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Sample records for numerical simulation dns

  1. Large Eddy Simulations (LES) and Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) for the computational analyses of high speed reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman; Madnia, Cyrus K.; Steinberger, C. J.; Frankel, S. H.

    1992-01-01

    The principal objective is to extend the boundaries within which large eddy simulations (LES) and direct numerical simulations (DNS) can be applied in computational analyses of high speed reacting flows. A summary of work accomplished during the last six months is presented.

  2. Assessment of the DNS Data Accuracy Using RANS-DNS Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colmenares F., Juan D.; Poroseva, Svetlana V.; Murman, Scott M.

    2015-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) provide the most accurate computational description of a turbulent flow field and its statistical characteristics. Therefore, results of simulations with Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence models are often evaluated against DNS data. The goal of our study is to determine a limit of RANS model performance in relation to existing DNS data. Since no model can outperform DNS, this limit can be determined by solving RANS equations with all unknown terms being represented by their DNS data (RANS-DNS simulations). In the presentation, results of RANS-DNS simulations conducted using transport equations for velocity moments of second, third, and fourth orders in incompressible planar wall-bounded flows are discussed. The results were obtained with two solvers: OpenFOAM and in-house code for fully-developed flows at different Reynolds numbers using different DNS databases. The material is in part based upon work supported by NASA under award NNX12AJ61A.

  3. DNS/LES Simulations of Separated Flows at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, P.

    2015-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) and large-eddy simulations (LES) simulations of flow through a periodic channel with a constriction are performed using the dynamic Smagorinsky model at two Reynolds numbers of 2800 and 10595. The LES equations are solved using higher order compact schemes. DNS are performed for the lower Reynolds number case using a fine grid and the data are used to validate the LES results obtained with a coarse and a medium size grid. LES simulations are also performed for the higher Reynolds number case using a coarse and a medium size grid. The results are compared with an existing reference data set. The DNS and LES results agreed well with the reference data. Reynolds stresses, sub-grid eddy viscosity, and the budgets for the turbulent kinetic energy are also presented. It is found that the turbulent fluctuations in the normal and spanwise directions have the same magnitude. The turbulent kinetic energy budget shows that the production peaks near the separation point region and the production to dissipation ratio is very high on the order of five in this region. It is also observed that the production is balanced by the advection, diffusion, and dissipation in the shear layer region. The dominant term is the turbulent diffusion that is about two times the molecular dissipation.

  4. Detailed characteristics of drop-laden mixing layers: LES predictions compared to DNS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okong'o, N.; Leboissetier, A.; Bellan, J.

    2004-01-01

    Results have been compared from Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of a temporal mixing layer laden with evaporating drops, to assess the ability of LES to reproduce detailed characteristics of DNS.

  5. Discussion of DNS: Past, Present, and Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, Ronald D.

    1997-01-01

    This paper covers the review, status, and projected future of direct numerical simulation (DNS) methodology relative to the state-of-the-art in computer technology, numerical methods, and the trends in fundamental research programs.

  6. Hierarchy of hybrid unsteady-flow simulations integrating time-resolved PTV with DNS and their data-assimilation capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Takao; Yamamoto, Fujio

    2015-10-01

    Data-assimilation capabilities of hybrid-type simulations integrating time-resolved particle image velocimetry with unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are characterized, and a series of algorithms developed previously are evaluated in terms of four criteria: (i) compatibility with the governing equations; (ii) completeness of a set of flow quantities; (iii) temporal and spatial filtering functions; and (iv) spatial resolution. This study specifically introduces a hierarchy of three hybrid simulations combining time-resolved particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) and direct numerical simulation (DNS) from low to high fidelities: the proper orthogonal decomposition-Galerkin-projection approach with proportional feedback of PTV data, the DNS solver with similar feedback, and the DNS solver with the extended Kalman filter. By solving a planar-jet problem at {Re}≈ 2000, we demonstrate that the resultant hybrid flow fields essentially (i) satisfy the governing equations spatially and approximately temporally, and (ii) can provide instantaneous pressure fields (iii) with the noise levels substantially lower than those of the original PTV data and (iv) the resolution comparable to CFD. The results show that increasing the feedback gain improves replicability, i.e. the agreement between the simulation and the data; however, it degrades temporal compatibility and filtering functions. On the other hand, the fidelity enhances both replicability and spatial filtering, but increases computational cost.

  7. Progress in direct numerical simulation of turbulent heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Kasagi, Nobuhide; Iida, Oaki

    1999-07-01

    With high performance computers, reliable numerical methods and efficient post-processing environment, direct numerical simulation (DNS) offers valuable numerical experiments for turbulent heat transfer research. In particular, one can extensively study the turbulence dynamics and transport mechanism by visualizing any physical variable in space and time. It is also possible to establish detailed database of various turbulence statistics of turbulent transport phenomena, while systematically changing important flow and scalar field parameters. The present paper illustrates these novelties of DNS by introducing several examples in recent studies. Future directions of DNS for turbulence and heat transfer research are also discussed.

  8. An algorithm for fast DNS cavitating flows simulations using homogeneous mixture approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žnidarčič, A.; Coutier-Delgosha, O.; Marquillie, M.; Dular, M.

    2015-12-01

    A new algorithm for fast DNS cavitating flows simulations is developed. The algorithm is based on Kim and Moin projection method form. Homogeneous mixture approach with transport equation for vapour volume fraction is used to model cavitation and various cavitation models can be used. Influence matrix and matrix diagonalisation technique enable fast parallel computations.

  9. LES versus DNS: A comparative study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shtilman, L.; Chasnov, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    We have performed Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of forced isotropic turbulence at moderate Reynolds numbers. The subgrid scale model used in the LES is based on an eddy viscosity which adjusts instantaneously the energy spectrum of the LES to that of the DNS. The statistics of the large scales of the DNS (filtered DNS field or fDNS) are compared to that of the LES. We present results for the transfer spectra, the skewness and flatness factors of the velocity components, the PDF's of the angle between the vorticity and the eigenvectors of the rate of strain, and that between the vorticity and the vorticity stretching tensor. The above LES statistics are found to be in good agreement with those measured in the fDNS field. We further observe that in all the numerical measurements, the trend was for the LES field to be more gaussian than the fDNS field. Future research on this point is planned.

  10. Hydroacoustic forcing function modeling using DNS database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zawadzki, I.; Gershfield, J. L.; Na, Y.; Wang, M.

    1996-01-01

    A wall pressure frequency spectrum model (Blake 1971 ) has been evaluated using databases from Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of a turbulent boundary layer (Na & Moin 1996). Good agreement is found for moderate to strong adverse pressure gradient flows in the absence of separation. In the separated flow region, the model underpredicts the directly calculated spectra by an order of magnitude. The discrepancy is attributed to the violation of the model assumptions in that part of the flow domain. DNS computed coherence length scales and the normalized wall pressure cross-spectra are compared with experimental data. The DNS results are consistent with experimental observations.

  11. A numerical method for DNS/LES of turbulent reacting flows

    SciTech Connect

    Doom, Jeff; Hou, Yucheng; Mahesh, Krishnan

    2007-09-10

    A spatially non-dissipative, implicit numerical method to simulate turbulent reacting flows over a range of Mach numbers, is described. The compressible Navier-Stokes equations are rescaled so that the zero Mach number equations are discretely recovered in the limit of zero Mach number. The dependent variables are co-located in space, and thermodynamic variables are staggered from velocity in time. The algorithm discretely conserves kinetic energy in the incompressible, inviscid, non-reacting limit. The chemical source terms are implicit in time to allow for stiff chemical mechanisms. The algorithm is readily extended to complex chemical mechanisms. Numerical examples using both simple and complex chemical mechanisms are presented.

  12. Prediction of dynamic and mixing characteristics of drop-laden mixing layers using DNS and LES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okong'o, N.; Leboissetier, A.; Bellan, J.

    2004-01-01

    Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) have been conducted of a temporal mixing layer laden with evaporating drops, in order to assess the ability of LES to reproduce dynamic and mixing aspects of the DNS which affect combustion, independently of combustion models.

  13. Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    An overview of historical and current numerical aerodynamic simulation (NAS) is given. The capabilities and goals of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility are outlined. Emphasis is given to numerical flow visualization and its applications to structural analysis of aircraft and spacecraft bodies. The uses of NAS in computational chemistry, engine design, and galactic evolution are mentioned.

  14. PDF turbulence modeling and DNS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, A. T.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of time discontinuity (or jump condition) in the coalescence/dispersion (C/D) mixing model is addressed in probability density function (pdf). A C/D mixing model continuous in time is introduced. With the continuous mixing model, the process of chemical reaction can be fully coupled with mixing. In the case of homogeneous turbulence decay, the new model predicts a pdf very close to a Gaussian distribution, with finite higher moments also close to that of a Gaussian distribution. Results from the continuous mixing model are compared with both experimental data and numerical results from conventional C/D models. The effect of Coriolis forces on compressible homogeneous turbulence is studied using direct numerical simulation (DNS). The numerical method used in this study is an eight order compact difference scheme. Contrary to the conclusions reached by previous DNS studies on incompressible isotropic turbulence, the present results show that the Coriolis force increases the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy, and that anisotropy develops as the Coriolis force increases. The Taylor-Proudman theory does apply since the derivatives in the direction of the rotation axis vanishes rapidly. A closer analysis reveals that the dissipation rate of the incompressible component of the turbulent kinetic energy indeed decreases with a higher rotation rate, consistent with incompressible flow simulations (Bardina), while the dissipation rate of the compressible part increases; the net gain is positive. Inertial waves are observed in the simulation results.

  15. Terascale Direct Numerical Simulations of Turbulent Combustion: Capabilities and Limits (PReSS Talk)

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Chun Sang

    2009-03-26

    The rapid growth in computational capabilities has provided great opportunities for direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent combustion, a type of simulations without any turbulence model. With the help of terascale high performance supercomputing (HPC) resources, we are now able to provide fundamental insight into turbulence-chemistry interaction in simple laboratory-scale turbulent flames with detailed chemistry using three-dimensional (3D) DNS. However, the actual domain size of 3D-DNS is still limited within {approx} O(10 cm{sup 3}) due to its tremendously high grid resolution required to resolve the smallest turbulent length scale as well as flame structures. Moreover, 3D-DNS will require more computing powers to investigate next-generation engines, of which operating conditions will be characterized by higher pressures, lower temperatures, and higher levels of dilution. In this talk, I will discuss the capabilities and limits of DNS of turbulent combustion and present some results of ignition/extinction characteristics of a highly diluted hydrogen flame counter-flowing against heated air. The results of our recent 3D-DNS of a spatially-developing turbulent lifted hydrogen jet flame in heated coflow will also be presented. The 3D-DNS was performed at a jet Reynolds number of 11,000 with {approx} 1 billion grid points, which required 3.5 million CPU hours on Cray XT3/XT4 at Oak Ridge National Laboratories.

  16. Direct Numerical Simulation of an Adverse Pressure Gradient Turbulent Boundary Layer at the Verge of Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitsios, Vassili; Atkinson, Callum; Sillero, Juan; Guillem, Borrell; Gungor, Ayse; Jimenéz, Javier; Soria, Julio

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the structure of an adverse pressure gradient (APG) turbulent boundary layer (TBL) at the verge of separation. The intended flow is generated via direct numerical simulation (DNS). The adopted DNS code was previously developed for a zero pressure gradient TBL. Here the farfield boundary condition (BC) is modified to generate the desired APG flow. The input parameters required for the APG BC are initially estimated from a series of Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes simulations. The BC is implemented into the DNS code with further refinement of the BC performed. The behaviour of the large scale dynamics is illustrated via the extraction of coherent structures from the DNS using analysis of the velocity gradient tensor and vortex clustering techniques. The authors acknowledge the research funding from the Australian Research Council and European Research Council, and the computational resources provided by NCI and PRACE.

  17. Rocket engine numerical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidian, Ken

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in view graph form and include the following: a definition of the rocket engine numerical simulator (RENS); objectives; justification; approach; potential applications; potential users; RENS work flowchart; RENS prototype; and conclusions.

  18. Direct numerical simulation of active fiber composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung J.; Hwang, Joon S.; Paik, Seung H.

    2003-08-01

    Active Fiber Composites (AFC) possess desirable characteristics for smart structure applications. One major advantage of AFC is the ability to create anisotropic laminate layers useful in applications requiring off-axis or twisting motions. AFC is naturally composed of two different constituents: piezoelectric fiber and matrix. Therefore, homogenization method, which is utilized in the analysis of laminated composite material, has been used to characterize the material properties. Using this approach, the global behaviors of the structures are predicted in an averaged sense. However, this approach has intrinsic limitations in describing the local behaviors in the level of the constituents. Actually, the failure analysis of AFC requires the knowledge of the local behaviors. Therefore, microscopic approach is necessary to predict the behaviors of AFC. In this work, a microscopic approach for the analysis of AFC was performed. Piezoelectric fiber and matrix were modeled separately and finite element method using three-dimensional solid elements was utilized. Because fine mesh is essential, high performance computing technology was applied to the solution of the immense degree-of-freedom problem. This approach is called Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of structure. Through the DNS of AFC, local stress distribution around the interface of fiber and matrix was analyzed.

  19. Direct numerical simulation of nonpremixed flame-wall interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yi; Trouve, Arnaud

    2006-02-01

    The objective of the present study is to use detailed numerical modeling to obtain basic information on the interaction of nonpremixed flames with cold wall surfaces. The questions of turbulent fuel-air-temperature mixing, flame extinction, and wall-surface heat transfer are studied using direct numerical simulation (DNS). The DNS configuration corresponds to an ethylene-air diffusion flame stabilized in the near-wall region of a chemically inert solid surface. Simulations are performed with adiabatic or isothermal wall boundary conditions and with different turbulence intensities. The simulations feature flame extinction events resulting from excessive wall cooling and convective heat transfer rates up to 90 kW/m{sup 2}. The structure of the simulated wall flames is studied in terms of a classical mass-mixing variable, the fuel-air based mixture fraction, and a less familiar heat loss variable, the excess enthalpy variable, introduced to provide a measure of nonadiabatic behavior due to wall cooling. In addition to the flame structure, extinction events are also studied in detail and a modified flame extinction criterion that combines the concepts of mixture fraction and excess enthalpy is proposed and then tested against the DNS data. (author)

  20. Direct Numerical Simulations of Multiphase Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tryggvason, Gretar

    2013-03-01

    Many natural and industrial processes, such as rain and gas exchange between the atmosphere and oceans, boiling heat transfer, atomization and chemical reactions in bubble columns, involve multiphase flows. Often the mixture can be described as a disperse flow where one phase consists of bubbles or drops. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of disperse flow have recently been used to study the dynamics of multiphase flows with a large number of bubbles and drops, often showing that the collective motion results in relatively simple large-scale structure. Here we review simulations of bubbly flows in vertical channels where the flow direction, as well as the bubble deformability, has profound implications on the flow structure and the total flow rate. Results obtained so far are summarized and open questions identified. The resolution for DNS of multiphase flows is usually determined by a dominant scale, such as the average bubble or drop size, but in many cases much smaller scales are also present. These scales often consist of thin films, threads, or tiny drops appearing during coalescence or breakup, or are due to the presence of additional physical processes that operate on a very different time scale than the fluid flow. The presence of these small-scale features demand excessive resolution for conventional numerical approaches. However, at small flow scales the effects of surface tension are generally strong so the interface geometry is simple and viscous forces dominate the flow and keep it simple also. These are exactly the conditions under which analytical models can be used and we will discuss efforts to combine a semi-analytical description for the small-scale processes with a fully resolved simulation of the rest of the flow. We will, in particular, present an embedded analytical description to capture the mass transfer from bubbles in liquids where the diffusion of mass is much slower than the diffusion of momentum. This results in very thin mass-boundary layers that are difficult to resolve, but the new approach allows us to simulate the mass transfer from many freely evolving bubbles and examine the effect of the interactions of the bubbles with each other and the flow. We will conclude by attempting to summarize the current status of DNS of multiphase flows. Support by NSF and DOE (CASL)

  1. Direct Numerical Simulation and Theories of Wall Turbulence with a Range of Pressure Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, G. N.; Garbaruk, A.; Spalart, P. R.

    2014-01-01

    A new Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of Couette-Poiseuille flow at a higher Reynolds number is presented and compared with DNS of other wall-bounded flows. It is analyzed in terms of testing semi-theoretical proposals for universal behavior of the velocity, mixing length, or eddy viscosity in pressure gradients, and in terms of assessing the accuracy of two turbulence models. These models are used in two modes, the traditional one with only a dependence on the wall-normal coordinate y, and a newer one in which a lateral dependence on z is added. For pure Couette flow and the Couette-Poiseuille case considered here, this z-dependence allows some models to generate steady streamwise vortices, which generally improves the agreement with DNS and experiment. On the other hand, it complicates the comparison between DNS and models.

  2. Estimating Uncertainties in Statistics Computed from DNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaya, Nicholas; Ulerich, Rhys; Oliver, Todd; Moser, Robert

    2012-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulence is a critical tool for investigating the physics of turbulent flows and for informing and developing engineering turbulence models. For instance, flow statistics obtained from DNS are commonly used as ``truth data'' for the calibration and evaluation of turbulence models. Thus, like experimental data, uncertainty estimates are a necessary component of the reported output. In DNS, uncertainties in the computed statistics arise from two sources: finite sampling and the discretization of the Navier-Stokes equations. Here, we apply estimators for both sources of error. Finite sampling errors are estimated using the ``effective sample size,'' which accounts for the fact that the instantaneous data are correlated. Discretization errors are estimated using data from simulations with varying time step and mesh spacing. The performance of these estimators is tested for several statistics using DNS of turbulent channel flow at low Reynolds number (Reτ ~ 180). This work is supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number [DE-FC52-08NA28615].

  3. DNS of turbulent channel flow with a higher Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Hiroshi; Abe, Hiroyuki; Matsuo, Yuichi

    1998-11-01

    With an aid of recent developments in the super and parallel computers, the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulence is now being increasingly performed. It is already more than 10 years ago when Kim-Moin-Moser published their DNS on the turbulent channel flow. Their Reynolds number based on the friction velocity and channel half width was Re_τ=180. In a couple of years they made also a DNS with a higher Re_τ of 395. To the author's knowledge, DNS of a higher Reynolds number than 400 has not been published. The author's group has attempted to perform the DNS of Re_τ=640 using a vectorized parallel computer NWT (Numerical Wind Tunnel). The calculation was made with 512×256×256 grids on 64 processors. The numerical integration was made by the finite difference method. The discretization scheme was a so-called 'consistent scheme', in which a special attention was paid for the consistency between the analytical and the numerical differentiations. The mean velocity and the Reynolds stress components as well as the budget of their transport equations were obtained. They are compared with those of lower Reynolds number flows and the effect of the Reynolds number is discussed.

  4. Direct numerical simulation of homogeneous turbulence with hyperviscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamorgese, A. G.; Caughey, D. A.; Pope, S. B.

    2005-01-01

    We perform direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the hyperviscous Navier-Stokes equations in a periodic box. We consider values of the hyperviscosity index h =1, 2, 8, and vary the hyperviscosity to obtain the largest range of lengthscale ratios possible for well-resolved pseudo-spectral DNS. It is found that the spectral bump, or bottleneck, in the energy spectrum observed at the start of the dissipation range becomes more pronounced as the hyperviscosity index is increased. The calculated energy spectra are used to develop an empirical model for the dissipation range which accurately represents the bottleneck. This model is used to predict the approach of the turbulent kinetic energy k to its asymptotic value, k∞, as the hyperviscosity tends to zero.

  5. Dynamic stiffness removal for direct numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Tianfeng; Law, Chung K.; Yoo, Chun Sang; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2009-08-15

    A systematic approach was developed to derive non-stiff reduced mechanisms for direct numerical simulations (DNS) with explicit integration solvers. The stiffness reduction was achieved through on-the-fly elimination of short time-scales induced by two features of fast chemical reactivity, namely quasi-steady-state (QSS) species and partial-equilibrium (PE) reactions. The sparse algebraic equations resulting from QSS and PE approximations were utilized such that the efficiency of the dynamic stiffness reduction is high compared with general methods of time-scale reduction based on Jacobian decomposition. Using the dimension reduction strategies developed in our previous work, a reduced mechanism with 52 species was first derived from a detailed mechanism with 561 species. The reduced mechanism was validated for ignition and extinction applications over the parameter range of equivalence ratio between 0.5 and 1.5, pressure between 10 and 50 atm, and initial temperature between 700 and 1600 K for ignition, and worst-case errors of approximately 30% were observed. The reduced mechanism with dynamic stiffness removal was then applied in homogeneous and 1-D ignition applications, as well as a 2-D direct numerical simulation of ignition with temperature inhomogeneities at constant volume with integration time-steps of 5-10 ns. The integration was numerically stable and good accuracy was achieved. (author)

  6. Large eddy simulations and direct numerical simulations of high speed turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman; Madnia, C. K.; Steinberger, C. J.; Tsai, A.

    1991-01-01

    This research is involved with the implementations of advanced computational schemes based on large eddy simulations (LES) and direct numerical simulations (DNS) to study the phenomenon of mixing and its coupling with chemical reactions in compressible turbulent flows. In the efforts related to LES, a research program was initiated to extend the present capabilities of this method for the treatment of chemically reacting flows, whereas in the DNS efforts, focus was on detailed investigations of the effects of compressibility, heat release, and nonequilibrium kinetics modeling in high speed reacting flows. The efforts to date were primarily focussed on simulations of simple flows, namely, homogeneous compressible flows and temporally developing hign speed mixing layers. A summary of the accomplishments is provided.

  7. Large eddy simulations and direct numerical simulations of high speed turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Givi, Peyman; Madnia, C. K.; Steinberger, C. J.; Tsai, A.

    1991-06-01

    This research is involved with the implementations of advanced computational schemes based on large eddy simulations (LES) and direct numerical simulations (DNS) to study the phenomenon of mixing and its coupling with chemical reactions in compressible turbulent flows. In the efforts related to LES, a research program was initiated to extend the present capabilities of this method for the treatment of chemically reacting flows, whereas in the DNS efforts, focus was on detailed investigations of the effects of compressibility, heat release, and nonequilibrium kinetics modeling in high speed reacting flows. The efforts to date were primarily focussed on simulations of simple flows, namely, homogeneous compressible flows and temporally developing hign speed mixing layers. A summary of the accomplishments is provided.

  8. Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, V. L.; Ballhaus, W. F., Jr.; Bailey, F. R.

    1983-01-01

    The history of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Program, which is designed to provide a leading-edge capability to computational aerodynamicists, is traced back to its origin in 1975. Factors motivating its development and examples of solutions to successively refined forms of the governing equations are presented. The NAS Processing System Network and each of its eight subsystems are described in terms of function and initial performance goals. A proposed usage allocation policy is discussed and some initial problems being readied for solution on the NAS system are identified.

  9. Numerical propulsion system simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lytle, John K.; Remaklus, David A.; Nichols, Lester D.

    1990-01-01

    The cost of implementing new technology in aerospace propulsion systems is becoming prohibitively expensive. One of the major contributors to the high cost is the need to perform many large scale system tests. Extensive testing is used to capture the complex interactions among the multiple disciplines and the multiple components inherent in complex systems. The objective of the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) is to provide insight into these complex interactions through computational simulations. This will allow for comprehensive evaluation of new concepts early in the design phase before a commitment to hardware is made. It will also allow for rapid assessment of field-related problems, particularly in cases where operational problems were encountered during conditions that would be difficult to simulate experimentally. The tremendous progress taking place in computational engineering and the rapid increase in computing power expected through parallel processing make this concept feasible within the near future. However it is critical that the framework for such simulations be put in place now to serve as a focal point for the continued developments in computational engineering and computing hardware and software. The NPSS concept which is described will provide that framework.

  10. The Use of DNS in Turbulence Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansour, Nagi N.; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The use of Direct numerical simulations (DNS) data in developing and testing turbulence models is reviewed. The data is used to test turbulence models at all levels: algebraic, one-equation, two-equation and full Reynolds stress models were tested. Particular examples on the development of models for the dissipation rate equation are presented. Homogeneous flows are used to test new scaling arguments for the various terms in the dissipation rate equation. The channel flow data is used to develop modifications to the equation model that take into account near-wall effects. DNS of compressible flows under mean compression are used in testing new compressible modifications to the two-equation models.

  11. Confidence in Numerical Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hemez, Francois M.

    2015-02-23

    This PowerPoint presentation offers a high-level discussion of uncertainty, confidence and credibility in scientific Modeling and Simulation (M&S). It begins by briefly evoking M&S trends in computational physics and engineering. The first thrust of the discussion is to emphasize that the role of M&S in decision-making is either to support reasoning by similarity or to “forecast,” that is, make predictions about the future or extrapolate to settings or environments that cannot be tested experimentally. The second thrust is to explain that M&S-aided decision-making is an exercise in uncertainty management. The three broad classes of uncertainty in computational physics and engineering are variability and randomness, numerical uncertainty and model-form uncertainty. The last part of the discussion addresses how scientists “think.” This thought process parallels the scientific method where by a hypothesis is formulated, often accompanied by simplifying assumptions, then, physical experiments and numerical simulations are performed to confirm or reject the hypothesis. “Confidence” derives, not just from the levels of training and experience of analysts, but also from the rigor with which these assessments are performed, documented and peer-reviewed.

  12. Large eddy simulations and direct numerical simulations of high speed turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, P.; Madnia, C. K.; Steinberger, C. J.; Frankel, S. H.; Vidoni, T. J.

    1991-01-01

    The main objective is to extend the boundaries within which large eddy simulations (LES) and direct numerical simulations (DNS) can be applied in computational analyses of high speed reacting flows. In the efforts related to LES, we were concerned with developing reliable subgrid closures for modeling of the fluctuation correlations of scalar quantities in reacting turbulent flows. In the work on DNS, we focused our attention to further investigation of the effects of exothermicity in compressible turbulent flows. In our previous work, in the first year of this research, we have considered only 'simple' flows. Currently, we are in the process of extending our analyses for the purpose of modeling more practical flows of current interest at LaRC. A summary of our accomplishments during the third six months of the research is presented.

  13. A high-order numerical algorithm for DNS of low-Mach-number reactive flows with detailed chemistry and quasi-spectral accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motheau, E.; Abraham, J.

    2016-05-01

    A novel and efficient algorithm is presented in this paper to deal with DNS of turbulent reacting flows under the low-Mach-number assumption, with detailed chemistry and a quasi-spectral accuracy. The temporal integration of the equations relies on an operating-split strategy, where chemical reactions are solved implicitly with a stiff solver and the convection-diffusion operators are solved with a Runge-Kutta-Chebyshev method. The spatial discretisation is performed with high-order compact schemes, and a FFT based constant-coefficient spectral solver is employed to solve a variable-coefficient Poisson equation. The numerical implementation takes advantage of the 2DECOMP&FFT libraries developed by [1], which are based on a pencil decomposition method of the domain and are proven to be computationally very efficient. An enhanced pressure-correction method is proposed to speed up the achievement of machine precision accuracy. It is demonstrated that a second-order accuracy is reached in time, while the spatial accuracy ranges from fourth-order to sixth-order depending on the set of imposed boundary conditions. The software developed to implement the present algorithm is called HOLOMAC, and its numerical efficiency opens the way to deal with DNS of reacting flows to understand complex turbulent and chemical phenomena in flames.

  14. Numerical Simulations of Bubble Dispersion over a Hydrofoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shuang; Ooi, Andrew; Blackburn, Hugh; Anderson, Brendon

    2009-11-01

    The production and entrainment of bubbles in ship wakes is not completely understood despite the fact that it has many practical applications. For example, bubbles trapped in the large vortical structures in the ship wake can form clusters that are able to persist for large distances leaving a long trail of bubbles, which increases the ship's signature; an important consideration in the defence environment. The fundamental mechanisms behind the complicated bubbly flow can be understood using data from numerical simulations. The objective of the study is to investigate the accuracy of current state-of-art numerical models for simulating bubbly flows. A spectral element-Fourier code will be used to carry out direct numerical simulations (DNS) with Lagrangian particle tracking to study the interaction of the upstream bubble distribution with a hydrofoil at different angles of attack and Reynolds numbers, and the effect on the resulting downstream bubble distribution.

  15. Direct Numerical Simulation of Mach 3 Compression Ramp Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priebe, Stephan; Martin, Pino

    2010-11-01

    We present the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a shockwave and turbulent boundary layer interaction (STBLI) generated by a compression ramp. The flow conditions are Mach 2.9 and Re?=2900, and the ramp angle is 24 degrees. STBLI flows are known to display low-frequency unsteadiness, typically at frequencies 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than that of the incoming undisturbed boundary layer. The presence of these low-frequency motions in the DNS data and their relationship with the upstream and downstream flow regions have been demonstrated (Priebe and Martin, AIAA paper 2010-108). The DNS data show that the low-frequency shock motion is significantly correlated with the downstream flow. A statistically significant but small correlation is also found with the upstream flow. In the present paper, we investigate the flow structure associated with the downstream flow regions and study the time-and-space resolved dynamics of the shock motion, shear layer and separated flow regions.

  16. Entropy Splitting for High Order Numerical Simulation of Compressible Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandham, N. D.; Yee, H. C.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A stable high order numerical scheme for direct numerical simulation (DNS) of shock-free compressible turbulence is presented. The method is applicable to general geometries. It contains no upwinding, artificial dissipation, or filtering. Instead the method relies on the stabilizing mechanisms of an appropriate conditioning of the governing equations and the use of compatible spatial difference operators for the interior points (interior scheme) as well as the boundary points (boundary scheme). An entropy splitting approach splits the inviscid flux derivatives into conservative and non-conservative portions. The spatial difference operators satisfy a summation by parts condition leading to a stable scheme (combined interior and boundary schemes) for the initial boundary value problem using a generalized energy estimate. A Laplacian formulation of the viscous and heat conduction terms on the right hand side of the Navier-Stokes equations is used to ensure that any tendency to odd-even decoupling associated with central schemes can be countered by the fluid viscosity. A special formulation of the continuity equation is used, based on similar arguments. The resulting methods are able to minimize spurious high frequency oscillation producing nonlinear instability associated with pure central schemes, especially for long time integration simulation such as DNS. For validation purposes, the methods are tested in a DNS of compressible turbulent plane channel flow at a friction Mach number of 0.1 where a very accurate turbulence data base exists. It is demonstrated that the methods are robust in terms of grid resolution, and in good agreement with incompressible channel data, as expected at this Mach number. Accurate turbulence statistics can be obtained with moderate grid sizes. Stability limits on the range of the splitting parameter are determined from numerical tests.

  17. Numerical Simulation of Viscoelastic Fluid Flow in the Curvilinear Micro-Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Y.; Li, F. C.; Zhang, H. N.; Cai, W. H.; Yang, J. C.

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, three-dimensional direct numerical simulation method (DNS) based on Giesekus constitutive models have been used to simulate viscoelastic fluid flows in a curvilinear micro-channel. For comparison, we also carried out numerical simulations of Newtonian fluid flow in the same channel. The results obtained were in good agreement with experimental results given by Li et al. in the same geometrical size. Through numerical simulations we investigated the basic characteristics of viscoelastic flow in such a geometry and the influence of the curvature. Besides, the physical mechanism of the elastic instability in the curvilinear micro-channel was also discussed.

  18. Direct numerical simulations of trailing-edge noise generated by boundary-layer instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandberg, R. D.; Sandham, N. D.; Joseph, P. F.

    2007-07-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) are conducted of noise generated at an infinitely thin trailing edge (TE). The aim is to predict the far-field sound and the near-field hydrodynamics, thereby providing an insight into the physical mechanisms of sound generation at airfoil TEs and potentially helping to validate acoustic theories. One of the theories widely used is the classical inviscid theory of Amiet, where the far-field sound can be evaluated in closed form if the convecting surface pressure spectrum upstream of the TE is known. For the first time, data from DNS including viscous effects are compared to the classical inviscid TE noise theory. In the present investigation, Tollmien-Schlichting waves are introduced close to the inflow boundary. The disturbances propagate downstream producing pressure fluctuations at the TE. In conducting two-dimensional DNS the theoretical method requires modification to account for the radiation of the total pressure difference in two dimensions only, as opposed to the three-dimensional sound radiation originally considered by Amiet. The modified theoretical analysis and a comparison between DNS and theoretical results are presented, scrutinizing the assumptions made in the derivation. Amiet's surface pressure jump transfer function is found to predict the scattered pressure field accurately. Directivity plots of DNS data show that viscous effects appear to smear individual lobes and that a downstream pointing lobe is present at higher Mach number which is attributed to an additional wake source.

  19. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent reacting flows

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.H.

    1993-12-01

    The development of turbulent combustion models that reflect some of the most important characteristics of turbulent reacting flows requires knowledge about the behavior of key quantities in well defined combustion regimes. In turbulent flames, the coupling between the turbulence and the chemistry is so strong in certain regimes that is is very difficult to isolate the role played by one individual phenomenon. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is an extremely useful tool to study in detail the turbulence-chemistry interactions in certain well defined regimes. Globally, non-premixed flames are controlled by two limiting cases: the fast chemistry limit, where the turbulent fluctuations. In between these two limits, finite-rate chemical effects are important and the turbulence interacts strongly with the chemical processes. This regime is important because industrial burners operate in regimes in which, locally the flame undergoes extinction, or is at least in some nonequilibrium condition. Furthermore, these nonequilibrium conditions strongly influence the production of pollutants. To quantify the finite-rate chemistry effect, direct numerical simulations are performed to study the interaction between an initially laminar non-premixed flame and a three-dimensional field of homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulence. Emphasis is placed on the dynamics of extinction and on transient effects on the fine scale mixing process. Differential molecular diffusion among species is also examined with this approach, both for nonreacting and reacting situations. To address the problem of large-scale mixing and to examine the effects of mean shear, efforts are underway to perform large eddy simulations of round three-dimensional jets.

  20. Direct numerical simulation of shockwave and turbulent boundary layer interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Minwei

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of a shockwave/turbulent boundary layer interaction (STBLI) at Mach number 3 and Reynolds number based on the momentum thickness of 2300 are performed. A 4th-order accurate, bandwidth-optimized weighted-essentially-non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme is used and the method is found to be too dissipative for the STBLI simulation due to the over-adaptation properties of this original WENO scheme. In turn, a relative limiter is introduced to mitigate the problem. Tests on the Shu-Osher problem show that the modified WENO scheme decreases the numerical dissipation significantly. By utilizing a combination of the relative limiter and the absolute limiter described by Jiang & Shu [32], the DNS results are improved further. The DNS data agree well with the reference experiments of Bookey et al. [10] in the size of the separation bubble, the separation and reattachment point, the mean wall-pressure distribution, and the velocity profiles both upstream and downstream of the interaction region. The DNS data show that velocity profiles change dramatically along the streamwise direction. Downstream of the interaction, the velocity profiles show a characteristic "dip" in the logarithmic region, as shown by the experiments of Smits & Muck [66] at much higher Reynolds number. In the separation region, the velocity profiles are found to resemble those of a laminar flow, yet the flow does not fully relaminarize. The mass-flux turbulence intensity is amplified by a factor of about 5 throughout the interaction, which is consistent with that found in higher Reynolds experiments of Selig et al. [52]. All Reynolds stress components are greatly amplified by the interaction. Assuming that the ow is still two dimensional downstream of the interaction, the components rhou'u', rhov'v', rho w'w', and rho u'w' are amplified by factors of 6, 6, 12, and 24, respectively, where u is the streamwise and w is the wall-normal velocity. However, analyses of the turbulence structure show that the ow is not uniform in the spanwise direction downstream of the interaction. A pair of counter-rotating vortices is observed in streamwise-wall-normal planes in the mean ow downstream of the ramp corner. Taking the three-dimensionality into account, the amplification factors of the Reynolds stresses are greatly decreased. The component rhou'w' is amplified by a factor of about 10, which is comparable to that found in the experiments of Smits & Muck [66]. Strong Reynolds analogy (SRA) relations are also studied using the DNS data. The SRA is found to hold in the incoming boundary layer of the DNS. However, inside and downstream of the interaction region, the SRA relations are not satisfied. From the DNS analyses, the shock motion is characterized by a low frequency component (of order 0.01Uinfinity/delta). In addition, the motion of the shock is found to have two aspects: a spanwise wrinkling motion and a streamwise oscillatory motion. The spanwise wrinkling is observed to be a local feature with high frequencies (of order Uinfinity /delta). Two-point correlations reveal that the spanwise wrinkling is closely related to the low momentum motions in the incoming boundary layer as they convect through the shock. The low frequency shock motion is found to be a streamwise oscillation motion. Conditional statistics show that there is no significant difference in the mean properties of the incoming boundary layer when the shock is at an upstream or downstream location. However, analyses of the unsteadiness of the separation bubble reveal that the low frequency shock motion is driven by the downstream flow.

  1. Numerical simulation of dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Winske, D.

    1995-09-01

    The numerical simulation of physical processes in dusty plasmas is reviewed, with emphasis on recent results and unresolved issues. Three areas of research are discussed: grain charging, weak dust-plasma interactions, and strong dust-plasma interactions. For each area, we review the basic concepts that are tested by simulations, present some appropriate examples, and examine numerical issues associated with extending present work.

  2. Validation of Direct Numerical Simulations in 3D pore geometries and Large-Eddy Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, Dmitri

    2013-04-01

    Numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes Equations became more popular in recent decades with increasingly accessible and powerful computational resources. Simulations in reconstructed or artificial pore geometries are often performed to gain insight into microscopic fluid flow structures or are used for upscaling quantities of interest, like hydraulic conductivity. A physically adequate representation of pore scale flow fields requires analysis of large domains in combination with turbulence models. We solve incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations in a cubic lattice and cubic close packing of spheres placed in a square duct with Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) and analyze the validity of the results. The influence of the number of spheres and mesh discretization is investigated for fluid flow up to Reynolds numbers of 5000 based on the spheres' diameter. The numerical simulations are performed with the OpenFOAM open-source CFD software. We statistically investigate spatial and temporal properties of the resulting fluid flow field and its kinetic energy spectra, and compare them to Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) performed for the same geometries. Differences between the DNS and LES are discussed together with upscaled hydraulic properties with respect to the number of spheres and the Reynolds number.

  3. Direct Numerical Simulation of a Weakly Stratified Turbulent Wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redford, J. A.; Lund, T. S.; Coleman, Gary N.

    2014-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is used to investigate a time-dependent turbulent wake evolving in a stably stratified background. A large initial Froude number is chosen to allow the wake to become fully turbulent and axisymmetric before stratification affects the spreading rate of the mean defect. The uncertainty introduced by the finite sample size associated with gathering statistics from a simulation of a time-dependent flow is reduced, compared to earlier simulations of this flow. The DNS reveals the buoyancy-induced changes to the turbulence structure, as well as to the mean-defect history and the terms in the mean-momentum and turbulence-kinetic-energy budgets, that characterize the various states of this flow - namely the three-dimensional (essentially unstratified), non-equilibrium (or 'wake-collapse') and quasi-two-dimensional (or 'two-component') regimes observed elsewhere for wakes embedded in both weakly and strongly stratified backgrounds. The wake-collapse regime is not accompanied by transfer (or 'reconversion') of the potential energy of the turbulence to the kinetic energy of the turbulence, implying that this is not an essential feature of stratified-wake dynamics. The dependence upon Reynolds number of the duration of the wake-collapse period is demonstrated, and the effect of the details of the initial/near-field conditions of the wake on its subsequent development is examined.

  4. Scalar Dissipation Modeling for Passive and Active Scalars: a priori Study Using Direct Numerical Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selle, L. C.; Bellan, Josette

    2006-01-01

    Transitional databases from Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of three-dimensional mixing layers for single-phase flows and two-phase flows with evaporation are analyzed and used to examine the typical hypothesis that the scalar dissipation Probability Distribution Function (PDF) may be modeled as a Gaussian. The databases encompass a single-component fuel and four multicomponent fuels, two initial Reynolds numbers (Re), two mass loadings for two-phase flows and two free-stream gas temperatures. Using the DNS calculated moments of the scalar-dissipation PDF, it is shown, consistent with existing experimental information on single-phase flows, that the Gaussian is a modest approximation of the DNS-extracted PDF, particularly poor in the range of the high scalar-dissipation values, which are significant for turbulent reaction rate modeling in non-premixed flows using flamelet models. With the same DNS calculated moments of the scalar-dissipation PDF and making a change of variables, a model of this PDF is proposed in the form of the (beta)-PDF which is shown to approximate much better the DNS-extracted PDF, particularly in the regime of the high scalar-dissipation values. Several types of statistical measures are calculated over the ensemble of the fourteen databases. For each statistical measure, the proposed (beta)-PDF model is shown to be much superior to the Gaussian in approximating the DNS-extracted PDF. Additionally, the agreement between the DNS-extracted PDF and the (beta)-PDF even improves when the comparison is performed for higher initial Re layers, whereas the comparison with the Gaussian is independent of the initial Re values. For two-phase flows, the comparison between the DNS-extracted PDF and the (beta)-PDF also improves with increasing free-stream gas temperature and mass loading. The higher fidelity approximation of the DNS-extracted PDF by the (beta)-PDF with increasing Re, gas temperature and mass loading bodes well for turbulent reaction rate modeling.

  5. Numerical simulations of turbulence and mixing induced by submesoscale instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamper, Megan; Taylor, John

    2015-11-01

    Submesoscale features in the upper ocean with horizontal scales between 1-10km have received significant attention in the oceanography community in recent years. Previous work has found that submesoscales play an important role in setting the stratification of the upper ocean, and these scales are associated with large vertical velocities that modify biological productivity. Submesoscales bridge the dynamical gap between the mesoscale (~100km) where the earth's rotation plays a major role, and turbulent overturning scales (~1-10m) where the earth's rotation is not directly felt. Here, we use very high resolution direct numerical simulations (DNS) to explore the interaction and feedbacks between submesoscales and small scale turbulence. In simulations with submesoscale motions generated via symmetric and baroclinic instability, we find that the emergence of secondary instabilities leads to significant small-scale turbulence and mixing, even in the absence of wind and convective forcing. From the DNS results, we quantify the additional mixing, dissipation, and vertical fluxes induced by small scale turbulence, and its feedback on the primary submesoscale instabilities.

  6. Direct Numerical Simulation of the Convective Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Jade Rachele; Mellado, Juan Pedro

    2012-11-01

    The inversion of the dry shear-free Convective Boundary Layer is investigated by means of Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS). This work is motivated by the importance of entrainment and related mechanisms at the inversion of the atmospheric boundary layer, combined with the uncertainty of Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) there. Despite moderate Reynolds numbers attainable, results show that the achieved scale separation is enough to capture the expected 1 / 2 power law evolution in time, and the expected structure--an inversion-capped outer layer, whose statistics are comparable to LES results and atmospheric data when normalized with the convective scales, and an inner layer near the surface comparable to that of the heated plate case. In agreement with some previous investigations, the entrainment ratio A is a factor of two less than the nominal 0 . 2 even though the corresponding entrainment velocity is within 5% of the Zero-order Model prediction with A = 0 . 2 . To understand this apparent discrepancy, we use DNS data to directly determine the behavior of the terms of an exact equation for the entrainment ratio. Jülich Research Centre for the computing time.

  7. Turbulence analysis of rough wall channel flows based on direct numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, A. V.; Bolotnov, I. A.

    2012-07-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of rough wall channel flows was performed for various surface roughnesses. The goal of the presented research is to investigate the effect of nucleating bubbles in subcooled boiling conditions on the turbulence. The nucleating bubbles are represented by hemispherical roughness elements at the wall. The stabilized finite element based code, PHASTA, is used to perform the simulations. Validation against theoretical, experimental and numerical data is performed for smooth channel flow and rectangular rod type of roughness. The presence of roughness elements affects the flow structure within the roughness sublayer, which is estimated to be 5 times the height of roughness elements. DNS observations are consistent with this result and demonstrate the flow homogeneity above 50 viscous units. The influence of roughness elements layout and density on the turbulence parameters is also demonstrated and analyzed. (authors)

  8. Numerical simulation of Bootstrap Current

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yanlin; White, R.B.

    1993-05-01

    The neoclassical theory of Bootstrap Current in toroidal systems is calculated in magnetic flux coordinates and confirmed by numerical simulation. The effects of magnetic ripple, loop voltage, and magnetic and electrostatic perturbations on bootstrap current for the cases of zero and finite plasma pressure are studied. The numerical results are in reasonable agreement with analytical estimates.

  9. Resilience of helical fields to turbulent diffusion - II. Direct numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Pallavi; Blackman, Eric G.; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2014-03-01

    Blackman and Subramanian (Paper I) found that sufficiently strong large-scale helical magnetic fields are resilient to turbulent diffusion, decaying on resistively slow rather than turbulently fast time-scales. This bolsters fossil field origins for magnetic fields in some astrophysical objects. Here, we study direct numerical simulations (DNS) of decaying large-scale helical magnetic fields in the presence of non-helical turbulence for two cases: (1) the initial helical field is large enough to decay resistively but transitions to fast decay; (2) the case of Paper I, wherein the transition energy for the initial helical field to decay fast directly is sought. Simulations and two-scale modelling (based on Paper 1) reveal the transition energy, Ec1 to be independent of the turbulent forcing scale, within a small range of RM. For case (2), the two-scale theory predicts a large-scale helical transition energy of Ec2 = (k1/kf)2Meq, where k1 and kf are the large-scale and small turbulent forcing scale, respectively, and Meq is the equipartition magnetic energy. The DNS agree qualitatively with this prediction but the RM, currently achievable, is too small to satisfy a condition 3/RM ≪ (k1/kf)2, necessary to robustly reveal the transition, Ec2. That two-scale theory and DNS agree wherever they can be compared suggests that Ec2 of Paper I should be identifiable at higher RM in DNS.

  10. Investigation of Hill's optical turbulence model by means of direct numerical simulation.

    PubMed

    Muschinski, Andreas; de Bruyn Kops, Stephen M

    2015-12-01

    For almost four decades, Hill's "Model 4" [J. Fluid Mech.88, 541 (1978)JFLSA70022-112010.1017/S002211207800227X] has played a central role in research and technology of optical turbulence. Based on Batchelor's generalized Obukhov-Corrsin theory of scalar turbulence, Hill's model predicts the dimensionless function h(κl0,Pr) that appears in Tatarskii's well-known equation for the 3D refractive-index spectrum in the case of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence, Φn(κ)=0.033Cn2κ-11/3h(κl0,Pr). Here we investigate Hill's model by comparing numerical solutions of Hill's differential equation with scalar spectra estimated from direct numerical simulation (DNS) output data. Our DNS solves the Navier-Stokes equation for the 3D velocity field and the transport equation for the scalar field on a numerical grid containing 40963 grid points. Two independent DNS runs are analyzed: one with the Prandtl number Pr=0.7 and a second run with Pr=1.0. We find very good agreement between h(κl0,Pr) estimated from the DNS output data and h(κl0,Pr) predicted by the Hill model. We find that the height of the Hill bump is 1.79 Pr1/3, implying that there is no bump if Pr<0.17. Both the DNS and the Hill model predict that the viscous-diffusive "tail" of h(κl0,Pr) is exponential, not Gaussian. PMID:26831396

  11. Numerical and Statistical Simulations of an Idealized Model Tachocline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plummer, Abigail; Tobias, Steve; Marston, Brad

    2015-11-01

    Solar-type stars with outer convective envelopes and stable interiors are believed to have tachoclines. As in the Sun, the tachocline is a thin shear layer thought to play an important role in the magnetic activity of these stars. We use an idealized two-dimensional model tachocline to investigate a joint instability in which the differential rotation is only stable in the absence of a magnetic field. A set of parameters are identified using Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) that produce a cycle in which energy is transferred abruptly between kinetic and magnetic potential energy reservoirs. Elements of this cyclic behavior are replicated using Direct Statistical Simulations (DSS). Insight is thus gained into the physics prompting these sharp transitions, suggesting that they are the result of eddies interacting to form new eddies. BM supported in part by NSF DMR-1306806 and NSF CCF-1048701.

  12. Analysis of DNS Cache Effects on Query Distribution

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies the DNS cache effects that occur on query distribution at the CN top-level domain (TLD) server. We first filter out the malformed DNS queries to purify the log data pollution according to six categories. A model for DNS resolution, more specifically DNS caching, is presented. We demonstrate the presence and magnitude of DNS cache effects and the cache sharing effects on the request distribution through analytic model and simulation. CN TLD log data results are provided and analyzed based on the cache model. The approximate TTL distribution for domain name is inferred quantificationally. PMID:24396313

  13. Requirements definition by numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickman, James J.; Kostas, Chris; Tsang, Kang T.

    1994-10-01

    We are investigating the issues involved in requirements definition for narcotics interdiction: how much of a particular signature is possible, how does this amount change for different conditions, and what is the temporal relationship in various scenarios. Our approach has been to simulate numerically the conditions that arise during vapor or particulate transport. The advantages of this approach are that (1) a broad range of scenarios can be rapidly and inexpensively analyzed by simulation, and (2) simulations can display quantities that are difficult or impossible to measure. The drawback of this approach is that simulations cannot include all of the phenomena present in a real measurement, and therefore the fidelity of the simulation results is always an issue. To address this limitation, we will ultimately combine the results of numerical simulations with measurements of physical parameters for inclusion in the simulation. In this paper, we discuss these issues and how they apply to the current problems in narcotics interdictions, especially cargo containers. We also show the results of 1D and 3D numerical simulations, and compare these results with analytical solutions. The results indicate that this approach is viable. We also present data from 3D simulations of vapor transport in a loaded cargo container and some of the issues present in this ongoing work.

  14. Direct numerical simulation of evaporation-induced particle motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Hochan; Son, Gihun

    2015-11-01

    A sharp-interface level-set (LS) method is presented for direct numerical simulation (DNS) of evaporation-induced particle motion. The liquid surface is tracked by the LS function, which is defined as a signed distance from the liquid-gas interface. The conservation equations of mass, momentum, energy for the liquid and gas phases and vapor mass fraction for the gas phase are solved accurately imposing the coupled temperature and vapor fraction conditions at the evaporating liquid-gas interface. A dynamic contact angle model is also incorporated into the LS method to account for the change between advancing and receding contact angles at the liquid-gas-solid contact line. The solid surface is tracked by another LS function, which is defined as a signed distance from the fluid-solid interface. The conservation equations for multiphase flows are extended to treat the solid particle as a high-viscosity non-evaporating fluid phase. The velocity inside the solid domain is modified to enforce the rigid body motion using the translational velocity and angular velocity of the particle centroid. The DNS results demonstrate the particle accumulation near the evaporating interface and the contact line pinning and stick-slip motion near the evaporating contact line.

  15. Evaluation of explicit algebraic stress models using direct numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naji, Hassan; Mompean, Gilmar; El Yahyaoui, Omar

    2004-11-01

    The paper deals with evaluation and improvement of two recent explicit algebraic turbulent stress models (EASMs). The first model was derived by Gatski and Rumsey (2001 Closure Strategies for Turbulent and Transitional Flows ed B E Launder and N D Sandham (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press) pp 9-46) and the second is the one devised by Wallin and Johansson (2000 J. Fluid Mech. 403 89-132). These models are studied for the turbulent flow through a square duct which involves a secondary flow and significant anisotropy between the turbulent Reynolds stress tensor components. An a priori evaluation of these models is made using direct numerical simulation (DNS) results of Navier-Stokes equations. In order to handle wall proximity effects, a damping function is suggested. The material frame-indifference (MFI) of these models is studied using the eigenvectors of the rate-of-deformation tensor and their angular velocities. This procedure allows us to evaluate an objective vorticity tensor. For this flow, it is shown that the weak-equilibrium assumption used in the derivation of EASMs is verified, i.e. the material derivative of the anisotropy tensor b is negligeable (Db/Dt ap 0). Comparisons of results from EASM and from DNS shows that these models are able to predict reasonably well such flows.

  16. Inertial particles in a shearless mixing layer: direct numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, Peter; Collins, Lance

    2010-11-01

    Entrainment, the drawing in of external fluid by a turbulent flow, is present in nearly all turbulent processes, from exhaust plumes to oceanic thermoclines to cumulus clouds. While the entrainment of fluid and of passive scalars in turbulent flows has been studied extensively, comparatively little research has been undertaken on inertial particle entrainment. We explore entrainment of inertial particles in a shearless mixing layer across a turbulent-non-turbulent interface (TNI) and a turbulent-turbulent interface (TTI) through direct numerical simulation (DNS). Particles are initially placed on one side of the interface and are advanced in time in decaying turbulence. Our results show that the TTI is more efficient in mixing droplets than the TNI. We also find that without the influence of gravity, over the range of Stokes numbers present in cumulus clouds, particle concentration statistics are essentially independent of the dissipation scale Stokes number. The DNS data agrees with results from experiments performed in a wind tunnel with close parametric overlap. We anticipate that a better understanding of the role of gravity and turbulence in inertial particle entrainment will lead to improved cloud evolution predictions and more accurate climate models. Sponsored by the U.S. NSF.

  17. Spatial Direct Numerical Simulation of Boundary-Layer Transition Mechanisms: Validation of PSE Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, R. D.; Streett, C. L.; Chang, C.-L.

    1991-01-01

    A study of instabilities in incompressible boundary-layer flow on a flat plate is conducted by spatial direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the Navier-Stokes equations. Here, the DNS results are used to critically evaluate the results obtained using parabolized stability equations (PSE) theory and to study mechanisms associated with breakdown from laminar to turbulent flow. Three test cases are considered: two-dimensional Tollmien-Schlichting wave propagation, subharmonic instability breakdown, and oblique-wave break-down. The instability modes predicted by PSE theory are in good quantitative agreement with the DNS results, except a small discrepancy is evident in the mean-flow distortion component of the 2-D test problem. This discrepancy is attributed to far-field boundary- condition differences. Both DNS and PSE theory results show several modal discrepancies when compared with the experiments of subharmonic breakdown. Computations that allow for a small adverse pressure gradient in the basic flow and a variation of the disturbance frequency result in better agreement with the experiments.

  18. High speed turbulent reacting flows: DNS and LES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman

    1990-01-01

    Work on understanding the mechanisms of mixing and reaction in high speed turbulent reacting flows was continued. Efforts, in particular, were concentrated on taking advantage of modern computational methods to simulate high speed turbulent flows. In doing so, two methodologies were used: large eddy simulations (LES) and direct numerical simulations (DNS). In the work related with LES the objective is to study the behavior of the probability density functions (pdfs) of scalar properties within the subgrid in reacting turbulent flows. The data base obtained by DNS for a detailed study of the pdf characteristics within the subgrid was used. Simulations are performed for flows under various initializations to include the effects of compressibility on mixing and chemical reactions. In the work related with DNS, a two-dimensional temporally developing high speed mixing layer under the influence of a second-order non-equilibrium chemical reaction of the type A + B yields products + heat was considered. Simulations were performed with different magnitudes of the convective Mach numbers and with different chemical kinetic parameters for the purpose of examining the isolated effects of the compressibility and the heat released by the chemical reactions on the structure of the layer. A full compressible code was developed and utilized, so that the coupling between mixing and chemical reactions is captured in a realistic manner.

  19. Numerical simulations of hot spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, Michael L.

    Numerical simulations of hot spots and their associated jets are examined with emphasis on their dynamical variability. Attention is given to two-dimensional simulations, which incorporate dynamically passive and important magnetic fields in the ideal MHD limit. Distributions of total and polarized radio brightness have been derived for comparison with observations. The move toward three-dimensional simulations is documented, and hydrodynamical models for multiple hot spots are discussed. It is suggested that useful insights can be obtained from two-dimensional slab jet simulation, which relax the axisymmetric constraints while allowing high numerical resolution. In particular the dentist-drill model of Scheuer (1982) for working-surface variability is substantiated, and it is shown to result from self-excited jet instabilities near the working surface.

  20. Numerical simulation of turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogallo, R. S.; Moin, P.

    1984-01-01

    Computational models of turbulence in incompressible Newtonian fluids governed by the Navier-Stokes equations are reviewed. The governing equations are presented, and both direct and large-eddy-simulations are examined. Resolution requirements and numerical techniques of spatial representation, definition of initial and boundary conditions, and time advancement are considered. Results of simulations of homogeneous turbulence in uniform shear, the evolution of a turbulent mixing layer, and turbulent channel flow are presented graphically and discussed.

  1. MEAN-FIELD MODELING OF AN α{sup 2} DYNAMO COUPLED WITH DIRECT NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF RIGIDLY ROTATING CONVECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Masada, Youhei; Sano, Takayoshi E-mail: sano@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2014-10-10

    The mechanism of large-scale dynamos in rigidly rotating stratified convection is explored by direct numerical simulations (DNS) in Cartesian geometry. A mean-field dynamo model is also constructed using turbulent velocity profiles consistently extracted from the corresponding DNS results. By quantitative comparison between the DNS and our mean-field model, it is demonstrated that the oscillatory α{sup 2} dynamo wave, excited and sustained in the convection zone, is responsible for large-scale magnetic activities such as cyclic polarity reversal and spatiotemporal migration. The results provide strong evidence that a nonuniformity of the α-effect, which is a natural outcome of rotating stratified convection, can be an important prerequisite for large-scale stellar dynamos, even without the Ω-effect.

  2. Direct numerical simulation of flow past cactus--shaped cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, Pradeep; Mahesh, Krishnan

    2006-11-01

    The Saguaro cacti are tall, have short root systems and can withstand high wind velocities (Bulk 1984, Talley et al. 2002). Their trunks are essentially cylindrical with V--shaped longitudinal cavities. The size and number of cavities on the Saguaro cacti vary so that they have a near--constant fraction cavity depth (l/D ratio of about 0.07, Geller & Nobel 1984). Direct numerical simulations is used to assess the aerodynamic effect of the grooves on the cactus. DNS is performed for cactus shaped cylinders with l/d ratio's of 0.07 and 0.105, and smooth cylinders (l/d=0) at the same Reynolds number. Presence of the V--shaped cavities is found to decrease the drag on the cylindrical trunk as well as affect the fluctuating lift forces. The talk will quantify these differences, and discuss the physical mechanisms by which V--shaped cavities on the surface influence the flow.

  3. A Numerical Study of Continuous Data Assimilation for the 2D-NS Equations Using Nodal Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gesho, Masakazu

    This thesis conducts a number of numerical experiments using massively parallel GPU computations to study a new continuous data assimilation algorithm. We test the algorithm on two-dimensional incompressible fluid flows given by the Navier--Stokes equations. In this context, observations of the Eulerian velocity field given at a finite resolution of nodal points in space may be used to recover the exact velocity field over time. We also consider nodal measurements of the vorticity field and stream function. The main difference between this new algorithm and previous continuous data assimilation methods is the inclusion of a relaxation parameter micro that controls the rate at which the approximate solution is forced toward the observational measurements. If micro is too small, the approximate solution obtained by data assimilation may not converge to the reference solution; however, if micro is too large then high frequency spill-over from the observations may contaminate the approximate solution. Our focus is on the resolution of the nodal points necessary for the algorithm to recover the exact velocity field and how best to choose the parameter micro.

  4. Direct Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Premixed Hydrogen/Air Flames in Sheared Turbulence and in Counterflow with Product Stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. H.

    2013-11-01

    Petascale direct numerical simulations (DNS) have been performed of canonical turbulent configurations to glean physical insight into turbulence-chemistry interactions in combustion and to provide validation data for the development of coarse-grained models for engineering CFD. The role of DNS is illustrated through two examples. In the first example, DNS of turbulent hydrogen/air premixed flames interacting with intense shear driven turbulence in the thin reaction zones regime at turbulent Reynolds numbers approaching 1000 (Hawkes et al. 2012) are performed over a range of Damköhler numbers. The DNS data are used to study inter-scale energy transfer through one-dimensional spectra of turbulent kinetic energy and reactive scalars from the turbulent premixed flames. Balance equations for the density weighted turbulent kinetic energy and scalar fluctuation spectra for reacting flows are derived and used to understand the physical processes unique to reacting flows. In the second example, DNS of highly turbulent lean premixed hydrogen-air flames stabilized against counterflowing non-adiabatic stoichiometric combustion products in chemical equilibrium are performed. The influence of product stratification on the mechanisms associated with local extinction and re-ignition in turbulent stratified combustion is studied.

  5. Comprehensive numerical methodology for direct numerical simulations of compressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reckinger, Scott J.; Livescu, Daniel; Vasilyev, Oleg V.

    2016-05-01

    An investigation of compressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) using Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) requires efficient numerical methods, advanced boundary conditions, and consistent initialization in order to capture the wide range of scales and vortex dynamics present in the system, while reducing the computational impact associated with acoustic wave generation and the subsequent interaction with the flow. An advanced computational framework is presented that handles the challenges introduced by considering the compressive nature of RTI systems, which include sharp interfacial density gradients on strongly stratified background states, acoustic wave generation and removal at computational boundaries, and stratification dependent vorticity production. The foundation of the numerical methodology described here is the wavelet-based grid adaptivity of the Parallel Adaptive Wavelet Collocation Method (PAWCM) that maintains symmetry in single-mode RTI systems to extreme late-times. PAWCM is combined with a consistent initialization, which reduces the generation of acoustic disturbances, and effective boundary treatments, which prevent acoustic reflections. A dynamic time integration scheme that can handle highly nonlinear and potentially stiff systems, such as compressible RTI, completes the computational framework. The numerical methodology is used to simulate two-dimensional single-mode RTI to extreme late-times for a wide range of flow compressibility and variable density effects. The results show that flow compressibility acts to reduce the growth of RTI for low Atwood numbers, as predicted from linear stability analysis.

  6. DNS of MHD turbulent flow via the HELIOS supercomputer system at IFERC-CSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satake, Shin-ichi; Kimura, Masato; Yoshimori, Hajime; Kunugi, Tomoaki; Takase, Kazuyuki

    2014-06-01

    The simulation plays an important role to estimate characteristics of cooling in a blanket for such high heating plasma in ITER-BA. An objective of this study is to perform large -scale direct numerical simulation (DNS) on heat transfer of magneto hydro dynamic (MHD) turbulent flow on coolant materials assumed from Flibe to lithium. The coolant flow conditions in ITER-BA are assumed to be Reynolds number and Hartmann number of a higher order. The maximum target of the DNS assumed by this study based on the result of the benchmark of Helios at IFERC-CSC for Project cycle 1 is 116 TB (2048 nodes). Moreover, we tested visualization by ParaView to visualize directly the large-scale computational result. If this large-scale DNS becomes possible, an essential understanding and modelling of a MHD turbulent flow and a design of nuclear fusion reactor contributes greatly.

  7. Terascale direct numerical simulations of turbulent combustion using S3D.

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaran, Ramanan; Mellor-Crummy, J.; DeVries, M.; Yoo, Chun Sang; Ma, K. L.; Podhorski, N.; Liao, W. K.; Klasky, S.; de Supinski, B.; Choudhary, A.; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Chen, Jacqueline H.; Shende, Sameer

    2008-08-01

    Computational science is paramount to the understanding of underlying processes in internal combustion engines of the future that will utilize non-petroleum-based alternative fuels, including carbon-neutral biofuels, and burn in new combustion regimes that will attain high efficiency while minimizing emissions of particulates and nitrogen oxides. Next-generation engines will likely operate at higher pressures, with greater amounts of dilution and utilize alternative fuels that exhibit a wide range of chemical and physical properties. Therefore, there is a significant role for high-fidelity simulations, direct numerical simulations (DNS), specifically designed to capture key turbulence-chemistry interactions in these relatively uncharted combustion regimes, and in particular, that can discriminate the effects of differences in fuel properties. In DNS, all of the relevant turbulence and flame scales are resolved numerically using high-order accurate numerical algorithms. As a consequence terascale DNS are computationally intensive, require massive amounts of computing power and generate tens of terabytes of data. Recent results from terascale DNS of turbulent flames are presented here, illustrating its role in elucidating flame stabilization mechanisms in a lifted turbulent hydrogen/air jet flame in a hot air co-flow, and the flame structure of a fuel-lean turbulent premixed jet flame. Computing at this scale requires close collaborations between computer and combustion scientists to provide optimized scaleable algorithms and software for terascale simulations, efficient collective parallel I/O, tools for volume visualization of multiscale, multivariate data and automating the combustion workflow. The enabling computer science, applied to combustion science, is also required in many other terascale physics and engineering simulations. In particular, performance monitoring is used to identify the performance of key kernels in the DNS code, S3D and especially memory intensive loops in the code. Through the careful application of loop transformations, data reuse in cache is exploited thereby reducing memory bandwidth needs, and hence, improving S3D's nodal performance. To enhance collective parallel I/O in S3D, an MPI-I/O caching design is used to construct a two-stage write-behind method for improving the performance of write-only operations. The simulations generate tens of terabytes of data requiring analysis. Interactive exploration of the simulation data is enabled by multivariate time-varying volume visualization. The visualization highlights spatial and temporal correlations between multiple reactive scalar fields using an intuitive user interface based on parallel coordinates and time histogram. Finally, an automated combustion workflow is designed using Kepler to manage large-scale data movement, data morphing, and archival and to provide a graphical display of run-time diagnostics.

  8. Terascale direct numerical simulations of turbulent combustion using S3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. H.; Choudhary, A.; de Supinski, B.; DeVries, M.; Hawkes, E. R.; Klasky, S.; Liao, W. K.; Ma, K. L.; Mellor-Crummey, J.; Podhorszki, N.; Sankaran, R.; Shende, S.; Yoo, C. S.

    2009-01-01

    Computational science is paramount to the understanding of underlying processes in internal combustion engines of the future that will utilize non-petroleum-based alternative fuels, including carbon-neutral biofuels, and burn in new combustion regimes that will attain high efficiency while minimizing emissions of particulates and nitrogen oxides. Next-generation engines will likely operate at higher pressures, with greater amounts of dilution and utilize alternative fuels that exhibit a wide range of chemical and physical properties. Therefore, there is a significant role for high-fidelity simulations, direct numerical simulations (DNS), specifically designed to capture key turbulence-chemistry interactions in these relatively uncharted combustion regimes, and in particular, that can discriminate the effects of differences in fuel properties. In DNS, all of the relevant turbulence and flame scales are resolved numerically using high-order accurate numerical algorithms. As a consequence terascale DNS are computationally intensive, require massive amounts of computing power and generate tens of terabytes of data. Recent results from terascale DNS of turbulent flames are presented here, illustrating its role in elucidating flame stabilization mechanisms in a lifted turbulent hydrogen/air jet flame in a hot air coflow, and the flame structure of a fuel-lean turbulent premixed jet flame. Computing at this scale requires close collaborations between computer and combustion scientists to provide optimized scaleable algorithms and software for terascale simulations, efficient collective parallel I/O, tools for volume visualization of multiscale, multivariate data and automating the combustion workflow. The enabling computer science, applied to combustion science, is also required in many other terascale physics and engineering simulations. In particular, performance monitoring is used to identify the performance of key kernels in the DNS code, S3D and especially memory intensive loops in the code. Through the careful application of loop transformations, data reuse in cache is exploited thereby reducing memory bandwidth needs, and hence, improving S3D's nodal performance. To enhance collective parallel I/O in S3D, an MPI-I/O caching design is used to construct a two-stage write-behind method for improving the performance of write-only operations. The simulations generate tens of terabytes of data requiring analysis. Interactive exploration of the simulation data is enabled by multivariate time-varying volume visualization. The visualization highlights spatial and temporal correlations between multiple reactive scalar fields using an intuitive user interface based on parallel coordinates and time histogram. Finally, an automated combustion workflow is designed using Kepler to manage large-scale data movement, data morphing, and archival and to provide a graphical display of run-time diagnostics.

