Science.gov

Sample records for numeral ocr system

  1. Performance evaluation of two OCR systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.; Subramaniam, S.; Haralick, R.M.; Phillips, I.T.

    1994-12-31

    An experimental protocol for the performance evaluation of Optical Character Recognition (OCR) algorithms is described. The protocol is intended to serve as a model for using the University of Washington English Document Image Database-I to evaluate OCR systems. The plain text zones (without special symbols) in this database have over 2,300,000 characters. The performances of two UNIX-based OCR systems, namely Caere OCR v109a and Xerox ScanWorX v2.0, are measured. The results suggest that Caere OCR outperforms ScanWorX in terms of recognition accuracy; however, ScanWorX is more robust in the presence of image flaws.

  2. The BBN Byblos Hindi OCR System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Prem; Macrostie, Ehry; Decerbo, Michael

    The BBN Byblos OCR system implements a script-independent methodology for OCR using hidden Markov models (HMMs). We have successfully ported the system to Arabic, English, Chinese, Pashto, and Japanese. In this chapter, we report on our recent effort in training the system to perform recognition of Hindi (Devanagari) documents. The initial experiments reported in this chapter were performed using a corpus of synthetic (computer-generated) document images along with slightly degraded versions of the same that were generated by scanning printed versions of the document images and by scanning faxes of the printed versions. On a fair test set consisting of synthetic images alone we measured a character error rate of 1.0%. The character error rate on a fair test set consisting of scanned images (scans of printed versions of the synthetic images) was 1.40% while the character error rate on a fair test set of fax images (scans of printed and faxed versions of the synthetic images) was 8.7%.

  3. The BBN Byblos Hindi OCR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Premkumar S.; MacRostie, Ehry; Decerbo, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The BBN Byblos OCR system implements a script-independent methodology for OCR using Hidden Markov Models (HMMs). We have successfully ported the system to Arabic, English, Chinese, Pashto, and Japanese. In this paper, we report on our recent effort in training the system to perform recognition of Hindi (Devanagari) documents. The initial experiments reported in this paper were performed using a corpus of synthetic (computer-generated) document images along with slightly degraded versions of the same that were generated by scanning printed versions of the document images and by scanning faxes of the printed versions. On a fair test set consisting of synthetic images alone we measured a character error rate of 1.0%. The character error rate on a fair test set consisting of scanned images (scans of printed versions of the synthetic images) was 1.40% while the character error rate on a fair test set of fax images (scans of printed and faxed versions of the synthetic images) was 8.7%.

  4. The BBN Byblos Hindi OCR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Premkumar S.; MacRostie, Ehry; Decerbo, Michael

    2004-12-01

    The BBN Byblos OCR system implements a script-independent methodology for OCR using Hidden Markov Models (HMMs). We have successfully ported the system to Arabic, English, Chinese, Pashto, and Japanese. In this paper, we report on our recent effort in training the system to perform recognition of Hindi (Devanagari) documents. The initial experiments reported in this paper were performed using a corpus of synthetic (computer-generated) document images along with slightly degraded versions of the same that were generated by scanning printed versions of the document images and by scanning faxes of the printed versions. On a fair test set consisting of synthetic images alone we measured a character error rate of 1.0%. The character error rate on a fair test set consisting of scanned images (scans of printed versions of the synthetic images) was 1.40% while the character error rate on a fair test set of fax images (scans of printed and faxed versions of the synthetic images) was 8.7%.

  5. A multi-evidence, multi-engine OCR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavorin, Ilya; Borovikov, Eugene; Borovikov, Anna; Hernandez, Luis; Summers, Kristen; Turner, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Although modern OCR technology is capable of handling a wide variety of document images, there is no single OCR engine that performs equally well on all documents for a given single language script. Naturally, each OCR engine has its strengths and weaknesses, and therefore different engines tend to differ in the accuracy on different documents, and in the errors on the same document image. While the idea of using multiple OCR engines to boost output accuracy is not new, most of the existing systems do not go beyond variations on majority voting. While this approach may work well in many cases, it has limitations, especially when OCR technology used to process a given script has not yet fully matured. Our goal is to develop a system called MEMOE (for "Multi-Evidence Multi-OCR-Engine") that combines, in an optimal or near-optimal way, output streams of one or more OCR engines together with various types of evidence extracted from these streams as well as from original document images, to produce output of higher quality than that of the individual OCR engines, or of majority voting applied to multiple OCR output streams. Furthermore, we aim to improve the accuracy of OCR output on images that might otherwise have low accuracy that significantly impacts downstream processing. The MEMOE system functions as an OCR engine taking document images and some configuration parameters as input and producing a single output text stream. In this paper, we describe the design of the system, various evidence types and how they are incorporated into MEMOE in the form of filters. Results of initial tests that involve two corpora of Arabic documents show that, even in its initial configuration, the system is superior to a voting algorithm and that even more improvement may be achieved by incorporating additional evidence types into the system.

  6. Counting OCR errors in typeset text

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandberg, Jonathan S.

    1995-03-01

    Frequently object recognition accuracy is a key component in the performance analysis of pattern matching systems. In the past three years, the results of numerous excellent and rigorous studies of OCR system typeset-character accuracy (henceforth OCR accuracy) have been published, encouraging performance comparisons between a variety of OCR products and technologies. These published figures are important; OCR vendor advertisements in the popular trade magazines lead readers to believe that published OCR accuracy figures effect market share in the lucrative OCR market. Curiously, a detailed review of many of these OCR error occurrence counting results reveals that they are not reproducible as published and they are not strictly comparable due to larger variances in the counts than would be expected by the sampling variance. Naturally, since OCR accuracy is based on a ratio of the number of OCR errors over the size of the text searched for errors, imprecise OCR error accounting leads to similar imprecision in OCR accuracy. Some published papers use informal, non-automatic, or intuitively correct OCR error accounting. Still other published results present OCR error accounting methods based on string matching algorithms such as dynamic programming using Levenshtein (edit) distance but omit critical implementation details (such as the existence of suspect markers in the OCR generated output or the weights used in the dynamic programming minimization procedure). The problem with not specifically revealing the accounting method is that the number of errors found by different methods are significantly different. This paper identifies the basic accounting methods used to measure OCR errors in typeset text and offers an evaluation and comparison of the various accounting methods.

  7. Robust language-independent OCR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhidong A.; Bazzi, Issam; Kornai, Andras; Makhoul, John; Natarajan, Premkumar S.; Schwartz, Richard

    1999-01-01

    We present a language-independent optical character recognition system that is capable, in principle, of recognizing printed text from most of the world's languages. For each new language or script the system requires sample training data along with ground truth at the text-line level; there is no need to specify the location of either the lines or the words and characters. The system uses hidden Markov modeling technology to model each character. In addition to language independence, the technology enhances performance for degraded data, such as fax, by using unsupervised adaptation techniques. Thus far, we have demonstrated the language-independence of this approach for Arabic, English, and Chinese. Recognition results are presented in this paper, including results on faxed data.

  8. Boost OCR accuracy using iVector based system combination approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xujun; Cao, Huaigu; Natarajan, Prem

    2015-01-01

    Optical character recognition (OCR) is a challenging task because most existing preprocessing approaches are sensitive to writing style, writing material, noises and image resolution. Thus, a single recognition system cannot address all factors of real document images. In this paper, we describe an approach to combine diverse recognition systems by using iVector based features, which is a newly developed method in the field of speaker verification. Prior to system combination, document images are preprocessed and text line images are extracted with different approaches for each system, where iVector is transformed from a high-dimensional supervector of each text line and is used to predict the accuracy of OCR. We merge hypotheses from multiple recognition systems according to the overlap ratio and the predicted OCR score of text line images. We present evaluation results on an Arabic document database where the proposed method is compared against the single best OCR system using word error rate (WER) metric.

  9. A robust omnifont open-vocabulary Arabic OCR system using pseudo-2D-HMM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashwan, Abdullah M.; Rashwan, Mohsen A.; Abdel-Hameed, Ahmed; Abdou, Sherif; Khalil, A. H.

    2012-01-01

    Recognizing old documents is highly desirable since the demand for quickly searching millions of archived documents has recently increased. Using Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) has been proven to be a good solution to tackle the main problems of recognizing typewritten Arabic characters. These attempts however achieved a remarkable success for omnifont OCR under very favorable conditions, they didn't achieve the same performance in practical conditions, i.e. noisy documents. In this paper we present an omnifont, large-vocabulary Arabic OCR system using Pseudo Two Dimensional Hidden Markov Model (P2DHMM), which is a generalization of the HMM. P2DHMM offers a more efficient way to model the Arabic characters, such model offer both minimal dependency on the font size/style (omnifont), and high level of robustness against noise. The evaluation results of this system are very promising compared to a baseline HMM system and best OCRs available in the market (Sakhr and NovoDynamics). The recognition accuracy of the P2DHMM classifier is measured against the classic HMM classifier, the average word accuracy rates for P2DHMM and HMM classifiers are 79% and 66% respectively. The overall system accuracy is measured against Sakhr and NovoDynamics OCR systems, the average word accuracy rates for P2DHMM, NovoDynamics, and Sakhr are 74%, 71%, and 61% respectively.

  10. An automated system for numerically rating document image quality

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, M.; Kelly, P.; Iyengar, S.S.; Brener, N.

    1997-04-01

    As part of the Department of Energy document declassification program, the authors have developed a numerical rating system to predict the OCR error rate that they expect to encounter when processing a particular document. The rating algorithm produces a vector containing scores for different document image attributes such as speckle and touching characters. The OCR error rate for a document is computed from a weighted sum of the elements of the corresponding quality vector. The predicted OCR error rate will be used to screen documents that would not be handled properly with existing document processing products.

  11. An evaluation of information retrieval accuracy with simulated OCR output

    SciTech Connect

    Croft, W.B.; Harding, S.M.; Taghva, K.; Borsack, J.

    1994-12-31

    Optical Character Recognition (OCR) is a critical part of many text-based applications. Although some commercial systems use the output from OCR devices to index documents without editing, there is very little quantitative data on the impact of OCR errors on the accuracy of a text retrieval system. Because of the difficulty of constructing test collections to obtain this data, we have carried out evaluation using simulated OCR output on a variety of databases. The results show that high quality OCR devices have little effect on the accuracy of retrieval, but low quality devices used with databases of short documents can result in significant degradation.

  12. Intelligent OCR Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Wei; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Identifies types and distributions of errors in text produced by optical character recognition (OCR) and proposes a process using machine learning techniques to recognize and correct errors in OCR texts. Results of experiments indicating that this strategy can reduce human interaction required for error correction are reported. (25 references)…

  13. Keyless Entry: Building a Text Database Using OCR Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grotophorst, Clyde W.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the use of optical character recognition (OCR) technology to produce an ASCII text database. A tutorial on digital scanning and OCR is provided, and a systems integration project which used the Calera CDP-3000XF scanner and text retrieval software to construct a database of dissertations at George Mason University is described. (four…

  14. OCR Scanners Facilitate WP Training in Business Schools and Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Business Affairs, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Optical Character Recognition Scanners (OCR) scan typed text and feed it directly into word processing systems, saving input time. OCRs are valuable in word processing training programs because they allow more students access to classes and more time for skill training. (MD)

  15. Kansas State University Libraries' OCR Labeling Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thierer, Joyce; Bower, Merry

    This publication describes the planning and implementation of an optical character recognition (OCR) labeling project, the first stage of Kansas State University (KSU) Libraries' program of conversion from a manual to an automated circulation system. It is noted that a telephone survey of libraries with automated circulation systems and…

  16. Prediction of OCR accuracy using simple image features

    SciTech Connect

    Blando, L.R.; Kanai, Junichi; Nartker, T.A.

    1995-04-01

    A classifier for predicting the character accuracy of a given page achieved by any Optical Character Recognition (OCR) system is presented. This classifier is based on measuring the amount of white speckle, the amount of character fragments, and overall size information in the page. No output from the OCR system is used. The given page is classified as either good quality (i.e., high OCR accuracy expected) or poor (i.e., low OCR accuracy expected). Six OCR systems processed two different sets of test data: a set of 439 pages obtained from technical and scientific documents and a set of 200 pages obtained from magazines. For every system, approximately 85% of the pages in each data set were correctly predicted. The performance of this classifier is also compared with the ideal-case performance of a prediction method based upon the number of reject markers in OCR generated text. In several cases, this method matched or exceeded the performance of the reject based approach.

  17. Correcting OCR text by association with historical datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauser, Susan E.; Schlaifer, Jonathan; Sabir, Tehseen F.; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Straughan, Scott; Thoma, George R.

    2003-01-01

    The Medical Article Records System (MARS) developed by the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications uses scanning, OCR and automated recognition and reformatting algorithms to generate electronic bibliographic citation data from paper biomedical journal articles. The OCR server incorporated in MARS performs well in general, but fares less well with text printed in small or italic fonts. Affiliations are often printed in small italic fonts in the journals processed by MARS. Consequently, although the automatic processes generate much of the citation data correctly, the affiliation field frequently contains incorrect data, which must be manually corrected by verification operators. In contrast, author names are usually printed in large, normal fonts that are correctly converted to text by the OCR server. The National Library of Medicine"s MEDLINE database contains 11 million indexed citations for biomedical journal articles. This paper documents our effort to use the historical author, affiliation relationships from this large dataset to find potential correct affiliations for MARS articles based on the author and the affiliation in the OCR output. Preliminary tests using a table of about 400,000 author/affiliation pairs extracted from the corrected data from MARS indicated that about 44% of the author/affiliation pairs were repeats and that about 47% of newly converted author names would be found in this set. A text-matching algorithm was developed to determine the likelihood that an affiliation found in the table corresponding to the OCR text of the first author was the current, correct affiliation. This matching algorithm compares an affiliation found in the author/affiliation table (found with the OCR text of the first author) to the OCR output affiliation, and calculates a score indicating the similarity of the affiliation found in the table to the OCR affiliation. Using a ground truth set of 519 OCR author/OCR affiliation/correct affiliation

  18. Robust keyword retrieval method for OCRed text

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yusaku; Takebe, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Hotta, Yoshinobu

    2011-01-01

    Document management systems have become important because of the growing popularity of electronic filing of documents and scanning of books, magazines, manuals, etc., through a scanner or a digital camera, for storage or reading on a PC or an electronic book. Text information acquired by optical character recognition (OCR) is usually added to the electronic documents for document retrieval. Since texts generated by OCR generally include character recognition errors, robust retrieval methods have been introduced to overcome this problem. In this paper, we propose a retrieval method that is robust against both character segmentation and recognition errors. In the proposed method, the insertion of noise characters and dropping of characters in the keyword retrieval enables robustness against character segmentation errors, and character substitution in the keyword of the recognition candidate for each character in OCR or any other character enables robustness against character recognition errors. The recall rate of the proposed method was 15% higher than that of the conventional method. However, the precision rate was 64% lower.

  19. Open source OCR framework using mobile devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Steven Zhiying; Gilani, Syed Omer; Winkler, Stefan

    2008-02-01

    Mobile phones have evolved from passive one-to-one communication device to powerful handheld computing device. Today most new mobile phones are capable of capturing images, recording video, and browsing internet and do much more. Exciting new social applications are emerging on mobile landscape, like, business card readers, sing detectors and translators. These applications help people quickly gather the information in digital format and interpret them without the need of carrying laptops or tablet PCs. However with all these advancements we find very few open source software available for mobile phones. For instance currently there are many open source OCR engines for desktop platform but, to our knowledge, none are available on mobile platform. Keeping this in perspective we propose a complete text detection and recognition system with speech synthesis ability, using existing desktop technology. In this work we developed a complete OCR framework with subsystems from open source desktop community. This includes a popular open source OCR engine named Tesseract for text detection & recognition and Flite speech synthesis module, for adding text-to-speech ability.

  20. Machine-printed Arabic OCR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassibi, Khosrow M.

    1994-02-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of our research in the development of an OCR system for recognition of machine-printed texts in languages that use the Arabic alphabet. The cursive nature of machine-printed Arabic makes the segmentation of words into letters a challenging problem. In our approach, through a novel preliminary segmentation technique, a word is broken into pieces where each piece may not represent a valid letter in general. Neural networks trained on a training sample set of about 500 Arabic text images are used for recognition of these pieces. The rules governing the alphabet and character-level contextual information are used for recombining these pieces into valid letters. Higher-level contextual analysis schemes including the use of an Arabic lexicon and n-grams is also under development and are expected to improve the word recognition accuracy. The segmentation, recognition, and contextual analysis processes are closely integrated using a feedback scheme. The details of preparation of the training set and some recent results on training of the networks will be presented.

  1. Efficient automatic OCR word validation using word partial format derivation and language model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Siyuan; Misra, Dharitri; Thoma, George R.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present an OCR validation module, implemented for the System for Preservation of Electronic Resources (SPER) developed at the U.S. National Library of Medicine.1 The module detects and corrects suspicious words in the OCR output of scanned textual documents through a procedure of deriving partial formats for each suspicious word, retrieving candidate words by partial-match search from lexicons, and comparing the joint probabilities of N-gram and OCR edit transformation corresponding to the candidates. The partial format derivation, based on OCR error analysis, efficiently and accurately generates candidate words from lexicons represented by ternary search trees. In our test case comprising a historic medico-legal document collection, this OCR validation module yielded the correct words with 87% accuracy and reduced the overall OCR word errors by around 60%.

  2. Adaptive detection of missed text areas in OCR outputs: application to the automatic assessment of OCR quality in mass digitization projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Salah, Ahmed; Ragot, Nicolas; Paquet, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    The French National Library (BnF*) has launched many mass digitization projects in order to give access to its collection. The indexation of digital documents on Gallica (digital library of the BnF) is done through their textual content obtained thanks to service providers that use Optical Character Recognition softwares (OCR). OCR softwares have become increasingly complex systems composed of several subsystems dedicated to the analysis and the recognition of the elements in a page. However, the reliability of these systems is always an issue at stake. Indeed, in some cases, we can find errors in OCR outputs that occur because of an accumulation of several errors at different levels in the OCR process. One of the frequent errors in OCR outputs is the missed text components. The presence of such errors may lead to severe defects in digital libraries. In this paper, we investigate the detection of missed text components to control the OCR results from the collections of the French National Library. Our verification approach uses local information inside the pages based on Radon transform descriptors and Local Binary Patterns descriptors (LBP) coupled with OCR results to control their consistency. The experimental results show that our method detects 84.15% of the missed textual components, by comparing the OCR ALTO files outputs (produced by the service providers) to the images of the document.

  3. Measurement of ocular counterrolling /OCR/ by polarized light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenyon, R. V.; Lichtenberg, B. K.

    1982-01-01

    The assessment of the activation of the otolith gravitoinertial sensors in the vestibular system of the inner ear may be accomplished by observing the occular counterrolling (OCR) movements which rotate the eyes about the line of sight. A method is presented for the continuous measurement of OCR by means of polarized light, a system of polarizers, and a contact lens. A polarized hard contact lens is placed between two soft lenses before application to the eye, and the measured phase difference between the incident rotating polarized light and the reflected light from this lens provides readings uncontaminated by other eye movement modes.

  4. Study of the Effectiveness of OCR for Decentralized Data Capture and Conversion. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liston, David M.; And Others

    The ERIC network conversion to an OCR (Optical Character Recognition) mode of data entry was studied to analyze the potential effectiveness of OCR data entry for future EPC/s (Editorial Processing Centers). Study results are also applicable to any other system involving decentralized bibliographic data capture and conversion functions. The report…

  5. Numerical Propulsion System Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naiman, Cynthia

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center, in partnership with the aerospace industry, other government agencies, and academia, is leading the effort to develop an advanced multidisciplinary analysis environment for aerospace propulsion systems called the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS). NPSS is a framework for performing analysis of complex systems. The initial development of NPSS focused on the analysis and design of airbreathing aircraft engines, but the resulting NPSS framework may be applied to any system, for example: aerospace, rockets, hypersonics, power and propulsion, fuel cells, ground based power, and even human system modeling. NPSS provides increased flexibility for the user, which reduces the total development time and cost. It is currently being extended to support the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate Fundamental Aeronautics Program and the Advanced Virtual Engine Test Cell (AVETeC). NPSS focuses on the integration of multiple disciplines such as aerodynamics, structure, and heat transfer with numerical zooming on component codes. Zooming is the coupling of analyses at various levels of detail. NPSS development includes capabilities to facilitate collaborative engineering. The NPSS will provide improved tools to develop custom components and to use capability for zooming to higher fidelity codes, coupling to multidiscipline codes, transmitting secure data, and distributing simulations across different platforms. These powerful capabilities extend NPSS from a zero-dimensional simulation tool to a multi-fidelity, multidiscipline system-level simulation tool for the full development life cycle.

  6. Issues in automatic OCR error classification

    SciTech Connect

    Esakov, J.; Lopresti, D.P.; Sandberg, J.S.; Zhou, J.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper we present the surprising result that OCR errors are not always uniformly distributed across a page. Under certain circumstances, 30% or more of the errors incurred can be attributed to a single, avoidable phenomenon in the scanning process. This observation has important ramifications for work that explicitly or implicitly assumes a uniform error distribution. In addition, our experiments show that not just the quantity but also the nature of the errors is affected. This could have an impact on strategies used for post-process error correction. Results such as these can be obtained only by analyzing large quantities of data in a controlled way. To this end, we also describe our algorithm for classifying OCR errors. This is based on a well-known dynamic programming approach for determining string edit distance which we have extended to handle the types of character segmentation errors inherent to OCR.

  7. Pattern matching techniques for correcting low-confidence OCR words in a known context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Glenn; Hauser, Susan E.; Le, Daniel X.; Thoma, George R.

    2000-12-01

    A commercial OCR system is a key component of a system developed at the National Library of Medicine for the automated extraction of bibliographic fields from biomedical journals. This 5-engine OCR system, while exhibiting high performance overall, does not reliably convert very small characters, especially those that are in italics. As a result, the 'affiliations' field that typically contains such characters in most journals, is not captured accurately, and requires a disproportionately high manual input. To correct this problem, dictionaries have been created from words occurring in this field (e.g., university, department, street addresses, names of cities, etc.) from 230,000 articles already processed. The OCR output corresponding to the affiliation field is then matched against these dictionary entries by approximate string-matching techniques, and the ranked matches are presented to operators for verification. This paper outlines the techniques employed and the results of a comparative evaluation.

  8. Generalization of Hindi OCR Using Adaptive Segmentation and Font Files

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Mudit; Ma, Huanfeng; Doermann, David

    In this chapter, we describe an adaptive Indic OCR system implemented as part of a rapidly retargetable language tool effort and extend work found in [20, 2]. The system includes script identification, character segmentation, training sample creation, and character recognition. For script identification, Hindi words are identified in bilingual or multilingual document images using features of the Devanagari script and support vector machine (SVM). Identified words are then segmented into individual characters, using a font-model-based intelligent character segmentation and recognition system. Using characteristics of structurally similar TrueType fonts, our system automatically builds a model to be used for the segmentation and recognition of the new script, independent of glyph composition. The key is a reliance on known font attributes. In our recognition system three feature extraction methods are used to demonstrate the importance of appropriate features for classification. The methods are tested on both Latin and non-Latin scripts. Results show that the character-level recognition accuracy exceeds 92% for non-Latin and 96% for Latin text on degraded documents. This work is a step toward the recognition of scripts of low-density languages which typically do not warrant the development of commercial OCR, yet often have complete TrueType font descriptions.

  9. The Bible, truth, and multilingual OCR evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanungo, Tapas; Resnik, Philip

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we propose to use the Bible as a dataset for comparing OCR accuracy across languages. Besides being available in a wide range of languages, Bible translations are closely parallel in content, carefully translated, surprisingly relevant with respect to modern-day language, and quite inexpensive. A project at University of Maryland is currently implementing this idea. We have created a scanned image dataset with groundtruth from an Arabic Bible. We have also used image degradation models to create synthetically degraded images of a French Bible. We hope to generate similar Bible datasets for other languages, and we are exploring alternative corpora with similar properties such the Koran and the Bhagavad Gita. Quantitative OCR evaluation based on the Arabic Bible dataset is currently in progress.

  10. Towards Mobile OCR: How To Take a Good Picture of a Document Without Sight

    PubMed Central

    Cutter, Michael; Manduchi, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The advent of mobile OCR (optical character recognition) applications on regular smartphones holds great promise for enabling blind people to access printed information. Unfortunately, these systems suffer from a problem: in order for OCR output to be meaningful, a well-framed image of the document needs to be taken, something that is difficult to do without sight. This contribution presents an experimental investigation of how blind people position and orient a camera phone while acquiring document images. We developed experimental software to investigate if verbal guidance aids in the acquisition of OCR-readable images without sight. We report on our participant's feedback and performance before and after assistance from our software. PMID:26677461

  11. Numerical Propulsion System Simulation Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naiman, Cynthia G.

    2004-01-01

    The Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) is a framework for performing analysis of complex systems. Because the NPSS was developed using the object-oriented paradigm, the resulting architecture is an extensible and flexible framework that is currently being used by a diverse set of participants in government, academia, and the aerospace industry. NPSS is being used by over 15 different institutions to support rockets, hypersonics, power and propulsion, fuel cells, ground based power, and aerospace. Full system-level simulations as well as subsystems may be modeled using NPSS. The NPSS architecture enables the coupling of analyses at various levels of detail, which is called numerical zooming. The middleware used to enable zooming and distributed simulations is the Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA). The NPSS Developer's Kit offers tools for the developer to generate CORBA-based components and wrap codes. The Developer's Kit enables distributed multi-fidelity and multi-discipline simulations, preserves proprietary and legacy codes, and facilitates addition of customized codes. The platforms supported are PC, Linux, HP, Sun, and SGI.

  12. Validation of simulated OCR data sets

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, G.

    1994-12-31

    Recent interest in synthetic data sets for improving classifier performance raises the question whether pseudo-random defect models provide a good approximation to live data from an OCR perspective. A proposal is presented to evaluate artificial data sets by comparing the confusion matrices genuerated on scanned and synthesized data by a given classifier. The proposed measure applies, in principle, to both isolated character recognition and to printed text. It is argued that the proposed method is more practical than direct comparison of synthetic data with real data.

  13. Study of style effects on OCR errors in the MEDLINE database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, Penny; Davis, Diane L.; Andersen, Tim L.; Barney Smith, Elisa H.

    2005-01-01

    The National Library of Medicine has developed a system for the automatic extraction of data from scanned journal articles to populate the MEDLINE database. Although the 5-engine OCR system used in this process exhibits good performance overall, it does make errors in character recognition that must be corrected in order for the process to achieve the requisite accuracy. The correction process works by feeding words that have characters with less than 100% confidence (as determined automatically by the OCR engine) to a human operator who then must manually verify the word or correct the error. The majority of these errors are contained in the affiliation information zone where the characters are in italics or small fonts. Therefore only affiliation information data is used in this research. This paper examines the correlation between OCR errors and various character attributes in the MEDLINE database, such as font size, italics, bold, etc. and OCR confidence levels. The motivation for this research is that if a correlation between the character style and types of errors exists it should be possible to use this information to improve operator productivity by increasing the probability that the correct word option is presented to the human editor. We have determined that this correlation exists, in particular for the case of characters with diacritics.

  14. Study of style effects on OCR errors in the MEDLINE database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, Penny; Davis, Diane L.; Andersen, Tim L.; Barney Smith, Elisa H.

    2004-12-01

    The National Library of Medicine has developed a system for the automatic extraction of data from scanned journal articles to populate the MEDLINE database. Although the 5-engine OCR system used in this process exhibits good performance overall, it does make errors in character recognition that must be corrected in order for the process to achieve the requisite accuracy. The correction process works by feeding words that have characters with less than 100% confidence (as determined automatically by the OCR engine) to a human operator who then must manually verify the word or correct the error. The majority of these errors are contained in the affiliation information zone where the characters are in italics or small fonts. Therefore only affiliation information data is used in this research. This paper examines the correlation between OCR errors and various character attributes in the MEDLINE database, such as font size, italics, bold, etc. and OCR confidence levels. The motivation for this research is that if a correlation between the character style and types of errors exists it should be possible to use this information to improve operator productivity by increasing the probability that the correct word option is presented to the human editor. We have determined that this correlation exists, in particular for the case of characters with diacritics.

  15. Relativistic positioning systems: Numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchades Colmenero, Neus

    The position of users located on the Earth's surface or near it may be found with the classic positioning systems (CPS). Certain information broadcast by satellites of global navigation systems, as GPS and GALILEO, may be used for positioning. The CPS are based on the Newtonian formalism, although relativistic post-Newtonian corrections are done when they are necessary. This thesis contributes to the development of a different positioning approach, which is fully relativistic from the beginning. In the relativistic positioning systems (RPS), the space-time position of any user (ship, spacecraft, and so on) can be calculated with the help of four satellites, which broadcast their proper times by means of codified electromagnetic signals. In this thesis, we have simulated satellite 4-tuples of the GPS and GALILEO constellations. If a user receives the signals from four satellites simultaneously, the emission proper times read -after decoding- are the user "emission coordinates". In order to find the user "positioning coordinates", in an appropriate almost inertial reference system, there are two possibilities: (a) the explicit relation between positioning and emission coordinates (broadcast by the satellites) is analytically found or (b) numerical codes are designed to calculate the positioning coordinates from the emission ones. Method (a) is only viable in simple ideal cases, whereas (b) allows us to consider realistic situations. In this thesis, we have designed numerical codes with the essential aim of studying two appropriate RPS, which may be generalized. Sometimes, there are two real users placed in different positions, which receive the same proper times from the same satellites; then, we say that there is bifurcation, and additional data are needed to choose the real user position. In this thesis, bifurcation is studied in detail. We have analyzed in depth two RPS models; in both, it is considered that the satellites move in the Schwarzschild's space

  16. A Functional Nuclear Localization Sequence in the C. elegans TRPV Channel OCR-2

    PubMed Central

    Ezak, Meredith J.; Ferkey, Denise M.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to modulate gene expression in response to sensory experience is critical to the normal development and function of the nervous system. Calcium is a key activator of the signal transduction cascades that mediate the process of translating a cellular stimulus into transcriptional changes. With the recent discovery that the mammalian Cav1.2 calcium channel can be cleaved, enter the nucleus and act as a transcription factor to control neuronal gene expression, a more direct role for the calcium channels themselves in regulating transcription has begun to be appreciated. Here we report the identification of a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) in the C. elegans transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) cation channel OCR-2. TRPV channels have previously been implicated in transcriptional regulation of neuronal genes in the nematode, although the precise mechanism remains unclear. We show that the NLS in OCR-2 is functional, being able to direct nuclear accumulation of a synthetic cargo protein as well as the carboxy-terminal cytosolic tail of OCR-2 where it is endogenously found. Furthermore, we discovered that a carboxy-terminal portion of the full-length channel can localize to the nucleus of neuronal cells. These results suggest that the OCR-2 TRPV cation channel may have a direct nuclear function in neuronal cells that was not previously appreciated. PMID:21957475

  17. DRR research beyond commercial off-the-shelf OCR software: a survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiaofan

    2005-01-01

    After decades of research, Optical Character Recognition (OCR) has entered into a relatively mature stage. Commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) OCR software packages have become powerful tools in Document Recognition and Retrieval (DRR) applications. One question naturally arises: What areas are left for new DRR research beyond COTS OCR software? There are many discussions around it in recent conferences. This paper attempts to address this question through a systematic survey of recently reported DRR projects as well as our own Digital Content Re-Mastering (DCRM) research at HP Labs. This survey has shown that custom DRR research is still in great need for better accuracy and reliability, complementary contents, or downstream information retrieval. Several concrete observations are also made on the basis of this survey: First, the basic character/word recognition is mostly taken on by COTS software, with a few exceptions. Second, system-level research with regard to reliability and guaranteed accuracy can seldom be replaced by COTS software. Third, document-level structure understanding still has much room to expand. Fourth, post-OCR information retrieval also has many challenging research topics.

  18. DRR research beyond commercial off-the-shelf OCR software: a survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiaofan

    2004-12-01

    After decades of research, Optical Character Recognition (OCR) has entered into a relatively mature stage. Commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) OCR software packages have become powerful tools in Document Recognition and Retrieval (DRR) applications. One question naturally arises: What areas are left for new DRR research beyond COTS OCR software? There are many discussions around it in recent conferences. This paper attempts to address this question through a systematic survey of recently reported DRR projects as well as our own Digital Content Re-Mastering (DCRM) research at HP Labs. This survey has shown that custom DRR research is still in great need for better accuracy and reliability, complementary contents, or downstream information retrieval. Several concrete observations are also made on the basis of this survey: First, the basic character/word recognition is mostly taken on by COTS software, with a few exceptions. Second, system-level research with regard to reliability and guaranteed accuracy can seldom be replaced by COTS software. Third, document-level structure understanding still has much room to expand. Fourth, post-OCR information retrieval also has many challenging research topics.

  19. Interagency mechanical operations group numerical systems group

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This report consists of the minutes of the May 20-21, 1971 meeting of the Interagency Mechanical Operations Group (IMOG) Numerical Systems Group. This group looks at issues related to numerical control in the machining industry. Items discussed related to the use of CAD and CAM, EIA standards, data links, and numerical control.

  20. Elliptic systems and numerical transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastin, C. W.; Thompson, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    Properties of a transformation method, which was developed for solving fluid dynamic problems on general two dimensional regions, are discussed. These include construction error of the transformation and applications to mesh generation. An error and stability analysis for the numerical solution of a model parabolic problem is also presented.

  1. A super resolution framework for low resolution document image OCR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Di; Agam, Gady

    2013-01-01

    Optical character recognition is widely used for converting document images into digital media. Existing OCR algorithms and tools produce good results from high resolution, good quality, document images. In this paper, we propose a machine learning based super resolution framework for low resolution document image OCR. Two main techniques are used in our proposed approach: a document page segmentation algorithm and a modified K-means clustering algorithm. Using this approach, by exploiting coherence in the document, we reconstruct from a low resolution document image a better resolution image and improve OCR results. Experimental results show substantial gain in low resolution documents such as the ones captured from video.

  2. Numerical methods for multibody systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glowinski, Roland; Nasser, Mahmoud G.

    1994-01-01

    This article gives a brief summary of some results obtained by Nasser on modeling and simulation of inequality problems in multibody dynamics. In particular, the augmented Lagrangian method discussed here is applied to a constrained motion problem with impulsive inequality constraints. A fundamental characteristic of the multibody dynamics problem is the lack of global convexity of its Lagrangian. The problem is transformed into a convex analysis problem by localization (piecewise linearization), where the augmented Lagrangian has been successfully used. A model test problem is considered and a set of numerical experiments is presented.

  3. Efficient Language-Independent Retrieval of Printed Documents without OCR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdy, Walid; Darwish, Kareem; El-Saban, Motaz

    Recent book digitization initiatives have facilitated the access and search of millions of books. Although OCR remains essential for retrieving printed documents, OCR engines remain limited in the languages they handle and are generally expensive to build. This paper proposes a language independent approach that enables search through printed documents in a way that combines image-based matching with conventional IR techniques without using OCR. While image-based matching can be effective in finding similar words, complementing it with efficient retrieval techniques allows for sub-word matching, term weighting, and document ranking. The basic idea is that similar connected elements in printed documents are clustered and represented with ID’s, which are then used to generate equivalent textual representations. The resultant representations are indexed using an IR engine and searched using the equivalent ID’s of the connected elements in queries. Though, the main benefit of the proposed approach lies in languages for which no OCR exists, the technique was tested on English and Arabic to ascertain the relative effectiveness of the approach. The approach achieves more than 61% relative effectiveness compared to using OCR for both languages. While the reported numbers are lower than that of OCR-based approaches, the proposed method is fully automated, does not require any supervised training, and allows documents to be searchable within a few hours.

  4. A segmentation-free approach to Arabic and Urdu OCR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbour, Nazly; Shafait, Faisal

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present a generic Optical Character Recognition system for Arabic script languages called Nabocr. Nabocr uses OCR approaches specific for Arabic script recognition. Performing recognition on Arabic script text is relatively more difficult than Latin text due to the nature of Arabic script, which is cursive and context sensitive. Moreover, Arabic script has different writing styles that vary in complexity. Nabocr is initially trained to recognize both Urdu Nastaleeq and Arabic Naskh fonts. However, it can be trained by users to be used for other Arabic script languages. We have evaluated our system's performance for both Urdu and Arabic. In order to evaluate Urdu recognition, we have generated a dataset of Urdu text called UPTI (Urdu Printed Text Image Database), which measures different aspects of a recognition system. The performance of our system for Urdu clean text is 91%. For Arabic clean text, the performance is 86%. Moreover, we have compared the performance of our system against Tesseract's newly released Arabic recognition, and the performance of both systems on clean images is almost the same.

  5. Combining multiple thresholding binarization values to improve OCR output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, William B.; Kennard, Douglas J.; Ringger, Eric K.

    2013-01-01

    For noisy, historical documents, a high optical character recognition (OCR) word error rate (WER) can render the OCR text unusable. Since image binarization is often the method used to identify foreground pixels, a body of research seeks to improve image-wide binarization directly. Instead of relying on any one imperfect binarization technique, our method incorporates information from multiple simple thresholding binarizations of the same image to improve text output. Using a new corpus of 19th century newspaper grayscale images for which the text transcription is known, we observe WERs of 13.8% and higher using current binarization techniques and a state-of-the-art OCR engine. Our novel approach combines the OCR outputs from multiple thresholded images by aligning the text output and producing a lattice of word alternatives from which a lattice word error rate (LWER) is calculated. Our results show a LWER of 7.6% when aligning two threshold images and a LWER of 6.8% when aligning five. From the word lattice we commit to one hypothesis by applying the methods of Lund et al. (2011) achieving an improvement over the original OCR output and a 8.41% WER result on this data set.

  6. Evaluating supervised topic models in the presence of OCR errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Daniel; Ringger, Eric; Seppi, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Supervised topic models are promising tools for text analytics that simultaneously model topical patterns in document collections and relationships between those topics and document metadata, such as timestamps. We examine empirically the effect of OCR noise on the ability of supervised topic models to produce high quality output through a series of experiments in which we evaluate three supervised topic models and a naive baseline on synthetic OCR data having various levels of degradation and on real OCR data from two different decades. The evaluation includes experiments with and without feature selection. Our results suggest that supervised topic models are no better, or at least not much better in terms of their robustness to OCR errors, than unsupervised topic models and that feature selection has the mixed result of improving topic quality while harming metadata prediction quality. For users of topic modeling methods on OCR data, supervised topic models do not yet solve the problem of finding better topics than the original unsupervised topic models.

  7. Numerical propulsion system simulation - An interdisciplinary approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Lester D.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1991-01-01

    The tremendous progress being made in computational engineering and the rapid growth in computing power that is resulting from parallel processing now make it feasible to consider the use of computer simulations to gain insights into the complex interactions in aerospace propulsion systems and to evaluate new concepts early in the design process before a commitment to hardware is made. Described here is a NASA initiative to develop a Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) capability.

  8. Numerical propulsion system simulation: An interdisciplinary approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Lester D.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1991-01-01

    The tremendous progress being made in computational engineering and the rapid growth in computing power that is resulting from parallel processing now make it feasible to consider the use of computer simulations to gain insights into the complex interactions in aerospace propulsion systems and to evaluate new concepts early in the design process before a commitment to hardware is made. Described here is a NASA initiative to develop a Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) capability.

  9. Numerical modeling of nonintrusive inspection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, J.; Morgan, J.; Sale, K.

    1992-12-01

    A wide variety of nonintrusive inspection systems have been proposed in the past several years for the detection of hidden contraband in airline luggage and shipping containers. The majority of these proposed techniques depend on the interaction of radiation with matter to produce a signature specific to the contraband of interest, whether drugs or explosives. In the authors` role as diagnostic specialists in the Underground Test Program over the past forty years, L-Division of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has developed a technique expertise in the combined numerical and experimental modeling of these types of system. Based on their experience, they are convinced that detailed numerical modeling provides a much more accurate estimate of the actual performance of complex experiments than simple analytical modeling. Furthermore, the construction of detailed numerical prototypes allows experimenters to explore the entire region of parameter space available to them before committing their ideas to hardware. This sort of systematic analysis has often led to improved experimental designs and reductions in fielding costs. L-Division has developed an extensive suite of computer codes to model proposed experiments and possible background interactions. These codes allow one to simulate complex radiation sources, model 3-dimensional system geometries with {open_quotes}real world{close_quotes} complexity, specify detailed elemental distributions, and predict the response of almost any type of detector. In this work several examples are presented illustrating the use of these codes in modeling experimental systems at LLNL and their potential usefulness in evaluating nonintrusive inspection systems is discussed.

  10. OCR enhancement through neighbor embedding and fast approximate nearest neighbors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. C.

    2012-10-01

    Generic optical character recognition (OCR) engines often perform very poorly in transcribing scanned low resolution (LR) text documents. To improve OCR performance, we apply the Neighbor Embedding (NE) single-image super-resolution (SISR) technique to LR scanned text documents to obtain high resolution (HR) versions, which we subsequently process with OCR. For comparison, we repeat this procedure using bicubic interpolation (BI). We demonstrate that mean-square errors (MSE) in NE HR estimates do not increase substantially when NE is trained in one Latin font style and tested in another, provided both styles belong to the same font category (serif or sans serif). This is very important in practice, since for each font size, the number of training sets required for each category may be reduced from dozens to just one. We also incorporate randomized k-d trees into our NE implementation to perform approximate nearest neighbor search, and obtain a 1000x speed up of our original NE implementation, with negligible MSE degradation. This acceleration also made it practical to combine all of our size-specific NE Latin models into a single Universal Latin Model (ULM). The ULM eliminates the need to determine the unknown font category and size of an input LR text document and match it to an appropriate model, a very challenging task, since the dpi (pixels per inch) of the input LR image is generally unknown. Our experiments show that OCR character error rates (CER) were over 90% when we applied the Tesseract OCR engine to LR text documents (scanned at 75 dpi and 100 dpi) in the 6-10 pt range. By contrast, using k-d trees and the ULM, CER after NE preprocessing averaged less than 7% at 3x (100 dpi LR scanning) and 4x (75 dpi LR scanning) magnification, over an order of magnitude improvement. Moreover, CER after NE preprocessing was more that 6 times lower on average than after BI preprocessing.

  11. Systems Improved Numerical Fluids Analysis Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costello, F. A.

    1990-01-01

    Systems Improved Numerical Fluids Analysis Code, SINFAC, consists of additional routines added to April, 1983, version of SINDA. Additional routines provide for mathematical modeling of active heat-transfer loops. Simulates steady-state and pseudo-transient operations of 16 different components of heat-transfer loops, including radiators, evaporators, condensers, mechanical pumps, reservoirs, and many types of valves and fittings. Program contains property-analysis routine used to compute thermodynamic properties of 20 different refrigerants. Source code written in FORTRAN 77.

  12. Numerical simulation of magmatic hydrothermal systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingebritsen, S.E.; Geiger, S.; Hurwitz, S.; Driesner, T.

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of magmatic hydrothermal systems entails coupled and nonlinear multiphase flow, heat and solute transport, and deformation in highly heterogeneous media. Thus, quantitative analysis of these systems depends mainly on numerical solution of coupled partial differential equations and complementary equations of state (EOS). The past 2 decades have seen steady growth of computational power and the development of numerical models that have eliminated or minimized the need for various simplifying assumptions. Considerable heuristic insight has been gained from process-oriented numerical modeling. Recent modeling efforts employing relatively complete EOS and accurate transport calculations have revealed dynamic behavior that was damped by linearized, less accurate models, including fluid property control of hydrothermal plume temperatures and three-dimensional geometries. Other recent modeling results have further elucidated the controlling role of permeability structure and revealed the potential for significant hydrothermally driven deformation. Key areas for future reSearch include incorporation of accurate EOS for the complete H2O-NaCl-CO2 system, more realistic treatment of material heterogeneity in space and time, realistic description of large-scale relative permeability behavior, and intercode benchmarking comparisons. Copyright 2010 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Research on ARM Numerical Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xu; JiHong, Chen

    Computerized Numerical Control (CNC) machine tools is the foundation of modern manufacturing systems, whose advanced digital technology is the key to solve the problem of sustainable development of machine tool manufacturing industry. The paper is to design CNC system embedded on ARM and indicates the hardware design and the software systems supported. On the hardware side: the driving chip of the motor control unit, as the core of components, is MCX314AL of DSP motion control which is developed by NOVA Electronics Co., Ltd. of Japan. It make convenient to control machine because of its excellent performance, simple interface, easy programming. On the Software side, the uC/OS-2 is selected as the embedded operating system of the open source, which makes a detailed breakdown of the modules of the CNC system. Those priorities are designed according to their actual requirements. The ways of communication between the module and the interrupt response are so different that it guarantees real-time property and reliability of the numerical control system. Therefore, it not only meets the requirements of the current social precision machining, but has good man-machine interface and network support to facilitate a variety of craftsmen use.

  14. Numerical data frame readout system used in testing telemetry systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cote, C. E.; Cressey, J. R.

    1967-01-01

    Digital telemetry systems are treated by a display system that offers direct readout as high data rates. The rates appear in numerical format and are adaptable to photographic recording techniques. The system can show bit dropouts at a memory output or locate a malfunction in a system.

  15. 2001 Numerical Propulsion System Simulation Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lytle, John; Follen, Gregory; Naiman, Cynthia; Veres, Joseph; Owen, Karl; Lopez, Isaac

    2002-01-01

    The technologies necessary to enable detailed numerical simulations of complete propulsion systems are being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center in cooperation with industry, academia and other government agencies. Large scale, detailed simulations will be of great value to the nation because they eliminate some of the costly testing required to develop and certify advanced propulsion systems. In addition, time and cost savings will be achieved by enabling design details to be evaluated early in the development process before a commitment is made to a specific design. This concept is called the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS). NPSS consists of three main elements: (1) engineering models that enable multidisciplinary analysis of large subsystems and systems at various levels of detail, (2) a simulation environment that maximizes designer productivity, and (3) a cost-effective, high-performance computing platform. A fundamental requirement of the concept is that the simulations must be capable of overnight execution on easily accessible computing platforms. This will greatly facilitate the use of large-scale simulations in a design environment. This paper describes the current status of the NPSS with specific emphasis on the progress made over the past year on air breathing propulsion applications. Major accomplishments include the first formal release of the NPSS object-oriented architecture (NPSS Version 1) and the demonstration of a one order of magnitude reduction in computing cost-to-performance ratio using a cluster of personal computers. The paper also describes the future NPSS milestones, which include the simulation of space transportation propulsion systems in response to increased emphasis on safe, low cost access to space within NASA's Aerospace Technology Enterprise. In addition, the paper contains a summary of the feedback received from industry partners on the fiscal year 2000 effort and the actions taken over the past year to

  16. 2000 Numerical Propulsion System Simulation Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lytle, John; Follen, Greg; Naiman, Cynthia; Veres, Joseph; Owen, Karl; Lopez, Isaac

    2001-01-01

    The technologies necessary to enable detailed numerical simulations of complete propulsion systems are being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center in cooperation with industry, academia, and other government agencies. Large scale, detailed simulations will be of great value to the nation because they eliminate some of the costly testing required to develop and certify advanced propulsion systems. In addition, time and cost savings will be achieved by enabling design details to be evaluated early in the development process before a commitment is made to a specific design. This concept is called the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS). NPSS consists of three main elements: (1) engineering models that enable multidisciplinary analysis of large subsystems and systems at various levels of detail, (2) a simulation environment that maximizes designer productivity, and (3) a cost-effective. high-performance computing platform. A fundamental requirement of the concept is that the simulations must be capable of overnight execution on easily accessible computing platforms. This will greatly facilitate the use of large-scale simulations in a design environment. This paper describes the current status of the NPSS with specific emphasis on the progress made over the past year on air breathing propulsion applications. Major accomplishments include the first formal release of the NPSS object-oriented architecture (NPSS Version 1) and the demonstration of a one order of magnitude reduction in computing cost-to-performance ratio using a cluster of personal computers. The paper also describes the future NPSS milestones, which include the simulation of space transportation propulsion systems in response to increased emphasis on safe, low cost access to space within NASA'S Aerospace Technology Enterprise. In addition, the paper contains a summary of the feedback received from industry partners on the fiscal year 1999 effort and the actions taken over the past year to

  17. Numeral-Incorporating Roots in Numeral Systems: A Comparative Analysis of Two Sign Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuentes, Mariana; Massone, Maria Ignacia; Fernandez-Viader, Maria del Pilar; Makotrinsky, Alejandro; Pulgarin, Francisca

    2010-01-01

    Numeral-incorporating roots in the numeral systems of Argentine Sign Language (LSA) and Catalan Sign Language (LSC), as well as the main features of the number systems of both languages, are described and compared. Informants discussed the use of numerals and roots in both languages (in most cases in natural contexts). Ten informants took part in…

  18. The Numerical Propulsion System Simulation: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lytle, John K.

    2000-01-01

    Advances in computational technology and in physics-based modeling are making large-scale, detailed simulations of complex systems possible within the design environment. For example, the integration of computing, communications, and aerodynamics has reduced the time required to analyze major propulsion system components from days and weeks to minutes and hours. This breakthrough has enabled the detailed simulation of major propulsion system components to become a routine part of designing systems, providing the designer with critical information about the components early in the design process. This paper describes the development of the numerical propulsion system simulation (NPSS), a modular and extensible framework for the integration of multicomponent and multidisciplinary analysis tools using geographically distributed resources such as computing platforms, data bases, and people. The analysis is currently focused on large-scale modeling of complete aircraft engines. This will provide the product developer with a "virtual wind tunnel" that will reduce the number of hardware builds and tests required during the development of advanced aerospace propulsion systems.

  19. Numerically simulating the sandwich plate system structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Guo-Qing; Li, Gang; Liu, Zhi-Hui; Niu, Huai-Lei; Li, Chen-Feng

    2010-09-01

    Sandwich plate systems (SPS) are advanced materials that have begun to receive extensive attention in naval architecture and ocean engineering. At present, according to the rules of classification societies, a mixture of shell and solid elements are required to simulate an SPS. Based on the principle of stiffness decomposition, a new numerical simulation method for shell elements was proposed. In accordance with the principle of stiffness decomposition, the total stiffness can be decomposed into the bending stiffness and shear stiffness. Displacement and stress response related to bending stiffness was calculated with the laminated shell element. Displacement and stress response due to shear was calculated by use of a computational code write by FORTRAN language. Then the total displacement and stress response for the SPS was obtained by adding together these two parts of total displacement and stress. Finally, a rectangular SPS plate and a double-bottom structure were used for a simulation. The results show that the deflection simulated by the elements proposed in the paper is larger than the same simulated by solid elements and the analytical solution according to Hoff theory and approximate to the same simulated by the mixture of shell-solid elements, and the stress simulated by the elements proposed in the paper is approximate to the other simulating methods. So compared with calculations based on a mixture of shell and solid elements, the numerical simulation method given in the paper is more efficient and easier to do.

  20. A unified approach for development of Urdu Corpus for OCR and demographic purpose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Prakash; Nain, Neeta; Ahmed, Mushtaq

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents a methodology for the development of an Urdu handwritten text image Corpus and application of Corpus linguistics in the field of OCR and information retrieval from handwritten document. Compared to other language scripts, Urdu script is little bit complicated for data entry. To enter a single character it requires a combination of multiple keys entry. Here, a mixed approach is proposed and demonstrated for building Urdu Corpus for OCR and Demographic data collection. Demographic part of database could be used to train a system to fetch the data automatically, which will be helpful to simplify existing manual data-processing task involved in the field of data collection such as input forms like Passport, Ration Card, Voting Card, AADHAR, Driving licence, Indian Railway Reservation, Census data etc. This would increase the participation of Urdu language community in understanding and taking benefit of the Government schemes. To make availability and applicability of database in a vast area of corpus linguistics, we propose a methodology for data collection, mark-up, digital transcription, and XML metadata information for benchmarking.

  1. [Antirestriction proteins ardA and Ocr as effective inhibitors of the type I restriction-modification enzymes].

    PubMed

    Zavil'gel'skiĭ, G B; Rastorguev, S M

    2009-01-01

    Genes encoding antirestriction proteins (antirestrictases, inasmuch as the antirestriction proteins inhibit the activity of restriction-modification systems, but have no proper enzyme activity, the name antirestrictase is only tentative) are included in the composition of conjugative plasmids (genes ardABC) and some bacteriophages (genes ocr and darA). Antirestriction proteins inhibit of the type I restriction-modification enzymes and thus protect unmodified DNA of plasmids and bacteriophages from degradation. Antirestriction proteins belong to the "protein mimicry of DNA" family: the spatial structure is like the B-form of DNA, and therefore the antirestriction proteins operated on the principle of concurrent inhibition replacing DNA in the complex with the restriction-modification enzyme. Based on the prepared in vitro mutant forms of ArdA and Ocr, and also on natural proteins ArdA selectively inhibiting restriction activity of the type I enzymes, but not affecting their methylase activity, we have developed a model of complex formation between the antirestriction proteins and the restriction-modification enzymes R2M2S. Antirestriction proteins are capable of competing displacement of the DNA strand from two sites which are situated as follows: 1) in S-subunit (enzyme contact with the specific DNA site) and 2) in R-subunit (through this unit translocation of the DNA strand occurs followed by its degradation). Analysis of estriction and antimodification activities of proteins ArdA and Ocr depending on the expression level of genes ardA and ocr was performed (the cloning of the genes was done under strictly regulated promoter). PMID:19425495

  2. Islet Oxygen Consumption Rate (OCR) Dose Predicts Insulin Independence in Clinical Islet Autotransplantation

    PubMed Central

    Papas, Klearchos K.; Bellin, Melena D.; Sutherland, David E. R.; Suszynski, Thomas M.; Kitzmann, Jennifer P.; Avgoustiniatos, Efstathios S.; Gruessner, Angelika C.; Mueller, Kathryn R.; Beilman, Gregory J.; Balamurugan, Appakalai N.; Loganathan, Gopalakrishnan; Colton, Clark K.; Koulmanda, Maria; Weir, Gordon C.; Wilhelm, Josh J.; Qian, Dajun; Niland, Joyce C.; Hering, Bernhard J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Reliable in vitro islet quality assessment assays that can be performed routinely, prospectively, and are able to predict clinical transplant outcomes are needed. In this paper we present data on the utility of an assay based on cellular oxygen consumption rate (OCR) in predicting clinical islet autotransplant (IAT) insulin independence (II). IAT is an attractive model for evaluating characterization assays regarding their utility in predicting II due to an absence of confounding factors such as immune rejection and immunosuppressant toxicity. Methods Membrane integrity staining (FDA/PI), OCR normalized to DNA (OCR/DNA), islet equivalent (IE) and OCR (viable IE) normalized to recipient body weight (IE dose and OCR dose), and OCR/DNA normalized to islet size index (ISI) were used to characterize autoislet preparations (n = 35). Correlation between pre-IAT islet product characteristics and II was determined using receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results Preparations that resulted in II had significantly higher OCR dose and IE dose (p<0.001). These islet characterization methods were highly correlated with II at 6–12 months post-IAT (area-under-the-curve (AUC) = 0.94 for IE dose and 0.96 for OCR dose). FDA/PI (AUC = 0.49) and OCR/DNA (AUC = 0.58) did not correlate with II. OCR/DNA/ISI may have some utility in predicting outcome (AUC = 0.72). Conclusions Commonly used assays to determine whether a clinical islet preparation is of high quality prior to transplantation are greatly lacking in sensitivity and specificity. While IE dose is highly predictive, it does not take into account islet cell quality. OCR dose, which takes into consideration both islet cell quality and quantity, may enable a more accurate and prospective evaluation of clinical islet preparations. PMID:26258815

  3. SINFAC - SYSTEMS IMPROVED NUMERICAL FLUIDS ANALYSIS CODE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costello, F. A.

    1994-01-01

    The Systems Improved Numerical Fluids Analysis Code, SINFAC, consists of additional routines added to the April 1983 revision of SINDA, a general thermal analyzer program. The purpose of the additional routines is to allow for the modeling of active heat transfer loops. The modeler can simulate the steady-state and pseudo-transient operations of 16 different heat transfer loop components including radiators, evaporators, condensers, mechanical pumps, reservoirs and many types of valves and fittings. In addition, the program contains a property analysis routine that can be used to compute the thermodynamic properties of 20 different refrigerants. SINFAC can simulate the response to transient boundary conditions. SINFAC was first developed as a method for computing the steady-state performance of two phase systems. It was then modified using CNFRWD, SINDA's explicit time-integration scheme, to accommodate transient thermal models. However, SINFAC cannot simulate pressure drops due to time-dependent fluid acceleration, transient boil-out, or transient fill-up, except in the accumulator. SINFAC also requires the user to be familiar with SINDA. The solution procedure used by SINFAC is similar to that which an engineer would use to solve a system manually. The solution to a system requires the determination of all of the outlet conditions of each component such as the flow rate, pressure, and enthalpy. To obtain these values, the user first estimates the inlet conditions to the first component of the system, then computes the outlet conditions from the data supplied by the manufacturer of the first component. The user then estimates the temperature at the outlet of the third component and computes the corresponding flow resistance of the second component. With the flow resistance of the second component, the user computes the conditions down stream, namely the inlet conditions of the third. The computations follow for the rest of the system, back to the first component

  4. Keeping on Keeping on: OCR and Complaints of Racial Discrimination 50 Years after "Brown"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollock, Mica

    2005-01-01

    This article, written by a former civil rights investigator in the U.S. Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights (OCR), contends that ordinary Americans advocating for equal educational opportunity for students of color might enlist OCR more actively and knowingly to help secure racial equality of opportunity 50 years after "Brown." Now a…

  5. History of the Tesseract OCR engine: what worked and what didn't

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Ray W.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the development history of the Tesseract OCR engine, and compares the methods to general changes in the field over a similar time period. Emphasis is placed on the lessons learned with the goal of providing a primer for those interested in OCR research.

  6. Low-Budget, Cost-Effective OCR: Optical Character Recognition for MS-DOS Micros.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Ernest

    1990-01-01

    Discusses optical character recognition (OCR) for use with MS-DOS microcomputers. Cost effectiveness is considered, three types of software approaches to character recognition are explained, hardware and operation requirements are described, possible library applications are discussed, future OCR developments are suggested, and a list of OCR…

  7. Optical character recognition (OCR) in uncontrolled environments using optical correlators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, Andre; Bergeron, Alain; Prevost, Donald; Radloff, Ernst A.

    1999-03-01

    With the emergence of a global economy, companies are more than ever pressured for improved efficiency. Int he transportation industry there is a growing need for better tracking of the status of containers in transit. This would lead to improved handling operation, reduce the number of errors, increase the throughput and enable the use of electronic data interchange (EDI). As electronic tags are not generalized in this industry, containers identification must rely on optical character recognition of the codes printed on the containers. OCR has been one of the first applications envisaged for optical correlation technologies as a result of their high-speed direct detection and identification capabilities. Until now though, most of the work in this area had been performed on computer-generated symbols. Field applications however, must cope with varying symbol fonts and sizes, colors and backgrounds, illumination levels, etc. Environmental variables such as dust, dirt and rust must also be accounted for. Together, these variables lead to a hard-to- solve problem. This paper presents INO's optical correlator and discusses the methods used to generate the identification vectors from which the OCR classification is achieved. It is shown that good results can be obtained on gray-scale real- life images when a multiple composite-filters strategy combined to an innovative classification method.

  8. Loose, Falling Characters and Sentences: The Persistence of the OCR Problem in Digital Repository E-Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kichuk, Diana

    2015-01-01

    The electronic conversion of scanned image files to readable text using optical character recognition (OCR) software and the subsequent migration of raw OCR text to e-book text file formats are key remediation or media conversion technologies used in digital repository e-book production. Despite real progress, the OCR problem of reliability and…

  9. 7 CFR 15f.19 - Other than myself, OCR, and the agency, may any other interested party participate in the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Other than myself, OCR, and the agency, may any other... Conducted? § 15f.19 Other than myself, OCR, and the agency, may any other interested party participate in... the complainant, OCR, and, and if it so desires, the agency. However, if there are circumstances...

  10. 7 CFR 15f.19 - Other than myself, OCR, and the agency, may any other interested party participate in the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Other than myself, OCR, and the agency, may any other... Conducted? § 15f.19 Other than myself, OCR, and the agency, may any other interested party participate in... the complainant, OCR, and, and if it so desires, the agency. However, if there are circumstances...

  11. 7 CFR 15f.19 - Other than myself, OCR, and the agency, may any other interested party participate in the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Other than myself, OCR, and the agency, may any other... Conducted? § 15f.19 Other than myself, OCR, and the agency, may any other interested party participate in... the complainant, OCR, and, and if it so desires, the agency. However, if there are circumstances...

  12. 7 CFR 15f.19 - Other than myself, OCR, and the agency, may any other interested party participate in the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Other than myself, OCR, and the agency, may any other... Conducted? § 15f.19 Other than myself, OCR, and the agency, may any other interested party participate in... the complainant, OCR, and, and if it so desires, the agency. However, if there are circumstances...

  13. 7 CFR 15f.19 - Other than myself, OCR, and the agency, may any other interested party participate in the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Other than myself, OCR, and the agency, may any other... Conducted? § 15f.19 Other than myself, OCR, and the agency, may any other interested party participate in... the complainant, OCR, and, and if it so desires, the agency. However, if there are circumstances...

  14. Numerical Archetypal Parameterization for Mesoscale Convective Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, J. I.

    2015-12-01

    Vertical shear tends to organize atmospheric moist convection into multiscale coherent structures. Especially, the counter-gradient vertical transport of horizontal momentum by organized convection can enhance the wind shear and transport kinetic energy upscale. However, this process is not represented by traditional parameterizations. The present paper sets the archetypal dynamical models, originally formulated by the second author, into a parameterization context by utilizing a nonhydrostatic anelastic model with segmentally-constant approximation (NAM-SCA). Using a two-dimensional framework as a starting point, NAM-SCA spontaneously generates propagating tropical squall-lines in a sheared environment. A high numerical efficiency is achieved through a novel compression methodology. The numerically-generated archetypes produce vertical profiles of convective momentum transport that are consistent with the analytic archetype.

