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Sample records for numerous norditerpenoid alkaloids

  1. A toxicokinetic comparison of norditerpenoid alkaloids from Delphinium barbeyi and D. glaucescens in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cattle are poisoned by N-(methylsuccinimido) anthranoyllycoctonine type (MSAL-type) and 7,8-methylenedioxylycoctonine type (MDL-type) norditerpenoid alkaloids in Delphinium spp. Alkaloids in D. glaucescens are primarily of the MSAL-type, while D. barbeyi is a mixture of MSAL and MDL-types. The obj...

  2. C19-Norditerpenoid Alkaloids from Aconitum szechenyianum and Their Effects on LPS-Activated NO Production.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Yue, Zhenggang; Xie, Pei; Zhang, Li; Li, Zhen; Song, Bei; Tang, Zhishu; Song, Xiaomei

    2016-01-01

    Three new C19-norditerpenoid alkaloids (1-3), along with two known C19-norditerpenoid alkaloids (4-5) have been isolated from Aconitum szechenyianum. Their structures were established by extensive spectroscopic techniques and chemical methods as szechenyianine A (1), szechenyianine B (2), szechenyianine C (3), N-deethyl-3-acetylaconitine (4), and N-deethyldeoxyaconitine (5). Additionally, compounds 1-5 were tested for the inhibition of NO production on LPS-activated RAW264.7 cells with IC50 values of 36.62 ± 6.86, 3.30 ± 0.11, 7.46 ± 0.89, 8.09 ± 1.31, and 11.73 ± 1.94 μM, respectively, while the positive control drug dexamethasone showed inhibitory activity with IC50 value of 8.32 ± 1.45 μM. The structure-activity relationship of aconitine alkaloids were discussed. PMID:27598121

  3. Toxicokinetics of norditerpenoid alkaloids from low larkspur (Delphinium andersonii) orally administered in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective- To better assess low larkspur toxicity and manage treatment of poisoned animals, more knowledge is needed about the serum toxicokinetics of toxic low larkspur alkaloids in cattle. Animals- Five black angus steers. Procedures- Low larkspur (Delphinium andersonii) in the flowering stage...

  4. Effect of MDL-Type alkaloids on tall larkspur toxicosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Larkspur plants contain numerous norditerpenoid alkaloids which include the 7, 8-methylenedioxylycoctonine (MDL) -type alkaloids and the N-(methylsuccinimido) anthranoyllycoctonine (MSAL) -type alkaloids. The MSAL-type alkaloids are generally much more toxic (typically > 20x) than the MDL-type alka...

  5. Effect of MDL-type alkaloids on tall larkspur toxicosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Larkspur plants contain numerous norditerpenoid alkaloids which include the 7, 8-methylenedioxylycoctonine (MDL) -type alkaloids and the N-(methylsuccinimido) anthranoyllycoctonine (MSAL) -type alkaloids. The MSAL-type alkaloids are generally much more toxic (typically > 20x). Toxicity of many tal...

  6. The physiological effects and toxicokinetics of tall larkspur (Delphinium barbeyi) alkaloids in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Norditerpenoid alkaloids of larkspur (Delphinium spp.) have a range of pharmacological and physiological properties. For example, the norditerpenoid alkaloid methyllycaconitine (MLA) can act as competitive antagonist at nicotinic cholinergic receptors. In this study, both dose-response and toxicok...

  7. Aspergiloid I, an unprecedented spirolactone norditerpenoid from the plant-derived endophytic fungus Aspergillus sp. YXf3.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhi Kai; Wang, Rong; Huang, Wei; Li, Xiao Nian; Jiang, Rong; Tan, Ren Xiang; Ge, Hui Ming

    2014-01-01

    An unusual C18 norditerpenoid, aspergiloid I (1), was isolated from the culture broth of Aspergillus sp. YXf3, an endophytic fungus derived from Ginkgo biloba. Its structure was unambiguously established by analysis of HRMS-ESI and spectroscopic data, and the absolute configuration was determined by low-temperature (100 K) single crystal X-ray diffraction with Cu Kα radiation. This compound is structurally characterized by a new carbon skeleton with an unprecedented 6/5/6 tricyclic ring system bearing an α,β-unsaturated spirolactone moiety in ring B, and represents a new subclass of norditerpenoid, the skeleton of which is named aspergilane. The hypothetical biosynthetic pathway for 1 was also proposed. The cytotoxic, antimicrobial, anti-oxidant and enzyme inhibitory activities of 1 were evaluated. PMID:25550731

  8. Vinca alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Moudi, Maryam; Go, Rusea; Yien, Christina Yong Seok; Nazre, Mohd

    2013-11-01

    Vinca alkaloids are a subset of drugs obtained from the Madagascar periwinkle plant. They are naturally extracted from the pink periwinkle plant, Catharanthus roseus G. Don and have a hypoglycemic as well as cytotoxic effects. They have been used to treat diabetes, high blood pressure and have been used as disinfectants. The vinca alkaloids are also important for being cancer fighters. There are four major vinca alkaloids in clinical use: Vinblastine (VBL), vinorelbine (VRL), vincristine (VCR) and vindesine (VDS). VCR, VBL and VRL have been approved for use in the United States. Vinflunine is also a new synthetic vinca alkaloid, which has been approved in Europe for the treatment of second-line transitional cell carcinoma of the urothelium is being developed for other malignancies. Vinca alkaloids are the second-most-used class of cancer drugs and will stay among the original cancer therapies. Different researches and studies for new vinca alkaloid applications will be carried out in this regard. PMID:24404355

  9. Vinca Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Moudi, Maryam; Go, Rusea; Yien, Christina Yong Seok; Nazre, Mohd.

    2013-01-01

    Vinca alkaloids are a subset of drugs obtained from the Madagascar periwinkle plant. They are naturally extracted from the pink periwinkle plant, Catharanthus roseus G. Don and have a hypoglycemic as well as cytotoxic effects. They have been used to treat diabetes, high blood pressure and have been used as disinfectants. The vinca alkaloids are also important for being cancer fighters. There are four major vinca alkaloids in clinical use: Vinblastine (VBL), vinorelbine (VRL), vincristine (VCR) and vindesine (VDS). VCR, VBL and VRL have been approved for use in the United States. Vinflunine is also a new synthetic vinca alkaloid, which has been approved in Europe for the treatment of second-line transitional cell carcinoma of the urothelium is being developed for other malignancies. Vinca alkaloids are the second-most-used class of cancer drugs and will stay among the original cancer therapies. Different researches and studies for new vinca alkaloid applications will be carried out in this regard. PMID:24404355

  10. Eight new diterpenoids and two new nor-diterpenoids from the stems of Croton cascarilloides.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Susumu; Toyoda, Hiroki; Harinantenaina, Liva; Matsunami, Katsuyoshi; Otsuka, Hideaki; Shinzato, Takakazu; Takeda, Yoshio; Kawahata, Masatoshi; Yamaguchi, Kentaro

    2013-01-01

    From the stems of Croton cascarilloides, eight new diterpenoids, named crotocascarins A-H (1-8), having a crotofolane skeleton were isolated along with two new nor-diterpenoids (9 and 10), named crotocascarins α and β, derived through rearrangement of the crotofolane skeleton. The structures of these compounds were elucidated by means of extensive one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopic analyses. The absolute structures of the diterpene moiety were determined by application of the circular dichroism (CD) rule for the γ-lactone ring. The relative structures of the two crotofolanes (1 and 2) and one rearranged compound (9) were confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analyses. Compounds 1, 2 and 9 possessed 2-methylbutyric acid in their molecules, the absolute configuration of which was found to be 2S by comparison of its HPLC behavior with that of an authentic sample. Therefore, the absolute structures of these crotocascarins (1, 2 and 9) were unambiguously determined. The absolute structures of crotofolanes are reported for the first time in this paper. PMID:23370306

  11. New Perspectives in the Chemistry of Marine Pyridoacridine Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Plodek, Alois; Bracher, Franz

    2016-01-01

    Secondary metabolites from marine organisms are a rich source of novel leads for drug development. Among these natural products, polycyclic aromatic alkaloids of the pyridoacridine type have attracted the highest attention as lead compounds for the development of novel anti-cancer and anti-infective drugs. Numerous sophisticated total syntheses of pyridoacridine alkaloids have been worked out, and many of them have also been extended to the synthesis of libraries of analogues of the alkaloids. This review summarizes the progress in the chemistry of pyridoacridine alkaloids that was made in the last one-and-a-half decades. PMID:26821033

  12. Effects of Larkspur (Delphinium barbeyi) on Heart Rate and Electrically Evoked Electromyographic Response of the External Anal Sphincter in Cattle.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Norditerpenoid alkaloids of larkspur (Delphinium spp.) are competitive antagonists of nicotinic cholinergic receptors and poison cattle with, high mortality. Of the norditerpenoids, the N-(methylsuccinimido) anthranoyllycoctonine type (MSAL-type) alkaloids are most toxic. This study tested the hyp...

  13. Two Faces of Alkaloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostál, Jirí

    2000-08-01

    Alkaloids can occur in two forms, denoted as ammonium salts and free bases. These forms differ substantially in their properties and in some cases in their structures. The article discusses and compares the salts and free bases of six well-known alkaloids: nicotine, morphine, cocaine, sanguinarine, allocryptopine, and magnoflorine. Relevance for the biological and medical uses of these compounds is emphasized.

  14. Amaryllidaceae and Sceletium alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhong

    2013-06-01

    Covering: July 2010 to June 2012. Previous review: Nat. Prod. Rep., 2011, 28, 1126-1142. Recent progress on the isolation, identification, biological activity and synthetic studies of structurally diverse alkaloids from plants of the family Amaryllidaceae is summarized in this review. In addition, the structurally related alkaloids isolated from Sceletium species are discussed as well. PMID:23644557

  15. Alkaloids from Chasmanthera dependens.

    PubMed

    Ohiri, F C; Verpoorte, R; Baerheim Svendsen, A

    1982-12-01

    A phytochemical investigation of the stem of Chasmanthera dependens Hochst led to the isolation and identification of five quaternary alkaloids: jatrorrhizine, columbamine, pseudocolumbamine, magnoflorine and palmatine and nine tertiary non-phenolic alkaloids: tetrahydropalmatine, liriodenine, lysicamine, oxoglaucine, glaucine, anonaine, nornuciferine, norglaucine and O,O-dimethylcorytuberine. PMID:17396979

  16. Dimeric Cinchona alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Boratyński, Przemysław J

    2015-05-01

    Nature is full of dimeric alkaloids of various types from many plant families, some of them with interesting biological properties. However, dimeric Cinchona alkaloids were not isolated from any species but were products of designed partial chemical synthesis. Although the Cinchona bark is amongst the sources of oldest efficient medicines, the synthetic dimers found most use in the field of asymmetric synthesis. Prominent examples include the Sharpless dihydroxylation and aminohydroxylation ligands, and dimeric phase transfer catalysts. In this article the syntheses of Cinchona alkaloid dimers and oligomers are reviewed, and their structure and applications are outlined. Various synthetic routes exploit reactivity of the alkaloids at the central 9-hydroxyl group, quinuclidine, and quinoline rings, as well as 3-vinyl group. This availability of reactive sites, in combination with a plethora of linker molecules, contributes to the diversity of the products obtained. PMID:25586655

  17. Occurrence of halogenated alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Gribble, Gordon W

    2012-01-01

    Once considered to be isolation artifacts or chemical "mistakes" of nature, the number of naturally occurring organohalogen compounds has grown from a dozen in 1954 to >5000 today. Of these, at least 25% are halogenated alkaloids. This is not surprising since nitrogen-containing pyrroles, indoles, carbolines, tryptamines, tyrosines, and tyramines are excellent platforms for biohalogenation, particularly in the marine environment where both chloride and bromide are plentiful for biooxidation and subsequent incorporation into these electron-rich substrates. This review presents the occurrence of all halogenated alkaloids, with the exception of marine bromotyrosines where coverage begins where it left off in volume 61 of The Alkaloids. Whereas the biological activity of these extraordinary compounds is briefly cited for some examples, a future volume of The Alkaloids will present full coverage of this topic and will also include selected syntheses of halogenated alkaloids. Natural organohalogens of all types, especially marine and terrestrial halogenated alkaloids, comprise a rapidly expanding class of natural products, in many cases expressing powerful biological activity. This enormous proliferation has several origins: (1) a revitalization of natural product research in a search for new drugs, (2) improved compound characterization methods (multidimensional NMR, high-resolution mass spectrometry), (3) specific enzyme-based and other biological assays, (4) sophisticated collection methods (SCUBA and remote submersibles for deep ocean marine collections), (5) new separation and purification techniques (HPLC and countercurrent separation), (6) a greater appreciation of traditional folk medicine and ethobotany, and (7) marine bacteria and fungi as novel sources of natural products. Halogenated alkaloids are truly omnipresent in the environment. Indeed, one compound, Q1 (234), is ubiquitous in the marine food web and is found in the Inuit from their diet of whale

  18. Marine Indole Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Netz, Natalie; Opatz, Till

    2015-01-01

    Marine indole alkaloids comprise a large and steadily growing group of secondary metabolites. Their diverse biological activities make many compounds of this class attractive starting points for pharmaceutical development. Several marine-derived indoles were found to possess cytotoxic, antineoplastic, antibacterial and antimicrobial activities, in addition to the action on human enzymes and receptors. The newly isolated indole alkaloids of marine origin since the last comprehensive review in 2003 are reported, and biological aspects will be discussed. PMID:26287214

  19. Marine Indole Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Netz, Natalie; Opatz, Till

    2015-08-01

    Marine indole alkaloids comprise a large and steadily growing group of secondary metabolites. Their diverse biological activities make many compounds of this class attractive starting points for pharmaceutical development. Several marine-derived indoles were found to possess cytotoxic, antineoplastic, antibacterial and antimicrobial activities, in addition to the action on human enzymes and receptors. The newly isolated indole alkaloids of marine origin since the last comprehensive review in 2003 are reported, and biological aspects will be discussed. PMID:26287214

  20. Sarpagine and related alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Namjoshi, Ojas A.; Cook, James M.

    2016-01-01

    The sarpagine-related macroline and ajmaline alkaloids share a common biosynthetic origin, and bear important structural similarities, as expected. These indole alkaloids are widely dispersed in 25 plant genera, principally in the Apocynaceae family. Very diverse and interesting biological properties have been reported for this group of natural products. Isolation of new sarpagine-related alkaloids as well as the asymmetric synthesis of these structurally complex molecules are of paramount importance to the synthetic and medicinal chemists. A total of 115 newly isolated sarpagine-related macroline and ajmaline alkaloids, along with their physicochemical properties have been included in this chapter. A general and efficient strategy for the synthesis of these monomeric alkaloids, as well as bisindoles has been presented, which involves application of the asymmetric Pictet–Spengler reaction (>98% ee) as a key step because of the ease of scale up of the tetracyclic template. Also included in this chapter are the syntheses of the sarpagine-related alkaloids, published since the year 2000. PMID:26827883

  1. Belladonna Alkaloid Combinations and Phenobarbital

    MedlinePlus

    Belladonna alkaloid combinations and phenobarbital are used to relieve cramping pains in conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome and ... Belladonna alkaloid combinations and phenobarbital come as a regular tablet, a slow-acting tablet, capsule, and liquid to take ...

  2. Cytotoxicity of Hymenocallis expansa alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Antoun, M D; Mendoza, N T; Ríos, Y R; Proctor, G R; Wickramaratne, D B; Pezzuto, J M; Kinghorn, A D

    1993-08-01

    From the bulbs and leaves of Hymenocallis expansa (Amaryllidaceae), three alkaloid constituents were identified: (+)-tazettine, (+)-hippeastrine, and (-)-haemanthidine. These alkaloids demonstrated significant cytotoxicity when tested against a panel of human and murine tumor cell lines. PMID:8229020

  3. Biosynthesis of Fungal Indole Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Gavia, Diego J.; Tang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    This review provides a summary of recent research advances in elucidating the biosynthesis of fungal indole alkaloids. Different strategies used to incorporate and derivatize the indole/indoline moieties in various families of fungal indole alkaloids will be discussed, including tryptophan-containing nonribosomal peptides and polyketide-nonribosomal peptide hybrids; and alkaloids derived from other indole building blocks. This review also includes discussion regarding the downstream modifications that generate chemical and structural diversity among indole alkaloids. PMID:25180619

  4. Lycorine alkaloids from Hymenocallis littoralis.

    PubMed

    Lin, L Z; Hu, S F; Chai, H B; Pengsuparp, T; Pezzuto, J M; Cordell, G A; Ruangrungsi, N

    1995-11-01

    From Hymenocallis littoralis, one new alkaloid, named littoraline, together with 13 known lycorine alkaloids and one lignan, were isolated. The structure and NMR assignments of this new alkaloid were determined by 1D and 2D NMR techniques. Littoraline showed inhibitory activity of HIV reverse transcriptase, and lycorine and haemanthamine showed potent in vitro cytotoxicity. PMID:7492374

  5. Analysis of Ergot Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Crews, Colin

    2015-06-01

    The principles and application of established and newer methods for the quantitative and semi-quantitative determination of ergot alkaloids in food, feed, plant materials and animal tissues are reviewed. The techniques of sampling, extraction, clean-up, detection, quantification and validation are described. The major procedures for ergot alkaloid analysis comprise liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (LC-FLD). Other methods based on immunoassays are under development and variations of these and minor techniques are available for specific purposes. PMID:26046699

  6. Analysis of Ergot Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Crews, Colin

    2015-01-01

    The principles and application of established and newer methods for the quantitative and semi-quantitative determination of ergot alkaloids in food, feed, plant materials and animal tissues are reviewed. The techniques of sampling, extraction, clean-up, detection, quantification and validation are described. The major procedures for ergot alkaloid analysis comprise liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (LC-FLD). Other methods based on immunoassays are under development and variations of these and minor techniques are available for specific purposes. PMID:26046699

  7. Identification and determination of ergot alkaloids in Morning Glory cultivars.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Julia; Woźniakiewicz, Michał; Klepacki, Piotr; Sowa, Anna; Kościelniak, Paweł

    2016-05-01

    Seeds of plants from Ipomoea genera contain numerous ergot alkaloids, including psychoactive ergine and ergometrine, and are often abused as so-called "legal highs." In this work, an analytical method for determination of ergine and ergometrine, and identification of other alkaloids was developed, optimized, and validated. Three extraction techniques, ultrasound-assisted extraction in bath, or with sonotrode, and microwave-assisted extraction were evaluated, and it was concluded that ultrasonic bath is the most suitable technique for extraction of ergot alkaloids. The extraction method was later optimized using a Doehlert experimental design with response surface methodology and used together with the optimized LC-Q-TOF-MS method. The analytical procedure was validated in terms of recovery and matrix effect, repeatability, and intermediate precision. Limits of detection and quantification were 1.0 and 3.0 ng mL(-1), respectively, and were sufficient for determination of ergot alkaloids in Ipomoea seeds. The analysis revealed that from five kinds of seeds purchased from different vendors, only three contained ergot alkaloids. Concentration of alkaloids and their relative abundance was similar in samples representative for whole seeds packs; however, when single seeds were analyzed, significant discrepancies in ergine and ergometrine concentrations were detected. Graphical Abstract Identification of six ergot alkaloids and determination of ergine and ergometrine in Morning glory seeds using the ultrasound-assisted extraction followed the LC-MS analysis. PMID:26873205

  8. Immunoassay of alkaloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, S. K.

    1993-08-01

    A survey is presented of literature data concerning the development and applications of the immunochemical methods for the assay of alkaloids — one of the classes of physiologically active compounds of plant origin most widely used in medical practice. The bibliography includes 141 references.

  9. Alkaloids Toxic to Livestock

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alkaloids are a specific group of nitrogen-containing natural metabolites that enable plants to overcome temporary or continuous threats integral to their environment, while also controlling essential functions of growth and reproduction. These compounds are probably produced primarily to control f...

  10. The Securinega alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Chirkin, Eqor; Atkatlian, William; Porée, François-Hugues

    2015-01-01

    Securinega alkaloids represent a family of plant secondary metabolites known for 50 years. Securinine (1), the most abundant and studied alkaloid of this series was isolated by Russian researchers in 1956. In the following years, French and Japanese scientists reported other Securinega compounds and extensive work was done to elucidate their intriguing structures. The homogeneity of this family relies mainly on its tetracyclic chemical backbone, which features a butenolide moiety (cycle D) and an azabicyclo[3.2.1]octane ring system (rings B and C). Interestingly, after a period of latency of 20 years, the Securinega topic reemerged as a prolific source of new natural structures and to date more than 50 compounds have been identified and characterized. The oligomeric subgroup gathering dimeric, trimeric, and tetrameric units is of particular interest. The unprecedented structure of the Securinega alkaloids was the subject of extensive synthetic efforts culminating in several efficient and elegant total syntheses. The botanical distribution of these alkaloids seems limited to the Securinega, Flueggea, Margaritaria, and Breynia genera (Phyllanthaceae). However, only a limited number of plant species have been considered for their alkaloid contents, and additional phytochemical as well as genetic studies are needed. Concerning the biosynthesis, experiments carried out with radiolabelled aminoacids allowed to identify lysine and tyrosine as the precursors of the piperidine ring A and the CD rings of securinine (1), respectively. Besides, plausible biosynthetic pathways were proposed for virosaine A (38) and B (39), flueggine A (46), and also the different oligomers flueggenine A-D (48-51), fluevirosinine A (56), and flueggedine (20). The case of nirurine (45) and secu'amamine (37) remains elusive and additional studies seem necessary to understand their mode of production. The scope of biological of activities of the Securinega alkaloids was mainly centered on the CNS

  11. Simple Indolizidine and Quinolizidine Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Michael, Joseph P

    2016-01-01

    This review of simple indolizidine and quinolizidine alkaloids (i.e., those in which the parent bicyclic systems are in general not embedded in polycyclic arrays) is an update of the previous coverage in Volume 55 of this series (2001). The present survey covers the literature from mid-1999 to the end of 2013; and in addition to aspects of the isolation, characterization, and biological activity of the alkaloids, much emphasis is placed on their total synthesis. A brief introduction to the topic is followed by an overview of relevant alkaloids from fungal and microbial sources, among them slaframine, cyclizidine, Steptomyces metabolites, and the pantocins. The important iminosugar alkaloids lentiginosine, steviamine, swainsonine, castanospermine, and related hydroxyindolizidines are dealt with in the subsequent section. The fourth and fifth sections cover metabolites from terrestrial plants. Pertinent plant alkaloids bearing alkyl, functionalized alkyl or alkenyl substituents include dendroprimine, anibamine, simple alkaloids belonging to the genera Prosopis, Elaeocarpus, Lycopodium, and Poranthera, and bicyclic alkaloids of the lupin family. Plant alkaloids bearing aryl or heteroaryl substituents include ipalbidine and analogs, secophenanthroindolizidine and secophenanthroquinolizidine alkaloids (among them septicine, julandine, and analogs), ficuseptine, lasubines, and other simple quinolizidines of the Lythraceae, the simple furyl-substituted Nuphar alkaloids, and a mixed quinolizidine-quinazoline alkaloid. The penultimate section of the review deals with the sizable group of simple indolizidine and quinolizidine alkaloids isolated from, or detected in, ants, mites, and terrestrial amphibians, and includes an overview of the "dietary hypothesis" for the origin of the amphibian metabolites. The final section surveys relevant alkaloids from marine sources, and includes clathryimines and analogs, stellettamides, the clavepictines and pictamine, and bis

  12. The Effect of High Deltaline Concentration on the Toxicity of Methyllycaconitine in Mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Larkspurs (Delphinium) are one of the most serious toxic plant problems on foothill and mountain rangelands in the western U.S. Total costs to the livestock industry have been estimated at over $20 million annually. Larkspur plants contain numerous norditerpenoid alkaloids (>18) which occur as one...

  13. Adverse effects of larkspur (Delphinium spp.) on cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are numerous species of larkspurs (Delphinium spp.) in North America. The larkspurs are a major cause of cattle losses on western ranges in the USA, especially on foothill and mountain rangelands. The toxicity of larkspur species is due to various norditerpenoid alkaloids. In this article, we ...

  14. Quinolizidine alkaloids from Lupinus lanatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto, Alexandre T.; Oliveira, Carolina Q.; Ilha, Vinicius; Pedroso, Marcelo; Burrow, Robert A.; Dalcol, Ionara I.; Morel, Ademir F.

    2011-10-01

    In this study, one new quinolizidine alkaloid, lanatine A ( 1), together with three other known alkaloids, 13-α- trans-cinnamoyloxylupanine ( 2), 13-α-hydroxylupanine ( 3), and (-)-multiflorine ( 4) were isolated from the aerial parts of Lupinus lanatus (Fabaceae). The structures of alkaloids 1- 4 were elucidated by spectroscopic data analysis. The stereochemistry of 1 was determined by single crystal X-ray analysis. Bayesian statistical analysis of the Bijvoet differences suggests the absolute stereochemistry of 1. In addition, the antimicrobial potential of alkaloids 1- 4 is also reported.

  15. The Veratrum and Solanum alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Heretsch, Philipp; Giannis, Athanassios

    2015-01-01

    This survey on steroidal alkaloids of the Veratrum and Solanum family isolated between 1974 and 2014 includes 187 compounds and 197 references. New developments in the chemistry and biology of this family of natural products with a special focus on the medicinal relevance of the jervanine alkaloid cyclopamine are discussed. PMID:25845062

  16. Automatic alkaloid removal system.

    PubMed

    Yahaya, Muhammad Rizuwan; Hj Razali, Mohd Hudzari; Abu Bakar, Che Abdullah; Ismail, Wan Ishak Wan; Muda, Wan Musa Wan; Mat, Nashriyah; Zakaria, Abd

    2014-01-01

    This alkaloid automated removal machine was developed at Instrumentation Laboratory, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin Malaysia that purposely for removing the alkaloid toxicity from Dioscorea hispida (DH) tuber. It is a poisonous plant where scientific study has shown that its tubers contain toxic alkaloid constituents, dioscorine. The tubers can only be consumed after it poisonous is removed. In this experiment, the tubers are needed to blend as powder form before inserting into machine basket. The user is need to push the START button on machine controller for switching the water pump ON by then creating turbulence wave of water in machine tank. The water will stop automatically by triggering the outlet solenoid valve. The powders of tubers are washed for 10 minutes while 1 liter of contaminated water due toxin mixture is flowing out. At this time, the controller will automatically triggered inlet solenoid valve and the new water will flow in machine tank until achieve the desire level that which determined by ultra sonic sensor. This process will repeated for 7 h and the positive result is achieved and shows it significant according to the several parameters of biological character ofpH, temperature, dissolve oxygen, turbidity, conductivity and fish survival rate or time. From that parameter, it also shows the positive result which is near or same with control water and assuming was made that the toxin is fully removed when the pH of DH powder is near with control water. For control water, the pH is about 5.3 while water from this experiment process is 6.0 and before run the machine the pH of contaminated water is about 3.8 which are too acid. This automated machine can save time for removing toxicity from DH compared with a traditional method while less observation of the user. PMID:24783795

  17. Biocatalysts from alkaloid producing plants.

    PubMed

    Kries, Hajo; O'Connor, Sarah E

    2016-04-01

    Metabolic pathways leading to benzylisoquinoline and monoterpene indole alkaloids in plants are revealing remarkable new reactions. Understanding of the enzymes involved in alkaloid biosynthesis provides access to a variety of applications in biocatalysis and bioengineering. In chemo-enzymatic settings, plant biocatalysts can transform medically important scaffolds. Additionally, synthetic biologists are taking alkaloid pathways as templates to assemble pathways in microorganisms that are tailored to the needs of medicinal chemistry. In light of these many recent discoveries, it is expected that plants will continue to be a source of novel biocatalysts for the foreseeable future. PMID:26773811

  18. Accumulation of ergot alkaloids during conidiophore development in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Mulinti, Prashanthi; Allen, Natalie A; Coyle, Christine M; Gravelat, Fabrice N; Sheppard, Donald C; Panaccione, Daniel G

    2014-01-01

    Production of ergot alkaloids in the opportunistic fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus is restricted to conidiating cultures. These cultures typically accumulate several pathway intermediates at concentrations comparable to that of the pathway end product. We investigated the contribution of different cell types that constitute the multicellular conidiophore of A. fumigatus to the production of ergot alkaloid pathway intermediates versus the pathway end product, fumigaclavine C. A relatively minor share (11 %) of the ergot alkaloid yield on a molar basis was secreted into the medium, whereas the remainder was associated with the conidiating colonies. Entire conidiating cultures (containing hyphae, vesicle of conidiophore, phialides of conidiophore, and conidia) accumulated higher levels of the pathway intermediate festuclavine and lower levels of the pathway end product fumigaclavine C than did isolated, abscised conidia, indicating that conidiophores and/or hyphae have a quantitatively different ergot alkaloid profile compared to that of conidia. Differences in alkaloid accumulation among cell types also were indicated by studies with conidiophore development mutants. A ∆medA mutant, in which conidiophores are numerous but develop poorly, accumulated higher levels of pathway intermediates than did the wildtype or a complemented ∆medA mutant. A ∆stuA mutant, which grows mainly as hyphae and produces very few, abnormal conidiophores, produced no detectable ergot alkaloids. The data indicated heterogeneous spatial distribution of ergot alkaloid pathway intermediates versus pathway end product in conidiating cultures of A. fumigatus. This skewed distribution may reflect differences in abundance or activity of pathway enzymes among cell types of those conidiating cultures. PMID:23925951

  19. Alkaloids of Litsea wightiana1.

    PubMed

    Bhakuni, D S; Gupta, S

    1983-05-01

    Six aporphine alkaloids glaucine, boldine, norboldine, isoboldine, norcorydine and laurotetanine have been isolated from the ethanolic extract of the stems of LITSEA WIGHTIANA in which spasmolytic, hypothermic and blood pressure lowering activities have been confirmed. PMID:17404942

  20. Biosynthetic pathways of ergot alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Gerhards, Nina; Neubauer, Lisa; Tudzynski, Paul; Li, Shu-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Ergot alkaloids are nitrogen-containing natural products belonging to indole alkaloids. The best known producers are fungi of the phylum Ascomycota, e.g., Claviceps, Epichloë, Penicillium and Aspergillus species. According to their structures, ergot alkaloids can be divided into three groups: clavines, lysergic acid amides and peptides (ergopeptines). All of them share the first biosynthetic steps, which lead to the formation of the tetracyclic ergoline ring system (except the simplest, tricyclic compound: chanoclavine). Different modifications on the ergoline ring by specific enzymes result in an abundance of bioactive natural products, which are used as pharmaceutical drugs or precursors thereof. From the 1950s through to recent years, most of the biosynthetic pathways have been elucidated. Gene clusters from several ergot alkaloid producers have been identified by genome mining and the functions of many of those genes have been demonstrated by knock-out experiments or biochemical investigations of the overproduced enzymes. PMID:25513893

  1. Biosynthetic Pathways of Ergot Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Gerhards, Nina; Neubauer, Lisa; Tudzynski, Paul; Li, Shu-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Ergot alkaloids are nitrogen-containing natural products belonging to indole alkaloids. The best known producers are fungi of the phylum Ascomycota, e.g., Claviceps, Epichloë, Penicillium and Aspergillus species. According to their structures, ergot alkaloids can be divided into three groups: clavines, lysergic acid amides and peptides (ergopeptines). All of them share the first biosynthetic steps, which lead to the formation of the tetracyclic ergoline ring system (except the simplest, tricyclic compound: chanoclavine). Different modifications on the ergoline ring by specific enzymes result in an abundance of bioactive natural products, which are used as pharmaceutical drugs or precursors thereof. From the 1950s through to recent years, most of the biosynthetic pathways have been elucidated. Gene clusters from several ergot alkaloid producers have been identified by genome mining and the functions of many of those genes have been demonstrated by knock-out experiments or biochemical investigations of the overproduced enzymes. PMID:25513893

  2. Genotoxicity of pyrrolizidine alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Mei, Nan; Fu, Peter P

    2010-04-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are common constituents of many plant species around the world. PA-containing plants are probably the most common poisonous plants affecting livestock and wildlife. They can inflict harm to humans through contaminated food sources, herbal medicines and dietary supplements. Half of the identified PAs are genotoxic and many of them are tumorigenic. The mutagenicity of PAs has been extensively studied in different biological systems. Upon metabolic activation, PAs produce DNA adducts, DNA cross-linking, DNA breaks, sister chromatid exchange, micronuclei, chromosomal aberrations, gene mutations and chromosome mutations in vivo and in vitro. PAs induced mutations in the cII gene of rat liver and in the p53 and K-ras genes of mouse liver tumors. It has been suggested that all PAs produce a set of (+/-)-6,7-dihydro-7-hydroxy-1-hydroxymethyl-5H-pyrrolizine-derived DNA adducts and similar types of gene mutations. The signature types of mutations are G : C --> T : A transversion and tandem base substitutions. Overall, PAs are mutagenic in vivo and in vitro and their mutagenicity appears to be responsible for the carcinogenesis of PAs. PMID:20112250

  3. Antimicrobial activity of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Villar, A; Mares, M; Rios, J L; Canton, E; Gobernado, M

    1987-04-01

    The antimicrobial in vitro activity of 14 benzylisoquinoline alkaloids was investigated by agar diffusion and agar dilution methods against several genera of microorganisms that included Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, Bacillus, Lysteria, Escherichia, Salmonella, Klebsiella, Pseudomonas, Enterobacter, Serratia, Shigella, Mycobacterium and Candida. Anolobine was the most active compound against grampositive bacteria with MIC90 between 12 and 50 mg/l; less active were anonaine, lysicamine and liriodenine. All the alkaloids of the noraporphine and oxoaporphine groups, with the exception of isopiline, showed activity against Mycobacterium phlei (MIC 6-25 mg/l). Candida albicans ATCC26555 was inhibited by anonaine, nornantenine and xylopine (MIC 3-12 mg/l). None of the alkaloids tested had a significant activity against gramnegative rods. The action against susceptible microorganisms was bactericidal. PMID:3615557

  4. The alkaloid profiles of Lupinus sulphureus.

    PubMed

    Cook, Daniel; Lee, Stephen T; Gardner, Dale R; Pfister, James A; Welch, Kevin D; Green, Benedict T; Davis, T Zane; Panter, Kip E

    2009-02-25

    Lupines are common plants on the rangelands in the western United States. Lupines contain alkaloids that can be toxic and teratogenic causing congenital birth defects (crooked calf disease). One such lupine, Lupinus sulphureus, occurs in parts of Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia. Specimens of L. sulphureus from field collections and herbaria were evaluated taxonomically and by chemical means. A total of seven distinct alkaloid profiles and the individual alkaloids associated with each profile were identified. Each alkaloid profile was unique in its geographical distribution and its potential risk to livestock. In conclusion, taxonomic classification is not sufficient to determine risk, as chemical characterization of the alkaloids must also be performed. PMID:19182952

  5. Structural and quantitative analysis of Equisetum alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Luise; Ernst, Ludger; Lubienski, Marcus; Papke, Uli; Schiebel, Hans-Martin; Jerz, Gerold; Beuerle, Till

    2015-08-01

    Equisetum palustre L. is known for its toxicity for livestock. Several studies in the past addressed the isolation and identification of the responsible alkaloids. So far, palustrine (1) and N(5)-formylpalustrine (2) are known alkaloids of E. palustre. A HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method in combination with simple sample work-up was developed to identify and quantitate Equisetum alkaloids. Besides the two known alkaloids six related alkaloids were detected in different Equisetum samples. The structure of the alkaloid palustridiene (3) was derived by comprehensive 1D and 2D NMR experiments. N(5)-Acetylpalustrine (4) was also thoroughly characterized by NMR for the first time. The structure of N(5)-formylpalustridiene (5) is proposed based on mass spectrometry results. Twenty-two E. palustre samples were screened by a HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method after development of a simple sample work-up and in most cases the set of all eight alkaloids were detected in all parts of the plant. A high variability of the alkaloid content and distribution was found depending on plant organ, plant origin and season ranging from 88 to 597mg/kg dried weight. However, palustrine (1) and the alkaloid palustridiene (3) always represented the main alkaloids. For the first time, a comprehensive identification, quantitation and distribution of Equisetum alkaloids was achieved. PMID:25823584

  6. Quaternary alkaloids of tinospora species.

    PubMed

    Bisset, N G; Nwaiwu, J

    1983-08-01

    The occurrence of quaternary alkaloids in TINOSPORA (and PARABAENA) species (Menispermaceae) has been studied. The main components were generally the protoberberine bases berberine and palmatine, with jatrorrhizine an occasional minor constituent, and the aporphine base magnoflorine. Choline was also often present. Only magnoflorine was detected in the PARABAENA material examined. PMID:17404996

  7. Cyclopeptide Alkaloids from Hymenocardia acida.

    PubMed

    Tuenter, Emmy; Exarchou, Vassiliki; Baldé, Aliou; Cos, Paul; Maes, Louis; Apers, Sandra; Pieters, Luc

    2016-07-22

    Four cyclopeptide alkaloids (1-4) were isolated from the root bark of Hymenocardia acida by means of semipreparative HPLC with DAD and ESIMS detection and conventional separation methods. Structure elucidation was performed by spectroscopic means. In addition to the known compound hymenocardine (1), three other alkaloids were isolated for the first time from a natural source. These included a hymenocardine derivative with a hydroxy group instead of a carbonyl group that was named hymenocardinol (2), as well as hymenocardine N-oxide (3) and a new cyclopeptide alkaloid containing an unusual histidine moiety named hymenocardine-H (4). The isolated cyclopeptide alkaloids were tested for their antiplasmodial activity and cytotoxicity. All four compounds showed moderate antiplasmodial activity, with IC50 values ranging from 12.2 to 27.9 μM, the most active one being hymenocardine N-oxide (3), with an IC50 value of 12.2 ± 6.6 μM. Compounds 2-4 were found not to be cytotoxic against MRC-5 cells (IC50 > 64.0 μM), but hymenocardine (1) showed some cytotoxicity, with an IC50 value of 51.1 ± 17.2 μM. PMID:27351950

  8. Leaf herbivory and nutrients increase nectar alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Adler, Lynn S; Wink, Michael; Distl, Melanie; Lentz, Amanda J

    2006-08-01

    Correlations between traits may constrain ecological and evolutionary responses to multispecies interactions. Many plants produce defensive compounds in nectar and leaves that could influence interactions with pollinators and herbivores, but the relationship between nectar and leaf defences is entirely unexplored. Correlations between leaf and nectar traits may be mediated by resources and prior damage. We determined the effect of nutrients and leaf herbivory by Manduca sexta on Nicotiana tabacum nectar and leaf alkaloids, floral traits and moth oviposition. We found a positive phenotypic correlation between nectar and leaf alkaloids. Herbivory induced alkaloids in nectar but not in leaves, while nutrients increased alkaloids in both tissues. Moths laid the most eggs on damaged, fertilized plants, suggesting a preference for high alkaloids. Induced nectar alkaloids via leaf herbivory indicate that species interactions involving leaf and floral tissues are linked and should not be treated as independent phenomena in plant ecology or evolution. PMID:16913940

  9. Imidazole alkaloids from Lepidium meyenii.

    PubMed

    Cui, Baoliang; Zheng, Bo Lin; He, Kan; Zheng, Qun Yi

    2003-08-01

    Two new imidazole alkaloids (lepidiline A and lepidiline B) have been isolated from a root extract of Lepidium meyenii with the common name Maca and identified as 1,3-dibenzyl-4,5-dimethylimidazolium chloride (1) and 1,3-dibenzyl-2,4,5-trimethylimidazolium chloride (2), respectively. The structures of these two new compounds were determined by spectroscopic methods, as well as single-crystal X-ray diffraction performed on compound 1. PMID:12932133

  10. Bacterial Alkaloids Prevent Amoebal Predation.

    PubMed

    Klapper, Martin; Götze, Sebastian; Barnett, Robert; Willing, Karsten; Stallforth, Pierre

    2016-07-25

    Bacterial defense mechanisms have evolved to protect bacteria against predation by nematodes, predatory bacteria, or amoebae. We identified novel bacterial alkaloids (pyreudiones A-D) that protect the producer, Pseudomonas fluorescens HKI0770, against amoebal predation. Isolation, structure elucidation, total synthesis, and a proposed biosynthetic pathway for these structures are presented. The generation of P. fluorescens gene-deletion mutants unable to produce pyreudiones rendered the bacterium edible to a variety of soil-dwelling amoebae. PMID:27294402

  11. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids in human diet.