  9. High-resolution numerical simulation of turbulence in natural waterways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Seokkoo; Lightbody, Anne; Hill, Craig; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2011-01-01

    We develop an efficient and versatile numerical model for carrying out high-resolution simulations of turbulent flows in natural meandering streams with arbitrarily complex bathymetry. The numerical model solves the 3D, unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes and continuity equations in generalized curvilinear coordinates. The method can handle the arbitrary geometrical complexity of natural streams using the sharp-interface curvilinear immersed boundary (CURVIB) method of Ge and Sotiropoulos (2007) [1]. The governing equations are discretized with three-point, central, second-order accurate finite-difference formulas and integrated in time using an efficient, second-order accurate fractional step method. To enable efficient simulations on grids with tens of millions of grid nodes in long and shallow domains typical of natural streams, the algebraic multigrid (AMG) method is used to solve the Poisson equation for the pressure coupled with a matrix-free Krylov solver for the momentum equations. Depending on the desired level of resolution and available computational resources, the numerical model can either simulate, via direct numerical simulation (DNS), large-eddy simulation (LES), or unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) modeling. The potential of the model as a powerful tool for simulating energetic coherent structures in turbulent flows in natural river reaches is demonstrated by applying it to carry out LES and URANS in a 50-m long natural meandering stream at resolution sufficiently fine to capture vortex shedding from centimeter-scale roughness elements on the bed. The accuracy of the simulations is demonstrated by comparisons with experimental data and the relative performance of the LES and URANS models is also discussed.

  10. Numerical simulation of electrochemical desalination.

    PubMed

    Hlushkou, D; Knust, K N; Crooks, R M; Tallarek, U

    2016-05-18

    We present an effective numerical approach to simulate electrochemically mediated desalination of seawater. This new membraneless, energy efficient desalination method relies on the oxidation of chloride ions, which generates an ion depletion zone and local electric field gradient near the junction of a microchannel branch to redirect sea salt into the brine stream, consequently producing desalted water. The proposed numerical model is based on resolution of the 3D coupled Navier-Stokes, Nernst-Planck, and Poisson equations at non-uniform spatial grids. The model is implemented as a parallel code and can be employed to simulate mass-charge transport coupled with surface or volume reactions in 3D systems showing an arbitrarily complex geometrical configuration. PMID:27089841

  11. Numerical simulation of electrochemical desalination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlushkou, D.; Knust, K. N.; Crooks, R. M.; Tallarek, U.

    2016-05-01

    We present an effective numerical approach to simulate electrochemically mediated desalination of seawater. This new membraneless, energy efficient desalination method relies on the oxidation of chloride ions, which generates an ion depletion zone and local electric field gradient near the junction of a microchannel branch to redirect sea salt into the brine stream, consequently producing desalted water. The proposed numerical model is based on resolution of the 3D coupled Navier–Stokes, Nernst–Planck, and Poisson equations at non-uniform spatial grids. The model is implemented as a parallel code and can be employed to simulate mass–charge transport coupled with surface or volume reactions in 3D systems showing an arbitrarily complex geometrical configuration.

  12. DNS of aerosol evolution in a turbulent jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Kun; Attili, Antonio; Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2011-11-01

    The effects of turbulence on the evolution of aerosols are not well understood. In this work, the interaction of aerosol dynamics and turbulence are studied in a canonical flow configuration by numerical means. The configuration consists of a hot nitrogen stream saturated with dibutyl phthalate (DBP) vapor mixing with cool air in a shear layer. A direct numerical simulation (DNS) for the momentum and scalar fields is coupled with the direct quadrature method of moments (DQMOM) for the condensing liquid phase. The effects of turbulent mixing on aerosol processes (nucleation, condensation, and coagulation) are quantified by analyzing the statistics of number density and droplet sizes.

  13. Numerical Simulation of Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teukolsky, Saul

    2003-04-01

    Einstein's equations of general relativity are prime candidates for numerical solution on supercomputers. There is some urgency in being able to carry out such simulations: Large-scale gravitational wave detectors are now coming on line, and the most important expected signals cannot be predicted except numerically. Problems involving black holes are perhaps the most interesting, yet also particularly challenging computationally. One difficulty is that inside a black hole there is a physical singularity that cannot be part of the computational domain. A second difficulty is the disparity in length scales between the size of the black hole and the wavelength of the gravitational radiation emitted. A third difficulty is that all existing methods of evolving black holes in three spatial dimensions are plagued by instabilities that prohibit long-term evolution. I will describe the ideas that are being introduced in numerical relativity to deal with these problems, and discuss the results of recent calculations of black hole collisions.

  14. A high-order photon Monte Carlo method for radiative transfer in direct numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Modest, M.F.; Haworth, D.C. . E-mail: dch12@psu.edu

    2007-05-01

    A high-order photon Monte Carlo method is developed to solve the radiative transfer equation. The statistical and discretization errors of the computed radiative heat flux and radiation source term are isolated and quantified. Up to sixth-order spatial accuracy is demonstrated for the radiative heat flux, and up to fourth-order accuracy for the radiation source term. This demonstrates the compatibility of the method with high-fidelity direct numerical simulation (DNS) for chemically reacting flows. The method is applied to address radiative heat transfer in a one-dimensional laminar premixed flame and a statistically one-dimensional turbulent premixed flame. Modifications of the flame structure with radiation are noted in both cases, and the effects of turbulence/radiation interactions on the local reaction zone structure are revealed for the turbulent flame. Computational issues in using a photon Monte Carlo method for DNS of turbulent reacting flows are discussed.

  15. Direct numerical simulation of transitional flow in a staggered tube bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linton, D.; Thornber, B.

    2016-02-01

    A series of Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of the flow through a staggered tube bundle has been performed over the range 1030 ≤ Rem ≤ 5572 to capture the flow transition that occurs at the matrix transition point of Rem ≈ 3000. The matrix transition is the point at which a second frequency becomes prominent in tube bundles. To date, this is the highest published Reynolds number at which a DNS has been performed on cross-flow over a tube bundle. This study describes the flow behaviour in terms of: the mean flow field, Strouhal numbers, vortex shedding, 3-D flow features, and turbulence properties. These results support the hypothesis that the transition in the vortex shedding behaviour at Rem ≈ 3000 is similar to that which occurs in single cylinder flow at the equivalent Reynolds number. The visualisations presented also demonstrate the nature of the shedding mechanisms before and after the matrix transition point.

  16. Numerical Propulsion System Simulation Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naiman, Cynthia G.

    2004-01-01

    The Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) is a framework for performing analysis of complex systems. Because the NPSS was developed using the object-oriented paradigm, the resulting architecture is an extensible and flexible framework that is currently being used by a diverse set of participants in government, academia, and the aerospace industry. NPSS is being used by over 15 different institutions to support rockets, hypersonics, power and propulsion, fuel cells, ground based power, and aerospace. Full system-level simulations as well as subsystems may be modeled using NPSS. The NPSS architecture enables the coupling of analyses at various levels of detail, which is called numerical zooming. The middleware used to enable zooming and distributed simulations is the Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA). The NPSS Developer's Kit offers tools for the developer to generate CORBA-based components and wrap codes. The Developer's Kit enables distributed multi-fidelity and multi-discipline simulations, preserves proprietary and legacy codes, and facilitates addition of customized codes. The platforms supported are PC, Linux, HP, Sun, and SGI.

  17. Direct numerical simulations of particle-laden density currents with adaptive, discontinuous finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, S. D.; Hill, J.; Piggott, M. D.; Allison, P. A.

    2014-05-01

    High resolution direct numerical simulations (DNS) are an important tool for the detailed analysis of turbidity current dynamics. Models that resolve the vertical structure and turbulence of the flow are typically based upon the Navier-Stokes equations. Two-dimensional simulations are known to produce unrealistic cohesive vortices that are not representative of the real three-dimensional physics. The effect of this phenomena is particularly apparent in the later stages of flow propagation. The ideal solution to this problem is to run the simulation in three dimensions but this is computationally expensive. This paper presents a novel finite-element (FE) DNS turbidity current model that has been built within Fluidity, an open source, general purpose, computational fluid dynamics code. The model is validated through re-creation of a lock release density current at a Grashof number of 5 × 106 in two, and three-dimensions. Validation of the model considers the flow energy budget, sedimentation rate, head speed, wall normal velocity profiles and the final deposit. Conservation of energy in particular is found to be a good metric for measuring mesh performance in capturing the range of dynamics. FE models scale well over many thousands of processors and do not impose restrictions on domain shape, but they are computationally expensive. Use of discontinuous discretisations and adaptive unstructured meshing technologies, which reduce the required element count by approximately two orders of magnitude, results in high resolution DNS models of turbidity currents at a fraction of the cost of traditional FE models. The benefits of this technique will enable simulation of turbidity currents in complex and large domains where DNS modelling was previously unachievable.

  18. Investigation of Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence and mixing using direct numerical simulation with experimentally-measured initial conditions. I. Comparison to experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Mueschke, N; Schilling, O

    2008-07-23

    A 1152 x 760 x 1280 direct numerical simulation (DNS) using initial conditions, geometry, and physical parameters chosen to approximate those of a transitional, small Atwood number Rayleigh-Taylor mixing experiment [Mueschke, Andrews and Schilling, J. Fluid Mech. 567, 27 (2006)] is presented. The density and velocity fluctuations measured just off of the splitter plate in this buoyantly unstable water channel experiment were parameterized to provide physically-realistic, anisotropic initial conditions for the DNS. The methodology for parameterizing the measured data and numerically implementing the resulting perturbation spectra in the simulation is discussed in detail. The DNS model of the experiment is then validated by comparing quantities from the simulation to experimental measurements. In particular, large-scale quantities (such as the bubble front penetration hb and the mixing layer growth parameter {alpha}{sub b}), higher-order statistics (such as velocity variances and the molecular mixing parameter {theta}), and vertical velocity and density variance spectra from the DNS are shown to be in favorable agreement with the experimental data. Differences between the quantities obtained from the DNS and from experimental measurements are related to limitations in the dynamic range of scales resolved in the simulation and other idealizations of the simulation model. This work demonstrates that a parameterization of experimentally-measured initial conditions can yield simulation data that quantitatively agrees well with experimentally-measured low- and higher-order statistics in a Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer. This study also provides resolution and initial conditions implementation requirements needed to simulate a physical Rayleigh-Taylor mixing experiment. In Part II [Mueschke and Schilling, Phys. Fluids (2008)], other quantities not measured in the experiment are obtained from the DNS and discussed, such as the integral- and Taylor-scale Reynolds numbers, Reynolds stress anisotropy and two-dimensional density and velocity variance spectra, hypothetical chemical product formation measures, other local and global mixing parameters, and the statistical composition of mixed fluid.

  19. Direct Numerical Simulation of Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarini, Stephen; Moser, Robert; Shariff, Karim; Wray, Alan

    1997-11-01

    Initial results from the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of compressible turbulent boundary layers will be presented. The spatially developing boundary layer is first transformed to a parallel shear layer using a transformation similar to that used by Spalart for an incompressible boundary layer. This allows us to avoid inflow and outflow boundary conditions, and to apply periodic boundary conditions in the streamwise and spanwise directions. The resulting equations are then solved using a mixed Fourier B-spline Galerkin method. One challenge to these highly accurate and non-dissipative numerics has been the occurrence of sharp density gradients, which require significantly more resolution than the incompressible case, especially during transients. The first simulation is at Mach 2.5 with a momentum thickness Reynolds number based on wall viscosity of R_?'=825. The simulations are used to examine the physics of the compressible boundary layer and to compute turbulence statistics and terms in the budget equations. The turbulence statistics include: rms and mean profiles, energy spectra, and two-point correlations.

  20. Direct numerical simulation of instability and noise generation of hot jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, M. C.

    1991-12-01

    The goal of the current investigation is to numerically simulate convectively and absolutely unstable jet flows in order to give a new insight into the underlying mechanisms of jet instabilities and their contributions to sound generation: DNS codes available at CTR solve the compressible Navier-Stokes equations and provide a very accurate flow representation. They have been able to simulate sound radiation and scattering (without an acoustical analogy or approximation). An application of these codes to heated 2-D jets has been started in this study and modifications have been made in order to allow for temperature dependent viscosity.

  1. Energy Spectra of Higher Reynolds Number Turbulence by the DNS with up to 122883 Grid Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Takashi; Kaneda, Yukio; Morishita, Koji; Yokokawa, Mitsuo; Uno, Atsuya

    2014-11-01

    Large-scale direct numerical simulations (DNS) of forced incompressible turbulence in a periodic box with up to 122883 grid points have been performed using K computer. The maximum Taylor-microscale Reynolds number Rλ, and the maximum Reynolds number Re based on the integral length scale are over 2000 and 105, respectively. Our previous DNS with Rλ up to 1100 showed that the energy spectrum has a slope steeper than - 5 / 3 (the Kolmogorov scaling law) by factor 0 . 1 at the wavenumber range (kη < 0 . 03). Here η is the Kolmogorov length scale. Our present DNS at higher resolutions show that the energy spectra with different Reynolds numbers (Rλ > 1000) are well normalized not by the integral length-scale but by the Kolmogorov length scale, at the wavenumber range of the steeper slope. This result indicates that the steeper slope is not inherent character in the inertial subrange, and is affected by viscosity.

  2. A Review of Direct Numerical Simulations of Astrophysical Detonations and Their Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Parete-Koon, Suzanne T; Messer, Bronson; Smith, Chris R; Papatheodore, Thomas L

    2013-01-01

    Multi-dimensional direct numerical simulations (DNS) of astrophysical detonations in degenerate matter have revealed that the nuclear burning is typically characterized by cellular structure caused by transverse instabilities in the detonation front. Type Ia supernova modelers often use one- dimensional DNS of detonations as inputs or constraints for their whole star simulations. While these one-dimensional studies are useful tools, the true nature of the detonation is multi-dimensional. The multi-dimensional structure of the burning influences the speed, stability, and the composition of the detonation and its burning products, and therefore, could have an impact on the spectra of Type Ia supernovae. Considerable effort has been expended modeling Type Ia supernovae at densities above 1 107 g cm 3 where the complexities of turbulent burning dominate the flame propagation. However, most full star models turn the nuclear burning schemes off when the density falls below 1 107 g cm 3 and distributed burning begins. The deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) is believed to occur at just these densities and consequently they are the densities important for studying the properties of the subsequent detonation. This work will review the status of DNS studies of detonations and their possible implications for Type Ia supernova models. It will cover the development of Detonation theory from the first simple Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) detonation models to the current models based on the time-dependent, compressible, reactive flow Euler equations of fluid dynamics.

  3. A review of direct numerical simulations of astrophysical detonations and their implications

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Parete-Koon, Suzanne T.; Smith, Christopher R.; Papatheodore, Thomas L.; Bronson Messer, O. E.

    2013-04-11

    Multi-dimensional direct numerical simulations (DNS) of astrophysical detonations in degenerate matter have revealed that the nuclear burning is typically characterized by cellular structure caused by transverse instabilities in the detonation front. Type Ia supernova modelers often use one- dimensional DNS of detonations as inputs or constraints for their whole star simulations. While these one-dimensional studies are useful tools, the true nature of the detonation is multi-dimensional. The multi-dimensional structure of the burning influences the speed, stability, and the composition of the detonation and its burning products, and therefore, could have an impact on the spectra of Type Ia supernovae. Considerablemore » effort has been expended modeling Type Ia supernovae at densities above 1x107 g∙cm-3 where the complexities of turbulent burning dominate the flame propagation. However, most full star models turn the nuclear burning schemes off when the density falls below 1x107 g∙cm-3 and distributed burning begins. The deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) is believed to occur at just these densities and consequently they are the densities important for studying the properties of the subsequent detonation. In conclusion, this work reviews the status of DNS studies of detonations and their possible implications for Type Ia supernova models. It will cover the development of Detonation theory from the first simple Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) detonation models to the current models based on the time-dependent, compressible, reactive flow Euler equations of fluid dynamics.« less

  4. DepenDNS: Dependable Mechanism against DNS Cache Poisoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hung-Min; Chang, Wen-Hsuan; Chang, Shih-Ying; Lin, Yue-Hsun

    DNS cache poisoning attacks have been proposed for a long time. In 2008, Kaminsky enhanced the attacks to be powerful based on nonce query method. By leveraging Kaminsky's attack, phishing becomes large-scale since victims are hard to detect attacks. Hence, DNS cache poisoning is a serious threat in the current DNS infrastructure. In this paper, we propose a countermeasure, DepenDNS, to prevent from cache poisoning attacks. DepenDNS queries multiple resolvers concurrently to verify an trustworthy answer while users perform payment transactions, e.g., auction, banking. Without modifying any resolver or authority server, DepenDNS is conveniently deployed on client side. In the end of paper, we conduct several experiments on DepenDNS to show its efficiency. We believe DepenDNS is a comprehensive solution against cache poisoning attacks.

  5. High performance Python for direct numerical simulations of turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, Mikael; Langtangen, Hans Petter

    2016-06-01

    Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of the Navier Stokes equations is an invaluable research tool in fluid dynamics. Still, there are few publicly available research codes and, due to the heavy number crunching implied, available codes are usually written in low-level languages such as C/C++ or Fortran. In this paper we describe a pure scientific Python pseudo-spectral DNS code that nearly matches the performance of C++ for thousands of processors and billions of unknowns. We also describe a version optimized through Cython, that is found to match the speed of C++. The solvers are written from scratch in Python, both the mesh, the MPI domain decomposition, and the temporal integrators. The solvers have been verified and benchmarked on the Shaheen supercomputer at the KAUST supercomputing laboratory, and we are able to show very good scaling up to several thousand cores. A very important part of the implementation is the mesh decomposition (we implement both slab and pencil decompositions) and 3D parallel Fast Fourier Transforms (FFT). The mesh decomposition and FFT routines have been implemented in Python using serial FFT routines (either NumPy, pyFFTW or any other serial FFT module), NumPy array manipulations and with MPI communications handled by MPI for Python (mpi4py). We show how we are able to execute a 3D parallel FFT in Python for a slab mesh decomposition using 4 lines of compact Python code, for which the parallel performance on Shaheen is found to be slightly better than similar routines provided through the FFTW library. For a pencil mesh decomposition 7 lines of code is required to execute a transform.

  6. Direct Numerical Simulation of Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guarini, Stephen; Moser, R.; Shariff, K.; Wray, A.; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The talk will present some initial results from the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of compressible turbulent boundary layers. We solve numerically the compressible Navier-Stokes equations using a method based on Spalart's transformation for the incompressible turbulent boundary layer. This allows the spatially developing boundary layer to be transformed to a calculation with periodic boundary conditions in the streamwise and spanwise directions. The equations are solved using Fourier expansions in the horizontal directions and B-splines in the wall-normal direction. The first simulation is at Mach 2.5 with a momentum thickness Reynolds number based on wall viscosity of R(sub theta(sup 1)) = 825. We are examining the physics of the compressible boundary layer using turbulence statistics and budget equations. The turbulence statistics include: rms (root mean square) and mean profiles, energy spectra, and two-point correlations. It is found that there are large density gradients which require significantly more resolution than the incompressible case.

  7. DNS of Flows over Periodic Hills using a Discontinuous-Galerkin Spectral-Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diosady, Laslo T.; Murman, Scott M.

    2014-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulent compressible flows is performed using a higher-order space-time discontinuous-Galerkin finite-element method. The numerical scheme is validated by performing DNS of the evolution of the Taylor-Green vortex and turbulent flow in a channel. The higher-order method is shown to provide increased accuracy relative to low-order methods at a given number of degrees of freedom. The turbulent flow over a periodic array of hills in a channel is simulated at Reynolds number 10,595 using an 8th-order scheme in space and a 4th-order scheme in time. These results are validated against previous large eddy simulation (LES) results. A preliminary analysis provides insight into how these detailed simulations can be used to improve Reynoldsaveraged Navier-Stokes (RANS) modeling

  8. Detailed Comparison of DNS to PSE for Oblique Breakdown at Mach 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, Christian S. J.; Fasel, Hermann F.; Choudhari, Meelan; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2010-01-01

    A pair of oblique waves at low amplitudes is introduced in a supersonic flat-plate boundary layer. Their downstream development and the concomitant process of laminar to turbulent transition is then investigated numerically using Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) and Parabolized Stability Equations (PSE). This abstract is the last part of an extensive study of the complete transition process initiated by oblique breakdown at Mach 3. In contrast to the previous simulations, the symmetry condition in the spanwise direction is removed for the simulation presented in this abstract. By removing the symmetry condition, we are able to confirm that the flow is indeed symmetric over the entire computational domain. Asymmetric modes grow in the streamwise direction but reach only small amplitude values at the outflow. Furthermore, this abstract discusses new time-averaged data from our previous simulation CASE 3 and compares PSE data obtained from NASA's LASTRAC code to DNS results.

  9. Using DNS and Statistical Learning to Model Bubbly Channel Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ming; Lu, Jiacai; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2015-11-01

    The transient evolution of laminar bubbly flow in a vertical channel is examined by direct numerical simulation (DNS). Nearly spherical bubbles, initially distributed evenly in a fully developed parabolic flow, are driven relatively quickly to the walls, where they increase the drag and reduce the flow rate on a longer time scale. Once the flow rate has been decreased significantly, some of the bubbles move back into the channel interior and the void fraction there approaches the value needed to balance the weight of the mixture and the imposed pressure gradient. A database generated by averaging the DNS results is used to model the closure terms in a simple model of the average flow. Those terms relate the averaged lateral flux of the bubbles, the velocity fluctuations and the averaged surface tension force to the fluid shear, the void fraction and its gradient, as well as the distance to the nearest wall. An aggregated neural network is used for the statistically leaning of unknown closures, and closure relationships are tested by following the evolution of bubbly channel flow with different initial conditions. It is found that the model predictions are in reasonably good agreement with DNS results. Supported by NSF.

  10. Studying the Microphysics of Superhydrophobic Surfaces using DNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alame, Karim; Mahesh, Krishnan

    2014-11-01

    DNS using the volume of fluid methodology will be used to study the microphysics of the gas-water interfaces in super-hydrophobic surfaces. The numerical method will be summarized along with relevant validation examples. The effect of pressure difference on an interface between solid walls will be discussed and contrasted to theory. Modes of interface failure will be presented. Simulations of channel flow with gas trapped in single longitudinal groove will be discussed and contrasted to results from approximate modeling approaches. Implications for air-layer drag reduction will be discussed. Supported by Office of Naval Research.

  11. Using direct numerical simulation to improve experimental measurements of inertial particle radial relative velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, Peter J.; Collins, Lance R.

    2012-11-01

    Turbulence-induced collision of inertial particles may contribute to the rapid onset of precipitation in warm cumulus clouds. The particle collision frequency is determined from two parameters: the radial distribution function g (r) and the mean inward radial relative velocity . These quantities have been measured in three dimensions computationally, using direct numerical simulation (DNS), and experimentally, using digital holographic particle image velocimetry (DHPIV). While good quantitative agreement has been attained between computational and experimental measures of g (r) (Salazar et al. 2008), measures of wr have not reached that stage (de Jong et al. 2010). We apply DNS to mimic the experimental image analysis used in the relative velocity measurement. To account for experimental errors, we add noise to the particle positions and `measure' the velocity from these positions. Our DNS shows that the experimental errors are inherent to the DHPIV setup, and so we explore an alternate approach, in which velocities are measured along thin two-dimensional planes using standard PIV. We show that this technique better recovers the correct radial relative velocity PDFs and suggest optimal parameter ranges for the experimental measurements.

  12. On locating the obstruction in the upper airway via numerical simulation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Elghobashi, S.

    2014-01-01

    The fluid dynamical properties of the air flow in the upper airway (UA) are not fully understood at present due to the three-dimensional (3D) patient-specific complex geometry of the airway, flow transition from laminar to turbulent and flow-structure interaction during the breathing cycle. It is quite difficult at present to experimentally measure the instantaneous velocity and pressure at specific points in the human airway. On the other hand, direct numerical simulation (DNS) can predict all the flow properties and resolve all its relevant length- and time-scales. We developed a DNS solver with the state-of-the-art lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), and used it to investigate the flow in two patient-specific UAs reconstructed from CT scan data. Inspiration and expiration flows through these two airways are studied. The time-averaged first spatial derivative of pressure (pressure gradient), ∂p/∂z, is used to locate the region of the UA obstruction. But the time-averaged second spatial derivative, ∂2p/∂z2, is used to pinpoint the exact location of the obstruction. The present results show that the DNS-LBM solver can be used to obtain accurate flow details in the UA and is a powerful tool to locate its obstruction. PMID:24389271

  13. Estimating uncertainties in statistics computed from direct numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Todd A.; Malaya, Nicholas; Ulerich, Rhys; Moser, Robert D.

    2014-03-01

    Rigorous assessment of uncertainty is crucial to the utility of direct numerical simulation (DNS) results. Uncertainties in the computed statistics arise from two sources: finite statistical sampling and the discretization of the Navier-Stokes equations. Due to the presence of non-trivial sampling error, standard techniques for estimating discretization error (such as Richardson extrapolation) fail or are unreliable. This work provides a systematic and unified approach for estimating these errors. First, a sampling error estimator that accounts for correlation in the input data is developed. Then, this sampling error estimate is used as part of a Bayesian extension of Richardson extrapolation in order to characterize the discretization error. These methods are tested using the Lorenz equations and are shown to perform well. These techniques are then used to investigate the sampling and discretization errors in the DNS of a wall-bounded turbulent flow at Reτ ≈ 180. Both small (Lx/δ × Lz/δ = 4π × 2π) and large (Lx/δ × Lz/δ = 12π × 4π) domain sizes are investigated. For each case, a sequence of meshes was generated by first designing a "nominal" mesh using standard heuristics for wall-bounded simulations. These nominal meshes were then coarsened to generate a sequence of grid resolutions appropriate for the Bayesian Richardson extrapolation method. In addition, the small box case is computationally inexpensive enough to allow simulation on a finer mesh, enabling the results of the extrapolation to be validated in a weak sense. For both cases, it is found that while the sampling uncertainty is large enough to make the order of accuracy difficult to determine, the estimated discretization errors are quite small. This indicates that the commonly used heuristics provide adequate resolution for this class of problems. However, it is also found that, for some quantities, the discretization error is not small relative to sampling error, indicating that the conventional wisdom that sampling error dominates discretization error for this class of simulations needs to be reevaluated.

  14. Direct Numerical Simulation of Transition in a Swept-Wing Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duan, Lian; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei

    2013-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is performed to examine laminar to turbulent transition due to high-frequency secondary instability of stationary crossflow vortices in a subsonic swept-wing boundary layer for a realistic natural-laminar-flow airfoil configuration. The secondary instability is introduced via inflow forcing derived from a two-dimensional, partial-differential-equation based eigenvalue computation; and the mode selected for forcing corresponds to the most amplified secondary instability mode which, in this case, derives a majority of its growth from energy production mechanisms associated with the wall-normal shear of the stationary basic state. Both the growth of the secondary instability wave and the resulting onset of laminar-turbulent transition are captured within the DNS computations. The growth of the secondary instability wave in the DNS solution compares well with linear secondary instability theory when the amplitude is small; the linear growth is followed by a region of reduced growth resulting from nonlinear effects before an explosive onset of laminar breakdown to turbulence. The peak fluctuations are concentrated near the boundary layer edge during the initial stage of transition, but rapidly propagates towards the surface during the process of laminar breakdown. Both time-averaged statistics and flow visualization based on the DNS reveal a sawtooth transition pattern that is analogous to previously documented surface flow visualizations of transition due to stationary crossflow instability. The memory of the stationary crossflow vortex is found to persist through the transition zone and well beyond the location of the maximum skin friction.

  15. Direct numerical simulation of elastic turbulence and its mixing-enhancement effect in a straight channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong-Na; Li, Feng-Chen; Cao, Yang; Kunugi, Tomoaki; Yu, Bo

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we present a direct numerical simulation (DNS) of elastic turbulence of viscoelastic fluid at vanishingly low Reynolds number (Re=1) in a three-dimensional straight channel flow for the first time, using the Giesekus constitutive model for the fluid. In order to generate and maintain the turbulent fluid motion in the straight channel, a sinusoidal force term is added to the momentum equation, and then the elastic turbulence is numerically realized with an initialized chaotic velocity field and a stretched conformation field. Statistical and structural characteristics of the elastic turbulence therein are analyzed based on the detailed information obtained from the DNS. The fluid mixing enhancement effect of elastic turbulence is also demonstrated for the potential applications of this phenomenon.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Protoplanetary Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, H.; Barranco, J. A.; Marcus, P. S.

    2003-01-01

    The fluid dynamics within a protoplanetary disk has been attracting the attention of many researchers for a few decades. Previous works include, to list only a few among many others, the well-known prescription of Shakura & Sunyaev, the convective and instability study of Stone & Balbus and Hawley et al., the Rossby wave approach of Lovelace et al., as well as a recent work by Klahr & Bodenheimer, which attempted to identify turbulent flow within the disk. The disk is commonly understood to be a thin gas disk rotating around a central star with differential rotation (the Keplerian velocity), and the central quest remains as how the flow behavior deviates (albeit by a small amount) from a strong balance established between gravitational and centrifugal forces, transfers mass and momentum inward, and eventually forms planetesimals and planets. In earlier works we have briefly described the possible physical processes involved in the disk; we have proposed the existence of long-lasting, coherent vortices as an efficient agent for mass and momentum transport. In particular, Barranco et al. provided a general mathematical framework that is suitable for the asymptotic regime of the disk; Barranco & Marcus (2000) addressed a proposed vortex-dust interaction mechanism which might lead to planetesimal formation; and Lin et al. (2002), as inspired by general geophysical vortex dynamics, proposed basic mechanisms by which vortices can transport mass and angular momentum. The current work follows up on our previous effort. We shall focus on the detailed numerical implementation of our problem. We have developed a parallel, pseudo-spectral code to simulate the full three-dimensional vortex dynamics in a stably-stratified, differentially rotating frame, which represents the environment of the disk. Our simulation is validated with full diagnostics and comparisons, and we present our results on a family of three-dimensional, coherent equilibrium vortices.

  17. Numerical simulation of particle bed scour by vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagan, Dan; Dubief, Yves; Dewoolkar, Mandar

    2014-11-01

    The repeated impacts of a vortex dipole on a particle bed are simulated using a Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) code. The resulting scour characteristics and flow dynamics are investigated as a function of the Shields number. The fluid phase is treated as a continuum and the discretized Navier-Stokes equations are solved down to the smallest scales of the flow, on an Eulerian grid. The particles comprising the bed are represented by the Discrete Particle Model (DPM), whereby each individual particle is tracked in a Lagrangian framework. Particle-particle and particle-wall collisions are modeled using a soft-sphere model. The fluid phase and the solid phase are coupled through a forcing term in the fluid conservation of momentum equation, and a drag force in the particle equation of motion, governed by Newton's Second Law. Above the critical Shields number, the scour hole topography is not fundamentally altered with subsequent impacts until the scale of the scour hole reaches a critical value. At which point, the shape and scale of the scour hole significantly alters the behavior of the vortex dipole and results in strongly asymmetric scour topographies. The two-way coupling between the bed scour and the vortex dipole dynamics are analyzed. Support from UVM Transportation Research Center and NSF CBET-0967224.

  18. DNS evaluation of Reynolds stress models and Generalized Langevin models using velocity-acceleration correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xinyu; Mathioudakis, Alexandros

    2015-11-01

    Velocity-acceleration correlation is used to evaluate the pressure-rate-of-strain term for Reynolds-stress based models and the drift coefficient in the generalized Langevin model. The direct numerical simulations (DNS) of a non-premixed temporally-evolving slot jet flame and a premixed temporally-evolving slot jet flame are used. Both flames feature moderate Reynolds numbers, as well as highly anisotropic and inhomogeneous flow environment. Good agreement is achieved between turbulent statistics obtained from velocity-acceleration correlation and those obtained directly from DNS. Different filter sizes are then applied to the DNS database to further test the feasibility of representing pressure-rate-of-strain term and the drift coefficient using velocity-acceleration correlation in experiments or large eddy simulations. Behaviors of turbulent statistics obtained from the premixed flame and those from the nonpremixed flame are analyzed. Finally, the applicability of existing generalized Langevin model coefficients to flame simulations is discussed. The authors acknowledge Dr. Jacqueline Chen for providing access to the DNS database and computing resources.

  19. Numerical Simulations of Thermobaric Explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A L; Bell, J B; Beckner, V E; Khasainov, B

    2007-05-04

    A Model of the energy evolution in thermobaric explosions is presented. It is based on the two-phase formulation: conservation laws for the gas and particle phases along with inter-phase interaction terms. It incorporates a Combustion Model based on the mass conservation laws for fuel, air and products; source/sink terms are treated in the fast-chemistry limit appropriate for such gas dynamic fields. The Model takes into account both the afterburning of the detonation products of the booster with air, and the combustion of the fuel (Al or TNT detonation products) with air. Numerical simulations were performed for 1.5-g thermobaric explosions in five different chambers (volumes ranging from 6.6 to 40 liters and length-to-diameter ratios from 1 to 12.5). Computed pressure waveforms were very similar to measured waveforms in all cases - thereby proving that the Model correctly predicts the energy evolution in such explosions. The computed global fuel consumption {mu}(t) behaved as an exponential life function. Its derivative {dot {mu}}(t) represents the global rate of fuel consumption. It depends on the rate of turbulent mixing which controls the rate of energy release in thermobaric explosions.

  20. Numerical simulations in stochastic mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClendon, Marvin; Rabitz, Herschel

    1988-05-01

    The stochastic differential equation of Nelson's stochastic mechanics is integrated numerically for several simple quantum systems. The calculations are performed with use of Helfand and Greenside's method and pseudorandom numbers. The resulting trajectories are analyzed both individually and collectively to yield insight into momentum, uncertainty principles, interference, tunneling, quantum chaos, and common models of diatomic molecules from the stochastic quantization point of view. In addition to confirming Shucker's momentum theorem, these simulations illustrate, within the context of stochastic mechanics, the position-momentum and time-energy uncertainty relations, the two-slit diffraction pattern, exponential decay of an unstable system, and the greater degree of anticorrelation in a valence-bond model as compared with a molecular-orbital model of H2. The attempt to find exponential divergence of initially nearby trajectories, potentially useful as a criterion for quantum chaos, in a periodically forced oscillator is inconclusive. A way of computing excited energies from the ground-state motion is presented. In all of these studies the use of particle trajectories allows a more insightful interpretation of physical phenomena than is possible within traditional wave mechanics.

  1. Numerical Simulations of the Slingatron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Gene R.; Tidman, Derek A.; Bundy, Mark L.; Wilkerson, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    The slingatron mass accelerator is described for several track configurations (shapes), and numerical simulations of this accelerating mass traversing a given track configuration are presented. The sled is modeled as a point mass that interacts with the slingatron track using both a conventional and a new empirical velocity dependent friction law. The closed loop circular slingatron was found to produce high maximum sled velocities provided the gyration angular speed is always increasing. In contrast several spiral shaped slingatron tracks reveal that high maximum sled velocities are obtainable with the gyration speed held constant. In fact, a slingatron constructed out of semi-circles is shown capable of generating high velocity sleds in such a way that no initial sled injection is necessary. Choosing the proper initial gyration phase with an empirically determined friction model allows the mass sled to gain ever-increasing velocities when placed in a semi-circle slingatron. The sled bearing pressure and its total acceleration are examined and presented.

  2. Numerical simulations of non-homogeneous viscoelastic turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Housiadas, Kostas; Beris, Antony

    2004-11-01

    The effect of the polymer mixing in turbulent channel flow is studied through numerical simulations, using a spectral technique. In particular, we simulate injection of polymeric material through a slit very close to the wall and parallel to it in pre-established Newtonian turbulent flow. The governing equations consist of the mass conservation, the modified Navier-Stokes equation (in order to take into account the polymer extra-stress), the evolution equation for the conformation tensor and an advection-diffusion equation for the polymer concentration. The injection process is simulated by dividing the computational domain in three different regions: (a) the entrance region where the polymer is introduced (b) the developing region where the polymer is allowed to convect freely interacting/modifying the turbulent flow and (c) the recovering region where we use a reacting sink to force the removal of the polymer from the solvent in order to re-establish the inlet conditions. A fully spectral method is used in order to solve the set of governing equations similar to that developed for homogenous viscoelastic turbulent DNS (Housiadas & Beris, Phys. Fluids, 15, (2003)). Although a significantly improved numerical algorithm has been successfully used before (Housiadas & Beris, to appear in J. Non-Newt. Fluid Mech. (2004)) a further improved version of that algorithm is presented in this work. The new algorithm has enabled us to extend the simulations for much wider range of viscoelasticity parameter values as well as for many viscoelastic models like the FENE-P, Giesekus, Oldroyd-B and the modified Giesekus/FENE-P model. Results for illustrative sets of parameter values are going to be presented.

  3. A Lagrangian-Eulerian Mapping Solver for Direct Numerical Simulation of Bubble-Laden Turbulent Shear Flows Using the Two-Fluid Formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druzhinin, O. A.; Elghobashi, S. E.

    1999-09-01

    In a recent study we showed that the two-fluid (TF) formulation can be used in the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of bubble- (or particle-) laden decaying isotropic turbulence with considerable saving in CPU-time and memory as compared to the trajectory approach employed by many researchers. In the present paper, we develop a Lagrangian-Eulerian mapping (LEM) solver for DNS of bubble-laden turbulent shear flows using TF. The purpose of LEM is to resolve the large gradients of bubble velocity and concentration which result from the absence of the diffusion terms in the equations of bubble-phase motion and the preferential accumulation of bubbles. A standard finite-difference scheme (FDS) fails to resolve these gradients. We examine the performance of the new method in DNS of a bubble-laden Taylor-Green vortex, spatially developing plane mixing layer, and homogeneous shear turbulent flow.

  4. Numerical Simulations of Homogeneous Turbulence Using Lagrangian-Averaged Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohseni, Kamran; Shkoller, Steve; Kosovic, Branko; Marsden, Jerrold E.; Carati, Daniele; Wray, Alan; Rogallo, Robert

    2000-01-01

    The Lagrangian-averaged Navier-Stokes (LANS) equations are numerically evaluated as a turbulence closure. They are derived from a novel Lagrangian averaging procedure on the space of all volume-preserving maps and can be viewed as a numerical algorithm which removes the energy content from the small scales (smaller than some a priori fixed spatial scale alpha) using a dispersive rather than dissipative mechanism, thus maintaining the crucial features of the large scale flow. We examine the modeling capabilities of the LANS equations for decaying homogeneous turbulence, ascertain their ability to track the energy spectrum of fully resolved direct numerical simulations (DNS), compare the relative energy decay rates, and compare LANS with well-accepted large eddy simulation (LES) models.

  5. Experimental and numerical investigation of passive scalar dispersal in bounded turbulent shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, J.M.; Bernard, P.S.; Balint, J.L.; Ong, L.

    1992-01-01

    Laboratory experiments and direct numerical simulations (DNS) of passive scalar contaminant dispersal in bounded shear flows have been carrried out. Both mass and heat transport have been experimentally studied. Statistical results for the temperature plume which develops from a line heat source at the wall are compared to the DNS results. The DNS results for this case and for the case of a uniform source with constant temperature boundaries are also compared to various model predictions.

  6. Experimental and numerical investigation of passive scalar dispersal in bounded turbulent shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, J.M.; Bernard, P.S.; Balint, J.L.; Ong, L.

    1992-12-31

    Laboratory experiments and direct numerical simulations (DNS) of passive scalar contaminant dispersal in bounded shear flows have been carrried out. Both mass and heat transport have been experimentally studied. Statistical results for the temperature plume which develops from a line heat source at the wall are compared to the DNS results. The DNS results for this case and for the case of a uniform source with constant temperature boundaries are also compared to various model predictions.

  7. Particle-Based Direct Numerical Simulation of Contaminant Transport and Deposition in Porous Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ray A. Berry; Richard C. Martineau; Thomas R. Wood

    2004-02-01

    This work describes an approach to porous flow modeling in which the "micro-length scale to macro-length scale" physical descriptions are addressed as Lagrangian, pore-level flow and transport. The flow features of the physical domain are solved by direct numerical simulation (DNS) with a grid-free, hybrid smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) numerical method (Berry, 2002) based on a local Riemann solution. In addition to being able to handle the large deformation, fluid–fluid and fluid–solid interactions within the contorted geometries of intra- and inter-pore-scale modeling, this Riemann–SPH method should be able to simulate other complexities, such as multiple fluid phases and chemical, particulate, and microbial transport with volumetric and surface reactions. A simple model is presented for the transfer of a contaminant from a carrier fluid to solid surfaces and is demonstrated for flow in a simulated porous media

  8. Numerical Simulations of Granular Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Derek C.; Michel, Patrick; Schwartz, Stephen R.; Ballouz, Ronald-Louis; Yu, Yang; Matsumura, Soko

    2014-11-01

    Spacecraft images and indirect observations including thermal inertia measurements indicate most small bodies have surface regolith. Evidence of granular flow is also apparent in the images. This material motion occurs in very low gravity, therefore in a completely different gravitational environment than on the Earth. Understanding and modeling these motions can aid in the interpretation of imaged surface features that may exhibit signatures of constituent material properties. Also, upcoming sample-return missions to small bodies, and possible future manned missions, will involve interaction with the surface regolith, so it is important to develop tools to predict the surface response. We have added new capabilities to the parallelized N-body gravity tree code pkdgrav [1,2] that permit the simulation of granular dynamics, including multi-contact physics and friction forces, using the soft-sphere discrete-element method [3]. The numerical approach has been validated through comparison with laboratory experiments (e.g., [3,4]). Ongoing and recently completed projects include: impacts into granular materials using different projectile shapes [5]; possible tidal resurfacing of asteroid Apophis during its 2029 encounter [6]; the Brazil-nut effect in low gravity [7]; and avalanche modeling.Acknowledgements: DCR acknowledges NASA (grants NNX08AM39G, NNX10AQ01G, NNX12AG29G) and NSF (AST1009579). PM acknowledges the French agency CNES. SRS works on the NEOShield Project funded under the European Commission’s FP7 program agreement No. 282703. SM acknowledges support from the Center for Theory and Computation at U Maryland and the Dundee Fellowship at U Dundee. Most simulations were performed using the YORP cluster in the Dept. of Astronomy at U Maryland and on the Deepthought High-Performance Computing Cluster at U Maryland.References: [1] Richardson, D.C. et al. 2000, Icarus 143, 45; [2] Stadel, J. 2001, Ph.D. Thesis, U Washington; [3] Schwartz, S.R. et al. 2012, Gran. Matt. 14, 363. [4] Schwartz, S.R. et al. 2013, Icarus 226, 67; [5] Schwartz, S.R. et al. 2014, P&SS, 10.1016/j.pss.2014.07.013; [6] Yu, Y. et al. 2014, Icarus, 10.1016/j.icarus.2014.07.027; [7] Matsumura, S. et al. 2014, MNRAS, 10.1093/mnras/stu1388.

  9. Scaling of turbulence and turbulent mixing using Terascale numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donzis, Diego A.

    Fundamental aspects of turbulence and turbulent mixing are investigated using direct numerical simulations (DNS) of stationary isotropic turbulence, with Taylor-scale Reynolds numbers (Rlambda) ranging from 8 to 650 and Schmidt numbers (Sc) from 1/8 to 1024. The primary emphasis is on important scaling issues that arise in the study of intermittency, mixing and turbulence under solid-body rotation. Simulations up to 20483 in size have been performed using large resource allocations on Terascale computers at leading supercomputing centers. Substantial efforts in algorithmic development have also been undertaken and resulted in a new code based on a two-dimensional domain decomposition which allows the use of very large number of processors. Benchmark tests indicate very good parallel performance for resolutions up to 40963 on up to 32768 processors, which is highly promising for future simulations at higher resolutions and processor counts eventually to approach Petascale levels. Investigation of intermittency through the statistics of dissipation and enstrophy in a series of simulations at the same Reynolds number but different resolution indicate that accurate results in high-order moments require a higher degree of fine-scale resolution than commonly practiced. However, statistics up to fourth order are satisfactory if the grid spacing is not larger than Komogorov scale, without the requirement of a clear analytic range for corresponding structure functions as suggested by recent theories. Results from highly resolved simulations provide support for a modified resolution criterion derived in this work for structure functions of different orders and as a function of Rlambda. At the highest Reynolds number in our simulations (400 and 650) dissipation and enstrophy exhibit extreme fluctuations of O(1000) the mean which have not been studied in the literature before. The far tails of the probability density functions of dissipation and enstrophy appear to coincide, suggesting a universal scaling of small scales. Simulations at Rlambda ≈ 650 on 2048 3 grids with scalars at Sc = 1/8 and 1 have allowed us to obtain the clearest evidence of attainment of k -5/3 inertial-convective scaling in the scalar spectrum (as function of wavenumber k) in numerical simulations to date. In addition, results at high Sc appear to support k -1 viscous-convective scaling. Intermittency for scalars as measured by the tail of the PDF of scalar dissipation and moments of scalar gradient fluctuations is found to saturate at high Sc. This asymptotic state is reached at lower Sc when R lambda is high. Statistics of scalar gradients in different directions are used to address the scaling of anisotropy due to the imposed mean scalar gradient. Persistent departures from isotropy are observed as R lambda increases. However, results suggest a return to isotropy at high Schmidt numbers, a tendency that appears to be stronger at high Reynolds numbers. The effects of the Coriolis force on turbulence under solid-body rotation are investigated using simulations at 10243 resolution on enlarged solution domains which reduce the effects of periodic boundary conditions due to the growth of integral scales. Anisotropy at all scales is observed, and is strongest at intermediate rotation rates. Spectra, structure functions and different alignments show strong departures from classical scaling. At high rotation rates the nonlinear terms are damped which help explain the observed decrease in intermittency. The basic property of enstrophy production through vortex stretching in non-rotating flows is also reduced at high rotation rates. Results from DNS do not appear to support some of the assumptions leading to the classical form of the Taylor-Proudman theorem. A mechanism for mixing and a scaling for structure functions is proposed for rapidly rotating flows.

  10. Resolution requirements for numerical simulations of transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, Thomas A.; Krist, Steven E.; Hussaini, M. Yousuff

    1989-01-01

    The resolution requirements for direct numerical simulations of transition to turbulence are investigated. A reliable resolution criterion is determined from the results of several detailed simulations of channel and boundary-layer transition.

  11. Direct Numerical Simulations in Solid Mechanics for Quantifying the Macroscale Effects of Microstructure and Material Model-Form Error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Joseph E.; Emery, John M.; Battaile, Corbett C.; Littlewood, David J.; Baines, Andrew J.

    2016-03-01

    Two fundamental approximations in macroscale solid-mechanics modeling are (1) the assumption of scale separation in homogenization theory and (2) the use of a macroscopic plasticity material model that represents, in a mean sense, the multitude of inelastic processes occurring at the microscale. With the goal of quantifying the errors induced by these approximations on engineering quantities of interest, we perform a set of direct numerical simulations (DNS) in which polycrystalline microstructures are embedded throughout a macroscale structure. The largest simulations model over 50,000 grains. The microstructure is idealized using a randomly close-packed Voronoi tessellation in which each polyhedral Voronoi cell represents a grain. An face centered cubic crystal-plasticity model is used to model the mechanical response of each grain. The overall grain structure is equiaxed, and each grain is randomly oriented with no overall texture. The detailed results from the DNS simulations are compared to results obtained from conventional macroscale simulations that use homogeneous isotropic plasticity models. The macroscale plasticity models are calibrated using a representative volume element of the idealized microstructure. Ultimately, we envision that DNS modeling will be used to gain new insights into the mechanics of material deformation and failure.

  12. Direct Numerical Simulations in Solid Mechanics for Quantifying the Macroscale Effects of Microstructure and Material Model-Form Error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Joseph E.; Emery, John M.; Battaile, Corbett C.; Littlewood, David J.; Baines, Andrew J.

    2016-05-01

    Two fundamental approximations in macroscale solid-mechanics modeling are (1) the assumption of scale separation in homogenization theory and (2) the use of a macroscopic plasticity material model that represents, in a mean sense, the multitude of inelastic processes occurring at the microscale. With the goal of quantifying the errors induced by these approximations on engineering quantities of interest, we perform a set of direct numerical simulations (DNS) in which polycrystalline microstructures are embedded throughout a macroscale structure. The largest simulations model over 50,000 grains. The microstructure is idealized using a randomly close-packed Voronoi tessellation in which each polyhedral Voronoi cell represents a grain. An face centered cubic crystal-plasticity model is used to model the mechanical response of each grain. The overall grain structure is equiaxed, and each grain is randomly oriented with no overall texture. The detailed results from the DNS simulations are compared to results obtained from conventional macroscale simulations that use homogeneous isotropic plasticity models. The macroscale plasticity models are calibrated using a representative volume element of the idealized microstructure. Ultimately, we envision that DNS modeling will be used to gain new insights into the mechanics of material deformation and failure.

  13. Relativistic positioning systems: Numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchades Colmenero, Neus

    The position of users located on the Earth's surface or near it may be found with the classic positioning systems (CPS). Certain information broadcast by satellites of global navigation systems, as GPS and GALILEO, may be used for positioning. The CPS are based on the Newtonian formalism, although relativistic post-Newtonian corrections are done when they are necessary. This thesis contributes to the development of a different positioning approach, which is fully relativistic from the beginning. In the relativistic positioning systems (RPS), the space-time position of any user (ship, spacecraft, and so on) can be calculated with the help of four satellites, which broadcast their proper times by means of codified electromagnetic signals. In this thesis, we have simulated satellite 4-tuples of the GPS and GALILEO constellations. If a user receives the signals from four satellites simultaneously, the emission proper times read -after decoding- are the user "emission coordinates". In order to find the user "positioning coordinates", in an appropriate almost inertial reference system, there are two possibilities: (a) the explicit relation between positioning and emission coordinates (broadcast by the satellites) is analytically found or (b) numerical codes are designed to calculate the positioning coordinates from the emission ones. Method (a) is only viable in simple ideal cases, whereas (b) allows us to consider realistic situations. In this thesis, we have designed numerical codes with the essential aim of studying two appropriate RPS, which may be generalized. Sometimes, there are two real users placed in different positions, which receive the same proper times from the same satellites; then, we say that there is bifurcation, and additional data are needed to choose the real user position. In this thesis, bifurcation is studied in detail. We have analyzed in depth two RPS models; in both, it is considered that the satellites move in the Schwarzschild's space-time (ST) corresponding to an ideal static spherically symmetric Earth. Since this ST is asymptotically Minkowskian, as soon as Schwarzschild's metric is assumed, there is a reference system with origin in the Earth center, which is inertial from the theoretical point of view, and almost inertial - since the acceleration due to the Sun and other small effects are being neglected- from the physical point of view. In one of the models, the 0-order RPS, photons move in the Minkowski ST asymptotic to Schwarzschild, whereas in the second model (1-order RPS), photons move - as the satellites - in Schwarzschild's ST. In the context of RPS, error estimations seem to be more systematic than in the framework of CPS. In the scheme presented in this thesis, there are two types of positioning errors. The U-errors are due to deviations of the actual satellite world lines with respect to the nominal lines (which have been adequately defined); whereas the S-errors arise when some sources of the gravitational field are neglected and, consequently, the metric and the photon null geodesics are not fully accurate. For every user, the total error is the addition of the U and the S errors. We have found, represented, and studied, the distributions of bifurcation points, U-errors, and S-errors, inside a wide spherical region with a radius of 100.000 km, which is located around Earth and centered in an arbitrary point on Earth's surface; in this way, we have discussed - for the first time - spacecraft positioning in this region based on GPS and GALILEO 4-tuples. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  14. Liquid falling films: linear stability and direct numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Patrick; O'Naraigh, Lennon; Valluri, Prashant; Lucquiaud, Mathieu

    2013-11-01

    Interfacial instability of falling liquid films in counter-current contact with a turbulent gas phase is investigated by means of an Orr-Sommerfeld analysis. This study is complemented by a full energy budget analysis, identifying the key mechanisms of the instability. This gives first insight into the dynamic behaviour of the two-phase system, which is relevant for a wide range of technical applications, such as absorption and distillation. The linear stability analysis is also used to identify the operating limits of a counter-current operation i.e. the so-called loading and flooding limits. In addition, the results of this analysis are benchmark for direct numerical simulations using the newly launched Two-Phase Level Set (http://sourceforge.net/projects/tpls/) solver. High resolution DNS is used to obtain detailed knowledge of important mechanisms at play, especially with regard to interfacial instability and transient system behaviour, which can help to design more efficient mass transfer equipment such as structured packings. Sulzer Chemtech Ltd, EPSRC, Energy Technology Partnership.

  15. Direct numerical simulation of the sea flows around blunt bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matyushin, Pavel V.; Gushchin, Valentin A.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present paper is the demonstration of the opportunities of the mathematical modeling of the separated flows of the sea water around blunt bodies on the basis of the Navier-Stokes equations (NSE) in the Boussinesq approximation. The 3D density stratified incompressible viscous fluid flows around a sphere have been investigated by means of the direct numerical simulation (DNS) on supercomputers and the visualization of the 3D vortex structures in the wake. For solving of NSE the Splitting on physical factors Method for Incompressible Fluid flows (SMIF) with hybrid explicit finite difference scheme (second-order accuracy in space, minimum scheme viscosity and dispersion, capable for work in wide range of the Reynolds (Re) and the internal Froude (Fr) numbers and monotonous) has been developed and successfully applied. The different transitions in sphere wakes with increasing of Re (10 < Re < 500) and decreasing of Fr (0.005 < Fr < 100) have been investigated in details. Thus the classifications of the viscous fluid flow regimes around a sphere have been refined.

  16. Direct numerical simulation of supersonic combustion with finite-rate chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saghafian, Amirreza; Pitsch, Heinz

    2011-11-01

    Three-dimensional direct numerical simulations (DNS) of reacting and inert compressible turbulent mixing layers have been performed. The simulations cover convective Mach numbers from subsonic to supersonic. A detailed chemistry mechanism with 9 species and 29 reactions for hydrogen is used in the reacting simulations. Effects of different initial conditions on the structure of the mixing layer, and time required to reach self-similarity are studied. Flame/turbulence interaction is analyzed by studying turbulent kinetic energy, Reynolds stresses, and their budgets in the reacting and inert simulations. The effects of different reactions on the heat release and mixture composition especially in the regions where shocklets impinge the flame are studied. These DNS databases will provide a better understanding for the compressibility effects on the combustion, and will be used to assess the accuracy of Flamelet/Progress variable approach in supersonic regime. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program (PSAAP) at Stanford University, Award Number(s)DE-FC52-08NA28614.

  17. A critical comparison of second order closures with direct numerical simulation of homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Lumley, John L.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, several second order closure models have been proposed for closing the second moment equations, in which the velocity-pressure gradient (and scalar-pressure gradient) tensor and the dissipation rate tensor are two of the most important terms. In the literature, these correlation tensors are usually decomposed into a so called rapid term and a return-to-isotropy term. Models of these terms have been used in global flow calculations together with other modeled terms. However, their individual behavior in different flows have not been fully examined because they are un-measurable in the laboratory. Recently, the development of direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulence has given us the opportunity to do this kind of study. With the direct numerical simulation, we may use the solution to exactly calculate the values of these correlation terms and then directly compare them with the values from their modeled formulations (models). Here, we make direct comparisons of five representative rapid models and eight return-to-isotropy models using the DNS data of forty five homogeneous flows which were done by Rogers et al. (1986) and Lee et al. (1985). The purpose of these direct comparisons is to explore the performance of these models in different flows and identify the ones which give the best performance. The modeling procedure, model constraints, and the various evaluated models are described. The detailed results of the direct comparisons are discussed, and a few concluding remarks on turbulence models are given.

  18. Compressible Turbulent Channel Flows: DNS Results and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, P. G.; Coleman, G. N.; Bradshaw, P.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The present paper addresses some topical issues in modeling compressible turbulent shear flows. The work is based on direct numerical simulation of two supersonic fully developed channel flows between very cold isothermal walls. Detailed decomposition and analysis of terms appearing in the momentum and energy equations are presented. The simulation results are used to provide insights into differences between conventional time-and Favre-averaging of the mean-flow and turbulent quantities. Study of the turbulence energy budget for the two cases shows that the compressibility effects due to turbulent density and pressure fluctuations are insignificant. In particular, the dilatational dissipation and the mean product of the pressure and dilatation fluctuations are very small, contrary to the results of simulations for sheared homogeneous compressible turbulence and to recent proposals for models for general compressible turbulent flows. This provides a possible explanation of why the Van Driest density-weighted transformation is so successful in correlating compressible boundary layer data. Finally, it is found that the DNS data do not support the strong Reynolds analogy. A more general representation of the analogy is analysed and shown to match the DNS data very well.

  19. Turbulent flame-wall interaction: a DNS study

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jackie; Hawkes, Evatt R; Sankaran, Ramanan; Gruber, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    A turbulent flame-wall interaction (FWI) configuration is studied using three-dimensional direct numerical simulation (DNS) and detailed chemical kinetics. The simulations are used to investigate the effects of the wall turbulent boundary layer (i) on the structure of a hydrogen-air premixed flame, (ii) on its near-wall propagation characteristics and (iii) on the spatial and temporal patterns of the convective wall heat flux. Results show that the local flame thickness and propagation speed vary between the core flow and the boundary layer, resulting in a regime change from flamelet near the channel centreline to a thickened flame at the wall. This finding has strong implications for the modelling of turbulent combustion using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes or large-eddy simulation techniques. Moreover, the DNS results suggest that the near-wall coherent turbulent structures play an important role on the convective wall heat transfer by pushing the hot reactive zone towards the cold solid surface. At the wall, exothermic radical recombination reactions become important, and are responsible for approximately 70% of the overall heat release rate at the wall. Spectral analysis of the convective wall heat flux provides an unambiguous picture of its spatial and temporal patterns, previously unobserved, that is directly related to the spatial and temporal characteristic scalings of the coherent near-wall turbulent structures.

  20. Numerical Simulation of Unsteady Aerodynamic Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Khanh Q.; Warmbrodt, William (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the results of the numerical simulations of unsteady aerodynamic models. The results focus on numerical accuracy and efficiency, and the robustness of the numerical methods. The aerodynamic models includes the classical Wagner and Kussner functions and the Leishman-Beddoes dynamic stall model. The simulations includes the numerical approximations of the Duhamel's integrals using both indicial (step) and impulse responses, the numerical integrations of the state-space models, and the exact solutions. The report also presents the conversion among different model representations.

  1. Direct numerical simulation of ignition front propagation in a constant volume with temperature inhomogeneities, Part II : Parametric study.

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaran, Ramanan; Chen, Jacqueline H.; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

    2005-01-01

    The influence of thermal stratification on autoignition at constant volume and high pressure is studied by direct numerical simulation (DNS) with detailed hydrogen/air chemistry. Parametric studies on the effect of the initial amplitude of the temperature fluctuations, the initial length scales of the temperature and velocity fluctuations, and the turbulence intensity are performed. The combustion mode is characterized using the diagnostic measures developed in Part I of this study. Specifically, the ignition front speed and the scalar mixing timescales are used to identify the roles of molecular diffusion and heat conduction in each case. Predictions from a multizone model initialized from the DNS fields are presented and differences are explained using the diagnostic tools developed.

  2. Direct numerical simulation of ignition front propagation in a constant volume with temperature inhomogeneities. II. Parametric study

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkes, Evatt R.; Sankaran, Ramanan; Pebay, Philippe P.; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2006-04-15

    The influence of thermal stratification on autoignition at constant volume and high pressure is studied by direct numerical simulation (DNS) with detailed hydrogen/air chemistry. Parametric studies on the effect of the initial amplitude of the temperature fluctuations, the initial length scales of the temperature and velocity fluctuations, and the turbulence intensity are performed. The combustion mode is characterized using the diagnostic measures developed in Part I of this study. Specifically, the ignition front speed and the scalar mixing timescales are used to identify the roles of molecular diffusion and heat conduction in each case. Predictions from a multizone model initialized from the DNS fields are presented and differences are explained using the diagnostic tools developed. (author)

  3. Direct Numerical Simulation of Boiling Multiphase Flows: State-of-the-Art, Modeling, Algorithmic and Computer Needs

    SciTech Connect

    Nourgaliev R.; Knoll D.; Mousseau V.; Berry R.

    2007-04-01

    The state-of-the-art for Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of boiling multiphase flows is reviewed, focussing on potential of available computational techniques, the level of current success for their applications to model several basic flow regimes (film, pool-nucleate and wall-nucleate boiling -- FB, PNB and WNB, respectively). Then, we discuss multiphysics and multiscale nature of practical boiling flows in LWR reactors, requiring high-fidelity treatment of interfacial dynamics, phase-change, hydrodynamics, compressibility, heat transfer, and non-equilibrium thermodynamics and chemistry of liquid/vapor and fluid/solid-wall interfaces. Finally, we outline the framework for the {\\sf Fervent} code, being developed at INL for DNS of reactor-relevant boiling multiphase flows, with the purpose of gaining insight into the physics of multiphase flow regimes, and generating a basis for effective-field modeling in terms of its formulation and closure laws.

  4. Direct numerical simulation of ignition front propagation in a constant volume with temperature inhomogeneities, part I : Fundamental analysis and diagnostics.

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaran, Ramanan; Mason, Scott D.; Chen, Jacqueline H.; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Im, Hong G.

    2005-01-01

    The influence of thermal stratification on autoignition at constant volume and high pressure is studied by direct numerical simulation (DNS) with detailed hydrogen/air chemistry. Parametric studies on the effect of the initial amplitude of the temperature fluctuations, the initial length scales of the temperature and velocity fluctuations, and the turbulence intensity are performed. The combustion mode is characterized using the diagnostic measures developed in Part I of this study. Specifically, the ignition front speed and the scalar mixing timescales are used to identify the roles of molecular diffusion and heat conduction in each case. Predictions from a multizone model initialized from the DNS fields are presented and differences are explained using the diagnostic tools developed.

  5. Rocket Engine Numerical Simulator (RENS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidian, Kenneth O.

    1997-01-01

    Work is being done at three universities to help today's NASA engineers use the knowledge and experience of their Apolloera predecessors in designing liquid rocket engines. Ground-breaking work is being done in important subject areas to create a prototype of the most important functions for the Rocket Engine Numerical Simulator (RENS). The goal of RENS is to develop an interactive, realtime application that engineers can utilize for comprehensive preliminary propulsion system design functions. RENS will employ computer science and artificial intelligence research in knowledge acquisition, computer code parallelization and objectification, expert system architecture design, and object-oriented programming. In 1995, a 3year grant from the NASA Lewis Research Center was awarded to Dr. Douglas Moreman and Dr. John Dyer of Southern University at Baton Rouge, Louisiana, to begin acquiring knowledge in liquid rocket propulsion systems. Resources of the University of West Florida in Pensacola were enlisted to begin the process of enlisting knowledge from senior NASA engineers who are recognized experts in liquid rocket engine propulsion systems. Dr. John Coffey of the University of West Florida is utilizing his expertise in interviewing and concept mapping techniques to encode, classify, and integrate information obtained through personal interviews. The expertise extracted from the NASA engineers has been put into concept maps with supporting textual, audio, graphic, and video material. A fundamental concept map was delivered by the end of the first year of work and the development of maps containing increasing amounts of information is continuing. Find out more information about this work at the Southern University/University of West Florida. In 1996, the Southern University/University of West Florida team conducted a 4day group interview with a panel of five experts to discuss failures of the RL10 rocket engine in conjunction with the Centaur launch vehicle. The discussion was recorded on video and audio tape. Transcriptions of the entire proceedings and an abbreviated video presentation of the discussion highlights are under development. Also in 1996, two additional 3year grants were awarded to conduct parallel efforts that would complement the work being done by Southern University and the University of West Florida. Dr. Prem Bhalla of Jackson State University in Jackson, Mississippi, is developing the architectural framework for RENS. By employing the Rose Rational language and Booch Object Oriented Programming (OOP) technology, Dr. Bhalla is developing the basic structure of RENS by identifying and encoding propulsion system components, their individual characteristics, and cross-functionality and dependencies. Dr. Ruknet Cezzar of Hampton University, located in Hampton, Virginia, began working on the parallelization and objectification of rocket engine analysis and design codes. Dr. Cezzar will use the Turbo C++ OOP language to translate important liquid rocket engine computer codes from FORTRAN and permit their inclusion into the RENS framework being developed at Jackson State University. The Southern University/University of West Florida grant was extended by 1 year to coordinate the conclusion of all three efforts in 1999.

  6. Direct numerical simulation of soot formation and transport in turbulent nonpremixed ethylene flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lignell, David Owen

    Combustion is central to society and accounts for the majority of the world's energy production. Soot formation, transport, and emission from turbulent flames are an important process in nonpremixed combustion. Soot is a major air pollutant with adverse health effects; its emission reduces combustion efficiencies associated with unburned fuel; and soot interacts strongly with the composition and temperature fields of flames, contributing to the bulk of radiative heat transfer. Simulation of combustion is an important and emerging discipline that compliments theoretical and experimental investigations and can provide fundamental insight into turbulent combustion environments and aid in engineering design of practical equipment. Simulations of practical combustion environments cannot fully resolve all flow and chemical phenomena due to the wide range of timescales and lengthscales present and must rely on models to capture the effects of unresolved turbulent transport and turbulence-chemistry interactions. Very little is know about soot formation in turbulent flames due to the difficulty of experimental measurements and the computational cost of simulation. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) resolves all relevant flow and chemical structures in turbulent flames, requiring no turbulence closure models. DNS of soot formation with realistic combustion chemistry and soot formation is presented in this dissertation. A series of increasingly complex flow configurations is investigated including one-dimensional relaxing diffusion flames, two-dimensional mixing layers and decaying turbulence simulations, and a three-dimensional temporally evolving jet flame. A reduced ethylene mechanism consisting of 19 transported species is coupled to a four-step soot model using the method of moments. The DNS are used to quantify soot formation and transport in turbulent flames. The proximity of soot to a flame is important, as this impacts the soot reaction and radiation rates. Differential diffusion between soot and the mixture fraction is very important. Multidimensional flame dynamic effects including flame curvature are shown to influence the direction of soot transport relative to a flame. The DNS provide a database by which turbulent combustion models may be validated and developed. Soot formation in the laminar flamelet and conditional moment closure models is examined.

  7. Numerical Simulation of a High Mach Number Jet Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayder, M. Ehtesham; Turkel, Eli; Mankbadi, Reda R.

    1993-01-01

    The recent efforts to develop accurate numerical schemes for transition and turbulent flows are motivated, among other factors, by the need for accurate prediction of flow noise. The success of developing high speed civil transport plane (HSCT) is contingent upon our understanding and suppression of the jet exhaust noise. The radiated sound can be directly obtained by solving the full (time-dependent) compressible Navier-Stokes equations. However, this requires computational storage that is beyond currently available machines. This difficulty can be overcome by limiting the solution domain to the near field where the jet is nonlinear and then use acoustic analogy (e.g., Lighthill) to relate the far-field noise to the near-field sources. The later requires obtaining the time-dependent flow field. The other difficulty in aeroacoustics computations is that at high Reynolds numbers the turbulent flow has a large range of scales. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) cannot obtain all the scales of motion at high Reynolds number of technological interest. However, it is believed that the large scale structure is more efficient than the small-scale structure in radiating noise. Thus, one can model the small scales and calculate the acoustically active scales. The large scale structure in the noise-producing initial region of the jet can be viewed as a wavelike nature, the net radiated sound is the net cancellation after integration over space. As such, aeroacoustics computations are highly sensitive to errors in computing the sound sources. It is therefore essential to use a high-order numerical scheme to predict the flow field. The present paper presents the first step in a ongoing effort to predict jet noise. The emphasis here is in accurate prediction of the unsteady flow field. We solve the full time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations by a high order finite difference method. Time accurate spatial simulations of both plane and axisymmetric jet are presented. Jet Mach numbers of 1.5 and 2.1 are considered. Reynolds number in the simulations was about a million. Our numerical model is based on the 2-4 scheme by Gottlieb & Turkel. Bayliss et al. applied the 2-4 scheme in boundary layer computations. This scheme was also used by Ragab and Sheen to study the nonlinear development of supersonic instability waves in a mixing layer. In this study, we present two dimensional direct simulation results for both plane and axisymmetric jets. These results are compared with linear theory predictions. These computations were made for near nozzle exit region and velocity in spanwise/azimuthal direction was assumed to be zero.