  15. Utilizing web data in identification and correction of OCR errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghva, Kazem; Agarwal, Shivam

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we report on our experiments for detection and correction of OCR errors with web data. More specifically, we utilize Google search to access the big data resources available to identify possible candidates for correction. We then use a combination of the Longest Common Subsequences (LCS) and Bayesian estimates to automatically pick the proper candidate. Our experimental results on a small set of historical newspaper data show a recall and precision of 51% and 100%, respectively. The work in this paper further provides a detailed classification and analysis of all errors. In particular, we point out the shortcomings of our approach in its ability to suggest proper candidates to correct the remaining errors.

  16. Implicit numerical integration for periodic solutions of autonomous nonlinear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurston, G. A.

    1982-01-01

    A change of variables that stabilizes numerical computations for periodic solutions of autonomous systems is derived. Computation of the period is decoupled from the rest of the problem for conservative systems of any order and for any second-order system. Numerical results are included for a second-order conservative system under a suddenly applied constant load. Near the critical load for the system, a small increment in load amplitude results in a large increase in amplitude of the response.

  17. Operating System For Numerically Controlled Milling Machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, R. B.

    1992-01-01

    OPMILL program is operating system for Kearney and Trecker milling machine providing fast easy way to program manufacture of machine parts with IBM-compatible personal computer. Gives machinist "equation plotter" feature, which plots equations that define movements and converts equations to milling-machine-controlling program moving cutter along defined path. System includes tool-manager software handling up to 25 tools and automatically adjusts to account for each tool. Developed on IBM PS/2 computer running DOS 3.3 with 1 MB of random-access memory.

  18. Numerical Poisson-Boltzmann Model for Continuum Membrane Systems.

    PubMed

    Botello-Smith, Wesley M; Liu, Xingping; Cai, Qin; Li, Zhilin; Zhao, Hongkai; Luo, Ray

    2013-01-01

    Membrane protein systems are important computational research topics due to their roles in rational drug design. In this study, we developed a continuum membrane model utilizing a level set formulation under the numerical Poisson-Boltzmann framework within the AMBER molecular mechanics suite for applications such as protein-ligand binding affinity and docking pose predictions. Two numerical solvers were adapted for periodic systems to alleviate possible edge effects. Validation on systems ranging from organic molecules to membrane proteins up to 200 residues, demonstrated good numerical properties. This lays foundations for sophisticated models with variable dielectric treatments and second-order accurate modeling of solvation interactions. PMID:23439886

  19. Generalized Database Management System Support for Numeric Database Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominick, Wayne D.; Weathers, Peggy G.

    1982-01-01

    This overview of potential for utilizing database management systems (DBMS) within numeric database environments highlights: (1) major features, functions, and characteristics of DBMS; (2) applicability to numeric database environment needs and user needs; (3) current applications of DBMS technology; and (4) research-oriented and…

  20. Highly accurate retrieval method of Japanese document images through a combination of morphological analysis and OCR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuyama, Yutaka; Takebe, Hiroaki; Kurokawa, Koji; Saitoh, Takahiro; Naoi, Satoshi

    2001-12-01

    We have developed a method that allows Japanese document images to be retrieved more accurately by using OCR character candidate information and a conventional plain text search engine. In this method, the document image is first recognized by normal OCR to produce text. Keyword areas are then estimated from the normal OCR produced text through morphological analysis. A lattice of candidate- character codes is extracted from these areas, and then character strings are extracted from the lattice using a word-matching method in noun areas and a K-th DP-matching method in undefined word areas. Finally, these extracted character strings are added to the normal OCR produced text to improve document retrieval accuracy when u sing a conventional plain text search engine. Experimental results from searches of 49 OHP sheet images revealed that our method has a high recall rate of 98.2%, compared to 90.3% with a conventional method using only normal OCR produced text, while requiring about the same processing time as normal OCR.

  1. Numerical quantification of habitability in serpentinizing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Som, S.; Alperin, M. J.; Hoehler, T. M.

    2012-12-01

    The likely presence of liquid water in contact with olivine-bearing rocks on Mars, the detection of serpentine minerals and of methane emissions possibly consistent with serpentinization, and the observation of serpentine-associated methane-cycling communities on Earth have all led to excitement over the potential of such systems to host life on Mars, even into the present day. However, the habitability of subsurface serpentinizing systems on Mars does not necessarily follow from these qualitative observations. In particular, while the production of H2 during serpentinization could provide methanogens with a needed substrate, the alkaline conditions and corresponding potential for carbon limitation that arise in concert are negatives against which H2 supply must be balanced. We considered this balance via a coupled geochemical-bioenergetic model that weighs the outputs of serpentinization against the metabolic requirements of methanogenesis, in an energetic frame of reference. Serpentinization is modeled using the "Geochemist's Workbench" (GWB) whereby ultramafic harzburgite rocks are reacted with oxygen and sulfate depleted seawater. Reaction kinetics are not explicitly considered, but comparable effects of partial reaction are approximated by assuming post-reaction dilution of equilibrated fluids. The output of GWB serves as the input to the bioenergetic model, which calculates methanogenic energy yields based on spherically-symmetrical diffusion of substrates to a cell followed by reaction at the diffusion-limited rate. Membrane selectivity for substrate transport is explicitly considered. Results will be report updates for two scenarios: (i) High temperature serpentinization followed by cooling and transport of equilibrated fluid to a lower temperature regime accessible to biology; (ii) Serpentinization within the biologically-tolerated range of temperatures. Such coupled models demonstrate that environmental variability with respect to both water-rock reaction

  2. How well does multiple OCR error correction generalize?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, William B.; Ringger, Eric K.; Walker, Daniel D.

    2013-12-01

    As the digitization of historical documents, such as newspapers, becomes more common, the need of the archive patron for accurate digital text from those documents increases. Building on our earlier work, the contributions of this paper are: 1. in demonstrating the applicability of novel methods for correcting optical character recognition (OCR) on disparate data sets, including a new synthetic training set, 2. enhancing the correction algorithm with novel features, and 3. assessing the data requirements of the correction learning method. First, we correct errors using conditional random fields (CRF) trained on synthetic training data sets in order to demonstrate the applicability of the methodology to unrelated test sets. Second, we show the strength of lexical features from the training sets on two unrelated test sets, yielding a relative reduction in word error rate on the test sets of 6.52%. New features capture the recurrence of hypothesis tokens and yield an additional relative reduction in WER of 2.30%. Further, we show that only 2.0% of the full training corpus of over 500,000 feature cases is needed to achieve correction results comparable to those using the entire training corpus, effectively reducing both the complexity of the training process and the learned correction model.

  3. Title extraction and generation from OCR'd documents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghva, Kazem; Condit, Allen; Lumos, Steve; Borsack, Julie; Nartker, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Extraction of metadata from documents is a tedious and expensive process. In general, documents are manually reviewed for structured data such as title, author, date, organization, etc. The purpose of extraction is to build metadata for documents that can be used when formulating structured queries. In many large document repositories such as the National Library of Medicine (NLM)1 or university libraries, the extraction task is a daily process that spans decades. Although some automation is used during the extraction process, generally, metadata extraction is a manual task. Aside from the cost and labor time, manual processing is error prone and requires many levels of quality control. Recent advances in extraction technology, as reported at the Message the Understanding Conference (MUC),2 is comparable with extraction performed by humans. In addition, many organizations use historical data for lookup to improve the quality of extraction. For the large government document repository we are working with, the task involves extraction of several fields from millions of OCR'd and electronic documents. Since this project is time-sensitive, automatic extraction turns out to be the only viable solution. There are more than a dozen fields associated with each document that require extraction. In this paper, we report on the extraction and generation of the title field.

  4. INFeRS: Interactive Numeric Files Retrieval System. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiang, Katherine; And Others

    In 1988 Mann Library at Cornell University proposed to develop a computer system that would support interactive access to significant electronic files in agriculture and the life sciences. This system was titled the Interactive Numeric Files Retrieval System (INFeRS). This report describes how project goals were met and it presents the project's…

  5. Quantitative analysis of numerical solvers for oscillatory biomolecular system models

    PubMed Central

    Quo, Chang F; Wang, May D

    2008-01-01

    Background This article provides guidelines for selecting optimal numerical solvers for biomolecular system models. Because various parameters of the same system could have drastically different ranges from 10-15 to 1010, the ODEs can be stiff and ill-conditioned, resulting in non-unique, non-existing, or non-reproducible modeling solutions. Previous studies have not examined in depth how to best select numerical solvers for biomolecular system models, which makes it difficult to experimentally validate the modeling results. To address this problem, we have chosen one of the well-known stiff initial value problems with limit cycle behavior as a test-bed system model. Solving this model, we have illustrated that different answers may result from different numerical solvers. We use MATLAB numerical solvers because they are optimized and widely used by the modeling community. We have also conducted a systematic study of numerical solver performances by using qualitative and quantitative measures such as convergence, accuracy, and computational cost (i.e. in terms of function evaluation, partial derivative, LU decomposition, and "take-off" points). The results show that the modeling solutions can be drastically different using different numerical solvers. Thus, it is important to intelligently select numerical solvers when solving biomolecular system models. Results The classic Belousov-Zhabotinskii (BZ) reaction is described by the Oregonator model and is used as a case study. We report two guidelines in selecting optimal numerical solver(s) for stiff, complex oscillatory systems: (i) for problems with unknown parameters, ode45 is the optimal choice regardless of the relative error tolerance; (ii) for known stiff problems, both ode113 and ode15s are good choices under strict relative tolerance conditions. Conclusions For any given biomolecular model, by building a library of numerical solvers with quantitative performance assessment metric, we show that it is possible

  6. Characterisation of the structure of ocr, the gene 0.3 protein of bacteriophage T7

    PubMed Central

    Atanasiu, C.; Byron, O.; McMiken, H.; Sturrock, S. S.; Dryden, D. T. F.

    2001-01-01

    The product of gene 0.3 of bacteriophage T7, ocr, is a potent inhibitor of type I DNA restriction and modification enzymes. We have used biophysical methods to examine the mass, stability, shape and surface charge distribution of ocr. Ocr is a dimeric protein with hydrodynamic behaviour equivalent to a prolate ellipsoid of axial ratio 4.3 ± 0.7:1 and mass of 27 kDa. The protein is resistant to denaturation but removal of the C-terminal region reduces stability substantially. Six amino acids, N4, D25, N43, D62, S68 and W94, are all located on the surface of the protein and N4 and S68 are also located at the interface between the two 116 amino acid monomers. Negatively charged amino acid side chains surround W94 but these side chains are not part of the highly acidic C-terminus after W94. Ocr is able to displace a short DNA duplex from the binding site of a type I enzyme with a dissociation constant of the order of 100 pM or better. These results suggest that ocr is of a suitable size and shape to effectively block the DNA binding site of a type I enzyme and has a large negatively charged patch on its surface. This charge distribution may be complementary to the charge distribution within the DNA binding site of type I DNA restriction and modification enzymes. PMID:11452031

  7. Characterisation of the structure of ocr, the gene 0.3 protein of bacteriophage T7.

    PubMed

    Atanasiu, C; Byron, O; McMiken, H; Sturrock, S S; Dryden, D T

    2001-07-15

    The product of gene 0.3 of bacteriophage T7, ocr, is a potent inhibitor of type I DNA restriction and modification enzymes. We have used biophysical methods to examine the mass, stability, shape and surface charge distribution of ocr. Ocr is a dimeric protein with hydrodynamic behaviour equivalent to a prolate ellipsoid of axial ratio 4.3 +/- 0.7:1 and mass of 27 kDa. The protein is resistant to denaturation but removal of the C-terminal region reduces stability substantially. Six amino acids, N4, D25, N43, D62, S68 and W94, are all located on the surface of the protein and N4 and S68 are also located at the interface between the two 116 amino acid monomers. Negatively charged amino acid side chains surround W94 but these side chains are not part of the highly acidic C-terminus after W94. Ocr is able to displace a short DNA duplex from the binding site of a type I enzyme with a dissociation constant of the order of 100 pM or better. These results suggest that ocr is of a suitable size and shape to effectively block the DNA binding site of a type I enzyme and has a large negatively charged patch on its surface. This charge distribution may be complementary to the charge distribution within the DNA binding site of type I DNA restriction and modification enzymes. PMID:11452031

  8. Boltzmann Fluctuations in Numerical Simulations of Nonequilibrium Lattice Threshold Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rundle, J.B.; Klein, W.; Gross, S.; Turcotte, D.L.

    1995-08-21

    Nonequilibrium threshold systems such as slider blocks are now used to model a variety of dynamical systems, including earthquake faults, driven neural networks, and sliding charge density waves. We show that for general mean field models driven at low rates fluctuations in the internal energy field are characterized by Boltzmann statistics. Numerical simulations confirm this prediction. Our results indicate that mean field models can be effectively treated as equilibrium systems.

  9. Design of motorcycle rider protection systems using numerical techniques.

    PubMed

    Miralbes, R

    2013-10-01

    The goal of this paper is the development of a design methodology, based on the use of finite elements numerical tools and dummies in order to study the damages and injuries that appear during a motorcyclist collision against a motorcyclist protection system (MPS). According to the existing regulation, a Hybrid III dummy FEM model has been used as a starting point and some modifications have been included. For instance a new finite element helmet model has been developed and later added to the dummy model. Moreover, some structural elements affecting the simulation results such as the connecting bolts or the ground have been adequately modeled. Finally there have been analyzed diverse types of current motorcyclists protection systems, for which it has been made a comparative numerical-experiment analysis to validate the numerical results and the methodology used. PMID:23792610

  10. Numerical evaluation of the performance of active noise control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mollo, C. G.; Bernhard, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a generalized numerical technique for evaluating the optimal performance of active noise controllers. In this technique, the indirect BEM numerical procedures are used to derive the active noise controllers for optimal control of enclosed harmonic sound fields where the strength of the noise sources or the description of the enclosure boundary may not be known. The performance prediction for a single-input single-output system is presented, together with the analysis of the stability and observability of an active noise-control system employing detectors. The numerical procedures presented can be used for the design of both the physical configuration and the electronic components of the optimal active noise controller.

  11. A Computer-Based Intelligent Assessment System for Numeric Disciplines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Ashok; Kinshuk; Russell, David

    1998-01-01

    Describes an intelligent assessment system for numeric disciplines that works in conjunction with the intelligent tutoring tools developed by Teaching and Learning Technology (TLTP) Byzantium, a consortium of six U.K. universities. Topics include intelligent tutoring tools based on cognitive apprenticeship framework, a history of computerized…

  12. A review of numerical simulation of hydrothermal systems.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mercer, J.W.; Faust, C.R.

    1979-01-01

    Many advances in simulating single and two-phase fluid flow and heat transport in porous media have recently been made in conjunction with geothermal energy research. These numerical models reproduce system thermal and pressure behaviour and can be used for other heat-transport problems, such as high-level radioactive waste disposal and heat-storage projects. -Authors

  13. Classification of remotely sensed data using OCR-inspired neural network techniques. [Optical Character Recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiang, Richard K.

    1992-01-01

    Neural networks have been applied to classifications of remotely sensed data with some success. To improve the performance of this approach, an examination was made of how neural networks are applied to the optical character recognition (OCR) of handwritten digits and letters. A three-layer, feedforward network, along with techniques adopted from OCR, was used to classify Landsat-4 Thematic Mapper data. Good results were obtained. To overcome the difficulties that are characteristic of remote sensing applications and to attain significant improvements in classification accuracy, a special network architecture may be required.

  14. Development of a numerical simulation model of the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Geertsema, A A; Rakhorst, G; Mihaylov, D; Blanksma, P K; Verkerke, G J

    1997-12-01

    A numerical simulation model of the cardiovascular system has been developed. It consists of a model of the left atrium, the left ventricle, the coronary vascular system, the aorta, the arterial system, and the venous system. The input of the complete model is the elastance (pressure/volume ratio) developed by the left ventricle. The shape of this elastance is constant in different circumstances. Left ventricular (LV) myocardial oxygen consumption and the amount of oxygen offered to the left ventricle can be calculated with the model. The model has been validated using data from a patient suffering from coronary artery disease. The measured clinical hemodynamical waveforms could be fitted to those generated by the model. With the numerical simulation model, it is possible to predict the functioning of the left ventricle under different circumstances. This makes it possible to study in vitro various pathological clinical situations. PMID:9423983

  15. Numerical models for the evaluation of geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Pruess, K.; Lippmann, M.J.

    1986-08-01

    We have carried out detailed simulations of various fields in the USA (Bada, New Mexico; Heber, California); Mexico (Cerro Prieto); Iceland (Krafla); and Kenya (Olkaria). These simulation studies have illustrated the usefulness of numerical models for the overall evaluation of geothermal systems. The methodology for modeling the behavior of geothermal systems, different approaches to geothermal reservoir modeling and how they can be applied in comprehensive evaluation work are discussed.

  16. Numerical simulations of strongly correlated electron and spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changlani, Hitesh Jaiprakash

    Developing analytical and numerical tools for strongly correlated systems is a central challenge for the condensed matter physics community. In the absence of exact solutions and controlled analytical approximations, numerical techniques have often contributed to our understanding of these systems. Exact Diagonalization (ED) requires the storage of at least two vectors the size of the Hilbert space under consideration (which grows exponentially with system size) which makes it affordable only for small systems. The Density Matrix Renormalization Group (DMRG) uses an intelligent Hilbert space truncation procedure to significantly reduce this cost, but in its present formulation is limited to quasi-1D systems. Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) maps the Schrodinger equation to the diffusion equation (in imaginary time) and only samples the eigenvector over time, thereby avoiding the memory limitation. However, the stochasticity involved in the method gives rise to the "sign problem" characteristic of fermion and frustrated spin systems. The first part of this thesis is an effort to make progress in the development of a numerical technique which overcomes the above mentioned problems. We consider novel variational wavefunctions, christened "Correlator Product States" (CPS), that have a general functional form which hopes to capture essential correlations in the ground states of spin and fermion systems in any dimension. We also consider a recent proposal to modify projector (Green's Function) Quantum Monte Carlo to ameliorate the sign problem for realistic and model Hamiltonians (such as the Hubbard model). This exploration led to our own set of improvements, primarily a semistochastic formulation of projector Quantum Monte Carlo. Despite their limitations, existing numerical techniques can yield physical insights into a wide variety of problems. The second part of this thesis considers one such numerical technique - DMRG - and adapts it to study the Heisenberg antiferromagnet

  17. High numerical aperture projection system for extreme ultraviolet projection lithography

    DOEpatents

    Hudyma, Russell M.

    2000-01-01

    An optical system is described that is compatible with extreme ultraviolet radiation and comprises five reflective elements for projecting a mask image onto a substrate. The five optical elements are characterized in order from object to image as concave, convex, concave, convex, and concave mirrors. The optical system is particularly suited for ring field, step and scan lithography methods. The invention uses aspheric mirrors to minimize static distortion and balance the static distortion across the ring field width which effectively minimizes dynamic distortion. The present invention allows for higher device density because the optical system has improved resolution that results from the high numerical aperture, which is at least 0.14.

  18. Numerical System Solver Developed for the National Cycle Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binder, Michael P.

    1999-01-01

    As part of the National Cycle Program (NCP), a powerful new numerical solver has been developed to support the simulation of aeropropulsion systems. This software uses a hierarchical object-oriented design. It can provide steady-state and time-dependent solutions to nonlinear and even discontinuous problems typically encountered when aircraft and spacecraft propulsion systems are simulated. It also can handle constrained solutions, in which one or more factors may limit the behavior of the engine system. Timedependent simulation capabilities include adaptive time-stepping and synchronization with digital control elements. The NCP solver is playing an important role in making the NCP a flexible, powerful, and reliable simulation package.

  19. Numerical Modeling of Flow Distribution in Micro-Fluidics Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok; Cole, Helen; Chen, C. P.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes an application of a general purpose computer program, GFSSP (Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program) for calculating flow distribution in a network of micro-channels. GFSSP employs a finite volume formulation of mass and momentum conservation equations in a network consisting of nodes and branches. Mass conservation equation is solved for pressures at the nodes while the momentum conservation equation is solved at the branches to calculate flowrate. The system of equations describing the fluid network is solved by a numerical method that is a combination of the Newton-Raphson and successive substitution methods. The numerical results have been compared with test data and detailed CFD (computational Fluid Dynamics) calculations. The agreement between test data and predictions is satisfactory. The discrepancies between the predictions and test data can be attributed to the frictional correlation which does not include the effect of surface tension or electro-kinetic effect.

  20. The use of Optical Character Recognition (OCR) in the digitisation of herbarium specimen labels.

    PubMed

    Drinkwater, Robyn E; Cubey, Robert W N; Haston, Elspeth M

    2014-01-01

    At the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh (RBGE) the use of Optical Character Recognition (OCR) to aid the digitisation process has been investigated. This was tested using a herbarium specimen digitisation process with two stages of data entry. Records were initially batch-processed to add data extracted from the OCR text prior to being sorted based on Collector and/or Country. Using images of the specimens, a team of six digitisers then added data to the specimen records. To investigate whether the data from OCR aid the digitisation process, they completed a series of trials which compared the efficiency of data entry between sorted and unsorted batches of specimens. A survey was carried out to explore the opinion of the digitisation staff to the different sorting options. In total 7,200 specimens were processed. When compared to an unsorted, random set of specimens, those which were sorted based on data added from the OCR were quicker to digitise. Of the methods tested here, the most successful in terms of efficiency used a protocol which required entering data into a limited set of fields and where the records were filtered by Collector and Country. The survey and subsequent discussions with the digitisation staff highlighted their preference for working with sorted specimens, in which label layout, locations and handwriting are likely to be similar, and so a familiarity with the Collector or Country is rapidly established. PMID:25009435

  1. The Ontology of Clinical Research (OCRe): An Informatics Foundation for the Science of Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Ida; Tu, Samson W.; Carini, Simona; Lehmann, Harold P.; Pollock, Brad H.; Peleg, Mor; Wittkowski, Knut M.

    2013-01-01

    To date, the scientific process for generating, interpreting, and applying knowledge has received less informatics attention than operational processes for conducting clinical studies. The activities of these scientific processes — the science of clinical research — are centered on the study protocol, which is the abstract representation of the scientific design of a clinical study. The Ontology of Clinical Research (OCRe) is an OWL 2 model of the entities and relationships of study design protocols for the purpose of computationally supporting the design and analysis of human studies. OCRe’s modeling is independent of any specific study design or clinical domain. It includes a study design typology and a specialized module called ERGO Annotation for capturing the meaning of eligibility criteria. In this paper, we describe the key informatics use cases of each phase of a study’s scientific lifecycle, present OCRe and the principles behind its modeling, and describe applications of OCRe and associated technologies to a range of clinical research use cases. OCRe captures the central semantics that underlies the scientific processes of clinical research and can serve as an informatics foundation for supporting the entire range of knowledge activities that constitute the science of clinical research. PMID:24239612

  2. The use of Optical Character Recognition (OCR) in the digitisation of herbarium specimen labels

    PubMed Central

    Drinkwater, Robyn E.; Cubey, Robert W. N.; Haston, Elspeth M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract At the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh (RBGE) the use of Optical Character Recognition (OCR) to aid the digitisation process has been investigated. This was tested using a herbarium specimen digitisation process with two stages of data entry. Records were initially batch-processed to add data extracted from the OCR text prior to being sorted based on Collector and/or Country. Using images of the specimens, a team of six digitisers then added data to the specimen records. To investigate whether the data from OCR aid the digitisation process, they completed a series of trials which compared the efficiency of data entry between sorted and unsorted batches of specimens. A survey was carried out to explore the opinion of the digitisation staff to the different sorting options. In total 7,200 specimens were processed. When compared to an unsorted, random set of specimens, those which were sorted based on data added from the OCR were quicker to digitise. Of the methods tested here, the most successful in terms of efficiency used a protocol which required entering data into a limited set of fields and where the records were filtered by Collector and Country. The survey and subsequent discussions with the digitisation staff highlighted their preference for working with sorted specimens, in which label layout, locations and handwriting are likely to be similar, and so a familiarity with the Collector or Country is rapidly established. PMID:25009435

  3. Automatic Cataloguing and Searching for Retrospective Data by Use of OCR Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tseng, Yuen-Hsien

    2001-01-01

    Describes efforts in supporting information retrieval from OCR (optical character recognition) degraded text. Reports on approaches used in an automatic cataloging and searching contest for books in multiple languages, including a vector space retrieval model, an n-gram indexing method, and a weighting scheme; and discusses problems of Asian…

  4. Numerical Three-Dimensional Model of Airport Terminal Drainage System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strzelecki, Michał

    2014-03-01

    During the construction of an airport terminal it was found that as a result of the hydrostatic pressure of underground water the foundation plate of the building had dangerously shifted in the direction opposite to that of the gravitational forces. The only effective measure was to introduce a drainage system on the site. The complex geology of the area indicated that two independent drainage systems, i.e., a horizontal system in the Quaternary beds and a vertical system in the Tertiary water-bearing levels, were necessary. This paper presents numerical FEM calculations of the two drainage systems being part of the airport terminal drainaged esign. The computer simulation which was carried out took into consideration the actual effect of the drainage systems and their impact on the depression cone being formed in the two aquifers.

  5. Interferometric correction system for a numerically controlled machine

    DOEpatents

    Burleson, Robert R.

    1978-01-01

    An interferometric correction system for a numerically controlled machine is provided to improve the positioning accuracy of a machine tool, for example, for a high-precision numerically controlled machine. A laser interferometer feedback system is used to monitor the positioning of the machine tool which is being moved by command pulses to a positioning system to position the tool. The correction system compares the commanded position as indicated by a command pulse train applied to the positioning system with the actual position of the tool as monitored by the laser interferometer. If the tool position lags the commanded position by a preselected error, additional pulses are added to the pulse train applied to the positioning system to advance the tool closer to the commanded position, thereby reducing the lag error. If the actual tool position is leading in comparison to the commanded position, pulses are deleted from the pulse train where the advance error exceeds the preselected error magnitude to correct the position error of the tool relative to the commanded position.

  6. Understanding disordered systems through numerical simulation and algorithm development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Sean Michael

    Disordered systems arise in many physical contexts. Not all matter is uniform, and impurities or heterogeneities can be modeled by fixed random disorder. Numerous complex networks also possess fixed disorder, leading to applications in transportation systems, telecommunications, social networks, and epidemic modeling, to name a few. Due to their random nature and power law critical behavior, disordered systems are difficult to study analytically. Numerical simulation can help overcome this hurdle by allowing for the rapid computation of system states. In order to get precise statistics and extrapolate to the thermodynamic limit, large systems must be studied over many realizations. Thus, innovative algorithm development is essential in order reduce memory or running time requirements of simulations. This thesis presents a review of disordered systems, as well as a thorough study of two particular systems through numerical simulation, algorithm development and optimization, and careful statistical analysis of scaling properties. Chapter 1 provides a thorough overview of disordered systems, the history of their study in the physics community, and the development of techniques used to study them. Topics of quenched disorder, phase transitions, the renormalization group, criticality, and scale invariance are discussed. Several prominent models of disordered systems are also explained. Lastly, analysis techniques used in studying disordered systems are covered. In Chapter 2, minimal spanning trees on critical percolation clusters are studied, motivated in part by an analytic perturbation expansion by Jackson and Read that I check against numerical calculations. This system has a direct mapping to the ground state of the strongly disordered spin glass. We compute the path length fractal dimension of these trees in dimensions d = {2, 3, 4, 5} and find our results to be compatible with the analytic results suggested by Jackson and Read. In Chapter 3, the random bond Ising

  7. Numerical simulations and modeling for stochastic biological systems with jumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Xiaoling; Wang, Ke

    2014-05-01

    This paper gives a numerical method to simulate sample paths for stochastic differential equations (SDEs) driven by Poisson random measures. It provides us a new approach to simulate systems with jumps from a different angle. The driving Poisson random measures are assumed to be generated by stationary Poisson point processes instead of Lévy processes. Methods provided in this paper can be used to simulate SDEs with Lévy noise approximately. The simulation is divided into two parts: the part of jumping integration is based on definition without approximation while the continuous part is based on some classical approaches. Biological explanations for stochastic integrations with jumps are motivated by several numerical simulations. How to model biological systems with jumps is showed in this paper. Moreover, method of choosing integrands and stationary Poisson point processes in jumping integrations for biological models are obtained. In addition, results are illustrated through some examples and numerical simulations. For some examples, earthquake is chose as a jumping source which causes jumps on the size of biological population.

  8. Numerical simulation of iontophoresis in the drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Filipovic, Nenad; Zivanovic, Marko; Savic, Andrej; Bijelic, Goran

    2016-01-01

    The architecture and composition of stratum corneum act as barriers and limit the diffusion of most drug molecules and ions. Much effort has been made to overcome this barrier and it can be seen that iontophoresis has shown a good effect. Iontophoresis represents the application of low electrical potential to increase the transport of drugs into and across the skin or tissue. Iontophoresis is a noninvasive drug delivery system, and therefore, it is a useful alternative to drug transportation by injection. In this study, we present a numerical model and effects of electrical potential on the drug diffusion in the buccal tissue and the stratum corneum. The initial numerical results are in good comparison with experimental observation. We demonstrate that the application of an applied voltage can greatly improve the efficacy of localized drug delivery as compared to diffusion alone. PMID:26592537

  9. INEX (integrated numerical experiment) simulations of the Boeing FEL system

    SciTech Connect

    Tokar, R.L.; Young, L.M.; Lumpkin, A.H.; McVey, B.D.; Thode, L.E.; Bender, S.C.; Chan, K.C.D. ); Yeremian, A.D.; Dowell, D.H.; Lowrey, A.R. )

    1989-01-01

    The INEX (integrated numerical experiment) numerical model is applied to the 0.6 {mu}m FEL oscillator at Boeing Aerospace and Electronics Company in Seattle, WA. This system consists of a 110 MeV L-band rf linac, a beam transport line from the accelerator to the entrance of the wiggler, the 5.0 meter THUNDER variable taper wiggler, and a near concentric two mirror optical oscillator. Many aspects of the model for the electron beam accelerator and transport line agree with experimental measurements. Predictions for lasing performance are compared with data obtained in May and June 1989 using a mild tapered wiggler. We obtain good agreement with the achieved extraction efficiency, while 1D pulse simulations reproduce the observed sideband instability. 15 refs., 11 figs.

  10. Numerical Simulations of the Solar Orbiter Antenna System RPW ANT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampl, M.; Rucker, H. O.; Oswald, T. H.; Plettemeier, D.; Maksimovic, M.; Macher, W.

    The high-frequency electric sensors onboard Solar Orbiter are part of the radio and plasma wave experiment (RPW). The sensors consist of cylindrical antennas (ANT) mounted on three booms extruded from the central body of the spacecraft. Due to the parasitic effects of the conducting spacecraft body and solar panels the true antenna properties (effective axes and length, capacitances) do not coincide with their physical representations. The numerical analysis of the reception properties of these antennas is presented. In order to analyze the antenna system we applied a numerical method. The current distribution on the spacecraft body and the effective length vector was calculated, by solving the underlying field equations using electromagnetic code. In the applied method the spacecraft is modeled as a mesh-grid.

  11. Numerical simulations of the thermoacoustic computed tomography breast imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiser, William Lester, Jr.

    A thermoacoustic wave is produced when an object absorbs energy and experiences a subsequent thermal expansion. We have developed a Thermoacoustic Computed Tomography (TACT) breast imaging system to exploit the thermoacoustic phenomena as a method of soft tissue imaging. By exposing the breast to short pulses of 434 MHz microwaves, ultrasonic pulses are generated and detected with a hemispherical transducer array submersed in a water bath. Filtering and back projecting the transducer signals generates a 3-D image that maps the localized microwave absorption properties of the breast. In an effort to understand the factors limiting image quality, the TACT system was numerically simulated. The simulations were used to generate the transducer signals that would be collected by the TACT system during a scan of an object. These simulated data streams were then fed into the system image reconstruction software to provide images of simulated phantoms. The effects of transducer diameter, transducer response, transducer array geometry and stimulating pulse width on the spatial and contrast resolution of the system were quantified using the simulations. The spatial resolution was highly dependent upon location in the imaging volume. This was due to the off axis response of transducers of finite aperture. Simulated data were compared with experimental data, obtained by imaging a parallel-piped resolution phantom, to verify the accuracy of the simulation code. A contrast-detail phantom was numerically simulated to determine the ability of the system to image spheres of diameters <1 cm with absorption values on the order of physiologic saline, when located in a background of noise. The results of the contrast-detail analysis were dependent on the location of the spheres in the imaging volume and the diameter of the simulated transducers. This work sets the foundation for the initial image quality studies of the TACT system. Improvements to the current imaging system, based on

  12. Numerical weather prediction model tuning via ensemble prediction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvinen, H.; Laine, M.; Ollinaho, P.; Solonen, A.; Haario, H.

    2011-12-01

    This paper discusses a novel approach to tune predictive skill of numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. NWP models contain tunable parameters which appear in parameterizations schemes of sub-grid scale physical processes. Currently, numerical values of these parameters are specified manually. In a recent dual manuscript (QJRMS, revised) we developed a new concept and method for on-line estimation of the NWP model parameters. The EPPES ("Ensemble prediction and parameter estimation system") method requires only minimal changes to the existing operational ensemble prediction infra-structure and it seems very cost-effective because practically no new computations are introduced. The approach provides an algorithmic decision making tool for model parameter optimization in operational NWP. In EPPES, statistical inference about the NWP model tunable parameters is made by (i) generating each member of the ensemble of predictions using different model parameter values, drawn from a proposal distribution, and (ii) feeding-back the relative merits of the parameter values to the proposal distribution, based on evaluation of a suitable likelihood function against verifying observations. In the presentation, the method is first illustrated in low-order numerical tests using a stochastic version of the Lorenz-95 model which effectively emulates the principal features of ensemble prediction systems. The EPPES method correctly detects the unknown and wrongly specified parameters values, and leads to an improved forecast skill. Second, results with an atmospheric general circulation model based ensemble prediction system show that the NWP model tuning capacity of EPPES scales up to realistic models and ensemble prediction systems. Finally, a global top-end NWP model tuning exercise with preliminary results is published.

  13. Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) 1999 Industry Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lytle, John; Follen, Greg; Naiman, Cynthia; Evans, Austin

    2000-01-01

    The technologies necessary to enable detailed numerical simulations of complete propulsion systems are being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center in cooperation with industry, academia, and other government agencies. Large scale, detailed simulations will be of great value to the nation because they eliminate some of the costly testing required to develop and certify advanced propulsion systems. In addition, time and cost savings will be achieved by enabling design details to be evaluated early in the development process before a commitment is made to a specific design. This concept is called the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS). NPSS consists of three main elements: (1) engineering models that enable multidisciplinary analysis of large subsystems and systems at various levels of detail, (2) a simulation environment that maximizes designer productivity, and (3) a cost-effective, high-performance computing platform. A fundamental requirement of the concept is that the simulations must be capable of overnight execution on easily accessible computing platforms. This will greatly facilitate the use of large-scale simulations in a design environment. This paper describes the current status of the NPSS with specific emphasis on the progress made over the past year on air breathing propulsion applications. In addition, the paper contains a summary of the feedback received from industry partners in the development effort and the actions taken over the past year to respond to that feedback. The NPSS development was supported in FY99 by the High Performance Computing and Communications Program.

  14. Numerical and experimental investigation of a rockfall drapery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoeni, K.; Giacomini, A.; Lambert, C.; Sloan, S. W.

    2012-04-01

    Rockfalls represent a significant hazard to people and infrastructures in steep terrain, should it be a mountainous region, a quarry, or a mine. Although rockfall occurrences cannot be totally eliminated, it is possible to reduce the risk by deploying effective rockfall protective systems such as metallic wire mesh draperies. This work focuses on the performance of a simple drapery system with a double-twisted hexagonal wire mesh. Numerical modelling and experimental investigations have been performed. The main objective of the work is the residual hazard assessment in conjunction with such a system since blocks can still detach between the installed drapery and the rock surface. First, the numerical model for the drapery mesh and the rock slope is presented. Following the approach by Bertrand et al. [1], a discrete element model of a hexagonal wire mesh has been implemented into the open-source framework YADE [4]. The mesh is discretised by a set of spherical particles which interact remotely (i.e. interactions between the particles exist without direct contact) and are located at the physical nodes of the mesh. The rock slope is represented by triangular elements which have been generated on the basis of a point cloud representation of the rock slope. The slope is assumed to be rigid and energy dissipation on the slope during rock impact is considered via friction and viscous damping. Second, results of field tests carried out at a mine in New South Wales (Australia) are presented [3]. Concrete blocks with shapes according to EOTA [2] were released from the top of a highwall. The tests were carried out on two different sections of the highwall: the first section had a drapery system installed whereas the second section had no protective system installed. In the first section, the blocks were released between the rock surface and the mesh drapery. The 3D block trajectories were recorded by using two stereo pairs of synchronised high speed cameras. The collected

  15. The hydraulic system of trees: theoretical framework and numerical simulation

    PubMed

    Fruh; Kurth

    1999-12-21

    Empirical studies pose the problem of the physiological integration of the tree organism, which is also important on the scale of ecosystems. Recently, spatially distributed models emerged, which approach this problem by reflecting the close linkage between physiological processes and the structures of trees and tree stands. In the case of water flow, the tree organism can be regarded as hydraulic system and the branched tree architecture as hydraulic network. Previous models of the hydraulic system either did not take into account the network structure, or they had shortcomings regarding the translation of the underlying physiological assumptions by the discrete computation method. We have developed a theoretical framework which takes the form of a numerical simulation model of tree water flow. A discrete initial boundary value problem (IBVP) combines the phenomena of Darcy flow, water storage and conductivity losses in the hydraulic network. The software HYDRA computes the solution of the IBVP. The theoretical derivation and model tests corroborate the consistent translation of the physiological assumptions by the computational method. Simulation studies enabled us to formulate hypotheses on the following points: (1) differences in the hydraulic segmentation between Picea abies and Thuja occidentalis, (2) responses of the hydraulic system to rapid transpiration changes and to a scenario of drought stress, and (3) how these responses depend on architectural quantities of the trees. The simulation studies demonstrated our possibilities of deriving theoretically well-founded hypotheses about the functioning of the hydraulic system and its relation to system structure. The numerical simulation model is designed as a tool for structure-function studies, which is able to treat tree architecture as independent variable. The model supports the integration of data on tree level, and it can be used for computer experiments which quantify the dynamics of the hydraulic

  16. Numerical studies of identification in nonlinear distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Lo, C. K.; Reich, Simeon; Rosen, I. G.

    1989-01-01

    An abstract approximation framework and convergence theory for the identification of first and second order nonlinear distributed parameter systems developed previously by the authors and reported on in detail elsewhere are summarized and discussed. The theory is based upon results for systems whose dynamics can be described by monotone operators in Hilbert space and an abstract approximation theorem for the resulting nonlinear evolution system. The application of the theory together with numerical evidence demonstrating the feasibility of the general approach are discussed in the context of the identification of a first order quasi-linear parabolic model for one dimensional heat conduction/mass transport and the identification of a nonlinear dissipation mechanism (i.e., damping) in a second order one dimensional wave equation. Computational and implementational considerations, in particular, with regard to supercomputing, are addressed.

  17. Numerical database system based on a weighted search tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S. C.; Bahri, C.; Draayer, J. P.; Zheng, S.-Q.

    1994-09-01

    An on-line numerical database system, that is based on the concept of a weighted search tree and which functions like a file directory, is introduced. The system, which is designed to aid in reducing time-consuming redundant calculations in numerically intensive computations, can be used to fetch, insert and delete items from a dynamically generated list in optimal [ O(log n) where n is the number of items in the list] time. Items in the list are ordered according to a priority queue with the initial priority for each element set either automatically or by an user supplied algorithm. The priority queue is updated on-the-fly to reflect element hit frequency. Items can be added to a database so long as there is space to accommodate them, and when there is not, the lowest priority element(s) is removed to make room for an incoming element(s) with higher priority. The system acts passively and therefore can be applied to any number of databases, with the same or different structures, within a single application.

  18. Numerical Study of a Four-Roll Coating System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, Takeaki

    The characteristics of a four-roll coating system were numerically investigated and compared with experimental data to validate the theoretical models used in this study. In the theoretical models, a film splitting model using a power-law-type equation, a roll-gap model based on elastohydrodynamics, and a flow model from a rotating-cylinder system were applied. The parametric computations for each operational condition revealed the steady and dynamic behaviors of a coating film and liquid films on the coating rolls. The results of the frequency response to the speed disturbances of the coating rolls indicated that the sensitivity of the lowest coating roll to the disturbance was half that of the others; this implies that the requirement for the accuracy of a driving system of the coating roll is not as severe as compared with others. The experimental data and the numerical results at steady state agreed well. Therefore, the theoretical models used in this research were found to be appropriate.

  19. Integrated numerical methods for hypersonic aircraft cooling systems analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petley, Dennis H.; Jones, Stuart C.; Dziedzic, William M.

    1992-01-01

    Numerical methods have been developed for the analysis of hypersonic aircraft cooling systems. A general purpose finite difference thermal analysis code is used to determine areas which must be cooled. Complex cooling networks of series and parallel flow can be analyzed using a finite difference computer program. Both internal fluid flow and heat transfer are analyzed, because increased heat flow causes a decrease in the flow of the coolant. The steady state solution is a successive point iterative method. The transient analysis uses implicit forward-backward differencing. Several examples of the use of the program in studies of hypersonic aircraft and rockets are provided.

  20. Integrating Numerical Groundwater Modeling Results With Geographic Information Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witkowski, M. S.; Robinson, B. A.; Linger, S. P.

    2001-12-01

    Many different types of data are used to create numerical models of flow and transport of groundwater in the vadose zone. Results from water balance studies, infiltration models, hydrologic properties, and digital elevation models (DEMs) are examples of such data. Because input data comes in a variety of formats, for consistency the data need to be assembled in a coherent fashion on a single platform. Through the use of a geographic information system (GIS), all data sources can effectively be integrated on one platform to store, retrieve, query, and display data. In our vadoze zone modeling studies in support of Los Alamos National Laboratory's Environmental Restoration Project, we employ a GIS comprised of a Raid storage device, an Oracle database, ESRI's spatial database engine (SDE), ArcView GIS, and custom GIS tools for three-dimensional (3D) analysis. We store traditional GIS data, such as, contours, historical building footprints, and study area locations, as points, lines, and polygons with attributes. Numerical flow and transport model results from the Finite Element Heat and Mass Transfer Code (FEHM) are stored as points with attributes, such as fluid saturation, or pressure, or contaminant concentration at a given location. We overlay traditional types of GIS data with numerical model results, thereby allowing us to better build conceptual models and perform spatial analyses. We have also developed specialized analysis tools to assist in the data and model analysis process. This approach provides an integrated framework for performing tasks such as comparing the model to data and understanding the relationship of model predictions to existing contaminant source locations and water supply wells. Our process of integrating GIS and numerical modeling results allows us to answer a wide variety of questions about our conceptual model design: - Which set of locations should be identified as contaminant sources based on known historical building operations

  1. Numerical approaches to isolated many-body quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolodrubetz, Michael H.

    Ultracold atoms have revolutionized atomic and condensed matter physics. In addition to having clean, controllable Hamiltonians, ultracold atoms are near-perfect realizations of isolated quantum systems, in which weak environmental coupling can be neglected on experimental time scales. This opens new opportunities to explore these systems not just in thermal equilibrium, but out of equilibrium as well. In this dissertation, we investigate some properties of closed quantum systems, utilizing a combination of numerical and analytical techniques. We begin by applying full configuration-interaction quantum Monte Carlo (FCIQMC) to the Fermi polaron, which we use as a test bed to improve the algorithm. In addition to adapting standard QMC techniques, we introduce novel controlled approximations that allow mitigation of the sign problem and simulation directly in the thermodynamic limit. We also contrast the sign problem of FCIQMC with that of more standard techniques, focusing on FCIQMC's capacity to work in a second quantized determinant space. Next, we discuss nonequilibrium dynamics near a quantum critical point, focusing on the one-dimensional transverse-field Ising (TFI) chain. We show that the TFI dynamics exhibit critical scaling, within which the spin correlations exhibit qualitatively athermal behavior. We provide strong numerical evidence for the universality of dynamic scaling by utilizing time-dependent matrix product states to simulate a non-integrable model in the same equilibrium universality class. As this non-integrable model has been realized experimentally, we investigate the robustness of our predictions against the presence of open boundary conditions and disorder. We find that the qualitatively athermal correlations remain visible, although other phenomena such as even/odd effects become relevant within the finite size scaling theory. Finally, we investigate the properties of the integrable TFI model upon varying the strength of a non

  2. Configuration Management File Manager Developed for Numerical Propulsion System Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Follen, Gregory J.

    1997-01-01

    One of the objectives of the High Performance Computing and Communication Project's (HPCCP) Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) is to provide a common and consistent way to manage applications, data, and engine simulations. The NPSS Configuration Management (CM) File Manager integrated with the Common Desktop Environment (CDE) window management system provides a common look and feel for the configuration management of data, applications, and engine simulations for U.S. engine companies. In addition, CM File Manager provides tools to manage a simulation. Features include managing input files, output files, textual notes, and any other material normally associated with simulation. The CM File Manager includes a generic configuration management Application Program Interface (API) that can be adapted for the configuration management repositories of any U.S. engine company.

  3. Lexicon-supported OCR of eighteenth century Dutch books: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Does, Jesse; Depuydt, Katrien

    2013-01-01

    We report on a case study on OCR of eighteenth century books conducted in the IMPACT project. After introducing the IMPACT project and its approach to lexicon building and deployment, we zoom in to the application of IMPACT tools and data to the Dutch EDBO collection. The results are exemplified by detailed discussion of various practical options to improve text recognition beyond a baseline of running an uncustomized Finereader 10. In particular, we discuss improved recognition of long s.

  4. Systematic analytical and numerical studies of highly correlated electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Shan-Wen

    Strong electron correlations in condensed matter systems give rise to a wide range of striking physical properties, producing phenomena as varied as high temperature superconductivity, metal-insulator transitions and the integer and fractional quantum Hall effects. Quantum critical systems also exhibit strong correlations between a large number of degrees of freedom. In this thesis we study these complicated systems using a combination of analytical and numerical approaches. We perform systematic investigations, which adds to the robustness of our results. We develop a new method, based on the density-matrix renormalization-group (DMRG) algorithm combined with finite-size scaling analysis, to study critical behavior in quantum spin chains and extract critical exponents. Accurate results are obtained for spin-1/2 antiferromagnetic chains and the spin-1 chain at the critical point separating the Haldane and the dimerized phases. Disorder in a system can change its properties drastically. Plateau transitions in the integer quantum Hall effect provide the clearest example of quantum critical behavior in a disordered system. We provide analytical proof that the Chalker-Coddington model, which is used to describe the plateau transitions, is quantum critical. Starting from a field theory based on this model, equivalent to a non-Hermitian supersymmetric spin chain, we prove quantum criticality by a Lieb-Schultz-Mattis type theorem. This approach was motivated by numerical results obtained using the DMRG/finite-size scaling method. Our generalized LSM theorem also applies to the spin quantum Hall effect, which can appear in disordered d-wave superconductors with broken time-reversal symmetry. The last part of the thesis is a renormalization-group study of two dimensional interacting electron systems. We obtain results relevant to high-temperature superconductors and also to the family of kappa - (BEDT - TTF)2X organic superconductors. At half filling, the fully nested

  5. Wind Tunnel to Flight: Numerical Simulations of Hypersonic Propulsion Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2009-11-01

    Uncertainties in the flight conditions and limitations of ground based facilities create inherent difficulties in assessing the performance of hypersonic propulsion systems. We use numerical simulations to investigate the correlation of wind-tunnel measurements (Steelant et al., 2006) and flight data (Hass et al., 2005) for the HyShot vehicle; the objective is to identify potential engine unstart events occurring under different combustion regimes. As a first step we perform simulations corresponding to both reacting and non-reacting conditions in the ground-based facility to validate the numerical tools. Next, we focus on reproducing the flight conditions; a fundamental difficulty is the lack of precise information about the vehicle trajectory. A Bayesian inversion strategy is used to infer the altitude, angle of attack and Mach number from the noisy pressure measurements collected during the flight. The estimated conditions, together with the scatter due to the measurement uncertainty, are then used to study the flow and thermal fields in the combustor. The details of the methods used to characterize the uncertainty in the flow simulations and to perform the Bayesian inversion will also be discussed.

  6. A numerical solution for the diffusion equation in hydrogeologic systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ishii, A.L.; Healy, R.W.; Striegl, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    The documentation of a computer code for the numerical solution of the linear diffusion equation in one or two dimensions in Cartesian or cylindrical coordinates is presented. Applications of the program include molecular diffusion, heat conduction, and fluid flow in confined systems. The flow media may be anisotropic and heterogeneous. The model is formulated by replacing the continuous linear diffusion equation by discrete finite-difference approximations at each node in a block-centered grid. The resulting matrix equation is solved by the method of preconditioned conjugate gradients. The conjugate gradient method does not require the estimation of iteration parameters and is guaranteed convergent in the absence of rounding error. The matrixes are preconditioned to decrease the steps to convergence. The model allows the specification of any number of boundary conditions for any number of stress periods, and the output of a summary table for selected nodes showing flux and the concentration of the flux quantity for each time step. The model is written in a modular format for ease of modification. The model was verified by comparison of numerical and analytical solutions for cases of molecular diffusion, two-dimensional heat transfer, and axisymmetric radial saturated fluid flow. Application of the model to a hypothetical two-dimensional field situation of gas diffusion in the unsaturated zone is demonstrated. The input and output files are included as a check on program installation. The definition of variables, input requirements, flow chart, and program listing are included in the attachments. (USGS)

  7. Numerical Analysis of a Radiant Heat Flux Calibration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Shanjuan; Horn, Thomas J.; Dhir, V. K.

    1998-01-01

    A radiant heat flux gage calibration system exists in the Flight Loads Laboratory at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center. This calibration system must be well understood if the heat flux gages calibrated in it are to provide useful data during radiant heating ground tests or flight tests of high speed aerospace vehicles. A part of the calibration system characterization process is to develop a numerical model of the flat plate heater element and heat flux gage, which will help identify errors due to convection, heater element erosion, and other factors. A 2-dimensional mathematical model of the gage-plate system has been developed to simulate the combined problem involving convection, radiation and mass loss by chemical reaction. A fourth order finite difference scheme is used to solve the steady state governing equations and determine the temperature distribution in the gage and plate, incident heat flux on the gage face, and flat plate erosion. Initial gage heat flux predictions from the model are found to be within 17% of experimental results.

  8. Numerical investigation and recommendations for push-pull ventilation systems.

    PubMed

    Chern, Ming-Jyh; Ma, Chen-Hsuan

    2007-03-01

    This study presents numerical simulations of push-pull ventilation systems. A push-pull system is a device commonly used in capturing pollutants from large tanks used in industrial chemical processes. An air jet is blown from one side of a tank and collected by an exhaust hood on the opposite side of the tank. In this study, a finite volume model coupled with the standard k -epsilon turbulent model is employed to describe the flow structures and characteristics. Moreover, the turbulence mass transfer equation is adopted to show the concentration distribution above the open surface tank. All the flow fields can be classified according to four dominant modes, i.e., dispersion, transition, encapsulation, and strong suction. The push and pull flow velocities should be adjusted into encapsulation and strong suction modes to ensure all pollutants can be captured by the exhaust hood. Other geometric parameters such as the flange size, pull-channel size, offset distance, etc., also influence the flow characteristics. For a variety of lengths of tanks and pollutant evaporation velocities, the push and pull flow velocity must be matched to achieve optimal operation. Furthermore, the flange size and other parameters are determined to enhance the capture efficiency of the push-pull system. Recommendations for design guidelines are introduced in this study. PMID:17237024

  9. SAMSAN- MODERN NUMERICAL METHODS FOR CLASSICAL SAMPLED SYSTEM ANALYSIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, H. P.

    1994-01-01

    SAMSAN was developed to aid the control system analyst by providing a self consistent set of computer algorithms that support large order control system design and evaluation studies, with an emphasis placed on sampled system analysis. Control system analysts have access to a vast array of published algorithms to solve an equally large spectrum of controls related computational problems. The analyst usually spends considerable time and effort bringing these published algorithms to an integrated operational status and often finds them less general than desired. SAMSAN reduces the burden on the analyst by providing a set of algorithms that have been well tested and documented, and that can be readily integrated for solving control system problems. Algorithm selection for SAMSAN has been biased toward numerical accuracy for large order systems with computational speed and portability being considered important but not paramount. In addition to containing relevant subroutines from EISPAK for eigen-analysis and from LINPAK for the solution of linear systems and related problems, SAMSAN contains the following not so generally available capabilities: 1) Reduction of a real non-symmetric matrix to block diagonal form via a real similarity transformation matrix which is well conditioned with respect to inversion, 2) Solution of the generalized eigenvalue problem with balancing and grading, 3) Computation of all zeros of the determinant of a matrix of polynomials, 4) Matrix exponentiation and the evaluation of integrals involving the matrix exponential, with option to first block diagonalize, 5) Root locus and frequency response for single variable transfer functions in the S, Z, and W domains, 6) Several methods of computing zeros for linear systems, and 7) The ability to generate documentation "on demand". All matrix operations in the SAMSAN algorithms assume non-symmetric matrices with real double precision elements. There is no fixed size limit on any matrix in any

  10. Numerical investigation of seismic wave propagation in fracture systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Weidong

    The geometric features and physical characteristics of fractures in rock masses are often considered major factors controlling the production of oil and gas. Therefore, it is important to detect fractures in oil and gas reservoirs. Of the various geophysical methods, seismic methods are particularly attractive for fracture detection and imaging because of the sensitivity of elastic waves to the mechanical compliance associated with fractures. Based on the effects of fracture on the velocities and amplitudes of seismic waves, several studies have shown the potential for using seismic tomography and vertical seismic profiling (VSP) techniques to characterize fracture systems in reservoirs. In this thesis, seismic wave propagation through a fracture system is numerically investigated by the finite-difference method. When seismic waves propagate in a medium with single fractures of infinite and finite length, the head wave and the dispersive interface waves (symmetric and antisymmetric modes) along the fracture are strongly excited by the explosion source if the seismic source is moved close to the fracture with low stiffness. In a fracture waveguide, fracture channel waves are supported by the waveguide, even in the absence of a velocity contrast between the fracture waveguide and surrounding host rock. The particular modes generated strongly depend on the polarization of the seismic source. When the seismic source is vertically (horizontally) polarized, antisymmetric (symmetric) modes are excited. In addition, if the thickness of the fracture waveguide increases, a complex particle motion of the fracture channel waves develops because the fracture channel waves partly couple with the interface waves along the fractures. For seismic wave propagation through a multi-fracture system consisting of equally spaced fractures, both an explicit fracture model and an equivalent transversely isotropic (TI) medium model were used to model the fracture system. In comparison to

  11. Effects of Fast Simple Numerical Calculation Training on Neural Systems

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Nagase, Tomomi; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sassa, Yuko; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Nouchi, Rui; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive training, including fast simple numerical calculation (FSNC), has been shown to improve performance on untrained processing speed and executive function tasks in the elderly. However, the effects of FSNC training on cognitive functions in the young and on neural mechanisms remain unknown. We investigated the effects of 1-week intensive FSNC training on cognitive function, regional gray matter volume (rGMV), and regional cerebral blood flow at rest (resting rCBF) in healthy young adults. FSNC training was associated with improvements in performance on simple processing speed, speeded executive functioning, and simple and complex arithmetic tasks. FSNC training was associated with a reduction in rGMV and an increase in resting rCBF in the frontopolar areas and a weak but widespread increase in resting rCBF in an anatomical cluster in the posterior region. These results provide direct evidence that FSNC training alone can improve performance on processing speed and executive function tasks as well as plasticity of brain structures and perfusion. Our results also indicate that changes in neural systems in the frontopolar areas may underlie these cognitive improvements. PMID:26881117

  12. Numeric Modeling of Valley Networks and Drainage Systems on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, A.

    2006-12-01

    Valley networks observed on Mars are often invoked to support the historical presence of water on the surface of Mars. There is a need for quantification of these networks and the drainage processes associated with them. Numerical modeling of these streams and drainage basins within a GIS environment allows for rapid assessment of hydrologic surface processes. In this study, several areas of valley networks which had been previously mapped visually using Viking, MOC, and MOLA datasets were re-examined using numeric processes and tools available in ArcGIS. Specifically, stream length and drainage density were quantified using the MOLA gridded DEM and ArcGIS tools. This process is significantly faster than the visual identification and delineation techniques used in the past. The project sought to test whether or not computer-assisted techniques were comparable in accuracy and precision to previous studies using visual techniques. To do this, two quadrangles previously visually mapped by Carr (1995) and Hynek and Phillips (2003) were analyzed. Total valley network length at the first site was found to be 18,300 km, compared to previous estimates of 1,308 km (Carr) and 11,100 km (Hynek and Phillips). Drainage density was calculated to be 0.0605/km, compared to previous estimates of 0.0076/km (Carr) and 0.065/km (Hynek and Phillips). The highest stream order found was 5th, compared to 3rd (Carr) and 6th (Hynek and Phillips). In the second quadrangle, total valley network length was measured at 4,010 km, compared to 453 km and 3,496 km. The drainage density was calculated to be 0.068/km, compared to 0.011/km and 0.082/km. The highest stream order found was 4th, compared to 2nd and 5th. Results were very similar to those using visual interpretation of MOC shaded relief by Hynek and Phillips. A difference in stream order, however, suggests that the computer-aided technique may not connect systems that visually have been connected. Still, automated results offer an

  13. A numerical investigation of a thermodielectric power generation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sklar, Akiva A.

    consists of four processes; the first process is a charging process, during which an electric field is applied to a thermodielectric material, causing it to acquire electrical charge on its surface (this process is analogous to the isentropic compression process of a Brayton cycle). The second process is a heating process in which the temperature of the dielectric material is increased via heat transfer from an external source. During this process, the thermodielectric material is forced to eject a portion of its surface charge because its charge storing capability decreases as the temperature increases; the ejected charge is intended for capture by external circuitry connected to the thermodielectric material, where it can be routed to an electrochemical storage device or an electromechanical device requiring high voltage direct current. The third process is a discharging process, during which the applied electric field is reduced to its initial strength (analogous to the isentropic expansion process of a Brayton cycle). The final process is a cooling process in which the temperature of the dielectric material is decreased via heat transfer from an external source, returning it to its initial temperature. Previously, predicting the performance of a thermodielectric power generator was hindered by a poor understanding of the material's thermodynamic properties and the effect unsteady heat transfer losses have on system performance. In order to improve predictive capabilities in this study, a thermodielectric equation of state was developed that relates the strength of the applied electric field, the amount of surface charge stored by the thermodielectric material, and its temperature. This state equation was then used to derive expressions for the material's thermodynamic states (internal energy, entropy), which were subsequently used to determine the optimum material properties for power generation. Next, a numerical simulation code was developed to determine the heat

  14. A numerical investigation of a thermodielectric power generation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sklar, Akiva A.

    consists of four processes; the first process is a charging process, during which an electric field is applied to a thermodielectric material, causing it to acquire electrical charge on its surface (this process is analogous to the isentropic compression process of a Brayton cycle). The second process is a heating process in which the temperature of the dielectric material is increased via heat transfer from an external source. During this process, the thermodielectric material is forced to eject a portion of its surface charge because its charge storing capability decreases as the temperature increases; the ejected charge is intended for capture by external circuitry connected to the thermodielectric material, where it can be routed to an electrochemical storage device or an electromechanical device requiring high voltage direct current. The third process is a discharging process, during which the applied electric field is reduced to its initial strength (analogous to the isentropic expansion process of a Brayton cycle). The final process is a cooling process in which the temperature of the dielectric material is decreased via heat transfer from an external source, returning it to its initial temperature. Previously, predicting the performance of a thermodielectric power generator was hindered by a poor understanding of the material's thermodynamic properties and the effect unsteady heat transfer losses have on system performance. In order to improve predictive capabilities in this study, a thermodielectric equation of state was developed that relates the strength of the applied electric field, the amount of surface charge stored by the thermodielectric material, and its temperature. This state equation was then used to derive expressions for the material's thermodynamic states (internal energy, entropy), which were subsequently used to determine the optimum material properties for power generation. Next, a numerical simulation code was developed to determine the heat

  15. Numerical Simulations of Quantum Many-body Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Scalapino, Douglas J. Sugar, Robert L.

    1998-04-20

    The goals of our DOE work were to develop numerical tools in order to (1) determine the actual phase of particular many-electron models and (2) to understand the underlying mechanisms responsible for the observed phases. Over the years, DOE funds provided support for a number of graduate students and postdoctoral fellows who have gone on to continue and extend this effort. Looking back, they were more successful in determining the types of correlations that developed in particular models and less successful in establishing the underlying mechanisms. For example, they found clear evidence for antiferromagnetism, d{sub x{sup 3}-y{sup 2}}-pairing correlations, and stripes in various t-t{prime}-J and Hubbard models. Here, the stripes consisted of 1/2-filled domain walls of holes separated by {pi}-phase shifted antiferromagnetic regions. They found that a next-near-neighbor hopping t{prime} with t{prime}/t > 0 suppressed the stripes and favored the d{sub x{sup 3}-y{sup 2}}-pairing correlations. They studied a model of a CuO, 2-leg ladder and found that d{sub x{sup 3}-y{sup 2}} correlations formed when the system was doped with either electrons or holes. Another example that they studied was a two-dimensional spin 1/2 easy plane model with a near-neighbor exchange J and a four-site ring exchange K. In this J-K model, as K/J is increased, one moves from XY order to stripe order and to Ising antiferromagnetic order. They are still exploring the unusual transition between the Xy and striped phase. The key feature that we found was that strongly-correlated, many-electron systems are 'delicately balanced' between different possible phases. They also believe that their work provides strong support in favor of Anderson's suggestion that the Hubbard model contains the basic physics of the cuprates. That is, it exhibits antiferromagnetism, d{sub x{sup 3}-y{sup 2}}-pairing correlations, and stripes as the half-filled model is doped with holes. They were not as successful in

  16. A numerical model of combustion in gasless pyrotechnic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Boddington, T.; Cottrell, A.; Laye, P.G.