    PubMed

    Prakash, A S; Pereira, T N; Reilly, P E; Seawright, A A

    1999-07-15

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids are the leading plant toxins associated with disease in humans and animals. Upon ingestion, metabolic activation in liver converts the parent compounds into highly reactive electrophiles capable of reacting with cellular macromolecules forming adducts which may initiate acute or chronic toxicity. The pyrrolizidine alkaloids present a serious health risk to human populations that may be exposed to them through contamination of foodstuffs or when plants containing them are consumed as medicinal herbs. Some pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PA) adducts are persistent in animal tissue and the metabolites may be re-released and cause damage long after the initial period of ingestion. PAs are also known to act as teratogens and abortifacients. Chronic ingestion of plants containing PAs has also led to cancer in experimental animals and metabolites of several PAs have been shown to be mutagenic in the Salmonella typhimurium/mammalian microsome system. However, no clinical association has yet been found between human cancer and exposure to PAs. Based on the extensive reports on the outcome of human exposure available in the literature, we conclude that while humans face the risk of veno-occlusive disease and childhood cirrhosis PAs are not carcinogenic to humans. PMID:10415431

  12. Alkaloids from Glaucium flavum from Sardinia.

    PubMed

    Petitto, Valentina; Serafini, Mauro; Gallo, Francesca Romana; Multari, Giuseppina; Nicoletti, Marcello

    2010-07-01

    Glaucium flavum collected in Sardinia was studied using a phytochemical approach in order to evaluate its alkaloid composition and obtain a comparison with the alkaloid contents of the same species in populations of other geographic proveniences. In fact, different chemoecotypes of G. flavum have been identified, on the basis of their particular content and composition in alkaloids, in accordance with the different distribution areas. The analysis showed that Sardinian G. flavum contains a homogeneous alkaloid pattern of aporphyne type, significantly different from those reported for populations from other parts of Europe. PMID:20552526

  13. An integrated strategy for the systematic characterization and discovery of new indole alkaloids from Uncaria rhynchophylla by UHPLC/DAD/LTQ-Orbitrap-MS.

    PubMed

    Pan, Huiqin; Yang, Wenzhi; Zhang, Yibei; Yang, Min; Feng, Ruihong; Wu, Wanying; Guo, Dean

    2015-08-01

    The exploration of new chemical entities from herbal medicines may provide candidates for the in silico screening of drug leads. However, this significant work is hindered by the presence of multiple classes of plant metabolites and many re-discovered structures. This study presents an integrated strategy that uses ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography/linear ion-trap quadrupole/Orbitrap mass spectrometry (UHPLC/LTQ-Orbitrap-MS) coupled with in-house library data for the systematic characterization and discovery of new potentially bioactive molecules. Exploration of the indole alkaloids from Uncaria rhynchophylla (UR) is presented as a model study. Initially, the primary characterization of alkaloids was achieved using mass defect filtering and neutral loss filtering. Subsequently, phytochemical isolation obtained 14 alkaloid compounds as reference standards, including a new one identified as 16,17-dihydro-O-demethylhirsuteine by NMR analyses. The direct-infusion fragmentation behaviors of these isolated alkaloids were studied to provide diagnostic structural information facilitating the rapid differentiation and characterization of four different alkaloid subtypes. Ultimately, after combining the experimental results with a survey of an in-house library containing 129 alkaloids isolated from the Uncaria genus, a total of 92 alkaloids (60 free alkaloids and 32 alkaloid O-glycosides) were identified or tentatively characterized, 56 of which are potential new alkaloids for the Uncaria genus. Hydroxylation on ring A, broad variations in the C-15 side chain, new N-oxides, and numerous O-glycosides, represent the novel features of the newly discovered indole alkaloid structures. These results greatly expand our knowledge of UR chemistry and are useful for the computational screening of potentially bioactive molecules from indole alkaloids. Graphical Abstract A four-step integrated strategy for the systematic characterization and efficient discovery of new indole

  14. De novo production of the plant-derived alkaloid strictosidine in yeast.

    PubMed

    Brown, Stephanie; Clastre, Marc; Courdavault, Vincent; O'Connor, Sarah E

    2015-03-17

    The monoterpene indole alkaloids are a large group of plant-derived specialized metabolites, many of which have valuable pharmaceutical or biological activity. There are ∼3,000 monoterpene indole alkaloids produced by thousands of plant species in numerous families. The diverse chemical structures found in this metabolite class originate from strictosidine, which is the last common biosynthetic intermediate for all monoterpene indole alkaloid enzymatic pathways. Reconstitution of biosynthetic pathways in a heterologous host is a promising strategy for rapid and inexpensive production of complex molecules that are found in plants. Here, we demonstrate how strictosidine can be produced de novo in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae host from 14 known monoterpene indole alkaloid pathway genes, along with an additional seven genes and three gene deletions that enhance secondary metabolism. This system provides an important resource for developing the production of more complex plant-derived alkaloids, engineering of nonnatural derivatives, identification of bottlenecks in monoterpene indole alkaloid biosynthesis, and discovery of new pathway genes in a convenient yeast host. PMID:25675512

  15. De novo production of the plant-derived alkaloid strictosidine in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Stephanie; Clastre, Marc; Courdavault, Vincent; O’Connor, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    The monoterpene indole alkaloids are a large group of plant-derived specialized metabolites, many of which have valuable pharmaceutical or biological activity. There are ∼3,000 monoterpene indole alkaloids produced by thousands of plant species in numerous families. The diverse chemical structures found in this metabolite class originate from strictosidine, which is the last common biosynthetic intermediate for all monoterpene indole alkaloid enzymatic pathways. Reconstitution of biosynthetic pathways in a heterologous host is a promising strategy for rapid and inexpensive production of complex molecules that are found in plants. Here, we demonstrate how strictosidine can be produced de novo in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae host from 14 known monoterpene indole alkaloid pathway genes, along with an additional seven genes and three gene deletions that enhance secondary metabolism. This system provides an important resource for developing the production of more complex plant-derived alkaloids, engineering of nonnatural derivatives, identification of bottlenecks in monoterpene indole alkaloid biosynthesis, and discovery of new pathway genes in a convenient yeast host. PMID:25675512

  16. Potentiation of the actions of acetylcholine, epibatidine, and nicotine by methyllycaconitine at fetal muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Norditerpenoid alkaloids from Delphinium spp. (larkspur) have been described as possessing “curariform-like” activity in cattle and are of economic importance because of the poisonings they cause. Methyllycaconitine (MLA) is a norditerpenoid alkaloid found in high abundance in toxic larkspur, and i...

  17. Two new acridone alkaloids from Glycosmis macrantha.

    PubMed

    Yahayu, Maizatul Akmal; Rahmani, Mawardi; Hashim, Najihah Mohd; Amin, Muhammad Aizat Mohd; Ee, Gwendoline Cheng Lian; Sukari, Mohd Aspollah; Akim, Abdah

    2011-01-01

    Extraction and chromatographic separation of the extracts of dried stem barks of Glycosmis macrantha lead to isolation of two new acridone alkaloids, macranthanine and 7-hydroxynoracronycine, and a known acridone, atalaphyllidine. The structures of these alkaloids were determined by detailed spectral analysis and also by comparison with reported data. PMID:21623311

  18. 27 CFR 21.99 - Brucine alkaloid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Brucine alkaloid. 21.99 Section 21.99 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.99 Brucine alkaloid. (a) Identification...

  19. Plant alkaloids of the polymethyleneamine series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogoza, Ludmila N.; Salakhutdinov, Nariman F.; Tolstikov, Genrikh A.

    2005-04-01

    The published data on the structures and biological activities of the plant alkaloids of the biogenic polymethyleneamine series, viz., putrescine (1,4-diaminobutane), spermidine (1,8-diamino-4 -azaoctane), and spermine (1,12-diamino-4,9-diazadodecane), are considered and systematised. The structures and biological activities of some synthetic analogues of these alkaloids are also presented.

  20. Glycoalkaloids and calystegine alkaloids in potatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potatoes contain two classes of alkaloids: the glycoalkaloids and the calystegines. The presence of glycoalkaloids in potatoes and their toxicity has been known for more than a century and much has been written about them. Discovery of the nortropane calystegine alkaloids is more recent, and the k...

  1. Ergot alkaloids: toxicokinetics and vascular effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endophyte (Neotyphodium coenophialum)-infected tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum) occupies nearly 15 million ha in the USA. Although this symbiosis is beneficial to the plant, it produces ergot alkaloids that are detrimental to livestock production. Livestock consuming the alkaloids elicit adverse ph...

  2. Microbial production of plant benzylisoquinoline alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Hiromichi; Kim, Ju-Sung; Ikezawa, Nobuhiro; Takemura, Tomoya; Katayama, Takane; Kumagai, Hidehiko; Sato, Fumihiko

    2008-01-01

    Benzylisoquinoline alkaloids, such as the analgesic compounds morphine and codeine, and the antibacterial agents berberine, palmatine, and magnoflorine, are synthesized from tyrosine in the Papaveraceae, Berberidaceae, Ranunculaceae, Magnoliaceae, and many other plant families. It is difficult to produce alkaloids on a large scale under the strict control of secondary metabolism in plants, and they are too complex for cost-effective chemical synthesis. By using a system that combines microbial and plant enzymes to produce desired benzylisoquinoline alkaloids, we synthesized (S)-reticuline, the key intermediate in benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis, from dopamine by crude enzymes from transgenic Escherichia coli. The final yield of (S)-reticuline was 55 mg/liter within 1 h. Furthermore, we synthesized an aporphine alkaloid, magnoflorine, or a protoberberine alkaloid, scoulerine, from dopamine via reticuline by using different combination cultures of transgenic E. coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The final yields of magnoflorine and scoulerine were 7.2 and 8.3 mg/liter culture medium. These results indicate that microbial systems that incorporate plant genes cannot only enable the mass production of scarce benzylisoquinoline alkaloids but may also open up pathways for the production of novel benzylisoquinoline alkaloids. PMID:18492807

  3. Iboga-Type Alkaloids from Ervatamia officinalis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ben-Qin; Wang, Wen-Jing; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Li, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Ren-Wang; Yang, Ting-Ting; Shi, Lei; Zhang, Xiao-Qi; Ye, Wen-Cai

    2014-08-22

    Seven new iboga-type alkaloids, ervaoffines A-D (1-4), (7S)-3-oxoibogaine hydroxyindolenine (5), ibogaine-5,6-dione (6), and 19-epi-5-oxovoacristine (7), and 10 known alkaloids were isolated from Ervatamia officinalis. The absolute configurations of 1-7 were determined through X-ray diffraction and electronic circular dichroism (ECD) analyses. Ervaoffines A and B represent the first iboga-type pseudoindoxyl alkaloids in which the C-2 spiro carbon configuration is opposite to that of other members of this class, such as iboluteine (8). The relationship between the absolute configuration of the spiro carbons and the Cotton effect in the ECD spectrum is established for the first time for iboga-type pseudoindoxyl and oxindole alkaloids. Additionally, a plausible biogenetic pathway for these alkaloids is proposed. PMID:25093992

  4. [Vinca alkaloid and MDR1].

    PubMed

    Takigawa, Nagio; Tanimoto, Mitsune

    2008-07-01

    Vinca alkaloids inhibit microtubule formation by binding to tubulin. There are four clinically available vinca alkaloids including vincristine, vinblastine, vindesine, and vinorelbine. P-glycoprotein(P-gp)is the one of the efflux adenosine triphosphate(ATP)-binding cassette family transporters and is the encoded product of MDR1 gene. P-gp is overexpressed not only in tumor cells resistant to multiple anticancer agents but also found in normal cells such as liver, gastrointestinal tract and kidney, working as a biological defense mechanism. Single nucleotide polymorphisms for MDR1 in exon 12(1236), exon 21(2677), and exon 26(3435)have been well studied. Although C1236T and C3435T do not change the amino acid, G2677T and G2677A result in amino acid substitution of Ala893Ser and Ala893Thr, respectively. In the use of haplotypes to predict vincristine pharmacokinetics, the correlation between the haplotypes and the elimination half-life was reported. Many studies of the relationship between polymorphism/haplotype for MDR1 and pharmacodynamics including efficacy and toxicity of chemotherapy have been explored. PMID:18633246

  5. Antioxidant action of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Ubeda, A; Montesinos, C; Payá, M; Terencio, C; Alcaraz, M J

    1993-01-01

    The antioxidant action of a series of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids has been investigated. Laudanosoline, protopapaverine, anonaine, apomorphine, glaucine, boldine, bulbocapnine, tetrahydroberberine and stepholidine produced a dose-dependent inhibition of microsomal lipid peroxidation induced by Fe2+/ascorbate, CCl4/NADPH or by Fe3+ ADP/NADPH. Apomorphine exerted the highest inhibitory effects in the three systems of induction used, with a potency higher than propyl gallate. Laudanosoline was particularly effective in the first system, while bulbocapnine and anonaine were more potent when CCl4/NADPH or Fe3(+)-ADP/NADPH were used as inducers. Laudanosoline, protopapaverine, apomorphine, tetrahydroberberine and stepholidine were also potent inhibitors of nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reduction. The presence of a free hydroxyl group or preferably of a catechol group is a feature relevant for inhibition of lipid peroxidation and NBT reduction, nevertheless the antioxidant activity of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids cannot be only ascribed to the formation of phenoxy radicals and other free radical species may be formed during aporphine and tetrahydroprotoberberine oxidation. The influence of this series of compounds on the time course of lipid peroxidation suggests that some of them, like apomorphine and boldine act as chain-breaking antioxidants. PMID:8319926

  6. Bioactive acridone alkaloids from Swinglea glutinosa.

    PubMed

    Weniger, B; Um, B H; Valentin, A; Estrada, A; Lobstein, A; Anton, R; Maillé, M; Sauvain, M

    2001-09-01

    A new prenylated acridone alkaloid, 1,3,5-trihydroxy-2,8-bis(3-methylbut-2-enyl)-10-methyl-9-acridone (1), was isolated from the stembark of Swinglea glutinosa, along with three known acridone alkaloids, 5-hydroxynoracronycine (2), 1,3,5-trihydroxy-4-methoxy-2-(3-methylbut-2-enyl)-10-methyl-9-acridone (3), and 1,3,5-trihydroxy-4-methoxy-10-methylacridone (4). The isolated alkaloids were assessed in vitro against chloroquine-sensitive and -resistant Plasmodium falciparum strains and for cytotoxicity using HeLa cells. PMID:11575960

  7. Polycyclic Guanidine Alkaloids from Poecilosclerida Marine Sponges

    PubMed Central

    Sfecci, Estelle; Lacour, Thierry; Amade, Philippe; Mehiri, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Sessile marine sponges provide an abundance of unique and diversified scaffolds. In particular, marine guanidine alkaloids display a very wide range of biological applications. A large number of cyclic guanidine alkaloids, including crambines, crambescins, crambescidins, batzelladines or netamins have been isolated from Poecilosclerida marine sponges. In this review, we will explore the chemodiversity of tri- and pentacyclic guanidine alkaloids. NMR and MS data tools will also be provided, and an overview of the wide range of bioactivities of crambescidins and batzelladines derivatives will be given. PMID:27070629

  8. A case of beta-carboline alkaloid intoxication following ingestion of Peganum harmala seed extract.

    PubMed

    Frison, Giampietro; Favretto, Donata; Zancanaro, Flavio; Fazzin, Giorgio; Ferrara, Santo Davide

    2008-08-01

    Beta-carboline alkaloids harmine, harmaline, and tetrahydroharmine can stimulate the central nervous system by inhibiting the metabolism of amine neurotransmitters, or by direct interaction with specific receptors; they are found in numerous plants, including Peganum harmala, Passiflora incarnata and Banisteriopsis caapi, and in the entheogen preparation Ayahuasca, which is traditionally brewed using B. caapi to enhance the activity of amine hallucinogenic drugs. The ingestion of plant preparations containing beta-carboline alkaloids may result in toxic effects, namely visual and auditory hallucinations, locomotor ataxia, nausea, vomiting, confusion and agitation. We report a case of intoxication following intentional ingestion of P. harmala seed infusion; P. harmala seeds were bought over the Internet. The harmala alkaloids were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in the seed extract and the patient's urine. This is, to our knowledge, the first case of P. harmala intoxication corroborated by toxicological findings. PMID:18603389

  9. 27 CFR 21.99 - Brucine alkaloid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... dissolved by hydrochloric acid when several drops of a 1 N barium chloride solution are added to 10 ml of a... Brucine alkaloid. (a) Identification test. Add a few drops of concentrated nitric acid to about 10 mg...

  10. 27 CFR 21.99 - Brucine alkaloid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... dissolved by hydrochloric acid when several drops of a 1 N barium chloride solution are added to 10 ml of a... Brucine alkaloid. (a) Identification test. Add a few drops of concentrated nitric acid to about 10 mg...

  11. 27 CFR 21.99 - Brucine alkaloid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... dissolved by hydrochloric acid when several drops of a 1 N barium chloride solution are added to 10 ml of a... Brucine alkaloid. (a) Identification test. Add a few drops of concentrated nitric acid to about 10 mg...

  12. 27 CFR 21.99 - Brucine alkaloid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... dissolved by hydrochloric acid when several drops of a 1 N barium chloride solution are added to 10 ml of a... Brucine alkaloid. (a) Identification test. Add a few drops of concentrated nitric acid to about 10 mg...

  13. Molecular pharmacokinetics of catharanthus (vinca) alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Levêque, Dominique; Jehl, François

    2007-05-01

    This review focuses on the published data regarding the molecular determinants (enzymes, transporters, orphan nuclear receptors) of Catharanthus (vinca) alkaloids pharmacokinetics in humans. The clinical impact of these determinants (drug disposition, drug-drug interactions) is also discussed. PMID:17442684

  14. In vitro anticholinesterase activity of various alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Orhan, Ilkay; Naz, Qamar; Kartal, Murat; Tosun, Fatma; Sener, Bilge; Choudhary, M Iqbal

    2007-01-01

    In the current study, a number of alkaloids including retamine, cytisine, and sparteine (quinolizidine-type), yohimbine and vincamine (indole-type), scopolamine and atropine (tropane-type), colchicine (tropolone-type), allantoin (imidazolidine-type), trigonelline (pyridine-type) as well as octopamine, synephrine, and capsaicin (exocyclic amine-type) were tested in vitro for their inhibitory activity against acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) at 1 mg/ml concentration by the Ellman method using an ELISA microplate reader. Among the alkaloids tested, only capsaicin exerted a remarkable inhibitory effect towards both AChE and BChE [(62.7 +/- 0.79)% and (75.3 +/- 0.98)%, respectively]. While the rest of the alkaloids did not show any significant inhibition against AChE, three of the alkaloids, namely retamine, sparteine, and yohimbine, exerted a noteworthy anti-BChE effect as compared to galanthamine, the reference drug. PMID:18069241

  15. Cytotoxic indole alkaloids from Tabernaemontana divaricata.

    PubMed

    Bao, Mei-Fen; Yan, Ju-Ming; Cheng, Gui-Guang; Li, Xing-Yao; Liu, Ya-Ping; Li, Yan; Cai, Xiang-Hai; Luo, Xiao-Dong

    2013-08-23

    Five new vobasinyl-ibogan-type bisindole alkaloids, tabernaricatines A-E (1-5), two new monomers, tabernaricatines F and G (6 and 7), and 24 known indole alkaloids were isolated from the aerial parts of Tabernaemontana divaricata. Alkaloids 1 and 2 are the first vobasinyl-ibogan-type alkaloids possessing a six-membered ring via an ether linkage between C-17 and C-21. All compounds except for 3 were evaluated for their cytotoxicity against five human cancer cell lines; conophylline showed significant bioactivity against HL-60, SMMC-7721, A-549, MCF-7, and SW480 cells with IC₅₀ values of 0.17, 0.35, 0.21, 1.02, and 1.49 μM, respectively. PMID:23944995

  16. Anxiolytic Activity of Diterpene Alkaloid Songorine.

    PubMed

    Nesterova, Yu V; Povet'eva, T N; Suslov, N I; Shults, E E; Ziuz'kov, G N; Aksinenko, S G; Afanas'eva, O G; Krapivin, A V; Kharina, T G

    2015-09-01

    Antianxiety action of diterpene alkaloid songorine was studied using Vogel conflict test. Songorine in a dose of 0.25 mg/kg demonstrated high anxiolytic activity comparable to that of phenazepam and produced no sedative effect. PMID:26468026

  17. Piperidine alkaloids: Human and food animal teratogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Piperidine alkaloids are acutely toxic to adult livestock species and produce musculoskeletal deformities in neonatal animals. These teratogenic effects include multiple congenital contracture (MCC) deformities and cleft palate in cattle, pigs, sheep, and goats. Poisonous plants containing teratogen...

  18. Total Synthesis of the Akuammiline Alkaloid Picrinine

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report the first total synthesis of the complex akuammiline alkaloid picrinine, which was first isolated nearly five decades ago. Our synthetic approach features a concise assembly of the [3.3.1]-azabicyclic core, a key Fischer indolization reaction to forge the natural product’s carbon framework, and a series of delicate late-stage transformations to complete the synthesis. Our synthesis of picrinine also constitutes a formal synthesis of the related polycyclic alkaloid strictamine. PMID:24597784

  19. A novel alkaloid from Gaultheria nummularioides.

    PubMed

    Yang, M-F; Li, Y-Y; Li, B-G; Zhang, G-L

    2007-03-01

    A novel alkaloid, gaultherialine A (1), along with twenty-seven known compounds were isolated from the whole plants of Gaultheria nummularioides D. Don. The structure of the new alkaloid was elucidated as 7,8-dimethoxy-1-(4-methoxyphenyl)-4,5-dihydro-2H-benzo[e]indole-2-one N-oxide (1) on the basis of spectral evidence. PMID:17454316

  20. Seco-tabersonine alkaloids from Tabernaemontana corymbosa.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kuan-Hon; Thomas, Noel F; Abdullah, Zanariah; Kam, Toh-Seok

    2009-02-01

    Two seco-tabersonine alkaloids, jerantiphyllines A and B, in addition to a tabersonine hydroxyindolenine, jerantinine H, and a recently reported vincamine alkaloid 7, were isolated from the leaf extract of the Malayan Tabernaemontana corymbosa and the structures were established using NMR and MS analysis. Biomimetic conversion of jerantinines A and E to their respective vincamine and 16-epivincamine derivatives were also carried out. PMID:19217125

  1. BIAdb: A curated database of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Benzylisoquinoline is the structural backbone of many alkaloids with a wide variety of structures including papaverine, noscapine, codeine, morphine, apomorphine, berberine, protopine and tubocurarine. Many benzylisoquinoline alkaloids have been reported to show therapeutic properties and to act as novel medicines. Thus it is important to collect and compile benzylisoquinoline alkaloids in order to explore their usage in medicine. Description We extract information about benzylisoquinoline alkaloids from various sources like PubChem, KEGG, KNApSAcK and manual curation from literature. This information was processed and compiled in order to create a comprehensive database of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids, called BIAdb. The current version of BIAdb contains information about 846 unique benzylisoquinoline alkaloids, with multiple entries in term of source, function leads to total number of 2504 records. One of the major features of this database is that it provides data about 627 different plant species as a source of benzylisoquinoline and 114 different types of function performed by these compounds. A large number of online tools have been integrated, which facilitate user in exploring full potential of BIAdb. In order to provide additional information, we give external links to other resources/databases. One of the important features of this database is that it is tightly integrated with Drugpedia, which allows managing data in fixed/flexible format. Conclusions A database of benzylisoquinoline compounds has been created, which provides comprehensive information about benzylisoquinoline alkaloids. This database will be very useful for those who are working in the field of drug discovery based on natural products. This database will also serve researchers working in the field of synthetic biology, as developing medicinally important alkaloids using synthetic process are one of important challenges. This database is available from http

  2. New furocarbazole alkaloids from Lonicera quinquelocularis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Dilfaraz; Khan, Shafiullah; Badshah, Syed; Ali, Hazrat; Ullah, Hamid; Muhammad, Zia; Woodward, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Two new furocarbazole alkaloids, 3-formyl-6,7-dimethoxy-furo[1,2]carbazole (1) and methyl-6,7-dimethoxy-furo[1,2]carbazole-3-carboxylate (2), along with two known carbazole alkaloids, 3-formyl-2-hydroxy-7-methoxycarbazole (3) and methyl 2,7-dimethoxycarbazole-3-carboxylate (4) were isolated from the ethyl acetate soluble fraction of Lonicera quinquelocularis. Their structures were established on the basis of spectroscopic analysis. PMID:26168923

  3. Bioactive indole alkaloids isolated from Alstonia angustifolia

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Li; Terrazas, César; Muñoz Acuña, Ulyana; Ninh, Tran Ngoc; Chai, Heebyung; Carcache de Blanco, Esperanza J.; Soejarto, Djaja D.; Satoskar, Abhay R.

    2014-01-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation was conducted on a CHCl3-soluble extract of the stem bark of Alstonia angustifolia (Apocynaceae) collected in Vietnam using the HT-29 human colon cancer cell line, and led to the isolation of a new sarpagine-type indole alkaloid (1), together with nine known alkaloids, including four macroline-derived alkaloids (2–5), a sarpagine-type alkaloid (6), and four macroline-pleiocarpamine bisindole alkaloids (7–10). The structure of the new compound (1) was determined on the basis of spectroscopic data interpretation. Compounds 1–10 were evaluated in vitro for their NF-κB (p65) inhibitory activity against the Hela cells in an ELISA assay. The new sarpagine alkaloid, N(4)-methyltalpinine (1), was found to show significant NF-κB inhibitory activity (ED50 = 1.2 µM). Furthermore, all the isolates (1–10) were evaluated in vitro for their antileishmanial activity, and compounds (1–4, 6 and 8–10) exhibited leishmaniacidal activity against promastigotes of Leishmania mexicana. PMID:25584095

  4. Multicomponent Therapeutics of Berberine Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jiaoyang; Yan, Dan; Yang, Meihua; Dong, Xiaoping; Xiao, Xiaohe

    2013-01-01

    Although berberine alkaloids (BAs) are reported to be with broad-spectrum antibacterial and antiviral activities, the interactions among BAs have not been elucidated. In the present study, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was chosen as a model organism, and modified broth microdilution was applied for the determination of the fluorescence absorption values to calculate the anti-MRSA activity of BAs. We have initiated four steps to seek the optimal combination of BAs that are (1) determining the anti-MRSA activity of single BA, (2) investigating the two-component combination to clarify the interactions among BAs by checkerboard assay, (3) investigating the multicomponent combination to determine the optimal ratio by quadratic rotation-orthogonal combination design, and (4) in vivo and in vitro validation of the optimal combination. The results showed that the interactions among BAs are related to their concentrations. The synergetic combinations included “berberine and epiberberine,” “jatrorrhizine and palmatine” and “jatrorrhizine and coptisine”; the antagonistic combinations included “coptisine and epiberberine”. The optimal combination was berberine : coptisine : jatrorrhizine : palmatine : epiberberine = 0.702 : 0.863 : 1 : 0.491 : 0.526, and the potency of the optimal combination on cyclophosphamide-immunocompromised mouse model was better than the natural combinations of herbs containing BAs. PMID:23634170

  5. Determining important parameters related to cyanobacterial alkaloid toxin exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Love, A H

    2005-09-16

    Science-based decision making required robust and high-fidelity mechanistic data about the system dynamics and impacts of system changes. Alkaloid cyanotoxins have the characteristics to warrant consideration for their potential threat. Since insufficient information is available to construct a systems model for the alkaloid cyanotoxins, saxitoxins, anatoxins, and anatoxin-a(S), an accurate assessments of these toxins as a potential threat for use for intentional contamination is not possible. Alkaloid cyanotoxin research that contributed to such a model has numerous areas of overlap for natural and intentional health effects issues that generates dual improvements to the state of the science. The use of sensitivity analyses of systems models can identify parameters that, when determined, result in the greatest impact to the overall system and may help to direct the most efficient use of research funding. This type of modeling-assisted experimentation may allow rapid progress for overall system understanding compared to observational or disciplinary research agendas. Assessment and management of risk from intentional contamination can be performed with greater confidence when mechanisms are known and the relationships between different components are validated. This level of understanding allows high-fidelity assessments that do not hamper legitimate possession of these toxins for research purposes, while preventing intentional contamination that would affect public health. It also allows for appropriate response to an intentional contamination event, even if the specific contamination had not been previous considered. Development of science-based decision making tools will only improve our ability to address the new requirements addressing potential threats to our nation.

  6. Indole alkaloid marine natural products: An established source of cancer drug leads with considerable promise for the control of parasitic, neurological and other diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gul, Waseem; Hamann, Mark T.

    2016-01-01

    The marine environment produces natural products from a variety of structural classes exhibiting activity against numerous disease targets. Historically marine natural products have largely been explored as anticancer agents. The indole alkaloids are a class of marine natural products that show unique promise in the development of new drug leads. This report reviews the literature on indole alkaloids of marine origin and also highlights our own research. Specific biological activities of indole alkaloids presented here include: cytotoxicity, antiviral, antiparasitic, anti-inflammatory, serotonin antagonism, Ca-releasing, calmodulin antagonism, and other pharmacological activities. PMID:16236327

  7. Actions of Piperidine Alkaloid Teratogens at Fetal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Teratogenic alkaloids are found in many species of plants including Conium maculatum L., Nicotiana glauca, Nicotiana tabaccum, and multiple Lupinus spp. Fetal musculoskeletal defects produced by alkaloids from these plants include arthrogyropisis, scoliosis, torticollis, kyposis, lordosis, and clef...

  8. Benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis in opium poppy.

    PubMed

    Beaudoin, Guillaume A W; Facchini, Peter J

    2014-07-01

    Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) is one of the world's oldest medicinal plants and remains the only commercial source for the narcotic analgesics morphine, codeine and semi-synthetic derivatives such as oxycodone and naltrexone. The plant also produces several other benzylisoquinoline alkaloids with potent pharmacological properties including the vasodilator papaverine, the cough suppressant and potential anticancer drug noscapine and the antimicrobial agent sanguinarine. Opium poppy has served as a model system to investigate the biosynthesis of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids in plants. The application of biochemical and functional genomics has resulted in a recent surge in the discovery of biosynthetic genes involved in the formation of major benzylisoquinoline alkaloids in opium poppy. The availability of extensive biochemical genetic tools and information pertaining to benzylisoquinoline alkaloid metabolism is facilitating the study of a wide range of phenomena including the structural biology of novel catalysts, the genomic organization of biosynthetic genes, the cellular and sub-cellular localization of biosynthetic enzymes and a variety of biotechnological applications. In this review, we highlight recent developments and summarize the frontiers of knowledge regarding the biochemistry, cellular biology and biotechnology of benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis in opium poppy. PMID:24671624

  9. Monoterpenoid Indole Alkaloids from Catharanthus roseus Cultivated in Yunnan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bei; Liu, Lu; Chen, Ying-ying; Li, Qiong; Li, Dan; Liu, Va-ping; Luo, Xiao-dong

    2015-12-01

    A new monoterpenoid indole alkaloid, 15,20-dehydro-3α-(2-oxopropyl) coronaridine (1), along with sixteen analogues (2-17) were isolated from the leaves of Catharanthus roseus cultivated in Yunnan. The new alkaloid was elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analysis, and the known alkaloids were identified by comparison with the reported spectroscopic data. Among them, alkaloid 16 was isolated from Catharanthus for the first time. PMID:26882670

  10. Simulation of the type of coralin alkaloid-DNA binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikov, K. G.; Koshlan, T. V.

    2015-05-01

    Interaction between a synthesized coralin protoberberine alkaloid and the DNA double helix of the calf's thymus in a salt solution is studied by optical absorption spectroscopy and spectropolarimetry. The dependence of the spectral characteristics of the alkaloid on a ratio between the DNA base pair concentration and the alkaloid molecule concentration is considered. The parameters of bonds between the coralin alkaloid and the DNA double helix are determined using modified McGhee-von Hippel equations.

  11. 21 CFR 119.1 - Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids... UNREASONABLE RISK § 119.1 Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids. Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids present an unreasonable risk of illness or injury under conditions of use recommended...

  12. 21 CFR 119.1 - Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids... UNREASONABLE RISK § 119.1 Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids. Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids present an unreasonable risk of illness or injury under conditions of use recommended...

  13. 21 CFR 119.1 - Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids... UNREASONABLE RISK § 119.1 Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids. Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids present an unreasonable risk of illness or injury under conditions of use recommended...

  14. 21 CFR 119.1 - Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids... UNREASONABLE RISK § 119.1 Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids. Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids present an unreasonable risk of illness or injury under conditions of use recommended...

  15. 21 CFR 119.1 - Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids... UNREASONABLE RISK § 119.1 Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids. Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids present an unreasonable risk of illness or injury under conditions of use recommended...

  16. Alkaloid profiles of Mimosa tenuiflora and associated methods of analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The alkaloid contents of the leaves and seeds of M. tenuiflora collected from northeastern Brazil were studied. Alkaloids were isolated by classical acid/base extraction procedures and by cation exchange solid phase extraction. The crude alkaloid fractions were then analysed by thin layer chromatogr...