  8. Estimating Uncertainties in Statistics Computed from DNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaya, Nicholas; Oliver, Todd; Ulerich, Rhys; Moser, Robert

    2013-11-01

    Rigorous assessment of uncertainty is crucial to the utility of DNS results. Uncertainties in the computed statistics arise from two sources: finite sampling and the discretization of the Navier-Stokes equations. Due to the presence of non-trivial sampling error, standard techniques for estimating discretization error (such as Richardson Extrapolation) fail or are unreliable. This talk provides a systematic and unified approach for estimating these errors. First, a sampling error estimator that accounts for correlation in the input data is developed. Then, this sampling error estimate is used as an input to a probabilistic extension of Richardson extrapolation in order to characterize the discretization error. These techniques are used to investigate the sampling and discretization errors in the DNS of a wall-bounded turbulent flow at Reτ = 180. We will show a well-resolved DNS simulation which, for the centerline velocity, possesses 0.02% sampling error and discretization errors of 0.003%. These results imply that standard resolution heuristics for DNS accurately predict required grid sizes. This work is supported by the Department of Energy [National Nuclear Security Administration] under Award Number [DE-FC52-08NA28615].

  9. A posteriori analysis of numerical errors in subfilter scalar variance modeling for large eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaul, C. M.; Raman, V.

    2011-03-01

    Subfilter scalar variance is a critical indicator of small scale mixing in large eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent combustion and is an important parameter of conserved scalar based combustion models. Realistic combustion models have a highly nonlinear dependence on the conserved scalar, making the prediction of flow thermochemistry sensitive to errors in subfilter variance modeling, including errors due to numerical discretization. Large numerical errors can result from the use of grid-based filtering and the resulting under-resolution of the smallest filtered scales, which are a key to variance modeling. Hence, the development of variance models should take into account this sensitivity to numerical discretization. In this work, a novel coupled direct numerical simulation (DNS)-LES a posteriori method is used to study the role of discretization errors in variance prediction for the two most widely used types of models: algebraic dynamic models and transport equation-based models. Algebraic models are found to be ill-suited to discretization due to their dependence on filtered scalar gradient values. Additionally, the use of dynamic modeling procedures enhances their sensitivity to filtered scalar errors. The accuracy of transport equation models primarily rests on the accuracy of the scalar dissipation rate closure with numerical error having a secondary effect. The influence of dissipation rate modeling error is investigated using the unique information provided by the combined DNS-LES simulation method. Overall, transport equation models are found to offer a more powerful approach to variance modeling due to more complete model physics and reduced effects of discretization error.

  10. Numerical wind speed simulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsdell, J.V.; Athey, G.F.; Ballinger, M.Y.

    1981-09-01

    A relatively simple stochastic model for simulating wind speed time series that can be used as an alternative to time series from representative locations is described in this report. The model incorporates systematic seasonal variation of the mean wind, its standard deviation, and the correlation speeds. It also incorporates systematic diurnal variation of the mean speed and standard deviation. To demonstrate the model capabilities, simulations were made using model parameters derived from data collected at the Hanford Meteorology Station, and results of analysis of simulated and actual data were compared.

  11. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF LARYNGEAL FLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, we have investigated laryngeal air flows by numerically solving the corresponding Navier-Stokes equations expressed in a two-dimensional cylindrical coordinate system. The glottal aperture, defined by the geometry of the vocal folds was allowed to change with the v...

  12. Direct numerical simulations of low Reynolds number flow over airfoils with trailing-edge serrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandberg, R. D.; Jones, L. E.

    2011-08-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) have been conducted of NACA-0012 with serrated and straight flat-plate trailing-edge extensions using a purposely developed immersed boundary method. For the low Reynolds number airfoil flows accessible by DNS, laminar separation bubbles involving laminar-turbulent transition and turbulent reattachment occurs. Comparing results from simulations with serrated and un-serrated trailing-edge extensions, noise reduction for higher frequencies is shown using power spectra and one-third octave averaged pressure contours. The effect of the trailing-edge serrations on an acoustic feedback loop observed in previous simulations and the subsequent effect on the laminar separation bubble is studied via cross-correlations, probability density functions of skin friction and spanwise wavenumber spectra. The results show that the presence of serrations leads to some spanwise variation of transitional structures in the separated shear layer, but does not significantly affect the overall hydrodynamic field on the airfoil upstream of the serrations. Two reasons for why the hydrodynamic field is not considerably affected by the presence of serrations are suggested.

  13. Direct numerical simulations of curvature effects on shear layer transition over airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Cheng, Wan; Qamar, Adnan; Gao, Wei; Samtaney, Ravi

    2013-11-01

    Shear layer transition and subsequent turbulent flow development over the leeward section of airfoils are affected by the surface curvature in terms of its associated effects, such as laminar flow separation, adverse pressure gradient, and the interactions between separated flow and wake vortices, etc. We present direct numerical simulations (DNS) of shear layer transitions over two airfoils, NACA 4412 and NACA 0012-64, at 10 deg. angle of attack, and Rec = 104 based on uniform inflow velocity and chord length. The two airfoils chosen are geometrically almost the same with identical maximum thickness along with chordwise position but different cambers and hence different curvature. The curvature effects on the flow are presented by the unsteady evolution patterns of laminar flow separation; shear layer detachment, breakdown to turbulence, turbulent boundary layer reattachment and vortex shedding, and quantitative results on the development of turbulent boundary layer are emphasized. This DNS database is generated with an energy conservative fourth-order incompressible Navier-Stokes code with O(109) mesh points. Supported by a KAUST funded project on large eddy simulation of turbulent flows. The IBM Blue Gene P Shaheen at KAUST was utilized for the simulations.

  14. Direct numerical simulation of homogeneous strained turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, K.

    Techniques for the direct numerical simulation of strained homogeneous compressible and incompressible flows are reviewed and demonstrated in a general introduction. Chapters are devoted to the physics of homogeneous turbulence, the governing equations for compressible fluids and for incompressible fluids convecting active or passive scalars, the governing equations for homogeneous turbulence, direct simulations at low and high Reynolds numbers, large-eddy simulations, numerical methods, and data processing. Extensive graphs, diagrams, and drawings are included.

  15. Assessment of closure schemes in second-order conditional moment closure against DNS with extinction and ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Sreedhara, S.; Huh, Kang Y.

    2005-12-01

    The performance of second-order conditional moment closure (CMC) depends on models to evaluate conditional variances and covariances of temperature and species mass fractions. In this paper the closure schemes based on the steady laminar flamelet model (SLFM) are validated against direct numerical simulation (DNS) involving extinction and ignition. Scaling is performed to reproduce proper absolute magnitudes, irrespective of the origin of mismatch between local flamelet structures and scalar dissipation rates. DNS based on the pseudospectral method is carried out to study hydrogen-air combustion with a detailed kinetic mechanism, in homogeneous, isotropic, and decaying turbulent media. Lewis numbers are set equal to unity to avoid complication of differential diffusion. The SLFM-based closures for correlations among fluctuations of reaction rate, scalar dissipation rate, and species mass fractions show good comparison with DNS. The variance parameter in lognormal PDF and the constants in the dissipation term have been estimated from DNS results. Comparison is made for the resulting conditional profiles from DNS, first-order CMC, and second-order CMC with correction to the most critical reaction step according to sensitivity analysis. Overall good agreement ensures validity of the SLFM-based closures for modeling conditional variances and covariances in second-order CMC.

  16. Numerical simulation of heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Sha, W.T.

    1985-01-01

    Accurate and detailed knowledge of the fluid flow field and thermal distribution inside a heat exchanger becomes invaluable as a large, efficient, and reliable unit is sought. This information is needed to provide proper evaluation of the thermal and structural performance characteristics of a heat exchanger. It is to be noted that an analytical prediction method, when properly validated, will greatly reduce the need for model testing, facilitate interpolating and extrapolating test data, aid in optimizing heat-exchanger design and performance, and provide scaling capability. Thus tremendous savings of cost and time are realized. With the advent of large digital computers and advances in the development of computational fluid mechanics, it has become possible to predict analytically, through numerical solution, the conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy for both the shellside and tubeside fluids. The numerical modeling technique will be a valuable, cost-effective design tool for development of advanced heat exchangers.

  17. Numerical Simulations of High Speed Turbulent Jets in Crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Xiaochuan

    This dissertation studies high speed jets in crossflow using numerical simulations. The complexity of this flow makes detailed measurements difficult, and only limited information is provided by past experimental studies. Traditional engineering simulation tools also have difficulties in simulating such flows. Therefore, the current study: 1) develops Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) capability and novel subgrid-scale (SGS) models for high speed flows in complex geometries; 2) realizes multiple methods to generate realistic turbulent boundary layer inflow condition for unstructured compressible flow solver; 3) explores the detailed physics of high speed jets in crossflow; 4) investigates the jet trajectory, entrainment and coherent vortical motions. Large-eddy simulation capability is developed for the base numerical scheme developed by Park & Mahesh (2007) for solving the compressible Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured grids. Large-eddy simulations are performed to study an under-expanded sonic jet injected into a supersonic crossflow and an over-expanded supersonic jet injected into a subsonic crossflow, where the flow conditions are based on Santiago et al.'s (1997) and Beresh et al.'s (2005) experiments, respectively. The simulations successfully reproduce experimentally observed shock systems and vortical structures. The time averaged flow fields are compared to the experimental results, and reasonable agreement is observed. The behavior of the flow is discussed, and the similarities and differences between the two regimes are studied. The trajectory and entrainment of the transverse jet is investigated. A modification to Schetz & Billig's theory (1966) theory is proposed, which yields good prediction of the jet trajectories in the current simulations in the near field. Along the jet center streamline, the jet entrainment grow faster compared to turbulent free jets. In the very far field, the growth rates of jet entrainment decrease to values that are close to those for turbulent free jets. The Strouhal numbers of relevant flow structures are computed from power spectral densities. Many flow motions are observed to be correlated in sonic jet in supersonic crossflow. The frequencies in supersonic injection are observed to be higher than those in sonic injection. A novel eddy-viscosity model, "dynamic k-equation model'', is proposed for the LES of compressible flows with complex flow geometries, where the transport equation for sub-grid scale (SGS) kinetic energy is introduced to predict SGS kinetic energy, instead of using Yoshizawa's model as in standard Dynamic Smagorinsky Model (DSM). The exact SGS kinetic energy transport equation for compressible flows is derived formally. Each of the unclosed terms in the SGS kinetic energy equation is modeled separately and dynamically closed, instead of being grouped into production and dissipation terms, as in the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. A priori test using Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of decaying isotropic turbulence shows that for Smagorinsky type eddy viscosity model, the correlation between SGS stress and the model is comparable to that from the original model. Also, the suggested model for pressure dilatation term in the SGS kinetic energy equation is found to have high correlation with its actual value. In a posteriori tests, the proposed dynamic k-equation model is applied to decaying isotropic turbulence and normal shock/isotropic turbulence interaction, and yields good agreement with available experimental and DNS data. Compared with the results of Dynamic Smagorinsky Model (DSM), the k-equation model predicts better energy spectra at high wave numbers, similar kinetic energy decay and fluctuations of thermodynamic quantities for decaying isotropic turbulence. For shock/turbulent interaction, k-equation model and DSM predict similar evolution of turbulent intensities across shocks, due to the dominant effect of linear interaction. The proposed k-equation model is more robust in that local averaging over neighboring control volumes (CV) is sufficient to regularize the dynamic procedure. The behavior of pressure dilation and dilatational dissipation is discussed through the budgets of SGS kinetic energy equation, and the importance of dilatational dissipation term is addressed. The proposed dynamic k-equation model is then applied to Mach 2.9 supersonic turbulent boundary layer, where a recycling-rescaling method for turbulent boundary layer generation on fully unstructured meshes is developed and applied. Good agreement is observed between the LES results and available DNS and experimental results.

  18. Large eddy simulations and direct numerical simulations of high speed turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, P.; Frankel, S. H.; Adumitroaie, V.; Sabini, G.; Madnia, C. K.

    1993-01-01

    The primary objective of this research is to extend current capabilities of Large Eddy Simulations (LES) and Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) for the computational analyses of high speed reacting flows. Our efforts in the first two years of this research have been concentrated on a priori investigations of single-point Probability Density Function (PDF) methods for providing subgrid closures in reacting turbulent flows. In the efforts initiated in the third year, our primary focus has been on performing actual LES by means of PDF methods. The approach is based on assumed PDF methods and we have performed extensive analysis of turbulent reacting flows by means of LES. This includes simulations of both three-dimensional (3D) isotropic compressible flows and two-dimensional reacting planar mixing layers. In addition to these LES analyses, some work is in progress to assess the extent of validity of our assumed PDF methods. This assessment is done by making detailed companions with recent laboratory data in predicting the rate of reactant conversion in parallel reacting shear flows. This report provides a summary of our achievements for the first six months of the third year of this program.

  19. A review of direct numerical simulations of astrophysical detonations and their implications

    SciTech Connect

    Parete-Koon, Suzanne T.; Smith, Christopher R.; Papatheodore, Thomas L.; Bronson Messer, O. E.

    2013-04-11

    Multi-dimensional direct numerical simulations (DNS) of astrophysical detonations in degenerate matter have revealed that the nuclear burning is typically characterized by cellular structure caused by transverse instabilities in the detonation front. Type Ia supernova modelers often use one- dimensional DNS of detonations as inputs or constraints for their whole star simulations. While these one-dimensional studies are useful tools, the true nature of the detonation is multi-dimensional. The multi-dimensional structure of the burning influences the speed, stability, and the composition of the detonation and its burning products, and therefore, could have an impact on the spectra of Type Ia supernovae. Considerable effort has been expended modeling Type Ia supernovae at densities above 1x107 g∙cm-3 where the complexities of turbulent burning dominate the flame propagation. However, most full star models turn the nuclear burning schemes off when the density falls below 1x107 g∙cm-3 and distributed burning begins. The deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) is believed to occur at just these densities and consequently they are the densities important for studying the properties of the subsequent detonation. In conclusion, this work reviews the status of DNS studies of detonations and their possible implications for Type Ia supernova models. It will cover the development of Detonation theory from the first simple Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) detonation models to the current models based on the time-dependent, compressible, reactive flow Euler equations of fluid dynamics.

  20. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent mixing at very low Schmidt number with a uniform mean gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeung, P. K.; Sreenivasan, K. R.

    2014-01-01

    In a recent direct numerical simulation (DNS) study [P. K. Yeung and K. R. Sreenivasan, "Spectrum of passive scalars of high molecular diffusivity in turbulent mixing," J. Fluid Mech. 716, R14 (2013)] with Schmidt number as low as 1/2048, we verified the essential physical content of the theory of Batchelor, Howells, and Townsend ["Small-scale variation of convected quantities like temperature in turbulent fluid. 2. The case of large conductivity," J. Fluid Mech. 5, 134 (1959)] for turbulent passive scalar fields with very strong diffusivity, decaying in the absence of any production mechanism. In particular, we confirmed the existence of the -17/3 power of the scalar spectral density in the so-called inertial-diffusive range. In the present paper, we consider the DNS of the same problem, but in the presence of a uniform mean gradient, which leads to the production of scalar fluctuations at (primarily) the large scales. For the parameters of the simulations, the presence of the mean gradient alters the physics of mixing fundamentally at low Peclet numbers. While the spectrum still follows a -17/3 power law in the inertial-diffusive range, the pre-factor is non-universal and depends on the magnitude of the mean scalar gradient. Spectral transfer is greatly reduced in comparison with those for moderately and weakly diffusive scalars, leading to several distinctive features such as the absence of dissipative anomaly and a new balance of terms in the spectral transfer equation for the scalar variance, differing from the case of zero gradient. We use the DNS results to present an alternative explanation for the observed scaling behavior, and discuss a few spectral characteristics in detail.

  1. Numerical simulation of conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Sin-Chung; To, Wai-Ming

    1992-01-01

    A new numerical framework for solving conservation laws is being developed. This new approach differs substantially from the well established methods, i.e., finite difference, finite volume, finite element and spectral methods, in both concept and methodology. The key features of the current scheme include: (1) direct discretization of the integral forms of conservation laws, (2) treating space and time on the same footing, (3) flux conservation in space and time, and (4) unified treatment of the convection and diffusion fluxes. The model equation considered in the initial study is the standard one dimensional unsteady constant-coefficient convection-diffusion equation. In a stability study, it is shown that the principal and spurious amplification factors of the current scheme, respectively, are structurally similar to those of the leapfrog/DuFort-Frankel scheme. As a result, the current scheme has no numerical diffusion in the special case of pure convection and is unconditionally stable in the special case of pure diffusion. Assuming smooth initial data, it will be shown theoretically and numerically that, by using an easily determined optimal time step, the accuracy of the current scheme may reach a level which is several orders of magnitude higher than that of the MacCormack scheme, with virtually identical operation count.

  2. Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Fluid Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, A.

    1983-01-01

    Numerical simulation of turbulent flows is discussed. Computational requirements for the direct simulaton of turbulence, simulation of arbitrary homogeneous flows, an expansion technique for wall bounded flows with application to pipe flow, and possibilities of flow representations or modeling techniques that allow the simulation of high Reynolds number flows with a relatively small number of dependent variables are included.

  3. Testing a similarity theory for isotropic turbulence on DNS data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melander, Mogens; Fabijonas, Bruce

    2006-11-01

    Using direct numerical simulations, we consider the issue of self-similarity in 3D incompressible isotropic turbulence. The starting point for our investigation is a similarity theory we have developed on the basis of high Reynolds number shell model calculations. Like Kolmogorov's 1941 theory, our theory calls for similarity across all scales in the inertial range. Unlike K41, our theory does not fail on account of intermittency, but is developed to blossom in that environment. To observe self-similarity, it is essential that the correct variables are used, otherwise one sees only intermittency. The correct variables are reasonably easy to spot for the shell model, but they are more difficult to identify for the full Navier-Stokes equations. Moreover, one has to overcome the fact that the DNS has lower Reynolds numbers than in the shell model simulations so that the inertial range is shorter. Using the technique ESS, we clear this obstacle with only a minor modification to the theory. The DNS data then collapse on the theoretical pdf at all scales.

  4. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent supersonic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Ram Mohan

    The objective of this research is to simulate compressible round jets to study the non-linear evolution of turbulent vortices and the resulting acoustic radiations. In particular, to understand the effect of turbulence structures on jet noise. For the simulation a highly accurate hybrid b-spline-spectral method is used. The streamwise direction is assumed to be periodic in order to allow the application of Fourier spectral methods in this direction. Thus a temporally evolving jet is simulated. The spectral method used to solve the compressible Navier-Stokes equations uses Fourier expansions in the azimuthal and streamwise direction and a 1-D b-spline basis representation in the radial direction. The b-spline basis is locally supported, this ensures block diagonal matrix equations which can be solved in O(N) steps. Additionally, it is easy to ensure regularity of functions (smoothness and boundedness) and impose modal reduction (to prevent severe restrictions in the time-step) near the axis. Direct simulations of both swirling and non-swirling jets are carried out at a Reynolds number of 10000 based on jet diameter and centerline jet velocity. For the swirling case, a very strong swirl is added by specifying an initial tangential velocity profile as a function of the streamwise velocity. The DNS jet simulations are used to study the various turbulent scales and mechanisms of turbulence generation and mixing in the evolution of compressible round jets. The instability waves are tracked as they grow and evolve into large scale structures and finally transition to turbulence. Helical waves are found to grow the fastest and develop into helical vortices which eventually breakdown into smaller scale turbulent vortices. The initially thin shear layer grows linearly in time until jet core collapse; this is when the jet shear layer reaches the jet axis. The jet core collapse is a very rapid process and is marked with the advent of Mach waves and increased acoustic emissions. The swirling jet is found to evolve more rapidly and make the transition to turbulence sooner. These simulations are also used to make some acoustic estimations.

  5. Numerical Simulation For Supersonic Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varner, M. O.; Martindale, W. R.; Phares, W. J.; Kneile, K. R.; Adams, J. C., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Flows calculated for realistic engine-inlet conditions. Computer code LAPIN, large-perturbation inlet, developed to analyze large-perturbation, transient-flow fields in supersonic inlets. Robust, quick-running code capable of solving unsteady quasi-one-dimensional, inviscid-flow problems in mixed subsonic and supersonic regimes for inlets. Approach based upon quasi-one-dimensional, inviscid, unsteady formulation including engineering models of unstart/restart, bleed, bypass, and geometrical effects. Numerical solution of governing time-dependent equations of motion accomplished through shock-capturing, finite-difference algorithm. Program written in FORTRAN IV.

  6. The Asteroid Shape: Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, R. A.; Lupishko, D. F.; Shevchenko, V. G.

    1996-01-01

    The numerical model of an asteroid, which shape is assumed to be a triaxial ellipsoid, is applied to real asteroids. Eleven asteroids (15, 20, 22, 23, 28, 31, 41, 43, 130, 354, and 532) are selected with reliably determined pole coordinates and axes ratios of the approximating ellipsoid, which may be used as test objects for the evaluation of new methods of asteroid pole coordinate determination. On the other hand, the shapes of asteroids 2, 3, 7, 29, 39, 44, 87, 216, 349, and 624 do not fit the triaxial ellipsoids with the available axes ratios. Their pole coordinates need to be redefined by the methods free from the asteroid shape influence.

  7. Direct Numerical Simulations of Autoignition in Stratified Dimethyl-ether (DME)/Air Turbulent Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Bansal, Gaurav; Mascarenhas, Ajith; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2014-10-01

    In our paper, two- and three-dimensional direct numerical simulations (DNS) of autoignition phenomena in stratified dimethyl-ether (DME)/air turbulent mixtures are performed. A reduced DME oxidation mechanism, which was obtained using rigorous mathematical reduction and stiffness removal procedure from a detailed DME mechanism with 55 species, is used in the present DNS. The reduced DME mechanism consists of 30 chemical species. This study investigates the fundamental aspects of turbulence-mixing-autoignition interaction occurring in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine environments. A homogeneous isotropic turbulence spectrum is used to initialize the velocity field in the domain. Moreover, the computational configuration corresponds to a constant volume combustion vessel with inert mass source terms added to the governing equations to mimic the pressure rise due to piston motion, as present in practical engines. DME autoignition is found to be a complex three-staged process; each stage corresponds to a distinct chemical kinetic pathway. The distinct role of turbulence and reaction in generating scalar gradients and hence promoting molecular transport processes are investigated. Then, by applying numerical diagnostic techniques, the different heat release modes present in the igniting mixture are identified. In particular, the contribution of homogeneous autoignition, spontaneous ignition front propagation, and premixed deflagration towards the total heat release are quantified.

  8. Direct Numerical Simulations of Autoignition in Stratified Dimethyl-ether (DME)/Air Turbulent Mixtures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bansal, Gaurav; Mascarenhas, Ajith; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2014-10-01

    In our paper, two- and three-dimensional direct numerical simulations (DNS) of autoignition phenomena in stratified dimethyl-ether (DME)/air turbulent mixtures are performed. A reduced DME oxidation mechanism, which was obtained using rigorous mathematical reduction and stiffness removal procedure from a detailed DME mechanism with 55 species, is used in the present DNS. The reduced DME mechanism consists of 30 chemical species. This study investigates the fundamental aspects of turbulence-mixing-autoignition interaction occurring in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine environments. A homogeneous isotropic turbulence spectrum is used to initialize the velocity field in the domain. Moreover, the computational configuration corresponds to amore » constant volume combustion vessel with inert mass source terms added to the governing equations to mimic the pressure rise due to piston motion, as present in practical engines. DME autoignition is found to be a complex three-staged process; each stage corresponds to a distinct chemical kinetic pathway. The distinct role of turbulence and reaction in generating scalar gradients and hence promoting molecular transport processes are investigated. Then, by applying numerical diagnostic techniques, the different heat release modes present in the igniting mixture are identified. In particular, the contribution of homogeneous autoignition, spontaneous ignition front propagation, and premixed deflagration towards the total heat release are quantified.« less

  9. LES, DNS and RANS for the analysis of high-speed turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adumitroaie, V.; Colucci, P. J.; Taulbee, D. B.; Givi, P.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to continue our efforts in advancing the state of knowledge in large eddy simulation (LES), direct numerical simulation (DNS), and Reynolds averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) methods for the computational analysis of high-speed reacting turbulent flows. In the second phase of this work, covering the period 1 Aug. 1994 - 31 Jul. 1995, we have focused our efforts on two programs: (1) developments of explicit algebraic moment closures for statistical descriptions of compressible reacting flows and (2) development of Monte Carlo numerical methods for LES of chemically reacting flows.

  10. Numerical Simulation on Laser Fusion in China

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Shaoping; Pei Wenbing; Xu Yan; Gu Peijun; Lan Ke; Ye Wenhua; Wu Junfeng; Li Jinghong; Gao Yaoming; Zheng Chunyang; Li Shuanggui; Mo Zeyao; Yan Jun; Zhang Weiyan

    2009-05-02

    Numerical simulation is a powerful tool to get insight into the physics of laser fusion. Much effort has been devoted to develop the numerical simulation code series named LARED in China. The code series LARED are composed of six parts and enable us to have the simulation capability for the key processes in laser fusion. In recent years, a number of numerical simulations using LARED have been carried out and the simulation is checked by experiments done at the laser facility SG-II and SG-III prototype. In the present talk, some details of LARED code series will be introduced, and some simulation results, especially recent work on the opacities, will be shown.

  11. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF CHROMOSPHERIC MICROFLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, R. L.; Fang, C.; Chen, P. F.

    2010-02-20

    With gravity, ionization, and radiation being considered, we perform 2.5 dimensional (2.5D) compressible resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of chromospheric magnetic reconnection using the CIP-MOCCT scheme. The temperature distribution of the quiet-Sun atmospheric model VALC and the helium abundance (10%) are adopted. Our 2.5D MHD simulation reproduces qualitatively the temperature enhancement observed in chromospheric microflares. The temperature enhancement DELTAT is demonstrated to be sensitive to the background magnetic field, whereas the total evolution time DELTAt is sensitive to the magnitude of the anomalous resistivity. Moreover, we found a scaling law, which is described as DELTAT/DELTAt {approx} n{sub H} {sup -1.5} B {sup 2.1}eta{sub 0} {sup 0.88}. Our results also indicate that the velocity of the upward jet is much greater than that of the downward jet, and the X-point may move up or down.

  12. Numerical Simulations of HH 555

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajdič, P.; Raga, A. C.

    2007-12-01

    We present three-dimensional (3D) gasdynamic simulations of the Herbig Haro object HH 555. HH 555 is a bipolar jet emerging from the tip of an elephant trunk entering the Pelican Nebula from the adjacent molecular cloud. Both beams of HH 555 are curved away from the center of the H II region. This indicates that they are being deflected by a sidewind probably coming from a star located inside the nebula or by the expansion of the nebula itself. HH 555 is most likely an irradiated jet emerging from a highly embedded protostar, which has not yet been detected. In our simulations we vary the incident photon flux, which in one of our models is equal to the flux coming from a star 1 pc away emitting 5×1048 ionizing (i.e., with energies above the H Lyman limit) photons per second. An external, plane-parallel flow (a ``sidewind'') is coming from the same direction as the photoionizing flux. We have made four simulations, decreasing the photon flux by a factor of 10 in each simulation. We discuss the properties of the flow, and we compute Hα emission maps (integrated along lines of sight). We show that the level of the incident photon flux has an important influence on the shape and visibility of the jet. If the flux is very high, it causes a strong evaporation of the neutral clump, producing a photoevaporated wind traveling in the direction opposite to the incident flow. The interaction of the two flows creates a double shock ``working surface'' around the clump, protecting it and the jet from the external flow. The jet only starts to curve when it penetrates through the working surface.

  13. Numerical simulation of jet noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliath, Umesh

    In the present work, computational aeroacoustics and parallel computers are used to conduct a study of flow-induced noise from different jet nozzle geometries. The nozzle is included as part of the computational domain. This is important to predict jet noise from nozzles associated with military aircraft engines. The Detached Eddy Simulation (DES) approach is used to simulate both the jet nozzle internal and external flows as well as the jet plume. This methodology allows the turbulence model to transition from an unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) method for attached boundary layers to a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) in separated regions. Thus, it is ideally suited to jet flow simulations where the nozzle is included. Both cylindrical polar and Cartesian coordinate systems are used. A spectral method is used to avoid the centerline singularity when using the cylindrical coordinate system. The one equation Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model, in DES mode, is used to describe the evolution of the turbulent eddy viscosity. An explicit 4th order Runge-Kutta time marching scheme is used. For spatial discritization the Dispersion Relation Preserving scheme(DRP) is used. The farfield sound is evaluated using the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings permeable surface wave extrapolation method. This permits the noise to be predicted at large distances from the jet based on fluctuations in the jets near field. The present work includes a study of the effect of different nozzle geometries such as axisymmetric/non-axisymmetric and planar/non-planar exits on the far field noise predictions. Also the effect of operating conditions such as a heated/unheated jet, the effect of forward flight, a jet flow at an angle of attack, and the effect of a supersonic exit Mach number, are included in the study.

  14. Direct Numerical Simulation of Two Shock Wave/Turbulent Boundary Layer Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priebe, Stephan

    Direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of two shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interactions (STBLIs) are presented in this thesis. The first interaction is a 24° compression ramp at Mach 2.9, and the second interaction is an 8° compression ramp at Mach 7.2. The large-scale low-frequency unsteadiness in the Mach 2.9 DNS is investigated with the aim of shedding some light on its physical origin. Previous experimental and computational works have linked the unsteadiness either to fluctuations in the incoming boundary layer or to a mechanism in the downstream separated flow. Consistent with experimental observations, the shock in the DNS is found to undergo streamwise oscillations, which are broadband and occur at frequencies that are about two orders of magnitude lower than the characteristic frequency of the energy-containing turbulent scales in the incoming boundary layer. Based on a coherence and phase analysis of signals at the wall and in the flow field, it is found that the low frequency shock unsteadiness is statistically linked to pulsations of the downstream separated flow. The statistical link with fluctuations in the upstream boundary layer is also investigated. A weak link is observed: the value of the low-frequency coherence with the upstream flow is found to lie just above the limit of statistical significance, which is determined by means of a Monte Carlo study. The dynamics of the downstream separated flow are characterized further based on low-pass filtered DNS fields. The results suggest that structural changes occur in the downstream separated flow during the low-frequency motions, including the breaking-up of the separation bubble, which is observed when the shock moves downstream. The structural changes are described based on the Cf distribution through the interaction, as well as the velocity and vorticity fields. The possible link between the low-frequency dynamics observed in the DNS and results from global instability theory is explored. It is observed that the structural changes in the downstream separated flow are reminiscent of certain global linear instability modes reported in the literature, suggesting that an inherent instability of the separated flow could be the driving mechanism for the unsteadiness. The separated shear layer in the DNS is characterized: the self-similarity of the shear layer profiles, the formation of vortical structures in the shear layer, and the low-frequency behavior of the shear layer are investigated. Based on the results, possible low-frequency mechanisms involving the shear layer are discussed. The second DNS presented in this thesis is of an attached hypersonic STBLI (8° compression ramp at Mach 7.2). The flow is described based on flow visualizations, distributions of wall quantities, as well as mean and fluctuating fields. Wall heat transfer scalings and the turbulence amplification in the interaction are discussed. The DNS results are compared to experiments performed by Smits and co-workers at similar flow conditions, and excellent qualitative agreement is observed.

  15. Mean-field and direct numerical simulations of magnetic flux concentrations from vertical field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, A.; Gressel, O.; Jabbari, S.; Kleeorin, N.; Rogachevskii, I.

    2014-02-01

    Context. Strongly stratified hydromagnetic turbulence has previously been found to produce magnetic flux concentrations if the domain is large enough compared with the size of turbulent eddies. Mean-field simulations (MFS) using parameterizations of the Reynolds and Maxwell stresses show a large-scale negative effective magnetic pressure instability and have been able to reproduce many aspects of direct numerical simulations (DNS) regarding growth rate, shape of the resulting magnetic structures, and their height as a function of magnetic field strength. Unlike the case of an imposed horizontal field, for a vertical one, magnetic flux concentrations of equipartition strength with the turbulence can be reached, resulting in magnetic spots that are reminiscent of sunspots. Aims: We determine under what conditions magnetic flux concentrations with vertical field occur and what their internal structure is. Methods: We use a combination of MFS, DNS, and implicit large-eddy simulations (ILES) to characterize the resulting magnetic flux concentrations in forced isothermal turbulence with an imposed vertical magnetic field. Results: Using DNS, we confirm earlier results that in the kinematic stage of the large-scale instability the horizontal wavelength of structures is about 10 times the density scale height. At later times, even larger structures are being produced in a fashion similar to inverse spectral transfer in helically driven turbulence. Using ILES, we find that magnetic flux concentrations occur for Mach numbers between 0.1 and 0.7. They occur also for weaker stratification and larger turbulent eddies if the domain is wide enough. Using MFS, the size and aspect ratio of magnetic structures are determined as functions of two input parameters characterizing the parameterization of the effective magnetic pressure. DNS, ILES, and MFS show magnetic flux tubes with mean-field energies comparable to the turbulent kinetic energy. These tubes can reach a length of about eight density scale heights. Despite being ≤1% equipartition strength, it is important that their lower part is included within the computational domain to achieve the full strength of the instability. Conclusions: The resulting vertical magnetic flux tubes are being confined by downflows along the tubes and corresponding inflow from the sides, which keep the field concentrated. Application to sunspots remains a viable possibility.

  16. Numerical simulation of small-scale mixing processes in the upper ocean and atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druzhinin, O.; Troitskaya, Yu; Zilitinkevich, S.

    2016-02-01

    The processes of turbulent mixing and momentum and heat exchange occur in the upper ocean at depths up to several dozens of meters and in the atmospheric boundary layer within interval of millimeters to dozens of meters and can not be resolved by known large- scale climate models. Thus small-scale processes need to be parameterized with respect to large scale fields. This parameterization involves the so-called bulk coefficients which relate turbulent fluxes with large-scale fields gradients. The bulk coefficients are dependent on the properties of the small-scale mixing processes which are affected by the upper-ocean stratification and characteristics of surface and internal waves. These dependencies are not well understood at present and need to be clarified. We employ Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) as a research tool which resolves all relevant flow scales and does not require closure assumptions typical of Large-Eddy and Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes simulations (LES and RANS). Thus DNS provides a solid ground for correct parameterization of small-scale mixing processes and also can be used for improving LES and RANS closure models. In particular, we discuss the problems of the interaction between small-scale turbulence and internal gravity waves propagating in the pycnocline in the upper ocean as well as the impact of surface waves on the properties of atmospheric boundary layer over wavy water surface.

  17. GPU accelerated flow solver for direct numerical simulation of turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvadore, Francesco; Bernardini, Matteo; Botti, Michela

    2013-02-01

    Graphical processing units (GPUs), characterized by significant computing performance, are nowadays very appealing for the solution of computationally demanding tasks in a wide variety of scientific applications. However, to run on GPUs, existing codes need to be ported and optimized, a procedure which is not yet standardized and may require non trivial efforts, even to high-performance computing specialists. In the present paper we accurately describe the porting to CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture) of a finite-difference compressible Navier-Stokes solver, suitable for direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulent flows. Porting and validation processes are illustrated in detail, with emphasis on computational strategies and techniques that can be applied to overcome typical bottlenecks arising from the porting of common computational fluid dynamics solvers. We demonstrate that a careful optimization work is crucial to get the highest performance from GPU accelerators. The results show that the overall speedup of one NVIDIA Tesla S2070 GPU is approximately 22 compared with one AMD Opteron 2352 Barcelona chip and 11 compared with one Intel Xeon X5650 Westmere core. The potential of GPU devices in the simulation of unsteady three-dimensional turbulent flows is proved by performing a DNS of a spatially evolving compressible mixing layer.

  18. Shock interaction with a deformable particle: Direct numerical simulation and point-particle modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Y.; Haselbacher, A.; Balachandar, S.; Najjar, F. M.; Stewart, D. S.

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of shock waves with deformable particles is an important fundamental problem. In some applications, e.g., the detonation of explosives loaded with metal particles, the pressure behind the shock wave can be significantly larger than the yield strength of the particle material. This means that particles can deform severely during their interaction with the shock wave. The experimental and theoretical studies of shock interaction with deformable particles (SIDP) are extremely challenging because of its highly transient nature. As a result, no accurate model exists yet that can be used in simulations. The objective of this paper is to develop a simple point-particle model that accurately captures the unsteady force and heat-transfer in SIDP. In the development of this model, we build on earlier models by Ling et al. (Int. J. Multiphase Flow 37, 1026-1044 (2011)) for the unsteady force and heat-transfer contributions for rigid particles. Insights gained from direct numerical simulations (DNS) guide the extension of these models to deforming particles. Results obtained with the extended model for the interaction of a deforming particle with a shock wave and a Chapman-Jouguet detonation wave compare well with DNS results and therefore offer significant improvements over standard models.

  19. GPU accelerated flow solver for direct numerical simulation of turbulent flows

    SciTech Connect

    Salvadore, Francesco; Botti, Michela

    2013-02-15

    Graphical processing units (GPUs), characterized by significant computing performance, are nowadays very appealing for the solution of computationally demanding tasks in a wide variety of scientific applications. However, to run on GPUs, existing codes need to be ported and optimized, a procedure which is not yet standardized and may require non trivial efforts, even to high-performance computing specialists. In the present paper we accurately describe the porting to CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture) of a finite-difference compressible Navier–Stokes solver, suitable for direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulent flows. Porting and validation processes are illustrated in detail, with emphasis on computational strategies and techniques that can be applied to overcome typical bottlenecks arising from the porting of common computational fluid dynamics solvers. We demonstrate that a careful optimization work is crucial to get the highest performance from GPU accelerators. The results show that the overall speedup of one NVIDIA Tesla S2070 GPU is approximately 22 compared with one AMD Opteron 2352 Barcelona chip and 11 compared with one Intel Xeon X5650 Westmere core. The potential of GPU devices in the simulation of unsteady three-dimensional turbulent flows is proved by performing a DNS of a spatially evolving compressible mixing layer.

  20. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of a bubble rising in an unbounded weakly viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cano-Lozano, Jose Carlos; Martínez-Bazán, Carlos; Tchoufag, Joel; Magnaudet, Jacques

    2015-11-01

    Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of a freely rising bubble in an unbounded low-viscosity fluid are performed to analyze the bubble trajectory for values of Galileo and Bond numbers close to the transition between vertical and non-vertical paths. The simulations are performed with the Gerris Flow Solver, based on the Volume of Fluid technique to track the interface, allowing deformations of the bubble during its rising motion. We find the existence of novel regimes of the bubble rise which we describe by tracking the bubble shape, path geometry and wake vortical structures, as well as the temporal evolution of the instantaneous Reynolds number. Besides the traditional rectilinear, zigzag and spiral paths, we observe chaotic, reflectional-symmetry-breaking or reflectional-symmetry-preserving regimes previously reported for axisymmetric solid bodies. The DNS results also allow us to check the accuracy of the neutral curve defining the region of the parameter space within which the vertical path of a buoyancy-driven bubble with fore-and-aft asymmetric shape is linearly stable. Supported by the Spanish MINECO, Junta de Andalucía and EU Funds under projects DPI 2014-59292-C3-3-P and P11-TEP7495.

  1. Numerical simulations of thermographic responses in composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winfree, William P.; Cramer, K. Elliott; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Howell, Patricia A.

    2016-02-01

    Numerical simulations of thermographic responses in composite materials have been useful for evaluating and optimizing thermographic analysis techniques. Numerical solutions are particularly beneficial for thermographic techniques, since the fabrication of specimens with realistic flaws is difficult. A quadrupole method for performing the simulations in two dimensions is presented. The results are compared to a finite element simulation of the same geometry. The technique is shown to be in good agreement with a finite element simulation of the same geometry, however, it requires about one hundredth of the computational time.

  2. Histogram Comparison via Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardiel, N.

    2015-09-01

    Although the use of histograms implies loss of information due to the fact that the actual data are replaced by the central values of the considered intervals, these graphical representations are commonly employed in scientific communication, particularly in astrophysics. This work explores the possibility of applying the Anderson-Darling test, a well-known test suitable for the comparison of continuous data sets, to the comparison of data in histogram format. For that purpose the data within each histogram interval are resampled, using the information provided by the frequencies of the adjacent intervals. Several resampling strategies have been examined by the comparison of histograms built from simulated data following a normal distribution.

  3. Numerical simulations of disordered superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Bedell, K.S.; Gubernatis, J.E.; Scalettar, R.T.; Zimanyi, G.T.

    1997-12-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors carried out Monte Carlo studies of the critical behavior of superfluid {sup 4}He in aerogel. They found the superfluid density exponent increases in the presence of fractal disorder with a value roughly consistent with experimental results. They also addressed the localization of flux lines caused by splayed columnar pins. Using a Sine-Gordon-type of renormalization group study they obtained an analytic form for the critical temperature. They also determined the critical temperature from I-V characteristics obtained from a molecular dynamics simulation. The combined studies enabled one to construct the phase diagram as a function of interaction strength, temperature, and disorder. They also employed the recently developed mapping between boson world-lines and the flux motion to use quantum Monte Carlo simulations to analyze localization in the presence of disorder. From measurements of the transverse flux line wandering, they determined the critical ratio of columnar to point disorder strength needed to localize the bosons.

  4. DNS of flows over superhydrophobic surfaces with small texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairhall, Chris; Garcia-Mayoral, Ricardo

    2015-11-01

    We present results from direct numerical simulations of turbulent flows over superhydrophobic surfaces with small texture sizes, comparable to those of practical application. Textures studied with DNS are usually much larger, as the cost of the simulations would otherwise be prohibitive. For this reason, a multi-block code that allows for finer resolution near the walls has been developed. We focus particularly on the pressure distribution at the wall. This distribution can cause the deformation of the gas pockets, which can ultimately lead to their loss and that of the drag reduction effect. The layout of the texture causes stagnation pressures which can contribute substantially to the wall pressure signal (Seo et al. JFM, under review). We study a range of different textures and their influence on these pressures.

  5. DNS of evaporating droplets in decaying isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, Michael; Ferrante, Antonino

    2015-11-01

    We have performed direct numerical simulation (DNS) of decaying isotropic turbulence laden with thousands of evaporating droplets of Taylor lengthscale size. The objective of this study is to explain the physical mechanisms occurring in evaporating droplet-laden homogeneous turbulence. To this end, we fully resolve the process of momentum, heat, and mass transfer between the droplets and the carrier fluid. The simulations are performed on a 10243 grid to resolve each droplet by 32 grids points per diameter with initial Taylor length-scale Reynolds number Reλ = 83 . We show the effects of varying the Weber number on the mean Nusselt number and Sherwood number of the droplets, and on the turbulence kinetic energy budget of the carrier fluid. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation CAREER Award, Grant No. OCI-1054591.

  6. Numerical Simulations of Thermographic Responses in Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, William P.; Cramer, K. Elliot; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Howell, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Numerical simulations of thermographic responses in composite materials have been a useful for evaluating and optimizing thermographic analysis techniques. Numerical solutions are particularly beneficial for thermographic techniques, since the fabrication of specimens with realistic flaws is difficult. Simulations are presented with different ply layups that incorporated the anisotropic thermal properties that exist in each ply. The results are compared to analytical series solutions and thermal measurements on composites with flat bottom holes and delaminations.

  7. Numerical Simulations of Cavitating Flows in Venturi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncalvès, Eric; Champagnac, Maxime; Patella, Regiane Fortes

    2008-09-01

    Different computational fluid dynamics (CFD) strategies were developed to analyze and to better understand the cavitation phenomenon. Based on homogeneous models, two numerical approaches were explored to capture large density variations and unsteady behaviors of cavitating flows. Several simulations were performed in a two-dimensional Venturi geometry. Local and global analyses were proposed based on comparisons between experimental and numerical results.

  8. Numerical Simulations of Drop Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nobari, M. R. H.; Tryggvason, G.

    1994-01-01

    Three-dimensional simulations of the off-axis collisions of two drops are presented. The full Navier-Stokes equations are solved by a Front-Tracking/Finite-Difference method that allows a fully deformable fluid interface and the inclusion of surface tension. The drops are accelerated towards each other by a body force that is turned off before the drops collide. Depending on whether the interface between the drops is ruptured or not, the drops either bounce or coalesce. For drops that coalesce, the impact parameter, which measures how far the drops are off the symmetry line, determines the eventual outcome of the collision. For low impact parameters, the drops coalesce permanently, but for higher impact parameters, a grazing collision, where the drops coalesce and then stretch apart again is observed. The results are in agreement with experimental observations.

  9. Direct Numerical Simulations and Unsteady Rans Calculations of Supersonic Turbulent Axisymmetric Wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandberg, Richard; Fasel, Hermann

    2001-11-01

    A high-order accurate compressible Navier-Stokes code was developed to perform Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) and Unsteady RANS (URANS) of a supersonic turbulent, axisymmetric wake. Bluff bodies in supersonic flows have been investigated for several decades motivated by the desire to obtain efficient methods to reduce the base drag which results from the low pressure in the recirculation region. Because of the tremendous resolution requirements, DNS have been restricted to moderate Reynolds numbers and so far, RANS calculations have failed to predict the correct mean flow behavior in the near wake region mainly because of not being able to capture relevant large structures. For the present work the full compressible Navier-Stokes equations in cylindrical coordinates are solved using sixth-order split compact differences for the downstream and radial directions featuring a state of the art treatment of the axis, and pseudospectral discretization in the azimuthal direction. To ensure an accurate time advancement, a fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme (R-K) is employed. For Unsteady RANS calculations, the k and e equations are solved either with a first order ADI -scheme or using a fourth order R-K integration. The Reynolds stresses are computed with an Algebraic Stress Model (ASM). Several DNS are presented which are compared to experiments and allow us to obtain 3-D data for Reynolds numbers up to 100,000 that can be used as a benchmark for the ongoing URANS. Also, validation calculations for the turbulence model were performed and are presented.

  10. Numerical Simulation of Nanostructure Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Helen H.; Bose, Deepak; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.

    2004-01-01

    Nanoscale structures, such as nanowires and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), are often grown in gaseous or plasma environments. Successful growth of these structures is defined by achieving a specified crystallinity or chirality, size or diameter, alignment, etc., which in turn depend on gas mixture ratios. pressure, flow rate, substrate temperature, and other operating conditions. To date, there has not been a rigorous growth model that addresses the specific concerns of crystalline nanowire growth, while demonstrating the correct trends of the processing conditions on growth rates. Most crystal growth models are based on the Burton, Cabrera, and Frank (BCF) method, where adatoms are incorporated into a growing crystal at surface steps or spirals. When the supersaturation of the vapor is high, islands nucleate to form steps, and these steps subsequently spread (grow). The overall bulk growth rate is determined by solving for the evolving motion of the steps. Our approach is to use a phase field model to simulate the growth of finite sized nanowire crystals, linking the free energy equation with the diffusion equation of the adatoms. The phase field method solves for an order parameter that defines the evolving steps in a concentration field. This eliminates the need for explicit front tracking/location, or complicated shadowing routines, both of which can be computationally expensive, particularly in higher dimensions. We will present results demonstrating the effect of process conditions, such as substrate temperature, vapor supersaturation, etc. on the evolving morphologies and overall growth rates of the nanostructures.

  11. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF SPICULE ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Guerreiro, N.; Carlsson, M.; Hansteen, V. E-mail: mats.carlsson@astro.uio.no

    2013-04-01

    Observations in the H{alpha} line of hydrogen and the H and K lines of singly ionized calcium on the solar limb reveal the existence of structures with jet-like behavior, usually designated as spicules. The driving mechanism for such structures remains poorly understood. Sterling et al. shed some light on the problem mimicking reconnection events in the chromosphere with a one-dimensional code by injecting energy with different spatial and temporal distributions and tracing the thermodynamic evolution of the upper chromospheric plasma. They found three different classes of jets resulting from these injections. We follow their approach but improve the physical description by including non-LTE cooling in strong spectral lines and non-equilibrium hydrogen ionization. Increased cooling and conversion of injected energy into hydrogen ionization energy instead of thermal energy both lead to weaker jets and smaller final extent of the spicules compared with Sterling et al. In our simulations we find different behavior depending on the timescale for hydrogen ionization/recombination. Radiation-driven ionization fronts also form.

  12. On the Universality of the Kolmogorov Constant in Numerical Simulations of Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeung, P. K.; Zhou, Ye

    1997-01-01

    Motivated by a recent survey of experimental data, we examine data on the Kolmogorov spectrum constant in numerical simulations of isotropic turbulence, using results both from previous studies and from new direct numerical simulations over a range of Reynolds numbers (up to 240 on the Taylor scale) at grid resolutions up to 512(exp 3). It is noted that in addition to k(exp -5/3) scaling, identification of a true inertial range requires spectral isotropy in the same wavenumber range. We found that a plateau in the compensated three-dimensional energy spectrum at k(eta) approx. = 0.1 - -0.2, commonly used to infer the Kolmogorov constant from the compensated three-dimensional energy spectrum, actually does not represent proper inertial range behavior. Rather, a proper, if still approximate, inertial range emerges at k(eta) approx. = 0.02 - 0.05 when R(sub lambda) increases beyond 140. The new simulations indicate proportionality constants C(sub 1) and C in the one- and three-dimensional energy spectra respectively about 0.60 and 1.62. If the turbulence were perfectly isotropic then use of isotropy relations in wavenumber space (C(sub 1) = 18/55 C) would imply that C(sub 1) approx. = 0.53 for C = 1.62, in excellent agreement with experiments. However the one- and three-dimensional estimates are not fully consistent, because of departures (due to numerical and statistical limitations) from isotropy of the computed spectra at low wavenumbers. The inertial scaling of structure functions in physical space is briefly addressed. Since DNS is still restricted to moderate Reynolds numbers, an accurate evaluation of the Kolmogorov constant is very difficult. We focus on providing new insights on the interpretation of Kolmogorov 1941 similarity in the DNS literature and do not consider issues pertaining to the refined similarity hypotheses of Kolmogorov (K62).

  13. Analysis of Numerical Simulation Database for Pressure Fluctuations Induced by High-Speed Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duan, Lian; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2014-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of Mach 6 turbulent boundary layer with nominal freestream Mach number of 6 and Reynolds number of Re(sub T) approximately 460 are conducted at two wall temperatures (Tw/Tr = 0.25, 0.76) to investigate the generated pressure fluctuations and their dependence on wall temperature. Simulations indicate that the influence of wall temperature on pressure fluctuations is largely limited to the near-wall region, with the characteristics of wall-pressure fluctuations showing a strong temperature dependence. Wall temperature has little influence on the propagation speed of the freestream pressure signal. The freestream radiation intensity compares well between wall-temperature cases when normalized by the local wall shear; the propagation speed of the freestream pressure signal and the orientation of the radiation wave front show little dependence on the wall temperature.

  14. DNS of transcritical turbulent boundary layers at supercritical pressures under abrupt variations in thermodynamic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Soshi

    2014-11-01

    In this talk, we first propose a numerical strategy that is robust and high-order accurate for enabling to simulate transcritical flows at supercritical pressures under abrupt variations in thermodynamic properties due to the real fluid effects. The method is based on introducing artificial density diffusion in a physically-consistent manner in order to capture the steep variation of thermodynamic properties in transcritical conditions robustly, while solving a pressure evolution equation to achieve pressure equilibrium at the transcritical interfaces. We then discuss the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of transcritical heated turbulent boundary layers on a zero-pressure-gradient flat plate at supercritical pressures. To the best of my knowledge, the present DNS is the first DNS of zero-pressure-gradient flat-plate transcritical turbulent boundary layer. The turbulent kinetic budget indicates that the compressibility effects (especially, pressure-dilatation correlation) are not negligible at the transcritical conditions even if the flow is subsonic. The unique and interesting interactions between the real fluid effects and wall turbulence, and their turbulence statistics, which have never been seen in the ideal-fluid turbulent boundary layers, are also discussed. This work was supported in part by Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Grant-in-Aid for Young Scientists (A) KAKENHI 26709066 and the JAXA International Top Young Fellowship Program.

  15. Direct numerical simulation of homogeneous strained turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoa, D.

    Direct numerical simulation of strained homogeneous turbulent flows of incompressible and compressible fluids is introduced. The equations to be solved and features of the rate of strain tensors required by the homogeneity hypothesis are discussed. The motivations of such simulations and their relationship with the modeling of turbulence in real flows are outlined. Numerical techniques used to solve the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations in the case of periodic boundary conditions are outlined with examples of data processing. The large eddy simulation technique used to overcome the low Reynolds number limitation due to insufficient spatial discretization is mentioned.

  16. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF IMBALANCED STRONG MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Jean Carlos; Boldyrev, Stanislav E-mail: boldyrev@wisc.edu

    2010-02-10

    Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is invoked to address turbulent fluctuations in a variety of astrophysical systems. MHD turbulence in nature is often anisotropic and imbalanced, in that Alfvenic fluctuations moving in opposite directions along the background magnetic field carry unequal energies. This work formulates specific requirements for effective numerical simulations of strong imbalanced MHD turbulence with a guide field B {sub 0}. High-resolution simulations are then performed and they suggest that the spectra of the counterpropagating Alfven modes do not differ from the balanced case, while their amplitudes and the corresponding rates of energy cascades are significantly affected by the imbalance. It is further proposed that the stronger the imbalance the larger the magnetic Reynolds number that is required in numerical simulations in order to correctly reproduce the turbulence spectrum. This may explain current discrepancies among numerical simulations and observations of imbalanced MHD turbulence.

  17. DNS and LES of a Shear-Free Mixing Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knaepen, B.; Debliquy, O.; Carati, D.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this work is twofold. First, given the computational resources available today, it is possible to reach, using DNS, higher Reynolds numbers than in Briggs et al.. In the present study, the microscale Reynolds numbers reached in the low- and high-energy homogeneous regions are, respectively, 32 and 69. The results reported earlier can thus be complemented and their robustness in the presence of increased turbulence studied. The second aim of this work is to perform a detailed and documented LES of the shear-free mixing layer. In that respect, the creation of a DNS database at higher Reynolds number is necessary in order to make meaningful LES assessments. From the point of view of LES, the shear-free mixing-layer is interesting since it allows one to test how traditional LES models perform in the presence of an inhomogeneity without having to deal with difficult numerical issues. Indeed, as argued in Briggs et al., it is possible to use a spectral code to study the shear-free mixing layer and one can thus focus on the accuracy of the modelling while avoiding contamination of the results by commutation errors etc. This paper is organized as follows. First we detail the initialization procedure used in the simulation. Since the flow is not statistically stationary, this initialization procedure has a fairly strong influence on the evolution. Although we will focus here on the shear-free mixing layer, the method proposed in the present work can easily be used for other flows with one inhomogeneous direction. The next section of the article is devoted to the description of the DNS. All the relevant parameters are listed and comparison with the Veeravalli & Warhaft experiment is performed. The section on the LES of the shear-free mixing layer follows. A detailed comparison between the filtered DNS data and the LES predictions is presented. It is shown that simple eddy viscosity models perform very well for the present test case, most probably because the flow seems to be almost isotropic in the small-scale range that is not resolved by the LES.

  18. Numerical Simulation of Turbulence Control with Surface-Mounted Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd-Yusof, J.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    1998-11-01

    A numerical scheme is developed which provides a framework to study a variety of actuator configurations without adaption of the underlying mesh, using body forces to enforce the wall boundary conditions. The forcing scheme does not impose time step restrictions on the underlying flow solver, in this case a Fourier/B-spline spectral method. The actuator configuration is coupled to a machine-learning algorithm to optimize the actuator geometry and feedback parameters to maximize drag reduction. The method is tested in DNS of a turbulent channel flow with a time-dependent bumpy wall. Preliminary results indicate that significant drag modification can be obtained.

  19. Direct numerical simulation of the mixing tab flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Suchuan

    The trapezoidal mixing tab has attracted growing attention due to its ability to generate hairpin vortices to enhance cross-stream mixing (Gretta & Smith, 1993; Elavarasan & Meng, 2000). In spite of several previous experimental studies, the physics pertaining to the topological, dynamical and statistical characteristics of the trapezoidal-tab wake is still poorly understood. A major difficulty is the highly three-dimensional nature of the tab wake. The objective of this work is to provide a comprehensive physical picture of the topological, dynamical and statistical features of the tab flow by using direct numerical simulations (DNS), and to elucidate several unresolved fundamental questions about the trapezoidal tab wake. The current work considers a trapezoidal tab mounted on a flat plate. Simulations are conducted for three tab inclination angles α = 12.25°, 24.5° and 49° with the Reynolds number Re = 600 based on the free-stream velocity and the tab height. A finite-volume discretization scheme involving about 2.6 × 106 control volumes is employed for the simulation and the results are compared with PIV experimental data. The simulation results are shown to reproduce all the flow features as observed in experiments and reveal several new phenomena. It is shown that the hairpin vortex comprises clustered flat-plate boundary-layer vortex lines from various streamwise locations. The hairpin vortex is found to be capable of lifting up and entraining new vortex lines from the local boundary layer, thereby increasing its strength to counter vorticity diffusion. This characteristic provides a self-sustaining mechanism for the hairpin structure. It is also shown that the turbulence production is mostly accomplished by the hairpin heads/arches, while the highest turbulent kinetic energy is associated with the hairpin legs. The topological characteristics of the vortex structures, the statistical characteristics and the mixing mechanisms of the flow are discussed in detail. Simulations also show that a larger inclination angle results in more enhanced mixing in the tab wake; however, with the penalty of a larger pressure drop across the tab.

  20. DNS of Horizontal Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Brian; Scotti, Alberto

    2014-11-01

    We perform three-dimensional DNS of Horizontal Convection in a rectangular tank with idealized boundary conditions. The flow is driven by imposing the profile for the buoyancy b at the surface, where it ranges from b0 to b0 + Δb and the transition region is confined to a very small area. The Rayleigh based on the domain depth ranges from 105 to 1012. The scaling observed for the Nusselt number and the strength of the circulation is consistent with Rossby's scaling across the range of Rayleigh numbers considered, indicating that the dynamics in the boundary layer under the ``warming'' side throttles the flow. Energetically, we find that Available Potential Energy (APE) is generated along the surface, and converted to Kinetic Energy (KE). Along the descending plume energy goes from APE to KE up to Ra ~1011 . For higher Rayleigh numbers the plume becomes a net sink of APE. When the switch occurs, a stagnant layer develops near the bottom, and the overall circulation becomes characterized by a narrow plume which retroflects rapidly towards the surface, with a shallow recirculation to close the flow. This may indicate the beginning of a Sandström regime characterized by a stagnant abyssal region and a shallow circulation. Work supported by the National Science Foundation.

  1. Numerical simulation of actuation behavior of active fiber composites in helicopter rotor blade application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paik, Seung Hoon; Kim, Ji Yeon; Shin, Sang Joon; Kim, Seung Jo

    2004-07-01

    Smart structures incorporating active materials have been designed and analyzed to improve aerospace vehicle performance and its vibration/noise characteristics. Helicopter integral blade actuation is one example of those efforts using embedded anisotropic piezoelectric actuators. To design and analyze such integrally-actuated blades, beam approach based on homogenization methodology has been traditionally used. Using this approach, the global behavior of the structures is predicted in an averaged sense. However, this approach has intrinsic limitations in describing the local behaviors in the level of the constituents. For example, the failure analysis of the individual active fibers requires the knowledge of the local behaviors. Microscopic approach for the analysis of integrally-actuated structures is established in this paper. Piezoelectric fibers and matrices are modeled individually and finite element method using three-dimensional solid elements is adopted. Due to huge size of the resulting finite element meshes, high performance computing technology is required in its solution process. The present methodology is quoted as Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the smart structure. As an initial validation effort, present analytical results are correlated with the experiments from a small-scaled integrally-actuated blade, Active Twist Rotor (ATR). Through DNS, local stress distribution around the interface of fiber and matrix can be analyzed.

  2. Direct numerical simulation of a turbulent stably stratified air flow above a wavy water surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druzhinin, O. A.; Troitskaya, Yu. I.; Zilitinkevich, S. S.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of the roughness of the underlaying water surface on turbulence is studied in a stably stratified boundary layer (SSBL). Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is conducted at various Reynolds (Re) and Richardson (Ri) numbers and the wave steepness ka. It is shown that, at constant Re, the stationary turbulent regime is set in at Ri below the threshold value Ri c depending on Re. At Ri > Ri c , in the absence of turbulent fluctuations near the wave water surface, three-dimensional quasiperiodical structures are identified and their threshold of origin depends on the steepness of the surface wave on the water surface. This regime is called a wave pumping regime. The formation of three-dimensional structures is explained by the development of parametric instability of the disturbances induced by the surface water in the air flow. The DNS results are quite consistent with prediction of the theoretical model of the SSBL flow, in which solutions for the disturbances of the fields of velocity and temperature in the wave pumping regime are found to be a solution of a two-dimensional linearized system with the heterogeneous boundary condition, which is caused by the presence of the surface wave. In addition to the turbulent fluctuations, the three-dimensional structures in the wave pumping regime provide for the transfer of impulse and heat, i.e., the increase in the roughness of the water-air boundary caused by the presence of waves intensifies the exchange in the SSBL.

  3. Advancing predictive models for particulate formation in turbulent flames via massively parallel direct numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Bisetti, Fabrizio; Attili, Antonio; Pitsch, Heinz

    2014-08-13

    Combustion of fossil fuels is likely to continue for the near future due to the growing trends in energy consumption worldwide. The increase in efficiency and the reduction of pollutant emissions from combustion devices are pivotal to achieving meaningful levels of carbon abatement as part of the ongoing climate change efforts. Computational fluid dynamics featuring adequate combustion models will play an increasingly important role in the design of more efficient and cleaner industrial burners, internal combustion engines, and combustors for stationary power generation and aircraft propulsion. Today, turbulent combustion modelling is hindered severely by the lack of data that are accurate and sufficiently complete to assess and remedy model deficiencies effectively. In particular, the formation of pollutants is a complex, nonlinear and multi-scale process characterized by the interaction of molecular and turbulent mixing with a multitude of chemical reactions with disparate time scales. The use of direct numerical simulation (DNS) featuring a state of the art description of the underlying chemistry and physical processes has contributed greatly to combustion model development in recent years. In this paper, the analysis of the intricate evolution of soot formation in turbulent flames demonstrates how DNS databases are used to illuminate relevant physico-chemical mechanisms and to identify modelling needs. PMID:25024412

  4. Direct Numerical Simulations of High-Speed Turbulent Boundary Layers over Riblets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duan, Lian; Choudhari, Meelan, M.

    2014-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of spatially developing turbulent boundary layers over riblets with a broad range of riblet spacings are conducted to investigate the effects of riblets on skin friction at high speeds. Zero-pressure gradient boundary layers under two flow conditions (Mach 2:5 with T(sub w)/T(sub r) = 1 and Mach 7:2 with T(sub w)/T(sub r) = 0:5) are considered. The DNS results show that the drag-reduction curve (delta C(sub f)/C(sub f) vs l(sup +)(sub g )) at both supersonic speeds follows the trend of low-speed data and consists of a `viscous' regime for small riblet size, a `breakdown' regime with optimal drag reduction, and a `drag-increasing' regime for larger riblet sizes. At l l(sup +)(sub g) approx. 10 (corresponding to s+ approx 20 for the current triangular riblets), drag reduction of approximately 7% is achieved at both Mach numbers, and con rms the observations of the few existing experiments under supersonic conditions. The Mach- number dependence of the drag-reduction curve occurs for riblet sizes that are larger than the optimal size, with smaller slopes of (delta C(sub f)/C(sub f) for larger freestream Mach numbers. The Reynolds analogy holds with 2(C(sub h)=C(sub f) approximately equal to that of at plates for both drag-reducing and drag-increasing configurations.

  5. Comparison of direct numerical simulation databases of turbulent channel flow at Reτ = 180

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vreman, A. W.; Kuerten, J. G. M.

    2014-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) databases are compared to assess the accuracy and reproducibility of standard and non-standard turbulence statistics of incompressible plane channel flow at Reτ = 180. Two fundamentally different DNS codes are shown to produce maximum relative deviations below 0.2% for the mean flow, below 1% for the root-mean-square velocity and pressure fluctuations, and below 2% for the three components of the turbulent dissipation. Relatively fine grids and long statistical averaging times are required. An analysis of dissipation spectra demonstrates that the enhanced resolution is necessary for an accurate representation of the smallest physical scales in the turbulent dissipation. The results are related to the physics of turbulent channel flow in several ways. First, the reproducibility supports the hitherto unproven theoretical hypothesis that the statistically stationary state of turbulent channel flow is unique. Second, the peaks of dissipation spectra provide information on length scales of the small-scale turbulence. Third, the computed means and fluctuations of the convective, pressure, and viscous terms in the momentum equation show the importance of the different forces in the momentum equation relative to each other. The Galilean transformation that leads to minimum peak fluctuation of the convective term is determined. Fourth, an analysis of higher-order statistics is performed. The skewness of the longitudinal derivative of the streamwise velocity is stronger than expected (-1.5 at y+ = 30). This skewness and also the strong near-wall intermittency of the normal velocity are related to coherent structures.

  6. Advancing predictive models for particulate formation in turbulent flames via massively parallel direct numerical simulations

    PubMed Central

    Bisetti, Fabrizio; Attili, Antonio; Pitsch, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Combustion of fossil fuels is likely to continue for the near future due to the growing trends in energy consumption worldwide. The increase in efficiency and the reduction of pollutant emissions from combustion devices are pivotal to achieving meaningful levels of carbon abatement as part of the ongoing climate change efforts. Computational fluid dynamics featuring adequate combustion models will play an increasingly important role in the design of more efficient and cleaner industrial burners, internal combustion engines, and combustors for stationary power generation and aircraft propulsion. Today, turbulent combustion modelling is hindered severely by the lack of data that are accurate and sufficiently complete to assess and remedy model deficiencies effectively. In particular, the formation of pollutants is a complex, nonlinear and multi-scale process characterized by the interaction of molecular and turbulent mixing with a multitude of chemical reactions with disparate time scales. The use of direct numerical simulation (DNS) featuring a state of the art description of the underlying chemistry and physical processes has contributed greatly to combustion model development in recent years. In this paper, the analysis of the intricate evolution of soot formation in turbulent flames demonstrates how DNS databases are used to illuminate relevant physico-chemical mechanisms and to identify modelling needs. PMID:25024412

  7. Suitability of commercial software for direct numerical simulations of chaotic electrokinetic transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatay, Elif; Mani, Ali

    2014-11-01

    Many microfluidic and electrochemical applications involve chaotic transport phenomena that arise due to instabilities stemming from coupling of hydrodynamics with ion transport and electrostatic forces. Recent investigations have revealed contribution of a wide range of spatio-temporal scales in such chaotic systems similar to those observed in turbulent flows. Given that these scales can span several orders of magnitude, significant numerical resolution is needed for accurate prediction of these phenomena. The objective of this work is to assess efficiency of commercial software for prediction of such phenomena. To this end we have considered Comsol Multiphysics as a general-purpose commercial CFD/transport solver, and have compared its performance against a custom-made DNS code tailored to the specific physics of chaotic electrokinetic phenomena. We present comparison for small systems, which can be simulated on a single core, and show detailed statistics including velocity and concentration spectra over a wide range of frequencies. Our results indicate that while accuracy can be guaranteed with proper mesh resolution, commercial solvers are generally at least an order of magnitude slower than custom-made DNS codes. Supported by NWO, Rubicon Grant.