    1989-04-01

    A simple numerical model has been developed for the propagation of a combustion wave through a gasless pyrotechnic mixture. A pseudo one-dimensional approach has been adopted in which an allowance for heat loss has been made by the inclusion of a simple Newtonian heat transfer term. Implementation requires a knowledge of the thermal and kinetic properties of the pyrotechnic mixture. The model reproduces the observed trends in burning velocity and predicts conditions leading to combustion failure.

  17. Field Study and Numerical Simulation of Sub Slab Ventilation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnefous, Y.C.; Gadgil, A.J.; Fisk, W.J.; Prill, R.J.; Nematollahi, A.R.

    1992-05-01

    The effectiveness of the technique of subslab ventilation (SSV) for limiting radon entry into basements was investigated through complementary experimentation and numerical modeling. Subslab pressure fields resulting from SSV were measured in six well-characterized basements, each with a different combination of soil and aggregate permeability. The relationship between air velocity and pressure gradient was measured in the laboratory for the three types of aggregate installed beneath the basement slabs. A new numerical model of SSV was developed and verified with the field data. This model simulates non-Darcy flow in the aggregate. We demonstrate that non-Darcy effects significantly impact SSV performance. Field data and numerical simulations indicate that increasing the aggregate permeability within the investigated range of 2 x 10{sup -8} m{sup 2} to 3 x 10{sup -7} m{sup 2} substantially improves the extension of the subslab pressure field due to SSV operation. Sealing of cracks in the slab and excavation of a small pit where the SSV pipe penetrates the slab also dramatically improve this pressure field extension. Our findings are consistent with the results of prior field studies; however, the studies reported here have improved our understanding of factors affecting SSV performance. The dependence of SSV performance on the relevant parameters are currently under investigation with the model.

  18. Numerical Methods of Computational Electromagnetics for Complex Inhomogeneous Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Wei

    2014-05-15

    Understanding electromagnetic phenomena is the key in many scientific investigation and engineering designs such as solar cell designs, studying biological ion channels for diseases, and creating clean fusion energies, among other things. The objectives of the project are to develop high order numerical methods to simulate evanescent electromagnetic waves occurring in plasmon solar cells and biological ion-channels, where local field enhancement within random media in the former and long range electrostatic interactions in the latter are of major challenges for accurate and efficient numerical computations. We have accomplished these objectives by developing high order numerical methods for solving Maxwell equations such as high order finite element basis for discontinuous Galerkin methods, well-conditioned Nedelec edge element method, divergence free finite element basis for MHD, and fast integral equation methods for layered media. These methods can be used to model the complex local field enhancement in plasmon solar cells. On the other hand, to treat long range electrostatic interaction in ion channels, we have developed image charge based method for a hybrid model in combining atomistic electrostatics and continuum Poisson-Boltzmann electrostatics. Such a hybrid model will speed up the molecular dynamics simulation of transport in biological ion-channels.

  19. Numerical simulation of nonlinear dynamical systems driven by commutative noise

    SciTech Connect

    Carbonell, F. Biscay, R.J.; Jimenez, J.C.; Cruz, H. de la

    2007-10-01

    The local linearization (LL) approach has become an effective technique for the numerical integration of ordinary, random and stochastic differential equations. One of the reasons for this success is that the LL method achieves a convenient trade-off between numerical stability and computational cost. Besides, the LL method reproduces well the dynamics of nonlinear equations for which other classical methods fail. However, in the stochastic case, most of the reported works has been focused in Stochastic Differential Equations (SDE) driven by additive noise. This limits the applicability of the LL method since there is a number of interesting dynamics observed in equations with multiplicative noise. On the other hand, recent results show that commutative noise SDEs can be transformed into a random differential equation (RDE) by means of a random diffeomorfism (conjugacy). This paper takes advantages of such conjugacy property and the LL approach for defining a LL scheme for SDEs driven by commutative noise. The performance of the proposed method is illustrated by means of numerical simulations.

  20. An Investigation of the Role of Alternate Numeration Systems in Preservice Teacher Mathematics Content Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasteen, Jodi I.

    Alternate numeration systems are common in preservice teacher (PST) mathematics curricula, but there is limited research on how to leverage alternate systems to promote the development of mathematical knowledge for teaching. I analyzed the role of alternate numeration systems in three ways. I conducted a thematic analysis of current PST textbooks to consider the role of alternate numeration systems in written curricula. I conducted a teaching experiment to analyze PSTs' mathematical activity as they engaged with a base five task sequence to reinvent an algorithm for multiplication. And I introduced problematizing mathematical contexts as a design heuristic, situating this within the design theory of Realistic Mathematics Education. I found that alternate numeration systems can be leveraged to create opportunities for PSTs to (a) engage in guided reinvention of an algorithm, (b) improve understanding of base ten by comparing it to other numeration systems, and (c) reflect on their learning experience and the learning experiences of children.

  1. Numerical simulation and wave extraction of binary black hole system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbiriba, Breno Cesar De Oliveira

    In the first part of this work, we apply finite difference methods, specially mesh refinement techniques, in order to numerically evolve a single black hole, which is represented by the puncture initial data. We use standard second order finite differences, and the second order Iterated Crank-Nicholson integrator. We observe that, in order to obtain a second order accurate evolution we must impose second order accurate interface conditions at the refinement boundaries. We test our evolution with both the geodesic and the 1+log slicing conditions, and observe the expected results. We conclude that our mesh refinement technique generates convergent evolutions, and the puncture method behaves very well with it. The second part of this work deals with a modification of the hybrid "Lazarus" method for wave extraction. This method is divided in three parts: an early evolution, a set of transformations to produce perturbations over a Kerr background from the numerical data, and Teukolsky evolution. By using our evolution code (with mesh refinement) and gauges (1+log, gamma-driver, shifting-shift), we deviate from the original Lazarus approach. We used an independent implementation of the Lazarus transformations, validating the original results, and of the Teukolsky equation. We obtained results similar to the original Lazarus, both on the waveforms as well as on the negative results at later times. For instance, strong pulses that contaminate some gauge transformations, which may be explained in part by the propagating gauge modes of the 1+log slicing. Increasing the accuracy of the initial black hole evolution we seem to obtain better final results for the Kerr test case. Because of the gauge problems, we develop an approximated embedding method which approximates location of the numerical slice into the Kerr spacetime. This method is much less sensitive to the gauge perturbations. Given the difficulties of the Lazarus procedure, we decide to use the Lazarus method as a

  2. Automated Testcase Generation for Numerical Support Functions in Embedded Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumann, Johann; Schnieder, Stefan-Alexander

    2014-01-01

    We present a tool for the automatic generation of test stimuli for small numerical support functions, e.g., code for trigonometric functions, quaternions, filters, or table lookup. Our tool is based on KLEE to produce a set of test stimuli for full path coverage. We use a method of iterative deepening over abstractions to deal with floating-point values. During actual testing the stimuli exercise the code against a reference implementation. We illustrate our approach with results of experiments with low-level trigonometric functions, interpolation routines, and mathematical support functions from an open source UAS autopilot.

  3. Numerical Modeling of Unsteady Thermofluid Dynamics in Cryogenic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok

    2003-01-01

    A finite volume based network analysis procedure has been applied to model unsteady flow without and with heat transfer. Liquid has been modeled as compressible fluid where the compressibility factor is computed from the equation of state for a real fluid. The modeling approach recognizes that the pressure oscillation is linked with the variation of the compressibility factor; therefore, the speed of sound does not explicitly appear in the governing equations. The numerical results of chilldown process also suggest that the flow and heat transfer are strongly coupled. This is evident by observing that the mass flow rate during 90-second chilldown process increases by factor of ten.

  4. Implication of the OCR Guidelines for the Use of Tests and Other Information in the Student Selection Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapes, Jerome T.; Greenwood, Katy L.

    The OCR Guidelines (Vocational Education Programs Guidelines for Eliminating Discrimination and Denial of Service on the Basis of Race, Color, National Origin, Sex and Handicap) are not the result of new legislation, but are new regulations for Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, and Section 504…

  5. Dance and Cheerleading as Competitive Sports: Making a Case for OCR Sport Recognition & NCAA Emerging Sport Designation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennefer, April; Sowder, Kristina; Pemberton, Cynthia Lee A.; Easterly, Debra M.

    During the 2001-02 academic year, Idaho State University engaged a nationwide study to investigate the prevalence of dance and cheerleading programs among National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) D-I schools. The goal of the study was to build a case for Office for Civil Rights (OCR) and NCAA sport recognition and designation. The study…

  6. Development of an Intelligent Monitoring and Control System for a Heterogeneous Numerical Propulsion System Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, John A.; Afjeh, Abdollah A.; Lewandowski, Henry; Homer, Patrick T.; Schlichting, Richard D.

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) project is exploring the use of computer simulation to facilitate the design of new jet engines. Several key issues raised in this research are being examined in an NPSS-related research project: zooming, monitoring and control, and support for heterogeneity. The design of a simulation executive that addresses each of these issues is described. In this work, the strategy of zooming, which allows codes that model at different levels of fidelity to be integrated within a single simulation, is applied to the fan component of a turbofan propulsion system. A prototype monitoring and control system has been designed for this simulation to support experimentation with expert system techniques for active control of the simulation. An interconnection system provides a transparent means of connecting the heterogeneous systems that comprise the prototype.

  7. An Evaluation of PC-Based Optical Character Recognition Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreier, E. M.; Uslan, M. M.

    1991-01-01

    The review examines six personal computer-based optical character recognition (OCR) systems designed for use by blind and visually impaired people. Considered are OCR components and terms, documentation, scanning and reading, command structure, conversion, unique features, accuracy of recognition, scanning time, speed, and cost. (DB)

  8. Neural Signatures of Number Processing in Human Infants: Evidence for Two Core Systems Underlying Numerical Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Daniel C.; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2011-01-01

    Behavioral research suggests that two cognitive systems are at the foundations of numerical thinking: one for representing 1-3 objects in parallel and one for representing and comparing large, approximate numerical magnitudes. We tested for dissociable neural signatures of these systems in preverbal infants by recording event-related potentials…

  9. Numerical investigation of smart base isolation system employing MR elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usman, M.; Sung, S. H.; Jang, D. D.; Jung, H. J.; Koo, J. H.

    2009-02-01

    This paper evaluates the dynamic performance of a newly proposed smart base isolation system employing Magneto-Rheological Elastomers (MREs). MREs belong to a class of smart materials whose elastic modulus or stiffness can be adjusted by varying the magnitude of the magnetic field. The base isolation systems are considered as one of the most effective devices for vibration reduction of civil engineering structures in the event of earthquakes. The proposed base isolation system strives to enhance the performance of the conventional base-isolation system by using controllable MREs. To validate the effectiveness of the MRE-based isolation system, an extensive simulation study has been performed using a five degree-of-freedom structure under several historical earthquake excitations. The results show that the proposed system outperformed the conventional system in reducing the responses of the structure in all the seismic excitations considered in the study.

  10. Optimizing OCR accuracy for bi-tonal, noisy scans of degraded Arabic documents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herceg, Paul; Huyck, Benjamin; Johnson, Christopher; Van Guilder, Linda; Kundu, Amlan

    2005-05-01

    Acquiring foreign language from degraded hardcopy documents is of interest to military and border control applications. Bi-tonal image scans are desirable because file size is small. However, the nature of hardcopy degradations and the scanner or image enhancement software capabilities used directly affect the quality of the captured image and the extent of language acquisition. We applied a collection of manual treatments to hardcopy Arabic documents to develop a corpus of bi-tonal images. We then used this corpus in an exploratory study to derive conclusions about how bi-tonal images could be enhanced. This paper discusses the manually degraded Arabic document corpus, the image enhancement study, and the significant optical character recognition (OCR) improvements obtained with simple scanner driver adjustments.

  11. 75 FR 18841 - Office for Civil Rights; Privacy Act of 1974, Amended System of Records

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-13

    ...),'' System No. 09-90-0052, published at 67 FR 57011, September 6, 2002. First, we propose to add a new... INFORMATION: The system of records (i.e., PIMS) described in the OCR's Privacy Act notice, 67 FR 57011 (Sept... Improvement Act of 2005, and altered to add two new routine uses in OCR's Privacy Act notice at 72 FR...

  12. Numerical modeling of pendulum dampers in torsional systems

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, P.R.; Shusto, L.M.

    1986-01-01

    Centrifugal pendulum-design dampers are utilized in torsional systems to reduce the vibration amplitude at certain objectionable torsional speeds. The damper is tuned by proper design of its mass, dimensions, and position on a carrier disk, which is rigidly attached to the torsional system. The effects of the pendulum damper on the response of the torsional system may be included by modifying the structural model to include a separate damper element representing each order of the pendulum damper. The stiffness and mass matrices for a damper element are dependent upon the order of vibration being dampened, the mass, and the geometry of the damper. A general form of the mass and stiffness equations for a simple centrifugal pendulum damper are derived from first principles using Lagrange's equations of motion. The analysis of torsional systems with pendulum dampers utilizing the mass and stiffness properties developed is included in the program SHAMS. SHAMS calculates the steady-state response of a system of springs and masses to harmonic loads using modal superposition. The response of a crankshaft system with and without the pendulum dampers are included as a case study.

  13. Numerical Modeling of a Shallow Borehole Thermal Energy Storage System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catolico, N.; Ge, S.; Lu, N.; McCartney, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    Borehole thermal energy storage (BTES) combined with solar thermal energy harvesting is an economic technological system to garner and store energy as well as an environmentally-sustainable alternative for the heating of buildings. The first community-scale BTES system in North America was installed in 2007 in the Drake Landing Solar Community (DLSC), about 35 miles south of Calgary, Canada. The BTES system involves direct circulation of water heated from solar thermal panels in the summer into a storage tank, after which it is circulate within an array of 144 closed-loop geothermal heat exchangers having a depth of 35 m and a spacing of 2.5 m. In the winter the circulation direction is reversed to supply heat to houses. Data collection over a six year period indicates that this system can supply more than 90% of the winter heating energy needs for 52 houses in the community. One major challenge facing the BTES system technology is the relatively low annual efficiency, i.e., the ratio of energy input and output is in the range of 15% to 40% for the system in Drake Landing. To better understand the working principles of BTES and to improve BTES performance for future applications at larger scales, a three-dimensional transient coupled fluid and heat transfer model is established using TOUGH2. The time-dependent injection temperatures and circulation rate measured over the six years of monitoring are used as model input. The simulations are calibrated using soil temperature data measured at different locations over time. The time-dependent temperature distributions within the borehole region agree well with the measured temperatures for soil with an intrinsic permeability of 10e-19 m2, an apparent thermal conductivity of 2.03 W/m°C, and a volumetric heat capacity of 2.31 MJ/m-3°C. The calibrated model serves as the basis for a sensitivity analysis of soil and operational parameters on BTES system efficiency preformed with TOUGH2. Preliminary results suggest 1) BTES

  14. Numerical simulations of thermal conductivity in dissipative two-dimensional Yukawa systems.

    PubMed

    Khrustalyov, Yu V; Vaulina, O S

    2012-04-01

    Numerical data on the heat transfer constants in two-dimensional Yukawa systems were obtained. Numerical study of the thermal conductivity and diffusivity was carried out for the equilibrium systems with parameters close to conditions of laboratory experiments with dusty plasma. For calculations of heat transfer constants the Green-Kubo formulas were used. The influence of dissipation (friction) on the heat transfer processes in nonideal systems was investigated. The approximation of the coefficient of thermal conductivity is proposed. Comparison of the obtained results to the existing experimental and numerical data is discussed. PMID:22680584

  15. Differential Emergence of Representational Systems: Drawings, Letters, and Numerals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamagata, Kyoko

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the process by which the representational activity and knowledge about drawing and letter and number writing emerge in children 21-46 months old. The results revealed that representational activities developed with age through several phases. Beginning at age 2, children produced different marks for different systems, but…

  16. Numerical analysis of nonlinear properties of rail fastening systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Luo, Y.; Yin, H. P.

    2014-10-01

    Higher demand on vibration isolation of track structure in nowadays leads to a trend of lower stiffness of rail fastening system accompanied with larger deformation of its rubber component. Nonlinear properties of rubber material under large deformation thus should be taken into account. Uniaxial tension, uniaxial compression and planar tension experiments of a rubber material were carried out to defined mathematical material models by using Abaqus. Accuracy of the material model and model coefficients were supported by good agreement between measured and simulated results. A shear type and a bonded compressed type of rail fastening system are designed and produced with the same rubber material. Quasi-static experiment of these two rail fastening systems were performed and simulated as well. Predictions of the preload dependent nonlinear properties of the two different rail fastening systems by Abaqus were found to be in good agreement with experiments. Nonlinearities of the two specimens, due both to the intrinsic rubber material properties and the geometric characteristics, were well analyzed and explained. This is believed to contribute to product designing and geometrical optimization with rubber component under general or local large deformation.

  17. Path-Integral Renormalization Group Method for Numerical Study of Strongly Correlated Electron Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imada, Masatoshi; Kashima, Tsuyoshi

    2000-09-01

    A numerical algorithm for studying strongly correlated electron systems is proposed. The groundstate wavefunction is projected out after a numerical renormalization procedure in the path integral formalism. The wavefunction is expressed from the optimized linear combination of retained states in the truncated Hilbert space with a numerically chosen basis. This algorithm does not suffer from the negative sign problem and can be applied to any type of Hamiltonian in any dimension. The efficiency is tested in examples of the Hubbard model where the basis of Slater determinants is numerically optimized. We show results on fast convergence and accuracy achieved with a small number of retained states.

  18. Numerical study on thermal load of laser reflecting focusing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Fu Qiang; Hong, Yan Ji

    2013-05-01

    In laser thrusters, the reflectors of the focusing system work under high-intensity laser radiation. The material choice of the reflectors is quite important due to thermal load raised by laser absorption. Meanwhile the endurance of heavy thermal load should be attributed to the metallic reflectors with low laser energy absorption ratio. Based on two-dimension heat conduction equation and several approximations, this study investigates the melting time and thermal deformation characteristics for three kind of metallic materials that are of high heat specific heat, high conductivity and high melting point, and so are some alloys. Calculated through Finite Differential Method, the results show that, as for the twice reflecting focusing system, the thermal load is quite remarkable for the both reflectors and is more serious for the second one, while different materials present distinct thermal endurance performance. For the materials under study, the beryllium mirrors featuring higher specific heat could endure longer laser radiation and may prolong the work time. Moreover, if the reflecting mirror is required to work under high laser radiation for longer time, the aid of cooling system maybe indispensable.

  19. Numerical modeling of Saturn's satellites and ring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Lindsey Starr

    2008-10-01

    Saturn's extensive ring and satellite system make it one of the most fascinating bodies in the solar system. Space missions like Cassini have revolutionized our understanding of the Saturn system; however, many issues remain unresolved. This dissertation explores three projects related to unanswered questions about Saturn's rings and satellites. Published moment of inertia data provide weak constraints on the interior structure of Saturn's mid-sized icy satellites. Giant impact basins and their associated antipodal terrains provide an alternate way to study the satellites' interior structures. I used hydrodynamical impact simulations to assess the amount of damage caused to the antipodal terrain of Tethys, Mimas and Rhea. Results vary somewhat from one satellite to another due to differences in the sizes of the satellites and impactors. I find that antipodal disruption depends more on core radius than core density, suggesting that core geometry may express a surface signature in global impacts on partially differentiated targets. The flux of meteoroids impacting Saturn's rings is not well known; this has important implications for the age of the rings. One way to better constrain this flux is to observe flashes caused by hypervelocity impacts between meteoroids and ring particles. 400 hours of ultraviolet Cassini observations were initially allotted to search for impact flashes. I used a hydrodynamics code to simulate such impacts and developed a radiative transfer model to study the resulting impact plumes. I find that the impact plumes last for only 10- 4 s, and radiation from the impact plumes is emitted in the visible rather than ultraviolet. The albedos of the ring particles are not well constrained. This directly relates to the composition of the rings and has implications for their age. I developed a radiative transfer code to model photon interactions with ring particles. This code includes the volume filling factor and demonstrates that inclusion of

  20. Lifeflow vad: design and numerical modeling of magnetic bearing system.

    PubMed

    Kailasan, Arunvel; Untaroiu, Alexandrina; Jiang, Wei; Wood, Houston G; Allaire, Paul E

    2012-01-01

    The non-contact and lubrication free support of magnetic bearings make them ideal to support rotating machines. One area of application of magnetic bearings is in the design of the mechanical heart pumps. The LifeFlow heart pump developed by the University of Virginia is one such heart pump which uses active and passive magnetic bearings to support the impeller. The design and controls of such bearings can be quite challenging. One of the major difficulties that one may encounter in designing the controller is to get accurate values of the control parameters such as bias flux, radial and axial stiffness values, forces, etc. In order to obtain these parameters accurately, a three dimensional finite element analysis of the magnetic bearings is crucial. This paper covers the analysis of the magnetic bearing system used in the LifeFlow Heart pump. The main purpose of the analysis was to provide accurate values of air gap flux, forces, radial and axial stiffness in order to design a robust and optimized controller for the bearings. As a result of the analysis, these parameters have been determined and the motor is being redesigned with a smaller footprint to achieve higher efficiency. PMID:22846286

  1. One Language, Two Number-Word Systems and Many Problems: Numerical Cognition in the Czech Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pixner, S.; Zuber, J.; Hermanova, V.; Kaufmann, L.; Nuerk, H.-C.; Moeller, K.

    2011-01-01

    Comparing numerical performance between different languages does not only mean comparing different number-word systems, but also implies a comparison of differences regarding culture or educational systems. The Czech language provides the remarkable opportunity to disentangle this confound as there exist two different number-word systems within…

  2. Neural computing for numeric-to-symbolic conversion in control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Passino, Kevin M.; Sartori, Michael A.; Antsaklis, Panos J.

    1989-01-01

    A type of neural network, the multilayer perceptron, is used to classify numeric data and assign appropriate symbols to various classes. This numeric-to-symbolic conversion results in a type of information extraction, which is similar to what is called data reduction in pattern recognition. The use of the neural network as a numeric-to-symbolic converter is introduced, its application in autonomous control is discussed, and several applications are studied. The perceptron is used as a numeric-to-symbolic converter for a discrete-event system controller supervising a continuous variable dynamic system. It is also shown how the perceptron can implement fault trees, which provide useful information (alarms) in a biological system and information for failure diagnosis and control purposes in an aircraft example.

  3. Heat transfer coefficients in two-dimensional Yukawa systems (numerical simulations)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrustalyov, Yu. V.; Vaulina, O. S.

    2013-05-01

    New data on heat transfer in two-dimensional Yukawa systems have been obtained. The results of a numerical study of the thermal conductivity for equilibrium systems with parameters close to the conditions of laboratory experiments in dusty plasma are presented. The Green-Kubo relations are used to calculate the heat transfer coefficients. The influence of dissipation (internal friction) on the heat transfer processes in nonideal systems is studied. New approximations are proposed for the thermal conductivity and diffusivity for nonideal dissipative systems. The results obtained are compared with the existing experimental and numerical data.

  4. Numerical solution of flow problems using body-fitted coordinate systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    The paper deals with numerically generated boundary-fitted coordinate systems. This procedure eliminates the shape of the boundaries as a complicating factor and allows the flow about arbitrary boundaries to be treated essentially as easily as that about simple boundaries. The technique of boundary-fitted coordinate systems is based on a method of automatic numerical generation of a general curvilinear coordinate system having a coordinate line coincident with each boundary of a general multiconnected region involving any number of arbitrarily shaped boundaries. Once the curvilinear coordinate system is generated, any partial differential system of interest may be solved on the coordinate system by transforming the equations and solving the resulting system in finite-difference approximation on the rectangular transformed plane. Attention is given to the types of boundary-fitted coordinate systems, coordinate system control, operation of the coordinate codes, solution of partial differential equations, application to free-surface flow, and other applications of interest.

  5. Experimental And Numerical Modelling Of The Priming Operation In Spacecraft Propulsion Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lema, Marcos; Pinho, Jorge; Steelant, Johan; Lopez-Pena, Fernando; Rambaud, Patrick

    2011-05-01

    The present study investigates experimentally and numerically the fluid hammer phenomenon in a confined environment, representing the priming operation of spacecraft propulsion systems. For the experimental approach, a new facility has been designed at the von Karman Institute, which can reproduce all the physical phenomena taking place in the propellant lines during a priming process. The simplified test procedure allows the recording of the pressure evolution of the liquid front with a fast response pressure transducer. The numerical approach is done with the numerical codes used by the European Space Agency (ESA) to support the propulsion systems design, i.e. EcosimPro/ESPSS and CFD-ACE+, simulating the experimental configuration both with 1D and 3D approaches. Comparing the numerical results with the experimental measurements indicates that the modelling of two-phase, two-component transient flows is a requirement for a proper simulation.

  6. Numerical study of a quasi-hydrodynamic system of equations for flow computation at small mach numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balashov, V. A.; Savenkov, E. B.

    2015-10-01

    The applicability of numerical algorithms based on a quasi-hydrodynamic system of equations for computing viscous heat-conducting compressible gas flows at Mach numbers M = 10-2-10-1 is studied numerically. The numerical algorithm is briefly described, and the results obtained for a number of two- and three-dimensional test problems are presented and compared with earlier numerical data.

  7. A numerical method for solving systems of linear ordinary differential equations with rapidly oscillating solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, Ira B.; Brookshaw, Leigh; Fox, Peter A.

    1992-01-01

    The present numerical method for accurate and efficient solution of systems of linear equations proceeds by numerically developing a set of basis solutions characterized by slowly varying dependent variables. The solutions thus obtained are shown to have a computational overhead largely independent of the small size of the scale length which characterizes the solutions; in many cases, the technique obviates series solutions near singular points, and its known sources of error can be easily controlled without a substantial increase in computational time.

  8. Free vibrations of beam-mass-spring systems: analytical analysis with numerical confirmation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darabi, Mohammad A.; Kazemirad, Siavash; Ghayesh, Mergen H.

    2012-04-01

    Free vibrations of a beam-mass-spring system with different boundary conditions are analyzed both analytically and numerically. In the analytical analysis, the system is divided into three subsystems and the effects of the spring and the point mass are considered as internal boundary conditions between any two neighboring subsystems. The partial differential equations governing the motion of the subsystems and internal boundary conditions are then solved using the method of separation of variables. In the numerical analysis, the whole system is considered as a single system and the effects of the spring and point mass are introduced using the Dirac delta function. The Galerkin method is then employed to discretize the equation of motion and the resulting set of ordinary differential equations are solved via eigenvalue analysis. Analytical and numerical results are shown to be in very good agreement.

  9. Journees 2010: New challenges for reference systems and numerical standards in astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capitaine, Nicole

    2011-10-01

    The Journees 2010 "Systemes de reference spatio-temporels", with the sub-title "New challenges for reference systems and numerical standards in astronomy", were organized from 20 to 22 September 2010 at Paris Observatory and Ecole Normale Superieure in Paris, France. The scientific programme was focused on the issues related to the recent developments and new challenges in astronomical space and time reference systems and their relativistic aspects, astrometric catalogs, Earth orientation, astronomical constants and numerical standards, planetary ephemerides and modern astrometry. There have been presentations and discussions related to the IAU Division 1 commissions and IAU Working Group "Numerical Standards for Fundamental astronomy" (NSFA); there has been a special session for presenting the latest developments in the solar system ephemerides and comparing details in those ephemerides.

  10. Coordinate Systems, Numerical Objects and Algorithmic Operations of Computational Experiment in Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degtyarev, Alexander; Khramushin, Vasily

    2016-02-01

    The paper deals with the computer implementation of direct computational experiments in fluid mechanics, constructed on the basis of the approach developed by the authors. The proposed approach allows the use of explicit numerical scheme, which is an important condition for increasing the effciency of the algorithms developed by numerical procedures with natural parallelism. The paper examines the main objects and operations that let you manage computational experiments and monitor the status of the computation process. Special attention is given to a) realization of tensor representations of numerical schemes for direct simulation; b) realization of representation of large particles of a continuous medium motion in two coordinate systems (global and mobile); c) computing operations in the projections of coordinate systems, direct and inverse transformation in these systems. Particular attention is paid to the use of hardware and software of modern computer systems.

  11. Equivalent series system to model a multiple friction pendulum system with numerous sliding interfaces for seismic analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, C. S.; Su, H. C.; Chiang, T. C.

    2014-03-01

    Current structural analysis software programs offer few if any applicable device-specific hysteresis rules or nonlinear elements to simulate the precise mechanical behavior of a multiple friction pendulum system (MFPS) with numerous sliding interfaces. Based on the concept of subsystems, an equivalent series system that adopts existing nonlinear elements with parameters systematically calculated and mathematically proven through rigorous derivations is proposed. The aim is to simulate the characteristics of sliding motions for an MFPS isolation system with numerous concave sliding interfaces without prior knowledge of detailed information on the mobilized forces at various sliding stages. An MFPS with numerous concave sliding interfaces and one articulated or rigid slider located between these interfaces is divided into two subsystems: the first represents the concave sliding interfaces above the slider, and the second represents those below the slider. The equivalent series system for the entire system is then obtained by connecting those for each subsystem in series. The equivalent series system is validated by comparing numerical results for an MFPS with four sliding interfaces obtained from the proposed method with those from a previous study by Fenz and Constantinou. Furthermore, these numerical results demonstrate that an MFPS isolator with numerous concave sliding interfaces, which may have any number of sliding interfaces, is a good isolation device to protect structures from earthquake damage through appropriate designs with controllable mechanisms.

  12. Online Numeric Data-Base Systems: A Resource for the Traditional Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Margaret O'Neill

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of one component of library reference service--online numeric database systems for time-series data--reviews tradition of reference service and ways in which computer technology has enhanced provision of library services. Experiences with Kentucky Economic Information System (KEIS) are described. Examples of KEIS and 30 references are…

  13. Variability in Chinese as a Foreign Language Learners' Development of the Chinese Numeral Classifier System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jie; Lu, Xiaofei

    2013-01-01

    This study examined variability in Chinese as a Foreign Language (CFL) learners' development of the Chinese numeral classifier system from a dynamic systems approach. Our data consisted of a longitudinal corpus of 657 essays written by CFL learners at lower and higher intermediate levels and a corpus of 100 essays written by native speakers (NSs)…

  14. Perception of graphic system data base problems and needs from a numerical control programmer's viewpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, O.A.

    1984-01-01

    Some needs addressed concerning computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacture include: data base definition rules and three-dimensional data bases; inclusion of concise dimensional, finishing, and other data in textual or attribute form; usable solid modeling capability; better toolpath control; programmable language section of system capable of addressing the whole system data structure; and broader numerical control macro capability. (LEW)

  15. Supporting Indigenous Students' Understanding of the Numeration System of Their First Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortina, Jose Luis

    2013-01-01

    Results from a project conducted in Mexico are discussed, in which a group of 17 indigenous teachers analyzed the numeration systems of their first language. The main goal of the project is to develop resources that help teachers in supporting students' understanding of the systems. In the first phase of the project, the central organizing ideas…

  16. Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS): An Award Winning Propulsion System Simulation Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauber, Laurel J.; Naiman, Cynthia G.

    2002-01-01

    The Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) is a full propulsion system simulation tool used by aerospace engineers to predict and analyze the aerothermodynamic behavior of commercial jet aircraft, military applications, and space transportation. The NPSS framework was developed to support aerospace, but other applications are already leveraging the initial capabilities, such as aviation safety, ground-based power, and alternative energy conversion devices such as fuel cells. By using the framework and developing the necessary components, future applications that NPSS could support include nuclear power, water treatment, biomedicine, chemical processing, and marine propulsion. NPSS will dramatically reduce the time, effort, and expense necessary to design and test jet engines. It accomplishes that by generating sophisticated computer simulations of an aerospace object or system, thus enabling engineers to "test" various design options without having to conduct costly, time-consuming real-life tests. The ultimate goal of NPSS is to create a numerical "test cell" that enables engineers to create complete engine simulations overnight on cost-effective computing platforms. Using NPSS, engine designers will be able to analyze different parts of the engine simultaneously, perform different types of analysis simultaneously (e.g., aerodynamic and structural), and perform analysis in a more efficient and less costly manner. NPSS will cut the development time of a new engine in half, from 10 years to 5 years. And NPSS will have a similar effect on the cost of development: new jet engines will cost about a billion dollars to develop rather than two billion. NPSS is also being applied to the development of space transportation technologies, and it is expected that similar efficiencies and cost savings will result. Advancements of NPSS in fiscal year 2001 included enhancing the NPSS Developer's Kit to easily integrate external components of varying fidelities, providing

  17. Proceedings of the IMOG (Interagency Manufacturing Operations Group) Numerical Systems Group. 62nd Meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Maes, G.J.

    1993-10-01

    This document contains the proceedings of the 62nd Interagency Manufacturing Operations Group (IMOG) Numerical Systems Group. Included are the minutes of the 61st meeting and the agenda for the 62nd meeting. Presentations at the meeting are provided in the appendices to this document. Presentations were: 1992 NSG Annual Report to IMOG Steering Committee; Charter for the IMOG Numerical Systems Group; Y-12 Coordinate Measuring Machine Training Project; IBH NC Controller; Automatically Programmed Metrology Update; Certification of Anvil-5000 for Production Use at the Y-12 Plant; Accord Project; Sandia National Laboratories {open_quotes}Accord{close_quotes}; Demo/Anvil Tool Path Generation 5-Axis; Demo/Video Machine/Robot Animation Dynamics; Demo/Certification of Anvil Tool Path Generation; Tour of the M-60 Inspection Machine; Distributed Numerical Control Certification; Spline Usage Method; Y-12 NC Engineering Status; and Y-12 Manufacturing CAD Systems.

  18. A numerical model of an intensive care ventilator-humidifier system.

    PubMed

    Drew, T; Vardy, A; Tarnow-Mordi, W; Lerski, R

    1996-04-01

    Current intensive care ventilator-humidifier systems neither monitor nor adequately control inspired gas humidity. Problems of low delivered humidity and condensation within ventilator circuitry are commonly encountered. To help to address these problems, a numerical model of a complete ventilator-humidifier-patient intensive care system has been developed. The model, based on a finite difference technique, can predict pressures, flow-rates, temperatures and relative humidities at discrete points throughout the system. A comparison of numerical predictions and measurements in a real system is reported. A strong qualitative agreement is demonstrated in all cases studied, and a good quantitative agreement is obtained in most cases. It is concluded that such models could be used to assess methods of controlling ventilator-humidifier systems to prevent the occurrence of condensation. Similar models could be developed for other medical gas delivery systems. PMID:8718951

  19. Supporting indigenous students' understanding of the numeration system of their first language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortina, José Luis

    2013-03-01

    Results from a project conducted in Mexico are discussed, in which a group of 17 indigenous teachers analyzed the numeration systems of their first language. The main goal of the project is to develop resources that help teachers in supporting students' understanding of the systems. In the first phase of the project, the central organizing ideas of 14 numeration systems were specified. Each system belonged to a different Mesoamerican language. Three aspects of the systems were identified that would have to be accounted for in instructional design. They include using 20 as a multiplicative base. Examples are presented of the instructional resources that indigenous teachers could use to help their students understand the quantitative rationales of the systems.

  20. Shaking table test and numerical analysis of offshore wind turbine tower systems controlled by TLCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianbing; Liu, Youkun; Bai, Xueyuan

    2015-03-01

    A wind turbine system equipped with a tuned liquid column damper (TLCD) is comprehensively studied via shaking table tests using a 1/13-scaled model. The effects of wind and wave actions are considered by inputting response-equivalent accelerations on the shaking table. The test results show that the control effect of the TLCD system is significant in reducing the responses under both wind-wave equivalent loads and ground motions, but obviously varies for different inputs. Further, a blade-hub-tower integrated numerical model for the wind turbine system is established. The model is capable of considering the rotational effect of blades by combining Kane's equation with the finite element method. The responses of the wind tower equipped with TLCD devices are numerically obtained and compared to the test results, showing that under both controlled and uncontrolled conditions with and without blades' rotation, the corresponding responses exhibit good agreement. This demonstrates that the proposed numerical model performs well in capturing the wind-wave coupled response of the offshore wind turbine systems under control. Both numerical and experimental results show that the TLCD system can significantly reduce the structural response and thus improve the safety and serviceability of the offshore wind turbine tower systems. Additional issues that require further study are discussed.

  1. A numerical scheme for optimal transition paths of stochastic chemical kinetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Di

    2008-10-01

    We present a new framework for finding the optimal transition paths of metastable stochastic chemical kinetic systems with large system size. The optimal transition paths are identified to be the most probable paths according to the Large Deviation Theory of stochastic processes. Dynamical equations for the optimal transition paths are derived using the variational principle. A modified Minimum Action Method (MAM) is proposed as a numerical scheme to solve the optimal transition paths. Applications to Gene Regulatory Networks such as the toggle switch model and the Lactose Operon Model in Escherichia coli are presented as numerical examples.

  2. Conservation properties of numerical integration methods for systems of ordinary differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenbaum, J. S.

    1976-01-01

    If a system of ordinary differential equations represents a property conserving system that can be expressed linearly (e.g., conservation of mass), it is then desirable that the numerical integration method used conserve the same quantity. It is shown that both linear multistep methods and Runge-Kutta methods are 'conservative' and that Newton-type methods used to solve the implicit equations preserve the inherent conservation of the numerical method. It is further shown that a method used by several authors is not conservative.

  3. A numerical method to study the dynamics of capillary fluid systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrada, M. A.; Montanero, J. M.

    2016-02-01

    We propose a numerical approach to study both the nonlinear dynamics and linear stability of capillary fluid systems. In the nonlinear analysis, the time-dependent fluid region is mapped onto a fixed numerical domain through a coordinate transformation. The hydrodynamic equations are spatially discretized with the Chebyshev spectral collocation technique, while an implicit time advancement is performed using second-order backward finite differences. The resulting algebraic equations are solved with the iterative Newton-Raphson technique. The most novel aspect of the method is the fact that the elements of the Jacobian of the discretized system of equations are symbolic functions calculated before running the simulation. These functions are evaluated numerically in the Newton-Raphson iterations to find the solution at each time step, which reduces considerably the computing time. Besides, this numerical procedure can be easily adapted to solve the eigenvalue problem which determines the linear global modes of the capillary system. Therefore, both the nonlinear dynamics and the linear stability analysis can be conducted with essentially the same algorithm. We validate this numerical approach by studying the dynamics of a liquid bridge close to its minimum volume stability limit. The results are virtually the same as those obtained with other methods. The proposed approach proves to be much more computationally efficient than those other methods. Finally, we show the versatility of the method by calculating the linear global modes of a gravitational jet.

  4. New developments in the numerical solution of differential/algebraic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Petzold, L.R.

    1987-04-01

    In this paper we survey some recent developments in the numerical solution of nonlinear differential/algebraic equation (DAE) systems of the form 0 = F(t,y,y'), where the initial values of y are known and par. deltaF/par. deltay' may be singular. These systems arise in the simulation of electrical networks, as well as in many other applications. DAE systems include standard form ODEs as a special case, but they also include problems which are in many ways quite different from ODEs. We examine the classification of DAE systems according to the degree of singularity of the system, and present some results on the analytical structure of these systems. We give convergence results for backward differentiation formulas applied to DAEs and examine some of the software issues involved in the numerical solution of DAEs. One-step methods are potentially advantageous for solving DAE systems with frequent discontinuities. However, recent results indicate that there is a reduction in the order of accuracy of many implicit Runge-Kutta methods even for simple DAE systems. We examine the current state of solving DAE systems by implicit Runge-Kutta methods. Finding a consistent set of initial conditions is often a problem for DAEs arising in applications. We explore some numerical methods for obtaining a consistent set of initial conditions. 21 refs.

  5. One language, two number-word systems and many problems: numerical cognition in the Czech language.

    PubMed

    Pixner, S; Zuber, J; Heřmanová, V; Kaufmann, L; Nuerk, H-C; Moeller, K

    2011-01-01

    Comparing numerical performance between different languages does not only mean comparing different number-word systems, but also implies a comparison of differences regarding culture or educational systems. The Czech language provides the remarkable opportunity to disentangle this confound as there exist two different number-word systems within the same language: for instance, "25" can be either coded in non-inverted order "dvadsetpät" [twenty-five] or in inverted order "pätadvadset" [five-and-twenty]. To investigate the influence of the number-word system on basic numerical processing within one culture, 7-year-old Czech-speaking children had to perform a transcoding task (i.e., writing Arabic numbers to dictation) in both number-word systems. The observed error pattern clearly indicated that the structure of the number-word system determined transcoding performance reliably: In the inverted number-word system about half of all errors were inversion-related. In contrast, hardly any inversion-related errors occurred in the non-inverted number-word system. We conclude that the development of numerical cognition does not only depend on cultural or educational differences, but is indeed related to the structure and transparency of a given number-word system. PMID:21763104

  6. Application of numerical optimization techniques to control system design for nonlinear dynamic models of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. Edward; Ge, Fuying

    1989-01-01

    Control system design for general nonlinear flight dynamic models is considered through numerical simulation. The design is accomplished through a numerical optimizer coupled with analysis of flight dynamic equations. The general flight dynamic equations are numerically integrated and dynamic characteristics are then identified from the dynamic response. The design variables are determined iteratively by the optimizer to optimize a prescribed objective function which is related to desired dynamic characteristics. Generality of the method allows nonlinear effects to aerodynamics and dynamic coupling to be considered in the design process. To demonstrate the method, nonlinear simulation models for an F-5A and an F-16 configurations are used to design dampers to satisfy specifications on flying qualities and control systems to prevent departure. The results indicate that the present method is simple in formulation and effective in satisfying the design objectives.

  7. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of the Cooling Performance of Water Spraying Systems during a Fire

    PubMed Central

    Chen, YaoHan; Su, ChungHwei; Tseng, JoMing; Li, WunJie

    2015-01-01

    The water spray systems are effective protection systems in the confined or unconfined spaces to avoid the damage to building structures since the high temperature when fires occur. NFPA 15 and 502 have suggested respectively that the factories or vehicle tunnels install water spray systems to protect the machinery and structures. This study discussed the cooling effect of water spray systems in experimental and numerical analyses. The actual combustion of woods were compared with the numerical simulations. The results showed that although the flame continued, the cooling effects by water spraying process within 120 seconds were obvious. The results also indicated that the simulation results of the fifth version Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS) overestimated the space temperature before water spraying in the case of the same water spray system. PMID:25723519

  8. Experimental and numerical analysis of the cooling performance of water spraying systems during a fire.

    PubMed

    Chen, YaoHan; Su, ChungHwei; Tseng, JoMing; Li, WunJie

    2015-01-01

    The water spray systems are effective protection systems in the confined or unconfined spaces to avoid the damage to building structures since the high temperature when fires occur. NFPA 15 and 502 have suggested respectively that the factories or vehicle tunnels install water spray systems to protect the machinery and structures. This study discussed the cooling effect of water spray systems in experimental and numerical analyses. The actual combustion of woods were compared with the numerical simulations. The results showed that although the flame continued, the cooling effects by water spraying process within 120 seconds were obvious. The results also indicated that the simulation results of the fifth version Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS) overestimated the space temperature before water spraying in the case of the same water spray system. PMID:25723519

  9. A numerical model for thermal energy storage systems utilising encapsulated phase change materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Rhys; Saman, Wasim; Bruno, Frank

    2016-05-01

    In an effort to reduce the cost of thermal energy storage for concentrated solar power plants, a thermocline storage concept was investigated. Two systems were investigated being a sensible-only and an encapsulated phase change system. Both systems have the potential to reduce the storage tank volume and/or reduce the cost of the filler material, thereby reducing the cost of the system when compared to current two-tank molten salt systems. The objective of the current paper is to create a numerical model capable of designing and simulating the aforementioned thermocline storage concepts in the open source programming language known as Python. The results of the current study are compared to previous numerical results and are found to be in good agreement.

  10. Numerical simulation of the actuation system for the ALDF's propulsion control valve. [Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korte, John J.

    1990-01-01

    A numerical simulation of the actuation system for the propulsion control valve (PCV) of the NASA Langley Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility was developed during the preliminary design of the PCV and used throughout the entire project. The simulation is based on a predictive model of the PCV which is used to evaluate and design the actuation system. The PCV controls a 1.7 million-pound thrust water jet used in propelling a 108,000-pound test carriage. The PCV can open and close in 0.300 second and deliver over 9,000 gallons of water per sec at pressures up to 3150 psi. The numerical simulation results are used to predict transient performance and valve opening characteristics, specify the hydraulic control system, define transient loadings on components, and evaluate failure modes. The mathematical model used for numerically simulating the mechanical fluid power system is described, and numerical results are demonstrated for a typical opening and closing cycle of the PCV. A summary is then given on how the model is used in the design process.

  11. Numerical Studies of Collective Phenomena in Two-Dimensional Electron and Cold Atom Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rezayi, Edward

    2013-07-25

    Numerical calculations were carried out to investigate a number of outstanding questions in both two-dimensional electron and cold atom systems. These projects aimed to increase our understanding of the properties of and prospects for non-Abelian states in quantum Hall matter.

  12. RELAP5 two-phase fluid model and numerical scheme for economic LWR system simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ransom, V.H.; Wagner, R.J.; Trapp, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    The RELAP5 two-phase fluid model and the associated numerical scheme are summarized. The experience accrued in development of a fast running light water reactor system transient analysis code is reviewed and example of the code application are given.

  13. A Framework for Evaluating Regional-Scale Numerical Photochemical Modeling Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the need for critically evaluating regional-scale (~ 200-2000 km) three dimensional numerical photochemical air quality modeling systems to establish a model's credibility in simulating the spatio-temporal features embedded in the observations. Because of li...

  14. Numerical modelling of interrogation systems for optical fibre Bragg grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswald, Daniel; Richardson, Steven; Wild, Graham

    2011-12-01

    There are a number of interrogation methods that can be used in optical Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) sensing system. For very high frequency signals interrogating the sensor signal from an FBG is limited to two intensiometric methods, edge filter detection and power detection. In edge filter detection, a broadband light source illuminates an FBG, the reflected spectrum is then passed through a spectral filter. In power detection, a narrowband light source with a wavelength corresponding to the 3dB point of the FBG is filtered by the FBG itself. Both methods convert the spectral shift of the FBG into intensity signals. These two categories each have a number of variations, all with different performance characteristics. In this work we present a numerical model for all of these interrogation systems. The numerical model is based on previous analytical modelling, which could only be utilised for perfect Gaussian profiles. However, interrogation systems can make use of non Gaussian shaped filters, or sources. The numerical modelling enables the different variations to be compared using identical component performance, showing the relative strengths and weakness of the systems in terms of useful parameters, including, signal-to-noise ratio, sensitivity, and dynamic resolution. The two different detection methods can also be compared side-by-side using the same FBG. Since the model is numerical, it enables real spectral data to be used for the various components (FBG, light source, filters). This has the added advantage of increasing the accuracy and usefulness of the model, over previous analytical work.

  15. System for measuring oxygen consumption rates of mammalian cells in static culture under hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Yuki; Miyahara, Hirotaka; Ota, Yuri; Tsuneda, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Estimating the oxygen consumption rates (OCRs) of mammalian cells in hypoxic environments is essential for designing and developing a three-dimensional (3-D) cell culture system. However, OCR measurements under hypoxic conditions are infrequently reported in the literature. Here, we developed a system for measuring OCRs at low oxygen levels. The system injects nitrogen gas into the environment and measures the oxygen concentration by an optical oxygen microsensor that consumes no oxygen. The developed system was applied to HepG2 cells in static culture. Specifically, we measured the spatial profiles of the local dissolved oxygen concentration in the medium, then estimated the OCRs of the cells. The OCRs, and also the pericellular oxygen concentrations, decreased nonlinearly as the oxygen partial pressure in the environment decreased from 19% to 1%. The OCRs also depended on the culture period and the matrix used for coating the dish surface. Using this system, we can precisely estimate the OCRs of various cell types under environments that mimic 3-D culture conditions, contributing crucial data for an efficient 3-D culture system design. PMID:26558344

  16. Research on numerical control system based on S3C2410 and MCX314AL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Qiang; Jiang, Tingbiao

    2008-10-01

    With the rapid development of micro-computer technology, embedded system, CNC technology and integrated circuits, numerical control system with powerful functions can be realized by several high-speed CPU chips and RISC (Reduced Instruction Set Computing) chips which have small size and strong stability. In addition, the real-time operating system also makes the attainment of embedded system possible. Developing the NC system based on embedded technology can overcome some shortcomings of common PC-based CNC system, such as the waste of resources, low control precision, low frequency and low integration. This paper discusses a hardware platform of ENC (Embedded Numerical Control) system based on embedded processor chip ARM (Advanced RISC Machines)-S3C2410 and DSP (Digital Signal Processor)-MCX314AL and introduces the process of developing ENC system software. Finally write the MCX314AL's driver under the embedded Linux operating system. The embedded Linux operating system can deal with multitask well moreover satisfy the real-time and reliability of movement control. NC system has the advantages of best using resources and compact system with embedded technology. It provides a wealth of functions and superior performance with a lower cost. It can be sure that ENC is the direction of the future development.

  17. Numerical test for hyperbolicity of chaotic dynamics in time-delay systems.

    PubMed

    Kuptsov, Pavel V; Kuznetsov, Sergey P

    2016-07-01

    We develop a numerical test of hyperbolicity of chaotic dynamics in time-delay systems. The test is based on the angle criterion and includes computation of angle distributions between expanding, contracting, and neutral manifolds of trajectories on the attractor. Three examples are tested. For two of them, previously predicted hyperbolicity is confirmed. The third one provides an example of a time-delay system with nonhyperbolic chaos. PMID:27575062

  18. A new method of modelling and numerical simulation of nonlinear dynamical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Colosi, T.; Codreanu, S.

    1996-06-01

    This work presents the most significant aspects of an original method of modelling and numerical simulation of nonlinear (linear) dynamical systems (1) it assures the local-iterative linearization (LIL) of nonlinear (linear) differential equations and transforms them, in the close proximity of a pivot moment, into algebraic equations. The use of this method is illustrated in the study of a particular nonlinear dynamical systems. The conclusions highlight the advantages of the proposed procedure. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Numerical test for hyperbolicity of chaotic dynamics in time-delay systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuptsov, Pavel V.; Kuznetsov, Sergey P.

    2016-07-01

    We develop a numerical test of hyperbolicity of chaotic dynamics in time-delay systems. The test is based on the angle criterion and includes computation of angle distributions between expanding, contracting, and neutral manifolds of trajectories on the attractor. Three examples are tested. For two of them, previously predicted hyperbolicity is confirmed. The third one provides an example of a time-delay system with nonhyperbolic chaos.

  20. Numerical methods for systems of conservation laws of mixed type using flux splitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, Chi-Wang

    1990-01-01

    The essentially non-oscillatory (ENO) finite difference scheme is applied to systems of conservation laws of mixed hyperbolic-elliptic type. A flux splitting, with the corresponding Jacobi matrices having real and positive/negative eigenvalues, is used. The hyperbolic ENO operator is applied separately. The scheme is numerically tested on the van der Waals equation in fluid dynamics. Convergence was observed with good resolution to weak solutions for various Riemann problems, which are then numerically checked to be admissible as the viscosity-capillarity limits. The interesting phenomena of the shrinking of elliptic regions if they are present in the initial conditions were also observed.

  1. Numerical Simulation of the Oscillations in a Mixer: An Internal Aeroacoustic Feedback System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Loh, Ching Y.

    2004-01-01

    The space-time conservation element and solution element method is employed to numerically study the acoustic feedback system in a high temperature, high speed wind tunnel mixer. The computation captures the self-sustained feedback loop between reflecting Mach waves and the shear layer. This feedback loop results in violent instabilities that are suspected of causing damage to some tunnel components. The computed frequency is in good agreement with the available experimental data. The physical phenomena are explained based on the numerical results.

  2. VINE-A NUMERICAL CODE FOR SIMULATING ASTROPHYSICAL SYSTEMS USING PARTICLES. I. DESCRIPTION OF THE PHYSICS AND THE NUMERICAL METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzstein, M.; Nelson, Andrew F.; Naab, T.; Burkert, A.

    2009-10-01

    We present a numerical code for simulating the evolution of astrophysical systems using particles to represent the underlying fluid flow. The code is written in Fortran 95 and is designed to be versatile, flexible, and extensible, with modular options that can be selected either at the time the code is compiled or at run time through a text input file. We include a number of general purpose modules describing a variety of physical processes commonly required in the astrophysical community and we expect that the effort required to integrate additional or alternate modules into the code will be small. In its simplest form the code can evolve the dynamical trajectories of a set of particles in two or three dimensions using a module which implements either a Leapfrog or Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg integrator, selected by the user at compile time. The user may choose to allow the integrator to evolve the system using individual time steps for each particle or with a single, global time step for all. Particles may interact gravitationally as N-body particles, and all or any subset may also interact hydrodynamically, using the smoothed particle hydrodynamic (SPH) method by selecting the SPH module. A third particle species can be included with a module to model massive point particles which may accrete nearby SPH or N-body particles. Such particles may be used to model, e.g., stars in a molecular cloud. Free boundary conditions are implemented by default, and a module may be selected to include periodic boundary conditions. We use a binary 'Press' tree to organize particles for rapid access in gravity and SPH calculations. Modules implementing an interface with special purpose 'GRAPE' hardware may also be selected to accelerate the gravity calculations. If available, forces obtained from the GRAPE coprocessors may be transparently substituted for those obtained from the tree, or both tree and GRAPE may be used as a combination GRAPE/tree code. The code may be run without

  3. Numerical Analysis of Combined Well and Open-Closed Loops Geothermal (CWG) Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yu-Chul

    2016-04-01

    Open-loop geothermal heat pump (GHP) system and closed-loop heat pump systems have been used in Korea to reduce emission of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2). The GHP systems have the pros and cons, for example, the open-loop GHP system is good energy-efficient and the closed-loop GHP system requires minimum maintenance costs. The open-loop GHP system can be used practically only with large amount of groundwater supply. The closed-loop GHP system can be used with high costs of initial installation. The performance and efficiency of the GHP system depend on the characteristics of the GHP system itself in addition to the geologic conditions. To overcome the cons of open-loop or closed-loop GHP system, the combined well and open-closed loops geothermal (CWG) system was designed. The open-loop GHP system is surrounded with closed-loop GHP systems in the CWG system. The geothermal energy in closed-loop GHP systems is supplied by the groundwater pumped by the open-loop GHP system. In this study, 2 different types of the CWG systems (small aperture hybrid CWG system and large aperture CWG system) are estimated using numerical simulation models in the aspect of energy efficiency. This work was supported by the New & Renewable Energy Core Technology Program of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP), granted financial resource from the Ministry of Trade, Industry & Energy, Republic of Korea. (No.20153030111120).

  4. Numerical modeling of an enhanced very early time electromagnetic (VETEM) prototype system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cui, T.J.; Chew, W.C.; Aydiner, A.A.; Wright, D.L.; Smith, D.V.; Abraham, J.D.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, two numerical models are presented to simulate an enhanced very early time electromagnetic (VETEM) prototype system, which is used for buried-object detection and environmental problems. Usually, the VETEM system contains a transmitting loop antenna and a receiving loop antenna, which run on a lossy ground to detect buried objects. In the first numerical model, the loop antennas are accurately analyzed using the Method of Moments (MoM) for wire antennas above or buried in lossy ground. Then, Conjugate Gradient (CG) methods, with the use of the fast Fourier transform (FFT) or MoM, are applied to investigate the scattering from buried objects. Reflected and scattered magnetic fields are evaluated at the receiving loop to calculate the output electric current. However, the working frequency for the VETEM system is usually low and, hence, two magnetic dipoles are used to replace the transmitter and receiver in the second numerical model. Comparing these two models, the second one is simple, but only valid for low frequency or small loops, while the first modeling is more general. In this paper, all computations are performed in the frequency domain, and the FFT is used to obtain the time-domain responses. Numerical examples show that simulation results from these two models fit very well when the frequency ranges from 10 kHz to 10 MHz, and both results are close to the measured data.

  5. Numerical analysis of impact effect on mechanical behavior of strong guardrail system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, X.; Guo, L.; Yang, L.; Du, X.; Cao, P.

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to estimate the crashworthiness of a guardrail system, and to optimize the relative vertical distance between centroid of vehicle and mounting height of W-beam. Abaqus/Explicit 6.5 software is used to simulate the dynamic response of the post and W-beam guardrail systems under vehicular impacts. Numerical results of maximum displacement of vehicles during dynamic contact between vehicle and guardrail system with various given masses of vehicles are obtained. Energy-absorbing properties of the guardrail system are studied for different values of centroid height. Influence of frictional coefficient between ground surface and vehicles is also investigated.

  6. A numerical study for design of depth, pitch and roll control system of a towed vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Koterayama, W.; Yamaguchi, S.; Nakamura, M.; Moriyama, A.; Akamatsu, T.

    1994-12-31

    A towed vehicle system, FLYING FISH, is under development for use in making chemical and physical measurements which enable the authors to obtain spacially continuous and real time data in an ocean mixed layer. The heave, pitch and roll of FLYING FISH are controlled by a main wing and horizontal tail wings which permit its stable attitudes and assure accurate measurements. The numerical simulation of motions was carried out to design the optimal control system of this towed vehicle system and the results gave the data for the design of the mechanical parts of the control system.

  7. Foundation heat exchangers for residential ground source heat pump systems Numerical modeling and experimental validation

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Lu; Cullin, James; Spitler, Jeffery; Im, Piljae; Fisher, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    A new type of ground heat exchanger that utilizes the excavation often made for basements or foundations has been proposed as an alternative to conventional ground heat exchangers. This article describes a numerical model that can be used to size these foundation heat exchanger (FHX) systems. The numerical model is a two-dimensional finite-volume model that considers a wide variety of factors, such as soil freezing and evapotranspiration. The FHX numerical model is validated with one year of experimental data collected at an experimental house located near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The model shows good agreement with the experimental data-heat pump entering fluid temperatures typically within 1 C (1.8 F) - with minor discrepancies due to approximations, such as constant moisture content throughout the year, uniform evapotranspiration over the seasons, and lack of ground shading in the model.

  8. A practical numerical scheme for the ternary Cahn-Hilliard system with a logarithmic free energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Darae; Kim, Junseok

    2016-01-01

    We consider a practically stable finite difference method for the ternary Cahn-Hilliard system with a logarithmic free energy modeling the phase separation of a three-component mixture. The numerical scheme is based on a linear unconditionally gradient stable scheme by Eyre and is solved by an efficient and accurate multigrid method. The logarithmic function has a singularity at zero. To remove the singularity, we regularize the function near zero by using a quadratic polynomial approximation. We perform a convergence test, a linear stability analysis, and a robustness test of the ternary Cahn-Hilliard equation. We observe that our numerical solutions are convergent, consistent with the exact solutions of linear stability analysis, and stable with practically large enough time steps. Using the proposed numerical scheme, we also study the temporal evolution of morphology patterns during phase separation in one-, two-, and three-dimensional spaces.

  9. Numerical determination of the transmissibility characteristics of a squeeze film damped forced vibration system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, M. A.; Davis, P. K.

    1976-01-01

    Numerical solutions of the governing equations of motion of a liquid squeeze film damped forced vibration system were carried out to examine the feasibility of using a liquid squeeze film to cushion and protect large structures, such as buildings, located in areas of high seismic activity. The mathematical model used was that for a single degree of freedom squeeze film damped spring mass system. The input disturbance was simulated by curve fitting actual seismic data with an eleventh order Lagranging polynomial technique. Only the normal component of the seismic input was considered. The nonlinear, nonhomogeneous governing differential equation of motion was solved numerically to determine the transmissibility over a wide range of physical parameters using a fourth-order Runge-Kutta technique. It is determined that a liquid squeeze film used as a damping agent in a spring-mass system can significantly reduce the response amplitude for a seismic input disturbance.

  10. Vibration control of piezoelectric smart structures based on system identification technique: Numerical simulation and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xing-Jian; Meng, Guang; Peng, Juan-Chun

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the efficiency of a system identification technique known as observer/Kalman filter identification (OKID) technique in the numerical simulation and experimental study of active vibration control of piezoelectric smart structures. Based on the structure responses determined by finite element method, an explicit state space model of the equivalent linear system is developed by employing OKID approach. The linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) algorithm is employed for controller design. The control law is then incorporated into the ANSYS finite element model to perform closed loop simulations. Therefore, the control law performance can be evaluated in the context of a finite element environment. Furthermore, a complete active vibration control system comprising the cantilever plate, the piezoelectric actuators, the accelerometers and the digital signal processor (DSP) board is set up to conduct the experimental investigation. A state space model characterizing the dynamics of the physical system is developed from experimental results using OKID approach for the purpose of control law design. The controller is then implemented by using a floating point TMS320VC33 DSP. Numerical examples by employing the proposed numerical simulation method, together with the experimental results obtained by using the active vibration control system, have demonstrated the validity and efficiency of OKID method in application of active vibration control of piezoelectric smart structures.

  11. System dynamic instabilities induced by sliding contact: A numerical analysis with experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunetti, J.; Massi, F.; Saulot, A.; Renouf, M.; D`Ambrogio, W.

    2015-06-01

    Mechanical systems present several contact surfaces between deformable bodies. The contact interface can be either static (joints) or in sliding (active interfaces). The sliding interfaces can have several roles and according to their application they can be developed either for maximizing the friction coefficient and the energy dissipation (e.g. brakes) or rather to allow the relative displacement at joints with a maximum efficiency. In both cases the coupling between system and local contact dynamics can bring to system dynamics instabilities (e.g. brake squeal or squeaking of hip prostheses). This results in unstable vibrations of the system, induced by the oscillation of the contact forces. In the literature, a large number of works deal with such kind of instabilities and are mainly focused on applied problems such as brake squeal noise. This paper shows a more general numerical analysis of a simple system constituted by two bodies in sliding contact: a rigid cylinder rotating inside a deformable one. The parametrical Complex Eigenvalue Analysis and the transient numerical simulations show how the friction forces can give rise to in-plane dynamic instabilities due to the interaction between two system modes, even for such a simple system characterized by one deformable body. Results from transient simulations highlight the key role of realistic values of the material damping to have convergence of the model and, consequently, reliable physical results. To this aim an experimental estimation of the material damping has been carried out. Moreover, the simplicity of the system allows for a deeper analysis of the contact instability and a balance of the energy flux among friction, system vibrations and damping. The numerical results have been validated by comparison with experimental ones, obtained by a specific test bench developed to reproduce and analyze the contact friction instabilities.