  17. Diterpenoid alkaloids from the roots of Aconitum brachypodum Diels.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Guo; Zhang, Ying-Jie; Xie, Jia-Ying; Xia, Wei-Jun; Zhang, Hai-Yuan; Tang, Meng-Yun; Mei, Shuang-Xi; Cui, Tao; Wang, Jing-Kun; Zhu, Zhao-Yun

    2016-09-01

    A new diterpenoid alkaloid, named bullatine H (1), along with 10 known diterpenoid alkaloids were isolated from the roots of Aconitum brachypodum Diels (Ranunculaceae). The structure of 1 was elucidated by analysis of its spectroscopic data. It should be noted that compound 1 is the first example with 11, 13-dioxygenated denudatine-type diterpenoid alkaloid isolated from Aconitum brachypodum. PMID:27268073

  18. Production, detection, and purification of clavine-type ergot alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Wallwey, Christiane; Li, Shu-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Ergot alkaloids are indole derivatives with diverse structures and biological activities. This chapter describes the procedure from fungal cultivation to purified ergot alkaloids, as exemplified by fumigaclavine A in Penicillium commune. Furthermore, useful notes for working with purified ergot alkaloids are given. PMID:23065612

  19. Antibacterial and antifungal activity of liriodenine and related oxoaporphine alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Hufford, C D; Sharma, A S; Oguntimein, B O

    1980-10-01

    Liriodenine was evaluated for its antibacterial and antifungal activity against several microorganisms. Other related oxoaporphine alkaloids also were evaluated. Attempts to prepare oxoaporphine alkaloids from N-acetylnoraporphines were unsuccessful, but an unexpected phenanthrene alkaloid was obtained. A novel N-demethylation reaction was noted when oxogaucine methiodide and liriodenine methiodide were treated with alumina. PMID:7420287

  20. Rotational Investigation of Tropane Alkaloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocinero, Emilio J.; Lesarri, Alberto; Ecija, Patricia; Grabow, Jens-Uwe; Fernández, Jose A.; Castano, Fernando

    2010-06-01

    We report an investigation of the rotational spectrum of several tropane alkaloids using the new Balle-Flygare-type FT-MW spectrometer built at the University of the Basque Country. The initial work focused on the azabicycles of tropinone, scopine and scopoline, vaporized using heating methods. For tropinone the spectrum confirmed the presence of equatorial and axial conformers originated by the inversion of the N-methyl group, with the tropane motif adopting a distorted chair configuration. The determination of substitution and effective structures for the two conformers included the 13C, 15N and 18O isotopomers observed in natural abundance. The structures revealed the flexibility and structural changes associated to the N-methyl inversion, mostly a flattening at the nitrogen atom and a simultaneous rising of the carbonyl group in the axial form. The investigation of scopine gave an intense spectrum, but it was inconsistent with the structural models expected for this molecule. The carrier of the new spectrum was later identified as scopoline, generated in situ by an intramolecular reaction at the moderate temperatures of the nozzle. A single conformation was detected for scopoline, with an ether bridge seriously distorting the tropane motif. E. J. Cocinero, A. Lesarri, P. écija, J.-U. Grabow, J. A. Fernández, F. Castaño, in publication, 2010 E. J. Cocinero, A. Lesarri, P. Écija, J.-U. Grabow, J. A. Fernández, F. Castaño, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys.,in press, 2010

  1. Ether bridge formation in loline alkaloid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Juan; Bhardwaj, Minakshi; Faulkner, Jerome R.; Nagabhyru, Padmaja; Charlton, Nikki D.; Higashi, Richard M.; Miller, Anne-Frances; Young, Carolyn A.; Grossman, Robert B.; Schardl, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Lolines are potent insecticidal agents produced by endophytic fungi of cool-season grasses. These alkaloids are composed of a pyrrolizidine ring system and an uncommon ether bridge linking carbons 2 and 7. Previous results indicated that 1-aminopyrrolizidine was a pathway intermediate. We used RNA interference to knock down expression of lolO, resulting in the accumulation of a novel alkaloid identified as exo-1-acetamidopyrrolizidine based on high-resolution MS and NMR. Genomes of endophytes differing in alkaloid profiles were sequenced, revealing that those with mutated lolO accumulated exo-1-acetamidopyrrolizidine but no lolines. Heterologous expression of wild-type lolO complemented a lolO mutant, resulting in the production of N-acetylnorloline. These results indicated that the non-heme iron oxygenase, LolO, is required for ether bridge formation, probably through oxidation of exo-1-acetamidopyrrolizidine. PMID:24374065

  2. An efficient synthesis of loline alkaloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cakmak, Mesut; Mayer, Peter; Trauner, Dirk

    2011-07-01

    Loline (1) is a small alkaloid that, in spite of its simple-looking structure, has posed surprising challenges to synthetic chemists. It has been known for more than a century and has been the subject of extensive biological investigations, but only two total syntheses have been achieved to date. Here, we report an asymmetric total synthesis of loline that, with less then ten steps, is remarkably short. Our synthesis incorporates a Sharpless epoxidation, a Grubbs olefin metathesis and an unprecedented transannular aminobromination, which converts an eight-membered cyclic carbamate into a bromopyrrolizidine. The synthesis is marked by a high degree of chemo- and stereoselectivity and gives access to several members of the loline alkaloid family. It delivers sufficient material to support a programme aimed at studying the complex interactions between plants, fungi, insects and bacteria brokered by loline alkaloids.

  3. Analysis of toxic alkaloids in body samples.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Jochen; Drummer, Olaf H; Maurer, Hans H

    2009-03-10

    Many plants contain toxic alkaloids which may be dangerous to humans. Despite the large number of poisonous plants, cases of fatal plant poisonings are relatively rare. The frequencies of poisonings and the plants involved are often regionally specific. Plant poisonings can be aggregated into three categories: unintended ingestions, intended ingestions, and poisoning due to abuse of plant material. Unintended ingestions often occur in children or from a mix-up of plants and mushrooms in adults. Intended ingestions are common in homicides and suicides. Increasingly common is the abuse of plants for hallucinogenic reasons. Toxicological analysis of such alkaloids may help in diagnosis of poisoning or abuse cases. This review describes the toxic alkaloids aconitine, atropine, coniine, colchicine, cytisine, dimethyltryptamine, harmine, harmaline, ibogaine, kawain, mescaline, scopolamine, and taxine, which are often involved in fatal and non-fatal poisonings. The paper summarizes the symptoms of the intoxications and reviews the methods of detection of their toxic constituents in biological fluids. PMID:19147309

  4. Antimicrobial hasubanalactam alkaloid from Stephania glabra.

    PubMed

    Semwal, Deepak Kumar; Rawat, Usha

    2009-03-01

    A novel hasubanalactam alkaloid, named glabradine, has been isolated from the tubers of Stephania glabra, together with three known quaternary protoberberine alkaloids, palmatine, dehydrocorydalmine and stepharanine. The structure of glabradine was assigned as 7-O-demethyl-N,O-dimethyloxostephinine, by means of rigorous spectroscopic analysis including 2 D NMR measurements. It was evaluated for antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, S. mutans, Microsporum gypseum, M. canis and Trichophyton rubrum and displayed potent antimicrobial activity superior to those of novobiocin and erythromycin used as positive controls. PMID:19148860

  5. Dihydrofuro [2,3-b] quinolinium alkaloids in cultured cells of Ptelea trifoliata L. : Isolation of a new alkaloid, ptelecultinium.

    PubMed

    Petit-Paly, G; Montagu, M; Viel, C; Rideau, M; Chénieux, J C

    1987-07-01

    Two dihydrofuroquinoline alkaloids, ptelefolonium and another new alkaloid, ptelecultinium, have been isolated from callus strains of Ptelea trifoliata L.. Ptelecultinium was not known to occur in the mature plants. The structure of these two alkaloids were established by UV, MS and (1)H-NMR spectra. PMID:24248767

  6. Therapeutic Potential of Steroidal Alkaloids in Cancer and Other Diseases.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qi-Wei; Chen, Mei-Wan; Cheng, Ke-Jun; Yu, Pei-Zhong; Wei, Xing; Shi, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Steroidal alkaloids are a class of secondary metabolites isolated from plants, amphibians, and marine invertebrates. Evidence accumulated in the recent two decades demonstrates that steroidal alkaloids have a wide range of bioactivities including anticancer, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antinociceptive, etc., suggesting their great potential for application. It is therefore necessary to comprehensively summarize the bioactivities, especially anticancer activities and mechanisms of steroidal alkaloids. Here we systematically highlight the anticancer profiles both in vitro and in vivo of steroidal alkaloids such as dendrogenin, solanidine, solasodine, tomatidine, cyclopamine, and their derivatives. Furthermore, other bioactivities of steroidal alkaloids are also discussed. The integrated molecular mechanisms in this review can increase our understanding on the utilization of steroidal alkaloids and contribute to the development of new drug candidates. Although the therapeutic potentials of steroidal alkaloids look promising in the preclinical and clinical studies, further pharmacokinetic and clinical studies are mandated to define their efficacy and safety in cancer and other diseases. PMID:25820039

  7. Pharmacokinetics of Hoasca alkaloids in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Callaway, J C; McKenna, D J; Grob, C S; Brito, G S; Raymon, L P; Poland, R E; Andrade, E N; Andrade, E O; Mash, D C

    1999-06-01

    N,N-Dimethyltryptamine (DMT), harmine, harmaline and tetrahydroharmine (THH) are the characteristic alkaloids found in Amazonian sacraments known as hoasca, ayahuasca, and yajè. Such beverages are characterized by the presence of these three harmala alkaloids, where harmine and harmaline reversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) while tetrahydroharmine weakly inhibits the uptake of serotonin. Together, both actions increase central and peripheral serotonergic activity while facilitating the psychoactivity of DMT. Though the use of such 'teas' has be known to western science for over 100 years, little is known of their pharmacokinetics. In this study, hoasca was prepared and administered in a ceremonial context. All four alkaloids were measured in the tea and in the plasma of 15 volunteers, subsequent to the ingestion of 2 ml hoasca/kg body weight, using gas (GC) and high pressure liquid chromatographic (HPLC) methods. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated and peak times of psychoactivity coincided with high alkaloid concentrations, particularly DMT which had an average Tmax of 107.5 +/- 32.5 min. While DMT parameters correlated with those of harmine, THH showed a pharmacokinetic profile relatively independent of harmine's. PMID:10404423

  8. Fluorescence lifetimes of some Rauwolfia alkaloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, J.; Arjona, D. Gonzalez; Roldan, E.; Sanchez, M.

    1986-03-01

    The natural fluorescence lifetimes of the following Rauwolfia alkaloids, Reserpine, Rescinnamine, Corynanthine, Yohimbine, --- Ajmalicine, Serpentine and Ajmaline, have been calculated from a modified form of the Strickler-Berg equation. The actual lifetimes were derived from the quantum yields and the calculated natural lifetimes.

  9. A novel alkaloid from Mitrephora maingayi.

    PubMed

    Yu, Rong; Li, Bo-Gang; Ye, Qi; Zhang, Guo-Lin

    2005-06-01

    A novel alkaloid, maingayinine, together with dicentrinone, dicentrinene, L-2-O-methyl-chiro-inositol, allantoin, glaucine, N-phenyl-2-naphthylamine, terephthalic acid and ayanin, was isolated from the twigs of Mitrephora maingayi Hook (Annonaceae). Their structures were established predominantly by IR, MS and NMR spectral data. PMID:15938142

  10. Ergot alkaloids decrease rumen epithelial blood flow

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two experiments were conducted to determine if ergot alkaloids affect blood flow to the absorptive surface of the rumen of steers. Steers (n=8 total) were pair-fed alfalfa cubes at 1.5× NEM and received ground endophyte-infected tall fescue seed (E+) or endophyte-free tall fescue seed (E-) via rumen...

  11. A new indole alkaloid from Ervatamia yunnanensis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yong-Sheng; Du, Jing-Ling; Chen, Hai-Sheng; Jin, Li; Liang, Shuang

    2010-01-01

    The stems of Ervatamia yunnanensis have afforded a new indole alkaloid, ervataine (1), whose structure was determined by spectroscopic analysis. Five known compounds, ibogaine (2) coronaridine (3), heyneanine (4), voacangine hydroxyindolenine (5) and coronaridine hydroxyindolenine (6), were also isolated. PMID:19647051

  12. The Alkaloid Profiles of Lupinus sulphureus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lupines are common plants found on the rangelands in the western United States. Lupines are known to contain alkaloids that can be toxic and teratogenic causing congenital birth defects (crooked calf disease). One such lupine, Lupinus sulphureus, occurs in parts of Oregon, Washington, and British ...

  13. Probing chemical space with alkaloid-inspired libraries.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Michael C; Singh, Gurpreet; Plampin, James N; Rane, Digamber; Wang, Jenna L; Day, Victor W; Aubé, Jeffrey

    2014-02-01

    Screening of small-molecule libraries is an important aspect of probe and drug discovery science. Numerous authors have suggested that bioactive natural products are attractive starting points for such libraries because of their structural complexity and sp(3)-rich character. Here, we describe the construction of a screening library based on representative members of four families of biologically active alkaloids (Stemonaceae, the structurally related cyclindricine and lepadiformine families, lupin and Amaryllidaceae). In each case, scaffolds were based on structures of the naturally occurring compounds or a close derivative. Scaffold preparation was pursued following the development of appropriate enabling chemical methods. Diversification provided 686 new compounds suitable for screening. The libraries thus prepared had structural characteristics, including sp(3) content, comparable to a basis set of representative natural products and were highly rule-of-five compliant. PMID:24451589

  14. Probing chemical space with alkaloid-inspired libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, Michael C.; Singh, Gurpreet; Plampin, James N.; Rane, Digamber; Wang, Jenna L.; Day, Victor W.; Aubé, Jeffrey

    2014-02-01

    Screening of small-molecule libraries is an important aspect of probe and drug discovery science. Numerous authors have suggested that bioactive natural products are attractive starting points for such libraries because of their structural complexity and sp3-rich character. Here, we describe the construction of a screening library based on representative members of four families of biologically active alkaloids (Stemonaceae, the structurally related cyclindricine and lepadiformine families, lupin and Amaryllidaceae). In each case, scaffolds were based on structures of the naturally occurring compounds or a close derivative. Scaffold preparation was pursued following the development of appropriate enabling chemical methods. Diversification provided 686 new compounds suitable for screening. The libraries thus prepared had structural characteristics, including sp3 content, comparable to a basis set of representative natural products and were highly rule-of-five compliant.

  15. Toxicosis by Plant Alkaloids in Humans and Animals in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Gonzalo J

    2015-12-01

    Due to its tropical location, chains of mountains, inter-Andean valleys, Amazon basin area, eastern plains and shores on both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, Colombia has many ecosystems and the second largest plant biodiversity in the world. Many plant species, both native and naturalized, are currently recognized as toxic for both animals and humans, and some of them are known to cause their toxic effects due to their alkaloid content. Among these, there are plants containing the hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids, neurotoxins such as the indolizidine alkaloid swainsonine and the piperidine alkaloids coniine and γ-coniceine and tropane alkaloids. Unfortunately, the research in toxic plants in Colombia is not nearly proportional to its plant biodiversity and the scientific information available is only very scarce. The present review aims at summarizing the scarce information about plant alkaloid toxicosis in animals and humans in Colombia. PMID:26690479

  16. Alkaloids Isolated from Natural Herbs as the Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jin-Jian; Bao, Jiao-Lin; Chen, Xiu-Ping; Huang, Min; Wang, Yi-Tao

    2012-01-01

    Alkaloids are important chemical compounds that serve as a rich reservoir for drug discovery. Several alkaloids isolated from natural herbs exhibit antiproliferation and antimetastasis effects on various types of cancers both in vitro and in vivo. Alkaloids, such as camptothecin and vinblastine, have already been successfully developed into anticancer drugs. This paper focuses on the naturally derived alkaloids with prospective anticancer properties, such as berberine, evodiamine, matrine, piperine, sanguinarine, and tetrandrine, and summarizes the mechanisms of action of these compounds. Based on the information in the literature that is summarized in this paper, the use of alkaloids as anticancer agents is very promising, but more research and clinical trials are necessary before final recommendations on specific alkaloids can be made. PMID:22988474

  17. Quinolizidine alkaloid biosynthesis: recent advances and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Bunsupa, Somnuk; Yamazaki, Mami; Saito, Kazuki

    2012-01-01

    Lys-derived alkaloids, including piperidine, quinolizidine, indolizidine, and lycopodium alkaloids, are widely distributed throughout the plant kingdom. Several of these alkaloids have beneficial properties for humans and have been used in medicine. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the biosynthesis of these alkaloids are not well understood. In the present article, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of Lys-derived alkaloids, especially the biochemistry, molecular biology, and biotechnology of quinolizidine alkaloid (QA) biosynthesis. We have also highlighted Lys decarboxylase (LDC), the enzyme that catalyzes the first committed step of QA biosynthesis and answers a longstanding question about the molecular entity of LDC activity in plants. Further prospects using current advanced technologies, such as next-generation sequencing, in medicinal plants have also been discussed. PMID:23112802

  18. Alkaloid Changes in Tobacco Seeds during Germination 1

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, W. W.; Bush, L. P.

    1974-01-01

    Nicotine, nornicotine, anabasine, and anatabine, normally found in growing and mature tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants, were extracted and quantified from mature tobacco seeds and young tobacco seedlings. The rate of net alkaloid disappearance and accumulation in tobacco seedlings was related to phases of germination. In general, the increased rate of germination associated with higher temperatures also increased the rate of initial loss of alkaloids and the subsequent rate of accumulation of alkaloids. Maximum alkaloid accumulation in 144-hour-old seedlings cultured with 10-hour day occurred at 27 C. Following an 8-hour photoinduction period, seeds germinated in darkness accumulated greater amounts of alkaloids than seeds exposed to light each day. Seeds germinated in darkness for 96 hours, following the 8-hour photoinduction period, and then exposed to light each day accumulated the greatest amounts of alkaloids. PMID:16658655

  19. Toxicosis by Plant Alkaloids in Humans and Animals in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Gonzalo J.

    2015-01-01

    Due to its tropical location, chains of mountains, inter-Andean valleys, Amazon basin area, eastern plains and shores on both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, Colombia has many ecosystems and the second largest plant biodiversity in the world. Many plant species, both native and naturalized, are currently recognized as toxic for both animals and humans, and some of them are known to cause their toxic effects due to their alkaloid content. Among these, there are plants containing the hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids, neurotoxins such as the indolizidine alkaloid swainsonine and the piperidine alkaloids coniine and γ-coniceine and tropane alkaloids. Unfortunately, the research in toxic plants in Colombia is not nearly proportional to its plant biodiversity and the scientific information available is only very scarce. The present review aims at summarizing the scarce information about plant alkaloid toxicosis in animals and humans in Colombia. PMID:26690479

  20. Total synthesis of the Daphniphyllum alkaloid daphenylline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhaoyong; Li, Yong; Deng, Jun; Li, Ang

    2013-08-01

    The Daphniphyllum alkaloids are a large class of natural products isolated from a genus of evergreen plants widely used in Chinese herbal medicine. They display a remarkable range of biological activities, including anticancer, antioxidant, and vasorelaxation properties as well as elevation of nerve growth factor. Daphenylline is a structurally unique member among the predominately aliphatic Daphniphyllum alkaloids, and contains a tetrasubstituted arene moiety mounted on a sterically compact hexacyclic scaffold. Herein, we describe the first total synthesis of daphenylline. A gold-catalysed 6-exo-dig cyclization reaction and a subsequent intramolecular Michael addition reaction, inspired by Dixon's seminal work, were exploited to construct the bridged 6,6,5-tricyclic motif of the natural product at an early stage, and the aromatic moiety was forged through a photoinduced olefin isomerization/6π-electrocyclization cascade followed by an oxidative aromatization process.

  1. New quinoline alkaloids from Ruta chalepensis.

    PubMed

    El Sayed, K; Al-Said, M S; El-Feraly, F S; Ross, S A

    2000-07-01

    The roots of Ruta chalepensis, collected from the northern Saudi desert, yielded two new quinoline alkaloids, namely, 2-¿6'-(2H-benzo[d]1' ',3' '-dioxolen-5' '-yl)hexyl¿-hydroquinolin-4-one (1) and 2-¿6'-(2H-benzo[d]1' ',3' '-dioxolen-5' '-yl)hexyl¿-4-methoxy-quinoline (2). Nine previously reported alkaloids, dictamnine, pteleine, skimmianine, rutacridone, isogravacridonechlorine, maculosidine, graveoline, graveolinine, and 4-methoxy-1-methyl-2(1H)-quinolinone, and coumarins, chalepensin, and umbelliferone were also isolated. Structure elucidations were based primarily on 1D and 2D NMR analyses and chemical transformations. Antimicrobial activity of these compounds is discussed. PMID:10924184

  2. Production of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Kristy M; Smolke, Christina D

    2010-01-01

    The benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs) are a diverse class of metabolites that exhibit a broad range of pharmacological activities and are synthesized through plant biosynthetic pathways comprised of complex enzyme activities and regulatory strategies. We have engineered yeast to produce the key intermediate reticuline and downstream BIA metabolites from a commercially available substrate. An enzyme tuning strategy was implemented that identified activity differences between variants from different plants and determined optimal expression levels. By synthesizing both stereoisomer forms of reticuline and integrating enzyme activities from three plant sources and humans, we demonstrated the synthesis of metabolites in the sanguinarine/berberine and morphinan branches. We also demonstrated that a human P450 enzyme exhibits a novel activity in the conversion of (R)-reticuline to the morphinan alkaloid salutaridine. Our engineered microbial hosts offer access to a rich group of BIA molecules and associated activities that will be further expanded through synthetic chemistry and biology approaches. PMID:18690217

  3. Metabolism and ecology of purine alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Anaya, Ana Luisa; Cruz-Ortega, Rocio; Waller, George R

    2006-01-01

    In this review, the biosynthesis, catabolism, ecological significance, and modes of action of purine alkaloids particularly, caffeine, theobromine and theophylline in plants are discussed. In the biosynthesis of caffeine, progress has been made in enzymology, the amino acid sequence of the enzymes, and in the genes encoding N-methyltransferases. In addition, caffeine-deficient plants have been produced. The ecology of purine alkaloids has not proved to be particularly promising. However, advances have been made in insecticidal and allelopathic fields, and in the role of microorganisms play in the changes that these compounds undergo in the soil. Caffeine inhibits cell plate formation during telophase throughout the development of coffee plants and other species. PMID:16720319

  4. Three new oxazoline alkaloids from Gymnotheca chinensis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shi-Ji; Guo, Da-Le; Zhang, Mao-Sheng; Chen, Fang; Ding, Li-Sheng; Zhou, Yan

    2016-08-01

    Three novel oxazoline alkaloids, 1-oxa-3-azaspiro [4.5] dec-2-ene-8-one (1), 1-oxa-3-azaspiro [4.5] dec-2, 6-diene-8-one (2), and 1-oxa-3-azaspiro [4.5] dec-10-methoxy-2, 6-diene-8-one (3) were isolated from the methanol extract of the whole plant of Gymnotheca chinensis. The chemical structures were established by means of spectroscopic analysis including one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. PMID:26949983

  5. Synthesis studies on the Melodinus alkaloid meloscine

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Ken S.; Antoline, Joshua F.

    2012-01-01

    The pentacyclic Melodinus alkaloid (±)-meloscine was synthesized in 19 chemical steps from 2-bromobenzaldehyde through a route featuring an allenyl azide cyclization cascade to deliver the core azabicyclo[3.3.0]octane substructure. Peripheral functionalization of this core included a Tollens-type aldol condensation to set the quaternary center at C(20) and a diastereoselective ring closing metathesis to forge the tetrahydropyridine ring. PMID:23316092

  6. Synthesis and SAR of vinca alkaloid analogues.

    PubMed

    Voss, Matthew E; Ralph, Jeffery M; Xie, Dejian; Manning, David D; Chen, Xinchao; Frank, Anthony J; Leyhane, Andrew J; Liu, Lei; Stevens, Jason M; Budde, Cheryl; Surman, Matthew D; Friedrich, Thomas; Peace, Denise; Scott, Ian L; Wolf, Mark; Johnson, Randall

    2009-02-15

    Versatile intermediates 12'-iodovinblastine, 12'-iodovincristine and 11'-iodovinorelbine were utilized as substrates for transition metal based chemistry which led to the preparation of novel analogues of the vinca alkaloids. The synthesis of key iodo intermediates, their transformation into final products, and the SAR based upon HeLa and MCF-7 cell toxicity assays is presented. Selected analogues 27 and 36 show promising anticancer activity in the P388 murine leukemia model. PMID:19147348

  7. Antimicrobial alkaloids from Zanthoxylum tetraspermum and caudatum.

    PubMed

    Nissanka, A P; Karunaratne, V; Bandara, B M; Kumar, V; Nakanishi, T; Nishi, M; Inada, A; Tillekeratne, L M; Wijesundara, D S; Gunatilaka, A A

    2001-04-01

    Two benzophenanthrene alkaloids, 8-acetonyldihydronitidine and 8-acetonyldihydroavicine were isolated from Zanthoxylum tetraspermum stem bark along with liriodenine, sesamin, lichexanthone and (+)-piperitol-gamma,gamma-dimethylallylether. The species endemic to Sri Lanka, Z. caudatum, contained sesamin, savinin, liriodenine, decarine and 8-O-desmethyl-N-nornitidine. 8-Acetonyldihydronitidine and 8-acetonyldihydroavicine showed significant antibacterial activity while the former along with liriodenine was strongly antifungal. Savinin exhibited potent spermicidal activity. Both savinin and sesamin exhibited significant insecticidal activity. PMID:11324918

  8. Histamine release inhibition activity of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Tsuchiya, S; Sugimoto, Y; Sugimura, Y; Yamada, Y

    1992-12-01

    Eleven examples of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids (head-to-head; 10, head-to-tail; 1) and one half molecule type (N-methylcoclaurine), were tested by in vitro histamine release inhibition assay. The order of the potency of the inhibitory effect was ranked thus: homoaromoline, aromoline, isotetrandrine, cepharanthine, fangchinoline, obaberine, and tetrandrine. The following substances, cepharanoline, berbamine, oxyacanthine, and cycleanine (head-to-tail structure) had no inhibitory effect. N-Methylcoclaurine showed an inhibitory effect comparable to that of fangchinoline. PMID:1484888

  9. A new cytotoxic carbazole alkaloid from Clausena excavata.

    PubMed

    Taufiq-Yap, Y H; Peh, T H; Ee, G C L; Rahmani, M; Sukari, M A; Ali, A M; Muse, R

    2007-07-20

    A new carbazole alkaloid, 3-carbomethoxy-2-hydroxy-7-methoxycarbazole, Clausine-TY (1), together with two known carbazole alkaloid, Clausine-H (2) and Clausine-B (3), were isolated from the ethyl acetate extract of the stem bark of the Malaysian Clausena excavata. The structures of these compounds were elucidated by spectroscopic analyses. The new carbazole alkaloid shows significant cytotoxicity against CEM-SS cell line. PMID:17654285

  10. A potent antibacterial indole alkaloid from Psychotria pilifera.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; Song, Chang-Wei; Khan, Afsar; Li, Xiao-Ning; Yang, Xing-Wei; Cheng, Gui-Guang; Liu, Ya-Ping; Luo, Xiao-Dong

    2016-08-01

    A new strychnine alkaloid, 16,17,19,20-tetrahydro-2,16-dehydro-18-deoxyisostrychnine (1), and fourteen known alkaloids were isolated from the leaves of Psychotria pilifera. Their structures were identified on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analysis, as well as by comparison with the reported spectroscopic data. The new alkaloid (1) exhibited potent antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, equivalent to cefotaxime with MIC value of 0.781 μg/ml. PMID:26963582

  11. Recent Advances in the Synthesis of Stemona Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Yu; Wang, Feng-Peng

    2015-06-01

    Stemona alkaloids, featuring polycyclic structures and interesting bioactivities, constitute a distinct class from the Stemonaceae family. In this review, recent advances in the synthesis of these unique alkaloids are briefly discussed, highlighting the application of novel synthetic strategies to access the core structures, as well as creative solutions to the installation of multiple stereogenic centers. The literature reviewed in this article covers the publications from 2010 to November 2014, a period that witnessed the prosperity of the synthesis of Stemona alkaloids. PMID:26197559

  12. A new monoterpenoid oxindole alkaloid from Hamelia patens micropropagated plantlets.

    PubMed

    Paniagua-Vega, David; Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M; Ponce-Noyola, Teresa; Ramos-Valdivia, Ana C

    2012-11-01

    Chemical studies on Hamelia patens (Rubiaceae) micropropagated plantlets allowed production of a new monoterpenoid oxindole alkaloid, named (-)-hameline (7), together with eight known alkaloids, tetrahydroalstonine (1), aricine (2), pteropodine (3), isopteropodine (4), uncarine F (5), speciophylline (6), palmirine (8), and rumberine (9). The structure of the new alkaloid was assigned on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and molecular modeling. PMID:23285803

  13. Drug Delivery Systems and Combination Therapy by Using Vinca Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chun-Ting; Huang, Yen-Wei; Yang, Chih-Hui; Huang, Keng-Shiang

    2015-01-01

    Developing new methods for chemotherapy drug delivery has become a topic of great concern. Vinca alkaloids are among the most widely used chemotherapy reagents for tumor therapy; however, their side effects are particularly problematic for many medical doctors. To reduce the toxicity and enhance the therapeutic efficiency of vinca alkaloids, many researchers have developed strategies such as using liposome-entrapped drugs, chemical- or peptide-modified drugs, polymeric packaging drugs, and chemotherapy drug combinations. This review mainly focuses on the development of a vinca alkaloid drug delivery system and the combination therapy. Five vinca alkaloids (eg, vincristine, vinblastine, vinorelbine, vindesine, and vinflunine) are reviewed. PMID:25877096

  14. Evaluation of Biosynthetic Pathway and Engineered Biosynthesis of Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Shinji; Sato, Michio; Tsunematsu, Yuta; Watanabe, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Varieties of alkaloids are known to be produced by various organisms, including bacteria, fungi and plants, as secondary metabolites that exhibit useful bioactivities. However, understanding of how those metabolites are biosynthesized still remains limited, because most of these compounds are isolated from plants and at a trace level of production. In this review, we focus on recent efforts in identifying the genes responsible for the biosynthesis of those nitrogen-containing natural products and elucidating the mechanisms involved in the biosynthetic processes. The alkaloids discussed in this review are ditryptophenaline (dimeric diketopiperazine alkaloid), saframycin (tetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloid), strictosidine (monoterpene indole alkaloid), ergotamine (ergot alkaloid) and opiates (benzylisoquinoline and morphinan alkaloid). This review also discusses the engineered biosynthesis of these compounds, primarily through heterologous reconstitution of target biosynthetic pathways in suitable hosts, such as Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus nidulans. Those heterologous biosynthetic systems can be used to confirm the functions of the isolated genes, economically scale up the production of the alkaloids for commercial distributions and engineer the biosynthetic pathways to produce valuable analogs of the alkaloids. In particular, extensive involvement of oxidation reactions catalyzed by oxidoreductases, such as cytochrome P450s, during the secondary metabolite biosynthesis is discussed in details. PMID:27548127

  15. Plant alkaloids as drug leads for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ng, Yu Pong; Or, Terry Cho Tsun; Ip, Nancy Y

    2015-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative illness associated with dementia and is most prevalent among the elderly population. Current medications can only treat symptoms. Alkaloids are structurally diverse and have been an important source of therapeutics for various brain disorders. Two US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved acetylcholinesterase inhibitors for AD, galantamine and rivastigmine, are in fact alkaloids. In addition, clinical trials of four other extensively studied alkaloids-huperzine A, caffeine, nicotine, and indomethacin-have been conducted but do not convincingly demonstrate their clinical efficacy for AD. Interestingly, rhynchophylline, a known neuroprotective alkaloid, was recently discovered by in silico screening as an inhibitor of EphA4, a novel target for AD. Here, we review the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying AD, current treatment strategies, and therapeutic potential of several selected plant alkaloids in AD, highlighting their various drug targets and the key supportive preclinical and clinical studies. Future research should include more rigorous clinical studies of the most promising alkaloids, the further development of recently discovered candidate alkaloids, and the continual search for new alkaloids for relevant drug targets. It remains promising that an alkaloid drug candidate could significantly affect the progression of AD in addition to providing symptomatic relief. PMID:26220901

  16. Drug delivery systems and combination therapy by using vinca alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chun-Ting; Huang, Yen-Wei; Yang, Chih-Hui; Huang, Keng-Shiang

    2015-01-01

    Developing new methods for chemotherapy drug delivery has become a topic of great concern. Vinca alkaloids are among the most widely used chemotherapy reagents for tumor therapy; however, their side effects are particularly problematic for many medical doctors. To reduce the toxicity and enhance the therapeutic efficiency of vinca alkaloids, many researchers have developed strategies such as using liposome-entrapped drugs, chemical- or peptide-modified drugs, polymeric packaging drugs, and chemotherapy drug combinations. This review mainly focuses on the development of a vinca alkaloid drug delivery system and the combination therapy. Five vinca alkaloids (eg, vincristine, vinblastine, vinorelbine, vindesine, and vinflunine) are reviewed. PMID:25877096

  17. Biologically active indole and bisindole alkaloids from Tabernaemontana divaricata.

    PubMed

    Kam, Toh-Seok; Pang, Huey-Shen; Lim, Tuck-Meng

    2003-04-21

    The ethanol extract of the leaves of Tabernaemontana divaricata (double flower variety) provided a total of 23 alkaloids, including the new aspidosperma alkaloids, taberhanine, voafinine, N-methylvoafinine, voafinidine, voalenine and the new bisindole alkaloid, conophyllinine in addition to the previously known, biologically active bisindole, conophylline and its congener, conofoline. The structures of the new alkaloids were established by spectroscopic methods. The preparation and characterization of the corresponding quinones of the biologically active bisindoles are also described in relation to a structure-activity study of these compounds with respect to their action in stimulating insulin expression. PMID:12929658

  18. Reduction of venom alkaloids in Solenopsis richteri×Solenopsis invicta hybrid: an attempt to identify new alkaloidal components.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Hu, Qiong-Bo; Fadamiro, Henry Y

    2010-11-24

    The alkaloid chemistry of the venom of hybrid fire ant, Solenopsis richteri × Solenopsis invicta, was investigated using silica gel chromatography and GC-MS techniques. In addition to most cis alkaloids of parental species, S. richteri Forel and S. invicta Buren, the cis alkaloid fraction of the body extract of hybrid fire ants also contains five significant new alkaloids. Hydrogenation of the cis alkaloid fraction yielded only five piperidines, 4', 12', 12, 20', and 20. Sodium borohydride and lithium aluminum hydride selectively reduced C═N double bond in piperideine alkaloids to give a mixture of cis and trans piperidines. However, reduction of the five new components yielded several new peaks with much longer retention times and increasing molecular weights over 30. It is evident that the chemical identities of the five new peaks are quite different from those known piperidines or piperideines found in Solenopsis fire ants. PMID:20964344

  19. Ergot alkaloids--biology and molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Schardl, Christopher L; Panaccione, Daniel G; Tudzynski, Paul

    2006-01-01

    EA have been a major benefit, and a major detriment, to humans since early in recorded history. Their medicinal properties have been used, and continue to be used, to aid in childbirth, with new uses being found in the treatment of neurological and cardiovascular disorders. The surprisingly broad range of pharmaceutical uses for EA stems from their affinities for multiple receptors for three distinct neurotransmitters (serotonin, dopamine, and adrenaline), from the great structural diversity of natural EA, and from the application of chemical techniques that further expand that structural diversity. The dangers posed by EA to humans and their livestock stem from the ubiquity of ergot fungi (Claviceps species) as parasites of cereals, and of related grass endophytes (Epichloë, Neotyphodium, and Balansia species) that may inhabit pasture grasses and produce toxic levels of EA. Further concerns stem from saprophytic EA producers in the genera Aspergillus and Penicillium, especially A. fumigatus, an opportunistic pathogen of humans. Numerous fungal species produce EA with a wide variety of structures and properties. These alkaloids are associated with plants in the families Poaceae, Cyperaceae, and Convolvulaceae, apparently because these plants can have symbiotic fungi that produce EA. Pharmacological activities of EA relate to their specific structures. Known as potent vasoconstrictors, the ergopeptines include a lysergic acid substituent with an amide linkage to a complex cyclol-lactam ring structure generated from three amino acids. Simpler lysergyl amides and clavines are more apt to have oxytonic or psychotropic activities. One of the lysergyl amides is LSD (5), the most potent hallucinogen known. The EA biosynthetic pathway in Claviceps species has been studied extensively for many decades, and recent studies have also employed epichloës and A. fumigatus. The early pathway, shared among these fungi, begins with the action of an aromatic prenyl transferase

  20. Effects of Ergot Alkaloids on Bovine Sperm Motility In Vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ergot alkaloids are synthesized by endophyte-infected (Neotyphodium coenophialum) tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum (Schreb.) S.J. Darbyshire). Our objective was to determine direct effects of ergot alkaloids (ergotamine, dihydroergotamine and ergonovine) on the motility of bovine spermatozoa in vit...

  1. Identification of the quinolizidine alkaloids in Sophora leachiana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sophora is a diverse genus representing herbs, shrubs, and trees that occurs throughout the world, primarily in the northern hemisphere. Sophora species contain a variety of quinolizidine alkaloids that are toxic and potentially teratogenic. However, there are no previous reports on the alkaloid c...

  2. Tall fescue seed extraction and partial purification of ergot alkaloids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many substances in the tall fescue/endophyte association (Schedonorus arundinaceus/Epichloë coenophiala) have biological activity. Of these compounds only the ergot alkaloids are known to have significant mammalian toxicity and the predominant ergot alkaloids are ergovaline and ergovalinine. Because...

  3. In vitro antibacterial screening of Cryptolepis sanguinolenta alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Paulo, A; Duarte, A; Gomes, E T

    1994-10-01

    The ethanol and aqueous crude extracts and five alkaloids isolated from the roots of Crytolepis sanguinolenta (Lindl.) Schlechter were screened for antibacterial activity against 7 reference strains by the twofold serial broth microdilution assay. The ethanol extract and the alkaloids cryptolepine and cryptoheptine inhibited the growth of all strains tested except that of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:7853864

  4. New monoterpenoid alkaloids from the aerial parts of Uncaria hirsuta.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jun-Feng; Zhang, Yuan; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Sheng-Yuan; Tian, Hai-Yan; Wang, Lei; Ye, Wen-Cai

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the chemical constituents of medicinal plant Uncaria hirsuta, three new monoterpenoid alkaloids, named hirsutanines A-C (1-3), were isolated. Their structures with absolute configurations were elucidated by means of NMR, X-ray diffraction and CD analysis. Compound 3 was the first dimeric monoterpenoid alkaloid obtained from genus Uncaria. PMID:24684175

  5. hERG Blockade by Iboga Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Alper, Kenneth; Bai, Rong; Liu, Nian; Fowler, Steven J; Huang, Xi-Ping; Priori, Silvia G; Ruan, Yanfei

    2016-01-01

    The iboga alkaloids are a class of naturally occurring and synthetic compounds, some of which modify drug self-administration and withdrawal in humans and preclinical models. Ibogaine, the prototypic iboga alkaloid that is utilized clinically to treat addictions, has been associated with QT prolongation, torsades de pointes and fatalities. hERG blockade as IKr was measured using the whole-cell patch clamp technique in HEK 293 cells. This yielded the following IC50 values: ibogaine manufactured by semisynthesis via voacangine (4.09 ± 0.69 µM) or by extraction from T. iboga (3.53 ± 0.16 µM); ibogaine's principal metabolite noribogaine (2.86 ± 0.68 µM); and voacangine (2.25 ± 0.34 µM). In contrast, the IC50 of 18-methoxycoronaridine, a product of rational synthesis and current focus of drug development was >50 µM. hERG blockade was voltage dependent for all of the compounds, consistent with low-affinity blockade. hERG channel binding affinities (K i) for the entire set of compounds, including 18-MC, ranged from 0.71 to 3.89 µM, suggesting that 18-MC binds to the hERG channel with affinity similar to the other compounds, but the interaction produces substantially less hERG blockade. In view of the extended half-life of noribogaine, these results may relate to observations of persistent QT prolongation and cardiac arrhythmia at delayed intervals of days following ibogaine ingestion. The apparent structure-activity relationships regarding positions of substitutions on the ibogamine skeleton suggest that the iboga alkaloids might provide an informative paradigm for investigation of the structural biology of the hERG channel. PMID:25636206

  6. Enantioselective Total Synthesis of Tricyclic Myrmicarin Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Movassaghi, Mohammad; Ondrus, Alison E.