  8. Utilizing Direct Numerical Simulations of Transition and Turbulence in Design Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man M.

    2015-01-01

    Design optimization methods that use the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with the associated turbulence and transition models, or other model-based forms of the governing equations, may result in aerodynamic designs with actual performance levels that are noticeably different from the expected values because of the complexity of modeling turbulence/transition accurately in certain flows. Flow phenomena such as wake-blade interaction and trailing edge vortex shedding in turbines and compressors (examples of such flows) may require a computational approach that is free of transition/turbulence models, such as direct numerical simulations (DNS), for the underlying physics to be computed accurately. Here we explore the possibility of utilizing DNS data in designing a turbine blade section. The ultimate objective is to substantially reduce differences between predicted performance metrics and those obtained in reality. The redesign of a typical low-pressure turbine blade section with the goal of reducing total pressure loss in the row is provided as an example. The basic ideas presented here are of course just as applicable elsewhere in aerodynamic shape optimization as long as the computational costs are not excessive.

  9. Direct Numerical Simulations of a Full Stationary Wind-Turbine Blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qamar, Adnan; Zhang, Wei; Gao, Wei; Samtaney, Ravi

    2014-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation of flow past a full stationary wind-turbine blade is carried out at Reynolds number, Re = 10,000 placed at 0 and 5 (degree) angle of attack. The study is targeted to create a DNS database for verification of solvers and turbulent models that are utilized in wind-turbine modeling applications. The full blade comprises of a circular cylinder base that is attached to a spanwise varying airfoil cross-section profile (without twist). An overlapping composite grid technique is utilized to perform these DNS computations, which permits block structure in the mapped computational space. Different flow shedding regimes are observed along the blade length. Von-Karman shedding is observed in the cylinder shaft region of the turbine blade. Along the airfoil cross-section of the blade, near body shear layer breakdown is observed. A long tip vortex originates from the blade tip region, which exits the computational plane without being perturbed. Laminar to turbulent flow transition is observed along the blade length. The turbulent fluctuations amplitude decreases along the blade length and the flow remains laminar regime in the vicinity of the blade tip. The Strouhal number is found to decrease monotonously along the blade length. Average lift and drag coefficients are also reported for the cases investigated. Supported by funding under a KAUST OCRF-CRG grant.

  10. Large eddy simulation and direct numerical simulation of high speed turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adumitroaie, V.; Frankel, S. H.; Madnia, C. K.; Givi, P.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this research is to make use of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) for the computational analyses of high speed reacting flows. Our efforts in the first phase of this research conducted within the past three years have been directed in several issues pertaining to intricate physics of turbulent reacting flows. In our previous 5 semi-annual reports submitted to NASA LaRC, as well as several technical papers in archival journals, the results of our investigations have been fully described. In this progress report which is different in format as compared to our previous documents, we focus only on the issue of LES. The reason for doing so is that LES is the primary issue of interest to our Technical Monitor and that our other findings were needed to support the activities conducted under this prime issue. The outcomes of our related investigations, nevertheless, are included in the appendices accompanying this report. The relevance of the materials in these appendices are, therefore, discussed only briefly within the body of the report. Here, results are presented of a priori and a posterior analyses for validity assessments of assumed Probability Density Function (PDF) methods as potential subgrid scale (SGS) closures for LES of turbulent reacting flows. Simple non-premixed reacting systems involving an isothermal reaction of the type A + B yields Products under both chemical equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions are considered. A priori analyses are conducted of a homogeneous box flow, and a spatially developing planar mixing layer to investigate the performance of the Pearson Family of PDF's as SGS models. A posteriori analyses are conducted of the mixing layer using a hybrid one-equation Smagorinsky/PDF SGS closure. The Smagorinsky closure augmented by the solution of the subgrid turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) equation is employed to account for hydrodynamic fluctuations, and the PDF is employed for modeling the effects of scalar fluctuations. The implementation of the model requires the knowledge of the local values of the first two SGS moments. These are provided by additional modeled transport equations. In both a priori and a posteriori analyses, the predicted results are appraised by comparison with subgrid averaged results generated by DNS. Based on these results, the paths to be followed in future investigations are identified.

  11. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent flow past a trailing edge and the associated noise generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandberg, Richard D.; Sandham, Neil D.

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) are conducted of turbulent flow passing an infinitely thin trailing edge. The objective is to investigate the turbulent flow field in the vicinity of the trailing edge and the associated broadband noise generation. To generate a turbulent boundary layer a short distance from the inflow boundary, high-amplitude lifted streaks and disturbances that can be associated with coherent outer-layer vortices are introduced at the inflow boundary. A rapid increase in skin friction and a decrease in boundary layer thickness and pressure fluctuations is observed at the trailing edge. It is demonstrated that the behaviour of the hydrodynamic field in the vicinity of the trailing edge can be predicted with reasonable accuracy using triple-deck theory if the eddy viscosity is accounted for. Point spectra of surface pressure difference are shown to vary considerably towards the trailing edge, with a significant reduction of amplitude occurring in the low-frequency range. The acoustic pressure obtained from the DNS is compared with predictions from two- and three-dimensional acoustic analogies and the classical trailing-edge theory of Amiet. For low frequencies, two-dimensional theory succeeds in predicting the acoustic pressure in the far field with reasonable accuracy due to a significant spanwise coherence of the surface pressure difference and predominantly two-dimensional sound radiation. For higher frequencies, however, the full three-dimensional theory is required for an accurate prediction of the acoustic far field. DNS data are used to test some of the key assumptions invoked by Amiet for the derivation of the classical trailing-edge theory. Even though most of the approximations are shown to be reasonable, they collectively lead to a deviation from the DNS results, in particular for higher frequencies. Moreover, because the three-dimensional acoustic analogy does not provide significantly improved results, it is suggested that some of the discrepancies can be attributed to the approach of evaluating the far-field sound using a Kirchhoff-type integration of the surface pressure difference.

  12. Calculation of Inter-Subchannel Turbulent Mixing Rate and Heat Transfer in a Triangular-Arrayed Rod Bundle Using Direct Numerical Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yudov, Yury V.

    2006-07-01

    The direct numerical simulation, extended to boundary - fitted coordinate, has been carried out for a fully-developed turbulent flow thermal hydraulics in a triangular rod bundle. The rod bundle is premised to be an infinite array. The spacer grid effects are ignored. The purpose of this work is to verify DNS methodology to be applied for deriving coefficients for inter-subchannel turbulent mixing and heat transfer on a rod. These coefficients are incorporated in subchannel analysis codes. To demonstrate the validity of this methodology, numerical calculation was performed for the bundle with the pitch to diameter ratio 1.2, at friction Reynolds number of 600 and Prandtl number of 1. The results for the hydraulic parameters are compared with published DNS data, and the results for the heat exchange coefficients -- with those obtained using semi-empirical correlations. (authors)

  13. Numerical simulations of cryogenic cavitating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunji; Kim, Hyeongjun; Min, Daeho; Kim, Chongam

    2015-12-01

    The present study deals with a numerical method for cryogenic cavitating flows. Recently, we have developed an accurate and efficient baseline numerical scheme for all-speed water-gas two-phase flows. By extending such progress, we modify the numerical dissipations to be properly scaled so that it does not show any deficiencies in low Mach number regions. For dealing with cryogenic two-phase flows, previous EOS-dependent shock discontinuity sensing term is replaced with a newly designed EOS-free one. To validate the proposed numerical method, cryogenic cavitating flows around hydrofoil are computed and the pressure and temperature depression effect in cryogenic cavitation are demonstrated. Compared with Hord's experimental data, computed results are turned out to be satisfactory. Afterwards, numerical simulations of flow around KARI turbopump inducer in liquid rocket are carried out under various flow conditions with water and cryogenic fluids, and the difference in inducer flow physics depending on the working fluids are examined.

  14. Numerically simulating the sandwich plate system structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Guo-Qing; Li, Gang; Liu, Zhi-Hui; Niu, Huai-Lei; Li, Chen-Feng

    2010-09-01

    Sandwich plate systems (SPS) are advanced materials that have begun to receive extensive attention in naval architecture and ocean engineering. At present, according to the rules of classification societies, a mixture of shell and solid elements are required to simulate an SPS. Based on the principle of stiffness decomposition, a new numerical simulation method for shell elements was proposed. In accordance with the principle of stiffness decomposition, the total stiffness can be decomposed into the bending stiffness and shear stiffness. Displacement and stress response related to bending stiffness was calculated with the laminated shell element. Displacement and stress response due to shear was calculated by use of a computational code write by FORTRAN language. Then the total displacement and stress response for the SPS was obtained by adding together these two parts of total displacement and stress. Finally, a rectangular SPS plate and a double-bottom structure were used for a simulation. The results show that the deflection simulated by the elements proposed in the paper is larger than the same simulated by solid elements and the analytical solution according to Hoff theory and approximate to the same simulated by the mixture of shell-solid elements, and the stress simulated by the elements proposed in the paper is approximate to the other simulating methods. So compared with calculations based on a mixture of shell and solid elements, the numerical simulation method given in the paper is more efficient and easier to do.

  15. Reliability of Complex Nonlinear Numerical Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.

    2004-01-01

    This work describes some of the procedure to ensure a higher level of confidence in the predictability and reliability (PAR) of numerical simulation of multiscale complex nonlinear problems. The focus is on relating PAR of numerical simulations with complex nonlinear phenomena of numerics. To isolate sources of numerical uncertainties, the possible discrepancy between the chosen partial differential equation (PDE) model and the real physics and/or experimental data is set aside. The discussion is restricted to how well numerical schemes can mimic the solution behavior of the underlying PDE model for finite time steps and grid spacings. The situation is complicated by the fact that the available theory for the understanding of nonlinear behavior of numerics is not at a stage to fully analyze the nonlinear Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. The discussion is based on the knowledge gained for nonlinear model problems with known analytical solutions to identify and explain the possible sources and remedies of numerical uncertainties in practical computations. Examples relevant to turbulent flow computations are included.

  16. Contribution to Numerical Simulation of Laser Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turňa, Milan; Taraba, Bohumil; Ambrož, Petr; Sahul, Miroslav

    Contribution deals with numerical simulation of thermal and stress fields in welding tubes made of austenitic stainless CrNi steel type AISI 304 with a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. Process simulation was realised by use of ANSYS 10 software. Experiments were aimed at solution of asymptotic, standard and the so-called shell model. Thermally dependent properties of AISI 304 steel were considered. Thermal fields developed in the course of welding process and also shape of weld pool were assessed. Contribution is aimed at simulation of technological welding process with input parameters regarding the thermal and strain task and comparison of attained results with real experiment. The achieved results of numerical simulation were almost identical with a real weldment thermally affected by welding process.

  17. Numerical propulsion system simulation: An interdisciplinary approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Lester D.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1991-01-01

    The tremendous progress being made in computational engineering and the rapid growth in computing power that is resulting from parallel processing now make it feasible to consider the use of computer simulations to gain insights into the complex interactions in aerospace propulsion systems and to evaluate new concepts early in the design process before a commitment to hardware is made. Described here is a NASA initiative to develop a Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) capability.

  18. Numerical propulsion system simulation - An interdisciplinary approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Lester D.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1991-01-01

    The tremendous progress being made in computational engineering and the rapid growth in computing power that is resulting from parallel processing now make it feasible to consider the use of computer simulations to gain insights into the complex interactions in aerospace propulsion systems and to evaluate new concepts early in the design process before a commitment to hardware is made. Described here is a NASA initiative to develop a Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) capability.

  19. Numerical Simulations of Precession Driven Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzani, S.; Tilgner, A.

    We present numerical simulations of precession driven flow at parameters at which the flow is unstable. The instabilities can be classified into viscous and inertial insta- bilities. It will be shown that a viscous instability may start at the boundaries or in the bulk of the fluid. The simulations also reveal resonant collapses of the excited modes. The possible implications for the geodynamo will be discussed.

  20. Direct Numerical Simulation of the generation of internal waves over a thin obstacle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraunie, Philippe; Houcine, Hatem; Chashechkin, Yuli; Gharbi, Adel; Lili, Taieb

    2010-05-01

    Numerical simulation of stratified flows past a thin obstacle are performed in comparison with laboratory experiments, allowing a detailed description of the transient processes occurring from the starting of the flow up to the formation of completed internal waves field. A high resolution finite differences scheme has been adapted to the low Reynolds Navier-Stokes equation with transport equation for density defined by salinity in the experiments. Details of the resolved flow pattern as obtained from DNS are enriching the quantitative description of this complex flow that can be expanded to the investigation of atmospheric and oceanic flows patterns on sharp topography. Acknowledgements : This work was partly financially supported by the RFBR (grants 08-05-00473 and 08-05-90434). PACA region grant for International Research in Mediterranean area.

  1. DNS with Discrete Element Modeling of Suspended Sediment Particles in an Open Channel Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paksereht, Pedram; Apte, Sourabh; Finn, Justin

    2015-11-01

    Interactions of glass particles in water in a turbulent open channel flow over a smooth bed with gravity perpendicular to the mean flow is examined using direct numerical simulation (DNS) together with Lagrangian Discrete-Element-Model (DEM) for particles. The turbulent Reynolds number (Reτ) is 710 corresponding to the experimental observations of Righetti & Romano (JFM, 2004). Particles of size 200 microns with volume loading on the order of 10-3 are simulated using four-way coupling with standard models for drag, added mass, lift, pressure, and inter-particle collision forces. The presence of particles affect the outer as well as inner region of the wall layer where particle inertia and concentration are higher. The DNS-DEM is able to capture the fluid-particle interactions in the outer layer accurately. However, in the inner layer, an increase in mean as well as rms fluid velocity, as observed in the experiments, is not predicted by the DNS-DEM model. It is conjectured that particles slide and roll on the bottom wall, creating slip-like condition. Predictions using different models for drag and lift forces, as well as strong torque coupling are explored and compared with experimental data. Funding: NSF project #1133363, Sediment-Bed-Turbulence Coupling in Oscillatory Flows.

  2. Simple Numerical Simulation of Strain Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, H.

    2002-01-01

    By adopting the basic principle of the reflection (and transmission) of a plane polarized electromagnetic wave incident normal to a stack of films of alternating refractive index, a simple numerical code was written to simulate the maximum reflectivity (transmittivity) of a fiber optic Bragg grating corresponding to various non-uniform strain conditions including photo-elastic effect in certain cases.

  3. A numerical simulation of galaxy subcluster mergers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roettiger, Kurt; Burns, Jack O.; Loken, Chris

    1993-01-01

    We present preliminary results of a 3-D numerical simulation of two merging subclusters of galaxies. By self-consistently modelling the intracluster gas and dark matter dynamics, we hope to gain insight as to how the dynamics of both relate to such observables as the cluster x-ray emission, radio source morphology, and velocity dispersions.

  4. Numerical simulation of plasma opening switches

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R.J.; Jones, M.E.; Bergman, C.D.

    1989-01-01

    Plasma Opening Switches have been examined numerically with the aid of the ANTHEM plasma simulation model. A generic bi-cylindrical switch is studied. The switching of generator pulses ranging from 50 ns to 1 ..mu..sec is reviewed, for a variety of plasma fill lengths and densities, and for a range of resistive loads. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  5. Sequential Quadratic Programming (SQP) for optimal control in direct numerical simulation of turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badreddine, Hassan; Vandewalle, Stefan; Meyers, Johan

    2014-01-01

    The current work focuses on the development and application of an efficient algorithm for optimization of three-dimensional turbulent flows, simulated using Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) or Large-Eddy Simulations, and further characterized by large-dimensional optimization-parameter spaces. The optimization algorithm is based on Sequential Quadratic Programming (SQP) in combination with a damped formulation of the limited-memory BFGS method. The latter is suitable for solving large-scale constrained optimization problems whose Hessian matrices cannot be computed and stored at a reasonable cost. We combine the algorithm with a line-search merit function based on an L1-norm to enforce the convergence from any remote point. It is first shown that the proposed form of the damped L-BFGS algorithm is suitable for solving equality constrained Rosenbrock type functions. Then, we apply the algorithm to an optimal-control test problem that consists of finding the optimal initial perturbations to a turbulent temporal mixing layer such that mixing is improved at the end of a simulation time horizon T. The controls are further subject to a non-linear equality constraint on the total control energy. DNSs are used to resolve all turbulent scales of motion, and a continuous adjoint formulation is employed to calculate the gradient of the cost functionals. We compare the convergence speed of the SQP L-BFGS algorithm to a conventional non-linear conjugate-gradient method (i.e. the current standard in DNS-based optimal control), and find that the SQP algorithm is more than an order of magnitude faster than the conjugate-gradient method.

  6. Numerical simulation of tubular blown film processing

    SciTech Connect

    Pontaza, J.P.; Reddy, J.N.

    2000-02-25

    Tubular film blowing is perhaps one of the most important and economical industrial processes used for the production of thin, biaxially oriented films. A numerical simulation of the film blowing process was performed using the Runge-Kutta scheme. The kinematic and force balance equations governing the process are derived, and the constitutive model proposed by Cao and Campbell is utilized. The model accounts for liquidlike behavior at the freeze line; it alters the demarcation between liquidlike behavior and solidlike behavior from the suggested kinematically based constraint to a rheologically based constraint, the plastic-elastic transition (PET). The paper presents a detailed discussion on how the numerical models were developed and implemented. The numerical simulation was successful in duplicating Cao and Campbell's results. Recommendations are made to gain some insight into the problem.

  7. DNS of Flow in a Low-Pressure Turbine Cascade Using a Discontinuous-Galerkin Spectral-Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garai, Anirban; Diosady, Laslo Tibor; Murman, Scott; Madavan, Nateri

    2015-01-01

    A new computational capability under development for accurate and efficient high-fidelity direct numerical simulation (DNS) and large eddy simulation (LES) of turbomachinery is described. This capability is based on an entropy-stable Discontinuous-Galerkin spectral-element approach that extends to arbitrarily high orders of spatial and temporal accuracy and is implemented in a computationally efficient manner on a modern high performance computer architecture. A validation study using this method to perform DNS of flow in a low-pressure turbine airfoil cascade are presented. Preliminary results indicate that the method captures the main features of the flow. Discrepancies between the predicted results and the experiments are likely due to the effects of freestream turbulence not being included in the simulation and will be addressed in the final paper.

  8. Direct numerical simulation of a turbulent reactive plume on a parallel computer

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, A.W.; Riley, J.J.

    1996-12-01

    A computational algorithm is described for direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a reactive plume in spatially evolving grid turbulence. The algorithm uses sixth-order compact differencing in conjunction with a fifth-order compact boundary scheme which has been developed and found to be stable. A compact filtering method is discussed as a means of stabilizing calculations where the viscous/diffusive terms are differenced in their conservative form. This approach serves as an alternative to nonconservative differencing, previously advocated as a means of damping the 2{delta} waves. In numerically solving the low Mach number equations the time derivative of the density field in the pressure Poisson equation was found to be the most destabilizing part of the calculation. Even-ordered finite difference approximations to this derivative were found to be more stable than odd-ordered approximations. Turbulence at the inlet boundary is generated by scanning through an existing three-dimensional field of fully developed turbulence. In scanning through the inlet field, it was found that a high order interpolation is necessary in order to provide continuous velocity derivatives. Regarding pressure, a Neumann inlet condition combined with a Dirichlet outlet condition was found to work well. The chemistry follows the single-step, irreversible, global reaction: Fuel + (r) Oxidizer {yields} (1 + r)Product + Heat, with parameters chosen to match experimental data as far as allowed by resolution constraints. Simulation results are presented for four different cases in order to examine the effects of heat release, Damkoehler number, and Arrhenius kinetics on the flow physics. Statistical data from the DNS are compared to theory and wind tunnel data and found in reasonable agreement with regard to growth of turbulent length scales, decay of turbulent kinetic energy, decay of centerline scalar concentration, decrease in scalar rms, and spread of plume profile.

  9. DNS of coflowing planar jet atomization: can one reach convergence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Yue; Zaleski, Stephane; Tryggvason, Gretar; Fuster, Daniel; Scardovelli, Ruben; Cenni, Matteo; Arrufat, Tomas

    2015-11-01

    Atomization of a liquid jet assisted by a coflowing fast gas jet is commonly seen in fuel injection systems. Three-dimensional direct numerical simulations are performed to investigate the turbulent multiphase flow characteristics in coflowing planar jet atomization, with the interface tracked by the Volume-of-fluid method. Although many numerical simulations of atomization were reported in the recent years, whether the atomization characteristics such as droplet formation and size distribution are fully resolved is often unclear. In this work, a series of very large-scale simulations of different grid resolution (up to four billion grid points) are conducted and particular attention is focused on examining whether we can achieve converged results on the statistical atomization characteristics. The statistical characteristics of the turbulence (such as turbulence kinetic energy) and of the spray (such as droplet size distribution, liquid volume fraction, and gas-liquid interfacial area) are calculated by averaging the DNS data spatially and temporally. The complex multiscale droplet formation mechanisms due to the interaction between the interface and the turbulence are also revealed by the simulation results. ANR-11-MONU-0011.

  10. Using direct numerical simulation to analyze and improve hot-wire probe sensor and array configurations for simultaneous measurement of the velocity vector and the velocity gradient tensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukoslavčević, Petar V.; Wallace, James M.

    2013-11-01

    Multi-sensor, hot-wire probes of various configurations have been used for 25 years to simultaneously measure the velocity vector and the velocity gradient tensor in turbulent flows. This is the same period in which direct numerical simulations (DNS) were carried out to investigate these flows. Using the first DNS of a turbulent boundary layer, Moin and Spalart ["Contributions of numerical simulation data bases to the physics, modeling and measurement of turbulence," NASA Technical Memorandum 100022 (1987)] examined, virtually, the performance of a two-sensor X-array probe with the sensors idealized as points in the numerical grid. Subsequently, several investigators have used DNS for similar studies. In this paper we use a highly resolved minimal channel flow DNS, following Jiménez and Moin ["The minimal flow unit in near-wall turbulence," J. Fluid Mech. 225, 213 (1991)], to study the performance of an 11-sensor probe. Our previous studies of this type have indicated that, on balance, a probe of the design described here may provide the most accurate measurements of many of the statistics formed from the velocity vector and the velocity gradient tensor (rms and skewness values of the velocity and vorticity components as well as the Reynolds shear stress and the dissipation and production rates). The results of the present study show that, indeed, the sensor and array configurations of a probe of this design are considerably better than previous designs that have been used, and they are likely to give reasonably satisfactory results for such measurements with a real probe in a real bounded flow.

  11. Numerical Simulation of Aircraft Trailing Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Switzer, George F.

    2000-01-01

    The increase in air traffic is currently outpacing the development of new airport runways. This is leading to greater air traffic congestion, resulting in costly delays and cancellations. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) under its Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) program is investigating new technologies that will allow increased airport capacity while maintaining the present standards for safety. As an element of this program, the Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS) is being demonstrated in July 2000, at Dallas Ft-Worth Airport. This system allows reduced aircraft separations, thus increasing the arrival and departure rates, while insuring that wake vortices from a leading aircraft do not endanger trailing aircraft. The system uses predictions or wake vortex position and strength based on input from the current weather state. This prediction is accomplished by a semi-empirical model developed from theory, field observations, and relationships derived from numerical wake vortex simulations. Numerical experiments with a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model are being conducted in order to provide guidance for the enhancement of these prediction algorithms. The LES Simulations of wake vortices are carried out with NASA's Terminal Area Simulation System (TASS). Previous wake vortex investigations with TASS are described. The primary objective of these numerical studies has been to quantify vortex transport and decay in relation to atmospheric variables. This paper summarizes many of the previous investigations with the TASS model and presents some new results regarding the onset of wake vortex decay.

  12. Direct numerical simulations and modeling of a spatially-evolving turbulent wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimbala, John M.

    1994-12-01

    Understanding of turbulent free shear flows (wakes, jets, and mixing layers) is important, not only for scientific interest, but also because of their appearance in numerous practical applications. Turbulent wakes, in particular, have recently received increased attention by researchers at NASA Langley. The turbulent wake generated by a two-dimensional airfoil has been selected as the test-case for detailed high-resolution particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiments. This same wake has also been chosen to enhance NASA's turbulence modeling efforts. Over the past year, the author has completed several wake computations, while visiting NASA through the 1993 and 1994 ASEE summer programs, and also while on sabbatical leave during the 1993-94 academic year. These calculations have included two-equation (K-omega and K-epsilon) models, algebraic stress models (ASM), full Reynolds stress closure models, and direct numerical simulations (DNS). Recently, there has been mutually beneficial collaboration of the experimental and computational efforts. In fact, these projects have been chosen for joint presentation at the NASA Turbulence Peer Review, scheduled for September 1994. DNS calculations are presently underway for a turbulent wake at Re(sub theta) = 1000 and at a Mach number of 0.20. (Theta is the momentum thickness, which remains constant in the wake of a two dimensional body.) These calculations utilize a compressible DNS code written by M. M. Rai of NASA Ames, and modified for the wake by J. Cimbala. The code employs fifth-order accurate upwind-biased finite differencing for the convective terms, fourth-order accurate central differencing for the viscous terms, and an iterative-implicit time-integration scheme. The computational domain for these calculations starts at x/theta = 10, and extends to x/theta = 610. Fully developed turbulent wake profiles, obtained from experimental data from several wake generators, are supplied at the computational inlet, along with appropriate noise. After some adjustment period, the flow downstream of the inlet develops into a fully three-dimensional turbulent wake. Of particular interest in the present study is the far wake spreading rate and the self-similar mean and turbulence profiles. At the time of this writing, grid resolution studies are underway, and a code is being written to calculate turbulence statistics from these wake calculations; the statistics will be compared to those from the ongoing PIV wake measurements, those of previous experiments, and those predicted by the various turbulence models. These calculations will lead to significant long-term benefits for the turbulence modeling effort. In particular, quantities such as the pressure-strain correlation and the dissipation rate tensor can be easily calculated from the DNS results, whereas these quantities are nearly impossible to measure experimentally. Improvements to existing turbulence models (and development of new models) require knowledge about flow quantities such as these. DNS data can show where deficiencies in the models exist; improvements to the models can then be attempted.

  13. Direct numerical simulations and modeling of a spatially-evolving turbulent wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cimbala, John M.

    1994-01-01

    Understanding of turbulent free shear flows (wakes, jets, and mixing layers) is important, not only for scientific interest, but also because of their appearance in numerous practical applications. Turbulent wakes, in particular, have recently received increased attention by researchers at NASA Langley. The turbulent wake generated by a two-dimensional airfoil has been selected as the test-case for detailed high-resolution particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiments. This same wake has also been chosen to enhance NASA's turbulence modeling efforts. Over the past year, the author has completed several wake computations, while visiting NASA through the 1993 and 1994 ASEE summer programs, and also while on sabbatical leave during the 1993-94 academic year. These calculations have included two-equation (K-omega and K-epsilon) models, algebraic stress models (ASM), full Reynolds stress closure models, and direct numerical simulations (DNS). Recently, there has been mutually beneficial collaboration of the experimental and computational efforts. In fact, these projects have been chosen for joint presentation at the NASA Turbulence Peer Review, scheduled for September 1994. DNS calculations are presently underway for a turbulent wake at Re(sub theta) = 1000 and at a Mach number of 0.20. (Theta is the momentum thickness, which remains constant in the wake of a two dimensional body.) These calculations utilize a compressible DNS code written by M. M. Rai of NASA Ames, and modified for the wake by J. Cimbala. The code employs fifth-order accurate upwind-biased finite differencing for the convective terms, fourth-order accurate central differencing for the viscous terms, and an iterative-implicit time-integration scheme. The computational domain for these calculations starts at x/theta = 10, and extends to x/theta = 610. Fully developed turbulent wake profiles, obtained from experimental data from several wake generators, are supplied at the computational inlet, along with appropriate noise. After some adjustment period, the flow downstream of the inlet develops into a fully three-dimensional turbulent wake. Of particular interest in the present study is the far wake spreading rate and the self-similar mean and turbulence profiles. At the time of this writing, grid resolution studies are underway, and a code is being written to calculate turbulence statistics from these wake calculations; the statistics will be compared to those from the ongoing PIV wake measurements, those of previous experiments, and those predicted by the various turbulence models. These calculations will lead to significant long-term benefits for the turbulence modeling effort. In particular, quantities such as the pressure-strain correlation and the dissipation rate tensor can be easily calculated from the DNS results, whereas these quantities are nearly impossible to measure experimentally. Improvements to existing turbulence models (and development of new models) require knowledge about flow quantities such as these. Present turbulence models do a very good job at prediction of the shape of the mean velocity and Reynolds stress profiles in a turbulent wake, but significantly underpredict the magnitude of the stresses and the spreading rate of the wake. Thus, the turbulent wake is an ideal flow for turbulence modeling research. By careful comparison and analysis of each term in the modeled Reynolds stress equations, the DNS data can show where deficiencies in the models exist; improvements to the models can then be attempted.

  14. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent, chemically reacting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doom, Jeffrey Joseph

    This dissertation: (i) develops a novel numerical method for DNS/LES of compressible, turbulent reacting flows, (ii) performs several validation simulations, (iii) studies auto-ignition of a hydrogen vortex ring in air and (iv) studies a hydrogen/air turbulent diffusion flame. The numerical method is spatially non-dissipative, implicit and applicable over a range of Mach numbers. The compressible Navier-Stokes equations are rescaled so that the zero Mach number equations are discretely recovered in the limit of zero Mach number. The dependent variables are co--located in space, and thermodynamic variables are staggered from velocity in time. The algorithm discretely conserves kinetic energy in the incompressible, inviscid, non--reacting limit. The chemical source terms are implicit in time to allow for stiff chemical mechanisms. The algorithm is readily applicable to complex chemical mechanisms. Good results are obtained for validation simulations. The algorithm is used to study auto-ignition in laminar vortex rings. A nine species, nineteen reaction mechanism for H2/air combustion proposed by Mueller et al. [37] is used. Diluted H 2 at ambient temperature (300 K) is injected into hot air. The simulations study the effect of fuel/air ratio, oxidizer temperature, Lewis number and stroke ratio (ratio of piston stroke length to diameter). Results show that auto--ignition occurs in fuel lean, high temperature regions with low scalar dissipation at a 'most reactive' mixture fraction, zeta MR (Mastorakos et al. [32]). Subsequent evolution of the flame is not predicted by zetaMR; a most reactive temperature TMR is defined and shown to predict both the initial auto-ignition as well as subsequent evolution. For stroke ratios less than the formation number, ignition in general occurs behind the vortex ring and propagates into the core. At higher oxidizer temperatures, ignition is almost instantaneous and occurs along the entire interface between fuel and oxidizer. For stroke ratios greater than the formation number, ignition initially occurs behind the leading vortex ring, then occurs along the length of the trailing column and propagates towards the ring. Lewis number is seen to affect both the initial ignition as well as subsequent flame evolution significantly. Non-uniform Lewis number simulations provide faster ignition and burnout time but a lower maximum temperature. The fuel rich reacting vortex ring provides the highest maximum temperature and the higher oxidizer temperature provides the fastest ignition time. The fuel lean reacting vortex ring has little effect on the flow and behaves similar to a non--reacting vortex ring. We then study auto-ignition of turbulent H2/air diffusion flames using the Mueller et al. [37] mechanism. Isotropic turbulence is superimposed on an unstrained diffusion flame where diluted H 2 at ambient temperature interacts with hot air. Both, unity and non-unity Lewis number are studied. The results are contrasted to the homogeneous mixture problem and laminar diffusion flames. Results show that auto-ignition occurs in fuel lean, low vorticity, high temperature regions with low scalar dissipation around a most reactive mixture fraction, zetaMR (Mastorakos et al. [32]). However, unlike the laminar flame where auto-ignition occurs at zetaMR, the turbulent flame auto-ignites over a very broad range of zeta around zetaMR, which cannot completely predict the onset of ignition. The simulations also study the effects of three-dimensionality. Past two--dimensional simulations (Mastorakos et al. [32]) show that when flame fronts collide, extinction occurs. However, our three dimensional results show that when flame fronts collide; they can either increase in intensity, combine without any appreciable change in intensity or extinguish. This behavior is due to the three--dimensionality of the flow.

  15. Direct Numerical Simulations of Turbulent Autoigniting Hydrogen Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaithambi, Rajapandiyan

    Autoignition is an important phenomenon and a tool in the design of combustion engines. To study autoignition in a canonical form a direct numerical simulation of a turbulent autoigniting hydrogen jet in vitiated coflow conditions at a jet Reynolds number of 10,000 is performed. A detailed chemical mechanism for hydrogen-air combustion and non-unity Lewis numbers for species transport is used. Realistic inlet conditions are prescribed by obtaining the velocity eld from a fully developed turbulent pipe flow simulation. To perform this simulation a scalable modular density based method for direct numerical simulation (DNS) and large eddy simulation (LES) of compressible reacting flows is developed. The algorithm performs explicit time advancement of transport variables on structured grids. An iterative semi-implicit time advancement is developed for the chemical source terms to alleviate the chemical stiffness of detailed mechanisms. The algorithm is also extended from a Cartesian grid to a cylindrical coordinate system which introduces a singularity at the pole r = 0 where terms with a factor 1/r can be ill-defined. There are several approaches to eliminate this pole singularity and finite volume methods can bypass this issue by not storing or computing data at the pole. All methods however face a very restrictive time step when using a explicit time advancement scheme in the azimuthal direction (theta) where the cell sizes are of the order DelrDeltheta. We use a conservative finite volume based approach to remove the severe time step restriction imposed by the CFL condition by merging cells in the azimuthal direction. In addition, fluxes in the radial direction are computed with an implicit scheme to allow cells to be clustered along the jet's shear layer. This method is validated and used to perform the large scale turbulent reacting simulation. The resulting flame structure is found to be similar to a turbulent diusion flame but stabilized by autoignition at the flame base. Mass-fraction of the hydroperoxyl radical, HO2, peaks in magnitude upstream of the flame's stabilization point indicating autoignition. A flame structure similar to a triple-flame, with a lean premixed flame and a rich premixed flame flanking a thick diffusion flame is identified by the flame index. Radicals formed in the shear layer ahead of ignition and oxygen from the coflow do not get fully consumed by the flame and are transported along the edges of the flame brush into the core of the jet. Ignition delays from a well-stirred reactor model and an autoigniting diffusion flame model are able predict the lift-off height of the turbulent flame. The local entrainment rate was observed to increase with axial distance until the flame stabilization point and then decrease downstream. Data from probes placed along the flame reveals a highly turbulent flow field with variable composition at a given location. In general however, it is observed that the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) is very high in cold fuel rich mixtures and is lowest in hot fuel lean mixtures. Autoignition occurs at the most-reactive hot and lean mixture fractions where the TKE is the lowest.

  16. Numerical Simulation of a Tornado Generating Supercell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Ahmad, Nashat N.; LimonDuparcmeur, Fanny M.

    2012-01-01

    The development of tornadoes from a tornado generating supercell is investigated with a large eddy simulation weather model. Numerical simulations are initialized with a sounding representing the environment of a tornado producing supercell that affected North Carolina and Virginia during the Spring of 2011. The structure of the simulated storm was very similar to that of a classic supercell, and compared favorably to the storm that affected the vicinity of Raleigh, North Carolina. The presence of mid-level moisture was found to be important in determining whether a supercell would generate tornadoes. The simulations generated multiple tornadoes, including cyclonic-anticyclonic pairs. The structure and the evolution of these tornadoes are examined during their lifecycle.

  17. Numerical simulations of iced airfoils and wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Jianping

    A numerical study was conducted to understand the effects of simulated ridge and leading-edge ice shapes on the aerodynamic performance of airfoils and wings. In the first part of this study, a range of Reynolds numbers and Mach numbers, as well as ice-shape sizes and ice-shape locations were examined for various airfoils with the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes approach. Comparisons between simulation results and experimental force data showed favorable comparison up to stall conditions. At and past stall condition, the aerodynamic forces were typically not predicted accurately for large upper-surface ice shapes. A lift-break (pseudo-stall) condition was then defined based on the lift curve slope change. The lift-break angles compared reasonably with experimental stall angles, and indicated that the critical ice-shape location tended to be near the location of minimum pressure and the location of the most adverse pressure gradient. With the aim of improving the predictive ability of the stall behavior for iced airfoils, simulations using the Detached Eddy Simulation (DES) approach were conducted in the second part of this numerical investigation. Three-dimensional DES computations were performed for a series of angles of attack around stall for the iced NACA 23012 and NLF 0414 airfoils. The simulations for both iced airfoils provided the maximum lift coefficients and stall behaviors qualitatively consistent with experiments.

  18. Issues in Numerical Simulation of Fire Suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Tieszen, S.R.; Lopez, A.R.

    1999-04-12

    This paper outlines general physical and computational issues associated with performing numerical simulation of fire suppression. Fire suppression encompasses a broad range of chemistry and physics over a large range of time and length scales. The authors discuss the dominant physical/chemical processes important to fire suppression that must be captured by a fire suppression model to be of engineering usefulness. First-principles solutions are not possible due to computational limitations, even with the new generation of tera-flop computers. A basic strategy combining computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation techniques with sub-grid model approximations for processes that have length scales unresolvable by gridding is presented.

  19. Numerical simulations of compressible mixing layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Normand, Xavier

    1990-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations of two-dimensional temporally growing compressible mixing layers are presented. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is initially excited by a white-noise perturbation superimposed onto a hyperbolic tangent meanflow profile. The linear regime is studied at low resolution in the case of two flows of equal temperatures, for convective Mach numbers from 0.1 to 1 and for different values of the Reynolds number. At higher resolution, the complete evolution of a two-eddy mixing layer between two flows of different temperatures is simulated at moderate Reynolds number. Similarities and differences between flows of equal convective Mach numbers are discussed.

  20. Numerical simulations of catastrophic disruption: Recent results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, W.; Asphaug, E.; Ryan, E. V.

    1994-01-01

    Numerical simulations have been used to study high velocity two-body impacts. In this paper, a two-dimensional Largrangian finite difference hydro-code and a three-dimensional smooth particle hydro-code (SPH) are described and initial results reported. These codes can be, and have been, used to make specific predictions about particular objects in our solar system. But more significantly, they allow us to explore a broad range of collisional events. Certain parameters (size, time) can be studied only over a very restricted range within the laboratory; other parameters (initial spin, low gravity, exotic structure or composition) are difficult to study at all experimentally. The outcomes of numerical simulations lead to a more general and accurate understanding of impacts in their many forms.

  1. Direct numerical simulations of turbulent non-premixed methane-air flames modeled with reduced kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, J. M.; Chen, J. H.; Day, M.; Mahalingam, S.

    1994-01-01

    Turbulent non-premixed stoichiometric methane-air flames modeled with reduced kinetics have been studied using the direct numerical simulation approach. The simulations include realistic chemical kinetics, and the molecular transport is modeled with constant Lewis numbers for individual species. The effect of turbulence on the internal flame structure and extinction characteristics of methane-air flames is evaluated. Consistent with earlier DNS with simple one-step chemistry, the flame is wrinkled and in some regions extinguished by the turbulence, while the turbulence is weakened in the vicinity of the flame due to a combination of dilatation and an increase in kinematic viscosity. Unlike previous results, reignition is observed in the present simulations. Lewis number effects are important in determining the local stoichiometry of the flame. The results presented in this work are preliminary but demonstrate the feasibility of incorporating reduced kinetics for the oxidation of methane with direct numerical simulations of homogeneous turbulence to evaluate the limitations of various levels of reduction in the kinetics and to address the formation of thermal and prompt NO(x).

  2. Numerical simulation of binary liquid droplet collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yu; Suga, Kazuhiko

    2005-08-01

    A numerical investigation of binary droplet collision has been conducted. The complete process of the collision of two liquid droplets is dynamically simulated by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the convective equation of the level set function that captures the interface between the liquid and the gas phases. The simulations cover four major regimes of binary collision: bouncing, coalescence, reflexive separation, and stretching separation. For water droplets in air, the numerical results are compared with the experiments by and Ashgriz and Poo [J. Fluid Mech. 221, 183 (1990)] on collision consequences. For hydrocarbon (C14H30) droplets in nitrogen gas, the simulated results are compared in detail with the time-resolved photographic images of the collision processes obtained by Qian and Law [J. Fluid Mech. 331, 59 (1997)] in every collision regime. The present numerical results suggest that the mechanism of a bouncing collision is governed by the macroscopic dynamics. However, the fact that the present macroscopic numerical model is unable to capture the collision regime of coalescence after minor deformation supports the speculation that its mechanism is related to the microscopic dynamics. Furthermore, the transition from bouncing to coalescence collisions has been predicted and agrees well with the analytical model. The mechanism of satellite droplet formation for head-on collision and stretching separation collision is also studied based on the detailed time-resolved dynamic simulation results. It is then confirmed that end pinching is the main cause of satellite formation in head-on collisions whereas the capillary-wave instability becomes dominant in large impact parameter cases. In the case of an intermediate impact parameter, the effects of twisting and stretching due to the angular momentum and the inertia of the colliding droplets are significant for the satellite formation.

  3. Numerical simulation air pollution in urban areas

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, J.Y.

    1984-01-01

    A three-dimensional, grid-based numerical air pollution model for the estimation and prediction of air pollutant concentrations in an urban area is developed. Based on the species continuity equation, the modeling system incorporates the combined influences of advective transport, turbulent diffusion, chemical transformation, source emissions and surface removal processes. The model is applied to study the behavior of SO{sub 2} and sulfate concentration distributions in an urban area using the St. Louis Regional Air Pollution Study (RAPS) data. Statistical techniques for the evaluation of the numerical model performance include paired analysis and resampling analysis. The comparisons of the numerical model with the new version of Pollution Episodic Model (PEM-2) and the RAM, a Gaussian model, are also performed using RAPS data base. A comparison between predicted and observed concentrations indicates that the numerical model can satisfactorily simulate the dynamics of the pollutant concentrations in the urban area. The results indicate that besides the uncertainty in the emission rate, the proper characterization of the emissions-as a point source or as an area source-is also critical to the accurate simulation of the concentration field in the urban areas.

  4. Direct Numerical Simulations of Transitional/Turbulent Wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man Mohan

    2011-01-01

    The interest in transitional/turbulent wakes spans the spectrum from an intellectual pursuit to understand the complex underlying physics to a critical need in aeronautical engineering and other disciplines to predict component/system performance and reliability. Cylinder wakes have been studied extensively over several decades to gain a better understanding of the basic flow phenomena that are encountered in such flows. Experimental, computational and theoretical means have been employed in this effort. While much has been accomplished there are many important issues that need to be resolved. The physics of the very near wake of the cylinder (less than three diameters downstream) is perhaps the most challenging of them all. This region comprises the two detached shear layers, the recirculation region and wake flow. The interaction amongst these three components is to some extent still a matter of conjecture. Experimental techniques have generated a large percentage of the data that have provided us with the current state of understanding of the subject. More recently computational techniques have been used to simulate cylinder wakes, and the data from such simulations are being used to both refine our understanding of such flows as well as provide new insights. A few large eddy and direct numerical simulations (LES and DNS) of cylinder wakes have appeared in the literature in the recent past. These investigations focus on the low Reynolds number range where the cylinder boundary layer is laminar (sub-critical range). However, from an engineering point of view, there is considerable interest in the situation where the upper and/or lower boundary layer of an airfoil is turbulent, and these turbulent boundary layers separate from the airfoil to contribute to the formation of the wake downstream. In the case of cylinders, this only occurs at relatively large unit Reynolds numbers. However, in the case of airfoils, the boundary layer has the opportunity to transition to turbulence on the airfoil surface at a relatively lower unit Reynolds number because the characteristic length of the airfoil is typically one to two orders of magnitude larger than the trailing edge diameter. This transition to turbulence would occur unless there is a strong favorable pressure gradient that results in the boundary layer remaining laminar or transitional over the surface of the airfoil. This presentation will focus on two direct numerical simulations that have been performed at NASA ARC. The first is of a cylinder wake with laminar separating boundary layers. The second is the wake of a flat plate with a circular trailing edge. The upper and lower plate surface boundary layers are both turbulent and statistically identical. Thus the computed wake is symmetric in a statistical sense. This flow is more representative of airfoil wakes than cylinder wakes. Results from the two simulations including flow visualization and turbulence statistics in the near wake will be presented at the seminar.

  5. DNS of self-similar adverse pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer at incipient separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soria, Julio; Kitsios, Vassili; Atkinson, Callum; Sillero, Juan; Borrell, Guillem; Gungar, Ayse; Jimenez, Javier

    2015-11-01

    A direct numerical simulation of a self-similar adverse pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer (APG-TBL) flow at incipient separation has been carried out. The maximum Reynolds number based on the momentum thickness, Reδ2 , reached in this DNS is 6,500. A wall-normal far-field boundary condition to effect the desired APG that will lead to the desired self-similar flow at the verge of separation has been developed. The self-similar analysis of the mean turbulent boundary layer equations yields the necessary conditions for a self-similar mean flow to exists. These conditions are tested using the DNS APG-TBL data base. First and second order statistics of the velocity across the APG-TBL are also presented in the light of the self-similar analysis results and compared to the results of a zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer DNS with similar mean inflow characteristics as the APG-TBL. The support of the ARC, NCI and Pawsey SCC funded by the Australian and Western Australian governments as well as the support of PRACE funded by the European Union are gratefully acknowledged.

  6. DNS, Enstrophy Balance, and the Dissipation Equation in a Separated Turbulent Channel Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, Ponnampalam; Rubinstein, Robert; Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2013-01-01

    The turbulent flows through a plane channel and a channel with a constriction (2-D hill) are numerically simulated using DNS and RANS calculations. The Navier-Stokes equations in the DNS are solved using a higher order kinetic energy preserving central schemes and a fifth order accurate upwind biased WENO scheme for the space discretization. RANS calculations are performed using the NASA code CFL3D with the komega SST two-equation model and a full Reynolds stress model. Using DNS, the magnitudes of different terms that appear in the enstrophy equation are evaluated. The results show that the dissipation and the diffusion terms reach large values at the wall. All the vortex stretching terms have similar magnitudes within the buffer region. Beyond that the triple correlation among the vorticity and strain rate fluctuations becomes the important kinematic term in the enstrophy equation. This term is balanced by the viscous dissipation. In the separated flow, the triple correlation term and the viscous dissipation term peak locally and balance each other near the separated shear layer region. These findings concur with the analysis of Tennekes and Lumley, confirming that the energy transfer terms associated with the small-scale dissipation and the fluctuations of the vortex stretching essentially cancel each other, leaving an equation for the dissipation that is governed by the large-scale motion.

  7. Direct numerical simulations of tonal noise generated by laminar flow past airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandberg, R. D.; Jones, L. E.; Sandham, N. D.; Joseph, P. F.

    2009-03-01

    A numerical investigation is presented of noise generated by flow past symmetric NACA airfoils with different thickness and at various angles of attack at M=0.4 and a Reynolds number based on chord of Re=50,000. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) are employed to directly compute both the near-field hydrodynamics and the far-field sound. The DNS data are then used to investigate whether the approach of determining tonal noise radiation based on the surface pressure difference, as done in the classical trailing-edge theory of Amiet, yields satisfactory results for finite thickness airfoils subject to mean loading effects. In addition, the accuracy of Amiet's surface pressure jump function is evaluated. Overall, the modified theory of Amiet appears to be suitable for finite thickness airfoils up to moderate incidence. However, when increasing the airfoil thickness to 12% chord, which corresponds to a trailing-edge angle of 16.8∘, an unexpected phase change between the incident and scattered pressure is found at the frequency of the forced instability waves. This phase change is attributed to the flow oscillating around the trailing edge at a separate wake frequency. For the largest incidence investigated, Amiet's response function does not predict the total surface pressure difference as accurately as for zero or small incidence at the vortex shedding frequency, resulting in a poor prediction of the directivity and amplitude of the acoustic pressure. Moreover, predicting the airfoil self-noise based on the surface pressure difference appears not to be generally applicable at higher angles of attack because the radiated sound is only partly due to classical trailing-edge noise mechanisms. In these cases, it appears as if volume sources in the flow cannot be neglected.

  8. 2000 Numerical Propulsion System Simulation Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lytle, John; Follen, Greg; Naiman, Cynthia; Veres, Joseph; Owen, Karl; Lopez, Isaac

    2001-01-01

    The technologies necessary to enable detailed numerical simulations of complete propulsion systems are being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center in cooperation with industry, academia, and other government agencies. Large scale, detailed simulations will be of great value to the nation because they eliminate some of the costly testing required to develop and certify advanced propulsion systems. In addition, time and cost savings will be achieved by enabling design details to be evaluated early in the development process before a commitment is made to a specific design. This concept is called the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS). NPSS consists of three main elements: (1) engineering models that enable multidisciplinary analysis of large subsystems and systems at various levels of detail, (2) a simulation environment that maximizes designer productivity, and (3) a cost-effective. high-performance computing platform. A fundamental requirement of the concept is that the simulations must be capable of overnight execution on easily accessible computing platforms. This will greatly facilitate the use of large-scale simulations in a design environment. This paper describes the current status of the NPSS with specific emphasis on the progress made over the past year on air breathing propulsion applications. Major accomplishments include the first formal release of the NPSS object-oriented architecture (NPSS Version 1) and the demonstration of a one order of magnitude reduction in computing cost-to-performance ratio using a cluster of personal computers. The paper also describes the future NPSS milestones, which include the simulation of space transportation propulsion systems in response to increased emphasis on safe, low cost access to space within NASA'S Aerospace Technology Enterprise. In addition, the paper contains a summary of the feedback received from industry partners on the fiscal year 1999 effort and the actions taken over the past year to respond to that feedback. NPSS was supported in fiscal year 2000 by the High Performance Computing and Communications Program.

  9. 2001 Numerical Propulsion System Simulation Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lytle, John; Follen, Gregory; Naiman, Cynthia; Veres, Joseph; Owen, Karl; Lopez, Isaac

    2002-01-01

    The technologies necessary to enable detailed numerical simulations of complete propulsion systems are being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center in cooperation with industry, academia and other government agencies. Large scale, detailed simulations will be of great value to the nation because they eliminate some of the costly testing required to develop and certify advanced propulsion systems. In addition, time and cost savings will be achieved by enabling design details to be evaluated early in the development process before a commitment is made to a specific design. This concept is called the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS). NPSS consists of three main elements: (1) engineering models that enable multidisciplinary analysis of large subsystems and systems at various levels of detail, (2) a simulation environment that maximizes designer productivity, and (3) a cost-effective, high-performance computing platform. A fundamental requirement of the concept is that the simulations must be capable of overnight execution on easily accessible computing platforms. This will greatly facilitate the use of large-scale simulations in a design environment. This paper describes the current status of the NPSS with specific emphasis on the progress made over the past year on air breathing propulsion applications. Major accomplishments include the first formal release of the NPSS object-oriented architecture (NPSS Version 1) and the demonstration of a one order of magnitude reduction in computing cost-to-performance ratio using a cluster of personal computers. The paper also describes the future NPSS milestones, which include the simulation of space transportation propulsion systems in response to increased emphasis on safe, low cost access to space within NASA's Aerospace Technology Enterprise. In addition, the paper contains a summary of the feedback received from industry partners on the fiscal year 2000 effort and the actions taken over the past year to respond to that feedback. NPSS was supported in fiscal year 2001 by the High Performance Computing and Communications Program.

  10. Direct Numerical Simulation of the Leidenfrost Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanguy, Sebastien; Rueda Villegas, Lucia; Fluid Mechanics Institute of Toulouse Team

    2015-11-01

    The development of numerical methods for the direct numerical simulation of two-phase flows with phase changes, is the main topic of this study. We propose a novel numerical method which allows dealing with both evaporation and boiling at the interface between a liquid and a gas. For instance it can occur for a Leidenfrost droplet; a water drop levitating above a hot plate which temperature is much higher than the boiling temperature. In this case, boiling occurs in the film of saturated vapor which is entrapped between the bottom of the drop and the plate, whereas the top of the water droplet evaporates in contact of ambient air. Thus, boiling and evaporation can occur simultaneously on different regions of the same liquid interface or occur successively at different times of the history of an evaporating droplet. Usual numerical methods are not able to perform computations in these transient regimes, therefore, we propose in this paper a novel numerical method to achieve this challenging task. Finally, we present several accurate validations against experimental results on Leidenfrost Droplets to strengthen the relevance of this new method.

  11. Numerical Simulation Air Pollution in Urban Areas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, Jia-Yeong

    A three-dimensional, grid-based numerical air pollution model for the estimation and prediction of air pollutant concentrations in an urban area is developed. Based on the species continuity equation, the modeling system incorporates the combined influences of advective transport, turbulent diffusion, chemical transformation, source emissions and surface removal processes. Recent developments in plume rise and plume penetration processes, non-divergent wind field analysis procedures and numerical solution techniques are described and incorporated in the model. The model is applied to study the behavior of SO(,2) and sulfate concentration distributions in an urban area using the St. Louis Regional Air Pollution Study (RAPS) data. Statistical techniques for the evaluation of the numerical model performance include paired analysis and resampling analysis. The comparisons of the numerical model with the new version of Pollution Episodic Model (PEM-2) and the RAM, a Gaussian model, are also performed using RAPS data base. A comparison between predicted and observed concentrations indicates that the numerical model can satisfactorily simulate the dynamics of the pollutant concentrations in the urban area. The numerical model performs much better in the summer days than in the winter days. A tendency to underpredict the SO(,2) concentrations at the receptors located in the rural areas is observed. Much improvement over the PEM -2 model is the numerical model's consistent performance and accurate prediction for various meteorological conditions which include light winds and sudden changes of wind directions. The numerical model, as revealed by the resampling analysis, performed quite well considering the confidence intervals associated with the uncertainty or variability in the observed concentrations. Finally, the findings of the study regarding the behavior of point and area sources in an urban area provide insight into the complex interrelationships between the point and area source emissions and the various meteorological conditions in determining the surface concentration distribution. The results indicate that besides the uncertainty in the emission rate, the proper characterization of the emissions--as a point source or as an area source--is also critical to the accurate simulation of the concentration field in the urban areas.

  12. Numerical Simulation of Two-Phase Flow in Severely Damaged Core Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Meekunnasombat, Phongsan; Fichot, Florian; Quintard, Michel

    2006-07-01

    In the event of a severe accident in a nuclear reactor, the oxidation, dissolution and collapse of fuel rods is likely to change dramatically the geometry of the core. A large part of the core would be damaged and would look like porous medium made of randomly distributed pellet fragments, broken claddings and relocated melts. Such a complex medium must be cooled in order to stop the accident progression. IRSN investigates the effectiveness of the water re-flooding mechanism in cooling this medium where complex two-phase flows are likely to exist. A macroscopic model for the prediction of the cooling sequence was developed for the ICARE/CATHARE code (IRSN mechanistic code for severe accidents). It still needs to be improved and assessed. It appears that a better understanding of the flow at the pore scale is necessary. As a result, a direct numerical simulation (DNS) code was developed to investigate the local features of a two-phase flow in complex geometries. In this paper, the Cahn-Hilliard model is used to simulate flows of two immiscible fluids in geometries representing a damaged core. These geometries are synthesized from experimental tomography images (PHEBUS-FP project) in order to study the effects of each degradation feature, such as displacement and fragmentation of the fuel rods and claddings, on the two-phase flow. For example, the presence of fragmented fuel claddings is likely to enhance the trapping of the residual phase (either steam or water) within the medium which leads to less flow fluctuations in the other phase. Such features are clearly shown by DNS calculations. From a series of calculations where the geometry of the porous medium is changed, conclusions are drawn for the impact of rods damage level on the characteristics of two-phase flow in the core. (authors)

  13. Numerical Simulation of Flowing Blood Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Jonathan B.

    2014-01-01

    The cellular detail of blood is an essential factor in its flow, especially in vessels or devices with size comparable to that of its suspended cells. This article motivates and reviews numerical simulation techniques that provide a realistic description of cell-scale blood flow by explicitly representing its coupled fluid and solid mechanics. Red blood cells are the principal focus because of their importance and because of their remarkable deformability, which presents particular simulation challenges. Such simulations must couple discretizations of the large-deformation elasticity of the cells with the viscous flow mechanics of the suspension. The Reynolds numbers are low, so the effectively linear fluid mechanics is amenable to a wide range of simulation methods, although the constitutive models and geometric factors of the coupled system introduce challenging nonlinearity. Particular emphasis is given to the relative merits of several fundamentally different simulation methods. The detailed description provided by such simulations is invaluable for advancing our scientific understanding of blood flow, and their ultimate impact will be in the design of biomedical tools and interventions.

  14. Numerical recipes for mold filling simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kothe, D.; Juric, D.; Lam, K.; Lally, B.

    1998-07-01

    Has the ability to simulate the filling of a mold progressed to a point where an appropriate numerical recipe achieves the desired results? If results are defined to be topological robustness, computational efficiency, quantitative accuracy, and predictability, all within a computational domain that faithfully represents complex three-dimensional foundry molds, then the answer unfortunately remains no. Significant interfacial flow algorithm developments have occurred over the last decade, however, that could bring this answer closer to maybe. These developments have been both evolutionary and revolutionary, will continue to transpire for the near future. Might they become useful numerical recipes for mold filling simulations? Quite possibly. Recent progress in algorithms for interface kinematics and dynamics, linear solution methods, computer science issues such as parallelization and object-oriented programming, high resolution Navier-Stokes (NS) solution methods, and unstructured mesh techniques, must all be pursued as possible paths toward higher fidelity mold filling simulations. A detailed exposition of these algorithmic developments is beyond the scope of this paper, hence the authors choose to focus here exclusively on algorithms for interface kinematics. These interface tracking algorithms are designed to model the movement of interfaces relative to a reference frame such as a fixed mesh. Current interface tracking algorithm choices are numerous, so is any one best suited for mold filling simulation? Although a clear winner is not (yet) apparent, pros and cons are given in the following brief, critical review. Highlighted are those outstanding interface tracking algorithm issues the authors feel can hamper the reliable modeling of today`s foundry mold filling processes.

  15. Numerical simulation of complex turbomachinery flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernobrovkin, Andrey A.

    1999-11-01

    An unsteady viscous flow solver based on the Runge-Kutta scheme has been developed. Pseudo-time step technique has been incorporated to provide efficient simulation of unsteady flows. Utilization of the pseudo-time approach reduces the computational time by a factor varying from 5 to 25 times in comparison with the original solver. The results of the stability analysis of the dual time step scheme are used to establish an optimum pseudo-time step based on the local CFL, VonNeuman numbers and the ratio of pseudo-to-physical time steps. The code has been validated against the analytical and experimental data. The influence of the numerical aspects (artificial dissipation, grid density etc.) on the accuracy of the prediction of the wake decay, transition, flow over a cylinder has been analyzed. Based on the results of the test cases, modifications to the k-epsilon model to improve the accuracy in the regions with dominant normal stresses are incorporated. Developed solver has been used for the numerical simulation of the complex steady and unsteady turbomachinery flows, including unsteady transitional flows in compressor and turbine, leading edge film cooling and secondary flow simulations. Three low Re k-epsilon turbulence models have been assessed for their ability to predict the unsteady transitional flows. Good agreement with the measured data has been achieved. The numerical solver was able to predict major features, associated with the wake-induced transition on blade (wake induced transitional strip, wake induced turbulent strip, etc.). Analysis and interpretation of the results from the flow simulation have been carried out to understand additional flow physics associated with the transitional, film cooling and secondary flows.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Fluid Mud Gravity Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, N. A.; Testik, F. Y.

    2011-12-01

    Fluid mud bottom gravity currents are simulated numerically using a commercial computational fluid dynamics software, ANSYS-Fluent. In this study, Eulerian-Eulerian multi-fluid method is selected since this method treats all phases in a multiphase system as interpenetrated continua. There are three different phases in the computational model constructed for this study: water, fluid mud, and air. Water and fluid mud are defined as two miscible fluids and the mass and momentum transfers between these two phases are taken into account. Fluid mud, which is a dense suspension of clay particles and water, is defined as a single-phase non-Newtonian fluid via user-defined-functions. These functions define the physical characteristics (density, viscosity, etc.) of the fluid mud and these characteristics vary with changing suspension concentration due to mass transfer between the fluid mud and the water phase. Results of this two-dimensional numerical model are verified with data obtained from experiments conducted in a laboratory flume with a lock-release set-up. Numerical simulations are currently being conducted to elucidate turbulent entrainment of ambient water into fluid mud gravity currents. This study is motivated by coastal dredge disposal operations.

  17. Numerical Simulation of Extreme European Windstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitas, C.

    2010-12-01

    Extreme synoptic storms present a significant economic risk in Europe mostly due to high wind gusts. This study focuses on understanding the most extreme storms that hit the European continent in terms of their dynamic and thermodynamic properties, utilizing high resolution numerical simulations of storms extracted from GCM runs. We have performed an ensemble of GCM simulations of over 2000 years, extracted tracks of storms produced by the GCM, downscaled these storms with WRF at a relatively high resolution (50km), and finally estimated their incurred economic loss using our proprietary catastrophe model. We choose a small set of the most extreme storms (in terms of economic loss) to analyze in more detail in the following way: 1. Identify common characteristics between extreme storms in terms of their evolution, vertical and horizontal structure, and the synoptic situation in which they are embedded. 2. Perform a series of numerical experiments with increasing WRF resolution and investigate changes in the storm intensity, size, and structure. The overall objective of this paper is to provide a clear understanding of the nature of extreme events and the numerical means needed to investigate them.

  18. Investigation of Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence and mixing using direct numerical simulation with experimentally measured initial conditions. II. Dynamics of transitional flow and mixing statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueschke, Nicholas J.; Schilling, Oleg

    2009-01-01

    A 1152×760×1280 direct numerical simulation (DNS) using initial conditions, geometry, and physical parameters chosen to approximate those of a transitional, small Atwood number, nonreacting Rayleigh-Taylor mixing experiment was presented in Paper I [Mueschke and Schilling, Phys. Fluids 21, 014106 (2009)]. In addition, the DNS model of the experiment was validated by comparing quantities from the simulation to experimental measurements, including large-scale quantities, higher-order statistics, and vertical velocity and density variance spectra. In Paper II of this study, other quantities not measured in the experiment are obtained from the DNS and discussed, such as the integral- and Taylor-scale Reynolds numbers, Reynolds stress and dissipation anisotropy, two-dimensional density and velocity variance spectra, hypothetical chemical product formation measures (similar to those used in reacting shear flow experiments), other local and global mixing parameters, and the statistical composition of mixed fluid. The integral- and Taylor-scale Reynolds numbers, together with visualizations of vertical and center plane slices of the density and vorticity fields, are used to elucidate the various evolutionary stages of the flow. It is shown that the early-time evolution retains a primarily two-dimensional character until the flow begins to transition to a more three-dimensional state at later times, as also observed in the experiment. The evolution of the three diagonal components of the anisotropy tensors showed that anisotropy persists to the latest times in the simulation. Compensated spectra at the latest time in the DNS suggest very short k-5/3 and k-5/4 inertial subrange scalings of the vertical velocity and density variance spectra, respectively. By interpreting the mixing between the two fluids as a hypothetical, infinitely fast, reversible chemical reaction between the species, the local formation of chemical product, equivalent product thickness, and other standard measures of mixing used in shear-driven turbulence are obtained from the DNS and discussed. Other measures of molecular mixing are shown to be qualitatively similar to the molecular mixing parameter θ on the center plane. Finally, the statistical composition of the mixed fluid is examined using the probability distribution function of the heavy-fluid volume fraction and the averaged composition of mixed fluid. Thus, DNS modeled closely after a physical Rayleigh-Taylor instability and mixing experiment can provide additional insights into the flow physics complementary to the experiment.

  19. Numerical simulation of real-world flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayase, Toshiyuki

    2015-10-01

    Obtaining real flow information is important in various fields, but is a difficult issue because measurement data are usually limited in time and space, and computational results usually do not represent the exact state of real flows. Problems inherent in the realization of numerical simulation of real-world flows include the difficulty in representing exact initial and boundary conditions and the difficulty in representing unstable flow characteristics. This article reviews studies dealing with these problems. First, an overview of basic flow measurement methodologies and measurement data interpolation/approximation techniques is presented. Then, studies on methods of integrating numerical simulation and measurement, namely, four-dimensional variational data assimilation (4D-Var), Kalman filters (KFs), state observers, etc are discussed. The first problem is properly solved by these integration methodologies. The second problem can be partially solved with 4D-Var in which only initial and boundary conditions are control parameters. If an appropriate control parameter capable of modifying the dynamical structure of the model is included in the formulation of 4D-Var, unstable modes are properly suppressed and the second problem is solved. The state observer and KFs also solve the second problem by modifying mathematical models to stabilize the unstable modes of the original dynamical system by applying feedback signals. These integration methodologies are now applied in simulation of real-world flows in a wide variety of research fields. Examples are presented for basic fluid dynamics and applications in meteorology, aerospace, medicine, etc.

  20. Numerical reproducibility for implicit Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cleveland, M.; Brunner, T.; Gentile, N.

    2013-07-01

    We describe and compare different approaches for achieving numerical reproducibility in photon Monte Carlo simulations. Reproducibility is desirable for code verification, testing, and debugging. Parallelism creates a unique problem for achieving reproducibility in Monte Carlo simulations because it changes the order in which values are summed. This is a numerical problem because double precision arithmetic is not associative. In [1], a way of eliminating this roundoff error using integer tallies was described. This approach successfully achieves reproducibility at the cost of lost accuracy by rounding double precision numbers to fewer significant digits. This integer approach, and other extended reproducibility techniques, are described and compared in this work. Increased precision alone is not enough to ensure reproducibility of photon Monte Carlo simulations. A non-arbitrary precision approaches required a varying degree of rounding to achieve reproducibility. For the problems investigated in this work double precision global accuracy was achievable by using 100 bits of precision or greater on all unordered sums which where subsequently rounded to double precision at the end of every time-step. (authors)

  1. Direct Numerical Simulation of Cosmological Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, Geoffrey C.

    We examine the epoch of hydrogen reionization using a new numerical method that allows us to self-consistently couple all the relevant physical processes (gas dynamics, dark matter dynamics, self-gravity, star formation/feedback, radiative transfer, ionization, recombination, heating and cooling) and evolve the system of coupled equations on the same high resolution mesh. We refer to this approach as direct numerical simulation, in contrast to existing approaches which decouple and coarse-grain the radiative transfer and ionization balance calculations relative to the underlying dynamical calculation. Our method is scalable with respect to the number of radiation sources, size of the mesh, and the number of computer processors employed, and is described in Chapter 2 of this thesis. This scalability permits us to simulate cosmological reionization in large cosmological volumes (~100 Mpc) while directly modeling the sources and sinks of ionizing radiation, including radiative feedback effects such as photoevaporation of gas from halos, Jeans smoothing of the IGM, and enhanced recombination due to small scale clumping. With our fiducial simulation, we find that roughly 2 ionizing photons per baryon is needed to highly ionize the intergalactic medium. The complicated events during reionization that lead to this number can be generally described as inside-out, but in reality the narrative depends on the level of ionization of the gas one defines as ionized. We have updated the formula observers often use for estimating the ionized volume filling fraction formula with a delta b and trec,eff to get from O(10%) to O(1%) consistency with our simulation results. This improvement comes from not using the traditional clumping factor, but instead, considering the history and local effects which were neglected in formulating the original expression. And finally, we have a new upper limit for the escape fraction of ~0.6 from our simulation, which takes into account the photons in the energy density field and photons used to ionize H I.