  12. Numerical Modeling of Pressurization of Cryogenic Propellant Tank for Integrated Vehicle Fluid System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok K.; LeClair, Andre C.; Hedayat, Ali

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical model of pressurization of a cryogenic propellant tank for the Integrated Vehicle Fluid (IVF) system using the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP). The IVF propulsion system, being developed by United Launch Alliance, uses boiloff propellants to drive thrusters for the reaction control system as well as to run internal combustion engines to develop power and drive compressors to pressurize propellant tanks. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been running tests to verify the functioning of the IVF system using a flight tank. GFSSP, a finite volume based flow network analysis software developed at MSFC, has been used to develop an integrated model of the tank and the pressurization system. This paper presents an iterative algorithm for converging the interface boundary conditions between different component models of a large system model. The model results have been compared with test data.

  13. Blue laser and high-numerical-aperture optical disk system for digital video recording (DVR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houten, Henk

    2001-02-01

    Based on a blue diode laser (405 nm wavelength) and a two- element objective lens with a numerical aperture of 0.85, a third generation optical recording system has been developed that is able to record 22.5 GB on a single sided 12 cm diameter disc, at a user data rate of 50 Mb/s. The system is referred to by the technical name DVR for high definition Digital Video Recording. In this paper, we review the physical and the system concept, the phase change media, the optical pick up unit, and the drive implementation.

  14. Simulation studies of the impact of advanced observing systems on numerical weather prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, R.; Kalnay, E.; Susskind, J.; Reuter, D.; Baker, W. E.; Halem, M.

    1984-01-01

    To study the potential impact of advanced passive sounders and lidar temperature, pressure, humidity, and wind observing systems on large-scale numerical weather prediction, a series of realistic simulation studies between the European Center for medium-range weather forecasts, the National Meteorological Center, and the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheric Sciences is conducted. The project attempts to avoid the unrealistic character of earlier simulation studies. The previous simulation studies and real-data impact tests are reviewed and the design of the current simulation system is described. Consideration is given to the simulation of observations of space-based sounding systems.

  15. Numerical solution of stiff systems of ordinary differential equations with applications to electronic circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenbaum, J. S.

    1971-01-01

    Systems of ordinary differential equations in which the magnitudes of the eigenvalues (or time constants) vary greatly are commonly called stiff. Such systems of equations arise in nuclear reactor kinetics, the flow of chemically reacting gas, dynamics, control theory, circuit analysis and other fields. The research reported develops an A-stable numerical integration technique for solving stiff systems of ordinary differential equations. The method, which is called the generalized trapezoidal rule, is a modification of the trapezoidal rule. However, the method is computationally more efficient than the trapezoidal rule when the solution of the almost-discontinuous segments is being calculated.

  16. Numerical analysis of composite systems by using interphase/interface models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaboche, J. L.; Girard, R.; Schaff, A.

    1997-07-01

    The paper considers two classes of approaches for the numerical analysis of composite systems: the first one discretizes the assumed interphase (between matrix and fibre) as volumic elements and uses material models that degenerate from Continuum Damage Mechanics. The second one introduces interface elements that relate non linearly the normal and tangential tractions to the corresponding displacement discontinuities, incorporating a progressive decohesion, following the lines of Needleman (1987) and Tvergaard (1990). The respective capabilities of these two approaches are discussed on the basis of some numerical results obtained for a unidirectional metal matrix composite system. When the models are consistently adjusted they are able to reproduce the same kind of results. The advantages of the second class of method is underlined and two new versions of interface models are proposed that guarantee the continuity and the monotonicity of the shear stiffness between the progressive decohesion phase and the subsequent contact/friction law that plays role under compressive shear after complete separation.

  17. Mapping sea ice leads with a coupled numeric/symbolic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Key, J.; Schweiger, A. J.; Maslanik, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    A method is presented which facilitates the detection and delineation of leads with single-channel Landsat data by coupling numeric and symbolic procedures. The procedure consists of three steps: (1) using the dynamic threshold method, an image is mapped to a lead/no lead binary image; (2) the likelihood of fragments to be real leads is examined with a set of numeric rules; and (3) pairs of objects are examined geometrically and merged where possible. The processing ends when all fragments are merged and statistical characteristics are determined, and a map of valid lead objects are left which summarizes useful physical in the lead complexes. Direct implementation of domain knowledge and rapid prototyping are two benefits of the rule-based system. The approach is found to be more successfully applied to mid- and high-level processing, and the system can retrieve statistics about sea-ice leads as well as detect the leads.

  18. Effect of anisotropy and groundwater system geometry on seepage through lakebeds. 2. Numerical simulation analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winter, T.C.; Pfannkuch, H.O.

    1984-01-01

    The interaction of lakes and groundwater is controlled partly by the geologic framework through which the water flows. Two interrelated geometric factors of the groundwater system that affect flow are overall geometry of the system, and anisotropy of the porous media within the system. Numerical simulation analysis was made for variations in the coefficient of anisotropy for each of several lake and groundwater settings having different geometric configurations. These analyses indicate that, for a given geometric setting, as the anisotropy of geologic materials decreases seepage from a lake decreases and depth of the local groundwater flow system associated with the lake increases. Transformation of scale of groundwater systems that have anisotropic media to isotropic equivalents results in a change in the overall geometry. Because of the different slopes of the water table and lakebed resulting from the scale transformations, a series of numerical experiments were made for various geometric configurations for a given anisotropy. These analyses indicate that as thickness of the groundwater system decreases, relative depth of the local flow system increases and seepage from the lake decreases. ?? 1984.

  19. Numerical model for the flow within the tower of a tornado-type wind energy system

    SciTech Connect

    Ayad, S.S.

    1981-11-01

    A two-equation turbulence model is used to predict numerically the flow within the tower of a tornado-type wind energy system. Calculations are carried out for a tower in a uniform flow. Both cases of closed-bottom tower and simulated turbine flow with a variety of turbine-to-tower diameter ratios and turbine flow rates are considered. Calculated values of pressure for closed-bottom tower are compared with experimental values. 11 refs.

  20. Simulation studies of proposed observing systems and their impact on numerical weather prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, R.; Kalnay, E.; Susskind, J.; Baker, W. E.; Halem, M.

    1984-01-01

    A series of realistic simulation studies is being conducted as a cooperative effort between the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), the National Meteorological Center (NMC), and the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheric Sciences (GLAS) to provide a quantitative assessment of the potential impact of proposed observation systems on large scale numerical weather prediction. A special objective of this project is to avoid the unrealistic character of earlier simulation studies.

  1. Experimental evidence, numerics, and theory of vibrational resonance in bistable systems.

    PubMed

    Baltanás, J P; López, L; Blechman, I I; Landa, P S; Zaikin, A; Kurths, J; Sanjuán, M A F

    2003-06-01

    We consider an overdamped bistable oscillator subject to the action of a biharmonic force with very different frequencies, and study the response of the system when the parameters of the high-frequency force are varied. A resonantlike behavior is obtained when the amplitude or the frequency of this force is modified in an experiment performed by means of an analog circuit. This behavior, confirmed by numerical simulations, is explained on the basis of a theoretical approach. PMID:16241316

  2. Large deviations in boundary-driven systems: Numerical evaluation and effective large-scale behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunin, Guy; Kafri, Yariv; Podolsky, Daniel

    2012-07-01

    We study rare events in systems of diffusive fields driven out of equilibrium by the boundaries. We present a numerical technique and use it to calculate the probabilities of rare events in one and two dimensions. Using this technique, we show that the probability density of a slowly varying configuration can be captured with a small number of long-wavelength modes. For a configuration which varies rapidly in space this description can be complemented by a local-equilibrium assumption.

  3. Numerical study of the performance of tornado-type wind energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ayad, S.S.

    1983-03-01

    The tornado-type wind energy system was proposed to utilize the pressure drop created by an intens vortex in a tower. The tower serves as a low pressure exhaust for the turbine. The author carried out a numerical solution of the tower flow, using the two-equation (kappa-epsilon) turbulence model, for the small size system tested by Yen, with a 0.127-m- (5-in.-) diam tower standing in a uniform wind flow. A comparison of the results with the measured pressure values verified the model. In the present work the same numerical model is used for a system with a tower that is completely embedded in an atmospheric boundary layer. The results show, for a tower in a boundary layer of the one-seventh power-law profile, about a 28% reduction of the values of power coefficient from those for a tower in a uniform stream. Calculations for the performance of a system with different tower heights and the same tower and turbine diameters show a sharp decrease of power for H/D less than or equal to 0.5. Analysis of the tangential velocity shows that the vortex should be maintained up to heights /ZETA//D less than or equal to 0.9 to avoid the decrease in power extraction. Numerical predictions are made for systems with tower diameters between 0.5 and 8 m (1.64 and 26.24 ft) using the same system geometry and approach flow conditions. The results show that the scale effect is negligible for systems of 4-m tower diameter or larger.

  4. Numerical Modeling of Cavitating Venturi: A Flow Control Element of Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok; Saxon, Jeff (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In a propulsion system, the propellant flow and mixture ratio could be controlled either by variable area flow control valves or by passive flow control elements such as cavitating venturies. Cavitating venturies maintain constant propellant flowrate for fixed inlet conditions (pressure and temperature) and wide range of outlet pressures, thereby maintain constant, engine thrust and mixture ratio. The flowrate through the venturi reaches a constant value and becomes independent of outlet pressure when the pressure at throat becomes equal to vapor pressure. In order to develop a numerical model of propulsion system, it is necessary to model cavitating venturies in propellant feed systems. This paper presents a finite volume model of flow network of a cavitating venturi. The venturi was discretized into a number of control volumes and mass, momentum and energy conservation equations in each control volume are simultaneously solved to calculate one-dimensional pressure, density, and flowrate and temperature distribution. The numerical model predicts cavitations at the throat when outlet pressure was gradually reduced. Once cavitation starts, with further reduction of downstream pressure, no change in flowrate is found. The numerical predictions have been compared with test data and empirical equation based on Bernoulli's equation.

  5. The generation and use of numerical shape models for irregular Solar System objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonelli, Damon P.; Thomas, Peter C.; Carcich, Brian T.; Veverka, Joseph

    1993-01-01

    We describe a procedure that allows the efficient generation of numerical shape models for irregular Solar System objects, where a numerical model is simply a table of evenly spaced body-centered latitudes and longitudes and their associated radii. This modeling technique uses a combination of data from limbs, terminators, and control points, and produces shape models that have some important advantages over analytical shape models. Accurate numerical shape models make it feasible to study irregular objects with a wide range of standard scientific analysis techniques. These applications include the determination of moments of inertia and surface gravity, the mapping of surface locations and structural orientations, photometric measurement and analysis, the reprojection and mosaicking of digital images, and the generation of albedo maps. The capabilities of our modeling procedure are illustrated through the development of an accurate numerical shape model for Phobos and the production of a global, high-resolution, high-pass-filtered digital image mosaic of this Martian moon. Other irregular objects that have been modeled, or are being modeled, include the asteroid Gaspra and the satellites Deimos, Amalthea, Epimetheus, Janus, Hyperion, and Proteus.

  6. Dynamic analysis of a motorbike engine timing system: Experimental and numerical investigation of the geartrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivola, Alessandro; Troncossi, Marco

    2014-10-01

    The development of high-performance vehicle engines requires advanced investigations in order to provide engineers with proper analysis tools to optimize the system design. The elastodynamic behaviour of the engine powertrain may be critical at high velocities (when the flexibility of the system components can have a major role on the overall performance) with consequences on the valve timing and the transmission of dynamic loads. A thorough numerical/experimental investigation was performed on the timing system of a racing motorbike engine. The timing system included the geartrain, which transmits power from the crankshaft to the camshafts, and the valve train, formed by the camshafts and the cam-follower mechanisms for the valve actuation. An experimental campaign was designed and carried out with the purpose of inspecting the timing system behaviour for different velocities and different design parameters. A numerical model was developed in order to provide a simulation/analysis tool that permits the design optimization of the main system components. The present work focuses on the geartrain elastodynamic analysis, which is the main novelty of a long-lasting activity carried out by the authors in collaborations with Ducati Motor Holding S.p.a. (Bologna, Italy). The experimental campaign, the model development and validation, and some simulation results are reported and discussed.

  7. Practical vision based degraded text recognition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, Khader; Agaian, Sos; Saleh, Hani

    2011-02-01

    Rapid growth and progress in the medical, industrial, security and technology fields means more and more consideration for the use of camera based optical character recognition (OCR) Applying OCR to scanned documents is quite mature, and there are many commercial and research products available on this topic. These products achieve acceptable recognition accuracy and reasonable processing times especially with trained software, and constrained text characteristics. Even though the application space for OCR is huge, it is quite challenging to design a single system that is capable of performing automatic OCR for text embedded in an image irrespective of the application. Challenges for OCR systems include; images are taken under natural real world conditions, Surface curvature, text orientation, font, size, lighting conditions, and noise. These and many other conditions make it extremely difficult to achieve reasonable character recognition. Performance for conventional OCR systems drops dramatically as the degradation level of the text image quality increases. In this paper, a new recognition method is proposed to recognize solid or dotted line degraded characters. The degraded text string is localized and segmented using a new algorithm. The new method was implemented and tested using a development framework system that is capable of performing OCR on camera captured images. The framework allows parameter tuning of the image-processing algorithm based on a training set of camera-captured text images. Novel methods were used for enhancement, text localization and the segmentation algorithm which enables building a custom system that is capable of performing automatic OCR which can be used for different applications. The developed framework system includes: new image enhancement, filtering, and segmentation techniques which enabled higher recognition accuracies, faster processing time, and lower energy consumption, compared with the best state of the art published

  8. Numerical simulation of geodesic acoustic modes in a multi-ion system

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Lei; Guo, Wenfeng; Xiao, Xiaotao; Wang, Shaojie

    2013-07-15

    Based on the semi-Lagrangian method, a δf drift kinetic continuum code incorporating magnetic flux coordinate was developed and applied to investigate the geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) oscillation in a multi-ion plasma system. This work proves clearly that the effective ion mass number affects the GAM in a multi-ion system. In this simulation, GAM frequency and damping rate are seen to vary with the proportion of impurity ions. The numerical result is consistent with the theoretical prediction in terms of both frequency and damping rate.

  9. Stability analysis and numerical simulation of 1 prey - 2 predator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savitri, D.; Abadi

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we study an ecological system that consists of 1 prey and 2 predators populations. The prey population grows logistically while Holling type II functional response is applied for both predators . The first predator preys on the prey and the second predator preys on the first one. The study starts with the stability analysis of critical points of the systems. Then, by using normal form and centre manifold method the information about other nontrivial solutions due to bifurcation including possible limit cycles appearance is obtained. The results are confirmed by numerical simulation using MatCont and biological interpretation of the results is also presented.

  10. Non-sequential Recursive Pair Substitutions and Numerical Entropy Estimates in Symbolic Dynamical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calcagnile, Lucio M.; Galatolo, Stefano; Menconi, Giulia

    2010-12-01

    We numerically test the method of non-sequential recursive pair substitutions to estimate the entropy of an ergodic source. We compare its performance with other classical methods to estimate the entropy (empirical frequencies, return times, and Lyapunov exponent). We have considered as a benchmark for the methods several systems with different statistical properties: renewal processes, dynamical systems provided and not provided with a Markov partition, and slow or fast decay of correlations. Most experiments are supported by rigorous mathematical results, which are explained in the paper.

  11. Numerical compensation of system polarization mode dispersion in polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ellen Ziyi; Oh, Wang-Yuhl; Villiger, Martin L.; Chen, Liang; Bouma, Brett E.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.

    2013-01-01

    Polarization mode dispersion (PMD), which can be induced by circulators or even moderate lengths of optical fiber, is known to be a dominant source of instrumentation noise in fiber-based PS-OCT systems. In this paper we propose a novel PMD compensation method that measures system PMD using three fixed calibration signals, numerically corrects for these instrument effects and reconstructs an improved sample image. Using a frequency multiplexed PS-OFDI setup, we validate the proposed method by comparing birefringence noise in images of intralipid, muscle, and tendon with and without PMD compensation. PMID:23389009

  12. Development of a Prototype Simulation Executive with Zooming in the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, John A.; Afjeh, Abdollah A.

    1995-01-01

    A major difficulty in designing aeropropulsion systems is that of identifying and understanding the interactions between the separate engine components and disciplines (e.g., fluid mechanics, structural mechanics, heat transfer, material properties, etc.). The traditional analysis approach is to decompose the system into separate components with the interaction between components being evaluated by the application of each of the single disciplines in a sequential manner. Here, one discipline uses information from the calculation of another discipline to determine the effects of component coupling. This approach, however, may not properly identify the consequences of these effects during the design phase, leaving the interactions to be discovered and evaluated during engine testing. This contributes to the time and cost of developing new propulsion systems as, typically, several design-build-test cycles are needed to fully identify multidisciplinary effects and reach the desired system performance. The alternative to sequential isolated component analysis is to use multidisciplinary coupling at a more fundamental level. This approach has been made more plausible due to recent advancements in computation simulation along with application of concurrent engineering concepts. Computer simulation systems designed to provide an environment which is capable of integrating the various disciplines into a single simulation system have been proposed and are currently being developed. One such system is being developed by the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) project. The NPSS project, being developed at the Interdisciplinary Technology Office at the NASA Lewis Research Center is a 'numerical test cell' designed to provide for comprehensive computational design and analysis of aerospace propulsion systems. It will provide multi-disciplinary analyses on a variety of computational platforms, and a user-interface consisting of expert systems, data base management and

  13. Stochastic coalescence in finite systems: an algorithm for the numerical solution of the multivariate master equation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonso, Lester; Zamora, Jose; Cruz, Pedro

    2015-04-01

    The stochastic approach to coagulation considers the coalescence process going in a system of a finite number of particles enclosed in a finite volume. Within this approach, the full description of the system can be obtained from the solution of the multivariate master equation, which models the evolution of the probability distribution of the state vector for the number of particles of a given mass. Unfortunately, due to its complexity, only limited results were obtained for certain type of kernels and monodisperse initial conditions. In this work, a novel numerical algorithm for the solution of the multivariate master equation for stochastic coalescence that works for any type of kernels and initial conditions is introduced. The performance of the method was checked by comparing the numerically calculated particle mass spectrum with analytical solutions obtained for the constant and sum kernels, with an excellent correspondence between the analytical and numerical solutions. In order to increase the speedup of the algorithm, software parallelization techniques with OpenMP standard were used, along with an implementation in order to take advantage of new accelerator technologies. Simulations results show an important speedup of the parallelized algorithms. This study was funded by a grant from Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologia de Mexico SEP-CONACYT CB-131879. The authors also thanks LUFAC® Computacion SA de CV for CPU time and all the support provided.

  14. Numerical analysis of some supersonic viscous flows related to inlet and nozzle systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Y.-N.; Buggeln, R. C.; Mcdonald, H.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical method originally developed for three-dimensional supersonic inlet flow calculations is extended and applied to the study of two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows associated with arbitrary propulsion systems. The method is based on the forward spatial marching solution of a reduced form of the three-dimensional steady Navier-Stokes equations in which streamwise pressure gradients are retained in both the subsonic and supersonic regions. The present paper briefly describes the analysis and then shows three applications. In the first application, a wall transpiration study has been performed for the two-dimensional shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction flow field with application to an inlet configuration. The second application treats a rectangular high speed inlet with a swept sideplate including the effects of sideplate spillage. Finally, the method is utilized to analyze the interaction of an under-expanded supersonic jet with an ambient flow. Computed results are examined and compared with available experimental measurements. It is demonstrated that the present numerical method is capable of numerically simulating complex two- and three-dimensional flows relevant to hypersonic propulsion systems in a manner which both shows good agreement with data when such data is available, and which shows the complex flow features in the absence of data.

  15. Assessment of numerical methods for the solution of fluid dynamics equations for nonlinear resonance systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekwas, A. J.; Yang, H. Q.

    1989-01-01

    The capability of accurate nonlinear flow analysis of resonance systems is essential in many problems, including combustion instability. Classical numerical schemes are either too diffusive or too dispersive especially for transient problems. In the last few years, significant progress has been made in the numerical methods for flows with shocks. The objective was to assess advanced shock capturing schemes on transient flows. Several numerical schemes were tested including TVD, MUSCL, ENO, FCT, and Riemann Solver Godunov type schemes. A systematic assessment was performed on scalar transport, Burgers' and gas dynamic problems. Several shock capturing schemes are compared on fast transient resonant pipe flow problems. A system of 1-D nonlinear hyperbolic gas dynamics equations is solved to predict propagation of finite amplitude waves, the wave steepening, formation, propagation, and reflection of shocks for several hundred wave cycles. It is shown that high accuracy schemes can be used for direct, exact nonlinear analysis of combustion instability problems, preserving high harmonic energy content for long periods of time.

  16. The Cognitive Advantages of Counting Specifically: A Representational Analysis of Verbal Numeration Systems in Oceanic Languages.

    PubMed

    Bender, Andrea; Schlimm, Dirk; Beller, Sieghard

    2015-10-01

    The domain of numbers provides a paradigmatic case for investigating interactions of culture, language, and cognition: Numerical competencies are considered a core domain of knowledge, and yet the development of specifically human abilities presupposes cultural and linguistic input by way of counting sequences. These sequences constitute systems with distinct structural properties, the cross-linguistic variability of which has implications for number representation and processing. Such representational effects are scrutinized for two types of verbal numeration systems-general and object-specific ones-that were in parallel use in several Oceanic languages (English with its general system is included for comparison). The analysis indicates that the object-specific systems outperform the general systems with respect to counting and mental arithmetic, largely due to their regular and more compact representation. What these findings reveal on cognitive diversity, how the conjectures involved speak to more general issues in cognitive science, and how the approach taken here might help to bridge the gap between anthropology and other cognitive sciences is discussed in the conclusion. PMID:26424227

  17. Numerical simulation of the blood flow in the human cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Zácek, M; Krause, E

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a numerical model of the human cardiovascular system. The model is composed of 15 elements connected in series representing the main parts of the system. Each element is composed of a rigid connecting tube and an elastic reservoir. The blood flow is described by a one-dimensional time-dependent Bernoulli equation. The action of the ventricles is simulated with a Hill's three-element model, adapted for the left and right heart. The closing of the four heart valves is simulated with the aid of time-dependent drag coefficients. Closing is achieved by letting the drag coefficient approach infinity. The resulting system of 32 non-linear ordinary differential equations is solved numerically with the Runge-Kutta method. The results of the simulation (pressure-time and volume-time dependence for the atria and ventricles and pressure forms in the aorta at a heart rate of 70 beats per minute) agree with the physiological data given in the literature. The model's input aortic impedance is 31.5 dyn s cm-5 which agrees with literature data given for aortic input impedance in man 26-80 dyn s cm-5). Long-term stability of the system was achieved. The cardiovascular system presented here can also be simulated at higher and varying heart rates--up to 200 beats per minute. The results of calculations for some pathological changes (e.g. valvular abnormalities) are discussed. PMID:8839013

  18. Numerical modeling of solidification and convection in a viscous pure binary eutectic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Spera, Frank J.

    1991-01-01

    The solidification and convection of the pure binary eutectic silicate system diopside-anorthite (Di-An) is numerically modeled. A mass-weighted enthalpy of fusion is used to account for the second solid phase (An) which crystallizes at the solidus temperature. Variable under-relaxation is used to aid convergence of the momentum equations in the implementation of the SIMPLER algorithm used to solve the two-dimensional continuum conservation equations. Numerical experiments of the solidification of Di80 melt show that a large temperature drop occurs across the solid and mush regions which decreases convective vigor in the liquid. Interesting compositional segregation patterns are produced during the solidification of Di80.

  19. Numerical characterization of a tomographic system for online dose measurements in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Minsky, D. M.; Valda, A. A.; Somacal, H.; Burlon, A. A.; Kreiner, A. J.

    2007-02-12

    A tomographic system for online dose measurements in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) based on the measurement of a specific 478 keV {gamma}-ray emitted after the neutron capture in boron is being developed. In the present work we study by means of Monte Carlo numerical simulations the effects of the finite spatial resolution and the limited number of counts, i. e. the statistical noise, on the reconstructed image contrast of numerical phantoms. These phantoms, of simple geometry, mimic the tumor (specific) and the normal tissue (non specific) boron concentrations. The simulated projection data were reconstructed using the expectation-maximization maximum-likelihood algorithm. These studies will help in the improvement of BNCT dosimetry.

  20. Numerical investigation on sensible thermal energy storage with porous media for high temperature solar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreozzi, A.; Buonomo, B.; Manca, O.; Mesolella, P.; Tamburrino, S.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper different high temperature TES components are numerically analyzed. The difference is defined by the different type of porous medium employed in the storage. Two different porous media are considered: spheres or foams. In all cases a ceramic material is considered. In the formulation of the model it is assumed that the system geometry is cylindrical, the fluid and the solid thermophysical properties are temperature independents, the radiation heat transfer mechanism is taken into account. The commercial CFD Fluent code is used to solve the governing equations in transient regime and in local thermal non-equilibrium (LTNE). Numerical simulations are carried out at different mass flow rates of the heat-carrying fluid. The results show the effects of the porosity and of the working fluid mass flow rate on the stored thermal energy and on the storage time.

  1. Comparison of numerical models for predicting ground water rebound in abandoned deep mine systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y.; Baek, H.; Kim, D.

    2012-12-01

    Cessation of dewatering usually results in ground water rebound after closing a deep underground mine because the mind voids and surrounding strata flood up to the levels of decant points such as shafts and drifts. Several numerical models have been developed to predict the timing, magnitude and location of discharges resulting from ground water rebound. We compared the numerical models such as VSS-NET, GRAM and MODFLOW codes at different spatial and time scales. Based on the comparisons, a new strategy is established to develop a program for ground water rebound modeling in abandoned deep mine systems. This presentation describes the new strategy and its application to an abandoned underground mine in Korea.

  2. Finite element modeling of borehole heat exchanger systems. Part 2. Numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diersch, H.-J. G.; Bauer, D.; Heidemann, W.; Rühaak, W.; Schätzl, P.

    2011-08-01

    Single borehole heat exchanger (BHE) and arrays of BHE are modeled by using the finite element method. Applying BHE in regional discretizations optimal conditions of mesh spacing around singular BHE nodes are derived. Optimal meshes have shown superior to such discretizations which are either too fine or too coarse. The numerical methods are benchmarked against analytical and numerical reference solutions. Practical application to a borehole thermal energy store (BTES) consisting of 80 BHE is given for the real-site BTES Crailsheim, Germany. The simulations are controlled by the specifically developed FEFLOW-TRNSYS coupling module. Scenarios indicate the effect of the groundwater flow regime on efficiency and reliability of the subsurface heat storage system.

  3. Numerical tools for the characterization of microelectromechanical systems by digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagliarulo, Vito; Russo, Tiziana; Miccio, Lisa; Ferraro, Pietro

    2015-10-01

    Digital holography (DH) in microscopy became an important interferometric tool in optical metrology when camera sensors reached a higher pixel number with smaller size and high-speed computers became able to process the acquired images. This allowed the investigation of engineered surfaces on microscale, such as microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). In DH, numerical tools perform the reconstruction of the wave field. This offers the possibility of retrieving not only the intensity of the acquired wavefield, but also the phase distribution. This review describes the principles of DH and shows the most important numerical tools discovered and applied to date in the field of MEMS. Both the static and the dynamic regimes can be analyzed by means of DH. Whereas the first one is mostly related to the characterization after the fabrication process, the second one is a useful tool to characterize the actuation of the MEMS.

  4. Protecting the Civil Rights of English Language Learners Today: A Study of the Recent DOJ and OCR Investigations of Selected School Districts in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oyeleye, Omobola Awosika

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the circumstances and practices that led to OCR and DOJ investigations in seven selected school districts, and to determine the emerging themes from the details of the settlement agreements between the school districts and the United States. The themes developed through this study were aimed at providing a…

  5. Numerical Modeling of Compliant-Moored System Dynamics with Applications to Marine Energy Converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichol, Tyler

    The development of a numerical model simulating the dynamic response of compliant-moored submerged systems to non-uniform fluid flow is presented. The model is meant to serve as a computational tool with applications to compliant-moored marine energy converters by time-domain representation of the mooring dynamics. The scope of the initial code is restricted to full-submerged moored tidal turbines, though the model can be readily expanded to analyze wave energy converters as well. The system is modeled in a Lagrangian frame treating tidal turbines and structural elements as rigid bodies. Mooring lines are modeled as a series of discrete elastic segments, with parameters and force contributions lumped to point-mass nodes joining each segment. Full-range of motion is achieved using the alpha-beta-gamma Euler Angle method. The governing equations of motion of the system are derived computationally through implementation of Lagrange's Equation of Motion. The techniques employed to develop the symbolic expressions for the total kinetic, potential, and damping energies of the system and the forces acting on each element of the system are discussed. The system of differential equations obtained from evaluation of Lagrange's Equation with the developed symbolic expressions is solved numerically using a built-in MATLAB ordinary differential equation solver called ODE15i.m with the user defined initial condition of the system. Several validation tests are presented and their results discussed. Finally, an explanation of future plans for development of the model and application to existing tidal energy systems are presented.

  6. Materials properties numerical database system established and operational at CINDAS/Purdue University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, C. Y.; Li, H. H.

    1989-01-01

    A computerized comprehensive numerical database system on the mechanical, thermophysical, electronic, electrical, magnetic, optical, and other properties of various types of technologically important materials such as metals, alloys, composites, dielectrics, polymers, and ceramics has been established and operational at the Center for Information and Numerical Data Analysis and Synthesis (CINDAS) of Purdue University. This is an on-line, interactive, menu-driven, user-friendly database system. Users can easily search, retrieve, and manipulate the data from the database system without learning special query language, special commands, standardized names of materials, properties, variables, etc. It enables both the direct mode of search/retrieval of data for specified materials, properties, independent variables, etc., and the inverted mode of search/retrieval of candidate materials that meet a set of specified requirements (which is the computer-aided materials selection). It enables also tabular and graphical displays and on-line data manipulations such as units conversion, variables transformation, statistical analysis, etc., of the retrieved data. The development, content, accessibility, etc., of the database system are presented and discussed.

  7. Numerical algorithms for computations of feedback laws arising in control of flexible systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasiecka, Irena

    1989-01-01

    Several continuous models will be examined, which describe flexible structures with boundary or point control/observation. Issues related to the computation of feedback laws are examined (particularly stabilizing feedbacks) with sensors and actuators located either on the boundary or at specific point locations of the structure. One of the main difficulties is due to the great sensitivity of the system (hyperbolic systems with unbounded control actions), with respect to perturbations caused either by uncertainty of the model or by the errors introduced in implementing numerical algorithms. Thus, special care must be taken in the choice of the appropriate numerical schemes which eventually lead to implementable finite dimensional solutions. Finite dimensional algorithms are constructed on a basis of a priority analysis of the properties of the original, continuous (infinite diversional) systems with the following criteria in mind: (1) convergence and stability of the algorithms and (2) robustness (reasonable insensitivity with respect to the unknown parameters of the systems). Examples with mixed finite element methods and spectral methods are provided.

  8. Numerical Treatment of the Boltzmann Equation for Self-Propelled Particle Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thüroff, Florian; Weber, Christoph A.; Frey, Erwin

    2014-10-01

    Kinetic theories constitute one of the most promising tools to decipher the characteristic spatiotemporal dynamics in systems of actively propelled particles. In this context, the Boltzmann equation plays a pivotal role, since it provides a natural translation between a particle-level description of the system's dynamics and the corresponding hydrodynamic fields. Yet, the intricate mathematical structure of the Boltzmann equation substantially limits the progress toward a full understanding of this equation by solely analytical means. Here, we propose a general framework to numerically solve the Boltzmann equation for self-propelled particle systems in two spatial dimensions and with arbitrary boundary conditions. We discuss potential applications of this numerical framework to active matter systems and use the algorithm to give a detailed analysis to a model system of self-propelled particles with polar interactions. In accordance with previous studies, we find that spatially homogeneous isotropic and broken-symmetry states populate two distinct regions in parameter space, which are separated by a narrow region of spatially inhomogeneous, density-segregated moving patterns. We find clear evidence that these three regions in parameter space are connected by first-order phase transitions and that the transition between the spatially homogeneous isotropic and polar ordered phases bears striking similarities to liquid-gas phase transitions in equilibrium systems. Within the density-segregated parameter regime, we find a novel stable limit-cycle solution of the Boltzmann equation, which consists of parallel lanes of polar clusters moving in opposite directions, so as to render the overall symmetry of the system's ordered state nematic, despite purely polar interactions on the level of single particles.

  9. Solving the Bateman equations in CASMO5 using implicit ode numerical methods for stiff systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hykes, J. M.; Ferrer, R. M.

    2013-07-01

    The Bateman equations, which describe the transmutation of nuclides over time as a result of radioactive decay, absorption, and fission, are often numerically stiff. This is especially true if short-lived nuclides are included in the system. This paper describes the use of implicit numerical methods for o D Es applied to the stiff Bateman equations, specifically employing the Backward Differentiation Formulas (BDF) form of the linear multistep method. As is true in other domains, using an implicit method removes or lessens the (sometimes severe) step-length constraints by which explicit methods must abide. To gauge its accuracy and speed, the BDF method is compared to a variety of other solution methods, including Runge-Kutta explicit methods and matrix exponential methods such as the Chebyshev Rational Approximation Method (CRAM). A preliminary test case was chosen as representative of a PWR lattice depletion step and was solved with numerical libraries called from a Python front-end. The Figure of Merit (a combined measure of accuracy and efficiency) for the BDF method was nearly identical to that for CRAM, while explicit methods and other matrix exponential approximations trailed behind. The test case includes 319 nuclides, in which the shortest-lived nuclide is {sup 98}Nb with a half-life of 2.86 seconds. Finally, the BDF and CRAM methods were compared within CASMO5, where CRAM had a FOM about four times better than BDF, although the BDF implementation was not fully optimized. (authors)

  10. Development of Education Support System for Numerical Electromagnetic Analysis Based on Server-Client Model using Java

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohchi, Masashi; Furukawa, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Shin-Ichiro

    Among several numerical methods, a Finite Element Method (FEM) has been adopted in various engineering problems. In such a background, it is necessary to instruct university students in the numerical analysis. The authors have designed and implemented the numerical analysis education support system for learning electromagnetic fields with Graphical User Interface (GUI) based on the server-client model using Java. In the paper, a feasibility study on the student laboratory class in the third year is described.

  11. Numerical Study of Tidal Circulation in the Magdalena-Almejas Lagoon System, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaytsev, O.; Sanchez-Montante, O.

    2006-12-01

    The Magdalena-Almejas lagoon system (MALS), the most extensive coastal system on the west coast of the Baja California Peninsula, Mexico, is characterized by high primary productivity. The tidal circulation in the MALS was simulated with a three-dimensional numerical Estuarine and Coastal Ocean Model (ECOM, Blumberg and Mellor). The model was forced by tidal sea level variations at the main inlets. Tidal mixing and water exchange through the lagoon inlets were also specified. Non-periodic mass transport, related to the tidal- induced residual circulation, and wind-driven circulation were simulated by means of the numerical experiments. The results of the numerical experiments show significant spatial variations of the tidal circulation, associated with bottom topography and tidal forcing through the inlets. A comparison between model outputs and field observation data provides satisfactory model calibration. It was found that the tidal circulation in the interior of the MALS is mainly driven by tidal flows through the Magdalena Bay (MB) inlet. A hydraulic effect modulates the tidal exchange between the bays which comprise the MALS. Tidal propagation through the channel connecting Magdalena and Almejas Bays establishes a time lag between tidal variations of sea level in these bays. Maximum tidal currents in MB during spring tide reached 0.8 m/s, and differences in current intensity rate as much as 3.3 times have been found between spring and neap tides. In comparison, the current generated by constant NW winds of 5 m/s was, on average, one order of magnitude smaller than the maximum tidal currents, but 10 times greater than the residual tide-induced currents. Nevertheless, the cyclonic residual circulation in the deepest part of the MB could transport cold oceanic water with high concentrations of nutrients to the inner part of the MALS and form a characteristic feature of the termohaline structure inside the lagoon system.

  12. Experimental and numerical investigation of the roll motion behavior of a floating liquefied natural gas system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, WenHua; Yang, JianMin; Hu, ZhiQiang; Xiao, LongFei; Peng, Tao

    2013-03-01

    The present paper does an experimental and numerical investigation of the hydrodynamic interaction and the response of a single point turret-moored Floating Liquefied Natural Gas (FLNG) system, which is a new type of floating LNG (Liquid Natural Gas) platform that consists of a ship-type FPSO hull equipped with LNG storage tanks and liquefaction plants. In particular, this study focuses on the investigation of the roll response of FLNG hull in free-decay motions, white noise waves and also in irregular waves. Model tests of the FLNG system in 60%H filling condition excited by both white noise waves and irregular waves combined with steady wind and current have been carried out. Response Amplitude Operators (RAOs) and time histories of the responses are obtained for sway, roll and yaw motions. Obvious Low Frequency (LF) components of the roll motions are observed, which may be out of expectation. To facilitate the physical understanding of this phenomenon, we filter the roll motions at the period of 30 s into two parts: the Wave Frequency (WF) motions and the Low Frequency (LF) motions respectively. The results indicate that the LF motions are closely related to the sway and yaw motions. Possible reasons for the presence of the LF motions of roll have been discussed in detail, through the comparison with the sway and yaw motions. As for the numerical part, the simulation of the modeled case is conducted with the help of the software SESAM®. A good agreement between experiments and calculations is reported within the scope of trends. However, the numerical simulations should be further improved for the prediction of the FLNG system in the heading sea.

  13. Numerical simulations of interactions among aerodynamics, structural dynamics, and control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preidikman, Sergio

    A robust technique for performing numerical simulations of nonlinear unsteady aeroelastic behavior is developed. The technique is applied to long-span bridges and the wing of a modern business jet. The heart of the procedure is combining the aerodynamic and structural models. The aerodynamic model is a general unsteady vortex-lattice method. The structural model for the bridges is a rigid roadbed supported by linear and torsional springs. For the aircraft wing, the structural model is a cantilever beam with rigid masses attached at various positions along the span; it was generated with the NASTRAN program. The structure, flowing air, and control devices are considered to be the elements of a single dynamic system. All the governing equations are integrated simultaneously and interactively in the time domain; a predictor-corrector method was adapted to perform this integration. For long-span bridges, the simulation predicts the onset of flutter accurately, and the numerical results strongly suggest that an actively controlled wing attached below the roadbed can easily suppress the wind-excited oscillations. The governing equations for a proposed passive system were developed. The wing structure is modelled with finite elements. The deflections are expressed as an expansion in terms of the free-vibration modes. The time-dependent coefficients are the generalized coordinates of the entire dynamic system. The concept of virtual work was extended to develop a method to transfer the aerodynamic loads to the structural nodes. Depending on the speed of the aircraft, the numerical results show damped responses to initial disturbances (although there are no viscous terms in either the aerodynamic or structural model), merging of modal frequencies, the development of limit-cycle oscillations, and the occurrence of a supercritical Hopf bifurcation leading to motion on a torus.

  14. ONE-DIMENSIONAL NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF THE TRANSIENT THERMAL RESPONSE OF MULTILAYER INSULATIVE SYSTEMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pittman, C. M.

    1994-01-01

    This program performs a one-dimensional numerical analysis of the transient thermal response of multi-layer insulative systems. The analysis can determine the temperature distribution through a system consisting of from one to four layers, one of which can be an air gap. Concentrated heat sinks at any interface can be included. The computer program based on the analysis will determine the thickness of a specified layer that will satisfy a temperature limit criterion at any point in the insulative system. The program will also automatically calculate the thickness at several points on a system and determine the total system mass. This program was developed as a tool for designing thermal protection systems for high-speed aerospace vehicles but could be adapted to many areas of industry involved in thermal insulation systems. In this package, the equations describing the transient thermal response of a system are developed. The governing differential equation for each layer and boundary condition are put in finite-difference form using a Taylor's series expansion. These equations yield an essentially tridiagonal matrix of unknown temperatures. A procedure based on Gauss' elimination method is used to solve the matrix. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for the CDC RUN compiler and has been implemented on a CDC 6000 series machine operating under SCOPE 3.0. This program requires a minimum of 44K (octal) of 60 bit words of memory.

  15. Numerical Simulation of the Multiphase Flow in the Rheinsahl-Heraeus (RH) System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Dian-Qiao; Lei, Hong; He, Ji-Cheng

    2010-02-01

    Knowledge of gas-liquid multiphase flow behavior in the Rheinsahl-Heraeus (RH) system is of great significance to clarify the circulation flow rate, decarburization, and inclusion removal with a reliable description. Thus, based on the separate model of injecting gas behavior, a novel mathematical model of multiphase flow has been developed to give the distribution of gas holdup in the RH system. The numerical results show that the predicted circulation flow rates, the predicted flow velocities, and the predicted mixing times agree with the measured results in a water model and that the predicted tracer concentration curve agrees with the results obtained in an actual RH system. With a lower lifting gas flow rate, the rising gas bubbles are concentrated near the wall; with a higher lifting gas flow rate, gas bubbles can reach the center of the up-snorkel. A critical lifting gas flow rate is used to obtain the maximum circulation flow rate.

  16. An innovative fixed-pole numerical approximation for fractional order systems.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yiheng; Tse, Peter W; Du, Bin; Wang, Yong

    2016-05-01

    A novel numerical approximation scheme is proposed for fractional order systems by the concept of identification. An identical equation is derived firstly, from which one can obtain the exact state space model of fractional order systems. It reveals the nature of the approximation problem, and then provides an effective scheme to obtain the desired model. This research project also focuses on solving a knotty but crucial issue, i.e., the initial value problem of fractional order systems. The results generated by the study prove that it can reduce to the Caputo case by selecting some specific initial values. A careful simulation study is reported to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme. To exhibit the superiority clearly, the results are compared with that of the published fixed-pole finite model method. PMID:26850750

  17. Numerical analysis of a rub-impact rotor-bearing system for hydraulic generating set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L. K.; Ma, Z. Y.

    2012-11-01

    In this article, vibration characteristics of a rub-impact rotor-bearing system excited by unbalanced magnetic pull (UMP) for hydraulic generating set are investigated. The rubbing model used consists of the radial elastic impact and the tangential Coulomb friction. Through numerical calculation, the excitation current, eccentricity are used as the control parameters, investigating their effect on the rub-impact rotor-bearing system, by bifurcation diagrams, Poincaré maps, trajectories, and frequency spectrums. Various nonlinear phenomena, including period-one, period-five, quasi-period and chaotic motions, are induced and the system stability is obviously influenced due to the UMP. In addition, it is found that the large eccentricity that exceeds to a certain extent may lead to the full annular rubbing from the partial rubbing. The results can provide some theoretical references for the safety operation and rub-impact fault diagnosis of the hydraulic generating set.

  18. NASA Scientific and Technical Information System (STI) and New Directory of Numerical Data Bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J.

    1984-01-01

    The heart of NASA's STI system is a collection of scientific and technical information gathered from worldwide sources. Currently containing over 2.2 million items, the data base is growing at the rate of 140,000 items per year. In addition to announcement journals, information is disseminated through the NASA RECON on-line bibliographic search system. One part of RECON is NALNET which lists journals and books held by the NASA Centers. Another service now accessible by recon is a directory of numerical data bases (DND) which can be shared by NASA staff and contractors. The DND describes each data base and gives the name and phone number of a contact person. A NASA-wide integrated library system is being developed for the Center libraries which will include on-line catalog and subsystems for acquisition, circulation control, information retrieveal, management information, and an authority file. These subsystems can interact with on-line bibliographic, patron, and vendor files.

  19. Numerical simulation of nonlinear processes in a beam-plasma system

    SciTech Connect

    Efimova, A. A. Berendeev, E. A.; Vshivkov, V. A.; Dudnikova, G. I.

    2015-10-28

    In the present paper we consider the efficiency of the electromagnetic radiation generation due to various nonlinear processes in the beam-plasma system. The beam and plasma parameters were chosen close to the parameters in the experiment on the GOL-3 facility (BINP SB RAS). The model of the collisionless plasma is described by system of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations with periodic boundary conditions. The parallel numerical algorithm is based on the particles-in-cell method (PIC) with mixed Euler-Lagrangian domain decomposition. Various scenarios of nonlinear evolution in the beam-plasma system under the influence of an external magnetic field in case of a low density beam were studied. The energy transfer from one unstable mode to the others modes was observed.

  20. Numerical analysis of NOx reduction for compact design in marine urea-SCR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Cheolyong; Sung, Yonmo; Choi, Gyung Min; Kim, Duck Jool

    2015-11-01

    In order to design a compact urea selective catalytic reduction system, numerical simulation was conducted by computational fluid dynamics tool. A swirl type static mixer and a mixing chamber were considered as mixing units in the system. It had great influence on flow characteristics and urea decomposition into ammonia. The mixer caused flow recirculation and high level of turbulence intensity, and the chamber increased residence time of urea-water-solution injected. Because of those effects, reaction rates of urea decomposition were enhanced in the region. When those mixing units were combined, it showed the maximum because the recirculation zone was significantly developed. NH3 conversion was maximized in the zone due to widely distributed turbulence intensity and high value of uniformity index. It caused improvement of NOx reduction efficiency of the system. It was possible to reduce 55% length of the chamber and connecting pipe without decrease of NOx reduction efficiency.

  1. Numerical experiments of adjusted Baumgarte-Shapiro-Shibata-Nakamura systems for controlling constraint violations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiuchi, Kenta; Shinkai, Hisa-Aki

    2008-02-01

    We present our numerical comparisons between the Baumgarte-Shapiro-Shibata-Nakamura (BSSN) formulation widely used in numerical relativity today and its adjusted versions using constraints. We performed three test beds: gauge-wave, linear wave, and Gowdy-wave tests, proposed by the Mexico workshop on the formulation problem of the Einstein equations. We tried three kinds of adjustments, which were previously proposed from the analysis of the constraint propagation equations, and investigated how they improve the accuracy and stability of evolutions. We observed that the signature of the proposed Lagrange multipliers are always right and the adjustments improve the convergence and stability of the simulations. When the original BSSN system already shows satisfactory good evolutions (e.g., linear wave test), the adjusted versions also coincide with those evolutions, while in some cases (e.g., gauge-wave or Gowdy-wave tests) the simulations using the adjusted systems last 10 times as long as those using the original BSSN equations. Our demonstrations imply a potential to construct a robust evolution system against constraint violations even in highly dynamical situations.

  2. Energetic pulses in exciton-phonon molecular chains and conservative numerical methods for quasilinear Hamiltonian systems.

    PubMed

    Lemesurier, Brenton

    2013-09-01

    The phenomenon of coherent energetic pulse propagation in exciton-phonon molecular chains such as α-helix protein is studied using an ODE system model of Davydov-Scott type, both with numerical studies using a new unconditionally stable fourth-order accurate energy-momentum conserving time discretization and with analytical explanation of the main numerical observations. Impulsive initial data associated with initial excitation of a single amide-I vibration by the energy released by ATP hydrolysis are used as well as the best current estimates of physical parameter values. In contrast to previous studies based on a proposed long-wave approximation by the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation and focusing on initial data resembling the soliton solutions of that equation, the results here instead lead to approximation by the third derivative nonlinear Schrödinger equation, giving a far better fit to observed behavior. A good part of the behavior is indeed explained well by the linear part of that equation, the Airy PDE, while other significant features do not fit any PDE approximation but are instead explained well by a linearized analysis of the ODE system. A convenient method is described for construction of the highly stable, accurate conservative time discretizations used, with proof of its desirable properties for a large class of Hamiltonian systems, including a variety of molecular models. PMID:24125294

  3. The numerical viscosity of entropy stable schemes for systems of conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadmor, E.

    1985-01-01

    Discrete approximations to hyperbolic systems of conservation laws are studied. The amount of numerical viscosity present in such schemes, is quantified and related to their entropy stability by means of comparison. To this end, conservative schemes which are also entropy conservative are constructed. These entropy conservative schemes enjoy second-order accuracy; moreover, they admit a particular interpretation within the finite-element frameworks, and hence can be formulated on various mesh configurations. It is then shown that conservative schemes are entropy stable if and only if they contain more viscosity than the mentioned above entropy conservative ones.

  4. The numerical viscosity of entropy stable schemes for systems of conservation laws. I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadmor, Eitan

    1987-01-01

    Discrete approximations to hyperbolic systems of conservation laws are studied. The amount of numerical viscosity present in such schemes is quantified and related to their entropy stability by means of comparison.To this end, conservative schemes which are also entropy-conservative are constructed. These entropy-conservative schemes enjoy second-order accuracy; moreover, they can be interpreted as piecewise-linear finite-element methods, and hence can be formulated on various mesh configurations. It is then shown that conservative schemes are entropy stable, if and (for three-point schemes) only they contain more viscosity than that present in the above-mentioned entropy-conservative ones.

  5. Numerical simulation of reacting flow in a thermally choked ram accelerator projectile launch system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusca, Michael J.

    1991-06-01

    CFD solutions for the Navier-Stokes equations are presently applied to a ram-accelerator projectile launcher's reacting and nonreacting turbulent flowfields. The gases in question are a hydrocarbon such as CH4, an oxidizer such as O2, and an inert gas such as N2. Numerical simulations are presented which highlight in-bore flowfield details and allow comparisons with measured launch tube wall pressures and projectile thrust as a function of velocity. The computation results thus obtained are used to ascertain the operational feasibility of a proposed 120-mm-bore ram accelerator system.

  6. Numerical arc segmentation algorithm for a radio conference - A software tool for communication satellite systems planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whyte, W. A.; Heyward, A. O.; Ponchak, D. S.; Spence, R. L.; Zuzek, J. E.

    1988-01-01

    A detailed description of a Numerical Arc Segmentation Algorithm for a Radio Conference (NASARC) software package for communication satellite systems planning is presented. This software provides a method of generating predetermined arc segments for use in the development of an allotment planning procedure to be carried out at the 1988 World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC - 88) on the use of the GEO and the planning of space services utilizing GEO. The features of the NASARC software package are described, and detailed information is given about the function of each of the four NASARC program modules. The results of a sample world scenario are presented and discussed.

  7. Numerical Simulation of HIWC Conditions with the Terminal Area Simulation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Switzer, George F.

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional, numerical simulation of a mesoconvective system is conducted in order to better understand conditions associated with High Ice Water Content (HIWC) and its threat to aviation safety. Although peak local values of ice water content may occur early in the storm lifetime, large areas of high concentrations expand with time and persist even when the storm tops begin to warm. The storm canopy which contains HIWC, has low radar reflectivity factor and is fed by an ensemble of regenerating thermal pulses.

  8. Addendum to `numerical modeling of an enhanced very early time electromagnetic (VETEM) prototype system'

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cui, T.J.; Chew, W.C.; Aydiner, A.A.; Wright, D.L.; Smith, D.V.; Abraham, J.D.

    2000-01-01

    Two numerical models to simulate an enhanced very early time electromagnetic (VETEM) prototype system that is used for buried-object detection and environmental problems are presented. In the first model, the transmitting and receiving loop antennas accurately analyzed using the method of moments (MoM), and then conjugate gradient (CG) methods with the fast Fourier transform (FFT) are utilized to investigate the scattering from buried conducting plates. In the second model, two magnetic dipoles are used to replace the transmitter and receiver. Both the theory and formulation are correct and the simulation results for the primary magnetic field and the reflected magnetic field are accurate.

  9. Numerical integration of nearly-Hamiltonian systems. [Van der Pol oscillator and perturbed Keplerian motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, V. R.

    1978-01-01

    The reported investigation is concerned with the solution of systems of differential equations which are derived from a Hamiltonian function in the extended phase space. The problem selected involves a one-dimensional perturbed harmonic oscillator. The van der Pol equation considered has an exact asymptotic value for its amplitude. Comparisons are made between a numerical solution and a known analytical solution. In addition to the van der Pol problem, known solutions regarding the restricted problem of three bodies are used as examples for perturbed Keplerian motion. The extended phase space Hamiltonian discussed by Stiefel and Scheifele (1971) is considered. A description is presented of two canonical formulations of the perturbed harmonic oscillator.

  10. Numerical studies of variable-range hopping in one-dimensional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodin, A. S.; Fogler, M. M.

    2010-03-01

    We report on our recent numerical study [1] of hopping transport in disordered one-dimensional systems. A fast new algorithm, based on Dijkstra shortest-path algorithm, is devised to find the lowest-resistance path through the hopping network at arbitrary electric field. Probability distribution functions of individual resistances on the path and the net resistance are calculated and fitted to compact analytic formulas. Qualitative differences between statistics of resistance fluctuations in Ohmic and non-Ohmic regimes are elucidated. The results are compared with prior theoretical and experimental work on the subject.[6pt] [1] A. S. Rodin and M. M. Fogler, Phys. Rev. B 80, 155435 (2009).

  11. Dissipative structures in a two-cell system: Numerical and experimental approaches

    PubMed Central

    Breton, J.; Thomas, D.; Hervagault, J. F.

    1986-01-01

    It has been shown that the coupling between the photoreduction of the oxidized form of dichloroindophenol (an artificial electron acceptor) by thylakoids and the incident light intensity can lead to the appearance of multiple steady states when the system is operated under open conditions. In the present work, a numerical study and experimental evidence are presented on the occurrence of dissipative structures in an arrangement of two continuously stirred tank reactors with mutual mass exchange of dichloroindophenol through an inert membrane. The stable spatial structures are generated by the creation of transient internal and external asymmetries. A nontrivial hysteresis effect between symmetric and asymmetric stable steady states has been observed. PMID:16593652

  12. All-reflective optical target illumination system with high numerical aperture

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Carlton E.; Sigler, Robert D.; Hoeger, John G.

    1979-01-01

    An all-reflective optical system for providing illumination of a target focal region at high numerical aperture from a pair of confluent collimated light beams. The collimated beams are each incident upon an associated concave eccentric pupil paraboloidal reflective surface, and thereby each focused through an opening in an associated outer ellipsoidal reflective surface onto a plane reflector. Each beam is reflected by its associated plane reflector onto the opposing concave surface of the outer ellipsoids to be focused through an opening in the plane surface onto an opposing inner concave ellipsoidal reflective surface, and thence onto the target region.

  13. Numerical Studies of Nonlinear Schrodinger and Klein-Gordon Systems: Techniques and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Dae-Il

    The continuing proliferation of computational resources makes it more and more powerful to conduct numerical studies on physics problems for which either analytic methods fail, or well-controlled experiments are very difficult, if not impossible. In particular, a finite-difference based numerical approach. has been an indispensable tool in the three areas of physics that, I study in this thesis: numerical relativity (boson stars), Bose-Einstein condensates, and atomic hydrogen in strong laser fields. Numerical relativity (NR) enables us to tackle problems of astrophysical interest which are difficult or impossible to study using analytic methods. Many of these problems involve strong and dynamical gravitational fields, and many involve the dynamics of one or more gravitationally compact objects such as black holes, neutron stars or, more speculatively, boson stars. A long term goal of NR, then (and of this research) is the accurate simulation of the dynamics of one or more compact objects. Here, as a step in that direction, I present some of the first results for a fully coupled Einstein/Klein-Gordon system in 3D, wherein I attempt to evolve a static relativistic boson star using the full equations of motion. A key motivation for the study of self-gravitating bosonic matter (in both the Newtonian and Einsteinian regimes) is the observation that, even though any direct physical relevance has yet to be demonstrated, boson star systems provide excellent numerical laboratories in which to develop techniques for NR. Specifically, the boson star model provides an ideal vehicle with which to implement and evaluate (1) various coordinate conditions in the context of the ADM formalism and (2) multidimensional adaptive mesh refinement techniques which appear crucial for many problems in 3D numerical relativity. Again, as a step towards studying the fully relativistic problem, I first consider boson stars in the Newtonian regime, which are described by the solutions of Schr

  14. Numerical modeling of the thermo-physical hydrology of volcanic geothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, S. W.; Driesner, T.; Weis, P.

    2013-12-01

    Numerical modeling of fluid flow and heat transfer plays an important role in elucidating the structure and dynamics of hydrothermal systems. Although past studies have provided important insights into the physical factors governing fluid convection, most numerical models have been limited by temperature restrictions or other simplifications that have limited the applicability of model results to natural geothermal systems. This study applies the fluid flow and heat transport code CSMP++ to simulate the cooling of intrusions and the sub-surface structure and evolution of hydrothermal systems. Early simulations are focused on characterizing the influence of ';primary' factors such as magma chamber depth and geometry as well as system-scale permeability. Later simulations will test the influence of fluid salinity, topography, as well as heterogeneous/anisotropic permeability. Preliminary results show that the depth of the magma chamber plays an important role in system evolution, strongly influencing whether two upflow zones develop on the margins of the chamber or a single upflow zone develops directly over the center. If the roof of the magma chamber is near 2-2.5 km depth, extensive two-phase zones can develop above the magma chambers and are able to transport heat much more rapidly than for single-phase upflow zones. As shown by previous studies, higher host rock permeability results in lower upflow temperatures and thus two-phase zones are more short-lived and confined to shallower depths. However, since the total fluid flux around the magma chamber is much greater, higher permeability causes magma chambers to cool more rapidly and develop more numerous, narrower upflow zones than develop at lower permeability. Although relatively little is known about the geometry of magma bodies acting as heat sources for geothermal systems, results from these simulations show that information obtainable from drilling, such as the locations and temperatures of upflow zones

  15. Numerical modeling of two-phase flow in the NaCl-H2O system: Introduction of a numerical method and benchmarking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, K. C.; Lowell, R. P.

    2009-05-01

    In order to facilitate modeling of fluid flow processes in seafloor hydrothermal systems, we introduce a numerical scheme called FISHES that is capable of simulating two-phase fluid flow in the NaCl-H2O system. We discuss the equations governing fluid flow, the thermodynamic relations between various quantities employed, and the coupling of these elements together in a time marching scheme. The thermodynamic relations are expressed in terms of equations of state compiled from lookup tables. These are based on previously published formulations for the density and enthalpy of NaCl-H2O fluid in regions of phase space that are relevant to the study of seafloor hydrothermal systems. We show that the thermodynamic quantities vary both smoothly and physically in P-T-X space. In particular, vapor salinity values near the vapor-liquid-halite coexistence surface are in agreement with recently measured values. We compare code output from an approximately one-dimensional scenario to the analytic solution of the classical one-dimensional thermal advection-diffusion equation and find that the numerical output and analytic solution are in agreement. The numerical code is also benchmarked against previously published results for the Elder problem and for the problem of fluid extraction from a one-dimensional, two-phase horizontal pipe. We find that the results using FISHES are in agreement with previously published results. Finally, we show that results from a one-dimensional vertical salt pipe simulation agree with an analytic solution.

  16. Experimental and numerical investigations of internal heat transfer in an innovative trailing edge blade cooling system: stationary and rotation effects, part 2: numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beniaiche, Ahmed; Ghenaiet, Adel; Carcasci, Carlo; Facchini, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a numerical validation of the aero-thermal study of a 30:1 scaled model reproducing an innovative trailing edge with one row of enlarged pedestals under stationary and rotating conditions. A CFD analysis was performed by means of commercial ANSYS-Fluent modeling the isothermal air flow and using k-ω SST turbulence model and an isothermal air flow for both static and rotating conditions (Ro up to 0.23). The used numerical model is validated first by comparing the numerical velocity profiles distribution results to those obtained experimentally by means of PIV technique for Re = 20,000 and Ro = 0-0.23. The second validation is based on the comparison of the numerical results of the 2D HTC maps over the heated plate to those of TLC experimental data, for a smooth surface for a Reynolds number = 20,000 and 40,000 and Ro = 0-0.23. Two-tip conditions were considered: open tip and closed tip conditions. Results of the average Nusselt number inside the pedestal ducts region are presented too. The obtained results help to predict the flow field visualization and the evaluation of the aero-thermal performance of the studied blade cooling system during the design step.

  17. Thermal buoyancy and Marangoni convection in a two fluid layered system - A numerical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.

    1990-01-01

    Thermal buoyancy and surface tension driven convection is numerically investigated in a system with two, immiscible fluids. The geometry investigated, has an open cavity configuration with the lighter fluid situated on top of the heavier fluid, forming a stable layered system. The upper fluid meniscus and the interface are assumed to be flat and undeformable in the calculations. The governing equations and boundary/interface conditions are solved by a control volume based finite difference scheme for two pairs of immiscible fluids; the water-hexadecane system and a so called generic system. The steady state calculations show, that dramatically different flows are predicted when the interfacial tension effects are included or excluded from the system model. These differences are particularly appreciable in surface tension dominated flows, that are typical of microgravity situations. Complex flow patterns, with induced secondary flows are noticed in both the fluids. In general, the overall system heat transfer is found to increase with increases in the thermal buoyancy and surface tension effects, but the behavior of the system flow and thermal fields is not easy to characterize, when different combinations of these forces are considered.