    2010-01-01

    An enantioselective gram-scale synthesis of a key dihydroindolizine intermediate for the preparation of myrmicarin alkaloids is described. Key transformations in this convergent approach include a stereospecific palladium–catalyzed N-vinylation of a pyrrole with a vinyl triflate, a copper–catalyzed enantioselective conjugate reduction of a β-pyrrolyl enoate, and a regioselective Friedel-Crafts reaction. The synthesis of optically active and isomerically pure samples of (4aR)-myrmicarins 215A, 215B, and 217 in addition to their respective C4a-epimers is presented. PMID:16178549

  7. Antiproliferative Activity of Amathaspiramide Alkaloids and Analogs.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, Jun; Chiyoda, Koji; Umihara, Hirotatsu; Fukuyama, Tohru

    2016-08-01

    Assisted by the total syntheses of all the amathaspiramides, six natural products and four synthetic intermediates with partially fluctuating structures were prepared and subjected to a growth inhibition assay in four human cancer cell lines. The results showed amathaspiramides A, C, and E had moderate antiproliferative activity. Examination of the structure-activity relationship revealed the importance of the amine or imine substructure on the pyrrolidine moiety and the 8R stereochemistry on the N-acyl hemiaminal moiety for the antiproliferative activity of amathaspiramide alkaloids. PMID:27169437

  8. Neurotoxic Alkaloids: Saxitoxin and Its Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Wiese, Maria; D’Agostino, Paul M.; Mihali, Troco K.; Moffitt, Michelle C.; Neilan, Brett A.

    2010-01-01

    Saxitoxin (STX) and its 57 analogs are a broad group of natural neurotoxic alkaloids, commonly known as the paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs). PSTs are the causative agents of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) and are mostly associated with marine dinoflagellates (eukaryotes) and freshwater cyanobacteria (prokaryotes), which form extensive blooms around the world. PST producing dinoflagellates belong to the genera Alexandrium, Gymnodinium and Pyrodinium whilst production has been identified in several cyanobacterial genera including Anabaena, Cylindrospermopsis, Aphanizomenon Planktothrix and Lyngbya. STX and its analogs can be structurally classified into several classes such as non-sulfated, mono-sulfated, di-sulfated, decarbamoylated and the recently discovered hydrophobic analogs—each with varying levels of toxicity. Biotransformation of the PSTs into other PST analogs has been identified within marine invertebrates, humans and bacteria. An improved understanding of PST transformation into less toxic analogs and degradation, both chemically or enzymatically, will be important for the development of methods for the detoxification of contaminated water supplies and of shellfish destined for consumption. Some PSTs also have demonstrated pharmaceutical potential as a long-term anesthetic in the treatment of anal fissures and for chronic tension-type headache. The recent elucidation of the saxitoxin biosynthetic gene cluster in cyanobacteria and the identification of new PST analogs will present opportunities to further explore the pharmaceutical potential of these intriguing alkaloids. PMID:20714432

  9. Cyclodextrin assisted nanophase determination of alkaloid salts.

    PubMed

    Csernák, Orsolya; Buvári-Barcza, Agnes; Barcza, Lajos

    2006-04-15

    The poor water solubility of the free base and the high dissociation constant (K(a)) hinder mainly the assay of alkaloid salts. We have elaborated an environment friendly method that can be carried out in aqueous media. The stability difference of the cyclodextrin (CD) complexes of free and protonated bases were used for this purpose. The base is included into the hydrophobic cavity of the CD (which serves as an apolar solvent phase on molecular level) and its solubility in water is increased. Since the base forms more stable inclusion complex than its protonated species, the pK(a) is decreased and the potentiometric titration is promoted by this way, too. Six different hydrohalide alkaloid salts have been investigated and the most appropriate CDs were chosen (depending on the size of the molecules and/or substituents). The results of the assays agree well with those obtained by the direct nonaqueous titrations. The stability constants of the inclusion complexes have been also computed. PMID:18970584

  10. Chirality and numbering of substituted tropane alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Humam, Munir; Shoul, Tarik; Jeannerat, Damien; Muñoz, Orlando; Christen, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The strict application of IUPAC rules for the numbering of tropane alkaloids is not always applied by authors and there is hence a lot of confusion in the literature. In most cases, the notation of 3, 6/7-disubstituted derivatives has been chosen arbitrarily, based on NMR and MS data, without taking into account the absolute configuration of these two carbons. This paper discusses the problem and the relevance of CD and NMR to determine molecular configurations. We report on the use of (1)H-NMR anisochrony (Δδ) induced by the Mosher's chiral auxiliary reagents (R)-(-)- and (S)-(+)-α-methoxy-α-trifluoromethyl-phenylacetyl chlorides (MTPA-Cl), to determine the absolute configuration of (3R,6R)-3α-hydroxy-6β-senecioyloxytropane, a disubstituted tropane alkaloid isolated from the aerial parts of Schizanthus grahamii (Solanaceae). These analytical tools should help future works in correctly assigning the configuration of additional 3, 6/7 disubstituted tropane derivatives. PMID:21869748

  11. Antifungal Quinoline Alkaloids from Waltheria indica.

    PubMed

    Cretton, Sylvian; Dorsaz, Stéphane; Azzollini, Antonio; Favre-Godal, Quentin; Marcourt, Laurence; Ebrahimi, Samad Nejad; Voinesco, Francine; Michellod, Emilie; Sanglard, Dominique; Gindro, Katia; Wolfender, Jean-Luc; Cuendet, Muriel; Christen, Philippe

    2016-02-26

    Chemical investigation of a dichloromethane extract of the aerial parts of Waltheria indica led to the isolation and characterization of five polyhydroxymethoxyflavonoids, namely, oxyanin A (1), vitexicarpin (3), chrysosplenol E (4), flindulatin (5), 5-hydroxy-3,7,4'-trimethoxyflavone (6), and six quinolone alkaloids, waltheriones M-Q (2, 7, 8, 10, 11) and 5(R)-vanessine (9). Among these, compounds 2, 7, 8, 10, and 11 have not yet been described in the literature. Their chemical structures were established by means of spectroscopic data interpretation including (1)H and (13)C, HSQC, HMBC, COSY, and NOESY NMR experiments and UV, IR, and HRESIMS. The absolute configurations of the compounds were established by ECD. The isolated constituents and 10 additional quinoline alkaloids previously isolated from the roots of the plant were evaluated for their in vitro antifungal activity against the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, and 10 compounds (7, 9, 11-16, 18, 21) showed growth inhibitory activity on both planktonic cells and biofilms (MIC ≤ 32 μg/mL). Their spectrum of activity against other pathogenic Candida species and their cytotoxicity against human HeLa cells were also determined. In addition, the cytological effect of the antifungal isolated compounds on the ultrastructure of C. albicans was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy. PMID:26848627

  12. Antifungal Indole Alkaloids from Winchia calophylla.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mei-Li; Chen, Jia; Sun, Meng; Zhang, Dong-Bo; Gao, Kun

    2016-05-01

    Ten indole alkaloids (1-10) were obtained from an antifungal extract of Winchia calophylla, of which two (2 and 4) were new. N(4)-Methyl-10-hydroxyl-desacetylakuammilin (2) was an akuammiline-type indole alkaloid. N(1)-Methyl-echitaminic acid (4) was an unusual zwitterion with a basic vincorine-type skeleton. This is the first report of 10 in W. calophylla. The structures of all of the compounds were determined based on spectroscopic data, and their bioactivities were assessed. Compound 1 showed potent activity against the plant pathogenic fungi of Penicillium italicum and Fusarium oxysporum f.sp cubens with IC50 s of 10.4 and 11.5 µM, respectively, and 3 inhibited Rhizoctonia solani with an IC50 of 11.7 µM. Compounds 2 and 4 showed weak cytotoxicity against the human leukemic cell line HL-60 in vitro with IC50 s of 51.4 and 75.3 µM, respectively. Compounds 1 and 2 displayed weak activity against acetylcholinesterase with IC50 s around 61.3 and 52.6 µM, respectively. PMID:27002397

  13. Antiplasmodial activity of Cryptolepis sanguinolenta alkaloids from leaves and roots.

    PubMed

    Paulo, A; Gomes, E T; Steele, J; Warhurst, D C; Houghton, P J

    2000-02-01

    The roots of Cryptolepis sanguinolenta have been investigated for their chemical composition since 1931 but so far no studies on the leaves have been reported although they are used in traditional medicine in Guinea-Bissau. Two new alkaloids identified as cryptolepinoic acid (1) and methyl cryptolepinoate (2) and the known alkaloids cryptolepine (4), hydroxycryptolepine (5/5a) and quindoline (6), were isolated from the ethanolic and chlorophormic leaf extracts. Aqueous and ethanolic extracts of the leaves and roots and seven alkaloids isolated from those extracts were tested in vitro against Plasmodium falciparum K1 (multidrug-resistant strain) and T996 (chloroquine-sensitive clone). All the extracts were shown to give 90% inhibition of P. falciparum K1 growth at concentrations < 23 micrograms/ml. Cryptolepine (4) was the most active alkaloid tested with IC50 values (0.23 microM to K1; 0.059 microM to T996) comparable with chloroquine (0.26 microM to K1; 0.019 microM to T996). The indolobenzazepine alkaloid cryptoheptine (7) was the second most active with IC50 values of 0.8 microM (K1) and 1.2 microM (T996). Cryptolepinoic acid (1) showed no significant activity while its ethyl ester derivative 3 was active against P. falciparum K1 (IC50 = 3.7 microM). All the indoloquinoline alkaloids showed cross-resistance with chloroquine but not the indolobenzazepine alkaloid 7. It was noticed that alkaloids with weakly basic characteristics were active whereas other structurally related alkaloids with different acid-base profiles were inactive. These observations are in agreement with the antimalarial mechanism of action for quinolines. PMID:10705730

  14. A Review of Bioinsecticidal Activity of Solanaceae Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Chowański, Szymon; Adamski, Zbigniew; Marciniak, Paweł; Rosiński, Grzegorz; Büyükgüzel, Ender; Büyükgüzel, Kemal; Falabella, Patrizia; Scrano, Laura; Ventrella, Emanuela; Lelario, Filomena; Bufo, Sabino A.

    2016-01-01

    Only a small percentage of insect species are pests. However, pest species cause significant losses in agricultural and forest crops, and many are vectors of diseases. Currently, many scientists are focused on developing new tools to control insect populations, including secondary plant metabolites, e.g., alkaloids, glycoalkaloids, terpenoids, organic acids and alcohols, which show promise for use in plant protection. These compounds can affect insects at all levels of biological organization, but their action generally disturbs cellular and physiological processes, e.g., by altering redox balance, hormonal regulation, neuronal signalization or reproduction in exposed individuals. Secondary plant metabolites cause toxic effects that can be observed at both lethal and sublethal levels, but the most important effect is repellence. Plants from the Solanaceae family, which contains numerous economically and ecologically important species, produce various substances that affect insects belonging to most orders, particularly herbivorous insects and other pests. Many compounds possess insecticidal properties, but they are also classified as molluscides, acaricides, nematocides, fungicides and bactericides. In this paper, we present data on the sublethal and lethal toxicity caused by pure metabolites and crude extracts obtained from Solanaceae plants. Pure substances as well as water and/or alcohol extracts cause lethal and sublethal effects in insects, which is important from the economical point of view. We discuss the results of our study and their relevance to plant protection and management. PMID:26938561

  15. A Review of Bioinsecticidal Activity of Solanaceae Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Chowański, Szymon; Adamski, Zbigniew; Marciniak, Paweł; Rosiński, Grzegorz; Büyükgüzel, Ender; Büyükgüzel, Kemal; Falabella, Patrizia; Scrano, Laura; Ventrella, Emanuela; Lelario, Filomena; Bufo, Sabino A

    2016-01-01

    Only a small percentage of insect species are pests. However, pest species cause significant losses in agricultural and forest crops, and many are vectors of diseases. Currently, many scientists are focused on developing new tools to control insect populations, including secondary plant metabolites, e.g., alkaloids, glycoalkaloids, terpenoids, organic acids and alcohols, which show promise for use in plant protection. These compounds can affect insects at all levels of biological organization, but their action generally disturbs cellular and physiological processes, e.g., by altering redox balance, hormonal regulation, neuronal signalization or reproduction in exposed individuals. Secondary plant metabolites cause toxic effects that can be observed at both lethal and sublethal levels, but the most important effect is repellence. Plants from the Solanaceae family, which contains numerous economically and ecologically important species, produce various substances that affect insects belonging to most orders, particularly herbivorous insects and other pests. Many compounds possess insecticidal properties, but they are also classified as molluscides, acaricides, nematocides, fungicides and bactericides. In this paper, we present data on the sublethal and lethal toxicity caused by pure metabolites and crude extracts obtained from Solanaceae plants. Pure substances as well as water and/or alcohol extracts cause lethal and sublethal effects in insects, which is important from the economical point of view. We discuss the results of our study and their relevance to plant protection and management. PMID:26938561

  16. Indole Alkaloids from the Leaves of Nauclea officinalis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Long; Liao, Cheng-Hui; Kang, Qiang-Rong; Zheng, Kai; Jiang, Ying-Chun; He, Zhen-Dan

    2016-01-01

    Three new indole alkaloids, named naucleamide G (1), and nauclealomide B and C (5 and 6), were isolated from the n-BuOH-soluble fraction of an EtOH extract of the leaves of Nauclea officinalis, together with three known alkaloids, paratunamide C (2), paratunamide D (3) and paratunamide A (4). The structures with absolute configurations of the new compounds were identified on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR, HRESIMS, acid hydrolysis and quantum chemical circular dichroism (CD) calculation. According to the structures of isolated indole alkaloids, their plausible biosynthetic pathway was deduced. PMID:27455233

  17. γ-Lactam alkaloids from the flower buds of daylily.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takahiro; Nakamura, Seikou; Nakashima, Souichi; Ohta, Tomoe; Yano, Mamiko; Tsujihata, Junichiro; Tsukioka, Junko; Ogawa, Keiko; Fukaya, Masashi; Yoshikawa, Masayuki; Matsuda, Hisashi

    2016-07-01

    Four new alkaloids, hemerocallisamines IV-VII, were isolated from the methanol extract of flower buds of daylily. The chemical structures of the new compounds were elucidated on the basis of chemical and physicochemical evidence. The absolute stereochemistry of the hemerocallisamines IV-VI was elucidated by the application of the modified Mosher's method, HPLC analysis, and optical rotation. In the present study, the isolated alkaloids significantly inhibited the aggregation of Aβ42 in vitro. This is the first report about bioactive alkaloids with a γ-lactam ring from daylily. In addition, isolated nucleosides showed accelerative effects on neurite outgrowth under the non-fasting condition. PMID:26849229

  18. Cyclobutane-Containing Alkaloids: Origin, Synthesis, and Biological Activities

    PubMed Central

    Sergeiko, Anastasia; Poroikov, Vladimir V; Hanuš, Lumir O; Dembitsky, Valery M

    2008-01-01

    Present review describes research on novel natural cyclobutane-containing alkaloids isolated from terrestrial and marine species. More than 60 biological active compounds have been confirmed to have antimicrobial, antibacterial, antitumor, and other activities. The structures, synthesis, origins, and biological activities of a selection of cyclobutane-containing alkaloids are reviewed. With the computer program PASS some additional biological activities are also predicted, which point toward new possible applications of these compounds. This review emphasizes the role of cyclobutane-containing alkaloids as an important source of leads for drug discovery. PMID:19696873

  19. Cytotoxic and antimalarial bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids from Stephania erecta.

    PubMed

    Likhitwitayawuid, K; Angerhofer, C K; Cordell, G A; Pezzuto, J M; Ruangrungsi, N

    1993-01-01

    (+)-2-N-Methyltelobine [1], a new alkaloid, together with twelve known bisbenzylisoquinolines, was isolated from the tubers of Stephania erecta. The structure determination and the complete 1H- and unambiguous 13C-nmr assignments of 1 were obtained through extensive use of several 1D and 2D nmr techniques. All alkaloids inhibited the growth of cultured Plasmodium falciparum strains D-6 and W-2 and displayed nonselective cytotoxicity with a battery of cultured mammalian cells. These data were used for the calculation of selectivity indices. Relative to known antimalarial agents, these bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids do not appear to be promising clinical candidates at the present time. PMID:8450319

  20. Ibogan, Aspidosperman, Vincamine, and Bisindole Alkaloids from a Malayan Tabernaemontana corymbosa: Iboga Alkaloids with C-20α Substitution.

    PubMed

    Nge, Choy-Eng; Chong, Kam-Weng; Thomas, Noel F; Lim, Siew-Huah; Low, Yun-Yee; Kam, Toh-Seok

    2016-05-27

    Ten new indole alkaloids (1-10) comprising five ibogan, two aspidosperman, one vincamine, and two bisindole alkaloids, in addition to 32 known alkaloids, were isolated from the stem-bark extract of a Malayan Tabernaemontana corymbosa. The structures of these alkaloids were determined based on analysis of the NMR and MS data and, in five instances (1, 3, 5, 6, 8), confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis. Two of the iboga alkaloids, conodusines B (2) and C (3), and the iboga-containing bisindole tabernamidine B (10) are notable for the presence of an α-substituted acetyl group at C-20 of the iboga carbon skeleton. The iboga alkaloid (+)-conodusine E (5) had MS and NMR data that were identical to those of (-)-ervatamine I, recently isolated from Ervatamia hainanensis. Establishment of the absolute configuration of (+)-conodusine E (5) was based on analysis of the ECD data, correlation with (-)-heyneanine, and X-ray analysis, which showed that (+)-5 belongs to the same enantiomeric series as exemplified by (-)-coronaridine. The configuration at C-20' of the previously reported Tabernaemontana bisindole alkaloid 19'-oxotabernamine (renamed tabernamidine B) required revision based on the present results. Several of the bisindoles showed pronounced in vitro growth inhibitory activity against drug-sensitive and vincristine-resistant KB cells. PMID:27077800

  1. Photofragmentation mechanisms in protonated chiral cinchona alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Lucas, Bruno; Fayeton, Jacqueline; Scuderi, Debora; Alata, Ivan; Broquier, Michel; Barbu-Debus, Katia Le; Lepère, Valeria; Zehnacker, Anne

    2016-08-10

    The photo-stability of protonated cinchona alkaloids is studied in the gas phase by a multi-technique approach. A multi-coincidence technique is used to demonstrate that the dissociation is a direct process. Two dissociation channels are observed. They result from the C8-C9 cleavage, accompanied or not by hydrogen migration. The branching ratio between the two photo-fragments is different for the two pseudo-enantiomers quinine and quinidine. Mass spectrometry experiments coupling UV photo-dissociation of the reactants and structural characterization of the ionic photo-products by Infra-Red Multiple Photo-Dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy provide unambiguous information on their structure. In addition, quantum chemical calculations allow proposing a reactive scheme and discussing it in terms of the ground-state geometry of the reactant. PMID:27477216

  2. Non-alkaloid constituents of Vinca major.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gui-Guang; Zhao, Hai-Yun; Liu, Lu; Zhao, Yun-Li; Song, Chang-Wei; Gu, Ji; Sun, Wei-Bang; Liu, Ya-Ping; Luo, Xiao-Dong

    2016-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the non-alkaloid compounds from the leaves and stems of Vinca major cultivated in Yunnan Province, China. The compounds were isolated using chromatographic techniques. The structures were elucidated by 1D- and 2D-NMR spectroscopic methods in combination with UV, IR, and MS analyses. The 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH)-scavenging activity of Compounds 1-7 were evaluated. One new iridoid glycoside (compound 1), together with 11 known compounds, were isolated from Vinca major. Compounds 1, 5, and 6 showed moderate DPPH-scavenging activity, with IC50 values being 70.6, 32.8, and 62.2 μmol·L(-1), respectively. In conclusion, compound 1 is a newly identified iridoid glycoside with moderate antioxidant activity. PMID:26850347

  3. Total Synthesis of Alkaloid 205B

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Concise and highly stereocontrolled total syntheses of racemic and enantiopure frog alkaloid 205B (1) were accomplished in 11 steps from 4-methoxypyridines 6 and 7 in overall yields of 8 and 8%, respectively. The assembly of the core of the natural product relies on a stereoselective Tsuji–Trost allylic amination reaction and a ring-closing metathesis. The synthesis features the use of an N-acylpyridinium salt reaction to introduce the first stereocenter and an unprecedented trifluoroacetic anhydride-mediated addition of an allylstannane to a vinylogous amide with complete facial selectivity. Deoxygenation of the C4 ketone proved difficult but was accomplished via a modified Barton–McCombie reaction in the presence of a catalytic amount of diphenyl diselenide. PMID:25180567

  4. Ergot alkaloids induce vasoconstriction of bovine foregut vasculature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alkaloids produced by the Neotyphodium coenophialum endophyte in association with tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum) are imputed to cause peripheral symptoms of fescue toxicosis. We hypothesized that theses compounds could correspondingly affect foregut vasculature. The objective of this study was to...

  5. Alkaloids with Different Carbon Units from Myrioneuron faberi.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ming-Ming; Zhang, Yu; Huang, Sheng-Dian; Di, Ying-Tong; Peng, Zong-Gen; Jiang, Jian-Dong; Yuan, Chun-Mao; Chen, Duo-Zhi; Li, Shun-Lin; He, Hong-Ping; Hao, Xiao-Jiang

    2015-11-25

    Three new Myrioneuron alkaloids, myrifamines A-C (1-3), with unique skeletons were isolated from Myrioneuron faberi. The absolute configuration of 1 was confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis, and the stereochemistry of the other two alkaloids was determined using a combination of ROESY experiments and calculated and experimental electronic circular dichroism spectra. Myrifamine C (3) is the first example of a symmetric dimer among the Myrioneuron alkaloids. Known alkaloids myrionamide (4) and schoberine (5) were also isolated, and experimental NMR and X-ray diffraction data suggest their structural revision. Compound 2 showed significant inhibitory activity toward the hepatitis C virus in vitro, with a therapeutic index (CC50/EC50) greater than 108.7. PMID:26551513

  6. Microcalorimetry studies of the antimicrobial actions of Aconitum alkaloids*

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yan-bin; Liu, Lian; Shao, Wei; Wei, Ting; Lin, Gui-mei

    2015-01-01

    The metabolic activity of organisms can be measured by recording the heat output using microcalorimetry. In this paper, the total alkaloids in the traditional Chinese medicine Radix Aconiti Lateralis were extracted and applied to Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The effect of alkaloids on bacteria growth was studied by microcalorimetry. The power-time curves were plotted with a thermal activity monitor (TAM) air isothermal microcalorimeter and parameters such as growth rate constant (μ), peak-time (Tm), inhibitory ratio (I), and enhancement ratio (E) were calculated. The relationships between the concentration of Aconitum alkaloids and μ of E. coli or S. aureus were discussed. The results showed that Aconitum alkaloids had little effect on E. coli and had a potentially inhibitory effect on the growth of S. aureus. PMID:26238544

  7. Microcalorimetry studies of the antimicrobial actions of Aconitum alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yan-bin; Liu, Lian; Shao, Wei; Wei, Ting; Lin, Gui-mei

    2015-08-01

    The metabolic activity of organisms can be measured by recording the heat output using microcalorimetry. In this paper, the total alkaloids in the traditional Chinese medicine Radix Aconiti Lateralis were extracted and applied to Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The effect of alkaloids on bacteria growth was studied by microcalorimetry. The power-time curves were plotted with a thermal activity monitor (TAM) air isothermal microcalorimeter and parameters such as growth rate constant (μ), peak-time (Tm), inhibitory ratio (I), and enhancement ratio (E) were calculated. The relationships between the concentration of Aconitum alkaloids and μ of E. coli or S. aureus were discussed. The results showed that Aconitum alkaloids had little effect on E. coli and had a potentially inhibitory effect on the growth of S. aureus. PMID:26238544

  8. Total synthesis, biosynthesis and biological profiles of clavine alkaloids.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Stephanie R; Wipf, Peter

    2016-07-01

    This review highlights noteworthy synthetic and biological aspects of the clavine subfamily of ergot alkaloids. Recent biosynthetic insights have laid the groundwork for a better understanding of the diverse biological pathways leading to these indole derivatives. Ergot alkaloids were among the first fungal-derived natural products identified, inspiring pharmaceutical applications in CNS disorders, migraine, infective diseases, and cancer. Pergolide, for example, is a semi-synthetic clavine alkaloid that has been used to treat Parkinson's disease. Synthetic activities have been particularly valuable to facilitate access to rare members of the Clavine family and empower medicinal chemistry research. Improved molecular target identification tools and a better understanding of signaling pathways can now be deployed to further extend the biological and medical utility of Clavine alkaloids. PMID:27215547

  9. New Lycopodine-Type Alkaloids from Lycopodium carinatum.

    PubMed

    Kogure, Noriyuki; Maruyama, Moe; Wongseripipatana, Sumphan; Kitajima, Mariko; Takayama, Hiromitsu

    2016-07-01

    The structures of new lycopodine-type alkaloids, lycopocarinamines A-F, which were isolated from Lycopodium carinatum, were elucidated by spectroscopic analysis and chemical conversions. The proposed structure of lycocarinatine A was revised. PMID:27020466

  10. Analysis of rye grains and rye meals for ergot alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Lauber, U; Schnaufer, R; Gredziak, M; Kiesswetter, Y

    2005-12-01

    Due to the exceptionally hot and dry summer in 2003 the ergot of that harvest was rather small and could only be separated from normal grain with increased efforts. Based on a clean-up procedure of Wolffet al. (1) and of Kluget al. (2), a HPLC-FLD-method for the determination of 12 ergot alkaloids (6 "In"-, 6 "Inin"-forms) was established and modified. Actually reference substances are commercially available only for 5 selected alkaloids. Because of the instability of the alkaloids a new standard preparation procedure was tested and implemented. The maximum allowed impurity with ergot (0.05%=1000 μg alkaloids/kg) was exceeded in samples of harvest 2003. Except for one sample, all exceedings were detected in conventionally grown products, unlike organically grown products. PMID:23605398

  11. Arginine decarboxylase as the source of putrescine for tobacco alkaloids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiburcio, A. F.; Galston, A. W.

    1986-01-01

    The putrescine which forms a part of nicotine and other pyrrolidine alkaloids is generally assumed to arise through the action of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC). However, we have previously noted that changes in the activity of arginine decarboxylase (ADC), an alternate source of putrescine, parallel changes in tissue alkaloids, while changes in ODC activity do not. This led us to undertake experiments to permit discrimination between ADC and ODC as enzymatic sources of putrescine destined for alkaloids. Two kinds of evidence presented here support a major role for ADC in the generation of putrescine going into alkaloids: (a) A specific 'suicide inhibitor' of ADC effectively inhibits the biosynthesis of nicotine and nornicotine in tobacco callus, while the analogous inhibitor of ODC is less effective, and (b) the flow of 14C from uniformly labelled arginine into nicotine is much more efficient than that from ornithine.

  12. Structure-cardiac activity relationship of C19-diterpenoid alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Jian, Xi-Xian; Tang, Pei; Liu, Xiu-Xiu; Chao, Ruo-Bing; Chen, Qiao-Hong; She, Xue-Ke; Chen, Dong-Lin; Wang, Feng-Peng

    2012-06-01

    Thirty three C19-diterpenoid alkaloids, twenty-two prepared from known C19-diterpenoid alkaloids and eleven isolated from Aconitum and Delphinium spp. were evaluated for their cardiac activity in the isolated bullfrog heart assay. Among them, eleven compounds exhibited cardiac activity, with average rate of amplitude increase in the range of 16-118%. Compound 7, mesaconine (17), hypaconine (25), and beiwutinine (26) exhibited strong cardiac activities relative to the reference drug. The structure-activity relationship data acquired indicated that an alpha-hydroxyl group at C-15, a hydroxyl group at C-8, an alpha-methoxyl or hydroxyl group at C-1, and a secondary amine or N-methyl group in ring A are important structure features necessary for the cardiac activities of the aconitine-type C19-diterpenoid alkaloids without any ester groups. In addition, an alpha-hydroxyl group at C-3 is also helpful for the cardiac activity of these alkaloids. PMID:22816290

  13. A new phenanthridine alkaloid from Hymenocallis x festalis.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, J; Forgo, P; Szabó, P

    2002-12-01

    Investigation of the alkaloid fraction of the bulbs of Hymenocallis x festalis yielded a new natural product, 3-methoxy-8,9-methylenedioxy-3,4-dihydrophenanthridine (1). The structure was elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data. PMID:12490249

  14. Pyrrolizidine alkaloid poisoning of yaks: identification of the plants involved.

    PubMed

    Winter, H; Seawright, A A; Noltie, H J; Mattocks, A R; Jukes, R; Wangdi, K; Gurung, J B

    1994-02-01

    A search was undertaken in the most eastern part of the Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan for the plants which are causing severe losses of yaks due to pyrrolizidine alkaloid poisoning. Two Senecio and three Ligularia species were found on yak pastures at altitudes between 3000 and 4000 m, including one so far underscribed Ligularia species. None was previously known to contain pyrrolizidine alkaloids. Another Senecio species was found between 2500 and 3000 m, an altitude too low for yaks to be kept but significant for other cattle. The search was supported by field chemical tests for the alkaloids and the diagnosis was later confirmed by thin layer chromatography and high pressure liquid chromatography. Two of the Senecio species had exceptionally high concentrations of pyrrolizidine alkaloids of about 0.5 per cent in the dry matter. PMID:8171783

  15. [Monomeric indole alkaloids from the aerial parts of Catharanthus roseus].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xiang-Zhang; Wang, Guo-Cai; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Xiao-Qi; Ye, Wen-Cai

    2010-04-01

    Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don is a plant of the Catharanthus genus of Apocynaceae which has been reported to have therapeutic effects of detoxication and anticancer. In order to further study the alkaloid constituents of C. roseus, the aerial parts of the plant were extracted with 95% EtOH, and then treated with 2% H2SO4 and NH3H2O to obtain total alkaloids. The total alkaloids were separated and purified by column chromatography over silica gel and prepared by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Their structures were elucidated on the basis of physicochemical properties and spectral data. A new alkaloid together with five known compounds were isolated and identified as vindolinine B (1), lochnericine (2), horhammericine (3), vindorosine (4), vindoline (5), and coronaridine (6). Compound 1 is a new compound and named as vindolinine B. PMID:21355212

  16. Activity of pyrrolizidine alkaloids against biofilm formation and Trichomonas vaginalis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crotalaria genus belongs to the subfamily Papilionoideae comprising about 600 species spread throughout tropical, neotropical and subtropical regions. In this study, seeds of Crolatalaria pallida were used to the isolation of usaramine, a pyrrolizidine alkaloid. Thus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Stap...

  17. Rhazinilam-Leuconolam-Leuconoxine Alkaloids from Leuconotis griffithii.

    PubMed

    Gan, Chew-Yan; Low, Yun-Yee; Thomas, Noel F; Kam, Toh-Seok

    2013-05-24

    Eight new indole alkaloids (1-8) belonging to the rhazinilam-leuconolam-leuconoxine group, in addition to 52 other alkaloids, were isolated from the stem-bark extract of Leuconotis griffithii, viz., nor-rhazinicine (1), 5,21-dihydrorhazinilam-N-oxide (2), 3,14-dehydroleuconolam (3), and leuconodines A-E (4-8). The structures of these alkaloids were determined using NMR and MS analyses and in some instances confirmed by X-ray diffraction analyses. Alkaloids 1, 5, and 7 showed only moderate to weak cytotoxicity toward KB cells (IC50 12-18 μg/mL), while 8 showed moderate activity in reversing MDR in vincristine-resistant KB cells. PMID:23647487

  18. Computational Studies on Cinchona Alkaloid-Catalyzed Asymmetric Organic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Tanriver, Gamze; Dedeoglu, Burcu; Catak, Saron; Aviyente, Viktorya

    2016-06-21

    Remarkable progress in the area of asymmetric organocatalysis has been achieved in the last decades. Cinchona alkaloids and their derivatives have emerged as powerful organocatalysts owing to their reactivities leading to high enantioselectivities. The widespread usage of cinchona alkaloids has been attributed to their nontoxicity, ease of use, stability, cost effectiveness, recyclability, and practical utilization in industry. The presence of tunable functional groups enables cinchona alkaloids to catalyze a broad range of reactions. Excellent experimental studies have extensively contributed to this field, and highly selective reactions were catalyzed by cinchona alkaloids and their derivatives. Computational modeling has helped elucidate the mechanistic aspects of cinchona alkaloid catalyzed reactions as well as the origins of the selectivity they induce. These studies have complemented experimental work for the design of more efficient catalysts. This Account presents recent computational studies on cinchona alkaloid catalyzed organic reactions and the theoretical rationalizations behind their effectiveness and ability to induce selectivity. Valuable efforts to investigate the mechanisms of reactions catalyzed by cinchona alkaloids and the key aspects of the catalytic activity of cinchona alkaloids in reactions ranging from pharmaceutical to industrial applications are summarized. Quantum mechanics, particularly density functional theory (DFT), and molecular mechanics, including ONIOM, were used to rationalize experimental findings by providing mechanistic insights into reaction mechanisms. B3LYP with modest basis sets has been used in most of the studies; nonetheless, the energetics have been corrected with higher basis sets as well as functionals parametrized to include dispersion M05-2X, M06-2X, and M06-L and functionals with dispersion corrections. Since cinchona alkaloids catalyze reactions by forming complexes with substrates via hydrogen bonds and long

  19. The effects of Aconitum alkaloids on the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Ameri, A

    1998-10-01

    Preparations of Aconitum roots are employed in Chinese and Japanese medicine for analgesic, antirheumatic and neurological indications. The recent surge in use of phytomedicine derived from traditional Chinese medicine as well as increasing concerns about possible toxic effects of these compounds have inspired a great deal of research into the mechanisms by which certain Aconitum alkaloids may act on the central nervous system. The pharmacological effects of preparations of Aconitum roots are attributed to several diterpenoid alkaloids. The main alkaloid of these plants is aconitine, a highly toxic diterpenoid alkaloid which is known to suppress the inactivation of voltage-dependent Na+ channels by binding to neurotoxin binding site 2 of the alpha-subunit of the channel protein. In this article the pharmacology of several structurally related Aconitum alkaloids is highlighted and their therapeutic vs toxic potential is discussed. Neurochemical and neurophysiological studies will be reviewed with emphasis on the effects of the alkaloids in regions of the brain that have been implicated in pain transmission and generation of epileptic activity. Considering the chemical structure of the Aconitum alkaloids as well as their mechanism of action, a subdivision in three groups becomes obvious: the first group comprises such alkaloids which possess high toxicity due to two ester boundings at the diterpene skeleton. The members of this group activate voltage-dependent sodium channels already at resting potential and inhibit noradrenaline reuptake. Activation of sodium channels and in consequence excessive depolarization with final inexcitability and suppression of pain transmission account for their antinociceptive properties. The second group comprises less toxic monoesters which have been shown to possess strong antinociceptive, antiarrhythmic and antiepileptiform properties due to a blockade of the voltage-dependent sodium channel. Electrophysiological studies have

  20. Himalensines A and B, Alkaloids from Daphniphyllum himalense.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Shyaula, Sajan L; Li, Jing-Ya; Li, Jia; Yue, Jian-Min

    2016-03-01

    Chemical investigation into the alkaloidal constituents of the Nepalese Daphniphyllum himalense has returned two new compounds, himalensines A (1) and B (2), with unprecedented carbon skeletons. Structures of the two alkaloids have been characterized on the basis of spectroscopic methods, especially via 2D NMR data analysis. Himalensine B (2) showed marginal inhibitory activities against two kinases, PTP1B and IKK-β. PMID:26914844

  1. Elaboration of simplified vinca alkaloids and phomopsin hybrids.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Quoc Anh; Roussi, Fanny; Thoret, Sylviane; Guéritte, Françoise

    2010-03-01

    Nine simplified vinca alkaloids and phomospin A hybrids, in which vindoline moiety has been replaced by a simpler scaffold, have been elaborated to evaluate their activity on the inhibition of tubulin polymerization. This article deals with the synthesis of various simplified vinca alkaloids, using a stereoselective coupling of catharantine with reactive aromatic compounds and methanol as well as their subsequent condensation with a large peptide chain mimicking those of phomopsin A. Biological evaluation and molecular modeling studies are also reported. PMID:20659111

  2. Pyrrolizidine alkaloid poisoning of sheep in New South Wales.

    PubMed

    Seaman, J T

    1987-06-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloid poisoning of sheep in New South Wales was reviewed, based on the records of the New South Wales Department of Agriculture's Regional Veterinary Laboratories. The plant species causing significant mortalities were Echium plantagineum and Heliotropium europaeum. The syndrome of hepatogenous chronic copper poisoning was more frequently diagnosed than primary pyrrolizidine alkaloid poisoning, particularly when grazing E. plantagineum. The data indicated that adult crossbred ewes were the most commonly affected class of sheep. PMID:3632498

  3. Thalifaberidine, a cytotoxic aporphine-benzylisoquinoline alkaloid from Thalictrum faberi.

    PubMed

    Lin, L Z; Hu, S F; Zaw, K; Angerhofer, C K; Chai, H; Pezzuto, J M; Cordell, G A; Lin, J; Zheng, D M

    1994-10-01

    From Thalictrum faberi, thalifaberidine [1], a new aporphine-benzylisoquinoline alkaloid, together with four known alkaloids, thalifaramine [2], thalifaricine [3], thalifarazine [4], and thalifaronine [5], were isolated. Thalifaberidine [1] was identified as 6',8-desmethylthalifaberine, and its 1H- and 13C-nmr data were completely assigned through the use of one- and two-dimensional nmr techniques. Thalifaberidine [1], thalifaberine [6], and thalifasine [7] showed cytotoxic activity against several human cancer cell lines, as well as antimalarial activity. PMID:7528786

  4. Bioinspired Collective Syntheses of Iboga-Type Indole Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gaoyuan; Xie, Xingang; Sun, Haiyu; Yuan, Ziyun; Zhong, Zhuliang; Tang, Shouchu; She, Xuegong

    2016-05-20

    We present the application of a bioinspired collective synthesis strategy in the total syntheses of seven iboga-type indole alkaloids: (±)-tabertinggine, (±)-ibogamine, (±)-ibogaine, (±)-ibogaine hydroxyindolenine, (±)-3-oxoibogaine hydroxyindolenine, (±)-iboluteine, and (±)-ervaoffines D. In particular, tabertinggine and its congeners serve as iboga precursors for the subsequent biomimetic transformations into other iboga-type alkaloids. PMID:27160167

  5. Cytotoxic indole alkaloids from the fruits of Melodinus cochinchinensis.

    PubMed

    Shao, Shun; Zhang, Hao; Yuan, Chun-Mao; Zhang, Yu; Cao, Ming-Ming; Zhang, Hai-Yuan; Feng, Yan; Ding, Xiao; Zhou, Qiang; Zhao, Qing; He, Hong-Ping; Hao, Xiao-Jiang

    2015-08-01

    Eight indole alkaloids, melosines A-H, together with 13 known alkaloids, were isolated from the fruits of Melodinus cochinchinensis. The structure elucidation of isolated secondary metabolites was based on comprehensive spectroscopic data analysis. Melosine B showed moderate cytotoxic activity against five human cancer cell lines, HL-60, SMMC-7721, A-549, MCF-7, and SW480 with IC50 values ranging from 1.6 to 8.1μM. PMID:25817833

  6. Microbial transformation of the phthalideisoquinoline alkaloid, (-)-beta-hydrastine.

    PubMed

    Herath, W H M W; Ferreira, D; Khan, I A

    2003-08-01

    The phthalideisoquinoline alkaloid (-)-beta-hydrastine is one of the main active constituents of the medicinal plant, Hydrastis canadensis, which is used in many dietary supplements intended to enhance the immune system. Treatment of hydrastine with the fermentation broth of Polyporous brumalis (ATCC 34487) as a model for mammalian metabolism, gave a new alkaloid, (1S)-hydroxyhydrastine. Structure elucidation was based primarily on NMR and chiroptical studies. PMID:12822906

  7. Cytotoxic and antimalarial bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids from Cyclea barbata.

    PubMed

    Lin, L Z; Shieh, H L; Angerhofer, C K; Pezzuto, J M; Cordell, G A; Xue, L; Johnson, M E; Ruangrungsi, N

    1993-01-01

    An alkaloid extract derived from the roots of Cyclea barbata demonstrated cytotoxic and antimalarial activities, and five bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids, (+)-tetrandrine [1], (-)-limacine [2], (+)-thalrugosine [3], (+)-homoaromoline [4], and (-)-cycleapeltine [5], were isolated as the active principles. The complete and unambiguous assignments of the 1H- and 13C-nmr data of these substances were made by 1D and 2D nmr techniques (COSY, phase-sensitive ROESY, HETCOR, and FLOCK). PMID:8450318

  8. Genetics, Genomics and Evolution of Ergot Alkaloid Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Young, Carolyn A.; Schardl, Christopher L.; Panaccione, Daniel G.; Florea, Simona; Takach, Johanna E.; Charlton, Nikki D.; Moore, Neil; Webb, Jennifer S.; Jaromczyk, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    The ergot alkaloid biosynthesis system has become an excellent model to study evolutionary diversification of specialized (secondary) metabolites. This is a very diverse class of alkaloids with various neurotropic activities, produced by fungi in several orders of the phylum Ascomycota, including plant pathogens and protective plant symbionts in the family Clavicipitaceae. Results of comparative genomics and phylogenomic analyses reveal multiple examples of three evolutionary processes that have generated ergot-alkaloid diversity: gene gains, gene losses, and gene sequence changes that have led to altered substrates or product specificities of the enzymes that they encode (neofunctionalization). The chromosome ends appear to be particularly effective engines for gene gains, losses and rearrangements, but not necessarily for neofunctionalization. Changes in gene expression could lead to accumulation of various pathway intermediates and affect levels of different ergot alkaloids. Genetic alterations associated with interspecific hybrids of Epichloë species suggest that such variation is also selectively favored. The huge structural diversity of ergot alkaloids probably represents adaptations to a wide variety of ecological situations by affecting the biological spectra and mechanisms of defense against herbivores, as evidenced by the diverse pharmacological effects of ergot alkaloids used in medicine. PMID:25875294

  9. Genetics, genomics and evolution of ergot alkaloid diversity.

    PubMed

    Young, Carolyn A; Schardl, Christopher L; Panaccione, Daniel G; Florea, Simona; Takach, Johanna E; Charlton, Nikki D; Moore, Neil; Webb, Jennifer S; Jaromczyk, Jolanta

    2015-04-01

    The ergot alkaloid biosynthesis system has become an excellent model to study evolutionary diversification of specialized (secondary) metabolites. This is a very diverse class of alkaloids with various neurotropic activities, produced by fungi in several orders of the phylum Ascomycota, including plant pathogens and protective plant symbionts in the family Clavicipitaceae. Results of comparative genomics and phylogenomic analyses reveal multiple examples of three evolutionary processes that have generated ergot-alkaloid diversity: gene gains, gene losses, and gene sequence changes that have led to altered substrates or product specificities of the enzymes that they encode (neofunctionalization). The chromosome ends appear to be particularly effective engines for gene gains, losses and rearrangements, but not necessarily for neofunctionalization. Changes in gene expression could lead to accumulation of various pathway intermediates and affect levels of different ergot alkaloids. Genetic alterations associated with interspecific hybrids of Epichloë species suggest that such variation is also selectively favored. The huge structural diversity of ergot alkaloids probably represents adaptations to a wide variety of ecological situations by affecting the biological spectra and mechanisms of defense against herbivores, as evidenced by the diverse pharmacological effects of ergot alkaloids used in medicine. PMID:25875294

  10. Anticholinesterase inhibitory activity of quaternary alkaloids from Tinospora crispa.

    PubMed

    Yusoff, Mashitah; Hamid, Hazrulrizawati; Houghton, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Quaternary alkaloids are the major alkaloids isolated from Tinospora species. A previous study pointed to the necessary presence of quaternary nitrogens for strong acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity in such alkaloids. Repeated column chromatography of the vine of Tinospora crispa extract led to the isolation of one new protoberberine alkaloid, 4,13-dihydroxy-2,8,9-trimethoxydibenzo[a,g]quinolizinium (1), along with six known alkaloids-dihydrodiscretamine (2), columbamine (3), magnoflorine (4), N-formylannonaine (5), N-formylnornuciferine (6), and N-trans-feruloyltyramine (7). The seven compounds were isolated and structurally elucidated by spectroscopic analysis. Two known alkaloids, namely, dihydrodiscretamine and columbamine are reported for the first time for this plant. The compounds were tested for AChE inhibitory activity using Ellman's method. In the AChE inhibition assay, only columbamine (3) showed strong activity with IC50 48.1 µM. The structure-activity relationships derived from these results suggest that the quaternary nitrogen in the skeleton has some effect, but that a high degree of methoxylation is more important for acetylcholinesterase inhibition. PMID:24448061

  11. Alkaloids of Thalictrum XXVII. New hypotensive aporphine-benzylisoquinoline derived dimeric alkaloids from Thalictrum minus race B.

    PubMed

    Liao, W T; Beal, J L; Wu, W N; Doskotch, R W

    1978-01-01

    The roots of T. minus race B have yielded, in addition to adiantifoline (1) previously isolated from this source, two new related alkaloids, thaliadine (2) and thaliadanine (5). Both were assigned complete structures by spectral methods and by chemical interconversion to adiantifoline or its product. O-Desmethyladiantifoline should have structure 14, rather than the previously reported 5. All three isolated alkaloids show hypotensive activity in rabbits, and thaliadanine (5) has antimicrobial activity against Mycobacterium smegmatis. PMID:672464

  12. Biosynthesis and Regulation of Bioprotective Alkaloids in the Gramineae Endophytic Fungi with Implications for Herbivores Deterrents.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hongping; Xie, Longxiang; Zeng, Jie; Xie, Jianping

    2015-12-01

    Four kinds of bioprotective alkaloids-peramine, loline, ergot alkaloid, indole-diterpenes, produced by grass-fungal endophyte symbioses, are deterrents or toxic to vertebrate and invertebrate herbivores. Ergot alkaloids have pharmacological properties and widely are used clinically. The regulation of alkaloids biosynthesis is under intensive study to improve the yield for better agricultural and medicinal application. In this paper, we summarize the structure, related genes, regulation, and toxicity of alkaloids. We focus on the biosynthesis and the regulation network of alkaloids. PMID:26349576

  13. Astonishing diversity of natural surfactants: 6. Biologically active marine and terrestrial alkaloid glycosides.

    PubMed

    Dembitsky, Valery M

    2005-11-01

    This review article presents 209 alkaloid glycosides isolated and identified from plants, microorganisms, and marine invertebrates that demonstrate different biological activities. They are of great interest, especially for the medicinal and/or pharmaceutical industries. These biologically active glycosides have good potential for future chemical preparation of compounds useful as antioxidants, anticancer, antimicrobial, and antibacterial agents. These glycosidic compounds have been subdivided into several groups, including: acridone; aporphine; benzoxazinoid; ergot; indole; enediyne alkaloidal antibiotics; glycosidic lupine alkaloids; piperidine, pyridine, pyrrolidine, and pyrrolizidine alkaloid glycosides; glycosidic quinoline and isoquinoline alkaloids; steroidal glycoalkaloids; and miscellaneous alkaloid glycosides. PMID:16459921

  14. Alkaloids and athlete immune function: caffeine, theophylline, gingerol, ephedrine, and their congeners.

    PubMed

    Senchina, David S; Hallam, Justus E; Kohut, Marian L; Nguyen, Norah A; Perera, M Ann d N

    2014-01-01

    Plant alkaloids are found in foods, beverages, and supplements consumed by athletes for daily nutrition, performance enhancement, and immune function improvement. This paper examined possible immunomodulatory roles of alkaloids in exercise contexts, with a focus on human studies. Four representative groups were scrutinized: (a) caffeine (guaranine, mateine); (b) theophylline and its isomers, theobromine and paraxanthine; (c) ginger alkaloids including gingerols and shogaol; and (d) ephedra alkaloids such as ephedrine and pseudoephedrine. Emerging or prospective alkaloid sources (Goji berry, Noni berry, and bloodroot) were also considered. Human in vitro and in vivo studies on alkaloids and immune function were often conflicting. Caffeine may be immunomodulatory in vivo depending on subject characteristics, exercise characteristics, and immune parameters measured. Caffeine may exhibit antioxidant capacities. Ginger may exert in vivo anti-inflammatory effects in certain populations, but it is unclear whether these effects are due to alkaloids or other biochemicals. Evidence for an immunomodulatory role of alkaloids in energy drinks, cocoa, or ephedra products in vivo is weak to nonexistent. For alkaloid sources derived from plants, variability in the reviewed studies may be due to the presence of unrecognized alkaloids or non-alkaloid compounds (which may themselves be immunomodulatory), and pre-experimental factors such as agricultural or manufacturing differences. Athletes should not look to alkaloids or alkaloid-rich sources as a means of improving immune function given their inconsistent activities, safety concerns, and lack of commercial regulation. PMID:24974722

  15. Synthesis of Morphinan Alkaloids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Fossati, Elena; Narcross, Lauren; Ekins, Andrew; Falgueyret, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Vincent J J

    2015-01-01

    Morphinan alkaloids are the most powerful narcotic analgesics currently used to treat moderate to severe and chronic pain. The feasibility of morphinan synthesis in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae starting from the precursor (R,S)-norlaudanosoline was investigated. Chiral analysis of the reticuline produced by the expression of opium poppy methyltransferases showed strict enantioselectivity for (S)-reticuline starting from (R,S)-norlaudanosoline. In addition, the P. somniferum enzymes salutaridine synthase (PsSAS), salutaridine reductase (PsSAR) and salutaridinol acetyltransferase (PsSAT) were functionally co-expressed in S. cerevisiae and optimization of the pH conditions allowed for productive spontaneous rearrangement of salutaridinol-7-O-acetate and synthesis of thebaine from (R)-reticuline. Finally, we reconstituted a 7-gene pathway for the production of codeine and morphine from (R)-reticuline. Yeast cell feeding assays using (R)-reticuline, salutaridine or codeine as substrates showed that all enzymes were functionally co-expressed in yeast and that activity of salutaridine reductase and codeine-O-demethylase likely limit flux to morphine synthesis. The results of this study describe a significant advance for the synthesis of morphinans in S. cerevisiae and pave the way for their complete synthesis in recombinant microbes. PMID:25905794

  16. Synthesis of Morphinan Alkaloids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Fossati, Elena; Narcross, Lauren; Ekins, Andrew; Falgueyret, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Vincent J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Morphinan alkaloids are the most powerful narcotic analgesics currently used to treat moderate to severe and chronic pain. The feasibility of morphinan synthesis in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae starting from the precursor (R,S)-norlaudanosoline was investigated. Chiral analysis of the reticuline produced by the expression of opium poppy methyltransferases showed strict enantioselectivity for (S)-reticuline starting from (R,S)-norlaudanosoline. In addition, the P. somniferum enzymes salutaridine synthase (PsSAS), salutaridine reductase (PsSAR) and salutaridinol acetyltransferase (PsSAT) were functionally co-expressed in S. cerevisiae and optimization of the pH conditions allowed for productive spontaneous rearrangement of salutaridinol-7-O-acetate and synthesis of thebaine from (R)-reticuline. Finally, we reconstituted a 7-gene pathway for the production of codeine and morphine from (R)-reticuline. Yeast cell feeding assays using (R)-reticuline, salutaridine or codeine as substrates showed that all enzymes were functionally co-expressed in yeast and that activity of salutaridine reductase and codeine-O-demethylase likely limit flux to morphine synthesis. The results of this study describe a significant advance for the synthesis of morphinans in S. cerevisiae and pave the way for their complete synthesis in recombinant microbes. PMID:25905794

  17. Bovine lateral saphenous veins exposed to ergopeptine alkaloids do not relax

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ergot alkaloid ergovaline has demonstrated a persistent and sustained contractile response in several different vascular models. It was hypothesized that different alkaloids isolated from tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum) will contribute to this contractile response differently. The objective wa...

  18. Bovine lateral saphenous veins exposed to ergopeptine alkaloids do not relax

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ergot alkaloid, ergovaline has demonstrated a persistent binding and sustained contractile response in several vascular models. It was hypothesized that different alkaloids isolated from tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum) will contribute to this response differently. The objective was to compare ...

  19. Alkaloids of the Annonaceae: occurrence and a compilation of their biological activities.

    PubMed

    Lúcio, Ana Silvia Suassuna Carneiro; Almeida, Jackson Roberto Guedes da Silva; Da-Cunha, Emídio Vasconcelos Leitão; Tavares, Josean Fechine; Barbosa Filho, Jos Maria

    2015-01-01

    This chapter presents an overview of the chemistry and pharmacology of the alkaloids found in species of the Annonaceae family. The occurrence of alkaloids from Annonaceae species, as well as their chemical structures and pharmacological activities are summarized in informative and easy-to-understand tables. Within the Annonaceae family, the genera Annona, Duguetia, and Guatteria have led to many important publications. Valuable and comprehensive information about the structure of these alkaloids is provided. The alkaloids of the aporphine type represent the predominant group in this family. Many of the isolated alkaloids exhibit unique structures. In addition to the chemical structures, the pharmacological activities of some alkaloids are also presented in this chapter. Thus, the leishmanicidal, antimicrobial, antitumor, cytotoxic, and antimalarial activities observed for these alkaloids are highlighted. The chapter is presented as a contribution for the scientific community, mainly to enable the search for alkaloids in species belonging to the Annonaceae family. PMID:25845063

  20. Transgenic and Mutation-Based Suppression of a Berberine Bridge Enzyme-Like (BBL) Gene Family Reduces Alkaloid Content in Field-Grown Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Ramsey S.; Lopez, Harry O.; Bowen, Steve W.; Andres, Karen R.; Steede, William T.; Dewey, Ralph E.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation exists to develop tobacco cultivars with reduced nicotine content for the purpose of facilitating compliance with expected tobacco product regulations that could mandate the lowering of nicotine levels per se, or the reduction of carcinogenic alkaloid-derived tobacco specific nitrosamines (TSNAs). A berberine bridge enzyme-like (BBL) gene family was recently characterized for N. tabacum and found to catalyze one of the final steps in pyridine alkaloid synthesis for this species. Because this gene family acts downstream in the nicotine biosynthetic pathway, it may represent an attractive target for genetic strategies with the objective of reducing alkaloid content in field-grown tobacco. In this research, we produced transgenic doubled haploid lines of tobacco cultivar K326 carrying an RNAi construct designed to reduce expression of the BBL gene family. Field-grown transgenic lines carrying functional RNAi constructs exhibited average cured leaf nicotine levels of 0.684%, in comparison to 2.454% for the untransformed control. Since numerous barriers would need to be overcome to commercialize transgenic tobacco cultivars, we subsequently pursued a mutation breeding approach to identify EMS-induced mutations in the three most highly expressed isoforms of the BBL gene family. Field evaluation of individuals possessing different homozygous combinations of truncation mutations in BBLa, BBLb, and BBLc indicated that a range of alkaloid phenotypes could be produced, with the triple homozygous knockout genotype exhibiting greater than a 13-fold reduction in percent total alkaloids. The novel source of genetic variability described here may be useful in future tobacco breeding for varied alkaloid levels. PMID:25688975

  1. Micelle assisted structural conversion with fluorescence modulation of benzophenanthridine alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Ankur Bikash; Bhuiya, Sutanwi; Haque, Lucy; Tiwari, Richa; Das, Suman

    2017-01-01

    In this study we have reported the anionic surfactant (Sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS) driven structural conversion of two benzophenanthridine plant alkaloids namely Chelerythrine (herein after CHL) and Sanguinarine (herein after SANG). Both the alkaloids exist in two forms: the charged iminium and the neutral alkanolamine form. The iminium form is stable at low pH (<6.5) and the alkanolamine form exists at higher pH (>10.1). The fluorescence intensity of the alkanolamine form is much stronger than the iminium form. The iminium form of both the alkaloids remains stable whereas the alkanolamine form gets converted to the iminium form in the SDS micelle environment. The iminium form possesses positive charge and it seems that electrostatic interaction between the positively charged iminium and negatively charged surfactant leads to the stabilization of the iminium form in the Stern layer of the anionic micelle. Whereas the conversion of the alkanolamine form into the iminium form takes place and that can be monitored in naked eye since the iminium form is orange in colour and the alkanolamine form has blue violet emission. Such a detail insight about the photophysical properties of the benzophenanthridine alkaloids would be a valuable addition in the field of alkaloid-surfactant interaction. PMID:27419642

  2. [Alkaloids of Vinca rosea L. introduced to Western Georgia].

    PubMed

    Vachnadze, N S; Kintsurashvili, L G; Suladze, T Sh; Bakuridze, A D; Vachnadze, V Iu

    2013-11-01

    Vinca roseae L. (Саtharanthus rosea (L.) G. Don) was introduced at Kobuleti experimental station of medical plants. The object of investigation was the plant material of Vinca roseae L. collected in May, 2005., September, 2006 and October, 2009. Total alkaloids were obtained in accordance with Atta- ur-Rachman method. The variability of the quantitative and qualitative composition of total alkaloids and vincaleikoblastin (VLB) fraction during vegetation was studied. It was established that the maximal content of total alkaloids and VLB fraction of Vinca roseae L. is accumulated in the phase of secondary flowering, hence the collecting of a plant material is recommended to be made during the aforesaid vegetation phase as for this period it is a rather high output of a raw material, alkaloid complex and VLB faction. Alkaloids vinkaleikoblastin, ajmalicine and new epimer tetrahydroalstonine with С3Н-α- orientation were yielded, separated and identified using modern physical-chemical and spectral methods (13С NMR). PMID:24323972

  3. Geographic distribution of three alkaloid chemotypes of Croton lechleri.

    PubMed

    Milanowski, Dennis J; Winter, Rudolph E K; Elvin-Lewis, Memory P F; Lewis, Walter H

    2002-06-01

    Three known alkaloids, isoboldine (2), norisoboldine (1), and magnoflorine (8), have been isolated for the first time from Croton lechleri, a source of the wound healing latex "sangre de grado". An HPLC system was developed, and a large number of latex and leaf samples of C. lechleri from 22 sites in northern Peru and Ecuador were analyzed to gain an understanding of the natural variation in alkaloid content for the species. Up to six alkaloids were found to occur in the leaves including, in addition to those listed above, thaliporphine (3), glaucine (4), and taspine (9), whereas the latex contained only 9. Taspine (9) is the component that has been previously found to be responsible for the wound healing activity of C. lechleri latex, and its mean concentration throughout the range examined was found to be 9% of the latex by dry weight. In addition, three chemotypes are defined based on the alkaloid content of the leaves, and the geographic distribution of these chemotypes is discussed along with a quantitative analysis of the alkaloid content as a function of chemotype. PMID:12088421

  4. 6,7-diepicastanospermine, a tetrahydroxyindolizidine alkaloid inhibitor of amyloglucosidase

    SciTech Connect

    Molyneux, R.J.; Benson, M. ); Pan, Y.T.; Tropea, J.E.; Kaushal, G.P.; Elbein, A.D. )

    1991-10-15

    A tetrahydroxyindolizidine alkaloid, 6,7-diepicastanospermine, was isolated from the seeds of Castanospermum australe by extraction with methanol and purified to homogeneity using ion-exchange, preparative thin-layer, and radial chromatography. A very low yield of a pyrrolidine alkaloid, N-(hydroxyethyl)-2-(hydroxymethyl)-3-hydroxypyrrolidine, was also obtained by analogous methods. The purity of both alkaloids was established by gas chromatography of their trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivatives as better than 99%. The molecular weight of each alkaloid was established as 189 and 161, respectively, by mass spectrometry, and the structure of each was deduced from their {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectra. The structure of the pyrrolidine alkaloids which co-occur in C. australe. 6,7-Diepicastanospermine was found to be a moderately good inhibitor of the fungal {alpha}-glucosidase, amyloglucosidase and a relatively weak inhibitor of {beta}-glucosidase. It failed to inhibit {alpha}-glucosidase. It failed to inhibit {alpha}- or {beta}-galactosidase, {alpha}- or {beta}-mannosidase, or {alpha}-L-fucosidase. Comparison of its inhibitory activity toward amyloglucosidase with those of its isomers, castanospermine and 6-epicastanospermine, demonstrated that epimerization of a single hydroxyl group can produce significant alteration of such inhibitory properties.

  5. Post-genome research on the biosynthesis of ergot alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-Ming; Unsöld, Inge A

    2006-10-01

    Genome sequencing provides new opportunities and challenges for identifying genes for the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. A putative biosynthetic gene cluster of fumigaclavine C, an ergot alkaloid of the clavine type, was identified in the genome sequence of ASPERGILLUS FUMIGATUS by a bioinformatic approach. This cluster spans 22 kb of genomic DNA and comprises at least 11 open reading frames (ORFs). Seven of them are orthologous to genes from the biosynthetic gene cluster of ergot alkaloids in CLAVICEPS PURPUREA. Experimental evidence of the identified cluster was provided by heterologous expression and biochemical characterization of two ORFs, FgaPT1 and FgaPT2, in the cluster of A. FUMIGATUS, which show remarkable similarities to dimethylallyltryptophan synthase from C. PURPUREA and function as prenyltransferases. FgaPT2 converts L-tryptophan to dimethylallyltryptophan and thereby catalyzes the first step of ergot alkaloid biosynthesis, whilst FgaPT1 catalyzes the last step of the fumigaclavine C biosynthesis, i. e., the prenylation of fumigaclavine A at C-2 position of the indole nucleus. In addition to information obtained from the gene cluster of ergot alkaloids from C. PURPUREA, the identification of the biosynthetic gene cluster of fumigaclavine C in A. FUMIGATUS opens an alternative way to study the biosynthesis of ergot alkaloids in fungi. PMID:16902860

  6. Ornithine Decarboxylase, Polyamines, and Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids in Senecio and Crotalaria

    PubMed Central

    Birecka, Helena; Birecki, Mieczyslaw; Cohen, Eric J.; Bitonti, Alan J.; McCann, Peter P.

    1988-01-01

    When tested for ornithine and arginine decarboxylases, pyrrolizidine alkaloid-bearing Senecio riddellii, S. longilobus (Compositae), and Crotalaria retusa (Leguminosae) plants exhibited only ornithine decarboxylase activity. This contrasts with previous studies of four species of pyrrolizidine alkaloid-bearing Heliotropium (Boraginaceae) in which arginine decarboxylase activity was very high relative to that of ornithine decarboxylase. Unlike Heliotropium angiospermum and Heliotropium indicum, in which endogenous arginine was the only detectable precursor of putrescine channeled into pyrrolizidines, in the species studied here—using difluoromethylornithine and difluoromethylarginine as the enzyme inhibitors—endogenous ornithine was the main if not the only precursor of putrescine converted into the alkaloid aminoalcohol moiety. In S. riddellii and C. retusa at flowering, ornithine decarboxylase activity was present mainly in leaves, especially the young ones. However, other very young organs such as inflorescence and growing roots exhibited much lower or very low activities; the enzyme activity in stems was negligible. There was no correlation between the enzyme activity and polyamine or alkaloid content in either species. In both species only free polyamines were detected except for C. retusa roots and inflorescence—with relatively very high levels of these compounds—in which conjugated putrescine, spermidine, and spermine were also found; agmatine was not identified by HPLC in any plant organ except for C. retusa roots with rhizobial nodules. Organ- or age-dependent differences in the polyamine levels were small or insignificant. The highest alkaloid contents were found in young leaves and inflorescence. PMID:16665870

  7. Claviceps nigricans and Claviceps grohii: their alkaloids and phylogenetic placement.

    PubMed

    Pazoutová, Sylvie; Olsovská, Jana; Sulc, Miroslav; Chudícková, Milada; Flieger, Miroslav

    2008-06-01

    Claviceps purpurea, C. grohii, C. zizaniae, C. cyperi, and C. nigricans are closely related ergot fungi and form a monophyletic clade inside the genus Claviceps. Analysis of alkaloid content in C. nigricans sclerotia using UPLC detected ergocristine (1), ergosine (2), alpha-ergocryptine (3), and ergocristam (4). Alkaloids 1, 3, and 4 were found in the sclerotia of C. grohii. The content of 4 in the mixture of alkaloids from C. nigricans and C. grohii (over 8% and over 20%, respectively) was unusually high. Submerged shaken cultures of C. nigricans produced no alkaloids, whereas C. grohii culture formed small amounts (15 mg L (-1)) of extracellular clavines and 1. In the previously used HPLC method the ergocristam degradation product could have been obscured by the ergosine peak. Therefore sclerotia of a C. purpurea habitat-specific population G2 with the dominant production of 1 and 2 have been reanalyzed, but no 4 was detected. The phylogeny of the C. purpurea-related species group is discussed with regard to alkaloid-specific nonribosomal peptide synthetase duplication leading to the production of two main ergopeptines instead of a single product. PMID:18461998

  8. Diterpene alkaloids with an aza-ent-kaurane skeleton from Isodon rubescens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu; Yang, Jing; Wang, Wei-Guang; Li, Yan; Wu, Ji-Zhou; Pu, Jian-Xin; Sun, Han-Dong

    2015-02-27

    Two compounds belonging to a new group of diterpene alkaloids, kaurines A and B (1 and 2), and an alkaloid bearing a succinimide moiety (3) were obtained from Isodon rubescens. Their structures and absolute configurations were determined by spectroscopy and quantum-chemical computational (13)C NMR and ECD data analysis. These alkaloids differ from known diterpene alkaloids and diterpenoids and are presumably biosynthesized from ent-kaurane diterpenoids. PMID:25590529

  9. Hydrofocusing Bioreactor Produces Anti-Cancer Alkaloids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Valluri, Jagan V.

    2011-01-01

    microgravitation of an HFB do not need to maintain the same surface forces as in normal Earth gravitation, they can divert more energy sources to growth and differentiation and, perhaps, to biosynthesis of greater quantities of desired medicinal compounds. Because one can adjust the HFB to vary effective gravitation, one can also test the effects of intermediate levels of gravitation on biosynthesis of various products. The potential utility of this methodology for producing drugs was demonstrated in experiments in which sandalwood and Madagascar periwinkle cells were grown in an HFB. The conditions in the HFB were chosen to induce the cells to form into aggregate cultures that produced anti-cancer indole alkaloids in amounts greater than do comparable numbers of cells of the same species cultured according to previously known methodologies. The observations made in these experiments were interpreted as suggesting that the aggregation of the cells might be responsible for the enhancement of production of alkaloids.

  10. Alkaloid Profiles, Concentration and Pools in Velvet Lupine (Lupinus leucophyllus) Over the Growing Season

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lupinus leucophyllus is one of many lupine species known to contain toxic and/or teratogenic alkaloids that can cause congenital birth defects. The concentrations of total alkaloids and the individual major alkaloids were measured in three different years from different plant parts over the phenolog...

  11. Recent investigations of ergot alkaloids incorporated into plant and/or animal systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ergot alkaloids produced by fungi have a basic chemical structure but different chemical moieties at substituent sites resulting in various forms of alkaloids that are distinguishable from one another. Since the ergoline ring structure found in ergot alkaloids is similar to that of biogenic amines (...

  12. Identification and quantification of isoquinoline alkaloids in the genus Sarcocapnos by GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Suau, R; Cabezudo, B; Valpuesta, M; Posadas, N; Diaz, A; Torres, G

    2005-01-01

    Six cularine alkaloids, cularicine, O-methylcularicine, celtisine, cularidine, cularine and celtine, three isocularine alkaloids, sarcophylline, sarcocapnine and sarcocapnidine, and five non-cularine alkaloids, glaucine, protopine, ribasine, dihydrosanguinarine and chelidonine, were identified and quantified by GC-MS in nine taxa of the genus Sarcocapnos (Fumariaceae). The chemotaxonomic significance of the results is discussed. PMID:16223088

  13. [Clavine alkaloid biosynthesis by the fungus Penicillium palitans westling 1911 isolated from ancient permafrost deposits].

    PubMed

    Kozlovskiĭ, A G; Zhelifonova, V P; Antipova, T V

    2009-01-01

    The relic strain of Penicillium palitans isolated from the ancient permafrost deposits produces clavine alkaloids such as festuclavine, fumigaclavine A, and fumigaclavine B. Alkaloid biosynthesis is concurrent with the growth. Tryptophan and zinc ion additives to the culture medium stimulate the synthesis of alkaloids. PMID:19382708

  14. tRNA binding with anti-cancer alkaloids-nature of interaction and comparison with DNA-alkaloids adducts.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Gunjan; Agarwal, Shweta; Mehrotra, Ranjana

    2015-01-01

    Vincristine and vinblastine are potent anti-proliferative compound whose mechanism of action inside a cell is not well elucidated and the basis of their differential cellular effect is also unknown. This work focuses towards understanding the interaction of vincristine and vinblastine with tRNA using spectroscopic approach. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared difference spectroscopy and UV-visible spectroscopy were used to study the binding parameters of tRNA-alkaloids interaction. Both the vinca alkaloids interact with tRNA through external binding with some degree of intercalation into the nitrogenous bases. The alkaloids adduct formation did not alter the A-conformation of the biopolymer and vincristine-tRNA complexes were found to be more stable than that of vinblastine-tRNA complexes. The binding constants (K) estimated for VCR-tRNA and VBS-tRNA complexation are 3×10(2)M(-1) and 2.5×10(2)M(-1) respectively, which suggests low affinity of alkaloids to tRNA. The study recognizes tRNA binding properties of vital vinca alkaloids and contributes to a better understanding of their mechanism of action and could also help in identifying the reason behind their diverse action in a cell. PMID:25574589

  15. A new alkaloid from the fruit of Nandina domestica Thunb.

    PubMed

    Peng, Cai-Ying; Liu, Jian-Qun; Zhang, Rui; Shu, Ji-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    A new steroidal alkaloid, (20S,22R,24R)-24-ethyl-3-oxocholest-4-en-22-amino, named as nandsterine (1), together with 10 known alkaloids, palmatine (2), O-methylbulbocapnine (3), nantenine (4), dehydronantenine (5), glaucine (6), didehydroglaucine (7), dehydrocorydaline (8), jatrorrhizine (9), magnoflorine (10) and berberine (11), was isolated from the fruit of Nandina domestica Thunb. Their structures were elucidated by using spectroscopic methods as well as by comparing with the published data. Compound 1 was a new class of steroidal alkaloid isolated from the family Berberidaceae, meanwhile compounds 2, 3, 6-8 and 10 were obtained from N. domestica for the first time. Compound 1 exhibited cytotoxicity against HL-60 cells (human leukaemia) with IC50 values of 52.1 μM. PMID:24897106

  16. The homalium alkaloids: isolation, synthesis, and absolute configuration assignment.

    PubMed

    Davies, Stephen G; Thomson, James E

    2015-01-01

    The structurally related natural products (-)-homaline, (-)-hopromine, (-)-hoprominol, and (-)-hopromalinol have been collectively termed the homalium alkaloids. All four alkaloids possess bis-ζ-azalactam structures, but differ only by the identities of the side chain on each lactam ring. Since their isolation (from the leaves of Homalium pronyense Guillaum found in the forests of New Caledonia), there have been several syntheses of homaline, hopromine, hoprominol, and hopromalinol in both racemic and enantiopure forms. The most highly yielding and versatile strategy for their synthesis employs the conjugate addition of an enantiopure lithium amide reagent to an α,β-unsaturated ester as the key stereodefining step. This methodology has been used in the syntheses of all four members of the homalium alkaloid family and their stereoisomers. PMID:25845060

  17. A look inside an alkaloid multisite plant: the Catharanthus logistics.

    PubMed

    Courdavault, Vincent; Papon, Nicolas; Clastre, Marc; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, Nathalie; St-Pierre, Benoit; Burlat, Vincent

    2014-06-01

    Environmental pressures forced plants to diversify specialized metabolisms to accumulate noxious molecules such as alkaloids constituting one of the largest classes of defense metabolites. Catharanthus roseus produces monoterpene indole alkaloids via a highly elaborated biosynthetic pathway whose characterization greatly progressed with the recent expansion of transcriptomic resources. The complex architecture of this pathway, sequentially distributed in at least four cell types and further compartmentalized into several organelles, involves partially identified inter-cellular and intra-cellular translocation events acting as potential key-regulators of metabolic fluxes. The description of this spatial organization and the inherent secretion and sequestration of metabolites not only provide new insight into alkaloid cell biology and its involvement in plant defense processes but also present new biotechnological challenges for synthetic biology. PMID:24727073

  18. [Occurrence of indole alkaloids among secondary metabolites of soil Aspergillus].

    PubMed

    Vinokurova, N G; Khmel'nitskaia, I I; Baskunov, B P; Arinbasarov, M U

    2003-01-01

    The occurrence of indole alkaloids among secondary fungal metabolites was studied in species of the genus Aspergillus, isolated from soils that were sampled in various regions of Russia (a total of 102 isolates of the species A. niger, A. phoenicis, A. fumigatus, A. flavus, A. versicolor, A. ustus, A. clavatus, and A. ochraceus). Clavine alkaloids were represented by fumigaclavine, which was formed by A. fumigatus. alpha-Cyclopiazonic acid was formed by isolates of A. fumigatus, A. flavus, A. versicolor, A. phoenicis, and A. clavatus. The occurrence of indole-containing diketopiperazine alkaloids was documented for isolates of A. flavus, A. fumigatus, A. clavatus, and A. ochraceus. No indole-containing metabolites were found among the metabolites of A. ustus or A. niger. PMID:12722658

  19. In vitro production of alkaloids: Factors, approaches, challenges and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Sayeed; Garg, Madhukar; Tamboli, Ennus Tajuddin; Abdin, M. Z.; Ansari, S. H.

    2013-01-01

    The wide diversity of plant secondary metabolites is largely used for the production of various pharmaceutical compounds. In vitro cell tissue or organ culture has been employed as a possible alternative to produce such industrial compounds. Tissue culture techniques provide continuous, reliable, and renewable source of valuable plant pharmaceuticals and might be used for the large-scale culture of the plant cells from which these secondary metabolites can be extracted. Alkaloids are one of the most important secondary metabolites known to play a vital role in various pharmaceutical applications leading to an increased commercial importance in recent years. The tissue culture techniques may be utilized to improve their production of alkaloids via somaclonal variations and genetic transformations. The focus of this review is toward the application of different tissue culture methods/techniques employed for the in vitro production of alkaloids with a systematic approach to improve their production. PMID:23922453

  20. The role of biocatalysis in the asymmetric synthesis of alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Alkaloids are not only one of the most intensively studied classes of natural products, their wide spectrum of pharmacological activities also makes them indispensable drug ingredients in both traditional and modern medicine. Among the methods for their production, biotechnological approaches are gaining importance, and biocatalysis has emerged as an essential tool in this context. A number of chemo-enzymatic strategies for alkaloid synthesis have been developed over the years, in which the biotransformations nowadays take an increasingly ‘central’ role. This review summarises different applications of biocatalysis in the asymmetric synthesis of alkaloids and discusses how recent developments and novel enzymes render innovative and efficient chemo-enzymatic production routes possible. PMID:25580241

  1. Isolation and antimalarial activity of alkaloids from Pseudoxandra cuspidata.

    PubMed

    Roumy, Vincent; Fabre, Nicolas; Souard, Florence; Massou, Stéphane; Bourdy, Geneviève; Maurel, Séverine; Valentin, Alexis; Moulis, Claude

    2006-08-01

    A novel and very unusual azaanthracene alkaloid, 1-aza-7,8,9,10-tetramethoxy-4-methyl-2-oxo-1,2-dihydroanthracene ( 1) and a new diastereoisomer of the bis-benzylisoquinoline alkaloid rodiasine, 1 S,1' R-rodiasine ( 2), as well as the alkaloids O-methylpunjabine ( 3) and O-methylmoschatoline ( 4) have been isolated from Pseudoxandra cuspidata bark, used in French Guiana as an antimalarial. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analyses, especially 2D-NMR techniques (ADEQUATE and NOESY). We found that the antimalarial activity of this bark was mostly due to bis-benzylisoquinoline 1 S,1' R-rodiasine ( 2) (IC (50)= 1 microM) also displaying a low cytotoxicity. PMID:16902855

  2. Engineering strategies for the fermentative production of plant alkaloids in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Trenchard, Isis J.; Smolke, Christina D.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial hosts engineered for the biosynthesis of plant natural products offer enormous potential as powerful discovery and production platforms. However, the reconstruction of these complex biosynthetic schemes faces numerous challenges due to the number of enzymatic steps and challenging enzyme classes associated with these pathways, which can lead to issues in metabolic load, pathway specificity, and maintaining flux to desired products. Cytochrome P450 enzymes are prevalent in plant specialized metabolism and are particularly difficult to express heterologously. Here, we describe the reconstruction of the sanguinarine branch of the benzylisoquinoline alkaloid pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, resulting in microbial biosynthesis of protoberberine, protopine, and benzophenanthridine alkaloids through to the end-product sanguinarine, which we demonstrate can be efficiently produced in yeast in the absence of the associated biosynthetic enzyme. We achieved titers of 676 µg/L stylopine, 548 µg/L cis-N-methylstylopine, 252 µg/L protopine, and 80 µg/L sanguinarine from the engineered yeast strains. Through our optimization efforts, we describe genetic and culture strategies supporting the functional expression of multiple plant cytochrome P450 enzymes in the context of a large multi-step pathway. Our results also provided insight into relationships between cytochrome P450 activity and yeast ER physiology. We were able to improve the production of critical intermediates by 32-fold through genetic techniques and an additional 45-fold through culture optimization. PMID:25981946

  3. Alkaloid-derived molecules in low rank Argonne premium coals.

    SciTech Connect

    Winans, R. E.; Tomczyk, N. A.; Hunt, J. E.

    2000-11-30

    Molecules that are probably derived from alkaloids have been found in the extracts of the subbituminous and lignite Argonne Premium Coals. High resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LCMS) have been used to characterize pyridine and supercritical extracts. The supercritical extraction used an approach that has been successful for extracting alkaloids from natural products. The first indication that there might be these natural products in coals was the large number of molecules found containing multiple nitrogen and oxygen heteroatoms. These molecules are much less abundant in bituminous coals and absent in the higher rank coals.

  4. Cytotoxicity of Naturally Occurring Isoquinoline Alkaloids of Different Structural Types.

    PubMed

    Chlebek, Jakub; Doskocil, Ivo; Hulcová, Daniela; Breiterová, Katerina; Šafratová, Marcela; Havelek, Radim; Habartová, Klára; Hošt'álková, Anna; Volštátová, Tereza; Cahlíková, Lucie

    2016-06-01

    Forty-six isoquinoline alkaloids, of eleven structural types isolated in our laboratory, have been evaluated for their cytotoxicity against two cancer cell lines (Caco-2 and Hep-G2 cancer cells), as well as against normal human lung fibroblast cells. Only scoulerine, aromoline, berbamine and parfumidine showed significant cytotoxic effects, but only scoulerine was active against both Caco-2 and Hep-G2 cells (IC50 values 6.44 ± 0.87 and 4.57 ± 0.42, respectively). Unfortunately, except for parfumidine, the other active alkaloids were also cytotoxic to the normal human lung fibroblast cells. PMID:27534109

  5. Methods for studying vinca alkaloid interactions with tubulin.

    PubMed

    Lobert, Sharon; Correia, John J

    2007-01-01

    Vinca alkaloids play a vital role in chemotherapy protocols for a wide range of hematological and solid tumors. Studies of drug interactions with the drug target, tubulin or microtubules, have helped us to understand the cytotoxic and toxic effects. We present here in vivo and in vitro methods for studying vinca alkaloid interactions with tubulin. In vivo methods for examining drug effects on cell proliferation and intracellular tubulin or microtubules and direct visualization of drug effects by fluorescence microscopy are presented. In vitro methods for measuring drug affinity for tubulin by analytical ultracentrifugation, kinetics of drug binding by light scattering and drug effects on microtubules by turbidity are also presented. PMID:18085235

  6. Recent Advances in the Synthesis of Morphine and Related Alkaloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chida, Noritaka

    Morphine, an alkaloid isolated from the opium poppy, has been widely used as an analgesic, and has been a fascinating synthetic target of organic chemists. After the first total synthesis reported in 1952, a number of synthetic studies toward morphine have been reported, and findings obtained in such studies have greatly contributed to the progress of synthetic organic chemistry as well as medicinal chemistry. This review provides an overview of recent studies toward the total synthesis of morphine and related alkaloids. Work reported in the literature since 2004 will be reviewed.

  7. 3-Methoxysampangine, a novel antifungal copyrine alkaloid from Cleistopholis patens.

    PubMed

    Liu, S C; Oguntimein, B; Hufford, C D; Clark, A M

    1990-04-01

    Further examination of the active ethanolic extract of the root bark of Cleistopholis patens by using bioassay-directed fractionation resulted in the isolation of a new alkaloid, 3-methoxysampangine (compound I), together with three known alkaloids, eupolauridine (compound II), liriodenine (compound III), and eupolauridine N-oxide (compound IV). The proposed structure of compound I was based on its physicochemical properties and spectral data. 3-Methoxysampangine exhibited significant antifungal activity against Candida albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Cryptococcus neoformans. This is the first report of the isolation of liriodenine (compound III) from the root bark of C. patens. PMID:2188584

  8. 3-Methoxysampangine, a novel antifungal copyrine alkaloid from Cleistopholis patens.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, S C; Oguntimein, B; Hufford, C D; Clark, A M

    1990-01-01

    Further examination of the active ethanolic extract of the root bark of Cleistopholis patens by using bioassay-directed fractionation resulted in the isolation of a new alkaloid, 3-methoxysampangine (compound I), together with three known alkaloids, eupolauridine (compound II), liriodenine (compound III), and eupolauridine N-oxide (compound IV). The proposed structure of compound I was based on its physicochemical properties and spectral data. 3-Methoxysampangine exhibited significant antifungal activity against Candida albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Cryptococcus neoformans. This is the first report of the isolation of liriodenine (compound III) from the root bark of C. patens. PMID:2188584

  9. Microbial Factories for the Production of Benzylisoquinoline Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Narcross, Lauren; Fossati, Elena; Bourgeois, Leanne; Dueber, John E; Martin, Vincent J J

    2016-03-01

    Benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs) are a family of ∼2500 alkaloids with both potential and realized pharmaceutical value, including most notably the opiates such as codeine and morphine. Only a few BIAs accumulate readily in plants, which limits the pharmaceutical potential of the family. Shifting BIA production to microbial sources could provide a scalable and flexible source of these compounds in the future. This review details the current status of microbial BIA synthesis and derivatization, including rapid developments in the past 6 months culminating in the synthesis of opioids from glucose in a microbial host. PMID:26775900

  10. Indole alkaloids from Vinca major and V. minor growing in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Bahadori, Fatemeh; Topçu, Gülaçti; Boğa, Mehmet; Türkekul, Ayla; Kolak, Ufuk; Kartal, Murat

    2012-06-01

    A new indole alkaloid, 11-hydroxypolyneuridine, was isolated from Vinca major subsp. major L. and the known indole alkaloids vallesiachotamine and isovallesiachotamine from Vinca minor L. This is the first report on the alkaloids of both Vinca species growing in Turkey; vallesiachotamine and isovallesiachotamine were isolated from a Vinca species for the first time. V. minor may be considered as a new source for these two alkaloids due to their occurrence in high amount in the aerial parts of the plant. The alkaloid extracts of the two Vinca species were found to have high lipid peroxidation inhibitory and DPPH radical scavenging activities. Anticholinesterase activity of the extracts was also very strong. PMID:22816294

  11. THE TOXICITY AND KINETICS OF LARKSPUR ALKALOID, METHYLLYCACONITINE, IN MICE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Larkspur poisoning sporadically kills from 5-15% of the cattle on North American mountain rangelands. Of the 40 different diterpenoid larkspur alkaloids, one that is thought to be responsible for much of larkspur's toxicity has been identified as methyllycaconitine (MLA). Little is known of MLA to...

  12. Diversification of ergot alkaloids in natural and modified fungi.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sarah L; Panaccione, Daniel G

    2015-01-01

    Several fungi in two different families--the Clavicipitaceae and the Trichocomaceae--produce different profiles of ergot alkaloids, many of which are important in agriculture and medicine. All ergot alkaloid producers share early steps before their pathways diverge to produce different end products. EasA, an oxidoreductase of the old yellow enzyme class, has alternate activities in different fungi resulting in branching of the pathway. Enzymes beyond the branch point differ among lineages. In the Clavicipitaceae, diversity is generated by the presence or absence and activities of lysergyl peptide synthetases, which interact to make lysergic acid amides and ergopeptines. The range of ergopeptines in a fungus may be controlled by the presence of multiple peptide synthetases as well as by the specificity of individual peptide synthetase domains. In the Trichocomaceae, diversity is generated by the presence or absence of the prenyl transferase encoded by easL (also called fgaPT1). Moreover, relaxed specificity of EasL appears to contribute to ergot alkaloid diversification. The profile of ergot alkaloids observed within a fungus also is affected by a delayed flux of intermediates through the pathway, which results in an accumulation of intermediates or early pathway byproducts to concentrations comparable to that of the pathway end product. PMID:25609183

  13. The alkaloid profiles of Sophora nuttalliana and Sophora stenophylla

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sophora is a diverse genus in the family Fabaceae, comprised of herbs, shrubs, and trees that occurs throughout the world, primarily in the northern hemisphere. Species of Sophora are known to contain quinolizidine alkaloids that are toxic and potentially teratogenic. Two perennial herbaceous spec...

  14. Biosynthesis of the defensive alkaloid cicindeloine in Stenus solutus beetles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schierling, Andreas; Dettner, Konrad; Schmidt, Jürgen; Seifert, Karlheinz

    2012-08-01

    To protect themselves from predation and microorganismic infestation, rove beetles of the genus Stenus produce and store bioactive alkaloids like stenusine, 3-(2-methyl-1-butenyl)pyridine, and cicindeloine in their pygidial glands. The biosynthesis of stenusine and 3-(2-methyl-1-butenyl)pyridine was previously investigated in Stenus bimaculatus and Stenus similis, respectively. Both molecules follow the same biosynthetic pathway, where the N-heterocyclic ring is derived from l-lysine and the side chain from l-isoleucine. The different alkaloids are finally obtained by slight modifications of shared precursor molecules. The piperideine alkaloid cicindeloine occurs as a main compound additionally to ( E)-3-(2-methyl-1-butenyl)pyridine and traces of stenusine in the pygidial gland secretion of Stenus cicindeloides and Stenus solutus. Feeding of S. solutus beetles with [D,15N]-labeled amino acids followed by GC/MS analysis techniques showed that cicindeloine is synthesized via the identical pathway and precursor molecules as the other two defensive alkaloids.

  15. In vitro cytotoxicity of various dehydropyrrolizidine ester alkaloids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids (DHPAs) are plant-derived hepato-, pneumo- and geno-toxins that are carcinogenic in several species. Because of the difficulty in isolating sufficient DHPA for toxicological studies, there are few direct comparisons of toxicity. The objectives of this study was to de...

  16. Ergot Alkaloids: Toxicokinetics and Vascular Effects in Grazing Animals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endophyte- (Neotyphodium coenophialum) infected tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum) occupies nearly 14 million ha within the USA. Although the endophyte-forage association is beneficial to the plant’s survival and production, it is detrimental to grazing livestock as a consequence of ergot alkaloid p...

  17. Alkaloid profiling and anticholinesterase activity of South American Lycopodiaceae species.

    PubMed

    Konrath, Eduardo Luis; Ortega, María Gabriela; de Loreto Bordignon, Sérgio; Apel, Miriam Anders; Henriques, Amélia Teresinha; Cabrera, José Luis

    2013-02-01

    The alkaloid extracts of four Huperzia and one Lycopodiella species, from Brazilian habitats, were tested for their in vitro anticholinesterase activities. IC(50) values showed a potent acetylcholinesterase inhibition for H. reflexa (0.11 ± 0.05 μg/mL), followed by H. quadrifariata (2.0 ± 0.3 μg/mL), H. acerosa (5.5 ± 0.9 μg/mL), H. heterocarpon (25.6 ± 2.7 μg/mL) and L. cernua (42.6 ± 1.5 μg/mL). A lower inhibition of butyrylcholinesterase was observed for all species with the exception of H. heterocarpon (8.3 ± 0.9 μg/mL), whose alkaloid extract presented a selectivity for pseudocholinesterase. Moreover, the chemical study of the bioactive extracts performed by GC-MS, revealed the presence of a number of Lycopodium alkaloids belonging to the lycopodane, flabellidane and cernuane groups. Surprisingly, the potent acetylcholinesterase inhibitors huperzines A and B were not detected in the extracts, suggesting that other alkaloids may be responsible for such an effect. PMID:22117191

  18. Investigation of a betainic alkaloid from Punica granatum.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Andreas; Mordhorst, Thorsten; Nieger, Martin

    2005-07-01

    Spectroscopic investigations reveal that a hydroquinone pyridinium alkaloid isolated from the leaves of pomegranates Punica granatum L. (X-ray) exists as a mixture of a conjugated and a cross-conjugated heterocyclic mesomeric betaine in aqueous and DMSO-d6 solution. Twofold deprotonation yields an anionic tripole. PMID:15938201

  19. Effect of Ergot Alkaloids on Bovine Foregut Vasculature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ergot alkaloids induce vasoconstriction of bovine foregut vasculature. Ergovaline induced the greatest response in ruminal artery while ergovaline and ergotamine induced the greatest response in ruminal vein. Lysergic acid did not stimulate a contractile response in either the ruminal artery or vein...

  20. Tall Fescue Alkaloids Bind Serotonin Receptors in Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The serotonin (5HT) receptor 5HT2A is involved in the tall fescue alkaloid-induced vascular contraction in the bovine periphery. This was determined by evaluating the contractile responses of lateral saphenous veins biopsied from cattle grazing different tall fescue/endophyte combinations. The contr...

  1. The Raputindoles: Novel Cyclopentyl Bisindole Alkaloids from Raputia simulans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel class of bisindole alkaloids is established by the isolation and structural determination of Raputindoles A-D (1-4) from the Amazonian plant Raputia simulans Kallunki (Rutaceae). Complete spectroscopic characterization was accomplished by means of NMR spectroscopy and APCI (+) HRMS. Raputind...

  2. Australine, a pyrrolizidine alkaloid that inhibits amyloglucosidase and glycoprotein processing

    SciTech Connect

    Tropea, J.E.; Molyneux, R.J.; Kaushal, G.P.; Pan, Y.T.; Mitchell, M.; Elbein, A.D. )

    1989-03-07

    Australine is a polyhydroxylated pyrrolizidine alkaloid that was isolated from the seeds of the Australian tree Castanospermum australe and characterized by NMR and X-ray diffraction analysis. Since swainsonine and catanospermine are polyhydroxylated indolizidine alkaloids that inhibit specific glycosidases, the authors tested australine against a variety of exoglycosidases to determine whether it would inhibit any of these enzymes. This alkaloid proved to be a good inhibitor of the {alpha}-glucosidase amyloglucosidase (50% inhibition at 5.8 {mu}M), but it did not inhibit {beta}-glucosidase, {alpha}- or {beta}-mannosidase, or {alpha}- or {beta}-galactosidase. The inhibition of amyloglucosidase was of a competitive nature. Australine also inhibited the glycoprotein processing enzyme glucosidase I, but had only slight activity toward glucosidase II. When incubated with cultured cells, this alkaloid inhibited glycoprotein processing at the glucosidase I step and caused the accumulation of glycoproteins with Glc{sub 3}Man{sub 7-9}(GlcNAc){sub 2}-oligosaccharides.

  3. Diversification of Ergot Alkaloids in Natural and Modified Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Sarah L.; Panaccione, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    Several fungi in two different families––the Clavicipitaceae and the Trichocomaceae––produce different profiles of ergot alkaloids, many of which are important in agriculture and medicine. All ergot alkaloid producers share early steps before their pathways diverge to produce different end products. EasA, an oxidoreductase of the old yellow enzyme class, has alternate activities in different fungi resulting in branching of the pathway. Enzymes beyond the branch point differ among lineages. In the Clavicipitaceae, diversity is generated by the presence or absence and activities of lysergyl peptide synthetases, which interact to make lysergic acid amides and ergopeptines. The range of ergopeptines in a fungus may be controlled by the presence of multiple peptide synthetases as well as by the specificity of individual peptide synthetase domains. In the Trichocomaceae, diversity is generated by the presence or absence of the prenyl transferase encoded by easL (also called fgaPT1). Moreover, relaxed specificity of EasL appears to contribute to ergot alkaloid diversification. The profile of ergot alkaloids observed within a fungus also is affected by a delayed flux of intermediates through the pathway, which results in an accumulation of intermediates or early pathway byproducts to concentrations comparable to that of the pathway end product. PMID:25609183

  4. Novel triterpenoid acyl esters and alkaloids from Anoectochilus roxburghii.

    PubMed

    Han, Mei-Hua; Yang, Xiu-Wei; Jin, Yan-Ping

    2008-01-01

    Two novel sorghumol acyl esters, sorghumol 3-O-Z-p-coumarate and sorghumol 3-O-E-p-coumarate, and a novel alkaloid, anoectochine, were isolated from the whole plants of Anoectochilus roxburghii along with one known triterpenoid, sorghumol. Their structures were established by their detailed spectral studies, including two-dimensional NMR ((1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC and HMBC). PMID:18435530

  5. Pyrrolizidine alkaloid toxicity in livestock: A paradigm for human poisoning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Livestock poisoning, primarily liver damage, caused by consumption of plants containing 1,2-dehydropyrro-lizidine ester alkaloids (dehydroPAs), and the corresponding N-oxides, is a relatively common occurrence worldwide. Because of the economic impact, extensive investigations...

  6. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids in food: A spectrum of potential health consequences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contamination of grain with 1,2-dehydropyrrolizidine ester alkaloids (dehydroPAs) and their N-oxides is responsible for large incidents of acute and subacute food poisoning, with high morbidity and mortality, in Africa and in central and south Asia. Herbal medicines and teas containing dehydroPAs ha...

  7. AUSTRALINE AND RELATED ALKALOIDS: EASY STRUCTURAL CONFIRMATION AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The first polyhydrroxylated pyrrolizidine alkaloid with a hydroxymethyl group at C-3 was isolated from pods of Alexa leiopetala (leguminosae) and designated alexine (1). The Australian legume Castanospermum australe is also known to produce the same structural type of pyrrolizidines. There are repor...

  8. New cholinesterase inhibiting bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids from Abuta grandifolia.

    PubMed

    Cometa, Maria Francesca; Fortuna, Stefano; Palazzino, Giovanna; Volpe, Maria Teresa; Rengifo Salgado, Elsa; Nicoletti, Marcello; Tomassini, Lamberto

    2012-04-01

    The phytochemical study of the stem bark and wood of Abuta grandifolia (Mart.) Sandwith led to the identification of four bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BBIQs), namely (R,S)-2 N-norberbamunine (1), (R,R)-isochondodendrine (2), (S-S)-O4″-methyl, Nb-nor-O6'-demethyl-(+)-curine (3), and (S-S)-O4″-methyl, O6'-demethyl-(+)-curine (4), together with the aporphine alkaloid R-nornuciferine (5), all obtained by countercurrent distribution separation (CCD) and identified on the basis of their spectroscopic data. Alkaloids 3 and 4 were new. All the isolated compounds were tested for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) inhibitory activities. 1 was the most active against AChE, whereas 3 and 4 were the most potent against BChE. Interestingly, all tested alkaloids are more potent against BChE than against AChE. This selectivity of cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition could be important in order to speculate on their potential therapeutic relevance. PMID:22230193

  9. Indole alkaloids of Rauwolfia reflexa. Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance structural analysis of the bis(indole) alkaloid flexicorine

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, A.; Ghosh, A.K.; Hagaman, E.W.

    1982-01-01

    The /sup 13/C NMR spectra analysis of the new bis(indole) alkaloid flexicorine and of its chemically modified derivatives were used to determine the structure of the natural base. Flexicorine is, apparently, the first 10'-hydroxy N'-unsubstituted indoline which preferentially exists in the original iminoquinone form. 2 tables.

  10. Ergot Alkaloids Produced by Endophytic Fungi of the Genus Epichloë

    PubMed Central

    Guerre, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The development of fungal endophytes of the genus Epichloë in grasses results in the production of different groups of alkaloids, whose mechanism and biological spectrum of toxicity can differ considerably. Ergot alkaloids, when present in endophyte-infected tall fescue, are responsible for “fescue toxicosis” in livestock, whereas indole-diterpene alkaloids, when present in endophyte-infected ryegrass, are responsible for “ryegrass staggers”. In contrast, peramine and loline alkaloids are deterrent and/or toxic to insects. Other toxic effects in livestock associated with the consumption of endophyte-infected grass that contain ergot alkaloids include the “sleepy grass” and “drunken horse grass” diseases. Although ergovaline is the main ergopeptine alkaloid produced in endophyte-infected tall fescue and is recognized as responsible for fescue toxicosis, a number of questions still exist concerning the profile of alkaloid production in tall fescue and the worldwide distribution of tall fescue toxicosis. The purpose of this review is to present ergot alkaloids produced in endophyte-infected grass, the factors of variation of their level in plants, and the diseases observed in the mammalian species as relate to the profiles of alkaloid production. In the final section, interactions between ergot alkaloids and drug-metabolizing enzymes are presented as mechanisms that could contribute to toxicity. PMID:25756954

  11. Solid-phase extraction and LC-MS analysis of pyrrolizidine alkaloids in honeys.

    PubMed

    Beales, Kerrie A; Betteridge, Keith; Colegate, Steven M; Edgar, John A

    2004-10-20

    Strong-cation-exchange, solid-phase extraction of pyrrolizidine alkaloids and their N-oxides from honey samples was followed by reduction of the N-oxides and subsequent analysis of total pyrrolizidine alkaloids using high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry. A limited survey of 63 preprocessing samples of honey, purposefully biased toward honeys attributed to floral sources known to produce pyrrolizidine alkaloids, demonstrated levels of pyrrolizidine alkaloids up to approximately 2000 parts per billion (ppb) in a sample attributed to Echium plantagineum. Up to 800 ppb pyrrolizidine alkaloids was detected in some honeys not attributed by the collector to any pyrrolizidine alkaloid-producing floral source. No pyrrolizidine alkaloids were detected in approximately 30% of the samples in this limited study, while some honeys showed the copresence of pyrrolizidine alkaloids from multiple floral sources such as E. plantagineum and Heliotropium europaeum. In addition, retail samples of blended honeys (with no labeling to suggest that pyrrolizidine alkaloid-producing floral sources were used in the blends) have been shown to contain up to approximately 250 ppb pyrrolizidine alkaloids. PMID:15479038

  12. Ergot alkaloids produced by endophytic fungi of the genus Epichloë.

    PubMed

    Guerre, Philippe

    2015-03-01

    The development of fungal endophytes of the genus Epichloë in grasses results in the production of different groups of alkaloids, whose mechanism and biological spectrum of toxicity can differ considerably. Ergot alkaloids, when present in endophyte-infected tall fescue, are responsible for "fescue toxicosis" in livestock, whereas indole-diterpene alkaloids, when present in endophyte-infected ryegrass, are responsible for "ryegrass staggers". In contrast, peramine and loline alkaloids are deterrent and/or toxic to insects. Other toxic effects in livestock associated with the consumption of endophyte-infected grass that contain ergot alkaloids include the "sleepy grass" and "drunken horse grass" diseases. Although ergovaline is the main ergopeptine alkaloid produced in endophyte-infected tall fescue and is recognized as responsible for fescue toxicosis, a number of questions still exist concerning the profile of alkaloid production in tall fescue and the worldwide distribution of tall fescue toxicosis. The purpose of this review is to present ergot alkaloids produced in endophyte-infected grass, the factors of variation of their level in plants, and the diseases observed in the mammalian species as relate to the profiles of alkaloid production. In the final section, interactions between ergot alkaloids and drug-metabolizing enzymes are presented as mechanisms that could contribute to toxicity. PMID:25756954

  13. Depth-related alkaloid variation in Mediterranean Aplysina sponges.

    PubMed

    Putz, Annika; Kloeppel, Anne; Pfannkuchen, Martin; Brümmer, Franz; Proksch, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Total amounts and patterns of bromoisoxazoline alkaloids of Aplysina sponges from Croatia (Mediterranean Sea) were analyzed along an underwater slope ranging from 1.8 to 38.5 m. Total amounts of alkaloids varied from sample to sample and showed no correlation with depth. In contrast, striking differences of alkaloid patterns were found between sponges from shallow sites (1.8-11.8 m) and those collected from deeper sites (11.8-38.5 m). Sponges from shallow depths consistently exhibited alkaloid patterns typical for Aplysina aerophoba with aerophobin-2 (2) and isofistularin-3 (3) as main constituents. Sponges from deeper sites (below 11.8 m) resembled Aplysina cavernicola with aerothionin (4) and aplysinamisin-1 (1) as major compounds. The typical A. cavernicola pigment 3,4-dihydroxyquinoline-2-carboxylic acid (6), however, could not be detected in A. aerophoba sponges but was replaced by the A. aerophoba pigment uranidine (5) which appeared to be present in all sponge samples analyzed. During transplantation experiments sponges from sites below 30 m featuring the A. cavernicola chemotype of bromoisoxazoline alkaloids were translocated to shallower habitats (10 m). The alkaloid patterns in transplanted sponges were found to be stable over a period of 12 months and unaffected by this change in depth. In a further experiment, clones of Aplysina sponges from shallow depths of 5-6 m resembling the A. aerophoba chemotype were either kept in situ under natural light conditions or artificially shaded by excluding photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Neither 4 nor 1 were detected in artificially shaded sponges over an observation period of 12 months. In summary, two chemically distinct types of Aplysina sponges were discovered in this study that proved to be remarkably stable with regard to the bromoisoxazoline patterns and unaffected either by changing the light conditions or depth. It is not clear presently whether the Aplysina sponges collected from depths < 11.8 m

  14. Analysis of Isoquinoline Alkaloid Composition and Wound-Induced Variation in Nelumbo Using HPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xianbao; Zhu, Lingping; Fang, Ting; Vimolmangkang, Sornkanok; Yang, Dong; Ogutu, Collins; Liu, Yanling; Han, Yuepeng

    2016-02-10

    Alkaloids are the most relevant bioactive components in lotus, a traditional herb in Asia, but little is known about their qualitative and quantitative distributions. Here, we report on the alkaloid composition in various lotus organs. Lotus laminae and embryos are rich in isoquinoline alkaloids, whereas petioles and rhizomes contain trace amounts of alkaloids. Wide variation of alkaloid accumulation in lamina and embryo was observed among screened genotypes. In laminae, alkaloid accumulation increases during early developmental stages, reaches the highest level at full size stage, and then decreases slightly during senescence. Vegetative and embryogenic tissues accumulate mainly aporphine-type and bisbenzylisoquinoline-type alkaloids, respectively. Bisbenzylisoquinoline-type alkaloids may be synthesized mainly in lamina and then transported into embryo via latex through phloem translocation. In addition, mechanical wounding was shown to induce significant accumulation of specific alkaloids in lotus leaves. PMID:26800445

  15. Diterpenoid alkaloids from the Chinese traditional herbal "Fuzi" and their cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Dan; Huang, Xing; Liu, Qian

    2012-01-01

    Ten diterpenoid alkaloids, including eight aconitine-type C₁₉-diterpenoid alkaloids and two hetisine-type C₂₀-diterpenoid alkaloids, were isolated from the secondary roots of Aconitum carmichaeli Debx., known as "Fuzi" in Chinese traditional herbal medicine. Their structures were established on the basis of their spectroscopic data and comparison with those of the literature. Among these alkaloids, chasmanine, oxonitine and 15-acetylsongoramine were isolated for the first time from this medicinal plant. The cytotoxic activity of the alkaloids were tested against several cell lines by the MTT method in which aconitine, hypaconitine, mesaconitne and oxonitine were found to strongly inhibit the growth of the HePG2 cell line, which showed that the existence and quantity of the ester groups have a significant influence on the cytotoxicity of the diterpenoid alkaloids. PMID:22628040

  16. Genome mining of ascomycetous fungi reveals their genetic potential for ergot alkaloid production.

    PubMed

    Gerhards, Nina; Matuschek, Marco; Wallwey, Christiane; Li, Shu-Ming

    2015-06-01

    Ergot alkaloids are important as mycotoxins or as drugs. Naturally occurring ergot alkaloids as well as their semisynthetic derivatives have been used as pharmaceuticals in modern medicine for decades. We identified 196 putative ergot alkaloid biosynthetic genes belonging to at least 31 putative gene clusters in 31 fungal species by genome mining of the 360 available genome sequences of ascomycetous fungi with known proteins. Detailed analysis showed that these fungi belong to the families Aspergillaceae, Clavicipitaceae, Arthrodermataceae, Helotiaceae and Thermoascaceae. Within the identified families, only a small number of taxa are represented. Literature search revealed a large diversity of ergot alkaloid structures in different fungi of the phylum Ascomycota. However, ergot alkaloid accumulation was only observed in 15 of the sequenced species. Therefore, this study provides genetic basis for further study on ergot alkaloid production in the sequenced strains. PMID:25796201

  17. Biogenetically inspired synthesis and skeletal diversification of indole alkaloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizoguchi, Haruki; Oikawa, Hideaki; Oguri, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    To access architecturally complex natural products, chemists usually devise a customized synthetic strategy for constructing a single target skeleton. In contrast, biosynthetic assembly lines often employ divergent intramolecular cyclizations of a polyunsaturated common intermediate to produce diverse arrays of scaffolds. With the aim of integrating such biogenetic strategies, we show the development of an artificial divergent assembly line generating unprecedented numbers of scaffold variations of terpenoid indole alkaloids. This approach not only allows practical access to multipotent intermediates, but also enables systematic diversification of skeletal, stereochemical and functional group properties without structural simplification of naturally occurring alkaloids. Three distinct modes of [4+2] cyclizations and two types of redox-mediated annulations provided divergent access to five skeletally distinct scaffolds involving iboga-, aspidosperma-, andranginine- and ngouniensine-type skeletons and a non-natural variant within six to nine steps from tryptamine. The efficiency of our approach was demonstrated by successful total syntheses of (±)-vincadifformine, (±)-andranginine and (-)-catharanthine.

  18. Taichunamides: Prenylated Indole Alkaloids from Aspergillus taichungensis (IBT 19404).

    PubMed

    Kagiyama, Ippei; Kato, Hikaru; Nehira, Tatsuo; Frisvad, Jens C; Sherman, David H; Williams, Robert M; Tsukamoto, Sachiko

    2016-01-18

    Seven new prenylated indole alkaloids, taichunamides A-G, were isolated from the fungus Aspergillus taichungensis (IBT 19404). Taichunamides A and B contained an azetidine and 4-pyridone units, respectively, and are likely biosynthesized from notoamide S via (+)-6-epi-stephacidin A. Taichunamides C and D contain endoperoxide and methylsulfonyl units, respectively. This fungus produced indole alkaloids containing an anti-bicyclo[2.2.2]diazaoctane core, whereas A. protuberus and A. amoenus produced congeners with a syn-bicyclo[2.2.2]diazaoctane core. Plausible biosynthetic pathways to access these cores within the three species likely arise from an intramolecular hetero Diels-Alder reaction. PMID:26644336

  19. Various alkaloid profiles in decoctions of Banisteriopsis caapi.

    PubMed

    Callaway, J C

    2005-06-01

    Twenty nine decoctions of Banisteriopsis caapi from four different sources and one specimen of B. caapi paste were analyzed for N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), tetrahydroharmine (THH), harmaline and harmine. Other plants were also used in the preparation of these products, typically Psychotria viridis, which provides DMT. There were considerable variations in alkaloid profiles, both within and between sample sources. DMT was not detected in all samples. Additional THH may be formed from both harmine and harmaline during the preparation of these products. The alkaloid composition of one decoction sample did not change significantly after standing at room temperature for 80 days, but the initial acidic pH was neutralized by natural fermentation after 50 days. PMID:16149328

  20. [Extraction of pharmacologically active alkaloids from Vinca species].

    PubMed

    Gagua, N D; Bakuridze, A D; Vachnadze, N S; Berashvili, D T; Vachnadze, V Iu

    2011-06-01

    From the Genius Vinca the drugs have been received, arbitrally named: Vingerbin- with anthyarithmic activity, Vincabral-for improvement of brain blood circulation and leicobetin-as stimulator of leicopoesis. The investigations has been performed for creation of rational, resource saving, rentable phyto technologies. As a result, the liquid extraction general schema is provided for receipt of indolic alkaloids from plants V. herbaceae and V.minor. Analyses have shown that extraction with diluent gaz gives the possibility to receive the sums rich with alkaloids:Vingerbin and Vincabral. The advantage of extraction with diluent gaz is exclusion of high volumes of organic and non organic chemicals on the stage of extraction from raw material and liquid extraction, and remain and lipofil fraction converse to new phytosubtances for receipt of biologically active flavonoids, amino acids etc. PMID:21778554

  1. Vinflunine: a fluorinated vinca alkaloid for bladder cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Gerullis, H

    2011-01-01

    Vinflunine is a novel third-generation bifluorinated semisynthetic vinca alkaloid that has been shown to have activity against a variety of solid tumor types including advanced transitional cell carcinoma of the urothelium. In contrast to other vinca alkaloids, vinflunine shows superior antitumor activity and an excellent safety profile. Vinflunine interacts with tubulin and has a lower affinity to tubulin; it has a high intracellular accumulation rate and therefore significant effects on microtubule dynamics. A large, phase III trial comparing vinflunine with best supportive care versus best supportive care alone showed an improvement in overall survival in the vinflunine arm in preplanned secondary analyses. In addition, the drug has shown a moderate adverse event profile in the phase II and III trials. In September 2009, vinflunine was approved as a second-line treatment for patients with urothelial carcinoma resistant to first-line platinum-containing chemotherapy by the European Medicines Agency. PMID:21373647

  2. Antimalarial benzylisoquinoline alkaloid from the rainforest tree Doryphora sassafras.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Malcolm S; Davis, Rohan A; Duffy, Sandra; Avery, Vicky M; Quinn, Ronald J

    2009-08-01

    Mass-directed isolation of the CH(2)Cl(2)/MeOH extract of Doryphora sassafras resulted in the purification of a new benzylisoquinoline alkaloid, 1-(4-hydroxybenzyl)-6,7-methylenedioxy-2-methylisoquinolinium trifluoroacetate (1), and the known aporphine alkaloid (S)-isocorydine (2). The structures of 1 and 2 were determined by 1D and 2D NMR and MS data analyses. The compounds were isolated during a drug discovery program aimed at identifying new antimalarial leads from a prefractionated natural product library. When tested against two different strains of the parasite Plasmodium falciparum (3D7 and Dd2), 1 displayed IC(50) values of 3.0 and 4.4 microM, respectively. Compound 1 was tested for cytotoxicity toward a human embryonic kidney cell line (HEK293) and displayed no activity at 120 microM. PMID:19637893

  3. Stereoselective interaction of cinchona alkaloid isomers with bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Chen, Mingmao; Jiang, Longguang; Song, Ling

    2015-08-15

    The dependence of the interaction between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and two cinchona alkaloids, quinine (QN) and quinidine (QD), on the absolute configuration of these stereoisomers has been comprehensively studied. The FTIR spectra showed that QN and QD interacted with both CO and C-N groups of BSA, resulting in changes to the secondary structure of the protein. Fluorescence quenching of BSA by the stereoisomers revealed lower efficiency for QD in quenching the Trp emission of BSA when compared to QN. Further analysis accurately described the different binding behaviors and recognition discrepancies of QN and QD towards BSA, which was reflected through binding affinities, driving forces, energy changes and conformational changes during the ligand-protein interactions. Synchronous fluorescence further proved that QD was farther from Trp and Tyr than that of QN. This work could provide basic data for clarifying the binding interaction, metabolism and distribution of cinchona alkaloid stereoisomers in vivo. PMID:25794736

  4. Isoneocryptolepine, a synthetic indoloquinoline alkaloid, as an antiplasmodial lead compound.

    PubMed

    Van Miert, Sabine; Hostyn, Steven; Maes, Bert U W; Cimanga, Kanyanga; Brun, Reto; Kaiser, Marcel; Mátyus, Péter; Dommisse, Roger; Lemière, Guy; Vlietinck, Arnold; Pieters, Luc

    2005-05-01

    The antiprotozoal activities of three naturally occurring isomeric indoloquinoline alkaloids, i.e., cryptolepine (1), neocryptolepine (2), and isocryptolepine (3), and two dimeric indoloquinoline alkaloids, cryptoquindoline (6) and biscryptolepine (7), originally obtained from the plant Cryptolepis sanguinolenta, were compared with those of a new synthetic indoloquinoline isomer, isoneocryptolepine (4), and a quaternary derivative, N-methyl-isocryptolepinium iodide (5). The latter compounds showed a high antiplasmodial activity against the chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum strain K1 (IC50 of 0.23 +/- 0.04 and 0.017 +/- 0.004 microM, respectively), while the cytotoxicity (L6 cells) was 4.32 +/- 0.04 and 12.7 +/- 2.0 microM, respectively. Isoneocryptolepine (4) was found to act as an inhibitor of beta-hematin formation and as a DNA-intercalating agent. PMID:15921407

  5. Synthesis and Antimicrobial Characterization of Half-Calycanthaceous Alkaloid Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shaojun; Zhou, Xinping; Xu, Shixun; Zhu, Rui; Bai, Hongjin; Zhang, Jiwen

    2016-01-01

    A total of 29 novel tetrahydropyrroloindol-based calycanthaceous alkaloid derivatives were synthesized from indole-3-acetonitrile in good yields. The synthesized compounds were evaluated against nine strains of bacteria and a wide range of plant pathogen fungi. Bioassay results revealed that majority of the compounds displayed similar or higher in vitro antimicrobial activities than the positive control. The biological activities also indicated that substituents at R₄ and R₅ significantly affect the activities. Notably, compound c4 was found to be most active among the tested calycanthaceous analogues and might be a novel potential leading compound for further development as an antifungal agent. The results could pave the way for further design and structural modification of calycanthaceous alkaloids as antimicrobial agents. PMID:27618003

  6. Complement-mediated antiinflammatory effect of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid fangchinoline.

    PubMed

    Hristova, M; Istatkova, R

    1999-11-01

    Complement-mediated mode of action of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid fangchinoline was investigated in vivo and in vitro. The application of fangchinoline intraperitoneally (i.p.) to complement normal mice, strain ICR, inhibited the complement activity in serum and peritoneal exudate. The substance activated serum complement of C5-deficient DBA/2 mice. Fangchinoline was able to provoke local inflammatory reaction in both strains after subcutaneous (s.c.) injection. The alkaloid suppressed paw swelling induced by live Candida albicans in ICR and DBA/2 mice. Its effect depended on the dose and time of injection prior to inflammatory reaction. The in vitro experiments proved the interference of fangchinoline action with post-C5 reactions. The substance augmented C5-convertase formation and functional activity. These results are in correspondence with our previous investigations, proving the complement-mediated action of fangchinoline. The antiinflammatory effect could be a consequence of the caused complement exhaustion. PMID:11962544

  7. Antiplasmodial activities of furoquinoline alkaloids from Teclea afzelii.

    PubMed

    Wansi, Jean Duplex; Hussain, Hidayat; Tcho, Alain Tadjong; Kouam, Simeon F; Specht, Sabine; Sarite, Salem Ramadan; Hoerauf, Achim; Krohn, Karsten

    2010-05-01

    The study of the chemical constituents of the stem bark of Teclea afzelii (Rutaceae) has resulted in the isolation and characterization of four furoquinoline alkaloids, namely kokusaginine (1), tecleaverdoornine (2), maculine (3) and montrifoline (4) together with lupeol (5) and beta-sitosterol glucopyranoside (6). The structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated based on spectroscopic studies. The antimalarial activity of compounds 1-4 against Plasmodium falciparum in vitro shows partial suppression of parasitic growth. PMID:19496062

  8. The Daphniphyllum Alkaloids: Total Synthesis of (−)-Calyciphylline N

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Presented here is a full account on the development of a strategy culminating in the first total synthesis of the architecturally complex daphniphyllum alkaloid, (−)-calyciphylline N. Highlights of the approach include a highly diastereoselective, intramolecular Diels–Alder reaction of a silicon-tethered acrylate; an efficient Stille carbonylation of a sterically encumbered vinyl triflate; a one-pot Nazarov cyclization/proto-desilylation sequence; and the chemoselective hydrogenation of a fully substituted diene ester. PMID:25756504

  9. Enantioselective Nazarov Cyclization Catalyzed by a Cinchona Alkaloid Derivative

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu-Wen; Frontier, Alison J.

    2015-01-01

    Nucleophilic catalysts for a 1,6 addition/Nazarov cyclization/elimination sequence were evaluated for their ability to induce enantioselectivity in the electrocyclization step. Of the tertiary amines examined, it was found that a cinchona alkaloid derivative was able to generate substituted 5-hydroxy γ-methylene cyclopentenones with excellent enantioselectivity. The study results suggest that successful cyclization depends upon the ability of the dienyl diketone substrate to readily adopt an s-cis conformation. PMID:26085696

  10. Widespread Chemical Detoxification of Alkaloid Venom by Formicine Ants.

    PubMed

    LeBrun, Edward G; Diebold, Peter J; Orr, Matthew R; Gilbert, Lawrence E

    2015-10-01

    The ability to detoxify defensive compounds of competitors provides key ecological advantages that can influence community-level processes. Although common in plants and bacteria, this type of detoxification interaction is extremely rare in animals. Here, using laboratory behavioral assays and analyses of videotaped interactions in South America, we report widespread venom detoxification among ants in the subfamily Formicinae. Across both data sets, nine formicine species, representing all major clades, used a stereotyped grooming behavior to self-apply formic acid (acidopore grooming) in response to fire ant (Solenopsis invicta and S. saevissima) venom exposure. In laboratory assays, this behavior increased the survivorship of species following exposure to S. invicta venom. Species expressed the behavior when exposed to additional alkaloid venoms, including both compositionally similar piperidine venom of an additional fire ant species and the pyrrolidine/pyrroline alkaloid venom of a Monomorium species. In addition, species expressed the behavior following exposure to the uncharacterized venom of a Crematogaster species. However, species did not express acidopore grooming when confronted with protein-based ant venoms or when exposed to monoterpenoid-based venom. This pattern, combined with the specific chemistry of the reaction of formic acid with venom alkaloids, indicates that alkaloid venoms are targets of detoxification grooming. Solenopsis thief ants, and Monomorium species stand out as brood-predators of formicine ants that produce piperidine, pyrrolidine, and pyrroline venom, providing an important ecological context for the use of detoxification behavior. Detoxification behavior also represents a mechanism that can influence the order of assemblage dominance hierarchies surrounding food competition. Thus, this behavior likely influences ant-assemblages through a variety of ecological pathways. PMID:26385230

  11. The daphniphyllum alkaloids: total synthesis of (-)-calyciphylline N.

    PubMed

    Shvartsbart, Artem; Smith, Amos B

    2015-03-18

    Presented here is a full account on the development of a strategy culminating in the first total synthesis of the architecturally complex daphniphyllum alkaloid, (-)-calyciphylline N. Highlights of the approach include a highly diastereoselective, intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction of a silicon-tethered acrylate; an efficient Stille carbonylation of a sterically encumbered vinyl triflate; a one-pot Nazarov cyclization/proto-desilylation sequence; and the chemoselective hydrogenation of a fully substituted diene ester. PMID:25756504

  12. [Experimental study of radiation protective efficacy of Vinca alkaloid drugs].

    PubMed

    Krasil'nikov, I I; Zhakovko, E B; Chigareva, N G

    1994-01-01

    In experiments with rats and dogs exposed to whole-body nonlethal and lethal gamma-radiation (2; 2,9 or 7.5 Gy) the radioprotective efficacy Vinca alkaloids drugs was investigated. It has been shown that enterally administered Vincanor (10 mg/kg over a three-day period) increased the radioresistance of animals. The prolonged radioprotective effect of Vincanor are discussed with regard to the phenomenon of sequential partial DNA synthesis inhibition in radiosensitive tissues. PMID:8069381

  13. Amaryllidaceae Isocarbostyril Alkaloids and Their Derivatives as Promising Antitumor Agents

    PubMed Central

    Ingrassia, Laurent; Lefranc, Florence; Mathieu, Véronique; Darro, Francis; Kiss, Robert

    2008-01-01

    This review covers the isolation, total synthesis, biologic activity, and more particularly the in vitro and in vivo antitumor activities of naturally occurring isocarbostyril alkaloids from the Amaryllidaceae family. Starting from these natural products, new derivatives have been synthesized to explore structure-activity relationships within the chemical class and to obtain potential candidates for preclinical development. This approach appears to be capable of providing novel promising anticancer agents. PMID:18607503

  14. Ultrasonic extraction of steroidal alkaloids from potato peel waste.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mohammad B; Tiwari, Brijesh K; Gangopadhyay, Nirupama; O'Donnell, Colm P; Brunton, Nigel P; Rai, Dilip K

    2014-07-01

    Potato processors produce large volumes of waste in the form of potato peel which is either discarded or sold at a low price. Potato peel waste is a potential source of steroidal alkaloids which are biologically active secondary metabolites which could serve as precursors to agents with apoptotic, chemopreventive and anti-inflammatory properties. The present study investigated the relative efficacy of ultrasound assisted extraction (UAE) and solid liquid extraction (SLE) both using methanol, to extract steroidal alkaloids from potato peel waste and identified optimal conditions for UAE of α-solanine, α-chaconine, solanidine and demissidine. Using response surface methodology optimal UAE conditions were identified as an amplitude of 61 μm and an extraction time of 17 min which resulted the recovery of 1102 μg steroidal alkaloids/g dried potato peel (DPP). In contrast, SLE yielded 710.51 glycoalkaloid μg/g DPP. Recoveries of individual glycoalkoids using UAE yielded 273, 542.7, 231 and 55.3 μg/g DPP for α-solanine, α-chaconine, solanidine and demissidine respectively. Whereas for SLE yields were 180.3, 337.6, 160.2 and 32.4 μg/g DPP for α-solanine, α-chaconine, solanidine and demissidine respectively. The predicted values from the developed second order quadratic polynomial equation were in close agreement with the experimental values with low average mean deviation (E<5%) values. Predicted models were highly significant (p<0.05) for all parameters studied. This study indicates that UAE has strong potential as an extraction method for steroidal alkaloids from potato peel waste. PMID:24582305

  15. Flueggether A and Virosinine A, Anti-HIV Alkaloids from Flueggea virosa.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Zhu, Kong-Kai; Han, Ying-Shan; Luo, Cheng; Wainberg, Mark A; Yue, Jian-Min

    2015-12-18

    Two new alkaloids, flueggether A (1) and virosinine A (2), were isolated from a Chinese medicinal plant, Flueggea virosa. Their structures were assigned via spectroscopic methods with the absolute configurations of 1 and 2 being established by X-ray diffraction analysis and calculated electronic circular dichroism data, respectively. Compound 1 represents the first example with an ether bridge of Securinega alkaloid oligomers, and 2 bears a new heterocyclic backbone. Both alkaloids showed mild in vitro anti-HIV activity. PMID:26632657

  16. Five New Alkaloids from Cephalotaxus lanceolata and C. fortunei var. alpina.

    PubMed

    Ni, Ling; Zhong, Xiu-Hong; Cai, Jie; Bao, Mei-Fen; Zhang, Bing-Jie; Wu, Jing; Cai, Xiang-Hai

    2016-06-01

    Five new alkaloids (1-5) were isolated from the leaves and twigs of Cephalotaxus lanceolata and C. fortunei var. alpina along with 24 known alkaloids. The new structures were elucidated based on spectroscopic data including 1D and 2D NMR, FTIR, UV and MS. These new alkaloids showed no cytotoxicity to HeLa, SGC-7901 gastric cancer, and A-549 lung cancer cell lines. PMID:27016921

  17. Tyrokeradines G and H, new bromotyrosine alkaloids from an Okinawan Verongid sponge.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Takaaki; Watase, Shinya; Sakai, Kanae; Fromont, Jane; Gonoi, Tohru; Kobayashi, Jun'ichi

    2015-11-15

    Two new bromotyrosine alkaloids, tyrokeradines G (1) and H (2), have been isolated from an Okinawan marine sponge of the order Verongida. The structures of 1 and 2 were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data. Tyrokeradine G (1) is the first bromotyrosine alkaloid possessing a β-alanine unit, while tyrokeradine H (2) is a rare bromotyrosine alkaloid possessing a N-substituted pyridinium ring. Tyrokeradines G (1) and H (2) showed antifungal activity. PMID:26459215

  18. Localization of the Enzymes of Quinolizidine Alkaloid Biosynthesis in Leaf Chloroplasts of Lupinus polyphyllus1

    PubMed Central

    Wink, Michael; Hartmann, Thomas

    1982-01-01

    Studies with purified chloroplasts of Lupinus polyphyllus LINDL. leaflets indicate that the first two enzymes of quinolizidine alkaloid biosynthesis, lysine decarboxylase and 17-oxosparteine synthase, are localized in the chloroplast stroma. Thus, both enzymes share the same subcellular compartment as the biosynthetic pathway of lysine, the precursor of quinolizidine alkaloids. The activity of diaminopimelate decarboxylase, the final enzyme in lysine biosynthesis, is about two to three orders of magnitude higher than that of the enzymes of alkaloid formation. PMID:16662483

  19. Isoquinoline alkaloids from Tinospora cordifolia inhibit rat lens aldose reductase.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mayurkumar B; Mishra, Shrihari

    2012-09-01

    The inhibitory activity of Tinospora cordifolia stem-derived alkaloids was evaluated against lens aldose reductase (AR) isolated from male Wistar rats. Anticataract potential of the alkaloids of T. cordifolia was evaluated in vitro in rat lenses, considering the activity of normal rat lenses as 100%. The biologically active constituents of T. cordifolia extract were characterized as the isoquinoline alkaloids, jatrorrhizine, palmatine and magnoflorine, by spectral analysis. The inhibitory effects varied with all chemicals and concentrations used. The inhibitory concentration (IC₅₀) values of jatrorrhizine, palmatine and magnoflorine are 3.23, 3.45 and 1.25 µg/mL respectively. The concentration of maximum activity was selected for its effect on galactose-induced polyol accumulation in vitro. The percentage inhibition of galactose-induced polyol accumulation was 62.6, 58.8 and 27.7% in the presence of jatrorrhizine, palmatine and magnoflorine, respectively. Magnoflorine may be useful as lead compounds and new agents for AR inhibition. PMID:22294283

  20. Ergot Alkaloids (Re)generate New Leads as Antiparasitics

    PubMed Central

    Chan, John D.; Agbedanu, Prince N.; Grab, Thomas; Zamanian, Mostafa; Dosa, Peter I.; Day, Timothy A.; Marchant, Jonathan S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Praziquantel (PZQ) is a key therapy for treatment of parasitic flatworm infections of humans and livestock, but the mechanism of action of this drug is unresolved. Resolving PZQ-engaged targets and effectors is important for identifying new druggable pathways that may yield novel antiparasitic agents. Here we use functional, genetic and pharmacological approaches to reveal that serotonergic signals antagonize PZQ action in vivo. Exogenous 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) rescued PZQ-evoked polarity and mobility defects in free-living planarian flatworms. In contrast, knockdown of a prevalently expressed planarian 5-HT receptor potentiated or phenocopied PZQ action in different functional assays. Subsequent screening of serotonergic ligands revealed that several ergot alkaloids possessed broad efficacy at modulating regenerative outcomes and the mobility of both free living and parasitic flatworms. Ergot alkaloids that phenocopied PZQ in regenerative assays to cause bipolar regeneration exhibited structural modifications consistent with serotonergic blockade. These data suggest that serotonergic activation blocks PZQ action in vivo, while serotonergic antagonists phenocopy PZQ action. Importantly these studies identify the ergot alkaloid scaffold as a promising structural framework for designing potent agents targeting parasitic bioaminergic G protein coupled receptors. PMID:26367744

  1. Absence of alkaloids in Psychotria carthagenensis Jacq. (Rubiaceae).

    PubMed

    Leal, M B; Elisabetsky, E

    1996-10-01

    Psychotria viridis and P. carthagenensis are often discussed in relation to the hallucinogenic beverage Ayahuasca, used for religious, medicinal and social purposes. The significance of including Psychotria species in this beverage has been understood on the basis of substantial amounts of tryptamine alkaloids detected on leaves of both P. viridis and P. carthagenensis. Nevertheless, there is a long lasting debate over the identification of which Psychotria species are actually traditionally employed. We here report that a P. carthagenensis leaf ethanol extract was found to be devoid of alkaloids. The extract significantly decreased mice body temperature (350 and 500 mg/kg). Toxicity assessment revealed that the extract induced sedation and slight ptoses (75% of animals treated with 1000 mg/kg). Lethality was not observed within 48 h. The data indicate that P. carthagenensis does have bioactive compound(s), possibly active at the central nervous system, but unlikely to be tryptamine alkaloids as in the case of P. viridis. Therefore, if P. carthagenensis is indeed used by ayahuasqueros, its chemical and pharmacological significance have yet to be elucidated. PMID:8941866

  2. Determination of alkaloids in onion nectar by micellar electrokinetic chromatography.

    PubMed

    Carolina Soto, Verónica; Jofré, Viviana Patricia; Galmarini, Claudio Romulo; Silva, María Fernanda

    2016-07-01

    Nectar is the most important floral reward offered by plants to insects. Minor components such as alkaloid compounds in nectar affect bee foraging, with great influence in seed production. CE is an advantageous tool for the analysis of unexplored samples such as onion nectar due to the limited amounts of samples. Considering the importance of these compounds, a simultaneous determination of nicotine, theophylline, theobromine, caffeine, harmaline, piperine in onion nectar by MEKC-UV is herein reported. The extraction of alkaloid compounds in nectar was performed by SPE using a homemade miniaturized column (C18 ). Effects of several important factors affecting extraction efficiency as well as electrophoretic performance were investigated to acquire optimum conditions. Under the proposed conditions, the analytes can be separated within 15 min in a 50 cm effective length capillary (75 μm id) at a separation voltage of 20 kV in 20 mmol/L sodium tretraborate, 100 mmol/L SDS. The amount of sample requirement was reduced up to 2000 times, when compared to traditional methods, reaching limits of detection as low as 0.0153 ng/L. For the first time, this study demonstrates that there are marked qualitative and quantitative differences in nectar alkaloids between open pollinated and male sterile lines (MSLs) and also within MSLs. PMID:27005835

  3. Metabolic engineering for the production of plant isoquinoline alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Andrew; Desgagné-Penix, Isabel

    2016-06-01

    Several plant isoquinoline alkaloids (PIAs) possess powerful pharmaceutical and biotechnological properties. Thus, PIA metabolism and its fascinating molecules, including morphine, colchicine and galanthamine, have attracted the attention of both the industry and researchers involved in plant science, biochemistry, chemical bioengineering and medicine. Currently, access and availability of high-value PIAs [commercialized (e.g. galanthamine) or not (e.g. narciclasine)] is limited by low concentration in nature, lack of cultivation or geographic access, seasonal production and risk of overharvesting wild plant species. Nevertheless, most commercial PIAs are still extracted from plant sources. Efforts to improve the production of PIA have largely been impaired by the lack of knowledge on PIA metabolism. With the development and integration of next-generation sequencing technologies, high-throughput proteomics and metabolomics analyses and bioinformatics, systems biology was used to unravel metabolic pathways allowing the use of metabolic engineering and synthetic biology approaches to increase production of valuable PIAs. Metabolic engineering provides opportunity to overcome issues related to restricted availability, diversification and productivity of plant alkaloids. Engineered plant, plant cells and microbial cell cultures can act as biofactories by offering their metabolic machinery for the purpose of optimizing the conditions and increasing the productivity of a specific alkaloid. In this article, is presented an update on the production of PIA in engineered plant, plant cell cultures and heterologous micro-organisms. PMID:26503307

  4. Short-term toxicity studies of loline alkaloids in mice.

    PubMed

    Finch, S C; Munday, J S; Munday, R; Kerby, J W F

    2016-08-01

    Epichloë endophytes have been used successfully in pastoral systems to reduce the impact of insect pests through the expression of secondary metabolites. The use of endophytes could be extended to other plant species, such as cereal crops, where the production of bioactive secondary metabolites would reduce the reliance on pesticides for insect control. The success of this approach is dependent on the selection of an appropriate secondary metabolite target which must not only be effective against insect pests but also be safe for grazing and monogastric animals. The loline alkaloids have been identified as possible target metabolites as they are associated with potent effects on insects and low toxicity to grazing animals. The purpose of the current study was to generate toxicological data on the loline alkaloids in a monogastric system using mice. Male and female mice were fed 415 mg/kg/day total lolines for a 3-week period. The loline treatment caused no statistically significant effect on gross pathology, histology, haematology, blood chemistry, heart rate, blood pressure or motor coordination. Reduced weight gain and food consumption were noted in the loline groups during the initial stages of the experiment. This experiment raises no food safety concerns for the loline alkaloids. PMID:27276360

  5. Plug-and-Play Benzylisoquinoline Alkaloid Biosynthetic Gene Discovery in Engineered Yeast.

    PubMed

    Morris, J S; Dastmalchi, M; Li, J; Chang, L; Chen, X; Hagel, J M; Facchini, P J

    2016-01-01

    Benzylisoquinoline alkaloid (BIA) metabolism has been the focus of a considerable research effort over the past half-century, primarily because of the pharmaceutical importance of several compounds produced by opium poppy (Papaver somniferum). Advancements in genomics technologies have substantially accelerated the rate of gene discovery over the past decade, such that most biosynthetic enzymes involved in the formation of the major alkaloids of opium poppy have now been isolated and partially characterized. Not unexpectedly, the availability of all perceived biosynthetic genes has facilitated the reconstitution of several BIA pathways in microbial hosts, including yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Product yields are currently insufficient to consider the commercial production of high-value BIAs, such as morphine. However, the rudimentary success demonstrated by the uncomplicated and routine assembly of a multitude of characterized BIA biosynthetic genes provides a valuable gene discovery tool for the rapid functional identification of the plethora of gene candidates available through increasingly accessible genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic databases. BIA biosynthetic gene discovery represents a substantial research opportunity largely owing to the wealth of existing enzyme data mostly obtained from a single plant species. Functionally novel enzymes and variants with potential metabolic engineering applications can be considered the primary targets. Selection of candidates from sequence repositories is facilitated by the monophyletic relationship among biosynthetic genes belonging to a wide range of enzyme families, such as the numerous cytochromes P450 and AdoMet-dependent O- and N-methyltransferases that operate in BIA metabolism. We describe methods for the rapid functional screening of uncharacterized gene candidates encoding potential BIA biosynthetic enzymes using yeast strains engineered to perform selected metabolic conversions. As an initial

  6. Recent Advances on the Total Syntheses of Communesin Alkaloids and Perophoramidine.

    PubMed

    Trost, Barry M; Osipov, Maksim

    2015-11-01

    The communesin alkaloids are a diverse family of Penicillium-derived alkaloids. Their caged-polycyclic structure and intriguing biological profiles have made these natural products attractive targets for total synthesis. Similarly, the ascidian-derived alkaloid, perophoramidine, is structurally related to the communesins and has also become a popular target for total synthesis. This review serves to summarize the many elegant approaches that have been developed to access the communesin alkaloids and perophoramidine. Likewise, strategies to access the communesin ring system are reviewed. PMID:26353936

  7. Identification and developmental expression profiling of putative alkaloid biosynthetic genes in Corydalis yanhusuo bulbs

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Dengqun; Wang, Pengfei; Jia, Chan; Sun, Peng; Qi, Jianjun; Zhou, Lili; Li, Xian’en

    2016-01-01

    Alkaloids in bulbs of Corydalis (C.) yanhusuo are the major pharmacologically active compounds in treatment of blood vessel diseases, tumors and various pains. However, due to the absence of gene sequences in C. yanhusuo, the genes involved in alkaloid biosynthesis and their expression during bulb development remain unknown. We therefore established the first transcriptome database of C. yanhusuo via Illumina mRNA-Sequencing of a RNA composite sample collected at Bulb initiation (Day 0), early enlargement (Day 10) and maturation (Day 30). 25,013,630 clean 90 bp paired-end reads were de novo assembled into 47,081 unigenes with an average length of 489 bp, among which 30,868 unigenes (65.56%) were annotated in four protein databases. Of 526 putative unigenes involved in biosynthesis o f various alkaloids, 187 were identified as the candidate genes involved in the biosynthesis of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs), the only alkaloid type reported in C. yanhusuo untill now. BIAs biosynthetic genes were highly upregulated in the overall pathway during bulb development. Identification of alkaloid biosynthetic genes in C. yanhusuo provide insights on pathways and molecular regulation of alkaloid biosynthesis, to initiate metabolic engineering in order to improve the yield of interesting alkaloids and to identify potentially new alkaloids predicted from the transcriptomic information. PMID:26777987

  8. Feeding responses to selected alkaloids by gypsy moth larvae, Lymantria dispar (L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Vonnie D. C.; Rodgers, Erin J.; Arnold, Nicole S.; Williams, Denise

    2006-03-01

    Deterrent compounds are important in influencing the food selection of many phytophagous insects. Plants containing deterrents, such as alkaloids, are generally unfavored and typically avoided by many polyphagous lepidopteran species, including the gypsy moth Lymantria dispar (L.) (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae). We tested the deterrent effects of eight alkaloids using two-choice feeding bioassays. Each alkaloid was applied at biologically relevant concentrations to glass fiber disks and leaf disks from red oak trees ( Quercus rubra) (L.), a plant species highly favored by these larvae. All eight alkaloids tested on glass fiber disks were deterrent to varying degrees. When these alkaloids were applied to leaf disks, only seven were still deterrent. Of these seven, five were less deterrent on leaf disks compared with glass fiber disks, indicating that their potency was dramatically reduced when they were applied to leaf disks. The reduction in deterrency may be attributed to the phagostimulatory effect of red oak leaves in suppressing the negative deterrent effect of these alkaloids, suggesting that individual alkaloids may confer context-dependent deterrent effects in plants in which they occur. This study provides novel insights into the feeding behavioral responses of insect larvae, such as L. dispar, to selected deterrent alkaloids when applied to natural vs artificial substrates and has the potential to suggest deterrent alkaloids as possible candidates for agricultural use.

  9. Structural Diversity and Biological Activities of Indole Diketopiperazine Alkaloids from Fungi.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yang-Min; Liang, Xi-Ai; Kong, Yang; Jia, Bin

    2016-09-01

    Indole diketopiperazine alkaloids are secondary metabolites of microorganisms that are widely distributed in filamentous fungi, especially in the genera Aspergillus and Penicillium of the phylum Ascomycota or sac fungi. These alkaloids represent a group of natural products characterized by diversity in both chemical structures and biological activities. This review aims to summarize 166 indole diketopiperazine alkaloids from fungi published from 1944 to mid-2015. The emphasis is on diverse chemical structures within these alkaloids and their relevant biological activities. The aim is to assess which of these compounds merit further study for purposes of drug development. PMID:27538469

  10. A new isoquinoline alkaloid with anti-microbial properties from Berberis jaeschkeana Schneid. var. jaeschkeana.

    PubMed

    Alamzeb, Muhammad; Khan, M Rafiullah; Mamoon-Ur-Rashid; Ali, Saqib; Khan, Ashfaq Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    One new isoquinoline alkaloid named berberidione (1) along with four new source alkaloids berberine (2), palmatine (3), jatrorrhizine (4) and chondrofoline (5) and three new source non-alkaloids syringic acid (6), β-sitosterol (7) and stigmasterol (8) was isolated and characterised from different fractions of Berberis jaeschkeana Schneid var. jaeschkeana. All the structures were determined from 1D and 2D spectroscopic data. Crude extract, sub-fractions and isolated compounds showed excellent anti-microbial properties. The toxicity level for the alkaloids was found to be very low on THP-1 cells. PMID:25424893

  11. (+)-Chenabinol (Revised NMR Data) and Two New Alkaloids from Berberis vulgaris and their Biological Activity.

    PubMed

    Novák, Zdenĕk; Hošt'álková, Anna; Opletal, Lubomír; Nováková, Lucie; Hrabinová, Martina; Kuneš, Jiří; Cahlíková, Lucie

    2015-10-01

    A known alkaloid (+)-chenabinol (1) and two new secobisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids were isolated by standard chromatographic methods from the root bark of Berberis vulgaris L. The structures of the new alkaloids, named berkristine (2) and verfilline (3), were established by spectroscopic (including 2D NMR), and HRMS (ESI) methods. The alkaloids were tested for their inhibition activity of human cholinesterases and prolyl oligopeptidase. Compound 1 inhibited human butyrylcholinesterase with an IC50 value of 44.8 ± 5.4 μM. PMID:26669104

  12. Chemotypic and genotypic diversity in the ergot alkaloid pathway of Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sarah L; Panaccione, Daniel G

    2012-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an opportunistic human pathogen that synthesizes a group of mycotoxins via a branch of the ergot alkaloid pathway. This fungus is globally distributed, and genetic data indicate that isolates recombine freely over that range; however, previous work on ergot alkaloids has focused on a limited number of isolates. We hypothesized that A. fumigatus harbors variation in the chemotype of ergot alkaloids and genotype of the ergot alkaloid gene cluster. Analysis of 13 isolates by high performance liquid chromatography revealed four distinct ergot alkaloid profiles or chemotypes. Five isolates completed the A. fumigatus branch of the ergot alkaloid pathway to fumigaclavine C. Six independent isolates accumulated fumigaclavine A, the pathway intermediate immediately before fumigaclavine C. One isolate accumulated only the early pathway intermediates chanoclavine-i and chanocla-vine-i aldehyde, and one isolate lacked ergot alkaloids altogether. A genetic basis for each of the observed chemotypes was obtained either by PCR analysis of the ergot alkaloid gene cluster or through sequencing of easL, the gene encoding the prenyl transferase that reverse prenylates fumigaclavine A to fumigaclavine C. Isolates also exhibited differences in pigmentation and sporulation. The ergot alkaloid chemotypes were widely distributed geographically and among substrate of origin. PMID:22453123

  13. Alkaloid variation in New Zealand kōwhai, Sophora species.

    PubMed

    McDougal, Owen M; Heenan, Peter B; Jaksons, Peter; Sansom, Catherine E; Smallfield, Bruce M; Perry, Nigel B; van Klink, John W

    2015-10-01

    Alkaloid contents of leaf and seed samples of eight species of Sophora native to New Zealand, plus Sophora cassioides from Chile are reported. Fifty-six leaf and forty-two seed samples were analysed for alkaloid content by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which showed major alkaloids as cytisine, N-methyl cytisine and matrine. GC analyses quantified these and identified further alkaloid components. The alkaloids identified were cytisine, sparteine, and matrine-types common to Sophora from other regions of the world. Cytisine, N-methyl cytisine, and matrine were generally the most abundant alkaloids across all species with seeds containing the highest concentrations of alkaloids. However, there was no clear taxonomic grouping based on alkaloid composition. A quantitative analysis of various parts of two Sophora microphylla trees showed that the seeds were the richest source of alkaloids (total 0.4-0.5% DM), followed by leaf and twig (0.1-0.3%) and then bark (0.04-0.06%), with only low amounts (<0.02%) found in the roots. This study represents the most comprehensive phytochemical investigation of New Zealand Sophora species to date and presents data for three species of Sophora for which no prior chemistry has been reported. PMID:26253652

  14. Naturally occurring bioactive Cyclobutane-containing (CBC) alkaloids in fungi, fungal endophytes, and plants.

    PubMed

    Dembitsky, Valery M

    2014-10-15

    This article focuses on the occurrence and biological activities of cyclobutane-containing (CBC) alkaloids obtained from fungi, fungal endophytes, and plants. Naturally occurring CBC alkaloids are of particular interest because many of these compounds display important biological activities and possess antitumour, antibacterial, antimicrobial, antifungal, and immunosuppressive properties. Therefore, these compounds are of great interest in the fields of medicine, pharmacology, medicinal chemistry, and the pharmaceutical industry. Fermentation and production of CBC alkaloids by fungi and/or fungal endophytes is also discussed. This review presents the structures and describes the activities of 98 CBC alkaloids. PMID:25442265

  15. Elemental step thermodynamics of various analogues of indazolium alkaloids to obtaining hydride in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Lei, Nan-Ping; Fu, Yan-Hua; Zhu, Xiao-Qing

    2015-12-21

    A series of analogues of indazolium alkaloids were designed and synthesized. The thermodynamic driving forces of the 6 elemental steps for the analogues of indazolium alkaloids to obtain hydride in acetonitrile were determined using an isothermal titration calorimeter (ITC) and electrochemical methods, respectively. The effects of molecular structure and substituents on the thermodynamic driving forces of the 6 steps were examined. Meanwhile, the oxidation mechanism of NADH coenzyme by indazolium alkaloids was examined using the chemical mimic method. The result shows that the oxidation of NADH coenzyme by indazolium alkaloids in vivo takes place by one-step concerted hydride transfer mechanism. PMID:26451708

  16. Reaction of dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids with valine and hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuewei; Wang, Shuguang; Xia, Qingsu; Gamboa da Costa, Gonçalo; Doerge, Daniel R; Cai, Lining; Fu, Peter P

    2014-10-20

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloid-containing plants are probably the most common poisonous plants affecting livestock, wildlife, and humans. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids exert toxicity through metabolism to dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids that bind to cellular protein and DNA, leading to hepatotoxicity, genotoxicity, and tumorigenicity. To date, it is not clear how dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids bind to cellular constituents, including amino acids and proteins, resulting in toxicity. Metabolism of carcinogenic monocrotaline, riddelliine, and heliotrine produces dehydromonocrotaline, dehyroriddelliine, and dehydroheliotrine, respectively, as primary reactive metabolites. In this study, we report that reaction of dehydromonocrotaline with valine generated four highly unstable 6,7-dihydro-7-hydroxy-1-hydroxymethyl-5H-pyrrolizine (DHP)-derived valine (DHP-valine) adducts. For structural elucidation, DHP-valine adducts were derivatized with phenyl isothiocyanate (PITC) to DHP-valine-PITC products. After HPLC separation, their structures were characterized by mass spectrometry, UV-visible spectrophotometry, (1)H NMR, and (1)H-(1)H COSY NMR spectral analysis. Two DHP-valine-PITC adducts, designated as DHP-valine-PITC-1 and DHP-valine-PITC-3, had the amino group of valine linked to the C7 position of the necine base, and the other two DHP-valine-PITC products, DHP-valine-PITC-2 and DHP-valine-PITC-4, linked to the C9 position of the necine base. DHP-valine-PITC-1 was interconvertible with DHP-valine-PITC-3, and DHP-valine-PITC-2 was interconvertible with DHP-valine-PITC-4. Reaction of dehydroriddelliine and dehydroheliotrine with valine provided similar results. However, reaction of valine and dehydroretronecine (DHR) under similar experimental conditions did not produce DHP-valine adducts. Reaction of dehydromonocrotaline with rat hemoglobin followed by derivatization with PITC also generated the same four DHP-valine-PITC adducts. This represents the first full structural elucidation of

  17. An Ergot Alkaloid Biosynthesis Gene and Clustered Hypothetical Genes from Aspergillus fumigatus†

    PubMed Central

    Coyle, Christine M.; Panaccione, Daniel G.

    2005-01-01

    The ergot alkaloids are a family of indole-derived mycotoxins with a variety of significant biological activities. Aspergillus fumigatus, a common airborne fungus and opportunistic human pathogen, and several fungi in the relatively distant taxon Clavicipitaceae (clavicipitaceous fungi) produce different sets of ergot alkaloids. The ergot alkaloids of these divergent fungi share a four-member ergoline ring but differ in the number, type, and position of the side chains. Several genes required for ergot alkaloid production are known in the clavicipitaceous fungi, and these genes are clustered in the genome of the ergot fungus Claviceps purpurea. We investigated whether the ergot alkaloids of A. fumigatus have a common biosynthetic and genetic origin with those of the clavicipitaceous fungi. A homolog of dmaW, the gene controlling the determinant step in the ergot alkaloid pathway of clavicipitaceous fungi, was identified in the A. fumigatus genome. Knockout of dmaW eliminated all known ergot alkaloids from A. fumigatus, and complementation of the mutation restored ergot alkaloid production. Clustered with dmaW in the A. fumigatus genome are sequences corresponding to five genes previously proposed to encode steps in the ergot alkaloid pathway of C. purpurea, as well as additional sequences whose deduced protein products are consistent with their involvement in the ergot alkaloid pathway. The corresponding genes have similarities in their nucleotide sequences, but the orientations and positions within the cluster of several of these genes differ. The data indicate that the ergot alkaloid biosynthetic capabilities in A. fumigatus and the clavicipitaceous fungi had a common origin. PMID:15933009

  18. Dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids in two Cryptantha species: Including two new open chain diesters one of which is amphoteric

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A livestock poisoning outbreak near Kingman, Arizona, USA, potentially linked to dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids, prompted an evaluation of some local plants for the presence of these hepatotoxic alkaloids. Two species of Cryptantha, a Boraginaceous genus previously shown to produce potentially toxic...

  19. [Effect produced by the alkaloid fraction of Mimosa tenuiflora (tepescohuite) on the peristaltic reflex of the guinea pig ileum].

    PubMed

    Meckes-Lozoya, M; Lozoya, X; González, J L; Martínez, M

    1990-01-01

    An alkaloidal fraction was obtained from Mimosa tenuiflora (Willd.) Poir (tepescohuite) trunk bark. The product contained mainly an indolealkylamine and three minor alkaloids. This fraction inhibited the peristaltic reflex in the guinea-pig isolated ileum in vitro. PMID:2103706

  20. Plant-symbiotic fungi as chemical engineers: multi-genome analysis of the Clavicipitaceae reveals dynamics of alkaloid loci

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungal family Clavicipitaceae includes plant symbionts and pathogens that produce neurotropic alkaloids with diverse effects on vertebrate and invertebrate animals. For example, ergot alkaloids are historically linked to mass poisonings (St. Anthony's fire) and sociological effects such as the ...

  1. Atropurpuran – Missing Biosynthetic Link Leading to the Hetidine and Arcutine C20-Diterpenoid Alkaloids or an Oxidative Degradation Product?

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Manuel; Owens, Kyle; Sarpong, Richmond

    2015-01-01

    A possible biosynthetic link between atropurpuran, the hetidine diterpenoid alkaloids and the alkaloid arcutine and congeners is proposed. The feasibility of aspects of this biosynthesis, especially key 1,2-rearrangements, have been examined computationally. PMID:26028789

  2. A divergent approach to benzylisoquinoline-type and oxoaporphine alkaloids via regioselective direct ring metalation of alkoxy isoquinolines.

    PubMed

    Melzer, Benedikt; Bracher, Franz

    2015-07-28

    Methoxy- and benzyloxy-substituted isoquinolines are regioselectively metalated at C-1 with the Knochel-Hauser base, subsequent trapping with aromatic aldehydes gives aryl(isoquinolin-1-yl)carbinols as building blocks for divergent syntheses of different types of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids. Photochemical cyclization of ortho-bromo analogues under reductive conditions gives oxoaporphine alkaloids. Nine benzylisoquinoline alkaloids and two oxoaporphine alkaloids were obtained in two or three steps from appropriate isoquinolines. PMID:26081123

  3. Analysis of Alkaloids from Physalis peruviana by Capillary GC, Capillary GC-MS, and GC-FTIR.

    PubMed

    Kubwabo, C; Rollmann, B; Tilquin, B

    1993-04-01

    The alkaloid composition of the aerial parts and roots of PHYSALIS PERUVIANA was analysed by capillary GC (GC (2)), GC (2)-MS and GC (2)-FTIR. Eight alkaloids were identified, three of those alkaloids are 3beta-acetoxytropane and two N-methylpyrrolidinylhygrine isomers, which were not previously found in the genus PHYSALIS. A reproduction of the identification of alkaloids detected in the plant by the use of retention indices has been proposed. PMID:17230349

  4. Conformational, IR spectroscopic and electronic properties of conium alkaloids and their adducts with C60 fullerene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabolotnyi, M. A.; Prylutskyy, Yu I.; Poluyan, N. A.; Evstigneev, M. P.; Dovbeshko, G. I.

    2016-08-01

    Conformational, IR spectroscopic and electronic properties of the components of Conium alkaloids (Conium maculatum) in aqueous environment were determined by model calculations and experiment. With the help of FT-IR spectroscopy the possibility of formation of an adduct between γ-coniceine alkaloid and C60 fullerene was demonstrated, which is important for further application of conium analogues in biomedical purposes.

  5. Dimerization of (+)-Myrmicarin 215B. A Potential Biomimetic Approach to Complex Myrmicarin Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Ondrus, Alison E.; Movassaghi, Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    The acid promoted diastereoselective dimerization of myrmicarin 215B is described. The reactivity of these sensitive alkaloids, structural assignment, and a possible mechanism for the observed dimerization are discussed. These finding raise the intriguing possibility of the synthesis of the highly sensitive myrmicarin alkaloids based on a strategy involving the direct dimerization of functional tricyclic myrmicarin derivatives. PMID:20640170

  6. Dietary exposure to ergot alkaloids decreases contractility of bovine mesenteric vasculature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ergot alkaloids are hypothesized to cause vasoconstriction in the midgut, and prior exposure may affect vasoactivity of these compounds. Objectives were to profile vasoactivity of ergot alkaloids in mesenteric artery and vein and determine if previous exposure to endophyte-infected tall fescue affec...

  7. Dietary exposure to ergot alkaloids decreases contractility of bovine mesenteric vasculature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ergot alkaloids are hypothesized to cause vasoconstriction in the midgut, and prior exposure may affect the vasoactivity of these compounds. The objectives of this study were to profile vasoactivity of ergot alkaloids in bovine mesenteric artery (MA) and vein (MV) and determine if previous exposure ...

  8. Role of the LolP Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenase in Loline Alkaloid Biosynthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The insecticidal loline alkaloids, produced by Neotyphodium uncinatum and related endophytes, are exo-1-aminopyrrolizidines with an ether bridge between C-2 and C-7. Loline alkaloids vary in methyl, acetyl, and formyl substituents on the 1-amine, which affect their biological activity. Enzymes for k...

  9. Antimicrobial agents from higher plants. The quaternary alkaloids of Ptelea trifoliata.

    PubMed

    Mitscher, L A; Bathala, M S; Clark, G W; Beal, J L

    1975-01-01

    Quaternary alkaloid extracts of Ptelea trifoliata showed potentially interesting antimicrobial activity. Chromatographic examination showed the presence of six components. Of these, choline and O-4-methyl ptelefolinium were known compounds. Rational structures are proposed for the new alkaloids, O-4-methylhydroxyluninium, neohydroxylunine and pteleatinium salts. Pteleatinium salt is responsible for the antimicrobial activity of the extracts of the plant. PMID:1094214

  10. Recognition of pyrrolizidine alkaloid esters in the invasive aquatic plant Gymnocoronis spilanthoides (Asteraceae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction – The freshwater aquatic plant Gymnocoronis spilanthoides (Senegal tea plant, jazmín del bañado, Falscher Wasserfreund) is an invasive plant in many countries. Behavioural observations of pyrrolizidine alkaloid-pharmacophagous butterflies suggested the presence of pyrrolizidine alkaloid...

  11. Effect of Feeding Fescue Seed Containing Ergot Alkaloid Toxins on Stallion Spermatogenesis and Sperm Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fayrer-Hosken, R; Stanley, A; Hill, N; Heusner, G; Christian, M; Fuente, R De La; Baumann, C; Jones, L

    2012-01-01

    Contents The cellular effects of tall fescue grass–associated toxic ergot alkaloids on stallion sperm and colt testicular tissue were evaluated. This was a continuation of an initial experiment where the effects of toxic ergot alkaloids on the stallion spermiogram were investigated. The only spermiogram parameter in exposed stallions that was affected by the toxic ergot alkaloids was a decreased gel-free volume of the ejaculate. This study examined the effect of toxic ergot alkaloids on chilling and freezing of the stallion sperm cells. The effect of toxic ergot alkaloids on chilled extended sperm cells for 48 h at 5 °C was to make the sperm cells less likely to undergo a calcium ionophore–induced acrosome reaction. The toxic ergot alkaloids had no effect on the freezability of sperm cells. However, if yearling colts were fed toxic ergot alkaloids, then the cytological analysis of meiotic chromosome synapsis revealed a significant increase in the proportion of pachytene spermatocytes showing unpaired sex chromosomes compared to control spermatocytes. There was little effect of ergot alkaloids on adult stallions, but there might be a significant effect on yearling colts. PMID:22524585

  12. Toxicity of ergovaline, the tall fescue ergot alkaloid, to Pratylenchus scribneri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neotyphodium infected tall fescue produces a variety of secondary metabolites that are toxic and/or grazing deterrents. Alkaloid production has been related to defense against vertebrate and insect pests, in particular plant-parasitic nematodes. The ergot and pyrrollizidine (loline) alkaloids are ...

  13. Antifungal activity of the methanolic extract and alkaloids of Glaucium oxylobum.

    PubMed

    Morteza-Semnani, K; Amin, Gh; Shidfar, M R; Hadizadeh, H; Shafiee, A

    2003-07-01

    The methanolic extract and total alkaloids of the aerial parts of Glaucium oxylobum exhibited good activity against Microsporum gypseum, Microsporum canis, Trichophyton mentagrophytes and Epidermophyton floccosum. Four alkaloids, dicentrine, glaucine, protopine, and alpha-allocryptopine, were identified as the compounds responsible for the antifungal activity of this plant. PMID:12837370

  14. Heterozygous P53 knockout mouse model for dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloid-induced carcinogenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids are a large, structurally diverse group of plant-derived protoxins that are potentially carcinogenic. With worldwide significance, these alkaloids can contaminate or be naturally present in the human food supply. To develop a small animal model that may be used to com...

  15. Plant alkaloids that cause developmental defects through the disruption of cholinergic neurotransmission

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The exposure of a developing embryo or fetus to alkaloids from plants, plant products, or plant extracts has the potential to cause developmental defects in humans and animals. These defects may have multiple causes but those induced by piperidine and quinolizidine alkaloids arise from the inhibiti...

  16. Synthesis and antiproliferativeactivity of new vinca alkaloids containing an α,β-unsaturated aromatic side chain.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Quoc Anh; Nguyen, Le Anh; Vo, Ngoc Binh; Nguyen, Thuy Hang; Roussi, Fanny; Nguyen, The Hung; Nguyen, Van Tuyen

    2015-12-01

    A new series of vinca-alkaloids derivatives containing various α,β-unsaturated aromatic side chains was synthesized. Four new vinca-alkaloids derivatives showed selective cytotoxicities against KB tumor cell lines with IC50 value below 0.1 μM, thus comparable with vinblastine. PMID:26522953

  17. Abundant Respirable Ergot Alkaloids from the Common Airborne Fungus Aspergillus fumigatus†

    PubMed Central

    Panaccione, Daniel G.; Coyle, Christine M.

    2005-01-01

    Ergot alkaloids are mycotoxins that interact with several monoamine receptors, negatively affecting cardiovascular, nervous, reproductive, and immune systems of exposed humans and animals. Aspergillus fumigatus, a common airborne fungus and opportunistic human pathogen, can produce ergot alkaloids in broth culture. The objectives of this study were to determine if A. fumigatus accumulates ergot alkaloids in a respirable form in or on its conidia, to quantify ergot alkaloids associated with conidia produced on several different substrates, and to measure relevant physical properties of the conidia. We found at least four ergot alkaloids, fumigaclavine C, festuclavine, fumigaclavine A, and fumigaclavine B (in order of abundance), associated with conidia of A. fumigatus. Under environmentally relevant conditions, the total mass of ergot alkaloids often constituted >1% of the mass of the conidium. Ergot alkaloids were extracted from conidia produced on all media tested, and the greatest quantities were observed when the fungus was cultured on latex paint or cultured maize seedlings. The values for physical properties of conidia likely to affect their respirability (i.e., diameter, mass, and specific gravity) were significantly lower for A. fumigatus than for Aspergillus nidulans, Aspergillus niger, and Stachybotrys chartarum. The demonstration of relatively high concentrations of ergot alkaloids associated with conidia of A. fumigatus presents opportunities for investigations of potential contributions of the toxins to adverse health effects associated with the fungus and to aspects of the biology of the fungus that contribute to its success. PMID:15933008

  18. Abundant respirable ergot alkaloids from the common airborne fungus Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Panaccione, Daniel G; Coyle, Christine M

    2005-06-01

    Ergot alkaloids are mycotoxins that interact with several monoamine receptors, negatively affecting cardiovascular, nervous, reproductive, and immune systems of exposed humans and animals. Aspergillus fumigatus, a common airborne fungus and opportunistic human pathogen, can produce ergot alkaloids in broth culture. The objectives of this study were to determine if A. fumigatus accumulates ergot alkaloids in a respirable form in or on its conidia, to quantify ergot alkaloids associated with conidia produced on several different substrates, and to measure relevant physical properties of the conidia. We found at least four ergot alkaloids, fumigaclavine C, festuclavine, fumigaclavine A, and fumigaclavine B (in order of abundance), associated with conidia of A. fumigatus. Under environmentally relevant conditions, the total mass of ergot alkaloids often constituted >1% of the mass of the conidium. Ergot alkaloids were extracted from conidia produced on all media tested, and the greatest quantities were observed when the fungus was cultured on latex paint or cultured maize seedlings. The values for physical properties of conidia likely to affect their respirability (i.e., diameter, mass, and specific gravity) were significantly lower for A. fumigatus than for Aspergillus nidulans, Aspergillus niger, and Stachybotrys chartarum. The demonstration of relatively high concentrations of ergot alkaloids associated with conidia of A. fumigatus presents opportunities for investigations of potential contributions of the toxins to adverse health effects associated with the fungus and to aspects of the biology of the fungus that contribute to its success. PMID:15933008

  19. Separation and Quantitation of Seven Ergot Alkaloids in Bovine Vein Tissue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ergot alkaloid related toxicosis has been documented in forage animals for over thirty years, but few mass spectrometry analytical methods for the detection and quantitation of these compounds exist. A primary ergot alkaloid of interest was ergovaline, the predominant toxicant in endophyte-inf...

  20. Livestock Poisoning with Pyrrolizidine Alkaloid Containing Plants (Senecio, Crotalaria, Cynoglossum, Amsinckia, Heliotropium and Echium spp.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are potent liver toxins that have been identified in over 6,000 plants throughout the world. Alkaloids are nitrogen-based compounds with potent biological activity. About half of the identified PAs are toxic and several cause cancer (carcinogenic). PA-containing plants...

  1. 7,7-Dimethylaporphine and Other Alkaloids from the Bark of Guatteria friesiana.

    PubMed

    Costa, Emmanoel V; Pinheiro, Maria Lúcia B; Maia, Beatriz Helena L N S; Marques, Francisco A; Ruiz, Ana Lúcia T G; Marchetti, Gabriela M; Carvalho, João Ernesto de; Soares, Milena B P; Costa, Cinara O S; Galvão, Alexandre F C; Lopes, Norberto P; Koolen, Hector H F; Bezerra, Daniel P; Barison, Andersson

    2016-06-24

    Phytochemical investigation of the bark of Guatteria friesiana afforded 12 new aporphines (1-12), along with nine known alkaloids (13-21). The structures of the new alkaloids were determined on the basis of spectroscopic data interpretation. The cytotoxic activity of the isolated compounds against a small panel of tumor cell lines was assessed using the Alamar blue assay. PMID:27300257

  2. 11-Isopropylcryptolepine: A novel alkaloid isolated from cryptolepis sanguinolenta characterized using submicro NMR techniques

    PubMed

    Hadden; Sharaf; Guido; Robins; Tackie; Phoebe; Schiff; Martin

    1999-02-01

    A new alkaloid has been isolated from extracts of the West African plant Cryptolepis sanguinolenta and identified by submicro NMR techniques as 11-isopropylcryptolepine (1). The unusual incorporation of the isopropyl group at the 11-position of the indolo[3,2-b]quinoline nucleus is suggestive of a mixed biosynthetic origin for the alkaloid. PMID:10075749

  3. Toxic alkaloid concentrations in Delphinium nuttallianum, D. andersonii, and D. geyeri in the Intermountain region

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low larkspurs (Delphinium nuttalliunum, D. andersonii) and plains larkspur (D. geyeri) are serious poisoning threats to cattle grazing on western North American rangelands. The dominant toxic alkaloid in low larkspurs and plains larkspur is methyllycaconitine (MLA); another very toxic alkaloid in lo...

  4. Antimicrobial activity of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids from Annona salzmanii D.C.

    PubMed

    Paulo, M de Q; Barbosa-Filho, J M; Lima, E O; Maia, R F; Barbosa, R de C; Kaplan, M A

    1992-02-01

    Bark of Annona salzmanii D.C. (Annonaceae), used in Brazilian folk medicine, was found to contain four benzylisoquinoline alkaloids, namely reticuline, anonaine, laurelliptine and isoboldine. Only anonaine possesses some antibacterial property while all four alkaloids show some antifungal activity. PMID:1501491

  5. Method validation for determination of alkaloid content in goldenseal root powder.

    PubMed

    Weber, Holly A; Zart, Matthew K; Hodges, Andrew E; White, Kellie D; Barnes, Sarah M; Moody, Leslie A; Clark, Alice P; Harris, Roger K; Overstreet, J Diane; Smith, Cynthia S

    2003-01-01

    A fast, practical ambient extraction methodology followed by isocratic liquid chromatography (LC) analysis with UV detection was validated for the determination of berberine, hydrastine, and canadine in goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis L.) root powder. The method was also validated for palmatine, a major alkaloid present in the possible bioadulterants Coptis, Oregon grape root, and barberry bark. Alkaloid standard solutions were linear over the evaluated concentration ranges. The analytical method was linear for alkaloid extraction using 0.3-2 g goldenseal root powder/100 mL extraction solvent. Precision of the method was demonstrated using 10 replicate extractions of 0.5 g goldenseal root powder, with percent relative standard deviation for all 4 alkaloids < or = 1.6. Alkaloid recovery was determined by spiking each alkaloid into triplicate aliquots of neat goldenseal root powder. Recoveries ranged from 92.3% for palmatine to 101.9% for hydrastine. Ruggedness of the method was evaluated by performing multiple analyses of goldenseal root powder from 3 suppliers over a 2-year period. The method was also used to analyze Coptis root, Oregon grape root, barberry bark, and celandine herb, which are possible goldenseal bioadulterants. The resulting chromatographic profiles of the bioadulterants were significantly different from that of goldenseal. The method was directly transferred to LC with mass spectrometry, which was used to confirm the presence of goldenseal alkaloids tetrahydroberberastine, berberastine, canadaline, berberine, hydrastine, and canadine, as well as alkaloids from the bioadulterants, including palmatine, jatrorrhizine, and coptisine. PMID:12852562

  6. The toxicity of Poison Dart Frog alkaloids against the Fire Ant (Solenopsis invicta)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hundreds of alkaloids, representing over 20 structural classes, have been identified from the skin of neotropical poison frogs (Dendrobatidae). These alkaloids are derived from arthropod prey of the frogs, and are generally are believed to deter vertebrate predators. We developed a method to put ind...

  7. Biogenetically-Inspired Total Synthesis of Epidithiodiketopiperazines and Related Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus Natural products chemistry has historically been the prime arena for the discovery of new chemical transformations and the fountain of insights into key biological processes. It remains a fervent incubator of progress in the fields of chemistry and biology and an exchange mediating the flow of ideas between these allied fields of science. It is with this ethos that our group has taken an interest in and pursued the synthesis of a complex family of natural products termed the dimeric epipolythiodiketopiperazine (ETP) alkaloids. We present here an Account of the highly complex target molecules to which we pegged our ambitions, our systematic and relentless efforts toward those goals, the chemistry we developed in their pursuit, and the insight we have gained for their translational potential as potent anticancer molecules. The dimeric ETP alkaloids are fungal metabolites that feature a highly complex molecular architecture comprising a densely functionalized core structure with many stereogenic centers, six of which are fully substituted, and a pair of vicinal quaternary carbon stereocenters, decorated on polycyclic architectures in addition to the unique ETP motif that has been recognized as acid-, base-, and redox-sensitive. A cyclo-dipeptide consisting of an essential tryptophan residue and a highly variable ancillary amino acid lies at the core of these structures; investigation of the transformations that take this simplistic core to the complex alkaloids lies at the heart of our research program. The dimeric epidithiodiketopiperazine alkaloids have largely resisted synthesis on account of their complexity since the 1970s when the founding members of this class, chaetocin A (HauserD. et al. Helv. Chim. Acta1970, 53, 10615448218) and verticillin A (KatagiriK. et al. J. Antibiot.1970, 23, 4205465723), were first isolated. This was despite their potent cytotoxic and bacteriostatic activities, which were well appreciated at the time of their discovery. In

  8. Biogenetically-inspired total synthesis of epidithiodiketopiperazines and related alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Justin; Movassaghi, Mohammad

    2015-04-21

    Natural products chemistry has historically been the prime arena for the discovery of new chemical transformations and the fountain of insights into key biological processes. It remains a fervent incubator of progress in the fields of chemistry and biology and an exchange mediating the flow of ideas between these allied fields of science. It is with this ethos that our group has taken an interest in and pursued the synthesis of a complex family of natural products termed the dimeric epipolythiodiketopiperazine (ETP) alkaloids. We present here an Account of the highly complex target molecules to which we pegged our ambitions, our systematic and relentless efforts toward those goals, the chemistry we developed in their pursuit, and the insight we have gained for their translational potential as potent anticancer molecules. The dimeric ETP alkaloids are fungal metabolites that feature a highly complex molecular architecture comprising a densely functionalized core structure with many stereogenic centers, six of which are fully substituted, and a pair of vicinal quaternary carbon stereocenters, decorated on polycyclic architectures in addition to the unique ETP motif that has been recognized as acid-, base-, and redox-sensitive. A cyclo-dipeptide consisting of an essential tryptophan residue and a highly variable ancillary amino acid lies at the core of these structures; investigation of the transformations that take this simplistic core to the complex alkaloids lies at the heart of our research program. The dimeric epidithiodiketopiperazine alkaloids have largely resisted synthesis on account of their complexity since the 1970s when the founding members of this class, chaetocin A ( Hauser , D. et al. Helv. Chim. Acta 1970 , 53 , 1061 ) and verticillin A ( Katagiri , K. et al. J. Antibiot. 1970 , 23 , 420 ), were first isolated. This was despite their potent cytotoxic and bacteriostatic activities, which were well appreciated at the time of their discovery. In the past

  9. The comparative toxicity of a reduced, crude comfrey (Symphytum officinale) alkaloid extract and the pure, comfrey-derived pyrrolizidine alkaloids, lycopsamine and intermedine in chicks (Gallus gallus domesticus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comfrey (Symphytum officinale), a commonly used herb, contains dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids (DHPAs) that, as a group of bioactive metabolites, are potentially hepatotoxic, pneumotoxic, genotoxic and carcinogenic. Consequently, regulatory agencies and international health organizations have recomm...

  10. Tall fescue seed extraction and partial purification of ergot alkaloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Lowell

    2014-12-01

    Many substances in the tall fescue/endophyte association (Schedonorus arundinaceus/Epichloë coenophiala) have biological activity. Of these compounds only the ergot alkaloids are known to have significant mammalian toxicity and the predominant ergot alkaloids are ergovaline and ergovalinine. Because synthetically produced ergovaline is difficult to obtain, we developed a seed extraction and partial purification protocol for ergovaline/ergovalinine that provided a biologically active product. Tall fescue seed was ground and packed into several different sized columns for liquid extraction. Smaller particle size and increased extraction time increased efficiency of extraction. Our largest column was a 114 × 52 × 61 cm (W×L×D) stainless steel tub. Approximately 150 kg of seed could be extracted in this tub. The extraction was done with 80% ethanol. When the solvent front migrated to bottom of the column, flow was stopped and seed was allowed to steep for at least 48 h. Light was excluded from the solvent from the beginning of this step to the end of the purification process. Following elution, ethanol was removed from the eluate by evaporation at room temperature. Resulting syrup was freeze-dried. About 80% recovery of alkaloids was achieved with 18-fold increase in concentration of ergovaline. Initial purification of the dried product was accomplished by extracting with hexane/water (6:1, v/v) and the hexane fraction was discarded. The aqueous fraction was extracted with chloroform, the aqueous layer discarded, after which the chloroform was removed with a resulting 20-fold increase of ergovaline. About 65% of the ergovaline was recovered from the chloroform residue for an overall recovery of 50%. The resultant partially purified ergovaline had biological activities in in vivo and in vitro bovine bioassays that approximate that of synthetic ergovaline.

  11. Poor permeability and absorption affect the activity of four alkaloids from Coptis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Han-Ming; Zhang, Qiu-Yan; Wang, Jia-Long; Chen, Jian-Long; Zhang, Yu-Ling; Tong, Xiao-Lin

    2015-11-01

    Coptidis rhizoma (Coptis) and its alkaloids exert various pharmacological functions in cells and tissues; however, the oral absorption of these alkaloids requires further elucidation. The present study aimed to examine the mechanism underlying the poor absorption of alkaloids, including berberine (BER), coptisine (COP), palmatine (PAL) and jatrorrhizine (JAT). An ultra‑performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) method was validated for the determination of BER, COP, PAL and JAT in the above experimental medium. In addition, the apparent oil‑water partition coefficient (Po/w); apparent permeability coefficient (Papp), determined using a parallel artificial membrane permeability assay (PAMPA) plate; membrane retention coefficient (R %); and effect of P‑glycoprotein (P‑gp) inhibitor on the Papp of the four alkaloids were investigated. The intestinal absorption rate constant (Ka) and absorption percentage (A %) of the four alkaloids were also determined. The results of the present study demonstrated that the Po/w of the four alkaloids in 0.1 mol·l‑1 HCl medium was significantly higher (P<0.01), compared with those of the alkaloids in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4). The Papp of BER was 1.0‑1.2x10‑6 cm·s‑1, determined using a PAMPA plate, and the Papp of BER, COP, PAL and JAT decreased sequentially. The concentrations of the four alkaloids on the apical‑to‑basolateral (AP‑BL) surface and the basolateral‑to‑apical (BL‑AP) surface increased in a linear manner, with increasing concentrations between 10 and 100 µmol. In addition, the transportation of BER on the BL‑AP surface was significantly faster (P<0.01), compared with that on the AP‑BL surface and, following the addition of verpamil (a P‑gp inhibitor), the Papp (AP‑BL) of the four alkaloids increased, whereas the Papp (BL‑AP) was significantly decreased (P<0.01). The rat intestinal perfusion experiment demonstrated that the four alkaloids were poorly absorbed; however, the Ka of BER

  12. Numerical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegler, Robert S.; Braithwaite, David W.

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we attempt to integrate two crucial aspects of numerical development: learning the magnitudes of individual numbers and learning arithmetic. Numerical magnitude development involves gaining increasingly precise knowledge of increasing ranges and types of numbers: from non-symbolic to small symbolic numbers, from smaller to larger…

  13. Bioactive heterocyclic alkaloids with diterpene structure isolated from traditional Chinese medicines.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tengfei; Liu, Shu; Meng, Lulu; Pi, Zifeng; Song, Fengrui; Liu, Zhiqiang

    2016-07-15

    The diterpenoid alkaloids as one type of heterocyclic alkaloids have been found in many traditional herbal medicines, such as genus Consolida, Aconitum, and Delphinium (Ranunculaceae). Pharmacological researches have indicated that many diterpenoid alkaloids are the main bioactive components which have analgesic, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, anti-tumor, cardiotonic, and anti-arrhythmic activities. Studies focused on the determination, quantitation and pharmacological properties of these alkaloids have dramatically increased during the past few years. Up to now, newly discovered diterpenoid alkaloids with important biological activities have been isolated and synthesized. Considering their significant role and diffusely used in many disease treatments, we summarized the information of their analysis methods, bioactivity, metabolism and biotransformation in vivo as well as the pharmacological mechanisms. Based on above review, the further researches are suggested. PMID:26456661

  14. Differential alkaloid profile in Uncaria tomentosa micropropagated plantlets and root cultures.

    PubMed

    Luna-Palencia, Gabriela R; Huerta-Heredia, Ariana A; Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M; Ramos-Valdivia, Ana C

    2013-05-01

    The alkaloids of Uncaria tomentosa micropropagated plantlets and root cultures were isolated and identified by NMR and mass spectrometry. Plantlets yielded pteropodine (1), isopteropodine (2), mitraphylline (3), isomitraphylline (4), uncarine F (5), speciophylline (6), rhynchophylline (7) and isorhynchophylline (8). In plantlets growing under continuous light, tetracyclic alkaloids 7 and 8 decreased from 20 ± 1.8 at 2 months to 2.2 ± 0.33 mg/g dry wt at 6 months, while the pentacyclic alkaloids 1-4 increased from 7.7 ± 1.4 to 15 ± 0.05 mg/g dry wt, supporting their biogenetic conversion. Micropropagated plantlets produced four times more alkaloids (27.6 ± 3.1 mg/g dry wt) than greenhouse plants. Plantlet roots yielded 3, 4, 8 and the glucoindole alkaloids 3α-dihydrocadambine (9) and dolichantoside (10), the last one not previously found in Uncaria. PMID:23296316

  15. (-)-Amarbellisine, a lycorine-type alkaloid from Amaryllis belladonna L. growing in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Evidente, Antonio; Andolfi, Anna; Abou-Donia, Amina H; Touema, Soad M; Hammoda, Hala M; Shawky, Eman; Motta, Andrea

    2004-07-01

    A new lycorine-type alkaloid, named (-)-amarbellisine, was isolated from the bulbs of Egyptian Amaryllis belladonna L. together with the well known alkaloids (-)-lycorine, (-)-pancracine, (+)-vittatine, (+)-11-hydroxyvittatine, and (+)-hippeastrine. The new alkaloid, containing the pyrrolo[de]phenanthridine ring system, was essentially characterised by spectroscopic and optical methods, and proved to be the 2-methoxy-3a,4,5,7,11b,11c-hexahydro-1H-[1,3]dioxolo[4,5-j]pyrrolo[3,2,1-de]phenanthridinol. By using HPTLC technique we also carried out a comparative study of the relative and total alkaloidal content at two different stages of plant growth. Finally, the antimicrobial activity of the isolated alkaloids was assayed. PMID:15279981

  16. Antibacterial monoterpenoid indole alkaloids from Alstonia scholaris cultivated in temperate zone.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; Chen, Ying-Ying; Qin, Xu-Jie; Wang, Bei; Jin, Qiong; Liu, Ya-Ping; Luo, Xiao-Dong

    2015-09-01

    Three new monoterpenoid indole alkaloids, named normavacurine-21-one (1), 5-hydroxy-19, 20-E-alschomine (2), and 5-hydroxy-19, 20-Z-alschomine (3), together with thirteen known indole alkaloids (4-16) were isolated from the leaves of Alstonia scholaris cultivated in Kunming. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analysis, as well as by comparison with the reported spectroscopic data. The leaves of A. scholaris cultivated in Kunming, contained picrinine-type alkaloids, scholaricin-type alkaloids and nareline as major alkaloids. New compounds 1-3 might be derived from a common biogenetic precursor (5). Compounds 1, 5 and 10 exhibited significant antibacterial activity against Enterococcus faecalis, and 3, 9 and 14 against Pseudomonas aeruginosa with an MIC value of 0.781 μg/mL, while 14 showed moderate activity against Klepsiella pneumonia with an MIC value of 1.56 μg/mL. PMID:26136061

  17. Cytotoxic Indole Alkaloids against Human Leukemia Cell Lines from the Toxic Plant Peganum harmala

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunhua; Zhang, Zhenxue; Wang, Yihai; He, Xiangjiu

    2015-01-01

    Bioactivity-guided fractionation was used to determine the cytotoxic alkaloids from the toxic plant Peganum harmala. Two novel indole alkaloids, together with ten known ones, were isolated and identified. The novel alkaloids were elucidated to be 2-(indol-3-yl)ethyl-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1 → 6)-β-d-glucopyranoside (2) and 3-hydroxy-3-(N-acetyl-2-aminoethyl)-6-methoxyindol-2-one (3). The cytotoxicity against human leukemia cells was assayed for the alkaloids and some of them showed potent activity. Harmalacidine (compound 8, HMC) exhibited the highest cytotoxicity against U-937 cells with IC50 value of 3.1 ± 0.2 μmol/L. The cytotoxic mechanism of HMC was targeting the mitochondrial and protein tyrosine kinase signaling pathways (PTKs-Ras/Raf/ERK). The results strongly demonstrated that the alkaloids from Peganum harmala could be a promising candidate for the therapy of leukemia. PMID:26540074

  18. Effects of root isoquinoline alkaloids from Hydrastis canadensis on Fusarium oxysporum isolated from Hydrastis root tissue.

    PubMed

    Tims, Michael c; Batista, Charisma

    2007-07-01

    Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis L.) is a popular medicinal plant distributed widely in North America. The rhizome, rootlets, and root hairs produce medicinally active alkaloids. Berberine, one of the Hydrastis alkaloids, has shown antifungal activity. The influence of a combination of the major Hydrastis alkaloids on the plant rhizosphere fungal ecology has not been investigated. A bioassay was developed to study the effect of goldenseal isoquinoline alkaloids on three Fusarium isolates, including the two species isolated from Hydrastis rhizosphere. The findings suggest that the Hydrastis root extract influences macroconidia germination, but that only the combined alkaloids--berberine, canadine, and hydrastine--appear to synergistically stimulate production of the mycotoxin zearalenone in the Fusarium oxysporum isolate. The Hydrastis root rhizosphere effect provided a selective advantage to the Fusarium isolates closely associated with the root tissue in comparison with the Fusarium isolate that had never been exposed to Hydrastis. PMID:17549565

  19. The serum concentrations of lupine alkaloids in orally-dosed Holstein cattle.

    PubMed

    Green, Benedict T; Lee, Stephen T; Welch, Kevin D; Gardner, Dale R; Stegelmeier, Bryan L; Davis, T Zane

    2015-06-01

    Teratogenic alkaloid-containing Lupinus spp. cause congenital defects known as crooked calf disease that is periodically economically devastating for the cattle industry. Previous research indicates that cattle breeds may eliminate plant toxins differently, potentially altering their susceptibility. The objective of this study was to describe the toxicokinetics in Holsteins of anagyrine, the teratogenic lupine alkaloid that produces crooked calf disease. Other alkaloids including lupanine, an unidentified alkaloid and 5,6-dehydrolupanine were also evaluated. Dried ground Lupinus leucophyllus was orally dosed to four Holstein steers and blood samples were collected for 96 h, analyzed for serum alkaloid concentrations and toxicokinetic parameters calculated. The serum elimination of anagyrine in Holstein steers was faster than those reported for beef breeds. This suggests that Holsteins may be less susceptible to lupine-induced crooked calf disease. Additional work is needed to confirm these findings and to verify if there is a breed difference in disease incidence or severity. PMID:25912242

  20. (+)-Angchibangkine, a new type of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid, and other dimers from Pachygone dasycarpa.

    PubMed

    Guinaudeau, H; Böhlke, M; Lin, L Z; Angerhofer, C K; Cordell, G A; RuangrungsiN

    1997-03-01

    Analysis of the alkaloidal fraction of the stem bark extract of Pachygone dasycarpa (Menispermaceae) resulted in the isolation of 10 known bisbenzylisoquinolines, (+)-tetrandrine, (+)-penduline, (+)-fangchinoline, (+)-atherospermoline, (+)-N-methyl-7-O-demethylpeinamine, (+)-daphnoline, (4-)-isotrilobine (1), (+)-cocsuline (2), (+)-tricordatine (3), (+)-2'-norcocsuline, and the new alkaloid (+)-12-O-methyltricordatine (4). The last bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid isolated, (+)-angchibangkine (5), is the first member of this alkaloid class found to possess three diphenyl ether bridges in the 7-6',8-7', and 11-12' positions. Structure elucidation of these alkaloids and of (+)-O-methylangchibangkine (6) was achieved by analysis of spectral data. Compounds 4-6 show antiplasmodial activity against Plasmodium falciparum. PMID:9157192

  1. In vitro antiplasmodial, antiamoebic, and cytotoxic activities of a series of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, S J; Russell, P F; Wright, C W; Anderson, M M; Phillipson, J D; Kirby, G C; Warhurst, D C; Schiff, P L

    1994-01-01

    Twenty-four bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids were screened for antiplasmoidal, antiamoebic, and cytotoxic activities by use of in vitro microtests. Eight of the alkaloids had antiplasmodial activity, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of less than 1 microM against a multidrug-resistant strain of Plasmodium falciparum (chloroquine had an IC50 of 0.2 microM). The three alkaloids most active against Entamoeba histolytica, aromoline, isotrilobine, and insularine, had IC50s of 5 to 11.1 microM (metronidazole had an IC50 of 1.87 microM). None of the 24 bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids exhibited significant cytotoxicity against the KB cell line, the most toxic being berbamine, with an IC50 of 17.8 microM (the IC50 of podophyllotoxin was 0.008 microM). Bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids merit further investigation as potential novel antimalarial agents. PMID:8141587

  2. Iteamine, the first alkaloid isolated from Itea virginica L. inflorescence.

    PubMed

    Ayers, Benjamin J; Hollinshead, Jacqueline; Saville, Alexander W; Nakagawa, Shinpei; Adachi, Isao; Kato, Atsushi; Izumori, Ken; Bartholomew, Barbara; Fleet, George W J; Nash, Robert J

    2014-04-01

    Iteamine, o-aminobenzyl β-D-glucopyranoside, is the first alkaloid to be isolated from Itea virginica. Itea is the sole plant source of D-psicose, a rare sugar likely to be a major dietary supplement. The structure of iteamine was established by NMR and confirmed by total synthesis. Iteamine and its galacto-analog (which was not found in Itea plants) showed no strong inhibition of any of the 15 glycosidases tested; unnatural galacto-iteamine was a weak inhibitor of chicken liver α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase. PMID:24534106

  3. Securinega alkaloids from the fruits of Flueggea suffruticosa.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Zhao, Bing-Xin; Jiang, Ren-Wang; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Wu, Zhen-Long; Wang, Ying; Ye, Wen-Cai

    2014-01-01

    Phytochemical investigation on the fruits of Flueggea suffruticosa resulted in the isolation of three new Securinega alkaloids, secu'amamine H (1), 15β-methoxy-14,15-dihydrosecurinine (3), and securinol E (7), as well as eight known ones (2, 4-6, and 8-11). Their structures were elucidated by means of spectroscopic techniques (1D and 2D NMR, MS, UV, and IR). The absolute configurations of the new compounds were established by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and CD analyses. PMID:24957326

  4. Dimacrolide Sesquiterpene Pyridine Alkaloids from the Stems of Tripterygium regelii.

    PubMed

    Fan, Dongsheng; Zhu, