Nucleotide Substitutions in Bacteriophage f1

    PubMed Central

    Peris, Joan B.; Davis, Paulina; Cuevas, José M.; Nebot, Miguel R.; Sanjuán, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    Empirical knowledge of the fitness effects of mutations is important for understanding many evolutionary processes, yet this knowledge is often hampered by several sources of measurement error and bias. Most of these problems can be solved using site-directed mutagenesis to engineer single mutations, an approach particularly suited for viruses due to their small genomes. Here, we used this technique to measure the fitness effect of 100 single-nucleotide substitutions in the bacteriophage f1, a filamentous single-strand DNA virus. We found that approximately one-fifth of all mutations are lethal. Viable ones reduced fitness by 11% on average and were accurately described by a log-normal distribution. More than 90% of synonymous substitutions were selectively neutral, while those affecting intergenic regions reduced fitness by 14% on average. Mutations leading to amino acid substitutions had an overall mean deleterious effect of 37%, which increased to 45% for those changing the amino acid polarity. Interestingly, mutations affecting early steps of the infection cycle tended to be more deleterious than those affecting late steps. Finally, we observed at least two beneficial mutations. Our results confirm that high mutational sensitivity is a general property of viruses with small genomes, including RNA and single-strand DNA viruses infecting animals, plants, and bacteria. PMID:20382832

  1. From single nucleotide substitutions up to chromosomal deletions: genetic pause of leucism-associated disorders in animals.

    PubMed

    Fleck, Katharina; Erhardt, Georg; Lühken, Gesine

    2016-01-01

    Leucism is characterized by a complete or partial white skin and hair in combination with pigmented irides, which can be vivid blue or heterochromatic. This is due to a complete or partial lack of melanocytes. The underlying pathogenesis is a disturbed emigration or differentiation of neural crest-derived cells. Therefore, leucistic phenotypes can be associated with defects, which mainly impair sensory organs and nerves. In humans, a well-known example is the Waardenburg syndrome. Leucism-associated disorders were also described in mouse, rat, hamster, rabbit, mink, cat, dog, pig, sheep, llama, alpaca, cattle and horse. In some of these species already identified causal mutations affect the genes EDN3, EDNRB, KIT, MITF, PAX3, SILV and SOX10. Defect alleles represent different types of genetic variation, ranging from single nucleotide substitutions up to larger chromosomal deletions. Some of the defect alleles produce desired coat color patterns. In some but not all cases, available genetic tests enable breeders to avoid production of animals affected by a leucism-associated disorder. PMID:27529988

  2. Species characterization in the genus Pestivirus according to palindromic nucleotide substitutions in the 5'-untranslated region.

    PubMed

    Giangaspero, Massimo; Harasawa, Ryô

    2011-06-01

    The palindromic nucleotide substitutions (PNS) at the three variable loci (V1, V2 and V3) in the 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of the Pestivirus genome have been considered for taxonomical segregation of the species, through the evaluation of 534 strains. On the basis of qualitative and quantitative secondary structure characteristics, species have been identified within the genus, determining genetic distances between species isolates, clarifying borderline and multirelated sequences, and characterizing and clustering the Pestivirus strains showing unexpected genomic sequences. Nine genomic groups have been identified: the species Bovine viral diarrhea virus 1 (BVDV-1), Bovine viral diarrhea virus 2 (BVDV-2), Border disease virus (BDV) and Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) and the tentative species Pronghorn, Giraffe, Bovine viral diarrhea virus 3 (BVDV-3) (HoBi group), Border disease virus 2 (BDV-2) (Italian small ruminant isolates) and Bungowannah. Palindromic positions have been characterized according to changes in nucleotide base-pairs identifying low variable positions (LVP) including base-pairs present in less than 80% of the genus. The determination of divergence between single strain sequences or genetic groups was obtained easily by comparing base-pairing combinations from aligned secondary structures. This provided clear information such as the level of heterogeneity within a species, the relatedness between species, or facilitating the characterization and clustering of specific strains. The BVDV-1 and BDV species resulted heterogeneous, showing isolates located on a borderline in the species. Within the BVDV-2 species, two main genogroups were identified, with strains showing common sequence characteristics to both groups (multirelated strains). They could be allocated correctly by quantitative analysis. Similarly, the relation between CSFV and BDV species appeared very clearly. Also in this case, ambiguous strain sequences could be clustered in the

  3. Association between nucleotide substitutions in cytochrome b gene and the control region in human mitochondrial DNA types

    SciTech Connect

    Malyarchuk, B.

    1995-07-01

    Nucleotide sequences of the cytochrome b gene fragment of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) between primers b1 and b2 were determined in eleven eastern Slavs. The group analyzed consisted of samples that differed in hypervariable segment I (HVSI) of the mtDNA control region by one to seven nucleotide substitutions. Three types of the b1 - b2 segment of the cytochrome b gene were registered. A lack of correlation between diversity in the coding (cytochrome b gene) and noncoding (HVSI) regions of mtDNA was shown. Association between substitutions at positions 14905 bp in cytochrome b gene, and also 16126 bp and 16294 bp in the control region of mtDNA, was found. 18 refs., 1 tab.

  4. Functional interplay between NTP leaving group and base pair recognition during RNA polymerase II nucleotide incorporation revealed by methylene substitution

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Candy S.; Xu, Liang; Wang, Wei; Ulrich, Sébastien; Zhang, Lu; Chong, Jenny; Shin, Ji Hyun; Huang, Xuhui; Kool, Eric T.; McKenna, Charles E.; Wang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    RNA polymerase II (pol II) utilizes a complex interaction network to select and incorporate correct nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) substrates with high efficiency and fidelity. Our previous ‘synthetic nucleic acid substitution’ strategy has been successfully applied in dissecting the function of nucleic acid moieties in pol II transcription. However, how the triphosphate moiety of substrate influences the rate of P-O bond cleavage and formation during nucleotide incorporation is still unclear. Here, by employing β,γ-bridging atom-‘substituted’ NTPs, we elucidate how the methylene substitution in the pyrophosphate leaving group affects cognate and non-cognate nucleotide incorporation. Intriguingly, the effect of the β,γ-methylene substitution on the non-cognate UTP/dT scaffold (∼3-fold decrease in kpol) is significantly different from that of the cognate ATP/dT scaffold (∼130-fold decrease in kpol). Removal of the wobble hydrogen bonds in U:dT recovers a strong response to methylene substitution of UTP. Our kinetic and modeling studies are consistent with a unique altered transition state for bond formation and cleavage for UTP/dT incorporation compared with ATP/dT incorporation. Collectively, our data reveals the functional interplay between NTP triphosphate moiety and base pair hydrogen bonding recognition during nucleotide incorporation. PMID:27060150

  5. Episodic nucleotide substitutions in seasonal influenza virus H3N2 can be explained by stochastic genealogical process without positive selection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kangchon; Kim, Yuseob

    2015-03-01

    Nucleotide substitutions in the HA1 domain of seasonal influenza virus H3N2 occur in temporal clusters, which was interpreted as a result of recurrent selective sweeps underlying antigenic drift. However, classical theory by Watterson suggests that episodic substitutions are mainly due to stochastic genealogy combined with unique genetic structure of influenza virus: High mutation rate over a nonrecombining viral segment. This explains why even larger variance in the number of allelic fixations per year is observed in nonantigenic gene segments of H3N2 than in antigenic (hemagglutinin and neuraminidase) segments. Using simulation, we confirm that allelic substitutions at nonrecombining segments with high mutation rate become temporally clustered without selection. We conclude that temporal clustering of fixations, as it is primarily caused by inherent randomness in genealogical process at linked sites, cannot be used as an evidence of positive selection in the H3N2 population. This effect of linkage and high mutation rate should be carefully considered in analyzing the genomic patterns of allelic substitutions in asexually reproducing systems in general. PMID:25492497

  6. Nucleotide substitutions in the Candida albicans ERG11 gene of azole-susceptible and azole-resistant clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Strzelczyk, Joanna Katarzyna; Slemp-Migiel, Anna; Rother, Magdalena; Gołąbek, Karolina; Wiczkowski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    One of the mechanisms of Candida albicans resistance to azole drugs used in antifungal therapy relies on increased expression and presence of point mutations in the ERG11 gene that encodes sterol 14α demethylase (14DM), an enzyme which is the primary target for the azole class of antifungals. The aim of the study was to analyze nucleotide substitutions in the Candida albicans ERG11 gene of azole-susceptible and azole-resistant clinical isolates. The Candida albicans isolates represented a collection of 122 strains selected from 658 strains isolated from different biological materials. Samples were obtained from hospitalized patients. Fluconazole susceptibility was tested in vitro using a microdilution assay. Candida albicans strains used in this study consisted of two groups: 61 of the isolates were susceptible to azoles and the 61 were resistant to azoles. Four overlapping regions of the ERG11 gene of the isolates of Candida albicans strains were amplified and sequenced. The MSSCP (multitemperature single strand conformation polymorphism) method was performed to select Candida albicans samples presenting genetic differences in the ERG11 gene fragments for subsequent sequence analysis. Based on the sequencing results we managed to detect 19 substitutions of nucleotides in the ERG11 gene fragments. Sequencing revealed 4 different alterations: T495A, A530C, G622A and A945C leading to changes in the corresponding amino acid sequence: D116E, K128T, V159I and E266D. The single nucleotide changes in the ERG11 gene did not affect the sensitivity of Candida albicans strains, whereas multiple nucleotide substitutions in the ERG11 gene fragments indicated a possible relation with the increase in resistance to azole drugs. PMID:24340302

  7. Substitution patterns are GC-biased in divergent sequences across the metazoans.

    PubMed

    Capra, John A; Pollard, Katherine S

    2011-01-01

    The fastest-evolving regions in the human and chimpanzee genomes show a remarkable excess of weak (A,T) to strong (G,C) nucleotide substitutions since divergence from their common ancestor. We investigated the phylogenetic extent and possible causes of this weak to strong (W → S) bias in divergent sequences (BDS) using recently sequenced genomes and recombination maps from eight trios of eukaryotic species. To quantify evidence for BDS, we inferred substitution histories using an efficient maximum likelihood approach with a context-dependent evolutionary model. We then annotated all lineage-specific substitutions in terms of W → S bias and density on the chromosomes. Finally, we used the inferred substitutions to calculate a BDS score-a log odds ratio between substitution type and density-and assessed its statistical significance with Fisher's exact test. Applying this approach, we found significant BDS in the coding and noncoding sequence of human, mouse, dog, stickleback, fruit fly, and worm. We also observed a significant lack of W → S BDS in chicken and yeast. The BDS score varies between species and across the chromosomes within each species. It is most strongly correlated with different genomic features in different species, but a strong correlation with recombination rates is found in several species. Our results demonstrate that a W → S substitution bias in fast-evolving sequences is a widespread phenomenon. The patterns of BDS observed suggest that a recombination-associated process, such as GC-biased gene conversion, is involved in the production of the bias in many species, but the strength of the BDS likely depends on many factors, including genome stability, variability in recombination rate over time and across the genome, the frequency of meiosis, and the amount of outcrossing in each species. PMID:21670083

  8. Multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis identifies specific nucleotide patterns promoting genetic polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Arehart, Eric; Gleim, Scott; White, Bill; Hwa, John; Moore, Jason H

    2009-01-01

    Background The fidelity of DNA replication serves as the nidus for both genetic evolution and genomic instability fostering disease. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) constitute greater than 80% of the genetic variation between individuals. A new theory regarding DNA replication fidelity has emerged in which selectivity is governed by base-pair geometry through interactions between the selected nucleotide, the complementary strand, and the polymerase active site. We hypothesize that specific nucleotide combinations in the flanking regions of SNP fragments are associated with mutation. Results We modeled the relationship between DNA sequence and observed polymorphisms using the novel multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) approach. MDR was originally developed to detect synergistic interactions between multiple SNPs that are predictive of disease susceptibility. We initially assembled data from the Broad Institute as a pilot test for the hypothesis that flanking region patterns associate with mutagenesis (n = 2194). We then confirmed and expanded our inquiry with human SNPs within coding regions and their flanking sequences collected from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database (n = 29967) and a control set of sequences (coding region) not associated with SNP sites randomly selected from the NCBI database (n = 29967). We discovered seven flanking region pattern associations in the Broad dataset which reached a minimum significance level of p ≤ 0.05. Significant models (p << 0.001) were detected for each SNP type examined in the larger NCBI dataset. Importantly, the flanking region models were elongated or truncated depending on the nucleotide change. Additionally, nucleotide distributions differed significantly at motif sites relative to the type of variation observed. The MDR approach effectively discerned specific sites within the flanking regions of observed SNPs and their respective identities, supporting the collective

  9. Distribution of Fitness and Virulence Effects Caused by Single-Nucleotide Substitutions in Tobacco Etch Virus▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Purificación; de la Iglesia, Francisca; Elena, Santiago F.

    2007-01-01

    Little is known about the fitness and virulence consequences of single-nucleotide substitutions in RNA viral genomes, and most information comes from the analysis of nonrandom sets of mutations with strong phenotypic effect or which have been assessed in vitro, with their relevance in vivo being unclear. Here we used site-directed mutagenesis to create a collection of 66 clones of Tobacco etch potyvirus, each carrying a different, randomly chosen, single-nucleotide substitution. Competition experiments between each mutant and the ancestral nonmutated clone were performed in planta to quantitatively assess the relative fitness of each mutant genotype. Among all mutations, 40.9% were lethal, and among the viable ones, 36.4% were significantly deleterious and 22.7% neutral. Not a single case of beneficial effects was observed within the level of resolution of our measures. On average, the fitness of a genotype carrying a deleterious but viable mutation was 49% smaller than that for its unmutated progenitor. Deleterious mutational effects conformed to a beta probability distribution. The virulence of a subset of viable mutants was assessed as the reduction in the number of viable seeds produced by infected plants. Mutational effects on virulence ranged between 17% reductions and 24.4% increases. Interestingly, the only mutations showing a significant effect on virulence were hypervirulent. Competitive fitness and virulence were uncorrelated traits. PMID:17898073

  10. Numerical taxonomy of the genus Pestivirus: new software for genotyping based on the palindromic nucleotide substitutions method.

    PubMed

    Giangaspero, Massimo; Apicella, Claudio; Harasawa, Ryô

    2013-09-01

    The genus Pestivirus from the family Flaviviridae is represented by four established species; Bovine viral diarrhea virus 1 (BVDV-1); Bovine viral diarrhea virus 2 (BVDV-2); Border disease virus (BDV); and Classical swine fever virus (CSFV); as well a tentative species from a Giraffe. The palindromic nucleotide substitutions (PNS) in the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of Pestivirus RNA has been described as a new, simple and practical method for genotyping. New software is described, also named PNS, that was prepared specifically for this PNS genotyping procedure. Pestivirus identification using PNS was evaluated on five hundred and forty-three sequences at genus, species and genotype level using this software. The software is freely available at www.pns-software.com. PMID:23684846

  11. Kinetico-Mechanistic Studies of Nucleoside and Nucleotide Substitution Reactions of Co(III) Complexes of Fully Alkylated Cyclen.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Manuel; Vázquez, Marta

    2015-05-18

    The solution chemistry of complex [Co{(Me)2(μ-ET)cyclen}(H2O)2](3+) containing a fully substituted tetraammine ligand designed for the avoidance of base-conjugated substitution mechanisms in the 6-8 pH range has been studied. The study should shed some light on the possible involvement of such Co(III) skeleton in inert interactions with biomolecules. The reactivity and speciation of the complex has been found similar to that of the parent cyclen derivative with the presence of mono- and bis-hydroxo-bridged species; at pH < 7.1, all reactivity has been found to be related to the aqua/hydroxo monomeric complexes. Under these pH conditions, the substitution reactions of the aqua/hydroxo ligands by chloride, inorganic phosphate, thymidine, cytidine 5'-monophosphate (5'-CMP), and thymidine-5'-monophosphate (5'-TMP) have been studied at varying conditions; ionic strength has been kept at 1.0 NaClO4 due to the high concentration of 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES) or N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES) used to ensure buffering. Except for chloride, the process occurs neatly in a one or two step process, showing dissociatively activated substitution mechanisms, having in general large ΔH(⧧), positive ΔS(⧧), and values of ΔV(⧧) close to those corresponding to the liberation of an aqua ligand to the reaction medium. The actuation of noticeable encounter-complex formation equilibrium constants has been found to be the determinant for the reactions with nucleosides and nucleotides, a clear indication of the relevance of hydrogen-bonding interactions in the reactivity of these molecules, even in this highly ionic strength medium. For the substitution of the active aqua/hydroxo ligands with 5'-TMP, the first substitution reaction produces an Nthymine-bound 5'-TMP complex that evolves to a bis-5'-TMP with an Nthymine,Ophosphate-bonding structure. The formation of outer-sphere complexes between the dangling phosphate group of the Nthymine

  12. A Visualization Tool for Calculating the Genetic Substitution Patterns Between Two Different Groups

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Insung; Jang, Jin-Hwa; Kim, Ha-Yeon; Lee, Ji-Hae; Son, Hyeon Seok

    2015-01-01

    We developed simulation tool for influenza virus variation (SimFluVar), an analytics software for calculating genomic variation among members of the influenza virus group. This study is related to computational evolutionary biology and evolutionary bioinformatics. SimFluVar is an analytical tool that can be used to calculate codon substitution patterns of viral genes. Designed to compare a large number of nucleotide sequences, SimFluVar provides precise patterns of codon variations between two viral groups, especially for the influenza virus. SimFluVar also provides useful functions, such as editing and visualization of the result matrix. This new tool can be used to analyze codon variation patterns over time as well as to analyze the genomic differences between viruses obtained from different geographical locations. SimFluVar is developed in C++, and Java RCP is used as a distribution package. SimFluVar, including the associated documentation, manuals, and examples, is publicly available at http://lcbb.snu.ac.kr/simfluvar. PMID:26279617

  13. Characterization of all possible single-nucleotide change caused amino acid substitutions in the kinase domain of Bruton tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Väliaho, Jouni; Faisal, Imrul; Ortutay, Csaba; Smith, C I Edvard; Vihinen, Mauno

    2015-06-01

    Knowledge about features distinguishing deleterious and neutral variations is crucial for interpretation of novel variants. Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) contains the highest number of unique disease-causing variations among the human protein kinases, still it is just 10% of all the possible single-nucleotide substitution-caused amino acid variations (SNAVs). In the BTK kinase domain (BTK-KD) can appear altogether 1,495 SNAVs. We investigated them all with bioinformatic and protein structure analysis methods. Most disease-causing variations affect conserved and buried residues disturbing protein stability. Minority of exposed residues is conserved, but strongly tied to pathogenicity. Sixty-seven percent of variations are predicted to be harmful. In 39% of the residues, all the variants are likely harmful, whereas in 10% of sites, all the substitutions are tolerated. Results indicate the importance of the entire kinase domain, involvement in numerous interactions, and intricate functional regulation by conformational change. These results can be extended to other protein kinases and organisms. PMID:25777788

  14. Kinetico-mechanistic Studies on the Substitution Reactivity on the {Ru(II)(bpy)2} Core with Nucleosides and Nucleotides at Physiological pH.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Marta; Martínez, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    The kinetico-mechanistic study of the substitution reactions of the aquo ligands in cis-[Ru(bpy)2(H2O)2](2+) by different nucleotides and nucleosides has been conducted at pH close to the physiological value. The concentration dependence and thermal and pressure activation parameters have been measured to ascertain the activation via which reactions take place. Substitution processes are found associatively activated for nitrogen-bonded nucleosides or nucleotides, with outer-sphere hydrogen-bonded aggregates being determinant. For reactions leading to oxygen-bonded nucleotides, the process is clearly dissociatively activated. A selectively induced lability of the inert {Ru(II)(bpy)2} core is observed on the formation of nitrogen(amide)-bonded complexes at relatively low pH values, which might be relevant for the effective intercalation of designed, ruthenium(II)-bonded, aromatic rings. PMID:27327488

  15. Subtype-Specific Analysis of the K65R Substitution in HIV-1 That Confers Hypersusceptibility to a Novel Nucleotide-Competing Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong-Tao; Colby-Germinario, Susan P.; Quashie, Peter K.; Bethell, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Compound A is a novel nucleotide-competing HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor (NcRTI) that selects for a unique W153L substitution that confers hypersusceptibility to tenofovir, while the K65R substitution in RT confers resistance against tenofovir and enhances susceptibility to NcRTIs. Although the K65R substitution is more common in subtype C viruses, the impact of subtype variability on NcRTI susceptibility has not been studied. In the present study, we performed experiments with compound A by using purified recombinant RT enzymes and viruses of subtypes B and C and circulating recombinant form CRF_A/G. We confirmed the hypersusceptibility of K65R substitution-containing RTs to compound A for subtype C, CRF_A/G, and subtype B. Steady-state kinetic analysis showed that K65R RTs enhanced the susceptibility to compound A by increasing binding of the inhibitor to the nucleotide binding site of RT in a subtype-independent manner, without significantly discriminating against the natural nucleotide substrate. These data highlight the potential utility of NcRTIs, such as compound A, for treatment of infections with K65R substitution-containing viruses, regardless of HIV-1 subtype. PMID:25779585

  16. Mixture models of nucleotide sequence evolution that account for heterogeneity in the substitution process across sites and across lineages.

    PubMed

    Jayaswal, Vivek; Wong, Thomas K F; Robinson, John; Poladian, Leon; Jermiin, Lars S

    2014-09-01

    Molecular phylogenetic studies of homologous sequences of nucleotides often assume that the underlying evolutionary process was globally stationary, reversible, and homogeneous (SRH), and that a model of evolution with one or more site-specific and time-reversible rate matrices (e.g., the GTR rate matrix) is enough to accurately model the evolution of data over the whole tree. However, an increasing body of data suggests that evolution under these conditions is an exception, rather than the norm. To address this issue, several non-SRH models of molecular evolution have been proposed, but they either ignore heterogeneity in the substitution process across sites (HAS) or assume it can be modeled accurately using the distribution. As an alternative to these models of evolution, we introduce a family of mixture models that approximate HAS without the assumption of an underlying predefined statistical distribution. This family of mixture models is combined with non-SRH models of evolution that account for heterogeneity in the substitution process across lineages (HAL). We also present two algorithms for searching model space and identifying an optimal model of evolution that is less likely to over- or underparameterize the data. The performance of the two new algorithms was evaluated using alignments of nucleotides with 10 000 sites simulated under complex non-SRH conditions on a 25-tipped tree. The algorithms were found to be very successful, identifying the correct HAL model with a 75% success rate (the average success rate for assigning rate matrices to the tree's 48 edges was 99.25%) and, for the correct HAL model, identifying the correct HAS model with a 98% success rate. Finally, parameter estimates obtained under the correct HAL-HAS model were found to be accurate and precise. The merits of our new algorithms were illustrated with an analysis of 42 337 second codon sites extracted from a concatenation of 106 alignments of orthologous genes encoded by the nuclear

  17. A Semidwarf Phenotype of Barley uzu Results from a Nucleotide Substitution in the Gene Encoding a Putative Brassinosteroid Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chono, Makiko; Honda, Ichiro; Zeniya, Haruko; Yoneyama, Koichi; Saisho, Daisuke; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Takatsuto, Suguru; Hoshino, Tsuguhiro; Watanabe, Yoshiaki

    2003-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) play important roles throughout plant growth and development. Despite the importance of clarifying the mechanism of BR-related growth regulation in cereal crops, BR-related cereal mutants have been identified only in rice (Oryza sativa). We previously found that semidwarf barley (Hordeum vulgare) accessions carrying the “uzu” gene, called “uzu” barley in Japan, are non-responding for brassinolide (BL). We then performed chemical and molecular analyses to clarify the mechanisms of uzu dwarfism using isogenic line pairs of uzu gene. The response of the uzu line to BL was significantly lower than that of its corresponding normal line. Measurement of BRs showed that the uzu line accumulates BRs, similar to known BR-insensitive mutants. The marker synteny of rice and barley chromosomes suggests that the uzu gene may be homologous to rice D61, a rice homolog of Arabidopsis BR-insensitive 1 (BRI1), encoding a BR-receptor protein. A barley homolog of BRI1, HvBRI1, was isolated by using degenerate primers. A comparison of HvBRI1 sequences in uzu and normal barley varieties showed that the uzu phenotype is correlated with a single nucleotide substitution. This substitution results in an amino acid change at a highly conserved residue in the kinase domain of the BR-receptor protein. These results may indicate that uzu dwarfism is caused by the missense mutation in HvBRI1. The uzu gene is being introduced into all hull-less barley cultivars in Japan as an effective dwarf gene for practical use, and this is the first report about an agronomically important mutation related to BRs. PMID:14551335

  18. Multilocus patterns of nucleotide polymorphism and demographic change in Taxodium distichum (Cupressaceae) in the lower Mississippi River alluvial valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kusumi, Junko; Zidong, Li; Kado, Tomoyuki; Tsumura, Yoshihiko; Middleton, Beth A.; Tachida, Hidenori

    2010-01-01

    Conclusions: Taxodium distichum had significantly higher nucleotide variation than C. japonica, and its patterns of polymorphism contrasted strikingly with those of the latter, which previously has been inferred to have experienced a reduction in population size.

  19. The evolution of the RNase P- and RNase MRP-associated RNAs: phylogenetic analysis and nucleotide substitution rate.

    PubMed

    Sbisà, E; Pesole, G; Tullo, A; Saccone, C

    1996-07-01

    We report a detailed evolutionary study of the RNase P- and RNase MRP- associated RNAs. The analyses were performed on all the available complete sequences of RNase MRP (vertebrates, yeast, plant), nuclear RNase P (vertebrates, yeast), and mitochondrial RNase P (yeast) RNAs. For the first time the phylogenetic distance between these sequences and the nucleotide substitution rates have been quantitatively measured.The analyses were performed by considering the optimal multiple alignments obtained mostly by maximizing similarity between primary sequences. RNase P RNA and MRP RNA display evolutionary dynamics following the molecular clock. Both have similar rates and evolve about one order of magnitude faster than the corresponding small rRNA sequences which have been, so far, the most common gene markers used for phylogeny. However, small rRNAs evolve too slowly to solve close phylogenetic relationships such as those between mammals. The quicker rate of RNase P and MRP RNA allowed us to assess phylogenetic relationships between mammals and other vertebrate species and yeast strains. The phylogenetic data obtained with yeasts perfectly agree with those obtained by functional assays, thus demonstrating the potential offered by this approach for laboratory experiments. PMID:8660429

  20. Temporal Patterns of Nucleotide Misincorporations and DNA Fragmentation in Ancient DNA

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, Susanna; Krause, Johannes; Guschanski, Katerina; Savolainen, Vincent; Pääbo, Svante

    2012-01-01

    DNA that survives in museum specimens, bones and other tissues recovered by archaeologists is invariably fragmented and chemically modified. The extent to which such modifications accumulate over time is largely unknown but could potentially be used to differentiate between endogenous old DNA and present-day DNA contaminating specimens and experiments. Here we examine mitochondrial DNA sequences from tissue remains that vary in age between 18 and 60,000 years with respect to three molecular features: fragment length, base composition at strand breaks, and apparent C to T substitutions. We find that fragment length does not decrease consistently over time and that strand breaks occur preferentially before purine residues by what may be at least two different molecular mechanisms that are not yet understood. In contrast, the frequency of apparent C to T substitutions towards the 5′-ends of molecules tends to increase over time. These nucleotide misincorporations are thus a useful tool to distinguish recent from ancient DNA sources in specimens that have not been subjected to unusual or harsh treatments. PMID:22479540

  1. Temporal patterns of nucleotide misincorporations and DNA fragmentation in ancient DNA.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Susanna; Krause, Johannes; Guschanski, Katerina; Savolainen, Vincent; Pääbo, Svante

    2012-01-01

    DNA that survives in museum specimens, bones and other tissues recovered by archaeologists is invariably fragmented and chemically modified. The extent to which such modifications accumulate over time is largely unknown but could potentially be used to differentiate between endogenous old DNA and present-day DNA contaminating specimens and experiments. Here we examine mitochondrial DNA sequences from tissue remains that vary in age between 18 and 60,000 years with respect to three molecular features: fragment length, base composition at strand breaks, and apparent C to T substitutions. We find that fragment length does not decrease consistently over time and that strand breaks occur preferentially before purine residues by what may be at least two different molecular mechanisms that are not yet understood. In contrast, the frequency of apparent C to T substitutions towards the 5'-ends of molecules tends to increase over time. These nucleotide misincorporations are thus a useful tool to distinguish recent from ancient DNA sources in specimens that have not been subjected to unusual or harsh treatments. PMID:22479540

  2. ModelOMatic: fast and automated model selection between RY, nucleotide, amino acid, and codon substitution models.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Simon; Allen, James E; Blackburne, Benjamin P; Talavera, David

    2015-01-01

    Molecular phylogenetics is a powerful tool for inferring both the process and pattern of evolution from genomic sequence data. Statistical approaches, such as maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference, are now established as the preferred methods of inference. The choice of models that a researcher uses for inference is of critical importance, and there are established methods for model selection conditioned on a particular type of data, such as nucleotides, amino acids, or codons. A major limitation of existing model selection approaches is that they can only compare models acting upon a single type of data. Here, we extend model selection to allow comparisons between models describing different types of data by introducing the idea of adapter functions, which project aggregated models onto the originally observed sequence data. These projections are implemented in the program ModelOMatic and used to perform model selection on 3722 families from the PANDIT database, 68 genes from an arthropod phylogenomic data set, and 248 genes from a vertebrate phylogenomic data set. For the PANDIT and arthropod data, we find that amino acid models are selected for the overwhelming majority of alignments; with progressively smaller numbers of alignments selecting codon and nucleotide models, and no families selecting RY-based models. In contrast, nearly all alignments from the vertebrate data set select codon-based models. The sequence divergence, the number of sequences, and the degree of selection acting upon the protein sequences may contribute to explaining this variation in model selection. Our ModelOMatic program is fast, with most families from PANDIT taking fewer than 150 s to complete, and should therefore be easily incorporated into existing phylogenetic pipelines. ModelOMatic is available at https://code.google.com/p/modelomatic/. PMID:25209223

  3. Gene comparison based on the repetition of single-nucleotide structure patterns.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhao-Hui; Du, Ming-Hui; Qi, Xiao-Qin; Zheng, Li-Juan

    2012-10-01

    According to the repetition structure patterns of single-nucleotides, we propose a novel digital representation method to characterize primary DNA sequences. Based on this representation we give a new RP-SP (repeat and space) vector to compute the distance of different sequences. The examination of similarities/dissimilarities among different sequences illustrates the utility of the proposed RP-SP vector distance. Then, we use the proposed RP-SP vector method to analyze two groups of genomes, 15 E. coli genomes and 31 mitochondrial genomes. For comparison, we also apply other alignment-free methods to the two groups of genomes. The results show that the proposed method can distinguish characteristics of different genomes and used to reconstruct the phylogenetic tree of different genomes. PMID:22902300

  4. A nonsense nucleotide substitution in the oculocutaneous albinism II gene underlies the original pink-eyed dilution allele (Oca2(p)) in mice.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Haruka; Kiniwa, Yukiko; Okuyama, Ryuhei; Yang, Mu; Higuchi, Keiichi; Mori, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    The original pink-eyed dilution (p) on chromosome 7 is a very old spontaneous mutation in mice. The oculocutaneous albinism II (Oca2) gene has previously been identified as the p gene. Oca2 transcripts have been shown to be absent in the skin of SJL/J mice with the original p mutant allele (Oca2(p)); however, the molecular genetic lesion underlying the original Oca2(p) allele has never been reported. The NCT mouse (commonly known as Nakano cataract mouse) has a pink-eyed dilution phenotype, which prompted us to undertake a molecular genetic analysis of the Oca2 gene of this strain. Our genetic linkage analysis suggests that the locus for the pink-eyed dilution phenotype of NCT is tightly linked to the Oca2 locus. PCR cloning and nucleotide sequence analysis indicates that the NCT mouse has a nonsense nucleotide substitution at exon 7 of the Oca2 gene. Examination of three mouse strains (NZW/NSlc, SJL/J, and 129X1/SvJJmsSlc) with the original Oca2(p) allele revealed the presence of a nonsense nucleotide substitution identical to that in the NCT strain. RT-PCR analysis revealed that the Oca2 transcripts were absent in the skin of NCT mice, suggesting intervention of the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway. Collectively, the data in this study indicate that the nonsense nucleotide substitution in the Oca2 gene underlies the Oca2(p) allele. Our data also indicate that the NCT mouse can be used not only as a cataract model, but also as a model for human type II oculocutaneous albinism. PMID:25736709

  5. Characterization of Specific Nucleotide Substitutions in DtxR-Specific Operators of Corynebacterium diphtheriae That Dramatically Affect DtxR Binding, Operator Function, and Promoter Strength

    PubMed Central

    Lee, John H.; Holmes, Randall K.

    2000-01-01

    The diphtheria toxin repressor (DtxR) of Corynebacterium diphtheriae uses Fe2+ as a corepressor. Holo-DtxR inhibits transcription from the iron-regulated promoters (IRPs) designated IRP1 through IRP5 as well as from the promoters for the tox and hmuO genes. DtxR binds to 19-bp operators with the consensus sequence 5′-TTAGGTTAGCCTAACCTAA-3′, a perfect 9-bp palindrome interrupted by a single C · G base pair. Among the seven known DtxR-specific operators, IRP3 exhibits the weakest binding to DtxR. The message (sense) strand of the IRP3 operator (5′-TTAGGTGAGACGCACCCAT-3′ [nonconsensus nucleotides underlined]) overlaps by 2 nucleotides at its 5′ end with the putative −10 sequence of the IRP3 promoter. The underlined C at position +7 from the center of the IRP3 operator [C(+7)] is unique, because T is conserved at that position in other DtxR-specific operators. The present study examined the effects of nucleotide substitutions at position +7 or −7 in the IRP3 operator. In gel mobility shift assays, only the change of C(+7) to the consensus nucleotide T caused a dramatic increase in the binding of DtxR, whereas other nucleotide substitutions for C(+7) or replacements for A(−7) had only small positive or negative effects on DtxR binding. All substitutions for C(+7) or A(−7) except for A(−7)C dramatically decreased IRP3 promoter strength. In contrast, the A(−7)C variant caused increased promoter strength at the cost of nearly eliminating repressibility by DtxR. The message (sense) strand of the IRP1 operator (5′-TTAGGTTAGCCAAACCTTT-3′) includes the −35 region of the IRP3 promoter. A T(+7)C variant of the IRP1 operator was also constructed, and it was shown to exhibit decreased binding to DtxR, decreased repressibility by DtxR, and increased promoter strength. The nucleotides at positions +7 and −7 in DtxR-specific operators are therefore important determinants of DtxR binding and repressibility of transcription by DtxR, and they also have

  6. The Slow:Fast substitution ratio reveals changing patterns of natural selection in gamma-proteobacterial genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Alm, Eric; Shapiro, B. Jesse

    2009-04-15

    Different microbial species are thought to occupy distinct ecological niches, subjecting each species to unique selective constraints, which may leave a recognizable signal in their genomes. Thus, it may be possible to extract insight into the genetic basis of ecological differences among lineages by identifying unusual patterns of substitutions in orthologous gene or protein sequences. We use the ratio of substitutions in slow versus fast-evolving sites (nucleotides in DNA, or amino acids in protein sequence) to quantify deviations from the typical pattern of selective constraint observed across bacterial lineages. We propose that elevated S:F in one branch (an excess of slow-site substitutions) can indicate a functionally-relevant change, due to either positive selection or relaxed evolutionary constraint. In a genome-wide comparative study of gamma-proteobacterial proteins, we find that cell-surface proteins involved with motility and secretion functions often have high S:F ratios, while information-processing genes do not. Change in evolutionary constraints in some species is evidenced by increased S:F ratios within functionally-related sets of genes (e.g., energy production in Pseudomonas fluorescens), while other species apparently evolve mostly by drift (e.g., uniformly elevated S:F across most genes in Buchnera spp.). Overall, S:F reveals several species-specific, protein-level changes with potential functional/ecological importance. As microbial genome projects yield more species-rich gene-trees, the S:F ratio will become an increasingly powerful tool for uncovering functional genetic differences among species.

  7. The nucleotide sequence of HLA-B{sup *}2704 reveals a new amino acid substitution in exon 4 which is also present in HLA-B{sup *}2706

    SciTech Connect

    Rudwaleit, M.; Bowness, P.; Wordsworth, P.

    1996-12-31

    The HLA-B27 subtype HLA-B{sup *}2704 is virtually absent in Caucasians but common in Orientals, where it is associated with ankylosing spondylitis. The amino acid sequence of HLA-B{sup *}2704 has been established by peptide mapping and was shown to differ by two amino acids from HLA-B{sup *}2705, HLA-B{sup *}2704 is characterized by a serine for aspartic acid substitution at position 77 and glutamic acid for valine at position 152. To date, however, no nucleotide sequence confirming these changes at the DNA level has been published. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Codon repeats in genes associated with human diseases: fewer repeats in the genes of nonhuman primates and nucleotide substitutions concentrated at the sites of reiteration.

    PubMed Central

    Djian, P; Hancock, J M; Chana, H S

    1996-01-01

    Five human diseases are due to an excessive number of CAG repeats in the coding regions of five different genes. We have analyzed the repeat regions in four of these genes from nonhuman primates, which are not known to suffer from the diseases. These primates have CAG repeats at the same sites as in human alleles, and there is similar polymorphism of repeat number, but this number is smaller than in the human genes. In some of the genes, the segment of poly(CAG) has expanded in nonhuman primates, but the process has advanced further in the human lineage than in other primate lineages, thereby predisposing to diseases of CAG reiteration. Adjacent to stretches of homogeneous present-day codon repeats, previously existing codons of the same kind have undergone nucleotide substitutions with high frequency. Where these lead to amino acid substitutions, the effect will be to reduce the length of the original homopolymeric stretch in the protein. PMID:8552651

  9. Substitution patterns across alternatives as a source of preference heterogeneity in recreation demand models.

    PubMed

    Bujosa Bestard, Angel

    2014-11-01

    Recent stated choice studies have shown that, in a context of inter-alternative correlation, individuals can assess alternatives differently. This asymmetry in perception between alternatives with different levels of substitutability becomes one additional, but usually overlooked, source of observed preference heterogeneity. In the context of beach recreation in Mallorca, Spain, this paper extends the investigation on this source of heterogeneity to a revealed preference setting. While the substitution pattern existent across sites is accounted for by means of a nested logit model, nest-specific coefficients are estimated to evaluate the utilities associated with different groups of sites. The results provide empirical evidence to suggest that substitution patterns across alternatives are a statistically significant source of influence on preference heterogeneity leading to different marginal sensitivities for a number of site attributes. PMID:24956466

  10. Haemophilia A: database of nucleotide substitutions, deletions, insertions and rearrangements of the factor VIII gene, second edition.

    PubMed Central

    Tuddenham, E G; Schwaab, R; Seehafer, J; Millar, D S; Gitschier, J; Higuchi, M; Bidichandani, S; Connor, J M; Hoyer, L W; Yoshioka, A

    1994-01-01

    A large number of different mutations in the factor VIII (F8) gene have been identified as a cause of haemophilia A. This compilation lists known single base-pair substitutions, deletions and insertions in the F8 gene and reviews the status of the inversional events which account for a substantial proportion of mutations causing severe haemophilia A. PMID:7937051

  11. Coinheritance of a Rare Nucleotide Substitution on the β-Globin Gene and Other Known Mutations in the Globin Clusters: Management in Genetic Counseling.

    PubMed

    Vinciguerra, Margherita; Passarello, Cristina; Leto, Filippo; Crivello, Anna; Fustaneo, Maria; Cassarà, Filippo; Cannata, Monica; Maggio, Aurelio; Giambona, Antonino

    2016-08-01

    A large number of methods for DNA analysis are available to identify defects in globin genes associated with hemoglobin (Hb) disorders. In this study, we report a rare nucleotide (nt) substitution on the β-globin gene, nt 781 in the second intron [IVS-II-781 (C > G); HBB: c.316-70C > G], identified in four patients. This nt substitution was previously described only as a personal communication to the HbVar database and indicated as a β(0) or β(+) mutation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical implication of this nt change, particularly when coinherited with severe β-thalassemia (β-thal), in order to be able to conduct appropriate genetic counseling. Genetic studies were performed on two subjects, one carried Hb S [β6(A3)Glu→Val; HBB: c.20A > T], and the other carried IVS-I-110 (G > A) (HBB: c.93-21G > A). All these subjects showed this new β nt substitution in association with Hb A2' (or Hb B2) [δ16(A13)Gly→Arg; HBD: c.49G > C]. Another 16 samples, carrying the same δ variant as the probands, were processed by β-globin gene sequencing in order to better understand the correlation between this Hb variant and the rare nt substitution reported in this study. The present investigation emphasizes the importance of sharing the observed nt changes in the globin gene cluster, especially in the case of new or rare undefined mutations, in order to facilitate the determination of their phenotypic expression, the possible interactions with known molecular defects and to formulate appropriate genetic counseling for at-risk couples. PMID:27258795

  12. Palindromic-nucleotide substitutions (PNS) of hepatitis C virus genotypes 1 and 5a from South Africa.

    PubMed

    Prabdial-Sing, N; Giangaspero, M; Puren, A J; Mahlangu, J; Barrow, P; Bowyer, S M

    2011-08-01

    The HCV stem-loop subdomains III-a, -b and -c have been shown to reflect the characteristics of the virus and identify isolates by genus, genotype and subtype. The aim of this study was to investigate the genotype-specific PNS within the 5'UTR of prevalent HCV genotypes (1 and 5a) found in South Africa. The genotype 5a (N = 35) and genotype 1 sequences (N=20) were from patients presenting with liver disease or haemophilia, respectively. PNS HCV typing characteristics, defined previously, were observed. The PNS method differentiated subtypes 1a and 1c from subtype 1b by the base change at nucleotide position 243. A lack of structural data from the variable loci V1 of the 5'UTR did not allow us to further differentiate the subtypes of 1. A nucleotide change from a thymine (T) to a cytosine (C) at position 183 was found among genotype 5a sequences. This mutation changed the stable U-AA bond to a Y AA bulge at base-pair position 32. There was an insertion of a single adenine (A) at position 207. At present PNS analysis is labour intensive but, with development of further software to aid the computer analysis, it has the potential to provide a rapid, reliable alternative to phylogenetic analysis. PMID:21600241

  13. Complex Multiple-Nucleotide Substitution Mutations Causing Human Inherited Disease Reveal Novel Insights into the Action of Translesion Synthesis DNA Polymerases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Min; Férec, Claude; Cooper, David N

    2015-11-01

    Translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerases allow the bypass of unrepaired lesions during DNA replication. Based upon mutational signatures of a subtype of multiple-nucleotide substitution (MNS) mutations causing human inherited disease, we have recently postulated two properties of TLS DNA polymerases in DNA repair, namely, the generation of neo-microhomologies potentiating strand-misalignment, and additional microlesions within the templated inserts when recruited to stalled replication forks. To provide further support for this postulate, we analyzed the mutational signatures of a new and complex subtype of pathogenic MNS mutation. Several mutations containing long templated inserts (8-19 bp) that are highly informative with regard to their underlying mutational mechanisms, harbor imprints of TLS DNA polymerase action. Dissecting the mechanism underlying the generation of the 19-bp insert implicated repeated participation of TLS DNA polymerases in the conversion of a damaged base into a complex MNS lesion through a process of successive template switching and bypass repair. PMID:26172832

  14. Evolution of Xylan Substitution Patterns in Gymnosperms and Angiosperms: Implications for Xylan Interaction with Cellulose.

    PubMed

    Busse-Wicher, Marta; Li, An; Silveira, Rodrigo L; Pereira, Caroline S; Tryfona, Theodora; Gomes, Thiago C F; Skaf, Munir S; Dupree, Paul

    2016-08-01

    The interaction between cellulose and xylan is important for the load-bearing secondary cell wall of flowering plants. Based on the precise, evenly spaced pattern of acetyl and glucuronosyl (MeGlcA) xylan substitutions in eudicots, we recently proposed that an unsubstituted face of xylan in a 2-fold helical screw can hydrogen bond to the hydrophilic surfaces of cellulose microfibrils. In gymnosperm cell walls, any role for xylan is unclear, and glucomannan is thought to be the important cellulose-binding polysaccharide. Here, we analyzed xylan from the secondary cell walls of the four gymnosperm lineages (Conifer, Gingko, Cycad, and Gnetophyta). Conifer, Gingko, and Cycad xylan lacks acetylation but is modified by arabinose and MeGlcA. Interestingly, the arabinosyl substitutions are located two xylosyl residues from MeGlcA, which is itself placed precisely on every sixth xylosyl residue. Notably, the Gnetophyta xylan is more akin to early-branching angiosperms and eudicot xylan, lacking arabinose but possessing acetylation on alternate xylosyl residues. All these precise substitution patterns are compatible with gymnosperm xylan binding to hydrophilic surfaces of cellulose. Molecular dynamics simulations support the stable binding of 2-fold screw conifer xylan to the hydrophilic face of cellulose microfibrils. Moreover, the binding of multiple xylan chains to adjacent planes of the cellulose fibril stabilizes the interaction further. Our results show that the type of xylan substitution varies, but an even pattern of xylan substitution is maintained among vascular plants. This suggests that 2-fold screw xylan binds hydrophilic faces of cellulose in eudicots, early-branching angiosperm, and gymnosperm cell walls. PMID:27325663

  15. Multilocus patterns of nucleotide polymorphism and demographic change in Taxodium distichum (Cupressaceae) in the lower Mississippi River alluvial valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kusumi, J.; Zidong, L.; Kado, T.; Tsumura, Y.; Middleton, B.A.; Tachida, H.

    2010-01-01

    Premise of the Study: Studies of the geographic patterns of genetic variation can give important insights into the past population structure of species. Our study species, Taxodium distichum L. (bald-cypress), prefers riparian and wetland habitats and is widely distributed in southeastern North America and Mexico. We compared the genetic variation of T. distichum with that of its close relative, Cryptomeria japonica, which is endemic to Japan. Methods: Nucleotide polymorphisms of T. distichum in the lower Mississippi River alluvial valley, USA, were examined at 10 nuclear loci. Key Results: The average nucleotide diversity at silent sites, 7sil, across the 10 loci in T. distichum was higher than that of C. japonica (7sil = 0.00732 and 0.00322, respectively). In T. distichum, Tajima's D values were each negative at 9 out of 10 loci, which suggests a recent population expansion. Maximum-likelihood and Bayesian estimations of the exponential population growth rate (g) of T. distichum populations indicated that this species had expanded approximately at the rate of 1.7 - 1.0 10 -6 per year in the past. Conclusions: Taxodium distichum had signifi cantly higher nucleotide variation than C. japonica, and its patterns of polymorphism contrasted strikingly with those of the latter, which previously has been inferred to have experienced a reduction in population size.

  16. Reconstruction of the ancestral plastid genome in Geraniaceae reveals a correlation between genome rearrangements, repeats, and nucleotide substitution rates.

    PubMed

    Weng, Mao-Lun; Blazier, John C; Govindu, Madhumita; Jansen, Robert K

    2014-03-01

    Geraniaceae plastid genomes are highly rearranged, and each of the four genera already sequenced in the family has a distinct genome organization. This study reports plastid genome sequences of six additional species, Francoa sonchifolia, Melianthus villosus, and Viviania marifolia from Geraniales, and Pelargonium alternans, California macrophylla, and Hypseocharis bilobata from Geraniaceae. These genome sequences, combined with previously published species, provide sufficient taxon sampling to reconstruct the ancestral plastid genome organization of Geraniaceae and the rearrangements unique to each genus. The ancestral plastid genome of Geraniaceae has a 4 kb inversion and a reduced, Pelargonium-like small single copy region. Our ancestral genome reconstruction suggests that a few minor rearrangements occurred in the stem branch of Geraniaceae followed by independent rearrangements in each genus. The genomic comparison demonstrates that a series of inverted repeat boundary shifts and inversions played a major role in shaping genome organization in the family. The distribution of repeats is strongly associated with breakpoints in the rearranged genomes, and the proportion and the number of large repeats (>20 bp and >60 bp) are significantly correlated with the degree of genome rearrangements. Increases in the degree of plastid genome rearrangements are correlated with the acceleration in nonsynonymous substitution rates (dN) but not with synonymous substitution rates (dS). Possible mechanisms that might contribute to this correlation, including DNA repair system and selection, are discussed. PMID:24336877

  17. Catalysis of hydrolysis and nucleophilic substitution at the P-N bond of phosphoimidazolide-activated nucleotides in phosphate buffers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.; Rosenbach, M. T.

    1991-01-01

    Phosphoimidazolide-activated derivatives of guanosine and cytidine 5'-monophosphates, henceforth called ImpN's, exhibit enhanced rates of degradation in the presence of aqueous inorganic phosphate in the range 4.0 < or = pH < or = 8.6. This degradation is been attributed to (i) nucleophilic substitution of the imidazolide and (ii) catalysis of the P-N bond hydrolysis by phosphate. The first reaction results in the formation of nucleoside 5'-diphosphate and the second in nucleoside 5'-monophosphate. Analysis of the observed rates as well as the product ratios as a function of pH and phosphate concentration allow distinction between various mechanistic possibilities. The results show that both H2PO4- and HPO4(2-) participate in both hydrolysis and nucleophilic substitution. Statistically corrected biomolecular rate constants indicate that the dianion is 4 times more effective as a general base than the monoanion, and 8 times more effective as nucleophile. The low Bronsted value beta = 0.15 calculated for these phosphate species, presumed to act as general bases in facilitating water attack, is consistent with the fact that catalysis of the hydrolysis of the P-N bond in ImpN's has not been detected before. The beta nuc = 0.35 calculated for water, H2PO4-, HPO4(2-), and hydroxide acting as nucleophiles indicates a more associative transition state for nucleotidyl (O2POR- with R = nucleoside) transfers than that observed for phosphoryl (PO3(2-)) transfers (beta nuc = 0.25). With respect to the stability/reactivity of ImpN's under prebiotic conditions, our study shows that these materials would not suffer additional degradation due to inorganic phosphate, assuming the concentrations of phosphate, Pi, on prebiotic Earth were similar to those in the present oceans ([Pi] approximately 2.25 micromoles).

  18. A distinct pattern of disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms in IBD risk genes in a family with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Barthel, Christiane; Spalinger, Marianne R; Brunner, Jakob; Lang, Silvia; Fried, Michael; Rogler, Gerhard; Scharl, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Recent studies have identified more than 160 inflammatory bowel disease susceptibility loci and provided evidence for genetic heritability in disease pathogenesis. Here we describe a case of a 47-year-old White woman suffering from Crohn's disease (CD), who had four children, two with CD and two with a factor V Leiden variation. We analysed the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms in several CD susceptibility genes. SNP analysis was carried out using commercially available assays. The female CD patient had a positive inflammatory bowel disease family history. All of the patients had a mild disease course, without fistulae or symptomatic stenosis. The patient was heterozygous for risk variants of the genes encoding nucleotide oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2) and Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) and a homozygous carrier of both of the identified protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor type 2 (PTPN2) risk alleles. The CD-affected daughter carried heterozygous risk alleles of the genes encoding TLR5, NOD2 and PTPN2. The son, with the earliest onset of disease in the family at the age of 12 years, was heterozygous for risk alleles of autophagy 16 like 1 (ATG16L1), TLR5, NOD2 and PTPN2. This study reports an interesting pattern of CD-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms in a family with CD. This report clearly supports the observation that genetic variations, especially in genes associated with the innate immune system, contribute to disease onset. PMID:24901824

  19. Contrasting patterns of nucleotide diversity for four conifers of Alpine European forests

    PubMed Central

    Mosca, Elena; Eckert, Andrew J; Liechty, John D; Wegrzyn, Jill L; La Porta, Nicola; Vendramin, Giovanni G; Neale, David B

    2012-01-01

    A candidate gene approach was used to identify levels of nucleotide diversity and to identify genes departing from neutral expectations in coniferous species of the Alpine European forest. Twelve samples were collected from four species that dominate montane and subalpine forests throughout Europe: Abies alba Mill, Larix decidua Mill, Pinus cembra L., and Pinus mugo Turra. A total of 800 genes, originally resequenced in Pinus taeda L., were resequenced across 12 independent trees for each of the four species. Genes were assigned to two categories, candidate and control, defined through homology-based searches to Arabidopsis. Estimates of nucleotide diversity per site varied greatly between polymorphic candidate genes (range: 0.0004–0.1295) and among species (range: 0.0024–0.0082), but were within the previously established ranges for conifers. Tests of neutrality using stringent significance thresholds, performed under the standard neutral model, revealed one to seven outlier loci for each species. Some of these outliers encode proteins that are involved with plant stress responses and form the basis for further evolutionary enquiries. PMID:23144662

  20. Contrasting patterns of nucleotide diversity for four conifers of Alpine European forests.

    PubMed

    Mosca, Elena; Eckert, Andrew J; Liechty, John D; Wegrzyn, Jill L; La Porta, Nicola; Vendramin, Giovanni G; Neale, David B

    2012-11-01

    A candidate gene approach was used to identify levels of nucleotide diversity and to identify genes departing from neutral expectations in coniferous species of the Alpine European forest. Twelve samples were collected from four species that dominate montane and subalpine forests throughout Europe: Abies alba Mill, Larix decidua Mill, Pinus cembra L., and Pinus mugo Turra. A total of 800 genes, originally resequenced in Pinus taeda L., were resequenced across 12 independent trees for each of the four species. Genes were assigned to two categories, candidate and control, defined through homology-based searches to Arabidopsis. Estimates of nucleotide diversity per site varied greatly between polymorphic candidate genes (range: 0.0004-0.1295) and among species (range: 0.0024-0.0082), but were within the previously established ranges for conifers. Tests of neutrality using stringent significance thresholds, performed under the standard neutral model, revealed one to seven outlier loci for each species. Some of these outliers encode proteins that are involved with plant stress responses and form the basis for further evolutionary enquiries. PMID:23144662

  1. Post-transcriptional modification of the wobble nucleotide in anticodon-substituted yeast tRNAArgII after microinjection into Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, M; Haumont, E; de Henau, S; Gangloff, J; Grosjean, H

    1983-01-01

    An enzymatic procedure for the replacement of the ICG anticodon of yeast tRNAArgII by NCG trinucleotide (N = A, C, G or U) is described. Partial digestion with S1-nuclease and T1-RNAase provides fragments which, when annealed together, form an "anticodon-deprived" yeast tRNAArgII. A novel anticodon, phosphorylated with (32P) label on its 5' terminal residue, is then inserted using T4-RNA ligase. Such "anticodon-substituted" yeast tRNAArgII are microinjected into the cytoplasm of Xenopus laevis oocytes and shown to be able to interact with the anticodon maturation enzymes under in vivo conditions. Our results indicate that when adenosine occurs in the wobble position (A34) in yeast tRNAArgII it is efficiently modified into inosine (I34) while uridine (U34) is transformed into two uridine derivatives, one of which is probably mcm5U. In contrast, when a cytosine (C34) or guanosine (G34) occurs, they are not modified. These results are at variance with those obtained previously under similar conditions with anticodon derivatives of yeast tRNAAsp harbouring A, C, G or U as the first anticodon nucleotide. In this case, guanosine and uridine were modified while adenosine and cytosine were not. Images PMID:6300762

  2. Inferring Multiple Refugia and Phylogeographical Patterns in Pinus massoniana Based on Nucleotide Sequence Variation and DNA Fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chung-Jian; Huang, Chi-Chung; Huang, Chao-Ching; Chiang, Yu-Chung; Chiang, Tzen-Yuh

    2012-01-01

    Background Pinus massoniana, an ecologically and economically important conifer, is widespread across central and southern mainland China and Taiwan. In this study, we tested the central–marginal paradigm that predicts that the marginal populations tend to be less polymorphic than the central ones in their genetic composition, and examined a founders' effect in the island population. Methodology/Principal Findings We examined the phylogeography and population structuring of the P. massoniana based on nucleotide sequences of cpDNA atpB-rbcL intergenic spacer, intron regions of the AdhC2 locus, and microsatellite fingerprints. SAMOVA analysis of nucleotide sequences indicated that most genetic variants resided among geographical regions. High levels of genetic diversity in the marginal populations in the south region, a pattern seemingly contradicting the central–marginal paradigm, and the fixation of private haplotypes in most populations indicate that multiple refugia may have existed over the glacial maxima. STRUCTURE analyses on microsatellites revealed that genetic structure of mainland populations was mediated with recent genetic exchanges mostly via pollen flow, and that the genetic composition in east region was intermixed between south and west regions, a pattern likely shaped by gene introgression and maintenance of ancestral polymorphisms. As expected, the small island population in Taiwan was genetically differentiated from mainland populations. Conclusions/Significance The marginal populations in south region possessed divergent gene pools, suggesting that the past glaciations might have low impacts on these populations at low latitudes. Estimates of ancestral population sizes interestingly reflect a recent expansion in mainland from a rather smaller population, a pattern that seemingly agrees with the pollen record. PMID:22952747

  3. Introns Structure Patterns of Variation in Nucleotide Composition in Arabidopsis thaliana and Rice Protein-Coding Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ressayre, Adrienne; Glémin, Sylvain; Montalent, Pierre; Serre-Giardi, Laurana; Dillmann, Christine; Joets, Johann

    2015-01-01

    Plant genomes present a continuous range of variation in nucleotide composition (G + C content). In coding regions, G + C-poor species tend to have unimodal distributions of G + C content among genes within genomes and slight 5′–3′ gradients along genes. In contrast, G + C-rich species display bimodal distributions of G + C content among genes and steep 5′–3′ decreasing gradients along genes. The causes of these peculiar patterns are still poorly understood. Within two species (Arabidopsis thaliana and rice), each representative of one side of the continuum, we studied the consequences of intron presence on coding region and intron G + C content at different scales. By properly taking intron structure into account, we showed that, in both species, intron presence is associated with step changes in nucleotide, codon, and amino acid composition. This suggests that introns have a barrier effect structuring G + C content along genes and that previous continuous characterizations of the 5′–3′ gradients were artifactual. In external gene regions (located upstream first or downstream last introns), species-specific factors, such as GC-biased gene conversion, are shaping G + C content whereas in internal gene regions (surrounded by introns), G + C content is likely constrained to remain within a range common to both species. PMID:26450849

  4. Introns Structure Patterns of Variation in Nucleotide Composition in Arabidopsis thaliana and Rice Protein-Coding Genes.

    PubMed

    Ressayre, Adrienne; Glémin, Sylvain; Montalent, Pierre; Serre-Giardi, Laurana; Dillmann, Christine; Joets, Johann

    2015-10-01

    Plant genomes present a continuous range of variation in nucleotide composition (G + C content). In coding regions, G + C-poor species tend to have unimodal distributions of G + C content among genes within genomes and slight 5'-3' gradients along genes. In contrast, G + C-rich species display bimodal distributions of G + C content among genes and steep 5'-3' decreasing gradients along genes. The causes of these peculiar patterns are still poorly understood. Within two species (Arabidopsis thaliana and rice), each representative of one side of the continuum, we studied the consequences of intron presence on coding region and intron G + C content at different scales. By properly taking intron structure into account, we showed that, in both species, intron presence is associated with step changes in nucleotide, codon, and amino acid composition. This suggests that introns have a barrier effect structuring G + C content along genes and that previous continuous characterizations of the 5'-3' gradients were artifactual. In external gene regions (located upstream first or downstream last introns), species-specific factors, such as GC-biased gene conversion, are shaping G + C content whereas in internal gene regions (surrounded by introns), G + C content is likely constrained to remain within a range common to both species. PMID:26450849

  5. Patterns and Evolution of Nucleotide Landscapes in Seed Plants[W

    PubMed Central

    Serres-Giardi, Laurana; Belkhir, Khalid; David, Jacques; Glémin, Sylvain

    2012-01-01

    Nucleotide landscapes, which are the way base composition is distributed along a genome, strongly vary among species. The underlying causes of these variations have been much debated. Though mutational bias and selection were initially invoked, GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC), a recombination-associated process favoring the G and C over A and T bases, is increasingly recognized as a major factor. As opposed to vertebrates, evolution of GC content is less well known in plants. Most studies have focused on the GC-poor and homogeneous Arabidopsis thaliana genome and the much more GC-rich and heterogeneous rice (Oryza sativa) genome and have often been generalized as a dicot/monocot dichotomy. This vision is clearly phylogenetically biased and does not allow understanding the mechanisms involved in GC content evolution in plants. To tackle these issues, we used EST data from more than 200 species and provided the most comprehensive description of gene GC content across the seed plant phylogeny so far available. As opposed to the classically assumed dicot/monocot dichotomy, we found continuous variations in GC content from the probably ancestral GC-poor and homogeneous genomes to the more derived GC-rich and highly heterogeneous ones, with several independent enrichment episodes. Our results suggest that gBGC could play a significant role in the evolution of GC content in plant genomes. PMID:22492812

  6. Expression Pattern and Localization Dynamics of Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor RIC8 during Mouse Oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tõnissoo, Tambet; Meier, Riho; Kask, Keiu; Ruisu, Katrin; Karis, Alar; Salumets, Andres; Pooga, Margus

    2015-01-01

    Targeting of G proteins to the cell cortex and their activation is one of the triggers of both asymmetric and symmetric cell division. Resistance to inhibitors of cholinesterase 8 (RIC8), a guanine nucleotide exchange factor, activates a certain subgroup of G protein α-subunits in a receptor independent manner. RIC8 controls the asymmetric cell division in Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster, and symmetric cell division in cultured mammalian cells, where it regulates the mitotic spindle orientation. Although intensely studied in mitosis, the function of RIC8 in mammalian meiosis has remained unknown. Here we demonstrate that the expression and subcellular localization of RIC8 changes profoundly during mouse oogenesis. Immunofluorescence studies revealed that RIC8 expression is dependent on oocyte growth and cell cycle phase. During oocyte growth, RIC8 is abundantly present in cytoplasm of oocytes at primordial, primary and secondary preantral follicle stages. Later, upon oocyte maturation RIC8 also populates the germinal vesicle, its localization becomes cell cycle dependent, and it associates with chromatin and the meiotic spindle. After fertilization, RIC8 protein converges to the pronuclei and is also detectable at high levels in the nucleolus precursor bodies of both maternal and paternal pronucleus. During first cleavage of zygote RIC8 localizes in the mitotic spindle and cell cortex of forming blastomeres. In addition, we demonstrate that RIC8 co-localizes with its interaction partners Gαi1/2:GDP and LGN in meiotic/mitotic spindle, cell cortex and polar bodies of maturing oocytes and zygotes. Downregulation of Ric8 by siRNA leads to interferred translocation of Gαi1/2 to cortical region of maturing oocytes and reduction of its levels. RIC8 is also expressed at high level in female reproductive organs e.g. oviduct. Therefore we suggest a regulatory function for RIC8 in mammalian gametogenesis and fertility. PMID:26062014

  7. Assessing patterns of hybridization between North Atlantic eels using diagnostic single-nucleotide polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Pujolar, J M; Jacobsen, M W; Als, T D; Frydenberg, J; Magnussen, E; Jónsson, B; Jiang, X; Cheng, L; Bekkevold, D; Maes, G E; Bernatchez, L; Hansen, M M

    2014-06-01

    The two North Atlantic eel species, the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) and the American eel (Anguilla rostrata), spawn in partial sympatry in the Sargasso Sea, providing ample opportunity to interbreed. In this study, we used a RAD (Restriction site Associated DNA) sequencing approach to identify species-specific diagnostic single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and design a low-density array that combined with screening of a diagnostic mitochondrial DNA marker. Eels from Iceland (N=159) and from the neighboring Faroe Islands (N=29) were genotyped, along with 94 larvae (49 European and 45 American eel) collected in the Sargasso Sea. Our SNP survey showed that the majority of Icelandic eels are pure European eels but there is also an important contribution of individuals of admixed ancestry (10.7%). Although most of the hybrids were identified as F1 hybrids from European eel female × American eel male crosses, backcrosses were also detected, including a first-generation backcross (F1 hybrid × pure European eel) and three individuals identified as second-generation backcrosses originating from American eel × F1 hybrid backcrosses interbreeding with pure European eels. In comparison, no hybrids were observed in the Faroe Islands, the closest bodies of land to Iceland. It is possible that hybrids show an intermediate migratory behaviour between the two parental species that ultimately brings hybrid larvae to the shores of Iceland, situated roughly halfway between the Sargasso Sea and Europe. Only two hybrids were observed among Sargasso Sea larvae, both backcrosses, but no F1 hybrids, that points to temporal variation in the occurrence of hybridization. PMID:24424165

  8. Assessing patterns of hybridization between North Atlantic eels using diagnostic single-nucleotide polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Pujolar, J M; Jacobsen, M W; Als, T D; Frydenberg, J; Magnussen, E; Jónsson, B; Jiang, X; Cheng, L; Bekkevold, D; Maes, G E; Bernatchez, L; Hansen, M M

    2014-01-01

    The two North Atlantic eel species, the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) and the American eel (Anguilla rostrata), spawn in partial sympatry in the Sargasso Sea, providing ample opportunity to interbreed. In this study, we used a RAD (Restriction site Associated DNA) sequencing approach to identify species-specific diagnostic single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and design a low-density array that combined with screening of a diagnostic mitochondrial DNA marker. Eels from Iceland (N=159) and from the neighboring Faroe Islands (N=29) were genotyped, along with 94 larvae (49 European and 45 American eel) collected in the Sargasso Sea. Our SNP survey showed that the majority of Icelandic eels are pure European eels but there is also an important contribution of individuals of admixed ancestry (10.7%). Although most of the hybrids were identified as F1 hybrids from European eel female × American eel male crosses, backcrosses were also detected, including a first-generation backcross (F1 hybrid × pure European eel) and three individuals identified as second-generation backcrosses originating from American eel × F1 hybrid backcrosses interbreeding with pure European eels. In comparison, no hybrids were observed in the Faroe Islands, the closest bodies of land to Iceland. It is possible that hybrids show an intermediate migratory behaviour between the two parental species that ultimately brings hybrid larvae to the shores of Iceland, situated roughly halfway between the Sargasso Sea and Europe. Only two hybrids were observed among Sargasso Sea larvae, both backcrosses, but no F1 hybrids, that points to temporal variation in the occurrence of hybridization. PMID:24424165

  9. Divergent synthetic nucleotide motif recognition pattern: design and development of potent immunomodulatory oligodeoxyribonucleotide agents with distinct cytokine induction profiles.

    PubMed

    Kandimalla, Ekambar R; Bhagat, Lakshmi; Wang, Daqing; Yu, Dong; Zhu, Fu-Gang; Tang, Jimmy; Wang, Hui; Huang, Ping; Zhang, Ruiwen; Agrawal, Sudhir

    2003-05-01

    Unmethylated CpG dinucleotides present within certain specific sequence contexts in bacterial and synthetic DNA stimulate innate immune responses and induce cytokine secretion. Recently, we showed that CpG DNAs containing two 5'-ends, immunomers, are more potent in both regards. In this study, we show that an immunomer containing a synthetic CpR motif (R = 2'-deoxy-7-deazaguanosine) is a potent immunostimulatory agent. However, the profile of cytokine induction is different from that with immunomers containing a natural CpG motif. In general, a CpR immunomer induced higher interleukin (IL)-12 and lower IL-6 secretion. Compared with conventional CpG DNAs, both types of immunomers showed a rapid and enhanced activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB in J774 cells. NF-kappaB activation by CpG DNA corresponded to degradation of IkappaBalpha in J774 cells. All three immunostimulatory oligonucleotides activated the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway as expected. Immunomers containing CpG and CpR motifs showed potent reversal of the antigen-induced Th2 immune response towards a Th1 type in antigen-sensitized mouse spleen cell cultures. Immunomers containing a CpR motif showed significant antitumor activity in nude mice bearing MCF-7 human breast cancer and U87MG glioblastoma xenografts. These studies suggest the ability for a divergent synthetic nucleotide motif recognition pattern of the receptor involved in the immunostimulatory pathway and the possibility of using synthetic nucleotides to elicit different cytokine response patterns. PMID:12711684

  10. Lys98 Substitution in Human AP Endonuclease 1 Affects the Kinetic Mechanism of Enzyme Action in Base Excision and Nucleotide Incision Repair Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Timofeyeva, Nadezhda A.; Koval, Vladimir V.; Ishchenko, Alexander A.; Saparbaev, Murat K.; Fedorova, Olga S.

    2011-01-01

    Human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) is a key enzyme in the base excision repair (BER) and nucleotide incision repair (NIR) pathways. We recently analyzed the conformational dynamics and kinetic mechanism of wild-type (wt) protein, in a stopped-flow fluorescence study. In this study, we investigated the mutant enzyme APE1K98A using the same approach. Lys98 was known to hydrogen bond to the carboxyl group of Asp70, a residue implicated in binding the divalent metal ion. Our data suggested that the conformational selection and induced fit occur during the enzyme action. We expanded upon the evidence that APE1 can pre-exist in two conformations. The isomerization of an enzyme-product complex in the BER process and the additional isomerization stage of enzyme-substrate complex in the NIR process were established for APE1K98A. These stages had not been registered for the wtAPE1. We found that the K98A substitution resulted in a 12-fold reduction of catalytic constant of 5′-phosphodiester bond hydrolysis in (3-hydroxytetrahydrofuran-2-yl)methyl phosphate (F, tetrahydrofuran) containing substrate, and in 200-fold reduction in 5,6-dihydrouridine (DHU) containing substrate. Thus, the K98A substitution influenced NIR more than BER. We demonstrated that the K98A mutation influenced the formation of primary unspecific enzyme-substrate complex in a complicated manner, depending on the Mg2+ concentration and pH. This mutation obstructed the induced fit of enzyme in the complex with undamaged DNA and F-containing DNA and appreciably decreased the stability of primary complex upon interaction of enzyme with DNA, containing the natural apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site. Furthermore, it significantly delayed the activation of the less active form of enzyme during NIR and slowed down the conformational conversion of the complex of enzyme with the cleavage product of DHU-substrate. Our data revealed that APE1 uses the same active site to catalyze the cleavage of DHU- and

  11. Geographical patterning of sixteen goat breeds from Italy, Albania and Greece assessed by Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Pariset, Lorraine; Cuteri, Antonella; Ligda, Christina; Ajmone-Marsan, Paolo; Valentini, Alessio

    2009-01-01

    Background SNP data of goats of three Mediterranean countries were used for population studies and reconstruction of geographical patterning. 496 individuals belonging to Italian, Albanian and Greek breeds were genotyped to assess the basic population parameters. Results A total of 26 SNPs were used, for a total of 12,896 genotypes assayed. Statistical analysis revealed that breeds are not so similar in terms of genetic variability, as reported in studies performed using different markers. The Mantel test showed a strongly significant correlation between genetic and geographic distance. Also, PCA analysis revealed that breeds are grouped according to geographical origin, with the exception of the Greek Skopelos breed. Conclusion Our data point out that the use of SNP markers to analyze a wider breed sample could help in understanding the recent evolutionary history of domestic goats. We found correlation between genetic diversity and geographic distance. Also PCA analysis shows that the breeds are well differentiated, with good correspondence to geographical locations, thus confirming the correlation between geographical and genetic distances. This suggests that migration history of the species played a pivotal role in the present-day structure of the breeds and a scenario in which coastal routes were easier for migrating in comparison with inland routes. A westward coastal route to Italy through Greece could have led to gene flow along the Northern Mediterranean. PMID:19725964

  12. The Effect of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism Marker Selection on Patterns of Haplotype Blocks and Haplotype Frequency Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Nothnagel, Michael; Rohde, Klaus

    2005-01-01

    The definition of haplotype blocks of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) has been proposed so that the haplotypes can be used as markers in association studies and to efficiently describe human genetic variation. The International Haplotype Map (HapMap) project to construct a comprehensive catalog of haplotypic variation in humans is underway. However, a number of factors have already been shown to influence the definition of blocks, including the population studied and the sample SNP density. Here, we examine the effect that marker selection has on the definition of blocks and the pattern of haplotypes by using comparable but complementary SNP sets and a number of block definition methods in various genomic regions and populations that were provided by the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project. We find that the chosen SNP set has a profound effect on the block-covered sequence and block borders, even at high marker densities. Our results question the very concept of discrete haplotype blocks and the possibility of generalizing block findings from the HapMap project. We comparatively apply the block-free tagging-SNP approach and discuss both the haplotype approach and the tagging-SNP approach as means to efficiently catalog genetic variation. PMID:16380910

  13. Analyzing generic and branded substitution patterns in the Netherlands using prescription data

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background As in other societies, pharmaceutical expenditures in the Netherlands are rising every year. As a consequence, needs for cost control are often expressed. One possible solution for cost control could come through increasing generic substitution by pharmacists. We aim to analyse the extent and nature of substitution in recent years and estimate the likelihood of generic or branded substitution in Dutch pharmacies in relation to various characteristics. Methods We utilized a linked prescription dataset originating from a general practitioner (GP) and a pharmacy database, both from the northern Netherlands. We selected specific drugs of interest, containing about 55,000 prescriptions from 15 different classes. We used a crossed generalized linear mixed model to estimate the effects that certain patient and pharmacy characteristics as well as timing have on the likelihood that a prescription will eventually be substituted by the pharmacist. Results Generic substitution occurred at 25% of the branded prescriptions. Generic substitution was more likely to occur earlier in time after patent expiry and to patients that were older and more experienced in their drug use. Individually owned pharmacies had a lower probability of generic substitution compared to chain pharmacies. Oppositely, branded substitution occurred in 10% of generic prescriptions and was positively related to the patients' experience in branded use. Individually owned pharmacies were more likely to substitute a generic drug to a branded compared to other pharmacies. Antidepressant and PPI prescriptions were less prone to generic and more prone to branded substitution. Conclusion Analysis of prescription substitution by the pharmacist revealed strong relations between substitution and patient experience on drug use, pharmacy status and timing. These findings can be utilised to design further strategies to enhance generic substitution. PMID:21524312

  14. Highly fluorinated 2,2'-biphenols and related compounds: relationship between substitution pattern and herbicidal activity.

    PubMed

    Francke, Robert; Reingruber, Rüdiger; Schollmeyer, Dieter; Waldvogel, Siegfried R

    2013-05-22

    A broad range of halogenated 2,2'-biphenols was tested for applicability as crop protection agents. The activity of these compounds toward four typical pest plants was observed after application by spraying of diluted solutions. Despite their rather simple structure, it was found that the studied compounds reveal a surprisingly high herbicidal impact. To gain a better understanding of the structure-activity relationship, specific sites of the molecule were chemically modified and the core structures thus gradually changed. The influence of the substitution pattern on the herbicidal properties is discussed, and conclusions on the active site of the biphenol structure are drawn. It was observed that type and position of the halogen substituents have a significant influence on the activity of the core structure. The hydroxy functionalities play a crucial role for the effectiveness of the tested compounds. Because the blocking of the hydroxy moiety leads to dramatically deteriorated performances, the presence of these functionalities on the aromatic ring seems to be indispensable. PMID:23641939

  15. Tuning the Biological Activity Profile of Antibacterial Polymers via Subunit Substitution Pattern

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Binary nylon-3 copolymers containing cationic and hydrophobic subunits can mimic the biological properties of host-defense peptides, but relationships between composition and activity are not yet well understood for these materials. Hydrophobic subunits in previously studied examples have been limited mostly to cycloalkane-derived structures, with cyclohexyl proving to be particularly promising. The present study evaluates alternative hydrophobic subunits that are isomeric or nearly isomeric with the cyclohexyl example; each has four sp3 carbons in the side chains. The results show that varying the substitution pattern of the hydrophobic subunit leads to relatively small changes in antibacterial activity but causes significant changes in hemolytic activity. We hypothesize that these differences in biological activity profile arise, at least in part, from variations among the conformational propensities of the hydrophobic subunits. The α,α,β,β-tetramethyl unit is optimal among the subunits we have examined, providing copolymers with potent antibacterial activity and excellent prokaryote vs eukaryote selectivity. Bacteria do not readily develop resistance to the new antibacterial nylon-3 copolymers. These findings suggest that variation in subunit conformational properties could be generally valuable in the development of synthetic polymers for biological applications. PMID:24601599

  16. Evolution of Xylan Substitution Patterns in Gymnosperms and Angiosperms: Implications for Xylan Interaction with Cellulose1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Li, An; Gomes, Thiago C.F.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between cellulose and xylan is important for the load-bearing secondary cell wall of flowering plants. Based on the precise, evenly spaced pattern of acetyl and glucuronosyl (MeGlcA) xylan substitutions in eudicots, we recently proposed that an unsubstituted face of xylan in a 2-fold helical screw can hydrogen bond to the hydrophilic surfaces of cellulose microfibrils. In gymnosperm cell walls, any role for xylan is unclear, and glucomannan is thought to be the important cellulose-binding polysaccharide. Here, we analyzed xylan from the secondary cell walls of the four gymnosperm lineages (Conifer, Gingko, Cycad, and Gnetophyta). Conifer, Gingko, and Cycad xylan lacks acetylation but is modified by arabinose and MeGlcA. Interestingly, the arabinosyl substitutions are located two xylosyl residues from MeGlcA, which is itself placed precisely on every sixth xylosyl residue. Notably, the Gnetophyta xylan is more akin to early-branching angiosperms and eudicot xylan, lacking arabinose but possessing acetylation on alternate xylosyl residues. All these precise substitution patterns are compatible with gymnosperm xylan binding to hydrophilic surfaces of cellulose. Molecular dynamics simulations support the stable binding of 2-fold screw conifer xylan to the hydrophilic face of cellulose microfibrils. Moreover, the binding of multiple xylan chains to adjacent planes of the cellulose fibril stabilizes the interaction further. Our results show that the type of xylan substitution varies, but an even pattern of xylan substitution is maintained among vascular plants. This suggests that 2-fold screw xylan binds hydrophilic faces of cellulose in eudicots, early-branching angiosperm, and gymnosperm cell walls. PMID:27325663

  17. Selectivity in the Addition Reactions of Organometallic Reagents to Aziridine-2-carboxaldehydes: The Effects of Protecting Groups and Substitution Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Kulshrestha, Aman; Schomaker, Jennifer M.; Holmes, Daniel; Staples, Richard J.; Jackson, James E.; Borhan, Babak

    2014-01-01

    Good to excellent stereo-selectivity has been found in the addition reactions of Grignard and organo-zinc reagents to N-protected aziridine-2-carboxaldehydes. Specifically, high syn selectivity was obtained with benzyl-protected cis, tert-butyloxycar-bonyl-protected trans, and tosyl-pro-tected 2,3-disubstituted aziridine-2-car-boxaldehydes. Furthermore, rate and selectivity effects of ring substituents, temperature, solvent, and Lewis acid and base modifiers were studied. The diastereomeric preference of addition is dominated by the substrate aziri-dines’ substitution pattern and especially the electronic character and conformational preferences of the nitrogen protecting groups. To help rationalize the observed stereochemical outcomes, conformational and electronic structural analyses of a series of model systems representing the various substitution patterns have been explored by density functional calculations at the B3LYP/6–31G* level of theory with the SM8 solvation model to account for solvent effects. PMID:21928447

  18. The unique Raman fingerprint of boron nitride substitution patterns in graphene.

    PubMed

    Maschio, Lorenzo; Lorenz, Marco; Pullini, Daniele; Sgroi, Mauro; Civalleri, Bartolomeo

    2016-07-27

    Boron nitride-substituted graphene (BNsG) two-dimensional structures are new materials of wide technological interest due to the rich variety of electronic structures and properties they can exploit. The ability to accurately characterize them is key to their future success. Here we show, by means of ab initio simulations, that the vibrational Raman spectra of such compounds are extremely sensitive to substitution motifs and concentration, and that each structure has unique and distinct features. This result can be useful as a guide for the optimization of production processes. PMID:27406407

  19. Aberrant 5′ splice sites in human disease genes: mutation pattern, nucleotide structure and comparison of computational tools that predict their utilization

    PubMed Central

    Buratti, Emanuele; Chivers, Martin; Královičová, Jana; Romano, Maurizio; Baralle, Marco; Krainer, Adrian R.; Vořechovský, Igor

    2007-01-01

    Despite a growing number of splicing mutations found in hereditary diseases, utilization of aberrant splice sites and their effects on gene expression remain challenging to predict. We compiled sequences of 346 aberrant 5′splice sites (5′ss) that were activated by mutations in 166 human disease genes. Mutations within the 5′ss consensus accounted for 254 cryptic 5′ss and mutations elsewhere activated 92 de novo 5′ss. Point mutations leading to cryptic 5′ss activation were most common in the first intron nucleotide, followed by the fifth nucleotide. Substitutions at position +5 were exclusively G>A transitions, which was largely attributable to high mutability rates of C/G>T/A. However, the frequency of point mutations at position +5 was significantly higher than that observed in the Human Gene Mutation Database, suggesting that alterations of this position are particularly prone to aberrant splicing, possibly due to a requirement for sequential interactions with U1 and U6 snRNAs. Cryptic 5′ss were best predicted by computational algorithms that accommodate nucleotide dependencies and not by weight-matrix models. Discrimination of intronic 5′ss from their authentic counterparts was less effective than for exonic sites, as the former were intrinsically stronger than the latter. Computational prediction of exonic de novo 5′ss was poor, suggesting that their activation critically depends on exonic splicing enhancers or silencers. The authentic counterparts of aberrant 5′ss were significantly weaker than the average human 5′ss. The development of an online database of aberrant 5′ss will be useful for studying basic mechanisms of splice-site selection, identifying splicing mutations and optimizing splice-site prediction algorithms. PMID:17576681

  20. Decreased Nucleotide and Expression Diversity and Modified Coexpression Patterns Characterize Domestication in the Common Bean[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Bellucci, Elisa; Bitocchi, Elena; Ferrarini, Alberto; Benazzo, Andrea; Biagetti, Eleonora; Klie, Sebastian; Minio, Andrea; Rau, Domenico; Rodriguez, Monica; Panziera, Alex; Venturini, Luca; Attene, Giovanna; Albertini, Emidio; Jackson, Scott A.; Nanni, Laura; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Nikoloski, Zoran; Bertorelle, Giorgio; Delledonne, Massimo; Papa, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Using RNA sequencing technology and de novo transcriptome assembly, we compared representative sets of wild and domesticated accessions of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) from Mesoamerica. RNA was extracted at the first true-leaf stage, and de novo assembly was used to develop a reference transcriptome; the final data set consists of ∼190,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms from 27,243 contigs in expressed genomic regions. A drastic reduction in nucleotide diversity (∼60%) is evident for the domesticated form, compared with the wild form, and almost 50% of the contigs that are polymorphic were brought to fixation by domestication. In parallel, the effects of domestication decreased the diversity of gene expression (18%). While the coexpression networks for the wild and domesticated accessions demonstrate similar seminal network properties, they show distinct community structures that are enriched for different molecular functions. After simulating the demographic dynamics during domestication, we found that 9% of the genes were actively selected during domestication. We also show that selection induced a further reduction in the diversity of gene expression (26%) and was associated with 5-fold enrichment of differentially expressed genes. While there is substantial evidence of positive selection associated with domestication, in a few cases, this selection has increased the nucleotide diversity in the domesticated pool at target loci associated with abiotic stress responses, flowering time, and morphology. PMID:24850850

  1. Profiling the substitution pattern of xyloglucan derivatives by integrated enzymatic hydrolysis, hydrophilic-interaction liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Kisonen, Victor; Willför, Stefan; Xu, Chunlin; Vilaplana, Francisco

    2016-09-01

    Plant polysaccharides constitute arguably the most complex family of biomacromolecules in terms of the stereochemistry and regiochemistry of their intramolecular linkages. The chemical modification of such polysaccharides introduces an additional level of complexity for structural determinations. We have developed an integrated analytical procedure combining selective enzymatic hydrolysis, hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC), and mass spectrometry (MS) to describe the substitution pattern of xyloglucan (XyG) and its chemo-enzymatic derivatives (cationic, anionic, and benzyl aminated). Enzymatic hydrolysis of XyG derivatives by a xyloglucan-specific endoglucanase (XEG) generates oligosaccharides amenable for mass spectrometric identification with distinct structures, based on enzymatic substrate recognition and hydrolytic pattern. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF-MS) and electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) offer qualitative mass profiling of the chemical derivatives. Separation and identification of the complex oligosaccharide profiles released by enzymatic hydrolysis is achieved by hyphenation of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry (HILIC-ESI-MS). Further fragmentation by tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) in positive mode enables the structural sequencing of modified XyG oligosaccharides and the identification of the substituent position without further derivatisation. This integrated approach can be used to obtain semi-quantitative information of the substitution pattern of hemicellulose derivatives, with fundamental implications for their modification mechanisms and performance. PMID:27524300

  2. High frequency of a single nucleotide substitution (c.-6-180T>G) of the canine MDR1/ABCB1 gene associated with phenobarbital-resistant idiopathic epilepsy in Border Collie dogs.

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Keijiro; Yabuki, Akira; Chang, Hye-Sook; Uddin, Mohammad Mejbah; Rahman, Mohammad Mahbubur; Kushida, Kazuya; Kohyama, Moeko; Yamato, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    A single nucleotide substitution (c.-6-180T>G) associated with resistance to phenobarbital therapy has been found in the canine MDR1/ABCB1 gene in Border Collies with idiopathic epilepsy. In the present study, a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay was developed for genotyping this mutation, and a genotyping survey was carried out in a population of 472 Border Collies in Japan to determine the current allele frequency. The survey demonstrated the frequencies of the T/T wild type, T/G heterozygote, and G/G mutant homozygote to be 60.0%, 30.3%, and 9.8%, respectively, indicating that the frequency of the mutant G allele is extremely high (24.9%) in Border Collies. The results suggest that this high mutation frequency of the mutation is likely to cause a high prevalence of phenobarbital-resistant epilepsy in Border Collies. PMID:24302812

  3. Patterns of nucleotide diversity and phenotypes of two domestication related genes (OsC1 and Wx) in indigenous rice varieties in Northeast India

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background During the domestication of crops, individual plants with traits desirable for human needs have been selected from their wild progenitors. Consequently, genetic and nucleotide diversity of genes associated with these selected traits in crop plants are expected to be lower than their wild progenitors. In the present study, we surveyed the pattern of nucleotide diversity of two selected trait specific genes, Wx and OsC1, which regulate amylose content and apiculus coloration respectively in cultivated rice varieties. The analyzed samples were collected from a wide geographic area in Northeast (NE) India, and included contrasting phenotypes considered to be associated with selected genes, namely glutinous and nonglutinous grains and colored and colorless apiculus. Results No statistically significant selection signatures were detected in both Wx and OsC1gene sequences. However, low level of selection that varied across the length of each gene was evident. The glutinous type varieties showed higher levels of nucleotide diversity at the Wx locus (πtot = 0.0053) than nonglutinous type varieties (πtot = 0.0043). The OsC1 gene revealed low levels of selection among the colorless apiculus varieties with lower nucleotide diversity (πtot = 0.0010) than in the colored apiculus varieties (πtot = 0.0023). Conclusions The results revealed that functional mutations at Wx and OsC1genes considered to be associated with specific phenotypes do not necessarily correspond to the phenotypes in indigenous rice varieties in NE India. This suggests that other than previously reported genomic regions may also be involved in determination of these phenotypes. PMID:24935343

  4. Drug Susceptibility and Viral Fitness of HIV-1 with Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitor Resistance Substitution Q148R or N155H in Combination with Nucleoside/Nucleotide Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor Resistance Substitutions

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Michael D.; White, Kirsten L.

    2015-01-01

    In clinical trials of coformulated elvitegravir (EVG), cobicistat (COBI), emtricitabine (FTC), and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF), emergent drug resistance predominantly involved the FTC resistance substitution M184V/I in reverse transcriptase (RT), with or without the tenofovir (TFV) resistance substitution K65R, accompanied by a primary EVG resistance substitution (E92Q, N155H, or Q148R) in integrase (IN). We previously reported that the RT-K65R, RT-M184V, and IN-E92Q substitutions lacked cross-class phenotypic resistance and replicative fitness compensation. As a follow-up, the in vitro characteristics of mutant HIV-1 containing RT-K65R and/or RT-M184V with IN-Q148R or IN-N155H were also evaluated, alone and in combination, for potential interactions. Single mutants displayed reduced susceptibility to their corresponding inhibitor classes, with no cross-class resistance. Viruses with IN-Q148R or IN-N155H exhibited reduced susceptibility to EVG (137- and 40-fold, respectively) that was not affected by the addition of RT-M184V or RT-K65R/M184V. All viruses containing RT-M184V were resistant to FTC (>1,000-fold). Mutants with RT-K65R had reduced susceptibility to TFV (3.3- to 3.6-fold). Without drugs present, the viral fitness of RT and/or IN mutants was diminished relative to that of the wild type in the following genotypic order: wild type > RT-M184V ≥ IN-N155H ≈ IN-Q148R ≥ RT-M184V + IN-N155H ≥ RT-M184V + IN-Q148R ≥ RT-K65R/M184V + IN-Q148R ≈ RT-K65R/M184V + IN-N155H. In the presence of drug concentrations approaching physiologic levels, drug resistance counteracted replication defects, allowing single mutants to outcompete the wild type with one drug present and double mutants to outcompete single mutants with two drugs present. These results suggest that during antiretroviral treatment with multiple drugs, the development of viruses with combinations of resistance substitutions may be favored despite diminished viral fitness. PMID:26574015

  5. Dependence of Mass Spectrometric Fragmentation on the Bromine Substitution Pattern of Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hua; Zhang, Siyu; Wang, Yawei; Wang, Ying; Li, An; Negrusz, Adam; Yu, Gang

    2014-06-01

    This study investigates the link between the bromine substitution and the mass spectrometric fragmentation of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). The mass spectra of 180 PBDEs were obtained in both electron impact (EI) and electron capture negative ionization (ECNI) modes using a single quadrupole mass spectrometer (MS) as well as EI using a tandem MS (MS/MS). The major ions are M+, [M-2Br]+, [M-2Br]2+ and [M-nBr-28]+ in EI, and Br-, [HBr2]- and [C6BrnO]- in ECNI. In EI-MS, congeners without ortho bromine or having 2,3 substitution on one ring and no ortho bromines on the other were more robust than the others in each homolog. These congeners generated low [M-2Br]+ but relatively high [M-2Br]2+ in EI-MS and negligible [HBr2]- in ECNI-MS. In EI-MS/MS, the molecular ions of these congeners required higher collision energy to debrominate, and produced additional ions of [M-nBr]+ and [M-nBr-28]+. Full ortho substitution promotes C-O cleavage forming [C6BrnO]- in ECNI for congeners with >5 bromines. The relationship between the abundance of M+ and collision energy of the EI-MS/MS was well characterized with a logistic regression model. Principle component analysis found associations between the inflection point collision energy and a few molecular descriptors. Quantum chemistry simulations revealed different EI-induced fragmentation mechanisms among four dibrominated congeners, supporting the hypothesized formation of a stable dibenzofuran-like intermediate during the fragmentation of some congeners but not of others.

  6. Dependence of mass spectrometric fragmentation on the bromine substitution pattern of polybrominated diphenyl ethers.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hua; Zhang, Siyu; Wang, Yawei; Wang, Ying; Li, An; Negrusz, Adam; Yu, Gang

    2014-06-01

    This study investigates the link between the bromine substitution and the mass spectrometric fragmentation of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). The mass spectra of 180 PBDEs were obtained in both electron impact (EI) and electron capture negative ionization (ECNI) modes using a single quadrupole mass spectrometer (MS) as well as EI using a tandem MS (MS/MS). The major ions are M(+), [M-2Br](+), [M-2Br](2+) and [M-nBr-28](+) in EI, and Br(-), [HBr2](-) and [C6BrnO](-) in ECNI. In EI-MS, congeners without ortho bromine or having 2,3 substitution on one ring and no ortho bromines on the other were more robust than the others in each homolog. These congeners generated low [M-2Br](+) but relatively high [M-2Br](2+) in EI-MS and negligible [HBr2](-) in ECNI-MS. In EI-MS/MS, the molecular ions of these congeners required higher collision energy to debrominate, and produced additional ions of [M-nBr](+) and [M-nBr-28](+). Full ortho substitution promotes C-O cleavage forming [C6BrnO](-) in ECNI for congeners with >5 bromines. The relationship between the abundance of M(+) and collision energy of the EI-MS/MS was well characterized with a logistic regression model. Principle component analysis found associations between the inflection point collision energy and a few molecular descriptors. Quantum chemistry simulations revealed different EI-induced fragmentation mechanisms among four dibrominated congeners, supporting the hypothesized formation of a stable dibenzofuran-like intermediate during the fragmentation of some congeners but not of others. PMID:24692043

  7. Probing the Protein–Nanoparticle Interface: The Role of Aromatic Substitution Pattern on Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Ekmekci, Zeynep; Saha, Krishnendu; Moyano, Daniel F.; Tonga, Gulen Yesilbag; Wang, Hao; Mout, Rubul; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2016-01-01

    A new class of cationic gold nanoparticles has been synthesized bearing benzyl moieties featuring -NO2 and -OMe groups to investigate the regioisomeric control of aromatic nanoparticle-protein recognition. In general, nanoparticles bearing electron withdrawing group demonstrated higher binding affinities towards green fluorescent protein (GFP) compared to electron-donating groups. Significantly, a ~7.5 and ~4.3 fold increase in binding with GFP was observed for –NO2 groups in meta- and para-position respectively, while ortho-substitution showed similar binding compared to the unsubstituted ring. These findings demonstrated that nanoparticle-protein interaction can be controlled by the tuning the spatial orientation and the relative electronic properties of the aromatic substituents. This improved biomolecular recognition provides opportunities for enhanced biosensing and functional protein delivery to the cells. PMID:27122961

  8. Calibration of a molecular clock in tits (Paridae)--do nucleotide substitution rates of mitochondrial genes deviate from the 2% rule?

    PubMed

    Päckert, Martin; Martens, Jochen; Tietze, Dieter Thomas; Dietzen, Christian; Wink, Michael; Kvist, Laura

    2007-07-01

    The ongoing debate on the reliability of avian molecular clocks is actually based on only a small number of calibrations carried out under different assumptions with respect to the choice and constraints of calibration points or to the use of substitution models. In this study, we provide substitution rate estimates for two mitochondrial genes, cytochrome b and the control region, and age estimates for lineage splits within four subgenera of tits (Paridae: Parus, Cyanistes, Poecile and Periparus). Overall sequence divergence between cytochrome b lineages covers a range of 0.4-1.8% per million years and is thus consistent with the frequently adopted approximation for a sequence divergence between avian lineages of 1.6-2% per my. Overall rate variation is high and encompasses the 2% value in a 95% CI for model corrected data. Mean rate estimates for cytochrome b range between 1.9 and 8.9 x 10(-3) substitutions per site per lineage. Local rates differ significantly between taxonomic levels with lowest estimates for haplotype lineages. At the population/subspecies level mean sequence divergence between lineages matches the 2% rule best for most cytochrome b datasets (1.5-1.9% per my) with maximum estimates for small isolated populations like those of the Canarian P. teneriffae complex (up to 3.9% per my). Overall rate estimates for the control region range at similar values like those for cytochrome b (2.7-8.8 x 10(-3), 0.5-1.8% per my), however, within some subgenera mean rates are higher than those for cytochrome b for uncorrected sequence data. The lowest rates for both genes were calculated for coal tits of subgenus Periparus (0.04-0.6% per my). Model-corrected sequence data tend to result in higher rate estimates than uncorrected data. Increase of the gamma shape parameter goes along with a significant decrease of rate and partly age estimates, too. Divergence times for earliest deep splits within tit subgenera Periparus and Parus were dated to the mid Miocene at

  9. Singly Bonded Monoadduct rather than Methanofullerene: Manipulating the Addition Pattern of Trimetallic Nitride Clusterfullerene through One Endohedral Metal Atom Substitution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Song; Huang, Jing; Gao, Congli; Jin, Fei; Li, Qunxiang; Xie, Suyuan; Yang, Shangfeng

    2016-06-01

    Bingel-Hirsch reactions of trimetallic nitride clusterfullerenes (NCFs) generally yield methanofullerene (cyclopropane) adducts instead of singly bonded derivatives, which have been reported for monometallofullerenes. Herein, we report the synthesis and characterization of the Bingel-Hirsch derivative of a mixed metal nitride clusterfullerene (MMNCF) TiY2 N@Ih -C80 . Surprisingly, in contrast to the reported Bingel-Hirsch cyclopropane adducts of the analogous NCF Y3 N@Ih -C80 , the Bingel-Hirsch derivative of TiY2 N@Ih -C80 is the first singly bonded monoadduct (labeled as TiY2 N@C80 -Mono) to be reported, which was determined unambiguously by single-crystal X-ray crystallography. Besides, the reactivity of TiY2 N@Ih -C80 was found to be significantly improved relative to that of Y3 N@Ih -C80 . Upon substituting one endohedral yttrium (Y) atom of Y3 N@Ih -C80 with titanium (Ti), the Bingel-Hirsch derivative changes from the cyclopropane to the singly bonded monoadduct, revealing that not only the reactivity but also the addition pattern of NCFs can be manipulated simultaneously through one endohedral metal atom substitution. PMID:27115985

  10. Binding Stoichiometry of a Recombinant Selenophosphate Synthetase with One Synonymic Substitution E197D to a Fluorescent Nucleotide Analog of ATP, TNP-ATP.

    PubMed

    Preobrazhenskaya, Y V; Stenko, A I; Shvarts, M V; Lugovtsev, V Y

    2013-01-01

    The transformation of the strain DH5α (TM)-T1(R) with plasmid vector pET11a containing the cloned gene of bacterial selenophosphate synthetase (SPS), selD, from the E. coli BL21-Gold (DE3) strain gives an overproducing strain of SPS with one synonymic substitution, E197D. The transformation efficiency was estimated as 8 × 10(8) CFU/ μ g plasmid DNA. 28 mg of highly purified preparation of recombinant SPS capable of binding TNP-ATP was eluted from DEAE-Sephadex column in amount of 15 % from the total soluble protein in crude extract. The fluorescent derivative of ATP, 2'(3')-O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)adenosine-5'-triphosphate (TNP-ATP), was used as a synthetic analog of the substrate for the monitoring and quantitative analysis of the functional activity of SPS. The non-linear regression analysis of the saturation curve of TNP-ATP binding to D197 SPS with GraphPad Prism software fits to a model with 2 distinct binding sites with KDs different in order. The SPS existence in a form of tetramer in given reaction conditions, in accordance with the concentration stoichiometry of 4 moles of TNP-ATP to 1 mole of recombinant protein, is being discussed. The tetramer structure was predicted with molecular modelling software YASARA and modelled in vacuum using steepest descent minimization energy method. We hypothesize here the recombinant SPS exists as a dimer in solution with two active sites capable of ATP binding in each subunit. PMID:24719756

  11. Understanding and solving disorder in the substitution pattern of amino functionalized MIL-47(V).

    PubMed

    Heinen, Jurn; Dubbeldam, David

    2016-03-14

    Electronic energies and elastic constants of four amino functionalized MIL-47(V) supercells were computed using plane wave density functional theory to determine the influence of the substituent positions on the organic linker. An inverse relationship between the ab initio energies and the elastic constants was found, indicating that the high electronic stability correlates with high mechanical stability. Torsion in all supercells was induced upon substitution, which caused strain in the NH2-MIL-47(V) supercell. The combined effect of the substituent bulkiness and the induced torsion reduced the pore volume of the NH2-MIL-47(V) structures by >7% and the surface area by >14% with respect to MIL-47(V). This reduction was confirmed by lower saturation capacities of methane, CO2 and benzene. When unfavourable substituent positions are chosen, large torsions caused a further reduction of the saturation capacity. Differences in surface area, pore volume and saturation capacity illustrate the importance of choosing the correct NH2-MIL-47(V) supercell. PMID:26660395

  12. Substitution Pattern Reverses the Fluorescence Response of Coumarin Glycoligands upon Coordination with Silver (I)

    PubMed Central

    Shi, De-Tai; Wei, Xiao-Li; Sheng, Yayun; Zang, Yi; He, Xiao-Peng; Xie, Juan; Liu, Guixia; Tang, Yun; Li, Jia; Chen, Guo-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Development of sugar-based fluorescence (FL) chemo-probes is of much interest since sugars are biocompatible, water-soluble and structurally rigid natural starting materials. We report here that fluorescent glycoligands with two triazolyl coumarin moieties installed onto the different positions of an identical glucosyl nucleus exert completely reversed optical response to a metal ion. C3,4-, C2,3- and C4,6-di-substituted coumarin glucosides synthesized by a click reaction similarly showed a selective FL variation in the presence of silver (I) among a range of metal cations in an aqueous solution. However, the variation was determined to be converse: the FL of the C3,4-ligand was quenched whereas that of the C2,3/C4,6-ligand tangibly enhanced. FL and NMR titrations suggested that this divergence was due to the distinct complexation modes of the conformationally constrained ligands with the ion. The optimal motifs of the ligand-ion complexation were predicted by a computational simulation. Finally, the C2,3-ligand was determined to be of low cytotoxicity and applicable in the FL imaging of silver ions internalized by live cells. PMID:24584644

  13. Substitution Pattern Reverses the Fluorescence Response of Coumarin Glycoligands upon Coordination with Silver (I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, De-Tai; Wei, Xiao-Li; Sheng, Yayun; Zang, Yi; He, Xiao-Peng; Xie, Juan; Liu, Guixia; Tang, Yun; Li, Jia; Chen, Guo-Rong

    2014-03-01

    Development of sugar-based fluorescence (FL) chemo-probes is of much interest since sugars are biocompatible, water-soluble and structurally rigid natural starting materials. We report here that fluorescent glycoligands with two triazolyl coumarin moieties installed onto the different positions of an identical glucosyl nucleus exert completely reversed optical response to a metal ion. C3,4-, C2,3- and C4,6-di-substituted coumarin glucosides synthesized by a click reaction similarly showed a selective FL variation in the presence of silver (I) among a range of metal cations in an aqueous solution. However, the variation was determined to be converse: the FL of the C3,4-ligand was quenched whereas that of the C2,3/C4,6-ligand tangibly enhanced. FL and NMR titrations suggested that this divergence was due to the distinct complexation modes of the conformationally constrained ligands with the ion. The optimal motifs of the ligand-ion complexation were predicted by a computational simulation. Finally, the C2,3-ligand was determined to be of low cytotoxicity and applicable in the FL imaging of silver ions internalized by live cells.

  14. Charge Transfer Through Dithieno[2,3-a:3',2'-c]phenazine: Effect of Substitution Pattern on the Optoelectronic Properties of Regioisomeric Luminophores.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yijing; Lu, Xuefeng; Xiang, Chunlan; Ling, Yuan; Zhou, Gang

    2016-03-18

    Two series of regioisomeric luminophores that contained a dithieno[2,3-a:3',2'-c]phenazine (DTP) unit as an electron acceptor have been designed and synthesized. To investigate the effect of substitution pattern on the optoelectronic properties of these luminophores, electron donors (N,N-dihexylaniline or N,N-dihexyl-4-vinylaniline) were incorporated at the 2,5-, 8,11-, and 9,10-positions of the DTP unit. We found that the optoelectronic properties of the regioisomeric luminophores were greatly affected by the substitution pattern: functionalization at the 8,11-positions of the DTP unit was superior to the other two substitution patterns in extending the effective π-conjugation and strengthening the intramolecular charge-transfer interactions. Moreover, the insertion of vinyl groups between the DTP and N,N-dihexylaniline units narrowed the energy band-gap for isomers 4 and 5. However, hypsochromically shifted absorption and photoluminescence maxima were observed for isomeric luminophore 6, in which electron donors were substituted at the 2,5-positions of the DTP unit. These results should facilitate greater understanding of the structure-property relationships in regioisomeric semiconductors and present a new way to design optoelectronic materials with effective substitution patterns. PMID:26790136

  15. Abnormal N-glycosylation pattern for brain nucleotide pyrophosphatase-5 (NPP-5) in Mecp2-mutant murine models of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cortelazzo, Alessio; De Felice, Claudio; Guerranti, Roberto; Signorini, Cinzia; Leoncini, Silvia; Pecorelli, Alessandra; Scalabrì, Francesco; Madonna, Michele; Filosa, Stefania; Della Giovampaola, Cinzia; Capone, Antonietta; Durand, Thierry; Mirasole, Cristiana; Zolla, Lello; Valacchi, Giuseppe; Ciccoli, Lucia; Guy, Jacky; D'Esposito, Maurizio; Hayek, Joussef

    2016-04-01

    Neurological disorders can be associated with protein glycosylation abnormalities. Rett syndrome is a devastating genetic brain disorder, mainly caused by de novo loss-of-function mutations in the methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene. Although its pathogenesis appears to be closely associated with a redox imbalance, no information on glycosylation is available. Glycoprotein detection strategies (i.e., lectin-blotting) were applied to identify target glycosylation changes in the whole brain of Mecp2 mutant murine models of the disease. Remarkable glycosylation pattern changes for a peculiar 50kDa protein, i.e., the N-linked brain nucleotide pyrophosphatase-5 were evidenced, with decreased N-glycosylation in the presymptomatic and symptomatic mutant mice. Glycosylation changes were rescued by selected brain Mecp2 reactivation. Our findings indicate that there is a causal link between the amount of Mecp2 and the N-glycosylation of NPP-5. PMID:26476268

  16. Effect of substitution of monovalent anions in external medium on the swimming pattern of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Hosoi, S; Oosawa, F

    1978-01-01

    The effect of replacement of ions in the extracellular medium on the swimming pattern of bacteria (Salmonella typhimurium) has been investigated. The replacement of chloride ion (Cl-) in the standard medium by methanesulfonate ion (MS-) or by propionate ion (Pr-) induced an increase in the tumbling frequency, or a decrease of the end-to-end distances of tracks. Replacement of MS- by Cl- resulted in transient depression of tumbling, and replacement of Pr- by Cl- resulted in immediate recovery of normal swimming. The replacement of cations was not very effective. The experimental data, including the dependence of the effect of replacement on the ion concentration, are consistent with the ideas that the tumbling frequency increases with depolarization of the bacterial membrane and that such anions as MS- and Pr- are more able to permeate the membrane than is Cl-. Images PMID:207676

  17. Grouping substitution types into different relaxed molecular clocks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hui-Jie; Kishino, Hirohisa; Rodrigue, Nicolas; Thorne, Jeffrey L

    2016-07-19

    Different types of nucleotide substitutions experience different patterns of rate change over time. We propose clustering context-dependent (or context-independent) nucleotide substitution types according to how their rates change and then using the grouping for divergence time estimation. With our models, relative rates among types that are in the same group are fixed, whereas absolute rates of the types within a group change over time according to a shared relaxed molecular clock. We illustrate our procedure by analysing a 0.15 Mb intergenic region to infer divergence times relating eight primates. The different groupings of substitution types that we explore have little effect on the posterior means of divergence times, but the widths of the credibility intervals decrease as the number of groups increases.This article is part of the themed issue 'Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks'. PMID:27325837

  18. Structure/antileishmanial activity relationship study of naphthoquinones and dependency of the mode of action on the substitution patterns.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ahmad; Assimopoulou, Andreana Nikolaos; Papageorgiou, Vassilios Peter; Kolodziej, Herbert

    2011-12-01

    crucial role in the host resistance against intracellular pathogens, excluding activation of microbicidal mechanisms in macrophages. The mode of action apparently depended on the substitution pattern, associated with the electrophilicity of the naphthoquinone or the efficiency of redox cycling. Conspicuously, members oxygenated in the quinone ring proved to be leishmanicidal when coincubated with glutathione, while the majority of the remaining compounds lost activity. PMID:21800278

  19. Laminin and Type IV Collagen Isoform Substitutions Occur in Temporally and Spatially Distinct Patterns in Developing Kidney Glomerular Basement Membranes

    PubMed Central

    St. John, Patricia L.; Stroganova, Larysa; Zelenchuk, Adrian; Steenhard, Brooke M.

    2013-01-01

    Kidney glomerular basement membranes (GBMs) undergo laminin and type IV collagen isoform substitutions during glomerular development, which are believed to be required for maturation of the filtration barrier. Specifically, GBMs of earliest glomeruli contain laminin α1β1γ1 and collagen α1α2α1(IV), whereas mature glomeruli contain laminin α5β2γ1 and collagen α3α4α5(IV). Here, we used confocal microscopy to simultaneously evaluate expression of different laminin and collagen IV isoforms in newborn mouse GBMs. Our results show loss of laminin α1 from GBMs in early capillary loop stages and continuous linear deposition of laminin bearing the α5 chain thereafter. In contrast, collagen α1α2α1(IV) persisted in linear patterns into late capillary loop stages, when collagen α3α4α5(IV) first appeared in discontinuous, non-linear patterns. This patchy pattern for collagen α3α4α5(IV) continued into maturing glomeruli where there were lengths of linear, laminin α5-positive GBM entirely lacking either isoform of collagen IV. Relative abundance of laminin and collagen IV mRNAs in newborn and 5-week-old mouse kidneys also differed, with those encoding laminin α1, α5, β1, β2, and γ1, and collagen α1(IV) and α2(IV) chains all significantly declining at 5 weeks, but α3(IV) and α4(IV) were significantly upregulated. We conclude that different biosynthetic mechanisms control laminin and type IV collagen expression in developing glomeruli. PMID:23896970

  20. Eight Nucleotide Substitutions Inhibit Splicing to HPV-16 3′-Splice Site SA3358 and Reduce the Efficiency by which HPV-16 Increases the Life Span of Primary Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoze; Johansson, Cecilia; Cardoso Palacios, Carlos; Mossberg, Anki; Dhanjal, Soniya; Bergvall, Monika; Schwartz, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The most commonly used 3′-splice site on the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) genome named SA3358 is used to produce HPV-16 early mRNAs encoding E4, E5, E6 and E7, and late mRNAs encoding L1 and L2. We have previously shown that SA3358 is suboptimal and is totally dependent on a downstream splicing enhancer containingmultiple potential ASF/SF2 binding sites. Here weshow that only one of the predicted ASF/SF2 sites accounts for the majority of the enhancer activity. We demonstrate that single nucleotide substitutions in this predicted ASF/SF2 site impair enhancer function and that this correlates with less efficient binding to ASF/SF2 in vitro. We provide evidence that HPV-16 mRNAs that arespliced to SA3358 interact with ASF/SF2 in living cells. In addition,mutational inactivation of the ASF/SF2 site weakened the enhancer at SA3358 in episomal forms of the HPV-16 genome, indicating that the enhancer is active in the context of the full HPV-16 genome.This resulted in induction of HPV-16 late gene expression as a result of competition from late splice site SA5639. Furthermore, inactivation of the ASF/SF2 site of the SA3358 splicing enhancer reduced the ability of E6- and E7-encoding HPV-16 plasmids to increase the life span of primary keratinocytes in vitro, demonstrating arequirement for an intact splicing enhancer of SA3358 forefficient production of the E6 and E7 mRNAs. These results link the strength of the HPV-16 SA3358 splicing enhancer to expression of E6 and E7 and to the pathogenic properties of HPV-16. PMID:24039800

  1. Eight nucleotide substitutions inhibit splicing to HPV-16 3'-splice site SA3358 and reduce the efficiency by which HPV-16 increases the life span of primary human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoze; Johansson, Cecilia; Cardoso Palacios, Carlos; Mossberg, Anki; Dhanjal, Soniya; Bergvall, Monika; Schwartz, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The most commonly used 3'-splice site on the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) genome named SA3358 is used to produce HPV-16 early mRNAs encoding E4, E5, E6 and E7, and late mRNAs encoding L1 and L2. We have previously shown that SA3358 is suboptimal and is totally dependent on a downstream splicing enhancer containingmultiple potential ASF/SF2 binding sites. Here weshow that only one of the predicted ASF/SF2 sites accounts for the majority of the enhancer activity. We demonstrate that single nucleotide substitutions in this predicted ASF/SF2 site impair enhancer function and that this correlates with less efficient binding to ASF/SF2 in vitro. We provide evidence that HPV-16 mRNAs that arespliced to SA3358 interact with ASF/SF2 in living cells. In addition,mutational inactivation of the ASF/SF2 site weakened the enhancer at SA3358 in episomal forms of the HPV-16 genome, indicating that the enhancer is active in the context of the full HPV-16 genome.This resulted in induction of HPV-16 late gene expression as a result of competition from late splice site SA5639. Furthermore, inactivation of the ASF/SF2 site of the SA3358 splicing enhancer reduced the ability of E6- and E7-encoding HPV-16 plasmids to increase the life span of primary keratinocytes in vitro, demonstrating arequirement for an intact splicing enhancer of SA3358 forefficient production of the E6 and E7 mRNAs. These results link the strength of the HPV-16 SA3358 splicing enhancer to expression of E6 and E7 and to the pathogenic properties of HPV-16. PMID:24039800

  2. An Aspergillus nidulans GH26 endo-β-mannanase with a novel degradation pattern on highly substituted galactomannans.

    PubMed

    von Freiesleben, Pernille; Spodsberg, Nikolaj; Blicher, Thomas Holberg; Anderson, Lars; Jørgensen, Henning; Stålbrand, Henrik; Meyer, Anne S; Krogh, Kristian B R M

    2016-02-01

    The activity and substrate degradation pattern of a novel Aspergillus nidulans GH26 endo-β-mannanase (AnMan26A) was investigated using two galactomannan substrates with varying amounts of galactopyranosyl residues. The AnMan26A was characterized in parallel with the GH26 endomannanase from Podospora anserina (PaMan26A) and three GH5 endomannanases from A. nidulans and Trichoderma reesei (AnMan5A, AnMan5C and TrMan5A). The initial rates and the maximal degree of enzymatically catalyzed conversion of locust bean gum and guar gum galactomannans were determined. The hydrolysis product profile at maximal degree of conversion was determined using DNA sequencer-Assisted Saccharide analysis in High throughput (DASH). This is the first reported use of this method for analyzing galactomannooligosaccharides. AnMan26A and PaMan26A were found to have a novel substrate degradation pattern on the two galactomannan substrates. On the highly substituted guar gum AnMan26A and PaMan26A reached 35-40% as their maximal degree of conversion whereas the three tested GH5 endomannanases only reached 8-10% as their maximal degree of conversion. α-Galactosyl-mannose was identified as the dominant degradation product resulting from AnMan26A and PaMan26A action on guar gum, strongly indicating that these two enzymes can accommodate galactopyranosyl residues in the -1 and in the +1 subsite. The degradation of α-6(4)-6(3)-di-galactosyl-mannopentaose by AnMan26A revealed accommodation of galactopyranosyl residues in the -2, -1 and +1 subsite of the enzyme. Accommodation of galactopyranosyl residues in subsites -2 and +1 has not been observed for other characterized endomannanases to date. Docking analysis of galactomannooligosaccharides in available crystal structures and homology models supported the conclusions drawn from the experimental results. This newly discovered diversity of substrate degradation patterns demonstrates an expanded functionality of fungal endomannanases, than hitherto

  3. Nucleotide diversity in gorillas.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ning; Jensen-Seaman, Michael I; Chemnick, Leona; Ryder, Oliver; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2004-01-01

    Comparison of the levels of nucleotide diversity in humans and apes may provide valuable information for inferring the demographic history of these species, the effect of social structure on genetic diversity, patterns of past migration, and signatures of past selection events. Previous DNA sequence data from both the mitochondrial and the nuclear genomes suggested a much higher level of nucleotide diversity in the African apes than in humans. Noting that the nuclear DNA data from the apes were very limited, we previously conducted a DNA polymorphism study in humans and another in chimpanzees and bonobos, using 50 DNA segments randomly chosen from the noncoding, nonrepetitive parts of the human genome. The data revealed that the nucleotide diversity (pi) in bonobos (0.077%) is actually lower than that in humans (0.087%) and that pi in chimpanzees (0.134%) is only 50% higher than that in humans. In the present study we sequenced the same 50 segments in 15 western lowland gorillas and estimated pi to be 0.158%. This is the highest value among the African apes but is only about two times higher than that in humans. Interestingly, available mtDNA sequence data also suggest a twofold higher nucleotide diversity in gorillas than in humans, but suggest a threefold higher nucleotide diversity in chimpanzees than in humans. The higher mtDNA diversity in chimpanzees might be due to the unique pattern in the evolution of chimpanzee mtDNA. From the nuclear DNA pi values, we estimated that the long-term effective population sizes of humans, bonobos, chimpanzees, and gorillas are, respectively, 10,400, 12,300, 21,300, and 25,200. PMID:15082556

  4. Large-Scale Analyses of Angiosperm Nucleotide-Binding Site-Leucine-Rich Repeat Genes Reveal Three Anciently Diverged Classes with Distinct Evolutionary Patterns.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhu-Qing; Xue, Jia-Yu; Wu, Ping; Zhang, Yan-Mei; Wu, Yue; Hang, Yue-Yu; Wang, Bin; Chen, Jian-Qun

    2016-04-01

    Nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) genes make up the largest plant disease resistance gene family (R genes), with hundreds of copies occurring in individual angiosperm genomes. However, the expansion history of NBS-LRR genes during angiosperm evolution is largely unknown. By identifying more than 6,000 NBS-LRR genes in 22 representative angiosperms and reconstructing their phylogenies, we present a potential framework of NBS-LRR gene evolution in the angiosperm. Three anciently diverged NBS-LRR classes (TNLs, CNLs, and RNLs) were distinguished with unique exon-intron structures and DNA motif sequences. A total of seven ancient TNL, 14 CNL, and two RNL lineages were discovered in the ancestral angiosperm, from which all current NBS-LRR gene repertoires were evolved. A pattern of gradual expansion during the first 100 million years of evolution of the angiosperm clade was observed for CNLs. TNL numbers remained stable during this period but were eventually deleted in three divergent angiosperm lineages. We inferred that an intense expansion of both TNL and CNL genes started from the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary. Because dramatic environmental changes and an explosion in fungal diversity occurred during this period, the observed expansions of R genes probably reflect convergent adaptive responses of various angiosperm families. An ancient whole-genome duplication event that occurred in an angiosperm ancestor resulted in two RNL lineages, which were conservatively evolved and acted as scaffold proteins for defense signal transduction. Overall, the reconstructed framework of angiosperm NBS-LRR gene evolution in this study may serve as a fundamental reference for better understanding angiosperm NBS-LRR genes. PMID:26839128

  5. Glycine substitutions in the triple-helical region of type VII collagen result in a spectrum of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa phenotypes and patterns of inheritance

    SciTech Connect

    Christiano, A.M.; McGrath, J.A.; Uitto, J.; Kong Chong Tan

    1996-04-01

    The dystrophic forms of epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) are characterized by fragility of the skin and mucous membranes. DEB can be inherited in either an autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive pattern, and the spectrum of clinical severity is highly variable. The unifying diagnostic hallmark of DEB is abnormalities in the anchoring fibrils, which consist of type VII collagen, and recently, mutations in the corresponding gene, COL7A1, have been disclosed in a number of families. In this study, we report six families with glycine substitution mutations in the triple-helical region of type VII collagen. Among the six families, two demonstrated a mild phenotype, and the inheritance of the mutation was consistent with the dominantly inherited form of DEB. In the four other families, the mutation was silent in the heterozygous state but, when present in the homozygous state, or combined with a second mutation, resulted in a recessively inherited DEB phenotype. Type VII collagen is, therefore, unique among the collagen genes, in that different glycine substitutions can be either silent in heterozygous individuals or result in a dominantly inherited DEB. Inspection of the locations of the glycine substitutions along the COL7A1 polypeptide suggests that the consequences of these mutations, in terms of phenotype and pattern of inheritance, are position independent. 29 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Chromium and Tantalum Site Substitution Patterns in Ni3Al (L1(sub 2))gamma(prime)- Precipitates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth-Morrison, Christopher; Mao, Zugang; Seidman, David N.; Noebe, Ronald D.

    2008-01-01

    The site substitution behavior of Cr and Ta in the Ni3Al (Ll2)-type gamma'-precipitates of a Ni-Al-Cr-Ta alloy is investigated by atom-probe tomography (APT) and first-principles calculations. Measurements of the gamma'-phase composition by APT suggest that Al, Cr, and Ta share the Al sublattice sites of the gamma'-precipitates. The calculated substitutional energies of the solute atoms at the Ni and Al sublattice sites indicate that Ta has a strong preference for the Al sites, while Cr has a weak Al site preference. Furthermore, Ta is shown to replace Cr at the Al sublattice sites of the gamma'-precipitates, altering the elemental phase partitioning behavior of the Ni-Al-Cr-Ta alloy.

  7. Cyanoethylation of the glucans dextran and pullulan: Substitution pattern and formation of nanostructures and entrapment of magnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Fiege, Kathrin; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Atarijabarzadeh, Sevil

    2012-01-01

    Summary Cyanoethylglucans with a degree of substitution in the range of 0.74 to 2.40 for dextran and 0.84 to 2.42 for pullulan were obtained by Michael addition of acrylonitrile to the glucans under various conditions. Products were thoroughly characterized, comprising elementary analysis, NMR and ATR–IR spectroscopy, and analysis of the substituent distribution in the glucosyl units by GC–FID and GC–MS of the constituting monosaccharide derivatives. Nanostructuring of the highly substituted cyanoethylpolysaccharides was performed by dialysis against a non-solvent. In the presence of ferromagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles, multicore cyanoethylglucan-coated ferromagnetic nanoparticles were formed by selective entrapment. The specific interaction between cyano groups and iron could be proven. The size distribution and morphology of the nanoparticles were analyzed by dynamic light scattering (DLS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EF–TEM) with parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy (PEELS). PMID:22563354

  8. Regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms at the beginning of intron 2 of the human KRAS gene.

    PubMed

    Antontseva, Elena V; Matveeva, Marina Yu; Bondar, Natalia P; Kashina, Elena V; Leberfarb, Elena Yu; Bryzgalov, Leonid O; Gervas, Polina A; Ponomareva, Anastasia A; Cherdyntseva, Nadezhda V; Orlov, Yury L; Merkulova, Tatiana I

    2015-12-01

    There are two regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms (rSNPs) at the beginning of the second intron of the mouse K-ras gene that are strongly associated with lung cancer susceptibility. We performed functional analysis of three SNPs (rs12228277: T greater than A, rs12226937: G greater than A, and rs61761074: T greater than G) located in the same region of human KRAS. We found that rs12228277 and rs61761074 result in differential binding patterns of lung nuclear proteins to oligonucleotide probes corresponding two alternative alleles; in both cases, the transcription factor NF-Y is involved. G greater than A substitution (rs12226937) had no effect on the binding of lung nuclear proteins. However, all the nucleotide substitutions under study showed functional effects in a luciferase reporter assay. Among them, rs61761074 demonstrated a significant correlation with allele frequency in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Taken together, the results of our study suggest that a T greater than G substitution at nucleotide position 615 in the second intron of the KRAS gene (rs61761074) may represent a promising genetic marker of NSCLC. PMID:26648033

  9. Lipoteichoic acid of Streptococcus oralis Uo5: a novel biochemical structure comprising an unusual phosphorylcholine substitution pattern compared to Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Gisch, Nicolas; Schwudke, Dominik; Thomsen, Simone; Heß, Nathalie; Hakenbeck, Regine; Denapaite, Dalia

    2015-01-01

    Members of the Mitis group of streptococci possess teichoic acids (TAs) as integral components of their cell wall that are unique among Gram-positive bacteria. Both, lipoteichoic (LTA) and wall teichoic acid, are formed by the same biosynthetic pathway, are of high complexity and contain phosphorylcholine (P-Cho) residues. These residues serve as anchors for choline-binding proteins (CBPs), some of which have been identified as virulence factors of the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. We investigated the LTA structure of its close relative Streptococcus oralis. Our analysis revealed that S. oralis Uo5 LTA has an overall architecture similar to pneumococcal LTA (pnLTA) and can be considered as a subtype of type IV LTA. Its structural complexity is even higher than that of pnLTA and its composition differs in number and type of carbohydrate moieties, inter-residue connectivities and especially the P-Cho substitution pattern. Here, we report the occurrence of a saccharide moiety substituted with two P-Cho residues, which is unique as yet in bacterial derived surface carbohydrates. Finally, we could link the observed important structural variations between S. oralis and S. pneumoniae LTA to the divergent enzymatic repertoire for their TA biosynthesis. PMID:26577602

  10. Genes Translocated into the Plastid Inverted Repeat Show Decelerated Substitution Rates and Elevated GC Content.

    PubMed

    Li, Fay-Wei; Kuo, Li-Yaung; Pryer, Kathleen M; Rothfels, Carl J

    2016-01-01

    Plant chloroplast genomes (plastomes) are characterized by an inverted repeat (IR) region and two larger single copy (SC) regions. Patterns of molecular evolution in the IR and SC regions differ, most notably by a reduced rate of nucleotide substitution in the IR compared to the SC region. In addition, the organization and structure of plastomes is fluid, and rearrangements through time have repeatedly shuffled genes into and out of the IR, providing recurrent natural experiments on how chloroplast genome structure can impact rates and patterns of molecular evolution. Here we examine four loci (psbA, ycf2, rps7, and rps12 exon 2-3) that were translocated from the SC into the IR during fern evolution. We use a model-based method, within a phylogenetic context, to test for substitution rate shifts. All four loci show a significant, 2- to 3-fold deceleration in their substitution rate following translocation into the IR, a phenomenon not observed in any other, nontranslocated plastid genes. Also, we show that after translocation, the GC content of the third codon position and of the noncoding regions is significantly increased, implying that gene conversion within the IR is GC-biased. Taken together, our results suggest that the IR region not only reduces substitution rates, but also impacts nucleotide composition. This finding highlights a potential vulnerability of correlating substitution rate heterogeneity with organismal life history traits without knowledge of the underlying genome structure. PMID:27401175

  11. Genes Translocated into the Plastid Inverted Repeat Show Decelerated Substitution Rates and Elevated GC Content

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fay-Wei; Kuo, Li-Yaung; Pryer, Kathleen M.; Rothfels, Carl J.

    2016-01-01

    Plant chloroplast genomes (plastomes) are characterized by an inverted repeat (IR) region and two larger single copy (SC) regions. Patterns of molecular evolution in the IR and SC regions differ, most notably by a reduced rate of nucleotide substitution in the IR compared to the SC region. In addition, the organization and structure of plastomes is fluid, and rearrangements through time have repeatedly shuffled genes into and out of the IR, providing recurrent natural experiments on how chloroplast genome structure can impact rates and patterns of molecular evolution. Here we examine four loci (psbA, ycf2, rps7, and rps12 exon 2–3) that were translocated from the SC into the IR during fern evolution. We use a model-based method, within a phylogenetic context, to test for substitution rate shifts. All four loci show a significant, 2- to 3-fold deceleration in their substitution rate following translocation into the IR, a phenomenon not observed in any other, nontranslocated plastid genes. Also, we show that after translocation, the GC content of the third codon position and of the noncoding regions is significantly increased, implying that gene conversion within the IR is GC-biased. Taken together, our results suggest that the IR region not only reduces substitution rates, but also impacts nucleotide composition. This finding highlights a potential vulnerability of correlating substitution rate heterogeneity with organismal life history traits without knowledge of the underlying genome structure. PMID:27401175

  12. Unravelling evolution of Nanog, the key transcription factor involved in self-renewal of undifferentiated embryonic stem cells, by pattern recognition in nucleotide and tandem repeats characteristics.

    PubMed

    Pashaiasl, Maryam; Khodadadi, Khodadad; Kayvanjoo, Amir Hossein; Pashaei-Asl, Roghiyeh; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil; Ebrahimi, Mansour

    2016-03-10

    Nanog, an important transcription factor in embryonic stem cells (ESC), is the key factor in maintaining pluripotency to establish ESC identity and has the ability to induce embryonic germ layers. Nanog is responsible for self-renewal and pluripotency of stem cells as well as cancer invasiveness, tumor cell proliferation, motility and drug-resistance. Understanding the underlying mechanisms of Nanog evolution and regulation can lead to future advances in treatment of cancers. Recent integration of machine learning models with genetics has provided a powerful tool for knowledge discovery and uncovering evolutionary pathways. Herein, sequences of 47 Nanog genes from various species were extracted and two datasets of features were computationally extracted from these sequences. At the first dataset, 76 nucleotide acid attributes were calculated for each Nanog sequence. The second dataset was prepared based on the 10,480 repeated nucleotide sequences (from 5 to 50bp lengths). Then, various data mining algorithms such as decision tree models were applied on these datasets to find the evolutionary pathways of Nanog diversion. Attribute weighting models were highlighted features such as the frequencies of AA and GC as the most important genomic features in Nanog gene classification and differentiation. Similar findings were obtained by tree induction algorithms. Results from the second database showed that some short sequence strings, such as ACTACT, TCCTGA, CCTGA, GAAGAC, and TATCCC can be effectively used to identify Nanog genes in various species. The outcomes of this study, for the first time, unravels the importance of particular genomic features in Nanog gene evolution paving roads toward better understanding of stem cell development and human targeted disorder therapy. PMID:26687709

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations and coupled nucleotide substitution experiments indicate the nature of A·A base pairing and a putative structure of the coralyne-induced homo-adenine duplex

    PubMed Central

    Hud, Nicholas V.; Cheatham, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    Coralyne is an alkaloid drug that binds homo-adenine DNA (and RNA) oligonucleotides more tightly than it does Watson–Crick DNA. Hud’s laboratory has shown that poly(dA) in the presence of coralyne forms an anti-parallel duplex, however attempts to determine the structure by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography have been unsuccessful. Assuming adenine–adenine hydrogen bonding between the two poly(dA) strands, we constructed 40 hypothetical homo-(dA) anti-parallel duplexes and docked coralyne into the six most favorable duplex structures. The two most stable structures had trans glycosidic bonds, but distinct pairing geometries, i.e. either Watson–Crick Hoogsteen (transWH) or Watson–Crick Watson–Crick (transWW) with stability of transWH > transWW. To narrow down the possibilities, 7-deaza adenine base substitutions (dA→7) were engineered into homo-(dA) sequences. These substitutions significantly reduced the thermal stability of the coralyne-induced homo-(dA) structure. These experiments strongly suggest the involvement of N7 in the coralyne-induced A·A base pairs. Moreover, due to the differential effect on melting as a function of the location of the dA→7 mutations, these results are consistent with the N1–N7 base pairing of the transWH pairs. Together, the simulation and base substitution experiments predict that the coralyne-induced homo-(dA) duplex structure adopts the transWH geometry. PMID:19850721

  14. An asparagine residue mediates intramolecular communication in nucleotide-regulated pyrophosphatase.

    PubMed

    Anashkin, Viktor A; Salminen, Anu; Vorobjeva, Natalia N; Lahti, Reijo; Baykov, Alexander A

    2016-07-15

    Many prokaryotic soluble PPases (pyrophosphatases) contain a pair of regulatory adenine nucleotide-binding CBS (cystathionine β-synthase) domains that act as 'internal inhibitors' whose effect is modulated by nucleotide binding. Although such regulatory domains are found in important enzymes and transporters, the underlying regulatory mechanism has only begun to come into focus. We reported previously that CBS domains bind nucleotides co-operatively and induce positive kinetic co-operativity (non-Michaelian behaviour) in CBS-PPases (CBS domain-containing PPases). In the present study, we demonstrate that a homodimeric ehPPase (Ethanoligenens harbinense PPase) containing an inherent mutation in an otherwise conserved asparagine residue in a loop near the active site exhibits non-co-operative hydrolysis kinetics. A similar N312S substitution in 'co-operative' dhPPase (Desulfitobacterium hafniense PPase) abolished kinetic co-operativity while causing only minor effects on nucleotide-binding affinity and co-operativity. However, the substitution reversed the effect of diadenosine tetraphosphate, abolishing kinetic co-operativity in wild-type dhPPase, but restoring it in the variant dhPPase. A reverse serine-to-asparagine replacement restored kinetic co-operativity in ehPPase. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the asparagine substitution resulted in a change in the hydrogen-bonding pattern around the asparagine residue and the subunit interface, allowing greater flexibility at the subunit interface without a marked effect on the overall structure. These findings identify this asparagine residue as lying at the 'crossroads' of information paths connecting catalytic and regulatory domains within a subunit and catalytic sites between subunits. PMID:27208172

  15. An acyl group makes a difference in the reactivity patterns of cytochrome P450 catalyzed N-demethylation of substituted N,N-dimethylbenzamides-high spin selective reactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Li, Dongmei; Han, Keli; Shaik, Sason

    2010-03-01

    This paper addresses the experimentally observed mechanistic differences between the cytochrome P450-catalyzed N-demethylation of substituted N,N-dimethylanilines (DMA) and of N,N-dimethylbenzamides (DMBA). The two reactions of these substrates are initiated by C-H activation of the methyl groups on the nitrogen. Thus, the DMA reactions exhibit small deuterium kinetic isotope effects (KIEs), and these KIEs and the corresponding reaction rates exhibit a linear response to the electronic nature of the para substituent. By contrast, the DMBA reactions exhibit large KIEs; the KIEs and reaction rates do not at all respond to the nature of the para substituent. Accordingly, the present paper uses density functional theoretical calculations to address these reactivity patterns in para-substituted DMBA and compare these results to those obtained for the DMA reactions previously (Wang, Y.; Kumar, D.; Yang, C. L.; Han, K. L.; Shaik, S. J. Phys. Chem. B 2007, 111, 7700). The theoretical calculations reproduce the experimental trends of narrow variations in rates and KIEs. It is shown that the above mechanistic differences between the two reaction series of DMA and DMBA are caused by the ability of the para substituent to maintain a conjugation path between the C-H reaction center and the aryl moiety. Furthermore, the computational results show a new feature of reactivity, namely, that the N-demethylation of DMBA proceeds by a spin-selective reaction via the high spin state of the active species of the enzyme. This conclusion is reinforced by the match of the calculated and experimental KIE values. PMID:20146528

  16. Master Amino acid Pattern as sole and total substitute for dietary proteins during a weight-loss diet to achieve the body's nitrogen balance equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Lucà-Moretti, M; Grandi, A; Lucà, E; Muratori, G; Nofroni, M G; Mucci, M P; Gambetta, P; Stimolo, R; Drago, P; Giudice, G; Tamburlin, N; Karbalai, M; Valente, C; Moras, G

    2003-01-01

    Results of this multicentric study have shown that by giving Master Amino acid Pattern (MAP) as a sole and total substitute of dietary proteins to 500 overweight participants undergoing the American Nutrition Clinics/Overweight Management Program (ANC/OMP), the participants' body nitrogen balance could be maintained in equilibrium with essentially no calories (MAP 1 g=0.04 kcal), thereby preserving the body's structural and functional proteins, eliminating excessive water retention from the interstitial compartment, and preventing the sudden weight increase after study conclusion commonly known as the yo-yo effect. Study results have shown that the use of MAP, in conjunction with the ANC/OMP regimen, has proven to be safe and effective by preventing those adverse effects associated with a negative nitrogen balance, such as oversized or flabby tissue, stretch marks, the sagging of breast tissue, increased hair loss, faded hair color, and fragile or brittle nails. Also prevented were those anomalies commonly associated with weight-loss diets, such as hunger, weakness, headache caused by ketosis, constipation, and decreased libido. The use of MAP in conjunction with the ANC/OMP also allowed for mean weight loss of 2.5 kg (5.5 lb) per week, achieved through reduction of excessive fat tissue and elimination of excessive water retention from the interstitial compartment. PMID:14964347

  17. Master Amino acid Pattern as substitute for dietary proteins during a weight-loss diet to achieve the body's nitrogen balance equilibrium with essentially no calories.

    PubMed

    Lucà-Moretti, M; Grandi, A; Lucà, E; Muratori, G; Nofroni, M G; Mucci, M P; Gambetta, P; Stimolo, R; Drago, P; Giudice, G; Tamburlin, N

    2003-01-01

    Results of this multicentric study have shown that by giving 10 g (10 tablets) of Master Amino acid Pattern (MAP) as a substitute for dietary proteins, once a day, to 114 overweight participants undergoing the American Nutrition Clinics/Overweight Management Program (ANC/OMP), the participants' nitrogen balance could be maintained in equilibrium with essentially no calories (MAP 1 g=0.04 kcal), thereby preserving the body's structural and functional proteins, eliminating excessive water retention from the interstitial compartment, and preventing the sudden weight increase after study conclusion commonly known as the yo-yo effect. Study results have shown that the use of MAP, in conjunction with the ANC/OMP, has proven to be safe and effective by preventing those adverse effects associated with a negative nitrogen balance, such as oversized or flabby tissue, stretch marks, sagging of breast tissue, increased hair loss, faded hair color, and fragile or brittle nails. Also preventing those anomalies commonly associated with weight-loss diets, such as hunger, weakness, headache caused by ketosis, constipation, or decreased libido, the use of MAP, in conjunction with the ANC/OMP, allowed for mean weight loss of 1.4 kg (3 lb) per week. PMID:14964348

  18. Functional characterization of single nucleotide polymorphisms with amino acid substitution in CYP1A2, CYP2A6, and CYP2B6 found in the Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Masahiko; Yoshimura, Yoshinobu; Asahi, Satoru; Saito, Kimitoshi; Sakai, Shuichi; Morita, Shigemichi; Takenaka, Osamu; Inoda, Toshio; Kashiyama, Eiji; Aoyama, Akinori; Nakabayashi, Takeshi; Omori, Satoshi; Kuwabara, Takashi; Izumi, Takashi; Nakamura, Kouichi; Takanaka, Kaoru; Nakayama, Yukiharu; Takeuchi, Mitsuaki; Nakamura, Hideki; Kametani, Shunichi; Terauchi, Yoshiaki; Hashizume, Takanori; Nagayama, Sekio; Kume, Toshiyuki; Achira, Meguru; Kawai, Hiroyuki; Kawashiro, Takashi; Nakamura, Akio; Nakai, Yasuhiro; Kagayama, Akira; Shiraga, Toshifumi; Niwa, Takuro; Yoshimura, Takuya; Morita, Jun; Ohsawa, Fukuichi; Tani, Masato; Osawa, Nobuo; Ida, Keiichi; Noguchi, Kiyoshi

    2004-12-01

    As a part of the studies conducted by the Pharma SNPs Consortium (PSC), the enzyme activities of CYP1A2, CYP2A6 and CYP2B6 variants with altered amino acids as a result of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) found among the Japanese population were analyzed under a unified protocol using the same lots of reagents by the laboratories participating in the PSC. Mutations in CYP1A2, CYP2A6 and CYP2B6 were introduced by site-directed mutagenesis and the wild type and mutated CYP molecules were expressed in Escherichia coli. The expressed cytochrome P450s were purified and the enzyme activities were measured in reconstitution systems. CYP1A2 and CYP1A2Gln478His did not show any differences in 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase activity. CYP2A6 and CYP2A6Glu419Asp metabolized coumarin to form 7-hydroxycoumarin in a similar manner, whereas CYP2A6Ile471Thr showed low activity compared to the wild-type CYP2A6. CYP2B6, CYP2B6Pro167Ala and CYP2B6Arg487Cys showed the same activity for 7-ethoxy-4-triflouromethyl-coumarin O-deethylation. However, CYP2B6Gln172His was roughly twice as active as CYP2B6 and the other CYP2B6 variants for 7-ethoxy-4-triflouromethylcoumarin O-deethylation activity. Although higher inter- and intra-laboratory variations were observed for the calculated Km and V(max) values because the studies were conducted in several different laboratories, the degree of variations was reduced by the increased number of analyses and the adoption of a simple analysis system. PMID:15681899

  19. Incorporation of reporter-labeled nucleotides by DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jon P; Angerer, Bernhard; Loeb, Lawrence A

    2005-02-01

    The incorporation of fluorescently labeled nucleotides into DNA by DNA polymerases has been used extensively for tagging genes and for labeling DNA. However, we lack studies comparing polymerase efficiencies for incorporating different fluorescently labeled nucleotides. We analyzed the incorporation of fluorescent deoxynucleoside triphosphates by 10 different DNA polymerases, representing a cross-section of DNA polymerases from families A, B, and reverse transcriptase. The substitution of one or more different reporter-labeled nucleotides for the cognate nucleotides was initially investigated by using an in vitro polymerase extension filter-binding assay with natural DNA as a template. Further analysis on longer DNA fragments containing one or more nucleotide analogs was performed using a newly developed extension cut assay. The results indicate that incorporation of fluorescent nucleotides is dependent on the DNA polymerase, fluorophore, linker between the nucleotide and the fluorophore, and position for attachment of the linker and the cognate nucleotide. Of the polymerases tested, Taq and Vent exo DNA polymerases were most efficient at incorporating a variety of fluorescently labeled nucleotides. This study suggests that it should be feasible to copy DNA with reactions mixtures that contain all four fluorescently labeled nucleotides allowing for high-density labeling of DNA. PMID:15727132

  20. Skin Substitutes

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Nicole; Cohen, George

    2014-01-01

    In a relatively short timespan, a wealth of new skin substitutes made of synthetic and biologically derived materials have arisen for the purpose of wound healing of various etiologies. This review article focuses on providing an overview of skin substitutes including their indications, contraindications, benefits, and limitations. The result of this overview was an appreciation of the vast array of options available for clinicians, many of which did not exist a short time ago. Yet, despite the rapid expansion this field has undergone, no ideal skin substitute is currently available. More research in the field of skin substitutes and wound healing is required not only for the development of new products made of increasingly complex biomolecular material, but also to compare the existing skin substitutes. PMID:25371771

  1. Nucleotide sequence variation of the envelope protein gene identifies two distinct genotypes of yellow fever virus.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, G J; Cropp, B C; Kinney, R M; Trent, D W; Gubler, D J

    1995-01-01

    The evolution of yellow fever virus over 67 years was investigated by comparing the nucleotide sequences of the envelope (E) protein genes of 20 viruses isolated in Africa, the Caribbean, and South America. Uniformly weighted parsimony algorithm analysis defined two major evolutionary yellow fever virus lineages designated E genotypes I and II. E genotype I contained viruses isolated from East and Central Africa. E genotype II viruses were divided into two sublineages: IIA viruses from West Africa and IIB viruses from America, except for a 1979 virus isolated from Trinidad (TRINID79A). Unique signature patterns were identified at 111 nucleotide and 12 amino acid positions within the yellow fever virus E gene by signature pattern analysis. Yellow fever viruses from East and Central Africa contained unique signatures at 60 nucleotide and five amino acid positions, those from West Africa contained unique signatures at 25 nucleotide and two amino acid positions, and viruses from America contained such signatures at 30 nucleotide and five amino acid positions in the E gene. The dissemination of yellow fever viruses from Africa to the Americas is supported by the close genetic relatedness of genotype IIA and IIB viruses and genetic evidence of a possible second introduction of yellow fever virus from West Africa, as illustrated by the TRINID79A virus isolate. The E protein genes of American IIB yellow fever viruses had higher frequencies of amino acid substitutions than did genes of yellow fever viruses of genotypes I and IIA on the basis of comparisons with a consensus amino acid sequence for the yellow fever E gene. The great variation in the E proteins of American yellow fever virus probably results from positive selection imposed by virus interaction with different species of mosquitoes or nonhuman primates in the Americas. PMID:7637022

  2. Plant Cyclic Nucleotide Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Atienza, Juliana; Van Ingelgem, Carl; Roef, Luc

    2007-01-01

    The presence of the cyclic nucleotides 3′,5′-cyclic adenyl monophosphate (cAMP) and 3′,5′-cyclic guanyl monophosphate (cGMP) in plants is now generally accepted. In addition, cAMP and cGMP have been implicated in the regulation of important plant processes such as stomatal functioning, monovalent and divalent cation fluxes, chloroplast development, gibberellic acid signalling, pathogen response and gene transcription. However, very little is known regarding the components of cyclic nucleotide signalling in plants. In this addendum, the evidence for specific mechanisms of plant cyclic nucleotide signalling is evaluated and discussed. PMID:19704553

  3. Structure-Function Relationship of Substituted Bromomethylcoumarins in Nucleoside Specificity of RNA Alkylation

    PubMed Central

    Kellner, Stefanie; Kollar, Laura Bettina; Ochel, Antonia; Ghate, Manjunath; Helm, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Selective alkylation of RNA nucleotides is an important field of RNA biochemistry, e.g. in applications of fluorescent labeling or in structural probing experiments, yet detailed structure-function studies of labeling agents are rare. Here, bromomethylcoumarins as reactive compounds for fluorescent labeling of RNA are developed as an attractive scaffold on which electronic properties can be modulated by varying the substituents. Six different 4-bromomethyl-coumarins of various substitution patterns were tested for nucleotide specificity of RNA alkylation using tRNA from Escherichia coli as substrate. Using semi-quantitative LC-MS/MS analysis, reactions at mildly acidic and slightly alkaline pH were compared. For all tested compounds, coumarin conjugates with 4-thiouridine, pseudouridine, guanosine, and uridine were identified, with the latter largely dominating. This data set shows that selectivity of ribonucleotide alkylation depends on the substitution pattern of the reactive dye, and even more strongly on the modulation of the reaction conditions. The latter should be therefore carefully optimized when striving to achieve selectivity. Interestingly, the highest selectivity for labeling of a modified nucleoside, namely of 4-thiouridine, was achieved with a compound whose selectivity was somewhat less dependent on reaction conditions than the other compounds. In summary, bromomethylcoumarin derivatives are a highly interesting class of compounds, since their selectivity for 4-thiouridine can be efficiently tuned by variation of substitution pattern and reaction conditions. PMID:23844135

  4. Necessary relations for nucleotide frequencies.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Robert

    2015-06-01

    Genome composition analysis of di-, tri- and tetra-nucleotide frequencies is known to be evolutionarily informative, and useful in metagenomic studies, where binning of raw sequence data is often an important first step. Patterns appearing in genome composition analysis may be due to evolutionary processes or purely mathematical relations. For example, the total number of dinucleotides in a sequence is equal to the sum of the individual totals of the sixteen types of dinucleotide, and this is entirely independent of any assumptions made regarding mutation or selection, or indeed any physical or chemical process. Before any statistical analysis can be attempted, a knowledge of all necessary mathematical relations is required. I show that 25% of di-, tri- and tetra-nucleotide frequencies can be written as simple sums and differences of the remainder. The vast majority of organisms have circular genomes, for which these relations are exact and necessary. In the case of linear molecules, the absolute error is very nearly zero, and does not grow with contiguous sequence length. As a result of the new, necessary relations presented here, the foundations of the statistical analysis of di-, tri- and tetra-nucleotide frequencies, and k-mer analysis in general, need to be revisited. PMID:25843217

  5. Evolving nucleotide binding surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieber-Emmons, T.; Rein, R.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the stability and nature of binding of a nucleotide to several known dehydrogenases. The employed approach includes calculation of hydrophobic stabilization of the binding motif and its intermolecular interaction with the ligand. The evolutionary changes of the binding motif are studied by calculating the Euclidean deviation of the respective dehydrogenases. Attention is given to the possible structural elements involved in the origin of nucleotide recognition by non-coded primordial polypeptides.

  6. Discovery of 5-substituted pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine antifolates as dual acting inhibitors of glycinamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase and 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase in de novo purine nucleotide biosynthesis: implications of inhibiting 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase to AMPK activation and anti-tumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Sudhir; Ravindra, Manasa Punaha; Hales, Eric; Orr, Steven; Cherian, Christina; Hou, Zhanjun

    2014-01-01

    We synthesized 5-substituted pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine antifolates (compounds 5–10) with 1 to 6 bridge carbons and a benozyl ring in the side chain as antitumor agents. Compound 8 with a 4-carbon bridge was the most active analog and potently inhibited proliferation of folate receptor (FR) α-expressing Chinese hamster ovary and KB human tumor cells. Growth inhibition was reversed completely or in part by excess folic acid, indicating that FRα is involved in cellular uptake, and resulted in S-phase accumulation and apoptosis. Anti-proliferative effects of compound 8 toward KB cells were protected by excess adenosine but not thymidine, establishing de novo purine nucleotide biosynthesis as the targeted pathway. However, 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide (AICA) protection was incomplete, suggesting inhibition of both AICA ribonucleotide formyltransferase (AICARFTase) and glycinamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase (GARFTase). Inhibition of GARFTase and AICARFTase by compound 8 was confirmed by cellular metabolic assays and resulted in ATP pool depletion. To our knowledge, this is the first example of an antifolate that acts as a dual inhibitor of GARFTase and AICARFTase as its principal mechanism of action. PMID:24256410

  7. Correlated Evolution of Nucleotide Positions within Splice Sites in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Denisov, Stepan; Bazykin, Georgii; Favorov, Alexander; Mironov, Andrey; Gelfand, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    Splice sites (SSs)—short nucleotide sequences flanking introns—are under selection for spliceosome binding, and adhere to consensus sequences. However, non-consensus nucleotides, many of which probably reduce SS performance, are frequent. Little is known about the mechanisms maintaining such apparently suboptimal SSs. Here, we study the correlations between strengths of nucleotides occupying different positions of the same SS. Such correlations may arise due to epistatic interactions between positions (i.e., a situation when the fitness effect of a nucleotide in one position depends on the nucleotide in another position), their evolutionary history, or to other reasons. Within both the intronic and the exonic parts of donor SSs, nucleotides that increase (decrease) SS strength tend to co-occur with other nucleotides increasing (respectively, decreasing) it, consistent with positive epistasis. Between the intronic and exonic parts of donor SSs, the correlations of nucleotide strengths tend to be negative, consistent with negative epistasis. In the course of evolution, substitutions at a donor SS tend to decrease the strength of its exonic part, and either increase or do not change the strength of its intronic part. In acceptor SSs, the situation is more complicated; the correlations between adjacent positions appear to be driven mainly by avoidance of the AG dinucleotide which may cause aberrant splicing. In summary, both the content and the evolution of SSs is shaped by a complex network of interdependences between adjacent nucleotides that respond to a range of sometimes conflicting selective constraints. PMID:26642327

  8. Correlated Evolution of Nucleotide Positions within Splice Sites in Mammals.

    PubMed

    Denisov, Stepan; Bazykin, Georgii; Favorov, Alexander; Mironov, Andrey; Gelfand, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    Splice sites (SSs)--short nucleotide sequences flanking introns--are under selection for spliceosome binding, and adhere to consensus sequences. However, non-consensus nucleotides, many of which probably reduce SS performance, are frequent. Little is known about the mechanisms maintaining such apparently suboptimal SSs. Here, we study the correlations between strengths of nucleotides occupying different positions of the same SS. Such correlations may arise due to epistatic interactions between positions (i.e., a situation when the fitness effect of a nucleotide in one position depends on the nucleotide in another position), their evolutionary history, or to other reasons. Within both the intronic and the exonic parts of donor SSs, nucleotides that increase (decrease) SS strength tend to co-occur with other nucleotides increasing (respectively, decreasing) it, consistent with positive epistasis. Between the intronic and exonic parts of donor SSs, the correlations of nucleotide strengths tend to be negative, consistent with negative epistasis. In the course of evolution, substitutions at a donor SS tend to decrease the strength of its exonic part, and either increase or do not change the strength of its intronic part. In acceptor SSs, the situation is more complicated; the correlations between adjacent positions appear to be driven mainly by avoidance of the AG dinucleotide which may cause aberrant splicing. In summary, both the content and the evolution of SSs is shaped by a complex network of interdependences between adjacent nucleotides that respond to a range of sometimes conflicting selective constraints. PMID:26642327

  9. Aryl substitution of pentacenes

    PubMed Central

    Waterloo, Andreas R; Sale, Anna-Chiara; Lehnherr, Dan; Hampel, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Summary A series of 11 new pentacene derivatives has been synthesized, with unsymmetrical substitution based on a trialkylsilylethynyl group at the 6-position and various aryl groups appended to the 13-position. The electronic and physical properties of the new pentacene chromophores have been analyzed by UV–vis spectroscopy (solution and thin films), thermoanalytical methods (DSC and TGA), cyclic voltammetry, as well as X-ray crystallography (for 8 derivatives). X-ray crystallography has been specifically used to study the influence of unsymmetrical substitution on the solid-state packing of the pentacene derivatives. The obtained results add to our ability to better predict substitution patterns that might be helpful for designing new semiconductors for use in solid-state devices. PMID:25161729

  10. Nucleotide Sequence Evolution at the κ-Casein Locus: Evidence for Positive Selection within the Family Bovidae

    PubMed Central

    Ward, T. J.; Honeycutt, R. L.; Derr, J. N.

    1997-01-01

    κ-Casein is a mammalian milk protein involved in a number of important physiological processes. In the gut, the ingested protein is split into an insoluble peptide (para κ-casein) and a soluble hydrophilic glycopeptide (caseinomacropeptide). Caseinomacropeptide is responsible for increased efficiency of digestion, prevention of neonate hypersensitivity to ingested proteins, and inhibition of gastric pathogens. Variation within this peptide has significant effects associated with important traits such as milk production. The nucleotide sequences for regions of κ-casein exon and intron four were determined for representatives of the artiodactyl family Bovidae. The pattern of nucleotide substitution in κ-casein sequences for distantly related bovid taxa demonstrates that positive selection has accelerated their divergence at the amino acid sequence level. This selection has differentially influenced the molecular evolution of the two κ-casein split peptides and is focused within a 34-codon region of caseinomacropeptide. PMID:9409842

  11. Prokaryotic nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Kisker, Caroline; Kuper, Jochen; Van Houten, Bennett

    2013-03-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) has allowed bacteria to flourish in many different niches around the globe that inflict harsh environmental damage to their genetic material. NER is remarkable because of its diverse substrate repertoire, which differs greatly in chemical composition and structure. Recent advances in structural biology and single-molecule studies have given great insight into the structure and function of NER components. This ensemble of proteins orchestrates faithful removal of toxic DNA lesions through a multistep process. The damaged nucleotide is recognized by dynamic probing of the DNA structure that is then verified and marked for dual incisions followed by excision of the damage and surrounding nucleotides. The opposite DNA strand serves as a template for repair, which is completed after resynthesis and ligation. PMID:23457260

  12. Solvent substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Office of Technology Development and the Air Force Engineering and Services Center convened the First Annual International Workshop on Solvent Substitution on December 4--7, 1990. The primary objectives of this joint effort were to share information and ideas among attendees in order to enhance the development and implementation of required new technologies for the elimination of pollutants associated with industrial use of hazardous and toxic solvents; and to aid in accelerating collaborative efforts and technology transfer between government and industry for solvent substitution. There were workshop sessions focusing on Alternative Technologies, Alternative Solvents, Recovery/Recycling, Low VOC Materials and Treatment for Environmentally Safe Disposal. The 35 invited papers presented covered a wide range of solvent substitution activities including: hardware and weapons production and maintenance, paint stripping, coating applications, printed circuit boards, metal cleaning, metal finishing, manufacturing, compliance monitoring and process control monitoring. This publication includes the majority of these presentations. In addition, in order to further facilitate information exchange and technology transfer, the US Air Force and DOE solicited additional papers under a general Call for Papers.'' These papers, which underwent review and final selection by a peer review committee, are also included in this combined Proceedings/Compendium. For those involved in handling, using or managing hazardous and toxic solvents, this document should prove to be a valuable resource, providing the most up-to-date information on current technologies and practices in solvent substitution. Individual papers are abstracted separated.

  13. The application and performance of single nucleotide polymorphism markers for population genetic analyses of Lepidoptera

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are nucleotide substitution mutations that tend to be at high densities within eukaryotic genomes. The development of assays that detect allelic variation at SNP loci is attractive for genome mapping, population genetics, and phylogeographic applications. A p...

  14. Sensory Substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verrillo, Ronald T.

    The idea that the cutaneous surface may be employed as a substitute for the eyes and ears is by no means a modern notion. Although the sense of touch has long been considered as a surrogate for both the visual and auditory modalities, the focus of this chapter will be on the efforts to develop a tactile substitute for hearing, especially that of human speech. The visual system is our primary means of processing information about environmental space such as orientation, distance, direction and size. It is much less effective in making temporal discriminations. The auditory system is unparalleled in processing information that involves rapid sequences of temporal events, such as speech and music. The tactile sense is capable of processing both spatial and temporal information although not as effective in either domain as the eye or the ear.

  15. Detection of nonneutral substitution rates on mammalian phylogenies

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, Katherine S.; Hubisz, Melissa J.; Rosenbloom, Kate R.; Siepel, Adam

    2010-01-01

    Methods for detecting nucleotide substitution rates that are faster or slower than expected under neutral drift are widely used to identify candidate functional elements in genomic sequences. However, most existing methods consider either reductions (conservation) or increases (acceleration) in rate but not both, or assume that selection acts uniformly across the branches of a phylogeny. Here we examine the more general problem of detecting departures from the neutral rate of substitution in either direction, possibly in a clade-specific manner. We consider four statistical, phylogenetic tests for addressing this problem: a likelihood ratio test, a score test, a test based on exact distributions of numbers of substitutions, and the genomic evolutionary rate profiling (GERP) test. All four tests have been implemented in a freely available program called phyloP. Based on extensive simulation experiments, these tests are remarkably similar in statistical power. With 36 mammalian species, they all appear to be capable of fairly good sensitivity with low false-positive rates in detecting strong selection at individual nucleotides, moderate selection in 3-bp elements, and weaker or clade-specific selection in longer elements. By applying phyloP to mammalian multiple alignments from the ENCODE project, we shed light on patterns of conservation/acceleration in known and predicted functional elements, approximate fractions of sites subject to constraint, and differences in clade-specific selection in the primate and glires clades. We also describe new “Conservation” tracks in the UCSC Genome Browser that display both phyloP and phastCons scores for genome-wide alignments of 44 vertebrate species. PMID:19858363

  16. Phase-partitioning and site-substitution patterns of molybdenum in a model Ni-Al-Mo superalloy: An atom-probe tomographic and first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Yiyou; Mao, Zugang; Seidman, David N.

    2012-09-01

    Atom-probe tomography (APT) and first-principles calculations are employed to investigate the partitioning of Mo in the γ(f.c.c.)-and γ'(L12)-phases in a model Ni-6.5Al-9.9Mo at. % superalloy. Mo is experimentally observed to partition preferentially to the γ(f.c.c.)-matrix, which is consistent with the smaller value of the γ(f.c.c.)-matrix substitutional formation-energy, with a driving force of 0.707 eV for partitioning as determined by first-principles calculations. APT measurements of the γ'(L12)-precipitate-phase composition and Al-, Mo-centered partial radial distribution functions indicate that Mo occupies the Al sublattice sites of the Ni3Al(L12) phase. The preferential site-substitution of Mo at Al sublattice sites is confirmed by first-principles calculations.

  17. Direct C-C coupling of two Ni-salphen complexes to yield dinickel-disalphen complexes with symmetric and non-symmetric substitution-patterns.

    PubMed

    Bugenhagen, B E C; Prosenc, M H

    2016-04-25

    The synthesis of symmetric and non-symmetric 5,5'-linked disalophen Ni(ii) complexes by the Suzuki-Miyaura-reaction is reported. Also, the synthesis and structural characterization of four Ni(ii)-precursor complexes are presented. The 5-Br-substituted mononuclear complexes and are coupled to the pinacolborane substituted complexes and yielding the four dinuclear dinickel complexes in good yields. The crystal structure of dinuclear complex was obtained revealing a coplanar arrangement between the two salophen fragments. Electronic spectra as well as DFT-calculations on the ground states and excitation energies are reported and they reveal a small coupling between the electronically saturated Ni-salophen complexes. PMID:27040080

  18. Performance of likelihood ratio tests of evolutionary hypotheses under inadequate substitution models.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J

    1999-06-01

    In recent years, likelihood ratio tests (LRTs) based on DNA and protein sequence data have been proposed for testing various evolutionary hypotheses. Because conducting an LRT requires an evolutionary model of nucleotide or amino acid substitution, which is almost always unknown, it becomes important to investigate the robustness of LRTs to violations of assumptions of these evolutionary models. Computer simulation was used to examine performance of LRTs of the molecular clock, transition/transversion bias, and among-site rate variation under different substitution models. The results showed that when correct models are used, LRTs perform quite well even when the DNA sequences are as short as 300 nt. However, LRTs were found to be biased under incorrect models. The extent of bias varies considerably, depending on the hypotheses tested, the substitution models assumed, and the lengths of the sequences used, among other things. A preliminary simulation study also suggests that LRTs based on parametric bootstrapping may be more sensitive to substitution models than are standard LRTs. When an assumed substitution model is grossly wrong and a more realistic model is available, LRTs can often reject the wrong model; thus, the performance of LRTs may be improved by using a more appropriate model. On the other hand, many factors of molecular evolution have not been considered in any substitution models so far built, and the possibility of an influence of this negligence on LRTs is often overlooked. The dependence of LRTs on substitution models calls for caution in interpreting test results and highlights the importance of clarifying the substitution patterns of genes and proteins and building more realistic models. PMID:10368963

  19. Nucleotide cleaving agents and method

    DOEpatents

    Que, Jr., Lawrence; Hanson, Richard S.; Schnaith, Leah M. T.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a unique series of nucleotide cleaving agents and a method for cleaving a nucleotide sequence, whether single-stranded or double-stranded DNA or RNA, using and a cationic metal complex having at least one polydentate ligand to cleave the nucleotide sequence phosphate backbone to yield a hydroxyl end and a phosphate end.

  20. Electrophoretic Transport of Single DNA Nucleotides through Nanoslits: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Xia, Kai; Novak, Brian R; Weerakoon-Ratnayake, Kumuditha M; Soper, Steven A; Nikitopoulos, Dimitris E; Moldovan, Dorel

    2015-09-01

    There is potential for flight time based DNA sequencing involving disassembly into individual nucleotides which would pass through a nanochannel with two or more detectors. We performed molecular dynamics simulations of electrophoretic motion of single DNA nucleotides through 3 nm wide hydrophobic slits with both smooth and rough walls. The electric field (E) varied from 0.0 to 0.6 V/nm. The nucleotides adsorb and desorb from walls multiple times during their transit through the slit. The nucleotide-wall interactions differed due to nucleotide hydrophobicities and wall roughness which determined duration and frequency of nucleotide adsorptions and their velocities while adsorbed. Transient association of nucleotides with one, two, or three sodium ions occurred, but the mean association numbers (ANs) were weak functions of nucleotide type. Nucleotide-wall interactions contributed more to separation of nucleotide flight time distributions than ion association and thus indicate that nucleotide-wall interactions play a defining role in successfully discriminating between nucleotides on the basis of their flight times through nanochannels/slits. With smooth walls, smaller nucleotides moved faster, but with rough walls larger nucleotides moved faster due to fewer favorable wall adsorption sites. This indicates that roughness, or surface patterning, might be exploited to achieve better time-of-flight based discrimination between nucleotides. PMID:26237155

  1. Vitreous Substitutes.

    PubMed

    Foster, William Joseph

    2008-04-01

    Modern vitreoretinal surgery is a young science. While tremendous developments have occurred in instrument design and technique since Machemer first described vitrectomy surgery in 1973[1], the application of advanced materials concepts to the development of intra-ocular compounds is a particularly exciting area of research. To date, the development of vitreous substitutes has played a significant role in enabling the dramatic and progressive improvement in surgical outcome, but perhaps no other area of research has the potential to further improve the treatment of retinal detachment and other retinal disorders. While prior research has focused solely upon the ability of a compound to re-attach the retina, future research should seek to enable the surgeon to inhibit the development of proliferative vitreoretinopathy and re-detachment, the integration of stem-cell therapies with surgical retina, long-term delivery of medications to the posterior segment, and the promotion of more rapid and complete visual rehabilitation. PMID:19343097

  2. Chiral propargylic cations as intermediates in SN1-type reactions: substitution pattern, nuclear magnetic resonance studies, and origin of the diastereoselectivity.

    PubMed

    Nitsch, Dominik; Huber, Stefan M; Pöthig, Alexander; Narayanan, Arjun; Olah, George A; Prakash, G K Surya; Bach, Thorsten

    2014-02-19

    Nine propargylic acetates, bearing a stereogenic center (-C*HXR(2)) adjacent to the electrophilic carbon atom, were prepared and subjected to SN1-type substitution reactions with various silyl nucleophiles employing bismuth trifluoromethanesulfonate [Bi(OTf)3] as the Lewis acid. The diastereoselectivity of the reactions was high when the alkyl group R(2) was tertiary (tert-butyl), irrespective of the substituent X. Products were formed consistently with a diastereomeric ratio larger than 95:5 in favor of the anti-diastereoisomer. If the alkyl substitutent R(2) was secondary, the diastereoselectivity decreased to 80:20. The reaction was shown to proceed stereoconvergently, and the relative product configuration was elucidated. The reaction outcome is explained by invoking a chiral propargylic cation as an intermediate, which is preferentially attacked by the nucleophile from one of its two diastereotopic faces. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggest a preferred conformation in which the group R(2) is almost perpendicular to the plane defined by the three substituents at the cationic center, with the nucleophile approaching the electrophilic center opposite to R(2). Transition states calculated for the reaction of allyltrimethylsilane with two representative cations support this hypothesis. Tertiary propargylic cations with a stereogenic center (-C*HXR(2)) in the α position were generated by ionization of the respective alcohol precursors with FSO3H in SO2ClF at -80 °C. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were obtained for five cations, and the chemical shifts could be unambiguously assigned. The preferred conformation of the cations as extracted from nuclear Overhauser experiments is in line with the preferred conformation responsible for the reaction of the secondary propargylic cations. PMID:24494822

  3. Healing patterns of critical size bony defects in rats after grafting with bone substitutes soaked in recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2: histological and histometric evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mokbel, N; Naaman, N; Nohra, J; Badawi, N

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of different bone substitutes soaked in recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) on the healing of critical size defects in calvarial bone. Defects were created in 24 Sprague Dawley rats. The rhBMP-2 was diluted to obtain a final concentration of 0.2mg/ml. Rats were divided into four groups and treated as follows: in the first group the defect was filled with anorganic bovine bone mineral (ABBM) and rhBMP-2, the second group was treated with freeze-dried bone allograft (FDBA) and rhBMP-2, and the third group was treated with autogenous bone (AUTO). In the control group the defects were left untreated. Animals were killed after 8weeks and calcified histological sections prepared. Histometric measurements showed that mean (SD) bone formation was 4.00 (1.69)mm(2) in the ABBM group, 2.56 (1.06)mm(2) in the FDBA group, and 2.30 (0.34)mm(2) in the AUTO group. The difference between the ABBM group and the other 3 groups was significant (p<0.0001) with a mean bone formation of 0.82 (0.25)mm(2) in the control group. There was no significant difference between the FDBA and the AUTO groups (p=0.96). Within the limits of this study we concluded that the addition of rhBMP-2 to bone substitutes was efficacious in regenerating bone in critical size bone defects in calveria in rats. PMID:22939894

  4. Pathways of Nucleotide Biosynthesis in Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Alana; Finch, Lloyd R.

    1977-01-01

    By measuring the specific activity of nucleotides isolated from ribonucleic acid after the incorporation of 14C-labeled precursors under various conditions of growth, we have defined the major pathways of ribonucleotide synthesis in Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides. M. mycoides did not possess pathways for the de novo synthesis of nucleotides but was capable of interconversion of nucleotides. Thus, uracil provided the requirement for both pyrimidine ribonucleotides. Thymine is also required, suggesting that the methylation step is unavailable. No use was made of cytosine. Uridine was rapidly degraded to uracil. Cytidine competed effectively with uracil to provide most of the cytidine nucleotide and also provided an appreciable proportion of uridine nucleotide. In keeping with these results, there was a slow deamination of cytidine to uridine with further degradation to uracil in cultures of M. mycoides. Guanine was capable of meeting the full requirement of the organism for purine nucleotide, presumably by conversion of guanosine 5′-monophosphate to adenosine 5′-monophosphate via the intermediate inosine 5′-monophosphate. When available with guanine, adenine effectively gave a complete provision of adenine nucleotide, whereas hypoxanthine gave a partial provision. Neither adenine nor hypoxanthine was able to act as a precursor for the synthesis of guanine nucleotide. Exogenous guanosine, inosine, and adenosine underwent rapid cleavage to the corresponding bases and so show a pattern of utilization similar to that of the latter. PMID:324972

  5. Nucleotide sequence of SHV-2 beta-lactamase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Garbarg-Chenon, A.; Godard, V.; Labia, R.; Nicolas, J.C. )

    1990-07-01

    The nucleotide sequence of plasmid-mediated beta-lactamase SHV-2 from Salmonella typhimurium (SHV-2pHT1) was determined. The gene was very similar to chromosomally encoded beta-lactamase LEN-1 of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Compared with the sequence of the Escherichia coli SHV-2 enzyme (SHV-2E.coli) obtained by protein sequencing, the deduced amino acid sequence of SHV-2pHT1 differed by three amino acid substitutions.

  6. A novel method for the analysis of the substitution pattern of O-methyl-[alpha]- and [beta]-1,4-glucans by means of electrospray ionisation-mass spectrometry/collision induced dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adden, Roland; Mischnick, Petra

    2005-03-01

    The substitution pattern of O-methyl amylose and O-methyl cellulose was analysed after per-O-methylation (Me-d3), and partial hydrolysis by subsequent ESI-MS/CID of the sodium (MS2) and the lithium adducts (MS3). Based on previous studies about the influence of regioselective O-methylation on the fragmentation pathways of malto- and cello-oligosaccharides, we could calculate the contribution of a certain methyl pattern to a distinct signal in the reproducible ESI-MS2 daughter spectrum. Signal intensities obtained from each O-methyl-O-methyl-d3 disaccharide were distributed on the corresponding methyl patterns and accumulated for all peaks of the mother mass spectrum. Data from ESI-MS2 were not sufficient for disaccharides bearing methyl and deuteromethyl groups in the combination 2 and 4, 3 and 3, or 4 and 2. Further independent information was obtained by ESI-MS3 of the lithium adducts. Monomer composition of methyl celluloses and methyl amyloses obtained by this novel approach were in very good agreement with reference data from GLC of the partially methylated glucitol acetates after complete hydrolysis, reduction and acetylation.

  7. Labeled nucleotide phosphate (NP) probes

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2009-02-03

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  8. Multiple Base Substitution Corrections in DNA Sequence Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalczuk, M.; Mackiewicz, P.; Szczepanik, D.; Nowicka, A.; Dudkiewicz, M.; Dudek, M. R.; Cebrat, S.

    We discuss the Jukes and Cantor's one-parameter model and Kimura's two-parameter model unability to describe evolution of asymmetric DNA molecules. The standard distance measure between two DNA sequences, which is the number of substitutions per site, should include the effect of multiple base substitutions separately for each type of the base. Otherwise, the respective tables of substitutions cannot reconstruct the asymmetric DNA molecule with respect to the composition. Basing on Kimura's neutral theory, we have derived a linear law for the correlation of the mean survival time of nucleotides under constant mutation pressure and their fraction in the genome. According to the law, the corrections to Kimura's theory have been discussed to describe evolution of genomes with asymmetric nucleotide composition. We consider the particular case of the strongly asymmetric Borrelia burgdorferi genome and we discuss in detail the corrections, which should be introduced into the distance measure between two DNA sequences to include multiple base substitutions.

  9. Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of carbohydrates and nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Shin, Joong-Won; Bernstein, Elliot R

    2014-01-28

    Carbohydrates (2-deoxyribose, ribose, and xylose) and nucleotides (adenosine-, cytidine-, guanosine-, and uridine-5(')-monophosphate) are generated in the gas phase, and ionized with vacuum ultraviolet photons (VUV, 118.2 nm). The observed time of flight mass spectra of the carbohydrate fragmentation are similar to those observed [J.-W. Shin, F. Dong, M. Grisham, J. J. Rocca, and E. R. Bernstein, Chem. Phys. Lett. 506, 161 (2011)] for 46.9 nm photon ionization, but with more intensity in higher mass fragment ions. The tendency of carbohydrate ions to fragment extensively following ionization seemingly suggests that nucleic acids might undergo radiation damage as a result of carbohydrate, rather than nucleobase fragmentation. VUV photoionization of nucleotides (monophosphate-carbohydrate-nucleobase), however, shows that the carbohydrate-nucleobase bond is the primary fragmentation site for these species. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the removed carbohydrate electrons by the 118.2 nm photons are associated with endocyclic C-C and C-O ring centered orbitals: loss of electron density in the ring bonds of the nascent ion can thus account for the observed fragmentation patterns following carbohydrate ionization. DFT calculations also indicate that electrons removed from nucleotides under these same conditions are associated with orbitals involved with the nucleobase-saccharide linkage electron density. The calculations give a general mechanism and explanation of the experimental results. PMID:25669546

  10. Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of carbohydrates and nucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Joong-Won; Bernstein, Elliot R.

    2014-01-28

    Carbohydrates (2-deoxyribose, ribose, and xylose) and nucleotides (adenosine-, cytidine-, guanosine-, and uridine-5{sup ′}-monophosphate) are generated in the gas phase, and ionized with vacuum ultraviolet photons (VUV, 118.2 nm). The observed time of flight mass spectra of the carbohydrate fragmentation are similar to those observed [J.-W. Shin, F. Dong, M. Grisham, J. J. Rocca, and E. R. Bernstein, Chem. Phys. Lett. 506, 161 (2011)] for 46.9 nm photon ionization, but with more intensity in higher mass fragment ions. The tendency of carbohydrate ions to fragment extensively following ionization seemingly suggests that nucleic acids might undergo radiation damage as a result of carbohydrate, rather than nucleobase fragmentation. VUV photoionization of nucleotides (monophosphate-carbohydrate-nucleobase), however, shows that the carbohydrate-nucleobase bond is the primary fragmentation site for these species. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the removed carbohydrate electrons by the 118.2 nm photons are associated with endocyclic C–C and C–O ring centered orbitals: loss of electron density in the ring bonds of the nascent ion can thus account for the observed fragmentation patterns following carbohydrate ionization. DFT calculations also indicate that electrons removed from nucleotides under these same conditions are associated with orbitals involved with the nucleobase-saccharide linkage electron density. The calculations give a general mechanism and explanation of the experimental results.

  11. Unified optical symbolic substitution processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casasent, David P.

    1990-07-01

    Symbolic substitution operations can be realized optically on a correlator. This is a very attractive and efficient architecture for symbolic substitution. It allows parallel multichannel realization with a fixed set of filters (on film or easily realized on low space bandwidth product spatial light modulators) using space and frequency-multiplexing or sequential filters. All basic logic, numeric and morphological image processing functions can be achieved by symbolic substitution. Moreover, all operations are possible on one multifunctional optical processor. Morphological operations are felt to be essential for ATR and pattern recognition preprocessing in clutter. They greatly improve the role for optics by allowing the same optical architecture to be used for low, medium and high level vision.

  12. A novel skew analysis reveals substitution asymmetries linked to genetic code GC-biases and PolIII a-subunit isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Apostolou-Karampelis, Konstantinos; Nikolaou, Christoforos; Almirantis, Yannis

    2016-01-01

    Strand biases reflect deviations from a null expectation of DNA evolution that assumes strand-symmetric substitution rates. Here, we present strong evidence that nearest-neighbour preferences are a strand-biased feature of bacterial genomes, indicating neighbour-dependent substitution asymmetries. To detect such asymmetries we introduce an alignment free index (relative abundance skews). The profiles of relative abundance skews along coding sequences can trace the phylogenetic relations of bacteria, suggesting that the patterns of neighbour-dependent substitution strand-biases are not common among different lineages, but are rather species-specific. Analysis of neighbour-dependent and codon-site skews sheds light on the origins of substitution asymmetries. Via a simple model we argue that the structure of the genetic code imposes position-dependent substitution strand-biases along coding sequences, as a response to GC mutation pressure. Thus, the organization of the genetic code per se can lead to an uneven distribution of nucleotides among different codon sites, even when requirements for specific codons and amino-acids are not accounted for. Moreover, our results suggest that strand-biases in replication fidelity of PolIII α-subunit induce substitution asymmetries, both neighbour-dependent and independent, on a genome scale. The role of DNA repair systems, such as transcription-coupled repair, is also considered. PMID:27345720

  13. Recent Trends in Nucleotide Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Roy, Béatrice; Depaix, Anaïs; Périgaud, Christian; Peyrottes, Suzanne

    2016-07-27

    Focusing on the recent literature (since 2000), this review outlines the main synthetic approaches for the preparation of 5'-mono-, 5'-di-, and 5'-triphosphorylated nucleosides, also known as nucleotides, as well as several derivatives, namely, cyclic nucleotides and dinucleotides, dinucleoside 5',5'-polyphosphates, sugar nucleotides, and nucleolipids. Endogenous nucleotides and their analogues can be obtained enzymatically, which is often restricted to natural substrates, or chemically. In chemical synthesis, protected or unprotected nucleosides can be used as the starting material, depending on the nature of the reagents selected from P(III) or P(V) species. Both solution-phase and solid-support syntheses have been developed and are reported here. Although a considerable amount of research has been conducted in this field, further work is required because chemists are still faced with the challenge of developing a universal methodology that is compatible with a large variety of nucleoside analogues. PMID:27319940

  14. Borate substituted ettringites

    SciTech Connect

    Csetenyi, L.J.; Glasser, F.P.

    1993-12-31

    The setting of cement is adversely affected by soluble borates. To reduce interference, the extent to which borate can be insolubilized has been investigated. One specific mechanism of insolubilization is by inclusion into ettringite. Ettringite, Ca{sub 6}Al{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}(OH){sub 12}{center_dot}26H{sub 2}O, is a normal and stable constituent of Portland cement. It has an open but non-zeolitic framework. Borate can substitute partially or fully for sulfate. Formation conditions, solubility and stability of borate ettringites, Ca{sub 6}Al{sub 2}(BO{sub 4}){sub 2-4}(OH,O){sub 12}{center_dot}26H{sub 2}O, are characterized using XRD, IR, DTA, and SEM. The potential durability of borate ettringites in a repository environment have been assessed by exposing it to Na-sulfate and Na-carbonate attack at different concentrations. Ion exchange occurs; back substitution of borate by sulfate is incomplete; high carbonate concentrations can, however, decompose borate ettringite. On heat treatment up to 85{degrees}C the crystalline morphology and the OH arrangement of the structure are altered, but the X-ray powder pattern, and hence its structural framework are largely unaffected. It is concluded that ettringite has potential to reduce the solubility of borate.

  15. Patterns of Protein Evolution in Cytochrome c Oxidase 1 (COI) from the Class Arachnida

    PubMed Central

    Young, Monica R; Hebert, Paul D. N.

    2015-01-01

    Because sequence information is now available for the 648bp barcode region of cytochrome c oxidase 1 (COI) from more than 400,000 animal species, this gene segment can be used to probe patterns of mitochondrial evolution. The present study examines levels of amino acid substitution and the frequency of indels in COI from 4177 species of arachnids, including representatives from all 16 orders and 43% of its families (267/625). It examines divergences at three taxonomic levels—among members of each order to an outgroup, among families in each order and among BINs, a species proxy, in each family. Order Distances vary fourfold (0.10–0.39), while the mean of the Family Distances for the ten orders ranges fivefold (0.07–0.35). BIN Distances show great variation, ranging from 0.01 or less in 12 families to more than 0.25 in eight families. Patterns of amino acid substitution in COI are generally congruent with previously reported variation in nucleotide substitution rates in arachnids, but provide some new insights, such as clear rate acceleration in the Opiliones. By revealing a strong association between elevated rates of nucleotide and amino acid substitution, this study builds evidence for the selective importance of the rate variation among arachnid lineages. Moreover, it establishes that groups whose COI genes have elevated levels of amino acid substitution also regularly possess indels, a dramatic form of protein reconfiguration. Overall, this study suggests that the mitochondrial genome of some arachnid groups is dynamic with high rates of amino acid substitution and frequent indels, while it is ‘locked down’ in others. Dynamic genomes are most prevalent in arachnids with short generation times, but the possible impact of breeding system deserves investigation since many of the rapidly evolving lineages reproduce by haplodiploidy, a mode of reproduction absent in ‘locked down’ taxa. PMID:26308206

  16. Nucleophilic Aromatic Substitution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avila, Walter B.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Described is a microscale organic chemistry experiment which demonstrates one feasible route in preparing ortho-substituted benzoic acids and provides an example of nucleophilic aromatic substitution chemistry. Experimental procedures and instructor notes for this activity are provided. (CW)

  17. The EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database.

    PubMed

    Stoesser, G; Tuli, M A; Lopez, R; Sterk, P

    1999-01-01

    The EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/embl.html) constitutes Europe's primary nucleotide sequence resource. Main sources for DNA and RNA sequences are direct submissions from individual researchers, genome sequencing projects and patent applications. While automatic procedures allow incorporation of sequence data from large-scale genome sequencing centres and from the European Patent Office (EPO), the preferred submission tool for individual submitters is Webin (WWW). Through all stages, dataflow is monitored by EBI biologists communicating with the sequencing groups. In collaboration with DDBJ and GenBank the database is produced, maintained and distributed at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI). Database releases are produced quarterly and are distributed on CD-ROM. Network services allow access to the most up-to-date data collection via Internet and World Wide Web interface. EBI's Sequence Retrieval System (SRS) is a Network Browser for Databanks in Molecular Biology, integrating and linking the main nucleotide and protein databases, plus many specialised databases. For sequence similarity searching a variety of tools (e.g. Blitz, Fasta, Blast etc) are available for external users to compare their own sequences against the most currently available data in the EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database and SWISS-PROT. PMID:9847133

  18. 40 CFR 721.8780 - Substituted pyridine azo substituted phenyl.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Substituted pyridine azo substituted... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8780 Substituted pyridine azo substituted phenyl. (a) Chemical substance... substituted pyridine azo substituted phenyl (PMNs P-96-767 and P-96-773) are subject to reporting under...

  19. 40 CFR 721.8780 - Substituted pyridine azo substituted phenyl.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted pyridine azo substituted... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8780 Substituted pyridine azo substituted phenyl. (a) Chemical substance... substituted pyridine azo substituted phenyl (PMNs P-96-767 and P-96-773) are subject to reporting under...

  20. 40 CFR 721.8780 - Substituted pyridine azo substituted phenyl.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted pyridine azo substituted... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8780 Substituted pyridine azo substituted phenyl. (a) Chemical substance... substituted pyridine azo substituted phenyl (PMNs P-96-767 and P-96-773) are subject to reporting under...

  1. 40 CFR 721.8780 - Substituted pyridine azo substituted phenyl.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted pyridine azo substituted... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8780 Substituted pyridine azo substituted phenyl. (a) Chemical substance... substituted pyridine azo substituted phenyl (PMNs P-96-767 and P-96-773) are subject to reporting under...

  2. 40 CFR 721.8780 - Substituted pyridine azo substituted phenyl.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Substituted pyridine azo substituted... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8780 Substituted pyridine azo substituted phenyl. (a) Chemical substance... substituted pyridine azo substituted phenyl (PMNs P-96-767 and P-96-773) are subject to reporting under...

  3. ADP-2Ho as a Phasing Tool for Nucleotide-Containing Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Ku,S.; Smith, G.; Howell, P.

    2007-01-01

    Trivalent holmium ions were shown to isomorphously replace magnesium ions to form an ADP-2Ho complex in the nucleotide-binding domain of Bacillus subtilis 5-methylthioribose (MTR) kinase. This nucleotide-holmium complex provided sufficient phasing power to allow SAD and SIRAS phasing of this previously unknown structure using the L{sub III} absorption edge of holmium. The structure of ADP-2Ho reveals that the two Ho ions are approximately 4 {angstrom} apart and are likely to share their ligands: the phosphoryl O atoms of ADP and a water molecule. The structure determination of MTR kinase using data collected using Cu K X-radiation was also attempted. Although the heavy-atom substructure determination was successful, interpretation of the map was more challenging. The isomorphous substitution of holmium for magnesium in the MTR kinase-nucleotide complex suggests that this could be a useful phasing tool for other metal-dependent nucleotide-containing proteins.

  4. Applications of adenine nucleotide measurements in oceanography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holm-Hansen, O.; Hodson, R.; Azam, F.

    1975-01-01

    The methodology involved in nucleotide measurements is outlined, along with data to support the premise that ATP concentrations in microbial cells can be extrapolated to biomass parameters. ATP concentrations in microorganisms and nucleotide analyses are studied.

  5. Nucleotide sequences 1986/1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    These eight volumes are the third annual published compendium of nucleic acid sequences included in the European Molecular Biology Laboratory Nucleotide Sequence Data Library and the GenBank Genetic Sequences Data Bank. Each volume surveys one or more subdivisions of the database. The volume subtitles are: Primates; Rodents; Other Vertebrates and Invertebrates, Plants and Organelles, Bacteria and Bacteriophage, Viruses, Structural RNA, Synthetic and Unannotated Sequences, and Database Directory and Master Indices.

  6. The Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Michael

    2003-01-01

    I want to discuss both the Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Consortium and the Human Genome Project. I am afraid most of my presentation will be thin on law and possibly too high on rhetoric. Having been engaged in a personal and direct way with these issues as a trained scientist, I find it quite difficult to be always as objective as I ought to be.

  7. Nucleotides in neuroregeneration and neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Miras-Portugal, M Teresa; Gomez-Villafuertes, Rosa; Gualix, Javier; Diaz-Hernandez, Juan Ignacio; Artalejo, Antonio R; Ortega, Felipe; Delicado, Esmerilda G; Perez-Sen, Raquel

    2016-05-01

    Brain injury generates the release of a multitude of factors including extracellular nucleotides, which exhibit bi-functional properties and contribute to both detrimental actions in the acute phase and also protective and reparative actions in the later recovery phase to allow neuroregeneration. A promising strategy toward restoration of neuronal function is based on activation of endogenous adult neural stem/progenitor cells. The implication of purinergic signaling in stem cell biology, including regulation of proliferation, differentiation, and cell death has become evident in the last decade. In this regard, current strategies of acute transplantation of ependymal stem/progenitor cells after spinal cord injury restore altered expression of P2X4 and P2X7 receptors and improve functional locomotor recovery. The expression of both receptors is transcriptionally regulated by Sp1 factor, which plays a key role in the startup of the transcription machinery to induce regeneration-associated genes expression. Finally, general signaling pathways triggered by nucleotide receptors in neuronal populations converge on several intracellular kinases, such as PI3K/Akt, GSK3 and ERK1,2, as well as the Nrf-2/heme oxigenase-1 axis, which specifically link them to neuroprotection. In this regard, regulation of dual specificity protein phosphatases can become novel mechanism of actions for nucleotide receptors that associate them to cell homeostasis regulation. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Purines in Neurodegeneration and Neuroregeneration'. PMID:26359530

  8. Evaluating Rare Amino Acid Substitutions (RGC_CAMs) in a Yeast Model Clade

    PubMed Central

    Polzin, Kenneth; Rokas, Antonis

    2014-01-01

    When inferring phylogenetic relationships, not all sites in a sequence alignment are equally informative. One recently proposed approach that takes advantage of this inequality relies on sites that contain amino acids whose replacement requires multiple substitutions. Identifying these so-called RGC_CAM substitutions (after Rare Genomic Changes as Conserved Amino acids-Multiple substitutions) requires that, first, at any given site in the amino acid sequence alignment, there must be a minimum of two different amino acids; second, each amino acid must be present in at least two taxa; and third, the amino acids must require a minimum of two nucleotide substitutions to replace each other. Although theory suggests that RGC_CAM substitutions are expected to be rare and less likely to be homoplastic, the informativeness of RGC_CAM substitutions has not been extensively evaluated in biological data sets. We investigated the quality of RGC_CAM substitutions by examining their degree of homoplasy and internode certainty in nearly 2.7 million aligned amino acid sites from 5,261 proteins from five species belonging to the yeast Saccharomyces sensu stricto clade whose phylogeny is well-established. We identified 2,647 sites containing RGC_CAM substitutions, a number that contrasts sharply with the 100,887 sites containing RGC_non-CAM substitutions (i.e., changes between amino acids that require only a single nucleotide substitution). We found that RGC_CAM substitutions had significantly lower homoplasy than RGC_non-CAM ones; specifically RGC_CAM substitutions showed a per-site average homoplasy index of 0.100, whereas RGC_non-CAM substitutions had a homoplasy index of 0.215. Internode certainty values were also higher for sites containing RGC_CAM substitutions than for RGC_non-CAM ones. These results suggest that RGC_CAM substitutions possess a strong phylogenetic signal and are useful markers for phylogenetic inference despite their rarity. PMID:24637883

  9. Managing Substitute Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Kevin R.

    1999-01-01

    This news brief presents information on managing substitute teaching. The information is based on issues discussed at a summit meeting which included public school administrators and personnel directors from around the nation. The main topics of concern focused around four core components related to the management of substitute teaching:…

  10. Nucleotide composition of CO1 sequences in Chelicerata (Arthropoda): detecting new mitogenomic rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Arabi, Juliette; Judson, Mark L I; Deharveng, Louis; Lourenço, Wilson R; Cruaud, Corinne; Hassanin, Alexandre

    2012-02-01

    Here we study the evolution of nucleotide composition in third codon-positions of CO1 sequences of Chelicerata, using a phylogenetic framework, based on 180 taxa and three markers (CO1, 18S, and 28S rRNA; 5,218 nt). The analyses of nucleotide composition were also extended to all CO1 sequences of Chelicerata found in GenBank (1,701 taxa). The results show that most species of Chelicerata have a positive strand bias in CO1, i.e., in favor of C nucleotides, including all Amblypygi, Palpigradi, Ricinulei, Solifugae, Uropygi, and Xiphosura. However, several taxa show a negative strand bias, i.e., in favor of G nucleotides: all Scorpiones, Opisthothelae spiders and several taxa within Acari, Opiliones, Pseudoscorpiones, and Pycnogonida. Several reversals of strand-specific bias can be attributed to either a rearrangement of the control region or an inversion of a fragment containing the CO1 gene. Key taxa for which sequencing of complete mitochondrial genomes will be necessary to determine the origin and nature of mtDNA rearrangements involved in the reversals are identified. Acari, Opiliones, Pseudoscorpiones, and Pycnogonida were found to show a strong variability in nucleotide composition. In addition, both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes have been affected by higher substitution rates in Acari and Pseudoscorpiones. The results therefore indicate that these two orders are more liable to fix mutations of all types, including base substitutions, indels, and genomic rearrangements. PMID:22362465

  11. Nicotinamide nucleotide synthesis in regenerating rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, G. M.; Clark, J. B.

    1971-01-01

    1. The concentrations and total content of the nicotinamide nucleotides were measured in the livers of rats at various times after partial hepatectomy and laparotomy (sham hepatectomy) and correlated with other events in the regeneration process. 2. The NAD content and concentration in rat liver were relatively unaffected by laparotomy, but fell to a minimum, 25 and 33% below control values respectively, 24h after partial hepatectomy. NADP content and concentration were affected similarly by both laparotomy and partial hepatectomy, falling rapidly and remaining depressed for up to 48h. 3. The effect of injecting various doses of nicotinamide on the liver DNA and NAD 18h after partial hepatectomy was studied and revealed an inverse correlation between NAD content and DNA content. 4. Injections of nicotinamide at various times after partial hepatectomy revealed that the ability to synthesize NAD from nicotinamide was impaired during the first 12h, rose to a peak at 26h and fell again by 48h after partial hepatectomy. 5. The total liver activity of NAD pyrophosphorylase (EC 2.7.7.1) remained at or slightly above the initial value for 12h after partial hepatectomy and then rose continuously until 48h after operation. The activity of NMN pyrophosphorylase (EC 2.4.2.12) showed a similar pattern of change after partial hepatectomy, but was at no time greater than 5% of the activity of NAD pyrophosphorylase. 6. The results are discussed with reference to the control of NAD synthesis in rapidly dividing tissue. It is suggested that the availability of cofactors and substrates for NAD synthesis is more important as a controlling factor than the maximum enzyme activities. It is concluded that the low concentrations of nicotinamide nucleotides in rapidly dividing tissues are the result of competition between NAD synthesis and nucleic acid synthesis for common precursor and cofactors. PMID:4398891

  12. 40 CFR 721.981 - Substituted naphtholoazo-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex. 721.981 Section 721.981 Protection of Environment...-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex. (a) Chemical substance and significant new... naphtholoazo-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex (PMN P-93-1631) is subject...

  13. 40 CFR 721.981 - Substituted naphtholoazo-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex. 721.981 Section 721.981 Protection of Environment...-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex. (a) Chemical substance and significant new... naphtholoazo-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex (PMN P-93-1631) is subject...

  14. 40 CFR 721.981 - Substituted naphtholoazo-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex. 721.981 Section 721.981 Protection of Environment...-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex. (a) Chemical substance and significant new... naphtholoazo-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex (PMN P-93-1631) is subject...

  15. 40 CFR 721.981 - Substituted naphtholoazo-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex. 721.981 Section 721.981 Protection of Environment...-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex. (a) Chemical substance and significant new... naphtholoazo-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex (PMN P-93-1631) is subject...

  16. 40 CFR 721.981 - Substituted naphtholoazo-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex. 721.981 Section 721.981 Protection of Environment...-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex. (a) Chemical substance and significant new... naphtholoazo-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex (PMN P-93-1631) is subject...

  17. Sugar substitutes during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Eliza; Koren, Gideon; Bozzo, Pina

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Question I have a pregnant patient who regularly consumes sugar substitutes and she asked me if continuing their use would affect her pregnancy or child. What should I tell her, and are there certain options that are better for use during pregnancy? Answer Although more research is required to fully determine the effects of in utero exposure to sugar substitutes, the available data do not suggest adverse effects in pregnancy. However, it is recommended that sugar substitutes be consumed in moderate amounts, adhering to the acceptable daily intake standards set by regulatory agencies. PMID:25392440

  18. High-throughput profiling of nucleotides and nucleotide sugars to evaluate their impact on antibody N-glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Villiger, Thomas K; Steinhoff, Robert F; Ivarsson, Marija; Solacroup, Thomas; Stettler, Matthieu; Broly, Hervé; Krismer, Jasmin; Pabst, Martin; Zenobi, Renato; Morbidelli, Massimo; Soos, Miroslav

    2016-07-10

    Recent advances in miniaturized cell culture systems have facilitated the screening of media additives on productivity and protein quality attributes of mammalian cell cultures. However, intracellular components are not routinely measured due to the limited throughput of available analytical techniques. In this work, time profiling of intracellular nucleotides and nucleotide sugars of CHO-S cell fed-batch processes in a micro-scale bioreactor system was carried out using a recently developed high-throughput method based on matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS). Supplementation of various media additives significantly altered the intracellular nucleotides and nucleotide sugars that are inextricably linked to the process of glycosylation. The results revealed that UDP-Gal synthesis appeared to be particularly limiting whereas the impact of elevated UDP-GlcNAc and GDP-Fuc levels on the final glycosylation patterns was only marginally important. In contrast, manganese and asparagine supplementation altered the glycan profiles without affecting intracellular components. The combination of miniaturized cell cultures and high-throughput analytical techniques serves therefore as a useful tool for future quality driven media optimization studies. PMID:27131894

  19. Chemical characterization of silicon-substituted hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Gibson, I R; Best, S M; Bonfield, W

    1999-03-15

    Bioceramic specimens have been prepared by incorporating a small amount of silicon (0.4 wt %) into the structure of hydroxyapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, HA] via an aqueous precipitation reaction to produce a silicon-substituted hydroxyapatite (Si-HA). The results of chemical analysis confirmed the proposed substitution of the silicon (or silicate) ion for the phosphorus (or phosphate) ion in hydroxyapatite. The Si-HA was produced by first preparing a silicon-substituted apatite (Si-Ap) by a precipitation process. A single-phase Si-HA was obtained by heating/calcining the as-prepared Si-Ap to temperatures above 700 degrees C; no secondary phases, such as tricalcium phosphate (TCP), tetracalcium phosphate (TeCP), or calcium oxide (CaO), were observed by X-ray diffraction analysis. Although the X-ray diffraction patterns of Si-HA and stoichiometric HA appeared to be identical, refinement of the diffraction data revealed some small structural differences between the two materials. The silicon substitution in the HA lattice resulted in a small decrease in the a axis and an increase in the c axis of the unit cell. This substitution also caused a decrease in the number of hydroxyl (OH) groups in the unit cell, which was expected from the proposed substitution mechanism. The incorporation of silicon in the HA lattice resulted in an increase in the distortion of the PO4 tetrahedra, indicated by an increase in the distortion index. Analysis of the Si-HA by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy indicated that although the amount of silicon incorporated into the HA lattice was small, silicon substitution appeared to affect the FTIR spectra of HA, in particular the P-O vibrational bands. The results demonstrate that phase-pure silicon-substituted hydroxyapatite may be prepared using a simple precipitation technique. PMID:10397946

  20. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David B.; Lao, Guifang

    1998-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium.

  1. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, D.B.; Lao, G.

    1998-01-06

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium. 3 figs.

  2. Substitution of anticonvulsant drugs

    PubMed Central

    Steinhoff, Bernhard J; Runge, Uwe; Witte, Otto W; Stefan, Hermann; Hufnagel, Andreas; Mayer, Thomas; Krämer, Günter

    2009-01-01

    Changing from branded drugs to generic alternatives, or between different generic formulations, is common practice aiming at reducing health care costs. It has been suggested that antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) should be exempt from substitution because of the potential negative consequences of adverse events and breakthrough seizures. Controlled data are lacking on the risk of substitution. However, retrospective data from large medical claims databases suggest that switching might be associated with increased use of AED and non-AED medications, and health care resources (including hospitalization). In addition, some anecdotal evidence from patients and health care providers’ surveys suggest a potentially negative impact of substitution. Well-controlled data are needed to assess the real risk associated with substitution, allowing health care professionals involved in the care of patients with epilepsy to make informed decisions. This paper reviews currently available literature, based on which the authors suggest that the decision to substitute should be made on an individual basis by the physician and an informed patient. Unendorsed or undisclosed substitution at the pharmacy level should be discouraged. PMID:19707254

  3. Mosaic organization of DNA nucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, C. K.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Havlin, S.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1994-01-01

    Long-range power-law correlations have been reported recently for DNA sequences containing noncoding regions. We address the question of whether such correlations may be a trivial consequence of the known mosaic structure ("patchiness") of DNA. We analyze two classes of controls consisting of patchy nucleotide sequences generated by different algorithms--one without and one with long-range power-law correlations. Although both types of sequences are highly heterogenous, they are quantitatively distinguishable by an alternative fluctuation analysis method that differentiates local patchiness from long-range correlations. Application of this analysis to selected DNA sequences demonstrates that patchiness is not sufficient to account for long-range correlation properties.

  4. Nucleotide excision repair in humans.

    PubMed

    Spivak, Graciela

    2015-12-01

    The demonstration of DNA damage excision and repair replication by Setlow, Howard-Flanders, Hanawalt and their colleagues in the early 1960s, constituted the discovery of the ubiquitous pathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER). The serial steps in NER are similar in organisms from unicellular bacteria to complex mammals and plants, and involve recognition of lesions, adducts or structures that disrupt the DNA double helix, removal of a short oligonucleotide containing the offending lesion, synthesis of a repair patch copying the opposite undamaged strand, and ligation, to restore the DNA to its original form. The transcription-coupled repair (TCR) subpathway of NER, discovered nearly two decades later, is dedicated to the removal of lesions from the template DNA strands of actively transcribed genes. In this review I will outline the essential factors and complexes involved in NER in humans, and will comment on additional factors and metabolic processes that affect the efficiency of this important process. PMID:26388429

  5. Nucleotide and phylogenetic analyses of the Chlamydia trachomatis ompA gene indicates it is a hotspot for mutation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Serovars of the human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis occupy one of three specific tissue niches. Genomic analyses indicate that the serovars have a phylogeny congruent with their pathobiology and have an average substitution rate of less than one nucleotide per kilobase. The ompA gene, h...

  6. Temporal patterns of damage and decay kinetics of DNA retrieved from plant herbarium specimens

    PubMed Central

    Weiß, Clemens L.; Schuenemann, Verena J.; Devos, Jane; Shirsekar, Gautam; Reiter, Ella; Gould, Billie A.; Stinchcombe, John R.; Krause, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Herbaria archive a record of changes of worldwide plant biodiversity harbouring millions of specimens that contain DNA suitable for genome sequencing. To profit from this resource, it is fundamental to understand in detail the process of DNA degradation in herbarium specimens. We investigated patterns of DNA fragmentation and nucleotide misincorporation by analysing 86 herbarium samples spanning the last 300 years using Illumina shotgun sequencing. We found an exponential decay relationship between DNA fragmentation and time, and estimated a per nucleotide fragmentation rate of 1.66 × 10−4 per year, which is six times faster than the rate estimated for ancient bones. Additionally, we found that strand breaks occur specially before purines, and that depurination-driven DNA breakage occurs constantly through time and can to a great extent explain decreasing fragment length over time. Similar to what has been found analysing ancient DNA from bones, we found a strong correlation between the deamination-driven accumulation of cytosine to thymine substitutions and time, which reinforces the importance of substitution patterns to authenticate the ancient/historical nature of DNA fragments. Accurate estimations of DNA degradation through time will allow informed decisions about laboratory and computational procedures to take advantage of the vast collection of worldwide herbarium specimens. PMID:27429780

  7. Temporal patterns of damage and decay kinetics of DNA retrieved from plant herbarium specimens.

    PubMed

    Weiß, Clemens L; Schuenemann, Verena J; Devos, Jane; Shirsekar, Gautam; Reiter, Ella; Gould, Billie A; Stinchcombe, John R; Krause, Johannes; Burbano, Hernán A

    2016-06-01

    Herbaria archive a record of changes of worldwide plant biodiversity harbouring millions of specimens that contain DNA suitable for genome sequencing. To profit from this resource, it is fundamental to understand in detail the process of DNA degradation in herbarium specimens. We investigated patterns of DNA fragmentation and nucleotide misincorporation by analysing 86 herbarium samples spanning the last 300 years using Illumina shotgun sequencing. We found an exponential decay relationship between DNA fragmentation and time, and estimated a per nucleotide fragmentation rate of 1.66 × 10(-4) per year, which is six times faster than the rate estimated for ancient bones. Additionally, we found that strand breaks occur specially before purines, and that depurination-driven DNA breakage occurs constantly through time and can to a great extent explain decreasing fragment length over time. Similar to what has been found analysing ancient DNA from bones, we found a strong correlation between the deamination-driven accumulation of cytosine to thymine substitutions and time, which reinforces the importance of substitution patterns to authenticate the ancient/historical nature of DNA fragments. Accurate estimations of DNA degradation through time will allow informed decisions about laboratory and computational procedures to take advantage of the vast collection of worldwide herbarium specimens. PMID:27429780

  8. The effect of imidazole, cyanamide, and polyornithine on the condensation of nucleotides in aqueous systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibanez, J.; Kimball, A. P.; Oro, J.

    1971-01-01

    Development of two models for the condensation of nucleotides under possibly prebiotic conditions. In the first of these models this type of reaction is promoted by the presence of imidazole and substituted imidazole compounds. The second model involves the condensation of mononucleotides with cyanamide in the presence and absence of a prototemplate such as polyornithine. A tentative mechanism for the role of imidazole catalysis in phosphodiester bond formation between adjacent TMP molecules is suggested.

  9. From Single Nucleotide Polymorphism to Transcriptional Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Martini, Sebastian; Nair, Viji; Patel, Sanjeevkumar R.; Eichinger, Felix; Nelson, Robert G.; Weil, E. Jennifer; Pezzolesi, Marcus G.; Krolewski, Andrzej S.; Randolph, Ann; Keller, Benjamin J.; Werner, Thomas; Kretzler, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have proven to be highly effective at defining relationships between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and clinical phenotypes in complex diseases. Establishing a mechanistic link between a noncoding SNP and the clinical outcome is a significant hurdle in translating associations into biological insight. We demonstrate an approach to assess the functional context of a diabetic nephropathy (DN)-associated SNP located in the promoter region of the gene FRMD3. The approach integrates pathway analyses with transcriptional regulatory pattern-based promoter modeling and allows the identification of a transcriptional framework affected by the DN-associated SNP in the FRMD3 promoter. This framework provides a testable hypothesis for mechanisms of genomic variation and transcriptional regulation in the context of DN. Our model proposes a possible transcriptional link through which the polymorphism in the FRMD3 promoter could influence transcriptional regulation within the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-signaling pathway. These findings provide the rationale to interrogate the biological link between FRMD3 and the BMP pathway and serve as an example of functional genomics-based hypothesis generation. PMID:23434934

  10. The substitutability of reinforcers

    PubMed Central

    Green, Leonard; Freed, Debra E.

    1993-01-01

    Substitutability is a construct borrowed from microeconomics that describes a continuum of possible interactions among the reinforcers in a given situation. Highly substitutable reinforcers, which occupy one end of the continuum, are readily traded for each other due to their functional similarity. Complementary reinforcers, at the other end of the continuum, tend to be consumed jointly in fairly rigid proportion, and therefore cannot be traded for one another except to achieve that proportion. At the center of the continuum are reinforcers that are independent with respect to each other; consumption of one has no influence on consumption of another. Psychological research and analyses in terms of substitutability employ standard operant conditioning paradigms in which humans and nonhumans choose between alternative reinforcers. The range of reinforcer interactions found in these studies is more readily accommodated and predicted when behavior-analytic models of choice consider issues of substitutability. New insights are gained into such areas as eating and drinking, electrical brain stimulation, temporal separation of choice alternatives, behavior therapy, drug use, and addictions. Moreover, the generalized matching law (Baum, 1974) gains greater explanatory power and comprehensiveness when measures of substitutability are included. PMID:16812696

  11. The substitutability of reinforcers.

    PubMed

    Green, Leonard; Freed, Debra E

    1993-07-01

    Substitutability is a construct borrowed from microeconomics that describes a continuum of possible interactions among the reinforcers in a given situation. Highly substitutable reinforcers, which occupy one end of the continuum, are readily traded for each other due to their functional similarity. Complementary reinforcers, at the other end of the continuum, tend to be consumed jointly in fairly rigid proportion, and therefore cannot be traded for one another except to achieve that proportion. At the center of the continuum are reinforcers that are independent with respect to each other; consumption of one has no influence on consumption of another. Psychological research and analyses in terms of substitutability employ standard operant conditioning paradigms in which humans and nonhumans choose between alternative reinforcers. The range of reinforcer interactions found in these studies is more readily accommodated and predicted when behavior-analytic models of choice consider issues of substitutability. New insights are gained into such areas as eating and drinking, electrical brain stimulation, temporal separation of choice alternatives, behavior therapy, drug use, and addictions. Moreover, the generalized matching law (Baum, 1974) gains greater explanatory power and comprehensiveness when measures of substitutability are included. PMID:16812696

  12. Cytochrome b nucleotide sequence variation among the Atlantic Alcidae.

    PubMed

    Friesen, V L; Montevecchi, W A; Davidson, W S

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of cytochrome b nucleotide sequences of the six extant species of Atlantic alcids and a gull revealed an excess of adenines and cytosines and a deficit of guanines at silent sites on the coding strand. Phylogenetic analyses grouped the sequences of the common (Uria aalge) and Brünnich's (U. lomvia) guillemots, followed by the razorbill (Alca torda) and little auk (Alle alle). The black guillemot (Cepphus grylle) sequence formed a sister taxon, and the puffin (Fratercula arctica) fell outside the other alcids. Phylogenetic comparisons of substitutions indicated that mutabilities of bases did not differ, but that C was much more likely to be incorporated than was G. Imbalances in base composition appear to result from a strand bias in replication errors, which may result from selection on secondary RNA structure and/or the energetics of codon-anticodon interactions. PMID:7916741

  13. Asymmetry in Object Substitution Masking Occurs Relative to the Direction of Spatial Attention Shift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirose, Nobuyuki; Osaka, Naoyuki

    2010-01-01

    A sparse mask that persists beyond the duration of a target can reduce its visibility, a phenomenon called "object substitution masking". Y. Jiang and M. M. Chun (2001a) found an asymmetric pattern of substitution masking such that a mask on the peripheral side of the target caused stronger substitution masking than on the central side. Assuming…

  14. Long-range correlations in nucleotide sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, C.-K.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Havlin, S.; Sciortino, F.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.

    1992-03-01

    DNA SEQUENCES have been analysed using models, such as an it-step Markov chain, that incorporate the possibility of short-range nucleotide correlations1. We propose here a method for studying the stochastic properties of nucleotide sequences by constructing a 1:1 map of the nucleotide sequence onto a walk, which we term a 'DNA walk'. We then use the mapping to provide a quantitative measure of the correlation between nucleotides over long distances along the DNA chain. Thus we uncover in the nucleotide sequence a remarkably long-range power law correlation that implies a new scale-invariant property of DNA. We find such long-range correlations in intron-containing genes and in nontranscribed regulatory DNA sequences, but not in complementary DNA sequences or intron-less genes.

  15. [Delegation yes, substitution no!].

    PubMed

    Schroeder, A

    2014-08-01

    The aging of society leads on the one hand to increasing case numbers and on the other hand to a reduction in the number of physicians available for patient treatment. The delegation and substitution of medical duties as a tried and tested method is increasingly being recommended in order to compensate for the lack of physicians. The Berufsverband der Deutschen Urologen (BDU, Professional Association of German Urologists) supports the guiding principle of the Bundesärztekammer (Federal Medical Council) of "delegation yes, substitution no" and rejects a substitution of medical duties by non-medical academic health personnel. Against the background of the demographic changes, the increasing need for treatment and the current deficiency of junior physicians, a more extensive inclusion of well-qualified and experienced non-medical personnel by the delegation of medically responsible duties (medical scope of practice) can be an appropriate measure to maintain a good medical service in practices, hospitals and nursing homes. PMID:25047595

  16. [Substitution therapy with diamorphine].

    PubMed

    Roy, Mandy; Bleich, Stefan; Hillemacher, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    After a long lead time the substitution with diamorphine was taken into the German catalogue of statutory health insurance in 2010. Currently about 570 patients are treated this way in 9 ambulances in Germany. The study phase as well as the clinical practice are showing the success of this therapy concerning physical and mental health of patients and their circumstances of social life. Thereby substitution with diamorphine is underlying very strict admission criteria regarding patients on the one hand and particular organizational requirements of the medical institution on the other hand. This article explains these criteria in detail as well as neurobiological information and clinical workflow is presented. Improvement of mandatory requirements could lead to a better reaching of patients who benefit from substitution with diamorphine. PMID:27029045

  17. Automated Identification of Nucleotide Sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osman, Shariff; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Fox, George; Zhu, Dian-Hui

    2007-01-01

    STITCH is a computer program that processes raw nucleotide-sequence data to automatically remove unwanted vector information, perform reverse-complement comparison, stitch shorter sequences together to make longer ones to which the shorter ones presumably belong, and search against the user s choice of private and Internet-accessible public 16S rRNA databases. ["16S rRNA" denotes a ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) sequence that is common to all organisms.] In STITCH, a template 16S rRNA sequence is used to position forward and reverse reads. STITCH then automatically searches known 16S rRNA sequences in the user s chosen database(s) to find the sequence most similar to (the sequence that lies at the smallest edit distance from) each spliced sequence. The result of processing by STITCH is the identification of the most similar well-described bacterium. Whereas previously commercially available software for analyzing genetic sequences operates on one sequence at a time, STITCH can manipulate multiple sequences simultaneously to perform the aforementioned operations. A typical analysis of several dozen sequences (length of the order of 103 base pairs) by use of STITCH is completed in a few minutes, whereas such an analysis performed by use of prior software takes hours or days.

  18. Catalyst-Free and Regioconvergent Substitution Reactions of Bromothiophenes with a BH3-Substituted Phosphide Anion.

    PubMed

    Imamoto, Tsuneo; Horiuchi, Yumi; Tamura, Ken; Sugiya, Masashi; Masu, Hyuma

    2016-08-19

    A range of bromothiophenes reacted with lithium boranato(tert-butyl)methylphosphide in the absence of transition-metal catalysts under mild conditions to provide the same 2,5-disubstituted and 2-monosubstituted products regardless of the substitution patterns of the starting bromothiophenes. PMID:27509360

  19. 40 CFR 721.6920 - Butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted silane. 721.6920 Section 721.6920 Protection... acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted silane. (a... butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

  20. 40 CFR 721.6920 - Butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted silane. 721.6920 Section 721.6920 Protection... acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted silane. (a... butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

  1. 40 CFR 721.6920 - Butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted silane. 721.6920 Section 721.6920 Protection... acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted silane. (a... butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

  2. Common nucleotide sequence of structural gene encoding fibroblast growth factor 4 in eight cattle derived from three breeds.

    PubMed

    Sato, Sho; Takahashi, Toshikiyo; Nishinomiya, Hiroshi; Katoh, Makiko; Itoh, Ryu; Yokoo, Masaki; Yokoo, Mari; Iha, Momoe; Mori, Yuki; Kasuga, Kano; Kojima, Ikuo; Kobayashi, Masayuki

    2012-03-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 4 (FGF4) is considered as a crucial gene for the proper development of bovine embryos. However, the complete nucleotide sequences of the structural genes encoding FGF4 in identified breeds are still unknown. In the present study, direct sequencing of PCR products derived from genomic DNA samples obtained from three Japanese Black, two Japanese Shorthorn and three Holstein cattle, revealed that the nucleotide sequences of the structural gene encoding FGF4 matched completely among these eight cattle. On the other hand, differences in the nucleotide sequences, leading to substitutions, insertions or deletions of amino acid residues were detected when compared with the already reported sequence from unidentified breeds. We cannot rule out a possibility that the structural gene elucidated in the present study is widely distributed in cattle. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first determination of the complete nucleotide sequence of the structural gene encoding bovine FGF4 in identified breeds. PMID:22435631

  3. No cheap substitutes.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Peter

    2016-06-15

    The Nuffield Trust report on reshaping the healthcare workforce was published last month. Its conclusions were widely reported as a recommendation to 'train up' nurses as a solution to junior doctor shortages, with support workers, in turn, substituting for registered nurses. PMID:27305238

  4. The Age of Substitutability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goeller, H. E.; Weinberg, Alvin M.

    1976-01-01

    Dwindling mineral resources might cause a shift from nonrenewable resources to renewable resources and inexhaustible elements such as iron and aluminum. Alternative energy sources such as breeder, fusion, solar, and geothermal power must be developed for production and recycling of materials. Substitution and, hence, living standards ultimately…

  5. Performing Substitute Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bletzer, Keith V.

    2010-01-01

    Formal education is both a right and an obligation bestowed on young people in most all nations of the world. Teachers (adults) and students (youth) form a co-present dyadic contract that must be maintained within the classroom. Substitute teachers fill a role in sustaining the integrity of this teacher-student link, whenever teachers are absent.…

  6. Nucleotide Salvage Deficiencies, DNA Damage and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Fasullo, Michael; Endres, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide balance is critically important not only in replicating cells but also in quiescent cells. This is especially true in the nervous system, where there is a high demand for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) produced from mitochondria. Mitochondria are particularly prone to oxidative stress-associated DNA damage because nucleotide imbalance can lead to mitochondrial depletion due to low replication fidelity. Failure to maintain nucleotide balance due to genetic defects can result in infantile death; however there is great variability in clinical presentation for particular diseases. This review compares genetic diseases that result from defects in specific nucleotide salvage enzymes and a signaling kinase that activates nucleotide salvage after DNA damage exposure. These diseases include Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, mitochondrial depletion syndromes, and ataxia telangiectasia. Although treatment options are available to palliate symptoms of these diseases, there is no cure. The conclusions drawn from this review include the critical role of guanine nucleotides in preventing neurodegeneration, the limitations of animals as disease models, and the need to further understand nucleotide imbalances in treatment regimens. Such knowledge will hopefully guide future studies into clinical therapies for genetic diseases. PMID:25923076

  7. Nucleotide discrimination with DNA immobilized in the MspA nanopore.

    PubMed

    Manrao, Elizabeth A; Derrington, Ian M; Pavlenok, Mikhail; Niederweis, Michael; Gundlach, Jens H

    2011-01-01

    Nanopore sequencing has the potential to become a fast and low-cost DNA sequencing platform. An ionic current passing through a small pore would directly map the sequence of single stranded DNA (ssDNA) driven through the constriction. The pore protein, MspA, derived from Mycobacterium smegmatis, has a short and narrow channel constriction ideally suited for nanopore sequencing. To study MspA's ability to resolve nucleotides, we held ssDNA within the pore using a biotin-NeutrAvidin complex. We show that homopolymers of adenine, cytosine, thymine, and guanine in MspA exhibit much larger current differences than in α-hemolysin. Additionally, methylated cytosine is distinguishable from unmethylated cytosine. We establish that single nucleotide substitutions within homopolymer ssDNA can be detected when held in MspA's constriction. Using genomic single nucleotide polymorphisms, we demonstrate that single nucleotides within random DNA can be identified. Our results indicate that MspA has high signal-to-noise ratio and the single nucleotide sensitivity desired for nanopore sequencing devices. PMID:21991340

  8. Nonenzymatic oligomerization reactions on templates containing inosinic acid or diaminopurine nucleotide residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlov, I. A.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The template-directed oligomerization of nucleoside-5'-phosphoro-2-methyl imidazolides on standard oligonucleotide templates has been studied extensively. Here, we describe experiments with templates in which inosinic acid (I) is substituted for guanylic acid, or 2,6-diaminopurine nucleotide (D) for adenylic acid. We find that the substitution of I for G in a template is strongly inhibitory and prevents any incorporation of C into internal positions in the oligomeric products of the reaction. The substitution of D for A, on the contrary, leads to increased incorporation of U into the products. We found no evidence for the template-directed facilitation of oligomerization of A or I through A-I base pairing. The significance of these results for prebiotic chemistry is discussed.

  9. Identical substitutions in magnesium chelatase paralogs result in chlorophyll deficient soybean mutants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) chlorophyll deficient line MinnGold is a spontaneous mutant characterized by yellow foliage. Map-based cloning and transgenic complementation revealed that the mutant phenotype is caused by a non-synonymous nucleotide substitution in the third exon of a Mg-chelat...

  10. Nucleotides as nucleophiles: reactions of nucleotides with phosphoimidazolide activated guanosine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.; Rosenbach, M. T.; Hurley, T. B.

    1991-01-01

    An earlier study of the reaction of phosphoimidazolide activated nucleosides (ImpN) in aqueous phosphate buffers indicated two modes of reaction of the phosphate monoanion and dianion. The first mode is catalysis of the hydrolysis of the P-N bond in ImpN's which leads to imidazole and nucleoside 5'-monophosphate. The second represents a nucleophilic substitution of the imidazole to yield the nucleoside 5'-diphosphate. This earlier study thus served as a model for the reaction of ImpN with nucleoside monophosphates (pN) because the latter can be regarded as phosphate derivatives. In the present study we investigated the reaction of guanosine 5'-phosphate-2-methylimidazolide, 2-MeImpG, in the presence of pN (N = guanosine, adenosine and uridine) in the range 6.9 less than or equal to pH less than or equal to 7.7. We observed that pN's do act as nucleophiles to form NppG, and as general base to enhance the hydrolysis of the P-N bond in 2-MeImpG, i.e. pN show the same behavior as inorganic phosphate. The kinetic analysis yields the following rate constants for the dianion pN2-: knpN = 0.17 +/- 0.02 M-1 h-1 for nucleophilic attack and khpN = 0.11 +/- 0.07 M-1 h-1 for general base catalysis of the hydrolysis. These rate constants which are independent of the nucleobase compare with kp.2 = 0.415 M-1 h-1 and khp2. = 0.217 M-1 h-1 for the reactions of HPO4(2-). In addition, this study shows that under conditions where pN presumably form stacks, the reaction mechanism remains unchanged although in quantitative terms stacked pN are somewhat less reactive. Attack by the 2'-OH and 3'-OH groups of the ribose moiety in amounts greater than or equal to 1% is not observed; this is attributed to the large difference in nucleophilicity in the neutral pH range between the phosphate group and the ribose hydroxyls. This nucleophilicity rank is not altered by stacking.

  11. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Liang, Yuting; Li, Hong; Li, Haibo; He, Quanze; Xue, Ying; Shen, Cong; Zhang, Chunhua; Xiang, Jingjing; Ding, Jie; Qiao, Longwei; Zheng, Qiping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Osteoarthritis (OA) is a complex disorder characterized by degenerative articular cartilage and is largely attributed to genetic risk factors. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are common DNA variants that have shown promising and efficiency, compared with positional cloning, to map candidate genes of complex diseases, including OA. In this study, we aim to provide an overview of multiple SNPs from a number of genes that have recently been linked to OA susceptibility. We also performed a comprehensive meta-analysis to evaluate the association of SNP rs7639618 of double von Willebrand factor A domains (DVWA) gene with OA susceptibility. A systematic search of studies on the association of SNPs with susceptibility to OA was conducted in PubMed and Google scholar. Studies subjected to meta-analysis include human and case-control studies that met the Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium model and provide sufficient data to calculate an odds ratio (OR). A total of 9500 OA cases and 9365 controls in 7 case-control studies relating to SNP rs7639618 were included in this study and the ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Over 50 SNPs from different genes have been shown to be associated with either hip (23), or knee (20), or both (13) OA. The ORs of these SNPs for OA and the subtypes are not consistent. As to SNP rs7639618 of DVWA, increased knee OA risk was observed in all genetic models analyzed. Specifically, people from Asian with G-allele showed significantly increased risk of knee OA (A versus G: OR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.13–1.46; AA versus GG: OR = 1.60, 95% CI 1.25–2.05; GA versus GG: OR = 1.31, 95% CI 1.18–1.44; AA versus GA+GG: OR = 1.34, 95% CI 1.12–1.61; AA+GA versus GG: OR = 1.40, 95% CI 1.19–1.64), but not in Caucasians or with hip OA. Our results suggest that multiple SNPs play different roles in the pathogenesis of OA and its subtypes; SNP rs7639618 of DVWA gene is associated with a significantly increased

  12. Advances in targeting cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases

    PubMed Central

    Maurice, Donald H.; Ke, Hengming; Ahmad, Faiyaz; Wang, Yousheng; Chung, Jay; Manganiello, Vincent C.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) catalyse the hydrolysis of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP, thereby regulating the intracellular concentrations of these cyclic nucleotides, their signalling pathways and, consequently, myriad biological responses in health and disease. Currently, a small number of PDE inhibitors are used clinically for treating the pathophysiological dysregulation of cyclic nucleotide signalling in several disorders, including erectile dysfunction, pulmonary hypertension, acute refractory cardiac failure, intermittent claudication and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, pharmaceutical interest in PDEs has been reignited by the increasing understanding of the roles of individual PDEs in regulating the subcellular compartmentalization of specific cyclic nucleotide signalling pathways, by the structure-based design of novel specific inhibitors and by the development of more sophisticated strategies to target individual PDE variants. PMID:24687066

  13. Advances in targeting cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases.

    PubMed

    Maurice, Donald H; Ke, Hengming; Ahmad, Faiyaz; Wang, Yousheng; Chung, Jay; Manganiello, Vincent C

    2014-04-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) catalyse the hydrolysis of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP, thereby regulating the intracellular concentrations of these cyclic nucleotides, their signalling pathways and, consequently, myriad biological responses in health and disease. Currently, a small number of PDE inhibitors are used clinically for treating the pathophysiological dysregulation of cyclic nucleotide signalling in several disorders, including erectile dysfunction, pulmonary hypertension, acute refractory cardiac failure, intermittent claudication and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, pharmaceutical interest in PDEs has been reignited by the increasing understanding of the roles of individual PDEs in regulating the subcellular compartmentalization of specific cyclic nucleotide signalling pathways, by the structure-based design of novel specific inhibitors and by the development of more sophisticated strategies to target individual PDE variants. PMID:24687066

  14. In vitro incorporation of LNA nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Veedu, Rakesh N; Vester, Birte; Wengel, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    An LNA modified nucleoside triphosphate 1 was synthesized in order to investigate its potential to act as substrate for DNA strand synthesis by polymerases. Primer extension assays for the incorporation experiments revealed that Phusion High Fidelity DNA polymerase is an efficient enzyme for incorporation of the LNA nucleotide and for extending strand to full length. It was also observed that pfu DNA polymerase could incorporate the LNA nucleotide but it failed to extend the strand to a full length product. PMID:18058567

  15. Regulation of mammalian nucleotide metabolism and biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Andrew N.; Fan, Teresa W.-M.

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotides are required for a wide variety of biological processes and are constantly synthesized de novo in all cells. When cells proliferate, increased nucleotide synthesis is necessary for DNA replication and for RNA production to support protein synthesis at different stages of the cell cycle, during which these events are regulated at multiple levels. Therefore the synthesis of the precursor nucleotides is also strongly regulated at multiple levels. Nucleotide synthesis is an energy intensive process that uses multiple metabolic pathways across different cell compartments and several sources of carbon and nitrogen. The processes are regulated at the transcription level by a set of master transcription factors but also at the enzyme level by allosteric regulation and feedback inhibition. Here we review the cellular demands of nucleotide biosynthesis, their metabolic pathways and mechanisms of regulation during the cell cycle. The use of stable isotope tracers for delineating the biosynthetic routes of the multiple intersecting pathways and how these are quantitatively controlled under different conditions is also highlighted. Moreover, the importance of nucleotide synthesis for cell viability is discussed and how this may lead to potential new approaches to drug development in diseases such as cancer. PMID:25628363

  16. Convergent evolution of marine mammals is associated with distinct substitutions in common genes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xuming; Seim, Inge; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic convergence is thought to be driven by parallel substitutions coupled with natural selection at the sequence level. Multiple independent evolutionary transitions of mammals to an aquatic environment offer an opportunity to test this thesis. Here, whole genome alignment of coding sequences identified widespread parallel amino acid substitutions in marine mammals; however, the majority of these changes were not unique to these animals. Conversely, we report that candidate aquatic adaptation genes, identified by signatures of likelihood convergence and/or elevated ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous nucleotide substitution rate, are characterized by very few parallel substitutions and exhibit distinct sequence changes in each group. Moreover, no significant positive correlation was found between likelihood convergence and positive selection in all three marine lineages. These results suggest that convergence in protein coding genes associated with aquatic lifestyle is mainly characterized by independent substitutions and relaxed negative selection. PMID:26549748

  17. Quantitative NMR Analysis of Partially Substituted Biodiesel Glycerols

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, M.; Alleman, T. L.; Dyer, T.; Ragauskas, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphitylation of hydroxyl groups in biodiesel samples with 2-chloro-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphospholane followed by 31P-NMR analysis provides a rapid quantitative analytical technique for the determination of substitution patterns on partially esterified glycerols. The unique 31P-NMR chemical shift data was established with a series mono and di-substituted fatty acid esters of glycerol and then utilized to characterize an industrial sample of partially processed biodiesel.

  18. Clinical applications of skin substitutes.

    PubMed

    Nyame, Theodore T; Chiang, H Abraham; Orgill, Dennis P

    2014-08-01

    A unique understanding of the components of mammalian skin has led to the development of numerous skin substitutes. These skin substitutes attempt to compensate for functional and physiologic deficits present in damaged tissue. Skin substitutes, when appropriately applied in optimized settings, offer a promising solution to difficult wound management. The body of literature on skin substitutes increases as the understanding of tissue engineering and molecular biology expands. Given the high cost of these products, future randomized large prospective studies are needed to guide the clinical applications of skin substitutes. PMID:25085091

  19. Statistical analysis of nucleotide sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Stückle, E E; Emmrich, C; Grob, U; Nielsen, P J

    1990-01-01

    In order to scan nucleic acid databases for potentially relevant but as yet unknown signals, we have developed an improved statistical model for pattern analysis of nucleic acid sequences by modifying previous methods based on Markov chains. We demonstrate the importance of selecting the appropriate parameters in order for the method to function at all. The model allows the simultaneous analysis of several short sequences with unequal base frequencies and Markov order k not equal to 0 as is usually the case in databases. As a test of these modifications, we show that in E. coli sequences there is a bias against palindromic hexamers which correspond to known restriction enzyme recognition sites. PMID:2251125

  20. Nucleotide sequence of a cloned woodchuck hepatitis virus genome: evolutional relationship between hepadnaviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, K; Ogasawara, N; Yoshikawa, H; Murakami, S

    1985-01-01

    We have determined the complete nucleotide sequence of a cloned DNA of woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV), the most oncogenic virus among hepadnaviruses. The genome, designated WHV2, is 3,320 base pairs long and contains four major open reading frames (ORFs) coded on the same strand of nucleotide sequence as in the human hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome. Comparison of the nucleotide sequence and amino acid sequences deduced from it among the genomes of various hepadnaviruses demonstrates that each protein shows an intrinsic property in conserving its amino acid sequence. A parameter, the ratio of the number of triplets with one-letter change but no amino acid substitution to the total number of triplets in which one-letter change occurred, was introduced to measure the intrinsic properties quantitatively. For each ORF, the parameter gave characteristic values in all combinations. Therefore, the relative evolutional distance between these hepadnaviruses can be measured by the amino acid substitution rate of any ORF. These comparisons suggest that (i) the difference between two WHV clones, WHV1 and WHV2, corresponds to that among clones of a HBV subtype, HBVadr, and (ii) WHV and ground squirrel hepatitis virus can be categorized in a way similar to the subgroups of HBV. PMID:3855246

  1. Methodologies in creating skin substitutes.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Mathew N; Jeschke, Marc G; Amini-Nik, Saeid

    2016-09-01

    The creation of skin substitutes has significantly decreased morbidity and mortality of skin wounds. Although there are still a number of disadvantages of currently available skin substitutes, there has been a significant decline in research advances over the past several years in improving these skin substitutes. Clinically most skin substitutes used are acellular and do not use growth factors to assist wound healing, key areas of potential in this field of research. This article discusses the five necessary attributes of an ideal skin substitute. It comprehensively discusses the three major basic components of currently available skin substitutes: scaffold materials, growth factors, and cells, comparing and contrasting what has been used so far. It then examines a variety of techniques in how to incorporate these basic components together to act as a guide for further research in the field to create cellular skin substitutes with better clinical results. PMID:27154041

  2. Asymmetric Context-Dependent Mutation Patterns Revealed through Mutation–Accumulation Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Way; Ackerman, Matthew S.; Gout, Jean-François; Miller, Samuel F.; Williams, Emily; Foster, Patricia L.; Lynch, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Despite the general assumption that site-specific mutation rates are independent of the local sequence context, a growing body of evidence suggests otherwise. To further examine context-dependent patterns of mutation, we amassed 5,645 spontaneous mutations in wild- type (WT) and mismatch-repair deficient (MMR–) mutation–accumulation (MA) lines of the gram-positive model organism Bacillus subtilis. We then analyzed>7,500 spontaneous base-substitution mutations across B. subtilis, Escherichia coli, and Mesoplasma florum WT and MMR– MA lines, finding a context-dependent mutation pattern that is asymmetric around the origin of replication. Different neighboring nucleotides can alter site-specific mutation rates by as much as 75-fold, with sites neighboring G:C base pairs or dimers involving alternating pyrimidine–purine and purine–pyrimidine nucleotides having significantly elevated mutation rates. The influence of context-dependent mutation on genome architecture is strongest in M. florum, consistent with the reduced efficiency of selection in organisms with low effective population size. If not properly accounted for, the disparities arising from patterns of context-dependent mutation can significantly influence interpretations of positive and purifying selection. PMID:25750180

  3. 40 CFR 721.10034 - Substituted pyridine coupled with diazotized substituted nitrobenzonitrile, diazotized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Substituted pyridine coupled with... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10034 Substituted pyridine coupled with diazotized substituted... as substituted pyridine coupled with diazotized substituted nitrobenzonitrile, diazotized...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10034 - Substituted pyridine coupled with diazotized substituted nitrobenzonitrile, diazotized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted pyridine coupled with... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10034 Substituted pyridine coupled with diazotized substituted... as substituted pyridine coupled with diazotized substituted nitrobenzonitrile, diazotized...

  5. Genome-wide analysis of single non-templated nucleotides in plant endogenous siRNAs and miRNAs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Johnson, Nathan R; Coruh, Ceyda; Axtell, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    Plant small RNAs are subject to various modifications. Previous reports revealed widespread 3' modifications (truncations and non-templated tailing) of plant miRNAs when the 2'-O-methyltransferase HEN1 is absent. However, non-templated nucleotides in plant heterochromatic siRNAs have not been deeply studied, especially in wild-type plants. We systematically studied non-templated nucleotide patterns in plant small RNAs by analyzing small RNA sequencing libraries from Arabidopsis, tomato, Medicago, rice, maize and Physcomitrella Elevated rates of non-templated nucleotides were observed at the 3' ends of both miRNAs and endogenous siRNAs from wild-type specimens of all species. 'Off-sized' small RNAs, such as 25 and 23 nt siRNAs arising from loci dominated by 24 nt siRNAs, often had very high rates of 3'-non-templated nucleotides. The same pattern was observed in all species that we studied. Further analysis of 24 nt siRNA clusters in Arabidopsis revealed distinct patterns of 3'-non-templated nucleotides of 23 nt siRNAs arising from heterochromatic siRNA loci. This pattern of non-templated 3' nucleotides on 23 nt siRNAs is not affected by loss of known small RNA 3'-end modifying enzymes, and may result from modifications added to longer heterochromatic siRNA precursors. PMID:27207877

  6. Genome-wide analysis of single non-templated nucleotides in plant endogenous siRNAs and miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Johnson, Nathan R.; Coruh, Ceyda; Axtell, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Plant small RNAs are subject to various modifications. Previous reports revealed widespread 3′ modifications (truncations and non-templated tailing) of plant miRNAs when the 2′-O-methyltransferase HEN1 is absent. However, non-templated nucleotides in plant heterochromatic siRNAs have not been deeply studied, especially in wild-type plants. We systematically studied non-templated nucleotide patterns in plant small RNAs by analyzing small RNA sequencing libraries from Arabidopsis, tomato, Medicago, rice, maize and Physcomitrella. Elevated rates of non-templated nucleotides were observed at the 3′ ends of both miRNAs and endogenous siRNAs from wild-type specimens of all species. ‘Off-sized’ small RNAs, such as 25 and 23 nt siRNAs arising from loci dominated by 24 nt siRNAs, often had very high rates of 3′-non-templated nucleotides. The same pattern was observed in all species that we studied. Further analysis of 24 nt siRNA clusters in Arabidopsis revealed distinct patterns of 3′-non-templated nucleotides of 23 nt siRNAs arising from heterochromatic siRNA loci. This pattern of non-templated 3′ nucleotides on 23 nt siRNAs is not affected by loss of known small RNA 3′-end modifying enzymes, and may result from modifications added to longer heterochromatic siRNA precursors. PMID:27207877

  7. Multifaceted Material Substitution: The Case of NdFeB Magnets, 2010-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Braeton J.; Eggert, Roderick G.

    2016-04-01

    Substitution is an important response for material users when faced with disruption to the availability or price of an essential material. In economic terms, substitution refers to the ability of firms to alter their patterns of material use in response to exogenous market shocks. Substitution comes in different forms which vary from situation to situation. This paper uses expert opinion to identify the specific forms of substitution that occurred in permanent magnets, specifically neodymium-iron-boron magnets, following the significant increase in rare earth prices in 2010-2011. The paper provides a framework for understanding the multifaceted nature of substitution and assesses the relative importance of five different types of substitution. Technology-for-element, grade-for-grade, and system-for-system substitution appear to have been more important than element-for-element and magnet-for-magnet substitution. Cost pass-through and absorption were also important responses.

  8. Multifaceted Material Substitution: The Case of NdFeB Magnets, 2010-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Braeton J.; Eggert, Roderick G.

    2016-07-01

    Substitution is an important response for material users when faced with disruption to the availability or price of an essential material. In economic terms, substitution refers to the ability of firms to alter their patterns of material use in response to exogenous market shocks. Substitution comes in different forms which vary from situation to situation. This paper uses expert opinion to identify the specific forms of substitution that occurred in permanent magnets, specifically neodymium-iron-boron magnets, following the significant increase in rare earth prices in 2010-2011. The paper provides a framework for understanding the multifaceted nature of substitution and assesses the relative importance of five different types of substitution. Technology-for-element, grade-for-grade, and system-for-system substitution appear to have been more important than element-for-element and magnet-for-magnet substitution. Cost pass-through and absorption were also important responses.

  9. Quantitative and kinetic examination of 32P-postlabeling of etheno-substituted nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Szyfter, K; Hemminki, K; Crane, A E; Watson, W P

    1991-01-01

    1,N6-ethenodeoxyadenosine-, 1,N2-ethenodeoxyguanosine- and 3,N4-ethenodeoxycytidine-3'-monophosphates were labeled by [gamma-32P] ATP using T4 polynucleotide kinase in conditions commonly used for the 32P-postlabeling assay. Kinetic studies showed that the reaction is fast reaching a plateau after 15-30 min. The efficiency of phosphorylation, as studied by substrate-product concentration dependency, was between 50-100% at the lower substrate concentrations. The adducts are labeled efficiently at sub-femtomole levels. All the adducts were sensitive to the 3'-dephosphorylation by P1 nuclease although the guanine derivative appeared to be more resistant than the two other adducts. PMID:1913981

  10. Photoinitiator Nucleotide for Quantifying Nucleic Acid Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Leah M.; Hansen, Ryan R.; Urban, Milan; Kuchta, Robert D.; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2010-01-01

    This first report of a photoinitiator-nucleotide conjugate demonstrates a novel approach for sensitive, rapid and visual detection of DNA hybridization events. This approach holds potential for various DNA labeling schemes and for applications benefiting from selective DNA-based polymerization initiators. Here, we demonstrate covalent, enzymatic incorporation of an eosin-photoinitiator 2′-deoxyuridine-5′-triphosphate (EITC-dUTP) conjugate into surface-immobilized DNA hybrids. Subsequent radical chain photoinitiation from these sites using an acrylamide/bis-acrylamide formulation yields a dynamic detection range between 500pM and 50nM of DNA target. Increasing EITC-nucleotide surface densities leads to an increase in surface-based polymer film heights until achieving a film height plateau of 280nm ±20nm at 610 ±70 EITC-nucleotides/μm2. Film heights of 10–20 nm were obtained from eosin surface densities of approximately 20 EITC-nucleotides/μm2 while below the detection limit of ~10 EITC-nucleotides/μm2, no detectable films were formed. This unique threshold behavior is utilized for instrument-free, visual quantification of target DNA concentration ranges. PMID:20337438

  11. Proofreading of misincorporated nucleotides in DNA transcription.

    PubMed

    Voliotis, Margaritis; Cohen, Netta; Molina-París, Carmen; Liverpool, Tanniemola B

    2012-06-01

    The accuracy of DNA transcription is crucial for the proper functioning of the cell. Although RNA polymerases demonstrate selectivity for correct nucleotides, additional active mechanisms of transcriptional error correction are required to achieve observed levels of fidelity. Recent experimental findings have shed light on a particular mechanism of transcriptional error correction involving: (i) diffusive translocation of the RNA polymerase along the DNA (backtracking) and (ii) irreversible RNA cleavage. This mechanism achieves preferential cleavage of misincorporated nucleotides by biasing the local rates of translocation. Here, we study how misincorporated nucleotides affect backtracking dynamics and how this effect determines the level of transcriptional fidelity. We consider backtracking as a diffusive process in a periodic, one-dimensional energy landscape, which at a coarse-grained level gives rise to a hopping process between neighboring local minima. We propose a model for how misincorporated nucleotides deform this energy landscape and hence affect the hopping rates. In particular, we show that this model can be used to derive both the theoretical limit on the fidelity (i.e. the minimum fraction of misincorporated nucleotides) and the actual fidelity relative to this optimum, achieved for specific combinations of the cleavage and polymerization rates. Finally, we study how external factors influencing backtracking dynamics affect transcriptional fidelity. We show that biologically relevant loads, similar to those exerted by nucleosomes or other transcriptional barriers, increase error correction. PMID:22643861

  12. Proofreading of misincorporated nucleotides in DNA transcription.

    PubMed

    Voliotis, Margaritis; Cohen, Netta; Molina-París, Carmen; Liverpool, Tanniemola B

    2012-06-01

    The accuracy of DNA transcription is crucial for the proper functioning of the cell. Although RNA polymerases demonstrate selectivity for correct nucleotides, additional active mechanisms of transcriptional error correction are required to achieve observed levels of fidelity. Recent experimental findings have shed light on a particular mechanism of transcriptional error correction involving: (i) diffusive translocation of the RNA polymerase along the DNA (backtracking) and (ii) irreversible RNA cleavage. This mechanism achieves preferential cleavage of misincorporated nucleotides by biasing the local rates of translocation. Here, we study how misincorporated nucleotides affect backtracking dynamics and how this effect determines the level of transcriptional fidelity. We consider backtracking as a diffusive process in a periodic, one-dimensional energy landscape, which at a coarse-grained level gives rise to a hopping process between neighbouring local minima. We propose a model for how misincorporated nucleotides deform this energy landscape and hence affect the hopping rates. In particular, we show that this model can be used to derive both the theoretical limit on the fidelity (i.e. the minimum fraction of misincorporated nucleotides) and the actual fidelity relative to this optimum, achieved for specific combinations of the cleavage and polymerization rates. Finally, we study how external factors influencing backtracking dynamics affect transcriptional fidelity. We show that biologically relevant loads, similar to those exerted by nucleosomes or other transcriptional barriers, increase error correction. PMID:22551978

  13. Polyimides comprising substituted benzidines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Frank W. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A new class of polyimides and copolyimides made from substituted benzidines and aromatic dianhydrides and other aromatic diamines. The polyimides obtained with said diamines are distinguished by excellent thermal, excellent solubility, excellent electrical properties such as very low dielectric constants, excellent clarity and mechanical properties making the polyimides ideally suited as coating materials for microelectronic apparatii, as membranes for selective molecular or gas separation, as fibers in molecular composites, as high tensile strength, high compression strength fibers, as film castable coatings, or as fabric components.

  14. Trifluoromethyl-substituted polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Current work sponsored by the grant at Southwest Texas State University is directed toward the synthesis and characterization of: (1) N-alkylated polyamides derived from o-fluorinated diacids; (2) highly fluorinated polyethers; (3) polyesters derived from 2-hydroxy-2-propyl substituted arenes and/or 2,5-difluoroterephthalic acid; and (4) silicon-containing fluoropolymers. Work during the period from 1 July to 31 Dec. 1993 focused primarily on items 3 and 4 and on the development of a phosphorus containing modification of '12F-PEK.'

  15. A Nucleotide Phosphatase Activity in the Nucleotide Binding Domain of an Orphan Resistance Protein from Rice*

    PubMed Central

    Fenyk, Stepan; de San Eustaquio Campillo, Alba; Pohl, Ehmke; Hussey, Patrick J.; Cann, Martin J.

    2012-01-01

    Plant resistance proteins (R-proteins) are key components of the plant immune system activated in response to a plethora of different pathogens. R-proteins are P-loop NTPase superfamily members, and current models describe their main function as ATPases in defense signaling pathways. Here we show that a subset of R-proteins have evolved a new function to combat pathogen infection. This subset of R-proteins possesses a nucleotide phosphatase activity in the nucleotide-binding domain. Related R-proteins that fall in the same phylogenetic clade all show the same nucleotide phosphatase activity indicating a conserved function within at least a subset of R-proteins. R-protein nucleotide phosphatases catalyze the production of nucleoside from nucleotide with the nucleotide monophosphate as the preferred substrate. Mutation of conserved catalytic residues substantially reduced activity consistent with the biochemistry of P-loop NTPases. Kinetic analysis, analytical gel filtration, and chemical cross-linking demonstrated that the nucleotide-binding domain was active as a multimer. Nuclear magnetic resonance and nucleotide analogues identified the terminal phosphate bond as the target of a reaction that utilized a metal-mediated nucleophilic attack by water on the phosphoester. In conclusion, we have identified a group of R-proteins with a unique function. This biochemical activity appears to have co-evolved with plants in signaling pathways designed to resist pathogen attack. PMID:22157756

  16. Cyclic nucleotide-activated channels in carp olfactory receptor cells.

    PubMed

    Kolesnikov, S S; Kosolapov, A V

    1993-07-25

    When applied from the cytoplasmic side, cyclic 3',5'-adenosine and guanosine monophosphates reversibly increased the ion permeability of inside-out patches of carp olfactory neuron plasma membrane. The cAMP (cGMP)-induced permeability via cAMP (cGMP) concentration was fitted by Hill's equation with the exponents of 1.07 +/- 0.15 (1.12 +/- 0.05) and EC50 = 1.3 +/- 0.6 microM (0.9 +/- 0.3 microM). Substitution of NaCl in the bathing solution by chlorides of other alkali metals resulted in a slight shift of reversal potential of the cyclic nucleotide-dependent (CN) current, which indicates a weak selectivity of the channels. Permeability coefficients calculated by Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz's equation corresponded to the following relation: PNa/PK/PLi/PRb/PCs = 1:0.98:0.94:0.70:0.61. Ca2+ and Mg2+ in physiological concentrations blocked the channels activated by cyclic nucleotides (CN-channels). In the absence of divalent cations the conductance of single CN-channels was equal to 51 +/- 9 pS in 100 mM NaCl solution. Channel density did not exceed 1 micron-2. The maximal open state probability of the channel (Po) tended towards 1.0 at a high concentration of cAMP or cGMP. Dichlorobenzamil decreased Po without changing the single CN-channel' conductance. CN-channels exhibited burst activity. Mean open and closed times as well as the burst duration depended on agonist concentration. A kinetic model with four states (an inactivated, a closed and two open ones) is suggested to explain the regularities of CN-channel gating and dose-response relations. PMID:8334139

  17. The International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, Guy; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Takagi, Toshihisa

    2016-01-01

    The International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC; http://www.insdc.org) comprises three global partners committed to capturing, preserving and providing comprehensive public-domain nucleotide sequence information. The INSDC establishes standards, formats and protocols for data and metadata to make it easier for individuals and organisations to submit their nucleotide data reliably to public archives. This work enables the continuous, global exchange of information about living things. Here we present an update of the INSDC in 2015, including data growth and diversification, new standards and requirements by publishers for authors to submit their data to the public archives. The INSDC serves as a model for data sharing in the life sciences. PMID:26657633

  18. Nucleotide `maps' of digests of deoxyribonucleic acid

    PubMed Central

    Murray, K.

    1970-01-01

    Various digests of 32P-labelled DNA were examined by two-dimensional ionophoresis on cellulose acetate and DEAE-cellulose paper. The products from digestion with pancreatic deoxyribonuclease and Neurospora crassa endonuclease were qualitatively closely similar, but very complex, and were used to investigate the mapping behaviour of nucleotides in various ionophoretic systems. Ionophoresis on DEAE-cellulose paper in triethylamine carbonate, pH 9.7, followed by ionophoresis in the second dimension at pH1.9 gave high resolution of nucleotides in very complex mixtures and permitted the fractionation of larger quantities than is possible on cellulose acetate. High resolution of nucleotides in compact spots was obtained with two-dimensional ionophoresis on cellulose acetate and AE-cellulose paper, a system that is a useful supplement to those based on DEAE-cellulose paper. ImagesPLATE 7PLATE 1PLATE 2PLATE 3PLATE 4PLATE 5PLATE 6 PMID:5476726

  19. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the hypervariable region III of mitochondrial DNA in Thais.

    PubMed

    Thongngam, Punlop; Leewattanapasuk, Worraanong; Bhoopat, Tanin; Sangthong, Padchanee

    2016-07-01

    This study analyzed the nucleotide sequences of the hypervariable region III (HVRIII) of mitochondrial DNA in Thai individuals. Buccal swab samples were randomly obtained from 100 healthy, unrelated, adult (18-60 years old), volunteer donors living in Thailand. Eighteen different haplotypes were found, of which 11 haplotypes were unique. The most frequent haplotypes observed were 522D-523D. Nucleotide transition from Thymine (T) to Cytosine (C) at position 489 (43%) was the most frequent substitution. Nucleotide transversions were also observed at position 433 (Adenine (A) to C, 1%) and position 499 (Guanine (G) to C, 1%). Fifty-three samples presented nucleotide insertion and deletion of C and A (CA) at position 514-523. Insertion of 1AC (3%) and 2AC (2%) were observed. Deletion of 1CA (53%) and 2CA (2%) at position 514-523 were revealed. The deletion of T at position 459 was observed. The haplotype diversity, random match probability, and discrimination power were calculated to be 0.7770, 0.2308, and 0.7692, respectively. PMID:27107562

  20. Novel interactions of fluorinated nucleotide derivatives targeting orotidine-5′-monophosphate decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Melissa; Avina, Maria Elena Meza; Wei, Lianhu; Crandall, Ian E.; Bello, Angelica Mara; Poduch, Ewa; Liu, Yan; Paige, Christopher J.; Kain, Kevin C.; Pai, Emil F.; Kotra, Lakshmi P.

    2011-01-01

    Fluorinated nucleosides and nucleotides are of considerable interest to medicinal chemists due to their antiviral, anticancer, and other biological activities. However, their direct interactions at target binding sites are not well understood. A new class of 2′-deoxy-2′-fluoro-C6-substituted uridine and UMP derivatives were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of orotidine-5′-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODCase). These compounds were synthesized from the key intermediate, fully-protected 2′-deoxy-2′-fluorouridine. Among the synthesized compounds, 2′-deoxy-2′-fluoro-6-iodo-UMP covalently inhibited human ODCase with a second-order rate constant of 0.62 ± 0.02 M−1sec−1. Interestingly, the 6-cyano-2′-fluoro derivative covalently interacted with ODCase defying the conventional thinking, where its ribosyl derivative undergoes transformation into BMP by ODCase. This confirms that the 2′-fluoro moiety influences the chemistry at the C6 position of the nucleotides, thus interactions in the active site of ODCase. Molecular interactions of the 2′-fluorinated nucleotides are compared to those with the 3′-fluorinated nucleotides bound to the corresponding target enzyme, and the carbohydrate moieties were shown to bind in different conformations. PMID:21417464

  1. Regulation of Ion Channels by Pyridine Nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Kilfoil, Peter J.; Tipparaju, Srinivas M.; Barski, Oleg A.; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2014-01-01

    Recent research suggests that in addition to their role as soluble electron carriers, pyridine nucleotides [NAD(P)(H)] also regulate ion transport mechanisms. This mode of regulation seems to have been conserved through evolution. Several bacterial ion–transporting proteins or their auxiliary subunits possess nucleotide-binding domains. In eukaryotes, the Kv1 and Kv4 channels interact with pyridine nucleotide–binding β-subunits that belong to the aldo-keto reductase superfamily. Binding of NADP+ to Kvβ removes N-type inactivation of Kv currents, whereas NADPH stabilizes channel inactivation. Pyridine nucleotides also regulate Slo channels by interacting with their cytosolic regulator of potassium conductance domains that show high sequence homology to the bacterial TrkA family of K+ transporters. These nucleotides also have been shown to modify the activity of the plasma membrane KATP channels, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, the transient receptor potential M2 channel, and the intracellular ryanodine receptor calcium release channels. In addition, pyridine nucleotides also modulate the voltage-gated sodium channel by supporting the activity of its ancillary subunit—the glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase-like protein. Moreover, the NADP+ metabolite, NAADP+, regulates intracellular calcium homeostasis via the 2-pore channel, ryanodine receptor, or transient receptor potential M2 channels. Regulation of ion channels by pyridine nucleotides may be required for integrating cell ion transport to energetics and for sensing oxygen levels or metabolite availability. This mechanism also may be an important component of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, memory, and circadian rhythms, and disruption of this regulatory axis may be linked to dysregulation of calcium homeostasis and cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:23410881

  2. Nucleotide chloramines and neutrophil-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bernofsky, C

    1991-03-01

    Hypochlorite is a reactive oxidant formed as an end product of the respiratory burst in activated neutrophils. It is responsible for killing bacteria and has been implicated in neutrophil-mediated tissue injury associated with the inflammatory process. Although hypochlorite is a potent cytotoxic agent, the primary mechanism by which it exerts its effect is unclear. This review examines evidence that the primary event in hypochlorite cytotoxicity is the loss of adenine nucleotides from the target cell. This loss appears to be mediated by the formation of adenine nucleotide chloramines which are reactive intermediates with a free radical character and are capable of forming stable ligands with proteins and nucleic acids. PMID:1848195

  3. A likelihood method for the detection of selection and recombination using nucleotide sequences.

    PubMed

    Grassly, N C; Holmes, E C

    1997-03-01

    Different regions along nucleotide sequences are often subject to different evolutionary forces. Recombination will result in regions having different evolutionary histories, while selection can cause regions to evolve at different rates. This paper presents a statistical method based on likelihood for detecting such processes by identifying the regions which do not fit with a single phylogenetic topology and nucleotide substitution process along the entire sequence. Subsequent reanalysis of these anomalous regions may then be possible. The method is tested using simulations, and its application is demonstrated using the primate psi eta-globin pseudogene, the V3 region of the envelope gene of HIV-1, and argF sequences from Neisseria bacteria. Reanalysis of anomalous regions is shown to reveal possible immune selection in HIV-1 and recombination in Neisseria. A computer program which implements the method is available. PMID:9066792

  4. Are substitution rates and RNA editing correlated?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background RNA editing is a post-transcriptional process that, in seed plants, involves a cytosine to uracil change in messenger RNA, causing the translated protein to differ from that predicted by the DNA sequence. RNA editing occurs extensively in plant mitochondria, but large differences in editing frequencies are found in some groups. The underlying processes responsible for the distribution of edited sites are largely unknown, but gene function, substitution rate, and gene conversion have been proposed to influence editing frequencies. Results We studied five mitochondrial genes in the monocot order Alismatales, all showing marked differences in editing frequencies among taxa. A general tendency to lose edited sites was observed in all taxa, but this tendency was particularly strong in two clades, with most of the edited sites lost in parallel in two different areas of the phylogeny. This pattern is observed in at least four of the five genes analyzed. Except in the groups that show an unusually low editing frequency, the rate of C-to-T changes in edited sites was not significantly higher that in non-edited 3rd codon positions. This may indicate that selection is not actively removing edited sites in nine of the 12 families of the core Alismatales. In all genes but ccmB, a significant correlation was found between frequency of change in edited sites and synonymous substitution rate. In general, taxa with higher substitution rates tend to have fewer edited sites, as indicated by the phylogenetically independent correlation analyses. The elimination of edited sites in groups that lack or have reduced levels of editing could be a result of gene conversion involving a cDNA copy (retroprocessing). If so, this phenomenon could be relatively common in the Alismatales, and may have affected some groups recurrently. Indirect evidence of retroprocessing without a necessary correlation with substitution rate was found mostly in families Alismataceae and Hydrocharitaceae

  5. Explicit Substitutions and All That

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayala-Rincon, Mauricio; Munoz, Cesar; Busnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Explicit substitution calculi are extensions of the Lambda-calculus where the substitution mechanism is internalized into the theory. This feature makes them suitable for implementation and theoretical study of logic-based tools such as strongly typed programming languages and proof assistant systems. In this paper we explore new developments on two of the most successful styles of explicit substitution calculi: the lambda(sigma)- and lambda(s(e))-calculi.

  6. Explicit Substitutions and All That

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayala-Rincon, Mauricio; Munoz, Cesar

    2000-01-01

    Explicit substitution calculi are extensions of the lambda-calculus where the substitution mechanism is internalized into the theory. This feature makes them suitable for implementation and theoretical study of logic-based tools such as strongly typed programming languages and proof assistant systems. In this paper we explore new developments on two of the most successful styles of explicit substitution calculi: the lambda sigma- and lambda S(e)-calculi.

  7. Trifluoromethyl-substituted tetrathiafulvalenes

    PubMed Central

    Jeannin, Olivier; Barrière, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Summary A series of tetrathiafulvalenes functionalized with one or two trifluoromethyl electron-withdrawing groups (EWG) is obtained by phosphite coupling involving CF3-substituted 1,3-dithiole-2-one derivatives. The relative effects of the EWG such as CF3, CO2Me and CN on the TTF core were investigated from a combination of structural, electrochemical, spectrochemical and theoretical investigations. Electrochemical data confirm the good correlations between the first oxidation potential of the TTF derivatives and the σmeta Hammet parameter, thus in the order CO2Me < CF3 < CN, indicating that, in any case, the mesomeric effect of the substituents is limited. Besides, crystal structure determinations show that the deformation of the unsymmetrically substituted dithiole rings, when bearing one, or two different EWG, and attributed to the mesomeric effect of ester or nitrile groups, is not notably modified or counter-balanced by the introduction of a neighboring trifluoromethyl group. DFT calculations confirm these observations and also show that the low energy HOMO–LUMO absorption band found in nitrile or ester-substituted TTFs is not found in TTF-CF3, where, as in TTF itself, the low energy absorption band is essentially attributable to a HOMO→LUMO + 1 transition. Despite relatively high oxidation potentials, these donor molecules with CF3 EWG can be involved in charge transfer complexes or cation radical salts, as reported here for the CF3-subsituted EDT-TTF donor molecule. A neutral charge transfer complex with TCNQ, (EDT-TTF-CF3)2(TCNQ) was isolated and characterized through alternated stacks of EDT-TTF-CF3 dimers and TCNQ in the solid state. A radical cation salt of EDT-TTF-CF3 is also obtained upon electrocrystallisation in the presence of the FeCl4 − anion. In this salt, formulated as (EDT-TTF-CF3)(FeCl4), the (EDT-TTF-CF3)+• radical cations are associated two-by-two into centrosymmetric dyads with a strong pairing of the radical species in a singlet

  8. Trifluoromethyl-substituted tetrathiafulvalenes.

    PubMed

    Jeannin, Olivier; Barrière, Frédéric; Fourmigué, Marc

    2015-01-01

    A series of tetrathiafulvalenes functionalized with one or two trifluoromethyl electron-withdrawing groups (EWG) is obtained by phosphite coupling involving CF3-substituted 1,3-dithiole-2-one derivatives. The relative effects of the EWG such as CF3, CO2Me and CN on the TTF core were investigated from a combination of structural, electrochemical, spectrochemical and theoretical investigations. Electrochemical data confirm the good correlations between the first oxidation potential of the TTF derivatives and the σmeta Hammet parameter, thus in the order CO2Me < CF3 < CN, indicating that, in any case, the mesomeric effect of the substituents is limited. Besides, crystal structure determinations show that the deformation of the unsymmetrically substituted dithiole rings, when bearing one, or two different EWG, and attributed to the mesomeric effect of ester or nitrile groups, is not notably modified or counter-balanced by the introduction of a neighboring trifluoromethyl group. DFT calculations confirm these observations and also show that the low energy HOMO-LUMO absorption band found in nitrile or ester-substituted TTFs is not found in TTF-CF3, where, as in TTF itself, the low energy absorption band is essentially attributable to a HOMO→LUMO + 1 transition. Despite relatively high oxidation potentials, these donor molecules with CF3 EWG can be involved in charge transfer complexes or cation radical salts, as reported here for the CF3-subsituted EDT-TTF donor molecule. A neutral charge transfer complex with TCNQ, (EDT-TTF-CF3)2(TCNQ) was isolated and characterized through alternated stacks of EDT-TTF-CF3 dimers and TCNQ in the solid state. A radical cation salt of EDT-TTF-CF3 is also obtained upon electrocrystallisation in the presence of the FeCl4 (-) anion. In this salt, formulated as (EDT-TTF-CF3)(FeCl4), the (EDT-TTF-CF3)(+•) radical cations are associated two-by-two into centrosymmetric dyads with a strong pairing of the radical species in a singlet state

  9. Y-Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Diversity in Chinese Indigenous Horse

    PubMed Central

    Han, Haoyuan; Zhang, Qin; Gao, Kexin; Yue, Xiangpeng; Zhang, Tao; Dang, Ruihua; Lan, Xianyong; Chen, Hong; Lei, Chuzhao

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to high genetic diversity of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), equine Y chromosome shows extremely low variability, implying limited patrilines in the domesticated horse. In this study, we applied direct sequencing and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) methods to investigate the polymorphisms of 33 Y chromosome specific loci in 304 Chinese indigenous horses from 13 breeds. Consequently, two Y-single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (Y-45701/997 and Y-50869) and one Y-indel (Y-45288) were identified. Of those, the Y-50869 (T>A) revealed the highest variation frequency (24.67%), whereas it was only 3.29% and 1.97% in Y-45288 (T/-) and Y-45701/997 (G>T) locus, respectively. These three mutations accounted for 27.96% of the total samples and identified five Y-SNP haplotypes, demonstrating genetic diversity of Y chromosome in Chinese horses. In addition, all the five Y-SNP haplotypes were shared by different breeds. Among 13 horse breeds analyzed, Balikun horse displayed the highest nucleotide diversity (π = 5.6×10−4) and haplotype diversity (h = 0.527), while Ningqiang horse showed the lowest nucleotide diversity (π = 0.00000) and haplotype diversity (h = 0.000). The results also revealed that Chinese horses had a different polymorphic pattern of Y chromosome from European and American horses. In conclusion, Chinese horses revealed genetic diversity of Y chromosome, however more efforts should be made to better understand the domestication and paternal origin of Chinese indigenous horses. PMID:26104513

  10. Nucleotide sequence of bacteriophage fd DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Beck, E; Sommer, R; Auerswald, E A; Kurz, C; Zink, B; Osterburg, G; Schaller, H; Sugimoto, K; Sugisaki, H; Okamoto, T; Takanami, M

    1978-01-01

    The sequence of the 6,408 nucleotides of bacteriophage fd DNA has been determined. This allows to deduce the exact organisation of the filamentous phage genome and provides easy access to DNA segments of known structure and function. PMID:745987

  11. Nucleotide-metabolizing enzymes in Chlamydomonas flagella.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T; Flavin, M

    1976-01-10

    Nucleotides have at least two functions in eukaryotic cilia and flagella. ATP, originating in the cells, is utilized for motility by energy-transducing protein(s) called dynein, and the binding of guanine nucleotides to tubulin, and probably certain transformations of the bound nucleotides, are prerequisites for the assembly of microtubules. Besides dynein, which can be solubulized from Chlamydomonas flagella as a heterogeneous, Mg2+ or Ca2+-activated ATPase, we have purified and characterized five other flagellar enzymes involved in nucleotide transformations. A homogeneous, low molecular weight, Ca2+-specific adenosine triphosphatase was isolated, which was inhibited by Mg2+ and was not specific for ATP. This enzyme was not formed by treating purified dynein with proteases. It was absent from extracts of Tetrahymena cilia. Its function might be an auxiliary energy transducer, or in steering or tactic responses. Two species of adenylate kinase were isolated, one of which was much elevated in regenerating flagella; the latter was also present in cell bodies. A large part of flagellar nucleoside diphosphokinase activity could not be solubilized. Two soluble enzyme species were identified, one of which was also present in cell bodies. Since these enzymes are of interest because they might function in microtubule assembly, we studied the extent to which brain nucleoside diphosphokinase co-polymerizes with tubulin purified by repeated cycles of polymerization. Arginine kinase was not detected in Chlamydomonas flagellar extracts. PMID:397

  12. The Complete Nucleotide Sequence of the Mitochondrial Genome of Bactrocera minax (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bin; Nardi, Francesco; Hull-Sanders, Helen; Wan, Xuanwu; Liu, Yinghong

    2014-01-01

    The complete 16,043 bp mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of Bactrocera minax (Diptera: Tephritidae) has been sequenced. The genome encodes 37 genes usually found in insect mitogenomes. The mitogenome information for B. minax was compared to the homologous sequences of Bactrocera oleae, Bactrocera tryoni, Bactrocera philippinensis, Bactrocera carambolae, Bactrocera papayae, Bactrocera dorsalis, Bactrocera correcta, Bactrocera cucurbitae and Ceratitis capitata. The analysis indicated the structure and organization are typical of, and similar to, the nine closely related species mentioned above, although it contains the lowest genome-wide A+T content (67.3%). Four short intergenic spacers with a high degree of conservation among the nine tephritid species mentioned above and B. minax were observed, which also have clear counterparts in the control regions (CRs). Correlation analysis among these ten tephritid species revealed close positive correlation between the A+T content of zero-fold degenerate sites (P0FD), the ratio of nucleotide substitution frequency at P0FD sites to all degenerate sites (zero-fold degenerate sites, two-fold degenerate sites and four-fold degenerate sites) and amino acid sequence distance (ASD) were found. Further, significant positive correlation was observed between the A+T content of four-fold degenerate sites (P4FD) and the ratio of nucleotide substitution frequency at P4FD sites to all degenerate sites; however, we found significant negative correlation between ASD and the A+T content of P4FD, and the ratio of nucleotide substitution frequency at P4FD sites to all degenerate sites. A higher nucleotide substitution frequency at non-synonymous sites compared to synonymous sites was observed in nad4, the first time that has been observed in an insect mitogenome. A poly(T) stretch at the 5′ end of the CR followed by a [TA(A)]n-like stretch was also found. In addition, a highly conserved G+A-rich sequence block was observed in front of the

  13. Predicting protein-binding RNA nucleotides using the feature-based removal of data redundancy and the interaction propensity of nucleotide triplets.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sungwook; Han, Kyungsook

    2013-11-01

    Several learning approaches have been used to predict RNA-binding amino acids in a protein sequence, but there has been little attempt to predict protein-binding nucleotides in an RNA sequence. One of the reasons is that the differences between nucleotides in their interaction propensity are much smaller than those between amino acids. Another reason is that RNA exhibits less diverse sequence patterns than protein. Therefore, predicting protein-binding RNA nucleotides is much harder than predicting RNA-binding amino acids. We developed a new method that removes data redundancy in a training set of sequences based on their features. The new method constructs a larger and more informative training set than the standard redundancy removal method based on sequence similarity, and the constructed dataset is guaranteed to be redundancy-free. We computed the interaction propensity (IP) of nucleotide triplets by applying a new definition of IP to an extensive dataset of protein-RNA complexes, and developed a support vector machine (SVM) model to predict protein binding sites in RNA sequences. In a 5-fold cross-validation with 812 RNA sequences, the SVM model predicted protein-binding nucleotides with an accuracy of 86.4%, an F-measure of 84.8%, and a Matthews correlation coefficient of 0.66. With an independent dataset of 56 RNA sequences that were not used in training, the resulting accuracy was 68.1% with an F-measure of 71.7% and a Matthews correlation coefficient of 0.35. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to predict protein-binding RNA nucleotides in a given RNA sequence from the sequence data alone. The SVM model and datasets are freely available for academics at http://bclab.inha.ac.kr/primer. PMID:24209914

  14. Distinctive features of single nucleotide alterations in induced pluripotent stem cells with different types of DNA repair deficiency disorders

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Kohji; Sakaguchi, Hironari; Sakamoto-Abutani, Rie; Nakanishi, Mahito; Nishimura, Ken; Yamazaki-Inoue, Mayu; Ohtaka, Manami; Periasamy, Vaiyapuri Subbarayan; Alshatwi, Ali Abdullah; Higuchi, Akon; Hanaoka, Kazunori; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Takada, Shuji; Hata, Kenichiro; Toyoda, Masashi; Umezawa, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    Disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have been used as a model to analyze pathogenesis of disease. In this study, we generated iPSCs derived from a fibroblastic cell line of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) group A (XPA-iPSCs), a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disease in which patients develop skin cancer in the areas of skin exposed to sunlight. XPA-iPSCs exhibited hypersensitivity to ultraviolet exposure and accumulation of single-nucleotide substitutions when compared with ataxia telangiectasia-derived iPSCs that were established in a previous study. However, XPA-iPSCs did not show any chromosomal instability in vitro, i.e. intact chromosomes were maintained. The results were mutually compensating for examining two major sources of mutations, nucleotide excision repair deficiency and double-strand break repair deficiency. Like XP patients, XPA-iPSCs accumulated single-nucleotide substitutions that are associated with malignant melanoma, a manifestation of XP. These results indicate that XPA-iPSCs may serve a monitoring tool (analogous to the Ames test but using mammalian cells) to measure single-nucleotide alterations, and may be a good model to clarify pathogenesis of XP. In addition, XPA-iPSCs may allow us to facilitate development of drugs that delay genetic alteration and decrease hypersensitivity to ultraviolet for therapeutic applications. PMID:27197874

  15. Distinctive features of single nucleotide alterations in induced pluripotent stem cells with different types of DNA repair deficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Kohji; Sakaguchi, Hironari; Sakamoto-Abutani, Rie; Nakanishi, Mahito; Nishimura, Ken; Yamazaki-Inoue, Mayu; Ohtaka, Manami; Periasamy, Vaiyapuri Subbarayan; Alshatwi, Ali Abdullah; Higuchi, Akon; Hanaoka, Kazunori; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Takada, Shuji; Hata, Kenichiro; Toyoda, Masashi; Umezawa, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    Disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have been used as a model to analyze pathogenesis of disease. In this study, we generated iPSCs derived from a fibroblastic cell line of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) group A (XPA-iPSCs), a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disease in which patients develop skin cancer in the areas of skin exposed to sunlight. XPA-iPSCs exhibited hypersensitivity to ultraviolet exposure and accumulation of single-nucleotide substitutions when compared with ataxia telangiectasia-derived iPSCs that were established in a previous study. However, XPA-iPSCs did not show any chromosomal instability in vitro, i.e. intact chromosomes were maintained. The results were mutually compensating for examining two major sources of mutations, nucleotide excision repair deficiency and double-strand break repair deficiency. Like XP patients, XPA-iPSCs accumulated single-nucleotide substitutions that are associated with malignant melanoma, a manifestation of XP. These results indicate that XPA-iPSCs may serve a monitoring tool (analogous to the Ames test but using mammalian cells) to measure single-nucleotide alterations, and may be a good model to clarify pathogenesis of XP. In addition, XPA-iPSCs may allow us to facilitate development of drugs that delay genetic alteration and decrease hypersensitivity to ultraviolet for therapeutic applications. PMID:27197874

  16. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Analysis of European Archaeological M. leprae DNA

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Claire L.; Lockwood, Diana N. J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Leprosy was common in Europe eight to twelve centuries ago but molecular confirmation of this has been lacking. We have extracted M. leprae ancient DNA (aDNA) from medieval bones and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typed the DNA, this provides insight into the pattern of leprosy transmission in Europe and may assist in the understanding of M. leprae evolution. Methods and Findings Skeletons have been exhumed from 3 European countries (the United Kingdom, Denmark and Croatia) and are dated around the medieval period (476 to 1350 A.D.). we tested for the presence of 3 previously identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 10 aDNA extractions. M. leprae aDNA was extracted from 6 of the 10 bone samples. SNP analysis of these 6 extractions were compared to previously analysed European SNP data using the same PCR assays and were found to be the same. Testing for the presence of SNPs in M. leprae DNA extracted from ancient bone samples is a novel approach to analysing European M. leprae DNA and the findings concur with the previously published data that European M. leprae strains fall in to one group (SNP group 3). Conclusions These findings support the suggestion that the M. leprae genome is extremely stable and show that archaeological M. leprae DNA can be analysed to gain detailed information about the genotypic make-up of European leprosy, which may assist in the understanding of leprosy transmission worldwide. PMID:19847306

  17. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 1 and vascular aging.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chen

    2015-12-01

    VSMCs (vascular smooth muscle cells) play critical roles in arterial remodelling with aging, hypertension and atherosclerosis. VSMCs exist in diverse phenotypes and exhibit phenotypic plasticity, e.g. changing from a quiescent/contractile phenotype to an active myofibroblast-like, often called 'synthetic', phenotype. Synthetic VSMCs are able to proliferate, migrate and secrete ECM (extracellular matrix) proteinases and ECM proteins. In addition, they produce pro-inflammatory molecules, providing an inflammatory microenvironment for leucocyte penetration, accumulation and activation. The aging VSMCs have also shown changes in cellular phenotype, responsiveness to contracting and relaxing mediators, replicating potential, matrix synthesis, inflammatory mediators and intracellular signalling. VSMC dysfunction plays a key role in age-associated vascular remodelling. Cyclic nucleotide PDEs (phosphodiesterases), by catalysing cyclic nucleotide hydrolysis, play a critical role in regulating the amplitude, duration and compartmentalization of cyclic nucleotide signalling. Abnormal alterations of PDEs and subsequent changes in cyclic nucleotide homoeostasis have been implicated in a number of different diseases. In the study published in the latest issue of Clinical Science, Bautista Niño and colleagues have shown that, in cultured senescent human VSMCs, PDE1A and PDE1C mRNA levels are significantly up-regulated and inhibition of PDE1 activity with vinpocetine reduced cellular senescent makers in senescent VSMCs. Moreover, in the premature aging mice with genomic instability (Ercc1(d/-)), impaired aortic ring relaxation in response to SNP (sodium nitroprusside), an NO (nitric oxide) donor, was also largely improved by vinpocetine. More interestingly, using data from human GWAS (genome-wide association studies), it has been found that PDE1A single nucleotide polymorphisms is significantly associated with diastolic blood pressure and carotid intima-media thickening, two

  18. A recombinant RNA bacteriophage system to identify functionally important nucleotides in a self-cleaving ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background RNA bacteriophages like Qbeta and MS2 are well known for their high mutation rate, short infection cycle and strong selection against foreign inserts. The hammerhead ribozyme (HHRz) is a small self-cleaving RNA molecule whose active residues have previously been identified by mutational analysis of each individual base. Here the functionally important bases of HHRz were determined in a single screening experiment by inserting the HHRz into the genome of MS2. Findings The minimal HHRz of satellite Tobacco ringspot virus was cloned into the genome of RNA bacteriophage MS2. Sequence analysis of the surviving phages revealed that the majority had acquired single base-substitutions that apparently inactivated the HHRz. The positions of these substitutions exactly matched that of the previously determined core residues of the HHRz. Conclusions Natural selection against a ribozyme in the genome of MS2 can be used to quickly identify nucleotides required for self-cleavage. PMID:24946926

  19. Displacement, Substitution, Sublimation: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    Sigmund Freund worked with the mechanisms of displacement, substitution, and sublimation. These mechanisms have many similarities and have been studied diagnostically and therapeutically. Displacement and substitution seem to fit in well with phobias, hysterias, somatiyations, prejudices, and scapegoating. Phobias, prejudices, and scapegoating…

  20. Muon-Substituted Malonaldehyde: Transforming a Transition State into a Stable Structure by Isotope Substitution.

    PubMed

    Goli, Mohammad; Shahbazian, Shant

    2016-02-12

    Isotope substitutions are usually conceived to play a marginal role on the structure and bonding pattern of molecules. However, a recent study [Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2014, 53, 13706-13709; Angew. Chem. 2014, 126, 13925-13929] further demonstrates that upon replacing a proton with a positively charged muon, as the lightest radioisotope of hydrogen, radical changes in the nature of the structure and bonding of certain species may take place. The present report is a primary attempt to introduce another example of structural transformation on the basis of the malonaldehyde system. Accordingly, upon replacing the proton between the two oxygen atoms of malonaldehyde with the positively charged muon a serious structural transformation is observed. By using the ab initio nuclear-electronic orbital non-Born-Oppenheimer procedure, the nuclear configuration of the muon-substituted species is derived. The resulting nuclear configuration is much more similar to the transition state of the proton transfer in malonaldehyde rather than to the stable configuration of malonaldehyde. The comparison of the "atoms in molecules" (AIM) structure of the muon-substituted malonaldehyde and the AIM structure of the stable and the transition-state configurations of malonaldehyde also unequivocally demonstrates substantial similarities of the muon-substituted malonaldehyde to the transition state. PMID:26749489

  1. Discovery of nucleotide polymorphisms in the Musa gene pool by Ecotilling.

    PubMed

    Till, Bradley J; Jankowicz-Cieslak, Joanna; Sági, László; Huynh, Owen A; Utsushi, Hiroe; Swennen, Rony; Terauchi, Ryohei; Mba, Chikelu

    2010-11-01

    Musa (banana and plantain) is an important genus for the global export market and in local markets where it provides staple food for approximately 400 million people. Hybridization and polyploidization of several (sub)species, combined with vegetative propagation and human selection have produced a complex genetic history. We describe the application of the Ecotilling method for the discovery and characterization of nucleotide polymorphisms in diploid and polyploid accessions of Musa. We discovered over 800 novel alleles in 80 accessions. Sequencing and band evaluation shows Ecotilling to be a robust and accurate platform for the discovery of polymorphisms in homologous and homeologous gene targets. In the process of validating the method, we identified two single nucleotide polymorphisms that may be deleterious for the function of a gene putatively important for phototropism. Evaluation of heterozygous polymorphism and haplotype blocks revealed a high level of nucleotide diversity in Musa accessions. We further applied a strategy for the simultaneous discovery of heterozygous and homozygous polymorphisms in diploid accessions to rapidly evaluate nucleotide diversity in accessions of the same genome type. This strategy can be used to develop hypotheses for inheritance patterns of nucleotide polymorphisms within and between genome types. We conclude that Ecotilling is suitable for diversity studies in Musa, that it can be considered for functional genomics studies and as tool in selecting germplasm for traditional and mutation breeding approaches. PMID:20589365

  2. How Do Substitute Teachers Substitute? An Empirical Study of Substitute-Teacher Labor Supply

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gershenson, Seth

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the daily labor supply of a potentially important, but often overlooked, source of instruction in U.S. public schools: substitute teachers. I estimate a sequential binary-choice model of substitute teachers' job-offer acceptance decisions using data on job offers made by a randomized automated calling system. Importantly, this…

  3. Patterns of Y and X chromosome DNA sequence divergence during the Felidae radiation.

    PubMed Central

    Pecon Slattery, J; O'Brien, S J

    1998-01-01

    The 37 species of modern cats have evolved from approximately eight phylogenetic lineages within the past 10 to 15 million years. The Felidae family has been described with multiple measures of morphologic and molecular evolutionary methods that serve as a framework for tracking gene divergence during brief evolutionary periods. In this report, we compare the mode and tempo of evolution of noncoding sequences of a large intron within Zfy (783 bp) and Zfx (854 bp), homologous genes located on the felid Y and X chromosomes, respectively. Zfy sequence variation evolves at about twice the rate of Zfx, and both gene intron sequences track feline hierarchical topologies accurately. As homoplasies are infrequent in patterns of nucleotide substitution, the Y chromosome sequence displays a remarkable degree of phylogenetic consistency among cat species and provides a highly informative glimpse of divergence of sex chromosome sequences in Felidae. PMID:9539439

  4. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo substituted phenyl azo... CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10126 Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo substituted phenyl azo... CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10126 Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato...

  6. Nucleotide and phylogenetic analyses of the Chlamydia trachomatis ompA gene indicates it is a hotspot for mutation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Serovars of the human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis occupy one of three specific tissue niches. Genomic analyses indicate that the serovars have a phylogeny congruent with their pathobiology and have an average substitution rate of less than one nucleotide per kilobase. In contrast, the gene that determines serovar specificity, ompA, has a phylogenetic association that is not congruent with tissue tropism and has a degree of nucleotide variability much higher than other genomic loci. The ompA gene encodes the major surface-exposed antigenic determinant, and the observed nucleotide diversity at the ompA locus is thought to be due to recombination and host immune selection pressure. The possible contribution of a localized increase in mutation rate, however, has not been investigated. Results Nucleotide diversity and phylogenetic relationships of the five constant and four variable domains of the ompA gene, as well as several loci surrounding ompA, were examined for each serovar. The loci flanking the ompA gene demonstrated that nucleotide diversity increased monotonically as ompA is approached and that their gene trees are not congruent with either ompA or tissue tropism. The variable domains of the ompA gene had a very high level of non-synonymous change, which is expected as these regions encode the surface-exposed epitopes and are under positive selection. However, the synonymous changes are clustered in the variable regions compared to the constant domains; if hitchhiking were to account for the increase in synonymous changes, these substitutions should be more evenly distributed across the gene. Recombination also cannot entirely account for this increase as the phylogenetic relationships of the constant and variable domains are congruent with each other. Conclusions The high number of synonymous substitutions observed within the variable domains of ompA appears to be due to an increased mutation rate within this region of the genome, whereas the

  7. Prothrombin carora: hypoprothrombinaemia caused by substitution of Tyr-44 by Cys.

    PubMed

    Sun, W Y; Ruiz-Saez, A; Burkart, M C; Bosch, N; Degen, S J

    1999-06-01

    Two members of a family from Carora, Venezuela, were found to have prothrombin activity levels at 4% of normal and undetectable antigen levels. All exons of the prothrombin gene from the proband were sequenced and a mutation at nucleotide 1305 was identified that would result in the substitution of Cys for Tyr at residue 44. Residue 44 is present in the aromatic stack region of the protein. Substitution of a Cys in this region would result in an abnormal folding of the protein which could be the cause for the observed lack of secretion of the abnormal prothrombin. PMID:10354129

  8. The multiple codes of nucleotide sequences.

    PubMed

    Trifonov, E N

    1989-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences carry genetic information of many different kinds, not just instructions for protein synthesis (triplet code). Several codes of nucleotide sequences are discussed including: (1) the translation framing code, responsible for correct triplet counting by the ribosome during protein synthesis; (2) the chromatin code, which provides instructions on appropriate placement of nucleosomes along the DNA molecules and their spatial arrangement; (3) a putative loop code for single-stranded RNA-protein interactions. The codes are degenerate and corresponding messages are not only interspersed but actually overlap, so that some nucleotides belong to several messages simultaneously. Tandemly repeated sequences frequently considered as functionless "junk" are found to be grouped into certain classes of repeat unit lengths. This indicates some functional involvement of these sequences. A hypothesis is formulated according to which the tandem repeats are given the role of weak enhancer-silencers that modulate, in a copy number-dependent way, the expression of proximal genes. Fast amplification and elimination of the repeats provides an attractive mechanism of species adaptation to a rapidly changing environment. PMID:2673451

  9. Evolution of functional six-nucleotide DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liqin; Yang, Zunyi; Sefah, Kwame; Bradley, Kevin M; Hoshika, Shuichi; Kim, Myong-Jung; Kim, Hyo-Joong; Zhu, Guizhi; Jiménez, Elizabeth; Cansiz, Sena; Teng, I-Ting; Champanhac, Carole; McLendon, Christopher; Liu, Chen; Zhang, Wen; Gerloff, Dietlind L; Huang, Zhen; Tan, Weihong; Benner, Steven A

    2015-06-01

    Axiomatically, the density of information stored in DNA, with just four nucleotides (GACT), is higher than in a binary code, but less than it might be if synthetic biologists succeed in adding independently replicating nucleotides to genetic systems. Such addition could also add functional groups not found in natural DNA, but useful for molecular performance. Here, we consider two new nucleotides (Z and P, 6-amino-5-nitro-3-(1'-β-D-2'-deoxyribo-furanosyl)-2(1H)-pyridone and 2-amino-8-(1'-β-D-2'-deoxyribofuranosyl)-imidazo[1,2-a]-1,3,5-triazin-4(8H)-one). These are designed to pair via complete Watson-Crick geometry. These were added to a library of oligonucleotides used in a laboratory in vitro evolution (LIVE) experiment; the GACTZP library was challenged to deliver molecules that bind selectively to liver cancer cells, but not to untransformed liver cells. Unlike in classical in vitro selection, low levels of mutation allow this system to evolve to create binding molecules not necessarily present in the original library. Over a dozen binding species were recovered. The best had Z and/or P in their sequences. Several had multiple, nearby, and adjacent Zs and Ps. Only the weaker binders contained no Z or P at all. This suggests that this system explored much of the sequence space available to this genetic system and that GACTZP libraries are richer reservoirs of functionality than standard libraries. PMID:25966323

  10. Visualization of cyclic nucleotide dynamics in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gorshkov, Kirill; Zhang, Jin

    2014-01-01

    The second messengers cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) transduce many neuromodulatory signals from hormones and neurotransmitters into specific functional outputs. Their production, degradation and signaling are spatiotemporally regulated to achieve high specificity in signal transduction. The development of genetically encodable fluorescent biosensors has provided researchers with useful tools to study these versatile second messengers and their downstream effectors with unparalleled spatial and temporal resolution in cultured cells and living animals. In this review, we introduce the general design of these fluorescent biosensors and describe several of them in more detail. Then we discuss a few examples of using cyclic nucleotide fluorescent biosensors to study regulation of neuronal function and finish with a discussion of advances in the field. Although there has been significant progress made in understanding how the specific signaling of cyclic nucleotide second messengers is achieved, the mechanistic details in complex cell types like neurons are only just beginning to surface. Current and future fluorescent protein reporters will be essential to elucidate the role of cyclic nucleotide signaling dynamics in the functions of individual neurons and their networks. PMID:25538560

  11. Nucleotide sequence of the 3'-noncoding region of alfalfa mosaic virus RNA 4 and its homology with the genomic RNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Koper-Zwarthoff, E C; Brederode, F T; Walstra, P; Bol, J F

    1979-01-01

    A 226-nucleotide fragment was derived from alfalfa mosaic virus RNA 4 (ALMV RNA 4), the subgenomic messenger for viral coat protein, and its sequence was deduced by in vitro labeling with polynucleotide kinase and application of RNA sequencing techniques. The fragment contains the 3'-terminal 45 nucleotides of the coat protein cistron and the complete 3'-noncoding region of 182 nucleotides. The total length of RNA 4 was calculated to be 881 nucleotides. AlMV RNAs 1, 2 and 3 were elongated with a 3'-terminal poly(A) stretch and subjected to sequence analysis by using a specific primer, reverse transcriptase and chain terminators. This revealed and extensive homology between the 3'-terminal 140 to 150 nucleotides of all four ALMV RNAs. Despite a number of base substitutions, the secondary structure of the homologous region is highly conserved. The observed homology indicates that, as with RNA 4, the sites with a high affinity for the viral coat protein are located at the 3'-termini of the genomic RNAs. Images PMID:537914

  12. Phylogenomic analyses reveal convergent patterns of adaptive evolution in elephant and human ancestries.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Morris; Sterner, Kirstin N; Islam, Munirul; Uddin, Monica; Sherwood, Chet C; Hof, Patrick R; Hou, Zhuo-Cheng; Lipovich, Leonard; Jia, Hui; Grossman, Lawrence I; Wildman, Derek E

    2009-12-01

    Specific sets of brain-expressed genes, such as aerobic energy metabolism genes, evolved adaptively in the ancestry of humans and may have evolved adaptively in the ancestry of other large-brained mammals. The recent addition of genomes from two afrotherians (elephant and tenrec) to the expanding set of publically available sequenced mammalian genomes provided an opportunity to test this hypothesis. Elephants resemble humans by having large brains and long life spans; tenrecs, in contrast, have small brains and short life spans. Thus, we investigated whether the phylogenomic patterns of adaptive evolution are more similar between elephant and human than between either elephant and tenrec lineages or human and mouse lineages, and whether aerobic energy metabolism genes are especially well represented in the elephant and human patterns. Our analyses encompassed approximately 6,000 genes in each of these lineages with each gene yielding extensive coding sequence matches in interordinal comparisons. Each gene's nonsynonymous and synonymous nucleotide substitution rates and dN/dS ratios were determined. Then, from gene ontology information on genes with the higher dN/dS ratios, we identified the more prevalent sets of genes that belong to specific functional categories and that evolved adaptively. Elephant and human lineages showed much slower nucleotide substitution rates than tenrec and mouse lineages but more adaptively evolved genes. In correlation with absolute brain size and brain oxygen consumption being largest in elephants and next largest in humans, adaptively evolved aerobic energy metabolism genes were most evident in the elephant lineage and next most evident in the human lineage. PMID:19926857

  13. Germline Methylation Patterns Determine the Distribution of Recombination Events in the Dog Genome

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, Jonas; Quilez, Javier; Arndt, Peter F.; Webster, Matthew T.

    2015-01-01

    The positive-regulatory domain containing nine gene, PRDM9, which strongly associates with the location of recombination events in several vertebrates, is inferred to be inactive in the dog genome. Here, we address several questions regarding the control of recombination and its influence on genome evolution in dogs. First, we address whether the association between CpG islands (CGIs) and recombination hotspots is generated by lack of methylation, GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC), or both. Using a genome-wide dog single nucleotide polymorphism data set and comparisons of the dog genome with related species, we show that recombination-associated CGIs have low CpG mutation rates, and that CpG mutation rate is negatively correlated with recombination rate genome wide, indicating that nonmethylation attracts the recombination machinery. We next use a neighbor-dependent model of nucleotide substitution to disentangle the effects of CpG mutability and gBGC and analyze the effects that loss of PRDM9 has on these rates. We infer that methylation patterns have been stable during canid genome evolution, but that dog CGIs have experienced a drastic increase in substitution rate due to gBGC, consistent with increased levels of recombination in these regions. We also show that gBGC is likely to have generated many new CGIs in the dog genome, but these mostly occur away from genes, whereas the number of CGIs in gene promoter regions has not increased greatly in recent evolutionary history. Recombination has a major impact on the distribution of CGIs that are detected in the dog genome due to the interaction between methylation and gBGC. The results indicate that germline methylation patterns are the main determinant of recombination rates in the absence of PRDM9. PMID:25527838

  14. 40 CFR 721.3063 - Substituted phenyl azo substituted phenyl esters (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Substituted phenyl azo substituted... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3063 Substituted phenyl azo substituted phenyl... chemical substances identified generically as substituted phenyl azo substituted phenyl esters (PMNs...

  15. 40 CFR 721.3063 - Substituted phenyl azo substituted phenyl esters (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted phenyl azo substituted... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3063 Substituted phenyl azo substituted phenyl... as substituted phenyl azo substituted phenyl esters (PMNs P-95-655, P-95-782 and P-95-871)...

  16. 40 CFR 721.3063 - Substituted phenyl azo substituted phenyl esters (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted phenyl azo substituted... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3063 Substituted phenyl azo substituted phenyl... chemical substances identified generically as substituted phenyl azo substituted phenyl esters (PMNs...

  17. Ciliate telomerase RNA loop IV nucleotides promote hierarchical RNP assembly and holoenzyme stability

    PubMed Central

    Robart, Aaron R.; O'Connor, Catherine M.; Collins, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    Telomerase adds simple-sequence repeats to chromosome 3′ ends to compensate for the loss of repeats with each round of genome replication. To accomplish this de novo DNA synthesis, telomerase uses a template within its integral RNA component. In addition to providing the template, the telomerase RNA subunit (TER) also harbors nontemplate motifs that contribute to the specialized telomerase catalytic cycle of reiterative repeat synthesis. Most nontemplate TER motifs function through linkage with the template, but in ciliate and vertebrate telomerases, a stem–loop motif binds telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and reconstitutes full activity of the minimal recombinant TERT+TER RNP, even when physically separated from the template. Here, we resolve the functional requirements for this motif of ciliate TER in physiological RNP context using the Tetrahymena thermophila p65-TER-TERT core RNP reconstituted in vitro and the holoenzyme reconstituted in vivo. Contrary to expectation based on assays of the minimal recombinant RNP, we find that none of a panel of individual loop IV nucleotide substitutions impacts the profile of telomerase product synthesis when reconstituted as physiological core RNP or holoenzyme RNP. However, loop IV nucleotide substitutions do variably reduce assembly of TERT with the p65-TER complex in vitro and reduce the accumulation and stability of telomerase RNP in endogenous holoenzyme context. Our results point to a unifying model of a conformational activation role for this TER motif in the telomerase RNP enzyme. PMID:20106956

  18. Nucleotide sequences of immunoglobulin eta genes of chimpanzee and orangutan: DNA molecular clock and hominoid evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Sakoyama, Y.; Hong, K.J.; Byun, S.M.; Hisajima, H.; Ueda, S.; Yaoita, Y.; Hayashida, H.; Miyata, T.; Honjo, T.

    1987-02-01

    To determine the phylogenetic relationships among hominoids and the dates of their divergence, the complete nucleotide sequences of the constant region of the immunoglobulin eta-chain (C/sub eta1/) genes from chimpanzee and orangutan have been determined. These sequences were compared with the human eta-chain constant-region sequence. A molecular clock (silent molecular clock), measured by the degree of sequence divergence at the synonymous (silent) positions of protein-encoding regions, was introduced for the present study. From the comparison of nucleotide sequences of ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin and ..beta..- and delta-globulin genes between humans and Old World monkeys, the silent molecular clock was calibrated: the mean evolutionary rate of silent substitution was determined to be 1.56 x 10/sup -9/ substitutions per site per year. Using the silent molecular clock, the mean divergence dates of chimpanzee and orangutan from the human lineage were estimated as 6.4 +/- 2.6 million years and 17.3 +/- 4.5 million years, respectively. It was also shown that the evolutionary rate of primate genes is considerably slower than those of other mammalian genes.

  19. Novel missense mutation in the cyclic nucleotide-binding domain of HERG causes long QT syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Satler, C.A.; Walsh, E.P.; Vesely, M.R.

    1996-10-02

    Autosomal-dominant long QT syndrome (LQT) is an inherited disorder, predisposing affected individuals to sudden death from tachyarrhythmias. To identify the gene(s) responsible for LQT, we identified and characterized an LQT family consisting of 48 individuals. DNA was screened with 150 microsatellite polymorphic markers encompassing approximately 70% of the genome. We found evidence for linkage of the LQT phenotype to chromosome 7(q35-36). Marker D7S636 yielded a maximum lod score of 6.93 at a recombination fraction ({theta}) of 0.00. Haplotype analysis further localized the LQT gene within a 6-2-cM interval. HERG encodes a potassium channel which has been mapped to this region. Single-strand conformational polymorphism analyses demonstrated aberrant bands that were unique to all affected individuals. DNA sequencing of the aberrant bands demonstrated a G to A substitution in all affected patients; this point mutation results in the substitution of a highly conserved valine residue with a methionine (V822M) in the cyclic nucleotide-binding domain of this potassium channel. The cosegregation of this distinct mutation with LQT demonstrates that HERG is the LQT gene in this pedigree. Furthermore, the location and character of this mutation suggests that the cyclic nucleotide-binding domain of the potassium channel encoded by HERG plays an important role in normal cardiac repolarization and may decrease susceptibility to ventricular tachyarrhythmias. 38 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Metal binding mediated conformational change of XPA protein:a potential cytotoxic mechanism of nickel in the nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianping; Hu, Ziheng; Zhang, Yan; Gou, Xiaojun; Mu, Ying; Wang, Lirong; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2016-07-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a pivotal life process for repairing DNA nucleotide mismatch caused by chemicals, metal ions, radiation, and other factors. As the initiation step of NER, the xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A protein (XPA) recognizes damaged DNA molecules, and recruits the replication protein A (RPA), another important player in the NER process. The stability of the Zn(2+)-chelated Zn-finger domain of XPA center core portion (i.e., XPA98-210) is the foundation of its biological functionality, while the displacement of the Zn(2+) by toxic metal ions (such as Ni(2+), a known human carcinogen and allergen) may impair the effectiveness of NER and hence elevate the chance of carcinogenesis. In this study, we first calculated the force field parameters for the bonded model in the metal center of the XPA98-210 system, showing that the calculated results, including charges, bonds, angles etc., are congruent with previously reported results measured by spectrometry experiments and quantum chemistry computation. Then, comparative molecular dynamics simulations using these parameters revealed the changes in the conformation and motion mode of XPA98-210 Zn-finger after the substitution of Zn(2+) by Ni(2+). The results showed that Ni(2+) dramatically disrupted the relative positions of the four Cys residues in the Zn-finger structure, forcing them to collapse from a tetrahedron into an almost planar structure. Finally, we acquired the binding mode of XPA98-210 with its ligands RPA70N and DNA based on molecular docking and structural alignment. We found that XPA98-210's Zn-finger domain primarily binds to a V-shaped cleft in RPA70N, while the cationic band in its C-terminal subdomain participates in the recognition of damaged DNA. In addition, this article sheds light on the multi-component interaction pattern among XPA, DNA, and other NER-related proteins (i.e., RPA70N, RPA70A, RPA70B, RPA70C, RPA32, and RPA14) based on previously reported

  1. Can Cannabis be Considered a Substitute Medication for Alcohol?

    PubMed Central

    Subbaraman, Meenakshi Sabina

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Substituting cannabis for alcohol may reduce drinking and related problems among alcohol-dependent individuals. Some even recommend prescribing medical cannabis to individuals attempting to reduce drinking. The primary aim of this review is to assess whether cannabis satisfies the seven previously published criteria for substitute medications for alcohol [e.g. ‘reduces alcohol-related harms’; ‘is safer in overdose than alcohol’; ‘should offer significant health economic benefits’; see Chick and Nutt ((2012) Substitution therapy for alcoholism: time for a reappraisal? J Psychopharmacol 26:205–12)]. Methods: Literature review. Results: All criteria appear either satisfied or partially satisfied, though studies relying on medical cannabis patients may be limited by selection bias and/or retrospective designs. Individual-level factors, such as severity of alcohol problems, may also moderate substitution. Conclusions: There is no clear pattern of outcomes related to cannabis substitution. Most importantly, the recommendation to prescribe alcohol-dependent individuals cannabis to help reduce drinking is premature. Future studies should use longitudinal data to better understand the consequences of cannabis substitution. PMID:24402247

  2. Mutagenesis of the cyclic AMP receptor protein of Escherichia coli: targeting positions 72 and 82 of the cyclic nucleotide binding pocket.

    PubMed Central

    Belduz, A O; Lee, E J; Harman, J G

    1993-01-01

    The 3', 5' cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) binding pocket of the cAMP receptor protein (CRP) of Escherichia coli was mutagenized to substitute leucine, glutamine, or aspartate for glutamate 72; and lysine, histidine, leucine, isoleucine, or glutamine for arginine 82. Substitutions were made in wild-type CRP and in a CRP*, or cAMP-independent, form of the protein to assess the effects of the amino acid substitutions on CRP structure. Cells containing the binding pocket residue-substituted forms of CRP were characterized through beta-galactosidase activity and by measurement of cAMP binding activity. This study confirms a role for both glutamate 72 and arginine 82 in cAMP binding and activation of CRP. Glutamine or leucine substitution of glutamate 72 produced forms of CRP having low affinity for the cAMP and unresponsive to the nucleotide. Aspartate substituted for glutamate 72 produced a low affinity cAMP-responsive form of CRP. CRP has a stringent requirement for the positioning of the position 72 glutamate carboxyl group within the cyclic nucleotide binding pocket. Results of this study also indicate that there are differences in the binding requirements of cAMP and cGMP, a competitive inhibitor of cAMP binding to CRP. PMID:8388097

  3. Molecular Evolution of the Duplicated Amy Locus in the Drosophila Melanogaster Species Subgroup: Concerted Evolution Only in the Coding Region and an Excess of Nonsynonymous Substitutions in Speciation

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, H.; Yamazaki, T.

    1995-01-01

    From the analysis of restriction maps of the Amy region in eight sibling species belonging to the Drosophila melanogaster species subgroup, we herein show that the patterns of duplication of the Amy gene are almost the same in all species. This indicates that duplication occurred before speciation within this species subgroup. From the nucleotide sequence data, we show a strong within-species similarity between the duplicated loci in the Amy coding region. This is in contrast to a strong similarity in the 5' and 3' flanking regions within each locus (proximal or distal) throughout the species subgroup. This means that concerted evolution occurred only in the Amy coding region and that differentiated evolution between the duplication occurred in the flanking regions. Moreover, when comparing the species, we also found a significant excess of nonsynonymous substitutions. In particular, all the fixed substitutions specific to D. erecta were found to be nonsynonymous. We thus conclude that adaptive protein evolution occurred in the lineage of D. erecta that is a ``specialist'' species for host plants and probably also occurs in the process of speciation in general. PMID:8536970

  4. A Simple, General Result for the Variance of Substitution Number in Molecular Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Houchmandzadeh, Bahram; Vallade, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    The number of substitutions (of nucleotides, amino acids, etc.) that take place during the evolution of a sequence is a stochastic variable of fundamental importance in the field of molecular evolution. Although the mean number of substitutions during molecular evolution of a sequence can be estimated for a given substitution model, no simple solution exists for the variance of this random variable. We show in this article that the computation of the variance is as simple as that of the mean number of substitutions for both short and long times. Apart from its fundamental importance, this result can be used to investigate the dispersion index R, that is, the ratio of the variance to the mean substitution number, which is of prime importance in the neutral theory of molecular evolution. By investigating large classes of substitution models, we demonstrate that although R≥1, to obtain R significantly larger than unity necessitates in general additional hypotheses on the structure of the substitution model. PMID:27189545

  5. Nucleophilic Substitution by Benzodithioate Anions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnans-Plaisance, Chantal; Gressier, Jean-Claude

    1988-01-01

    Describes a two-session experiment designed to provide a good illustration of, and to improve student knowledge of, the Grignard reaction and nucleophilic substitution. Discusses the procedure, experimental considerations, and conclusion of this experiment. (CW)

  6. DESIGNING ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN SOLVENT SUBSTITUTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since the signing of 1987 Montreal Protocol, reducing and eliminating the use of harmful solvents has become an internationally imminent environmental protection mission. Solvent substitution is an effective way to achieve this goal. The Program for Assisting the Replacement of...

  7. Apolipoprotein A-I mutant proteins having cysteine substitutions and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Oda, Michael N.; Forte, Trudy M.

    2007-05-29

    Functional Apolipoprotein A-I mutant proteins, having one or more cysteine substitutions and polynucleotides encoding same, can be used to modulate paraoxonase's arylesterase activity. These ApoA-I mutant proteins can be used as therapeutic agents to combat cardiovascular disease, atherosclerosis, acute phase response and other inflammatory related diseases. The invention also includes modifications and optimizations of the ApoA-I nucleotide sequence for purposes of increasing protein expression and optimization.

  8. pH profile of the adsorption of nucleotides onto montmorillonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawless, J. G.; Banin, A.; Church, F. M.; Mazzurco, J.; Huff, R.; Kao, J.; Cook, A.; Lowe, T.; Orenberg, J. B.; Edelson, E.

    1985-06-01

    The effect of adsorbed ions and pH on the adsorption of several purine and pyrimidine nucleotides on montmorillonite was studied. The cations used to prepare homoionic montmorillonite were Na+, Mn2+, Fe3+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, and Zn2+. The nucleotides studied were 5'-, 3'-, and 2'-AMP, and 5'-CMP in the pH range 2 through 12. The results show that preferential adsorption amongst nucleotides and similar molecules is dependent upon pH and the nature of the substituted metal cation in the clay. At neutral pH, it was observed that 5'-AMP was more strongly adsorbed than 2'-AMP, 3'-AMP, and 5'-CMP. Cu2+ and Zn2+ clays showed enhanced adsorption of 5'-AMP compared to the other cation clays studied in the pH range 4 8. Below pH 4, the adsorption is attributed to cation and anion exchange adsorption mechanisms; above pH 4, anion exchange may also occur, but the adsorption (when it occurs) likely depends on a complexation mechanism occurring between metal cation in the clay exchange site and the biomolecule. It is thus proposed that homoionic clays may have played a significant role in the concentration mechanism of biomonomers in the prebiotic environment, a prerequisite step necessary for the formation of biopolymers in the remaining steps leading to the origin of life.

  9. Assessing the State of Substitution Models Describing Noncoding RNA Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Allen, James E.; Whelan, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Phylogenetic inference is widely used to investigate the relationships between homologous sequences. RNA molecules have played a key role in these studies because they are present throughout life and tend to evolve slowly. Phylogenetic inference has been shown to be dependent on the substitution model used. A wide range of models have been developed to describe RNA evolution, either with 16 states describing all possible canonical base pairs or with 7 states where the 10 mismatched nucleotides are reduced to a single state. Formal model selection has become a standard practice for choosing an inferential model and works well for comparing models of a specific type, such as comparisons within nucleotide models or within amino acid models. Model selection cannot function across different sized state spaces because the likelihoods are conditioned on different data. Here, we introduce statistical state-space projection methods that allow the direct comparison of likelihoods between nucleotide models and 7-state and 16-state RNA models. To demonstrate the general applicability of our new methods, we extract 287 RNA families from genomic alignments and perform model selection. We find that in 281/287 families, RNA models are selected in preference to nucleotide models, with simple 7-state RNA models selected for more conserved families with shorter stems and more complex 16-state RNA models selected for more divergent families with longer stems. Other factors, such as the function of the RNA molecule or the GC-content, have limited impact on model selection. Our models and model selection methods are freely available in the open-source PHASE 3.0 software. PMID:24391153

  10. Genotyping single-nucleotide polymorphisms of human genes involved in organophosphate detoxification by high-resolution melting.

    PubMed

    Kurdyukov, Ivan; Rodionov, Gennady; Radilov, Andrey; Babakov, Vladimir

    2014-08-01

    Paraoxonase-1 (PON1) and butyrylcholinesterase (BCHE) are natural bioscavengers of organophosphate acetylcholinesterase inhibitors in the human body, which can determine individual sensitivity to organophosphate toxicity. Interindividual differences in activity of PON1 (catalytic bioscavenger) and substrate specificity are strongly associated with the substitution of two amino acids: Leu/Met (L/M) at position 55 (rs854560) and Gln/Arg (Q/R) at position 192 (rs662). In the case of BCHE (stoichiometric bioscavenger) substitution, Ala/Thr (A/T) at position 539 produces the so-called "K-variant" of the enzyme (rs1803274). Threonine allele is often co-inherited with an atypical BCHE allele (rs1799807). The atypical variant of BCHE displays a lower affinity for cholinesterase inhibitors. Genotyping rs662 and rs1803274 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) by high-resolution melting (HRM) is facilitated by the nucleotide substitution A>G (G>A), which resulted in a changed number of hydrogen bonds in the PCR product and, consequently, shifted T m. In the case of rs854560, genotyping is complicated by the nucleotide substitution T>A, which has no significant effect on the T m of the PCR product. An addition of a small quantity of LL homozygote DNA into the reaction mixture before PCR discriminates the three genotypes by the melt curves due to different amounts of heteroduplexes formed in the LM and MM samples. HRM analysis can be applied for genotyping human rs854560, rs662, and rs1803274 SNPs. PMID:24705954

  11. Abasic pivot substitution harnesses target specificity of RNA interference

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye-Sook; Seok, Heeyoung; Lee, Dong Ha; Ham, Juyoung; Lee, Wooje; Youm, Emilia Moonkyung; Yoo, Jin Seon; Lee, Yong-Seung; Jang, Eun-Sook; Chi, Sung Wook

    2015-01-01

    Gene silencing via RNA interference inadvertently represses hundreds of off-target transcripts. Because small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) can function as microRNAs, avoiding miRNA-like off-target repression is a major challenge. Functional miRNA–target interactions are known to pre-require transitional nucleation, base pairs from position 2 to the pivot (position 6). Here, by substituting nucleotide in pivot with abasic spacers, which prevent base pairing and alleviate steric hindrance, we eliminate miRNA-like off-target repression while preserving on-target activity at ∼80–100%. Specifically, miR-124 containing dSpacer pivot substitution (6pi) loses seed-mediated transcriptome-wide target interactions, repression activity and biological function, whereas other conventional modifications are ineffective. Application of 6pi allows PCSK9 siRNA to efficiently lower plasma cholesterol concentration in vivo, and abolish potentially deleterious off-target phenotypes. The smallest spacer, C3, also shows the same improvement in target specificity. Abasic pivot substitution serves as a general means to harness the specificity of siRNA experiments and therapeutic applications. PMID:26679372

  12. Evolution of Functional Six-Nucleotide DNA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liqin; Yang, Zunyi; Sefah, Kwame; Bradley, Kevin M.; Hoshika, Shuichi; Kim, Myong-Jung; Kim, Hyo-Joong; Zhu1, Guizhi; Jiménez, Elizabeth; Cansiz, Sena; Teng, I-Ting; Champanhac, Carole; McLendon, Christopher; Liu, Chen; Zhang, Wen; Gerloff, Dietlind L.

    2015-01-01

    Axiomatically, the density of information stored in DNA, with just four nucleotides (GACT), is higher than in a binary code, but less than it might be if synthetic biologists succeed in adding independently replicating nucleotides to genetic systems. Such addition could also add additional functional groups, not found in natural DNA but useful for molecular performance. Here, we consider two new nucleotides (Z and P, 6-amino-5-nitro-3-(1′-β-D-2′-deoxyribo-furanosyl)-2(1H)-pyridone and 2-amino-8-(1′-β-D-2′-deoxyribofuranosyl)-imidazo[1,2-a]-1,3,5-triazin-4(8H)-one). These are designed to pair via strict Watson-Crick geometry. These were added to lies in a ibrarlaboratory in vitro evolution (LIVE) experiment; the GACTZP library was challenged to deliver molecules that bind selectively to liver cancer cells, but not to untransformed liver cells. Unlike in classical in vitro selection systems, low levels of mutation allow this system to evolve to create binding molecules not necessarily present in the original library. Over a dozen binding species were recovered. The best had Z and/or P in their sequences. Several had multiple, nearby, and adjacent Z’s and P’s. Only the weaker binders contained no Z or P at all. This suggests that this system explored much of the sequence space available to this genetic system, and that GACTZP libraries are richer reservoir of functionality than standard libraries. PMID:25966323

  13. G to A substitution in 5{prime} donor splice site of introns 18 and 48 of COL1A1 gene of type I collagen results in different splicing alternatives in osteogenesis imperfecta type I cell strains

    SciTech Connect

    Willing, M.; Deschenes, S.

    1994-09-01

    We have identified a G to A substitution in the 5{prime} donor splice site of intron 18 of one COL1A1 allele in two unrelated families with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I. A third OI type I family has a G to A substitution at the identical position in intron 48 of one COL1A1 allele. Both mutations abolish normal splicing and lead to reduced steady-state levels of mRNA from the mutant COL1A1 allele. The intron 18 mutation leads to both exon 18 skipping in the mRNA and to utilization of a single alternative splice site near the 3{prime} end of exon 18. The latter results in deletion of the last 8 nucleotides of exon 18 from the mRNA, a shift in the translational reading-frame, and the creation of a premature termination codon in exon 19. Of the potential alternative 5{prime} splice sites in exon 18 and intron 18, the one utilized has a surrounding nucleotide sequence which most closely resembles that of the natural splice site. Although a G to A mutation was detected at the identical position in intron 48 of one COL1A1 allele in another OI type I family, nine complex alternative splicing patterns were identified by sequence analysis of cDNA clones derived from fibroblast mRNA from this cell strain. All result in partial or complete skipping of exon 48, with in-frame deletions of portions of exons 47 and/or 49. The different patterns of RNA splicing were not explained by their sequence homology with naturally occuring 5{prime} splice sites, but rather by recombination between highly homologous exon sequences, suggesting that we may not have identified the major splicing alternative(s) in this cell strain. Both G to A mutations result in decreased production of type I collagen, the common biochemical correlate of OI type I.

  14. Navigating the Nucleotide Excision Repair Threshold

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liren; Lee, Jennifer; Zhou, Pengbo

    2010-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the primary DNA repair pathway that removes helix-distorting DNA strand damage induced by ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation or chemical carcinogens to ensure genome integrity. While the core NER proteins that carry out damage recognition, excision and repair reactions have been identified and extensively characterized, and the NER pathway has been reconstituted in vitro, the regulatory pathways that govern the threshold levels of NER have not been fully elucidated. This mini-review focuses on recently discovered transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms that specify the capacity of NER, and suggests the potential implications of modulating NER activity in cancer prevention and therapeutic intervention. PMID:20458729

  15. Facing growth in the European Nucleotide Archive

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, Guy; Alako, Blaise; Amid, Clara; Bower, Lawrence; Cerdeño-Tárraga, Ana; Cleland, Iain; Gibson, Richard; Goodgame, Neil; Jang, Mikyung; Kay, Simon; Leinonen, Rasko; Lin, Xiu; Lopez, Rodrigo; McWilliam, Hamish; Oisel, Arnaud; Pakseresht, Nima; Pallreddy, Swapna; Park, Youngmi; Plaister, Sheila; Radhakrishnan, Rajesh; Rivière, Stephane; Rossello, Marc; Senf, Alexander; Silvester, Nicole; Smirnov, Dmitriy; ten Hoopen, Petra; Toribio, Ana; Vaughan, Daniel; Zalunin, Vadim

    2013-01-01

    The European Nucleotide Archive (ENA; http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ena/) collects, maintains and presents comprehensive nucleic acid sequence and related information as part of the permanent public scientific record. Here, we provide brief updates on ENA content developments and major service enhancements in 2012 and describe in more detail two important areas of development and policy that are driven by ongoing growth in sequencing technologies. First, we describe the ENA data warehouse, a resource for which we provide a programmatic entry point to integrated content across the breadth of ENA. Second, we detail our plans for the deployment of CRAM data compression technology in ENA. PMID:23203883

  16. Complete Nucleotide Sequence of Tn10

    PubMed Central

    Chalmers, Ronald; Sewitz, Sven; Lipkow, Karen; Crellin, Paul

    2000-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of Tn10 has been determined. The dinucleotide signature and percent G+C of the sequence had no discontinuities, indicating that Tn10 constitutes a homogeneous unit. The new sequence contained three new open reading frames corresponding to a glutamate permease, repressors of heavy metal resistance operons, and a hypothetical protein in Bacillus subtilis. The glutamate permease was fully functional when expressed, but Tn10 did not protect Escherichia coli from the toxic effects of various metals. PMID:10781570

  17. Complete nucleotide sequence of Nootka lupine vein-clearing virus.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Nancy L; Côté, Fabien; Paré, Christine; Leblanc, Eric; Bergeron, Michel G; Leclerc, Denis

    2007-12-01

    The complete genome sequence of Nootka lupine vein-clearing virus (NLVCV) was determined to be 4,172 nucleotides in length containing four open reading frames (ORFs) with a similar genetic organization of virus species in the genus Carmovirus, family Tombusviridae. The order and gene product size, starting from the 5'-proximal ORF consisted of: (1) polymerase/replicase gene, ORF1 (p27) and ORF1RT (readthrough) (p87), (2) movement proteins ORF2 (p7) and ORF3 (p9), and, (3) the 3'-proximal coat protein ORF4, (p37). The genomic 5'- and 3'-proximal termini contained a short (59 nt) and a relatively longer 405 nt untranslated region, respectively. The longer replicase gene product contained the GDD motif common to RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. Phylogenetically, NLVCV formed a subgroup with the following four carmoviruses when separately comparing the amino acids of the coat protein or replicase protein: Angelonia flower break virus (AnFBV), Carnation mottle virus (CarMV), Pelargonium flower break virus (PFBV), and Saguaro cactus virus (SgCV). Whole genome nucleotide analysis (percent identities) among the carmoviruses with NLVCV suggested a similar pattern. The species demarcation criteria in the genus Carmovirus for the amino acid sequence identity of the polymerase (<52%) and coat (<41%) protein genes restricted NLVCV as a distinct species, and instead, placed it as a tentative strain of CarMV, PFBV, or SgCV when both the polymerase and CP were used as the determining factors. In contrast, the species criteria that included different host ranges with no overlap and lack of serology relatedness between NLVCV and the carmoviruses, suggested that NLVCV was a distinct species. The relatively low cutoff percentages allowed for the polymerase and CP genes to dictate the inclusion/exclusion of a distinct carmovirus species should be reevaluated. Therefore, at this time we have concluded that NLVCV should be classified as a tentative new species in the genus Carmovirus

  18. Functional roles of the nucleotide-binding folds in the activation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed Central

    Smit, L S; Wilkinson, D J; Mansoura, M K; Collins, F S; Dawson, D C

    1993-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a member of the traffic ATPase superfamily, possesses two putative nucleotide-binding folds (NBFs). The NBFs are sufficiently similar that sequence alignment of highly conserved regions can be used to identify analogous residues in the two domains. To determine whether this structural homology is paralleled in function, we compared the activation of chloride conductance by forskolin and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine in Xenopus oocytes expressing CFTRs bearing mutations in NBF1 or NBF2. Mutation of a conserved glycine in the putative linker domain in either NBF produced virtually identical changes in the sensitivity of chloride conductance to activating conditions, and mutation of this site in both NBFs produced additive effects, suggesting that in the two NBFs this region plays a similar and critical role in the activation process. In contrast, amino acid substitutions in the Walker A and B motifs, thought to form an integral part of the nucleotide-binding pockets, produced strikingly different effects in NBF1 and NBF2. Substitutions for the conserved lysine (Walker A) or aspartate (Walker B) in NBF1 resulted in a marked decrease in sensitivity to activation, whereas the same changes in NBF2 produced an increase in sensitivity. These results are consistent with a model for the activation of CFTR in which both NBF1 and NBF2 are required for normal function but in which either the nature or the exact consequences of nucleotide binding differ for the two domains. PMID:7694298

  19. NADH peroxidase: kinetic mechanism and nucleotide specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Stoll, V.S.; Blanchard, J.S.

    1987-05-01

    NADH peroxidase is a flavoprotein reductase isolated from Streptococcus faecalis which catalyzes the pyridine nucleotide dependent reduction of hydrogen peroxide to water. Initial velocity, product and dead-end inhibition studies have been performed and all support a ping-pong kinetic mechanism. Further support for the ping-pong nature of the kinetic mechanism are the hydrogen peroxide independent transhydrogenase activity of the enzyme, measured either with thio-NAD or with radiolabeled NAD (isotope exchange studies). Kinetic parameters will be presented for a number of reduced pyridine nucleotide analogs. Analogs which have been modified in the adenine ring exhibit much higher K/sub m/'s relative to their adenine analogs. NADH peroxidase catalyzes the stereo-specific removal of the 4S hydrogen of NADH and primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects have been determined for a number of these substrates with 4S-deuterated molecules. There is a strong correlation between their steady-state K/sub m/ and /sup D/V/K. Small values for /sup D/V are interpreted as supporting rate-limitation in the oxidative half-reaction. These data will be discussed in terms of a kinetic and chemical mechanism proposed for NADH peroxidase.

  20. (Biological applications of nucleosides and nucleotides)

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, P.C.

    1990-08-20

    The traveler was invited to visit The Meditech Group, VTT Technology, Inc., Reactor Laboratory, VTT Technical Research Center of Finland (VTT), Otakaari, Espoo, Finland. The Meditech Group commands a 70 percent market share of Finland's radiopharmaceutical business and plans to expand its activities to other Scandinavian countries as well as in the Leningrad area of USSR. Meditech has plans to separate itself from Technical Research Center of Finland and its subsidiary VTT Technology, Inc., to become a private radiopharmaceutical company in the near future. As a private company, Meditech could expand its activities to encompass radiopharmaceutical research and development and may require foreign technical experts to support its research endeavors. The traveler also attended the Ninth International Round Table Conference on Nucleosides, Nucleotides, and Their Biological Applications held at the Biomedical Center, University of Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden. The meeting focused on the chemistry and biology of RNA and DNA and their building blocks, nucleosides and nucleotides. The traveler also presented an invited paper entitled Design, Synthesis and Tumor Specificity of Azomycin Ribo- and Acyclonucleosides,'' describing his recent work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  1. Molybdenum, Tungsten, and Aluminium Substitution for Enhancement of the Thermoelectric Performance of Higher Manganese Silicides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nhi Truong, D. Y.; Berthebaud, David; Gascoin, Franck; Kleinke, Holger

    2015-10-01

    An easy and efficient process involving ball milling under soft conditions and spark plasma sintering was used to synthesize higher manganese silicide (HMS)-based compounds, for example MnSi1.75Ge0.02, with different molybdenum, tungsten, and aluminium substitution. The x-ray diffraction patterns of the samples after sintering showed the main phase to be HMS with the presence of some side products. Molybdenum substitution enlarges the unit cells more than tungsten substitution, owing to its greater solubility in the HMS structure, whereas substitution with aluminium did not substantially alter the cell parameters. The electrical resistivity of HMS-based compounds was reduced by <10% by this substitution, because of increased carrier concentrations. Changes of the Seebeck coefficient were insignificant after molybdenum and aluminium substitution whereas tungsten substitution slightly reduced the thermopower of the base material by approximately 8% over the whole temperature range; this was ascribed to reduced carrier mobility as a result of enhanced scattering. Substitution with any combination of two of these elements resulted in no crucial modification of the electrical properties of the base material. Large decreases of lattice thermal conductivity were observed, because of enhanced phonon scattering, with the highest reduction up to 25% for molybdenum substitution; this resulted in a 20% decrease of total thermal conductivity, which contributed to improvement of the figure of merit ZT of the HMS-based materials. The maximum ZT value was approximately 0.40 for the material with 2 at.% molybdenum substitution at the Mn sites.

  2. Real-time NMR Study of Three Small GTPases Reveals That Fluorescent 2′(3′)-O-(N-Methylanthraniloyl)-tagged Nucleotides Alter Hydrolysis and Exchange Kinetics*

    PubMed Central

    Mazhab-Jafari, Mohammad T.; Marshall, Christopher B.; Smith, Matthew; Gasmi-Seabrook, Geneviève M. C.; Stambolic, Vuk; Rottapel, Robert; Neel, Benjamin G.; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2010-01-01

    The Ras family of small GTPases control diverse signaling pathways through a conserved “switch” mechanism, which is turned on by binding of GTP and turned off by GTP hydrolysis to GDP. Full understanding of GTPase switch functions requires reliable, quantitative assays for nucleotide binding and hydrolysis. Fluorescently labeled guanine nucleotides, such as 2′(3′)-O-(N-methylanthraniloyl) (mant)-substituted GTP and GDP analogs, have been widely used to investigate the molecular properties of small GTPases, including Ras and Rho. Using a recently developed NMR method, we show that the kinetics of nucleotide hydrolysis and exchange by three small GTPases, alone and in the presence of their cognate GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) and guanine nucleotide exchange factors, are affected by the presence of the fluorescent mant moiety. Intrinsic hydrolysis of mantGTP by Ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb) is ∼10 times faster than that of GTP, whereas it is 3.4 times slower with RhoA. On the other hand, the mant tag inhibits TSC2GAP-catalyzed GTP hydrolysis by Rheb but promotes p120 RasGAP-catalyzed GTP hydrolysis by H-Ras. Guanine nucleotide exchange factor-catalyzed nucleotide exchange for both H-Ras and RhoA was inhibited by mant-substituted nucleotides, and the degree of inhibition depends highly on the GTPase and whether the assay measures association of mantGTP with, or dissociation of mantGDP from the GTPase. These results indicate that the mant moiety has significant and unpredictable effects on GTPase reaction kinetics and underscore the importance of validating its use in each assay. PMID:20018863

  3. Structural study of yttrium substituted BiFeO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejía Gómez, J. A.; Canaria, C.; Ochoa Burgos, R.; Ortiz, C. A.; Supelano, G. I.; Parra Vargas, C. A.

    2016-02-01

    Yttrium-substituted Bi1-xYxFeO3 (x=0, 0.03, 0.07, 0.15, 0.2 and 0.5) samples were prepared by solid state reaction technique. Morphological analysis was obtained by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) technique indicating mainly granular behaviour. In addition, the substitution of yttrium promotes smaller particle size of BiFeO3. The obtained samples were also studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The crystal structure and the lattice parameters were confirmed by XRD. Rietveld refinement of experimental X-ray diffraction patterns showed that substituted BiFeO3 compounds crystallize in a R3c type structure and the lattice parameters decrease as Y concentration increases.

  4. Structure-substitution limit correlation study on Cr3+ substituted polycrystalline yttrium iron garnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modi, K. B.; Sharma, P. U.; Lakhani, V. K.; Vasoya, N. H.; Saija, K. G.; Pathak, T. K.; Zankat, K. B.

    2016-05-01

    Polycrystalline samples of Cr3+ - substituted yttrium iron garnet (Y3Fe5O12) system with general chemical formula, Y3Fe5-xCrxO12, x = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 were synthesized by double sintering ceramic technique and characterized by X-ray powder diffractometry. The Rietveld fitted X-ray diffraction patterns analysis revealed mono phase formation for x = 0.0 - 0.4 compositions while x = 0.6 composition possesses mixed phase character. The observed substitution limit has been discussed in the light of ionic size of substituent, electrostatic energy, electronic configuration and synthesis parameters. These observations strongly suggest that the electronic configuration of Cr3+, which is favorable to the formation of d2sp3 (octahedral) type bonds, must be important. In the case of Cr3+, the substitution does not appear to proceed well for x much greater than 0.5, this limitation probably is a consequence of the strong preference of a smaller ion Cr3+, for a larger octahedral site which quickly leads to a condition not comparable with the requirement of the structure. The distribution of cations, mean ionic radii and theoretical lattice constant values have been determined.

  5. Characterization of polyploid wheat genomic diversity using a high-density 90 000 single nucleotide polymorphism array

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping chips are a powerful tool for studying genomic patterns of diversity, inferring ancestral relationships among individuals in populations and studying marker-trait associations in mapping experiments. We developed a genotyping array includ...

  6. Pattern Recognition on Read Positioning in Next Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Boseon; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The usefulness and the utility of the next generation sequencing (NGS) technology are based on the assumption that the DNA or cDNA cleavage required to generate short sequence reads is random. Several previous reports suggest the existence of sequencing bias of NGS reads. To address this question in greater detail, we analyze NGS data from four organisms with different GC content, Plasmodium falciparum (19.39%), Arabidopsis thaliana (36.03%), Homo sapiens (40.91%) and Streptomyces coelicolor (72.00%). Using machine learning techniques, we recognize the pattern that the NGS read start is positioned in the local region where the nucleotide distribution is dissimilar from the global nucleotide distribution. We also demonstrate that the mono-nucleotide distribution underestimates sequencing bias, and the recognized pattern is explained largely by the distribution of multi-nucleotides (di-, tri-, and tetra- nucleotides) rather than mono-nucleotides. This implies that the correction of sequencing bias needs to be performed on the basis of the multi-nucleotide distribution. Providing companion software to quantify the effect of the recognized pattern on read positioning, we exemplify that the bias correction based on the mono-nucleotide distribution may not be sufficient to clean sequencing bias. PMID:27299343

  7. Polyamine/Nucleotide Coacervates Provide Strong Compartmentalization of Mg²⁺, Nucleotides, and RNA.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Erica A; Bevilacqua, Philip C; Keating, Christine D

    2016-03-01

    Phase separation of aqueous solutions containing polyelectrolytes can lead to formation of dense, solute-rich liquid droplets referred to as coacervates, surrounded by a dilute continuous phase of much larger volume. This type of liquid-liquid phase separation is thought to help explain the appearance of polyelectrolyte-rich intracellular droplets in the cytoplasm and nucleoplasm of extant biological cells and may be relevant to protocellular compartmentalization of nucleic acids on the early Earth. Here we describe complex coacervates formed upon mixing the polycation poly(allylamine) (PAH, 15 kDa) with the anionic nucleotides adenosine 5'-mono-, di-, and triphosphate (AMP, ADP, and ATP). Droplet formation was observed over a wide range of pH and MgCl2 concentrations. The nucleotides themselves as well as Mg(2+) and RNA oligonucleotides were all extremely concentrated within the coacervates. Nucleotides present at just 2.5 mM in bulk solution had concentrations greater than 1 M inside the coacervate droplets. A solution with a total Mg(2+) concentration of 10 mM had 1-5 M Mg(2+) in the coacervates, and RNA random sequence (N54) partitioned ∼10,000-fold into the coacervates. Coacervate droplets are thus rich in nucleotides, Mg(2+), and RNA, providing a medium favorable for generating functional RNAs. Compartmentalization of nucleotides at high concentrations could have facilitated their polymerization to form oligonucleotides, which preferentially accumulate in the droplets. Locally high Mg(2+) concentrations could have aided folding and catalysis in an RNA world, making coacervate droplets an appealing platform for exploring protocellular environments. PMID:26844692

  8. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... substituted benzenesulfonic acid copper compound (generic). 721.10126 Section 721.10126 Protection of... substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenesulfonic acid copper compound (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenesulfonic acid copper compound (PMN P-06-689) is subject to...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... substituted benzenesulfonic acid copper compound (generic). 721.10126 Section 721.10126 Protection of... substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenesulfonic acid copper compound (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenesulfonic acid copper compound (PMN P-06-689) is subject to...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... substituted benzenesulfonic acid copper compound (generic). 721.10126 Section 721.10126 Protection of... substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenesulfonic acid copper compound (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenesulfonic acid copper compound (PMN P-06-689) is subject to...

  11. 40 CFR 721.2577 - Copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl azo substituted phenyl) disulfonaphthyl azo, amine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Copper complex of (substituted... Copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl azo substituted phenyl) disulfonaphthyl azo, amine salt... substances identified generically as copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl azo substituted...

  12. 40 CFR 721.2577 - Copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl azo substituted phenyl) disulfonaphthyl azo, amine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Copper complex of (substituted... Copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl azo substituted phenyl) disulfonaphthyl azo, amine salt... substances identified generically as copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl azo substituted...

  13. 40 CFR 721.2577 - Copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl azo substituted phenyl) disulfonaphthyl azo, amine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Copper complex of (substituted... Copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl azo substituted phenyl) disulfonaphthyl azo, amine salt... substances identified generically as copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl azo substituted...

  14. 40 CFR 721.2577 - Copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl azo substituted phenyl) disulfonaphthyl azo, amine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Copper complex of (substituted... Copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl azo substituted phenyl) disulfonaphthyl azo, amine salt... substances identified generically as copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl azo substituted...

  15. Patterns of Broken Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, R. W.; Park, G. B.; Changala, P. B.; Baraban, J. H.; Stanton, J. F.; Merer, A. J.

    2013-06-01

    Spectroscopy - it is all about patterns. Some patterns look so indescribably complicated that, unlike pornography, you do not know one when you see one. It is tempting to say that, at high vibrational excitation, interactions among normal mode basis states are so strong and widespread that all patterns are obliterated. But this is not true. When normal mode frequencies are in near integer multiple ratios, polyads emerge. A polyad is a robust pattern often comprising many vibrational eigenstates. Each such pattern might span many hundreds of cm^{-1}, and it is inevitable that several unrelated polyad patterns overlap. When polyads overlap, it might seem impossible to disentangle them. However, the key to disentanglement is that polyads come in families in which successive generations are related by harmonic oscillator matrix element selection and scaling rules. Families of polyads are described by families of scaling-based effective Hamiltonian matrices, {H}^{{eff}}. No matter how complex and overlapped, the polyad {H}^{{eff}} serves as a magic decoder for picking out the polyad pattern. Sometimes the polyad patterns are systematically broken (a meta-pattern), owing to proximity to an isomerization barrier, as occurs in highly excited bending levels of the S_{1} state of HCCH, which encode the trans-cis minimum energy isomerization path. Quantum Chemists often dismiss {H}^{{eff}} models, precisely because they are models that do not express the full dimensionality of the complete Hamiltonian. But an {H}^{{eff}} explains rather than describes. Shunning {H}^{{eff}}s is like throwing out the baby with the bath water. Don't do it!

  16. Bone grafts and their substitutes.

    PubMed

    Fillingham, Y; Jacobs, J

    2016-01-01

    The continual cycle of bone formation and resorption is carried out by osteoblasts, osteocytes, and osteoclasts under the direction of the bone-signaling pathway. In certain situations the host cycle of bone repair is insufficient and requires the assistance of bone grafts and their substitutes. The fundamental properties of a bone graft are osteoconduction, osteoinduction, osteogenesis, and structural support. Options for bone grafting include autogenous and allograft bone and the various isolated or combined substitutes of calcium sulphate, calcium phosphate, tricalcium phosphate, and coralline hydroxyapatite. Not all bone grafts will have the same properties. As a result, understanding the requirements of the clinical situation and specific properties of the various types of bone grafts is necessary to identify the ideal graft. We present a review of the bone repair process and properties of bone grafts and their substitutes to help guide the clinician in the decision making process. PMID:26733632

  17. Magnesium substitution in brushite cements.

    PubMed

    Alkhraisat, Mohammad Hamdan; Cabrejos-Azama, Jatsue; Rodríguez, Carmen Rueda; Jerez, Luis Blanco; Cabarcos, Enrique López

    2013-01-01

    The use of magnesium-doped ceramics has been described to modify brushite cements and improve their biological behavior. However, few studies have analyzed the efficiency of this approach to induce magnesium substitution in brushite crystals. Mg-doped ceramics composed of Mg-substituted β-TCP, stanfieldite and/or farringtonite were reacted with primary monocalcium phosphate (MCP) in the presence of water. The cement setting reaction has resulted in the formation of brushite and newberyite within the cement matrix. Interestingly, the combination of SAED and EDX analyses of single crystal has indicated the occurrence of magnesium substitution within brushite crystals. Moreover, the effect of magnesium ions on the structure, and mechanical and setting properties of the new cements was characterized as well as the release of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) ions. Further research would enhance the efficiency of the system to incorporate larger amounts of magnesium ions within brushite crystals. PMID:25428098

  18. Resistance-induced antibiotic substitution.

    PubMed

    Howard, David H

    2004-06-01

    In many cases, physicians prescribe antibiotics without knowing whether an individual patient is infected with a susceptible or resistant pathogen. As the proportion of resistant organisms in a community increases, physicians substitute away from older-inexpensive drugs to newer, more expensive agents as first line therapy. This paper explores the implications of resistance-induced antibiotic substitution for epidemiological models to predict future resistance levels, efforts to measure the health care costs associated with resistance, and policies to improve physicians' antibiotic prescribing decisions. The extent of resistance-induced substitution in outpatient settings is documented using a data set consisting of observations on initial physician office visits for otitis media in the US controlling for new product introductions and price increases, per prescription antibiotic spending increased by 22% between 1980 and 1996, corresponding to a steep increase in resistance levels over the same period. PMID:15185388

  19. Substitution systems and nonextensive statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Morales, V.

    2015-12-01

    Substitution systems evolve in time by generating sequences of symbols from a finite alphabet: At a certain iteration step, the existing symbols are systematically replaced by blocks of Nk symbols also within the alphabet (with Nk, a natural number, being the length of the kth block of the substitution). The dynamics of these systems leads naturally to fractals and self-similarity. By using B-calculus (García-Morales, 2012) universal maps for deterministic substitution systems both of constant and non-constant length, are formulated in 1D. It is then shown how these systems can be put in direct correspondence with Tsallis entropy. A 'Second Law of Thermodynamics' is also proved for these systems in the asymptotic limit of large words.

  20. Fractional-difference stochastic model of evolutionary substitutions in DNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Bruce J.; Bickel, David R.

    1999-05-01

    The number of molecular substitutions occurring in a DNA sequence over a given time is described by a fractional-difference random walk model. This is an empirically motivated stochastic model of molecular evolution and does not address the detailed evolutionary mechanisms that lead to the substitution of nucleotides. This fractal stochastic process yields a Fano Factor, the ratio of the variance to the mean in the number of molecular substitutions, that increases as a power law in time. This prediction agrees with the observed statistics across 49 different genes in mammals. The fractional-difference model of molecular evolution is episodic and can be made consistent with the punctuated equilibrium model of macroevolution.

  1. Patient-specific factors influence somatic variation patterns in von Hippel-Lindau disease renal tumours.

    PubMed

    Fei, Suzanne S; Mitchell, Asia D; Heskett, Michael B; Vocke, Cathy D; Ricketts, Christopher J; Peto, Myron; Wang, Nicholas J; Sönmez, Kemal; Linehan, W Marston; Spellman, Paul T

    2016-01-01

    Cancer development is presumed to be an evolutionary process that is influenced by genetic background and environment. In laboratory animals, genetics and environment are variables that can largely be held constant. In humans, it is possible to compare independent tumours that have developed in the same patient, effectively constraining genetic and environmental variation and leaving only stochastic processes. Patients affected with von Hippel-Lindau disease are at risk of developing multiple independent clear cell renal carcinomas. Here we perform whole-genome sequencing on 40 tumours from six von Hippel-Lindau patients. We confirm that the tumours are clonally independent, having distinct somatic single-nucleotide variants. Although tumours from the same patient show many differences, within-patient patterns are discernible. Single-nucleotide substitution type rates are significantly different between patients and show biases in trinucleotide mutation context. We also observe biases in chromosome copy number aberrations. These results show that genetic background and/or environment can influence the types of mutations that occur. PMID:27174753

  2. Patient-specific factors influence somatic variation patterns in von Hippel–Lindau disease renal tumours

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Suzanne S.; Mitchell, Asia D.; Heskett, Michael B.; Vocke, Cathy D.; Ricketts, Christopher J.; Peto, Myron; Wang, Nicholas J.; Sönmez, Kemal; Linehan, W. Marston; Spellman, Paul T.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer development is presumed to be an evolutionary process that is influenced by genetic background and environment. In laboratory animals, genetics and environment are variables that can largely be held constant. In humans, it is possible to compare independent tumours that have developed in the same patient, effectively constraining genetic and environmental variation and leaving only stochastic processes. Patients affected with von Hippel–Lindau disease are at risk of developing multiple independent clear cell renal carcinomas. Here we perform whole-genome sequencing on 40 tumours from six von Hippel-Lindau patients. We confirm that the tumours are clonally independent, having distinct somatic single-nucleotide variants. Although tumours from the same patient show many differences, within-patient patterns are discernible. Single-nucleotide substitution type rates are significantly different between patients and show biases in trinucleotide mutation context. We also observe biases in chromosome copy number aberrations. These results show that genetic background and/or environment can influence the types of mutations that occur. PMID:27174753

  3. Structural Basis for Nucleotide Exchange in Heterotrimeric G Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dror, Ron O.; Mildorf, Thomas J.; Hilger, Daniel; Manglik, Aashish; Borhani, David W.; Arlow, Daniel H.; Philippsen, Ansgar; Villanueva, Nicolas; Yang, Zhongyu; Lerch, Michael T.; Hubbell, Wayne L.; Kobilka, Brian K.; Sunahara, Roger K.; Shaw, David E.

    2016-01-01

    G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) relay diverse extracellular signals into cells by catalyzing nucleotide release from heterotrimeric G proteins, but the mechanism underlying this quintessential molecular signaling event has remained unclear. Here we use atomic-level simulations to elucidate the nucleotide-release mechanism. We find that the G protein α subunit Ras and helical domains—previously observed to separate widely upon receptor binding to expose the nucleotide-binding site—separate spontaneously and frequently even in the absence of a receptor. Domain separation is necessary but not sufficient for rapid nucleotide release. Rather, receptors catalyze nucleotide release by favoring an internal structural rearrangement of the Ras domain that weakens its nucleotide affinity. We use double electron-electron resonance spectroscopy and protein engineering to confirm predictions of our computationally determined mechanism. PMID:26089515

  4. Signal transduction by guanine nucleotide binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, A M

    1987-01-01

    High affinity binding of guanine nucleotides and the ability to hydrolyze bound GTP to GDP are characteristics of an extended family of intracellular proteins. Subsets of this family include cytosolic initiation and elongation factors involved in protein synthesis, and cytoskeletal proteins such as tubulin (Hughes, S.M. (1983) FEBS Lett. 164, 1-8). A distinct subset of guanine nucleotide binding proteins is membrane-associated; members of this subset include the ras gene products (Ellis, R.W. et al. (1981) Nature 292, 506-511) and the heterotrimeric G-proteins (also termed N-proteins) (Gilman, A.G. (1984) Cell 36, 577-579). Substantial evidence indicates that G-proteins act as signal transducers by coupling receptors (R) to effectors (E). A similar function has been suggested but not proven for the ras gene products. Known G-proteins include Gs and Gi, the G-proteins associated with stimulation and inhibition, respectively, of adenylate cyclase; transducin (TD), the G-protein coupling rhodopsin to cGMP phosphodiesterase in rod photoreceptors (Bitensky, M.W. et al. (1981) Curr. Top. Membr. Transp. 15, 237-271; Stryer, L. (1986) Annu. Rev. Neurosci. 9, 87-119), and Go, a G-protein of unknown function that is highly abundant in brain (Sternweis, P.C. and Robishaw, J.D. (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 13806-13813; Neer, E.J. et al. (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 14222-14229). G-proteins also participate in other signal transduction pathways, notably that involving phosphoinositide breakdown. In this review, I highlight recent progress in our understanding of the structure, function, and diversity of G-proteins. PMID:2435586

  5. The Levels of Soluble Nucleotides in Wheat Aleurone Tissue 1

    PubMed Central

    Collins, G. G.; Jenner, C. F.; Paleg, L. G.

    1972-01-01

    The content of soluble nucleotides in aleurone layers isolated from mature wheat (Triticum aestivum var. Olympic) grain was investigated. The most abundant nucleotides were adenosine triphosphate, uridine triphosphate, and uridine diphosphoglucose. Smaller amounts of guanosine triphosphate, cytidine triphosphate, adenosine diphosphate, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide were also identified. The levels of some of these nucleotides were increased after incubation of the tissue under certain conditions. Nucleotide levels were measured at intervals during incubation of aleurone layers in water. The changes observed are discussed in relation to a response by the tissue to wounding. PMID:16657969

  6. 40 CFR 721.10214 - Poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha.-substituted carbomonocycle-.omega.-substituted carbomonocycle...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha... Poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha.-substituted carbomonocycle-.omega.-substituted carbomonocycle (generic... identified generically as poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha.-substituted...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10214 - Poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha.-substituted carbomonocycle-.omega.-substituted carbomonocycle...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha... Poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha.-substituted carbomonocycle-.omega.-substituted carbomonocycle (generic... identified generically as poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha.-substituted...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10214 - Poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha.-substituted carbomonocycle-.omega.-substituted carbomonocycle...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha... Poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha.-substituted carbomonocycle-.omega.-substituted carbomonocycle (generic... identified generically as poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha.-substituted...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10214 - Poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha.-substituted carbomonocycle-.omega.-substituted carbomonocycle...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha... Poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha.-substituted carbomonocycle-.omega.-substituted carbomonocycle (generic... identified generically as poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha.-substituted...

  10. The nucleotide sequence of the tnpA gene completes the sequence of the Pseudomonas transposon Tn501.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, N L; Winnie, J N; Fritzinger, D; Pridmore, R D

    1985-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the gene (tnpA) which codes for the transposase of transposon Tn501 has been determined. It contains an open reading frame for a polypeptide of Mr = 111,500, which terminates within the inverted repeat sequence of the transposon. The reading frame would be transcribed in the same direction as the mercury-resistance genes and the tnpR gene. The amino acid sequence predicted from this reading frame shows 32% identity with that of the transposase of the related transposon Tn3. The C-terminal regions of these two polypeptides show slightly greater homology than the N-terminal regions when conservative amino acid substitutions are considered. With this sequence determination, the nucleotide sequence of Tn501 is fully defined. The main features of the sequence are briefly presented. PMID:2994007

  11. 'Vegetable' substitutes for diesel fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-22

    Research programs in the US, Brazil, South Africa and the Philippines on efforts to find a vegetable oil substitute for diesel fuel are reported. A narrowing price gap with diesel fuel and a favourable energy balance improve the prospects for such fuels. Much of the current work is centered on blends, rather than the use of the pure oil.

  12. Pyridine nucleotide coenzymes: Chemical, biological, and medical aspects. Vol. 2, Pt. A

    SciTech Connect

    Dolphin, D.; Poulson, R.; Avramovic, O.

    1987-01-01

    This text contains the following: History of the Pyridine Nucleotides Nomenclature; Evolution of Pyridine Nucleotide; Relationship Between Biosynthesis and Evolution; Crystal Structure; Coenzyme Conformations; Protein Interactions; Optical Spectroscopy of the Pyridine Nucleotides; Excited States of Pyridine Nucleotide Coenzymes; Fluorescence and Phosphorescence; Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Pyridine Nucleotides; Mass Spectrometry of Pyridine Nucleotides; Mechanism of Action of the Pyridine Nucleotides; Chemical Stability and Reactivity of Pyridine Nucleotide Coenzymes; Stereochemistry of Fatty Acid Biosynthesis and Metabolism; Kinetics of Pyridine Nucleotide-Utilizing Enzymes; Preparation and Properties of NAD and NADP Analogs; Model Studies and Biological Activity of Analogs; and Spin-Labeled Pyridine Nucleotide Derivatives.

  13. Vesicular nucleotide transport: a brief history and the vesicular nucleotide transporter as a target for drug development.

    PubMed

    Hiasa, Miki; Togawa, Natsuko; Moriyama, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    Neurons and neuroendocrine cells store nucleotides in vesicles and release them upon stimulation, leading to intercellular purinergic signaling. The molecular machinery responsible for the vesicular storage of nucleotides was a long standing enigma, however, recently the transporter involving in the process was identified. This article summarizes the history of vesicular storage of nucleotides and the identification of the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT) responsible for the process. The significance of VNUT as a drug target to control purinergic chemical transmission is also discussed. PMID:23886392

  14. Single nucleotide polymorphism-based dispersal estimates using noninvasive sampling.

    PubMed

    Norman, Anita J; Spong, Göran

    2015-08-01

    Quantifying dispersal within wild populations is an important but challenging task. Here we present a method to estimate contemporary, individual-based dispersal distance from noninvasively collected samples using a specialized panel of 96 SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms). One main issue in conducting dispersal studies is the requirement for a high sampling resolution at a geographic scale appropriate for capturing the majority of dispersal events. In this study, fecal samples of brown bear (Ursus arctos) were collected by volunteer citizens, resulting in a high sampling resolution spanning over 45,000 km(2) in Gävleborg and Dalarna counties in Sweden. SNP genotypes were obtained for unique individuals sampled (n = 433) and subsequently used to reconstruct pedigrees. A Mantel test for isolation by distance suggests that the sampling scale was appropriate for females but not for males, which are known to disperse long distances. Euclidean distance was estimated between mother and offspring pairs identified through the reconstructed pedigrees. The mean dispersal distance was 12.9 km (SE 3.2) and 33.8 km (SE 6.8) for females and males, respectively. These results were significantly different (Wilcoxon's rank-sum test: P-value = 0.02) and are in agreement with the previously identified pattern of male-biased dispersal. Our results illustrate the potential of using a combination of noninvasively collected samples at high resolution and specialized SNPs for pedigree-based dispersal models. PMID:26357536

  15. Single nucleotide polymorphism-based dispersal estimates using noninvasive sampling

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Anita J; Spong, Göran

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying dispersal within wild populations is an important but challenging task. Here we present a method to estimate contemporary, individual-based dispersal distance from noninvasively collected samples using a specialized panel of 96 SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms). One main issue in conducting dispersal studies is the requirement for a high sampling resolution at a geographic scale appropriate for capturing the majority of dispersal events. In this study, fecal samples of brown bear (Ursus arctos) were collected by volunteer citizens, resulting in a high sampling resolution spanning over 45,000 km2 in Gävleborg and Dalarna counties in Sweden. SNP genotypes were obtained for unique individuals sampled (n = 433) and subsequently used to reconstruct pedigrees. A Mantel test for isolation by distance suggests that the sampling scale was appropriate for females but not for males, which are known to disperse long distances. Euclidean distance was estimated between mother and offspring pairs identified through the reconstructed pedigrees. The mean dispersal distance was 12.9 km (SE 3.2) and 33.8 km (SE 6.8) for females and males, respectively. These results were significantly different (Wilcoxon’s rank-sum test: P-value = 0.02) and are in agreement with the previously identified pattern of male-biased dispersal. Our results illustrate the potential of using a combination of noninvasively collected samples at high resolution and specialized SNPs for pedigree-based dispersal models. PMID:26357536

  16. Journey of poly-nucleotides through OmpF porin.

    PubMed

    Hadi-Alijanvand, Hamid; Rouhani, Maryam

    2015-05-21

    OmpF is an abundant porin in many bacteria which attracts attention as a promising biological nanopore for DNA sequencing. We study the interactions of OmpF with pentameric poly-nucleotides (poly-Ns) in silico. The poly-N molecule is forced to translocate through the lumen of OmpF. Subsequently, the structural and dynamical effects of translocation steps on protein and poly-N molecules are explored in detail. The external loops of OmpF are introduced as the main region for discrimination of poly-Ns based on their organic bases. Structural network analyses of OmpF in the presence or absence of poly-Ns characterize special residues in the structural network of porin. These residues pave the way for engineering OmpF protein. The poly-N-specific pattern of OmpF's local conductance is detected in the current study. Computing the potential of mean force for translocation steps, we define the energetic barrier ahead of poly-N to move through OmpF's lumen. We suggest that fast translocation of the examined poly-N molecules through OmpF seems unattainable by small external driving forces. Our computational results suggest some abilities for OmpF porin like OmpF's potential for being used in poly-N sequencing. PMID:25965338

  17. Four novel cystic fibrosis mutations in splice junction sequences affecting the CFTR nucleotide binding folds

    SciTech Connect

    Doerk, T.; Wulbrand, U.; Tuemmler, B. )

    1993-03-01

    Single cases of the four novel splice site mutations 1525[minus]1 G [r arrow] A (intron 9), 3601[minus]2 A [r arrow] G (intron 18), 3850[minus]3 T [r arrow] G (intron 19), and 4374+1 G [r arrow] T (intron 23) were detected in the CFTR gene of cystic fibrosis patients of Indo-Iranian, Turkish, Polish, and Germany descent. The nucleotide substitutions at the +1, [minus]1, and [minus]2 positions all destroy splice sites and lead to severe disease alleles associated with features typical of gastrointestinal and pulmonary cystic fibrosis disease. The 3850[minus]3 T-to-G change was discovered in a very mildly affected 33-year-old [Delta]F508 compound heterozygote, suggesting that the T-to-G transversion at the less conserved [minus]3 position of the acceptor splice site may retain some wildtype function. 13 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  18. Microbial metabolism of thiopurines: A method to measure thioguanine nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Movva, Ramya; Lobb, Michael; Ó Cuív, Páraic; Florin, Timothy H J; Duley, John A; Oancea, Iulia

    2016-09-01

    Thiopurines are anti-inflammatory prodrugs. We hypothesised that bacteria may contribute to conversion to active drug. Escherichia coli strain DH5α was evaluated to determine whether it could metabolise the thiopurine drugs, thioguanine or mercaptopurine, to thioguanine nucleotides. A rapid and reliable high performance liquid chromatography (ultraviolet detection) method was developed to quantify indirectly thioguanine nucleotides, by measuring thioguanine nucleoside. PMID:27444548

  19. Accounting for product substitution in the analysis of food taxes targeting obesity.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhen; Beghin, John C; Jensen, Helen H

    2013-11-01

    We extend the existing literature on food taxes targeting obesity. We systematically incorporate the implicit substitution between added sugars and solid fats into a comprehensive food demand system and evaluate the effect of taxes on sugars and fats. The approach conditions how food and obesity taxes affect total calorie intake. The proposed methodology accounts for the ability of consumers to substitute leaner low-fat and low-sugar items for rich food items within the same food group. We calibrate this demand system approach using recent food intake data and existing estimates of price and income elasticities of demand. The demand system accounts for both the within-food group substitution and the substitution across these groups. Simulations of taxes on added sugars and solid fat show that the tax impact on consumption patterns is understated and the induced welfare loss is overstated when not allowing for the substitution possibilities within food groups. PMID:23192837

  20. Preparation and Magnetic Studies of Mn Substituted Analogues of BiFeO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, B. L.; Kumar, Sudhish; Krishnamurthy, Anjali; Srivastava, Bipin K.

    2011-11-01

    Manganese substituted samples (for iron) in the multiferroic BiFeO3 have been prepared using solid state ceramic route. It has been possible to prepare a sample with the highest 40% Mn content. Reitveld analysis of the X-ray diffraction patterns shows that the substituted analogues crystallize in rhombohedral symmetry in R-3¯c space group. Effort to prepare 50 atomic% Mn substituted sample did not succeed. Magnetization measurements have been made in the temperature range 20K-300K and in fields upto 8 kOe. Magnetic nature of the 40 atomic% Mn substituted sample is alike that of 30 atomic% Mn substituted one. Mn induces weak ferromagnetism with the average magnetic moment increasing with its concentration.

  1. Molecular cloning and nucleotide sequence of cDNA for human glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase variant A(-).

    PubMed Central

    Hirono, A; Beutler, E

    1988-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD; D-glucose-6-phosphate:NADP+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.49) A(-) is a common variant in Blacks that causes sensitivity to drug-and infection-induced hemolytic anemia. A cDNA library was constructed from Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cells from a male who was G6PD A(-). One of four cDNA clones isolated contained a sequence not found in the other clones nor in the published cDNA sequence. Consisting of 138 bases and coding 46 amino acids, this segment of cDNA apparently is derived from the alternative splicing involving the 3' end of intron 7. Comparison of the remaining sequences of these clones with the published sequence revealed three nucleotide substitutions: C33----G, G202----A, and A376----G. Each change produces a new restriction site. Genomic DNA from five G6PD A(-) individuals was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction. The base substitution at position 376, identical to the substitution that has been reported in G6PD A(+), was present in all G6PD A(-) samples and none of the control G6PD B(+) samples examined. The substitution at position 202 was found in four of the five G6PD A(-) samples and no normal control sample. At position 33 guanine was found in all G6PD A(-) samples and seven G6PD B(+) control samples and is, presumably, the usual nucleotide found at this position. The finding of the same mutation in G6PD A(-) as is found in G6PD A(+) strongly suggests that the G6PD A(-) mutation arose in an individual with G6PD A(+), adding another mutation that causes the in vivo instability of this enzyme protein. Images PMID:2836867

  2. Nucleotide-binding mechanisms in pseudokinases

    PubMed Central

    Hammarén, Henrik M.; Virtanen, Anniina T.; Silvennoinen, Olli

    2015-01-01

    Pseudokinases are classified by the lack of one or several of the highly conserved motifs involved in nucleotide (nt) binding or catalytic activity of protein kinases (PKs). Pseudokinases represent ∼10% of the human kinome and they are found in all evolutionary classes of kinases. It has become evident that pseudokinases, which were initially considered somewhat peculiar dead kinases, are important components in several signalling cascades. Furthermore, several pseudokinases have been linked to human diseases, particularly cancer, which is raising interest for therapeutic approaches towards these proteins. The ATP-binding pocket is a well-established drug target and elucidation of the mechanism and properties of nt binding in pseudokinases is of significant interest and importance. Recent studies have demonstrated that members of the pseudokinase family are very diverse in structure as well as in their ability and mechanism to bind nts or perform phosphoryl transfer reactions. This diversity also precludes prediction of pseudokinase function, or the importance of nt binding for said function, based on primary sequence alone. Currently available data indicate that ∼40% of pseudokinases are able to bind nts, whereas only few are able to catalyse occasional phosphoryl transfer. Pseudokinases employ diverse mechanisms to bind nts, which usually occurs at low, but physiological, affinity. ATP binding serves often a structural role but in most cases the functional roles are not precisely known. In the present review, we discuss the various mechanisms that pseudokinases employ for nt binding and how this often low-affinity binding can be accurately analysed. PMID:26589967

  3. Nucleotide Phosphohydrolase in Purified Vaccinia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Munyon, William; Paoletti, Enzo; Ospina, Julio; Grace, James T.

    1968-01-01

    Purified infectious vaccinia virus has been shown to contain an enzyme or enzymes that remove the terminal phosphate group from adenosine triphosphate (ATP), guanosine triphosphate (GTP), uridine triphosphate (UTP), and cytidine triphosphate (CTP). The Km for ATP of this enzyme is 5.5 × 10−4m, and the relative rates of the reaction with ATP, GTP, UTP, and CTP are 1.00, 0.34, 0.15, and 0.29, respectively. The virus enzyme does not react with any of the diphosphates. The rate of the reaction is proportional to the amount of virus added and is linear for 130 min. The virus nucleotide phosphohydrolase activity is greatly stimulated by Mg++ and very slightly stimulated by Ca++. The small residual activity observed in the absence of divalent cations is completely inhibited by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. Neither Na+ nor K+ ions, nor any mixture of these, was found to stimulate the reaction significantly, and ouabain, at 10−4m, inhibited the reaction by only 27%. The response of the vaccinia enzyme to mono- and divalent cations and to ouabain indicates that the vaccinia enzyme has different properties from those associated with microsomes and mitochondria. PMID:4986904

  4. Exploiting Nucleotide Composition to Engineer Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Mauceli, Evan; Ernst, Wolfgang; Baumann, Martina; Biagi, Tara; Swofford, Ross; Russell, Pamela; Zody, Michael C.; Di Palma, Federica; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Grabherr, Reingard M.

    2011-01-01

    The choice of promoter is a critical step in optimizing the efficiency and stability of recombinant protein production in mammalian cell lines. Artificial promoters that provide stable expression across cell lines and can be designed to the desired strength constitute an alternative to the use of viral promoters. Here, we show how the nucleotide characteristics of highly active human promoters can be modelled via the genome-wide frequency distribution of short motifs: by overlapping motifs that occur infrequently in the genome, we constructed contiguous sequence that is rich in GC and CpGs, both features of known promoters, but lacking homology to real promoters. We show that snippets from this sequence, at 100 base pairs or longer, drive gene expression in vitro in a number of mammalian cells, and are thus candidates for use in protein production. We further show that expression is driven by the general transcription factors TFIIB and TFIID, both being ubiquitously present across cell types, which results in less tissue- and species-specific regulation compared to the viral promoter SV40. We lastly found that the strength of a promoter can be tuned up and down by modulating the counts of GC and CpGs in localized regions. These results constitute a “proof-of-concept” for custom-designing promoters that are suitable for biotechnological and medical applications. PMID:21625601

  5. 40 CFR 721.4280 - Substituted hydrazine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Substituted hydrazine. 721.4280... Substances § 721.4280 Substituted hydrazine. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted hydrazine (PMN P-90-594)...

  6. 40 CFR 721.4280 - Substituted hydrazine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted hydrazine. 721.4280... Substances § 721.4280 Substituted hydrazine. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted hydrazine (PMN P-90-594)...

  7. 40 CFR 721.4280 - Substituted hydrazine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Substituted hydrazine. 721.4280... Substances § 721.4280 Substituted hydrazine. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted hydrazine (PMN P-90-594)...

  8. 40 CFR 721.4280 - Substituted hydrazine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted hydrazine. 721.4280... Substances § 721.4280 Substituted hydrazine. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted hydrazine (PMN P-90-594)...

  9. 40 CFR 721.4280 - Substituted hydrazine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted hydrazine. 721.4280... Substances § 721.4280 Substituted hydrazine. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted hydrazine (PMN P-90-594)...

  10. 40 CFR 721.9100 - Substituted quinoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Substituted quinoline. 721.9100... Substances § 721.9100 Substituted quinoline. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted quinoline (PMN P-93-1183)...

  11. 40 CFR 721.9100 - Substituted quinoline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted quinoline. 721.9100... Substances § 721.9100 Substituted quinoline. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted quinoline (PMN P-93-1183)...

  12. 40 CFR 721.3360 - Substituted ethanolamine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted ethanolamine. 721.3360... Substances § 721.3360 Substituted ethanolamine. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted ethanolamine (PMN P-91-490)...

  13. Ethynyl and substituted ethynyl-terminated polysulfones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Ethynyl and substituted ethynyl-terminated polysulfones and a process for preparing the same are disclosed. These polysulfones are thermally cured to induce cross-linking and chain extension, producing a polymer system with improved solvent resistance and use temperature. Also disclosed are substituted 4-ethynylbenzoyl chlorides as precursors to the substituted ethynyl-terminated polysulfones and a process for preparing the same.

  14. Ethynyl and substituted ethynyl-terminated polysulfones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    Ethynyl and substituted ethynyl-terminated polysulfones and their synthesis are disclosed. These polysulfones are thermally cured to induce cross-linking and chain extension, producing a polymer system with improved solvent resistance and use temperatures. Also disclosed are substituted 4-ethynylbenzoyl chlorides as precursors to the substituted ethynyl-terminated polysulfones and a process for preparing the same.

  15. Permanent Teacher Preparation for Substitute Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardman, Steve; Tippetts, Zachary

    2001-01-01

    Presents information about what should be communicated to substitute teachers and why it is important, focusing on the substitute teacher's role, classroom management tools, curriculum management, and preparing students for the substitute teacher by creating bridges that will help minimize the sense of separation students feel when they have a…

  16. Substitutes for School Nurses in Illinois

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollinger, Linda Jeno; Bergren, Martha Dewey; Belmonte-Mann, Frances

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to explore utilization of nurse substitutes in the school setting in Illinois. The literature described personnel who staff the school health office in the absence of the school nurse and the barriers to obtaining nurse substitutes. There were no empirical studies conducted on school nurse substitutes in…

  17. 40 CFR 721.9820 - Substituted triazole.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted triazole. 721.9820 Section... Substances § 721.9820 Substituted triazole. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as a substituted triazole (PMN P-90-1731)...

  18. 40 CFR 721.9820 - Substituted triazole.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted triazole. 721.9820 Section... Substances § 721.9820 Substituted triazole. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as a substituted triazole (PMN P-90-1731)...

  19. 40 CFR 721.9820 - Substituted triazole.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Substituted triazole. 721.9820 Section... Substances § 721.9820 Substituted triazole. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as a substituted triazole (PMN P-90-1731)...

  20. 40 CFR 721.9820 - Substituted triazole.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted triazole. 721.9820 Section... Substances § 721.9820 Substituted triazole. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as a substituted triazole (PMN P-90-1731)...

  1. 40 CFR 721.9820 - Substituted triazole.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Substituted triazole. 721.9820 Section... Substances § 721.9820 Substituted triazole. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as a substituted triazole (PMN P-90-1731)...

  2. 24 CFR 221.252 - Substitute mortgagors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Substitute mortgagors. 221.252... Cost Homes § 221.252 Substitute mortgagors. (a) Selling mortgagor. The mortgagee may effect the release... approval of a substitute mortgagor, as provided by this section. (b) Purchasing mortgagor. The...

  3. 40 CFR 721.5867 - Substituted phenol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Substituted phenol. 721.5867 Section... Substances § 721.5867 Substituted phenol. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as substituted phenol (PMNs P-89-1125,...

  4. 40 CFR 721.5867 - Substituted phenol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Substituted phenol. 721.5867 Section... Substances § 721.5867 Substituted phenol. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as substituted phenol (PMNs P-89-1125,...

  5. 40 CFR 721.5867 - Substituted phenol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted phenol. 721.5867 Section... Substances § 721.5867 Substituted phenol. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as substituted phenol (PMNs P-89-1125,...

  6. 40 CFR 721.5867 - Substituted phenol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted phenol. 721.5867 Section... Substances § 721.5867 Substituted phenol. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as substituted phenol (PMNs P-89-1125,...

  7. 40 CFR 721.5867 - Substituted phenol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted phenol. 721.5867 Section... Substances § 721.5867 Substituted phenol. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as substituted phenol (PMNs P-89-1125,...

  8. pH profile of the adsorption of nucleotides onto montmorillonite. I - Selected homoionic clays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, J. G.; Church, F. M.; Mazzurco, J.; Banin, A.; Huff, R.; Kao, J.; Cook, A.; Lowe, T.; Orenberg, J. B.; Edelson, E.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of pH and adsorbed ions on the adsorption of purine and pyrimidine nucleotides on montmorillonite clay was studied experimentally. The specific nucleotides examined were: 5 prime-AMP; 3-prime AMP; and 5 prime-CMP. The pH of the clay samples was adjusted to various levels in the 2-12 pH range using microliter volumes of concentrated acid (1N HCl) and base (1NHNaOH). It was found that preferential adsorption among nulceotides was dependent on the pH level and on the characteristics of the substituted metal cation and anion exchange mechanisms. Below pH 4, adsorption was attributed to cation and anion exchange mechanisms. Above pH 4, however, adsorption was attributed to the complexation mechanisms occurring between the metal cations in the clay exchange site and in the biomolecule. The possible role of homoionic clays in the concentration mechanisms of biomonomers in the prebiotic environment is discussed.

  9. Site-Specific DNA Structural and Dynamic Features Revealed by Nucleotide-Independent Nitroxide Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Popova, Anna; Kalai, Tamas; Hideg, Kalman; Qin, Peter Z.

    2009-09-15

    In site-directed spin labeling, a covalently attached nitroxide probe containing a chemically inert unpaired electron is utilized to obtain information on the local environment of the parent macromolecule. Studies presented here examine the feasibility of probing local DNA structural and dynamic features using a class of nitroxide probes that are linked to chemically substituted phosphorothioate positions at the DNA backbone. Two members of this family, designated as R5 and R5a, were attached to eight different sites of a dodecameric DNA duplex without severely perturbing the native B-form conformation. Measured X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra, which report on nitroxide rotational motions, were found to vary depending on the location of the label (e.g., duplex center vs termini) and the surrounding DNA sequence. This indicates that R5 and R5a can provide information on the DNA local environment at the level of an individual nucleotide. As these probes can be attached to arbitrary nucleotides within a nucleic acid sequence, they may provide a means to “scan” a given DNA molecule in order to interrogate its local structural and dynamic features.

  10. Iridium-Catalyzed Allylic Substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, John F.; Pouy, Mark J.

    Iridium-catalyzed asymmetric allylic substitution has become a valuable method to prepare products from the addition of nucleophiles at the more substituted carbon of an allyl unit. The most active and selective catalysts contain a phosphoramidite ligand possessing at least one arylethyl substituent on the nitrogen atom of the ligand. In these systems, the active catalyst is generated by a base-induced cyclometalation at the methyl group of this substituent to generate an iridium metalacycle bound by the COD ligand of the [Ir(COD)Cl]2 precursor and one additional labile dative ligand. Such complexes catalyze the reactions of linear allylic esters with alkylamines, arylamines, phenols, alcohols, imides, carbamates, ammonia, enolates and enolate equivalents, as well as typical stabilized carbon nucleophiles generated from malonates and cyanoesters. Iridium catalysts for enantioselective allylic substitution have also been generated from phosphorus ligands with substituents bound by heteroatoms, and an account of the studies of such systems, along with a description of the development of iridium catalysts is included.

  11. Resonant photodissociation in substituted benzenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarborough, Tim; McAcy, Collin; Foote, David; Uiterwaal, Cornelis

    2011-05-01

    Cyclic aromatic molecules are abundant in organic chemistry, with a wide variety of applications, including pharmacology, pollution studies and genetic research. Among the simplest of these molecules is benzene (C6H6) , with many relevant molecules being benzene-like with a single atomic substitution. In such a substitution, the substituent determines a characteristic perturbation of the electronic structure of the molecule. We discuss the substitution of halogens into the ring (C6H5X), and its effects on the dynamics of ionization and dissociation of the molecule without the focal volume effect. In particular, using 800-nm, 50-fs laser pulses, we present results in the dissociation of fluorobenzene, chlorobenzene, bromobenzene and iodobenzene into the phenyl ring (C6H5) and the atomic halogen, and the subsequent ionization of these fragments. The impact of the ``heavy atom effect'' on a 1 (π , π*) -->3 (n , σ*) singlet-triplet intersystem crossing will be emphasized. Currently under investigation is whether such a dissociation can be treated as an effective source of the neutral substituent. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-0355235.

  12. Probing genomic diversity and evolution of Escherichia coli O157 by single nucleotide polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Qi, Weihong; Albert, Thomas J.; Motiwala, Alifiya S.; Alland, David; Hyytia-Trees, Eija K.; Ribot, Efrain M.; Fields, Patricia I.; Whittam, Thomas S.; Swaminathan, Bala

    2006-01-01

    Infections by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 (STEC O157) are the predominant cause of bloody diarrhea and hemolytic uremic syndrome in the United States. In silico comparison of the two complete STEC O157 genomes (Sakai and EDL933) revealed a strikingly high level of sequence identity in orthologous protein-coding genes, limiting the use of nucleotide sequences to study the evolution and epidemiology of this bacterial pathogen. To systematically examine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at a genome scale, we designed comparative genome sequencing microarrays and analyzed 1199 chromosomal genes (a total of 1,167,948 bp) and 92,721 bp of the large virulence plasmid (pO157) of eleven outbreak-associated STEC O157 strains. We discovered 906 SNPs in 523 chromosomal genes and observed a high level of DNA polymorphisms among the pO157 plasmids. Based on a uniform rate of synonymous substitution for Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica (4.7 × 10−9 per site per year), we estimate that the most recent common ancestor of the contemporary β-glucuronidase-negative, non-sorbitolfermenting STEC O157 strains existed ca. 40 thousand years ago. The phylogeny of the STEC O157 strains based on the informative synonymous SNPs was compared to the maximum parsimony trees inferred from pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus variable numbers of tandem repeats analysis. The topological discrepancies indicate that, in contrast to the synonymous mutations, parts of STEC O157 genomes have evolved through different mechanisms with highly variable divergence rates. The SNP loci reported here will provide useful genetic markers for developing high-throughput methods for fine-resolution genotyping of STEC O157. Functional characterization of nucleotide polymorphisms should shed new insights on the evolution, epidemiology, and pathogenesis of STEC O157 and related pathogens. PMID:16606700

  13. Relationship between nucleotide binding and ion channel gating in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, Andrei A; Cui, Liying; Riordan, John R

    2009-06-15

    We have employed rate-equilibrium free energy relationship (REFER) analysis to characterize the dynamic events involved in the allosteric regulation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function. A wide range of different hydrolysable and poorly hydrolysable nucleoside triphosphates were used to elucidate the role of ATP hydrolysis in CFTR function. The linearity of the REFER plots and Phi values near unity for all ligands tested implies that CFTR channel gating is a reversible thermally driven process with all structural reorganization in the binding site(s) completed prior to channel opening. This is consistent with the requirement for nucleotide binding for channel opening. However, the channel structural transition from the open to the closed state occurs independently of any events in the binding sites. Similar results were obtained on substitution of amino acids at coupling joints between both nucleotide binding domains (NBD) and cytoplasmic loops (CL) in opposite halves of the protein, indicating that any structural reorganization there also had occurred in the channel closed state. The fact that fractional Phi values were not observed in either of these distant sites suggests that there may not be a deterministic 'lever-arm' mechanism acting between nucleotide binding sites and the channel gate. These findings favour a stochastic coupling between binding and gating in which all structural transitions are thermally driven processes. We speculate that increase of channel open state probability is due to reduction of the number of the closed state configurations available after physical interaction between ligand bound NBDs and the channel. PMID:19403599

  14. Relationship between nucleotide binding and ion channel gating in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

    PubMed Central

    Aleksandrov, Andrei A; Cui, Liying; Riordan, John R

    2009-01-01

    We have employed rate-equilibrium free energy relationship (REFER) analysis to characterize the dynamic events involved in the allosteric regulation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function. A wide range of different hydrolysable and poorly hydrolysable nucleoside triphosphates were used to elucidate the role of ATP hydrolysis in CFTR function. The linearity of the REFER plots and Φ values near unity for all ligands tested implies that CFTR channel gating is a reversible thermally driven process with all structural reorganization in the binding site(s) completed prior to channel opening. This is consistent with the requirement for nucleotide binding for channel opening. However, the channel structural transition from the open to the closed state occurs independently of any events in the binding sites. Similar results were obtained on substitution of amino acids at coupling joints between both nucleotide binding domains (NBD) and cytoplasmic loops (CL) in opposite halves of the protein, indicating that any structural reorganization there also had occurred in the channel closed state. The fact that fractional Φ values were not observed in either of these distant sites suggests that there may not be a deterministic ‘lever-arm’ mechanism acting between nucleotide binding sites and the channel gate. These findings favour a stochastic coupling between binding and gating in which all structural transitions are thermally driven processes. We speculate that increase of channel open state probability is due to reduction of the number of the closed state configurations available after physical interaction between ligand bound NBDs and the channel. PMID:19403599

  15. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Transcription Elongation Mutants Are Defective in PUR5 Induction in Response to Nucleotide Depletion

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Randal J.; Reines, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the de novo synthesis of guanine nucleotides. It is a target of therapeutically useful drugs and is implicated in the regulation of cell growth rate. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mutations in components of the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcription elongation machinery confer increased sensitivity to a drug that inhibits IMPDH, 6-azauracil (6AU), by a mechanism that is poorly understood. This phenotype is thought to reflect the need for an optimally functioning transcription machinery under conditions of lowered intracellular GTP levels. Here we show that in response to the application of IMPDH inhibitors such as 6AU, wild-type yeast strains induce transcription of PUR5, one of four genes encoding IMPDH-related enzymes. Yeast elongation mutants sensitive to 6AU, such as those with a disrupted gene encoding elongation factor SII or those containing amino acid substitutions in Pol II subunits, are defective in PUR5 induction. The inability to fully induce PUR5 correlates with mutations that effect transcription elongation since 6AU-sensitive strains deleted for genes not related to transcription elongation are competent to induce PUR5. DNA encompassing the PUR5 promoter and 5′ untranslated region supports 6AU induction of a luciferase reporter gene in wild-type cells. Thus, yeast sense and respond to nucleotide depletion via a mechanism of transcriptional induction that restores nucleotides to levels required for normal growth. An optimally functioning elongation machinery is critical for this response. PMID:11003640

  16. 40 CFR 721.1555 - Substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... benzenediazonium salt. 721.1555 Section 721.1555 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1555 Substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt. (a... generically as a substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt (PMN P-92-652) is subject...

  17. 40 CFR 721.1555 - Substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... benzenediazonium salt. 721.1555 Section 721.1555 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1555 Substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt. (a... generically as a substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt (PMN P-92-652) is subject...

  18. 40 CFR 721.6920 - Butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Butyl acrylate, polymer with... acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted silane. (a... butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

  19. 40 CFR 721.1555 - Substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... benzenediazonium salt. 721.1555 Section 721.1555 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1555 Substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt. (a... generically as a substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt (PMN P-92-652) is subject...

  20. 40 CFR 721.9545 - Substituted phenyl azo substituted sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt. 721.9545 Section 721.9545 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9545 Substituted phenyl azo substituted sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt... identified generically as a substituted phenyl azo substituted sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt (PMN...

  1. 40 CFR 721.9545 - Substituted phenyl azo substituted sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt. 721.9545 Section 721.9545 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9545 Substituted phenyl azo substituted sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt... identified generically as a substituted phenyl azo substituted sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt (PMN...

  2. 40 CFR 721.9545 - Substituted phenyl azo substituted sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt. 721.9545 Section 721.9545 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9545 Substituted phenyl azo substituted sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt... identified generically as a substituted phenyl azo substituted sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt (PMN...

  3. 40 CFR 721.9545 - Substituted phenyl azo substituted sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt. 721.9545 Section 721.9545 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9545 Substituted phenyl azo substituted sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt... identified generically as a substituted phenyl azo substituted sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt (PMN...

  4. 40 CFR 721.9545 - Substituted phenyl azo substituted sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt. 721.9545 Section 721.9545 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9545 Substituted phenyl azo substituted sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt... identified generically as a substituted phenyl azo substituted sulfocarbopolycle, sodium salt (PMN...

  5. 40 CFR 721.1555 - Substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... benzenediazonium salt. 721.1555 Section 721.1555 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1555 Substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt. (a... generically as a substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt (PMN P-92-652) is subject...

  6. 40 CFR 721.1555 - Substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... benzenediazonium salt. 721.1555 Section 721.1555 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1555 Substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt. (a... generically as a substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt (PMN P-92-652) is subject...

  7. 40 CFR 721.6920 - Butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Butyl acrylate, polymer with... acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted silane. (a... butyl acrylate, polymer with substituted methyl styrene, methyl methacrylate, and substituted...

  8. Synthesis and nucleophilic aromatic substitution of 3-fluoro-5-nitro-1-(pentafluorosulfanyl)benzene.

    PubMed

    Ajenjo, Javier; Greenhall, Martin; Zarantonello, Camillo; Beier, Petr

    2016-01-01

    3-Fluoro-5-nitro-1-(pentafluorosulfanyl)benzene was prepared by three different ways: as a byproduct of direct fluorination of 1,2-bis(3-nitrophenyl)disulfane, by direct fluorination of 4-nitro-1-(pentafluorosulfanyl)benzene, and by fluorodenitration of 3,5-dinitro-1-(pentafluorosulfanyl)benzene. The title compound was subjected to a nucleophilic aromatic substitution of the fluorine atom with oxygen, sulfur and nitrogen nucleophiles affording novel (pentafluorosulfanyl)benzenes with 3,5-disubstitution pattern. Vicarious nucleophilic substitution of the title compound with carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen nucleophiles provided 3-fluoro-5-nitro-1-(pentafluorosulfanyl)benzenes substituted in position four. PMID:26977178

  9. Synthesis and nucleophilic aromatic substitution of 3-fluoro-5-nitro-1-(pentafluorosulfanyl)benzene

    PubMed Central

    Ajenjo, Javier; Greenhall, Martin; Zarantonello, Camillo

    2016-01-01

    Summary 3-Fluoro-5-nitro-1-(pentafluorosulfanyl)benzene was prepared by three different ways: as a byproduct of direct fluorination of 1,2-bis(3-nitrophenyl)disulfane, by direct fluorination of 4-nitro-1-(pentafluorosulfanyl)benzene, and by fluorodenitration of 3,5-dinitro-1-(pentafluorosulfanyl)benzene. The title compound was subjected to a nucleophilic aromatic substitution of the fluorine atom with oxygen, sulfur and nitrogen nucleophiles affording novel (pentafluorosulfanyl)benzenes with 3,5-disubstitution pattern. Vicarious nucleophilic substitution of the title compound with carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen nucleophiles provided 3-fluoro-5-nitro-1-(pentafluorosulfanyl)benzenes substituted in position four. PMID:26977178

  10. On-Surface Synthesis of BN-Substituted Heteroaromatic Networks.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sánchez, Carlos; Brüller, Sebastian; Sachdev, Hermann; Müllen, Klaus; Krieg, Matthias; Bettinger, Holger F; Nicolaï, Adrien; Meunier, Vincent; Talirz, Leopold; Fasel, Roman; Ruffieux, Pascal

    2015-09-22

    We report on the bottom-up fabrication of BN-substituted heteroaromatic networks achieved by surface-assisted polymerization and subsequent cyclodehydrogenation of specifically designed BN-substituted precursor monomers based on a borazine core structural element. To get insight into the cyclodehydrogenation pathway and the influence of molecular flexibility on network quality, two closely related precursor monomers with different degrees of internal cyclodehydrogenation have been employed. Scanning tunneling microscopy shows that, for both monomers, surface-assisted cyclodehydrogenation allows for complete monomer cyclization and the formation of covalently interlinked BN-substituted polyaromatic hydrocarbon networks on the Ag(111) surface. In agreement with experimental observations, density functional theory calculations reveal a significantly lower energy barrier for the cyclodehydrogenation of the conformationally more rigid precursor monomer, which is also reflected in a higher degree of long-range order of the obtained heteroaromatic network. Our proof-of-concept study will allow for the fabrication of atomically precise substitution patterns within BNC heterostructures. PMID:26280065

  11. Oxidative DNA Damage and Nucleotide Excision Repair

    PubMed Central

    Melis, Joost P.M.; Luijten, Mirjam

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Oxidative DNA damage is repaired by multiple, overlapping DNA repair pathways. Accumulating evidence supports the hypothesis that nucleotide excision repair (NER), besides base excision repair (BER), is also involved in neutralizing oxidative DNA damage. Recent Advances: NER includes two distinct sub-pathways: transcription-coupled NER (TC-NER) and global genome repair (GG-NER). The CSA and CSB proteins initiate the onset of TC-NER. Recent findings show that not only CSB, but also CSA is involved in the repair of oxidative DNA lesions, in the nucleus as well as in mitochondria. The XPG protein is also of importance for the removal of oxidative DNA lesions, as it may enhance the initial step of BER. Substantial evidence exists that support a role for XPC in NER and BER. XPC deficiency not only results in decreased repair of oxidative lesions, but has also been linked to disturbed redox homeostasis. Critical Issues: The role of NER proteins in the regulation of the cellular response to oxidative (mitochondrial and nuclear) DNA damage may be the underlying mechanism of the pathology of accelerated aging in Cockayne syndrome patients, a driving force for internal cancer development in XP-A and XP-C patients, and a contributor to the mixed exhibited phenotypes of XP-G patients. Future Directions: Accumulating evidence indicates that DNA repair factors can be involved in multiple DNA repair pathways. However, the distinct detailed mechanism and consequences of these additional functions remain to be elucidated and can possibly shine a light on clinically related issues. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 2409–2419. PMID:23216312

  12. Cardiac Na+ Current Regulation by Pyridine Nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Man; Sanyal, Shamarendra; Gao, Ge; Gurung, Iman S.; Zhu, Xiaodong; Gaconnet, Georgia; Kerchner, Laurie J.; Shang, Lijuan L.; Huang, Christopher L-H.; Grace, Andrew; London, Barry; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale Mutations in glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1-like (GPD1-L) protein reduce cardiac Na+ current (INa) and cause Brugada Syndrome (BrS). GPD1-L has >80% amino acid homology with glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, which is involved in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent energy metabolism. Objective Therefore, we tested whether NAD(H) could regulate human cardiac sodium channels (Nav1.5). Methods and Results HEK293 cells stably expressing Nav1.5 and rat neonatal cardiomyocytes were used. The influence of NADH/NAD+ on arrhythmic risk was evaluated in wild-type or SCN5A+/− mouse heart. A280V GPD1-L caused a 2.48 ± 0.17-fold increase in intracellular NADH level (P<0.001). NADH application or co-transfection with A280V GPD1-L resulted in decreased INa (0.48 ± 0.09 or 0.19 ±0.04 of control group, respectively; P<0.01), which was reversed by NAD+, chelerythrine, or superoxide dismutase (SOD). NAD+ antagonism of the Na+ channel downregulation by A280V GPD1-L or NADH was prevented by a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, PKAI6–22. The effects of NADH and NAD+ were mimicked by a phorbol ester and forskolin, respectively. Increasing intracellular NADH was associated with an increased risk of ventricular tachycardia (VT) in wild-type mouse hearts. Extracellular application of NAD+ to SCN5A+/− mouse hearts ameliorated the risk of VT. Conclusions Our results show that Nav1.5 is regulated by pyridine nucleotides, suggesting a link between metabolism and INa. This effect required protein kinase C (PKC) activation and was mediated by oxidative stress. NAD+ could prevent this effect by activating PKA. Mutations of GPD1-L may downregulate Nav1.5 by altering the oxidized to reduced NAD(H) balance. PMID:19745168

  13. Synthetic Nucleotides as Probes of DNA Polymerase Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Jason M.; Beuning, Penny J.

    2012-01-01

    The genetic code is continuously expanding with new nucleobases designed to suit specific research needs. These synthetic nucleotides are used to study DNA polymerase dynamics and specificity and may even inhibit DNA polymerase activity. The availability of an increasing chemical diversity of nucleotides allows questions of utilization by different DNA polymerases to be addressed. Much of the work in this area deals with the A family DNA polymerases, for example, Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I, which are DNA polymerases involved in replication and whose fidelity is relatively high, but more recent work includes other families of polymerases, including the Y family, whose members are known to be error prone. This paper focuses on the ability of DNA polymerases to utilize nonnatural nucleotides in DNA templates or as the incoming nucleoside triphosphates. Beyond the utility of nonnatural nucleotides as probes of DNA polymerase specificity, such entities can also provide insight into the functions of DNA polymerases when encountering DNA that is damaged by natural agents. Thus, synthetic nucleotides provide insight into how polymerases deal with nonnatural nucleotides as well as into the mutagenic potential of nonnatural nucleotides. PMID:22720133

  14. The Kinesin-1 tail conformationally restricts the nucleotide pocket.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yao Liang; Dietrich, Kristen A; Naber, Nariman; Cooke, Roger; Rice, Sarah E

    2009-04-01

    We have used electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy to study the interaction between the kinesin-1 head and its regulatory tail domain. The interaction between the tails and the enzymatically active heads has been shown to inhibit intrinsic and microtubule-stimulated ADP release. Here, we demonstrate that the probe mobility of two different spin-labeled nucleotide analogs in the kinesin-1 nucleotide pocket is restricted upon binding of the tail domain to kinesin-1 heads. This conformational restriction is distinct from the microtubule-induced changes in the nucleotide pocket. Unlike myosin V, this tail-induced restriction occurs independent of nucleotide state. We find that the head-tail interaction that causes the restriction only weakly stabilizes Mg(2+) in the nucleotide pocket. The conformational restriction also occurs when a tail construct containing a K922A point mutation is used. This mutation eliminates the tail's ability to inhibit ADP release, indicating that the tail does not inhibit nucleotide ejection from the pocket by simple steric hindrance. Together, our data suggest that the observed head-tail interaction serves as a scaffold to position K922 to exert its inhibitory effect, possibly by interacting with the nucleotide alpha/beta-phosphates in a manner analogous to the arginine finger regulators of some G proteins. PMID:19348763

  15. The Kinesin-1 Tail Conformationally Restricts the Nucleotide Pocket

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Yao Liang; Dietrich, Kristen A.; Naber, Nariman; Cooke, Roger; Rice, Sarah E.

    2009-01-01

    We have used electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy to study the interaction between the kinesin-1 head and its regulatory tail domain. The interaction between the tails and the enzymatically active heads has been shown to inhibit intrinsic and microtubule-stimulated ADP release. Here, we demonstrate that the probe mobility of two different spin-labeled nucleotide analogs in the kinesin-1 nucleotide pocket is restricted upon binding of the tail domain to kinesin-1 heads. This conformational restriction is distinct from the microtubule-induced changes in the nucleotide pocket. Unlike myosin V, this tail-induced restriction occurs independent of nucleotide state. We find that the head-tail interaction that causes the restriction only weakly stabilizes Mg2+ in the nucleotide pocket. The conformational restriction also occurs when a tail construct containing a K922A point mutation is used. This mutation eliminates the tail's ability to inhibit ADP release, indicating that the tail does not inhibit nucleotide ejection from the pocket by simple steric hindrance. Together, our data suggest that the observed head-tail interaction serves as a scaffold to position K922 to exert its inhibitory effect, possibly by interacting with the nucleotide α/β-phosphates in a manner analogous to the arginine finger regulators of some G proteins. PMID:19348763

  16. Nucleic acid analysis using terminal-phosphate-labeled nucleotides

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2008-04-22

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  17. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in caprine calpastatin gene.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R; Maitra, A; Pandey, A K; Singh, L V; Mishra, B P

    2013-04-01

    The calpains and calpastatin (CAST) make up a major cytosolic proteolytic system, the calpain-calpastatin system, found in mammalian tissues. The relative levels of the components of the calpain-calpastatin system determine the extent of meat tenderization during postmortem storage. Calpastatin (CAST) is a protein inhibitor of the ubiquitous calcium-dependent proteases-micro-calpain and m-calpain. Polymorphisms in the bovine, ovine and pig CAST gene have been associated with meat tenderness but little is known about how caprine CAST gene may affect goat meat quality traits. In this study we selected different parts of the CAST gene: 1) that have been previously reported to be polymorphic, intron 5 and 12 and 3'UTR; 2) first time explored (exon 3, 7 and 8 and part of intron 7 and 8) to investigate polymorphic status of caprine CAST gene. Using comparative sequencing ten novel SN Ps located in exon 3 and intron 5, 7 and 8 were identified. Previously reported SNPs in intron 5, 3'UTR and intron 12 were absent. Sequence analysis revealed a non synonymous amino acid variation in exon 3, which would result in Lys/Arg substitution in the corresponding protein sequence. Considerable variation was detected in intronic regions. Twenty-four InDel were also recognized in intronic regions (15) and 3'UTR (9). All the sequences shared high homology with published bovine and ovine sequences. Three PCR-RFLP loci have been established for further analyzing genetic polymorphism in indigenous goats. PMID:23866627

  18. Nucleotide sequence of both genomic RNAs of a North American tobacco rattle virus isolate.

    PubMed

    Sudarshana, M R; Berger, P H

    1998-01-01

    The complete sequence of a North American tobacco rattle virus (TRV) isolate, 'Oregon yellow' (ORY), was determined from cDNA and RT-PCR clones derived from the two genomic RNAs of this isolate. The RNA-1 is 6790 bases and RNA-2 is 3261 bases. The sequence of TRV-ORY RNA-1 was similar to RNA-1 to TRV isolate SYM, and differs in 48 nucleotides. TRV-ORY RNA-1 was one base shorter than--SYM, and had 47 base substitutions resulting in 12 amino acid substitutions of which 4 were conservative. The RNA-2 of TRV-ORY was distinct from RNA-2 of other characterized TRV isolates and contained three open reading frames (ORFs) that could potentially code for proteins of MW 22.4 kDa, 37.6 kDa and 17.9 kDa. Based on the homology of the predicted amino acid sequence with those of other tobraviruses. ORF1 of RNA-2 encodes the coat protein (CP). The protein sequence of ORF2 had regions of limited similarity with those of ORF2 of two other TRV isolates and pea early browning tobravirus. The ORF3 was unique to TRV-ORY. Phylogenetic analysis of tobravirus CPs indicated that TRV-ORY was most closely related to pepper ringspot tobravirus and TRV-TCM. The relationship of tobravirus CPs to other rod-shaped tubular plant viruses is also discussed. PMID:9739332

  19. Coordinated regulation of XPA stability by ATR and HERC2 during nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Lee, T-H; Park, J-M; Leem, S-H; Kang, T-H

    2014-01-01

    ATR (ATM and Rad3-related) is an essential regulator of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) mechanism. For NER activation, ATR phosphorylates XPA, the rate-limiting factor in the NER pathway. However, the role of XPA phosphorylation at serine 196 by ATR has been elusive. Here we show that ATR-mediated XPA phosphorylation enhances XPA stability by inhibiting HERC2-mediated ubiquitination and subsequent degradation. We analyzed stabilization of XPA with substitutions of Ser 196 either to aspartate (S196D), a phosphomimetic mutation, or to alanine (S196A), a phosphodeficient mutation. Upon ultraviolet damage, ATR facilitated HERC2 dissociation from the XPA complex to induce XPA stabilization. However, this regulation was abrogated in S196A-complemented XPA-deficient cells due to persistent association of HERC2 with this XPA complex, resulting in enhanced ubiquitination of S196A. Conversely, the S196D substitution showed delayed degradation kinetics compared with the wild-type and less binding with HERC2, resulting in reduced ubiquitination of S196D. We also found that XPA phosphorylation enhanced the chromatin retention of XPA, the interaction with its binding partners following DNA damage. Taken together, our study presents a novel control mechanism in the NER pathway by regulating the steady-state level of XPA through posttranslational modifications by which ATR-mediated phosphorylation induces XPA stabilization by antagonizing HERC2-catalyzed XPA ubiquitination. PMID:23178497

  20. Why Nature Chose A, C, G and U/T: An Error-Coding Perspective of Nucleotide Alphabet Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dónaill, Dónall A. Mac

    2003-10-01

    The question of whether the size and make-up of the natural nucleotide alphabet is a consequence of selection pressure, or simply a frozen accident, is one of the fundamental questions of biology. Nucleotide replication is essentially an information transmission phenomenon, and so it seems reasonable to explore the issue from the perspective of theoretical computer science, and of error-coding theory in particular. In this analysis it is shown that the essential recognition features of nucleotides may be naturally expressed as 4-digit binary numbers, capturing the hydrogen acceptor/donor patterns (3-bits) and the purine/pyrimidine feature (1-bit). Optimal alphabets consist of nucleotides in which the purine/pyrimidine feature is related to the acceptor/donor pattern as a parity bit. Numerically interpreted, such alphabets correspond to parity check codes, simple but effective error-resistant structures. The natural alphabet appears to be an adaptation of one of two optimal solutions, constrained to its present size and composition by a combination of chemical and coding-theory factors.

  1. Modified nucleotides in T1 RNase oligonucleotides of 18S ribosomal RNA of the Novikoff hepatoma.

    PubMed

    Choi, Y C; Busch, H

    1978-06-27

    The primary structure of 18S rRNA of the Novikoff hepatoma cells was investigated. Regardless of whether the primary sequence of 18S rRNA is finally determined by RNA sequencing methods or DNA sequencing methods, it is important to identify numbers and types of the modified nucleotides and accordingly the present study was designed to localize the modified regions in T1 RNase derived oligonucleotide. Modified nucleotides found in 66 different oligonucleotide sequences included 2 m62A, 1 m6A, 1 m7G, 1m1cap3psi, 7 Cm, 13 Am, 9 Gm, 11 Um, and 38 psi residues. A number of these modified nucleotides are now placed in defined sequences of T1 RNase oligonucleotides which are now being searched for in larger fragments derived from partial T1 RNase digests of 18S rRNA. Improved homochromatography fingerprinting (Choi et al. (1976) Cancer Res. 36, 4301) of T1 RNase derived oligonucleotides provided a distinctive pattern for 18S rRNA of Novikoff hepatoma ascites cells. The 116 spots obtained by homochromatography contain 176 oligonucleotide sequences. PMID:209819

  2. Linking the human cytogenetic map with nucleotide sequence: the CCAP clone set.

    PubMed

    Jang, Wonhee; Yonescu, Raluca; Knutsen, Turid; Brown, Theresa; Reppert, Tricia; Sirotkin, Karl; Schuler, Gregory D; Ried, Thomas; Kirsch, Ilan R

    2006-07-15

    We present the completed dataset and clone repository of the Cancer Chromosome Aberration Project (CCAP), an initiative developed and funded through the intramural program of the U.S. National Cancer Institute, to provide seamless linkage of human cytogenetic markers with the primary nucleotide sequence of the human genome. Spaced at 1-2 Mb intervals across the human genome, 1,339 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones have been localized to chromosomal bands through high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) mapping. Of these clones, 99.8% can be positioned on the primary human genome sequence and 95% are placed at or close to their precise nucleotide starts and stops. This dataset can be studied and manipulated within generally available public Web sites. The clones are available from a commercial repository. The CCAP BAC clone set provides anchors for the interrogation of gene and sequence involvement in oncogenic and developmental disorders when the starting point is the recognition of a structural, numerical, or interstitial chromosomal aberration. This dataset also provides a current view of the quality and coherence of the available genome sequence and insight into the nucleotide and three-dimensional structures that manifest as Giemsa light and dark chromosomal banding patterns. PMID:16843097

  3. Identification and characterization of a novel plastidic adenine nucleotide uniporter from Solanum tuberosum.

    PubMed

    Leroch, Michaela; Kirchberger, Simon; Haferkamp, Ilka; Wahl, Markus; Neuhaus, H Ekkehard; Tjaden, Joachim

    2005-05-01

    Homologs of BT1 (the Brittle1 protein) are found to be phylogenetically related to the mitochondrial carrier family and appear to occur in both mono- and dicotyledonous plants. Whereas BT1 from cereals is probably involved in the transport of ADP-glucose, which is essential for starch metabolism in endosperm plastids, BT1 from a noncereal plant, Solanum tuberosum (StBT1), catalyzes an adenine nucleotide uniport when functionally integrated into the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. Import studies into intact Escherichia coli cells harboring StBT1 revealed a narrow substrate spectrum with similar affinities for AMP, ADP, and ATP of about 300-400 mum. Transiently expressed StBT1-green fluorescent protein fusion protein in tobacco leaf protoplasts showed a plastidic localization of the StBT1. In vitro synthesized radioactively labeled StBT1 was targeted to the envelope membranes of isolated spinach chloroplasts. Furthermore, we showed by real time reverse transcription-PCR a ubiquitous expression pattern of the StBT1 in autotrophic and heterotrophic potato tissues. We therefore propose that StBT1 is a plastidic adenine nucleotide uniporter used to provide the cytosol and other compartments with adenine nucleotides exclusively synthesized inside plastids. PMID:15737999

  4. CLEANUP: a fast computer program for removing redundancies from nucleotide sequence databases.

    PubMed

    Grillo, G; Attimonelli, M; Liuni, S; Pesole, G

    1996-02-01

    A key concept in comparing sequence collections is the issue of redundancy. The production of sequence collections free from redundancy is undoubtedly very useful, both in performing statistical analyses and accelerating extensive database searching on nucleotide sequences. Indeed, publicly available databases contain multiple entries of identical or almost identical sequences. Performing statistical analysis on such biased data makes the risk of assigning high significance to non-significant patterns very high. In order to carry out unbiased statistical analysis as well as more efficient database searching it is thus necessary to analyse sequence data that have been purged of redundancy. Given that a unambiguous definition of redundancy is impracticable for biological sequence data, in the present program a quantitative description of redundancy will be used, based on the measure of sequence similarity. A sequence is considered redundant if it shows a degree of similarity and overlapping with a longer sequence in the database greater than a threshold fixed by the user. In this paper we present a new algorithm based on an "approximate string matching' procedure, which is able to determine the overall degree of similarity between each pair of sequences contained in a nucleotide sequence database and to generate automatically nucleotide sequence collections free from redundancies. PMID:8670613

  5. Identifying 2'-O-methylationation sites by integrating nucleotide chemical properties and nucleotide compositions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Feng, Pengmian; Tang, Hua; Ding, Hui; Lin, Hao

    2016-06-01

    2'-O-methylationation is an important post-transcriptional modification and plays important roles in many biological processes. Although experimental technologies have been proposed to detect 2'-O-methylationation sites, they are cost-ineffective. As complements to experimental techniques, computational methods will facilitate the identification of 2'-O-methylationation sites. In the present study, we proposed a support vector machine-based method to identify 2'-O-methylationation sites. In this method, RNA sequences were formulated by nucleotide chemical properties and nucleotide compositions. In the jackknife cross-validation test, the proposed method obtained an accuracy of 95.58% for identifying 2'-O-methylationation sites in the human genome. Moreover, the model was also validated by identifying 2'-O-methylation sites in the Mus musculus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomes, and the obtained accuracies are also satisfactory. These results indicate that the proposed method will become a useful tool for the research on 2'-O-methylation. PMID:27191866

  6. Nucleotides Flanking the Start Codon in hsp70 mRNAs with Very Short 5’-UTRs Greatly Affect Gene Expression in Haloarchaea

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenchao; Yang, Guopeng; He, Yue; Zhang, Shaoming; Chen, Haiyan; Shen, Ping; Chen, Xiangdong; Huang, Yu-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Leaderless translation is prevalent in haloarchaea, with many of these leaderless transcripts possessing short 5’-untranslated regions (UTRs) less than 10 nucleotides. Whereas, little is known about the function of this very short 5’-UTR. Our previous studies determined that just four nucleotides preceded the start codon of hsp70 mRNA in Natrinema sp. J7, with residues -3A and +4G, relative to the A of the ATG start codon, acting as the preferred bases around the start codon of all known haloarchaeal hsp70 genes. Here, we examined the effects of nucleotides flanking the start codon on gene expression. The results revealed that shortening and deletion of the short 5’-UTR enhanced transcript levels; however, it led to significant reductions in overall translational efficiency. AUG was efficiently used as start codons, in both the presence and absence of short 5’-UTRs. GUG also could initiate translation, even though it was so inefficient that it would not be detected without considerably elevated transcript. Nucleotide substitutions at position -4 to +6 were shown to affect gene expression by transcript and/or translational levels. Notably, -3A and A/U nucleotides at position +4~+6 were more optimal for gene expression. Nucleotide transversions of -3A to -3C and +4G to +4T with hsp70 promoter from either Haloferax volcanii DS70 or Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 showed the same effects on gene expression as that of Natrinema sp. J7. Taken together, our results suggest that the nucleotides flanking the start codon in hsp70 mRNAs with very short 5’-UTRs play an important role in haloarchaeal gene expression. PMID:26379277

  7. Thermogram No Substitute for Mammogram

    MedlinePlus

    ... above) produces an infrared image that shows the patterns of heat and blood flow on or near the surface of the ... Thermography produces an infrared image that shows the patterns of heat and blood flow on or near the surface of the ...

  8. RasGRP Ras guanine nucleotide exchange factors in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ksionda, Olga; Limnander, Andre

    2014-01-01

    Summary RasGRP proteins are activators of Ras and other related small GTPases by the virtue of functioning as guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). In vertebrates, four RasGRP family members have been described. RasGRP-1 through −4 share many structural domains but there are also subtle differences between each of the different family members. Whereas SOS RasGEFs are ubiquitously expressed, RasGRP proteins are expressed in distinct patterns, such as in different cells of the hematopoietic system and in the brain. Most studies have concentrated on the role of RasGRP proteins in the development and function of immune cell types because of the predominant RasGRP expression profiles in these cells and the immune phenotypes of mice deficient for Rasgrp genes. However, more recent studies demonstrate that RasGRPs also play an important role in tumorigenesis. Examples are skin- and hematological-cancers but also solid malignancies such as melanoma or prostate cancer. These novel studies bring up many new and unanswered questions related to the molecular mechanism of RasGRP-driven oncogenesis, such as new receptor systems that RasGRP appears to respond to as well as regulatory mechanism for RasGRP expression that appear to be perturbed in these cancers. Here we will review some of the known aspects of RasGRP biology in lymphocytes and will discuss the exciting new notion that RasGRP Ras exchange factors play a role in oncogenesis downstream of various growth factor receptors. PMID:24744772

  9. Resistance issues with new nucleoside/nucleotide backbone options.

    PubMed

    Wainberg, Mark A; Turner, Dan

    2004-09-01

    The nucleoside and nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs/NtRTIs) remain an enduring feature of combination therapy. As NRTI/NtRTI options continue to expand, questions arise about how best to combine these agents to create effective dual NRTI/NtRTI backbones in antiretroviral regimens while avoiding treatment-emergent drug resistance. Clinicians must consider how NRTIs/NtRTIs such as tenofovir DF (TDF), abacavir (ABC), and emtricitabine (FTC), as well as new once-daily and coformulated NRTIs/NtRTIs, interact with older agents when combined in novel regimens and how sequencing the new NRTIs can preserve future treatment options. Resistance data from clinical trials have revealed important information on the patterns, prevalence, and effects of resistance seen among patients experiencing virologic failure. In recent years, the prevalence of some mutations such as M184V and Q151M has remained relatively constant, while the L74V mutation, the 69 insertions, and thymidine analogue mutations have decreased in prevalence. Other mutations such as K65R and Y115F, while still relatively uncommon, are increasing in prevalence. This increase may be due to the use of new treatment combinations that select for these mutations at a higher rate. Clinical trials suggest that new regimens containing TDF or ABC select for K65R and that this mutation is observed more frequently with TDF; in contrast, L74V is observed more frequently in ABC-containing regimens but is not commonly selected by TDF-containing regimens. Several lines of evidence are converging to suggest that the presence of zidovudine may decrease the risk of L74V and K65R in ABC- or TDF-containing regimens. This review summarizes the clinical implications of resistance profiles associated with new NRTI/NtRTI regimens in current use and in advanced clinical studies. PMID:15319668

  10. Use This Test to Spruce Up Your Substitute Teacher Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sendor, Elizabeth

    1982-01-01

    Presents and interprets an 18-question test to determine how well a school's substitute teacher program functions. Topics covered include substitute teacher screening and preparation, lists of substitutes, lesson plans, staff and student evaluation of substitutes, substitutes' salaries, legal considerations, and making substitutes feel needed.…

  11. Biologic and synthetic skin substitutes: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Halim, Ahmad Sukari; Khoo, Teng Lye; Mohd. Yussof, Shah Jumaat

    2010-01-01

    The current trend of burn wound care has shifted to more holistic approach of improvement in the long-term form and function of the healed burn wounds and quality of life. This has demanded the emergence of various skin substitutes in the management of acute burn injury as well as post burn reconstructions. Skin substitutes have important roles in the treatment of deep dermal and full thickness wounds of various aetiologies. At present, there is no ideal substitute in the market. Skin substitutes can be divided into two main classes, namely, biological and synthetic substitutes. The biological skin substitutes have a more intact extracellular matrix structure, while the synthetic skin substitutes can be synthesised on demand and can be modulated for specific purposes. Each class has its advantages and disadvantages. The biological skin substitutes may allow the construction of a more natural new dermis and allow excellent re-epithelialisation characteristics due to the presence of a basement membrane. Synthetic skin substitutes demonstrate the advantages of increase control over scaffold composition. The ultimate goal is to achieve an ideal skin substitute that provides an effective and scar-free wound healing. PMID:21321652

  12. Sensory substitution as an artificially acquired synaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Ward, Jamie; Wright, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    In this review we explore the relationship between synaesthesia and sensory substitution and argue that sensory substitution does indeed show properties of synaesthesia. Both are associated with atypical perceptual experiences elicited by the processing of a qualitatively different stimulus to that which normally gives rise to that experience. In the most common forms of sensory substitution, perceptual processing of an auditory or tactile signal (which has been converted from a visual signal) is experienced as visual-like in addition to retaining auditory/tactile characteristics. We consider different lines of evidence that support, to varying degrees, the assumption that sensory substitution is associated with visual-like experiences. We then go on to analyse the key similarities and differences between sensory substitution and synaesthesia. Lastly, we propose two testable predictions: firstly that, in an expert user of a sensory substitution device, the substituting modality should not be lost. Secondly that stimulation within the substituting modality, but by means other than a sensory substitution device, should still produce sensation in the normally substituted modality. PMID:22885223

  13. DNAzyme-mediated catalysis with only guanosine and cytidine nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Schlosser, Kenny; Li, Yingfu

    2009-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA molecules have the capacity to adopt catalytically active structures known as DNAzymes, although the fundamental limits of this ability have not been determined. Starting with a parent DNAzyme composed of all four types of standard nucleotides, we conducted a search of the surrounding sequence space to identify functional derivatives with catalytic cores composed of only three, and subsequently only two types of nucleotides. We provide the first report of a DNAzyme that contains only guanosine and cytidine deoxyribonucleotides in its catalytic domain, which consists of just 13 nucleotides. This DNAzyme catalyzes the Mn2+-dependent cleavage of an RNA phosphodiester bond ∼5300-fold faster than the corresponding uncatalyzed reaction, but ∼10 000-fold slower than the parent. The demonstration of a catalytic DNA molecule made from a binary nucleotide alphabet broadens our understanding of the fundamental limits of nucleic-acid-mediated catalysis. PMID:19050014

  14. A single-nucleotide exon found in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lei; Liu, Chun-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The presence of introns in gene-coding regions is one of the most mysterious evolutionary inventions in eukaryotic organisms. It has been proposed that, although sequences involved in intron recognition and splicing are mainly located in introns, exonic sequences also contribute to intron splicing. The smallest constitutively spliced exon known so far has 6 nucleotides, and the smallest alternatively spliced exon has 3 nucleotides. Here we report that the Anaphase Promoting Complex subunit 11 (APC11) gene in Arabidopsis thaliana carries a constitutive single-nucleotide exon. In vivo transcription and translation assays performed using APC11-Green Fluorescence Protein (GFP) fusion constructs revealed that intron splicing surrounding the single-nucleotide exon is effective in both Arabidopsis and rice. This discovery warrants attention to genome annotations in the future. PMID:26657562

  15. A single-nucleotide exon found in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lei; Liu, Chun-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The presence of introns in gene-coding regions is one of the most mysterious evolutionary inventions in eukaryotic organisms. It has been proposed that, although sequences involved in intron recognition and splicing are mainly located in introns, exonic sequences also contribute to intron splicing. The smallest constitutively spliced exon known so far has 6 nucleotides, and the smallest alternatively spliced exon has 3 nucleotides. Here we report that the Anaphase Promoting Complex subunit 11 (APC11) gene in Arabidopsis thaliana carries a constitutive single-nucleotide exon. In vivo transcription and translation assays performed using APC11-Green Fluorescence Protein (GFP) fusion constructs revealed that intron splicing surrounding the single-nucleotide exon is effective in both Arabidopsis and rice. This discovery warrants attention to genome annotations in the future. PMID:26657562

  16. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms for Pig Identification and Parentage Exclusion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms have become an important type of marker for commercial diagnostic and parentage genotyping applications as automated genotyping systems have been developed that yield accurate genotypes. Unfortunately, a large number of highly informative public SNP markers tested in ...

  17. Supramolecular gels made from nucleobase, nucleoside and nucleotide analogs.

    PubMed

    Peters, Gretchen Marie; Davis, Jeffery T

    2016-06-01

    Supramolecular or molecular gels are attractive for various applications, including diagnostics, tissue scaffolding and targeted drug release. Gelators derived from natural products are of particular interest for biomedical purposes, as they are generally biocompatible and stimuli-responsive. The building blocks of nucleic acids (i.e. nucleobases, nucleosides, and nucleotides) are desirable candidates for supramolecular gelation as they readily engage in reversible, noncovalent interactions. In this review, we describe a number of organo- and hydrogels formed through the assembly of nucleosides, nucleotides, and their derivatives. While natural nucleosides and nucleotides generally require derivatization to induce gelation, guanosine and its corresponding nucleotides are well known gelators. This unique gelating ability is due to propensity of the guanine nucleobase to self-associate into stable higher-order assemblies, such as G-ribbons, G4-quartets, and G-quadruplexes. PMID:27146863

  18. Structure/Reactivity Relationships in the Benzo[c]phenanthrene Skeleton: Stable Ion and Electrophilic Substitution (Nitration, Bromination) Study of Substituted Analogs; Novel Carbocations and Substituted Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Brulé, Cédric; Laali, Kenneth K.; Okazaki, Takao; Lakshman, Mahesh K.

    2008-01-01

    A series of novel carbocations were generated by low temperature protonation of substituted benzo[c]phenanthrenes B[c]Phs and their charge delocalization pathways were elucidated by NMR based on the magnitude of Δδ13C values. It has been shown that the protonation regioselectivity is strongly controlled by methoxy and hydroxyl substituents, whose directive effects override methyl substitution effects. Regiocontrol by –OMe and –OH substituents, and its stronger influence relative to methyl groups, was also observed in the nitration and bromination reactions. Charge distribution modes in the regioisomeric protonated carbocations via parent B[c]Ph as well as in the benzylic carbocation formed via fjord-region epoxide ring opening were deduced by GIAO-DFT, and from the NPA-derived changes in charges over CHs. These patterns were compared with those derived from NMR experiments in the substituted derivatives. NMR-based charge delocalization mapping provided insight into structure/activity relationships in the methylated and fluorinated B[c]Phs. Regioselectivities observed in the nitration and bromination reactions in representative cases are the same as those via protonations. Among a group of novel nitro and bromo derivatives synthesized in this study are examples where nitro group is introduced into the fjord-region, for which X-ray structure could be obtained in one case. PMID:17394355

  19. Reducing nontemplated 3' nucleotide addition to polynucleotide transcripts

    DOEpatents

    Kao, C. Cheng

    2000-01-01

    Non-template 3' nucleotide addition to a transcript is reduced by transcribing a transcript from a template comprising an ultimate and/or penultimate 5' ribose having a C'2 substituent such as methoxy, which reduces non-template 3' nucleotide addition to the transcript. The methods are shown to be applicable to a wide variety of polymerases, including Taq, T7 RNA polymerase, etc.

  20. An introduction to recurrent nucleotide interactions in RNA.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Blake A; Roy, Poorna; Leontis, Neocles B

    2015-01-01

    RNA secondary structure diagrams familiar to molecular biologists summarize at a glance the folding of RNA chains to form Watson–Crick paired double helices. However, they can be misleading: First of all, they imply that the nucleotides in loops and linker segments, which can amount to 35% to 50% of a structured RNA, do not significantly interact with other nucleotides. Secondly, they give the impression that RNA molecules are loosely organized in three-dimensional (3D) space. In fact, structured RNAs are compactly folded as a result of numerous long-range, sequence-specific interactions, many of which involve loop or linker nucleotides. Here, we provide an introduction for students and researchers of RNA on the types, prevalence, and sequence variations of inter-nucleotide interactions that structure and stabilize RNA 3D motifs and architectures, using Escherichia coli (E. coli) 16S ribosomal RNA as a concrete example. The picture that emerges is that almost all nucleotides in structured RNA molecules, including those in nominally single-stranded loop or linker regions, form specific interactions that stabilize functional structures or mediate interactions with other molecules. The small number of noninteracting, ‘looped-out’ nucleotides make it possible for the RNA chain to form sharp turns. Base-pairing is the most specific interaction in RNA as it involves edge-to-edge hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) of the bases. Non-Watson–Crick base pairs are a significant fraction (30% or more) of base pairs in structured RNAs. PMID:25664365

  1. Electron migration in 5-bromouracil-substituted DNA and oligonucleotides in irradiated aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Zimbrick, J.D.; Beach, C.M.; Fuciarelli, A.G.; Sisk, E.C.

    1992-06-01

    Results of work by other investigators support the hypothesis that negative charge can migrate in DNA. Charge transfer between nucleotides and electron migration in solid state DNA has been demonstrated, with migration distances as great as 110 bases. Here we report a series of studies on aqueous solutions of DNA and oligonucleotides in which the radiolysis of 5-bromouracil (BU) substituted for thymine is used as a molecular probe to detect and measure the extent of electron migration. In studies using oligonucleotides, BU was substituted for thymine at specific locations in defined base sequences using automated phosphoramidite synthesis techniques. Using these single-stranded oligonucleotides with BU located at the 5 in. end of the sequence, electrons do not appear to migrate more than one base, if any.

  2. Increased Thermal Stability of Chromatin Containing 5-Bromodeoxyuridine-Substituted DNA

    PubMed Central

    David, John; Gordon, Joel S.; Rutter, William J.

    1974-01-01

    The replacement of thymidine by 5-bromodeoxyuridine in DNA leads to a greatly enhanced stability of chromatin from hepatoma tissue culture or embryonic rat pancreas, as measured by thermal chromatography on hydroxylapatite. The increased stability is directly correlated with the degree of bromodeoxyuridine substitution. On the other hand, the incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine into DNA results in a modest stabilization of purified DNA. Substitution of nucleotide also alters slightly the hyperchromicity profile generated during the thermal denaturation of purified DNA and chromatin. The observed changes can best be explained by an altered interaction between the bromodeoxyuridine-DNA and other chromatin components, presumably proteins. These results suggests that the selective effects of bromodeoxyuridine on cytodifferentiation may be due to an increased affinity of regulatory proteins for bromodeoxyuridine-DNA. PMID:4368811

  3. Trends in substitution models of molecular evolution

    PubMed Central

    Arenas, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Substitution models of evolution describe the process of genetic variation through fixed mutations and constitute the basis of the evolutionary analysis at the molecular level. Almost 40 years after the development of first substitution models, highly sophisticated, and data-specific substitution models continue emerging with the aim of better mimicking real evolutionary processes. Here I describe current trends in substitution models of DNA, codon and amino acid sequence evolution, including advantages and pitfalls of the most popular models. The perspective concludes that despite the large number of currently available substitution models, further research is required for more realistic modeling, especially for DNA coding and amino acid data. Additionally, the development of more accurate complex models should be coupled with new implementations and improvements of methods and frameworks for substitution model selection and downstream evolutionary analysis. PMID:26579193

  4. Formation of substituted oxa- and azarhodacyclobutanes.

    PubMed

    Dauth, Alexander; Rigling, Carla; Tsoung, Jennifer; Love, Jennifer A

    2013-12-01

    The preparation of substituted oxa- and azarhodacyclobutanes is reported. After exchange of ethylene with a variety of unsymmetrically and symmetrically substituted alkenes, the corresponding rhodium-olefin complexes were oxidized with H2O2 and PhINTs (Ts=p-toluenesulfonyl) to yield the substituted oxa- and azarhodacyclobutanes, respectively. Oxarhodacyclobutanes could be prepared with excellent selectivity for incorporation of the oxygen atom on the more substituted carbon atom of the alkene. At the same time, azarhodacyclobutanes showed good-to-excellent selectivity for heteroatom incorporation on the less substituted carbon. Furthermore, it was shown that steric modifications of the ancillary ligand have a significant influence on the selectivity of Rh-olefin complex formation as well as formation of the substituted azametallacycles. PMID:24307371

  5. Trends in substitution models of molecular evolution.

    PubMed

    Arenas, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Substitution models of evolution describe the process of genetic variation through fixed mutations and constitute the basis of the evolutionary analysis at the molecular level. Almost 40 years after the development of first substitution models, highly sophisticated, and data-specific substitution models continue emerging with the aim of better mimicking real evolutionary processes. Here I describe current trends in substitution models of DNA, codon and amino acid sequence evolution, including advantages and pitfalls of the most popular models. The perspective concludes that despite the large number of currently available substitution models, further research is required for more realistic modeling, especially for DNA coding and amino acid data. Additionally, the development of more accurate complex models should be coupled with new implementations and improvements of methods and frameworks for substitution model selection and downstream evolutionary analysis. PMID:26579193

  6. Distinct patterns of somatic alterations in a lymphoblastoid and a tumor genome derived from the same individual

    PubMed Central

    Galante, Pedro A. F.; Parmigiani, Raphael B.; Zhao, Qi; Caballero, Otávia L.; de Souza, Jorge E.; Navarro, Fábio C. P.; Gerber, Alexandra L.; Nicolás, Marisa F.; Salim, Anna Christina M.; Silva, Ana Paula M.; Edsall, Lee; Devalle, Sylvie; Almeida, Luiz G.; Ye, Zhen; Kuan, Samantha; Pinheiro, Daniel G.; Tojal, Israel; Pedigoni, Renato G.; de Sousa, Rodrigo G. M. A.; Oliveira, Thiago Y. K.; de Paula, Marcelo G.; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; Kirkness, Ewen F.; Levy, Samuel; da Silva, Wilson A.; Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza R.; Ren, Bing; Zago, Marco Antonio; Strausberg, Robert L.; Simpson, Andrew J. G.; de Souza, Sandro J.; Camargo, Anamaria A.

    2011-01-01

    Although patterns of somatic alterations have been reported for tumor genomes, little is known on how they compare with alterations present in non-tumor genomes. A comparison of the two would be crucial to better characterize the genetic alterations driving tumorigenesis. We sequenced the genomes of a lymphoblastoid (HCC1954BL) and a breast tumor (HCC1954) cell line derived from the same patient and compared the somatic alterations present in both. The lymphoblastoid genome presents a comparable number and similar spectrum of nucleotide substitutions to that found in the tumor genome. However, a significant difference in the ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions was observed between both genomes (P = 0.031). Protein–protein interaction analysis revealed that mutations in the tumor genome preferentially affect hub-genes (P = 0.0017) and are co-selected to present synergistic functions (P < 0.0001). KEGG analysis showed that in the tumor genome most mutated genes were organized into signaling pathways related to tumorigenesis. No such organization or synergy was observed in the lymphoblastoid genome. Our results indicate that endogenous mutagens and replication errors can generate the overall number of mutations required to drive tumorigenesis and that it is the combination rather than the frequency of mutations that is crucial to complete tumorigenic transformation. PMID:21493686

  7. Dominant role of nucleotide substitution in the diversification of serotype 3 pneumococci over decades and during a single infection.

    PubMed

    Croucher, Nicholas J; Mitchell, Andrea M; Gould, Katherine A; Inverarity, Donald; Barquist, Lars; Feltwell, Theresa; Fookes, Maria C; Harris, Simon R; Dordel, Janina; Salter, Susannah J; Browall, Sarah; Zemlickova, Helena; Parkhill, Julian; Normark, Staffan; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Hinds, Jason; Mitchell, Tim J; Bentley, Stephen D

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae of serotype 3 possess a mucoid capsule and cause disease associated with high mortality rates relative to other pneumococci. Phylogenetic analysis of a complete reference genome and 81 draft sequences from clonal complex 180, the predominant serotype 3 clone in much of the world, found most sampled isolates belonged to a clade affected by few diversifying recombinations. However, other isolates indicate significant genetic variation has accumulated over the clonal complex's entire history. Two closely related genomes, one from the blood and another from the cerebrospinal fluid, were obtained from a patient with meningitis. The pair differed in their behaviour in a mouse model of disease and in their susceptibility to antimicrobials, with at least some of these changes attributable to a mutation that up-regulated the patAB efflux pump. This indicates clinically important phenotypic variation can accumulate rapidly through small alterations to the genotype. PMID:24130509

  8. Dominant Role of Nucleotide Substitution in the Diversification of Serotype 3 Pneumococci over Decades and during a Single Infection

    PubMed Central

    Croucher, Nicholas J.; Mitchell, Andrea M.; Gould, Katherine A.; Inverarity, Donald; Barquist, Lars; Feltwell, Theresa; Fookes, Maria C.; Harris, Simon R.; Dordel, Janina; Salter, Susannah J.; Browall, Sarah; Zemlickova, Helena; Parkhill, Julian; Normark, Staffan; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Hinds, Jason; Mitchell, Tim J.; Bentley, Stephen D.

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae of serotype 3 possess a mucoid capsule and cause disease associated with high mortality rates relative to other pneumococci. Phylogenetic analysis of a complete reference genome and 81 draft sequences from clonal complex 180, the predominant serotype 3 clone in much of the world, found most sampled isolates belonged to a clade affected by few diversifying recombinations. However, other isolates indicate significant genetic variation has accumulated over the clonal complex's entire history. Two closely related genomes, one from the blood and another from the cerebrospinal fluid, were obtained from a patient with meningitis. The pair differed in their behaviour in a mouse model of disease and in their susceptibility to antimicrobials, with at least some of these changes attributable to a mutation that up-regulated the patAB efflux pump. This indicates clinically important phenotypic variation can accumulate rapidly through small alterations to the genotype. PMID:24130509

  9. Presence of nucleotide substitutions in the ABO promoter in individuals with phenotypes A3 and B3.

    PubMed

    Isa, K; Yamamuro, Y; Ogasawara, K; Yabe, R; Ogiyama, Y; Ito, S; Takahashi, Y; Kominato, Y; Sano, R; Uchikawa, M

    2016-04-01

    Recently, the involvement of mutation and deletion of transcription regulatory elements in the Bm , Am , A3 and B3 phenotypes has been reported. In the present study, we carried out genetic analysis of individuals with A3 and B3 using peptide nucleic acid-clamping PCR to exclude amplification of O alleles. Two single-point mutations, -76G>C and -68G>T, were found in the ABO promoter on the A-allele in three A3 individuals and on the B allele in a B3 individual, respectively. Transient transfection of luciferase reporter plasmids carrying the same mutations into K562 cells revealed decreased luciferase activity in comparison with that carrying the wild-type promoter. These observations suggest that the mutations downregulate the promoter activity, leading to reduction in A- or B-antigen expression on red blood cells in individuals with the A3 and B3 phenotypes. PMID:26529276

  10. Audio-lingual Teaching and the Pattern Drill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, Herschel J.

    1968-01-01

    Pattern practice, as a functional part of the audiolingual and grammar translation methods of language instruction, is described. Characteristics and limitations of repetition, substitution, transformation, and translation drills are outlined. (AF)

  11. Auditory Sensory Substitution is Intuitive and Automatic with Texture Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Stiles, Noelle R. B.; Shimojo, Shinsuke

    2015-01-01

    Millions of people are blind worldwide. Sensory substitution (SS) devices (e.g., vOICe) can assist the blind by encoding a video stream into a sound pattern, recruiting visual brain areas for auditory analysis via crossmodal interactions and plasticity. SS devices often require extensive training to attain limited functionality. In contrast to conventional attention-intensive SS training that starts with visual primitives (e.g., geometrical shapes), we argue that sensory substitution can be engaged efficiently by using stimuli (such as textures) associated with intrinsic crossmodal mappings. Crossmodal mappings link images with sounds and tactile patterns. We show that intuitive SS sounds can be matched to the correct images by naive sighted participants just as well as by intensively-trained participants. This result indicates that existing crossmodal interactions and amodal sensory cortical processing may be as important in the interpretation of patterns by SS as crossmodal plasticity (e.g., the strengthening of existing connections or the formation of new ones), especially at the earlier stages of SS usage. An SS training procedure based on crossmodal mappings could both considerably improve participant performance and shorten training times, thereby enabling SS devices to significantly expand blind capabilities. PMID:26490260

  12. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of Toll-like receptors and susceptibility to infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Skevaki, C; Pararas, M; Kostelidou, K; Tsakris, A; Routsias, J G

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are the best-studied family of pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs), whose task is to rapidly recognize evolutionarily conserved structures on the invading microorganisms. Through binding to these patterns, TLRs trigger a number of proinflammatory and anti-microbial responses, playing a key role in the first line of defence against the pathogens also promoting adaptive immunity responses. Growing amounts of data suggest that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on the various human TLR proteins are associated with altered susceptibility to infection. This review summarizes the role of TLRs in innate immunity, their ligands and signalling and focuses on the TLR SNPs which have been linked to infectious disease susceptibility. PMID:25560985

  13. Uncovering the polymerase-induced cytotoxicity of an oxidized nucleotide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freudenthal, Bret D.; Beard, William A.; Perera, Lalith; Shock, David D.; Kim, Taejin; Schlick, Tamar; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress promotes genomic instability and human diseases. A common oxidized nucleoside is 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine, which is found both in DNA (8-oxo-G) and as a free nucleotide (8-oxo-dGTP). Nucleotide pools are especially vulnerable to oxidative damage. Therefore cells encode an enzyme (MutT/MTH1) that removes free oxidized nucleotides. This cleansing function is required for cancer cell survival and to modulate Escherichia coli antibiotic sensitivity in a DNA polymerase (pol)-dependent manner. How polymerases discriminate between damaged and non-damaged nucleotides is not well understood. This analysis is essential given the role of oxidized nucleotides in mutagenesis, cancer therapeutics, and bacterial antibiotics. Even with cellular sanitizing activities, nucleotide pools contain enough 8-oxo-dGTP to promote mutagenesis. This arises from the dual coding potential where 8-oxo-dGTP(anti) base pairs with cytosine and 8-oxo-dGTP(syn) uses its Hoogsteen edge to base pair with adenine. Here we use time-lapse crystallography to follow 8-oxo-dGTP insertion opposite adenine or cytosine with human pol β, to reveal that insertion is accommodated in either the syn- or anti-conformation, respectively. For 8-oxo-dGTP(anti) insertion, a novel divalent metal relieves repulsive interactions between the adducted guanine base and the triphosphate of the oxidized nucleotide. With either templating base, hydrogen-bonding interactions between the bases are lost as the enzyme reopens after catalysis, leading to a cytotoxic nicked DNA repair intermediate. Combining structural snapshots with kinetic and computational analysis reveals how 8-oxo-dGTP uses charge modulation during insertion that can lead to a blocked DNA repair intermediate.

  14. Multiple substitutions in the von Willebrand factor gene that mimic the pseudogene sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Eikenboom, J.C.; Brieet, E.; Reitsma, P.H.; Vink, T.; Sixma, J.J.

    1994-03-15

    The authors have analyzed a type IIB and a type I von Willebrand disease family for the presence of mutations in the region coding for the glycoprotein Ib binding domain of the von Willebrand factor. Since this sequence is also present in the highly homologous von Willebrand factor pseudogene, the authors have studied genomic DNA as well as cDNA, which was produced from RNA isolated from endothelial cells or platelets. In both families, they have detected multiple consecutive nucleotide substitutions in the 5{prime} end of exon 28 that result in a sequence identical to the von Willebrand factor pseudogene. These substitutions were also found in cDNA, which proves that they are present in the active gene. The occurrence of multiple adjacent substitutions that exactly reflect a part of the sequence of the von Willebrand factor pseudogene is difficult to reconcile with sequential single mutational events. They therefore hypothesize that each of these multiple substitutions arose from one recombinational event between gene and pseudogene. 34 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. The Construction and Use of Log-Odds Substitution Scores for Multiple Sequence Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Altschul, Stephen F.; Wootton, John C.; Zaslavsky, Elena; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2010-01-01

    Most pairwise and multiple sequence alignment programs seek alignments with optimal scores. Central to defining such scores is selecting a set of substitution scores for aligned amino acids or nucleotides. For local pairwise alignment, substitution scores are implicitly of log-odds form. We now extend the log-odds formalism to multiple alignments, using Bayesian methods to construct “BILD” (“Bayesian Integral Log-odds”) substitution scores from prior distributions describing columns of related letters. This approach has been used previously only to define scores for aligning individual sequences to sequence profiles, but it has much broader applicability. We describe how to calculate BILD scores efficiently, and illustrate their uses in Gibbs sampling optimization procedures, gapped alignment, and the construction of hidden Markov model profiles. BILD scores enable automated selection of optimal motif and domain model widths, and can inform the decision of whether to include a sequence in a multiple alignment, and the selection of insertion and deletion locations. Other applications include the classification of related sequences into subfamilies, and the definition of profile-profile alignment scores. Although a fully realized multiple alignment program must rely upon more than substitution scores, many existing multiple alignment programs can be modified to employ BILD scores. We illustrate how simple BILD score based strategies can enhance the recognition of DNA binding domains, including the Api-AP2 domain in Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum. PMID:20657661

  16. 40 CFR 721.10497 - Substituted alkyl ester, hydrolysis products with silica and substituted silane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... products with silica and substituted silane (generic). 721.10497 Section 721.10497 Protection of... ester, hydrolysis products with silica and substituted silane (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... alkyl ester, hydrolysis products with silica and substituted silane (PMNs P-06-276 and P-06-279)...

  17. 40 CFR 721.2577 - Copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl azo substituted phenyl) disulfonaphthyl azo, amine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Copper complex of (substituted... Copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl azo substituted phenyl) disulfonaphthyl azo, amine salt... significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10497 - Substituted alkyl ester, hydrolysis products with silica and substituted silane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... products with silica and substituted silane (generic). 721.10497 Section 721.10497 Protection of... ester, hydrolysis products with silica and substituted silane (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... alkyl ester, hydrolysis products with silica and substituted silane (PMNs P-06-276 and P-06-279)...

  19. 40 CFR Appendix D to Subpart G of... - Substitutes Subject to Use Restrictions and Unacceptable Substitutes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Comments Electronics Cleaning w/CFC-113 and MCF HFC-4310mee Acceptable Subject to a 200 ppm time-weighted... Electronics Cleaning w/CFC-113 and MCF Perfluoropolyethers Perfluoropolyethers are acceptable substitutes for... that for PFCs. Unacceptable Substitutes End-use Substitute Decision Comments Electronics Cleaning...

  20. 40 CFR 721.5340 - Substituted benzothiazole-azo-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic). 721.5340 Section 721.5340 Protection of Environment...-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject...-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (PMN P-99-897) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  1. 40 CFR 721.5340 - Substituted benzothiazole-azo-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic). 721.5340 Section 721.5340 Protection of Environment...-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject...-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (PMN P-99-897) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  2. 40 CFR 721.5340 - Substituted benzothiazole-azo-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic). 721.5340 Section 721.5340 Protection of Environment...-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject...-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (PMN P-99-897) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  3. 40 CFR 721.5340 - Substituted benzothiazole-azo-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic). 721.5340 Section 721.5340 Protection of Environment...-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject...-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (PMN P-99-897) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  4. 40 CFR 721.5340 - Substituted benzothiazole-azo-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic). 721.5340 Section 721.5340 Protection of Environment...-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject...-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (PMN P-99-897) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  5. A testis-specific gene within a widely expressed gene: Contrasting evolutionary patterns of two differentially expressed mammalian proteins encoded by a single gene, CAMK4.

    PubMed

    Padhi, Abinash; Ma, Li

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the patterns of genetic variations within fertility-related genes and the evolutionary forces that shape such variations is crucial in predicting the fitness landscapes of subsequent generations. This study reports distinct evolutionary features of two differentially expressed mammalian proteins [CaMKIV (Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV) and CaS (calspermin)] that are encoded by a single gene, CAMK4. The multifunctional CaMKIV, which is expressed in multiple tissues including testis and ovary, is evolving at a relatively low rate (0.46-0.64 × 10(-9) nucleotide substitutions/site/year), whereas the testis-specific CaS gene, which is predominantly expressed in post-meiotic cells, evolves at least three to four times faster (1.48-1.98 × 10(-9) substitutions/site/year). Concomitantly, maximum-likelihood-based selection analyses revealed that the ubiquitously expressed CaMKIV is constrained by intense purifying selection and, therefore, remained functionally highly conserved throughout the mammalian evolution, whereas the testis-specific CaS gene is under strong positive selection. The substitution rates of different mammalian lineages within both genes are positively correlated with GC content, indicating the possible influence of GC-biased gene conversion on the estimated substitution rates. The observation of such unusually high GC content of the CaS gene (≈74%), particularly in the lineage that comprises the bovine species, suggests the possible role of GC-biased gene conversion in the evolution of CaS that mimics positive selection. PMID:26388303

  6. Vitamin B-12 deficiency induces anomalies of base substitution and methylation in the DNA of rat colonic epithelium.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sang-Woon; Friso, Simonetta; Ghandour, Haifa; Bagley, Pamela J; Selhub, Jacob; Mason, Joel B

    2004-04-01

    Derangements of one-carbon metabolism can directly affect the integrity of the genome by producing inappropriate uracil insertion into DNA and by altering patterns of DNA methylation. Vitamin B-12, a one-carbon nutrient, serves as a cofactor in the synthesis of precursors of biological methylation and in nucleotide synthesis. We therefore examined whether vitamin B-12 deficiency can induce these molecular anomalies in the colonic mucosa of rats. Weanling male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 30) were divided into 2 groups and fed either a vitamin B-12-deficient diet or a similar diet containing adequate amounts of the vitamin. Rats from each group were killed at 6 and 10 wk. Uracil misincorporation into DNA was measured by GC/MS and genomic DNA methylation was measured by LC/MS. Plasma vitamin B-12 concentrations in deficient rats were below detectable limits at 6 and 10 wk; in control rats, concentrations were 0.46 +/- 0.07 and 0.42 +/- 0.10 nmol/L at those times. Although the colon total folate concentration did not differ between the groups, the proportion that was methylfolate was marginally greater in the deficient rats at 10 wk (P = 0.05) compared with control, consistent with the "methylfolate trap" that develops during vitamin B-12 deficiency. After 10 wk, the colonic DNA of the deficient rats displayed a 35% decrease in genomic methylation and a 105% increase in uracil incorporation (P < 0.05). This vitamin B-12-deficient diet, which was of insufficient severity to cause anemia or illness, created aberrations in both base substitution and methylation of colonic DNA, which might increase susceptibility to carcinogenesis. PMID:15051821

  7. Targeting Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterase in the Heart: Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Clint L.

    2010-01-01

    The second messengers, cAMP and cGMP, regulate a number of physiological processes in the myocardium, from acute contraction/relaxation to chronic gene expression and cardiac structural remodeling. Emerging evidence suggests that multiple spatiotemporally distinct pools of cyclic nucleotides can discriminate specific cellular functions from a given cyclic nucleotide-mediated signal. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs), by hydrolyzing intracellular cyclic AMP and/or cyclic GMP, control the amplitude, duration, and compartmentation of cyclic nucleotide signaling. To date, more than 60 different isoforms have been described and grouped into 11 broad families (PDE1–PDE11) based on differences in their structure, kinetic and regulatory properties, as well as sensitivity to chemical inhibitors. In the heart, PDE isozymes from at least six families have been investigated. Studies using selective PDE inhibitors and/or genetically manipulated animals have demonstrated that individual PDE isozymes play distinct roles in the heart by regulating unique cyclic nucleotide signaling microdomains. Alterations of PDE activity and/or expression have also been observed in various cardiac disease models, which may contribute to disease progression. Several family-selective PDE inhibitors have been used clinically or pre-clinically for the treatment of cardiac or vascular-related diseases. In this review, we will highlight both recent advances and discrepancies relevant to cardiovascular PDE expression, pathophysiological function, and regulation. In particular, we will emphasize how these properties influence current and future development of PDE inhibitors for the treatment of pathological cardiac remodeling and dysfunction. PMID:20632220

  8. Moss Phylogeny Reconstruction Using Nucleotide Pangenome of Complete Mitogenome Sequences.

    PubMed

    Goryunov, D V; Nagaev, B E; Nikolaev, M Yu; Alexeevski, A V; Troitsky, A V

    2015-11-01

    Stability of composition and sequence of genes was shown earlier in 13 mitochondrial genomes of mosses (Rensing, S. A., et al. (2008) Science, 319, 64-69). It is of interest to study the evolution of mitochondrial genomes not only at the gene level, but also on the level of nucleotide sequences. To do this, we have constructed a "nucleotide pangenome" for mitochondrial genomes of 24 moss species. The nucleotide pangenome is a set of aligned nucleotide sequences of orthologous genome fragments covering the totality of all genomes. The nucleotide pangenome was constructed using specially developed new software, NPG-explorer (NPGe). The stable part of the mitochondrial genome (232 stable blocks) is shown to be, on average, 45% of its length. In the joint alignment of stable blocks, 82% of positions are conserved. The phylogenetic tree constructed with the NPGe program is in good correlation with other phylogenetic reconstructions. With the NPGe program, 30 blocks have been identified with repeats no shorter than 50 bp. The maximal length of a block with repeats is 140 bp. Duplications in the mitochondrial genomes of mosses are rare. On average, the genome contains about 500 bp in large duplications. The total length of insertions and deletions was determined in each genome. The losses and gains of DNA regions are rather active in mitochondrial genomes of mosses, and such rearrangements presumably can be used as additional markers in the reconstruction of phylogeny. PMID:26615445

  9. Substitutes for Leadership: An Empirical Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Jon P.; Dorfman, Peter W.

    The leadership substitutes hypothesis has been used to explain the occasional successes and frequent failures of leadership predictions. Three hypotheses were formulated to test the viability of the leadership substitutes concepts. Questionnaires were administered to hospital managers (N=63) and engineers (N=71). Instrumental and supportive leader…

  10. Carboranylmethylene-substituted phosphazenes and polymers thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allcock, H. R.; Scopelianos, A. G. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Carboranylmethylene-substituted cyclophosphazenes are described which can be thermally polymerized into carboranylmethylene-substituted phosphazene polymers. The polymers are useful as thermally stable coatings. Also, due to the characteristics of these polymers in acting as a ligand for transition metals, metalocarboranylmethylene phosphazene polymers are described which can act as immobilized catalyst systems, and are electrically conductive and superconductive.

  11. 40 CFR 721.323 - Substituted acrylamide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.323 Substituted acrylamide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as substituted acrylamide (PMN P-90-1687)...

  12. 40 CFR 721.323 - Substituted acrylamide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.323 Substituted acrylamide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as substituted acrylamide (PMN P-90-1687)...

  13. Substitute Teachers: Making Lost Days Count

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    True, Charlene; Butler, Kyle; Sefton, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    As K-12 teachers and administrators grow increasingly concerned with issues of accountability, research-based methods, and intervention strategies, little discussion exists on the impact of substitute teachers in the classroom. In the rush to analyze test scores, are the days covered by substitute teachers even considered? Though districts are…

  14. Substitute Your Way to a Real Job

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    For some, substitute teaching is a career choice. However, for the majority of new teachers, it is often a necessary gateway to landing a first job. Either way, it is a great way to sharpen one's skills. This article presents tips from principals, teachers, and human resource directors to make the most of the substitute teaching experience…

  15. 25 CFR 522.9 - Substitute approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Substitute approval. 522.9 Section 522.9 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR APPROVAL OF CLASS II AND CLASS III ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS SUBMISSION OF GAMING ORDINANCE OR RESOLUTION § 522.9 Substitute approval. If the Chairman fails...

  16. Educators Take Another Look at Substitutes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zubrzycki, Jaclyn

    2012-01-01

    The mythology surrounding the substitute teacher is not a pretty one: Paper airplanes, lost learning, bullying. But as schools collect more information about teacher absenteeism and its consequences, districts and schools are exploring ways to professionalize substitute teaching--or experiment with alternative ways of coping with teacher absences.…

  17. Dimensions of Needs in Secondary Substitute Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dilanian, Seta Margo

    Following a brief review of research and literature regarding the needs of secondary school substitute teachers, suggestions for helping these teachers do an effective, professional job are offered. Research indicates that understanding of the subject matter along with understanding of various learning approaches enhances the substitute teacher's…

  18. 24 CFR 235.206 - Substitute mortgagors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Substitute mortgagors. 235.206... MORTGAGE INSURANCE AND ASSISTANCE PAYMENTS FOR HOME OWNERSHIP AND PROJECT REHABILITATION Contract Rights and Obligations-Homes for Lower Income Families § 235.206 Substitute mortgagors. (a) Selling...

  19. 40 CFR 721.323 - Substituted acrylamide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted acrylamide. 721.323 Section 721.323 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.323 Substituted acrylamide....

  20. Savvy Substitutions. Tricks of the Trade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guhin, Paula

    2000-01-01

    Provides ideas for using throwaways and substitutions, such as homemade objects and everyday items, as art supplies and other resources in the art classroom. Throwaways and substitutions are a way to be environmentally caring, to extend meager supplies, and to supplement art budgets. (CMK)

  1. Brillouin function characteristics for La-Co substituted barium hexaferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chuanjian; Yu, Zhong; Yang, Yan; Sun, Ke; Guo, Rongdi; Jiang, Xiaona; Lan, Zhongwen

    2015-09-01

    La-Co substituted barium hexaferrites with the chemical formula of Ba1-xLaxFe12-xCoxO19 (x = 0.0, 0.1, 0.3, and 0.5), prepared by a conventional ceramic method, were systematically investigated by Raman spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction patterns, and vibrating sample magnetometer. The result manifests that all the compounds are crystallized in magnetoplumbite hexagonal structure. Trivalent cobalt ions prevailingly occupy the 2a, 4f1, and 12k sites. According to Néel model of collinear-spin ferrimagnetism, the molecular-field coefficients ωbf2, ωkf1, ωaf1, ωkf2, and ωbk of La-Co substituted barium hexaferrites have been calculated using the nonlinear fitting method, and the magnetic moment of five sublattices (2a, 2b, 4f1, 4f2, and 12k) versus temperature T has been also investigated. The fitting results are coincided well with the experimental data. Moreover, with the increase of La-Co substitution amount x, the molecular-field coefficients ωbf2 and ωaf1 decrease constantly, while the molecular-field coefficients ωkf1, ωkf2, and ωbk show a slight change.

  2. Canine distemper virus neutralization activity is low in human serum and it is sensitive to an amino acid substitution in the hemagglutinin protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinsheng; Wallace, Olivia L; Domi, Arban; Wright, Kevin J; Driscoll, Jonathan; Anzala, Omu; Sanders, Eduard J; Kamali, Anatoli; Karita, Etienne; Allen, Susan; Fast, Pat; Gilmour, Jill; Price, Matt A; Parks, Christopher L

    2015-08-01

    Serum was analyzed from 146 healthy adult volunteers in eastern Africa to evaluate measles virus (MV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) neutralizing antibody (nAb) prevalence and potency. MV plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) results indicated that all sera were positive for MV nAbs. Furthermore, the 50% neutralizing dose (ND50) for the majority of sera corresponded to antibody titers induced by MV vaccination. CDV nAbs titers were low and generally were detected in sera with high MV nAb titers. A mutant CDV was generated that was less sensitive to neutralization by human serum. The mutant virus genome had 10 nucleotide substitutions, which coded for single amino acid substitutions in the fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (H) glycoproteins and two substitutions in the large polymerase (L) protein. The H substitution occurred in a conserved region involved in receptor interactions among morbilliviruses, implying that this region is a target for cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies. PMID:25880113

  3. Body-scaled affordances in sensory substitution.

    PubMed

    Travieso, David; Gómez-Jordana, Luis; Díaz, Alex; Lobo, Lorena; Jacobs, David M

    2015-12-15

    The research field on sensory substitution devices has strong implications for theoretical work on perceptual consciousness. One of these implications concerns the extent to which the devices allow distal attribution. The present study applies a classic empirical approach on the perception of affordances to the field of sensory substitution. The reported experiment considers the perception of the stair-climbing affordance. Participants judged the climbability of steps apprehended through a vibrotactile sensory substitution device. If measured with standard metric units, climbability judgments of tall and short participants differed, but if measured in units of leg length, judgments did not differ. These results are similar to paradigmatic results in regular visual perception. We conclude that our sensory substitution device allows the perception of affordances. More generally, we argue that the theory of affordances may enrich theoretical debates concerning sensory substitution to a larger extent than has hitherto been the case. PMID:26587958

  4. Characterization of frequencies and distribution of single nucleotide insertions/deletions in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ene-Choo; Li, Haixia

    2006-07-19

    Most of the studies on single nucleotide variations are on substitutions rather than insertions/deletions. In this study, we examined the distribution and characteristics of single nucleotide insertions/deletions (SNindels), using data available from dbSNP for all the human chromosomes. There are almost 300,000 SNindels in the database, of which only 0.8% are validated. They occur at the frequency of 0.887 per 10 kb on average for the whole genome, or approximately 1 for every 11,274 bp. More than half occur in regions with mononucleotide repeats the longest of which is 47 bases. Overall the mononucleotide repeats involving C and G are much shorter than those for A and T. About 12% are surrounded by palindromes. There is general correlation between chromosome size and total number for each chromosome. Inter-chromosomal variation in density ranges from 0.6 to 21.7 per kilobase. The overall spectrum shows very high proportion of SNindel of types -/A and -/T at over 81%. The proportion of -/A and -/T SNindels for each chromosome is correlated to its AT content. Less than half of the SNindels are within or near known genes and even fewer (<0.183%) in coding regions, and more than 1.4% of -/C and -/G are in coding compared to 0.2% for -/A and -/T types. SNindels of -/A and -/T types make up 80% of those found within untranslated regions but less than 40% of those within coding regions. A separate analysis using the subset of 2324 validated SNindels showed slightly less AT bias of 74%, SNindels not within mononucleotide repeats showed even less AT bias at 58%. Density of validated SNindels is 0.007/10 kb overall and 90% are found within or near genes. Among all chromosomes, Y has the lowest numbers and densities for all SNindels, validated SNindels, and SNindels not within repeats. PMID:16781088

  5. Microheterogeneity of antithrombin III: effect of single amino acid substitutions and relationship with functional abnormalities.

    PubMed

    De Stefano, V; Leone, G; Mastrangelo, S; Lane, D A; Girolami, A; de Moerloose, P; Sas, G; Abildgaard, U; Blajchman, M; Rodeghiero, F

    1994-02-01

    Microheterogeneity of antithrombin III (AT-III) was investigated by crossed immunoelectrofocusing (CIEF) on eleven molecular variants. A normal pattern was found in five variants while two different abnormal CIEF patterns were found in the other four and two variants, respectively. Point mutations causing a major pI change (exceeding 4.0) of the amino acid substituted lead to alterations in the overall microheterogeneity. The variants thus substituted share a first type of abnormal CIEF pattern with alterations throughout the pH range, regardless of the location of the mutation (reactive site and adjacent regions or heparin binding region). Minor amino acid pI changes in these regions do not alter the AT-III overall microheterogeneity, whatever the resulting functional defect. However, if the mutation is placed in the region around positions 404 or 429, then even minor changes of the amino acid pI seem able to alter the overall charge, leading to a second type of abnormal CIEF pattern with the main alteration at pH 4.8-4.6. Neuraminidase treatment leads to disappearance of microheterogeneity except for the variants with the Arg393 to Cys substitution. Addition of thrombin induces CIEF modifications specifically related to the functional defect. A normal formation of thrombin-antithrombin complexes induces a shift towards the more acid pH range, whereas in the variants substituted at the reactive site the CIEF pattern is substantially unaffected by thrombin; variants substituted at positions 382-384 show a maximal thrombin-induced increase of the isoforms at pI 4.8-4.6. Therefore mutant antithrombins with different functional abnormalities but sharing a common CIEF pattern were well distinguished.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8180341

  6. Getting it Right: How DNA Polymerases Select the Right Nucleotide.

    PubMed

    Ludmann, Samra; Marx, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    All living organisms are defined by their genetic code encrypted in their DNA. DNA polymerases are the enzymes that are responsible for all DNA syntheses occurring in nature. For DNA replication, repair and recombination these enzymes have to read the parental DNA and recognize the complementary nucleotide out of a pool of four structurally similar deoxynucleotide triphosphates (dNTPs) for a given template. The selection of the nucleotide is in accordance with the Watson-Crick rule. In this process the accuracy of DNA synthesis is crucial for the maintenance of the genome stability. However, to spur evolution a certain degree of freedom must be allowed. This brief review highlights the mechanistic basis for selecting the right nucleotide by DNA polymerases. PMID:27052761

  7. Fixed-Gap Tunnel Junction for Reading DNA Nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Previous measurements of the electronic conductance of DNA nucleotides or amino acids have used tunnel junctions in which the gap is mechanically adjusted, such as scanning tunneling microscopes or mechanically controllable break junctions. Fixed-junction devices have, at best, detected the passage of whole DNA molecules without yielding chemical information. Here, we report on a layered tunnel junction in which the tunnel gap is defined by a dielectric layer, deposited by atomic layer deposition. Reactive ion etching is used to drill a hole through the layers so that the tunnel junction can be exposed to molecules in solution. When the metal electrodes are functionalized with recognition molecules that capture DNA nucleotides via hydrogen bonds, the identities of the individual nucleotides are revealed by characteristic features of the fluctuating tunnel current associated with single-molecule binding events. PMID:25380505

  8. Updating Our View of Organelle Genome Nucleotide Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David Roy

    2012-01-01

    Organelle genomes show remarkable variation in architecture and coding content, yet their nucleotide composition is relatively unvarying across the eukaryotic domain, with most having a high adenine and thymine (AT) content. Recent studies, however, have uncovered guanine and cytosine (GC)-rich mitochondrial and plastid genomes. These sequences come from a small but eclectic list of species, including certain green plants and animals. Here, I review GC-rich organelle DNAs and the insights they have provided into the evolution of nucleotide landscape. I emphasize that GC-biased mitochondrial and plastid DNAs are more widespread than once thought, sometimes occurring together in the same species, and suggest that the forces biasing their nucleotide content can differ both among and within lineages, and may be associated with specific genome architectural features and life history traits. PMID:22973299

  9. Proton-translocating nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase. Reconstitution of the extramembranous nucleotide-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, M; Hatefi, Y

    1995-11-24

    The nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase of bovine mitochondria is a homodimer of monomer M(r) = 109,065. The monomer is composed of three domains, an NH2-terminal 430-residue-long hydrophilic domain I that binds NAD(H), a central 400-residue-long hydrophobic domain II that is largely membrane intercalated and carries the enzyme's proton channel, and a COOH-terminal 200-residue-long hydrophilic domain III that binds NADP(H). Domains I and III protrude into the mitochondrial matrix, where they presumably come together to form the enzyme's catalytic site. The two-subunit transhydrogenase of Escherichia coli and the three-subunit transhydrogenase of Rhodospirillum rubrum have each the same overall tridomain hydropathy profile as the bovine enzyme. Domain I of the R. rubrum enzyme (the alpha 1 subunit) is water soluble and easily removed from the chromatophore membranes. We have isolated domain I of the bovine transhydrogenase after controlled trypsinolysis of the purified enzyme and have expressed in E. coli and purified therefrom domain III of this enzyme. This paper shows that an active bidomain transhydrogenase lacking domain II can be reconstituted by the combination of purified bovine domains I plus III or R. rubrum domain I plus bovine domain III. PMID:7499307

  10. Insecticide-Driven Patterns of Genetic Variation in the Dengue Vector Aedes aegypti in Martinique Island

    PubMed Central

    Paupy, Christophe; Bringuier, Charline; Yebakima, André; Chandre, Fabrice; David, Jean-Philippe; Corbel, Vincent; Despres, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Effective vector control is currently challenged worldwide by the evolution of resistance to all classes of chemical insecticides in mosquitoes. In Martinique, populations of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti have been intensively treated with temephos and deltamethrin insecticides over the last fifty years, resulting in heterogeneous levels of resistance across the island. Resistance spreading depends on standing genetic variation, selection intensity and gene flow among populations. To determine gene flow intensity, we first investigated neutral patterns of genetic variability in sixteen populations representative of the many environments found in Martinique and experiencing various levels of insecticide pressure, using 6 microsatellites. Allelic richness was lower in populations resistant to deltamethrin, and consanguinity was higher in populations resistant to temephos, consistent with a negative effect of insecticide pressure on neutral genetic diversity. The global genetic differentiation was low, suggesting high gene flow among populations, but significant structure was found, with a pattern of isolation-by-distance at the global scale. Then, we investigated adaptive patterns of divergence in six out of the 16 populations using 319 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Five SNP outliers displaying levels of genetic differentiation out of neutral expectations were detected, including the kdr-V1016I mutation in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene. Association tests revealed a total of seven SNPs associated with deltamethrin resistance. Six other SNPs were associated with temephos resistance, including two non-synonymous substitutions in an alkaline phosphatase and in a sulfotransferase respectively. Altogether, both neutral and adaptive patterns of genetic variation in mosquito populations appear to be largely driven by insecticide pressure in Martinique. PMID:24204999

  11. Determination of substitution positions in hyaluronic acid hydrogels using NMR and MS based methods.

    PubMed

    Wende, Frida J; Gohil, Suresh; Mojarradi, Hotan; Gerfaud, Thibaud; Nord, Lars I; Karlsson, Anders; Boiteau, Jean-Guy; Kenne, Anne Helander; Sandström, Corine

    2016-01-20

    In hydrogels of cross-linked polysaccharides, the total amount of cross-linker and the degree of cross-linking influence the properties of the hydrogel. The substitution position of the cross-linker on the polysaccharide is another parameter that can influence hydrogel properties; hence methods for detailed structural analysis of the substitution pattern are required. NMR and LC-MS methods were developed to determine the positions and amounts of substitution of 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether (BDDE) on hyaluronic acid (HA), and for the first time it is shown that BDDE can react with any of the four available hydroxyl groups of the HA disaccharide repeating unit. This was achieved by studying di-, tetra-, and hexasaccharides obtained from degradation of BDDE cross-linked HA hydrogel by chondroitinase. Furthermore, amount of linker substitution at each position was shown to be dependent on the size of the oligosaccharides. For the disaccharide, substitutions were predominantly at ΔGlcA-OH2 and GlcNAc-OH6 while in the tetra- and hexasaccharides, it was mainly at the reducing end GlcNAc-OH4. In the disaccharide there was no substitution at this position. Since chondroitinase is able to completely hydrolyse non-substituted HA into unsaturated disaccharides, these results indicate that the enzyme is prevented to cleave on the non-reducing side of an oligosaccharide substituted at the reducing end GlcNAc-OH4. The procedure can be adopted for the determination of substitution positions in other types of polymers. PMID:26572480

  12. Substituted Hydroxyapatites with Antibacterial Properties

    PubMed Central

    Kolmas, Joanna; Groszyk, Ewa; Kwiatkowska-Różycka, Dagmara

    2014-01-01

    Reconstructive surgery is presently struggling with the problem of infections located within implantation biomaterials. Of course, the best antibacterial protection is antibiotic therapy. However, oral antibiotic therapy is sometimes ineffective, while administering an antibiotic at the location of infection is often associated with an unfavourable ratio of dosage efficiency and toxic effect. Thus, the present study aims to find a new factor which may improve antibacterial activity while also presenting low toxicity to the human cells. Such factors are usually implemented along with the implant itself and may be an integral part of it. Many recent studies have focused on inorganic factors, such as metal nanoparticles, salts, and metal oxides. The advantages of inorganic factors include the ease with which they can be combined with ceramic and polymeric biomaterials. The following review focuses on hydroxyapatites substituted with ions with antibacterial properties. It considers materials that have already been applied in regenerative medicine (e.g., hydroxyapatites with silver ions) and those that are only at the preliminary stage of research and which could potentially be used in implantology or dentistry. We present methods for the synthesis of modified apatites and the antibacterial mechanisms of various ions as well as their antibacterial efficiency. PMID:24949423

  13. Skin substitutes and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Auger, F A; Lacroix, D; Germain, L

    2009-01-01

    Medical science has vastly improved on the means and methods available for the treatment of wounds in the clinic. The production and use of various types of skin substitutes has led to dramatic improvements in the odds of survival for severely burned patients, but they have also shown promise for many other applications, including cases involving chronic wounds that are not life threatening. Nowadays, more than 20 products are commercially available, more are undergoing clinical trials and a large number of new models are being investigated in various research laboratories worldwide. Many of the current products do not contain any living cells and vary in their capacity to harness the innate capacity of the body to heal itself. Others include living cells, of allogeneic or autologous origin, and are often referred to as 'cellular therapy' or 'tissue-engineered' products. Modifications and improvements are currently investigated that aim at improving the healing potential of those products through the use of recombinant growth factors and additional features such as microvascularization. Fundamental research into wound healing and scar-free regeneration raises the hope that we will eventually be able to restore almost completely the appearance and function of skin after the healing of wounds. PMID:19188757

  14. Wearable and implantable pancreas substitutes.

    PubMed

    Ricotti, Leonardo; Assaf, Tareq; Dario, Paolo; Menciassi, Arianna

    2013-03-01

    A lifelong-implanted and completely automated artificial or bioartificial pancreas (BAP) is the holy grail for type 1 diabetes treatment, and could be a definitive solution even for other severe pathologies, such as pancreatitis and pancreas cancer. Technology has made several important steps forward in the last years, providing new hope for the realization of such devices, whose feasibility is strictly connected to advances in glucose sensor technology, subcutaneous and intraperitoneal insulin pump development, the design of closed-loop control algorithms for mechatronic pancreases, as well as cell and tissue engineering and cell encapsulation for biohybrid pancreases. Furthermore, smart integration of the mentioned components and biocompatibility issues must be addressed, bearing in mind that, for mechatronic pancreases, it is most important to consider how to recharge implanted batteries and refill implanted insulin reservoirs without requiring periodic surgical interventions. This review describes recent advancements in technologies and concepts related to artificial and bioartificial pancreases, and assesses how far we are from a lifelong-implanted and self-working pancreas substitute that can fully restore the quality of life of a diabetic (or other type of) patient. PMID:22990986

  15. tert-butyl-substituted cyclooctatetraenes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.J.; Lyttle, M.H.; Streitwieser, A. Jr.

    1981-05-08

    Reaction of cyclooctatetraene (COT) with tert-butyllithium provides a convenient synthesis of tert-butylcyclooctatetraene, 4. As a byproduct of the reaction mixture, 1,4-di-tert-butylcyclooctatriene has been isolated and converted to 1,4-di-tert-butylcyclooctatetraene, 5, by deprotonation with potassium amide and oxidation with iodine. An independent synthesis of 5 was developed from 9-oxabicyclo(6.1.0)octa-2,4,6-triene (cyclooctatetraene oxide), 9. The highly substituted compound 1,3,5,7-tetra-tert-butylcyclooctatetraene (6) has been prepared in 24% overall yield in four steps. The acetylenic ketone 27, prepared from (tert-butylethynyl)copper and pivaloyl chloride, undergoes condensation with dimethyl malonate to give the pyrone ester 28. This ester undergoes facile hydrolysis and decarboxylation in hot concentrated sulfuric acid to yield 4,6-di-tert-butyl-2H-pyran-2-one (22) which is converted to 6 in one step by photolysis in dilute solution.

  16. Uproar over Milk Substitutes Act.

    PubMed

    1993-11-15

    Health policy activists lobbied 7 years for the Infant Milk Substitutes, Feeding Bottles and Infant Food Bill. Proponents of the bill say that it basically curtails unethical marketing practices, not the sales of baby foods, and argue that it was conceived to reduce the trend of mothers over-diluting commercial milk in order to reduce household expenses as well as stem the potential erosion of knowledge on locally available weaning foods. Even though the bill will become an Act only after its rules and regulations have been finalized, the government has already banned baby food advertisements on television and in other electronic media under its control. Women's groups now argue that the bill tends to focus almost exclusively upon the welfare of children and compromises the position of women who can not lactate adequately. Moreover, they hold that the bill may be used to compel wives to stay out of the formal workforce so that they may feed their babies. The intention of the bill may be meaningless without complementary legislation addressing the problems of working mothers. Specifically, amendments to the Maternity Benefits Act of 1961 would extend maternity leave to 4 months after delivery and lengthen the duration of nursing breaks. It is, however, feared that these changes may reduce employment prospects for women. PMID:12179211

  17. Content discovery and retrieval services at the European Nucleotide Archive

    PubMed Central

    Silvester, Nicole; Alako, Blaise; Amid, Clara; Cerdeño-Tárraga, Ana; Cleland, Iain; Gibson, Richard; Goodgame, Neil; ten Hoopen, Petra; Kay, Simon; Leinonen, Rasko; Li, Weizhong; Liu, Xin; Lopez, Rodrigo; Pakseresht, Nima; Pallreddy, Swapna; Plaister, Sheila; Radhakrishnan, Rajesh; Rossello, Marc; Senf, Alexander; Smirnov, Dmitriy; Toribio, Ana Luisa; Vaughan, Daniel; Zalunin, Vadim; Cochrane, Guy

    2015-01-01

    The European Nucleotide Archive (ENA; http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ena) is Europe's primary resource for nucleotide sequence information. With the growing volume and diversity of public sequencing data comes the need for increased sophistication in data organisation, presentation and search services so as to maximise its discoverability and usability. In response to this, ENA has been introducing and improving checklists for use during submission and expanding its search facilities to provide targeted search results. Here, we give a brief update on ENA content and some major developments undertaken in data submission services during 2014. We then describe in more detail the services we offer for data discovery and retrieval. PMID:25404130

  18. Biocuration of functional annotation at the European nucleotide archive

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Richard; Alako, Blaise; Amid, Clara; Cerdeño-Tárraga, Ana; Cleland, Iain; Goodgame, Neil; ten Hoopen, Petra; Jayathilaka, Suran; Kay, Simon; Leinonen, Rasko; Liu, Xin; Pallreddy, Swapna; Pakseresht, Nima; Rajan, Jeena; Rosselló, Marc; Silvester, Nicole; Smirnov, Dmitriy; Toribio, Ana Luisa; Vaughan, Daniel; Zalunin, Vadim; Cochrane, Guy

    2016-01-01

    The European Nucleotide Archive (ENA; http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ena) is a repository for the submission, maintenance and presentation of nucleotide sequence data and related sample and experimental information. In this article we report on ENA in 2015 regarding general activity, notable published data sets and major achievements. This is followed by a focus on sustainable biocuration of functional annotation, an area which has particularly felt the pressure of sequencing growth. The importance of functional annotation, how it can be submitted and the shifting role of the biocurator in the context of increasing volumes of data are all discussed. PMID:26615190

  19. Biodegradation of DNA and nucleotides to nucleosides and free bases.

    PubMed

    Kruszewska, Hanna; Misicka, Aleksandra; Chmielowiec, Urszula

    2004-01-01

    Thirty-two different microorganisms were examined in order to check their ability to degrade an exogenous DNA. Bacteria from species: Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Brevundimonas diminuta, Bacillus subtilis, Mycobacterium butyricum and fungus Fusarium moniliforme were capable to degrade DNA to nucleic bases or their derivatives. Degradation of DNA by S. maltophilia resulted in formation of free bases, such as hypoxanthine, thymine, uracil and xanthine. The optimum concentration of DNA seemed to be 3 mg ml(-1). The mode of degradation of DNA nucleotides depended on the type of nucleotide and its concentration, but nucleic bases or their derivatives were always formed at the end of the reaction process. PMID:14751311

  20. Biocuration of functional annotation at the European nucleotide archive.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Richard; Alako, Blaise; Amid, Clara; Cerdeño-Tárraga, Ana; Cleland, Iain; Goodgame, Neil; Ten Hoopen, Petra; Jayathilaka, Suran; Kay, Simon; Leinonen, Rasko; Liu, Xin; Pallreddy, Swapna; Pakseresht, Nima; Rajan, Jeena; Rosselló, Marc; Silvester, Nicole; Smirnov, Dmitriy; Toribio, Ana Luisa; Vaughan, Daniel; Zalunin, Vadim; Cochrane, Guy

    2016-01-01

    The European Nucleotide Archive (ENA; http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ena) is a repository for the submission, maintenance and presentation of nucleotide sequence data and related sample and experimental information. In this article we report on ENA in 2015 regarding general activity, notable published data sets and major achievements. This is followed by a focus on sustainable biocuration of functional annotation, an area which has particularly felt the pressure of sequencing growth. The importance of functional annotation, how it can be submitted and the shifting role of the biocurator in the context of increasing volumes of data are all discussed. PMID:26615190

  1. Simplified computer programs for search of homology within nucleotide sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Kröger, M; Kröger-Block, A

    1984-01-01

    Four new computer programs for search of homology within nucleotide sequences are presented. The main scope of the program design is flexibility, independence of sequence length and the capability to be used by any molecular biologist without any prior computer experience. The programs offer a linear search, a search for maximal identity, an alignment along a given sequence and a search based on homology within the amino acid coding capacity of nucleotide sequences. The language is Fortran V. Copies are available on request. PMID:6546417

  2. Economic implications of substituting plant oils for diesel fuel. Volume 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, R.C.; Collins, G.S.; Lacewell, R.D.; Chang, H.C.

    1983-08-01

    This study of expected economic impacts of substituting plant oils for diesel fuel consisted of two components: (1) analysis of oilseed production and oilseed crushing capacity in the US and Texas and (2) simulation of impacts on US cropping patterns, crop prices, producer rent, and consumer surplus. The primary oilseed crops considered were soybeans, cottonseed, sunflowers, and peanuts. 19 references, 2 figures, 14 tables.

  3. First principles investigation of substituted strontium hexaferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Vivek

    This dissertation investigates how the magnetic properties of strontium hexaferrite change upon the substitution of foreign atoms at the Fe sites. Strontium hexaferrite, SrFe12O19, is a commonly used hard magnetic material and is produced in large quantities (around 500,000 tons per year). For different applications of strontium hexaferrite, its magnetic properties can be tuned by a proper substitution of the foreign atoms. Experimental screening for a proper substitution is a cost-intensive and time-consuming process, whereas computationally it can be done more efficiently. We used the 'density functional theory' a first principles based method to study substituted strontium hexaferrite. The site occupancies of the substituted atoms were estimated by calculating the substitution energies of different configurations. The formation probabilities of configurations were used to calculate the magnetic properties of substituted strontium hexaferrite. In the first study, Al-substituted strontium hexaferrite, SrFe12-x AlxO19 with x=0.5 and x=1.0 were investigated. It was found that at the annealing temperature the non-magnetic Al +3 ions preferentially replace Fe+3 ions from the 12 k and 2a sites. We found that the magnetization decreases and the magnetic anisotropy field increases as the fraction, x of the Al atoms increases. In the second study, SrFe12-xGaxO19 and SrFe12-xInxO19 with x=0.5 and x=1.0 were investigated. In the case of SrFe12-xGaxO19, the sites where Ga+3 ions prefer to enter are: 12 k, 2a, and 4f1. For SrFe12-xInxO19, In+3 ions most likely to occupy the 12k, 4f1 , and 4f2 sites. In both cases the magnetization was found to decrease slightly as the fraction of substituted atom increases. The magnetic anisotropy field increased for SrFe12-xGaxO 19, and decreased for SrFe12-xInxO19 as the concentration of substituted atoms increased. In the third study, 23 elements (M) were screened for their possible substitution in strontium hexaferrite, SrFe12-xMxO 19

  4. 40 CFR 721.5930 - Phenylenebis[imino (chlorotriazinyl)imino(substituted naphthyl)azo(substituted phenyl)azo, sodium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...)imino(substituted naphthyl)azo(substituted phenyl)azo, sodium salt (generic name). 721.5930 Section 721... Phenylenebis[imino (chlorotriazinyl)imino(substituted naphthyl)azo(substituted phenyl)azo, sodium salt (generic... identified generically as phenylenebis[imino (chlorotriazinyl)imino(substituted naphthyl)azo...

  5. 40 CFR 721.5930 - Phenylenebis[imino (chlorotriazinyl)imino(substituted naphthyl)azo(substituted phenyl)azo, sodium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...)imino(substituted naphthyl)azo(substituted phenyl)azo, sodium salt (generic name). 721.5930 Section 721... Phenylenebis[imino (chlorotriazinyl)imino(substituted naphthyl)azo(substituted phenyl)azo, sodium salt (generic... identified generically as phenylenebis[imino (chlorotriazinyl)imino(substituted naphthyl)azo...

  6. 40 CFR 721.5930 - Phenylenebis[imino (chlorotriazinyl)imino(substituted naphthyl)azo(substituted phenyl)azo, sodium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...)imino(substituted naphthyl)azo(substituted phenyl)azo, sodium salt (generic name). 721.5930 Section 721... Phenylenebis[imino (chlorotriazinyl)imino(substituted naphthyl)azo(substituted phenyl)azo, sodium salt (generic... identified generically as phenylenebis[imino (chlorotriazinyl)imino(substituted naphthyl)azo...

  7. 40 CFR 721.5930 - Phenylenebis[imino (chlorotriazinyl)imino(substituted naphthyl)azo(substituted phenyl)azo, sodium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...)imino(substituted naphthyl)azo(substituted phenyl)azo, sodium salt (generic name). 721.5930 Section 721... Phenylenebis[imino (chlorotriazinyl)imino(substituted naphthyl)azo(substituted phenyl)azo, sodium salt (generic... identified generically as phenylenebis[imino (chlorotriazinyl)imino(substituted naphthyl)azo...

  8. 40 CFR 721.5930 - Phenylenebis[imino (chlorotriazinyl)imino(substituted naphthyl)azo(substituted phenyl)azo, sodium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...)imino(substituted naphthyl)azo(substituted phenyl)azo, sodium salt (generic name). 721.5930 Section 721... Phenylenebis[imino (chlorotriazinyl)imino(substituted naphthyl)azo(substituted phenyl)azo, sodium salt (generic... identified generically as phenylenebis[imino (chlorotriazinyl)imino(substituted naphthyl)azo...

  9. Modeling competitive substitution in a polyelectrolyte complex

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, B.; Muthukumar, M.

    2015-12-28

    We have simulated the invasion of a polyelectrolyte complex made of a polycation chain and a polyanion chain, by another longer polyanion chain, using the coarse-grained united atom model for the chains and the Langevin dynamics methodology. Our simulations reveal many intricate details of the substitution reaction in terms of conformational changes of the chains and competition between the invading chain and the chain being displaced for the common complementary chain. We show that the invading chain is required to be sufficiently longer than the chain being displaced for effecting the substitution. Yet, having the invading chain to be longer than a certain threshold value does not reduce the substitution time much further. While most of the simulations were carried out in salt-free conditions, we show that presence of salt facilitates the substitution reaction and reduces the substitution time. Analysis of our data shows that the dominant driving force for the substitution process involving polyelectrolytes lies in the release of counterions during the substitution.

  10. Amino Acid Substitutions in a Variant of IMP-1 Metallo-β-Lactamase

    PubMed Central

    Iyobe, Shizuko; Kusadokoro, Haruko; Ozaki, Junko; Matsumura, Naoki; Minami, Shinzaburo; Haruta, Shin; Sawai, Tetsuo; O'Hara, Koji

    2000-01-01

    In the course of surveying for the carbapenem-hydrolyzing metallo-β-lactamase gene blaIMP in pathogenic bacteria by the PCR method, we detected a gene encoding a variant metallo-β-lactamase, designated IMP-3, which differed from IMP-1 by having low hydrolyzing activity for penicillins and carbapenems. PCR product direct sequencing of a 2.2-kb segment revealed that the gene blaIMP-3 was located on a cassette inserted within a class I integron in the pMS390 plasmid. The 741-bp nucleotide sequence of blaIMP-3 was identical to that of blaIMP-1, except for seven base substitutions. Among these were two, at nucleotide positions 314 and 640, which caused amino acid alterations. Hybrid bla genes were constructed from blaIMP-3 and blaIMP-1 by recombinant DNA techniques, and β-lactamases encoded by these genes were compared with those of the parents IMP-3 and IMP-1 under the same experimental conditions. The kinetic parameters indicated that the inefficient hydrolysis of benzylpenicillin, ampicillin, imipenem, and ceftazidime by IMP-3 was due to the substitution of glycine for serine at amino acid residue 196 in the mature enzyme. This alteration corresponded to the presence of guanine instead of an adenine at nucleotide position 640 of the blaIMP-3 gene. This indicated that extension of the substrate profile in the metallo-β-lactamase IMP-1 compared to IMP-3 is the result of a one-step single-base mutation, suggesting that the gene blaIMP-3 is an ancestor of blaIMP-1. PMID:10898670

  11. QGRS Mapper: a web-based server for predicting G-quadruplexes in nucleotide sequences

    PubMed Central

    Kikin, Oleg; D'Antonio, Lawrence; Bagga, Paramjeet S

    2006-01-01

    The quadruplex structures formed by guanine-rich nucleic acid sequences have received significant attention recently because of growing evidence for their role in important biological processes and as therapeutic targets. G-quadruplex DNA has been suggested to regulate DNA replication and may control cellular proliferation. Sequences capable of forming G-quadruplexes in the RNA have been shown to play significant roles in regulation of polyadenylation and splicing events in mammalian transcripts. Whether quadruplex structure directly plays a role in regulating RNA processing requires investigation. Computational approaches to study G-quadruplexes allow detailed analysis of mammalian genomes. There are no known easily accessible user-friendly tools that can compute G-quadruplexes in the nucleotide sequences. We have developed a web-based server, QGRS Mapper, that predicts quadruplex forming G-rich sequences (QGRS) in nucleotide sequences. It is a user-friendly application that provides many options for defining and studying G-quadruplexes. It performs analysis of the user provided genomic sequences, e.g. promoter and telomeric regions, as well as RNA sequences. It is also useful for predicting G-quadruplex structures in oligonucleotides. The program provides options to search and retrieve desired gene/nucleotide sequence entries from NCBI databases for mapping G-quadruplexes in the context of RNA processing sites. This feature is very useful for investigating the functional relevance of G-quadruplex structure, in particular its role in regulating the gene expression by alternative processing. In addition to providing data on composition and locations of QGRS relative to the processing sites in the pre-mRNA sequence, QGRS Mapper features interactive graphic representation of the data. The user can also use the graphics module to visualize QGRS distribution patterns among all the alternative RNA products of a gene simultaneously on a single screen. QGRS Mapper can be

  12. Computational Analysis of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Associated with Altered Drug Responsiveness in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Valerio; Federico, Antonio; Pollastro, Carla; Ziviello, Carmela; Cataldi, Simona; Formisano, Pietro; Ciccodicola, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is one of the most frequent mortality causes in western countries, with rapidly increasing prevalence. Anti-diabetic drugs are the first therapeutic approach, although many patients develop drug resistance. Most drug responsiveness variability can be explained by genetic causes. Inter-individual variability is principally due to single nucleotide polymorphisms, and differential drug responsiveness has been correlated to alteration in genes involved in drug metabolism (CYP2C9) or insulin signaling (IRS1, ABCC8, KCNJ11 and PPARG). However, most genome-wide association studies did not provide clues about the contribution of DNA variations to impaired drug responsiveness. Thus, characterizing T2D drug responsiveness variants is needed to guide clinicians toward tailored therapeutic approaches. Here, we extensively investigated polymorphisms associated with altered drug response in T2D, predicting their effects in silico. Combining different computational approaches, we focused on the expression pattern of genes correlated to drug resistance and inferred evolutionary conservation of polymorphic residues, computationally predicting the biochemical properties of polymorphic proteins. Using RNA-Sequencing followed by targeted validation, we identified and experimentally confirmed that two nucleotide variations in the CAPN10 gene—currently annotated as intronic—fall within two new transcripts in this locus. Additionally, we found that a Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP), currently reported as intergenic, maps to the intron of a new transcript, harboring CAPN10 and GPR35 genes, which undergoes non-sense mediated decay. Finally, we analyzed variants that fall into non-coding regulatory regions of yet underestimated functional significance, predicting that some of them can potentially affect gene expression and/or post-transcriptional regulation of mRNAs affecting the splicing. PMID:27347941

  13. When You're Absent: Preparing for the Substitute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Brian A.

    1988-01-01

    Suggests ways classroom teachers can prepare for absences and help make substitute teaching productive. Recommends forming a list of preferred substitutes at the beginning of the school year; clarifying with students expected behavior; and preparing a permanent substitute packet. (LS)

  14. Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 RNA Crystal Structures Reveal Heterogeneous 1 × 1 Nucleotide UU Internal Loop Conformations

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Amit; Park, HaJeung; Fang, Pengfei; Parkesh, Raman; Guo, Min; Nettles, Kendall W.; Disney, Matthew D.

    2012-03-27

    RNA internal loops often display a variety of conformations in solution. Herein, we visualize conformational heterogeneity in the context of the 5'CUG/3'GUC repeat motif present in the RNA that causes myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Specifically, two crystal structures of a model DM1 triplet repeating construct, 5'r[{und UU}GGGC(C{und U}G){sub 3}GUCC]{sub 2}, refined to 2.20 and 1.52 {angstrom} resolution are disclosed. Here, differences in the orientation of the 5' dangling UU end between the two structures induce changes in the backbone groove width, which reveals that noncanonical 1 x 1 nucleotide UU internal loops can display an ensemble of pairing conformations. In the 2.20 {angstrom} structure, CUGa, the 5' UU forms a one hydrogen-bonded pair with a 5' UU of a neighboring helix in the unit cell to form a pseudoinfinite helix. The central 1 x 1 nucleotide UU internal loop has no hydrogen bonds, while the terminal 1 x 1 nucleotide UU internal loops each form a one-hydrogen bond pair. In the 1.52 {angstrom} structure, CUGb, the 5' UU dangling end is tucked into the major groove of the duplex. While the canonically paired bases show no change in base pairing, in CUGb the terminal 1 x 1 nucleotide UU internal loops now form two hydrogen-bonded pairs. Thus, the shift in the major groove induced by the 5' UU dangling end alters noncanonical base patterns. Collectively, these structures indicate that 1 x 1 nucleotide UU internal loops in DM1 may sample multiple conformations in vivo. This observation has implications for the recognition of this RNA, and other repeating transcripts, by protein and small molecule ligands.

  15. Myotonic dystrophy type 1 RNA crystal structures reveal heterogeneous 1 × 1 nucleotide UU internal loop conformations.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Park, HaJeung; Fang, Pengfei; Parkesh, Raman; Guo, Min; Nettles, Kendall W; Disney, Matthew D

    2011-11-15

    RNA internal loops often display a variety of conformations in solution. Herein, we visualize conformational heterogeneity in the context of the 5'CUG/3'GUC repeat motif present in the RNA that causes myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Specifically, two crystal structures of a model DM1 triplet repeating construct, 5'r[UUGGGC(CUG)(3)GUCC](2), refined to 2.20 and 1.52 Å resolution are disclosed. Here, differences in the orientation of the 5' dangling UU end between the two structures induce changes in the backbone groove width, which reveals that noncanonical 1 × 1 nucleotide UU internal loops can display an ensemble of pairing conformations. In the 2.20 Å structure, CUGa, the 5' UU forms a one hydrogen-bonded pair with a 5' UU of a neighboring helix in the unit cell to form a pseudoinfinite helix. The central 1 × 1 nucleotide UU internal loop has no hydrogen bonds, while the terminal 1 × 1 nucleotide UU internal loops each form a one-hydrogen bond pair. In the 1.52 Å structure, CUGb, the 5' UU dangling end is tucked into the major groove of the duplex. While the canonically paired bases show no change in base pairing, in CUGb the terminal 1 × 1 nucleotide UU internal loops now form two hydrogen-bonded pairs. Thus, the shift in the major groove induced by the 5' UU dangling end alters noncanonical base patterns. Collectively, these structures indicate that 1 × 1 nucleotide UU internal loops in DM1 may sample multiple conformations in vivo. This observation has implications for the recognition of this RNA, and other repeating transcripts, by protein and small molecule ligands. PMID:21988728

  16. Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 RNA Crystal Structures Reveal Heterogeneous 1×1 Nucleotide UU Internal Loop Conformations⊥

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Park, HaJeung; Fang, Pengfei; Parkesh, Raman; Guo, Min; Nettles, Kendall W.; Disney, Matthew D.

    2011-01-01

    RNA internal loops often display a variety of conformations in solution. Herein, we visualize conformational heterogeneity in the context of the 5′CUG/3′GUC repeat motif present in the RNA that causes myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Specifically, two crystal structures are disclosed of a model DM1 triplet repeating construct, 5′r(UUGGGC(CUG)3GUCC)2, refined to 2.20 Å and 1.52 Å resolution. Here, differences in orientation of the 5′ dangling UU end between the two structures induce changes in the backbone groove width, which reveals that non-canonical 1×1 nucleotide UU internal loops can display an ensemble of pairing conformations. In the 2.20 Å structure, CUGa, the 5′UU forms one hydrogen-bonded pairs with a 5′UU of a neighboring helix in the unit cell to form a pseudo-infinite helix. The central 1×1 nucleotide UU internal loop has no hydrogen bonds, while the terminal 1×1 nucleotide UU internal loops each form a one hydrogen-bonded pair. In the 1.52 Å structure, CUGb, the 5′ UU dangling end is tucked into the major groove of the duplex. While the canonical paired bases show no change in base pairing, in CUGb the terminal 1×1 nucleotide UU internal loops form now two hydrogen-bonded pairs. Thus, the shift in major groove induced by the 5′UU dangling end alters non-canonical base patterns. Collectively, these structures indicate that 1×1 nucleotide UU internal loops in DM1 may sample multiple conformations in vivo. This observation has implications for the recognition of this RNA, and other repeating transcripts, by protein and small molecule ligands. PMID:21988728

  17. Substitution: An FGD vision reaches fruition

    SciTech Connect

    Feeney, S.

    1995-06-01

    Through Substitution, Phase I affected utilities can meet their Phase I SO{sub 2} allowance requirements by reductions made at a Phase II source. The thinking is that it might be more cost-effective for certain Phase II affected sources to make these SO{sub 2} reductions. This paper will discuss several examples of FGD-equipped, Phase II affected sources who decided to Substitute. Included will be the economics of two particular utilities, one who decided to participate in Substitution, and one who found it uneconomical.

  18. A comparative study of nemertean complete mitochondrial genomes, including two new ones for Nectonemertes cf. mirabilis and Zygeupolia rubens, may elucidate the fundamental pattern for the phylum Nemertea

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The mitochondrial genome is important for studying genome evolution as well as reconstructing the phylogeny of organisms. Complete mitochondrial genome sequences have been reported for more than 2200 metazoans, mainly vertebrates and arthropods. To date, from a total of about 1275 described nemertean species, only three complete and two partial mitochondrial DNA sequences from nemerteans have been published. Here, we report the entire mitochondrial genomes for two more nemertean species: Nectonemertes cf. mirabilis and Zygeupolia rubens. Results The sizes of the entire mitochondrial genomes are 15365 bp for N. cf. mirabilis and 15513 bp for Z. rubens. Each circular genome contains 37 genes and an AT-rich non-coding region, and overall nucleotide composition is AT-rich. In both species, there is significant strand asymmetry in the distribution of nucleotides, with the coding strand being richer in T than A and in G than C. The AT-rich non-coding regions of the two genomes have some repeat sequences and stem-loop structures, both of which may be associated with the initiation of replication or transcription. The 22 tRNAs show variable substitution patterns in nemerteans, with higher sequence conservation in genes located on the H strand. Gene arrangement of N. cf. mirabilis is identical to that of Paranemertes cf. peregrina, both of which are Hoplonemertea, while that of Z. rubens is the same as in Lineus viridis, both of which are Heteronemertea. Comparison of the gene arrangements and phylogenomic analysis based on concatenated nucleotide sequences of the 12 mitochondrial protein-coding genes revealed that species with closer relationships share more identical gene blocks. Conclusion The two new mitochondrial genomes share many features, including gene contents, with other known nemertean mitochondrial genomes. The tRNA families display a composite substitution pathway. Gene order comparison to the proposed ground pattern of Bilateria and some

  19. Co-substitution of carbonate and fluoride in hydroxyapatite: Effect on substitution type and content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qing-Xia; Li, Ya-Ming; Han, Dan

    2015-04-01

    The nanosized hydroxyapatite substituted by fluoride and carbonate ions (CFHA) had been synthesized by aqueous precipitation method. CFHA had been considered as potential bone graft material for orthopedic and dental applications. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of simultaneously incorporated CO{3/2-} and F- on the substitution type and content. The morphologies of CFHAs were observed by TEM. The carbonate substitution type and content were characterized by FTIR. The fluoride contents were determined by F-selective electrode. The phase compositions and crystallinity of the samples were investigated by XRD. The fluoride and carbonate contents of CFHA increase with the dopant concentrations nonlinearly. The carbonate substitution has much more obvious effect on morphology compared with the fluoride substitution. The co-existence of CO{3/2-} and F- ions can influence the corresponding substitution fraction. The isomorphic substitution of sodium for calcium in the substitution process of CO{3/2-} can improve crystal degree and favor the B-type substitutions. Due to the closeness of the ion radii and equivalent substitution of F- and OH-, F- will occupy the OH- sites of HA crystals more easily, compelling most of the CO{3/2-} to be located in the B sites.

  20. An Interpretation of the Ancestral Codon from Miller’s Amino Acids and Nucleotide Correlations in Modern Coding Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Carels, Nicolas; de Leon, Miguel Ponce

    2015-01-01

    Purine bias, which is usually referred to as an “ancestral codon”, is known to result in short-range correlations between nucleotides in coding sequences, and it is common in all species. We demonstrate that RWY is a more appropriate pattern than the classical RNY, and purine bias (Rrr) is the product of a network of nucleotide compensations induced by functional constraints on the physicochemical properties of proteins. Through deductions from universal correlation properties, we also demonstrate that amino acids from Miller’s spark discharge experiment are compatible with functional primeval proteins at the dawn of living cell radiation on earth. These amino acids match the hydropathy and secondary structures of modern proteins. PMID:25922573