  18. Numerical evaluation of the groundwater drainage system for underground storage caverns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Eui Seob; Chae, Byung Gon

    2015-04-01

    A novel concept storing cryogenic liquefied natural gas in a hard rock lined cavern has been developed and tested for several years as an alternative. In this concept, groundwater in rock mass around cavern has to be fully drained until the early stage of construction and operation to avoid possible adverse effect of groundwater near cavern. And then rock mass should be re-saturated to form an ice ring, which is the zone around cavern including ice instead of water in several joints within the frozen rock mass. The drainage system is composed of the drainage tunnel excavated beneath the cavern and drain holes drilled on rock surface of the drainage tunnel. In order to de-saturate sufficiently rock mass around the cavern, the position and horizontal spacing of drain holes should be designed efficiently. In this paper, a series of numerical study results related to the drainage system of the full-scale cavern are presented. The rock type in the study area consists mainly of banded gneiss and mica schist. Gneiss is in slightly weathered state and contains a little joint and fractures. Schist contains several well-developed schistosities that mainly stand vertically, so that vertical joints are better developed than the horizontals in the area. Lugeon tests revealed that upper aquifer and bedrock are divided in the depth of 40-50m under the surface. Groundwater level was observed in twenty monitoring wells and interpolated in the whole area. Numerical study using Visual Modflow and Seep/W has been performed to evaluate the efficiency of drainage system for underground liquefied natural gas storage cavern in two hypothetically designed layouts and determine the design parameters. In Modflow analysis, groundwater flow change in an unconfined aquifer was simulated during excavation of cavern and operation of drainage system. In Seep/W analysis, amount of seepage and drainage was also estimated in a representative vertical section of each cavern. From the results

  19. A Coursewriter II Function (FCALC) For the Manipulation of Numerical and Algebraic Expressions. Systems Memo Number One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Authella; And Others

    Documentation of the Coursewriter II Function FCALC is provided. The function is designed for use on the IBM 1500 instructional system and has three major applications: 1) comparison of a numeric expression in buffer 5 with a numeric expression in buffer 0; 2) comparison of an algebraic expression in buffer 5 with an algebraic expression in buffer…

  20. Optimization Algorithm for Kalman Filter Exploiting the Numerical Characteristics of SINS/GPS Integrated Navigation Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shaoxing; Xu, Shike; Wang, Duhu; Zhang, Aiwu

    2015-01-01

    Aiming at addressing the problem of high computational cost of the traditional Kalman filter in SINS/GPS, a practical optimization algorithm with offline-derivation and parallel processing methods based on the numerical characteristics of the system is presented in this paper. The algorithm exploits the sparseness and/or symmetry of matrices to simplify the computational procedure. Thus plenty of invalid operations can be avoided by offline derivation using a block matrix technique. For enhanced efficiency, a new parallel computational mechanism is established by subdividing and restructuring calculation processes after analyzing the extracted “useful” data. As a result, the algorithm saves about 90% of the CPU processing time and 66% of the memory usage needed in a classical Kalman filter. Meanwhile, the method as a numerical approach needs no precise-loss transformation/approximation of system modules and the accuracy suffers little in comparison with the filter before computational optimization. Furthermore, since no complicated matrix theories are needed, the algorithm can be easily transplanted into other modified filters as a secondary optimization method to achieve further efficiency. PMID:26569247

  1. Hybrid heating systems optimization of residential environment to have thermal comfort conditions by numerical simulation.

    PubMed

    Jahantigh, Nabi; Keshavarz, Ali; Mirzaei, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine optimum hybrid heating systems parameters, such as temperature, surface area of a radiant heater and vent area to have thermal comfort conditions. DOE, Factorial design method is used to determine the optimum values for input parameters. A 3D model of a virtual standing thermal manikin with real dimensions is considered in this study. Continuity, momentum, energy, species equations for turbulent flow and physiological equation for thermal comfort are numerically solved to study heat, moisture and flow field. K - ɛRNG Model is used for turbulence modeling and DO method is used for radiation effects. Numerical results have a good agreement with the experimental data reported in the literature. The effect of various combinations of inlet parameters on thermal comfort is considered. According to Pareto graph, some of these combinations that have significant effect on the thermal comfort require no more energy can be used as useful tools. A better symmetrical velocity distribution around the manikin is also presented in the hybrid system. PMID:26052442

  2. Optimization Algorithm for Kalman Filter Exploiting the Numerical Characteristics of SINS/GPS Integrated Navigation Systems.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shaoxing; Xu, Shike; Wang, Duhu; Zhang, Aiwu

    2015-01-01

    Aiming at addressing the problem of high computational cost of the traditional Kalman filter in SINS/GPS, a practical optimization algorithm with offline-derivation and parallel processing methods based on the numerical characteristics of the system is presented in this paper. The algorithm exploits the sparseness and/or symmetry of matrices to simplify the computational procedure. Thus plenty of invalid operations can be avoided by offline derivation using a block matrix technique. For enhanced efficiency, a new parallel computational mechanism is established by subdividing and restructuring calculation processes after analyzing the extracted "useful" data. As a result, the algorithm saves about 90% of the CPU processing time and 66% of the memory usage needed in a classical Kalman filter. Meanwhile, the method as a numerical approach needs no precise-loss transformation/approximation of system modules and the accuracy suffers little in comparison with the filter before computational optimization. Furthermore, since no complicated matrix theories are needed, the algorithm can be easily transplanted into other modified filters as a secondary optimization method to achieve further efficiency. PMID:26569247

  3. A numerical study of circulation in a coastal reef-lagoon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Ryan J.; Falter, James L.; Monismith, Stephen G.; Atkinson, Marlin J.

    2009-06-01

    A coupled wave-circulation numerical model was used to simulate the distribution of wave energy, as well as the circulation induced by wave breaking, wind, and tidal forcing, within a coral reef system in Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, Hawaii. Modeled wave, current, and wave setup fields were compared with field measurements collected on the forereef, reef flat, and reef channels and in the lagoon over a 4-week period. The predicted wave height transformation across the reef-lagoon system was in good agreement with field observations, using single-parameter (spatially uniform) values to describe both wave-breaking and frictional dissipation. The spatial distribution of the resulting wave setup field drove a persistent wave-driven flow across the reef flat that returned to the ocean through two deeper channels in the reef. Both the magnitude and direction of these currents were well described using a spatially uniform hydraulic roughness length scale. Notably, the model lends support to field observations that setup within the coastally bounded lagoon was a substantial fraction of the maximum setup on the reef (˜60-80%), which generated relatively weak cross-reef wave-driven flows (˜10-20 cm s-1) compared with reefs having mostly unbounded lagoons (e.g., many atolls and barrier reefs). Numerical experiments conducted using Lagrangian particle tracking revealed that residence times within Kaneohe Bay are extremely heterogeneous, typically ranging from <1 day on the reef to >1 month within its sheltered southern lagoon.

  4. Numerical studies on self-organized liquid crystal micro photonic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Tatsunosuke; Kitaguchi, Masahiro; Okajima, Akiko

    2014-03-01

    The liquid crystals (LCs) form various types of nano- and micro- structures in a self-organized manner. In recent years, numerous studies have been carried out to develop novel types of optical functional materials and devices utilizing such self-organizing characteristics of the LCs. Based on the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method or its extended version, auxiliary differential equation FDTD (ADE-FDTD) method, we have been numerically studying on the optical characteristics and functionalities of the self-organized LCs such as: (1) lasing from the cholesteric LCs (CLCs) and (2) photonic nanojet (PNJ) from LC micro-systems. Based on the ADE-FDTD method incorporating the equation of motion of the macroscopic polarization and the rate equations at the four level energy structures, we have successfully reproduced circularly polarized lasing from CLC at the edge energy of the stop band. It has also been clarified that the introduction of the defect is effective to lower the lasing threshold. Our technique can be utilized to design the CLC laser devise architecture for much lowered lasing threshold. The PNJ from LC micro-systems are uniquely polarized reflecting birefringence of LCs, which cannot be obtained using optically isotropic microdroplets or microcylinders. A small degree of birefringence drastically changes the optical characteristics of the obtained PNJ. Our findings may open the way for the development of the novel optical functional materials and devices.

  5. On the coupling of hyperbolic and parabolic systems: Analytical and numerical approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gastaldi, Fabio; Quarteroni, Alfio

    1988-01-01

    The coupling of hyperbolic and parabolic systems is discussed in a domain Omega divided into two distinct subdomains omega(+) and omega(-). The main concern is to find the proper interface conditions to be fulfilled at the surface separating the two domains. Next, they are used in the numerical approximation of the problem. The justification of the interface conditions is based on a singular perturbation analysis, i.e., the hyperbolic system is rendered parabolic by adding a small artifical viscosity. As this goes to zero, the coupled parabolic-parabolic problem degenerates into the original one, yielding some conditions at the interface. These are taken as interface conditions for the hyperbolic-parabolic problem. Actually, two alternative sets of interface conditions are discussed according to whether the regularization procedure is variational or nonvariational. It is shown how these conditions can be used in the frame of a numerical approximation to the given problem. Furthermore, a method of resolution is discussed which alternates the resolution of the hyperbolic problem within omega(-) and of the parabolic one within omega(+). The spectral collocation method is proposed, as an example of space discretization (different methods could be used as well); both explicit and implicit time-advancing schemes are considered. The present study is a preliminary step toward the analysis of the coupling between Euler and Navier-Stokes equations for compressible flows.

  6. A faster numerical scheme for a coupled system modeling soil erosion and sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, M.-H.; Cordier, S.; Lucas, C.; Cerdan, O.

    2015-02-01

    Overland flow and soil erosion play an essential role in water quality and soil degradation. Such processes, involving the interactions between water flow and the bed sediment, are classically described by a well-established system coupling the shallow water equations and the Hairsine-Rose model. Numerical approximation of this coupled system requires advanced methods to preserve some important physical and mathematical properties; in particular, the steady states and the positivity of both water depth and sediment concentration. Recently, finite volume schemes based on Roe's solver have been proposed by Heng et al. (2009) and Kim et al. (2013) for one and two-dimensional problems. In their approach, an additional and artificial restriction on the time step is required to guarantee the positivity of sediment concentration. This artificial condition can lead the computation to be costly when dealing with very shallow flow and wet/dry fronts. The main result of this paper is to propose a new and faster scheme for which only the CFL condition of the shallow water equations is sufficient to preserve the positivity of sediment concentration. In addition, the numerical procedure of the erosion part can be used with any well-balanced and positivity preserving scheme of the shallow water equations. The proposed method is tested on classical benchmarks and also on a realistic configuration.

  7. Numerical and experimental studies of the elastic enhancement factor of 2D open systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirko, Leszek; Białous, Małgorzata; Yunko, Vitalii; Bauch, Szymon; Ławniczak, Michał

    We present the results of numerical and experimental studies of the elastic enhancement factor W for microwave rough and rectangular cavities simulating two-dimensional chaotic and partially chaotic quantum billiards in the presence of moderate absorption strength. We show that for the frequency range ν = 15 . 0 - 18 . 5 GHz, in which the coupling between antennas and the system is strong enough, the values of W for the microwave rough cavity lie below the predictions of random matrix theory and on average they are above the theoretical results of V. Sokolov and O. Zhirov, Phys. Rev. E, 91, 052917 (2015). We also show that the enhancement factor W of a microwave rectangular cavity coupled to the external channels via microwave antennas, simulating a partially chaotic quantum billiard, calculated by applying the Potter-Rosenzweig model with κ = 2 . 8 +/- 0 . 5 is close to the experimental one. Our numerical and experimental results suggest that the enhancement factor can be used as a measure of internal chaos which can be especially useful for systems with significant openness or absorption. This work was partially supported by the Ministry of Science and Higher Education Grants N N202 130239 and UMO-2013/09/D/ST2/03727.

  8. A microkernel design for component-based parallel numerical software systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Balay, S.

    1999-01-13

    What is the minimal software infrastructure and what type of conventions are needed to simplify development of sophisticated parallel numerical application codes using a variety of software components that are not necessarily available as source code? We propose an opaque object-based model where the objects are dynamically loadable from the file system or network. The microkernel required to manage such a system needs to include, at most: (1) a few basic services, namely--a mechanism for loading objects at run time via dynamic link libraries, and consistent schemes for error handling and memory management; and (2) selected methods that all objects share, to deal with object life (destruction, reference counting, relationships), and object observation (viewing, profiling, tracing). We are experimenting with these ideas in the context of extensible numerical software within the ALICE (Advanced Large-scale Integrated Computational Environment) project, where we are building the microkernel to manage the interoperability among various tools for large-scale scientific simulations. This paper presents some preliminary observations and conclusions from our work with microkernel design.

  9. Analysis and numerical optimization of gas turbine space power systems with nuclear fission reactor heat sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    2005-07-01

    A new three objective optimization technique is developed and applied to find the operating conditions for fission reactor heated Closed Cycle Gas Turbine (CCGT) space power systems at which maximum efficiency, minimum radiator area, and minimum total system mass is achieved. Such CCGT space power systems incorporate a nuclear reactor heat source with its radiation shield; the rotating turbo-alternator, consisting of the compressor, turbine and the electric generator (three phase AC alternator); and the heat rejection subsystem, principally the space radiator, which enables the hot gas working fluid, emanating from either the turbine or a regenerative heat exchanger, to be cooled to compressor inlet conditions. Numerical mass models for all major subsystems and components developed during the course of this work are included in this report. The power systems modeled are applicable to future interplanetary missions within the Solar System and planetary surface power plants at mission destinations, such as our Moon, Mars, the Galilean moons (Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto), or Saturn's moon Titan. The detailed governing equations for the thermodynamic processes of the Brayton cycle have been derived and successfully programmed along with the heat transfer processes associated with cycle heat exchangers and the space radiator. System performance and mass results have been validated against a commercially available non-linear optimization code and also against data from existing ground based power plants.

  10. Scour Monitoring System for Subsea Pipeline Based on Active Thermometry: Numerical and Experimental Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Li, Weijie; Song, Gangbing; Zhu, Zuo; Du, Jun

    2013-01-01

    A scour monitoring system for subsea pipeline based on active thermometry is proposed in this paper. The temperature reading of the proposed system is based on a distributed Brillouin optical fiber sensing technique. A thermal cable acts as the main component of the system, which consists of a heating belt, armored optical fibers and heat-shrinkable tubes which run parallel to the pipeline. The scour-induced free span can be monitored through different heat transfer behaviors of in-water and in-sediment scenarios during heating and cooling processes. Two sets of experiments, including exposing different lengths of the upper surface of the pipeline to water and creating free spans of various lengths, were carried out in laboratory. In both cases, the scour condition was immediately detected by the proposed monitoring system, which confirmed the system is robust and very sensitive. Numerical study of the method was also investigated by using the finite element method (FEM) with ANSYS, resulting in reasonable agreement with the test data. This brand new system provides a promising, low cost, highly precise and flexible approach for scour monitoring of subsea pipelines. PMID:23348035

  11. Numerical Comparison of NASA's Dual Brayton Power Generation System Performance Using CO2 or N2 as the Working Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ownens, Albert K.; Lavelle, Thomas M.; Hervol, David S.

    2010-01-01

    A Dual Brayton Power Conversion System (DBPCS) has been tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center using Nitrogen (N2) as the working fluid. This system uses two closed Brayton cycle systems that share a common heat source and working fluid but are otherwise independent. This system has been modeled using the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) environment. This paper presents the results of a numerical study that investigated system performance changes resulting when the working fluid is changed from gaseous (N2) to gaseous carbon dioxide (CO2).

  12. Numerical simulation of the influence of a left ventricular assist device on the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Verkerke, G J; Geertsema, A A; Mihaylov, D; Blanksma, P K; Rakhorst, G

    2000-11-01

    The PUCA (pulsatile catheter) pump is a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) capable of unloading the left ventricle (LV) and improving coronary flow by providing a counterpulsation effect. It consists of an extracorporeal located membrane pump, coupled to a transarterial catheter that enters the body via a superficial artery and ends in the LV. Blood is aspirated from the LV and pumped in the ascending aorta through the same catheter guided by a valve system. Timing and frequency of the PUCA pump influence its efficacy. To study the influence of several pump parameters a numerical model of the device and the circulatory system has been developed. Results of animal experiments were used to validate the model. Optimization studies resulted in a pump configuration with a stroke volume of 50 cc and pump:heart frequency mode of 1:2 that starts ejection at the beginning of diastole. PMID:11132021

  13. Numerical analysis for finite-range multitype stochastic contact financial market dynamic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ge; Wang, Jun; Fang, Wen

    2015-04-01

    In an attempt to reproduce and study the dynamics of financial markets, a random agent-based financial price model is developed and investigated by the finite-range multitype contact dynamic system, in which the interaction and dispersal of different types of investment attitudes in a stock market are imitated by viruses spreading. With different parameters of birth rates and finite-range, the normalized return series are simulated by Monte Carlo simulation method and numerical studied by power-law distribution analysis and autocorrelation analysis. To better understand the nonlinear dynamics of the return series, a q-order autocorrelation function and a multi-autocorrelation function are also defined in this work. The comparisons of statistical behaviors of return series from the agent-based model and the daily historical market returns of Shanghai Composite Index and Shenzhen Component Index indicate that the proposed model is a reasonable qualitative explanation for the price formation process of stock market systems.

  14. Lifetime of metastable states in a Ginzburg-Landau system: Numerical simulations at large driving forces.

    PubMed

    Umantsev, A

    2016-04-01

    We developed a "brute-force" simulation method and conducted numerical "experiments" on homogeneous nucleation in an isotropic system at large driving forces (not small supersaturations) using the stochastic Ginzburg-Landau approach. Interactions in the system are described by the asymmetric (no external field), athermal (temperature-independent driving force), tangential (simple phase diagram) Hamiltonian, which has two independent "drivers" of the phase transition: supersaturation and thermal noise. We obtained the probability distribution function of the lifetime of the metastable state and analyzed its mean value as a function of the supersaturation, noise strength, and volume. We also proved the nucleation theorem in the mean-field approximation. The results allowed us to find the thermodynamic properties of the barrier state and conclude that at large driving forces the fluctuating volumes are not independent. PMID:27176373

  15. Numerical analysis for finite-range multitype stochastic contact financial market dynamic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ge; Wang, Jun; Fang, Wen

    2015-04-15

    In an attempt to reproduce and study the dynamics of financial markets, a random agent-based financial price model is developed and investigated by the finite-range multitype contact dynamic system, in which the interaction and dispersal of different types of investment attitudes in a stock market are imitated by viruses spreading. With different parameters of birth rates and finite-range, the normalized return series are simulated by Monte Carlo simulation method and numerical studied by power-law distribution analysis and autocorrelation analysis. To better understand the nonlinear dynamics of the return series, a q-order autocorrelation function and a multi-autocorrelation function are also defined in this work. The comparisons of statistical behaviors of return series from the agent-based model and the daily historical market returns of Shanghai Composite Index and Shenzhen Component Index indicate that the proposed model is a reasonable qualitative explanation for the price formation process of stock market systems.

  16. Numerical Interpolation of Orbitals in Periodic Systems for Diffusion Monte Carlo Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, William; Umrigar, Cyrus

    2005-03-01

    Diffusion Monte Carlo methods provide accurate energies for complex materials, however, the algorithms are computationally intensive. Representing the orbitals of the Slater determinant numerically with splines reduces the time scaling from O(N^3) to O(N^2) ootnotetextA. J. Williamson, R. Q. Hood, and J. C. Grossman. PRL 87, 246406 (2001).. We compare memory and time requirements and the accuracy dependence on the number of grid points for cubic spline and Lagrange interpolation schemes in periodic systems. Both interpolation schemes have a small prefactor, providing speedup even for small systems. For example, in bulk silicon with 256 electrons, Lagrange interpolation reduces the computation time by a factor of 70. We are currently working on the implementation of different splines routines.

  17. On the numerical solution of the cylindrical Poisson equation for isolated self-gravitating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohl, Howard Saul

    This dissertation addresses the need for an accurate and efficient technique which solves the Poisson equation for arbitrarily complex, isolated, self-gravitating fluid systems. Generally speaking, a potential solver is composed of two distinct pieces: a boundary solver and an interior solver. The boundary solver computes the potential, Φ(xB) on a surface which bounds some finite volume of space, V, and contains an isolated mass-density distribution, ρ(x). Given ρ(x) and Φ(xB), the interior solver computes the potential Φ(x) everywhere within V. Herein, we describe the development of a numerical technique which efficiently solves Poisson's equation in cylindrical coordinates on massively parallel computing architectures. First, we report the discovery of a compact cylindrical Green's function (CCGF) expansion and show how the CCGF can be used to efficiently compute the exact numerical representation of Φ(xB). As an analytical representation, the CCGF should prove to be extremely useful wherever one requires the isolated azimuthal modes of a self-gravitating system. We then discuss some mathematical consequences of the CCGF expansion, such as it's applicability to all nine axisymmetric coordinate systems which are R -separable for Laplace's equation. The CCGF expansion, as applied to the spherical coordinate system, leads to a second addition theorem for spherical harmonics. Finally, we present a massively parallel implementation of an interior solver which is based on a data-transpose technique applied to a Fourier-ADI (Alternating Direction Implicit) scheme. The data-transpose technique is a parallelization strategy in which all communication is restricted to global 3D data-transposition operations and all computations are subsequently performed with perfect load balance and zero communication. The potential solver, as implemented here in conjunction with the CCGF expansion, should prove to be an extremely useful tool in a wide variety of astrophysical

  18. The Ndynamics package—Numerical analysis of dynamical systems and the fractal dimension of boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avellar, J.; Duarte, L. G. S.; da Mota, L. A. C. P.; de Melo, N.; Skea, J. E. F.

    2012-09-01

    A set of Maple routines is presented, fully compatible with the new releases of Maple (14 and higher). The package deals with the numerical evolution of dynamical systems and provide flexible plotting of the results. The package also brings an initial conditions generator, a numerical solver manager, and a focusing set of routines that allow for better analysis of the graphical display of the results. The novelty that the package presents an optional C interface is maintained. This allows for fast numerical integration, even for the totally inexperienced Maple user, without any C expertise being required. Finally, the package provides the routines to calculate the fractal dimension of boundaries (via box counting). New version program summary Program Title: Ndynamics Catalogue identifier: %Leave blank, supplied by Elsevier. Licensing provisions: no. Programming language: Maple, C. Computer: Intel(R) Core(TM) i3 CPU M330 @ 2.13 GHz. Operating system: Windows 7. RAM: 3.0 GB Keywords: Dynamical systems, Box counting, Fractal dimension, Symbolic computation, Differential equations, Maple. Classification: 4.3. Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADKH_v1_0. Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Commun. 119 (1999) 256. Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes. Nature of problem Computation and plotting of numerical solutions of dynamical systems and the determination of the fractal dimension of the boundaries. Solution method The default method of integration is a fifth-order Runge-Kutta scheme, but any method of integration present on the Maple system is available via an argument when calling the routine. A box counting [1] method is used to calculate the fractal dimension [2] of the boundaries. Reasons for the new version The Ndynamics package met a demand of our research community for a flexible and friendly environment for analyzing dynamical systems. All the user has to do is create his/her own Maple session, with the system to

  19. Numerical and experimental analyses of the radiant heat flux produced by quartz heating systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Ash, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    A method is developed for predicting the radiant heat flux distribution produced by tungsten filament, tubular fused-quartz envelope heating systems with reflectors. The method is an application of Monte Carlo simulation, which takes the form of a random walk or ray tracing scheme. The method is applied to four systems of increasing complexity, including a single lamp without a reflector, a single lamp with a Hat reflector, a single lamp with a parabolic reflector, and up to six lamps in a six-lamp contoured-reflector heating unit. The application of the Monte Carlo method to the simulation of the thermal radiation generated by these systems is discussed. The procedures for numerical implementation are also presented. Experiments were conducted to study these quartz heating systems and to acquire measurements of the corresponding empirical heat flux distributions for correlation with analysis. The experiments were conducted such that several complicating factors could be isolated and studied sequentially. Comparisons of the experimental results with analysis are presented and discussed. Good agreement between the experimental and simulated results was obtained in all cases. This study shows that this method can be used to analyze very complicated quartz heating systems and can account for factors such as spectral properties, specular reflection from curved surfaces, source enhancement due to reflectors and/or adjacent sources, and interaction with a participating medium in a straightforward manner.

  20. Improving Ground Penetrating Radar Imaging in High Loss Environments by Coordinated System Development, Data Processing, Numerical Modeling, & Visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, David L.

    2004-12-01

    Improving Ground Penetrating Radar Imaging in High Loss Environments by Coordinated System Development, Data Processing, Numerical Modeling, and Visualization Methods with Applications to Site Characterization EMSP Project 86992 Progress Report as of 9/2004.

  1. Numerical simulation of the hydrodynamics within octagonal tanks in recirculating aquaculture systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yao; Liu, Baoliang; Lei, Jilin; Guan, Changtao; Huang, Bin

    2016-07-01

    A three-dimensional numerical model was established to simulate the hydrodynamics within an octagonal tank of a recirculating aquaculture system. The realizable k-ɛ turbulence model was applied to describe the flow, the discrete phase model (DPM) was applied to generate particle trajectories, and the governing equations are solved using the finite volume method. To validate this model, the numerical results were compared with data obtained from a full-scale physical model. The results show that: (1) the realizable k-ɛ model applied for turbulence modeling describes well the flow pattern in octagonal tanks, giving an average relative error of velocities between simulated and measured values of 18% from contour maps of velocity magnitudes; (2) the DPM was applied to obtain particle trajectories and to simulate the rate of particle removal from the tank. The average relative error of the removal rates between simulated and measured values was 11%. The DPM can be used to assess the self-cleaning capability of an octagonal tank; (3) a comprehensive account of the hydrodynamics within an octagonal tank can be assessed from simulations. The velocity distribution was uniform with an average velocity of 15 cm/s; the velocity reached 0.8 m/s near the inlet pipe, which can result in energy losses and cause wall abrasion; the velocity in tank corners was more than 15 cm/s, which suggests good water mixing, and there was no particle sedimentation. The percentage of particle removal for octagonal tanks was 90% with the exception of a little accumulation of ≤ 5 mm particle in the area between the inlet pipe and the wall. This study demonstrated a consistent numerical model of the hydrodynamics within octagonal tanks that can be further used in their design and optimization as well as promote the wide use of computational fluid dynamics in aquaculture engineering.

  2. Numerical Modeling of Brine Formation and Serpentinization at the Rainbow Hydrothermal System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekhar, P.; Lowell, R. P.

    2015-12-01

    The Rainbow hydrothermal field on the Mid Atlantic Ridge is a high-temperature hydrothermal system hosted in peridotite. The vent fluids are rich in methane and hydrogen suggesting that serpentinization is occurring at depth in the system. Vent temperature of ~365°C, salinity of ~4.5 wt%, and heat output of ~500 MW suggest that Rainbow field is driven by a magmatic heat source and that phase separation is occurring at depth. To understand the origin of high salinity in the Rainbow hydrothermal fluid, we construct a 2D numerical model of two-phase hydrothermal circulation using the numerical simulator FISHES. This code uses the finite volume method to solve the conservation of mass, momentum, energy, and salt equations in a NaCl-H2O fluid. We simulate convection in an open top 2D box at a surface pressure of 23 MPa and seawater temperature of 10oC. The bottom and sides of the box are insulated and impermeable, and a fixed temperature distribution is maintained at the base to ensure phase separation. We first consider a homogeneous model with a permeability of 10-13 m2 and system depths of 2 and 1 km, respectively. The brine-derived fluid from the deeper system barely exceeds seawater, whereas the shallower system produces a short pulse of 9.0 wt% for 5 years. We then consider 1 km deep systems with a high permeability discharge zone of 5x10-13 m2 that corresponds to a fault zone, surrounded by recharge zones of 10-13, 10-14 and 10-15 m2, respectively. The model with recharge permeability of 10-14 m2 yields stable plumes that vent brine-derived fluid of 4.2 wt% for 150 years. Using the quasi- steady state of this model as a base, we estimate the rate of serpentinization along the fluid flow paths, and evolution of porosity and permeability. This analysis will indicate the extent to which serpentinization will affect the dynamics of the system and will provide insight into methane flux in the Rainbow vent field.

  3. Modern numerical techniques and software for photo- and thermoemission electron optical systems computer-aided design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monastyrski, Mikhail A.; Andreev, Sergei V.; Gaidukova, Inna S.; Tarasov, Victor A.; Filachev, Anatoly M.

    1997-09-01

    The paper is devoted to software development for simulation, optimization, and computer-aided design of photo/thermo- emission electron optical systems and units. The first part of the paper presents the applied program package (APP) 'ELIMDYNAMICS\\ intended for computer-aided design of dynamic photo-emission image tubes with electro/magnetostatic focusing and deflection (streak tubes). The developed software allows highly precise computation of basic image quality characteristics both in static and streak modes. One of the main advantages of the new program version presented is that 'through' electron beam computation from the photocathode to image receiver is available with regard to dynamic aberrations caused by scattering fields located nearby the edges of deflecting plates. In the second part, the possibility is shown to generalize some numerical techniques being effectively applied in photo-emission imaging electron optics (namely, the (tau) -variation - and the first kind integral equations techniques) to simulation of the thermo-emission electron beam technology units. Functions of the new APP 'CHARGE' are presented, and some numerical aspects of the self-coordinated problem are discussed.

  4. Experimental and numerical investigation of interactions between above and below ground drainage systems.

    PubMed

    Djordjević, Slobodan; Saul, Adrian J; Tabor, Gavin R; Blanksby, John; Galambos, Istvan; Sabtu, Nuridah; Sailor, Gavin

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the experimental and numerical investigation of interactions between surface flood flow in urban areas and the flow in below ground drainage systems (sewer pipes and manholes). An experimental rig has been set up at the Water Engineering Laboratory at the University of Sheffield. It consists of a full scale gully structure with inlet grating, which connects the 8 m(2) surface area with the pipe underneath that can function as an outfall and is also further connected to a tank so that it can come under surcharging conditions and cause outflow from the gully. A three-dimensional CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) model has been set up to investigate the hydraulic performance of this type of gully inlet during the interactions between surface flood flow and surcharged pipe flow. Preliminary results show that the numerical model can replicate various complex 3D flow features observed in laboratory conditions. This agreement is overall better in the case of water entering the gully than for the outflow conditions. The influence of the surface transverse slope on flow characteristics has been demonstrated. It is shown that re-circulation zones can form downstream from the gully. The number and size of these zones is influenced by the transverse terrain slope. PMID:23202557

  5. Numerical Investigation of Supersonic Oscillatory Flow with Strong Interference over a Capsule-shaped Abort System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yunpeng; Ozawa, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    The flow past a capsule-shaped space transportation system (STS) is numerically analyzed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for different free stream Mach numbers ranging from 1.2 to 5.0, where a capsule is modeled by a cone, and a rocket by a circular cylinder. The objective of this research is to study Mach number effects on phenomena of the supersonic aerodynamic interference with periodic flow oscillations at supersonic regime. So far we have considered two models: model A (without disk) and model B (with disk). It was found from experimental and computational results that the flow around model A becomes steady, where aerodynamic interaction is not observed, while in model B, flow becomes unsteady with periodic oscillations. This flow oscillation is considered to be a potentially high risk in separation of the capsule and rocket. Therefore, the present study focuses on the unsteady case of model B. Numerical results at M=3.0 compared well with experimental ones, which validates the present CFD. Time-averaged results are employed to see the whole trajectories of shock waves and the variation in amplitude of flow oscillation during one cycle. Moreover, a fence is proposed as a device to suppress the flow oscillation.

  6. Numerical simulations of mesoscale precipitation systems. Final progress report, 1 April-30 June 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Dingle, A.N.

    1982-05-12

    A numerical model designed for the study of mesoscale weather phenomena is presented. It is a three-dimensional, time-dependent model based upon a mesoscale primitive-equation system, and it includes parameterizations of cloud and precipitation processes, boundary-layer transfers, and ground surface energy and moisture budgets. This model was used to simulate the lake-effect convergence over and in the lee of Lake Michigan in late fall and early winter. The lake-effect convergence is created in advected cold air as it moves first from cold land to the warm constant-temperature lake surface, and then on to cold land. A numerical experiment with a prevailing northwesterly wind is conducted for a period of twelve hours. Two local maxima of the total precipitation are observed along the eastern shore of Lake Michigan. The results in this hypothetical case correspond quite well to the observed precipitation produced by a real event in which the hypothetical conditions are approximately fulfilled.

  7. Numerical simulation of a closed rotor-stator system using Large Eddy Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amouyal, Solal Abraham Teva

    A large eddy simulation of an enclosed annular rotor stator cavity is presented. The geometry is characterized by a large aspect ratio G = (b-a)/h = 18.32 and a small radius ratio a/b = 0.152, where a and b are the inner and outer radii of the rotating disk and h is the interdisk spacing. The rotation rate o under consideration is equivalent to the rotational Reynolds number Re = o b2 /nu= 9.5x104 , where nu is the kinematic viscosity. The main objective of this study is to correctly simulate the rotor stator cavity using a low order numerical scheme on unstructured grids. The numerical simulations were run on the software AVBP developed by the Centre Europeen de Recherche et de Formation Avancee en Calcul Scientific. The results were compared to the experimental results obtained by Sebastien Poncet of Universit e Aix-Marseille. Two large eddy simulations techniques were used: the Smagorinsky and Wall-adapting local eddy-viscosity models. The simulations were run on three set of grids, each with a different cell resolution-14, 35 and 50- along the thickness of the system. Results from each mesh show a good qualitative agreement of the mean velocity field with Poncet's experimental results. It was found that the Samgorinsky model to be more appropriate for this configuration.

  8. Steady-State Cycle Deck Launcher Developed for Numerical Propulsion System Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDrei, Donald E.

    1997-01-01

    One of the objectives of NASA's High Performance Computing and Communications Program's (HPCCP) Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) is to reduce the time and cost of generating aerothermal numerical representations of engines, called customer decks. These customer decks, which are delivered to airframe companies by various U.S. engine companies, numerically characterize an engine's performance as defined by the particular U.S. airframe manufacturer. Until recently, all numerical models were provided with a Fortran-compatible interface in compliance with the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) document AS681F, and data communication was performed via a standard, labeled common structure in compliance with AS681F. Recently, the SAE committee began to develop a new standard: AS681G. AS681G addresses multiple language requirements for customer decks along with alternative data communication techniques. Along with the SAE committee, the NPSS Steady-State Cycle Deck project team developed a standard Application Program Interface (API) supported by a graphical user interface. This work will result in Aerospace Recommended Practice 4868 (ARP4868). The Steady-State Cycle Deck work was validated against the Energy Efficient Engine customer deck, which is publicly available. The Energy Efficient Engine wrapper was used not only to validate ARP4868 but also to demonstrate how to wrap an existing customer deck. The graphical user interface for the Steady-State Cycle Deck facilitates the use of the new standard and makes it easier to design and analyze a customer deck. This software was developed following I. Jacobson's Object-Oriented Design methodology and is implemented in C++. The AS681G standard will establish a common generic interface for U.S. engine companies and airframe manufacturers. This will lead to more accurate cycle models, quicker model generation, and faster validation leading to specifications. The standard will facilitate cooperative work between

  9. A One Dimensional, Time Dependent Inlet/Engine Numerical Simulation for Aircraft Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, Doug; Davis, Milt, Jr.; Cole, Gary

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) and the Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) have developed a closely coupled computer simulation system that provides a one dimensional, high frequency inlet/engine numerical simulation for aircraft propulsion systems. The simulation system, operating under the LeRC-developed Application Portable Parallel Library (APPL), closely coupled a supersonic inlet with a gas turbine engine. The supersonic inlet was modeled using the Large Perturbation Inlet (LAPIN) computer code, and the gas turbine engine was modeled using the Aerodynamic Turbine Engine Code (ATEC). Both LAPIN and ATEC provide a one dimensional, compressible, time dependent flow solution by solving the one dimensional Euler equations for the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. Source terms are used to model features such as bleed flows, turbomachinery component characteristics, and inlet subsonic spillage while unstarted. High frequency events, such as compressor surge and inlet unstart, can be simulated with a high degree of fidelity. The simulation system was exercised using a supersonic inlet with sixty percent of the supersonic area contraction occurring internally, and a GE J85-13 turbojet engine.

  10. Factors affecting air sparging remediation systems using field data and numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Benner, Michael L; Mohtar, Rabi H; Lee, Linda S

    2002-12-01

    Field data from five air sparging sites were used to assess the effect of several soil, contaminant, and air sparging system factors on the removal time and associated costs required to reach specified clean-up criteria. Numerical simulations were also performed to better assess the field data and to expand the data sets beyond the five field sites. Ten factors were selected and evaluated individually over a range of values based on information from practitioners and the literature. Trends in removal time and removal cost to reach a specified clean-up criterion were analyzed to ascertain the conditions controlling contaminant removal with variations in each factors' value. A linear sensitivity equation was used to quantify system dynamics controlling the observed contaminant removal trends for each factor. Factors found most critical across all field sites in terms of removal time and/or cost were contaminant type, sparge pulsing schedule, number of wells, maximum biodecay rate, total soil porosity, and aquifer organic carbon content. Factors showing moderate to low effect included the depth of the sparge point below the water table, air injection rate/pressure, horizontal air conductivity, and anisotropy ratio. At each field site, subsurface coverage of sparged air, sparged air residence time, contaminant equilibrium in the system, contaminant phase distribution, oxygen availability to microbes, and contaminant volatility seem to control the system responses and were affected by one or more of the 10 factors evaluated. PMID:12423944

  11. Numerical simulation of the spreading dynamic responses of the multibody system with a floating base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhaobing; Shao, Luzhong; Shao, Fei

    2015-07-01

    To simulate the dynamic responses of the multibody system with a floating base when the upper parts spread with a certain sequence and relative speed, the homogeneous matrix method is employed to model and simulate a four-body system with a floating base and the motions are analyzed when the upper parts are spread sequentially or synchronously. The rolling, swaying and heaving temporal variations are obtained when the multibody system is under the conditions of the static water along with the wave loads and the mean wind loads or the single pulse wind loads, respectively. The moment variations of each joint under the single pulse wind load are also gained. The numerical results showed that the swaying of the floating base is almost not influenced by the spreading time or form when the upper parts spread sequentially or synchronously, while the rolling and the heaving mainly depend on the spreading time and forms. The swaying and heaving motions are influenced significantly by the mean wind loads. The single pulse wind load also has influences on the dynamic responses. The torque of joint 3 and joint 4 in the single pulse wind environment may be twice that in the windless environment when the system spreads with 60 s duration.

  12. Numerical Modeling of Fluid Transient in Cryogenic Fluid Network of Rocket Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok; Flachbart, Robin

    2003-01-01

    Fluid transients, also known as water hammer, can have a significant impact on the design and operation of both spacecraft and launch vehicles propulsion systems. These transients often occur at system activation and shut down. For ground safety reasons, many spacecrafts are launched with the propellant lines dry. These lines are often evacuated by the time the spacecraft reaches orbit. When the propellant isolation valve opens during propulsion system activation, propellant rushes into lines creating a pressure surge. During propellant system shutdown, a pressure surge is created due to sudden closure of a valve. During both activation and shutdown, pressure surges must be predicted accurately to ensure structural integrity of the propulsion system fluid network. The method of characteristics is the most widely used method of calculating fluid transients in pipeline [ 1,2]. The method of characteristics, however, has limited applications in calculating flow distribution in complex flow circuits with phase change, heat transfer and rotational effects. A robust cryogenic propulsion system analyzer must have the capability to handle phase change, heat transfer, chemical reaction, rotational effects and fluid transients in conjunction with subsystem flow model for pumps, valves and various pipe fittings. In recent years, such a task has been undertaken at Marshall Space Flight Center with the development of the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP), which is based on finite volume method in fluid network [3]. GFSSP has been extensively verified and validated by comparing its predictions with test data and other numerical methods for various applications such as internal flow of turbo-pump [4], propellant tank pressurization [5,6], chilldown of cryogenic transfer line [7] and squeeze film damper rotordynamics [8]. The purpose of the present paper is to investigate the applicability of the finite volume method to predict fluid transient in cryogenic flow

  13. NUMERICAL ANALYSES FOR TREATING DIFFUSION IN SINGLE-, TWO-, AND THREE-PHASE BINARY ALLOY SYSTEMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    This package consists of a series of three computer programs for treating one-dimensional transient diffusion problems in single and multiple phase binary alloy systems. An accurate understanding of the diffusion process is important in the development and production of binary alloys. Previous solutions of the diffusion equations were highly restricted in their scope and application. The finite-difference solutions developed for this package are applicable for planar, cylindrical, and spherical geometries with any diffusion-zone size and any continuous variation of the diffusion coefficient with concentration. Special techniques were included to account for differences in modal volumes, initiation and growth of an intermediate phase, disappearance of a phase, and the presence of an initial composition profile in the specimen. In each analysis, an effort was made to achieve good accuracy while minimizing computation time. The solutions to the diffusion equations for single-, two-, and threephase binary alloy systems are numerically calculated by the three programs NAD1, NAD2, and NAD3. NAD1 treats the diffusion between pure metals which belong to a single-phase system. Diffusion in this system is described by a one-dimensional Fick's second law and will result in a continuous composition variation. For computational purposes, Fick's second law is expressed as an explicit second-order finite difference equation. Finite difference calculations are made by choosing the grid spacing small enough to give convergent solutions of acceptable accuracy. NAD2 treats diffusion between pure metals which form a two-phase system. Diffusion in the twophase system is described by two partial differential equations (a Fick's second law for each phase) and an interface-flux-balance equation which describes the location of the interface. Actual interface motion is obtained by a mass conservation procedure. To account for changes in the thicknesses of the two phases as diffusion

  14. Numerical modeling of two-phase flow in the sodium chloride-water system with applications to seafloor hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Kayla C.

    In order to explain the observed time-dependent salinity variations in seafloor hydrothermal vent fluids, quasi-numerical and fully numerical fluid flow models of the NaCl-H2O system are constructed. For the quasi-numerical model, a simplified treatment of phase separation of seawater near an igneous dike is employed to obtain rough estimates of the thickness and duration of the two-phase zone, the amount of brine formed, and its distribution in the subsurface. Under the assumption that heat transfer occurs mainly by thermal conduction it is shown that, for a two-meter wide dike, the maximum width of the two phase zone is approximately 20 cm and that a zone of halite is deposited near the dike wall. The two-phase zone is mainly filled with vapor. After 13 days, the two-phase zone begins to disappear at the base of the system, and disappears completely by 16 days. The results of this simplified model agree reasonably well with transient numerical solutions for the analogous two-phase flow in a pure water system. The seafloor values of vapor salinity given by the model are compared with vapor salinity data from the "A" vent at 9-10°N on the East Pacific Rise and it is argued that either non-equilibrium thermodynamic behavior or near-surface mixing of brine with vapor in the two-phase region may explain the discrepancies between model predictions and data. For the fully numerical model, the equations governing fluid flow, the thermodynamic relations between various quantities employed, and the coupling of these elements together in a time marching scheme is discussed. The thermodynamic relations are expressed in terms of equations of state, and the latter are shown to vary both smoothly and physically in P-T-X space. In particular, vapor salinity values near the vapor-liquid-halite coexistence surface are shown to be in strong agreement with recently measured values. The fully numerical model is benchmarked against previously published heat pipe and Elder problem

  15. Numerical Analysis on Air Ingress Behavior in GTHTR300-Cogeneration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Tetsuaki; Yan, Xing; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko

    The objective of this study is to clarify safety characteristics of a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) for the pipe rupture accident. Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has been developing the analytical code for the safety characteristics of the HTGR and carrying out design study of the gas turbine high temperature reactor of 300MWe nominal-capacity for hydrogen production, the GTHTR300C (Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor 300 for Cogeneration). A numerical analysis of heat and mass transfer fluid flow with multi-component gas mixture has been performed to obtain the variation of the density of the gas mixture, and the onset time of natural circulation of air. From the results obtained in this analysis, it was found that the duration time of the air ingress by molecular diffusion would increase due to the existence of the recuperator in the GTHTR300C system.

  16. Numerical Study of a System of Long Josephson Junctions with Inductive and Capacitive Couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmonov, I. R.; Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Plecenik, A.; Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Bashashin, M. V.

    2016-02-01

    The phase dynamics of the stacked long Josephson junctions is investigated taking into account the inductive and capacitive couplings between junctions and the diffusion current. The simulation of the current-voltage characteristics is based on the numerical solution of a system of nonlinear partial differential equations by a fourth order Runge-Kutta method and finite-difference approximation. A parallel implementation is based on the MPI technique. The effectiveness of the MPI/C++ code is confirmed by calculations on the multi-processor cluster CICC (LIT JINR, Dubna). We demonstrate the appearance of the charge traveling wave (CTW) at the boundary of the zero field step. Based on this fact, we conclude that the CTW and the fluxons coexist.

  17. Numerical system utilising a Monte Carlo calculation method for accurate dose assessment in radiation accidents.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, F; Endo, A

    2007-01-01

    A system utilising radiation transport codes has been developed to derive accurate dose distributions in a human body for radiological accidents. A suitable model is quite essential for a numerical analysis. Therefore, two tools were developed to setup a 'problem-dependent' input file, defining a radiation source and an exposed person to simulate the radiation transport in an accident with the Monte Carlo calculation codes-MCNP and MCNPX. Necessary resources are defined by a dialogue method with a generally used personal computer for both the tools. The tools prepare human body and source models described in the input file format of the employed Monte Carlo codes. The tools were validated for dose assessment in comparison with a past criticality accident and a hypothesized exposure. PMID:17510203

  18. A multilevel control system for the large space telescope. [numerical analysis/optimal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siljak, D. D.; Sundareshan, S. K.; Vukcevic, M. B.

    1975-01-01

    A multilevel scheme was proposed for control of Large Space Telescope (LST) modeled by a three-axis-six-order nonlinear equation. Local controllers were used on the subsystem level to stabilize motions corresponding to the three axes. Global controllers were applied to reduce (and sometimes nullify) the interactions among the subsystems. A multilevel optimization method was developed whereby local quadratic optimizations were performed on the subsystem level, and global control was again used to reduce (nullify) the effect of interactions. The multilevel stabilization and optimization methods are presented as general tools for design and then used in the design of the LST Control System. The methods are entirely computerized, so that they can accommodate higher order LST models with both conceptual and numerical advantages over standard straightforward design techniques.

  19. Internal energy flows of coma-affected singular beams in low-numerical-aperture systems.

    PubMed

    Bahl, Monika; Singh, Brijesh Kumar; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Senthilkumaran, P

    2015-04-01

    The circulating phase gradient component of a singular beam gets modified when focused by a low-numerical-aperature system suffering from coma aberration. The gradient due to this coma aberration splits the higher charge vortex into elementary vortices and distributes them spatially. This splitting depends on the charge and polarity of the incident singular beam as well as the sign and magnitude of the aberration coefficient. The transverse component of the Poynting vector field distribution at the focal plane is decomposed into the curl or solenoidal component and divergence or irrotational component using the Helmholtz-Hodge decomposition technique. The solenoidal component that relates to the orbital angular momentum carries the circulating energy, while the irrotational component shows the sources and sinks of the energy. Intriguing results of the study of energy flow around the edge dislocations apart from the point phase defects in the irrotational components are also presented. PMID:26366760

  20. Numerical analysis of a spontaneous collapse model for a two-level system

    SciTech Connect

    Bassi, Angelo; Ippoliti, Emiliano

    2004-01-01

    We study a spontaneous collapse model for a two-level (spin) system, in which the Hamiltonian and the stochastic terms do not commute. The numerical solution of the equations of motions allows one to give precise estimates on the regime at which the collapse of the state vector occurs, the reduction and delocalization times, and the reduction probabilities; it also allows one to quantify the effect that a Hamiltonian which does not commute with the reducing terms has on the collapse mechanism. We also give a clear picture of the transition from the 'microscopic' regime (when the noise terms are weak and the Hamiltonian prevents the state vector to collapse) to the 'macroscopic' regime (when the noise terms are dominant and the collapse becomes effective for very long times). Finally, we clarify the distinction between decoherence and collapse.

  1. Numerical analysis of noise-induced oscillating bistability in a prey-predator plankton system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryashko, Lev

    2013-10-01

    Stochastic cycles of the Truscott-Brindley (TB) model for predator-prey plankton system are studied. For weak noise, random trajectories are concentrated in the small neighborhood of the unforced deterministic cycle. As the noise intensity increases, in the Canard-like cycles zone of the TB model, the stochastic trajectories begin to split into two parts. This new noise-induced phenomenon is investigated using numerical simulation of random trajectories and stochastic sensitivity functions (SSF) technique. It is shown that the intensity of noise generating this splitting bifurcation significantly depends on the stochastic sensitivity of cycles. Using the SSF technique, we find a critical value of the parameter corresponding to the supersensitive cycle. For this critical value, a comparative parametrical analysis of the stochastic cycle splitting is presented. An interplay of this noise-induced phenomenon with local instability of Canard cycles is discussed.

  2. Enhancement of a Spring-mass System Model for Numerical Simulations of Centrifugal Deployment Dynamics of Folded Square Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuizumi, Nobukatsu; Muta, Azusa; Matunaga, Saburo

    In this paper, the spring-mass system model developed for simple numerical simulations of thin membranes is enhanced by taking into account the properties of buckling and creases. The model is applied to the numerical simulations of centrifugal deployments of folded square membranes that are small-scale models for solar sail spacecraft “IKAROS”. First the folding and deployment methods are reviewed. Then the formulation of the enhanced spring-mass system model is explained. Numerical simulations of the centrifugal deployments of two kinds of folded square membranes with different crease intervals are performed and the numerical results are compared with the corresponding experimental results. The deployment behaviors are discussed and the validity of the spring-mass system model is examined.

  3. A novel formulation for the numerical computation of magnetization modes in complex micromagnetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Aquino, Massimiliano; Serpico, Claudio; Miano, Giovanni; Forestiere, Carlo

    2009-09-01

    The small oscillation modes in complex micromagnetic systems around an equilibrium are numerically evaluated in the frequency domain by using a novel formulation, which naturally preserves the main physical properties of the problem. The Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation, which describes magnetization dynamics, is linearized around a stable equilibrium configuration and the stability of micromagnetic equilibria is discussed. Special attention is paid to take into account the property of conservation of magnetization magnitude in the continuum as well as discrete model. The linear equation is recast in the frequency domain as a generalized eigenvalue problem for suitable self-adjoint operators connected to the micromagnetic effective field. This allows one to determine the normal oscillation modes and natural frequencies circumventing the difficulties arising in time-domain analysis. The generalized eigenvalue problem may be conveniently discretized by finite difference or finite element methods depending on the geometry of the magnetic system. The spectral properties of the eigenvalue problem are derived in the lossless limit. Perturbation analysis is developed in order to compute the changes in the natural frequencies and oscillation modes arising from the dissipative effects. It is shown that the discrete approximation of the eigenvalue problem obtained either by finite difference or finite element methods has a structure which preserves relevant properties of the continuum formulation. Finally, the generalized eigenvalue problem is solved for a rectangular magnetic thin-film by using the finite differences and for a linear chain of magnetic nanospheres by using the finite elements. The natural frequencies and the spatial distribution of the natural modes are numerically computed.

  4. An Introduction to Transient Engine Applications Using the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) and MATLAB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Jeffrey C.; Csank, Jeffrey T.; Haller, William J.; Seidel, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    This document outlines methodologies designed to improve the interface between the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation framework and various control and dynamic analyses developed in the Matlab and Simulink environment. Although NPSS is most commonly used for steady-state modeling, this paper is intended to supplement the relatively sparse documentation on it's transient analysis functionality. Matlab has become an extremely popular engineering environment, and better methodologies are necessary to develop tools that leverage the benefits of these disparate frameworks. Transient analysis is not a new feature of the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS), but transient considerations are becoming more pertinent as multidisciplinary trade-offs begin to play a larger role in advanced engine designs. This paper serves to supplement the relatively sparse documentation on transient modeling and cover the budding convergence between NPSS and Matlab based modeling toolsets. The following sections explore various design patterns to rapidly develop transient models. Each approach starts with a base model built with NPSS, and assumes the reader already has a basic understanding of how to construct a steady-state model. The second half of the paper focuses on further enhancements required to subsequently interface NPSS with Matlab codes. The first method being the simplest and most straightforward but performance constrained, and the last being the most abstract. These methods aren't mutually exclusive and the specific implementation details could vary greatly based on the designer's discretion. Basic recommendations are provided to organize model logic in a format most easily amenable to integration with existing Matlab control toolsets.

  5. Recirculation System for Geothermal Energy Recovery in Sedimentary Formations: Laboratory Experiments and Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkhoury, J. E.; Detwiler, R. L.; Serajian, V.; Bruno, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    Geothermal energy resources are more widespread than previously thought and have the potential for providing a significant amount of sustainable clean energy worldwide. In particular, hot permeable sedimentary formations provide many advantages over traditional geothermal recovery and enhanced geothermal systems in low permeability crystalline formations. These include: (1) eliminating the need for hydraulic fracturing, (2) significant reduction in risk for induced seismicity, (3) reducing the need for surface wastewater disposal, (4) contributing to decreases in greenhouse gases, and (5) potential use for CO2 sequestration. Advances in horizontal drilling, completion, and production technology from the oil and gas industry can now be applied to unlock these geothermal resources. Here, we present experimental results from a laboratory scale circulation system and numerical simulations aimed at quantifying the heat transfer capacity of sedimentary rocks. Our experiments consist of fluid flow through a saturated and pressurized sedimentary disc of 23-cm diameter and 3.8-cm thickness heated along its circumference at a constant temperature. Injection and production ports are 7.6-cm apart in the center of the disc. We used DI de-aired water and mineral oil as working fluids and explored temperatures from 20 to 150 oC and flow rates from 2 to 30 ml/min. We performed experiments on sandstone samples (Castlegate and Kirby) with different porosity, permeability and thermal conductivity to evaluate the effect of hydraulic and thermal properties on the heat transfer capacity of sediments. The producing fluid temperature followed an exponential form with time scale transients between 15 and 45 min. Steady state outflow temperatures varied between 60% and 95% of the set boundary temperature, higher percentages were observed for lower temperatures and flow rates. We used the flow and heat transport simulator TOUGH2 to develop a numerical model of our laboratory setting. Given

  6. Numerical investigations of failure in EB-PVD thermal barrier coating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glynn, Michael L.

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems are used in high temperature applications in turbine engines. TBCs are applied on superalloy substrates and are multilayered coatings comprised of a metallic bond coat, a thermally grown oxide (TGO) and a ceramic top coat. They provide thermal protection for the superalloy substrate and are considered to hold the greatest potential for increased operating temperatures. Failure of the TBC system most commonly occurs as a result of large scale buckling and spallation. The buckling is a consequence of many small-scale delaminations that arise in the top coat above local imperfections in the TGO, and durability of the TBC system is governed by a sequence of crack nucleation, propagation and coalescence. The numerical investigations that are employed in this dissertation are used to determine the stress development near the imperfections and are based on microstructural observations and measured material properties of TBC test buttons supplied by GE Aircraft Engines. The test buttons were subject to thermal cycling at GE and cycled to different percentages of TBC life. Numerical simulations of two different types of TBC tests are used to show that the top coat out-of-plane stress increases with a decrease of the substrate radius of curvature and a decrease in the heating rate. An inherent scaling parameter in the TBC system is identified and used to demonstrate that the stress developed in the top coat is governed by the evolution of an imperfection in the TGO. The effect of a martensitic phase transformation in the bond coat, related to a change in bond coat chemistry, is shown to significantly increase the top coat out-of-plane tensile stress. Finally, a subsurface crack is simulated in the top coat and used to determine the influence of the bond coat on failure of the TBC system. While the bond coat inelastic properties are the most important factors in determining the extent of the crack opening displacement, the bond coat

  7. Numerical optimization of a multi-jet cooling system for the blown film extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janas, M.; Wortberg, J.

    2015-05-01

    The limiting factor for every extrusion process is the cooling. For the blown film process, this task is usually done by means of a single or dual lip air ring. Prior work has shown that two major effects are responsible for a bad heat transfer. The first one is the interaction between the jet and the ambient air. It reduces the velocity of the jet and enlarges the straight flow. The other one is the formation of a laminar boundary layer on the film surface due to the fast flowing cooling air. In this case, the boundary layer isolates the film and prevents an efficient heat transfer. To improve the heat exchange, a novel cooling approach is developed, called Multi-Jet. The new cooling system uses several slit nozzles over the whole tube formation zone for cooling the film. In contrast to a conventional system, the cooling air is guided vertically on the film surface in different heights to penetrate the boundary sublayer. Simultaneously, a housing of the tube formation zone is practically obtained to reduce the interaction with the ambient air. For the numerical optimization of the Multi-Jet system, a new procedure is developed. First, a prediction model identifies a worth considering cooling configuration. Therefore, the prediction model computes a film curve using the formulation from Zatloukal-Vlcek and the energy balance for the film temperature. Thereafter, the optimized cooling geometry is investigated in detail using a process model for the blown film extrusion that is able to compute a realistic bubble behavior depending on the cooling situation. In this paper, the Multi-Jet cooling system is numerically optimized for several different process states, like mass throughputs and blow-up ratios using one slit nozzle setting. For each process condition, the best cooling result has to be achieved. Therefore, the height of any nozzle over the tube formation zone is adjustable. The other geometrical parameters of the cooling system like the nozzle diameter or the

  8. Numerical continuation of canard orbits in slow-fast dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desroches, M.; Krauskopf, B.; Osinga, H. M.

    2010-03-01

    A trajectory of a system with two clearly separated time scales generally consists of fast segments (or jumps) followed by slow segments where the trajectory follows an attracting part of a slow manifold. The switch back to fast dynamics typically occurs when the trajectory passes a fold with respect to a fast direction. A special role is played by trajectories known as canard orbits, which do not jump at a fold but, instead, follow a repelling slow manifold for some time. We concentrate here on the case of a slow-fast system with two slow and one fast variable, where canard orbits arise geometrically as intersection curves of two-dimensional attracting and repelling slow manifolds. Canard orbits are intimately related to the dynamics near special points known as folded singularities, which in turn have been shown to explain small-amplitude oscillations that can be found as part of so-called mixed-mode oscillations. In this paper we present a numerical method to detect and then follow branches of canard orbits in a system parameter. More specifically, we define well-posed two-point boundary value problems (BVPs) that represent orbit segments on the slow manifolds, and we continue their solution families with the package AUTO. In this way, we are able to deal effectively with the numerical challenge of strong attraction to and strong repulsion from the slow manifolds. Canard orbits are detected as the transverse intersection points of the curves along which attracting and repelling slow manifolds intersect a suitable section (near a folded node). These intersection points correspond to a unique pair of orbits segments, one on the attracting and one on the repelling slow manifold. After concatenation of the respective pairs of orbit segments, all detected canard orbits are represented as solutions of a single BVP, which allows us to continue them in system parameters. We demonstrate with two examples—the self-coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo system and a three

  9. Numerical simulations of LWFA for the next generation of laser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Martins, S. F.; Vieira, J.; Fiuza, F.; Silva, L. O.; Trines, R.; Norreys, P.

    2009-01-22

    The development of new laser systems based on OPCPA will push Laser Wakefield Accelerators (LWFA) to a qualitatively new energy range. As in the past, numerical simulations will play a critical role in testing, probing and optimizing the physical parameters and setup of these upscale experiments. Based on the prospective design parameters for the future Vulcan 10 PW OPCPA laser system, we have determined the optimal parameters for a single LWFA stage from theoretical scalings for such system, which predict accelerations to the energy frontier, with self-injected electrons in excess of 10 GeV for a self-guided configuration, and above 50 GeV bunches with externally-injected electrons in a laser-guided configuration. These parameters were then used as a baseline for 3D full scale simulations with OSIRIS and QuickPIC. A 12 GeV self-injected beam was obtained with both codes, in agreement with theoretical predictions for the maximum energy gain and the injected charge. Preliminary results on the laser-guided configuration already confirm the accelerating gradients and the stability of the laser guided propagation for long distances required to reach the higher energies predicted by the theoretical scalings for this scenario.

  10. Numerical calculation of interaction forces between paramagnetic colloids in two-dimensional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Di; Toffoletto, Frank; Biswal, Sibani Lisa

    2014-04-01

    Typically the force between paramagnetic particles in a uniform magnetic field is described using the dipolar model, which is inaccurate when particles are in close proximity to each other. Instead, the exact force between paramagnetic particles can be determined by solving a three-dimensional Laplace's equation for magnetostatics under specified boundary conditions and calculating the Maxwell stress tensor. The analytical solution to this multi-boundary-condition Laplace's equation can be obtained by using a solid harmonics expansion in conjunction with the Hobson formula. However, for a multibody system, finite truncation of the Hobson formula does not lead to convergence of the expansion at all points, which makes the approximation physically unrealistic. Here we present a numerical method for solving this Laplace's equation for magnetostatics. This method uses a smoothed representation to replace all the boundary conditions. A two-step propagation is used to dramatically accelerate the calculation without losing accuracy. Using this method, we calculate the force between two paramagnetic particles in a uniform and a rotational external field and compare our results with other models. Furthermore, the many-body effects for three-particle, ten-particle, and 24-particle systems are examined using the same method. We also calculate the interaction between particles with different magnetic susceptibilities and particle diameters. The Laplace's equation solver method described in this article that is used to determine the force between paramagnetic particles is shown to be very useful for dynamic simulations for both two-particle systems and a large cluster of particles.

  11. Numerical study on dynamical behavior in oscillatory driven quantum double-well systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igarashi, Akira; Yamada, Hiroaki

    2008-08-01

    We numerically investigate quantum dynamics in a one-dimensional double-well system emphasizing influence of a parametrically polychromatic perturbation on the dynamics. It is found that time dependence of transition probability for an initially localized wave packet between the wells shows two types of motion, coherent and incoherent motion, depending on the perturbation parameters. As the strength and/or the number of frequency components of the perturbation increase, coherent motion changes into incoherent one. The former is related to coherent tunneling of the wave packet due to coherence; the latter is related to a delocalized state caused by decoherence. In coherent motion, by virtue of coherence of the dynamics, the expectation value and the standard deviation of a dynamical variable such as the energy of the system show oscillatory time dependence around the initial values. On the contrary in incoherent motion, because of the decoherence, the time dependence fluctuates irregularly around a certain value after a rapid increase due to the resonance. We find that negativity of the Wigner function also show similar time dependence in each type of motion. We compare the classification of the quantum dynamics based on regularity of the time dependence with the one of corresponding classical dynamics based on the Lyapunov exponent. The classifications of the quantum and classical dynamics overlap well in the parameter space. Furthermore, we confirm decoherence of quantum dynamics in a kicked double-well system.

  12. Numerical simulation of nocturnal drainage flows in an idealized valley-tributary system

    SciTech Connect

    O`Steen, L.B.

    1994-05-01

    During 1984 and 1988 a substantial amount of meteorological field data was collected in the Brush Creek valley area of western Colorado as a part of the Atmospheric Science in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) program. This field experiment was designed to investigate the characteristics of nocturnal drainage flows in valleys as well as valley tributaries and sidewalls. The data collected during the Brush Creek experiment has been used to study a variety of nocturnal flow phenomena including: velocity and thermal structure of slope and valley flows; mass, momentum and energy balances in valleys and tributaries; tracer transport and diffusion in valley drainage flows. In support of the Brush Creek experiments, several mesoscale modeling studies have been performed. The numerical studies dealt with various aspects of along-valley nocturnal drainage flow. However, a good deal of effort was expended studying tributary flows and their interaction with the along-valley wind system. These investigations generated considerable debate over the contribution of tributaries to the valley mass flux and the source of observed velocity oscillations in valley-tributary systems. In this study, results from simulations of nocturnal drainage in an idealized valley-tributary-plain system are presented.

  13. Neural Systems with Numerically Matched Input-Output Statistic: Isotonic Bivariate Statistical Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Fiori, Simone

    2007-01-01

    Bivariate statistical modeling from incomplete data is a useful statistical tool that allows to discover the model underlying two data sets when the data in the two sets do not correspond in size nor in ordering. Such situation may occur when the sizes of the two data sets do not match (i.e., there are “holes” in the data) or when the data sets have been acquired independently. Also, statistical modeling is useful when the amount of available data is enough to show relevant statistical features of the phenomenon underlying the data. We propose to tackle the problem of statistical modeling via a neural (nonlinear) system that is able to match its input-output statistic to the statistic of the available data sets. A key point of the new implementation proposed here is that it is based on look-up-table (LUT) neural systems, which guarantee a computationally advantageous way of implementing neural systems. A number of numerical experiments, performed on both synthetic and real-world data sets, illustrate the features of the proposed modeling procedure. PMID:18566641

  14. Numerical characterization of nonlinear dynamical systems using parallel computing: The role of GPUS approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazanaro, Filipe I.; Soriano, Diogo C.; Suyama, Ricardo; Madrid, Marconi K.; Oliveira, José Raimundo de; Muñoz, Ignacio Bravo; Attux, Romis

    2016-08-01

    The characterization of nonlinear dynamical systems and their attractors in terms of invariant measures, basins of attractions and the structure of their vector fields usually outlines a task strongly related to the underlying computational cost. In this work, the practical aspects related to the use of parallel computing - specially the use of Graphics Processing Units (GPUS) and of the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) - are reviewed and discussed in the context of nonlinear dynamical systems characterization. In this work such characterization is performed by obtaining both local and global Lyapunov exponents for the classical forced Duffing oscillator. The local divergence measure was employed by the computation of the Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCSS), revealing the general organization of the flow according to the obtained separatrices, while the global Lyapunov exponents were used to characterize the attractors obtained under one or more bifurcation parameters. These simulation sets also illustrate the required computation time and speedup gains provided by different parallel computing strategies, justifying the employment and the relevance of GPUS and CUDA in such extensive numerical approach. Finally, more than simply providing an overview supported by a representative set of simulations, this work also aims to be a unified introduction to the use of the mentioned parallel computing tools in the context of nonlinear dynamical systems, providing codes and examples to be executed in MATLAB and using the CUDA environment, something that is usually fragmented in different scientific communities and restricted to specialists on parallel computing strategies.

  15. The role of numerical simulation for the development of an advanced HIFU system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okita, Kohei; Narumi, Ryuta; Azuma, Takashi; Takagi, Shu; Matumoto, Yoichiro

    2014-10-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been used clinically and is under clinical trials to treat various diseases. An advanced HIFU system employs ultrasound techniques for guidance during HIFU treatment instead of magnetic resonance imaging in current HIFU systems. A HIFU beam imaging for monitoring the HIFU beam and a localized motion imaging for treatment validation of tissue are introduced briefly as the real-time ultrasound monitoring techniques. Numerical simulations have a great impact on the development of real-time ultrasound monitoring as well as the improvement of the safety and efficacy of treatment in advanced HIFU systems. A HIFU simulator was developed to reproduce ultrasound propagation through the body in consideration of the elasticity of tissue, and was validated by comparison with in vitro experiments in which the ultrasound emitted from the phased-array transducer propagates through the acrylic plate acting as a bone phantom. As the result, the defocus and distortion of the ultrasound propagating through the acrylic plate in the simulation quantitatively agree with that in the experimental results. Therefore, the HIFU simulator accurately reproduces the ultrasound propagation through the medium whose shape and physical properties are well known. In addition, it is experimentally confirmed that simulation-assisted focus control of the phased-array transducer enables efficient assignment of the focus to the target. Simulation-assisted focus control can contribute to design of transducers and treatment planning.

  16. JPSS application in a near real time regional numerical forecast system at CIMSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Wang, P.; Han, H.; Zhu, F.; Schmit, T. J.; Goldberg, M.

    2015-12-01

    Observations from next generation of environmental sensors onboard the Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Parnership (S-NPP) and its successor, the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS), provide us the critical information for numerical weather forecast (NWP). How to better represent these satellite observations and how to get value added information into NWP system still need more studies. Recently scientists from Cooperative Institute of Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS) at University of Wisconsin-Madison have developed a near realtime regional Satellite Data Assimilation system for Tropical storm forecasts (SDAT) (http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/sdat). The system is built with the community Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) assimilation and advanced Weather Research Forecast (WRF) model. With GSI, SDAT can assimilate all operational available satellite data including GOES, AMSUA/AMSUB, HIRS, MHS, ATMS, AIRS and IASI radiances and some satellite derived products. In addition, some research products, such as hyperspectral IR retrieved temperature and moisture profiles, GOES imager atmospheric motion vector (AMV) and GOES sounder layer precipitable water (LPW), are also added into the system. Using SDAT as a research testbed, studies have been conducted to show how to improve high impact weather forecast by better handling cloud information in satellite data. Previously by collocating high spatial resolution MODIS data with hyperspectral resolution AIRS data, precise clear pixels of AIRS can be identified and some partially or thin cloud contamination from pixels can be removed by taking advantage of high spatial resolution and high accurate MODIS cloud information. The results have demonstrated that both of these strategies have greatly improved the hurricane track and intensity forecast. We recently have extended these methodologies into processing CrIS/VIIRS data. We also tested similar ideas in microwave sounders by the collocation of AMSU/MODIS and ATMS

  17. Development of a numerical computer code and circuit element models for simulation of firing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, K.H. . Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering)

    1990-07-02

    Numerical simulation of firing systems requires both the appropriate circuit analysis framework and the special element models required by the application. We have modified the SPICE circuit analysis code (version 2G.6), developed originally at the Electronic Research Laboratory of the University of California, Berkeley, to allow it to be used on MSDOS-based, personal computers and to give it two additional circuit elements needed by firing systems--fuses and saturating inductances. An interactive editor and a batch driver have been written to ease the use of the SPICE program by system designers, and the interactive graphical post processor, NUTMEG, supplied by U. C. Berkeley with SPICE version 3B1, has been interfaced to the output from the modified SPICE. Documentation and installation aids have been provided to make the total software system accessible to PC users. Sample problems show that the resulting code is in agreement with the FIRESET code on which the fuse model was based (with some modifications to the dynamics of scaling fuse parameters). In order to allow for more complex simulations of firing systems, studies have been made of additional special circuit elements--switches and ferrite cored inductances. A simple switch model has been investigated which promises to give at least a first approximation to the physical effects of a non ideal switch, and which can be added to the existing SPICE circuits without changing the SPICE code itself. The effect of fast rise time pulses on ferrites has been studied experimentally in order to provide a base for future modeling and incorporation of the dynamic effects of changes in core magnetization into the SPICE code. This report contains detailed accounts of the work on these topics performed during the period it covers, and has appendices listing all source code written documentation produced.

  18. Numerical 3D models support two distinct hydrothermal circulation systems at fast spreading ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasenclever, Jörg; Theissen-Krah, Sonja; Rüpke, Lars

    2013-04-01

    We present 3D numerical calculations of hydrothermal fluid flow at fast spreading ridges. The setup of the 3D models is based our previous 2D studies, in which we have coupled numerical models for crustal accretion and hydrothermal fluid flow. One result of these calculations is a crustal permeability field that leads to a thermal structure in the crust that matches seismic tomography data of the East Pacific Rise (EPR). The 1000°C isotherm obtained from the 2D results is now used as the lower boundary of the 3D model domain, while the upper boundary is a smoothed bathymetry of the EPR. The same permeability field as in the 2D models is used, with the highest permeability at the ridge axis and a decrease with both depth and distance to the ridge. Permeability is also reduced linearly between 600 and 1000°C. Using a newly developed parallel finite element code written in Matlab that solves for thermal evolution, fluid pressure and Darcy flow, we simulate the flow patterns of hydrothermal circulation in a segment of 5000m along-axis, 10000m across-axis and up to 5000m depth. We observe two distinct hydrothermal circulation systems: An on-axis system forming a series of vents with a spacing ranging from 100 to 500m that is recharged by nearby (100-200m) downflows on both sides of the ridge axis. Simultaneously a second system with much broader extensions both laterally and vertically exists off-axis. It is recharged by fluids intruding between 1500m to 5000m off-axis and sampling both upper and lower crust. These fluids are channeled in the deepest and hottest regions with high permeability and migrate up-slope following the 600°C isotherm until reaching the edge of the melt lens. Depending on the width of the melt lens these off-axis fluids either merge with the on-axis hydrothermal system or form separate vents. We observe separate off-axis vent fields if the magma lens half-width exceeds 1000m and confluence of both systems for half-widths smaller than 500m. For

  19. In-situ Spectroscopy of Water Oxidation at Ir Oxide Nanocluster Drivenby Visible TiOCr Charge-Transfer Chromophore in Mesoporous Silica

    SciTech Connect

    Frei, Heinz; Han, Hongxian; Frei, Heinz

    2008-06-03

    An all-inorganic photocatalytic unit consisting of a binuclear TiOCr charge-transfer chromophore coupled to an Ir oxide nanocluster has been assembled on the pore surface of mesoporous silica AlMCM-41. In situ FT-Raman and EPR spectroscopy of an aqueous suspension of the resulting IrxOy-TiCr-AlMCM-41 powder reveal the formation of superoxide species when exciting the Ti(IV)OCr(III) --> Ti(III)OCr(IV) metal-to-metal charge-transfer chromophore with visible light. Use of H218O confirms that the superoxide species originates from oxidation of water. Photolysis in the absence of persulfate acceptor leads to accumulation of Ti(III) instead. The results are explained by photocatalytic oxidation of water at Ir oxide nanoclusters followed by trapping of the evolving O2 by transient Ti(III) centers to yield superoxide. Given the flexibility to select donor metals with appropriate redox potential, photocatalytic units consisting of a binuclear charge-transfer chromophore coupled to a water oxidation catalyst shown here constitute a step towards thermodynamically efficient visible light water oxidation units.

  20. Parallel direct numerical simulation of wake vortex detection using monostatic and bistatic radio acoustic sounding systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boluriaan Esfahaani, Said

    A parallel two-dimensional code is developed in this thesis to numerically simulate wake vortex detection using a Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS). The Maxwell equations for media with non-uniform permittivity and the linearized Euler equations for media with non-uniform mean flow are the main framework for the simulations. The code is written in Fortran 90 with the Message Passing Interface (MPI) for parallel implementation. The main difficulty encountered with a time accurate simulation of a RASS is the number of samples required to resolve the Doppler shift in the scattered electromagnetic signal. Even for a 1D simulation with a typical scatterer size, the CPU time required to run the code is far beyond currently available computer resources. Two solutions that overcome this problem are described. In the first the actual electromagnetic wave propagation speed is replaced with a much lower value. This allows an explicit, time accurate numerical scheme to be used. In the second the governing differential equations are recast in order to remove the carrier frequency and solve only for the frequency shift using an implicit scheme with large time steps. The numerical stability characteristics of the resulting discretized equation with complex coefficients are examined. A number of cases for both the monostatic and bistatic configurations are considered. First, a uniform mean flow is considered and the RASS simulation is performed for two different types of incident acoustic field, namely a short single frequency acoustic pulse and a continuous broadband acoustic source. Both the explicit and implicit schemes are examined and the mean flow velocity is determined from the spectrum of the backscattered electromagnetic signal with very good accuracy. Second, the Taylor and Oseen vortex models are considered and their velocity field along the incident electromagnetic beam is retrieved. The Abel transform is then applied to the velocity profiles determined by both

  1. Coupled circuit numerical analysis of eddy currents in an open MRI system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akram, Md. Shahadat Hossain; Terada, Yasuhiko; Keiichiro, Ishi; Kose, Katsumi

    2014-08-01

    We performed a new coupled circuit numerical simulation of eddy currents in an open compact magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. Following the coupled circuit approach, the conducting structures were divided into subdomains along the length (or width) and the thickness, and by implementing coupled circuit concepts we have simulated transient responses of eddy currents for subdomains in different locations. We implemented the Eigen matrix technique to solve the network of coupled differential equations to speed up our simulation program. On the other hand, to compute the coupling relations between the biplanar gradient coil and any other conducting structure, we implemented the solid angle form of Ampere’s law. We have also calculated the solid angle for three dimensions to compute inductive couplings in any subdomain of the conducting structures. Details of the temporal and spatial distribution of the eddy currents were then implemented in the secondary magnetic field calculation by the Biot-Savart law. In a desktop computer (Programming platform: Wolfram Mathematica 8.0®, Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Duo E7500 @ 2.93 GHz; OS: Windows 7 Professional; Memory (RAM): 4.00 GB), it took less than 3 min to simulate the entire calculation of eddy currents and fields, and approximately 6 min for X-gradient coil. The results are given in the time-space domain for both the direct and the cross-terms of the eddy current magnetic fields generated by the Z-gradient coil. We have also conducted free induction decay (FID) experiments of eddy fields using a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe to verify our simulation results. The simulation results were found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. In this study we have also conducted simulations for transient and spatial responses of secondary magnetic field induced by X-gradient coil. Our approach is fast and has much less computational complexity than the conventional electromagnetic numerical

  2. Coupled circuit numerical analysis of eddy currents in an open MRI system.

    PubMed

    Akram, Md Shahadat Hossain; Terada, Yasuhiko; Keiichiro, Ishi; Kose, Katsumi

    2014-08-01

    We performed a new coupled circuit numerical simulation of eddy currents in an open compact magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. Following the coupled circuit approach, the conducting structures were divided into subdomains along the length (or width) and the thickness, and by implementing coupled circuit concepts we have simulated transient responses of eddy currents for subdomains in different locations. We implemented the Eigen matrix technique to solve the network of coupled differential equations to speed up our simulation program. On the other hand, to compute the coupling relations between the biplanar gradient coil and any other conducting structure, we implemented the solid angle form of Ampere's law. We have also calculated the solid angle for three dimensions to compute inductive couplings in any subdomain of the conducting structures. Details of the temporal and spatial distribution of the eddy currents were then implemented in the secondary magnetic field calculation by the Biot-Savart law. In a desktop computer (Programming platform: Wolfram Mathematica 8.0®, Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Duo E7500 @ 2.93GHz; OS: Windows 7 Professional; Memory (RAM): 4.00GB), it took less than 3min to simulate the entire calculation of eddy currents and fields, and approximately 6min for X-gradient coil. The results are given in the time-space domain for both the direct and the cross-terms of the eddy current magnetic fields generated by the Z-gradient coil. We have also conducted free induction decay (FID) experiments of eddy fields using a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe to verify our simulation results. The simulation results were found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. In this study we have also conducted simulations for transient and spatial responses of secondary magnetic field induced by X-gradient coil. Our approach is fast and has much less computational complexity than the conventional electromagnetic numerical simulation

  3. Numerical simulation of an innovated building cooling system with combination of solar chimney and water spraying system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabani, Ramin; Faghih, Ahmadreza K.; Rabani, Mehrdad; Rabani, Mehran

    2014-05-01

    In this study, passive cooling of a room using a solar chimney and water spraying system in the room inlet vents is simulated numerically in Yazd, Iran (a hot and arid city with very high solar radiation). The performance of this system has been investigated for the warmest day of the year (5 August) which depends on the variation of some parameters such as water flow rate, solar heat flux, and inlet air temperature. In order to get the best performance of the system for maximum air change and also absorb the highest solar heat flux by the absorber in the warmest time of the day, different directions (West, East, North and South) have been studied and the West direction has been selected as the best direction. The minimum amount of water used in spraying system to set the inside air averaged relative humidity <65 % is obtained using trial and error method. The simulation results show that this proposed system decreases the averaged air temperature in the middle of the room by 9-14 °C and increases the room relative humidity about 28-45 %.

  4. Combined analytical and numerical approaches in Dynamic Stability analyses of engineering systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Náprstek, Jiří

    2015-03-01

    Dynamic Stability is a widely studied area that has attracted many researchers from various disciplines. Although Dynamic Stability is usually associated with mechanics, theoretical physics or other natural and technical disciplines, it is also relevant to social, economic, and philosophical areas of our lives. Therefore, it is useful to occasionally highlight the general aspects of this amazing area, to present some relevant examples and to evaluate its position among the various branches of Rational Mechanics. From this perspective, the aim of this study is to present a brief review concerning the Dynamic Stability problem, its basic definitions and principles, important phenomena, research motivations and applications in engineering. The relationships with relevant systems that are prone to stability loss (encountered in other areas such as physics, other natural sciences and engineering) are also noted. The theoretical background, which is applicable to many disciplines, is presented. In this paper, the most frequently used Dynamic Stability analysis methods are presented in relation to individual dynamic systems that are widely discussed in various engineering branches. In particular, the Lyapunov function and exponent procedures, Routh-Hurwitz, Liénard, and other theorems are outlined together with demonstrations. The possibilities for analytical and numerical procedures are mentioned together with possible feedback from experimental research and testing. The strengths and shortcomings of these approaches are evaluated together with examples of their effective complementing of each other. The systems that are widely encountered in engineering are presented in the form of mathematical models. The analyses of their Dynamic Stability and post-critical behaviour are also presented. The stability limits, bifurcation points, quasi-periodic response processes and chaotic regimes are discussed. The limit cycle existence and stability are examined together with their

  5. Numerical modeling of groundwater flow in the coastal aquifer system of Taranto (southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Filippis, Giovanna; Giudici, Mauro; Negri, Sergio; Margiotta, Stefano; Cattaneo, Laura; Vassena, Chiara

    2014-05-01

    The Mediterranean region is characterized by a strong development of coastal areas with a high concentration of water-demanding human activities, resulting in weakly controlled withdrawals of groundwater which accentuate the saltwater intrusion phenomenon. The worsening of groundwater quality is a huge problem especially for those regions, like Salento (southern Italy), where a karst aquifer system represents the most important water resource because of the deficiency of a well developed superficial water supply. In this frame, the first 2D numerical model describing the groundwater flow in the karst aquifer of Salento peninsula was developed by Giudici et al. [1] at the regional scale and then improved by De Filippis et al. [2]. In particular, the estimate of the saturated thickness of the deep aquifer highlighted that the Taranto area is particularly sensitive to the phenomenon of seawater intrusion, both for the specific hydrostratigraphic configuration and for the presence of highly water-demanding industrial activities. These remarks motivate a research project which is part of the research program RITMARE (The Italian Research for the Sea), within which a subprogram is specifically dedicated to the problem of the protection and preservation of groundwater quality in Italian coastal aquifers and in particular, among the others, in the Taranto area. In this context, the CINFAI operative unit aims at providing a contribution to the characterization of groundwater in the study area. The specific objectives are: a. the reconstruction of the groundwater dynamic (i.e., the preliminary identification of a conceptual model for the aquifer system and the subsequent modeling of groundwater flow in a multilayered system which is very complex from the hydrostratigraphical point of view); b. the characterization of groundwater outflows through submarine and subaerial springs and the water exchanges with the shallow coastal water bodies (e.g. Mar Piccolo) and the off

  6. Thin-foil magnetic force system for high-numerical-aperture microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fisher, J K; Cribb, J; Desai, K V; Vicci, L; Wilde, B; Keller, K; Taylor, R M; Haase, J; Bloom, K; O'Brien, E Timothy; Superfine, R

    2006-02-01

    Forces play a key role in a wide range of biological phenomena from single-protein conformational dynamics to transcription and cell division, to name a few. The majority of existing microbiological force application methods can be divided into two categories: those that can apply relatively high forces through the use of a physical connection to a probe and those that apply smaller forces with a detached probe. Existing magnetic manipulators utilizing high fields and high field gradients have been able to reduce this gap in maximum applicable force, but the size of such devices has limited their use in applications where high force and high-numerical-aperture (NA) microscopy must be combined. We have developed a magnetic manipulation system that is capable of applying forces in excess of 700 pN on a 1 mum paramagnetic particle and 13 nN on a 4.5 mum paramagnetic particle, forces over the full 4pi sr, and a bandwidth in excess of 3 kHz while remaining compatible with a commercially available high-NA microscope objective. Our system design separates the pole tips from the flux coils so that the magnetic-field geometry at the sample is determined by removable thin-foil pole plates, allowing easy change from experiment to experiment. In addition, we have combined the magnetic manipulator with a feedback-enhanced, high-resolution (2.4 nm), high-bandwidth (10 kHz), long-range (100 mum xyz range) laser tracking system. We demonstrate the usefulness of this system in a study of the role of forces in higher-order chromosome structure and function. PMID:16858495

  7. Estimating biozone hydraulic conductivity in wastewater soil-infiltration systems using inverse numerical modeling.

    PubMed

    Bumgarner, Johnathan R; McCray, John E

    2007-06-01

    During operation of an onsite wastewater treatment system, a low-permeability biozone develops at the infiltrative surface (IS) during application of wastewater to soil. Inverse numerical-model simulations were used to estimate the biozone saturated hydraulic conductivity (K(biozone)) under variably saturated conditions for 29 wastewater infiltration test cells installed in a sandy loam field soil. Test cells employed two loading rates (4 and 8cm/day) and 3 IS designs: open chamber, gravel, and synthetic bundles. The ratio of K(biozone) to the saturated hydraulic conductivity of the natural soil (K(s)) was used to quantify the reductions in the IS hydraulic conductivity. A smaller value of K(biozone)/K(s,) reflects a greater reduction in hydraulic conductivity. The IS hydraulic conductivity was reduced by 1-3 orders of magnitude. The reduction in IS hydraulic conductivity was primarily influenced by wastewater loading rate and IS type and not by the K(s) of the native soil. The higher loading rate yielded greater reductions in IS hydraulic conductivity than the lower loading rate for bundle and gravel cells, but the difference was not statistically significant for chamber cells. Bundle and gravel cells exhibited a greater reduction in IS hydraulic conductivity than chamber cells at the higher loading rates, while the difference between gravel and bundle systems was not statistically significant. At the lower rate, bundle cells exhibited generally lower K(biozone)/K(s) values, but not at a statistically significant level, while gravel and chamber cells were statistically similar. Gravel cells exhibited the greatest variability in measured values, which may complicate design efforts based on K(biozone) evaluations for these systems. These results suggest that chamber systems may provide for a more robust design, particularly for high or variable wastewater infiltration rates. PMID:17449084

  8. Thin-foil magnetic force system for high-numerical-aperture microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, J. K.; Cribb, J.; Desai, K. V.; Vicci, L.; Wilde, B.; Keller, K.; Taylor, R. M.; Haase, J.; Bloom, K.; O'Brien, E. Timothy; Superfine, R.

    2006-01-01

    Forces play a key role in a wide range of biological phenomena from single-protein conformational dynamics to transcription and cell division, to name a few. The majority of existing microbiological force application methods can be divided into two categories: those that can apply relatively high forces through the use of a physical connection to a probe and those that apply smaller forces with a detached probe. Existing magnetic manipulators utilizing high fields and high field gradients have been able to reduce this gap in maximum applicable force, but the size of such devices has limited their use in applications where high force and high-numerical-aperture (NA) microscopy must be combined. We have developed a magnetic manipulation system that is capable of applying forces in excess of 700 pN on a 1 μm paramagnetic particle and 13 nN on a 4.5 μm paramagnetic particle, forces over the full 4π sr, and a bandwidth in excess of 3 kHz while remaining compatible with a commercially available high-NA microscope objective. Our system design separates the pole tips from the flux coils so that the magnetic-field geometry at the sample is determined by removable thin-foil pole plates, allowing easy change from experiment to experiment. In addition, we have combined the magnetic manipulator with a feedback-enhanced, high-resolution (2.4 nm), high-bandwidth (10 kHz), long-range (100 μm xyz range) laser tracking system. We demonstrate the usefulness of this system in a study of the role of forces in higher-order chromosome structure and function. PMID:16858495

  9. Numerical simulations of recent proton acceleration experiments with sub-100 TW laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinigardi, Stefano

    2016-09-01

    Recent experiments carried out at the Italian National Research Center, National Optics Institute Department in Pisa, are showing interesting results regarding maximum proton energies achievable with sub-100 TW laser systems. While laser systems are being continuously upgraded in laboratories around the world, at the same time a new trend on stabilizing and making ion acceleration results reproducible is growing in importance. Almost all applications require a beam with fixed performance, so that the energy spectrum and the total charge exhibit moderate shot to shot variations. This result is surely far from being achieved, but many paths are being explored in order to reach it. Some of the reasons for this variability come from fluctuations in laser intensity and focusing, due to optics instability. Other variation sources come from small differences in the target structure. The target structure can vary substantially, when it is impacted by the main pulse, due to the prepulse duration and intensity, the shape of the main pulse and the total energy deposited. In order to qualitatively describe the prepulse effect, we will present a two dimensional parametric scan of its relevant parameters. A single case is also analyzed with a full three dimensional simulation, obtaining reasonable agreement between the numerical and the experimental energy spectrum.

  10. Numerical simulation of quantum systems using the Particle-In-Cell method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirkmann, Sven; Youssef, Ziad; Hemke, Torben; Mussenbrock, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    The Particle-In-Cell (PIC) method is a very powerful method for studying the dynamics of plasmas. It has been primarily developed for tracking the charged particle trajectories subject to selfconsistent and external electromagnetic fields. Exploiting the power of modern computers, one is able to track the classical paths of tens of millions of particles at the same time. In the late 1980th, it was Dawson (and later Dauger) who had the idea to apply the PIC method to the classical part in the semiclassical approach to quantum systems via path integral methods. One could estimate that if a thousands of classical paths are sufficient to describe the dynamics of one quantum particle, then millions classical paths could describe the dynamics of a quantum particle system. A PIC code in the frame of a semiclassical approach would therefore enable the investigation of a number of quantum phenomena, e.g., optical properties, electrical properties, and, ultimately, chemical reactions. In this contribution we explain the use of the PIC code yapic (developed by the authors) in the frame of the path integral method and discuss the numerical results for simple quantum phenomena, i.e., the quantum harmonic oscillator and quantum tunneling. This work is supported by the German Research Foundation in the frame of FOR 2093.

  11. Numerical characterization of the hydrodynamics and thermal behavior of air flow in flexible air distribution system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharehdaghi, Samad; Moujaes, Samir

    2013-10-01

    Flexible duct air distribution systems are used in a large percentage of residential and small commercial buildings in the United States . Very few empirical or predictive data are available though to help provide the HVAC design engineer with reliable information . Moreover, because of the ducts flexibility, the shapes of these ducts offer a different set of operating fluid flow and thermal conditions from traditional smooth metal ducts. Hence, both the flow field and heat transfer through this kind of ducts are much more complex and merit to be analyzed from a numerical predictive approach. The aim of this research paper is to compute some of the hydrodynamic and heat transfer characteristics of the air flow inside these ducts over a range of Re numbers commonly used in the flow conditions of these air distribution systems. The information resulting from this CFD simulation, where a κ-ɛ turbulent model is used to predict the flow conditions, provide pressure drop and average convective heat transfer coefficients that exist in these ducts and was compared to previously found data. Circulation zones in the depressions of these ducts are found to exist which are suspected of influencing the pressured drop and heat transfer coefficients as compared to smooth ducts. The results show that fully developed conditions exist much earlier with regard to the inlet for both hydrodynamic and thermal entrance regions than what would be expected in smooth ducts under the same turbulent conditions.

  12. Formation Of The Haumea System: Checking Alternative Scenarios By N-body Based Numerical Simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirouin, Audrey; Bagati, A. C.; Ortiz, J.; Duffard, R.; Benavidez, P.; Richardson, D.

    2010-10-01

    Haumea is one of the most studied and probably one of the most interesting Trans-Neptunian Objects (TNOs) and a fast spinning dwarf planet (Rabinowitz et al., 2006; Thirouin et al. 2010) that has at least two satellites and whose orbital elements are related to a group/family of bodies. A catastrophic collision at high relative velocity (around 3 km/s) between two bodies in the 1000-1500 km size range and a mass ratio 0.2 has been suggested for the formation of the 'family' and the presence of satellites (Brown et al. 2007). Leinhardt et al. (2010) proposed another mechanism in which two 1300 km size bodies undergo a grazing collision with reacculumation of part of the mass and dispersion of the rest, partly into satellites. The likelihood of both scenarios is small when tested against collisional and dynamical evolution model predictions of collisional probabilities. Furthermore, these mechanisms have trouble in explaining the velocity dispersion of the family members and the fast spin of Haumea. Schlichting and Sari (2009) proposed that a former collision at low speed formed a proto-satellite that should lately undergo a final impact finally leading to the current observed system. In this work, we propose alternative mechanisms for the formation of the Haumea system ant test them by means of N-body numerical simulations (PKDGRAV code. Richardson, 1994).

  13. Numerical analysis for finite-range multitype stochastic contact financial market dynamic systems.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ge; Wang, Jun; Fang, Wen

    2015-04-01

    In an attempt to reproduce and study the dynamics of financial markets, a random agent-based financial price model is developed and investigated by the finite-range multitype contact dynamic system, in which the interaction and dispersal of different types of investment attitudes in a stock market are imitated by viruses spreading. With different parameters of birth rates and finite-range, the normalized return series are simulated by Monte Carlo simulation method and numerical studied by power-law distribution analysis and autocorrelation analysis. To better understand the nonlinear dynamics of the return series, a q-order autocorrelation function and a multi-autocorrelation function are also defined in this work. The comparisons of statistical behaviors of return series from the agent-based model and the daily historical market returns of Shanghai Composite Index and Shenzhen Component Index indicate that the proposed model is a reasonable qualitative explanation for the price formation process of stock market systems. PMID:25933659

  14. A numerical study of the target system of an ADSS with different flow guides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, K. Arul; Rathis Kumar, B. V.; Biswas, G.

    2007-02-01

    The mechanical design of the target module of an accelerator driven sub- critical nuclear reactor system (ADSS) calls for an analysis of the related thermal-hydraulic issues because of large amount of heat deposition in the spallation region during the course of nuclear interactions with the molten lead bismuth eutectic (LBE) target. The LBE also should carry the entire heat generated as a consequence of the spallation reaction. The problem of heat removal by the LBE is a challenging thermal-hydraulic issue. For this, one has to examine the flows of low Prandtl number fluids (LBE) in a complex ADSS geometry. In this study, the equations governing the laminar flow and thermal energy are solved numerically using the streamline upwind Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) finite element (FE) method. The target systems with a straight and a nozzle guide have been considered. The principal purpose of the analysis is to trace the flow and temperature distribution and thereby to check the suitability of the flow guide in avoiding the recirculation or stagnation zones in the flow space that may lead to hot spots.

  15. Identification and correction of rejection and substitution errors in optical character recognition systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himes, Glenn S.; Scholl, Marty M.; DeCosta, Frank A., III

    1993-04-01

    We examine the use of character image analysis coupled with contextual information in complex data gathering forms to identify and correct optical character recognition (OCR) system rejection and substitution errors. Segmented characters from a complex data gathering form are initially classified using an OCR engine based on a combination of Karhunen-Loeve transforms and a back-propagation neural network. Systems of equations are derived from the data gathering form to determine the values of characters rejected by the OCR engine and to verify the consistency of the data captured. If the OCR results for a single form are determined to be inconsistent with respect to the form's data relationships, a set of decision algorithms which incorporates a second neural network and uses additional character features is used to tag characters according to their likelihood of substitution error. Potential substitution errors are incrementally added to the set of OCR reject errors and are processed through dynamically selected systems of equations and search techniques which correct both error classes. We provide experimental results and determine the extent to which errors can be detected and corrected for various OCR error rates.

  16. Numerical studies of the thermal design sensitivity calculation for a reaction-diffusion system with discontinuous derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Jean W.; Sheen, Jeen S.

    1987-01-01

    The aim of this study is to find a reliable numerical algorithm to calculate thermal design sensitivities of a transient problem with discontinuous derivatives. The thermal system of interest is a transient heat conduction problem related to the curing process of a composite laminate. A logical function which can smoothly approximate the discontinuity is introduced to modify the system equation. Two commonly used methods, the adjoint variable method and the direct differentiation method, are then applied to find the design derivatives of the modified system. The comparisons of numerical results obtained by these two methods demonstrate that the direct differentiation method is a better choice to be used in calculating thermal design sensitivity.

  17. Numerical model for the evaluation of Earthquake effects on a magmatic system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Deepak; Longo, Antonella; Papale, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    A finite element numerical model is presented to compute the effect of an Earthquake on the dynamics of magma in reservoirs with deformable walls. The magmatic system is hit by a Mw 7.2 Earthquake (Petrolia/Capo Mendocina 1992) with hypocenter at 15 km diagonal distance. At subsequent times the seismic wave reaches the nearest side of the magmatic system boundary, travels through the magmatic fluid and arrives to the other side of the boundary. The modelled physical system consists in the magmatic reservoir with a thin surrounding layer of rocks. Magma is considered as an homogeneous multicomponent multiphase Newtonian mixture with exsolution and dissolution of volatiles (H2O+CO2). The magmatic reservoir is made of a small shallow magma chamber filled with degassed phonolite, connected by a vertical dike to a larger deeper chamber filled with gas-rich shoshonite, in condition of gravitational instability. The coupling between the Earthquake and the magmatic system is computed by solving the elastostatic equation for the deformation of the magmatic reservoir walls, along with the conservation equations of mass of components and momentum of the magmatic mixture. The characteristic elastic parameters of rocks are assigned to the computational domain at the boundary of magmatic system. Physically consistent Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions are assigned according to the evolution of the seismic signal. Seismic forced displacements and velocities are set on the part of the boundary which is hit by wave. On the other part of boundary motion is governed by the action of fluid pressure and deviatoric stress forces due to fluid dynamics. The constitutive equations for the magma are solved in a monolithic way by space-time discontinuous-in-time finite element method. To attain additional stability least square and discontinuity capturing operators are included in the formulation. A partitioned algorithm is used to couple the magma and thin layer of rocks. The

  18. OpenSMOKE++: An object-oriented framework for the numerical modeling of reactive systems with detailed kinetic mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuoci, A.; Frassoldati, A.; Faravelli, T.; Ranzi, E.

    2015-07-01

    OpenSMOKE++ is a general framework for numerical simulations of reacting systems with detailed kinetic mechanisms, including thousands of chemical species and reactions. The framework is entirely written in object-oriented C++ and can be easily extended and customized by the user for specific systems, without having to modify the core functionality of the program. The OpenSMOKE++ framework can handle simulations of ideal chemical reactors (plug-flow, batch, and jet stirred reactors), shock-tubes, rapid compression machines, and can be easily incorporated into multi-dimensional CFD codes for the modeling of reacting flows. OpenSMOKE++ provides useful numerical tools such as the sensitivity and rate of production analyses, needed to recognize the main chemical paths and to interpret the numerical results from a kinetic point of view. Since simulations involving large kinetic mechanisms are very time consuming, OpenSMOKE++ adopts advanced numerical techniques able to reduce the computational cost, without sacrificing the accuracy and the robustness of the calculations. In the present paper we give a detailed description of the framework features, the numerical models available, and the implementation of the code. The possibility of coupling the OpenSMOKE++ functionality with existing numerical codes is discussed. The computational performances of the framework are presented, and the capabilities of OpenSMOKE++ in terms of integration of stiff ODE systems are discussed and analyzed with special emphasis. Some examples demonstrating the ability of the OpenSMOKE++ framework to successfully manage large kinetic mechanisms are eventually presented.

  19. Symmetry-plane model of 3D Euler flows: Mapping to regular systems and numerical solutions of blowup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulungye, Rachel M.; Lucas, Dan; Bustamante, Miguel D.

    2014-11-01

    We introduce a family of 2D models describing the dynamics on the so-called symmetry plane of the full 3D Euler fluid equations. These models depend on a free real parameter and can be solved analytically. For selected representative values of the free parameter, we apply the method introduced in [M.D. Bustamante, Physica D: Nonlinear Phenom. 240, 1092 (2011)] to map the fluid equations bijectively to globally regular systems. By comparing the analytical solutions with the results of numerical simulations, we establish that the numerical simulations of the mapped regular systems are far more accurate than the numerical simulations of the original systems, at the same spatial resolution and CPU time. In particular, the numerical integrations of the mapped regular systems produce robust estimates for the growth exponent and singularity time of the main blowup quantity (vorticity stretching rate), converging well to the analytically-predicted values even beyond the time at which the flow becomes under-resolved (i.e. the reliability time). In contrast, direct numerical integrations of the original systems develop unstable oscillations near the reliability time. We discuss the reasons for this improvement in accuracy, and explain how to extend the analysis to the full 3D case. Supported under the programme for Research in Third Level Institutions (PRTLI) Cycle 5 and co-funded by the European Regional Development Fund.

  20. SINDA'85/FLUINT - SYSTEMS IMPROVED NUMERICAL DIFFERENCING ANALYZER AND FLUID INTEGRATOR (CONVEX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullimore, B.

    1994-01-01

    SINDA, the Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer, is a software system for solving lumped parameter representations of physical problems governed by diffusion-type equations. SINDA was originally designed for analyzing thermal systems represented in electrical analog, lumped parameter form, although its use may be extended to include other classes of physical systems which can be modeled in this form. As a thermal analyzer, SINDA can handle such interrelated phenomena as sublimation, diffuse radiation within enclosures, transport delay effects, and sensitivity analysis. FLUINT, the FLUid INTegrator, is an advanced one-dimensional fluid analysis program that solves arbitrary fluid flow networks. The working fluids can be single phase vapor, single phase liquid, or two phase. The SINDA'85/FLUINT system permits the mutual influences of thermal and fluid problems to be analyzed. The SINDA system consists of a programming language, a preprocessor, and a subroutine library. The SINDA language is designed for working with lumped parameter representations and finite difference solution techniques. The preprocessor accepts programs written in the SINDA language and converts them into standard FORTRAN. The SINDA library consists of a large number of FORTRAN subroutines that perform a variety of commonly needed actions. The use of these subroutines can greatly reduce the programming effort required to solve many problems. A complete run of a SINDA'85/FLUINT model is a four step process. First, the user's desired model is run through the preprocessor which writes out data files for the processor to read and translates the user's program code. Second, the translated code is compiled. The third step requires linking the user's code with the processor library. Finally, the processor is executed. SINDA'85/FLUINT program features include 20,000 nodes, 100,000 conductors, 100 thermal submodels, and 10 fluid submodels. SINDA'85/FLUINT can also model two phase flow

  1. Numerical modeling of continental rifting: Implications for the East African Rift system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koptev, Alexander; Burov, Evgueni; Calais, Eric; Leroy, Sylvie; Gerya, Taras; Guillou-Frottier, Laurent; Cloetingh, Sierd

    2016-04-01

    The East African Rift system (EARS) provides a unique system with juxtaposition of two contrasting yet simultaneously formed rift branches, the eastern, magma-rich, and the western, magma-poor, on either side of the old thick Tanzanian craton embedded into younger lithosphere. Here we take advantage of the improvements in our understanding of deep structures, geological evolution and recent kinematics, together with new cutting edge numerical modeling techniques to design a three-dimensional ultra-high resolution viscous plastic thermo-mechanical numerical model that accounts for thermo-rheological structure of the lithosphere and hence captures the essential geophysical features of the central EARS. Based on our experiments, we show that in case of the mantle plume seeded slightly to the northeast of the craton center, the ascending plume material is deflected by the cratonic keel and preferentially channeled along the eastern side of the craton, leading to formation of a large rift zone characterized by important magmatic activity with substantial amounts of melts derived from mantle plume material. This model is in good agreement with the observations in the EARS, as it reproduces the magmatic eastern branch and at the same time, anticlockwise rotation of the craton. However, this experiment does not reproduce the observed strain localization along the western margin of the cratonic bloc. To explain the formation of contrasting magmatic and amagmatic rift branches initiating simultaneously on either side of a non-deforming block as observed in the central EARS, we experimentally explored several scenarios of which three can be retained as specifically pertaining to the EARS: (1) The most trivial first scenario assumes rheologically weak vertical interface simulating the suture zone observed in the geological structure along the western border of the craton; (2) The second scenario involves a second smaller plume initially shifted in SW direction; (3) Finally, a

  2. Cryosphere-hydrosphere interactions: numerical modeling using the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) at different scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamasco, A.; Budgell, W. P.; Carniel, S.; Sclavo, M.

    2005-03-01

    Conveyor belt circulation controls global climate through heat and water fluxes with atmosphere and from tropical to polar regions and vice versa. This circulation, commonly referred to as thermohaline circulation (THC), seems to have millennium time scale and nowadays--a non-glacial period--appears to be as rather stable. However, concern is raised by the buildup of CO2 and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere (IPCC, Third assessment report: Climate Change 2001. A contribution of working group I, II and III to the Third Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (Cambridge Univ. Press, UK) 2001, http://www.ipcc.ch) as these may affect the THC conveyor paths. Since it is widely recognized that dense-water formation sites act as primary sources in strengthening quasi-stable THC paths (Stommel H., Tellus131961224), in order to simulate properly the consequences of such scenarios a better understanding of these oceanic processes is needed. To successfully model these processes, air-sea-ice-integrated modelling approaches are often required. Here we focus on two polar regions using the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS). In the first region investigated, the North Atlantic-Arctic, where open-ocean deep convection and open-sea ice formation and dispersion under the intense air-sea interactions are the major engines, we use a new version of the coupled hydrodynamic-ice ROMS model. The second area belongs to the Antarctica region inside the Southern Ocean, where brine rejections during ice formation inside shelf seas origin dense water that, flowing along the continental slope, overflow becoming eventually abyssal waters. Results show how nowadays integrated-modelling tasks have become more and more feasible and effective; numerical simulations dealing with large computational domains or challenging different climate scenarios can be run on multi-processors platforms and on systems like LINUX clusters, made of the same hardware as PCs, and

  3. Numerical Modeling of Thermal-Geochemical Processes in the Hydrothermal System of Pantelleria Island, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellani, S.; Gherardi, F.

    2009-12-01

    The island of Pantelleria, located in the Sicily Channel, Central Mediterranean, (about 100 km from Sicily and 70 km from Tunisia), represents the emergent part of a quiescent Quaternary volcano. It has been affected by an intense recent volcano-tectonic activity. The rocks outcropping on the island are mainly lavas and pyroclastic deposits, mostly represented by pantellerites and trachytes. Surface geothermal manifestations are diffused in Pantelleria, with fumaroles, mofettes and hot springs with temperatures up to 98 °C. Since the 60s’, a number of pre-feasibility studies was carried out on the island, which underwent an extensive geothermal exploration during the early 90s’. The results of the exploration revealed a very promising zone in the southern part of the island, where the main geothermal manifestations are concentrated. Temperatures above 250°C were measured in exploratory drillings down to 1100 m b.g.l. (well PPT1). The intrusion of pure seawater likely occurs throughout the island, and deep geothermal reservoir recharge appears to be predominantly of marine origin, though contributions from meteoric water are also possible. A conceptual model of the system has been set up on the basis of a wide set of geological, geophysical and geochemical data obtained during the surveys. The TOUGHREACT simulator was used for the water-rock reaction simulations. A plug-flow model has been used to perform non-isothermal calculations. Boundary thermal conditions have been calibrated according to heat flow measurements and well temperature data. Water-rock interactions have been evaluated in successive steps. First, the saturation states of minerals of sampled geothermal fluids were computed at reservoir temperatures to determine the mineral phases which would likely be dissolving or precipitating. The composition of “synthetic”, nearly-equilibrated waters likely occurring at depth within the reservoir has been then numerically reconstructed. Next, the

  4. Improvements in Numerical Modeling Methodology of Dry Woven Fabrics for Aircraft Engine Containment Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fein, Jonathan

    Woven fabric composite materials are widely used in the construction of aircraft engine fan containment systems, mostly due to their high strength to weight ratios and ease of implementation. The development of a predictive model for fan blade containment would provide great benefit to engine manufactures in shortened development cycle time, less risk in certification and fewer dollars lost to redesign/recertification cycles. A mechanistic user-defined material model subroutine has been developed at Arizona State University (ASU) that captures the behavioral response of these fabrics, namely Kevlar ® 49, under ballistic loading. Previously developed finite element models used to validate the consistency of this material model neglected the effects of the physical constraints imposed on the test setup during ballistic testing performed at NASA Glenn Research Center (NASA GRC). Part of this research was to explore the effects of these boundary conditions on the results of the numerical simulations. These effects were found to be negligible in most instances. Other material models for woven fabrics are available in the LS-DYNA finite element code. One of these models, MAT234: MAT_VISCOELASTIC_LOOSE_FABRIC (Ivanov & Tabiei, 2004) was studied and implemented in the finite element simulations of ballistic testing associated with the FAA ASU research. The results from these models are compared to results obtained from the ASU UMAT as part of this research. The results indicate an underestimation in the energy absorption characteristics of the Kevlar 49 fabric containment systems. More investigation needs to be performed in the implementation of MAT234 for Kevlar 49 fabric. Static penetrator testing of Kevlar® 49 fabric was performed at ASU in conjunction with this research. These experiments are designed to mimic the type of loading experienced during fan blade out events. The resulting experimental strains were measured using a non-contact optical strain measurement

  5. Numerical calculation of interaction forces between paramagnetic colloids in two-dimensional systems.

    PubMed

    Du, Di; Toffoletto, Frank; Biswal, Sibani Lisa

    2014-04-01

    Typically the force between paramagnetic particles in a uniform magnetic field is described using the dipolar model, which is inaccurate when particles are in close proximity to each other. Instead, the exact force between paramagnetic particles can be determined by solving a three-dimensional Laplace's equation for magnetostatics under specified boundary conditions and calculating the Maxwell stress tensor. The analytical solution to this multi-boundary-condition Laplace's equation can be obtained by using a solid harmonics expansion in conjunction with the Hobson formula. However, for a multibody system, finite truncation of the Hobson formula does not lead to convergence of the expansion at all points, which makes the approximation physically unrealistic. Here we present a numerical method for solving this Laplace's equation for magnetostatics. This method uses a smoothed representation to replace all the boundary conditions. A two-step propagation is used to dramatically accelerate the calculation without losing accuracy. Using this method, we calculate the force between two paramagnetic particles in a uniform and a rotational external field and compare our results with other models. Furthermore, the many-body effects for three-particle, ten-particle, and 24-particle systems are examined using the same method. We also calculate the interaction between particles with different magnetic susceptibilities and particle diameters. The Laplace's equation solver method described in this article that is used to determine the force between paramagnetic particles is shown to be very useful for dynamic simulations for both two-particle systems and a large cluster of particles. PMID:24827363

  6. Numerical Simulation of One- and Two-Phase Flows in Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilinsky, Mikhail; Patel, Kaushal; Alexander, Casey; Thompson, Tyesha; Blankson, Isaiah M.; Shvets, Alexander I.; Gromov, Valery G.; Sakharov, Vladimir I.

    2001-01-01

    In this report, we present some results of problems investigated during joint research between the Hampton University Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics Laboratory (HU/FM&AL), NASA GRC, and the LaRC Hyper-X Program. This work is supported by joint research between the NASA GRC and the Institute of Mechanics at Moscow State University (IM/MSU) in Russia under a CRDF grant. The main areas of current scientific interest of the HU/FM&AL include an investigation of the proposed and patented advanced methods for aircraft engine thrust and noise benefits. These methods are based on nontraditional 3D corrugated and composite nozzle, inlet, propeller and screw designs such as a Bluebell and Telescope nozzle, Mobius-shaped screw, etc. This is the main subject of our other projects, of which one is presented at the current conference. Here we analyze additional methods for exhaust jet noise reduction without essential thrust loss and even with thrust augmentation. Such additional approaches are: (1) to add some solid, fluid, or gas mass at discrete locations to the main supersonic gas stream to minimize the negative influence of strong shock waves formed in propulsion systems. This mass addition may be accompanied by heat addition to the main stream as a result of the fuel combustion or by cooling of this stream as a result of the liquid mass evaporation and boiling; (2) Use of porous or permeable nozzles and additional shells at the nozzle exit for preliminary cooling of the hot jet exhaust and pressure compensation for off-design conditions (so-called continuous ejector with small mass flow rate); and (3) to propose and analyze new effective methods of fuel injection into the flow stream in air-breathing engines. The research is focused on a wide regime of problems in the propulsion field as well as in experimental testing and theoretical and numerical simulation analyses for advanced aircraft and rocket engines. The FM&AL Team uses analytical methods, numerical simulations, and

  7. Numerical Simulation of One- and Two-Phase Flows in Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilinsky, Mikhail; Patel, Kaushal; Alexander, Casey; Thompson, Tyesha; Blankson, Isaiah M.; Shvets, Alexander I.; Gromov, Valery G.; Sakharov, Vladimir I.

    2001-01-01

    In this report, we present some results of problems investigated during joint research between the Hampton University Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics Laboratory (HU/FM&AL), NASA GRC, and the LaRC Hyper-X Program. This work is supported by joint research between the NASA GRC and the Institute of Mechanics at Moscow State University (IM/MSU) in Russia under a CRDF grant. The main areas of current scientific interest of the HU/FM&AL include an investigation of the proposed and patented advanced methods for aircraft engine thrust and noise benefits. These methods are based on nontraditional 3D corrugated and composite nozzle, inlet, propeller and screw designs such as a Bluebell and Telescope nozzle, Mobius-shaped screw, etc. This is the main subject of our other projects, of which one is presented at the current conference. Here we analyze additional methods for exhaust jet noise reduction without essential thrust loss and even with thrust augmentation. Such additional approaches are: (1) to add some solid, fluid, or gas mass at discrete locations to the main supersonic gas stream to minimize the negative influence of strong shock waves formed in propulsion systems. This mass addition may be accompanied by heat addition to the main stream as a result of the fuel combustion or by cooling of this stream as a result of the liquid mass evaporation and boiling; (2) Use of porous or permeable nozzles and additional shells at the nozzle exit for preliminary cooling of the hot jet exhaust and pressure compensation for off-design conditions (so-called continuous ejector with small mass flow rate); and (3) to propose and analyze new effective methods of fuel injection into the flow stream in air-breathing engines. The research is focused on a wide regime of problems in the propulsion field as well as in experimental testing and theoretical and numerical simulation analyses for advanced aircraft and rocket engines. The FM&AL Team uses analytical methods, numerical simulations, and

  8. Evaluation of an automatic markup system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghva, Kazem; Condit, Allen; Borsack, Julie

    1995-03-01

    One predominant application of OCR is the recognition of full text documents for information retrieval. Modern retrieval systems exploit both the textual content of the document as well as its structure. The relationship between textual content and character accuracy have been the focus of recent studies. It has been shown that due to the redundancies in text, average precision and recall is not heavily affected by OCR character errors. What is not fully known is to what extent OCR devices can provide reliable information that can be used to capture the structure of the document. In this paper, we present a preliminary report on the design and evaluation of a system to automatically markup technical documents, based on information provided by an OCR device. The device we use differs from traditional OCR devices in that it not only performs optical character recognition, but also provides detailed information about page layout, word geometry, and font usage. Our automatic markup program, which we call Autotag, uses this information, combined with dictionary lookup and content analysis, to identify structural components of the text. These include the document title, author information, abstract, sections, section titles, paragraphs, sentences, and de-hyphenated words. A visual examination of the hardcopy is compared to the output of our markup system to determine its correctness.

  9. An evaluation of an automatic markup system

    SciTech Connect

    Taghva, K.; Condit, A.; Borsack, J.

    1995-04-01

    One predominant application of OCR is the recognition of full text documents for information retrieval. Modern retrieval systems exploit both the textual content of the document as well as its structure. The relationship between textual content and character accuracy have been the focus of recent studies. It has been shown that due to the redundancies in text, average precision and recall is not heavily affected by OCR character errors. What is not fully known is to what extent OCR devices can provide reliable information that can be used to capture the structure of the document. In this paper, the authors present a preliminary report on the design and evaluation of a system to automatically markup technical documents, based on information provided by an OCR device. The device the authors use differs from traditional OCR devices in that it not only performs optical character recognition, but also provides detailed information about page layout, word geometry, and font usage. Their automatic markup program, which they call Autotag, uses this information, combined with dictionary, lookup and content analysis, to identify structural components of the text. These include the document title, author information, abstract, sections, section titles, paragraphs, sentences, and de-hyphenated words. A visual examination of the hardcopy will be compared to the output of their markup system to determine its correctness.

  10. Numerical framework to model temporally resolved multi-stage dynamic systems.

    PubMed

    Zakharov, M N; Bhasin, S; Szafran, A T; Mancini, M A; Jasuja, R

    2012-11-01

    Numerical modeling of steroid hormone signaling presents an exciting challenge involving spatiotemporal coordination of multiple events. Ligand binding in cytoplasm triggers dissociation and/or association of coregulators which subsequently regulate DNA binding and transcriptional activity in nucleus. In order to develop a comprehensive multi-stage model, it is imperative to follow not only the transcriptional outcomes but also the intermediate protein complexes. Accordingly, we developed a software toolkit for simulating complex biochemical pathways as a set of non-linear differential equations in LabVIEW (Laboratory Virtual Instrumentation and Engineering Workbench, National Instruments, Austin, TX) environment. The toolkit is visual, highly modular, loosely coupled with the rest of LabVIEW, scalable and extensible. The toolkit can be used to develop and validate biochemical models and estimate model parameters from existing experimental data. We illustrate the application of the toolkit for simulation of steroid hormone response in cells, and demonstrate how the toolkit can be employed for other biological and chemical systems as well. The software module presented here can be used stand-alone as well as built into data collection and analysis applications. PMID:22727632

  11. A joint-space numerical model of metabolic energy expenditure for human multibody dynamic system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo H; Roberts, Dustyn

    2015-09-01

    Metabolic energy expenditure (MEE) is a critical performance measure of human motion. In this study, a general joint-space numerical model of MEE is derived by integrating the laws of thermodynamics and principles of multibody system dynamics, which can evaluate MEE without the limitations inherent in experimental measurements (phase delays, steady state and task restrictions, and limited range of motion) or muscle-space models (complexities and indeterminacies from excessive DOFs, contacts and wrapping interactions, and reliance on in vitro parameters). Muscle energetic components are mapped to the joint space, in which the MEE model is formulated. A constrained multi-objective optimization algorithm is established to estimate the model parameters from experimental walking data also used for initial validation. The joint-space parameters estimated directly from active subjects provide reliable MEE estimates with a mean absolute error of 3.6 ± 3.6% relative to validation values, which can be used to evaluate MEE for complex non-periodic tasks that may not be experimentally verifiable. This model also enables real-time calculations of instantaneous MEE rate as a function of time for transient evaluations. Although experimental measurements may not be completely replaced by model evaluations, predicted quantities can be used as strong complements to increase reliability of the results and yield unique insights for various applications. PMID:25914404

  12. A Numerical SImulation of the Goshen Tornado Observed During Vortex 2: An Orogenic Convective System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripoli, G. J.; Trevorrow, S. T.; Büker, M.

    2014-12-01

    A numerical simulation of the Goshen 2009 tornado observed during Vortex 2 is presented. The simulation is initialized from the North American Regional Reanalysis data set on the scale of the North American continent. The observed Goshen County tornadic supercell evolves in the simulation from the regional slope flow embedded an a favorable synoptic environment. A supercell and tornado were produced by the simulation in the approximate location and precise time that observations were made of the event by the Vortex 2 team. This was withoiut additional assimilation of high resolution observations beyond the standard data contributing to the 1500 UTC 35 km NARR analysis 7 hours prior to the observed tornado. The simulation can be and is compared directly to Vortex 2 Doppler observations. The process of orogenic storm organization driven by the interaction of topography and the large scale environment is discussed. It is hypothesized that the unusually high predictability of the timing and location as well as the system structure and attendant weather including tornado activity was the result of a highly predictable diurnal slope flow environment that constrained and so reduced the uncertainty of the simulation outcome.

  13. System and method for simultaneously collecting serial number information from numerous identity tags

    DOEpatents

    Doty, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    A system and method for simultaneously collecting serial number information reports from numerous colliding coded-radio-frequency identity tags. Each tag has a unique multi-digit serial number that is stored in non-volatile RAM. A reader transmits an ASCII coded "D" character on a carrier of about 900 MHz and a power illumination field having a frequency of about 1.6 Ghz. A one MHz tone is modulated on the 1.6 Ghz carrier as a timing clock for a microprocessor in each of the identity tags. Over a thousand such tags may be in the vicinity and each is powered-up and clocked by the 1.6 Ghz power illumination field. Each identity tag looks for the "D" interrogator modulated on the 900 MHz carrier, and each uses a digit of its serial number to time a response. Clear responses received by the reader are repeated for verification. If no verification or a wrong number is received by any identity tag, it uses a second digital together with the first to time out a more extended period for response. Ultimately, the entire serial number will be used in the worst case collision environments; and since the serial numbers are defined as being unique, the final possibility will be successful because a clear time-slot channel will be available.

  14. System and method for simultaneously collecting serial number information from numerous identity tags

    DOEpatents

    Doty, M.A.

    1997-01-07

    A system and method are disclosed for simultaneously collecting serial number information reports from numerous colliding coded-radio-frequency identity tags. Each tag has a unique multi-digit serial number that is stored in non-volatile RAM. A reader transmits an ASCII coded ``D`` character on a carrier of about 900 MHz and a power illumination field having a frequency of about 1.6 Ghz. A one MHz tone is modulated on the 1.6 Ghz carrier as a timing clock for a microprocessor in each of the identity tags. Over a thousand such tags may be in the vicinity and each is powered-up and clocked by the 1.6 Ghz power illumination field. Each identity tag looks for the ``D`` interrogator modulated on the 900 MHz carrier, and each uses a digit of its serial number to time a response. Clear responses received by the reader are repeated for verification. If no verification or a wrong number is received by any identity tag, it uses a second digital together with the first to time out a more extended period for response. Ultimately, the entire serial number will be used in the worst case collision environments; and since the serial numbers are defined as being unique, the final possibility will be successful because a clear time-slot channel will be available. 5 figs.

  15. Overview of High-Fidelity Modeling Activities in the Numerical Propulsion System Simulations (NPSS) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veres, Joseph P.

    2002-01-01

    A high-fidelity simulation of a commercial turbofan engine has been created as part of the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation Project. The high-fidelity computer simulation utilizes computer models that were developed at NASA Glenn Research Center in cooperation with turbofan engine manufacturers. The average-passage (APNASA) Navier-Stokes based viscous flow computer code is used to simulate the 3D flow in the compressors and turbines of the advanced commercial turbofan engine. The 3D National Combustion Code (NCC) is used to simulate the flow and chemistry in the advanced aircraft combustor. The APNASA turbomachinery code and the NCC combustor code exchange boundary conditions at the interface planes at the combustor inlet and exit. This computer simulation technique can evaluate engine performance at steady operating conditions. The 3D flow models provide detailed knowledge of the airflow within the fan and compressor, the high and low pressure turbines, and the flow and chemistry within the combustor. The models simulate the performance of the engine at operating conditions that include sea level takeoff and the altitude cruise condition.

  16. Numerical simulation approaches to evaluate nitrate contamination of groundwater through leakage well in layered aquifer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, E.; Lee, E.; Lee, K.

    2013-12-01

    The layered aquifer system (i.e. perched and regional aquifers) is locally observed in Gosan area of Jeju Island, Korea due to scattered distributions of an impermeable clay layer. In the Gosan area, farming is actively performed and nitrate contamination has been frequently reported in groundwater of regional aquifer which is sole water resource in the island. Water quality of the regional groundwater is impacted by inflows of the nitrate-rich perched groundwater, which is located above the impermeable layer and directly affected by surface contaminants. A poorly grouted well penetrating the impermeable layer provides a passage of contaminated groundwater through the impermeable layer. Such a hydrogeological characteristic consequently induces nitrate contamination of the regional aquifer in this region. To quantify the inflows of the perched groundwater via leakage wells, a numerical model was developed to calculate leakage amounts of the perched groundwater into the regional groundwater. This perched groundwater leakages were applied as point and time-variable contamination sources during the solute transport simulation process for the regional aquifer. This work will provide useful information to suggest effective ways to control nitrate contamination of groundwater in the agricultural field.

  17. Numerical model and analysis of an energy-based system using microwaves for vision correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pertaub, Radha; Ryan, Thomas P.

    2009-02-01

    A treatment system was developed utilizing a microwave-based procedure capable of treating myopia and offering a less invasive alternative to laser vision correction without cutting the eye. Microwave thermal treatment elevates the temperature of the paracentral stroma of the cornea to create a predictable refractive change while preserving the epithelium and deeper structures of the eye. A pattern of shrinkage outside of the optical zone may be sufficient to flatten the central cornea. A numerical model was set up to investigate both the electromagnetic field and the resultant transient temperature distribution. A finite element model of the eye was created and the axisymmetric distribution of temperature calculated to characterize the combination of controlled power deposition combined with surface cooling to spare the epithelium, yet shrink the cornea, in a circularly symmetric fashion. The model variables included microwave power levels and pulse width, cooling timing, dielectric material and thickness, and electrode configuration and gap. Results showed that power is totally contained within the cornea and no significant temperature rise was found outside the anterior cornea, due to the near-field design of the applicator and limited thermal conduction with the short on-time. Target isothermal regions were plotted as a result of common energy parameters along with a variety of electrode shapes and sizes, which were compared. Dose plots showed the relationship between energy and target isothermic regions.

  18. Numerical arc segmentation algorithm for a radio conference: A software tool for communication satellite systems planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whyte, W. A.; Heyward, A. O.; Ponchak, D. S.; Spence, R. L.; Zuzek, J. E.

    1988-01-01

    The Numerical Arc Segmentation Algorithm for a Radio Conference (NASARC) provides a method of generating predetermined arc segments for use in the development of an allotment planning procedure to be carried out at the 1988 World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC) on the Use of the Geostationary Satellite Orbit and the Planning of Space Services Utilizing It. Through careful selection of the predetermined arc (PDA) for each administration, flexibility can be increased in terms of choice of system technical characteristics and specific orbit location while reducing the need for coordination among administrations. The NASARC software determines pairwise compatibility between all possible service areas at discrete arc locations. NASARC then exhaustively enumerates groups of administrations whose satellites can be closely located in orbit, and finds the arc segment over which each such compatible group exists. From the set of all possible compatible groupings, groups and their associated arc segments are selected using a heuristic procedure such that a PDA is identified for each administration. Various aspects of the NASARC concept and how the software accomplishes specific features of allotment planning are discussed.

  19. Numerical studies of cold water injection into vapor-dominated geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, C.H; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1991-01-01

    Recent reservoir pressure and steam flow rate declines at The Geysers geothermal field in California have attracted interest in studies of increased cold water injection into this system. In this paper, numerical studies of such injection into a fractured vapor-dominated reservoir are conducted using a two-dimensional radial, double-porosity model. The results obtained indicate that cold water injection into superheated (low-pressure) zones will greatly enhance the productivities of steam wells. Injection into two-phase zones with significant liquid reserves in the matrix blocks does not appear to aid in steam recovery until most of the original liquid reserves are depleted. Sensitivity studies are conducted over the range of fracture and matrix permeabilities applicable to the Geysers. The sensitivity of the grid size is also conducted, and shows very large grid effects. A fine vertical space discretization near the bottom of the reservoir is necessary to accurately predict the boiling of the injected water. 28 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Opto-acoustic imaging system for early breast cancer diagnostics: experimental and numerical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhlova, Tanya D.; Zharinov, Alexei M.; Kozhushko, Viktor V.; Pelivanov, Ivan M.; Karabutov, Alexander A.

    2006-03-01

    Optoacoustic (OA) imaging is based on the generation of thermoelastic stress waves by heating an object in an optically heterogeneous medium with a short laser pulse. The stress waves contain information on the distribution of structures with enhanced optical absorption that can be used for early cancer diagnostics. This technique has already been applied in-vivo for breast cancer diagnostics and yielded higher contrast of obtained images than that of X-ray or ultrasonic images. The resolution was comparable with that yielded by ultrasonic imaging. Therefore, OA imaging is a very promising technique and it is being rapidly developed. Research in the area is now mostly targeted to the development of OA wave detection systems and image reconstruction algorithms. In this work a new design of receiving array transducer, that allows to enhance image resolution is proposed. The array consists of 64 focused piezo-elements made of PVDF slabs imposed on a spherical surface. Resolution yielded by the array in different directions is determined. Several tissue irradiation geometries and laser wavelengths are considered for optimization of the OA image contrast. Obtained results are used for maximum imaging depth studies. All the investigations include both numerical modelling and experiment.

  1. Numerical study of a three-state host-parasite system on the square lattice.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Takehisa; Konno, Norio; Masuda, Naoki

    2011-04-01

    We numerically study the phase diagram of a three-state host-parasite model on the square lattice motivated by population biology. The model is an extension of the contact process, and the three states correspond to an empty site, a host, and a parasite. We determine the phase diagram of the model by scaling analysis. In agreement with previous results, three phases are identified: the phase in which both hosts and parasites are extinct (S(0)), the phase in which hosts survive but parasites are extinct (S(01)), and the phase in which both hosts and parasites survive (S(012)). We argue that both the S(0)-S(01) and S(01)-S(012) boundaries belong to the directed percolation class. In this model, it has been suggested that an excessively large reproduction rate of parasites paradoxically extinguishes hosts and parasites and results in S(0). We show that this paradoxical extinction is a finite size effect; the corresponding parameter region is likely to disappear in the limit of infinite system size. PMID:21599235

  2. Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part I: Numerical Modeling and Baseline Model Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sumeet; Heister, Stephen D.; Xu, Xianfan; Salvador, James R.; Meisner, Gregory P.

    2013-04-01

    A numerical model has been developed to simulate coupled thermal and electrical energy transfer processes in a thermoelectric generator (TEG) designed for automotive waste heat recovery systems. This model is capable of computing the overall heat transferred, the electrical power output, and the associated pressure drop for given inlet conditions of the exhaust gas and the available TEG volume. Multiple-filled skutterudites and conventional bismuth telluride are considered for thermoelectric modules (TEMs) for conversion of waste heat from exhaust into usable electrical power. Heat transfer between the hot exhaust gas and the hot side of the TEMs is enhanced with the use of a plate-fin heat exchanger integrated within the TEG and using liquid coolant on the cold side. The TEG is discretized along the exhaust flow direction using a finite-volume method. Each control volume is modeled as a thermal resistance network which consists of integrated submodels including a heat exchanger and a thermoelectric device. The pressure drop along the TEG is calculated using standard pressure loss correlations and viscous drag models. The model is validated to preserve global energy balances and is applied to analyze a prototype TEG with data provided by General Motors. Detailed results are provided for local and global heat transfer and electric power generation. In the companion paper, the model is then applied to consider various TEG topologies using skutterudite and bismuth telluride TEMs.

  3. MASS2, Modular Aquatic Simulation System in Two Dimensions, Theory and Numerical Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2007-07-01

    The Modular Aquatic Simulation System in Two Dimensions (MASS2) is a two-dimensional, depth-averaged hydrodynamics and transport model. The model simulates time varying distributions of depth-averaged velocities, water surface elevations, and water quality constituents. MASS2 uses a structured, multi-block, boundary-fitted, curvilinear computational mesh, which allows the simulation of very complex riverine or estuarine networks. The blocks may be of varying resolution, which allows high resolution to be used only where needed. MASS2 can simulate a wide variety of hydrodynamic conditions, including supercritical flow and hydraulic jumps. It can also simulate a wide variety of water quality conditions, including sediment, conservative or decaying contaminants, sediment-sorbed contaminants, water temperature, and total dissolved gas. Any number of these constituents may be simulated simultaneously. In addition, transport simulations may be performed using pre-calculated hydrodynamic conditions, allowing long-term transport simulations unencumbered by the more intensive hydrodynamic calculations, or repeated transport simulations without re-simulating hydrodynamics. This report documents the theory and numerical methods used in MASS2. In addition, the results are presented from several of hydrodynamic and transport validation tests to which MASS2 was subjected. The companion user manual documents the application of MASS2.

  4. All-reflective optical target illumination system with high numerical aperture

    DOEpatents

    Sigler, Robert D.

    1978-01-01

    An all-reflective optical system for providing illumination of a target focal region at high numerical aperture from a pair of co-axially, confluent collimated light beams. A target cavity is defined by a pair of opposed inner ellipsoidal reflectors having respective first focal points within a target region and second focal points at a vertex opening in the opposing reflector. Outwardly of each inner reflector is the opposed combination of a spherical reflector, and an outer generally ellipsoidal reflector having an aberrated first focal point coincident with the focus of the opposing spherical reflector and a second focal point coincident with the second focal point of the opposing inner ellipsoidal reflector through a vertex opening in the spherical reflector. The confluent collimated beams are incident through vertex openings in the outer ellipsoidal reflectors onto respective opposing spherical reflectors. Each beam is reflected by the associated spherical reflector onto the opposing outer ellipsoidal reflector and focused thereby onto the opposing inner ellipsoidal reflector, and then onto the target region.

  5. Water uptake by a maize root system - An explicit numerical 3-dimensional simulation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, Daniel; Schnepf, Andrea; Klepsch, Sabine; Roose, Tiina

    2010-05-01

    Water is one of the most important resources for plant growth and function. An accurate modelling of the unsaturated flow is not only substantial to predict water uptake but also important to describe nutrient movement regarding water saturation and transport. In this work we present a model for water uptake. The model includes the simultaneous flow of water inside the soil and inside the root network. Water saturation in the soil volume is described by the Richards equation. Water flow inside the roots' xylem is calculated using the Poiseuille law for water flow in a cylindrical tube. The water saturation in the soil as well as water uptake of the root system is calculated numerically in three dimensions. We study water uptake of a maize plant in a confined pot under different supply scenarios. The main improvement of our approach is that the root surfaces act as spatial boundaries of the soil volume. Therefore water influx into the root is described by a surface flux instead of a volume flux, which is commonly given by an effective sink term. For the numerical computation we use the following software: The 3-dimensional maize root architecture is created by a root growth model based on L-Systems (Leitner et al 2009). A mesh of the surrounding soil volume is created using the meshing software DistMesh (Persson & Strang 2004). Using this mesh the partial differential equations are solved with the finite element method using Comsol Multiphysics 3.5a. Modelling results are related to accepted water uptake models from literature (Clausnitzer & Hopmans 1994, Roose & Fowler 2004, Javaux et al 2007). This new approach has several advantages. By considering the individual roots it is possible to analyse the influence of overlapping depletion zones due to inter root competition. Furthermore, such simulations can be used to estimate the influence of simplifying assumptions that are made in the development of effective models. The model can be easily combined with a nutrient

  6. Investigation of the groundwater system at Masaya Caldera, Nicaragua, using transient electromagnetics and numerical simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacNeil, R.E.; Sanford, W.E.; Connor, C.B.; Sandberg, S.K.; Diez, M.

    2007-01-01

    The distribution of groundwater beneath Masaya Volcano, in Nicaragua, and its surrounding caldera was characterized using the transient electromagnetic method (TEM). Multiple soundings were conducted at 30 sites. Models of the TEM data consistently indicate a resistive layer that is underlain by one or more conductive layers. These two layers represent the unsaturated and saturated zones, respectively, with the boundary between them indicating the water-table elevation. A map of the TEM data shows that the water table in the caldera is a subdued replica of the topography, with higher elevations beneath the edifice in the south-central caldera and lower elevations in the eastern caldera, coinciding with the elevation of Laguna de Masaya. These TEM data, combined with regional hydrologic data, indicate that the caldera in hydrologically isolated from the surrounding region, with as much as 60??m of difference in elevation of the groundwater table across caldera-bounding faults. The water-table information and estimates of fluxes of water through the system were used to constrain a numerical simulation of groundwater flow. The simulation results indicate that basalt flows in the outer parts of the caldera have a relatively high transmissivity, whereas the central edifice has a substantially lower transmissivity. A layer of relatively high transmissivity must be present at depth within the edifice in order to deliver the observed flux of water and steam to the active vent. This hydrologic information about the caldera provides a baseline for assessing the response of this isolated groundwater system to future changes in magmatic activity. ?? 2007.

  7. A New Linearized Photochemistry Parameterization for Operational Ozone Assimilation in Numerical Weather Prediction Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormack, J. P.; Allen, D. R.; Coy, L.; Eckermann, S. D.; Stajner, I.

    2005-12-01

    The Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) will deliver real-time ozone data for assimilation in numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. This information will benefit forecasts by improving the modeled stratospheric heating rates and providing better first-guess temperature profiles needed for infrared satellite radiance retrieval algorithms. Operational ozone data assimilation for NWP requires a fast, accurate treatment of stratospheric ozone photochemistry. We present results from the new NRL CHEM2D Ozone Photochemistry Parameterization (CHEM2D-OPP), which is based on output from the zonally averaged NRL-CHEM2D middle atmosphere photochemical-transport model. CHEM2D-OPP is a linearized parameterization of gas-phase stratospheric ozone photochemistry developed for NOGAPS-ALPHA, the Navy's prototype global high altitude NWP model. A recent study of NOGAPS-ALPHA ozone simulations found that a preliminary version of the CHEM2D-based photochemistry parameterization generally performed better than other current photochemistry schemes that are now widely used in operational NWP and data assimilation systems. A new, improved version of CHEM2D-OPP is now available. Here we report the first quantitative performance assessments of the updated CHEM2D-OPP package in the NRL Global Ozone Assimilation Testing System (GOATS). This study compares the mean differences between GOATS ozone analyses and SBUV/2 ozone measurements (both vertical profile and total column) during September 2002 using several different ozone photochemistry schemes. We find that CHEM2D-OPP generally delivers the best performance out of all the photochemistry schemes we tested. Future development plans for CHEM2D-OPP, such as interfacing it with a "cold tracer" parameterization for heterogeneous ozone-hole chemistry, will also be presented.

  8. Numerical Aspects of Eigenvalue and Eigenfunction Computations for Chaotic Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bäcker, A.

    Summary: We give an introduction to some of the numerical aspects in quantum chaos. The classical dynamics of two-dimensional area-preserving maps on the torus is illustrated using the standard map and a perturbed cat map. The quantization of area-preserving maps given by their generating function is discussed and for the computation of the eigenvalues a computer program in Python is presented. We illustrate the eigenvalue distribution for two types of perturbed cat maps, one leading to COE and the other to CUE statistics. For the eigenfunctions of quantum maps we study the distribution of the eigenvectors and compare them with the corresponding random matrix distributions. The Husimi representation allows for a direct comparison of the localization of the eigenstates in phase space with the corresponding classical structures. Examples for a perturbed cat map and the standard map with different parameters are shown. Billiard systems and the corresponding quantum billiards are another important class of systems (which are also relevant to applications, for example in mesoscopic physics). We provide a detailed exposition of the boundary integral method, which is one important method to determine the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the Helmholtz equation. We discuss several methods to determine the eigenvalues from the Fredholm equation and illustrate them for the stadium billiard. The occurrence of spurious solutions is discussed in detail and illustrated for the circular billiard, the stadium billiard, and the annular sector billiard. We emphasize the role of the normal derivative function to compute the normalization of eigenfunctions, momentum representations or autocorrelation functions in a very efficient and direct way. Some examples for these quantities are given and discussed.

  9. An approach for the development of an aerodynamic-structural interaction numerical simulation for aeropropulsion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Naziar, J.; Couch, R.; Davis, M.

    1996-01-01

    Traditionally, aeropropulsion structural performance and aerodynamic performance have been designed separately and later mated together via flight testing. In today`s atmosphere of declining resources, it is imperative that more productive ways of designing and verifying aeropropulsion performance and structural interaction be made available to the aerospace industry. One method of obtaining a more productive design and evaluation capability is through the use of numerical simulations. Currently, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has developed a generalized fluid/structural interaction code known as ALE3D. This code is capable of characterizing fluid and structural interaction for components such as the combustor, fan/stators, inlet and/or nozzles. This code solves the 3D Euler equations and has been applied to several aeropropulsion applications such as a supersonic inlet and a combustor rupture simulation. To characterize aerodynamic-structural interaction for rotating components such as the compressor, appropriate turbomachinery simulations would need to be implemented within the ALE3D structure. The Arnold Engineering Development Center is currently developing a three-dimensional compression system code known as TEACC (Turbine Engine Analysis Compressor Code). TEACC also solves the 3D Euler equations and is intended to simulate dynamic behavior such as inlet distortion, surge or rotating stall. The technology being developed within the TEACC effort provides the necessary turbomachinery simulation for implementation into ALE3D. This paper describes a methodology to combine three-dimensional aerodynamic turbomachinery technology into the existing aerodynamic-structural interaction simulation, ALE3D to obtain the desired aerodynamic and structural integrated simulation for an aeropropulsion system.

  10. A Study of the Use of Manipulative Materials as Multiple Embodiments for the Study of Numeration Systems by Prospective Elementary Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skipper, Slade Welma

    This study investigates effects of different instructional methods on positional numeration systems. It involved prospective elementary teachers and assessed (1) understanding, (2) performance, and (3) transference of numeration concepts. The effects were measured by the Test On Numeration Systems (TONS). During each of two semesters, three…

  11. Seismic fragility evaluation of a piping system in a nuclear power plant by shaking table test and numerical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M. K.; Kim, J. H.; Choi, I. K.

    2012-07-01

    In this study, a seismic fragility evaluation of the piping system in a nuclear power plant was performed. For the evaluation of seismic fragility of the piping system, this research was progressed as three steps. At first, several piping element capacity tests were performed. The monotonic and cyclic loading tests were conducted under the same internal pressure level of actual nuclear power plants to evaluate the performance. The cracks and wall thinning were considered as degradation factors of the piping system. Second, a shaking tale test was performed for an evaluation of seismic capacity of a selected piping system. The multi-support seismic excitation was performed for the considering a difference of an elevation of support. Finally, a numerical analysis was performed for the assessment of seismic fragility of piping system. As a result, a seismic fragility for piping system of NPP in Korea by using a shaking table test and numerical analysis. (authors)

  12. Numerical performance of half-sweep SOR method for solving second order composite closed Newton-Cotes system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthuvalu, Mohana Sundaram; Aruchunan, Elayaraja; Akhir, Mohd Kamalrulzaman Md; Sulaiman, Jumat; Karim, Samsul Ariffin Abdul

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, application of the Half-Sweep Successive Over-Relaxation (HSSOR) iterative method is extended by solving second order composite closed Newton-Cotes quadrature (2-CCNC) system. The performance of HSSOR method in solving 2-CCNC system is comparatively studied by their application on linear Fredholm integral equations of the second kind. The derivation and implementation of the method are discussed. In addition, numerical results by solving two test problems are included and compared with the standard Gauss-Seidel (GS) and Successive Over-Relaxation (SOR) methods. Numerical results demonstrate that HSSOR method is an efficient method among the tested methods.

  13. Application of a numerically generated orthogonal coordinate system to the solution of inviscid axisymmetric supersonic flow over blunt bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, H. H., II; Graves, R. A., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A numerically generated orthogonal coordinate system (with the body surface and shock wave as opposite boundaries) was applied with a time asymptotic method to obtain steady flow solutions for axisymmetric inviscid flow over several blunt bodies including spheres, paraboloids, ellipsoids, hyperboloids, hemisphere cylinders, spherically blunted cones, and a body with a concavity in the stagnation region. Comparisons with experimental data and with the results of other computational methods are discussed. The numerically generated orthogonal coordinate system is described and applications of the method to complex body shapes, particularly those with concave regions, are discussed.

  14. Modeling and numerical simulation of interior ballistic processes in a 120mm mortar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Ragini

    Numerical Simulation of interior ballistic processes in gun and mortar systems is a very difficult and interesting problem. The mathematical model for the physical processes in the mortar systems consists of a system of non-linear coupled partial differential equations, which also contain non-homogeneity in form of the source terms. This work includes the development of a three-dimensional mortar interior ballistic (3D-MIB) code for a 120mm mortar system and its stage-wise validation with multiple sets of experimental data. The 120mm mortar system consists of a flash tube contained within an ignition cartridge, tail-boom, fin region, charge increments containing granular propellants, and a projectile payload. The ignition cartridge discharges hot gas-phase products and unburned granular propellants into the mortar tube through vent-holes on its surface. In view of the complexity of interior ballistic processes in the mortar propulsion system, the overall problem was solved in a modular fashion, i.e., simulating each physical component of the mortar propulsion system separately. These modules were coupled together with appropriate initial and boundary conditions. The ignition cartridge and mortar tube contain nitrocellulose-based ball propellants. Therefore, the gas dynamical processes in the 120mm mortar system are two-phase, which were simulated by considering both phases as an interpenetrating continuum. Mass and energy fluxes from the flash tube into the granular bed of ignition cartridge were determined from a semi-empirical technique. For the tail-boom section, a transient one-dimensional two-phase compressible flow solver based on method of characteristics was developed. The mathematical model for the interior ballistic processes in the mortar tube posed an initial value problem with discontinuous initial conditions with the characteristics of the Riemann problem due to the discontinuity of the initial conditions. Therefore, the mortar tube model was solved

  15. Hydrogeologic controls on saturation profiles in heat-pipe-like hydrothermal systems: numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervin, Mollika; Ghergut, Iulia; Graf, Thomas; Peche, Aaron

    2016-04-01

    work, we explore some mechanisms and geologic controls that can lead to the formation of extensive vapor-dominated zones within a two-phase system. In particular, we investigate the effect of vertical heterogeneity of permeability (stratified reservoir, containing a permeability barrier) on the liquid water saturation profile within a modified HP model. Though in field observations liquid water has been directly encountered only within the condensation zone at reservoir top, it was speculated that large amounts of liquid water might also exist below the condensation zone. This is of great practical significance to the exploitation of vapor-dominated reservoirs, as their longevity depends on the fluid reserves in place. Within this work, we demonstrate by numerical simulations of a modified HP model that high values of liquid water saturation (>0.8) can prevail even far below the condensation zone. Such findings are useful as a baseline for future calculations regarding the economic exploitation of vapor-dominated systems, where premature productivity drop (or dry-out) is the main issue of concern. References: Eastman, G. Y:, 1968: The heat pipe. Scientific American, 218(5):38-46. Preuss, K. A., 1985: A quantitative model of vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs as heat pipes in fractured porous rock, Transactions, Geothermal Resources. Council, 9(2), 353-361. Truesdell, A. H., and White, D.E. 1973: Production of superheated Steam from Vapor- dominated geothermal reservoirs. Geothermics, 2(3-4), 154-173

  16. OCReP: An Optimally Conditioned Regularization for pseudoinversion based neural training.

    PubMed

    Cancelliere, Rossella; Gai, Mario; Gallinari, Patrick; Rubini, Luca

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we consider the training of single hidden layer neural networks by pseudoinversion, which, in spite of its popularity, is sometimes affected by numerical instability issues. Regularization is known to be effective in such cases, so that we introduce, in the framework of Tikhonov regularization, a matricial reformulation of the problem which allows us to use the condition number as a diagnostic tool for identification of instability. By imposing well-conditioning requirements on the relevant matrices, our theoretical analysis allows the identification of an optimal value for the regularization parameter from the standpoint of stability. We compare with the value derived by cross-validation for overfitting control and optimization of the generalization performance. We test our method for both regression and classification tasks. The proposed method is quite effective in terms of predictivity, often with some improvement on performance with respect to the reference cases considered. This approach, due to analytical determination of the regularization parameter, dramatically reduces the computational load required by many other techniques. PMID:26318638

  17. Various Numerical Applications on Tropical Convective Systems Using a Cloud Resolving Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shie, C.-L.; Tao, W.-K.; Simpson, J.

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, increasing attention has been given to cloud resolving models (CRMs or cloud ensemble models-CEMs) for their ability to simulate the radiative-convective system, which plays a significant role in determining the regional heat and moisture budgets in the Tropics. The growing popularity of CRM usage can be credited to its inclusion of crucial and physically relatively realistic features such as explicit cloud-scale dynamics, sophisticated microphysical processes, and explicit cloud-radiation interaction. On the other hand, impacts of the environmental conditions (for example, the large-scale wind fields, heat and moisture advections as well as sea surface temperature) on the convective system can also be plausibly investigated using the CRMs with imposed explicit forcing. In this paper, by basically using a Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model, three different studies on tropical convective systems are briefly presented. Each of these studies serves a different goal as well as uses a different approach. In the first study, which uses more of an idealized approach, the respective impacts of the large-scale horizontal wind shear and surface fluxes on the modeled tropical quasi-equilibrium states of temperature and water vapor are examined. In this 2-D study, the imposed large-scale horizontal wind shear is ideally either nudged (wind shear maintained strong) or mixed (wind shear weakened), while the minimum surface wind speed used for computing surface fluxes varies among various numerical experiments. For the second study, a handful of real tropical episodes (TRMM Kwajalein Experiment - KWAJEX, 1999; TRMM South China Sea Monsoon Experiment - SCSMEX, 1998) have been simulated such that several major atmospheric characteristics such as the rainfall amount and its associated stratiform contribution, the Qlheat and Q2/moisture budgets are investigated. In this study, the observed large-scale heat and moisture advections are continuously applied to the 2-D

  18. Numerical Comparison of Artificial Recharge by Small-diameter Wells to Common Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Händel, F.; Liu, G.; Dietrich, P.; Liedl, R.; Fank, J.; Fank, A.; Butler, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Scarcity of potable water has reached to a critical level all around the world. To address the temporal inequality of demand and availability of water resources, as well as additional purposes like enhancing water quality, artificial recharge is increasingly used. For shallow infiltration, such recharge methods as surface infiltration basins and trenches are commonly applied. However, these methods have significant disadvantages, e.g., enhanced clogging, evaporation, and an increased need of land use. Therefore, a new method for artificial recharge using shallow small-diameter wells is investigated. Such wells can be installed by Direct Push (DP) and water is allowed to infiltrate into aquifers by natural gravity, so that their installation and operation costs are very low. In this work, this method is compared numerically to a surface infiltration basin and a system applying horizontal filter pipes. For this, the work is divided into two parts. First, a rigorous comparison is done between the DP well and the infiltration basin. The simulated aquifer is composed of an unsaturated zone of 12 m and a saturated zone of 8 m. The results show the dependency of both methods on different components of the hydraulic conductivity, and highlight the advantages of the DP well over the basin. A small number of 5-cm shallow wells of 12 m length can be used to recharge water at the same infiltration rate as from a 60 m2 basin. When a layer of low hydraulic conductivity is present, the infiltration capacity of surface basins is significantly reduced while the adverse impacts on the wells are less pronounced due to the horizontal flow above the low conductivity layer (larger distance of water movement away from the screen). In the second part of this work, the DP wells will be compared to an operating horizontal, vadose zone artificial recharge system in Southern Styria, Austria. The water table is 3 m deep and horizontal filter pipes are used to recharge water into the shallow

  19. Thermal history of the Acoculco geothermal system, eastern Mexico: Insights from numerical modeling and radiocarbon dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canet, Carles; Trillaud, Frederic; Prol-Ledesma, Rosa María; González-Hernández, Galia; Peláez, Berenice; Hernández-Cruz, Berenice; Sánchez-Córdova, María M.

    2015-10-01

    Acoculco is a geothermal prospective area hosted by a volcanic caldera complex in the eastern Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. Surface manifestations are scarce and consist of gas discharges (CO2-rich) and acid-sulfate springs of low temperature, whereas hydrothermal explosive activity is profusely manifested by meter-scale craters and mounds of hydrothermal debris and breccias. Silicic alteration extends for several square kilometers around the zone with gas manifestations and explosive features, affecting surficial volcanic rocks, primarily tuffs and breccias. In the subsurface, an argillic alteration zone (ammonium illite) extends down to a depth of ∼ 600 m, and underneath it a propylitic zone (epidote-calcite-chlorite) occurs down to ∼ 1000 m. Thermal logs from an exploratory borehole (EAC-1, drilled in 1995 down to 1810 m) showed a conductive heat transfer regime under high geothermal gradient (∼ 140 °C/1000 m). In contrast, the thermal profile established from temperatures of homogenization of fluid inclusions-measured on core samples from the same drill hole-suggests that convection occurred in the past through the upper ~ 1400 m of the geothermal system. A drop in permeability due to the precipitation of alteration minerals would have triggered the cessation of the convective heat transfer regime to give place to a conductive one. With the purpose of determining when the transition of heat transfer regime occurred, we developed a 1D model that simulates the time-depth distribution of temperature. According to our numerical simulations, this transition happened ca. 7000 years ago; this date is very recent compared to the lifespan of the geothermal system. In addition, radiocarbon chronology indicates that the hydrothermal explosive activity postdates the end of the convective heat transfer regime, having dated at least three explosive events, at 4867-5295, 1049-1417 and 543-709 y cal. BP. Therefore, hydrothermal explosions arise from the self-sealing of

  20. Numerical Study of Virtual Cathode Behavior in Vacuum Collective Ion Acceleration Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossmann, John Mark

    The behavior of an intense relativistic beam of electrons injected into a cylindrical conducting drift tube is investigated with the aid of an electrostatic simulation code. The relevance of such a study is in linear beam, evacuated drift tube systems where high energy ions are observed when the beam interacts with a source of ions. In our numerical study, the beam's motion is assumed to be purely one dimensional; however, the electric field is solved in two dimensions using special "method of lines" techniques. One of the two principal techniques is developed to accurately resolve the extreme local gradients in charge density and potential existing in the drift tube. It is a Galerkin solution of Poisson's equation on a non-uniform mesh and has an operations count of O(N('2)) and convergence rate in energy norm of O(1/N). The other O(N log(,N)N) technique uses FFT methods on a uniform mesh and converges in uniform norm O(1/N('2)). It is found that when the injected current of the beam is above a threshold or limiting value the beam-drift tube system reacts by abruptly forming a dense clump of electrons near the injection end of the tube. This clump prevents the steady flow of electrons downstream and is called a virtual cathode (VC). A detailed picture of the VC formation process is provided by our simulations, together with a display of the dynamic behavior of the VC at various injection currents and parameter regimes. The VC oscillates in well depth and position at about the plasma frequency of the dense clump of electrons. The potential at the clump oscillates between (phi)(,0) and 1.6 (phi)(,0) where (phi)(,0) is the energy of the injected electrons. In addition, the VC sprays a group of electrons downstream every plasma period in such a manner that the average current associated with the stream is close to the limiting current. Peak electric fields at the anode are in the range 200-600 MV/m for our system parameters. Finally, a preliminary investigation is

  1. Three-dimensional transient numerical simulation for intake process in the engine intake port-valve-cylinder system.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ma-Ji; Chen, Guo-Hua; Ma, Yuan-Hao

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a KIVA-3 code based numerical model for three-dimensional transient intake flow in the intake port-valve-cylinder system of internal combustion engine using body-fitted technique, which can be used in numerical study on internal combustion engine with vertical and inclined valves, and has higher calculation precision. A numerical simulation (on the intake process of a two-valve engine with a semi-sphere combustion chamber and a radial intake port) is provided for analysis of the velocity field and pressure field of different plane at different crank angles. The results revealed the formation of the tumble motion, the evolution of flow field parameters and the variation of tumble ratios as important information for the design of engine intake system. PMID:12765285

  2. Post audit of a numerical prediction of wellfield drawdown in a semiconfined aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, M.; Langevin, C.

    1999-01-01

    A numerical ground water flow model was created in 1978 and revised in 1981 to predict the drawdown effects of a proposed municipal wellfield permitted to withdraw 30 million gallons per day (mgd; 1.1 x 105 m3/day) of water from the semiconfined Floridan Aquifer system. The predictions are based on the assumption that water levels in the semiconfined Floridan Aquifer reach a long-term, steady-state condition within a few days of initiation of pumping. Using this assumption, a 75 day simulation without water table recharge, pumping at the maximum permitted rates, was considered to represent a worst-case condition and the greatest drawdowns that could be experienced during wellfield operation. This method of predicting wellfield effects was accepted by the permitting agency. For this post audit, observed drawdowns were derived by taking the difference between pre-pumping and post-pumping potentiometric surface levels. Comparison of predicted and observed drawdowns suggests that actual drawdown over a 12 year period exceeds predicted drawdown by a factor of two or more. Analysis of the source of error in the 1981 predictions suggests that the values used for transmissivity, storativity, specific yield, and leakance are reasonable at the wellfield scale. Simulation using actual 1980-1992 pumping rates improves the agreement between predicted and observed drawdowns. The principal source of error is the assumption that water levels in a semiconfined aquifer achieve a steady-state condition after a few days or weeks of pumping. Simulations using a version of the 1981 model modified to include recharge and evapotranspiration suggest that it can take hundreds of days or several years for water levels in the linked Surficial and Floridan Aquifers to reach an apparent steady-state condition, and that slow declines in levels continue for years after the initiation of pumping. While the 1981 'impact' model can be used for reasonably predicting short-term, wellfield

  3. Enrichment of Bibliographic Records of Online Catalogs through OCR and SGML Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peis, Eduardo; Fernandez-Molina, J. Carlos

    1998-01-01

    Presents research on using scanner technology to capture the contents pages of collective monographs, extract bibliographic information, and process this information with a standardized language, such as SGML, for tagging electronic documents. Results confirmed the feasibility of developing a system to automatically enrich records in online…

  4. The Coupling of the Numerical Heat Transfer Model of the Pauzhetka Hydrothermal System (Kamchatka, USSR) with Hydroisotopic Data

    SciTech Connect

    Kiryukhin, A.V.; Sugrobov, V.M.

    1986-01-21

    The application of the two-dimensional numerical heat-transfer model to the Pauzhetka hydrothermal system allowed us to establish that: (1) a shallow magma body with the anomalous temperature of 700-1000 C and with a volume of 20-30 km{sup 3} may be a heat source for the formation of the Pauzhetka hydrothermal system. (2) The water feeding source of the Pauzhetka hydrothermal system may be meteoric waters which are infiltrated at an average rate of 5-10 kg/s {center_dot} km{sup 2}. The coupling of the numerical heat-transfer model with hydroisotopic data (D,T,{sup 18}O) obtained from the results of testing of exploitation wells, rivers and springs is the basis to understand more clearly the position of recharge areas and the structure of water flows in the hydrothermal system.

  5. A Roe-like numerical method for weakly hyperbolic systems of equations in conservation and non-conservation form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Timothy A.; Petty, David J.; Pantano, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    We describe a scheme for the numerical approximation of uniformly or locally weakly hyperbolic systems of equations in conservation and non-conservation forms. The strategy focuses on generalizations of the Roe scheme for non-conservation systems that can be considered as upstream differencing discretizations. The present work explicitly treats an advection matrix that is not diagonalizable by extending previous ideas that introduce a perturbation into the weakly hyperbolic problem to convert it to a nearby strongly hyperbolic problem. The perturbative expansion allows one to identify and remove the terms that would otherwise result in an apparent singularity and isolate the regular part of the numerical method. The performance of the method is showcased for uniformly and locally weakly hyperbolic systems in one and two dimensions. Generalization to higher dimensional systems can be performed by following the usual practice of dimension-by-dimension splitting.

  6. Development of numerical simulation system for thermal-hydraulic analysis in fuel assembly of sodium-cooled fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Uwaba, Tomoyuki; Hashimoto, Akihiko; Imai, Yasutomo; Ito, Masahiro

    2015-12-01

    A numerical simulation system, which consists of a deformation analysis program and three kinds of thermal-hydraulics analysis programs, is being developed in Japan Atomic Energy Agency in order to offer methodologies to clarify thermal-hydraulic phenomena in fuel assemblies of sodium-cooled fast reactors under various operating conditions. This paper gives the outline of the system and its applications to fuel assembly analyses as a validation study.

  7. Development of numerical simulation system for thermal-hydraulic analysis in fuel assembly of sodium-cooled fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Uwaba, Tomoyuki; Hashimoto, Akihiko; Imai, Yasutomo; Ito, Masahiro

    2015-12-31

    A numerical simulation system, which consists of a deformation analysis program and three kinds of thermal-hydraulics analysis programs, is being developed in Japan Atomic Energy Agency in order to offer methodologies to clarify thermal-hydraulic phenomena in fuel assemblies of sodium-cooled fast reactors under various operating conditions. This paper gives the outline of the system and its applications to fuel assembly analyses as a validation study.

  8. Comparison of numeric keyboard and CRT line-labeled buttons for information access. [in computerized, area navigation system for aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D.

    1976-01-01

    Test were conducted to determine whether differences in speed and accuracy are experienced when using either line-labeled index buttons or a numeric keyboard for page selection in airborne CRT-display area navigation systems. The experiment was conducted with six airline pilots, each flying the same two simulated RNAV routes. Three pilot subjects used line-labeled buttons adjacent to the CRT screen, while three used a numeric keyboard for page access. The hypothesis of no differences in response times between the two modes of access could not be rejected.

  9. Numerical Simulations of Two Wildfire Events Using a Combined Modeling System (HIGRAD/BEHAVE)

    SciTech Connect

    Reisner, J.; Bossert, J.; Winterkamp, J.

    1997-12-31

    The ability to accurately forecast the spread of a wildfire would significantly reduce human suffering and loss of life, the destruction of property, and expenditures for assessment and recovery. To help achieve this goal we have developed a model which accurately simulates the interactions between winds and the heat source associated with a wildfire. We have termed our new model HIGRAD or High resolution model for strong GRA-Dient applications. HIGRAD employs a sophisticated numerical technique to prevent numerical Oscillations from occurring in the vicinity of the lire. Of importance for fire modeling, HIGRAD uses a numerical technique which allows for the use of a compressible equation set, but without the time-step restrictions associated with the propagation of sound-waves.

  10. Numerical Zooming Between a NPSS Engine System Simulation and a One-Dimensional High Compressor Analysis Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Follen, Gregory; auBuchon, M.

    2000-01-01

    Within NASA's High Performance Computing and Communication (HPCC) program, NASA Glenn Research Center is developing an environment for the analysis/design of aircraft engines called the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS). NPSS focuses on the integration of multiple disciplines such as aerodynamics, structures, and heat transfer along with the concept of numerical zooming between zero-dimensional to one-, two-, and three-dimensional component engine codes. In addition, the NPSS is refining the computing and communication technologies necessary to capture complex physical processes in a timely and cost-effective manner. The vision for NPSS is to create a "numerical test cell" enabling full engine simulations overnight on cost-effective computing platforms. Of the different technology areas that contribute to the development of the NPSS Environment, the subject of this paper is a discussion on numerical zooming between a NPSS engine simulation and higher fidelity representations of the engine components (fan, compressor, burner, turbines, etc.). What follows is a description of successfully zooming one-dimensional (row-by-row) high-pressure compressor analysis results back to a zero-dimensional NPSS engine simulation and a discussion of the results illustrated using an advanced data visualization tool. This type of high fidelity system-level analysis, made possible by the zooming capability of the NPSS, will greatly improve the capability of the engine system simulation and increase the level of virtual test conducted prior to committing the design to hardware.

  11. Numerical methods for stiff systems of two-point boundary value problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flaherty, J. E.; Omalley, R. E., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Numerical procedures are developed for constructing asymptotic solutions of certain nonlinear singularly perturbed vector two-point boundary value problems having boundary layers at one or both endpoints. The asymptotic approximations are generated numerically and can either be used as is or to furnish a general purpose two-point boundary value code with an initial approximation and the nonuniform computational mesh needed for such problems. The procedures are applied to a model problem that has multiple solutions and to problems describing the deformation of thin nonlinear elastic beam that is resting on an elastic foundation.

  12. Numerical simulations for tumor and cellular immune system interactions in lung cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolev, M.; Nawrocki, S.; Zubik-Kowal, B.

    2013-06-01

    We investigate a new mathematical model that describes lung cancer regression in patients treated by chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The model is composed of nonlinear integro-differential equations derived from the so-called kinetic theory for active particles and a new sink function is investigated according to clinical data from carcinoma planoepitheliale. The model equations are solved numerically and the data are utilized in order to find their unknown parameters. The results of the numerical experiments show a good correlation between the predicted and clinical data and illustrate that the mathematical model has potential to describe lung cancer regression.

  13. Conceptual and numerical models of the glacial aquifer system north of Aberdeen, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marini, Katrina A.; Hoogestraat, Galen K.; Aurand, Katherine R.; Putnam, Larry D.

    2012-01-01

    This U.S. Geological Survey report documents a conceptual and numerical model of the glacial aquifer system north of Aberdeen, South Dakota, that can be used to evaluate and manage the city of Aberdeen's water resources. The glacial aquifer system in the model area includes the Elm, Middle James, and Deep James aquifers, with intervening confining units composed of glacial till. The Elm aquifer ranged in thickness from less than 1 to about 95 feet (ft), with an average thickness of about 24 ft; the Middle James aquifer ranged in thickness from less than 1 to 91 ft, with an average thickness of 13 ft; and the Deep James aquifer ranged in thickness from less than 1 to 165 ft, with an average thickness of 23 ft. The confining units between the aquifers consisted of glacial till and ranged in thickness from 0 to 280 ft. The general direction of groundwater flow in the Elm aquifer in the model area was from northwest to southeast following the topography. Groundwater flow in the Middle James aquifer was to the southeast. Sparse data indicated a fairly flat potentiometric surface for the Deep James aquifer. Horizontal hydraulic conductivity for the Elm aquifer determined from aquifer tests ranged from 97 to 418 feet per day (ft/d), and a confined storage coefficient was determined to be 2.4x10-5. Estimates of the vertical hydraulic conductivity of the sediments separating the Elm River from the Elm aquifer, determined from the analysis of temperature gradients, ranged from 0.14 to 2.48 ft/d. Average annual precipitation in the model area was 19.6 inches per year (in/yr), and agriculture was the primary land use. Recharge to the Elm aquifer was by infiltration of precipitation through overlying outwash, lake sediments, and glacial till. The annual recharge for the model area, calculated by using a soil-water-balance method for water year (WY) 1975-2009, ranged from 0.028 inch in WY 1980 to 4.52 inches in WY 1986, with a mean of 1.56 inches. The annual potential

  14. Numerical techniques for electromagnetic applications in microelectronic and radar imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akerson, Jerome J.

    1998-12-01

    In this thesis, the application of numerical techniques to electromagnetic problems in microelectronic and radar imaging systems are investigated. In particular the following problems are studied: (1) Dielectric rib waveguide discontinuities are analyzed with the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method. The application of Berenger's Perfectly Matched Layer to multi-layered dielectrics is analyzed and the specific conditions needed to successfully match the multiple dielectric layers are determined and justified. An FDTD method to find the fundamental mode's spatial distribution is used to excite the discontinuity problem. It is shown that the computational domain can be reduced by twenty percent over Gaussian excitations. The effects of rib waveguide bend discontinuities and the effects of the rib geometry to the bend loss are presented. (2) An Impedance Boundary Condition (IBC) for two dimensional FDTD simulations containing thin, good conductor sheets is developed. The IBC uses a recursive convolution scheme based on approximating the conductor's impedance as a sum of exponentials. The effects of FDTD parameters such as grid size and time step on simulation accuracy are presented. The IBC is shown to accurately model the conductor loss over a wide frequency range. The verification is performed by comparing the quality factors of rectangular resonant structures determined by the FDTD simulation and analytical methods. (3) Phase unwrapping techniques for the inversion of terrain height using Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) data are analyzed. The weighted least squares and branch cut phase unwrapping techniques are specifically studied. An optimal branch cut method and a hybrid least squares/branch cut method are presented and used to unwrap the phase of both simulated and real SAR interferograms. When used to invert terrain height, these new SAR phase unwrapping methods offer over fifty percent reduction in root mean square (rms) height error

  15. Numerical simulations and analyses of mesoscale convective systems during MC3E with data assimilation at a convective permitting scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Z.; Lin, C.; Wei, L.

    2012-12-01

    Our previous studies demonstrate that assimilation of surface mesonet observations and atmospheric profiles results in improved numerical simulations and predictability of mesoscale convective systems and their related atmospheric boundary layer conditions. In this study, numerical simulations of mesoscale convective systems observed during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign are conducted with the mesoscale community Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model at a convective permitting scale. First, five time periods, with convective systems evolved are identified over the Oklahoma-Kansas area. High-resolution numerical simulations are conducted with the WRF model for those five periods. A multiple-level nested domain technique is used to achieve the cloud-permitting scale simulation. Specifically, the model domains are set up for 3 nested domains with horizontal resolutions at 12 km, 4 km and 1.33 km, respectively. The model initial and boundary conditions are derived from the NCEP Northern American Mesoscale model (NAM) analysis. Results show that the WRF model reproduces the convective initiations and relatively reasonable evolution of those convective systems during most of the simulation periods, although errors are present in all numerical simulations when compared the model simulated convective initiation time, location and quantitative precipitation with observations. As an early investigation, sensitivity of numerical simulations of mesoscale convective systems to WRF model physical parameterization schemes is examined. For the cases during 12 UTC 19 May to 12 UTC 21 May 2011, it is found that the numerical simulation results are very sensitive to the choice of microphysical schemes in the WRF model. However, even with the best numerical simulation, errors are still found in terms of the prediction of convective initiation time, location and quantitative precipitation, indicating the need for data assimilation

  16. Holographic velocimetry using object-conjugate reconstruction (OCR): a new approach for simultaneous, 3D displacement measurement in fluid and solid mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhart, D. H.; Chan, V. S. S.; Halliwell, N. A.; Coupland, J. M.

    2002-08-01

    This paper reports on a new form of holographic metrology that enables displacement measurement in both fluid and solid mechanics simultaneously. In such instances, existing holographic methods for displacement measurement would require the application of multiple techniques in a hybrid fashion. Known as object-conjugate reconstruction (OCR), our new approach unifies the disciplines of holographic velocimetry and holographic interferometry. Using complex correlation processing, it provides a sub-wavelength resolution for all three components of displacement and enables automated data extraction at selected points throughout a volume in space.

  17. Numerical study of a Vlasov equation for systems with interacting particles

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, Dianela; Curilef, Sergio

    2015-03-10

    We solve numerically the Vlasov equation for the self-gravitating sheet model. We used the method introduced by Cheng and Knorr [Comput Phys 22, 330-351 (1976)]. We discuss the quasi-stationary state for some thermodynamical observables, specifically the kinetic energy, whose trend is depicted for early evolution.

  18. Colloquial Gender Neutralization in the Numeral Systems of Modern Hebrew and Lebanese Arabic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolozky, Shmuel; Haydar, Adnan F.

    1986-01-01

    A review of literature and research of some linguistic theories illustrates how gender neutralization in absolute numbers in Hebrew and Lebanese Arabic can more appropriately be accounted for by the rhythmic characteristics of the numeral set as recited in sequence. (CB)

  19. Some numerical methods for integrating systems of first-order ordinary differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, N. W.

    1969-01-01

    Report on numerical methods of integration includes the extrapolation methods of Bulirsch-Stoer and Neville. A comparison is made nith the Runge-Kutta and Adams-Moulton methods, and circumstances are discussed under which the extrapolation method may be preferred.

  20. Continuous wave synthetic low-coherence wind sensing Lidar: motionless measurement system with subsequent numerical range scanning.

    PubMed

    Brinkmeyer, Ernst; Waterholter, Thomas

    2013-01-28

    A continuous wave (CW) Lidar system for detection of scattering from atmospheric aerosol particles is presented which is useful in particular for remote sensing of wind velocities. It is based on a low-coherence interferometric setup powered by a synthetic broadband laser source with Gaussian power density spectrum. The laser bandwidth is electronically adjustable and determines the spatial resolution which is independent of range. The Lidar system has no moving parts. The location to be resolved can be shifted numerically after the measurement meaning that a single measurement already contains the full range information. The features of constant resolution and numerical range scanning are in sharp contrast to ordinary CW Lidar systems. PMID:23389172

  1. ON THE ROLE OF DISKS IN THE FORMATION OF STELLAR SYSTEMS: A NUMERICAL PARAMETER STUDY OF RAPID ACCRETION

    SciTech Connect

    Kratter, Kaitlin M.; Matzner, Christopher D.; Krumholz, Mark R.; Klein, Richard I.

    2010-01-10

    We study rapidly accreting, gravitationally unstable disks with a series of idealized global, numerical experiments using the code ORION. Our numerical parameter study focuses on protostellar disks, showing that one can predict disk behavior and the multiplicity of the accreting star system as a function of two dimensionless parameters which compare the infall rate to the disk sound speed and orbital period. Although gravitational instabilities become strong, we find that fragmentation into binary or multiple systems occurs only when material falls in several times more rapidly than the canonical isothermal limit. The disk-to-star accretion rate is proportional to the infall rate and governed by gravitational torques generated by low-m spiral modes. We also confirm the existence of a maximum stable disk mass: disks that exceed approx50% of the total system mass are subject to fragmentation and the subsequent formation of binary companions.

  2. Automated synthesis of both the topology and numerical parameters for seven patented optical lens systems using genetic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Lee W.; Al-Sakran, Sameer H.; Koza, John R.

    2005-08-01

    This paper describes how genetic programming was used as an automated invention machine to synthesize both the topology and numerical parameters for seven previously patented optical lens systems, including one aspherical system and one issued in the 21st-century. Two of the evolved optical lens systems infringe the claims of the patents and the others are novel solutions that satisfy the design goals stated in the patent. The automatic synthesis was done "from scratch"--that is, without starting from a pre-existing good design and without pre-specifying the number of lenses, the topological layout of the lenses, or the numerical parameters of the lenses. Genetic programming is a form of evolutionary computation used to automatically solve problems. It starts from a high-level statement of what needs to be done and progressively breeds a population of candidate individuals over many generations using the principle of Darwinian natural selection and genetic recombination. The paper describes how genetic programming created eyepieces that duplicated the functionality of seven previously patented lens systems. The seven designs were created in a substantially similar and routine way, suggesting that the use of genetic programming in the automated design of both the topology and numerical parameters for optical lens systems may have widespread utility.

  3. Numerical investigation of the triggering mechanisms of the Piz Dora sackung system (Val Mustair, Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riva, Federico; Agliardi, Federico; Crosta, Giovanni B.; Zanchi, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Deep-Seated Gravitational Slope Deformations (DSGSD) are widespread phenomena in alpine environments, where they affect entire high-relief valley flanks involving huge rock volumes. Slope scale inherited structures related to ductile and brittle tectonic deformation can control the onset and development of DSGSD and the localization of strain in deep gravitational shear zones. Slope unloading, rock mass damage and hydrological perturbations related to deglaciation are considered important triggers of these phenomena in formerly glaciated areas. Furthermore, earthquake shaking and the long-term effects of seismicity in active tectonic areas might provide an additional triggering component. Nevertheless, the role played by these different processes and their interplay is not obvious, especially in geological context less typically favourable to DSGSD and in low-magnitude seismicity settings as the axial European Alps. We analysed the Piz Dora sackung system (Val Mustair, Switzerland), which affects conglomerates, meta-conglomerates and phyllites of the Austroalpine S-Charl nappe, involved in a slope-scale, WNW trending closed anticline fold. The area is actively uplifting, seismically active (maximum Mw>5) and experienced extensive glaciation during the LGM. The slope is affected by sharp gravitational morphostructures associated to the deep-seated sliding of 1.85 km3 of rock along a basal shear zone up to 300 m deep (Agliardi et al., 2014; Barbarano et al., 2015). We investigated the controlling role of inherited tectonic features and the relative influence of different candidate triggering processes (post-glacial debuttressing, related changes in slope hydrology, seismicity) through a series of 2D Distinct Element (DEM) numerical models set up using the code UDEC (ItascaTM). Based on field structural and geomechanical data, we discretized the slope into an ensemble of discontinuum domains, accounting for the slope-scale folded structure and characterised by unique

  4. Investigation into a displacement bias in numerical weather prediction models' forecasts of mesoscale convective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yost, Charles

    Although often hard to correctly forecast, mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) are responsible for a majority of warm-season, localized extreme rain events. This study investigates displacement errors often observed by forecasters and researchers in the Global Forecast System (GFS) and the North American Mesoscale (NAM) models, in addition to the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) and the 4-km convection allowing NSSL-WRF models. Using archived radar data and Stage IV precipitation data from April to August of 2009 to 2011, MCSs were recorded and sorted into unique six-hour intervals. The locations of these MCSs were compared to the associated predicted precipitation field in all models using the Method for Object-Based Diagnostic Evaluation (MODE) tool, produced by the Developmental Testbed Center and verified through manual analysis. A northward bias exists in the location of the forecasts in all lead times of the GFS, NAM, and ECMWF models. The MODE tool found that 74%, 68%, and 65% of the forecasts were too far to the north of the observed rainfall in the GFS, NAM and ECMWF models respectively. The higher-resolution NSSL-WRF model produced a near neutral location forecast error with 52% of the cases too far to the south. The GFS model consistently moved the MCSs too quickly with 65% of the cases located to the east of the observed MCS. The mean forecast displacement error from the GFS and NAM were on average 266 km and 249 km, respectively, while the ECMWF and NSSL-WRF produced a much lower average of 179 km and 158 km. A case study of the Dubuque, IA MCS on 28 July 2011 was analyzed to identify the root cause of this bias. This MCS shattered several rainfall records and required over 50 people to be rescued from mobile home parks from around the area. This devastating MCS, which was a classic Training Line/Adjoining Stratiform archetype, had numerous northward-biased forecasts from all models, which are examined here. As common with

  5. Dynamics of the circulation in the Sea of Marmara: numerical modeling experiments and observations from the Turkish straits system experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiggiato, Jacopo; Jarosz, Ewa; Book, Jeffrey W.; Dykes, James; Torrisi, Lucio; Poulain, Pierre-Marie; Gerin, Riccardo; Horstmann, Jochen; Beşiktepe, Şükrü

    2012-01-01

    During September 2008 and February 2009, the NR/V Alliance extensively sampled the waters of the Sea of Marmara within the framework of the Turkish Straits System (TSS) experiment coordinated by the NATO Undersea Research Centre. The observational effort provided an opportunity to set up realistic numerical experiments for modeling the observed variability of the Marmara Sea upper layer circulation at mesoscale resolution over the entire basin during the trial period, complementing relevant features and forcing factors revealed by numerical model results with information acquired from in situ and remote sensing datasets. Numerical model solutions from realistic runs using the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) produce a general circulation in the Sea of Marmara that is consistent with previous knowledge of the circulation drawn from past hydrographic measurements, with a westward meandering current associated with a recurrent large anticyclone. Additional idealized numerical experiments illuminate the role various dynamics play in determining the Sea of Marmara circulation and pycnocline structure. Both the wind curl and the strait flows are found to strongly influence the strength and location of the main mesoscale features. Large displacements of the pycnocline depth were observed during the sea trials. These displacements can be interpreted as storm-driven upwelling/downwelling dynamics associated with northeasterly winds; however, lateral advection associated with flow from the Straits also played a role in some displacements.

  6. Numerical Simulations and Experiments about Contamination Mechanism of Solid Immersion Lens System Concerning Hole and Geometries of Lens Holder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Moon-Ho; Yang, Tae-Man; Rhim, Yoon-Chul; Seo, Jeong-Kyo; Choi, In-Ho; Min, Byung-Hoon

    2008-07-01

    The air flow field around a conical type solid immersion lens (SIL) system is simulated numerically and confirmed with experiment using a micro-particle image velocimetry (PIV) system. It is found that the back-flow from the downstream of the SIL is a major candidate for the contamination of the SIL. Five modifications are proposed to suppress the particle conveying mechanism, the back-flow. Among these modifications a method using two flow-bypasses reduces the back-flow most effectively, which connects the top surface of the SIL system and two side-holes of the lens holder where the static pressure is the minimum.

  7. Confronting Numerical Relativity With Nature: A model-independent characterization of binary black-hole systems in LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jani, Karan; Clark, James; Shoemaker, Deirdre; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Stellar and Intermediate mass binary black hole systems (10-1000 solar masses) are likely to be among the strongest sources of gravitational wave detection in Advanced LIGO. In this talk we discuss the prospects for the detection and characterization of these extreme astrophysical system using robust, morphology-independent analysis techniques. In particular, we demonstrate how numerical relativity simulations of black hole collisions may be combined with waveform reconstructions to constrain properties of a binary black-hole system using only exact solutions from general relativity and any potential gravitational wave signal in the data.

  8. Verifying the error bound of numerical computation implemented in computer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, Jun

    2013-03-12

    A verification tool receives a finite precision definition for an approximation of an infinite precision numerical function implemented in a processor in the form of a polynomial of bounded functions. The verification tool receives a domain for verifying outputs of segments associated with the infinite precision numerical function. The verification tool splits the domain into at least two segments, wherein each segment is non-overlapping with any other segment and converts, for each segment, a polynomial of bounded functions for the segment to a simplified formula comprising a polynomial, an inequality, and a constant for a selected segment. The verification tool calculates upper bounds of the polynomial for the at least two segments, beginning with the selected segment and reports the segments that violate a bounding condition.

  9. Automation of the process of speech signal segmentation in an analogic-numeric system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domagala, P.

    Eighteen Polish words uttered by 12 voices (7 male and 5 female) were taperecorded and analyzed by computer. Numeric analysis of the dynamic spectrum was implemented using an algorithm composed of simple logical sentences on the MERA 303 minicomputer. Compared with the visual segmentation achieved in the spectrographic computer images, correctness of segmentation reached a level of about 94 percent. No differences were found in quality of segmentation between male and female utterances.

  10. Mathematical and Numerical Analysis of Model Equations on Interactions of the HIV/AIDS Virus and the Immune System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parumasur, N.; Willie, R.

    2008-09-01

    We consider a simple HIV/AIDs finite dimensional mathematical model on interactions of the blood cells, the HIV/AIDs virus and the immune system for consistence of the equations to the real biomedical situation that they model. A better understanding to a cure solution to the illness modeled by the finite dimensional equations is given. This is accomplished through rigorous mathematical analysis and is reinforced by numerical analysis of models developed for real life cases.

  11. Common Analysis Tool Being Developed for Aeropropulsion: The National Cycle Program Within the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Follen, Gregory J.; Naiman, Cynthia G.

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center is developing an environment for analyzing and designing aircraft engines-the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS). NPSS will integrate multiple disciplines, such as aerodynamics, structure, and heat transfer, and will make use of numerical "zooming" on component codes. Zooming is the coupling of analyses at various levels of detail. NPSS uses the latest computing and communication technologies to capture complex physical processes in a timely, cost-effective manner. The vision of NPSS is to create a "numerical test cell" enabling full engine simulations overnight on cost-effective computing platforms. Through the NASA/Industry Cooperative Effort agreement, NASA Lewis and industry partners are developing a new engine simulation called the National Cycle Program (NCP). NCP, which is the first step toward NPSS and is its initial framework, supports the aerothermodynamic system simulation process for the full life cycle of an engine. U.S. aircraft and airframe companies recognize NCP as the future industry standard common analysis tool for aeropropulsion system modeling. The estimated potential payoff for NCP is a $50 million/yr savings to industry through improved engineering productivity.

  12. Numerical study of mountain system evolution along the Tarim-Altay profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suvorov, V. D.; Stefanov, Yu. P.; Pavlov, E. V.; Kochnev, V. A.; Melnik, E. A.; Tataurova, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    The paper reports the numerical modeling results on the Earth's crust deformation along the Tarim-Altay profile under gravity and lateral compression. Modeling was performed to study how the strength properties and block structure of the crust section influence the formation of plastic deformation zones, day surface relief and the Moho deflection. Conditions were estimated in which mountains grow under certain geological and geophysical characteristics, including mountain root formation. The deformation process was considered in a 2D elastic-plastic formulation for the vertical section of the crust and upper mantle down to a depth of 90 km.

  13. A numerical study of crack initiation in a bcc iron system based on dynamic bifurcation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiantao

    2014-10-28

    Crack initiation under dynamic loading conditions is studied under the framework of dynamic bifurcation theory. An atomistic model for BCC iron is considered to explicitly take into account the detailed molecular interactions. To understand the strain-rate dependence of the crack initiation process, we first obtain the bifurcation diagram from a computational procedure using continuation methods. The stability transition associated with a crack initiation, as well as the connection to the bifurcation diagram, is studied by comparing direct numerical results to the dynamic bifurcation theory [R. Haberman, SIAM J. Appl. Math. 37, 69–106 (1979)].

  14. A numerical study of crack initiation in a bcc iron system based on dynamic bifurcation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiantao

    2014-10-01

    Crack initiation under dynamic loading conditions is studied under the framework of dynamic bifurcation theory. An atomistic model for BCC iron is considered to explicitly take into account the detailed molecular interactions. To understand the strain-rate dependence of the crack initiation process, we first obtain the bifurcation diagram from a computational procedure using continuation methods. The stability transition associated with a crack initiation, as well as the connection to the bifurcation diagram, is studied by comparing direct numerical results to the dynamic bifurcation theory [R. Haberman, SIAM J. Appl. Math. 37, 69-106 (1979)].

  15. Numerical studies of the trapping of Frenkel excitons in one-dimensional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, D. L.; Ching, W. Y.

    1990-10-01

    Numerical studies of the trapping of Frenkel excitons on a one-dimensional lattice are reported. The effects of trapping are introduced through a non-Hermitian decay term in the Hamiltonian. Each of the traps, which are assumed to occupy interstitial positions, can receive excitation from a single center. The equations of motion for the exciton correlation functions of a finite array of centers are integrated to obtain the decay of the k = 0 mode and the probability of finding an exciton in any mode, following excitation of the k = 0 mode. Results for the latter are compared with the predictions of calculations by Hemenger and Pearlstein.

  16. Ballistic transport in planetary ring systems due to particle erosion mechanisms. I - Theory, numerical methods, and illustrative examples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durisen, Richard H.; Murphy, Brian W.; Cramer, Nichael Lynn; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Mullikin, Thomas L.

    1989-01-01

    Ballistic transport, defined as the net radial transport of mass and angular momentum due to exchanges of meteoroid hypersonic-impact ejecta by neighboring planetary ring regions on time-scales orders-of-magnitude shorter than the age of the solar system, is presently considered as a problem in mathematical physics. The preliminary results of a numerical scheme for following the combined effects of ballistic transport and viscous diffusion demonstrate that ballistic transport generates structure near sharp edges already present in the ring-mass distribution; the entire ring system ultimately develops an undulatory structure whose length scale is typically of the order of the radial excursion of the impact ejecta.

  17. Temperature and Pinning Effects on Driving a 2D Electron System on a Helium Film: A Numerical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damasceno, Pablo F.; Dasilva, Cláudio José; Rino, José Pedro; Cândido, Ladir

    2010-07-01

    Using numerical simulations we investigated the dynamic response to an externally driven force of a classical two-dimensional (2D) electron system on a helium film at finite temperatures. A potential barrier located at the center of the system behaves as a pinning center that results in an insulator state below a threshold driving force. We have found that the current-voltage characteristic obeys the scaling relation I= f ξ , with ξ ranging from ˜(1.0-1.7) for different pinning strengths and temperatures. Our results may be used to understand the spread range of ξ in experiments with typical characteristic of plastic depinning.

  18. Numerical simulation of systems of shear bands in ductile metal with inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plohr, JeeYeon N.; Plohr, Bradley J.

    2016-02-01

    We develop a method for numerical simulations of high strain-rate loading of mesoscale samples of ductile metal with inclusions. Because of its small-scale inhomogeneity, the composite material is prone to localized shear deformation (adiabatic shear bands). This method employs the Generalized Method of Cells of Paley and Aboudi [Mech. Materials, vol. 14, pp. 127-139, 1992] to ensure that the micro mechanical behavior of the metal and inclusions is reflected properly in the behavior of the composite at the mesoscale. To find the effective plastic strain rate when shear bands are present, we extend and apply the analytic and numerical analysis of shear bands of Glimm, Plohr, and Sharp [Mech. Materials, vol. 24, pp. 31-41, 1996]. Our tests of the method focus on the stress/strain response in uniaxial-strain flow, both compressive and tensile, of depleted uranium metal containing silicon carbide inclusions. We use the Preston-Tonks-Wallace viscoplasticity model [J. Appl. Phys., vol. 93, pp. 211-220, 2003], which applies to the high strain-rate regime of an isotropic viscoplastic solid. In results, we verify the elevated temperature and thermal softening at shear bands in our simulations of pure DU and DU/SiC composites. We also note that in composites, due the asymmetry caused by the inclusions, shear band form at different times in different subcells. In particular, in the subcells near inclusions, shear band form much earlier than they do in pure DU.

  19. On the numerical treatment of dissipative particle dynamics and related systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leimkuhler, Benedict; Shang, Xiaocheng

    2015-01-01

    We review and compare numerical methods that simultaneously control temperature while preserving the momentum, a family of particle simulation methods commonly used for the modelling of complex fluids and polymers. The class of methods considered includes dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) as well as extended stochastic-dynamics models incorporating a generalized pairwise thermostat scheme in which stochastic forces are eliminated and the coefficient of dissipation is treated as an additional auxiliary variable subject to a feedback (kinetic energy) control mechanism. In the latter case, we consider the addition of a coupling of the auxiliary variable, as in the Nosé-Hoover-Langevin (NHL) method, with stochastic dynamics to ensure ergodicity, and find that the convergence of ensemble averages is substantially improved. To this end, splitting methods are developed and studied in terms of their thermodynamic accuracy, two-point correlation functions, and convergence. In terms of computational efficiency as measured by the ratio of thermodynamic accuracy to CPU time, we report significant advantages in simulation for the pairwise NHL method compared to popular alternative schemes (up to an 80% improvement), without degradation of convergence rate. The momentum-conserving thermostat technique described here provides a consistent hydrodynamic model in the low-friction regime, but it will also be of use in both equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular simulation applications owing to its efficiency and simple numerical implementation.

  20. Numerical algorithms for the direct spectral transform with applications to nonlinear Schroedinger type systems

    SciTech Connect

    Burtsev, S.; Camassa, R.; Timofeyev, I.

    1998-11-20

    The authors implement two different algorithms for computing numerically the direct Zakharov-Shabat eigenvalue problem on the infinite line. The first algorithm replaces the potential in the eigenvalue problem by a piecewise-constant approximation, which allows one to solve analytically the corresponding ordinary differential equation. The resulting algorithm is of second order in the step size. The second algorithm uses the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. They test and compare the performance of these two algorithms on three exactly solvable potentials. They find that even though the Runge-Kutta method is of higher order, this extra accuracy can be lost because of the additional dependence of its numerical error on the eigenvalue. this limits the usefulness of the Runge-Kutta algorithm to a region inside the unit circle around the origin in the complex plane of the eigenvalues. For the computation of the continuous spectrum density, this limitation is particularly severe, as revealed by the spectral decomposition of the L{sup 2}-norm of a solution to the nonlinear Schroedinger equation. They show that no such limitations exist for the piecewise-constant algorithm. In particular, this scheme converges uniformly for both continuous and discrete spectrum components.

  1. Direct numerical simulation of fluid-particle mass, momentum, and heat tranfers in reactive systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammouti, Abdelkader; Wachs, Anthony

    2015-11-01

    Many industrial processes like coal combustion, catalytic cracking, gas phase polymerization reactors and more recently biomass gasification and chemical looping involve two-phase reactive flows in which the continuous phase is a fluid and the dispersed phase consists of rigid particles. Improving both the design and the operating conditions of these processes represents a major scientific and industrial challenge in a context of markedly rising energy cost and sustainable development. Thus, it is above all important to better understand the coupling of hydrodynamic, chemical and thermal phenomena in those flows in order to be able to predict them reliably. The aim of our work is to build up a multi-scale modelling approach of reactive particulate flows and at first to focus on the development of a microscopic-scale including heat and mass transfers and chemical reactions for the prediction of particle-laden flows in dense and dilute regimes. A first step is the upgrading and the validation of our numerical tools via analytical solutions or empirical correlations when it is feasible. These couplings are implemented in a massively parallel numerical code that already enable to take a step towards the enhanced design of semi-industrial processes.

  2. Numerical analysis on cavitation inception in the rotary valve of the power steering system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyeon Ryu, Gwang; Park, Sun Hong; Cho, Myung Hwan; Yoo, Jung Yul

    2009-11-01

    The power steering valve directs the power steering oil to either side of a power piston and relieves the driver of the effort to turn the wheel, when a driver begins to operate the vehicle. It is well known that hiss noise occurring at that moment is caused mainly by cavitation of the oil inside the rotary valve. However, it is very difficult to check the flow pattern and the cavitation inception experimentally because of the complex geometry and high pressure in the interior of the rotary valve. In spite of the increasing interest in this flow phenomenon inside the rotary valve, only few studies have been reported. In the present study, this complex oil flow inside the rotary valve has been analyzed numerically using three-dimensional cavitation model provided by the commercial code, FLUENT 6.2. It is confirmed that the location of cavitation inception is similar to that obtained by the existing two-dimensional numerical analysis. Then, the volume fraction of oil vapor has been compared with the hiss noise level measured experimentally in a semi-anechoic room.

  3. The Heinz Electronic Library Interactive Online System (HELIOS): Building a Digital Archive Using Imaging, OCR, and Natural Language Processing Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galloway, Edward A.; Michalek, Gabrielle V.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the conversion project of the congressional papers of Senator John Heinz into digital format and the provision of electronic access to these papers by Carnegie Mellon University. Topics include collection background, project team structure, document processing, scanning, use of optical character recognition software, verification…

  4. Real-time dynamics in electron-lattice coupled system: Numerical study on an extended double-exchange model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshibae, Wataru; Furukawa, Nobuo; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2013-03-01

    We have developed a new theoretical method to study the photo-induced insulator-to-metal (IM) transition in strongly correlated electron systems [PRL 103, 266402 ('09) EPL 94, 27003 ('11).]. In the manganese oxides, it has been observed that the photo-induced dynamics with several tens of THz in frequency can drive IM transition [Nature Materials 6, 643 ('07).]. The excitation energy with several tens of THz in frequency is fairly lower than the insulating energy gap of the electronic state. In this study, we introduce an extended double exchange model where the conduction electron couples with the orbital-ordering field and lattice distortion, and numerically examine the lattice vibration induced IM transition in the electron-lattice coupled system. To simplify the numerical calculation, the electronic states are restricted in the Hilbert space for perfect ferromagnetic states involving the ground state. In the numerical simulation, we find that the low frequency vibration of Jahn-Teller distortion can change the orbital-ordering pattern and trigger the IM transition. A threshold behavior of the lattice-vibration induced IM transition and the electron-hole excitation by continuous forced lattice-vibration are also examined.

  5. Path-Integral Renormalization Group Method for Numerical Study on Ground States of Strongly Correlated Electronic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashima, Tsuyoshi; Imada, Masatoshi

    2001-08-01

    A new efficient numerical algorithm for interacting fermion systems is proposed and examined in detail. The ground state is expressed approximately by a linear combination of numerically chosen basis states in a truncated Hilbert space. Two procedures lead to a better approximation. The first is a numerical renormalization, which optimizes the chosen basis and projects onto the ground state within the fixed dimension, L, of the Hilbert space. The second is an increase of the dimension of the truncated Hilbert space, which enables the linear combination to converge to a better approximation. The extrapolation L→∞ after the convergence removes the approximation error systematically. This algorithm does not suffer from the negative sign problem and can be applied to systems in any spatial dimension and arbitrary lattice structure. The efficiency is tested and the implementation explained for two-dimensional Hubbard models where Slater determinants are employed as chosen basis. Our results with less than 400 chosen basis indicate good accuracy within the errorbar of the best available results as those of the quantum Monte Carlo for energy and other physical quantities.

  6. Design of Dual band Modified Inverted F-Antenna for Military and Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) Applications by Numerical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Robiul; Karmokar, Debabrata Kumar

    2012-11-01

    A design of single feed Dual Band Modified Inverted F-Antenna (IFA) operating at 4.45 GHz (4.4-4.7GHz) and 5.9 GHz (5.850-5.925 GHz) has been proposed in this paper. The design is initiated by trial and error method of Numerical Analysis and method of moments (MoMís) in Numerical Electromagnetic code (NEC) is used to design, simulate and analyze this antenna. The results exhibit a proper operation of the antenna in terms of return loss, bandwidth, efficiency, VSWR, and gain at both bands. Proposed antenna is designed to achieve multi-serving purposes. Military applications and applications in the Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) are the most important applications within the above mentioned frequency bands respectively. The simulated results including performance parameters of antenna are presented and all are acceptable for the standard antennas.

  7. Use of numerically generated body-fitted coordinate systems for solution of the Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, J. F.; Mastin, C. W.; Thames, F. C.; Shanks, S. P.

    1975-01-01

    A procedure for numerical solution of the time-dependent, two-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations that can treat the unsteady laminar flow about bodies of arbitrary shape, such as two-dimensional airfoils, multiple airfoils, and submerged hydrofoils, as naturally as it can deal with the flow about simple bodies. The solution is based on a method of automatic numerical generation of a general curvilinear coordinate system with coordinate lines coincident with all boundaries of a general multiconnected region containing any number of arbitrarily shaped bodies. The curvilinear coordinates are generated as the solution of two elliptical partial differential equations with Dirichlet boundary conditions, one coordinate being specified to be constant on each of the boundaries, and a distribution of the other being specified along the boundaries. The solution compares excellently with the Blasius boundary layer solution for the flow past a semiinfinite flat plate.

  8. Space- and Time-Dependent Probabilities for Earthquake Fault Systems from Numerical Simulations: Feasibility Study and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Aalsburg, Jordan; Rundle, John B.; Grant, Lisa B.; Rundle, Paul B.; Yakovlev, Gleb; Turcotte, Donald L.; Donnellan, Andrea; Tiampo, Kristy F.; Fernandez, Jose

    2010-08-01

    In weather forecasting, current and past observational data are routinely assimilated into numerical simulations to produce ensemble forecasts of future events in a process termed "model steering". Here we describe a similar approach that is motivated by analyses of previous forecasts of the Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities (WGCEP). Our approach is adapted to the problem of earthquake forecasting using topologically realistic numerical simulations for the strike-slip fault system in California. By systematically comparing simulation data to observed paleoseismic data, a series of spatial probability density functions (PDFs) can be computed that describe the probable locations of future large earthquakes. We develop this approach and show examples of PDFs associated with magnitude M > 6.5 and M > 7.0 earthquakes in California.

  9. Imbalanced land surface water budgets in a numerical weather prediction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffeldt, Anna; Halldin, Sven; Pappenberger, Florian; Wetterhall, Fredrik; Xu, Chong-Yu; Cloke, Hannah L.

    2015-06-01

    There has been a significant increase in the skill and resolution of numerical weather prediction models (NWPs) in recent decades, extending the time scales of useful weather predictions. The land surface models (LSMs) of NWPs are often employed in hydrological applications, which raises the question of how hydrologically representative LSMs really are. In this paper, precipitation (P), evaporation (E), and runoff (R) from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts global models were evaluated against observational products. The forecasts differ substantially from observed data for key hydrological variables. In addition, imbalanced surface water budgets, mostly caused by data assimilation, were found on both global (P-E) and basin scales (P-E-R), with the latter being more important. Modeled surface fluxes should be used with care in hydrological applications, and further improvement in LSMs in terms of process descriptions, resolution, and estimation of uncertainties is needed to accurately describe the land surface water budgets.

  10. Numerical simulation of thermal acoustic oscillations in a liquid helium system

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Youfan; Timmerhaus, K.D.

    1996-12-31

    Thermal acoustic oscillations (TAOs) can generally be described by the general hydrodynamic equations for flow processes. Therefore, an understanding of the mechanisms associated with TAOs requires a full solution of these equations. However, the complexity of these equations make an analytical solution for TAOs essentially impossible. Accordingly, a numerical method has been employed to simulate the oscillation process. A combination of the finite difference and finite element method has been found to be most effective in simulating the oscillation process. Simulated oscillation results match the experimental observations with reasonable accuracy. Detailed axial pressure distribution, axial mean gas velocity and radial temperature gradient in an oscillation tube have been obtained and are included in this study.

  11. Numerical analyses for treating diffusion in single-, two- and three-phase binary alloy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, D. R.; Unnam, J.

    1978-01-01

    Numerical solutions were applicable for planar, cylindrical, or spherical geometries with any diffusion-zone size and any continuous variation of the diffusion coefficient with concentration. Special techniques were included in the analyses to account for differences in molal volumes, initiation and growth of an intermediate phase, disappearance of a phase, and the presence of an initial composition profile in the specimen. A major improvement in solution accuracy was achieved in the two phase analysis by employing a mass conservation criterion to establish the location of the interface rather than the conventional interface-flux-balance criterion. In the three phase analysis, computation time was minimized without sacrificing solution accuracy by treating the three phase problem as a two phase problem when the thickness of the intermediate phase was less than a preset small value. Three computer codes were developed to perform these analyses.

  12. Design and development of an ancient Chinese document recognition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Liangrui; Xiu, Pingping; Ding, Xiaoqing

    2003-12-01

    The digitization of ancient Chinese documents presents new challenges to OCR (Optical Character Recognition) research field due to the large character set of ancient Chinese characters, variant font types, and versatile document layout styles, as these documents are historical reflections to the thousands of years of Chinese civilization. After analyzing the general characteristics of ancient Chinese documents, we present a solution for recognition of ancient Chinese documents with regular font-types and layout-styles. Based on the previous work on multilingual OCR in TH-OCR system, we focus on the design and development of two key technologies which include character recognition and page segmentation. Experimental results show that the developed character recognition kernel of 19,635 Chinese characters outperforms our original traditional Chinese recognition kernel; Benchmarked test on printed ancient Chinese books proves that the proposed system is effective for regular ancient Chinese documents.

  13. Numerical modelling of the impact of a liquid drop on the surface of a two-phase fluid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sochan, Agata; Lamorski, Krzysztof; Bieganowski, Andrzej; Ryżak, Magdalena

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the study was validation of a numerical model of the impact of a liquid drop on the surface of a two-phase system of immiscible fluids. The drop impact phenomenon was recorded using a high-speed camera (Vision Research MIRO M310) and the data were recorded at 2000 frames per second. The numerical calculations were performed with the Finite Volume Method (FVM) solving the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations for three phases: air and two selected immiscible fluids. The Volume of Fluid (VOF) technique was employed for modelling of the boundaries between the phases. Numerical modelling was done with the Finite Volume Method using an available OpenFOAM software. The experiment was based on three variables: • the height from which the drop of the selected fluids fell (the speed of the drop), • the thickness of the layers of the two selected immiscible fluids (a thin layer of the fluid with a lower density was spread over the higher-density fluid), • the size of the fluid droplet. The velocity and radius of the falling drop was calculated based on the recorded images. The used parameters allowed adequate projection of the impact of fluid droplets on a system of two immiscible liquids. Development of the numerical model of splash may further have practical applications in environmental protection (spraying of hazardous fluids, spread of fuels and other hazardous substances as a result of disasters, spraying (water cooling) of hot surfaces), and in agriculture (prevention of soil erosion). The study was partially funded from the National Science Centre (Poland) based on the decision no. DEC-2012/07/N/ST10/03280.

  14. Numerical Simulation of One- And Two-Phase Flows In Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilinsky, Mikhail M.

    2002-01-01

    In this report, we present some results of problems investigated during joint research between the Hampton University (HU) Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics Laboratory (FM&AL), NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and the Hyper-X Program of the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). This work is supported by joint research between the NASA GRC/HU FM&AL and the Institute of Mechanics at Moscow State University (IM/MSU) in Russia under a Civilian Research and Development Foundation (CRDF) grant, #RE1-2068. The main areas of current scientific interest of the FM&AL include an investigation of the proposed and patented advanced methods for aircraft engine thrust and noise benefits. These methods are based on nontraditional 3D (three dimensional) corrugated and composite nozzle, inlet, propeller and screw designs such as the Bluebell and Telescope nozzles, Mobius-shaped screws, etc. These are the main subject of our other projects, of which one is the NASA MURED's (Minority University Research and Education Division) FAR (Faculty Awards for Research) Award, #NAG-3-2249. Working jointly with this project team, our team also analyzes additional methods for exhaust jet noise reduction. These methods are without essential thrust loss and even with thrust augmentation. The research is focused on a wide regime of problems in the propulsion field as well as in experimental testing and theoretical and numerical simulation analyses for advanced aircraft and rocket engines. The FM&AL Team uses analytical methods, numerical simulations and experimental tests at the Hampton University campus, NASA and IM/MSU. The main results obtained by FM&AL team were published in the papers and patents.

  15. Implementation of numerical simulation techniques in analysis of the accidents in complex technological systems

    SciTech Connect

    Klishin, G.S.; Seleznev, V.E.; Aleoshin, V.V.

    1997-12-31

    Gas industry enterprises such as main pipelines, compressor gas transfer stations, gas extracting complexes belong to the energy intensive industry. Accidents there can result into the catastrophes and great social, environmental and economic losses. Annually, according to the official data several dozens of large accidents take place at the pipes in the USA and Russia. That is why prevention of the accidents, analysis of the mechanisms of their development and prediction of their possible consequences are acute and important tasks nowadays. The accidents reasons are usually of a complicated character and can be presented as a complex combination of natural, technical and human factors. Mathematical and computer simulations are safe, rather effective and comparatively inexpensive methods of the accident analysis. It makes it possible to analyze different mechanisms of a failure occurrence and development, to assess its consequences and give recommendations to prevent it. Besides investigation of the failure cases, numerical simulation techniques play an important role in the treatment of the diagnostics results of the objects and in further construction of mathematical prognostic simulations of the object behavior in the period of time between two inspections. While solving diagnostics tasks and in the analysis of the failure cases, the techniques of theoretical mechanics, of qualitative theory of different equations, of mechanics of a continuous medium, of chemical macro-kinetics and optimizing techniques are implemented in the Conversion Design Bureau {number_sign}5 (DB{number_sign}5). Both universal and special numerical techniques and software (SW) are being developed in DB{number_sign}5 for solution of such tasks. Almost all of them are calibrated on the calculations of the simulated and full-scale experiments performed at the VNIIEF and MINATOM testing sites. It is worth noting that in the long years of work there has been established a fruitful and effective

  16. The implementation of the graphics of program EAGLE: A numerical grid generation code on NASA Langley SNS computer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Johnny L.

    1989-01-01

    Program EAGLE (Eglin Arbitrary Geometry Implicit Euler) Numerical Grid Generation System is a composite (multi-block) algebraic or elliptic grid generation system designed to discretize the domain in and/or around any arbitrarily shaped three dimensional regions. This system combines a boundary conforming surface generation scheme and includes plotting routines designed to take full advantage of the DISSPLA Graphics Package (Version 9.0). Program EAGLE is written to compile and execute efficiently on any Cray machine with or without solid state disk (SSD) devices. Also, the code uses namelist inputs which are supported by all Cray machines using the FORTRAN compiler CFT77. The namelist inputs makes it easier for the user to understand the inputs and operation of Program EAGLE. EAGLE's numerical grid generator is constructed in the following form: main program, EGG (executive routine); subroutine SURFAC (surface generation routine); subroutine GRID (grid generation routine); and subroutine GRDPLOT (grid plotting routines). The EAGLE code was modified to use on the NASA-LaRC SNS computer (Cray 2S) system. During the modification a conversion program was developed for the output data of EAGLE's subroutine GRID to permit the data to be graphically displayed by IRIS workstations, using Plot3D. The code of program EAGLE was modified to make operational subroutine GRDPLOT (using DI-3000 Graphics Software Packages) on the NASA-LaRC SNS Computer System. How to implement graphically, the output data of subroutine GRID was determined on any NASA-LaRC graphics terminal that has access to the SNS Computer System DI-300 Graphics Software Packages. A Quick Reference User Guide was developed for the use of program EAGLE on the NASA-LaRC SNS Computer System. One or more application program(s) was illustrated using program EAGLE on the NASA LaRC SNS Computer System, with emphasis on graphics illustrations.

  17. An investigation of the role of current and future remote sensing data systems in numerical meteorology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diak, George R.; Smith, William L.

    1992-01-01

    A flexible system for performing observing system simulation experiments which made contributions to meteorology across all elements of the observing system simulation experiment (OSSE) components was developed. Future work will seek better understanding of the links between satellite-measured radiation and radiative transfer in the clear, cloudy and precipitating atmosphere and investigate how that understanding might be applied to improve the depiction of the initial state and the treatment of physical processes in forecast models of the atmosphere.

  18. Q parameter estimation using numerical simulations for linear and nonlinear transmission systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhard, Marc; Blow, Keith J.

    2006-09-01

    We compare the Q parameter obtained from scalar, semi-analytical and full vector models for realistic transmission systems. One set of systems is operated in the linear regime, while another is using solitons at high peak power. We report in detail on the different results obtained for the same system using different models. Polarisation mode dispersion is also taken into account and a novel method to average Q parameters over several independent simulation runs is described.

  19. Numerical and experimental studies of liquid storage tank thermal stratification for a solar energy system

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, S T; Han, S M

    1980-11-01

    The results of theoretical and experimental studies of thermal stratification in liquid energy storage tanks for the performance of solar energy systems are presented. The investigation was divided into three areas: (1) Justification of the Importance of Thermal Stratification Inside the Energy Storage Tanks, (II) Development of a Simple Mathematical Model which is Compatible with Existing Solar Energy System Simulation Code, and (III) Validation of Mathematical Models by Experimental Data Obtained from Realistic Solar Energy System Operations.

  20. Numerical modeling and simulation of hot air jet anti-icing system employing channels for enhanced heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Kamran Zaki

    Aircraft icing is a serious concern for the aviation community since it is one of the major causes of fatal aircraft accidents. Aircrafts use different anti-icing systems and one such system is the hot-air anti-icing system, which utilizes hot-air from the engine compressor bleed to heat critical aircraft surfaces and prevent ice formation. Numerous experimental and numerical studies have been performed to increase the efficiency of the hot-air jet based anti-icing systems. Most of the investigations have focused on either orifice design or the impingement region of target surface geometry. Since the impingement surface heat transfer drops off sharply past the stagnation region, investigators have studied the use of multiple jets to enhance surface heat transfer over a larger area. However, use of multiple jets is a further strain on engine resources. One way to conserve engine resources is to use single jet in conjunction with various geometric and physical mechanisms to enhance heat transfer. The current study focuses on enhancing heat transfer using a single jet and a channel. The study investigates the effect of channel's height, inlet location and Reynolds number on heat transfer characteristics in terms of average Nusselt number distribution along the impingement surface. The commercial CFD code, FLUENT, is used to simulate the different cases. Results indicate that the heat transfer depends strongly on height and width of channel, jet-to-target spacing, inlet angle and jet Reynolds number.

  1. Numerical simulations of saltwater displacement via fault systems due to exploitation of the subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, Maria; Tillner, Elena; Kempka, Thomas; Kühn, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Injection of fluids into deep saline aquifers induces an increase in pore pressure in the storage formation, and thus displacement of resident brines. Upward brine migration into shallower aquifers via hydraulically conductive faults may therefore lead to unwanted salinization of potable groundwater resources. In the present study, we investigated different scenarios for a prospective storage site close to the city of Beeskow in the Northeast German Basin by using a representative 3D regional-scale model (100 km x 100 km x 1.34 km) that includes four regional fault zones. The focus was on assessing the impact of fault length and permeability as well as model boundary conditions on the potential salinization of shallow groundwater resources. Moreover, the effects of an overlying secondary brine-bearing reservoir as well as varying initial salt-freshwater boundaries were investigated. We employed numerical simulations of brine injection as a representative fluid based on an example case study discussed by Tillner et al. (2013). Our simulation results demonstrate that pressure build-up within the reservoir determines the fluid rates and duration through the faults, and hence salinization of shallower aquifers. Application of different boundary conditions proved that these have a crucial impact on reservoir fluid displacement. If reservoir boundaries are closed, the fluid displaced via the faults into the shallow aquifer corresponds to the overall injected fluid mass. In that case, fault length and permeability as well as the presence of an overlying secondary reservoir have only temporal effects on brine migration. A fault zone with a hydraulically conductive segment of only two kilometres length causes brine flow into the shallow aquifer of 330 years, which is thus five times longer compared to the case with four faults open over their entire length of 193 km. The presence of an overlying secondary reservoir leads to an additional retardation of brine inflow into the

  2. Numerical Modeling and Test Data Comparison of Propulsion Test Article Helium Pressurization System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Kimberly; Majumdar, Alok; Steadman, Todd; Hedayat, Ali; Fogle, Frank R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A transient model of the propulsion test article (PTA) helium pressurization system was developed using the generalized fluid system simulation program (GFSSP). The model included pressurization lines from the facility interface to the engine purge interface and liquid oxygen (lox) and rocket propellant-1 (RP-1) tanks, the propellant tanks themselves including ullage space, and propellant feed lines to their respective pump interfaces. GFSSP's capability was extended to model a control valve to maintain ullage pressure within a specified limit and pressurization processes such as heat transfer between ullage gas, propellant, and the tank wall as well as conduction in the tank wall. The purpose of the model is to predict the flow system characteristics in the entire pressurization system during 80 sec of lower feed system priming, 420 sec of fuel and lox pump priming, and 150 sec of engine firing.

  3. Numerical and experimental analysis of structure-borne sound transmission in coupled systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xiaodong; Backhaus, Stefan-Georg; Scheidl, Rudolf; Rembe, Christian

    2016-06-01

    The vibration-power transmission is often applied as a quantity to describe the structure-borne sound transmission in a vibration system and is, therefore, of major interest for machine manufactures. Well-developed theories about power transfer for multi-point coupled systems exist, especially, for structure-borne sound characterization. However, a theoretic analysis of area coupled systems is still a research topic because a direct measurement of vibration-power transmission in the contact interface for such systems is not possible. This paper introduces a strategy to investigate the vibration power transmission in such systems by using a finite element model which is updated by the so-called "model updating technique" based on experimental modal analysis, which is performed by a laser scanning Doppler vibrometer, in opposite to conventionally by accelerometer. The strategy is demonstrated on a simple test assembly and the estimated power transmission is derived.

  4. 3-D parallel program for numerical calculation of gas dynamics problems with heat conductivity on distributed memory computational systems (CS)

    SciTech Connect

    Sofronov, I.D.; Voronin, B.L.; Butnev, O.I.

    1997-12-31

    The aim of the work performed is to develop a 3D parallel program for numerical calculation of gas dynamics problem with heat conductivity on distributed memory computational systems (CS), satisfying the condition of numerical result independence from the number of processors involved. Two basically different approaches to the structure of massive parallel computations have been developed. The first approach uses the 3D data matrix decomposition reconstructed at temporal cycle and is a development of parallelization algorithms for multiprocessor CS with shareable memory. The second approach is based on using a 3D data matrix decomposition not reconstructed during a temporal cycle. The program was developed on 8-processor CS MP-3 made in VNIIEF and was adapted to a massive parallel CS Meiko-2 in LLNL by joint efforts of VNIIEF and LLNL staffs. A large number of numerical experiments has been carried out with different number of processors up to 256 and the efficiency of parallelization has been evaluated in dependence on processor number and their parameters.

  5. Optical tweezers and surface plasmon resonance combination system based on the high numerical aperture lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Xuchen; Zhang, Bei; Lan, Guoqiang; Wang, Yiqiao; Liu, Shugang

    2015-11-01

    Biology and medicine sample measurement takes an important role in the microscopic optical technology. Optical tweezer has the advantage of accurate capture and non-pollution of the sample. The SPR(surface plasmon resonance) sensor has so many advantages include high sensitivity, fast measurement, less consumption of sample and label-free detection of biological sample that the SPR sensing technique has been used for surface topography, analysis of biochemical and immune, drug screening and environmental monitoring. If they combine, they will play an important role in the biological, chemical and other subjects. The system we propose use the multi-axis cage system, by using the methods of reflection and transmiss ion to improve the space utilization. The SPR system and optical tweezer were builtup and combined in one system. The cage of multi-axis system gives full play to its accuracy, simplicity and flexibility. The size of the system is 20 * 15 * 40 cm3 and thus the sample can be replaced to switch between the optical tweezers system and the SPR system in the small space. It means that we get the refractive index of the sample and control the particle in the same system. In order to control the revolving stage, get the picture and achieve the data stored automatically, we write a LabVIEW procedure. Then according to the data from the back focal plane calculate the refractive index of the sample. By changing the slide we can trap the particle as optical tweezer, which makes us measurement and trap the sample at the same time.

  6. Numerical study of a bucked-coil system for muon transport and cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Stratakis, Diktys; Alekou, Androula; Neuffer, David; Pasternak, Jaroslaw; Rogers, Chris T.

    2012-12-21

    A Neutrino Factory, which can deliver an intense flux of {approx}10{sup 21} neutrinos per year from a multi-GeV stored muon-beam is seemingly the ideal tool for studying neutrino oscillations and CP-violations for leptons. The front-end of this facility plays a critical role in determining the number of muons that can be accepted by the downstream accelerators. Delivering peak performance requires transporting the muon beams through long sections of a beam channel containing high-gradient rf cavities and strong focusing solenoids. Here, we propose a novel scheme to improve the performance of the cavities, thereby increasing the number of muons within the acceptance of the accelerator chain. The key element of our new scheme is to apply a set of bucked coils along the lattice, thus forcing the external magnetic field to drop substantially within the cavity. We incorporate this idea into a new lattice design for a Neutrino Factory, and detail its performance numerically.

  7. Experimental and numerical investigation of thermosyphone performance in HVAC system applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eidan, Adel A.; Najim, Saleh E.; Jalil, Jalal M.

    2016-03-01

    An experimental and numerical investigations are conducted on a Two Phase Closed Thermosyphon (TPCT) charged with six working fluids; namely (water, methanol, ethanol, acetone, butanol and R134a) with filling ratios (40, 50, 60, 70 and 100 %). The TPCT is made from a 0.016 m diameter copper tube, which consists of a 0.15 m evaporator, 0.1 m adiabatic and 0.15 m condenser sections, respectively. Thermocouples are located in the core and on the wall of the TPCT. The main objectives of the experimental investigation are to analyze the effect of the working fluid and filling ratio (liquid inventory) under heat inputs (20-120 W) with a fixed condenser cooling temperature of (25 °C) on the thermal performance of the TPCT. The results are compared with a simulation model using finite difference method in three dimensional cylindrical coordinates by using FORTRAN. The correlations of the phase change for the TPCT based on the theory of thermal resistance are used in the evaporator and condenser sections. The agreement between theoretical and experimental results is shown to be accurate within 10 %. The results showed that the maximum heat transport ability is associated with using of water and acetone where it is compared with other fluids under the same range of operating temperatures of 35-50 °C. This is the range between lowest and highest temperatures for the sub-tropical climates.

  8. Achieving high performance in numerical computations on RISC workstations and parallel systems

    SciTech Connect

    Goedecker, S.; Hoisie, A.

    1997-08-20

    The nominal peak speeds of both serial and parallel computers is raising rapidly. At the same time however it is becoming increasingly difficult to get out a significant fraction of this high peak speed from modern computer architectures. In this tutorial the authors give the scientists and engineers involved in numerically demanding calculations and simulations the necessary basic knowledge to write reasonably efficient programs. The basic principles are rather simple and the possible rewards large. Writing a program by taking into account optimization techniques related to the computer architecture can significantly speedup your program, often by factors of 10--100. As such, optimizing a program can for instance be a much better solution than buying a faster computer. If a few basic optimization principles are applied during program development, the additional time needed for obtaining an efficient program is practically negligible. In-depth optimization is usually only needed for a few subroutines or kernels and the effort involved is therefore also acceptable.

  9. Numerical investigation of the near wake of generic space launcher systems at transonic and supersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statnikov, V.; Glatzer, C.; Meiß, J.-H.; Meinke, M.; Schröder, W.

    2013-06-01

    Numerical simulations of the near wake of generic rocket configurations are performed at transonic and supersonic freestream conditions to improve the understanding of the highly intricate near wake structures. The Reynolds number in both flow regimes is 106 based on the main body diameter, i. e., specific freestream conditions of ESA's Ariane launcher trajectory. The geometry matches models used in experiments in the framework of the German Transregional Collaborative Research Center TRR40. Both axisymmetric wind tunnel models possess cylindrical sting supports, representing a nozzle to allow investigations of a less disturbed wake flow. A zonal approach consisting of a Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) and a large-eddy simulation (LES) is applied. It is shown that the highly unsteady transonic wake flow at Ma∞ = 0.7 is characterized by the expanding separated shear layer, while the Mach 6.0 wake is defined by a shock, expansion waves, and a recompression region. In both cases, an instantaneous view on the base characteristics reveals complex azimuthal flow structures even for axisymmetric geometries. The flow regimes are discussed by comparing the aerodynamic characteristics, such as the size of the recirculation region and the turbulent kinetic energy.

  10. Numerical analysis on seismic response of Shinkansen bridge-train interaction system under moderate earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xingwen; Kawatani, Mitsuo; Hayashikawa, Toshiro; Matsumoto, Takashi

    2011-03-01

    This study is intended to evaluate the influence of dynamic bridge-train interaction (BTI) on the seismic response of the Shinkansen system in Japan under moderate earthquakes. An analytical approach to simulate the seismic response of the BTI system is developed. In this approach, the behavior of the bridge structure is assumed to be within the elastic range under moderate ground motions. A bullet train car model idealized as a sprung-mass system is established. The viaduct is modeled with 3D finite elements. The BTI analysis algorithm is verified by comparing the analytical and experimental results. The seismic analysis is validated through comparison with a general program. Then, the seismic responses of the BTI system are simulated and evaluated. Some useful conclusions are drawn, indicating the importance of a proper consideration of the dynamic BTI in seismic design.

  11. A numerical scheme for the identification of hybrid systems describing the vibration of flexible beams with tip bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, I. G.

    1984-01-01

    A cubic spline based Galerkin-like method is developed for the identification of a class of hybrid systems which describe the transverse vibration to flexible beams with attached tip bodies. The identification problem is formulated as a least squares fit to data subject to the system dynamics given by a coupled system of ordnary and partial differential equations recast as an abstract evolution equation (AEE) in an appropriate infinite dimensional Hilbert space. Projecting the AEE into spline-based subspaces leads naturally to a sequence of approximating finite dimensional identification problems. The solutions to these problems are shown to exist, are relatively easily computed, and are shown to, in some sense, converge to solutions to the original identification problem. Numerical results for a variety of examples are discussed.

  12. Numerical modelling of a 100-Wh lab-scale thermochemical heat storage system for concentrating solar power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Miguel, Sandra Álvarez; Bellan, Selvan; de María, J. M. García; González-Aguilar, José; Romero, Manuel

    2016-05-01

    Dispatchable electricity generation on demand is a fundamental issue for commercial deployment of Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) plants. One of the promising routes to overcome the intermittence of the solar resource is the use of thermochemical energy storage systems based on redox reactions of metal oxides. Different metal oxides might potential candidates as storing material depending on the foreseen working temperature range. In the framework of the FP7 European project TCSPower, a particle-based reactor is used to analyze this type of materials. The lab-scale thermochemical reactor is initially tested using an inert material (alumina particles) instead of reactants in order to study its thermal performance. Thermocouples installed inside the system at various positions monitor the experiments. A three dimensional numerical model is developed to investigate the flow and heat transfer in the reactor. The governing equations - mass, momentum and energy conservation - are solved by the finite element method in the commercial software COMSOL Multiphysics. Simulations are performed for the experimental conditions. Experimentally measured and numerically predicted temperature profiles at various locations inside the system are compared and presented in this paper.

  13. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Air Flow, Heat Transfer and Thermal Comfort in Buildings with Different Heating Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabanskis, A.; Virbulis, J.

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring of temperature, humidity and air flow velocity is performed in 5 experimental buildings with the inner size of 3×3×3 m3 located in Riga, Latvia. The buildings are equipped with different heating systems, such as an air-air heat pump, air-water heat pump, capillary heating mat on the ceiling and electric heater. Numerical simulation of air flow and heat transfer by convection, conduction and radiation is carried out using OpenFOAM software and compared with experimental data. Results are analysed regarding the temperature and air flow distribution as well as thermal comfort.

  14. A stochastic regulator for integrated communication and control systems. I - Formulation of control law. II - Numerical analysis and simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Luen-Woei; Ray, Asok

    1991-01-01

    A state feedback control law for integrated communication and control systems (ICCS) is formulated by using the dynamic programming and optimality principle on a finite-time horizon. The control law is derived on the basis of a stochastic model of the plant which is augmented in state space to allow for the effects of randomly varying delays in the feedback loop. A numerical procedure for synthesizing the control parameters is then presented, and the performance of the control law is evaluated by simulating the flight dynamics model of an advanced aircraft. Finally, recommendations for future work are made.

  15. A numerical method for a model of two-phase flow in a coupled free flow and porous media system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jie; Sun, Shuyu; Wang, Xiao-Ping

    2014-07-01

    In this article, we study two-phase fluid flow in coupled free flow and porous media regions. The model consists of coupled Cahn-Hilliard and Navier-Stokes equations in the free fluid region and the two-phase Darcy law in the porous medium region. We propose a Robin-Robin domain decomposition method for the coupled Navier-Stokes and Darcy system with the generalized Beavers-Joseph-Saffman condition on the interface between the free flow and the porous media regions. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of this method.

  16. Steady-State Currents through Nanodevices: A Scattering-States Numerical Renormalization-Group Approach to Open Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, Frithjof B.

    2008-08-01

    We propose a numerical renormalization group (NRG) approach to steady-state currents through nanodevices. A discretization of the scattering-states continuum ensures the correct boundary condition for an open quantum system. We introduce two degenerate Wilson chains for current carrying left- and right-moving electrons reflecting time-reversal symmetry in the absence of a finite bias V. We employ the time-dependent NRG to evolve the known steady-state density operator for a noninteracting junction into the density operator of the fully interacting nanodevice at finite bias. We calculate the differential conductance as function of V, T, and the external magnetic field.

  17. Numerical Investigation on Performance of In-Building Plastic Optical Fiber Transmission Systems and Role of Digital Television Broadcasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matera, Francesco; Tiano, Stefania; Settembre, Marina

    2012-07-01

    This article reports a numerical investigation on the transmission performance of multilevel systems operating in building links encompassing step-index plastic optical fibers. For such an aim, a simplified model for the multimode fiber propagation is introduced. A sub-carrier multiplexing technique is also simulated to demonstrate the distribution of broadcasting television channels by adopting such fibers. The reported results show that a unique building network based on step-index plastic optical fibers is suitable to carry both Ethernet and broadcast TV signals in all rooms.

  18. Description of a computer program and numerical techniques for developing linear perturbation models from nonlinear systems simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dieudonne, J. E.

    1978-01-01

    A numerical technique was developed which generates linear perturbation models from nonlinear aircraft vehicle simulations. The technique is very general and can be applied to simulations of any system that is described by nonlinear differential equations. The computer program used to generate these models is discussed, with emphasis placed on generation of the Jacobian matrices, calculation of the coefficients needed for solving the perturbation model, and generation of the solution of the linear differential equations. An example application of the technique to a nonlinear model of the NASA terminal configured vehicle is included.

  19. Numerical Modeling of Anti-icing Systems and Comparison to Test Results on a NACA 0012 Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Al-Khalil, Kamel M.; Potapczuk, Mark G.

    1993-01-01

    A series of experimental tests were conducted in the NASA Lewis IRT on an electro-thermally heated NACA 0012 airfoil. Quantitative comparisons between the experimental results and those predicted by a computer simulation code were made to assess the validity of a recently developed anti-icing model. An infrared camera was utilized to scan the instantaneous temperature contours of the skin surface. Despite some experimental difficulties, good agreement between the numerical predictions and the experiment results were generally obtained for the surface temperature and the possibility for each runback to freeze. Some recommendations were given for an efficient operation of a thermal anti-icing system.

  20. A numerical method for solving systems of higher order linear functional differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yüzbasi, Suayip; Gök, Emrah; Sezer, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Functional differential equations have importance in many areas of science such as mathematical physics. These systems are difficult to solve analytically.In this paper we consider the systems of linear functional differential equations [1-9] including the term y(αx + β) and advance-delay in derivatives of y .To obtain the approximate solutions of those systems, we present a matrix-collocation method by using Müntz-Legendre polynomials and the collocation points. For this purpose, to obtain the approximate solutions of those systems, we present a matrix-collocation method by using Müntz-Legendre polynomials and the collocation points. This method transform the problem into a system of linear algebraic equations. The solutions of last system determine unknown co-efficients of original problem. Also, an error estimation technique is presented and the approximate solutions are improved by using it. The program of method is written in Matlab and the approximate solutions can be obtained easily. Also some examples are given to illustrate the validity of the method.

  1. Numerical modeling of self-pressurization and pressure control by a thermodynamic vent system in a cryogenic tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Alok; Valenzuela, Juan; LeClair, Andre; Moder, Jeff

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a numerical model of a system-level test bed-the multipurpose hydrogen test bed (MHTB) using the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP). MHTB is representative in size and shape of a space transportation vehicle liquid hydrogen propellant tank, and ground-based testing was performed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to generate data for cryogenic storage. GFSSP is a finite volume-based network flow analysis software developed at MSFC and used for thermofluid analysis of propulsion systems. GFSSP has been used to model the self-pressurization and ullage pressure control by the Thermodynamic Vent System (TVS). A TVS typically includes a Joule-Thompson (J-T) expansion device, a two-phase heat exchanger (HEX), and a mixing pump and liquid injector to extract thermal energy from the tank without significant loss of liquid propellant. For the MHTB tank, the HEX and liquid injector are combined into a vertical spray bar assembly. Two GFSSP models (Self-Pressurization and TVS) were separately developed and tested and then integrated to simulate the entire system. The Self-Pressurization model consists of multiple ullage nodes, a propellant node, and solid nodes; it computes the heat transfer through multilayer insulation blankets and calculates heat and mass transfer between the ullage and liquid propellant and the ullage and tank wall. A TVS model calculates the flow through a J-T valve, HEX, and spray and vent systems. Two models are integrated by exchanging data through User Subroutines of both models. Results of the integrated models have been compared with MHTB test data at a 50% fill level. Satisfactory comparison was observed between tests and numerical predictions.

  2. Numerical Modeling of the Impact-Induced Hydrothermal System at Sudbury Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, O.; Kring, D. A.

    2003-12-01

    An understanding of impact-generated hydrothermal systems is crucial for deciphering the environment on early Earth and Mars, as well as predicting promising locations for finding evidence of past life on Mars. Impact events and early life may be tightly connected -- a sudden increase in the number of impact events which occurred at ˜3.9 Ga coincides remarkably well with the earliest isotopic evidence of life on Earth at ˜3.85 Ga, and hydrothermal systems generated by impact events can provide a habitable environment for thermophilic organisms. Several hydrothermal systems associated with terrestrial impact craters have been identified on the basis of mineralogical evidence. Examples of known systems include the 35 km Manson crater, the 80 km Puchezh-Katunki crater, and the 250 km Sudbury crater. In order to better constrain the expected lifetimes of these systems and further understand their mechanics, a finite-difference computer simulation is used to evaluate the effects of convective cooling by circulating water and steam. In this work we present modeling results of water and heat transport shortly after the formation of the Sudbury impact crater in present-day Ontario, Canada. Our model predicts that an impact-induced hydrothermal system associated with a Sudbury-sized impact crater can remain active for at least 105 - 106 years. While the location and volume of the habitable zone within the crater changes as the crater undergoes cooling, it is sufficiently long-lived for an ecosystem to develop. The insight into the mechanics of these systems gained from this model can help locate hydrothermal vents and hydrothermally altered minerals at Martian impact craters.

  3. Numerical and Experimental Characterizations of Damping Properties of SMAs Composite for Vibration Control Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biffi, Carlo Alberto; Bassani, P.; Tuissi, A.; Carnevale, M.; Lecis, N.; LoConte, A.; Previtali, B.

    2012-12-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) are very interesting smart materials not only for their shape memory and superelastic effects but also because of their significant intrinsic damping capacity. The latter is exhibited upon martensitic transformations and especially in martensitic state. The combination of these SMA properties with the mechanical and the lightweight of fiberglass-reinforced polymer (FGRP) is a promising solution for manufacturing of innovative composites for vibration suppression in structural applications. CuZnAl sheets, after laser patterning, were embedded in a laminated composite between a thick FGRP core and two thin outer layers with the aim of maximizing the damping capacity of the beam for passive vibration suppression. The selected SMA Cu66Zn24Al10 at.% was prepared by vacuum induction melting; the ingot was subsequently hot-and-cold rolled down to 0.2 mm thickness tape. The choice of a copper alloy is related to some advantages in comparison with NiTiCu SMA alloys, which was tested for the similar presented application in a previous study: lower cost, higher storage modulus and consequently higher damping properties in martensitic state. The patterning of the SMA sheets was performed by means of a pulsed fiber laser. After the laser processing, the SMA sheets were heat treated to obtain the desired martensitic state at room temperature. The transformation temperatures were measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The damping properties were determined, at room temperature, on full-scale sheet, using a universal testing machine (MTS), with cyclic tensile tests at different deformation amplitudes. Damping properties were also determined as a function of the temperature on miniature samples with a dynamical mechanical analyzer (DMA). Numerical modeling of the laminated composite, done with finite element method analysis and modal strain energy approaches, was performed to estimate the corresponding total damping capacity and then

  4. Numerical Modeling of Helium Pressurization System of Propulsion Test Article (PTA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steadman, Todd; Majumdar, Alok; Holt, Kimberly

    2001-01-01

    A transient model of the Propulsion Test Article (PTA) Helium Pressurization System was developed using the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP). The model included feed lines from the facility interface to the engine purge interface and Liquid Oxygen (LOX) and Rocket Propellant 1 (RP-1) tanks, the propellant tanks themselves including ullage space and propellant feed lines to their respective pump interfaces. GFSSP's capability was extended to model a control valve to maintain ullage pressure within a specified limit and pressurization processes such as heat transfer between ullage gas, propellant and the tank wall. The purpose of the model is to predict the flow system characteristics in the entire pressurization system during 80 seconds of lower feed system priming, 420 seconds of fuel and LOX pump priming and 150 seconds of engine firing. Subsequent to the work presented here, the PTA model has been updated to include the LOX and RP-1 pumps, while the pressurization option itself has been modified to include the effects of mass transfer. This updated model will be compared with PTA test data as it becomes available.

  5. Large fluctuations of the macroscopic current in diffusive systems: a numerical test of the additivity principle.

    PubMed

    Hurtado, Pablo I; Garrido, Pedro L

    2010-04-01

    Most systems, when pushed out of equilibrium, respond by building up currents of locally conserved observables. Understanding how microscopic dynamics determines the averages and fluctuations of these currents is one of the main open problems in nonequilibrium statistical physics. The additivity principle is a theoretical proposal that allows to compute the current distribution in many one-dimensional nonequilibrium systems. Using simulations, we validate this conjecture in a simple and general model of energy transport, both in the presence of a temperature gradient and in canonical equilibrium. In particular, we show that the current distribution displays a Gaussian regime for small current fluctuations, as prescribed by the central limit theorem, and non-Gaussian (exponential) tails for large current deviations, obeying in all cases the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem. In order to facilitate a given current fluctuation, the system adopts a well-defined temperature profile different from that of the steady state and in accordance with the additivity hypothesis predictions. System statistics during a large current fluctuation is independent of the sign of the current, which implies that the optimal profile (as well as higher-order profiles and spatial correlations) are invariant upon current inversion. We also demonstrate that finite-time joint fluctuations of the current and the profile are well described by the additivity functional. These results suggest the additivity hypothesis as a general and powerful tool to compute current distributions in many nonequilibrium systems. PMID:20481672

  6. High numerical aperture ring field projection system for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Hudyma, Russell; Shafer, David

    2001-01-01

    An all-reflective optical system for a projection photolithography camera has a source of EUV radiation, a wafer and a mask to be imaged on the wafer. The optical system includes a first convex mirror, a second mirror, a third convex mirror, a fourth concave mirror, a fifth convex mirror and a sixth concave mirror. The system is configured such that five of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 9.degree., and each of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 14.degree.. Four of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 12 .mu.m. Five of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 12 .mu.m. Each of the six reflecting surfaces has an aspheric departure of less than substantially 16 .mu.m.

  7. High numerical aperture ring field projection system for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Hudyma, Russell

    2001-01-01

    An all-reflective optical system for a projection photolithography camera has a source of EUV radiation, a wafer and a mask to be imaged on the wafer. The optical system includes a first concave mirror, a second mirror, a third convex mirror, a fourth concave mirror, a fifth convex mirror and a sixth concave mirror. The system is configured such that five of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 12.degree., and each of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 15.degree.. Four of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 7 .mu.m. Five of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 14 .mu.m. Each of the six reflecting surfaces has an aspheric departure of less than 16.0 .mu.m.

  8. High numerical aperture ring field projection system for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Hudyma, Russell; Shafer, David R.

    2001-01-01

    An all-reflective optical system for a projection photolithography camera has a source of EUV radiation, a wafer and a mask to be imaged on the wafer. The optical system includes a first convex mirror, a second mirror, a third convex mirror, a fourth concave mirror, a fifth convex mirror and a sixth concave mirror. The system is configured such that five of the six mirrors receive a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 9.degree., and each of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 14.degree.. Four of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 12 .mu.m. Five of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 12 .mu.m. Each of the six reflecting surfaces has an aspheric departure of less than substantially 16 .mu.m.

  9. High numerical aperture ring field projection system for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Hudyma, Russell

    2000-01-01

    An all-refelctive optical system for a projection photolithography camera has a source of EUV radiation, a wafer and a mask to be imaged on the wafer. The optical system includes a first concave mirror, a second mirror, a third convex mirror, a fourth concave mirror, a fifth convex mirror and a sixth concave mirror. The system is configured such that five of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle less than substantially 12.degree., and each of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 15.degree.. Four of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 7 .mu.m. Five of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 14 .mu.m. Each of the six refelecting surfaces has an aspheric departure of less than 16.0 .mu.m.

  10. Frictional-anisotropy-based systems in biology: structural diversity and numerical model.

    PubMed

    Filippov, Alexander; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2013-01-01

    There is a huge variety in biological surfaces covered with micro- and nanostructures oriented at some angle to the supporting surface. Such structures, for example snake skin, burr-covered plant leaves, cleaning devices and many others cause mechanical anisotropy due to different friction or/and mechanical interlocking during sliding in contact with another surface in different directions. Such surfaces serve propulsion generation on the substrate (or within the substrate) for the purpose of locomotion or for transporting items. We have theoretically studied the dependence of anisotropic friction efficiency in these systems on (1) the slope of the surface structures, (2) rigidity of their joints, and (3) sliding speed. Based on the proposed model, we suggest the generalized optimal set of variables for maximizing functional efficiency of anisotropic systems of this type. Finally, we discuss the optimal set of such parameters from the perspective of biological systems. PMID:23393622

  11. A numerical method for systems of conservation laws of mixed type admitting hyperbolic flux splitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, Chi-Wang

    1992-01-01

    The present treatment of elliptic regions via hyperbolic flux-splitting and high order methods proposes a flux splitting in which the corresponding Jacobians have real and positive/negative eigenvalues. While resembling the flux splitting used in hyperbolic systems, the present generalization of such splitting to elliptic regions allows the handling of mixed-type systems in a unified and heuristically stable fashion. The van der Waals fluid-dynamics equation is used. Convergence with good resolution to weak solutions for various Riemann problems are observed.

  12. Numerical studies of the melting transition in 2D Yukawa systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, P.; Donko, Z.; Kalman, G. J.

    2008-09-07

    We present the latest results of our systematic studies of the solid--liquid phase transition in 2D classical many-particle systems interacting with the Yukawa potential. Our previous work is extended by applying the molecular dynamic simulations to systems with up to 1.6 million particles in the computational box (for {kappa} = 2 case). Equilibrium simulations are performed for different coupling parameters in the vicinity of the expected melting transition ({gamma}{sub m}{sup {kappa}}{sup ={sup 2}}{approx_equal}415) and a wide range of observables are averaged over uncorrelated samples of the micro-canonical ensemble generated by the simulations.

  13. Evaluation of a numerical simulation model for a system coupling atmospheric gas, surface water and unsaturated or saturated porous medium.

    PubMed

    Hibi, Yoshihiko; Tomigashi, Akira; Hirose, Masafumi

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulations that couple flow in a surface fluid with that in a porous medium are useful for examining problems of pollution that involve interactions among the atmosphere, surface water and groundwater, including, for example, saltwater intrusion along coasts. We previously developed a numerical simulation method for simulating a coupled atmospheric gas, surface water, and groundwater system (called the ASG method) that employs a saturation equation for flow in a porous medium; this equation allows both the void fraction of water in the surface system and water saturation in the porous medium to be solved simultaneously. It remained necessary, however, to evaluate how global pressure, including gas pressure, water pressure, and capillary pressure, should be specified at the boundary between the surface and the porous medium. Therefore, in this study, we derived a new equation for global pressure and integrated it into the ASG method. We then simulated water saturation in a porous medium and the void fraction of water in a surface system by the ASG method and reproduced fairly well the results of two column experiments. Next, we simulated water saturation in a porous medium (sand) with a bank, by using both the ASG method and a modified Picard (MP) method. We found only a slight difference in water saturation between the ASG and MP simulations. This result confirmed that the derived equation for global pressure was valid for a porous medium, and that the global pressure value could thus be used with the saturation equation for porous media. Finally, we used the ASG method to simulate a system coupling atmosphere, surface water, and a porous medium (110m wide and 50m high) with a trapezoidal bank. The ASG method was able to simulate the complex flow of fluids in this system and the interaction between the porous medium and the surface water or the atmosphere. PMID:26583741

  14. Evaluation of a numerical simulation model for a system coupling atmospheric gas, surface water and unsaturated or saturated porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibi, Yoshihiko; Tomigashi, Akira; Hirose, Masafumi

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulations that couple flow in a surface fluid with that in a porous medium are useful for examining problems of pollution that involve interactions among the atmosphere, surface water and groundwater, including, for example, saltwater intrusion along coasts. We previously developed a numerical simulation method for simulating a coupled atmospheric gas, surface water, and groundwater system (called the ASG method) that employs a saturation equation for flow in a porous medium; this equation allows both the void fraction of water in the surface system and water saturation in the porous medium to be solved simultaneously. It remained necessary, however, to evaluate how global pressure, including gas pressure, water pressure, and capillary pressure, should be specified at the boundary between the surface and the porous medium. Therefore, in this study, we derived a new equation for global pressure and integrated it into the ASG method. We then simulated water saturation in a porous medium and the void fraction of water in a surface system by the ASG method and reproduced fairly well the results of two column experiments. Next, we simulated water saturation in a porous medium (sand) with a bank, by using both the ASG method and a modified Picard (MP) method. We found only a slight difference in water saturation between the ASG and MP simulations. This result confirmed that the derived equation for global pressure was valid for a porous medium, and that the global pressure value could thus be used with the saturation equation for porous media. Finally, we used the ASG method to simulate a system coupling atmosphere, surface water, and a porous medium (110 m wide and 50 m high) with a trapezoidal bank. The ASG method was able to simulate the complex flow of fluids in this system and the interaction between the porous medium and the surface water or the atmosphere.

  15. Towards numerical temporal-frequency system modelling of associations between electrocardiogram and ballistocardiogram.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Aravind; Zhang, Haihong; Lin, Zhiping; Biswas, Jit; Chen, Zhihao

    2015-01-01

    Ballistocardiogram (BCG) is a vital sign of ballistic forces generated by each heartbeat. With the advancements in related sensor and computing technologies in recent years, BCG has become far more accessible and thus regained its interest in both research and industry fields. Here we would like to promote the system modelling approach to BCG computing that allows to explore the underlying association between BCG and other physiological signals such as electrocardiogram (ECG). This is in contrast to most of the existing works in the related signal processing domain, which focus on detecting heart rate only. The system modelling approach may eventually improve the clinical significance of the BCG by extracting deeply embedded information. Towards this goal, here we present our preliminary study where we design a Wavelet-based temporal-frequency system model for associating BCG and ECG. To validate the model, we also collect simultaneous BCG and ECG recordings from 4 healthy subjects. We use the system model to build a BCG to ECG predicting algorithm. We demonstrate that this temporal-frequency model and algorithm is far superior, in terms of accuracy, to the naïve method of linear modelling. PMID:26736282

  16. Induced current electrical impedance tomography system: experimental results and numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Zlochiver, Sharon; Radai, M Michal; Abboud, Shimon; Rosenfeld, Moshe; Dong, Xiu-Zhen; Liu, Rui-Gang; You, Fu-Sheng; Xiang, Hai-Yan; Shi, Xue-Tao

    2004-02-01

    In electrical impedance tomography (EIT), measurements of developed surface potentials due to applied currents are used for the reconstruction of the conductivity distribution. Practical implementation of EIT systems is known to be problematic due to the high sensitivity to noise of such systems, leading to a poor imaging quality. In the present study, the performance of an induced current EIT (ICEIT) system, where eddy current is applied using magnetic induction, was studied by comparing the voltage measurements to simulated data, and examining the imaging quality with respect to simulated reconstructions for several phantom configurations. A 3-coil, 32-electrode ICEIT system was built, and an iterative modified Newton-Raphson algorithm was developed for the solution of the inverse problem. The RMS norm between the simulated and the experimental voltages was found to be 0.08 +/- 0.05 mV (<3%). Two regularization methods were implemented and compared: the Marquardt regularization and the Laplacian regularization (a bounded second-derivative regularization). While the Laplacian regularization method was found to be preferred for simulated data, it resulted in distinctive spatial artifacts for measured data. The experimental reconstructed images were found to be indicative of the angular positioning of the conductivity perturbations, though the radial sensitivity was low, especially when using the Marquardt regularization method. PMID:15005319

  17. Evaluating Geothermal Potential in Germany by Numerical Reservoir Modeling of Engineered Geothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Charitra; Vogt, Christian; Clauser, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    We model hypothetical Engineered Geothermal System (EGS) reservoirs by solving coupled partial differential equations governing fluid flow and heat transport. Building on EGS's strengths of inherent modularity and storage capability, it is possible to implement multiple wells in the reservoir to extend the rock volume accessible for circulating water in order to increase the heat yield. By varying parameters like flow rates and well-separations in the subsurface, this study looks at their long-term impacts on the reservoir development. This approach allows us to experiment with different placements of the engineered fractures and propose several EGS layouts for achieving optimized heat extraction. Considering the available crystalline area and accounting for the competing land uses, this study evaluates the overall EGS potential and compares it with those of other used renewables in Germany. There is enough area to support 13450 EGS plants, each with six reversed-triplets (18 wells) and an average electric power of 35.3MWe. When operated at full capacity, these systems can collectively supply 4155TWh of electric energy in one year which would be roughly six times the electric energy produced in Germany in the year 2011. Engineered Geothermal Systems make a compelling case for contributing towards national power production in a future powered by a sustainable, decentralized energy system.

  18. Numerical analysis of stiffened shells of revolution. Volume 7: Satellite programs for the STARS system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svalbonas, V.; Ogilvie, P.

    1973-01-01

    The user and programming information necessary for the application of the SATELLITE programs for the STARS system are presented. The individual program functions are: (1) data debugging for the STARS-2S program, (2) Fourier series conversion program, (3) data debugging for the STARS-2B program, and (4) data debugging for the STARS-2V program.

  19. Numerical investigation of nonlinear vibration for rotor-seal system of centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, W. J.; Yang, Y. C.; Xing, G. K.; Wang, L. Q.

    2013-12-01

    The exciting force in the seal is an important factor for the stability of a multiple stage centrifugal pump. With the speed increasing, the rotor system of multiple stage centrifugal pump presents some nonlinear characters. In order to provide supports for the research of nonlinear characters of multiple stage centrifugal pump, a rotor-seal system model of centrifugal pump is presented and the Muszynska nonlinear seal model is used to express the seal exciting force with multiple parameters in the paper. The fourth-order Runge-Kutta method is also used to determine the vibration response at the impeller place and obtain bifurcation diagram, axis orbit, phase diagram as well as Poincaré Map. The bifurcation results show that the rotor-seal system would be stable under a lower speed and change to be unstable as the rotor speed increases. Various multi-periodic motions and quasi-periodic motions are found showing the complicated motions in the rotor-seal system under nonlinear seal forces.

  20. Numerical Simulation and Analysis of a Series of Mesoscale Convective Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bresch, James Francis

    A case in which a series of mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) traversed across Kansas and Oklahoma (3 -4 June 1985) was examined using observations and the MM4 model. The first MCS in the series (MCS1) began north of a stationary front in a region of strong low-level warm advection and moisture convergence near the terminus of a low-level jet (LLJ). Simulations of this system evolved realistically and show that the elevated convection fed on air riding over the frontal inversion. This source air originated in the heated boundary layer over Texas and Oklahoma the previous afternoon. The system-relative circulation of the mature system did not exhibit a front -to-rear upper-level flow nor extensive trailing stratiform region as has been observed with other systems. The second MCS (MCS2) was linked to an upper-level jet streak throughout its lifetime. In agreement with observations, the simulation produced the two precipitation bands within MCS2 that gave it the appearance of a miniature occluded cyclone. The north-south band, located in the southern half of the system, consisted of surface-based convection forced by low-level convergence of convective downdrafts with the environmental flow, while the northeast -southwest band in the northern part of the system was comprised of elevated convection occurring in a frontogenetic zone. Convection in this region was initially triggered by a LLJ induced by transverse ageostrophic circulations about an approaching upper-level jet streak. The strong LLJ was decoupled from the surface by the frontal inversion and was able to advect high-theta_ E air northwestward, destabilizing the airmass. The simulation of MCS1 was found to be sensitive to the initial low-level moisture distribution, suggesting that accurate prediction of elevated convection requires initial conditions that include mesoscale details aloft. In agreement with a previous study, the simulation was found to be quite sensitive to the convective trigger function