  2. Conditional statistics in a turbulent premixed flame derived from direct numerical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantel, Thierry; Bilger, Robert W.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to briefly introduce conditional moment closure (CMC) methods for premixed systems and to derive the transport equation for the conditional species mass fraction conditioned on the progress variable based on the enthalpy. Our statistical analysis will be based on the 3-D DNS database of Trouve and Poinsot available at the Center for Turbulence Research. The initial conditions and characteristics (turbulence, thermo-diffusive properties) as well as the numerical method utilized in the DNS of Trouve and Poinsot are presented, and some details concerning our statistical analysis are also given. From the analysis of DNS results, the effects of the position in the flame brush, of the Damkoehler and Lewis numbers on the conditional mean scalar dissipation, and conditional mean velocity are presented and discussed. Information concerning unconditional turbulent fluxes are also presented. The anomaly found in previous studies of counter-gradient diffusion for the turbulent flux of the progress variable is investigated.

  3. Numerical simulation of platelet margination in microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong; Shaqfeh, Eric

    2009-11-01

    The adhesion of platelets to vascular walls is the first step in clotting. This process critically depends on the preferential concentration of platelets near walls. The presence of red blood cells, which are the predominant blood constituents, is known to affect the steady state platelet concentration and the dynamic platelet margination, but the underlying mechanism is not well understood to-day. We use a direct numerical simulation to study the platelet margination process, with particular emphasis on the Stokesian hydrodynamic interactions among red cells, platelets, and vessel walls. Well-known mechanical models are used for the shearing and bending stiffness of red cell membranes, and the stiffer platelets are modeled as rigid discoids. A boundary integral formulation is used to solve the flow field, where the numerical solution procedure is accelerated by a parallel O(N N) smooth particle-mesh Ewald method. The effects of red cell hematocrit and deformability will be discussed.

  4. Direct numerical simulation of ignition front propagation in a constant volume with temperature inhomogeneities. I. Fundamental analysis and diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jacqueline H.; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Sankaran, Ramanan; Mason, Scott D.; Im, Hong G.

    2006-04-15

    The influence of thermal stratification on autoignition at constant volume and high pressure is studied by direct numerical simulation (DNS) with detailed hydrogen/air chemistry with a view to providing better understanding and modeling of combustion processes in homogeneous charge compression-ignition engines. Numerical diagnostics are developed to analyze the mode of combustion and the dependence of overall ignition progress on initial mixture conditions. The roles of dissipation of heat and mass are divided conceptually into transport within ignition fronts and passive scalar dissipation, which modifies the statistics of the preignition temperature field. Transport within ignition fronts is analyzed by monitoring the propagation speed of ignition fronts using the displacement speed of a scalar that tracks the location of maximum heat release rate. The prevalence of deflagrative versus spontaneous ignition front propagation is found to depend on the local temperature gradient, and may be identified by the ratio of the instantaneous front speed to the laminar deflagration speed. The significance of passive scalar mixing is examined using a mixing timescale based on enthalpy fluctuations. Finally, the predictions of the multizone modeling strategy are compared with the DNS, and the results are explained using the diagnostics developed. (author)

  5. Velocity streaks in a Blasius boundary layer induced by external streamwise vortices: numerical simulation and linear stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siconolfi, Lorenzo; Camarri, Simone; Fransson, Jens H. M.

    2014-11-01

    This work investigates numerically the streamwise velocity streaks generated in a Blasius boundary layer (BL) by an array of counter-rotating vortices. The array is positioned outside the BL and generates the streaks by velocity induction. This investigation is motivated by previous studies demonstrating that stable streamwise streaks can lead to a stabilization of the Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) waves and to a subsequent delay of the transition between laminar and turbulent regime. In most of the previous studies streamwise vortices generating the streaks lie inside the BL. Conversely, the conceptual configuration considered here, with vortices outside the BL, has potential advantages due to the lower dissipation rate of the vortices in the streamwise direction. Direct numerical simulations (DNSs) are carried out to study the flow, where the streamwise vortices are introduced in an idealized form. Interesting configurations are identified by DNS and a reference one is selected and investigated in details. Bi-global stability analysis shows benefic effects on the evolution of TS waves and allows the construction of a modified stability curve for the controlled flow. The resulting transition delay is also demonstrated by DNS. PRACE is acknowledged for awarding us access to resource FERMI based in Italy at CINECA.

  6. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent mixing.

    PubMed

    Statsenko, V P; Yanilkin, Yu V; Zhmaylo, V A

    2013-11-28

    The results of three-dimensional numerical simulations of turbulent flows obtained by various authors are reviewed. The paper considers the turbulent mixing (TM) process caused by the development of the main types of instabilities: those due to gravitation (with either a fixed or an alternating-sign acceleration), shift and shock waves. The problem of a buoyant jet is described as an example of the mixed-type problem. Comparison is made with experimental data on the TM zone width, profiles of density, velocity and turbulent energy and degree of homogeneity. PMID:24146009

  7. Numerical simulation of riblet controlled oblique transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klumpp, S.; Meinke, M.; Schrder, W.

    To analyze the fundamental physical mechanism which determines the damping effect of a riblet surface on three-dimensional oblique transition numerical simulations of a spatial evolving zero-pressure gradient boundary layer above a clean and a riblet wall are performed. The laminar flow is excited by two oblique waves to force the oblique transition scenario. The occurring three-dimensional structures, i.e, ? and streamwisely aligned vortices are found to be damped and their breakdown to turbulence is damped by the riblets compared to a clean surface. The investigation of the near-wall flow structures reveals secondary flows induced by the riblets.

  8. Numerical simulation of flow through biofluid devices

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, S.E.; Kwak, D. ); Kiris, C.; Chang, I.D. )

    1990-01-01

    The results of a numerical simulation on a Cray-2 supercomputer of flow through an artificial heart and through an artificial tilting-disk heart valve are presented. The simulation involves solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations; the solution process is described. The details and difficulties of modeling these particular geometries are discussed. The artificial heart geometry uses a single moving grid, and the valve computation uses an overlaid-grid approach with one moving grid and one stationary grid. The equations must be solved iteratively for each discrete time step of the computations, requiring a significant amount of computing time. It is particularly difficult to analyze and present the fluid physics represented by these calculations because of the time-varying nature of the flow, and because the flows are internal. The use of three-dimensional graphics and scientific visualization techniques have become instrumental in solving these problems.

  9. Numerical Simulation of Sodium Pool Fire

    SciTech Connect

    Doda, Norihiro; Okano, Yasushi; Ninokata, Hisashi

    2003-11-15

    A numerical simulation thermal-hydraulics code called SPOOL based on computational fluid dynamics considering sodium reaction and aerosol transport is developed. Sodium pool fires are simulated using the SPOOL code, and periodic oscillation of the flame is observed with frequency similar to that observed for small-scale pool fire experiments with industrial fuels. The calculated mass-burning rate differs slightly from experimental results, yet it increases with pool temperature in agreement with experimental trends. The mass flux of aerosol driven by thermophoresis is calculated to be about 100 times larger than that by gravity, and the aerosols become concentrated at the edge of the pool. The release fraction, obtained by dividing the total mass of aerosol released into the atmosphere by that produced, increases with pool temperature in qualitative agreement with experiments.

  10. Numerical simulation of large fabric filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedláček, Jan; Kovařík, Petr

    2012-04-01

    Fabric filters are used in the wide range of industrial technologies for cleaning of incoming or exhaust gases. To achieve maximal efficiency of the discrete phase separation and long lifetime of the filter hoses, it is necessary to ensure uniform load on filter surface and to avoid impacts of heavy particles with high velocities to the filter hoses. The paper deals with numerical simulation of two phase flow field in a large fabric filter. The filter is composed of six chambers with approx. 1600 filter hoses in total. The model was simplified to one half of the filter, the filter hoses walls were substituted by porous zones. The model settings were based on experimental data, especially on the filter pressure drop. Unsteady simulations with different turbulence models were done. Flow field together with particles trajectories were analyzed. The results were compared with experimental observations.

  11. Numerical simulation of corotating interaction regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kota, J.; Jokipii, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    We report on a numerical simulation of Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs) in the solar wind. We employ an MHD calculation with a tilted dipole model: slow wind is assumed around the tilted current sheet. As a simplifying assumption the solar wind is kept radial, meridional and azimuthal deflections are neglected. Despite of this simplification the model reproduces several observed features of CIR-s. CIR-s turn out most prominent at mid-latitudes. Toward increasing heliographic latitudes, reverse shocks become dominant, forward shocks tend to become weaker then disappear. The frozen in magnetic field is calculated and applied for the simulation of the transport of cosmic rays in the heliosphere. Some consequences on recurrent cosmic ray phenomena and on the acceleration of energetic particles will be discussed.

  12. Numerical simulation of flow through biofluid devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Stuart E.; Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Cetin; Chang, I-Dee

    1990-01-01

    The results of a numerical simulation of flow through an artificial heart and through an artificial tilting-disk heart valve are presented. The simulation involves solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations; the solution process is described. The details and difficulties of modeling these particular geometries are discussed. The artificial heart geometry uses a single moving grid, and the valve computation uses an overlaid-grid approach with one moving grid and one stationary grid. The equations must be solved iteratively for each discrete time step of the computations, requiring a significant amount of computing time. It is particularly difficult to analyze and present the fluid physics represented by these calculations because of the time-varying nature of the flow, and because the flows are internal. Three-dimensional graphics and scientific visualization techniques have become instrumental in solving these problems.

  13. DNS and LES/FMDF of turbulent jet ignition and combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Validi, Abdoulahad; Jaberi, Farhad

    2014-11-01

    The ignition and combustion of lean fuel-air mixtures by a turbulent jet flow of hot combustion products injected into various geometries are studied by high fidelity numerical models. Turbulent jet ignition (TJI) is an efficient method for starting and controlling the combustion in complex propulsion systems and engines. The TJI and combustion of hydrogen and propane in various flow configurations are simulated with the direct numerical simulation (DNS) and the hybrid large eddy simulation/filtered mass density function (LES/FMDF) models. In the LES/FMDF model, the filtered form of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved with a high-order finite difference scheme for the turbulent velocity and the FMDF transport equation is solved with a Lagrangian stochastic method to obtain the scalar field. The DNS and LES/FMDF data are used to study the physics of TJI and combustion for different turbulent jet igniter and gas mixture conditions. The results show the very complex and different behavior of the turbulence and the flame structure at different jet equivalence ratios.

  14. Direct numerical simulations of the double scalar mixing layer. Part II: Reactive scalars

    SciTech Connect

    Mortensen, Mikael; de Bruyn Kops, Stephen M.; Cha, Chong M.

    2007-06-15

    The reacting double scalar mixing layer (RDSML) is investigated as a canonical multistream flow and a model problem for simple piloted diffusion flames. In piloted diffusion flames, the reacting fuel and oxidizer streams are initially separated by a central pilot stream at stoichiometric composition. The primary purpose of this pilot is to delay the mixing of the pure streams until a stable flame base can develop. In such multistream systems, the modeling of turbulent scalar mixing is complicated by the multiple feed streams, leading to more complex fine-scale statistics, which remain as yet an unmet modeling challenge compared to the simpler two-feed system. In Part I we described how multimodal mixture fraction probability density functions (PDFs) and conditional scalar dissipation rates can be modeled with a presumed mapping function approach. In this work we present an efficient and robust extension of the modeling to a general multistream reacting flow and compare predictions to three-dimensional direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the RDSML with a single-step reversible chemistry model and varying levels of extinction. With high extinction levels, the interaction with the pilot stream is described. Additionally, state-of-the-art combustion modeling calculations including conditional moment closure (CMC) and stationary laminar flamelet modeling (SLFM) are performed with the newly developed mixing model. Excellent agreement is found between the DNS and modeling predictions, even where the PDF is essentially a triple-delta shape near the flame base, so long as extinction levels are moderate to low. The suggested approach outlined in this paper is strictly valid only for flows that can be described by a single mixture fraction. For these flows the approach should provide engineers with fine-scale models that are of accuracy comparable to those already available for binary mixing, at only marginally higher complexity and cost. (author)

  15. Direct numerical simulations of the turbulence evolution in a uniformly sheared and stably stratified flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobitz, Frank G.; Sarkar, Sutanu; van Atta, Charles W.

    1997-07-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) are performed to investigate the evolution of turbulence in a uniformly sheared and stably stratified flow. The spatial discretization is accomplished by a spectral collocation method, and the solution is advanced in time with a third-order Runge Kutta scheme. The turbulence evolution is found to depend strongly on at least three parameters: the gradient Richardson number Ri, the initial value of the Taylor microscale Reynolds number Re[lambda], and the initial value of the shear number SK/<[epsilon]. The effect of each parameter is individually studied while the remaining parameters are kept constant. The evolution of the turbulent kinetic energy K is found to follow approximately an exponential law. The shear number SK/<[epsilon], whose effect has not been investigated in previous studies, was found to have a strong non-monotone influence on the turbulence evolution. Larger values of the shear number do not necessarily lead to a larger value of the eventual growth rate of the turbulent kinetic energy. Variation of the Reynolds number Re[lambda] indicated that the turbulence growth rate tends to become insensitive to Re[lambda] at the higher end of the Re[lambda] range studied here. The dependence of the critical Richardson number Ricr, which separates asymptotic growth of the turbulent kinetic energy K from asymptotic decay, on the initial values of the Reynolds number Re[lambda] and the shear number SK/<[epsilon] was also obtained. It was found that the critical Richardson number varied over the range 0.04DNS due to its strong dependence on Reynolds and shear numbers.

  16. Direct numerical simulation of viscoelastic-fluid-based nanofluid turbulent channel flow with heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Juan-Cheng; Li, Feng-Chen; Cai, Wei-Hua; Zhang, Hong-Na; Yu, Bo

    2015-08-01

    Our previous experimental studies have confirmed that viscoelastic-fluid-based nanofluid (VFBN) prepared by suspending nanoparticles in a viscoelastic base fluid (VBF, behaves drag reduction at turbulent flow state) can reduce turbulent flow resistance as compared with water and enhance heat transfer as compared with VBF. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is performed in this study to explore the mechanisms of heat transfer enhancement (HTE) and flow drag reduction (DR) for the VFBN turbulent flow. The Giesekus model is used as the constitutive equation for VFBN. Our previously proposed thermal dispersion model is adopted to take into account the thermal dispersion effects of nanoparticles in the VFBN turbulent flow. The DNS results show similar behaviors for flow resistance and heat transfer to those obtained in our previous experiments. Detailed analyses are conducted for the turbulent velocity, temperature, and conformation fields obtained by DNSs for different fluid cases, and for the friction factor with viscous, turbulent, and elastic contributions and heat transfer rate with conductive, turbulent and thermal dispersion contributions of nanoparticles, respectively. The mechanisms of HTE and DR of VFBN turbulent flows are then discussed. Based on analogy theory, the ratios of Chilton-Colburn factor to friction factor for different fluid flow cases are investigated, which from another aspect show the significant enhancement in heat transfer performance for some cases of water-based nanofluid and VFBN turbulent flows. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51276046), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20112302110020), the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2014M561037), and the President Fund of University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, China (Grant No. Y3510213N00).

  17. Closure Models for Turbulent Particle-laden Flows from Particle-resolved Direct Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, Shankar; Tenneti, Sudheer; Mehrabadi, Mohammad; Garg, Rahul

    2012-11-01

    Gas-phase velocity fluctuations in fixed particle beds and freely evolving suspensions are quantified using a particle-resolved direct numerical simulation (PR-DNS). The flow regime corresponds to gas-solid systems typically encountered in fluidized bed risers, with high solid to gas density ratio and particle diameter being greater than the dissipative length scales. The kinetic energy associated with gas-phase velocity fluctuations in homogeneous monodisperse fixed beds is characterized as a function of solid volume fraction φ and the Reynolds number based on the mean slip velocity Re. A simple scaling analysis is used to explain the dependence of k on ɛ and Re. The steady value of k results from the balance between the source of k due to interphase transfer of kinetic energy, and the dissipation rate (ɛ) of k in the gas-phase. It is found that the dissipation rate of k in gas-solid flows can be modeled using a length scale that is analogous to the Taylor microscale used in single-phase turbulence. Using the PR-DNS data for k and ɛ we also infer an eddy viscosity for gas-solid flow. For the parameter values considered here, the level of gas-phase velocity fluctuations in freely evolving suspensions differs by only 10% from the value for the corresponding fixed beds. Funded in part by the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory Grant DE-FC26-07NT43098 (Advanced Research) and the National Science Foundation's grant CBET 1134500.

  18. A direct numerical simulation study of vorticity transformation in weakly turbulent premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatnikov, A. N.; Nishiki, S.; Hasegawa, T.

    2014-10-01

    Database obtained earlier in 3D Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of statistically stationary, 1D, planar turbulent flames characterized by three different density ratios σ is processed in order to investigate vorticity transformation in premixed combustion under conditions of moderately weak turbulence (rms turbulent velocity and laminar flame speed are roughly equal to one another). In cases H and M characterized by σ = 7.53 and 5.0, respectively, anisotropic generation of vorticity within the flame brush is reported. In order to study physical mechanisms that control this phenomenon, various terms in vorticity and enstrophy balance equations are analyzed, with both mean terms and terms conditioned on a particular value c of the combustion progress variable being addressed. Results indicate an important role played by baroclinic torque and dilatation in transformation of average vorticity and enstrophy within both flamelets and flame brush. Besides these widely recognized physical mechanisms, two other effects are documented. First, viscous stresses redistribute enstrophy within flamelets, but play a minor role in the balance of the mean enstrophy overline{Ω } within turbulent flame brush. Second, negative correlation overline{mathbf {u}^' } \\cdot nabla Ω ^' }} between fluctuations in velocity u and enstrophy gradient contributes substantially to an increase in the mean overline{Ω } within turbulent flame brush. This negative correlation is mainly controlled by the positive correlation between fluctuations in the enstrophy and dilatation and, therefore, dilatation fluctuations substantially reduce the damping effect of the mean dilatation on the vorticity and enstrophy fields. In case L characterized by σ = 2.5, these effects are weakly pronounced and overline{Ω } is reduced mainly due to viscosity. Under conditions of the present DNS, vortex stretching plays a minor role in the balance of vorticity and enstrophy within turbulent flame brush in all three cases.

  19. Numerical simulations of the Ross Sea tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macayeal, D. R.

    1984-01-01

    Tidal currents below the floating Ross Ice shelf are reconstructed by using a numerical tidal model. They are predominantly diurnal, achieve maximum strength in regions near where the ice shelf runs aground, and are significantly enhanced by topographic Rossby wave propagation along the ice front. A comparison with observations of the vertical motion of the ice shelf surface indicates that the model reproduces the diurnal tidal characteristics within 20 percent. Similar agreement for the relatively weak semidiurnal tides was not obtained, and this calls attention to possible errors of the open boundary forcing obtained from global-ocean tidal simulations and to possible errors in mapping zones of ice shelf grounding. Air-sea contact below the ice shelf is eliminated by the thick ice cover. The dominant sub-ice-shelf circulation may thus be tidally induced. A preliminary assessment of sub-ice-shelf conditions based on the numerical tidal simulations suggests that (1) strong barotropic circulation is driven along the ice front and (2) tidal fronts may form in the sub-ice-shelf cavity where the water column is thin and where the buoyancy input is weak.

  20. Numerical simulations of a turbulent axial vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jim Hongxin

    Although the vortex is present in most flows of engineering interest, the turbulent structure of the vortex is not well understood. Current prediction capabilities are especially weak for the vortex as well as other strongly rotating flows. The objective of this work is to aid the development of turbulence models for the vortex as well as strongly rotating flows in general by using direct numerical simulations of the vortex. The present study focuses on the turbulent axial vortex with and without an external strain field. The numerical simulations of a turbulent axial vortex without strain, i.e. an isolated vortex, have been performed by using a pseudo spectral method for compressible flow. The results qualitatively match well with the experimental data. The isolated vortex is stable unless the mean axial wake flow has sufficient magnitude. During the period of decay of disturbances, the mean tangential velocity profile exhibits anti-diffusion because a negative eddy viscosity develops near the center of the vortex. With the disturbance growth, the isolated vortex develops large-scale helical vortex structures, but they eventually disappear during the period of relaminarization. The details of turbulent statistics have been examined. The turbulent structure is related to the in stability of the isolated vortex. The budgets for the Reynolds stresses reveal that the production term is the primary source term, but the pressure strain, pressure transport, and turbulent transport terms also make a large contribution to the budgets for the Reynolds stresses.

  1. Scalability study of parallel spatial direct numerical simulation code on IBM SP1 parallel supercomputer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanebutte, Ulf R.; Joslin, Ronald D.; Zubair, Mohammad

    1994-01-01

    The implementation and the performance of a parallel spatial direct numerical simulation (PSDNS) code are reported for the IBM SP1 supercomputer. The spatially evolving disturbances that are associated with laminar-to-turbulent in three-dimensional boundary-layer flows are computed with the PS-DNS code. By remapping the distributed data structure during the course of the calculation, optimized serial library routines can be utilized that substantially increase the computational performance. Although the remapping incurs a high communication penalty, the parallel efficiency of the code remains above 40% for all performed calculations. By using appropriate compile options and optimized library routines, the serial code achieves 52-56 Mflops on a single node of the SP1 (45% of theoretical peak performance). The actual performance of the PSDNS code on the SP1 is evaluated with a 'real world' simulation that consists of 1.7 million grid points. One time step of this simulation is calculated on eight nodes of the SP1 in the same time as required by a Cray Y/MP for the same simulation. The scalability information provides estimated computational costs that match the actual costs relative to changes in the number of grid points.

  2. Numerical simulations of rotating axisymmetric sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botha, G. J. J.; Busse, F. H.; Hurlburt, N. E.; Rucklidge, A. M.

    2008-07-01

    A numerical model of axisymmetric convection in the presence of a vertical magnetic flux bundle and rotation about the axis is presented. The model contains a compressible plasma described by the non-linear MHD equations, with density and temperature gradients simulating the upper layer of the Sun's convection zone. The solutions exhibit a central magnetic flux tube in a cylindrical numerical domain, with convection cells forming collar flows around the tube. When the numerical domain is rotated with a constant angular velocity, the plasma forms a Rankine vortex, with the plasma rotating as a rigid body where the magnetic field is strong, as in the flux tube, while experiencing sheared azimuthal flow in the surrounding convection cells, forming a free vortex. As a result, the azimuthal velocity component has its maximum value close to the outer edge of the flux tube. The azimuthal flow inside the magnetic flux tube and the vortex flow is prograde relative to the rotating cylindrical reference frame. A retrograde flow appears at the outer wall. The most significant convection cell outside the flux tube is the location for the maximum value of the azimuthal magnetic field component. The azimuthal flow and magnetic structure are not generated spontaneously, but decay exponentially in the absence of any imposed rotation of the cylindrical domain.

  3. Numerical simulation of swash zone fluid accelerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puleo, Jack A.; Farhadzadeh, Ali; Kobayashi, Nobuhisa

    2007-07-01

    A volume-of-fluid Navier-Stokes solver incorporating a k-ɛ closure model, NumErical Water FLUME (NEWFLUME) (Lin and Xu, 2005) is used to investigate the temporal and spatial structure of accelerations in the swash zone of steep beaches for surging, plunging, and nearly spilling waves. Simulations for idealized swash over planar slopes show that shoreward directed local accelerations exist only for up to 22% of the swash cycle depending on wave type. In general, shoreward directed local accelerations were predicted to occur only near the wave run down limit (Baldock and Holmes, 1997). Similarly, convective accelerations had the largest magnitudes during this time and tended to be either near zero or shoreward directed for the remainder of the swash cycle. This finding is in direct contrast to a modified ballistic theory for swash motion arising as a particular solution to the depth-averaged nonlinear shallow water equations (Peregrine and Williams, 2001) that predicts the convective acceleration maintains the sign of the fluid velocity. Near-bed pressure gradients are found to be poorly correlated to both the depth-averaged and near-bed local acceleration. These numerical findings indicate that local fluid accelerations are not a proxy for pressure gradients in the swash zone for enhanced sediment transporting mechanisms or parameterizations. However, the numerical results require corroboration with highly resolved swash zone data.

  4. Direct Numerical Simulation of Turbulence and Mixing in Highly Compressible Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yifeng; Jaberi, Farhad; Li, Zhaorui; Livescu, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    The effects of normal shock waves on isotropic turbulence and scalar mixing are studied by direct numerical simulation (DNS) of fully compressible equations with high-order monotonicity-preserving and compact finite-difference numerical schemes for various flow and scalar conditions. Detailed examinations of the turbulence and scalar statistics such as the turbulent kinetic energy and scalar variance indicate that the numerical method is accurate and is able to correctly capture the shock-turbulence interactions and scalar mixing near and away from the shock even at very high Mach numbers. As expected, the shock wave increases the small-scale turbulence and the skewness and flatness of the turbulent velocity fluctuations, but the turbulent compressibility is actually decreased by the shock. The effect of shock on the turbulence was to found be strongly dependent on the pre-shock turbulence parameters such as the turbulence intensity. The enhancement of scalar mixing by the shock is also found to be dependent on the pre-shock scalar structure. The mechanisms responsible for the modification of turbulence and scalar mixing are identified by analyzing the flow structure and the transport equations for the Reynolds stress, vorticity and scalar variance inside and outside the shock zone.

  5. Numerical Simulations of High Enthalpy Pulse Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Gregory J.; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Axisymmetric flows within shock tubes and expansion tubes are simulated including the effects of finite rate chemistry and both laminar and turbulent boundary layers. The simulations demonstrate the usefulness of computational fluid dynamics for characterizing the flows in high enthalpy pulse facilities. The modeling and numerical requirements necessary to simulate these flows accurately are also discussed. Although there is a large body of analysis which explains and quantifies the boundary layer growth between the shock and the interface in a shock tube, there is a need for more detailed solutions. Phenomena such as thermochemical nonequilibrium. or turbulent transition behind the shock are excluded in the assumptions of Mirels' analysis. Additionally there is inadequate capability to predict the influence of the boundary layer on the expanded gas behind the interface. Quantifying the gas in this region is particularly important in expansion tubes because it is the location of the test gas. Unsteady simulations of the viscous flow in shock tubes are computationally expensive because they must follow features such as a shock wave over the length of the facility and simultaneously resolve the small length scales within the boundary layer. As a result, efficient numerical algorithms are required. The numerical approach of the present work is to solve the axisymmetric gas dynamic equations using an finite-volume formulation where the inviscid fluxes are computed with a upwind TVD scheme. Multiple species equations are included in the formulation so that finite-rate chemistry can be modeled. The simulations cluster grid points at the shock and interface and translate this clustered grid with these features to minimize numerical errors. The solutions are advanced at a CFL number of less than one based on the inviscid gas dynamics. To avoid limitations on the time step due to the viscous terms, these terms are treated implicitly. This requires a block tri-diagonal matrix inversion along each line of cells normal to the wall. The cost of this inversion is more than offset by the larger allowable time step. The source terms representing the finite-rate chemical kinetics are also treated implicitly. An algebraic turbulence model for compressible flow is used. The flow in a low pressure shock tube is computed and the results are compared with Mirels'analysis. The driven gas is nitrogen at 70 Pa, and the incident shock speed is approximately 2.9 km/sec so that there is little dissociation. The simulations include a laminar boundary layer and are run until the limiting flow regime is achieved. At this limit, the shock and interface travel at the same velocity because the amount of driven gas between these two features remains the same: the mass flow across the shock is equal to the mass of gas being entrained at the interface by the boundary layer. Simulations with several grids are presented to establish the grid independence of the solution, Good agreement is achieved between Mirels' correlations and the computations. This is expected since the flow conditions are chosen to be consistent with the assumptions used in Mirels' analysis. This comparison adds credibility to the numerical approach and highlights some of the differences between the theory and the detailed simulations. In addition, simulations of the HYPULSE expansion tube are presented for two operating conditions and the computations are compared to experimental data. The operating gas for both cases is nitrogen. One test condition is at a total enthalpy of 15.2 MJ/Kg and a relatively low pressure of 2 kPa. This case is characterized by a laminar boundary layer and significant chemical nonequilibrium. in the acceleration gas. The second test condition is at a total enthalpy of 10.2 MJ/Kg and a pressure of 38 kPa and is characterized by a turbulent boundary layer. The simulations compare well with experiment and reveal that the nonuniformity in pressure observed during the test time is related to variations in the boundary layer displacement thickness.

  6. The Numerical Propulsion System Simulation: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lytle, John K.

    2000-01-01

    Advances in computational technology and in physics-based modeling are making large-scale, detailed simulations of complex systems possible within the design environment. For example, the integration of computing, communications, and aerodynamics has reduced the time required to analyze major propulsion system components from days and weeks to minutes and hours. This breakthrough has enabled the detailed simulation of major propulsion system components to become a routine part of designing systems, providing the designer with critical information about the components early in the design process. This paper describes the development of the numerical propulsion system simulation (NPSS), a modular and extensible framework for the integration of multicomponent and multidisciplinary analysis tools using geographically distributed resources such as computing platforms, data bases, and people. The analysis is currently focused on large-scale modeling of complete aircraft engines. This will provide the product developer with a "virtual wind tunnel" that will reduce the number of hardware builds and tests required during the development of advanced aerospace propulsion systems.

  7. Numerical simulation of pump-intake vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolf, Pavel; Klas, Roman

    2015-05-01

    Pump pre-swirl or uneven flow distribution in front of the pump can induce pump-intake vortices. These phenomena result in blockage of the impeller suction space, deterioration of efficiency, drop of head curve and earlier onset of cavitation. Real problematic case, where head curve drop was documented, is simulated using commercial CFD software. Computational simulation was carried out for three flow rates, which correspond to three operating regimes of the vertical pump. The domain consists of the pump sump, pump itself excluding the impeller and the delivery pipe. One-phase approach is applied, because the vortex cores were not filled with air during observation of the real pump operation. Numerical simulation identified two surface vortices and one bottom vortex. Their position and strength depend on the pump flow rate. Paper presents detail analysis of the flow field on the pump intake, discusses influence of the vortices on pump operation and suggests possible actions that should be taken to suppress the intake vortices.

  8. Numerical Simulation of Rotating Gallium Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kageyama, Akira

    2001-10-01

    Laboratory experiment to study magnetorotational instability (MRI) using liquid gallium has been proposed at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. In this experiment, liquid gallium in cylindrical annulus is subject to a rotating shear motion induced by a differential rotation of two (inner and outer) cylindrical walls. A magnetic field, parallel to the cylinders axis, is imposed and the MRI can be detected as a sudden breaking of rotating shear motion of the liquid metal. We are developing a 3-dimentional, nonlinear MHD code to simulate this liquid metal disk experiment. Since experimental geometry is similar to the classical Taylor-Couette experiment of water, we follow numerical algorithms developed for Navier-Stokes simulations for Taylor-Couette instability. In our code, time development of viscous, resistive, and incompressible MHD equation is solved by the spectral method. Variables are expanded by Chebyshev polynomials in radial and vertical directions. Fourier expansion is used in the azimuthal direction. Time splitting method is used for the temporal integration. We will report latest simulation results with 3D, nonlinear effects. Special focus will be on the nonlinear stage of the instability. Effects of viscous boundary layers on the angular momentum transport will be discussed. Physical mechanism of MRI will also be presented.

  9. Numerical simulation of premixed turbulent methane combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Grcar, Joseph F.

    2001-12-14

    In this paper we study the behavior of a premixed turbulent methane flame in three dimensions using numerical simulation. The simulations are performed using an adaptive time-dependent low Mach number combustion algorithm based on a second-order projection formulation that conserves both species mass and total enthalpy. The species and enthalpy equations are treated using an operator-split approach that incorporates stiff integration techniques for modeling detailed chemical kinetics. The methodology also incorporates a mixture model for differential diffusion. For the simulations presented here, methane chemistry and transport are modeled using the DRM-19 (19-species, 84-reaction) mechanism derived from the GRIMech-1.2 mechanism along with its associated thermodynamics and transport databases. We consider a lean flame with equivalence ratio 0.8 for two different levels of turbulent intensity. For each case we examine the basic structure of the flame including turbulent flame speed and flame surface area. The results indicate that flame wrinkling is the dominant factor leading to the increased turbulent flame speed. Joint probability distributions are computed to establish a correlation between heat release and curvature. We also investigate the effect of turbulent flame interaction on the flame chemistry. We identify specific flame intermediates that are sensitive to turbulence and explore various correlations between these species and local flame curvature. We identify different mechanisms by which turbulence modulates the chemistry of the flame.

  10. 3D Numerical simulations of oblique subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malatesta, C.; Gerya, T.; Scambelluri, M.; Crispini, L.; Federico, L.; Capponi, G.

    2012-04-01

    In the past 2D numerical studies (e.g. Gerya et al., 2002; Gorczyk et al., 2007; Malatesta et al., 2012) provided evidence that during intraoceanic subduction a serpentinite channel forms above the downgoing plate. This channel forms as a result of hydration of the mantle wedge by uprising slab-fluids. Rocks buried at high depths are finally exhumed within this buoyant low-viscosity medium. Convergence rate in these 2D models was described by a trench-normal component of velocity. Several present and past subduction zones worldwide are however driven by oblique convergence between the plates, where trench-normal motion of the subducting slab is coupled with trench-parallel displacement of the plates. Can the exhumation mechanism and the exhumation rates of high-pressure rocks be affected by the shear component of subduction? And how uprise of these rocks can vary along the plate margin? We tried to address these questions performing 3D numerical models that simulate an intraoceanic oblique subduction. The models are based on thermo-mechanical equations that are solved with finite differences method and marker-in-cell techniques combined with multigrid approach (Gerya, 2010). In most of the models a narrow oceanic basin (500 km-wide) surrounded by continental margins is depicted. The basin is floored by either layered or heterogeneous oceanic lithosphere with gabbro as discrete bodies in serpentinized peridotite and a basaltic layer on the top. A weak zone in the mantle is prescribed to control the location of subduction initiation and therefore the plate margins geometry. Finally, addition of a third dimension in the simulations allowed us to test the role of different plate margin geometries on oblique subduction dynamics. In particular in each model we modified the dip angle of the weak zone and its "lateral" geometry (e.g. continuous, segmented). We consider "continuous" weak zones either parallel or increasingly moving away from the continental margins. Moreover, we tested the effect on subduction/exhumation dynamics of several values of the trench-parallel component of convergence-rate vector. Gerya T., Stöckhert B., Perchuk A.L. (2002). Exhumation of high-pressure metamorphic rocks in a subduction channel: a numerical simulation. Tectonics, vol. 21, n. 6, 1056. Gerya, T. V., 2010. Introduction to numerical geodynamic modelling. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. Gorczyk W., Guillot S., Gerya T.V., Hattori K. (2007a). Asthenospheric upwelling, oceanic slab retreat, and exhumation of UHP mantle rocks: insights from Greater Antilles. Geophysical research letters, vol. 34, L21309. Malatesta C., Gerya T., Scambelluri M., Federico L., Crispini L., Capponi G. (2012). Intraoceanic subduction of "heterogeneous" oceanic lithosphere in narrow basins: 2D numerical modeling. Lithos, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lithos.2012.01.003

  11. Numerical Simulation of DC Coronal Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlburg, Russell B.; Einaudi, G.; Taylor, Brian D.; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Warren, Harry; Rappazzo, A. F.; Velli, Marco

    2016-05-01

    Recent research on observational signatures of turbulent heating of a coronal loop will be discussed. The evolution of the loop is is studied by means of numerical simulations of the fully compressible three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations using the HYPERION code. HYPERION calculates the full energy cycle involving footpoint convection, magnetic reconnection, nonlinear thermal conduction and optically thin radiation. The footpoints of the loop magnetic field are convected by random photospheric motions. As a consequence the magnetic field in the loop is energized and develops turbulent nonlinear dynamics characterized by the continuous formation and dissipation of field-aligned current sheets: energy is deposited at small scales where heating occurs. Dissipation is non-uniformly distributed so that only a fraction of thecoronal mass and volume gets heated at any time. Temperature and density are highly structured at scales which, in the solar corona, remain observationally unresolved: the plasma of the simulated loop is multi thermal, where highly dynamical hotter and cooler plasma strands are scattered throughout the loop at sub-observational scales. Typical simulated coronal loops are 50000 km length and have axial magnetic field intensities ranging from 0.01 to 0.04 Tesla. To connect these simulations to observations the computed number densities and temperatures are used to synthesize the intensities expected in emission lines typically observed with the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode. These intensities are then employed to compute differential emission measure distributions, which are found to be very similar to those derived from observations of solar active regions.

  12. Numerical Simulations of Acoustically Driven, Burning Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H.-C.; Karagozian, A. R.; Smith, O. I.; Urban, Dave (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This computational study focuses on understanding and quantifying the effects of external acoustical perturbations on droplet combustion. A one-dimensional, axisymmetric representation of the essential diffusion and reaction processes occurring in the vicinity of the droplet stagnation point is used here in order to isolate the effects of the imposed acoustic disturbance. The simulation is performed using a third order accurate, essentially non-oscillatory (ENO) numerical scheme with a full methanol-air reaction mechanism. Consistent with recent microgravity and normal gravity combustion experiments, focus is placed on conditions where the droplet is situated at a velocity antinode in order for the droplet to experience the greatest effects of fluid mechanical straining of flame structures. The effects of imposed sound pressure level and frequency are explored here, and conditions leading to maximum burning rates are identified.

  13. Numerical Simulation of Coherent Error Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crow, Daniel; Joynt, Robert; Saffman, Mark

    A major goal in quantum computation is the implementation of error correction to produce a logical qubit with an error rate lower than that of the underlying physical qubits. Recent experimental progress demonstrates physical qubits can achieve error rates sufficiently low for error correction, particularly for codes with relatively high thresholds such as the surface code and color code. Motivated by experimental capabilities of neutral atom systems, we use numerical simulation to investigate whether coherent error correction can be effectively used with the 7-qubit color code. The results indicate that coherent error correction does not work at the 10-qubit level in neutral atom array quantum computers. By adding more qubits there is a possibility of making the encoding circuits fault-tolerant which could improve performance.

  14. Numerical aerodynamic simulation facility feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    There were three major issues examined in the feasibility study. First, the ability of the proposed system architecture to support the anticipated workload was evaluated. Second, the throughput of the computational engine (the flow model processor) was studied using real application programs. Third, the availability reliability, and maintainability of the system were modeled. The evaluations were based on the baseline systems. The results show that the implementation of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility, in the form considered, would indeed be a feasible project with an acceptable level of risk. The technology required (both hardware and software) either already exists or, in the case of a few parts, is expected to be announced this year. Facets of the work described include the hardware configuration, software, user language, and fault tolerance.

  15. History of the numerical aerodynamic simulation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Victor L.; Ballhaus, William F., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) program has reached a milestone with the completion of the initial operating configuration of the NAS Processing System Network. This achievement is the first major milestone in the continuing effort to provide a state-of-the-art supercomputer facility for the national aerospace community and to serve as a pathfinder for the development and use of future supercomputer systems. The underlying factors that motivated the initiation of the program are first identified and then discussed. These include the emergence and evolution of computational aerodynamics as a powerful new capability in aerodynamics research and development, the computer power required for advances in the discipline, the complementary nature of computation and wind tunnel testing, and the need for the government to play a pathfinding role in the development and use of large-scale scientific computing systems. Finally, the history of the NAS program is traced from its inception in 1975 to the present time.

  16. Numerical simulations of jet- interstellar medium interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustamujic, S.; Gómez de Castro, A. I.; López-Santiago, J.

    2015-05-01

    The physical system formed by a very young star and its accretion disc is a scaled version of the compact object+accretion disc scenario observed in AGNs. For young stars with accretion discs (e.g. classical T Tauri stars), dense gas coming from the disc is collimated into a jet as explained in the context of the theory of magneto-centrifugal launching. We aim at studying the jet propagation and its interaction with the ambient medium. In particular, we are interested in determining the properties of the jet material in terms of density and temperature. Our objective is to understand the morphology of the jet at different wavelengths and the appearance of distinct structures such as blobs and Herbig-Haro objects and their relation with initial conditions. We performed a set of numerical model simulations of supersonic jet ramming into uniform ambient medium using the PLUTO code.

  17. Computing abstraction hierarchies by numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Bundy, A.; Giunchiglia, F.; Sebastiani, R.; Walsh, T.

    1996-12-31

    We present a novel method for building ABSTRIPS-style abstraction hierarchies in planning. The aim of this method is to minimize the amount of backtracking between abstraction levels. Previous approaches have determined the criticality of operator preconditions by reasoning about plans directly. Here, we adopt a simpler and faster approach where we use numerical simulation of the planning process. We demonstrate the theoretical advantages of our approach by identifying some simple properties lacking in previous approaches but possessed by our method. We demonstrate the empirical advantages of our approach by a set of four benchmark experiments using the ABTWEAK system. We compare the quality of the abstraction hierarchies generated with those built by the ALPINE and HIGHPOINT algorithms.

  18. Numerical simulation of flexible blank drawer formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L. C.; Li, M. Z.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a finite element model for a technology of Fexible Blank Drawer Formation (FBDF) for the forming process.In order to verify the feasibility and versatility of the FBDF technology, we performed numerical simulations for multi-point saddle-shaped parts, and for convex curved surface and hemispherical parts. We analysed the effect of different forming methods on wrinkling and cracking, stress and strain distribution as well as circulating and spring back. Also, we studied the effect on the FBDF result caused by the chucking power, blank drawer force, friction coefficient and material parameters. The results showed that under the same conditions, the parts formed by FBDF technology showed uniform stress and strain distribution with little spring back. The blank drawer force can efficiently restrain the defects such as wrinkling and crack.

  19. Numerical simulation of three dimensional transonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahu, Jubaraj; Steger, Joseph L.

    1987-01-01

    The three-dimensional flow over a projectile has been computed using an implicit, approximately factored, partially flux-split algorithm. A simple composite grid scheme has been developed in which a single grid is partitioned into a series of smaller grids for applications which require an external large memory device such as the SSD of the CRAY X-MP/48, or multitasking. The accuracy and stability of the composite grid scheme has been tested by numerically simulating the flow over an ellipsoid at angle of attack and comparing the solution with a single grid solution. The flowfield over a projectile at M = 0.96 and 4 deg angle-of-attack has been computed using a fine grid, and compared with experiment.

  20. Direct Numerical Simulation of Automobile Cavity Tones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurbatskii, Konstantin; Tam, Christopher K. W.

    2000-01-01

    The Navier Stokes equation is solved computationally by the Dispersion-Relation-Preserving (DRP) scheme for the flow and acoustic fields associated with a laminar boundary layer flow over an automobile door cavity. In this work, the flow Reynolds number is restricted to R(sub delta*) < 3400; the range of Reynolds number for which laminar flow may be maintained. This investigation focuses on two aspects of the problem, namely, the effect of boundary layer thickness on the cavity tone frequency and intensity and the effect of the size of the computation domain on the accuracy of the numerical simulation. It is found that the tone frequency decreases with an increase in boundary layer thickness. When the boundary layer is thicker than a certain critical value, depending on the flow speed, no tone is emitted by the cavity. Computationally, solutions of aeroacoustics problems are known to be sensitive to the size of the computation domain. Numerical experiments indicate that the use of a small domain could result in normal mode type acoustic oscillations in the entire computation domain leading to an increase in tone frequency and intensity. When the computation domain is expanded so that the boundaries are at least one wavelength away from the noise source, the computed tone frequency and intensity are found to be computation domain size independent.

  1. DNS of vibrating grid turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khujadze, G.; Oberlack, M.

    Direct numerical simulation of the turbulence generated at a grid vibrating normally to itself using spectral code [1] is presented. Due to zero mean shear there is no production of turbulence apart from the grid. Action of the grid is mimiced by the function implemented in the middle of the simulation box:f_i (x_1 ,x_2 ) = {n^2 S}/2left\\{ {left| {{δ _{i3} }/4\\cos left( {{2π }/Mx_1 } right)\\cos left. {left( {{2π }/Mx_2 } right)} right|} right.sin (nt) + {β _i }/4} right\\}, where M is the mesh size, S/2 - amplitude or stroke of the grid, n - frequency. β i are random numbers with uniform distribution. The simulations were performed for the following parameters: x 1, x 2 ∈ [-π; π], x 3 ∈ [-2π; 2π]; Re = nS 2/? = 1000; S/M = 2; Numerical grid: 128 × 128 × 256.

  2. DNS of vibrating grid turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khujadze, G.; Oberlack, M.

    Direct numerical simulation of the turbulence generated at a grid vibrating normally to itself using spectral code [1] is presented. Due to zero mean shear there is no production of turbulence apart from the grid. Action of the grid is mimiced by the function implemented in the middle of the simulation box:f_i (x_1 ,x_2 ) = {n^2 S}/2left{ {left| {{δ _{i3} }/4\\cos left( {{2π }/Mx_1 } right)\\cos left. {left( {{2π }/Mx_2 } right)} right|} right.sin (nt) + {β _i }/4} right}, where M is the mesh size, S/2 - amplitude or stroke of the grid, n - frequency. β i are random numbers with uniform distribution. The simulations were performed for the following parameters: x 1, x 2 ∈ [-π; π], x 3 ∈ [-2π; 2π]; Re = nS 2/? = 1000; S/M = 2; Numerical grid: 128 × 128 × 256.

  3. Collisionless microinstabilities in stellarators. II. Numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Proll, J. H. E.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Helander, P.

    2013-12-15

    Microinstabilities exhibit a rich variety of behavior in stellarators due to the many degrees of freedom in the magnetic geometry. It has recently been found that certain stellarators (quasi-isodynamic ones with maximum-J geometry) are partly resilient to trapped-particle instabilities, because fast-bouncing particles tend to extract energy from these modes near marginal stability. In reality, stellarators are never perfectly quasi-isodynamic, and the question thus arises whether they still benefit from enhanced stability. Here, the stability properties of Wendelstein 7-X and a more quasi-isodynamic configuration, QIPC, are investigated numerically and compared with the National Compact Stellarator Experiment and the DIII-D tokamak. In gyrokinetic simulations, performed with the gyrokinetic code GENE in the electrostatic and collisionless approximation, ion-temperature-gradient modes, trapped-electron modes, and mixed-type instabilities are studied. Wendelstein 7-X and QIPC exhibit significantly reduced growth rates for all simulations that include kinetic electrons, and the latter are indeed found to be stabilizing in the energy budget. These results suggest that imperfectly optimized stellarators can retain most of the stabilizing properties predicted for perfect maximum-J configurations.

  4. Collisionless microinstabilities in stellarators. II. Numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proll, J. H. E.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Helander, P.

    2013-12-01

    Microinstabilities exhibit a rich variety of behavior in stellarators due to the many degrees of freedom in the magnetic geometry. It has recently been found that certain stellarators (quasi-isodynamic ones with maximum-J geometry) are partly resilient to trapped-particle instabilities, because fast-bouncing particles tend to extract energy from these modes near marginal stability. In reality, stellarators are never perfectly quasi-isodynamic, and the question thus arises whether they still benefit from enhanced stability. Here, the stability properties of Wendelstein 7-X and a more quasi-isodynamic configuration, QIPC, are investigated numerically and compared with the National Compact Stellarator Experiment and the DIII-D tokamak. In gyrokinetic simulations, performed with the gyrokinetic code GENE in the electrostatic and collisionless approximation, ion-temperature-gradient modes, trapped-electron modes, and mixed-type instabilities are studied. Wendelstein 7-X and QIPC exhibit significantly reduced growth rates for all simulations that include kinetic electrons, and the latter are indeed found to be stabilizing in the energy budget. These results suggest that imperfectly optimized stellarators can retain most of the stabilizing properties predicted for perfect maximum-J configurations.

  5. Numerical simulation of premixed turbulent methane combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Day, Marc S.; Bell, John B.; Almgren, Ann S.; Beckner, Vincent E.; Lijewski, Michael J.; Cheng, Robert; Shepherd, Ian; Johnson, Matthew

    2003-06-14

    With adaptive-grid computational methodologies and judicious use of compressible and low Mach number combustion models, we are carrying out three-dimensional, time-dependent direct numerical simulations of a laboratory-scale turbulent premixed methane burner. In the laboratory experiment, turbulence is generated by a grid located in the throat of a 50mm diameter circular nozzle; swirl is be introduced by four tangential air jets spaced uniformly around the circumference of the nozzle just above the turbulence grid. A premixed methane flame is stabilized above the nozzle in the central core region where a velocity deficit is induced7the swirling flow. The time-dependent flow field inside the nozzle, from the turbulence grid and the high-speed jets, to the nozzle exit plane is simulated using an adaptive-grid embedded-boundary compressible Navier-Stokes solver. The compressible calculation then provides time-dependent boundary conditions for an adaptive low Mach number model of the swirl-stabilized premixed flame. The low Mach model incorporates detailed chemical kinetics and species transport using 20 species and 84 reactions. Laboratory diagnostics available for comparisons include characterizations of the flow field just down stream of the nozzle exit plane, and flame surface statistics, such as mean location, wrinkling and crossing frequencies.

  6. Numerical simulation of tulip flame dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L.D.

    1991-11-30

    A finite difference reactive flow hydrodynamics program based on the full Navier-Stokes equations was used to simulate the combustion process in a homogeneous-charge, constant-volume combustion bomb in which an oddly shaped flame, known as a ``tulip flame`` in the literature, occurred. The ``tulip flame`` was readily reproduced in the numerical simulations, producing good agreement with the experimental flame shapes and positions at various times. The calculations provide sufficient detail about the dynamics of the experiment to provide some insight into the physical mechanisms responsible for the peculiar flame shape. Several factors seem to contribute to the tulip formation. The most important process is the baroclinic production of vorticity by the flame front, and this rate of production appears to be dramatically increased by the nonaxial flow generated when the initial semicircular flame front burns out along the sides of the chamber. The vorticity produces a pair of vortices behind the flame that advects the flame into the tulip shape. Boundary layer effects contribute to the details of the flame shape next to the walls of the chamber, but are otherwise not important. 24 refs.

  7. Numerical simulation of tulip flame dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L.D.

    1991-11-30

    A finite difference reactive flow hydrodynamics program based on the full Navier-Stokes equations was used to simulate the combustion process in a homogeneous-charge, constant-volume combustion bomb in which an oddly shaped flame, known as a tulip flame'' in the literature, occurred. The tulip flame'' was readily reproduced in the numerical simulations, producing good agreement with the experimental flame shapes and positions at various times. The calculations provide sufficient detail about the dynamics of the experiment to provide some insight into the physical mechanisms responsible for the peculiar flame shape. Several factors seem to contribute to the tulip formation. The most important process is the baroclinic production of vorticity by the flame front, and this rate of production appears to be dramatically increased by the nonaxial flow generated when the initial semicircular flame front burns out along the sides of the chamber. The vorticity produces a pair of vortices behind the flame that advects the flame into the tulip shape. Boundary layer effects contribute to the details of the flame shape next to the walls of the chamber, but are otherwise not important. 24 refs.

  8. Numerical simulation of solar coronal magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahlburg, Russell B.; Antiochos, Spiro K.; Zang, T. A.

    1990-01-01

    Many aspects of solar activity are believed to be due to the stressing of the coronal magnetic field by footpoint motions at the photosphere. The results are presented of a fully spectral numerical simulation which is the first 3-D time dependent simulation of footpoint stressing in a geometry appropriate for the corona. An arcade is considered that is initially current-free and impose a smooth footpoint motion that produces a twist in the field of approx 2 pi. The footprints were fixed and the evolution was followed until the field relaxes to another current-free state. No evidence was seen for any instability, either ideal or resistive and no evidence for current sheet formation. The most striking feature of the evolution is that in response to photospheric motions, the field expands rapidly upward to minimize the stress. The expansion has two important effects. First, it suppresses the development of dips in the field that could support dense, cool material. For the motions assumed, the magnetic field does not develop a geometry suitable for prominence formation. Second, the expansion inhibits ideal instabilities such as kinking. The results indicate that simple stearing of a single arcade is unlikely to lead to solar activity such as flares or prominences. Effects are discussed that might possibly lead to such activity.

  9. Numerical Simulations of Hypersonic Boundary Layer Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartkowicz, Matthew David

    Numerical schemes for supersonic flows tend to use large amounts of artificial viscosity for stability. This tends to damp out the small scale structures in the flow. Recently some low-dissipation methods have been proposed which selectively eliminate the artificial viscosity in regions which do not require it. This work builds upon the low-dissipation method of Subbareddy and Candler which uses the flux vector splitting method of Steger and Warming but identifies the dissipation portion to eliminate it. Computing accurate fluxes typically relies on large grid stencils or coupled linear systems that become computationally expensive to solve. Unstructured grids allow for CFD solutions to be obtained on complex geometries, unfortunately, it then becomes difficult to create a large stencil or the coupled linear system. Accurate solutions require grids that quickly become too large to be feasible. In this thesis a method is proposed to obtain more accurate solutions using relatively local data, making it suitable for unstructured grids composed of hexahedral elements. Fluxes are reconstructed using local gradients to extend the range of data used. The method is then validated on several test problems. Simulations of boundary layer transition are then performed. An elliptic cone at Mach 8 is simulated based on an experiment at the Princeton Gasdynamics Laboratory. A simulated acoustic noise boundary condition is imposed to model the noisy conditions of the wind tunnel and the transitioning boundary layer observed. A computation of an isolated roughness element is done based on an experiment in Purdue's Mach 6 quiet wind tunnel. The mechanism for transition is identified as an instability in the upstream separation region and a comparison is made to experimental data. In the CFD a fully turbulent boundary layer is observed downstream.

  10. Aspect ratio effects in turbulent duct flows studied with DNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinuesa, R.; Noorani, A.; Lozano-Durn, A.; Schlatter, P.; Fischer, P.; Nagib, H.

    2012-11-01

    Three-dimensional effects present in turbulent duct flows, i.e., side-wall boundary layers and secondary motions, are studied by means of direct numerical simulations (DNS). The spectral element code Nek5000, developed by Fischer et. al. (2008), is used to compute turbulent duct flows with aspect ratios 1 and 3 in streamwise-periodic boxes of length 25 h (long enough to capture the longest streamwise structures). The total number of grid points is 28 and 62 million respectively, and the inflow conditions were adjusted iteratively in order to keep the same bulk Reynolds number at the centerplane (Reb , c = 2800) in both cases. Spanwise variations in wall shear, mean-flow profiles and turbulence statistics were analyzed with aspect ratio, and also compared with the 2D channel. The simulations were started from a laminar duct profile, and transition to turbulence was triggered by means of trip-forcing in the wall-normal direction, applied at the two horizontal walls. In addition, we developed a convergence criterion aimed at assessing the necessary averaging time TA for converged statistics. We find that econdary motions present in duct flows require longer averaging times and the total shear-stress profile is not necessarily linear.

  11. A priori direct numerical simulation assessment of algebraic flame surface density models for turbulent premixed flames in the context of large eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Nilanjan; Klein, Markus

    2008-08-01

    Flame surface density (FSD) based reaction rate closure is one of the most important approaches in turbulent premixed flame modeling. The algebraic models for FSD based on power laws often require information about the fractal dimension D and the inner cut-off scale ηi. In the present study, two three-dimensional direct numerical simulation (DNS) databases for freely propagating statistically planar turbulent premixed flames are analyzed among which the flame in one case belongs to the corrugated flamelet (CF) regime, whereas the other falls well within the thin reaction zone (TRZ) regime. It is found that D for the flame in the TRZ regime is greater than the value obtained for the flame in the CF regime. For the flame within the TRZ regime, the fractal dimension is found to be 7/3, which is the same as D for a material surface in a turbulent environment. For the flame in the CF regime, ηi is found to scale with the Gibson scale, whereas ηi is found to scale with the Kolmogorov length scale for the flame in the TRZ regime. Based on these observations a new algebraic model for FSD is proposed, where D and ηi are expressed as functions of Karlovitz number. The performances of the new and existing algebraic models for FSD are compared with the corresponding values obtained from DNS databases.

  12. Passive and Active Control of Supersonic Axisymmetric Base Flows: Direct Numerical Simulations and Large-Eddy Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasel, Hermann F.

    2002-04-01

    A new compressible Navier-Stokes code in cylindrical coordinates was developed for investigating axisymmetric wakes of bluff-based bodies in supersonic flows. In this code, high-order compact finite differences derived for non-equidistant grids are employed and a new state-of-the-art axis treatment is incorporated. Additionally, the fully three-dimensional transport equations for turbulent kinetic energy and turbulent dissipation are implemented to enable (steady or unsteady) Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) simulations. Furthermore, a new "Flow Simulation Methodology" (FSM) was developed for computing complex compressible flows. The centerpiece of FSM is a strategy to provide the proper amount of modeling of the subgrid scales. This is accomplished by a "contribution function" which locally and instantaneously compares the smallest relevant scales to the local grid size. The contribution function is designed such that it provides no modeling if the computation is locally well resolved so that the computation approaches a Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) in the fine grid limit, or provides modeling of all scales in the coarse grid limit and thus approaches an unsteady RANS (URANS) calculation. In between these resolution limits, the contribution function adjusts the necessary modeling for the unresolved scales while the larger (resolved) scales are computed as in traditional Large Eddy Simulations (LES). Preliminary results have shown that the new high order code has great advantages for supersonic base flow simulations and that calculations, in particular together with FSM, will allow simulations of supersonic base flows at much higher Reynolds numbers than possible with conventional LES.

  13. Numerical simulations of interacting disk galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noguchi, Masafumi

    1990-01-01

    Galaxy-galaxy interactions have long attracted many extragalactic astronomers in various aspects. A number of computer simulations performed in the 1970s have successfully reproduced the peculiar morphologies observed in interacting disk galaxies and clarified that tidal deformation explains most of the observed global peculiarities. However, most of these simulations have used test particles in modelling the disk component. Tidal response of a self-gravitating disk remains to be further clarified. Another topic which is intensely discussed at present is the relation between galaxy-galaxy interactions and activity. Many observations suggest that interactions trigger strong starbursts and possibly active galactic nuclei (AGN). However, the detailed mechanism of triggering is not yet clear. It is vital here to understand the dynamics of interstellar gas. In order to understand various phenomena related to galaxy-galaxy interactions (mainly for disk galaxies), the author performed a series of numerical simulations on close galaxy encounters which includes both interstellar gas and self-gravitating disk components. In these simulations, the galaxy model to be perturbed (target galaxy) consists of a halo and a disk. The halo was treated as a rigid spherical gravitational field which is assumed to remain fixed during the interaction. The disk is composed of stars and gas. The stellar disk was constructed by 20000 collisionless particles of the same mass. Those particles move in the halo gravitational field, interacting with each other and with the perturber. Therefore, the self-graviy of the disk is properly taken into account. Stellar particles were initially given circular velocities with small random motions required to stabilize the disk against local axisymmetric disturbances. The gravitational field of the stellar disk was calculated by the particle-mesh scheme (e.g. Hockney and Eastwood 1981). The gaseous component was modelled by the cloud-particle scheme (e.g. Roberts and Hausman 1984). Here, the authors represent the gas as an ensemble of small spheres (i.e. clouds) and include the creation of an OB star in a cloud-cloud collision and subsequent velocity push on nearby clouds due to a supernova explosion.

  14. Numerical simulation of "An American Haboob"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukovic, A.; Vujadinovic, M.; Pejanovic, G.; Andric, J.; Kumjian, M. R.; Djurdjevic, V.; Dacic, M.; Prasad, A. K.; El-Askary, H. M.; Paris, B. C.; Petkovic, S.; Nickovic, S.; Sprigg, W. A.

    2013-10-01

    A dust storm of fearful proportions hit Phoenix in the early evening hours of 5 July 2011. This storm, an American haboob, was predicted hours in advance because numerical, land-atmosphere modeling, computing power and remote sensing of dust events have improved greatly over the past decade. High resolution numerical models are required for accurate simulation of the small-scales of the haboob process, with high velocity surface winds produced by strong convection and severe downbursts. Dust productive areas in this region consist mainly of agricultural fields, with soil surfaces disturbed by plowing and tracks of land in the high Sonoran desert laid barren by ongoing draught. Model simulation of the 5 July 2011 dust storm uses the coupled atmospheric-dust model NMME-DREAM with 3.5 km horizontal resolution. A mask of the potentially dust productive regions is obtained from the land cover and the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Model results are compared with radar and other satellite-based images and surface meteorological and PM10 observations. The atmospheric model successfully hindcasted the position of the front in space and time, with about 1 h late arrival in Phoenix. The dust model predicted the rapid uptake of dust and high values of dust concentration in the ensuing storm. South of Phoenix, over the closest source regions (~ 25 km), the model PM10 surface dust concentration reached ~ 2500 ?g m-3, but underestimated the values measured by the PM10stations within the city. Model results are also validated by the MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD), employing deep blue (DB) algorithms for aerosol loadings. Model validation included Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO), equipped with the lidar instrument, to disclose the vertical structure of dust aerosols as well as aerosol subtypes. Promising results encourage further research and application of high-resolution modeling and satellite-based remote sensing to warn of approaching severe dust events and reduce risks for safety and health.

  15. Numerical simulation of "an American haboob"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukovic, A.; Vujadinovic, M.; Pejanovic, G.; Andric, J.; Kumjian, M. R.; Djurdjevic, V.; Dacic, M.; Prasad, A. K.; El-Askary, H. M.; Paris, B. C.; Petkovic, S.; Nickovic, S.; Sprigg, W. A.

    2014-04-01

    A dust storm of fearful proportions hit Phoenix in the early evening hours of 5 July 2011. This storm, an American haboob, was predicted hours in advance because numerical, land-atmosphere modeling, computing power and remote sensing of dust events have improved greatly over the past decade. High-resolution numerical models are required for accurate simulation of the small scales of the haboob process, with high velocity surface winds produced by strong convection and severe downbursts. Dust productive areas in this region consist mainly of agricultural fields, with soil surfaces disturbed by plowing and tracks of land in the high Sonoran Desert laid barren by ongoing draught. Model simulation of the 5 July 2011 dust storm uses the coupled atmospheric-dust model NMME-DREAM (Non-hydrostatic Mesoscale Model on E grid, Janjic et al., 2001; Dust REgional Atmospheric Model, Nickovic et al., 2001; Prez et al., 2006) with 4 km horizontal resolution. A mask of the potentially dust productive regions is obtained from the land cover and the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The scope of this paper is validation of the dust model performance, and not use of the model as a tool to investigate mechanisms related to the storm. Results demonstrate the potential technical capacity and availability of the relevant data to build an operational system for dust storm forecasting as a part of a warning system. Model results are compared with radar and other satellite-based images and surface meteorological and PM10 observations. The atmospheric model successfully hindcasted the position of the front in space and time, with about 1 h late arrival in Phoenix. The dust model predicted the rapid uptake of dust and high values of dust concentration in the ensuing storm. South of Phoenix, over the closest source regions (~25 km), the model PM10 surface dust concentration reached ~2500 ?g m-3, but underestimated the values measured by the PM10 stations within the city. Model results are also validated by the MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD), employing deep blue (DB) algorithms for aerosol loadings. Model validation included Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO), equipped with the lidar instrument, to disclose the vertical structure of dust aerosols as well as aerosol subtypes. Promising results encourage further research and application of high-resolution modeling and satellite-based remote sensing to warn of approaching severe dust events and reduce risks for safety and health.

  16. Numerical Simulations of Relativistic Jets in Collapsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Woosley, S. E.; Heger, A.; MacFadyen, A. I.

    2003-12-01

    The propagation and break out of relativistic jets in collapsars, which are believed to give rise to outburst of high-energy emission known as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), are examined in multi-dimensional numerical simulations using a special relativistic hydrodynamics code. If powered long enough, a relativistic jet from a collapsar can break out of a massive Wolf-Rayet star. During its propagation, the jet is collimated by the passage through the stellar mantle. Starting with an initial half-angle of up to 20 degrees, it emerges with an half-angle that, though variable with time, is around 5 degrees. Interaction of the jet with the star and its own cocoon also causes mixing that sporadically decelerates the flow. As it erupts, the highly relativistic jet core (3 to 5 degrees) is surrounded by a cocoon of less energetic, but still moderately relativistic ejecta (Γ ˜ 15) that expands and becomes visible at larger polar angles ( ˜ 10 degrees). We predict a distribution of energy and Lorentz factor with viewing angle in the jet beam and its cocoon. These results have important implications for the observed light curves and energies of GRBs and imply that what is seen may vary greatly with viewing angle. In particular, we predict the existence of a large number of low energy GRBs with mild Lorentz factors that may be related to GRB 980425/SN 1998bw and to the recently recognized XRFs. Jet stability is also examined in three-dimensional calculations. It is found that a three-dimensional jet undergoes a kink instability. Processing jets are also examined in three-dimensional simulations. If the jet changes angle by more than three degrees in several seconds, it will dissipate, producing a broad beam with inadequate Lorentz factor to make a common gamma-ray burst.

  17. Fully resolved direct numerical simulations of a particle in a turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jebakumar, Anand Samuel; Premnath, Kannan Nandha; Abraham, John

    2015-11-01

    In a recent experimental study, Lau and Nathan (2014) have reported that the distribution of particles in a turbulent pipe flow is strongly influenced by the Stokes number (St). At St lower than 1, particles migrate toward the wall and at St greater than 10 they tend to migrate toward the axis. It was suggested that this preferential migration of particles is due to two forces, the Saffman lift force and the turbophoretic force. Saffman lift force represents a force acting on the particle as a result of a velocity gradient across the particle when it leads or lags the fluid flow (Saffman, 1965). Turbophoretic force is induced by turbulence which tends to move the particle in the direction of decreasing turbulent kinetic energy (Reeks, 1983). In this study, the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) is employed to simulate a fully-resolved particle in a turbulent channel flow through Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS). The particle boundary is approximated by a modified bounce-back technique proposed by Bouzidi et al. (2001) to prevent a staircase representation of the particle. The influence of Saffman lift force and turbophoretic force on the particle is examined. The effect of St is also explained through this fundamental study.

  18. Direct numerical simulations of aeolian sand ripples

    PubMed Central

    Durán, Orencio; Claudin, Philippe; Andreotti, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Aeolian sand beds exhibit regular patterns of ripples resulting from the interaction between topography and sediment transport. Their characteristics have been so far related to reptation transport caused by the impacts on the ground of grains entrained by the wind into saltation. By means of direct numerical simulations of grains interacting with a wind flow, we show that the instability turns out to be driven by resonant grain trajectories, whose length is close to a ripple wavelength and whose splash leads to a mass displacement toward the ripple crests. The pattern selection results from a compromise between this destabilizing mechanism and a diffusive downslope transport which stabilizes small wavelengths. The initial wavelength is set by the ratio of the sediment flux and the erosion/deposition rate, a ratio which increases linearly with the wind velocity. We show that this scaling law, in agreement with experiments, originates from an interfacial layer separating the saltation zone from the static sand bed, where momentum transfers are dominated by midair collisions. Finally, we provide quantitative support for the use of the propagation of these ripples as a proxy for remote measurements of sediment transport. PMID:25331873

  19. Direct numerical simulations of aeolian sand ripples.

    PubMed

    Durán, Orencio; Claudin, Philippe; Andreotti, Bruno

    2014-11-01

    Aeolian sand beds exhibit regular patterns of ripples resulting from the interaction between topography and sediment transport. Their characteristics have been so far related to reptation transport caused by the impacts on the ground of grains entrained by the wind into saltation. By means of direct numerical simulations of grains interacting with a wind flow, we show that the instability turns out to be driven by resonant grain trajectories, whose length is close to a ripple wavelength and whose splash leads to a mass displacement toward the ripple crests. The pattern selection results from a compromise between this destabilizing mechanism and a diffusive downslope transport which stabilizes small wavelengths. The initial wavelength is set by the ratio of the sediment flux and the erosion/deposition rate, a ratio which increases linearly with the wind velocity. We show that this scaling law, in agreement with experiments, originates from an interfacial layer separating the saltation zone from the static sand bed, where momentum transfers are dominated by midair collisions. Finally, we provide quantitative support for the use of the propagation of these ripples as a proxy for remote measurements of sediment transport. PMID:25331873

  20. Numerical simulation of ball-racket impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yingpang

    The collision of a ball with a tennis racket is usually modeled in terms of rigid body dynamics or an elastic system involving only a few springs. In this paper, we study the impact between a tennis ball and racket, by modeling the tennis ball in two different yaws. One method models the tennis ball as a Hertz elastic body and the other one models the ball by a more accurate finite element analysis. In the first model, we assume that the elastic properties of the ball obeys Hertz's law. In the finite element model, we consider the tennis ball as a shell witch is a elastic system constructed out of many isotropic small linear flat, elements, witch have both elastic and damping properties. The damping in each way is approximated as viscous term. In both methods, we study the static condition of deformation against a rigid surface before applying these models to dynamical processes. We compare these two methods and eventually determine how the racket parameters effect the performance of the racket, using numerical simulations. Comparison with experiment are show to confirm the general conclusion of the model.

  1. Numerical Simulations of Heated Supersonic Rectangular Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolbe, R. L.; Kailasanath, K.; Boris, J. P.

    1996-11-01

    The heated supersonic flow from rectangular jets with paddles in the flow field have been simulated numerically to study the effects of heating on the flow field and near-field noise. The flapping motion across the narrow dimension of the jet, which is the dominant feature of the unheated jet, is also found to be present in heated jets with temperature ratios (temperature of the jet to that of the surroundings) from 2.17 to 5.0. With increasing jet temperature, the jet core extends further downstream towards the paddles and the shear layer development is also delayed. Furthermore, as the temperature ratio increases, the amplitude of the velocity fluctuations decrease and additional frequencies also begin to appear. The characteristic frequency also changes with temperature and the corresponding Strouhal number is found to decrease exponentially with increase in the temperature over the range studied. Several interesting observations on the modes of the heated jet will also be presented. footnote Sponsored by NASA-Lewis and NRL

  2. Cloud interactions and merging - Numerical simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Simpson, J.

    1984-01-01

    A total of 48 numerical experiments have been performed to study cloud interactions adn merging by means of a two-dimensional multi-cell model. Two soundings of deep convection during GATE and two different magnitudes of large-scale lifting have been used as the initial conditions and as the main forcing on the model. Over two hundred groups of cloud systems with a life history of over sixty minutes have been generated under the influence of different combinations of the stratification and large-scale lifting. The results demonstrate the increase in convective activity and in amount of precipitation with increased intensity of large-scale lifting. The results also show increased occurrence of cloud merger with increased intensity of large-scale lifting. The most unfavorable environmental conditions for cloud merging are (1) less unstable stratification of the atmosphere and (2) weaker large-scale lifting. A total of fourteen cloud systems qualify as mergers. Two selected cases will be described dynamically and thermodynamically in this paper. Although these cloud mergers have been simulated under the influence of different synoptic-scale conditions, the major physical mechanism related to the cloud merging process is the same as that proposed by Simpson. Cumulus downdrafts and associated cold outflows play a dominant role in the merging process in all cases studied.

  3. Direct Numerical Simulation of Cell Printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Rui; He, Ping

    2010-11-01

    Structural cell printing, i.e., printing three dimensional (3D) structures of cells held in a tissue matrix, is gaining significant attention in the biomedical community. The key idea is to use desktop printer or similar devices to print cells into 3D patterns with a resolution comparable to the size of mammalian cells, similar to that in living organs. Achieving such a resolution in vitro can lead to breakthroughs in areas such as organ transplantation and understanding of cell-cell interactions in truly 3D spaces. Although the feasibility of cell printing has been demonstrated in the recent years, the printing resolution and cell viability remain to be improved. In this work, we investigate one of the unit operations in cell printing, namely, the impact of a cell-laden droplet into a pool of highly viscous liquids using direct numerical simulations. The dynamics of droplet impact (e.g., crater formation and droplet spreading and penetration) and the evolution of cell shape and internal stress are quantified in details.

  4. Numerical simulations of drainage flows on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parish, Thomas R.; Howard, Alan D.

    1992-01-01

    Data collected by Viking Landers have shown that the meteorology of the near surface Martian environment is analogous to desertlike terrestrial conditions. Geological evidence such as dunes and frost streaks indicate that the surface wind is a potentially important factor in scouring of the martian landscape. In particular, the north polar basin shows erosional features that suggest katabatic wind convergence into broad valleys near the margin of the polar cap. The pattern of katabatic wind drainage off the north polar cap is similar to that observed on Earth over Antarctica or Greenland. The sensitivity is explored of Martian drainage flows to variations in terrain slope and diurnal heating using a numerical modeling approach. The model used is a 2-D sigma coordinate primitive equation system that has been used for simulations of Antarctic drainage flows. Prognostic equations include the flux forms of the horizontal scalar momentum equations, temperature, and continuity. Parameterization of both longwave (terrestrial) and shortwave (solar) radiation is included. Turbulent transfer of heat and momentum in the Martian atmosphere remains uncertain since relevant measurements are essentially nonexistent.

  5. Numeric simulation of plant signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Genoud, T; Trevino Santa Cruz, M B; Métraux, J P

    2001-08-01

    Plants have evolved an intricate signaling apparatus that integrates relevant information and allows an optimal response to environmental conditions. For instance, the coordination of defense responses against pathogens involves sophisticated molecular detection and communication systems. Multiple protection strategies may be deployed differentially by the plant according to the nature of the invading organism. These responses are also influenced by the environment, metabolism, and developmental stage of the plant. Though the cellular signaling processes traditionally have been described as linear sequences of events, it is now evident that they may be represented more accurately as network-like structures. The emerging paradigm can be represented readily with the use of Boolean language. This digital (numeric) formalism allows an accurate qualitative description of the signal transduction processes, and a dynamic representation through computer simulation. Moreover, it provides the required power to process the increasing amount of information emerging from the fields of genomics and proteomics, and from the use of new technologies such as microarray analysis. In this review, we have used the Boolean language to represent and analyze part of the signaling network of disease resistance in Arabidopsis. PMID:11500542

  6. Numeric Simulation of Plant Signaling Networks1

    PubMed Central

    Genoud, Thierry; Trevino Santa Cruz, Marcela B.; Métraux, Jean-Pierre

    2001-01-01

    Plants have evolved an intricate signaling apparatus that integrates relevant information and allows an optimal response to environmental conditions. For instance, the coordination of defense responses against pathogens involves sophisticated molecular detection and communication systems. Multiple protection strategies may be deployed differentially by the plant according to the nature of the invading organism. These responses are also influenced by the environment, metabolism, and developmental stage of the plant. Though the cellular signaling processes traditionally have been described as linear sequences of events, it is now evident that they may be represented more accurately as network-like structures. The emerging paradigm can be represented readily with the use of Boolean language. This digital (numeric) formalism allows an accurate qualitative description of the signal transduction processes, and a dynamic representation through computer simulation. Moreover, it provides the required power to process the increasing amount of information emerging from the fields of genomics and proteomics, and from the use of new technologies such as microarray analysis. In this review, we have used the Boolean language to represent and analyze part of the signaling network of disease resistance in Arabidopsis. PMID:11500542

  7. DNS and LES of Separated Flows at Moderate Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadieux, F.; Domaradzki, J. A.; Sayadi, T.; Bose, S.; Duchaine, F.

    2012-11-01

    Flows in rotating machinery, for unmanned and micro aerial vehicles, wind turbines, and propellers consist of different flow regimes. First, a laminar boundary layer is followed by a laminar separation bubble with a shear layer on top of it that experiences transition to turbulence. Subsequently, the separated turbulent flow reattaches and evolves downstream from a nonequilibrium turbulent boundary layer to an equilibrium one. Typical RANS and LES turbulence modeling methods experience difficulties when simulating such flows because they were developed for fully developed turbulent flows. This currently leaves DNS as the only reliable but computationally expensive alternative. Our work assesses the capability of LES to reduce the resolution requirements for such flows. Flow over a flat plate with suitable velocity boundary conditions away from the plate to produce a separation bubble is considered. Benchmark DNS data for this configuration was generated with the resolution of 50 ×106 mesh points; also used was a different DNS database with 15 ×106 points reported by Spalart and Strelets in JFM 403 (2000). Employing two codes, one using structured and another unstructured mesh, we concluded that accurate LES are possible using O(1%) of the DNS resolution. Work performed during Stanford-CTR Summer Program 2012.

  8. Direct numerical simulation of particle deposition onto a free-slip and no-slip surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Haarlem, Bas; Boersma, Bendiks J.; Nieuwstadt, Frans T. M.

    1998-10-01

    We consider here the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of channel flow with two different surfaces: a no-slip, fixed wall and on the opposite side a free-slip, free surface. The simulated velocity field agrees well with the experimental data for a free-surface flow obtained by Komori et al. [Int. J. Heat Mass Transf. 25, 513 (1982)]. The DNS is used to simulate particle trajectories, which are computed with a dynamic particle equation in which only the drag force given by the Stokes law is taken into account. For the particle time scale, nondimensionalized in terms of the fixed-wall friction velocity and the kinematic viscosity, we use the values τ+=5 and τ+=15. A statistically stationary condition is studied that is obtained by the introduction of a uniform distribution of particles at the beginning of the channel and by continuous removal through deposition at the two walls. The steady-state concentration distribution is nonuniform across the channel width, primarily due to the process whereby particles are trapped close to the surface. Moreover, we find that the wall-normal concentration profiles are self-similar. The deposition on both the no-slip and the free-slip wall can be described by a constant deposition coefficient, with for τ+=5 the larger value on the free-slip wall and for τ+=15 the opposite, i.e., the larger value over the no-slip wall. To study the deposition process in more detail we consider the cross channel particle fluxes and velocity statistics that are conditioned on deposition events. By means of instantaneous near-wall particle distributions we also consider the patterns of particles and their accumulation in certain areas of the flow. For a no-slip surface the well-known result that particles tend to collect in the low-speed streaks is confirmed. The patterns of particles near the free-slip surface are completely different, which can be explained in terms of the different types of coherent structures that are present near this surface.

  9. Direct test of a nonlinear constitutive equation for simple turbulent shear flows using DNS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, François G.

    2007-10-01

    Several nonlinear constitutive equations have been proposed to overcome the limitations of the linear eddy-viscosity models to describe complex turbulent flows. These nonlinear equations have often been compared to experimental data through the outputs of numerical models. Here we perform a priori analysis of nonlinear eddy-viscosity models using direct numerical simulation (DNS) of simple shear flows. In this paper, the constitutive equation is directly checked using a tensor projection which involves several invariants of the flow. This provides a 3 terms development which is exact for 2D flows, and a best approximation for 3D flows. We provide the quadratic nonlinear constitutive equation for the near-wall region of simple shear flows using DNS data, and estimate their coefficients. We show that these coefficients have several common properties for the different simple shear flow databases considered. We also show that in the central region of pipe flows, where the shear rate is very small, the coefficients of the constitutive equation diverge, indicating the failure of this representation for vanishing shears.

  10. Thermo/Soluto-capillary instabilities in 3D bi-component liquid pools using DNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Adam; Saenz, Pedro; Valluri, Prashant; Sefiane, Khellil

    2015-11-01

    The behaviour of surface tension dominated flows in the presence of a temperature gradient and phase change is of great importance in designing micro-cooling devices. While evaporating pools and droplets have been investigated numerically and experimentally, these studies have dealt only with pure fluids. For bicomponent liquid mixtures, limited experimental studies have been conducted but a rigorous numerical model is absent. We present a two-phase multicomponent DNS model to simulate thermo/soluto-capillary instabilities in bicomponent liquid layers subject to a horizontal temperature gradient. The strategy fully accounts for a deformable interface using a variant of volume-of-fluid method. The presence of a second component introduces thermophoresis in the liquid phase which then gives rise to solutal Marangoni effects. By combining mixture thermodynamics with multiphase DNS, we investigate thermo/soluto-capillary and interfacial instabilities of a 3D bicomponent liquid pool. An important aspect we quantify is the strength of solutal over thermal Marangoni convection and its effect on stability of resultant interfacial waves and phase-separation in the liquid. The model is robust enough to include phase-change and the advection-diffusion of volatile species in the gas phase. Funded by EPSRC, Grant No. EP/K00963X/1.

  11. DNS of Laminar-Turbulent Transition in Swept-Wing Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duan, L.; Choudhari, M.; Li, F.

    2014-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is performed to examine laminar to turbulent transition due to high-frequency secondary instability of stationary crossflow vortices in a subsonic swept-wing boundary layer for a realistic natural-laminar-flow airfoil configuration. The secondary instability is introduced via inflow forcing and the mode selected for forcing corresponds to the most amplified secondary instability mode that, in this case, derives a majority of its growth from energy production mechanisms associated with the wall-normal shear of the stationary basic state. An inlet boundary condition is carefully designed to allow for accurate injection of instability wave modes and minimize acoustic reflections at numerical boundaries. Nonlinear parabolized stability equation (PSE) predictions compare well with the DNS in terms of modal amplitudes and modal shape during the strongly nonlinear phase of the secondary instability mode. During the transition process, the skin friction coefficient rises rather rapidly and the wall-shear distribution shows a sawtooth pattern that is analogous to the previously documented surface flow visualizations of transition due to stationary crossflow instability. Fully turbulent features are observed in the downstream region of the flow.

  12. Numerical simulations of relativistic jets in collapsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiqun

    Relativistic jets in collapsars are studied in this thesis. Shocks within these jets are believed to give rise to outbursts of high-energy emission known as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The propagation and break out of the jets are examined in multi-dimensional numerical simulations using a special relativistic hydrodynamics code. If powered long enough, a relativistic jet from a collapsar can break out of a massive Wolf-Rayet star. During its propagation, the jet is collimated by the passage through the stellar mantle. Starting with an initial half-angle of up to 20 degrees, it emerges with an half-angle that, though variable with time, is around 5 degrees. Interaction of the jet with the star and its own cocoon also causes mixing that sporadically decelerates the flow. We speculate that this mixing instability is chiefly responsible for the variable Lorentz factor needed in the internal shock model and for the complex light curves seen in many gamma-ray bursts. As it erupts, the highly relativistic jet core (3 to 5 degrees) is surrounded by a cocoon of less energetic, but still moderately relativistic ejecta (Gamma ˜ 15) that expands and becomes visible at larger polar angles (˜10 degrees). We predict a distribution of energy and Lorentz factor with viewing angle in the jet beam and its cocoon. These results have important implications for the observed light curves and energies of GRBs and imply that what is seen may vary greatly with viewing angle. In particular, we predict the existence of a large number of low energy GRBs with mild Lorentz factors that may be related to GRB 980425/SN 1998bw and to the recently recognized cosmological X-ray flashes (XRFs). Jet stability is also examined in three-dimensional calculations. It is found that a three-dimensional jet undergoes a kink instability. Processing jets are also examined in three-dimensional simulations. If the jet changes angle by more than three degrees in several seconds, it will dissipate, producing a broad beam with inadequate Lorentz factor to make a common GRB.

  13. Numerical Simulation of Complex Turbomachinery Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernobrovkin, A. A.; Lakshiminarayana, B.

    1999-01-01

    An unsteady, multiblock, Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes solver based on Runge-Kutta scheme and Pseudo-time step for turbo-machinery applications was developed. The code was validated and assessed against analytical and experimental data. It was used to study a variety of physical mechanisms of unsteady, three-dimensional, turbulent, transitional, and cooling flows in compressors and turbines. Flow over a cylinder has been used to study effects of numerical aspects on accuracy of prediction of wake decay and transition, and to modify K-epsilon models. The following simulations have been performed: (a) Unsteady flow in a compressor cascade: Three low Reynolds number turbulence models have been assessed and data compared with Euler/boundary layer predictions. Major flow features associated with wake induced transition were predicted and studied; (b) Nozzle wake-rotor interaction in a turbine: Results compared to LDV data in design and off-design conditions, and cause and effect of unsteady flow in turbine rotors were analyzed; (c) Flow in the low-pressure turbine: Assessed capability of the code to predict transitional, attached and separated flows at a wide range of low Reynolds numbers and inlet freestream turbulence intensity. Several turbulence and transition models have been employed and comparisons made to experiments; (d) leading edge film cooling at compound angle: Comparisons were made with experiments, and the flow physics of the associated vortical structures were studied; and (e) Tip leakage flow in a turbine. The physics of the secondary flow in a rotor was studied and sources of loss identified.

  14. High resolution DNS of shear-convective turbulence and its implications to second-order parameterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tse, K. L.; Mahalov, A.; Nicolaenko, B.; Joseph, B.

    2004-09-01

    Shear-convective turbulence is studied using a high resolution 3D direct numerical simulation (DNS). Flow configuration consisting of a modeled jet capping a thermally unstable layer is simulated and the results are compared with the reference situation where only the convective layer is present. Quasi-equilibrium turbulent datasets, in which the turbulent energy budgets are nearly balanced, are obtained. A ‘mechanical’ barrier is identified near the jet centerline in the shear-convective case. Intense and elongated vorticity regions are created in a narrow layer above the barrier in a way similar to the shear-sheltering effect. Vertical profiles of turbulence statistics and budgets are presented. We have unambiguously identified layers of counter-gradient momentum and heat fluxes which occur near regions of penetrative convection. Using quasi-equilibrium DNS datasets, we evaluate the performance of some popular second-order closure models of turbulence. The models satisfactorily predict the triple moments and dissipation, except in the counter-gradient region. The models, however, fail to predict the pressure correlation terms.

  15. DNS Study of Transient Disturbance Growth and Bypass Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephani, Kelly; Goldstein, David

    2008-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation was used to investigate the detailed flow past a periodic array of cylindrical roughness elements. The problem was constructed as channel flow over a flat plate surface with roughness elements formed using an immersed boundary technique with a spectral method approach. Solutions were obtained for two roughness heights corresponding to Reynolds numbers (Rek) of 189 and 350, and results are presented for both cases. Cylindrical roughness elements with Rek=189 produced minimal disturbances and the flow remained laminar in the wake downstream of the roughness elements. Flow past cylindrical roughness elements corresponding to Rek=350 was found to transition as soon as 2-3 cylinder diameters downstream and had developed into fully turbulent flow by the end of the domain. Results were found to compare reasonably well with a similar set of DNS computations by Rizzetta and Visbal using a sixth-order-accurate centered compact finite difference scheme as well as experimental results obtained by Ergin and White using time-averaged hotwire measurements of the velocity components.

  16. Reynolds number trends from DNS of the turbulent Ekman layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, G. N.; Johnstone, R.; Ashworth, M.

    2004-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation of the neutrally stratified pressure-driven turbulent Ekman layer over a smooth flat surface has been performed at Reynolds number Re=2000 (based on geostrophic wind speed G, kinematic viscosity ν and viscous boundary-layer depth D=√(2ν/f), where f is the Coriolis parameter). The fully spectral Fourier/Jacobi MPI-based code has been run with a 1024×1024×200 grid on 104 processors of the UK HPCx IBM p690+ cluster, requiring approximately 100,000 CPU-node-hours to reach steady state and produce an adequate statistical sample. Results are used to quantify Reynolds number trends by comparing to earlier Re=400, 500 and 1000 DNS data. We are particularly interested in assessing the Spalart (1989) finite-Reynolds-number modification to the Csanady (1967) similarity theory for three-dimensional boundary layers, and implications for predicting the magnitude and direction of the surface shear stress at arbitrary Reynolds numbers.

  17. Numerical simulation of 3D breaking waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraunie, Philippe; Golay, Frederic

    2015-04-01

    Numerical methods dealing with two phase flows basically can be classified in two ways : the "interface tracking" methods when the two phases are resolved separately including boundary conditions fixed at the interface and the "interface capturing" methods when a single flow is considered with variable density. Physical and numerical properties of the two approaches are discussed, based on some numerical experiments performed concerning 3D breaking waves. Acknowledgements : This research was supported by the Modtercom program of Region PACA.

  18. Numerical simulation of the flow over Barchan dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omidyeganeh, Mohammad; Piomelli, Ugo; Christensen, Kenneth T.; Best, Jim

    2012-11-01

    We performed large-eddy simulation of the turbulent flow over a typical barchan dune model. The configuration is similar to that of experiments carried out at the University of Illinois, but the Reynolds number based on the free-surface velocity and the dune height is one fifth of the experiment. The simulation adopts the volume-of-fluid technique to model the dune. The use of periodic boundary conditions in the streamwise and spanwise directions implies that we are considering a fully developed flow over one dune in an infinite array. The height of the domain is close to the thickness of the approaching boundary layer, upstream of the dunes in the experiment. The resolution used is close to a typical DNS; Δx+ < 20 . 7 , Δy+ < 0 . 8 , and Δz+ < 10 . 3 . The approaching flow to the dune accelerates over the stoss (upstream) side and rises up to the crest, while at the same time diverging slowly in the spanwise direction toward the closest horn. The separated flow either reattaches on the plane or moves helically inside the recirculation zone toward the closest horn. The separated shear-layer extends downstream and toward the free-surface and contribute to downstream dunes. The agreement of the turbulence statistics with the experiment is good.

  19. Direct numerical simulations of particle-laden density currents with adaptive, discontinuous finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, S. D.; Hill, J.; Piggott, M. D.; Allison, P. A.

    2014-09-01

    High-resolution direct numerical simulations (DNSs) are an important tool for the detailed analysis of turbidity current dynamics. Models that resolve the vertical structure and turbulence of the flow are typically based upon the Navier-Stokes equations. Two-dimensional simulations are known to produce unrealistic cohesive vortices that are not representative of the real three-dimensional physics. The effect of this phenomena is particularly apparent in the later stages of flow propagation. The ideal solution to this problem is to run the simulation in three dimensions but this is computationally expensive. This paper presents a novel finite-element (FE) DNS turbidity current model that has been built within Fluidity, an open source, general purpose, computational fluid dynamics code. The model is validated through re-creation of a lock release density current at a Grashof number of 5 × 106 in two and three dimensions. Validation of the model considers the flow energy budget, sedimentation rate, head speed, wall normal velocity profiles and the final deposit. Conservation of energy in particular is found to be a good metric for measuring model performance in capturing the range of dynamics on a range of meshes. FE models scale well over many thousands of processors and do not impose restrictions on domain shape, but they are computationally expensive. The use of adaptive mesh optimisation is shown to reduce the required element count by approximately two orders of magnitude in comparison with fixed, uniform mesh simulations. This leads to a substantial reduction in computational cost. The computational savings and flexibility afforded by adaptivity along with the flexibility of FE methods make this model well suited to simulating turbidity currents in complex domains.

  20. DNS and RANS Modeling of Dispersion in the Wake of an Obstacle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philips, David; Rossi, Riccardo; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2009-11-01

    We present a numerical study of the dispersion of a passive scalar in turbulent separated flows to establish the predictive capabilities of algebraic flux models against the standard eddy-diffusivity representation. The scalar dispersion from a point source over a wavy wall is initially investigated to carefully evaluate scalar flux models through comparisons with DNS data. The roof-top release of a passive plume from a wall-mounted cube in a turbulent boundary layer is then presented to demonstrate that algebraic models can also be applied successfully to atmospheric dispersion at street-scale. Despite the questionable validity of local-equilibrium conditions, the numerical experiments show that algebraic models provide a significant improvement for scalar dispersion simulations of complex flows with respect to the standard eddy-diffusivity model.

  1. NUMERICAL NOISE PM SIMULATION IN CMAQ

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have found that numerical noise in the latest release of CMAQ using the yamo advection scheme when compiled on Linux cluster with pgf90 (5.0 or 6.0). We recommend to use -C option to eliminate the numerical noise.

  2. Direct Numerical Simulation of electrochemical reactions in a turbulent electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doche, Olivier; Bauer, Frederic; Tardu, Sedat

    2010-11-01

    In electrochemical processes, such as industrial electrodeposition, the flow state can influence the mass transfer of the active chemical species in solution. This could lead to significant modifications of reaction kinetics at the electrode and obviously affects the global performance of the system. We aim here to describe via DNS the behavior of a turbulent electrolyte in a channel configuration where electrode are placed at each wall. Since the whole problem is governed by a full multiphysic coupling, we resolve in 3D and at each time step a set of equations constituted by 2 turbulent transport equations -momentum and a passive scalar- completed by the potential distribution resolution. These 3 distinct physics are coupled through the Butler-Volmer boundary condition which acts at the electrode/electrolyte interface and governs the whole electrochemical activity. We present the numerical methodology used in this work and all the quantitative results obtained. We also report significant differences with the literature, mainly on the mass transfer statistics, which tend to confirm that a fully coupled approach is necessary to obtain a reliable description of the physic involved in such electrochemical transformations.

  3. Numerical simulation of seasonal groundwater pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filimonova, Elena; Baldenkov, Mikhail

    2015-04-01

    Increasing scarcity and contamination of water recourses require innovative water management strategies such as combined water system. The combined water system is a complex technology comprising two separate wells, major catchment-zone well and compensation pumping well, located inside a single stream basin. The major well is supplied by the well's catchment zone or surface flow, thus depleting the stream flow. The pumping rate of a major well is determined by the difference between the current stream flow and the minimum permissible stream flow. The deficiency of the stream flow in dry seasons can be compensated for by the short-term pumping of groundwater. The compensation pumping rate is determined by the difference between water demand and the permissible water withdrawal of the major well. The source for the compensation well is the aquifer storage. The estimation of streamflow depletion caused by compensation pumping is major question to evaluate the efficiency of the combined water system. Short-term groundwater pumping can use aquifer storage instead of catchment-zone water until the drawdown reaches the edge of the stream. Traditionally pumping simulation calculates in two-step procedure. Natural conditions, an aquifer system is in an approximate dynamic equilibrium, describe by steady-state model. A steady-state solution provides an initial heads, a set of flows through boundaries, and used as initial state for transient solutions, when pumping is imposed on an aquifer system. The transient solutions provide the total change in flows through the boundaries. A difference between the transient and steady-state solutions estimates the capture and the streamflow depletion. Numerical modeling of cyclical compensation pumping has special features: the periodic solution, the seasonal changes through the boundaries and the importance even small drawdown of stream level. When seasonality is a modeling feature, traditional approach leads to mistaken values of streamflow depletion. In this case three-step procedure is used. The first step is usual construction steady-state model. Then steady oscillatory model is constructed in which heads and flows through boundaries vary through the seasons but repeat from year to year (from cycle to cycle). Steady oscillatory solutions are used as initial conditions for transient pumping model. The stream flow depletion is estimated by difference between the transient solution and steady oscillatory solution. The purpose of these investigations was to evaluate the error, caused by using non-periodic solution as initial conditions for transient pumping model and to determine number of cycles required to reach steady oscillatory solution. For this study seasonal numerical models were constructed using ModTECH 2.3 and MODFLOW-2000. The developed models showed significant errors of stream depletion value, when non-periodic solution is used, miscalculation exceed 70 percent and more. It was obtained equations to estimate required number of cycles (N): for confined aquiferN = 0.2 - z + 9 for unconfined aquiferN = 0.0051 - z - 0.3 (L-+L-')2 -S z = T where T and S are transmissivity and specific yield of the aquifer (or storage coefficient for a confined aquifer), L' is stream leakance and L is riverbank size.

  4. An analysis of lower-dimensional approximations to the scalar dissipation rate using direct numerical simulations of plane jet flames

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jackie; Sankaran, Ramanan; Hawkes, Evatt R

    2009-05-01

    The difficulty of experimental measurements of the scalar dissipation rate in turbulent flames has required researchers to estimate the true three-dimensional (3D) scalar dissipation rate from one-dimensional (1D) or two-dimensional (2D) gradient measurements. In doing so, some relationship must be assumed between the true values and their lower dimensional approximations. We develop these relationships by assuming a form for the statistics of the gradient vector orientation, which enables several new results to be obtained and the true 3D scalar dissipation PDF to be reconstructed from the lower-dimensional approximations. We use direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent plane jet flames to examine the orientation statistics, and verify our assumptions and final results. We develop and validate new theoretical relationships between the lower-dimensional and true moments of the scalar dissipation PDF assuming a log-normal true PDF. We compare PDFs reconstructed from lower-dimensional gradient projections with the true values and find an excellent agreement for a 2D simulated measurement and also for a 1D simulated measurement perpendicular to the mean flow variations. Comparisons of PDFs of thermal dissipation from DNS with those obtained via reconstruction from 2D experimental measurements show a very close match, indicating this PDF is not unique to a particular flame configuration. We develop a technique to reconstruct the joint PDF of the scalar dissipation and any other scalar, such as chemical species or temperature. Reconstructed conditional means of the hydroxyl mass fraction are compared with the true values and an excellent agreement is obtained.

  5. Direct Numerical Simulation of turbulent flows over superhydrophobic surfaces: capillary waves on gas-liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jongmin; García-Mayoral, Ricardo; Mani, Ali

    2015-11-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces under liquid flow can produce significant slip, and thus drag reduction, when they entrap gas bubbles within their roughness elements. Our work aims to explore the onset mechanism to the failure of drag reduction by superhydrophobic surfaces when they are exposed to turbulent boundary layers. We focus on the effect of finite surface tension to the dynamic response of deformable interfaces between overlying water flow and the gas pockets. To this end, we conduct direct numerical simulations of turbulent flows over superhydrophobic surfaces allowing deformable gas-liquid interface. DNS results show that spanwise-coherent, upstream-traveling waves develop on the gas-liquid interface as a result of its interactions with turbulence. We study the nature and scaling of the upstream-traveling waves through semi-analytical modeling. We will show that the traveling waves are well described by a Weber number based on the slip velocity at the interface. In higher Weber number, the stability of gas pocket decreases as the amplitude of interface deformation and the magnitude of pressure fluctuations are augmented. Supported by Office of Naval Research and the Kwanjeong Educational Scholarship Foundation.

  6. Direct Numerical Simulation of Vertical Particulate Channel Flow in the Turbulent Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlmann, M.; Pinelli, A.

    We have conducted a DNS study of dilute turbulent particulate flow in a vertical plane channel, considering up to 8192 finite-size rigid particles with numerically resolved phase interfaces. The particle diameter corresponds to approximately 9 wall units and their terminal Reynolds number is set to 136. The fluid flow with bulk Reynolds number 2700 is directed upward, which maintains the particles suspended upon average. Two different density ratios were simulated, varying by a factor of 4.5. The corresponding Stokes numbers of the two particles were O(10) in the near-wall region and O(1) in the outer flow. We have observed the formation of large-scale elongated streak-like structures with streamwise dimensions of the order of 8 channel half-widths and cross-stream dimensions of the order of one half-width. At the same time, we have found no evidence of significant formation of particle clusters, which suggests that the large structures are due to an mtxinsic instability of the flow, triggered by the presence of the particles. It was found that the mean flow velocity profile tends towards a concave shape, and the turbulence intensity as well as the normal stress anisotropy are strongly increased. The effect of varying the Stokes number while keeping the buoyancy, particle size and volume fraction constant was relatively weak. More details about part of this work can be found in (2008).

  7. Direct Numerical Simulation of Particle Behaviour in a Gas-Solid Three Dimensional Plane Jet

    SciTech Connect

    Qazi, N. A.; Tang, J. C. K.; Hawkes, E. R.; Yeoh, G. H.; Grout, Ray W.; Sitaraman, Hariswaran; Talei, M.; Taylor, R. A.; Bolla, M.; Wang, H.

    2014-12-08

    In this paper, direct numerical simulations (DNS) of a three-dimensional (3D), non-reacting, temporally evolving planar jet laden with mono-dispersed solid particles in the two-way coupling (TWC) regime are performed. Three different particles Stokes numbers (St = 0.1, 1, 10) have been considered. This has been achieved by varying the particle diameter while keeping the particle mass loading (fm = 1) and the jet Reynolds number (Rejet = 2000) unchanged. The objective is to study the effect of the particle Stokes number TWC regime on the temporal development of the planar jet. Two-way coupled momentum and heat transfer has been studied by investigating mean relative velocity and temperature. Results indicate that the relative parameters are more pronounced on the edges of the jet and decrease in time in general. At the center of the jet however, the mean value first increases and then decreases again. Additionally, lighter particles spread farther than heavier particles from the center of the jet. Furthermore, the heavier particles delay the development of the jet due to TWC effects.

  8. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent supercritical flow and heat transfer of water in a vertical pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Jung Yul; Lee, Sang Hoon; Bae, Joong Hun

    2012-11-01

    Turbulent heat transfer to supercritical-pressure water flowing in a heated vertical tube is investigated using direct numerical simulation. A conservative space-time discretization scheme for variable-density flows at low Mach numbers is adopted to treat steep variations of fluid properties at supercritical pressure just above the thermodynamic critical point, where the fluid properties at such conditions are obtained using PROPATH and used in the form of tables. The buoyancy influence induced by strong variation of density across the pseudo-critical temperature proves to play an important role in turbulent flow and heat transfer at supercritical state. The predicted wall temperature shows localized peaks in the axial distribution. Localized heat transfer impairment of the supercritical-pressure water is found to occur where turbulent energy diffusion is locally suppressed due to the influence of buoyancy. Although the present DNS has been performed at a much lower Reynolds number than that of typical experimental conditions, the peculiar characteristics of supercritical heat transfer including both enhancement and local deterioration are well predicted, in particular, the occurrence of double hot spots. The support of Priority Research Centers Program through the National Research Foundation funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (2011-0029613), Republic of Korea is gratefully acknowledged.

  9. The study of the properties of turbulent stably stratified air flow over water surface by direct numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druzhinin, Oleg; Troitskaya, Yuliya; Zilitinkevich, Sergej

    2014-05-01

    Parameterization of turbulent momentum and heat fluxes in a turbulent, stably stratified boundary layer flow over water surface is important for numerical climate modeling and weather prediction. In this work, the detailed structure and statistical characteristics of a turbulent, stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer flow over water surface is studied by direct numerical simulation (DNS). The most difficult case for modeling is that of flows at high Reynolds numbers and sufficiently steep surface waves, when strongly non-linear effects (e.g. sheltering, boundary layer separation, vortex formation etc.) are encountered. Of special interest is the influence of the wind flow stratification on the properties of boundary-layer turbulence and the turbulent momentum and heat fluxes. In DNS a two-dimensional water wave with different wave age parameters (c/u*, where u* is the friction velocity and c is the wave celerity), wave slope ka varying from 0 to 0.2 and bulk Reynolds number Re (from 15000 to 80000) and different Richardson numbers are considered. The shape of the water wave is prescribed and does not evolve under the action of the wind. The full, 3D Navier-Stokes equations under the Boussinesq approximation are solved in curvilinear coordinates in a frame of reference moving the phase velocity of the wave. The shear driving the flow is created by an upper plane boundary moving horizontally with a bulk velocity in the x-direction. Periodic boundary conditions are considered in the horizontal (x) and lateral (y) directions, and no-slip boundary condition is considered in the vertical z-direction. The grid of 360 x 240 x 360 nodes in the x, y, and z directions is used. The Adams-Bashforth method is employed to advance the integration in time and the equation for the pressure is solved iteratively. Ensemble-averaged velocity and pressure fields are evaluated by averaging over time and the spanwise coordinate. Profiles of the mean velocity and turbulent stresses are obtained by averaging over wavelength. The DNS results show that the properties of the boundary layer flow are significantly affected by stratification. If the Richardson number Ri is sufficiently small, the flow remains turbulent and qualitatively similar to the non-stratified case. On the other hand, at high Ri turbulent fluctuations and momentum and heat fluxes decay to zero at low wave slope but remain finite at sufficiently large ka (>0.15). Parameterization of turbulent and heat production, diffusion and dissipation is also performed by a closure procedure and compared with the results of DNS. The criteria in terms of the product of the Kolmogorov time scale and local buoyancy frequency or/and the ratio of the Kolmogorov vs. Ozmidov lengh scales is proposed to characterize the different flow regimes observed in DNS. This work was supported by RFBR (project Nos. 10-05-91177, 14-05-00367) and by the grant from the Government of the Russian Federation under contract No. 11.G34.31.0048.

  10. Validation of three-dimensional incompressible spatial direct numerical simulation code: A comparison with linear stability and parabolic stability equation theories for boundary-layer transition on a flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, Ronald D.; Streett, Craig L.; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    1992-01-01

    Spatially evolving instabilities in a boundary layer on a flat plate are computed by direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. In a truncated physical domain, a nonstaggered mesh is used for the grid. A Chebyshev-collocation method is used normal to the wall; finite difference and compact difference methods are used in the streamwise direction; and a Fourier series is used in the spanwise direction. For time stepping, implicit Crank-Nicolson and explicit Runge-Kutta schemes are used to the time-splitting method. The influence-matrix technique is used to solve the pressure equation. At the outflow boundary, the buffer-domain technique is used to prevent convective wave reflection or upstream propagation of information from the boundary. Results of the DNS are compared with those from both linear stability theory (LST) and parabolized stability equation (PSE) theory. Computed disturbance amplitudes and phases are in very good agreement with those of LST (for small inflow disturbance amplitudes). A measure of the sensitivity of the inflow condition is demonstrated with both LST and PSE theory used to approximate inflows. Although the DNS numerics are very different than those of PSE theory, the results are in good agreement. A small discrepancy in the results that does occur is likely a result of the variation in PSE boundary condition treatment in the far field. Finally, a small-amplitude wave triad is forced at the inflow, and simulation results are compared with those of LST. Again, very good agreement is found between DNS and LST results for the 3-D simulations, the implication being that the disturbance amplitudes are sufficiently small that nonlinear interactions are negligible.

  11. Analysis of turbulent transport and mixing in transitional Rayleigh–Taylor unstable flow using direct numerical simulation data

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, Oleg; Mueschke, Nicholas J.

    2010-10-18

    Data from a 1152X760X1280 direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a transitional Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer modeled after a small Atwood number water channel experiment is used to comprehensively investigate the structure of mean and turbulent transport and mixing. The simulation had physical parameters and initial conditions approximating those in the experiment. The budgets of the mean vertical momentum, heavy-fluid mass fraction, turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate, heavy-fluid mass fraction variance, and heavy-fluid mass fraction variance dissipation rate equations are constructed using Reynolds averaging applied to the DNS data. The relative importance of mean and turbulent production, turbulent dissipation and destruction, and turbulent transport are investigated as a function of Reynolds number and across the mixing layer to provide insight into the flow dynamics not presently available from experiments. The analysis of the budgets supports the assumption for small Atwood number, Rayleigh/Taylor driven flows that the principal transport mechanisms are buoyancy production, turbulent production, turbulent dissipation, and turbulent diffusion (shear and mean field production are negligible). As the Reynolds number increases, the turbulent production in the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate equation becomes the dominant production term, while the buoyancy production plateaus. Distinctions between momentum and scalar transport are also noted, where the turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate both grow in time and are peaked near the center plane of the mixing layer, while the heavy-fluid mass fraction variance and its dissipation rate initially grow and then begin to decrease as mixing progresses and reduces density fluctuations. All terms in the transport equations generally grow or decay, with no qualitative change in their profile, except for the pressure flux contribution to the total turbulent kinetic energy flux, which changes sign early in time (a countergradient effect). The production-to-dissipation ratios corresponding to the turbulent kinetic energy and heavy-fluid mass fraction variance are large and vary strongly at small evolution times, decrease with time, and nearly asymptote as the flow enters a self-similar regime. The late-time turbulent kinetic energy production-to-dissipation ratio is larger than observed in shear-driven turbulent flows. The order of magnitude estimates of the terms in the transport equations are shown to be consistent with the DNS at late-time, and also confirms both the dominant terms and their evolutionary behavior. Thus, these results are useful for identifying the dynamically important terms requiring closure, and assessing the accuracy of the predictions of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and large-eddy simulation models of turbulent transport and mixing in transitional Rayleigh-Taylor instability-generated flow.

  12. LES, DNS and RANS for the analysis of high-speed turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this research is to continue our efforts in advancing the state of knowledge in Large Eddy Simulation (LES), Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS), and Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) methods for the analysis of high-speed reacting turbulent flows. In the first phase of this research, conducted within the past six months, focus was in three directions: RANS of turbulent reacting flows by Probability Density Function (PDF) methods, RANS of non-reacting turbulent flows by advanced turbulence closures, and LES of mixing dominated reacting flows by a dynamics subgrid closure. A summary of our efforts within the past six months of this research is provided in this semi-annual progress report.

  13. LES, DNS and RANS for the analysis of high-speed turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman; Taulbee, Dale B.; Adumitroaie, Virgil; Sabini, George J.; Shieh, Geoffrey S.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to continue our efforts in advancing the state of knowledge in large eddy simulation (LES), direct numerical simulation (DNS), and Reynolds averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) methods for the computational analysis of high-speed reacting turbulent flows. In the second phase of this work, covering the period 1 Sep. 1993 - 1 Sep. 1994, we have focused our efforts on two research problems: (1) developments of 'algebraic' moment closures for statistical descriptions of nonpremixed reacting systems, and (2) assessments of the Dirichlet frequency in presumed scalar probability density function (PDF) methods in stochastic description of turbulent reacting flows. This report provides a complete description of our efforts during this past year as supported by the NASA Langley Research Center under Grant NAG1-1122.

  14. A DNS study of supersonic boundary layer trip induced transition and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beekman, Izaak; Martin, M. Pino

    2014-11-01

    We perform the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a Mach 7 . 2 , turbulent boundary layer, with a laminar inflow. A two-dimensional, semi-circular, bar-type roughness element is introduced near the inlet to hasten transition to turbulence. We choose this geometry because two-dimensional trip-wire-type devices have been used extensively by the experimental community, but we know of no computational studies to simulate transition behind such a roughness element in supersonic flow. We vary the trip size to investigate how size and trip-imposed length scales affect the transition process and the resulting turbulence. The incoming boundary layer conditions are matched to those of experiments being conducted at Princeton University Gas Dynamics Laboratory, where the free stream Mach number is 7 . 2 . This work is sponsored by the USAF under Grant AF/9550-10-1-0535 STW 21 - Revitalization of the Hypersonics Testing and Evaluation Workforce.

  15. Terascale High-Fidelity Simulations of Turbulent Combustion with Detailed Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Raghurama Reddy; Roberto Gomez; Junwoo Lim; Yang Wang; Sergiu Sanielevici

    2004-10-15

    This SciDAC project enabled a multidisciplinary research consortium to develop a high fidelity direct numerical simulation (DNS) software package for the simulation of turbulent reactive flows. Within this collaboration, the authors, based at CMU's Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center (PSC), focused on extensive new developments in Sandia National Laboratories' "S3D" software to address more realistic combustion features and geometries while exploiting Terascale computational possibilities. This work significantly advances the state-of-the-art of DNS of turbulent reacting flows.

  16. Numerical simulation of the 1988 midwestern drought

    SciTech Connect

    Chern, Jiun-Dar; Sun, Wen-Yih

    1997-11-01

    In this study, the Purdue Regional Model (PRM) is utilized to simulate the monthly evolution of the weather patterns during the summer of 1988. The primary goal of this study is to develop and validate the PRM. The PRM, a regional climate model, is a hydrostatic primitive-equation model that uses the Arakawa C staggered grid in the horizontal and a terrain-following vertical coordinate. The model was used to simulate the 1988 drought for one month with lateral boundary conditions. The simulation reproduced the driest events in the Midwest; however, the simulated precipitation along the Gulf coast and Florida was underestimated. This suggests that the 60 km model resolution used in the simulation was not high enough to simulate the convective precipitation associated with the sea breeze circulations. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Numerical Simulation Of Cutting Of Gear Teeth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Huston, Ronald L.; Mavriplis, Dimitrios

    1994-01-01

    Shapes of gear teeth produced by gear cutters of specified shape simulated computationally, according to approach based on principles of differential geometry. Results of computer simulation displayed as computer graphics and/or used in analyses of design, manufacturing, and performance of gears. Applicable to both standard and non-standard gear-tooth forms. Accelerates and facilitates analysis of alternative designs of gears and cutters. Simulation extended to study generation of surfaces other than gears. Applied to cams, bearings, and surfaces of arbitrary rolling elements as well as to gears. Possible to develop analogous procedures for simulating manufacture of skin surfaces like automobile fenders, airfoils, and ship hulls.

  18. Numerical Simulation of Electroosmotic Flow through Triangular Microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanaraj, Vaitheeswaran; Mohan, V.

    2007-11-01

    Numerical simulation electroosmotic flow through triangular microchannels has been developed in this paper. The governing equations consist of a 2D Poisson-Boltzman equation and a 2D Navier Stoke's with Electric Double Layer (EDL) field and velocity field in the cross-section of triangular microchannel are solved analytically. The effects of channel height, electrolyte concentration, surface potential, EDL thickness and externally applied elctric field on the velocity profile of traiangular microchannels are numerically studied. The comparison of numerical simulation results shows excellent agreement with the corresponding analytical solution. The numerical simulation shows significant influences of channel cross-section geometry and volumetric flow rate.

  19. Numerical Simulation of Two Phase Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing

    2001-01-01

    Two phase flows can be found in broad situations in nature, biology, and industry devices and can involve diverse and complex mechanisms. While the physical models may be specific for certain situations, the mathematical formulation and numerical treatment for solving the governing equations can be general. Hence, we will require information concerning each individual phase as needed in a single phase. but also the interactions between them. These interaction terms, however, pose additional numerical challenges because they are beyond the basis that we use to construct modern numerical schemes, namely the hyperbolicity of equations. Moreover, due to disparate differences in time scales, fluid compressibility and nonlinearity become acute, further complicating the numerical procedures. In this paper, we will show the ideas and procedure how the AUSM-family schemes are extended for solving two phase flows problems. Specifically, both phases are assumed in thermodynamic equilibrium, namely, the time scales involved in phase interactions are extremely short in comparison with those in fluid speeds and pressure fluctuations. Details of the numerical formulation and issues involved are discussed and the effectiveness of the method are demonstrated for several industrial examples.

  20. Numerical simulation of turbulent combustion: Scientific challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, ZhuYin; Lu, Zhen; Hou, LingYun; Lu, LiuYan

    2014-08-01

    Predictive simulation of engine combustion is key to understanding the underlying complicated physicochemical processes, improving engine performance, and reducing pollutant emissions. Critical issues as turbulence modeling, turbulence-chemistry interaction, and accommodation of detailed chemical kinetics in complex flows remain challenging and essential for high-fidelity combustion simulation. This paper reviews the current status of the state-of-the-art large eddy simulation (LES)/prob-ability density function (PDF)/detailed chemistry approach that can address the three challenging modelling issues. PDF as a subgrid model for LES is formulated and the hybrid mesh-particle method for LES/PDF simulations is described. Then the development need in micro-mixing models for the PDF simulations of turbulent premixed combustion is identified. Finally the different acceleration methods for detailed chemistry are reviewed and a combined strategy is proposed for further development.

  1. Tracking of large-scale structures in turbulent channel with direct numerical simulation of low Prandtl number passive scalar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiselj, Iztok

    2014-12-01

    Channel flow DNS (Direct Numerical Simulation) at friction Reynolds number 180 and with passive scalars of Prandtl numbers 1 and 0.01 was performed in various computational domains. The "normal" size domain was ˜2300 wall units long and ˜750 wall units wide; size taken from the similar DNS of Moser et al. The "large" computational domain, which is supposed to be sufficient to describe the largest structures of the turbulent flows was 3 times longer and 3 times wider than the "normal" domain. The "very large" domain was 6 times longer and 6 times wider than the "normal" domain. All simulations were performed with the same spatial and temporal resolution. Comparison of the standard and large computational domains shows the velocity field statistics (mean velocity, root-mean-square (RMS) fluctuations, and turbulent Reynolds stresses) that are within 1%-2%. Similar agreement is observed for Pr = 1 temperature fields and can be observed also for the mean temperature profiles at Pr = 0.01. These differences can be attributed to the statistical uncertainties of the DNS. However, second-order moments, i.e., RMS temperature fluctuations of standard and large computational domains at Pr = 0.01 show significant differences of up to 20%. Stronger temperature fluctuations in the "large" and "very large" domains confirm the existence of the large-scale structures. Their influence is more or less invisible in the main velocity field statistics or in the statistics of the temperature fields at Prandtl numbers around 1. However, these structures play visible role in the temperature fluctuations at low Prandtl number, where high temperature diffusivity effectively smears the small-scale structures in the thermal field and enhances the relative contribution of large-scales. These large thermal structures represent some kind of an echo of the large scale velocity structures: the highest temperature-velocity correlations are not observed between the instantaneous temperatures and instantaneous streamwise velocities, but between the instantaneous temperatures and velocities averaged over certain time interval.

  2. Polarization transmission at RHIC, numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Meot F.; Bai, M.; Liu, C.; Minty, M.; Ranjbar, V.

    2012-05-20

    Typical tracking simulations regarding the transmission of the polarization in the proton-proton collider RHIC are discussed. They participate in general studies aimed at understanding and improving polarization performances during polarized proton-proton runs.

  3. Numerical simulator for superconducting integrated circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Rollins, J.G. )

    1991-02-01

    Recent advances in materials technology may greatly reduce the cost of producing and operating superconducting (SC) integrated circuits (IC's). In anticipation of the development of these new IC's, this paper describes a computer program and models for simulation of Josephson junction switching circuits. The program uses SPICE like input syntax and is capable of both static and dynamic analysis. The basic operation of Josephson logic is explained and several example simulations are given.

  4. Analysis and modeling of subgrid scalar mixing using numerical data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girimaji, Sharath S.; Zhou, YE

    1995-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of passive scalar mixing in isotropic turbulence is used to study, analyze and, subsequently, model the role of small (subgrid) scales in the mixing process. In particular, we attempt to model the dissipation of the large scale (supergrid) scalar fluctuations caused by the subgrid scales by decomposing it into two parts: (1) the effect due to the interaction among the subgrid scales; and (2) the effect due to interaction between the supergrid and the subgrid scales. Model comparisons with DNS data show good agreement. This model is expected to be useful in the large eddy simulations of scalar mixing and reaction.

  5. Direct numerical simulations of transition and turbulence in smooth-walled Stokes boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozdemir, Celalettin E.; Hsu, Tian-Jian; Balachandar, S.

    2014-04-01

    Stokes boundary layer (SBL) is a time-periodic canonical flow that has several environmental, industrial, and physiological applications. Understanding the hydrodynamic instability and turbulence in SBL, therefore, will shed more light on the nature of such flows. Unlike its steady counterpart, the flow in a SBL varies both in space and time, which makes hydrodynamic instability and transition from laminar to turbulent state highly complicated. In this study, we utilized direct numerical simulations (DNS) to understand the characteristics of hydrodynamic instability, the transition from laminar to turbulent state, and the characteristics of intermittent turbulence in a smooth SBL for Re_Δ in the range of 500-1000. Simulation results show that nonlinear growth plays a critical role on the instability at Re_Δ = 500 and 600. However, the nonlinear growth does not warrant sustainable transition to turbulence and the outcome is highly dependent on the amplitude and spatial distribution of the initial velocity disturbance in addition to Re_Δ . Simulation results at Re_Δ = 500 confirm that instability and subsequent transitional flow will eventually decay. At Re_Δ = 600 nonlinear growth recurs at every modulation period but such transition does not evolve into fully developed turbulence at any time in the modulation cycle. At Re_Δ = 700, the flow shows features of fully developed turbulence during some modulation periods and the transitional character of Re_Δ = 600 at the remaining. Therefore, we conclude that flow in the range of Re_Δ = 600-700 is to be classified as self-sustaining transitional flow. For higher Reynolds number the flow indeed exhibits features of fully developed boundary layer turbulence for a portion of the wave period, which is known as the intermittently turbulent regime in the literature.

  6. The normal stress amplifier: A numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debbaut, Benoit

    We investigate the Weissenberg effect of a bi-fluid system. A viscoelastic fluid is floating on a Newtonian inelastic liquid. Both fluids are set into motion by a rotating rod. Such a device is considered as a normal stress amplifier, since the down-climb produced by the viscoelastic liquid can be larger than the up-climb. Numerical results are displayed, and compared with previous experimental measurements and analytical predictions. The complex developments of the secondary motions is also presented.

  7. Numerical Simulation Of Buckling In Waffle Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, Dah N.; Tran, Vu M.

    1990-01-01

    Accurate results obtained when fillet radii considered. Two reports describe numerical and experimental study of application of PASCO and WAFFLE computer programs to analysis of buckling in integrally machined, biaxially stiffened panel. PASCO (Panal Analysis and Sizing Code) is finite-element stress-and-strain code written for analysis and sizing of uniaxially stiffened panels. WAFFLE program provides comprehensive stress analysis of waffle panel, used to determine bending moments at interfaces.

  8. Numerical simulation of in situ bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, B.J.

    1998-12-31

    Models that couple subsurface flow and transport with microbial processes are an important tool for assessing the effectiveness of bioremediation in field applications. A numerical algorithm is described that differs from previous in situ bioremediation models in that it includes: both vadose and groundwater zones, unsteady air and water flow, limited nutrients and airborne nutrients, toxicity, cometabolic kinetics, kinetic sorption, subgridscale averaging, pore clogging and protozoan grazing.

  9. Numerical simulation of hemorrhage in human injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Kwitae; Jiang, Chenfanfu; Santhanam, Anand; Benharash, Peyman; Teran, Joseph; Eldredge, Jeff

    2015-11-01

    Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is adapted to simulate hemorrhage in the injured human body. As a Lagrangian fluid simulation, SPH uses fluid particles as computational elements and thus mass conservation is trivially satisfied. In order to ensure anatomical fidelity, a three-dimensional reconstruction of a portion of the human body -here, demonstrated on the lower leg- is sampled as skin, bone and internal tissue particles from the CT scan image of an actual patient. The injured geometry is then generated by simulation of ballistic projectiles passing through the anatomical model with the Material Point Method (MPM) and injured vessel segments are identified. From each such injured segment, SPH is used to simulate bleeding, with inflow boundary condition obtained from a coupled 1-d vascular tree model. Blood particles interact with impermeable bone and skin particles through the Navier-Stokes equations and with permeable internal tissue particles through the Brinkman equations. The SPH results are rendered in post-processing for improved visual fidelity. The overall simulation strategy is demonstrated on several injury scenarios in the lower leg.

  10. DNS of turbulent wall bounded flows with a passive scalar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araya, Juan Guillermo

    In this thesis, Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of the velocity and temperature fields are performed for incompressible turbulent flows in plane channels and spatially-developing boundary layers. The main goal is to numerically analyze the behavior of the momentum and thermal boundary layers subjected to different external and upstream conditions, the main focus is given to: (i) local flow perturbations, (ii) different Reynolds numbers, and, (iii) external pressure gradient. Two types of turbulent wall-bounded flows are examined in this investigation. One of them consists of the fully developed turbulent channel. Furthermore, after the developing section, the boundary layers generated by the lower and upper walls collapse. From this point to downstream, periodic boundary conditions are applicable due to the existent homogeneity. The second type of wall bounded flow explored possesses no restriction in the upper zone; consequently, the boundary layer may grow infinitely downstream. This streamwise non-homogeneous state does not allow to prescribe periodic boundary conditions along the direction of the flow. Therefore, time-dependent turbulent information must be assigned at the domain inlet, turning the numerical problem into a very challenging one. The spatially-developing turbulent boundary layer in a flat plate is a typical example of non-homogeneous flow. In the first part of this thesis, the influence of local forcing on an incompressible turbulent channel flow is numerically investigated. The extensive information provided by the DNS enable us to have a better understanding of the physical mechanism responsible for local heat transfer enhancement and drag reduction. Time-periodic blowing/suction is applied by means of thin spanwise slots located at the lower and upper walls of the channel at several forcing frequencies. It was found in Araya et al. (2008-a) the existence of a characteristic frequency, i.e. of f = 0.64 or f* = 0.044, at which maximum local augmentation of the molecular and turbulent heat transfer rates were obtained downstream from the local forcing source. Furthermore, the key role of pressure fluctuations in the energy exchange and redistribution of energy among the components was confirmed by Araya et al. (2008-b) by analyzing the budget of wall-normal turbulent heat fluxes in locally forced turbulent flows at the characteristic frequency. Additionally, the analysis of power spectra and cospectra of fluctuations in Araya et al. (2008-b) demonstrated that the largest energy increases due to periodic blowing/suction are attained by the wall-normal velocity fluctuations and wall-normal turbulent heat fluxes at very low wavenumbers or large scales. The latter part of this work is principally devoted to the analysis of the rescaling-recycling method on the generation of time-dependent turbulent inflow conditions on spatially evolving boundary layers in zero (ZPG) and adverse (APG) pressure gradient flows. The rescaling-recycling method shows promising features as a turbulent inflow generator, particularly on pressure gradient (PG) flows. Its simplicity permits to avoid the calculation of the laminar-transition stage, and, as a consequence, a huge amount of computational time can be saved. Not to mention that the computational domain is drastically reduced due to the short developing section needed. Nevertheless, the original procedure proposed by Lund et al. (1998) was limited to flows without streamwise pressure gradients due to the single scaling assumption. This is indeed the first time that a recycling approach successfully worked for PG flows. In this study, an alternative multi-scale similarity method for the generation of inflow turbulent momentum/thermal information is introduced for flows with and without streamwise pressure gradients for Reynolds numbers up to 2300 based on the momentum thickness, i.e. Retheta. The velocity scaling laws for the mean flow are based on the works by George and Castillo (1997) and Castillo and George (2001). In the same way, the mean temperature scaling is derived from the investigations performed by Wang (2003) and Wang and Castillo (2003). Finally, DNS of spatially-developing turbulent boundary layers on a flat plate (ZPG) at low and high Reynolds numbers are performed. To the best of our understanding, the thermal boundary layer simulations carried out at Retheta = 1940--2300 represent the numerical predictions at the highest Reynolds number available in the turbulence community. Additionally, direct simulations of a turbulent boundary layer subjected to a moderate adverse pressure gradient (APG) are also presented based on the novel multi-scale method. Turbulence parameters are compared with experimental data and other numerical predictions found in the literature. Furthermore, the effects of the Reynolds number and pressure gradient are discussed for the velocity-temperature analogy, turbulent Prandtl number, energy budgets and turbulence structures.

  11. 3D DNS and LES of Breaking Inertia-Gravity Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remmler, S.; Fruman, M. D.; Hickel, S.; Achatz, U.

    2012-04-01

    As inertia-gravity waves we refer to gravity waves that have a sufficiently low frequency and correspondingly large horizontal wavelength to be strongly influenced by the Coriolis force. Inertia-gravity waves are very active in the middle atmosphere and their breaking is potentially an important influence on the circulation in this region. The parametrization of this process requires a good theoretical understanding, which we want to enhance with the present study. Primary linear instabilities of an inertia-gravity wave and "2.5-dimensional" nonlinear simulations (where the spatial dependence is two dimensional but the velocity and vorticity fields are three-dimensional) with the wave perturbed by its leading primary instabilities by Achatz [1] have shown that the breaking differs significantly from that of high-frequency gravity waves due to the strongly sheared component of velocity perpendicular to the plane of wave-propagation. Fruman & Achatz [2] investigated the three-dimensionalization of the breaking by computing the secondary linear instabilities of the same waves using singular vector analysis. These secondary instabilities are variations perpendicular to the direction of the primary perturbation and the wave itself, and their wavelengths are an order of magnitude shorter than both. In continuation of this work, we carried out fully three-dimensional nonlinear simulations of inertia-gravity waves perturbed by their leading primary and secondary instabilities. The direct numerical simulation (DNS) was made tractable by restricting the domain size to the dominant scales selected by the linear analyses. The study includes both convectively stable and unstable waves. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first fully three-dimensional nonlinear direct numerical simulation of inertia-gravity waves at realistic Reynolds numbers with complete resolution of the smallest turbulence scales. Previous simulations either were restricted to high frequency gravity waves (e. g. Fritts et al. [3]), or the ratio N/f was artificially reduced (e. g. Lelong & Dunkerton [4]). The present simulations give us insight into the three-dimensional breaking process as well as the emerging turbulence. We assess the possibility of reducing the computational costs of three-dimensional simulations by using an implicit turbulence subgrid-scale parametrization based on the Adaptive Local Deconvolution Method (ALDM) for stratified turbulence [5]. In addition, we have performed ensembles of nonlinear 2.5-dimensional DNS, like those in Achatz [1] but with a small amount of noise superposed to the initial state, and compared the results with coarse-resolution simulations using either ALDM as well as with standard LES schemes. We found that the results of the models with parametrized turbulence, which are orders of magnitude more computationally economical than the DNS, compare favorably with the DNS in terms of the decay of the wave amplitude with time (the quantity most important for application to gravity-wave drag parametrization) suggesting that they may be trusted in future simulations of gravity wave breaking.

  12. An idealized numerical simulation of mammatus-like clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanak, Katharine M.; Straka, Jerry M.

    2006-01-01

    A three-dimensional numerical simulation of mammatus-like clouds is presented. A portion of a cirrus outflow anvil cloud is simulated including cloud ice and snow microphysical representations. The simulated mammatus clouds appear in a cellular pattern and are compared with the few available previously published physical observations of mammatus.

  13. Numerical simulations of plasma double layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.; Borovsky, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    The results of analytical studies of quasi-static electric fields along geomagnetic field lines are discussed. The calculations were targeted at the structure, generation mechanisms and stability parameters. The field consists of two oppositely charged layers, either weakly or strongly charged, with an electric field between. Existence conditions are defined for the double layer field and balancing requirements are explored. Details of the simulation techniques, i.e., particle in cell and Vlasov simulations, for studying the double layer are outlined, noting that both periodic and quasi-periodic simulations are used. Solutions to Poisson's equation for fixed and floating point boundary conditions are generated. Finally, attention is also given to oblique and two-dimensional magnetic double layers.

  14. Numerical simulation of powered-lift flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dalsem, William R.; Chawla, Kalpana; Smith, Merritt H.; Abeloff, Patricia A.

    1990-01-01

    This article presents work performed at NASA's Ames Research Center involving the application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to the prediction of flows encountered by powered-lift aircraft operating in ground effect. These flows are characterized by jet and jet-induced flows interacting with the ground and aerodynamic surfaces. Over the last five years, work has progressed from simulating the interaction of a single jet impacting on a ground plane, through the simulation of a delta planform with multiple jets in ground effect, to an ongoing effort to simulate the complete flow about a Harrier AV-8B in ground effect. Efforts have also been made to predict the thermal interaction between hot propulsive jets and a landing surface of arbitrary thermal properties. Progress to date in each of these areas will be outlined.

  15. Numerical simulations on electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Okuda, H.; Cheng, C.Z.; Lee, W.W.

    1981-02-01

    Both one- and two-dimensional particle simulation models have been used to study the nonlinear behavior of the electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron instabilities driven by the electron current along magnetic field. It is found that the instability saturates as a result of electron velocity space diffusion along magnetic field. The cyclotron waves remain highly coherent in the nonlinear stage. When the electron drift speed is comparable to thermal speed, substantial ion heating as well as particle cross-field diffusion comparable to Bohm diffusion has been observed. Comparisons of the simulation results with the theoretical predictions and the observations in both laboratory and space plasmas are discussed.

  16. Numerical simulations of dense collisional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salo, H.

    1991-04-01

    The present use of a local simulation method akin to that of Wisdom and Tremaine (1988) to examine the viscous stability characteristics of dense planetary rings confirms that the viscous instability of the standard elastic model of icy particles should not occur for systems of identical, meter-sized particles, but may indeed occur in dense systems composed of cm-sized ones. In the case of nonidentical particles, small particles become more easily unstable. The layered structure of Wisdom and Tremaine's simulation with self-gravity can be substantially modified if the vertical field is calculated self-consistently; in some cases, a flattening to the central plane may be virtually complete.

  17. Numerical simulations in the development of propellant management devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaulke, Diana; Winkelmann, Yvonne; Dreyer, Michael

    Propellant management devices (PMDs) are used for positioning the propellant at the propel-lant port. It is important to provide propellant without gas bubbles. Gas bubbles can inflict cavitation and may lead to system failures in the worst case. Therefore, the reliable operation of such devices must be guaranteed. Testing these complex systems is a very intricate process. Furthermore, in most cases only tests with downscaled geometries are possible. Numerical sim-ulations are used here as an aid to optimize the tests and to predict certain results. Based on these simulations, parameters can be determined in advance and parts of the equipment can be adjusted in order to minimize the number of experiments. In return, the simulations are validated regarding the test results. Furthermore, if the accuracy of the numerical prediction is verified, then numerical simulations can be used for validating the scaling of the experiments. This presentation demonstrates some selected numerical simulations for the development of PMDs at ZARM.

  18. Coupled numerical simulation of hot stamping process and experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ye; Ying, Liang; Hu, Ping; Shi, Dongyong; Zhao, Xi; Dai, Minghua

    2013-05-01

    Hot stamping process is a high non-linear process showing the effect on thermal, mechanical and metallurgical phenomena as they relate to each other. In order to carry out this coupled numerical simulation, fundamental thermal properties such as interfacial heat transfer coefficient and convection heat transfer coefficient as well as crucial mechanics properties were first investigated. Hot stamping tools with cooling system which has been optimized by genetic algorithm were employed in the simulation. The coupled numerical simulation to the whole hot stamping process was built with the ABAQUS/Explicit and FLUENT. Experiment was setup and the results of blank temperature and spring-back were compared with the results of coupled numerical simulation. The comparisons show that the simulation results of numerical model are consistent with experimental results.

  19. Numerical simulation of quasi-multifractal diffusion process

    SciTech Connect

    Saichev, A. I. Filimonov, V. A.

    2008-08-15

    The properties of quasi-multifractal diffusion process are discussed. A discrete model of the process is constructed, and a method is proposed for calculating the quasi-multifractal spectrum, based on statistical processing of its realizations. An analysis of multifractal properties performed by numerical simulation of the quasi-multifractal spectrum is qualitatively substantiated by examining realizations of the simulated process. The results of numerical simulations suggest that there are three distinct scaling regions. Special attention is given to comparative analyses between numerical and analytical results and between realizations of the proposed process and the well-known multifractal random walk.

  20. Numerical simulation of cross field amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.

    1990-01-01

    Cross field amplifiers (CFA) have been used in many applications where high power, high frequency microwaves are needed. Although these tubes have been manufactured for decades, theoretical analysis of their properties is not as highly developed as for other microwave devices such as klystrons. One feature distinguishing cross field amplifiers is that the operating current is produced by secondary emission from a cold cathode. This removes the need for a heater and enables the device to act as a switch tube, drawing no power until the rf drive is applied. However, this method of generating the current does complicate the simulation. We are developing a simulation model of cross field amplifiers using the PIC code CONDOR. We simulate an interaction region, one traveling wavelength long, with periodic boundary conditions. An electric field with the appropriate phase velocity is imposed on the upper boundary of the problem. Evaluation of the integral of E{center dot}J gives the power interchanged between the wave and the beam. Given the impedance of the structure, we then calculate the change in the traveling wave field. Thus we simulate the growth of the wave through the device. The main advance of our model over previous CFA simulations is the realistic tracking of absorption and secondary emission. The code uses experimental curves to calculate secondary production as a function of absorbed energy, with a theoretical expression for the angular dependence. We have used this code to model the 100 MW X-band CFA under construction at SLAC, as designed by Joseph Feinstein and Terry Lee. We are examining several questions of practical interest, such as the power and spectrum of absorbed electrons, the minimum traveling wave field needed to initiate spoke formation, and the variation of output power with dc voltage, anode-cathode gap, and magnetic field. 5 refs., 8 figs.

  1. High-Reynolds number turbulent boundary layers studied by numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlatter, Philipp; Li, Qiang; Brethouwer, Geert; Johansson, Arne V.; Henningson, Dan S.

    2009-11-01

    Direct and large-eddy simulations (DNS and LES) of spatially developing high-Reynolds number turbulent boundary layers (Reθ up to 4300) under zero pressure gradient are studied. The inflow of the computational domain and the tripping of the boundary layer is located at low Reynolds numbers Reθ 350, a position where natural transition to turbulence can be expected. The simulation thus includes the spatial evolution of the boundary layer for an extended region, providing statistics and budget terms at each streamwise position. The data is obtained with up to O(10^10) grid points using a parallelised, fully spectral method. The DNS and LES results are critically evaluated and validated, in comparison with other relevant data, e.g. the experiments by "Osterlund et al. (1999). Quantities difficult or even impossible to measure, e.g. pressure fluctuations and complete Reynolds stress budgets, shall be discussed. In addition, special emphasis is put on a further quantification of the large-scale structures appearing in the flow, and their relation to other wall-bounded flow as e.g. channel flow. The results clearly show that with today's computer power Reynolds numbers relevant for industrial applications can be within reach for DNS/LES.

  2. Brush seal numerical simulation: Concepts and advances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, M. J.; Kudriavtsev, V. V.

    1994-01-01

    The development of the brush seal is considered to be most promising among the advanced type seals that are presently in use in the high speed turbomachinery. The brush is usually mounted on the stationary portions of the engine and has direct contact with the rotating element, in the process of limiting the 'unwanted' leakage flows between stages, or various engine cavities. This type of sealing technology is providing high (in comparison with conventional seals) pressure drops due mainly to the high packing density (around 100 bristles/sq mm), and brush compliance with the rotor motions. In the design of modern aerospace turbomachinery leakage flows between the stages must be minimal, thus contributing to the higher efficiency of the engine. Use of the brush seal instead of the labyrinth seal reduces the leakage flow by one order of magnitude. Brush seals also have been found to enhance dynamic performance, cost less, and are lighter than labyrinth seals. Even though industrial brush seals have been successfully developed through extensive experimentation, there is no comprehensive numerical methodology for the design or prediction of their performance. The existing analytical/numerical approaches are based on bulk flow models and do not allow the investigation of the effects of brush morphology (bristle arrangement), or brushes arrangement (number of brushes, spacing between them), on the pressure drops and flow leakage. An increase in the brush seal efficiency is clearly a complex problem that is closely related to the brush geometry and arrangement, and can be solved most likely only by means of a numerically distributed model.

  3. Brush seal numerical simulation: Concepts and advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, M. J.; Kudriavtsev, V. V.

    1994-07-01

    The development of the brush seal is considered to be most promising among the advanced type seals that are presently in use in the high speed turbomachinery. The brush is usually mounted on the stationary portions of the engine and has direct contact with the rotating element, in the process of limiting the 'unwanted' leakage flows between stages, or various engine cavities. This type of sealing technology is providing high (in comparison with conventional seals) pressure drops due mainly to the high packing density (around 100 bristles/sq mm), and brush compliance with the rotor motions. In the design of modern aerospace turbomachinery leakage flows between the stages must be minimal, thus contributing to the higher efficiency of the engine. Use of the brush seal instead of the labyrinth seal reduces the leakage flow by one order of magnitude. Brush seals also have been found to enhance dynamic performance, cost less, and are lighter than labyrinth seals. Even though industrial brush seals have been successfully developed through extensive experimentation, there is no comprehensive numerical methodology for the design or prediction of their performance. The existing analytical/numerical approaches are based on bulk flow models and do not allow the investigation of the effects of brush morphology (bristle arrangement), or brushes arrangement (number of brushes, spacing between them), on the pressure drops and flow leakage. An increase in the brush seal efficiency is clearly a complex problem that is closely related to the brush geometry and arrangement, and can be solved most likely only by means of a numerically distributed model.

  4. Numerical simulations at CEBAF using PARMELA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.

    1993-12-01

    PARMELA has been used at CEBAF for numerical modeling of the nuclear physics injector chopping system, a possible FEL laser gun injector, and the rf steering and focusing effects of the standard CEBAF SRF cavities. These applications call for the code to input field data consistently from SUPERFISH, POISSON, and MAFIA, to properly treat a focusing solenoidal lens having an actual field profile either individually or together with its adjacent rf cavity, to deal with the space charge forces, to model the longitudinal phase space matching required for bunching electrons using a phase-compressor chicane, etc. In this paper, we describe in detail these issues of general interest.

  5. Numerical simulation of oil pool boundary evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khudobina, Yulia; Bubenchikov, Aleksey; Bubenchikov, Mikhail; Matvienko, Oleg; Libin, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    The study of spatial distribution of hydrocarbon resources and forecasting their geographical location is of great importance for the most complete recovery of hydrocarbons from deposits. The present study gives new mathematical results in the theory of stratified fluid flow in a porous medium. This paper analyzes the evolution of oil pool boundary basing on vortex numerical model for movement of the boundary separating fluids of different densities. It presents the investigation of how the location of light fluid regarding the heavier fluid influences on the changes in the boundary between two media in case of various shifting of the well.

  6. Numerical Simulation of Pulsed Meander Coil Emat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhayalan, R.; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Krishnamurthy, C. V.

    2010-02-01

    Electro magnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) are now being widely investigated for non-contact non-destructive testing (NDT) of solid materials. This type of transducer can generate and/or detect ultrasound in electrically conductive or magnetic materials through the Lorentz force principle and/or magneto-elastic effects. This work describes about the Meander coil EMAT that is modeled using finite element method. A 2-D finite element model was developed to calculate the induced current inside the medium, and subsequently the Lorentz force density in the medium. The calculated Lorentz force density values are applied for simulating the transient ultrasonic wave generation within the medium. Meander coil EMATs that were designed using the model were used for experimental studies. Several case studies will be reported which include Rayleigh waves, Shear waves, Longitudinal and Lamb wave modes using pulsed mode of excitation. The experimental results were agreed well with the simulation results.

  7. Numerical Simulations Using the Immersed Boundary Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piomelli, Ugo; Balaras, Elias

    1997-01-01

    The immersed-boundary method can be used to simulate flows around complex geometries within a Cartesian grid. This method has been used quite extensively in low Reynolds-number flows, and is now being applied to turbulent flows more frequently. The technique will be discussed, and three applications of the method will be presented, with increasing complexity. to illustrate the potential and limitations of the method, and some of the directions for future work.

  8. DNS of a spatially evolving hypersonic turbulent boundary layer at Mach 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xian; Li, XinLiang

    2013-07-01

    This paper reports the direct numerical simulation (DNS) for hypersonic turbulent boundary layer over a flat-plate at Ma ∞=8 with the ratio of wall-to-freestream temperature equal to 1.9, which indicates an extremely cold wall condition. It is primarily used to assess the wall temperature effects on the mean velocity profile, Walz equation, turbulent intensity, strong Reynolds analogy (SRA), and compressibility. The present high Mach number with cold wall condition induces strong compressibility effects. As a result, the Morkovin's hypothesis is not fully valid and so the classical SRA is also not fully consistent. However, some modified SRA is still valid at the far-wall region. It is also verified that the semi-local wall coordinate y* is better than conventional y + in analysis of statistics features in turbulent boundary layer (TBL) in hypersonic flow.

  9. Numerical Simulation of Ion Thruster Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawlin, Vincent K. (Technical Monitor); Farnell, Cody C.; Williams, John D.; Wilbur, Paul J.

    2003-01-01

    A three-dimensional simulation code (ffx) designed to analyze ion thruster optics is described. It is an extension of an earlier code and includes special features like the ability to model a wide range of grid geometries, cusp details, and mis-aligned aperture pairs to name a few. However, the principle reason for advancing the code was in the study of ion optics erosion. Ground based testing of ion thruster optics, essential to the understanding of the processes of grid erosion, can be time consuming and costly. Simulation codes that can accurately predict grid lifetimes and the physical mechanisms of grid erosion can be of great utility in the development of future ion thruster optics designed for more ambitious applications. Results of simulations are presented that describe wear profiles for several standard and nonstandard aperture geometries, such as those grid sets with square- or slotted-hole layout patterns. The goal of this paper will be to introduce the methods employed in the ffx code and to briefly demonstrate their use.

  10. Numerical simulations of crude-oil fouling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Junfeng; Matar, Omar

    2014-11-01

    Crude-oil fouling proceeds via several individual steps: initiation, transportation, attachment, removal and ageing. At initiation, two foulant formation routes have been identified: chemical reaction and asphaltene precipitation. Current fouling models either focus on the kinetics of each route individually, or simply lumps the routes together. Very few studies address the issue of interaction of the two routes. The sparingly-soluble foulant precursor could either form larger insoluble fouling particles, or precipitate out of the crude-oil phase directly. Clearly, these two routes compete with each other, e.g. higher chemical reaction fouling rates lead to greater consumption of the sparingly-soluble foulant, and lower precipitation rate. Accounting for the mechanism of interaction between reaction- and precipitation-driven fouling is critical for accurate prediction of the overall fouling formation rate, and the development of fouling mitigation strategies. We develop CFD tools that account for the individual steps that accompany fouling in circular tubes, and use large eddy simulations to simulate turbulence. We use our simulations to elucidate the interaction between the different deposition routes. Skolkovo Foundation through the UNIHEAT Project.

  11. High order hybrid numerical simulations of two dimensional detonation waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, Wei

    1993-01-01

    In order to study multi-dimensional unstable detonation waves, a high order numerical scheme suitable for calculating the detailed transverse wave structures of multidimensional detonation waves was developed. The numerical algorithm uses a multi-domain approach so different numerical techniques can be applied for different components of detonation waves. The detonation waves are assumed to undergo an irreversible, unimolecular reaction A yields B. Several cases of unstable two dimensional detonation waves are simulated and detailed transverse wave interactions are documented. The numerical results show the importance of resolving the detonation front without excessive numerical viscosity in order to obtain the correct cellular patterns.

  12. The study of the effect of the surface wave on turbulent stably-stratified boundary layer air-flow by direct numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druzhinin, Oleg; Troitskaya, Yliya; Zilitinkevich, Sergej

    2015-04-01

    Detailed knowledge of the interaction of surface water waves with the wind flow is of primary importance for correct parameterization of turbulent momentum and heat fluxes which define the energy and momentum transfer between the atmosphere and hydrosphere. The objective of the present study is to investigate the properties of the stably stratified turbulent boundary-layer (BL) air-flow over waved water surface by direct numerical simulation (DNS) at a bulk Reynolds number varying from 15000 to 80000 and the surface-wave slope up to ka = 0.2. The DNS results show that the BL-flow remains in the statistically stationary, turbulent regime if the Reynolds number (ReL) based on the Obukhov length scale and friction velocity is sufficiently large (ReL > 100). In this case, mean velocity and temperature vertical profiles are well predicted by log-linear asymptotic solutions following from the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory provided the velocity and temperature roughness parameters, z0U and z0T, are appropriately prescribed. Both z0U and z0T increase for larger surface-wave slope. DNS results also show that turbulent momentum and heat fluxes and turbulent velocity and temperature fluctuations are increased for larger wave slope (ka) whereas the mean velocity and temperature derivatives remain practically the same for different ka. Thus, we conclude that the source of turbulence enhancement in BL-flow are perturbations induced by the surface wave, and not the shear instability of the bulk flow. On the other hand, if stratification is sufficiently strong, and the surface-wave slope is sufficiently small, the BL-flow over waved surface relaminarizes in the bulk of the domain. However, if the surface-wave slope exceeds a threshold value, the velocity and temperature fluctuations remain finite in the vicinity of the critical-layer level, where the surface-wave phase velocity coincides with the mean flow velocity. We call this new stably-stratified BL-flow regime observed in our DNS a "wave-pumping" regime. We develop a theoretical model and explain the occurrence of the wave-pumping regime observed in DNS as a result of the generation of two-dimensional (2D) disturbances in the air flow under the influence of the surface wave and secondary, parametric instability of these disturbances along the surface-wave front direction. The model predicts that the wave-pumping regime occurs only for sufficiently steep waves which is in agreement with DNS results. The model prediction for the amplitudes of the wave-induced 2D disturbances in the air flow is also in good qualitative and quantitative agreement with DNS results. The results also show that increasing the bulk Reynolds number of the air-flow leads to the development of a wide spectrum of the disturbances. At a sufficiently high super-criticality we expect a transition to occur from the wave-pumping regime to a fully-developed, turbulent BL-flow regime, even at high Richardson number when the air flow over a smooth surface relaminarizes. This work was supported by RFBR (project No. 14-05-00367) and by RSF (project No. 14-17 -0086).

  13. Direct numerical simulation of stagnation region flow and heat transfer with free-stream turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Sungwon; Lele, Sanjiva K.; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2003-06-01

    A direct numerical simulation is performed for stagnation-region flow with free-stream turbulence. A fully implicit second-order time-advancement scheme with fourth-order finite differences and an optimized scheme are employed. The optimized scheme is developed to save computational cost. The free-stream turbulence is a precomputed field of isotropic turbulence. The present DNS results in the "damping" and "attached amplifying" regimes are found to be similar to those of the organized inflow disturbances. Emphasis is placed on the flow and temperature fields in the "detached amplifying" regime. The contours of instantaneous flow field illustrate that streamwise vortices are stretched in the streamwise direction by mean strain rate. The temperature field is also stretched in the streamwise direction near the wall. The surface contours reveal that the temperature field is influenced significantly by streamwise vorticity. Due to the dominance of the mean strain, the log-law region is not observed for ū and T˜, the inner scaling fails, but the outer scaling works. The single-point turbulence statistics and the turbulent statistics budgets are obtained. The flow statistics reflect the typical characteristics of stagnation-region flow which are generically different from those of other canonical shear flows. One of the typical features of the budgets is that the velocity pressure correlation and the turbulent transport play significant roles in the stagnation-region flow. Finally, the present simulation data are compared with experimental results. It is found that the effect of large-scale eddies on the enhancement of wall heat transfer is substantial in the turbulent stagnation-region heat transfer.

  14. Scramjet Propulsive Flowpath Design and Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-ping; Song, Wen-yan; Liu, Xin

    2014-06-01

    The integrated propulsive flowpath of scramjet configuration was preliminarily designed and analyzed in this paper. The flow-fields characteristics and performance of the designed two-dimensional integrated propulsive flowpath were numerically calculated under various equivalent fuel-air ratio conditions, using computational fluid dynamics methods. The calculation results were then compared with the experimental data on some typical conditions, and the flow-field and performance of the integrated scramjet flowpath with different equivalent fuel-air ratios were analyzed and discussed in detail. The investigation results from these efforts showed that: (1) the inlet function was beyond disturbances by combustion induced shock wave and pressure fluctuations under the equivalent fuel-air ratio condition of 1.0, which well satisfied the design requirements; (2) with the increasing equivalent fuel-air ratio, the combustion intensity in the combustor was significantly enhanced, resulting in an increasing net-thrust of the propulsive flowpath.

  15. Numerical simulation of electrophoresis separation processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganjoo, D. K.; Tezduyar, T. E.

    1986-01-01

    A new Petrov-Galerkin finite element formulation has been proposed for transient convection-diffusion problems. Most Petrov-Galerkin formulations take into account the spatial discretization, and the weighting functions so developed give satisfactory solutions for steady state problems. Though these schemes can be used for transient problems, there is scope for improvement. The schemes proposed here, which consider temporal as well as spatial discretization, provide improved solutions. Electrophoresis, which involves the motion of charged entities under the influence of an applied electric field, is governed by equations similiar to those encountered in fluid flow problems, i.e., transient convection-diffusion equations. Test problems are solved in electrophoresis and fluid flow. The results obtained are satisfactory. It is also expected that these schemes, suitably adapted, will improve the numerical solutions of the compressible Euler and the Navier-Stokes equations.

  16. A Priori Analysis of Subgrid Mass Flux Vectors from Massively Parallel Direct Numerical Simulations of High Pressure H2/O2 Reacting Shear Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Justin; Miller, Richard

    2011-11-01

    Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) are conducted for temporally developing reacting H2/O2 shear layers at an ambient pressure of 100atm. The compressible form of the governing equations are coupled with the Peng Robinson real gas equation of state and are solved using eighth order central finite differences and fourth order Runge Kutta time integration with resolutions up to ~3/4 billion grid points. The formulation includes a detailed pressure dependent kinetics mechanism having 8 species and 19 steps, detailed property models, and generalized forms of the multicomponent heat and mass diffusion vectors derived from nonequilibrium thermodynamics and fluctuation theory. The DNS is performed over a range of Reynolds numbers up to 4500 based on the free stream velocity difference and initial vorticity thickness. The results are then analyzed in an a priori manner to illustrate the role of the subgrid mass flux vector within the filtered form of the governing equations relevant to Large Eddy Simulations. The subgrid mass flux vector is found to be a significant term; particularly within localized regions of the flame. Research supported by NSF Grant CBET-0965624 and Clemson University's Palmetto Cluster.

  17. Use of an Accurate DNS Particulate Flow Method to Supply and Validate Boundary Conditions for the MFIX Code

    SciTech Connect

    Zhi-Gang Feng

    2012-05-31

    The simulation of particulate flows for industrial applications often requires the use of two-fluid models, where the solid particles are considered as a separate continuous phase. One of the underlining uncertainties in the use of the two-fluid models in multiphase computations comes from the boundary condition of the solid phase. Typically, the gas or liquid fluid boundary condition at a solid wall is the so called no-slip condition, which has been widely accepted to be valid for single-phase fluid dynamics provided that the Knudsen number is low. However, the boundary condition for the solid phase is not well understood. The no-slip condition at a solid boundary is not a valid assumption for the solid phase. Instead, several researchers advocate a slip condition as a more appropriate boundary condition. However, the question on the selection of an exact slip length or a slip velocity coefficient is still unanswered. Experimental or numerical simulation data are needed in order to determinate the slip boundary condition that is applicable to a two-fluid model. The goal of this project is to improve the performance and accuracy of the boundary conditions used in two-fluid models such as the MFIX code, which is frequently used in multiphase flow simulations. The specific objectives of the project are to use first principles embedded in a validated Direct Numerical Simulation particulate flow numerical program, which uses the Immersed Boundary method (DNS-IB) and the Direct Forcing scheme in order to establish, modify and validate needed energy and momentum boundary conditions for the MFIX code. To achieve these objectives, we have developed a highly efficient DNS code and conducted numerical simulations to investigate the particle-wall and particle-particle interactions in particulate flows. Most of our research findings have been reported in major conferences and archived journals, which are listed in Section 7 of this report. In this report, we will present a brief description of these results.

  18. MODELING STATISTICAL PROPERTIES OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS THROUGH DIRECT NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF 3D-MHD TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Malapaka, Shiva Kumar; Mueller, Wolf-Christian

    2013-09-01

    Statistical properties of the Sun's photospheric turbulent magnetic field, especially those of the active regions (ARs), have been studied using the line-of-sight data from magnetograms taken by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and several other instruments. This includes structure functions and their exponents, flatness curves, and correlation functions. In these works, the dependence of structure function exponents ({zeta}{sub p}) of the order of the structure functions (p) was modeled using a non-intermittent K41 model. It is now well known that the ARs are highly turbulent and are associated with strong intermittent events. In this paper, we compare some of the observations from Abramenko et al. with the log-Poisson model used for modeling intermittent MHD turbulent flows. Next, we analyze the structure function data obtained from the direct numerical simulations (DNS) of homogeneous, incompressible 3D-MHD turbulence in three cases: sustained by forcing, freely decaying, and a flow initially driven and later allowed to decay (case 3). The respective DNS replicate the properties seen in the plots of {zeta}{sub p} against p of ARs. We also reproduce the trends and changes observed in intermittency in flatness and correlation functions of ARs. It is suggested from this analysis that an AR in the onset phase of a flare can be treated as a forced 3D-MHD turbulent system in its simplest form and that the flaring stage is representative of decaying 3D-MHD turbulence. It is also inferred that significant changes in intermittency from the initial onset phase of a flare to its final peak flaring phase are related to the time taken by the system to reach the initial onset phase.

  19. Numerical Simulation of Nix's Rotation - Duration: 100 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    This is a numerical simulation of the orientation of Nix as seen from the center of the Pluto system. It has been sped up so that one orbit of Nix around Pluto takes 2 seconds instead of 25 days. L...

  20. Numerical simulations of suspersonic extragalactic radio jets

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    A boundary following code was used to simulate jets emanating from active galactic nuclei as they propagate through a bimodal external medium that first consists of an isothermal galactic halo with density falling roughly as a power law with radius, and later of a hotter, less dense, uniform intergalactic medium (IGM). By varying the beam power, the radius of the galactic halo/IGM interface, the redshift, the steepness of the power law fall-off of pressure within the halo, and the temperature ratio of the IGM to the halo, models of a wide range of radio galaxies were considered. The maximum linear sizes of the beams were found as functions of the beam and halo parameters using two different criteria, the nuclear activity time, and the point at which the advance of the beam goes subsonic. Good agreement was obtained with regard to the relationship between the observed linear size of such radio sources and both the cosmological redshift (at fixed power) and the total radio power (at fixed redshift). These results are also confirmed by a sample of fully hydrodynamical (2-D) simulations. Monte Carlo simulations which span the parameter space were employed to find the median distances for plausible distributions of the parameters for a number of constant values of density and temperature of the IGM. A statistical analysis comparing the distributions of radio galaxies in power-size-redshift bins with observational results supports the existence of a cosmologically significant IGM. The fashions in which this picture might be modified if the difference between radio galaxies, quasars, and blazars are due to orientation effects were also discussed.

  1. Direct Numerical Simulation of Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alame, Karim; Mahesh, Krishnan

    2015-11-01

    A volume of fluid methodology will be used to study the physics of superhydrophobic surfaces. The geometry of the surface will be resolved. The effect of pressure difference on the interface will be presented and contrasted to theory. Interface failure will be explored and simulations of microchannel flow will be compared to experiments. A turbulent channel with superhydrophobic grooves will be presented showing the interface behavior and implications on drag reduction. Extension to random textured surfaces will be discussed. This work is supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  2. Large-eddy simulation of transitional channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piomelli, Ugo; Zang, Thomas A.

    1990-01-01

    A large-eddy simulation (LES) of transition in plane channel flow was carried out. The LES results were compared with those of a fine direct numerical simulation (DNS), and with those of a coarse DNS that uses the same mesh as the LES, but does not use a residual stress model. While at the early stages of transition, LES and coarse DNS give the same results: the presence of the residual stress model was found to be necessary to predict accurately mean velocity and Reynolds stress profiles during the late stages of transition (after the second spike stage). The evolution of single Fourier modes is also predicted more accurately by the LES than by the DNS. As small scales are generated, the dissipative character of the residual stress starts to reproduce correctly the energy cascade. As transition progresses, the flow approaches its fully developed turbulent state, the subgrid scales tend towards equilibrium, and the model becomes more accurate.

  3. Numerical and laboratory simulations of auroral acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Gunell, H.; De Keyser, J.; Mann, I.

    2013-10-15

    The existence of parallel electric fields is an essential ingredient of auroral physics, leading to the acceleration of particles that give rise to the auroral displays. An auroral flux tube is modelled using electrostatic Vlasov simulations, and the results are compared to simulations of a proposed laboratory device that is meant for studies of the plasma physical processes that occur on auroral field lines. The hot magnetospheric plasma is represented by a gas discharge plasma source in the laboratory device, and the cold plasma mimicking the ionospheric plasma is generated by a Q-machine source. In both systems, double layers form with plasma density gradients concentrated on their high potential sides. The systems differ regarding the properties of ion acoustic waves that are heavily damped in the magnetosphere, where the ion population is hot, but weakly damped in the laboratory, where the discharge ions are cold. Ion waves are excited by the ion beam that is created by acceleration in the double layer in both systems. The efficiency of this beam-plasma interaction depends on the acceleration voltage. For voltages where the interaction is less efficient, the laboratory experiment is more space-like.

  4. Numerical Simulations of the Mechanics of Vitrectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Ethan; Eldredge, Jeff D.; Hubschman, Jean-Pierre

    2014-11-01

    Filling the cavity between the lens and retina in the eye is a clear, gel-like substance known as vitreous humor. The treatment of certain eye abnormalities necessitates the removal of this substance, in a surgical procedure called a vitrectomy, using a device called a vitreous cutter. Understanding the behavior of this viscoelastic biofluid during operations is essential to improving the effectiveness of the procedure. In this work, a three-dimensional computational model of a vitreous cutter is investigated using an immersed boundary method and a viscoelastic constitutive model. The solver uses a fractional-step method to satisfy continuity and traction boundary conditions to simulate the applied suction. The Giesekus constitutive equation is used to model the vitreous, as it captures both elastic and shear-thinning effects. Rheological parameters were obtained from the work of Sharif-Kashani et al. [Retina, 2013]. These simulations were used to quantify both the average and time-varying flow rate through the device during different stages in the cutting cycle. Characteristics of the flow field illustrate how surgical variables like cutting speed, duty cycle, and aspiration pressure affect overall flow rate and suggest targets for improving cutter efficacy.

  5. Numerical simulation of electromagnetic turbulence in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Waltz, R.E.

    1985-02-01

    Nonlinear two- and three-fluid equations are written for the time evolution of the perturbed electrostatic potential, densities, vector potential, and parallel ion motion of collisional and trapped electron plasmas in tokamak geometry. The nonlinear terms arise from the E x B/sub 0/ convection (d/dt = partial/partialt+v/sub E/ x del/sub perpendicular/) and magnetic flutter (del-tilde/sub parallel/ = del/sub parallel/+(B/sub perpendicular//B/sub 0/) x del/sub perpendicular/). Simplified two-dimensional (k/sub perpendicular/) mode coupling simulations with a fixed average parallel wavenumber (k/sub parallel/ = 1/Rq) and curvature drift (..omega../sub g/ = (L/sub n//R)..omega../sub asterisk/ ) characteristic of outward ballooning are performed. Homogeneous stationary turbulent states of the dissipative drift and interchange modes from 0< or =..beta..<..beta../sub crit/ for both the collisional and trapped electron plasmas are obtained. Transport coefficients associated with E x B and magnetic motions are calculated. The problem of simulating plasmas with high viscous Reynolds number is treated with an absorbing mantle at the largest wavenumbers.

  6. Numerical simulation of the SOFIA flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klotz, Stephen P.

    1995-01-01

    This report provides a concise summary of the contribution of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to the SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) project at NASA Ames and presents results obtained from closed- and open-cavity SOFIA simulations. The aircraft platform is a Boeing 747SP and these are the first SOFIA simulations run with the aircraft empennage included in the geometry database. In the open-cavity runs the telescope is mounted behind the wings. Results suggest that the cavity markedly influences the mean pressure distribution on empennage surfaces and that 110-140 decibel (db) sound pressure levels are typical in the cavity and on the horizontal and vertical stabilizers. A strong source of sound was found to exist on the rim of the open telescope cavity. The presence of this source suggests that additional design work needs to be performed in order to minimize the sound emanating from that location. A fluid dynamic analysis of the engine plumes is also contained in this report. The analysis was part of an effort to quantify the degradation of telescope performance resulting from the proximity of the port engine exhaust plumes to the open telescope bay.

  7. Numerical Simulations of the Mechanics of Vitrectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Ethan; Eldredge, Jeff; Hubschman, Jean-Pierre

    2015-11-01

    Vitreous is the clear, gel-like substance that fills the cavity between the lens and retina in the eye. Treating certain eye abnormalities requires removing this substance using a minimally-invasive device called a vitreous cutter. Understanding the behavior of this viscoelastic biofluid during surgeries is essential to improving the effectiveness of the procedure. In this study, three-dimensional computational models of vitreous cutters are investigated using an immersed boundary method paired with a viscoelastic constitutive model. The solver uses a fractional-step method to satisfy continuity and traction boundary conditions to simulate the applied suction. The current work extends previous efforts to accurately model the rheological parameters measured by Sharif-Kashani et al. using the Giesekus constitutive equation [Retina, 2013]. The simulations were used to quantify both the average and time-varying flow rate through the device. Values for flow rate are compared with experimental results from Hubschman et al. [Retina, 2009]. Flow features associated with the cutting dynamics are of particular interest, as is the geometry of the cutter itself. These operational and design changes are a target for improving cutter efficacy while minimizing potential tissue damage.

  8. Numerical simulations of moon-ringlet interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanninen, J.

    1993-05-01

    Nonaxisymmetric ring features excited by perturbations of shepherd satellites are studied in terms of direct particle simulations using Aarseth's N-body integrator combined with the calculation of particle-particle impacts. Interaction parameters typical to Saturn's F-ring are investigated. The generation of clumps by external satellites is verified, but the interparticle collisions tend to smooth sharp features. Using F-ring parameters the clumps are observed to cover the total azimuthal length, but it is not clear whether these azimuthally overlapping clumps would be detectable in the actual F-ring. Gravitational scattering by ring particles increases the velocity dispersion, smearing regular azimuthal features at least in the rings of low optical depths. Considerable accretion is observed to occur, particles sticking pairwise to each other, even if the tendency of the particles to accrete is artificially reduced in the simulations. A new explanation for the braided appearance of the F-ring is proposed, based on the interaction between the shepherding satellites and the ring containing embedded moonlets. In our model the braiding is a dynamic phenomenon: the braids are destroyed and recreated in a cyclical manner.

  9. Numerical and laboratory simulations of auroral acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunell, H.; De Keyser, J.; Mann, I.

    2013-10-01

    The existence of parallel electric fields is an essential ingredient of auroral physics, leading to the acceleration of particles that give rise to the auroral displays. An auroral flux tube is modelled using electrostatic Vlasov simulations, and the results are compared to simulations of a proposed laboratory device that is meant for studies of the plasma physical processes that occur on auroral field lines. The hot magnetospheric plasma is represented by a gas discharge plasma source in the laboratory device, and the cold plasma mimicking the ionospheric plasma is generated by a Q-machine source. In both systems, double layers form with plasma density gradients concentrated on their high potential sides. The systems differ regarding the properties of ion acoustic waves that are heavily damped in the magnetosphere, where the ion population is hot, but weakly damped in the laboratory, where the discharge ions are cold. Ion waves are excited by the ion beam that is created by acceleration in the double layer in both systems. The efficiency of this beam-plasma interaction depends on the acceleration voltage. For voltages where the interaction is less efficient, the laboratory experiment is more space-like.

  10. Floret Test, Numerical Simulations of the Dent, Comparison with Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lefrancois, A.; Cutting, J.; Gagliardi, F.; Tarver, C.; Tran, T.

    2006-02-14

    The Floret test has been developed as a screening test to study the performance of a small amount of HE. Numerical simulations have been performed recently using CTH. The objective of this study is to perform numerical simulations in order to better understand the shock waves interactions, involved in the dent formation. Different 3D wedge configurations have been tested using the Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for the HE receptor with Ls-Dyna.

  11. NUMERICAL METHODS FOR THE SIMULATION OF HIGH INTENSITY HADRON SYNCHROTRONS.

    SciTech Connect

    LUCCIO, A.; D'IMPERIO, N.; MALITSKY, N.

    2005-09-12

    Numerical algorithms for PIC simulation of beam dynamics in a high intensity synchrotron on a parallel computer are presented. We introduce numerical solvers of the Laplace-Poisson equation in the presence of walls, and algorithms to compute tunes and twiss functions in the presence of space charge forces. The working code for the simulation here presented is SIMBAD, that can be run as stand alone or as part of the UAL (Unified Accelerator Libraries) package.

  12. A fast algorithm for Direct Numerical Simulation of natural convection flows in arbitrarily-shaped periodic domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeli, D.; Stalio, E.; Corticelli, M. A.; Barozzi, G. S.

    2015-11-01

    A parallel algorithm is presented for the Direct Numerical Simulation of buoyancy- induced flows in open or partially confined periodic domains, containing immersed cylindrical bodies of arbitrary cross-section. The governing equations are discretized by means of the Finite Volume method on Cartesian grids. A semi-implicit scheme is employed for the diffusive terms, which are treated implicitly on the periodic plane and explicitly along the homogeneous direction, while all convective terms are explicit, via the second-order Adams-Bashfort scheme. The contemporary solution of velocity and pressure fields is achieved by means of a projection method. The numerical resolution of the set of linear equations resulting from discretization is carried out by means of efficient and highly parallel direct solvers. Verification and validation of the numerical procedure is reported in the paper, for the case of flow around an array of heated cylindrical rods arranged in a square lattice. Grid independence is assessed in laminar flow conditions, and DNS results in turbulent conditions are presented for two different grids and compared to available literature data, thus confirming the favorable qualities of the method.

  13. Numerical Simulations of a Flux Rope Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, P.; Mackay, D. H.; Poedts, S.

    2015-03-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the most violent phenomena observed on the Sun. One of the most successful models to explain CMEs is the flux rope ejection model, where a magnetic flux rope is expelled from the solar corona after a long phase along which the flux rope stays in equilibrium while magnetic energy is being accumulated. However, still many questions are outstanding on the detailed mechanism of the ejection and observations continuously provide new data to interpret and put in the context. Currently, extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) are providing new insights into the early phase of CME evolution. In particular, observations show the ejection of magnetic flux ropes from the solar corona and how they evolve into CMEs. However, these observations are difficult to interpret in terms of basic physical mechanisms and quantities, thus, we need to compare equivalent quantities to test and improve our models. In our work, we intend to bridge the gap between models and observations with our model of flux rope ejection where we consistently describe the full life span of a flux rope from its formation to ejection. This is done by coupling the global non-linear force-free model (GNLFFF) built to describe the slow low- β formation phase, with a full MHD simulation run with the software MPI-AMRVAC, suitable to describe the fast MHD evolution of the flux rope ejection that happens in a heterogeneous β regime. We also explore the parameter space to identify the conditions upon which the ejection is favoured (gravity stratification and magnetic field intensity) and we produce synthesised AIA observations (171 Å and 211 Å). To carry this out, we run 3D MHD simulation in spherical coordinates where we include the role of thermal conduction and radiative losses, both of which are important for determining the temperature distribution of the solar corona during a CME. Our model of flux rope ejection is successful in realistically describing the entire life span of a flux rope and we also set some conditions for the backgroud solar corona to favour the escape of the flux rope, so that it turns into a CME. Furthermore, our MHD simulation reproduces many of the features found in the AIA observations.

  14. Numerical simulation of rough-surface aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Xingkai

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of flow over surfaces with roughness in which the details of the surface geometry must be resolved pose major challenges. The objective of this study is to address these challenges through two important engineering problems, where roughness play a critical role---flow over airfoils with accrued ice and flow and heat transfer over turbine blade surfaces roughened by erosion and/or deposition. CFD simulations of iced airfoils face two major challenges. The first is how to generate high-quality single- and multi-block structured grids for highly convoluted convex and concave surface geometries with multiple scales. In this study, two methods were developed for the generation of high-quality grids for such geometries. The method developed for single-block grids involves generating a grid about the clean airfoil, carving out a portion of that grid about the airfoil, replacing that portion with a grid that accounts for the accrued ice geometry, and performing elliptic smoothing. The method developed for multi-block grids involves a transition-layer grid to ensure jaggedness in the ice geometry does not propagate into the domain. It also involves a "thick" wrap-around grid about the ice to ensure grid lines clustered next to solid surfaces do not propagate as streaks of tightly packed grid lines into the domain along block boundaries. For multi-block grids, this study also developed blocking topologies that ensure solutions to multi-block grids converge to steady state as quickly as single-block grids. The second major challenge in CFD simulations of iced airfoils is not knowing when it will predict reliably because of uncertainties in the turbulence modeling. In this study, the effects of turbulence models in predicting lift, drag, and moment coefficients were examined for airfoils with rime ice (i.e., ice with jaggedness only) and with glaze ice (i.e., ice with multiple protruding horns and surface jaggedness) as a function of angle of attack. In this examination, three different CFD codes---WIND, FLUENT, and PowerFLOW were used to examine a variety of turbulence models, including Spalart-Allmaras, RNG k-epsilon, shear-stress transport, v2-f, and differential Reynolds stress with and without non-equilibrium wall functions. The accuracy of the CFD predictions was evaluated by comparing grid-independent solutions with measured experimental data. Results obtained show CFD with WIND and FLUENT to predict the aerodynamics of airfoils with rime ice reliably up to near stall for all turbulence models investigated. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  15. Numerical simulation of supersonic gap flow.

    PubMed

    Jing, Xu; Haiming, Huang; Guo, Huang; Song, Mo

    2015-01-01

    Various gaps in the surface of the supersonic aircraft have a significant effect on airflows. In order to predict the effects of attack angle, Mach number and width-to-depth ratio of gap on the local aerodynamic heating environment of supersonic flow, two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved by the finite volume method, where convective flux of space term adopts the Roe format, and discretization of time term is achieved by 5-step Runge-Kutta algorithm. The numerical results reveal that the heat flux ratio is U-shaped distribution on the gap wall and maximum at the windward corner of the gap. The heat flux ratio decreases as the gap depth and Mach number increase, however, it increases as the attack angle increases. In addition, it is important to find that chamfer in the windward corner can effectively reduce gap effect coefficient. The study will be helpful for the design of the thermal protection system in reentry vehicles. PMID:25635395

  16. Primitive numerical simulation of circular Couette flow

    SciTech Connect

    Hasiuk, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    The azimuthal-invariant, 3-d cylindrical, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved to steady state for a finite-length, physically realistic model. The numerical method relies on an alternating-direction implicit (ADI) scheme that is formally second-order accurate in space and first-order accurate in time. The equations are linearized and uncoupled by evaluating variable coefficients at the previous time iteration. Wall grid clustering is provided by a Roberts transformation in radial and axial directions. A vorticity-velocity formulation is found to be preferable to a vorticity-stream function approach. Subject to no-slip, Dirichlet boundary conditions, except for the inner-cylinder rotation velocity (impulsive start-up) and zero-flow initial conditions, nonturbulent solutions are obtained for sub- and supercritical Reynolds numbers of 100 to 400 for a finite geometry. An axially-stretched model solution is shown to asymptotically approach the 1-d analytic Couette solution at the cylinder midheight. Flowfield change from laminar to Taylor-vortex flow is discussed as a function of Reynolds number.

  17. Numerical Simulation of Supersonic Gap Flow

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Xu; Haiming, Huang; Guo, Huang; Song, Mo

    2015-01-01

    Various gaps in the surface of the supersonic aircraft have a significant effect on airflows. In order to predict the effects of attack angle, Mach number and width-to-depth ratio of gap on the local aerodynamic heating environment of supersonic flow, two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved by the finite volume method, where convective flux of space term adopts the Roe format, and discretization of time term is achieved by 5-step Runge-Kutta algorithm. The numerical results reveal that the heat flux ratio is U-shaped distribution on the gap wall and maximum at the windward corner of the gap. The heat flux ratio decreases as the gap depth and Mach number increase, however, it increases as the attack angle increases. In addition, it is important to find that chamfer in the windward corner can effectively reduce gap effect coefficient. The study will be helpful for the design of the thermal protection system in reentry vehicles. PMID:25635395

  18. Gravity Currents with Convective Mixing: High-resolution Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voskov, D.; Elenius, M. T.; Tchelepi, H.

    2014-12-01

    Due to challenges in performing direct numerical simulations for gravity currents with convective mixing, different attempts have been made to simplify the problem. In this work, the full problem is investigated with direct numerical simulations. Our simulations employ a recently developed capability in our General Purpose Research Simulator (AD-GPRS). The compositional approach is based on K-values and a linear density model. A shared-memory parallel implementation allows for high resolution simulations in a reasonable time frame. Our results indicate that it is important to consider the reduction in the dissolution rate after the fingers begin to interact with the bottom of the aquifer. Another important observation suggests considering a reduction in the dissolution rate where the plume thickness increases in time. In addition to the large-scale simulations, we performed convective-mixing simulations in relatively small domains to support the analysis of large-scale plume migration and CO2 trapping.

  19. Numerical simulation of the world ocean circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takano, K.; Mintz, Y.; Han, Y. J.

    1973-01-01

    A multi-level model, based on the primitive equations, is developed for simulating the temperature and velocity fields produced in the world ocean by differential heating and surface wind stress. The model ocean has constant depth, free slip at the lower boundary, and neglects momentum advection; so that there is no energy exchange between the barotropic and baroclinic components of the motion, although the former influences the latter through temperature advection. The ocean model was designed to be coupled to the UCLA atmospheric general circulation model, for the study of the dynamics of climate and climate changes. But here, the model is tested by prescribing the observed seasonally varying surface wind stress and the incident solar radiation, the surface air temperature and humidity, cloudiness and the surface wind speed, which, together with the predicted ocean surface temperature, determine the surface flux of radiant energy, sensible heat and latent heat.

  20. Relevance of numerical simulations to booming sand.

    PubMed

    Richard, Patrick; McNamara, Sean; Tankeo, Merline

    2012-01-01

    We have performed a simulation study of three-dimensional cohesionless granular flows down an inclined chute. We find that the oscillations observed in [L. E. Silbert, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 098002 (2005)] near the angle of repose are harmonic vibrations of the lowest normal mode. Their frequencies depend on the contact stiffness as well as on the depth of the flow. Could these oscillations account for the phenomena of "booming sand"? We estimate an effective contact stiffness from the Hertz law, but this leads to frequencies that are several times higher than observed. However, the Hertz law also predicts interpenetrations of a few nanometers, indicating that the oscillations frequencies are governed by the surface stiffness, which can be much lower than the bulk one. This is in agreement with previous studies ascribing the ability to sing to the presence of a soft coating on the grain surface. PMID:22400502

  1. Numerical aerodynamic simulation facility. Preliminary study extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The production of an optimized design of key elements of the candidate facility was the primary objective of this report. This was accomplished by effort in the following tasks: (1) to further develop, optimize and describe the function description of the custom hardware; (2) to delineate trade off areas between performance, reliability, availability, serviceability, and programmability; (3) to develop metrics and models for validation of the candidate systems performance; (4) to conduct a functional simulation of the system design; (5) to perform a reliability analysis of the system design; and (6) to develop the software specifications to include a user level high level programming language, a correspondence between the programming language and instruction set and outline the operation system requirements.

  2. Numerical simulation of synthesis gas incineration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakov, A. V.; Khaustov, S. A.; Tabakaev, R. B.; Belousova, Y. A.

    2016-04-01

    The authors have analysed the expediency of the suggested low-grade fuels application method. Thermal processing of solid raw materials in the gaseous fuel, called synthesis gas, is investigated. The technical challenges concerning the applicability of the existing gas equipment developed and extensively tested exclusively for natural gas were considered. For this purpose computer simulation of three-dimensional syngas-incinerating flame dynamics was performed by means of the ANSYS Multiphysics engineering software. The subjects of studying were: a three-dimensional aerodynamic flame structure, heat-release and temperature fields, a set of combustion properties: a flare range and the concentration distribution of burnout reagents. The obtained results were presented in the form of a time-averaged pathlines with color indexing. The obtained results can be used for qualitative and quantitative evaluation of complex multicomponent gas incineration singularities.

  3. Batman-cracks. Observations and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvadurai, A. P. S.; Busschen, A. Ten; Ernst, L. J.

    1991-05-01

    To ensure mechanical strength of fiber reinforced plastics (FRP), good adhesion between fibers and the matrix is considered to be an essential requirement. An efficient test of fiber-matrix interface characterization is the fragmentation test which provides information about the interface slip mechanism. This test consists of the longitudinal loading of a single fiber which is embedded in a matrix specimen. At critical loads the fiber experiences fragmentation. This fragmentation will terminate depending upon the shear-slip strength of the fiber-matrix adhesion, which is inversely proportional to average fragment lengths. Depending upon interface strength characteristics either bond or slip matrix fracture can occur at the onset of fiber fracture. Certain particular features of matrix fracture are observed at the locations of fiber fracture in situations where there is sufficient interface bond strength. These refer to the development of fractures with a complex surface topography. The experimental procedure involved in the fragmentation tests is discussed and the boundary element technique to examine the development of multiple matrix fractures at the fiber fracture locations is examined. The mechanics of matrix fracture is examined. When bond integrity is maintained, a fiber fracture results in a matrix fracture. The matrix fracture topography in a fragmentation test is complex; however, simplified conoidal fracture patterns can be used to investigate the crack extension phenomena. Via a mixed-mode fracture criterion, the generation of a conoidal fracture pattern in the matrix is investigated. The numerical results compare favorably with observed experimental data derived from tests conducted on fragmentation test specimens consisting of a single glass fiber which is embedded in a polyester matrix.

  4. Parallel Numerical Simulations of Water Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Pedro; Mangiavacchi, Norberto

    2010-11-01

    The study of the water flow and scalar transport in water reservoirs is important for the determination of the water quality during the initial stages of the reservoir filling and during the life of the reservoir. For this scope, a parallel 2D finite element code for solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations coupled with scalar transport was implemented using the message-passing programming model, in order to perform simulations of hidropower water reservoirs in a computer cluster environment. The spatial discretization is based on the MINI element that satisfies the Babuska-Brezzi (BB) condition, which provides sufficient conditions for a stable mixed formulation. All the distributed data structures needed in the different stages of the code, such as preprocessing, solving and post processing, were implemented using the PETSc library. The resulting linear systems for the velocity and the pressure fields were solved using the projection method, implemented by an approximate block LU factorization. In order to increase the parallel performance in the solution of the linear systems, we employ the static condensation method for solving the intermediate velocity at vertex and centroid nodes separately. We compare performance results of the static condensation method with the approach of solving the complete system. In our tests the static condensation method shows better performance for large problems, at the cost of an increased memory usage. Performance results for other intensive parts of the code in a computer cluster are also presented.

  5. Numerical simulation of aluminum extrusion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, T. J.; Muller, A.

    1995-04-01

    This presentation describes a research program directed towards the development of automated design procedures for aluminum extrusion technology. The objective is to eliminate costly trial and error by being able to simultaneously design the product, die, billet, and process (e.g.. extrusion temperatures and speeds, uniformizing metal flow, etc.), within constraints of feasibility, and satisfying objectives including, but not limited to, optimizing shape, surface finish, and properties of the product, processing costs, time to market, and full utilization of capabilities. The approach is based on the development of efficient and effective analysis of the whole processing system employing newly developed finite element solution technologies for complex, multi region, multiphysical behavior. Generalizations of these methodologies to include Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) mesh descriptions for nonlinear, elastic viscoplastic mechanical constitution equations will allow the faithful modeling of the metal flow within the die system and the accurate attainment of final shape upon exit. Automatic meshing and adaptive remeshing will insure efficient and accurate simulation of the entire forming process. New element technologies facilitating the use of general meshing procedures for difficult metal-forming processes involving a variety of kinematical constraints, such as incompressibility, contact, etc., are utilized. Feature based design methodologies, parametric modeling, and knowledge-based engineering techniques will constitute the fundamental methodologies for representing designs, managing the hierarchy of analysis models, performing model reduction and feature removal, and effectively utilizing design knowledge.

  6. Probabilistic Approach to Numerical Simulation of Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimov, Alexander

    2013-06-01

    The natural heterogeneity of real materials structure influencing on distribution of material physicomechanical characteristics (PMC) is one of the factors determining character of destruction. The introduction of the given factor in the equations of mechanics of a deformable solid is possible at use probabilistic laws of distribution PMC on volume of a considered design. There are problems where the fragmentation is mainly probabilistic process: explosive destruction axisymmetric shells where character of blasting fragmentation are beforehand unknown. Determining influence of heterogeneity of material structure is shown as well in problems punching thin barrier. In order that simulated process of a fragmentation reflected a real picture of behavior of the destroyed bodies, it is necessary to bring in casual distribution of initial deviations strength properties from rating value to PMC of a body. In work the explosive fragmentation of the shells, a fragmentation of a barrier and an shell after barrier piercing, punching thin barrier on a normal and under an angle, crushing of metal rings, process of high-speed impact of the laminated - spaced barrier with the steel spheres is considered.

  7. Numerical Simulations of Hot Vertical Displacement Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunkers, K. J.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2015-11-01

    Loss of vertical positioning control in tokamaks leads to instability where hot confined plasma rests against the chamber wall. Resistive-MHD modeling with the NIMROD code is applied to model these events. After divertor-coil current is perturbed, resistive diffusion through the non-ideal wall sets the timescale as the simulated tokamak evolves from a diverted equilibrium to a limited configuration. Results show that plasma outflow along opening magnetic surfaces, just outside the confinement zone, approaches the local ion-acoustic speed. The projection of the plasma flow velocity into the surface-normal direction (n . V) near the surface exceeds the local E × B drift speed; near surfaces n × E is approximately the same as n ×Ewall in the nearly steady conditions. The safety factor of flux surfaces that remain intact is approximately constant over the evolution time, which is much shorter than the plasma resistive diffusion time. Assessment of external-kink stability and initial findings from 3D nonlinear computations are presented. This effort is supported by the U.S. Dept. of Energy, award numbers DE-FG02-06ER54850 and DE-FC02-08ER54975.

  8. Numerical simulations of generally relativistic hydrodynamic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhlberger, Curran Daniel

    The study of binary neutron star coalescence, one the most energetic classes of events in the universe, requires calculating the complicated interactions of strong gravity, relativistic fluids, and magnetic fields. The Spectral Einstein Code provides a framework for simulating the inspiral and merger of black holes and neutron stars, but its ability to model the behavior of binary neutron stars and magnetic fields is a recent development. This work describes the implementation of an initial data solver for neutron star binaries, a magnetohydrodynamics module for neutron star and accretion disk evolutions, a pair of basis functions wellsuited to spectral representations of neutron star spacetimes, and a selection of other improvements to this research code. It also presents the results of early investigations using these new capabilities, including the effects of magnetic fields on shear instabilities differentially rotating neutron stars. Such stars may be formed from core-collapse supernovae or low-mass binary neutron star mergers, and fluid instabilities in galactic sources can produce gravitational waves observable by detectors in the near future. We find that strong magnetic fields are capable of suppressing a shear instability, but they also trigger magnetic instabilities whose effects may be just as observable as the original signal.

  9. A priori comparison of RANS scalar flux models using DNS data of a Mach 5 boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braman, Kalen; Raman, Venkatramanan

    2009-11-01

    In order to investigate the applicability of Reynolds-averaged scalar flux models (SFM) to scalar dispersion in high speed turbulent flows, a priori comparisons have been performed utilizing the results of direct numerical simulations (DNS) of a Mach 5 boundary layer. At a small patch on the solid surface boundary, a scalar was introduced into the flow at a rate depending upon the local surface temperature. This configuration mimics surface ablation in hypersonic flows. In different simulations, the scalar injection rate was varied, and the scalar was treated as both passive, not affecting the flow field, and active, affecting the flow field due to having different molecular properties than the bulk flow and having an injection velocity. Statistics of the simulated scalar fields have been calculated and compared a priori with terms from SFMs. Comparisons from the passive scalar case show that the scalar flux terms in the standard gradient diffusion model fail to predict even the trend of the DNS values. The generalized gradient diffusion models, while an improvement for the streamwise component of scalar flux, nevertheless fail to predict the wall normal and spanwise fluxes. Additionally, production and dissipation models for the scalar variance equation are evaluated.

  10. Validated numerical simulation model of a dielectric elastomer generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foerster, Florentine; Moessinger, Holger; Schlaak, Helmut F.

    2013-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer generators (DEG) produce electrical energy by converting mechanical into electrical energy. Efficient operation requires homogeneous deformation of each single layer. However, by different internal and external influences like supports or the shape of a DEG the deformation will be inhomogeneous and hence negatively affect the amount of the generated electrical energy. Optimization of the deformation behavior leads to improved efficiency of the DEG and consequently to higher energy gain. In this work a numerical simulation model of a multilayer dielectric elastomer generator is developed using the FEM software ANSYS. The analyzed multilayer DEG consists of 49 active dielectric layers with layer thicknesses of 50 ?m. The elastomer is silicone (PDMS) while the compliant electrodes are made of graphite powder. In the simulation the real material parameters of the PDMS and the graphite electrodes need to be included. Therefore, the mechanical and electrical material parameters of the PDMS are determined by experimental investigations of test samples while the electrode parameters are determined by numerical simulations of test samples. The numerical simulation of the DEG is carried out as coupled electro-mechanical simulation for the constant voltage energy harvesting cycle. Finally, the derived numerical simulation model is validated by comparison with analytical calculations and further simulated DEG configurations. The comparison of the determined results show good accordance with regard to the deformation of the DEG. Based on the validated model it is now possible to optimize the DEG layout for improved deformation behavior with further simulations.

  11. A Preliminary Numerical Simulation of a Shower.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, John Y. C.

    1984-03-01

    A quasi-one-dimensional, time-dependent and precipitating cumulus cloud model incorporated with a time-dependent PBL model has been used to simulate the precipitation record of a local summer afternoon shower induced by sea breeze. The system is so designed that it is subjected only to the variations of the parameters pertaining to the PBL. Through the use of this system, we have obtained relatively good agreement between the observed and model produced rainfall pattern, peak rainfall intensity and total rainfall; we are also confident of reproducing the time of onset of the shower. It has also been found that the PBL influences the precipitation characteristic of a shower in a complicated way. For a given water vapor content, greater thickness of the PBL, which implies a greater heat supply to the cloud activity above, will delay the onset of a shower, reduce its total rainfall and produce multi-peaked intensities. When the thickness is increased to a critical value, no shower can be produced. If the thickness is increased further, a shower can be produced again. For a given thickness, increasing water vapor will greatly expedite the onset of a shower which also has greater total rainfall and multi-peaked rainfall intensities. Only when the heat content is accompanied by a proper water vapor content can a shower of single-peaked rainfall intensity be produced.In this model, we have introduced an immediate environmental (IE) region which allows the cloud to generate its own inner or immediate environment, enriched by water mass in both liquid and vapor form. Our work has shown that the IE region plays an important role in enhancing cloud development, delaying the showers to afternoon hours and in providing a recycling process of water mass so that heavy rainfall can be produced by this simple model.

  12. Numerical simulation of photoexcited polaron states in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Volokhova, A. V.; Lakhno, V. D.; Amirkhanov, I. V.; Puzynin, I. V.; Puzynina, T. P.; Rikhvitskiy, V. S.; Atanasova, P. Kh.

    2015-10-01

    We consider the dynamic polaron model of the hydrated electron state on the basis of a system of three nonlinear partial differential equations with appropriate initial and boundary conditions. A parallel numerical algorithm for the numerical solution of this system has been developed. Its effectiveness has been tested on a few multi-processor systems. A numerical simulation of the polaron states formation in water under the action of the ultraviolet range laser irradiation has been performed. The numerical results are shown to be in a reasonable agreement with experimental data and theoretical predictions.

  13. Three-Dimensional Numerical Simulation to Mud Turbine for LWD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xiaojiang; Dong, Jingxin; Shang, Jie; Zhang, Guanqi

    Hydraulic performance analysis was discussed for a type of turbine on generator used for LWD. The simulation models were built by CFD analysis software FINE/Turbo, and full three-dimensional numerical simulation was carried out for impeller group. The hydraulic parameter such as power, speed and pressure drop, were calculated in two kinds of medium water and mud. Experiment was built in water environment. The error of numerical simulation was less than 6%, verified by experiment. Based on this rationalization proposals would be given to choice appropriate impellers, and the rationalization of methods would be explored.

  14. Feasibility study for a numerical aerodynamic simulation facility. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lincoln, N. R.; Bergman, R. O.; Bonstrom, D. B.; Brinkman, T. W.; Chiu, S. H. J.; Green, S. S.; Hansen, S. D.; Klein, D. L.; Krohn, H. E.; Prow, R. P.

    1979-01-01

    A Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility (NASF) was designed for the simulation of fluid flow around three-dimensional bodies, both in wind tunnel environments and in free space. The application of numerical simulation to this field of endeavor promised to yield economies in aerodynamic and aircraft body designs. A model for a NASF/FMP (Flow Model Processor) ensemble using a possible approach to meeting NASF goals is presented. The computer hardware and software are presented, along with the entire design and performance analysis and evaluation.

  15. Numerical simulation of turbulent flow in a cyclonic separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, Dmitry; Poniaev, Sergey

    2014-12-01

    Numerical simulation of a turbulent flow of air with dispersed particles through a cyclonic separator is presented. Because of a high streamline curvature in the separator it is difficult to simulate the flow by using the conventional turbulent models. In this work the curvature correction term was included into the k - ω - SST turbulence model implemented in the OpenFOAM® software. Experimental data and results of numerical simulation by the commercial ANSYS Fluent® solver for a turbulent flow in a U-duct were used to validate the model. The numerical simulation of the flow in the cyclonic separator demonstrates that the implemented turbulence model successfully predicts the cyclonic separator efficiency.

  16. Numerical simulation of length-limited parametric sound beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Hideyuki; Hedberg, Claes M.; Kamakura, Tomoo

    2012-05-01

    This study proposes a numerical simulation method that predicts nonlinear propagation of ultrasound beams in order to estimate the sound field of parametric array in the time domain. Basically, the method resorts to solving numerically and compactly the governing equations in a compressible viscous fluid using the Yee algorithm finite-difference time domain method. The simulation indicates a narrow audible sound beam which is a feature of the parametric array. Additionally, a length-limited parametric sound beam, which is proposed by Hedberg et al. [C. M. Hedberg et al., Acoust. Phys. 56, 637-639 (2010)], is numerically simulated as a model application. A pair of parametric sound sources generates the length-limited sound beam by control of the amplitudes and initial phases of the sources. The simulation shows a narrow truncated array length-limited sound beam.

  17. Water and heat fluxes in desert soils: 2. Numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Scanlon, B.R. ); Milly, P.C.D. )

    1994-03-01

    Numerical models of varying complexity have been used to simulate nonisothermal liquid and vapor flow. Development of these models has been motivated by problems such as evaluation of insaturated zones, geothermal reservoirs, and nuclear waste disposal sites. The objective of this study was to evaluate and explain liquid and vapor fluxes in the shallow unsaturated zone of the Chihuahuan Desert of Texas in response to an annual climate cycle as opposed to shorter, restricted periods. The approach was to use numerical simulations to interpret observed field data. Good agreement was found between NHD (nonhysteretic drying water retention function)-simulated and field-measured water potentials and temperatures. This simulation research provides a greater understanding of unsaturated zone processes in desert soils. Agreement between computed and measured parameters are attributed to the robustness of the thermal calculations. These simulations also indicate sone of the main sources of uncertainty, particularly in the estimated hydraulic conductivities.

  18. The study of the interaction between small-scale turbulence and internal gravity waves by direct numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druzhinin, Oleg; Ostrovsky, Lev

    2015-04-01

    The interaction between small-scale turbulence and internal gravity waves (IWs) plays an important role in the processes of mixing which have direct impact on the dynamics of seasonal pycnocline in the ocean. Among many interesting and practically important aspects of this interaction are the effects of damping of IWs by turbulence on the one hand, and the possibility of the enhancement of turbulence by IWs on the other hand. Previously these effects were studied mostly in laboratory experiments. The present study presents the results of direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the IW-turbulence interaction. We perform DNS of the dynamics of small-scale turbulence near a pycnocline in the presence of monochromatic internal gravity wave propagating along a pycnocline. Small-scale turbulence is induced in a horizontal layer at some distance above the pycnocline. The velocity and density fields of IW propagating in the pycnocline are also prescribed as initial condition, and the IW wavelength is considered to be by the order of magnitude larger as compared to the initial turbulence integral length scale. Stratification in the pycnocline is considered to be sufficiently strong so that the effects of turbulent mixing remain negligible. In order to study the effect of damping of IW by turbulence, we firstly consider a stationary forced turbulence. The DNS results show that the observed IW damping rate is well predicted by a theory based on the semi-empirical approach, but only in the case where turbulence is sufficiently strong to be only weakly perturbed by the internal wave. However, the theory overestimates the damping rate almost by the order of magnitude if IW amplitude is of the order or larger as compared to the turbulence amplitude. The effect of the IW on the turbulence dynamics is further studied in the case where IW amplitude is of the order of the initial turbulence amplitude. In this case, turbulence is not supported by additional forcing and the effect of damping of IW by turbulence remains negligible. The DNS results show that in the absence of IW turbulence decays, but its decay rate is reduced in the vicinity of the pycnocline where stratification effects are significant. In this case, at sufficiently late times most of turbulent energy is located in a layer close to the pycnocline center. Here turbulent eddies are collapsed in the vertical direction and acquire the "pancake" shape. IW modifies turbulence dynamics, in that the turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) is significantly enhanced as compared to the TKE in the absence of IW. As in the case without IW, most of turbulent energy is localized in the vicinity of the pycnocline center. Here the TKE spectrum is considerably enhanced in the entire wavenumber range as compared to the TKE spectrum in the absence of IW. This work was supported by RFBR (project No. 14-05-00367).

  19. Numerical simulation of a laser-acoustic landmine detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancranjan, Ion I.; Miclos, Sorin; Savastru, Dan; Savastru, Roxana; Opran, Constantin

    2012-06-01

    The preliminary numerical simulation results obtained in the analysis of a landmine detection system based on laser excitation of acoustic - seismic waves in the soil and observing its surface vibration above the embedded landmine are presented. The presented numerical simulations comprise three main parts: 1) Laser oscillator and laser beam propagation and absorption in soil; a laser oscillator operated in Q-switched regime is considered; different laser wavelengths are investigated. 2) Acoustic - seismic wave generation by absorption in soil of laser pulse energy; 3) Evaluation of acoustic - seismic wave generation by the buried in soil landmine; 4) Comparison of Distributed Feed- Back Fiber Laser (DFB-FL) and Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) detector used for soil vibrations evaluation. The above mentioned numerical simulation is dedicated for evaluation of an integrated portable detection system.

  20. Compressible Turbulent Flow Numerical Simulations of Tip Vortex Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatami, F.; van der Weide, E.; Hoeijmakers, H.

    2015-12-01

    For an elliptic Arndt's hydrofoil numerical simulations of vortex cavitation are presented. An equilibrium cavitation model is employed. This single-fluid model assumes local thermodynamic and mechanical equilibrium in the mixture region of the flow, is employed. Furthermore, for characterizing the thermodynamic state of the system, precomputed multiphase thermodynamic tables containing data for the appropriate equations of state for each of the phases are used and a fast, accurate, and efficient look-up approach is employed for interpolating the data. The numerical simulations are carried out using the Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) equations for compressible flow. The URANS equations of motion are discretized using an finite volume method for unstructured grids. The numerical simulations clearly show the formation of the tip vortex cavitation in the flow about the elliptic hydrofoil.

  1. Simulation of crossflow instability on a supersonic highly swept wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruett, C. David

    1995-01-01

    A direct numerical simulation (DNS) algorithm has been developed and validated for use in the investigation of crossflow instability on supersonic swept wings, an application of potential relevance to the design of the High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). The algorithm is applied to the investigation of stationary crossflow instability on an infinitely long 77-degree swept wing in Mach 3.5 flow. The results of the DNS are compared with the predictions of linear parabolized stability equation (PSE) methodology. In-general, the DNS and PSE results agree closely in terms of modal growth rate, structure, and orientation angle. Although further validation is needed for large-amplitude (nonlinear) disturbances, the close agreement between independently derived methods offers preliminary validation of both DNS and PSE approaches.

  2. Direct numerical simulation of flow and heat transfer in a turbine cascade with incoming wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wissink, Jan G.; Rodi, Wolfgang

    2006-12-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of flow in a turbine cascade with heat transfer have been performed. The set-up of the simulations was chosen in close accordance with previous experiments. Three of the experimental situations were simulated: one without free-stream turbulence and two with periodically incoming wakes of different frequency and with different levels of background fluctuation. Hence, the calculations allow us to study the influence of impinging wakes and background fluctuations on the development of the boundary layers and the local Nusselt number along the surfaces of the heated blade. Along the suction side, the pressure gradient is first favourable and then turns adverse near the trailing edge and the boundary layer remains laminar for the case without free-stream turbulence with the Nusselt number showing the typical decay from the leading to the trailing edge. With periodic wakes and background turbulence, transition occurs when the pressure gradient turns adverse, but intermittency persists so that the boundary layer is not fully turbulent when the trailing edge is reached. In this region, the heat transfer is increased significantly by an amount comparable to that found in the experiments. In the pre-transitional region with favourable pressure gradient, the flow acceleration stretches the free-stream vortices, aligning their axis with the flow direction, thereby forming streamwise vortical structures. These increase the laminar heat transfer in this region by 20 30%, which is, however, much less than observed in the experiments. On the pressure side, the pressure gradient is favourable along the entire blade so that the boundary layer remains laminar. Here, the wakes, through their impingement, also generate streamwise vortical structures which, because of the low convection speed on this side, have a very long lifetime compared to the structures along the suction side. Also these structures increase the laminar heat transfer by about 30%, which for the case with the highest wake frequency is again much less than in the experiments. The simulated average level of fluctuations in the laminar parts of the boundary layers is comparable or even higher than that in the experiments so that it seems likely that a difference in the spectral contents causes the discrepancies. The wake turbulence entering the calculation domain corresponds to that in far wakes with relatively small-scale structures, whereas in the experiments the wakes most probably still carried some large-scale fluctuations of the size of the wake width, which have been found to be more effective in increasing laminar heat transfer.

  3. Numerical simulation of surface waves instability on a homogeneous grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotkevich, Alexander O.; Dyachenko, Alexander I.; Zakharov, Vladimir E.

    2016-05-01

    We performed full-scale numerical simulation of instability of weakly nonlinear waves on the surface of deep fluid. We show that the instability development leads to chaotization and formation of wave turbulence. Instability of both propagating and standing waves was studied. We separately studied pure capillary wave, that was unstable due to three-wave interactions and pure gravity waves, that were unstable due to four-wave interactions. The theoretical description of instabilities in all cases is included in the article. The numerical algorithm used in these and many other previous simulations performed by the authors is described in detail.

  4. Numerical simulation of three-dimensional self-gravitating flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1993-01-01

    The three-dimensional flow of a self-gravitating fluid is numerically simulated using a Fourier pseudospectral method with a logarithmic variable formulation. Two cases with zero total angular momentum are studied in detail, a 323 simulation (Run B). Other than the grid size, the primary difference between the two cases are that Run A modeled atomic hydrogen and had considerably more compressible motion initially than Run B, which modeled molecular hydrogen. The numerical results indicate that gravitational collapse can proceed in a variety of ways. In the Run A, collapse led to an elongated tube-like structure, while in the Run B, collapse led to a flatter, disklike structure.

  5. Numerical simulation of tornado wind loading on structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maiden, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical simulation of a tornado interacting with a building was undertaken in order to compare the pressures due to a rotational unsteady wind with that due to steady straight winds used in design of nuclear facilities. The numerical simulations were performed on a two-dimensional compressible hydrodynamics code. Calculated pressure profiles for a typical building were then subjected to a tornado wind field and the results were compared with current quasisteady design calculations. The analysis indicates that current design practices are conservative.

  6. Numerical simulation of graphene in an external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyda, D. L.; Braguta, V. V.; Valgushev, S. N.; Polikarpov, M. I.; Ulybyshev, M. V.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper the results of numerical simulation of graphene effective field theory in external magnetic field are presented. The numerical simulation is performed using noncompact (3+1)-dimensional Abelian lattice gauge fields and (2+1)-dimensional staggered lattice fermions. The dependences of fermion condensate and conductivity on the dielectric permittivity of the substrate for different values of external magnetic field are calculated. It is found that magnetic field shifts insulator-semimetal phase transition to larger values of the dielectric permittivity of the substrate. The phase diagram of graphene in external magnetic field is drawn.

  7. Vortical flow aerodynamics - Physical aspects and numerical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsome, Richard W.; Kandil, Osama A.

    1987-01-01

    Progress in the numerical simulation of vortical flow due to three-dimensional flow separation about flight vehicles at high angles of attack and quasi-steady flight conditions is surveyed. Primary emphasis is placed on Euler and Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes methods where the vortices are 'captured' as a solution to the governing equations. A discussion of the relevant flow physics provides a perspective from which to assess numerical solutions. Current numerical prediction capabilities and their evolutionary development are surveyed. Future trends and challenges are identified and discussed.

  8. Building Blocks for Reliable Complex Nonlinear Numerical Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.

    2005-01-01

    This chapter describes some of the building blocks to ensure a higher level of confidence in the predictability and reliability (PAR) of numerical simulation of multiscale complex nonlinear problems. The focus is on relating PAR of numerical simulations with complex nonlinear phenomena of numerics. To isolate sources of numerical uncertainties, the possible discrepancy between the chosen partial differential equation (PDE) model and the real physics and/or experimental data is set aside. The discussion is restricted to how well numerical schemes can mimic the solution behavior of the underlying PDE model for finite time steps and grid spacings. The situation is complicated by the fact that the available theory for the understanding of nonlinear behavior of numerics is not at a stage to fully analyze the nonlinear Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. The discussion is based on the knowledge gained for nonlinear model problems with known analytical solutions to identify and explain the possible sources and remedies of numerical uncertainties in practical computations.

  9. Building Blocks for Reliable Complex Nonlinear Numerical Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Mansour, Nagi N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This talk describes some of the building blocks to ensure a higher level of confidence in the predictability and reliability (PAR) of numerical simulation of multiscale complex nonlinear problems. The focus is on relating PAR of numerical simulations with complex nonlinear phenomena of numerics. To isolate sources of numerical uncertainties, the possible discrepancy between the chosen partial differential equation (PDE) model and the real physics and/or experimental data is set aside. The discussion is restricted to how well numerical schemes can mimic the solution behavior of the underlying PDE model for finite time steps and grid spacings. The situation is complicated by the fact that the available theory for the understanding of nonlinear behavior of numerics is not at a stage to fully analyze the nonlinear Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. The discussion is based on the knowledge gained for nonlinear model problems with known analytical solutions to identify and explain the possible sources and remedies of numerical uncertainties in practical computations. Examples relevant to turbulent flow computations are included.

  10. Building Blocks for Reliable Complex Nonlinear Numerical Simulations. Chapter 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Mansour, Nagi N. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This chapter describes some of the building blocks to ensure a higher level of confidence in the predictability and reliability (PAR) of numerical simulation of multiscale complex nonlinear problems. The focus is on relating PAR of numerical simulations with complex nonlinear phenomena of numerics. To isolate sources of numerical uncertainties, the possible discrepancy between the chosen partial differential equation (PDE) model and the real physics and/or experimental data is set aside. The discussion is restricted to how well numerical schemes can mimic the solution behavior of the underlying PDE model for finite time steps and grid spacings. The situation is complicated by the fact that the available theory for the understanding of nonlinear behavior of numerics is not at a stage to fully analyze the nonlinear Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. The discussion is based on the knowledge gained for nonlinear model problems with known analytical solutions to identify and explain the possible sources and remedies of numerical uncertainties in practical computations. Examples relevant to turbulent flow computations are included.

  11. Numerical simulation of double-diffusive finger convection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hughes, J.D.; Sanford, W.E.; Vacher, H.L.

    2005-01-01

    A hybrid finite element, integrated finite difference numerical model is developed for the simulation of double-diffusive and multicomponent flow in two and three dimensions. The model is based on a multidimensional, density-dependent, saturated-unsaturated transport model (SUTRA), which uses one governing equation for fluid flow and another for solute transport. The solute-transport equation is applied sequentially to each simulated species. Density coupling of the flow and solute-transport equations is accounted for and handled using a sequential implicit Picard iterative scheme. High-resolution data from a double-diffusive Hele-Shaw experiment, initially in a density-stable configuration, is used to verify the numerical model. The temporal and spatial evolution of simulated double-diffusive convection is in good agreement with experimental results. Numerical results are very sensitive to discretization and correspond closest to experimental results when element sizes adequately define the spatial resolution of observed fingering. Numerical results also indicate that differences in the molecular diffusivity of sodium chloride and the dye used to visualize experimental sodium chloride concentrations are significant and cause inaccurate mapping of sodium chloride concentrations by the dye, especially at late times. As a result of reduced diffusion, simulated dye fingers are better defined than simulated sodium chloride fingers and exhibit more vertical mass transfer. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. Processing biobased polymers using plasticizers: Numerical simulations versus experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desplentere, Frederik; Cardon, Ludwig; Six, Wim; Erkoç, Mustafa

    2016-03-01

    In polymer processing, the use of biobased products shows lots of possibilities. Considering biobased materials, biodegradability is in most cases the most important issue. Next to this, bio based materials aimed at durable applications, are gaining interest. Within this research, the influence of plasticizers on the processing of the bio based material is investigated. This work is done for an extrusion grade of PLA, Natureworks PLA 2003D. Extrusion through a slit die equipped with pressure sensors is used to compare the experimental pressure values to numerical simulation results. Additional experimental data (temperature and pressure data along the extrusion screw and die are recorded) is generated on a dr. Collin Lab extruder producing a 25mm diameter tube. All these experimental data is used to indicate the appropriate functioning of the numerical simulation tool Virtual Extrusion Laboratory 6.7 for the simulation of both the industrial available extrusion grade PLA and the compound in which 15% of plasticizer is added. Adding the applied plasticizer, resulted in a 40% lower pressure drop over the extrusion die. The combination of different experiments allowed to fit the numerical simulation results closely to the experimental values. Based on this experience, it is shown that numerical simulations also can be used for modified bio based materials if appropriate material and process data are taken into account.

  13. Numerical modeling and simulation of chemically reacting reentry flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurien, E.; Bohle, M.; Holthoff, H.; Wiesbaum, J.

    The hypersonic flow along the heat-shield of reentry capsules involves strong shocks and high temperatures at low air density. This study outlines the development of a three-dimensional shock-capturing numerical algorithm to simulate such a flow along a reentry trajectory. The continuum model used presents a coupling of aerothermodynamical conservation equations with air chemistry at high temperatures. A simulation algorithm on the basis of the Taylor-Galerkin finite-element method using unstructured numerical grids has been developed. The paper gives a status report on progressing work of the present group. Two- and three-dimensional flow simulations around a blunt body in chemical equilibrium or thermal nonequilibrium are presented. The impact of high temperature aerothermodynamics and air chemistry on the flow under selected parameters are elucidated. The current work makes an attempt to simulate reentry flows along the reentry trajectory with the aim of providing data for design studies and environmental investigations.

  14. Numerical simulation of impact cratering on granular material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Koji; Senshu, Hiroki; Matsui, Takafumi

    2006-02-01

    A new numerical code based on the Distinct Element Method (DEM) is developed to study the impact cratering processes on granular material. This code has a potential advantage to simulate the cratering process on granular material, since the movement of discrete particles can be treated. To show the physical plausibility of this code, we conduct 3-D numerical simulations of vertical impact into granular material targets that consist of 384,000 particles, and compare the results with those from experimental studies. It is shown that the excavation stage of cratering derived from experimental studies is represented well by our simulation: the size of the crater cavity, and the ejecta velocity and angle distributions are consistent with those obtained in laboratory experiments. The impact simulation code developed in this study is thus suggested to be useful for the analysis of the impact cratering process on granular material.

  15. Numerical simulation of a premixed turbulent V-flame

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, John B.; Day, Marc S.; Grcar, Joseph F.; Lijewski, Michael J.; Johnson, Matt R.; Cheng, Robert K.; Shepherd, Ian G.

    2003-07-27

    We present three-dimensional, time-dependent simulations of a full-size laboratory-scale rod-stabilized premixed turbulent V-flame. The computations use an adaptive projection method based on a low Mach number formulation that incorporates detailed chemical kinetics and transport. The simulations are performed without introducing models for turbulence or turbulence chemistry interaction. We outline the numerical procedure and experimental setup, and compare computed results to mean flame location and surface wrinkling statistics gathered from experiment.

  16. Numerical Simulations of the Digital Microfluidic Manipulation of Single Microparticles.

    PubMed

    Lan, Chuanjin; Pal, Souvik; Li, Zhen; Ma, Yanbao

    2015-09-01

    Single-cell analysis techniques have been developed as a valuable bioanalytical tool for elucidating cellular heterogeneity at genomic, proteomic, and cellular levels. Cell manipulation is an indispensable process for single-cell analysis. Digital microfluidics (DMF) is an important platform for conducting cell manipulation and single-cell analysis in a high-throughput fashion. However, the manipulation of single cells in DMF has not been quantitatively studied so far. In this article, we investigate the interaction of a single microparticle with a liquid droplet on a flat substrate using numerical simulations. The droplet is driven by capillary force generated from the wettability gradient of the substrate. Considering the Brownian motion of microparticles, we utilize many-body dissipative particle dynamics (MDPD), an off-lattice mesoscopic simulation technique, in this numerical study. The manipulation processes (including pickup, transport, and drop-off) of a single microparticle with a liquid droplet are simulated. Parametric studies are conducted to investigate the effects on the manipulation processes from the droplet size, wettability gradient, wetting properties of the microparticle, and particle-substrate friction coefficients. The numerical results show that the pickup, transport, and drop-off processes can be precisely controlled by these parameters. On the basis of the numerical results, a trap-free delivery of a hydrophobic microparticle to a destination on the substrate is demonstrated in the numerical simulations. The numerical results not only provide a fundamental understanding of interactions among the microparticle, the droplet, and the substrate but also demonstrate a new technique for the trap-free immobilization of single hydrophobic microparticles in the DMF design. Finally, our numerical method also provides a powerful design and optimization tool for the manipulation of microparticles in DMF systems. PMID:26241832

  17. Numerical simulations and modeling for stochastic biological systems with jumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Xiaoling; Wang, Ke

    2014-05-01

    This paper gives a numerical method to simulate sample paths for stochastic differential equations (SDEs) driven by Poisson random measures. It provides us a new approach to simulate systems with jumps from a different angle. The driving Poisson random measures are assumed to be generated by stationary Poisson point processes instead of Lvy processes. Methods provided in this paper can be used to simulate SDEs with Lvy noise approximately. The simulation is divided into two parts: the part of jumping integration is based on definition without approximation while the continuous part is based on some classical approaches. Biological explanations for stochastic integrations with jumps are motivated by several numerical simulations. How to model biological systems with jumps is showed in this paper. Moreover, method of choosing integrands and stationary Poisson point processes in jumping integrations for biological models are obtained. In addition, results are illustrated through some examples and numerical simulations. For some examples, earthquake is chose as a jumping source which causes jumps on the size of biological population.

  18. Direct numerical simulation of auto-ignition of a hydrogen vortex ring reacting with hot air

    SciTech Connect

    Doom, Jeff; Mahesh, Krishnan

    2009-04-15

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is used to study chemically reacting, laminar vortex rings. A novel, all-Mach number algorithm developed by Doom et al. [J. Doom, Y. Hou, K. Mahesh, J. Comput. Phys. 226 (2007) 1136-1151] is used. The chemical mechanism is a nine species, nineteen reaction mechanism for H{sub 2}/air combustion proposed by Mueller et al. [M.A. Mueller, T.J. Kim, R.A. Yetter, F.L. Dryer, Int. J. Chem. Kinet. 31 (1999) 113-125]. Diluted H{sub 2} at ambient temperature (300 K) is injected into hot air. The simulations study the effect of fuel/air ratios, oxidizer temperature, Lewis number and stroke ratio (ratio of piston stroke length to diameter). Results show that auto-ignition occurs in fuel lean, high temperature regions with low scalar dissipation at a 'most reactive' mixture fraction, {zeta}{sub MR} (Mastorakos et al. [E. Mastorakos, T.A. Baritaud, T.J. Poinsot, Combust. Flame 109 (1997) 198-223]). Subsequent evolution of the flame is not predicted by {zeta}{sub MR}; a most reactive temperature T{sub MR} is defined and shown to predict both the initial auto-ignition as well as subsequent evolution. For stroke ratios less than the formation number, ignition in general occurs behind the vortex ring and propagates into the core. At higher oxidizer temperatures, ignition is almost instantaneous and occurs along the entire interface between fuel and oxidizer. For stroke ratios greater than the formation number, ignition initially occurs behind the leading vortex ring, then occurs along the length of the trailing column and propagates toward the ring. Lewis number is seen to affect both the initial ignition as well as subsequent flame evolution significantly. Non-uniform Lewis number simulations provide faster ignition and burnout time but a lower maximum temperature. The fuel rich reacting vortex ring provides the highest maximum temperature and the higher oxidizer temperature provides the fastest ignition time. The fuel lean reacting vortex ring has little effect on the flow and behaves similar to a non-reacting vortex ring. (author)

  19. Numerical simulation of viscous flows over transonic aircraft configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takanashi, Susumu; Yoshida, Masahiro; Fujii, Kozo; Matsushima, Kisa; Obayashi, Shigeru

    1987-01-01

    Numerical simulation of compressible viscous flow fields is performed for a transonic transport configuration. A single structured grid system is constructed using analytical transformations such as conformal mapping, shearing/twisting/rotating/clustering/stretching transformations. The Reynolds-averaged, thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations are solved on a supercomputer, FACOM VP-400, using the LU-ADI factorization method.

  20. Numerical Simulation of the Perrin-Like Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazur, Zygmunt; Grech, Dariusz

    2008-01-01

    A simple model of the random Brownian walk of a spherical mesoscopic particle in viscous liquids is proposed. The model can be solved analytically and simulated numerically. The analytic solution gives the known Einstein-Smoluchowski diffusion law r[superscript 2] = 2Dt, where the diffusion constant D is expressed by the mass and geometry of a

  1. Numerical simulation of a HgCdTe solidification process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexiades, V.; Geist, G. A.; Solomon, A. D.

    1985-08-01

    The solidification of a cylindrical ingot of mercury-cadmium-telluride is modeled taking into account both heat conduction and solute diffusion. Values of the relevant thermophysical parameters of the pseudo-binary HgTe-CdTe are compiled. The model is implemented numerically by a finite-difference discretization and results of the simulation of a freezing experiment are reported.

  2. A review of numerical simulation of hydrothermal systems.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mercer, J.W.; Faust, C.R.

    1979-01-01

    Many advances in simulating single and two-phase fluid flow and heat transport in porous media have recently been made in conjunction with geothermal energy research. These numerical models reproduce system thermal and pressure behaviour and can be used for other heat-transport problems, such as high-level radioactive waste disposal and heat-storage projects. -Authors

  3. Numerical aerodynamic simulation facility preliminary study: Executive study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A computing system was designed with the capability of providing an effective throughput of one billion floating point operations per second for three dimensional Navier-Stokes codes. The methodology used in defining the baseline design, and the major elements of the numerical aerodynamic simulation facility are described.

  4. IRIS Spectrum Line Plot - Numeric Simulation - Duration: 13 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video is similar to the IRIS Spectrum Line Plot video at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E4V_vF3qMSI, but now as derived from a numerical simulation of the Sun by the University of Oslo. Credit...

  5. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF THREE-DIMENSIONAL TUFT CORONA AND ELECTROHYDRODYNAMICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The numerical simulation of three-dimensional tuft corona and electrohydrodynamics (EHD) is discussed. The importance of high-voltage and low-current operation in the wire-duct precipitator has focused attention on collecting high-resistivity dust. The local current density of in...

  6. Numerical approaches for multidimensional simulations of stellar explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Heger, Alexander; Almgren, Ann S.

    2013-11-01

    We introduce numerical algorithms for initializing multidimensional simulations of stellar explosions with 1D stellar evolution models. The initial mapping from 1D profiles onto multidimensional grids can generate severe numerical artifacts, one of the most severe of which is the violation of conservation laws for physical quantities. We introduce a numerical scheme for mapping 1D spherically-symmetric data onto multidimensional meshes so that these physical quantities are conserved. We verify our scheme by porting a realistic 1D Lagrangian stellar profile to the new multidimensional Eulerian hydro code CASTRO. Our results show that all important features in the profiles are reproduced on the new grid and that conservation laws are enforced at all resolutions after mapping. We also introduce a numerical scheme for initializing multidimensional supernova simulations with realistic perturbations predicted by 1D stellar evolution models. Instead of seeding 3D stellar profiles with random perturbations, we imprint them with velocity perturbations that reproduce the Kolmogorov energy spectrum expected for highly turbulent convective regions in stars. Our models return Kolmogorov energy spectra and vortex structures like those in turbulent flows before the modes become nonlinear. Finally, we describe approaches to determining the resolution for simulations required to capture fluid instabilities and nuclear burning. Our algorithms are applicable to multidimensional simulations besides stellar explosions that range from astrophysics to cosmology.

  7. Numerical Simulation of the Perrin-Like Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazur, Zygmunt; Grech, Dariusz

    2008-01-01

    A simple model of the random Brownian walk of a spherical mesoscopic particle in viscous liquids is proposed. The model can be solved analytically and simulated numerically. The analytic solution gives the known Einstein-Smoluchowski diffusion law r[superscript 2] = 2Dt, where the diffusion constant D is expressed by the mass and geometry of a…

  8. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF NATURAL GAS-SWIRL BURNER

    SciTech Connect

    Ala Qubbaj

    2005-03-01

    A numerical simulation of a turbulent natural gas jet diffusion flame at a Reynolds number of 9000 in a swirling air stream is presented. The numerical computations were carried out using the commercially available software package CFDRC. The instantaneous chemistry model was used as the reaction model. The thermal, composition, flow (velocity), as well as stream function fields for both the baseline and air-swirling flames were numerically simulated in the near-burner region, where most of the mixing and reactions occur. The results were useful to interpret the effects of swirl in enhancing the mixing rates in the combustion zone as well as in stabilizing the flame. The results showed the generation of two recirculating regimes induced by the swirling air stream, which account for such effects. The present investigation will be used as a benchmark study of swirl flow combustion analysis as a step in developing an enhanced swirl-cascade burner technology.

  9. Numerical simulation of cavitating flow past axisymmetric body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Park, Warn-Gyu; Jung, Chul-Min

    2012-09-01

    Cavitating flow simulation is of practical importance for many engineering systems, such as marine propellers, pump impellers, nozzles, torpedoes, etc. The present work has developed the base code to solve the cavitating flows past the axisymmetric bodies with several forebody shapes. The governing equation is the Navier-Stokes equation based on homogeneous mixture model. The momentum is in the mixture phase while the continuity equation is solved in liquid and vapor phase, separately. The solver employs an implicit preconditioning algorithm in curvilinear coordinates. The computations have been carried out for the cylinders with hemispherical, 1-caliber, and 0-caliber forebody and, then, compared with experiments and other numerical results. Fairly good agreements with experiments and numerical results have been achieved. It has been concluded that the present numerical code has successfully accounted for the cavitating flows past axisymmetric bodies. The present code has also shown the capability to simulate ventilated cavitation.

  10. Numerical solute transport simulation using fuzzy sets approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Chunhua; Woldt, Wayne; Bogardi, Istvan; Dahab, Mohamed

    1997-07-01

    This paper applies fuzzy sets and fuzzy arithmetic to incorporate imprecise information into transport modeling of nonreactive solute materials in groundwater flow. The method is applied to both one- and two-dimensional uniform flow fields. Emphasis is on the solution methods of the fuzzy numerical model of solute transport, which is a function of fuzzy variables. The solution techniques, including the vertex method and the fuzzy-numerical simulation method (i.e. the single-value simulation method), are discussed in detail. The solute concentration outputs from the fuzzy finite-difference numerical models based on these two solution methods are compared with those from the fuzzy analytical models. The vertex method can avoid the widening of the fuzzy function value set, in this case, the fuzzy solute concentration function. This widening is due to multi-occurrence of variables in the function expression when using conventional interval analysis. However, in fuzzy finite-difference numerical simulation of solute transport, the vertex method may still overestimate the uncertainty in the concentration outputs since all the fuzzy variables in the fuzzy numerical model are taken to be independent. The fuzzy-numerical simulation method can control the growth of the imprecision in the solute concentration calculations by taking into account the interaction (dependence) of concentration variables in both space and time dimensions in the fuzzy finite-difference model of solute transport. It has the advantage of allowing the use of imprecise data for modeling and also processing the fuzzy information using generated crisp values of fuzzy variables. The adoption of fuzzy sets allows common-sense knowledge to be represented in defining values through the use of a membership function. This enables the subjective information to be incorporated in system modeling in a formal algorithm.

  11. Configuration Management File Manager Developed for Numerical Propulsion System Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Follen, Gregory J.

    1997-01-01

    One of the objectives of the High Performance Computing and Communication Project's (HPCCP) Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) is to provide a common and consistent way to manage applications, data, and engine simulations. The NPSS Configuration Management (CM) File Manager integrated with the Common Desktop Environment (CDE) window management system provides a common look and feel for the configuration management of data, applications, and engine simulations for U.S. engine companies. In addition, CM File Manager provides tools to manage a simulation. Features include managing input files, output files, textual notes, and any other material normally associated with simulation. The CM File Manager includes a generic configuration management Application Program Interface (API) that can be adapted for the configuration management repositories of any U.S. engine company.

  12. Evaluation of a vortex-based subgrid stress model using DNS databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ashish; Lund, Thomas S.

    1996-01-01

    The performance of a SubGrid Stress (SGS) model for Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) developed by Misra k Pullin (1996) is studied for forced and decaying isotropic turbulence on a 32(exp 3) grid. The physical viability of the model assumptions are tested using DNS databases. The results from LES of forced turbulence at Taylor Reynolds number R(sub (lambda)) approximately equals 90 are compared with filtered DNS fields. Probability density functions (pdfs) of the subgrid energy transfer, total dissipation, and the stretch of the subgrid vorticity by the resolved velocity-gradient tensor show reasonable agreement with the DNS data. The model is also tested in LES of decaying isotropic turbulence where it correctly predicts the decay rate and energy spectra measured by Comte-Bellot & Corrsin (1971).

  13. A DNS study on the stabilization mechanism of a turbulent lifted ethylene jet flame in highly-heated coflow

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Chun S

    2011-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the near-field of a three-dimensional spatially-developing turbulent ethylene jet flame in highly-heated coflow is performed with a reduced mechanism to determine the stabilization mechanism. The DNS was performed at a jet Reynolds number of 10,000 with over 1.29 billion grid points. The results show that auto-ignition in a fuel-lean mixture at the flame base is the main source of stabilization of the lifted jet flame. The Damkoehler number and chemical explosive mode (CEM) analysis also verify that auto-ignition occurs at the flame base. In addition to auto-ignition, Lagrangian tracking of the flame base reveals the passage of large-scale flow structures and their correlation with the fluctuations of the flame base similar to a previous study (Yoo et al., J. Fluid Mech. 640 (2009) 453-481) with hydrogen/air jet flames. It is also observed that the present lifted flame base exhibits a cyclic 'saw-tooth' shaped movement marked by rapid movement upstream and slower movement downstream. This is a consequence of the lifted flame being stabilized by a balance between consecutive auto-ignition events in hot fuel-lean mixtures and convection induced by the high-speed jet and coflow velocities. This is confirmed by Lagrangian tracking of key variables including the flame-normal velocity, displacement speed, scalar dissipation rate, and mixture fraction at the stabilization point.

  14. A DNS study on the stabilization mechanism of a turbulent lifted ethylene jet flame in highly-heated coflow

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C. S.; Richardson, E.; Sankaran, R.; Chen, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the near-field of a three-dimensional spatially-developing turbulent ethylene jet flame in highly-heated coflow is performed with a reduced mechanism to determine the stabilization mechanism. The DNS was performed at a jet Reynolds number of 10,000 with over 1.29 billion grid points. The results show that auto-ignition in a fuel-lean mixture at the flame base is the main source of stabilization of the lifted jet flame. The Damköhler number and chemical explosive mode (CEM) analysis also verify that auto-ignition occurs at the flame base. In addition to auto-ignition, Lagrangian tracking of the flame base reveals the passage of large-scale flow structures and their correlation with the fluctuations of the flame base similar to a previous study (Yoo et al., J. Fluid Mech. 640 (2009) 453–481) with hydrogen/air jet flames. It is also observed that the present lifted flame base exhibits a cyclic ‘saw-tooth’ shaped movement marked by rapid movement upstream and slower movement downstream. This is a consequence of the lifted flame being stabilized by a balance between consecutive auto-ignition events in hot fuel-lean mixtures and convection induced by the high-speed jet and coflow velocities. This is confirmed by Lagrangian tracking of key variables including the flame-normal velocity, displacement speed, scalar dissipation rate, and mixture fraction at the stabilization point.

  15. Comparative Laboratory and Numerical Simulations of Shearing Granular Fault Gouge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, J. K.; Marone, C.

    2004-05-01

    Laboratory studies of granular shear zones have provided significant insight into fault zone processes and the mechanics of earthquakes, including important contributions to our understanding of earthquake nucleation, the seismic-aseismic stability transition, dynamic rupture, and fault interactions. Numerical simulations using particle dynamics methods can offer unique views into deforming fault zones, particularly regarding the micromechanisms of deformation in shearing materials. Recently, significant advances in our understanding of granular shear have been gained by integrating these two approaches to better model the frictional behavior of tectonic faults. We describe a series of comparative laboratory and numerical experiments of granular shear carried out under identical initial and boundary conditions, using idealized granular materials, i.e., glass beads and rods. Phenomenologically, the two sets of experiments are very similar, demonstrating shear strength fluctuations that can be related to variations in particle size distribution, shear zone thickness, and imposed normal stress. Observed discrepancies in absolute shear strength and stress-strain behavior, then, allow us to calibrate and update the numerical interparticle contact laws to gain improved fits to the laboratory results. The numerical simulations serve to clarify the active deformation processes, demonstrating the role of shear localization, and partitioning between deformation mechanisms, including grain boundary sliding, rolling, and changes in particle size distribution. This integrated study offers great promise to improve our understanding of fault mechanics and earthquake physics. We describe results of the combined study and development of the next generation of particle-based numerical models, including realistic, physico-chemically based contact laws.

  16. Numerical simulation of the unsteady behaviour of cavitating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutier-Delgosha, O.; Reboud, J. L.; Delannoy, Y.

    2003-06-01

    A 2D numerical model is proposed to simulate unsteady cavitating flows. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved for the mixture of liquid and vapour, which is considered as a single fluid with variable density. The vapourization and condensation processes are controlled by a barotropic state law that relates the fluid density to the pressure variations. The numerical resolution is a pressure-correction method derived from the SIMPLE algorithm, with a finite volume discretization. The standard scheme is slightly modified to take into account the cavitation phenomenon. That numerical model is used to calculate unsteady cavitating flows in two Venturi type sections. The choice of the turbulence model is discussed, and the standard RNG k-model is found to lead to non-physical stable cavities. A modified k-model is proposed to improve the simulation. The influence of numerical and physical parameters is presented, and the numerical results are compared to previous experimental observations and measurements. The proposed model seems to describe the unsteady cavitation behaviour in 2D geometries well.

  17. Analysis of turbulent transport and mixing in transitional Rayleigh–Taylor unstable flow using direct numerical simulation data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schilling, Oleg; Mueschke, Nicholas J.

    2010-10-18

    Data from a 1152X760X1280 direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a transitional Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer modeled after a small Atwood number water channel experiment is used to comprehensively investigate the structure of mean and turbulent transport and mixing. The simulation had physical parameters and initial conditions approximating those in the experiment. The budgets of the mean vertical momentum, heavy-fluid mass fraction, turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate, heavy-fluid mass fraction variance, and heavy-fluid mass fraction variance dissipation rate equations are constructed using Reynolds averaging applied to the DNS data. The relative importance of mean and turbulent production, turbulent dissipationmore » and destruction, and turbulent transport are investigated as a function of Reynolds number and across the mixing layer to provide insight into the flow dynamics not presently available from experiments. The analysis of the budgets supports the assumption for small Atwood number, Rayleigh/Taylor driven flows that the principal transport mechanisms are buoyancy production, turbulent production, turbulent dissipation, and turbulent diffusion (shear and mean field production are negligible). As the Reynolds number increases, the turbulent production in the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate equation becomes the dominant production term, while the buoyancy production plateaus. Distinctions between momentum and scalar transport are also noted, where the turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate both grow in time and are peaked near the center plane of the mixing layer, while the heavy-fluid mass fraction variance and its dissipation rate initially grow and then begin to decrease as mixing progresses and reduces density fluctuations. All terms in the transport equations generally grow or decay, with no qualitative change in their profile, except for the pressure flux contribution to the total turbulent kinetic energy flux, which changes sign early in time (a countergradient effect). The production-to-dissipation ratios corresponding to the turbulent kinetic energy and heavy-fluid mass fraction variance are large and vary strongly at small evolution times, decrease with time, and nearly asymptote as the flow enters a self-similar regime. The late-time turbulent kinetic energy production-to-dissipation ratio is larger than observed in shear-driven turbulent flows. The order of magnitude estimates of the terms in the transport equations are shown to be consistent with the DNS at late-time, and also confirms both the dominant terms and their evolutionary behavior. Thus, these results are useful for identifying the dynamically important terms requiring closure, and assessing the accuracy of the predictions of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and large-eddy simulation models of turbulent transport and mixing in transitional Rayleigh-Taylor instability-generated flow.« less

  18. Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) 1999 Industry Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lytle, John; Follen, Greg; Naiman, Cynthia; Evans, Austin

    2000-01-01

    The technologies necessary to enable detailed numerical simulations of complete propulsion systems are being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center in cooperation with industry, academia, and other government agencies. Large scale, detailed simulations will be of great value to the nation because they eliminate some of the costly testing required to develop and certify advanced propulsion systems. In addition, time and cost savings will be achieved by enabling design details to be evaluated early in the development process before a commitment is made to a specific design. This concept is called the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS). NPSS consists of three main elements: (1) engineering models that enable multidisciplinary analysis of large subsystems and systems at various levels of detail, (2) a simulation environment that maximizes designer productivity, and (3) a cost-effective, high-performance computing platform. A fundamental requirement of the concept is that the simulations must be capable of overnight execution on easily accessible computing platforms. This will greatly facilitate the use of large-scale simulations in a design environment. This paper describes the current status of the NPSS with specific emphasis on the progress made over the past year on air breathing propulsion applications. In addition, the paper contains a summary of the feedback received from industry partners in the development effort and the actions taken over the past year to respond to that feedback. The NPSS development was supported in FY99 by the High Performance Computing and Communications Program.

  19. Thermal numerical simulator for laboratory evaluation of steamflood oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Sarathi, P.

    1991-04-01

    A thermal numerical simulator running on an IBM AT compatible personal computer is described. The simulator was designed to assist laboratory design and evaluation of steamflood oil recovery. An overview of the historical evolution of numerical thermal simulation, NIPER's approach to solving these problems with a desk top computer, the derivation of equations and a description of approaches used to solve these equations, and verification of the simulator using published data sets and sensitivity analysis are presented. The developed model is a three-phase, two-dimensional multicomponent simulator capable of being run in one or two dimensions. Mass transfer among the phases and components is dictated by pressure- and temperature-dependent vapor-liquid equilibria. Gravity and capillary pressure phenomena were included. Energy is transferred by conduction, convection, vaporization and condensation. The model employs a block centered grid system with a five-point discretization scheme. Both areal and vertical cross-sectional simulations are possible. A sequential solution technique is employed to solve the finite difference equations. The study clearly indicated the importance of heat loss, injected steam quality, and injection rate to the process. Dependence of overall recovery on oil volatility and viscosity is emphasized. The process is very sensitive to relative permeability values. Time-step sensitivity runs indicted that the current version is time-step sensitive and exhibits conditional stability. 75 refs., 19 figs., 19 tabs.

  20. Numerical simulation of landfill aeration using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fytanidis, Dimitrios K; Voudrias, Evangelos A

    2014-04-01

    The present study is an application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to the numerical simulation of landfill aeration systems. Specifically, the CFD algorithms provided by the commercial solver ANSYS Fluent 14.0, combined with an in-house source code developed to modify the main solver, were used. The unsaturated multiphase flow of air and liquid phases and the biochemical processes for aerobic biodegradation of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste were simulated taking into consideration their temporal and spatial evolution, as well as complex effects, such as oxygen mass transfer across phases, unsaturated flow effects (capillary suction and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity), temperature variations due to biochemical processes and environmental correction factors for the applied kinetics (Monod and 1st order kinetics). The developed model results were compared with literature experimental data. Also, pilot scale simulations and sensitivity analysis were implemented. Moreover, simulation results of a hypothetical single aeration well were shown, while its zone of influence was estimated using both the pressure and oxygen distribution. Finally, a case study was simulated for a hypothetical landfill aeration system. Both a static (steadily positive or negative relative pressure with time) and a hybrid (following a square wave pattern of positive and negative values of relative pressure with time) scenarios for the aeration wells were examined. The results showed that the present model is capable of simulating landfill aeration and the obtained results were in good agreement with corresponding previous experimental and numerical investigations. PMID:24525420

  1. Modeling, Testing and Numerical Simulation on Hot Forming of HSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ning; Hu, Ping; Shen, Guozhe; Wu, Wenhua

    2010-06-01

    The thermal-mechanical-transformation coupled relationship of microalloy steel has important significance in forming mechanism and numerical simulation of hot forming. Tensile and quenching experiments are implemented at high temperature, and then the thermal-mechanical-transformation coupled constitutive models of hot forming are developed. Based these models, the nonlinear large-deformation dynamic explicit finite element equations are proposed. The phase transformation latent heat is introduced into the analysis of temperature field during the hot forming process. Based on the independently developed commercial CAE software for sheet metal forming, named KMAS (King-Mesh Analysis System), the numerical simulation module of hot forming is developed, which considers multi-field coupled models, nonlinear and large deformation analysis. Then the hot forming process of a reinforced beam inside the automobile door is simulated by the KMAS software, and compared with its hot forming experimental testing. The experimental results indicate the validity and efficiency of the present multi-field coupled constitutive models and numerical simulation software KMAS of hot forming.

  2. Graphics interfaces and numerical simulations: Mexican Virtual Solar Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, L.; González, A.; Salas, G.; Santillán, A.

    2007-08-01

    Preliminary results associated to the computational development and creation of the Mexican Virtual Solar Observatory (MVSO) are presented. Basically, the MVSO prototype consists of two parts: the first, related to observations that have been made during the past ten years at the Solar Observation Station (EOS) and at the Carl Sagan Observatory (OCS) of the Universidad de Sonora in Mexico. The second part is associated to the creation and manipulation of a database produced by numerical simulations related to solar phenomena, we are using the MHD ZEUS-3D code. The development of this prototype was made using mysql, apache, java and VSO 1.2. based GNU and `open source philosophy'. A graphic user interface (GUI) was created in order to make web-based, remote numerical simulations. For this purpose, Mono was used, because it is provides the necessary software to develop and run .NET client and server applications on Linux. Although this project is still under development, we hope to have access, by means of this portal, to other virtual solar observatories and to be able to count on a database created through numerical simulations or, given the case, perform simulations associated to solar phenomena.

  3. Image based numerical simulation of hemodynamics in a intracranial aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Trung; Ge, Liang; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Kallmes, David; Cloft, Harry; Lewis, Debra; Dai, Daying; Ding, Yonghong; Kadirvel, Ramanathan

    2007-11-01

    Image-based numerical simulations of hemodynamics in a intracranial aneurysm are carried out. The numerical solver based on CURVIB (curvilinear grid/immersed boundary method) approach developed in Ge and Sotiropoulos, JCP 2007 is used to simulate the blood flow. A curvilinear grid system that gradually follows the curved geometry of artery wall and consists of approximately 5M grid nodes is constructed as the background grid system and the boundaries of the investigated artery and aneurysm are treated as immersed boundaries. The surface geometry of aneurysm wall is reconstructed from an angiography study of an aneurysm formed on the common carotid artery (CCA) of a rabbit and discretized with triangular meshes. At the inlet a physiological flow waveform is specified and direct numerical simulations are used to simulate the blood flow. Very rich vortical dynamics is observed within the aneurysm area, with a ring like vortex sheds from the proximal side of aneurysm, develops and impinge onto the distal side of the aneurysm as flow develops, and destructs into smaller vortices during later cardiac cycle. This work was supported in part by the University of Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

  4. Numerical simulation of the interaction between two bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, R.; Yao, X. L.; Zhang, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Different evolution patterns of two bubbles may be observed for different values of the phase difference and the inter-bubble distance. Based on potential flow theory, a boundary element method (BEM) is adopted to simulate the interaction between two bubbles and the toroidal bubble after the jet impact is also investigated by placing a vortex ring within the bubble. Meanwhile, some numerical techniques are used to deal with problems like coalescence and collapse. Typical phenomena like coalescence, jet towards and jet away are investigated numerically in this paper. The mechanisms underlying the various phenomena are given through the analysis of the velocity and pressure fields.

  5. A Priori Analysis of Subgrid-Scale Models for Large Eddy Simulations of Supercritical Binary-Species Mixing Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okong'o, Nora; Bellan, Josette

    2005-01-01

    Models for large eddy simulation (LES) are assessed on a database obtained from direct numerical simulations (DNS) of supercritical binary-species temporal mixing layers. The analysis is performed at the DNS transitional states for heptane/nitrogen, oxygen/hydrogen and oxygen/helium mixing layers. The incorporation of simplifying assumptions that are validated on the DNS database leads to a set of LES equations that requires only models for the subgrid scale (SGS) fluxes, which arise from filtering the convective terms in the DNS equations. Constant-coefficient versions of three different models for the SGS fluxes are assessed and calibrated. The Smagorinsky SGS-flux model shows poor correlations with the SGS fluxes, while the Gradient and Similarity models have high correlations, as well as good quantitative agreement with the SGS fluxes when the calibrated coefficients are used.

  6. Prediction of strong and weak ignition regimes in turbulent reacting flows with temperature fluctuations: A direct numerical simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Pinaki; Valorani, Mauro; Im, Hong; Wooldridge, Margaret

    2015-11-01

    The present work investigates the auto-ignition characteristics of compositionally homogeneous reactant mixtures in the presence of thermal non-uniformities and turbulent velocity fluctuations. An auto-ignition regime diagram is briefly discussed, that provides the framework for predicting the expected ignition behavior based on the thermo-chemical properties of the reactant mixture and flow/scalar field conditions. The regime diagram classifies the ignition regimes mainly into three categories: weak (deflagration dominant), reaction-controlled strong and mixing-controlled strong (volumetric ignition/spontaneous propagation dominant) regimes. Two-dimensional direct numerical simulations (DNS) of auto-ignition in a lean thermally-stratified syngas/air turbulent mixture at high-pressure, low-temperature conditions are performed to assess the validity of the regime diagram. Various parametric cases are considered corresponding to different locations on the regime diagram, by varying the characteristic turbulent Damköhler and Reynolds numbers. Detailed analysis of the reaction front propagation and heat release indicates that the observed ignition behaviors agree very well with the corresponding predictions by the regime diagram. U.S. DOE NETL award number DE-FE0007465; King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST).

  7. Expert System Architecture for Rocket Engine Numerical Simulators: A Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitra, D.; Babu, U.; Earla, A. K.; Hemminger, Joseph A.

    1998-01-01

    Simulation of any complex physical system like rocket engines involves modeling the behavior of their different components using mostly numerical equations. Typically a simulation package would contain a set of subroutines for these modeling purposes and some other ones for supporting jobs. A user would create an input file configuring a system (part or whole of a rocket engine to be simulated) in appropriate format understandable by the package and run it to create an executable module corresponding to the simulated system. This module would then be run on a given set of input parameters in another file. Simulation jobs are mostly done for performance measurements of a designed system, but could be utilized for failure analysis or a design job such as inverse problems. In order to use any such package the user needs to understand and learn a lot about the software architecture of the package, apart from being knowledgeable in the target domain. We are currently involved in a project in designing an intelligent executive module for the rocket engine simulation packages, which would free any user from this burden of acquiring knowledge on a particular software system. The extended abstract presented here will describe the vision, methodology and the problems encountered in the project. We are employing object-oriented technology in designing the executive module. The problem is connected to the areas like the reverse engineering of any simulation software, and the intelligent systems for simulation.

  8. Numerical simulations of internal wave generation by convection in water.

    PubMed

    Lecoanet, Daniel; Le Bars, Michael; Burns, Keaton J; Vasil, Geoffrey M; Brown, Benjamin P; Quataert, Eliot; Oishi, Jeffrey S

    2015-06-01

    Water's density maximum at 4°C makes it well suited to study internal gravity wave excitation by convection: an increasing temperature profile is unstable to convection below 4°C, but stably stratified above 4°C. We present numerical simulations of a waterlike fluid near its density maximum in a two-dimensional domain. We successfully model the damping of waves in the simulations using linear theory, provided we do not take the weak damping limit typically used in the literature. To isolate the physical mechanism exciting internal waves, we use the spectral code dedalus to run several simplified model simulations of our more detailed simulation. We use data from the full simulation as source terms in two simplified models of internal-wave excitation by convection: bulk excitation by convective Reynolds stresses, and interface forcing via the mechanical oscillator effect. We find excellent agreement between the waves generated in the full simulation and the simplified simulation implementing the bulk excitation mechanism. The interface forcing simulations overexcite high-frequency waves because they assume the excitation is by the "impulsive" penetration of plumes, which spreads energy to high frequencies. However, we find that the real excitation is instead by the "sweeping" motion of plumes parallel to the interface. Our results imply that the bulk excitation mechanism is a very accurate heuristic for internal-wave generation by convection. PMID:26172801

  9. Numerical simulations of zero-Prandtl-number thermohaline convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prat, V.; Lignières, F.; Lagarde, N.

    2015-12-01

    Thermohaline (or fingering) convection has been used to explain chemical anomalies at the surface of red giant stars. However, recent numerical simulations suggest that the efficiency of thermohaline convection is lower than expected, and thus not sufficient to explain the observations. One of the uncertainties of these simulations is that they have been performed in a parameter range for the Prandtl number (i.e. the ratio between viscosity and thermal diffusivity) which is far from what can be found in stellar interiors. Using the small-Péclet-number approximation, we are able for the first time to perform simulations of thermohaline convection in a parameter domain which is relevant for stellar physics. In the present paper, we discuss the validity of this approximation and compare our results with previous simulations and models.

  10. Numerical Simulation of nZVI at the Field Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, A. I.; Krol, M.; Sleep, B. E.; O'Carroll, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    Nano-scale zero valent iron (nZVI) has been used at a number of contaminated sites over the last decade. At most of these sites, significant decreases in contaminant concentrations have resulted from the application of nZVI. However, limited work has been completed investigating nZVI mobility at the field-scale. In this study a three dimensional, three phase, finite difference numerical simulator (CompSim) was used to simulate nZVI and polymer transport in a variably saturated site. The model was able to accurately predict the field observed head data without parameter fitting. In addition, the numerical simulator estimated the amount of nZVI delivered to the saturated and unsaturated zones as well as the phase of nZVI (i.e., attached or aqueous phase). The simulation results showed that the injected slurry migrated radially outward from the injection well, and therefore nZVI transport was governed by injection velocity as well as viscosity of the injected solution. A suite of sensitivity analyses was performed to investigate the impact of different injection scenarios (e.g. different volume and injection rate) on nZVI migration. Simulation results showed that injection of a higher volume of nZVI delivered more iron particles at a given distance; however, not necessarily to a greater distance proportionate to the increase in volume. This study suggests that on-site synthesized nZVI particles are mobile in the subsurface and the numerical simulator can be a valuable tool for optimum design of nZVI applications.

  11. Characterizing Electron Temperature Gradient Turbulence Via Numerical Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Nevins, W M; Candy, J; Cowley, S; Dannert, T; Dimits, A; Dorland, W; Estrada-Mila, C; Hammett, G W; Jenko, F; Pueschel, M J; Shumaker, D E

    2006-05-22

    Numerical simulations of electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence are presented which characterize the ETG fluctuation spectrum, establish limits to the validity of the adiabatic ion model often employed in studying ETG turbulence, and support the tentative conclusion that plasmaoperating regimes exist in which ETG turbulence produces sufficient electron heat transport to be experimentally relevant. We resolve prior controversies regarding simulation techniques and convergence by benchmarking simulations of ETG turbulence from four microturbulence codes, demonstrating agreement on the electron heat flux, correlation functions, fluctuation intensity, and rms flow shear at fixed simulation cross section and resolution in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. Excellent convergence of both continuum and particle-in-cell codes with time step and velocity-space resolution is demonstrated, while numerical issues relating to perpendicular (to the magnetic field) simulation dimensions and resolution are discussed. A parameter scan in the magnetic shear, s, demonstrates that the adiabatic ion model is valid at small values of s (s < 0.4 for the parameters used in this scan) but breaks down at higher magnetic shear. A proper treatment employing gyrokinetic ions reveals a steady increase in the electron heat transport with increasing magnetic shear, reaching electron heat transport rates consistent with analyses of experimental tokamak discharges.

  12. Numerical Simulation of Multi-CME Events in the Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odstrcil, Dusan; Luhmann, Janet G.; Jian, Lan; Mays, Leila; Xie, Hong; Taktakishvilli, Aleksandre

    The ENLIL-based modeling system enables faster-than-real time simulations of corotating and transient heliospheric disturbances. This “hybrid” system does not simulate origin of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) but uses appearance in coronagraphs, fits geometric and kinematic parameters, and launches a CME-like structure into the solar wind computed using the Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) coronal model. Numerical heliospheric simulation then provides global context of CMEs propagating in the inner heliosphere and interacting with structured background solar wind and with other CMEs. In this presentation, we introduce the recent improvements that support modeling of the evolving background solar wind and continuous modeling of multiple-CME events. We simulated over 700 CMEs in 2011-2013 to validate and calibrate our new modeling system. In this presentation, we will show examples of multi-CME events in March 2012 and July 2012 periods of enhanced solar activity. We will present results of 3D numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations and compare them with remote white-light observations, with in-situ measurements of plasma parameters and detection of solar energetic particles (SEPs) at various spacecraft.

  13. Numerical simulation of the final stages of terrestrial planet formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, L. P.; Lewis, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Three representative numerical simulations of the growth of the terrestrial planets by accretion of large protoplanets are considered. The mass and relative-velocity distributions of the bodies are free to evolve simultaneously in response to close gravitational encounters and occasional collisions between bodies. The collisions between bodies arise therefore in a natural way and the assumption of expressions for the relative-velocity distribution and the gravitational collision cross section is unnecessary. These simulations indicate that the growth of bodies with final masses approaching those of Venus and earth is possible, at least for the case of a two-dimensional system

  14. Extrapolating gravitational-wave data from numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, Michael; Mroue, Abdul H.

    2009-12-15

    Two complementary techniques are developed for obtaining the asymptotic form of gravitational-wave data at large radii from numerical simulations, in the form of easily implemented algorithms. It is shown that, without extrapolation, near-field effects produce errors in extracted waveforms that can significantly affect LIGO data analysis. The extrapolation techniques are discussed in the context of Newman-Penrose data applied to extrapolation of waveforms from an equal-mass, nonspinning black-hole binary simulation. The results of the two methods are shown to agree within error estimates. The various benefits and deficiencies of the methods are discussed.

  15. Numerical Simulation of Impact Effects on Multilayer Fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahrenthold, Eric; Rabb, Robert; Bohannan, April

    2007-12-01

    High strength fabrics provide lightweight impact protection and are employed in a wide range of applications. Examples include body armor for law enforcement and military personnel and orbital debris shielding for the International Space Station. Numerical simulation of impact effects on fabric protection systems is difficult, due to the complex woven structure of the fabric layers and the typical application of fabrics in a multilayer configuration. Recent research has applied a new particle-element method to the simulation of impact effects on multilayer fabrics, applicable over a wide range of impact velocities, for use in body armor and orbital debris shielding design applications.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Impact Effects on Multilayer Fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahrenthold, Eric

    2007-06-01

    High strength fabrics provide lightweight impact protection and are employed in a wide range of applications. Examples include body armor for law enforcement and military personnel and orbital debris shielding for the International Space Station. Numerical simulation of impact effects on fabric protection systems is difficult, due to the complex woven structure of the fabric layers and the typical application of fabrics in a multilayer configuration. Recent research has developed new particle-element methods for the simulation of impact effects on multilayer fabrics, applicable over a wide range of impact velocities, for use in body armor and orbital debris shielding applications.

  17. Numerical Simulation of Cast Distortion in Gas Turbine Engine Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inozemtsev, A. A.; Dubrovskaya, A. S.; Dongauser, K. A.; Trufanov, N. A.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper the process of multiple airfoilvanes manufacturing through investment casting is considered. The mathematical model of the full contact problem is built to determine stress strain state in a cast during the process of solidification. Studies are carried out in viscoelastoplastic statement. Numerical simulation of the explored process is implemented with ProCASTsoftware package. The results of simulation are compared with the real production process. By means of computer analysis the optimization of technical process parameters is done in order to eliminate the defect of cast walls thickness variation.

  18. New prescriptions of turbulent transport from local numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prat, V.; Lignires, F.; Lesur, G.

    2015-01-01

    Massive stars often experience fast rotation, which is known to induce turbulent mixing with a strong impact on the evolution of these stars. Local direct numerical simulations of turbulent transport in stellar radiative zones are a promising way to constrain phenomenological transport models currently used in many stellar evolution codes. We present here the results of such simulations of stably-stratified sheared turbulence taking notably into account the effects of thermal diffusion and chemical stratification. We also discuss the impact of theses results on stellar evolution theory.

  19. Numerical Simulation of a Spatially Evolving Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatski, T. B.; Erlebacher, G.

    2002-01-01

    The results from direct numerical simulations of a spatially evolving, supersonic, flat-plate turbulent boundary-layer flow, with free-stream Mach number of 2.25 are presented. The simulated flow field extends from a transition region, initiated by wall suction and blowing near the inflow boundary, into the fully turbulent regime. Distributions of mean and turbulent flow quantities are obtained and an analysis of these quantities is performed at a downstream station corresponding to Re(sub x)= 5.548 x10(exp 6) based on distance from the leading edge.

  20. Numerical aerodynamic simulation program long haul communications prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cmaylo, Bohden K.; Foo, Lee

    1987-01-01

    This document is a report of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Long Haul Communications Prototype (LHCP). It describes the accomplishments of the LHCP group, presents the results from all LHCP experiments and testing activities, makes recommendations for present and future LHCP activities, and evaluates the remote workstation accesses from Langley Research Center, Lewis Research Center, and Colorado State University to Ames Research Center. The report is the final effort of the Long Haul (Wideband) Communications Prototype Plan (PT-1133-02-N00), 3 October 1985, which defined the requirements for the development, test, and operation of the LHCP network and was the plan used to evaluate the remote user bandwidth requirements for the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Processing System Network.

  1. Numerical simulation of thermograpy for breast tumor detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hong-qin; Lin, Qing-yuan; Ye, Zhen; Chen, Shu-qiang; Xie, Shu-sen

    2008-02-01

    A multi-dimensional thermal model was presented to explore the relationship between an embedded tumor and the resulting temperature distributions on the breast surface on purpose to be an adjunct tool for interpreting thermograms. Steady-state temperature distributions on the skin of the breast were attained by numerically solving the heat diffusion equation. The numerical results show that the temperature distributions in the thermal images of breast tumor can be significantly influenced by surface air flow and environmental temperature. Furthermore, the simulated results also show that thermography do not have sufficient sensitivity for detection of a small tumor in deeper region. Finally, the feasibility and limitations of capturing tumor information by infrared thermal imaging is discussed. Our study shows that the heat patterns over breasts can be well simulated with this comprehensive thermal model, which may be helpful for the doctor to interpret the thermograms.

  2. Simulating Prosthetic Heart Valve Hemodynamics: Numerical Model Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Liang

    2005-11-01

    Since the first successful implantation of a prosthetic heart valve four decades ago, over 50 different designs have been developed including both mechanical and bio-prosthetic valves. Valve implants, however, are associated with increased risk of blood clotting, a trend which is believed to be linked to the complex hemodynamics induced by the prosthesis. To understand prosthetic valve hemodynamics under physiological conditions, we develop a numerical method capable of simulating flows in realistic prosthetic heart valves in anatomical geometries. The method employs a newly developed hybrid numerical technique that integrates the chimera overset grid approach with a Cartesian, sharp-interface immersed boundary methodology. The capabilities of the method are demonstrated by applying it to simulate pulsatile flow in both bileaflet and tri-leaflet valves moving with prescribed leaflet kinematics.

  3. Global Numerical Simulations of Acoustic Wave Propagation in the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartlep, Thomas; Mansour, N. N.

    2006-06-01

    Helioseimology, the study of solar oscillations, has made a profound impact on our understanding of the structure and dynamics of the sun and is our only direct observational probe into the solar interior. By providing tests of helioseismic inversion methods using simulated oscillation data, we hope to improve the quantitative soundness of those helioseismic methods. Here, we present a numerical method for the simulation of the acoustic propagation equations in the full solar body. The numerical code is able to propagate linear waves with hight accuracy, i.e. with low dissipation, weak artificial reflections, accurate phase speeds, and coverage of the frequencies and wavelengths of interest. To accomplish these requirements, spherical harmonics are used in the angular directions and B-splines are used in the radial direction. B-splines allow arbitrary spacing of the radial mesh points and the dropping of high spherical modes deep in the interior where they do not propagate.

  4. Numerical Simulations of Forming Aluminum Beverage Can End Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jing; Yamazaki, Koetsu; Hasegawa, Takashi; Itoh, Ryouiti; Nishiyama, Sadao

    2011-08-01

    Forming simulations of can end shell have been implemented and compared with the experimental observations of the shell actual forming process. The influences of the loads applied to tools, the clearances between tools, the shapes of the tool profiles and the positions of tools, on the shell forming quality, have then been investigated numerically. The design optimization method based on the numerical simulations has been applied to search optimum design points, in order to reduce the amount of thinning subjected to the constraints of the shell geometric shape and the suppression of wrinkles. The optimization results show that the amount of thinning can be reduced up to 4% by optimizing the forming route, adjusting the clearances and the loads, and modifying the tool shapes.

  5. Numerical simulation of asymmetric particle precipitation by pitch angle diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, Richard M.; Abel, Robert W.; Summers, Danny

    1996-11-01

    A numerical simulation code is developed to evaluate the loss rate of particles trapped in a mirror magnetic field geometry with asymmetric loss cones. The one-dimensional model can accommodate particle diffusion at any prescribed rate and loss cones of any prescribed sizes, and it incorporates the important effect of atmospheric backscattering. Numerical solutions for the loss cone particle distribution function calculated for the case of equal loss cones provide an acceptable simulation of the well-known modified Bessel function solution. The code provides the first quantitative solutions for any specified rate of pitch angle scattering for the general case of arbitrary asymmetry in loss cone size. In the case of weak or moderate diffusion the ratio of particle precipitation fluxes into the two loss cones can provide a sensitive measurement of the rate of particle scattering, but to utilize this important diagnostic property, one must also have information on the fraction of particles that are backscattered from the atmosphere.

  6. Numerical simulations of a diode laser BPH treatment system

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, V; London, R A; Papademetriou, S

    1999-02-23

    Numerical simulations are presented of the laser-tissue interaction of a diode laser system for treating benign prostate hyperplasia. The numerical model includes laser light transport, heat transport, cooling due to blood perfusion, thermal tissue damage, and enthalpy of tissue damage. Comparisons of the simulation results to clinical data are given. We report that a reasonable variation from a standard set of input data produces heating times which match those measured in the clinical trials. A general trend of decreasing damage volume with increasing heating time is described. We suggest that the patient-to- patient variability seen in the data can be explained by differences in fundamental biophysical properties such as the optical coefficients. Further work is identified, including the measurement and input to the model of several specific data parameters such as optical coefficients, blood perfusion cooling rate, and coagulation rates.

  7. Numerical Relativity Simulations for Black Hole Merger Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.

    2010-01-01

    Massive black hole mergers are perhaps the most energetic astronomical events, establishing their importance as gravitational wave sources for LISA, and also possibly leading to observable influences on their local environments. Advances in numerical relativity over the last five years have fueled the development of a rich physical understanding of general relativity's predictions for these events. Z will overview the understanding of these event emerging from numerical simulation studies. These simulations elucidate the pre-merger dynamics of the black hole binaries, the consequent gravitational waveform signatures ' and the resulting state, including its kick velocity, for the final black hole produced by the merger. Scenarios are now being considered for observing each of these aspects of the merger, involving both gravitational-wave and electromagnetic astronomy.

  8. Numerical simulation of LVI test onto composite plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputo, Francesco; Lamanna, Giuseppe; De Luca, Alessandro; Lopresto, Valentina

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the proposed research activity is to investigate on the structural behaviour of laminated composite plates under low velocity impacts. Analytical closed-form methods are generally unable to describe simultaneously different composite failure modes, as well as experimental tests are unable to be applied to complex boundary conditions or component geometries. Within this work it is shown that numerical simulation appears a reliable tool to describe and forecast the damage onset and growth in composite components. A numerical procedure, based on explicit finite element methods, has been proposed and applied to the simulation of drop mass impacts on composite plates, by taking in account both intra-lamina and inter-laminates damages onset and propagation up to component failure. A global/local modelling approach has been employed to create the model and its validation has been performed by considering results from different sessions of experimental tests.

  9. Numerical model for learning concepts of streamflow simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeLong, L.L.

    1993-01-01

    Numerical models are useful for demonstrating principles of open-channel flow. Such models can allow experimentation with cause-and-effect relations, testing concepts of physics and numerical techniques. Four PT is a numerical model written primarily as a teaching supplement for a course in one-dimensional stream-flow modeling. Four PT options particularly useful in training include selection of governing equations, boundary-value perturbation, and user-programmable constraint equations. The model can simulate non-trivial concepts such as flow in complex interconnected channel networks, meandering channels with variable effective flow lengths, hydraulic structures defined by unique three-parameter relations, and density-driven flow.The model is coded in FORTRAN 77, and data encapsulation is used extensively to simplify maintenance and modification and to enhance the use of Four PT modules by other programs and programmers.

  10. Numerical Simulations of the Geodynamo and Scaling Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oruba, L.; Dormy, E.

    2013-12-01

    State of the art numerical models of the Geodynamo are still performed in a parameter regime extremely remote from the values relevant to the physics of the Earth core. In order to establish a connection between dynamo modeling and the geophysical motivation, it is necessary to use scaling laws. Such laws establish the dependency of essential quantities (such as the magnetic field strength) on measured or controlled quantities. They allow for a direct confrontation of advanced models with geophysical constraints. We will present a detailed analysis of scaling laws based on a wide database of 185 direct numerical simulations (courtesy of U. Christensen) and test various existing scaling laws. Our main concern is to stress the risks of a direct numerical fit free from physical insight. We show that different a priori hypothesis can yield contradictory dependences, in particular concerning the dependence of the magnetic field strength on the rotation rate as well as on the viscosity.

  11. Numerical simulation of turbulent flow in concentric and eccentric annuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azouz, Idir; Shirazi, Siamak A.; Pilehvari, Ali; Azar, J. J.

    1993-07-01

    Fully-developed turbulent flow in concentric and eccentric annuli is numerically simulated as part of an investigation aimed at modeling drilled cuttings transport in inclined wellbores. A numerical code is developed to solve the time-averaged axial momentum equation wherein the Reynolds stresses arc modeled using the eddy-viscosity approach. The turbulent eddy-viscosity is calculated using both a mixing-length model and a low-Reynolds number, two-equation (k-T) model. A curvilinear, boundary-fitted coordinate system is used to facilitate the implementation of boundary conditions and simplify the logic of the computer program. The numerical predictions are compared to experimental data obtajned from various sources. It is observed that the mixing-length and the k-T models perform equa1ly well for concentric annuli. For eccentric annuli the k-T model seems to perform slightly better than the mixing-length model.

  12. Numerical simulation of weakly ionized hypersonic flow over reentry capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalabrin, Leonardo C.

    The mathematical and numerical formulation employed in the development of a new multi-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code for the simulation of weakly ionized hypersonic flows in thermo-chemical non-equilibrium over reentry configurations is presented. The flow is modeled using the Navier-Stokes equations modified to include finite-rate chemistry and relaxation rates to compute the energy transfer between different energy modes. The set of equations is solved numerically by discretizing the flowfield using unstructured grids made of any mixture of quadrilaterals and triangles in two-dimensions or hexahedra, tetrahedra, prisms and pyramids in three-dimensions. The partial differential equations are integrated on such grids using the finite volume approach. The fluxes across grid faces are calculated using a modified form of the Steger-Warming Flux Vector Splitting scheme that has low numerical dissipation inside boundary layers. The higher order extension of inviscid fluxes in structured grids is generalized in this work to be used in unstructured grids. Steady state solutions are obtained by integrating the solution over time implicitly. The resulting sparse linear system is solved by using a point implicit or by a line implicit method in which a tridiagonal matrix is assembled by using lines of cells that are formed starting at the wall. An algorithm that assembles these lines using completely general unstructured grids is developed. The code is parallelized to allow simulation of computationally demanding problems. The numerical code is successfully employed in the simulation of several hypersonic entry flows over space capsules as part of its validation process. Important quantities for the aerothermodynamics design of capsules such as aerodynamic coefficients and heat transfer rates are compared to available experimental and flight test data and other numerical results yielding very good agreement. A sensitivity analysis of predicted radiative heating of a space capsule to several thermo-chemical non-equilibrium models is also performed.

  13. Analysis of mass transfer in dissipative nonideal systems: Numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Vaulina, O. S.; Adamovich, K. G.

    2008-05-15

    The results of a numerical analysis of mass transfer in extended quasi-two-dimensional and three-dimensional dissipative nonideal systems are presented. Pair interaction between particles is modeled by isotropic repulsive potentials represented by combinations of power laws and exponentials. Simulations are performed for parameter values characteristic of laboratory dusty plasmas. It is shown that short-time particle dynamics in nonideal liquid systems is similar to evolution of thermal oscillations at crystal lattice sites.

  14. Numerical simulations of cloaking problems using a DPG method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demkowicz, L.; Li, Jichun

    2013-05-01

    The paper reviews the construction of cloaks for 2D acoustic or electromagnetic waves using the Piola transform, and shows how the knowledge of the transform leads to the construction of a quasi-optimal test norm for the Discontinuous Petrov-Galerkin (DPG) method with optimal test functions for this class of problems. Numerical experiments for cylindrical and square cloaks illustrate the discussed concepts and demonstrate the effectiveness of the DPG method in cloak simulations.

  15. Numerical simulation of flow in the wet scrubber for desulfurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novosád, Jan; Vít, Tomáš

    2015-05-01

    This article deals with numerical simulation of flow and chemical reactions in absorber for desulfurization of flue-gas. The objective of the work is the investigation of effect of different nozzles types and their placement in spray layers. These nozzles distribute lime suspension into flue gas stream. The research includes two types of nozzles and four different arrangements of nozzles and spray layers. Conclusion describes the effect of nozzle types and their arrangements on the suspension concentration in absorber.

  16. Numerical simulations of a pulsed detonation wave augmentation device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambier, Jean-Luc; Adelman, Henry; Menees, Gene P.

    1993-01-01

    We present here the concept of a hybrid engine for Single Stage To Orbit (SSTO) air-breathing hypersonic vehicle. This concept relies on the use of pulsed detonation waves, both for thrust generation and mixing/combustion augmentation. We describe the principles behind the engine concept, which we call the Pulsed Detonation Wave Augmentor (PDWA). We demonstrate the principles of operation for two possible configurations through numerical simulations. We also attempt a first approximation to engine design, and propose various applications.

  17. Numerical simulation of melting ice around a floating by microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakzian, Esmail; Parsian, Armin; Lakzian, Kazem

    2016-03-01

    In this paper a new method in using microwaves is provided for melting the ice around a floating equipment in a freezing condition in cold regions. The numerical simulation's results for validation are compared with the simple model's experimental data. Using microwave in melting the ice around a floating equipment is caused by lack of the mechanical wear, low energy dissipation factor and acceptable defrosting process speed in small lakes.

  18. EXTENDED SCALING LAWS IN NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, Joanne; Cattaneo, Fausto; Perez, Jean Carlos; Boldyrev, Stanislav E-mail: cattaneo@flash.uchicago.edu E-mail: boldyrev@wisc.edu

    2011-07-10

    Magnetized turbulence is ubiquitous in astrophysical systems, where it notoriously spans a broad range of spatial scales. Phenomenological theories of MHD turbulence describe the self-similar dynamics of turbulent fluctuations in the inertial range of scales. Numerical simulations serve to guide and test these theories. However, the computational power that is currently available restricts the simulations to Reynolds numbers that are significantly smaller than those in astrophysical settings. In order to increase computational efficiency and, therefore, probe a larger range of scales, one often takes into account the fundamental anisotropy of field-guided MHD turbulence, with gradients being much slower in the field-parallel direction. The simulations are then optimized by employing the reduced MHD equations and relaxing the field-parallel numerical resolution. In this work we explore a different possibility. We propose that there exist certain quantities that are remarkably stable with respect to the Reynolds number. As an illustration, we study the alignment angle between the magnetic and velocity fluctuations in MHD turbulence, measured as the ratio of two specially constructed structure functions. We find that the scaling of this ratio can be extended surprisingly well into the regime of relatively low Reynolds number. However, the extended scaling easily becomes spoiled when the dissipation range in the simulations is underresolved. Thus, taking the numerical optimization methods too far can lead to spurious numerical effects and erroneous representation of the physics of MHD turbulence, which in turn can affect our ability to identify correctly the physical mechanisms that are operating in astrophysical systems.

  19. Direct Numerical Simulation of A Shaped Hole Film Cooling Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Todd; Moser, Robert

    2015-11-01

    The combustor exit temperatures in modern gas turbine engines are generally higher than the melting temperature of the turbine blade material. Film cooling, where cool air is fed through holes in the turbine blades, is one strategy which is used extensively in such engines to reduce heat transfer to the blades and thus reduce their temperature. While these flows have been investigated both numerically and experimentally, many features are not yet well understood. For example, the geometry of the hole is known to have a large impact on downstream cooling performance. However, the details of the flow in the hole, particularly for geometries similar to those used in practice, are generally know well-understood, both because it is difficult to experimentally observe the flow inside the hole and because much of the numerical literature has focused on round hole simulations. In this work, we show preliminary direct numerical simulation results for a film cooling flow passing through a shaped hole into a the boundary layer developing on a flat plate. The case has density ratio 1.6, blowing ratio 2.0, and the Reynolds number (based on momentum thickness) of incoming boundary layer is approximately 600. We compare the new simulations against both previous experiments and LES.

  20. Numerical Homogenization of Jointed Rock Masses Using Wave Propagation Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasmi, Hatem; Hamdi, Essaïeb; Bouden Romdhane, Nejla

    2014-07-01

    Homogenization in fractured rock analyses is essentially based on the calculation of equivalent elastic parameters. In this paper, a new numerical homogenization method that was programmed by means of a MATLAB code, called HLA-Dissim, is presented. The developed approach simulates a discontinuity network of real rock masses based on the International Society of Rock Mechanics (ISRM) scanline field mapping methodology. Then, it evaluates a series of classic joint parameters to characterize density (RQD, specific length of discontinuities). A pulse wave, characterized by its amplitude, central frequency, and duration, is propagated from a source point to a receiver point of the simulated jointed rock mass using a complex recursive method for evaluating the transmission and reflection coefficient for each simulated discontinuity. The seismic parameters, such as delay, velocity, and attenuation, are then calculated. Finally, the equivalent medium model parameters of the rock mass are computed numerically while taking into account the natural discontinuity distribution. This methodology was applied to 17 bench fronts from six aggregate quarries located in Tunisia, Spain, Austria, and Sweden. It allowed characterizing the rock mass discontinuity network, the resulting seismic performance, and the equivalent medium stiffness. The relationship between the equivalent Young's modulus and rock discontinuity parameters was also analyzed. For these different bench fronts, the proposed numerical approach was also compared to several empirical formulas, based on RQD and fracture density values, published in previous research studies, showing its usefulness and efficiency in estimating rapidly the Young's modulus of equivalent medium for wave propagation analysis.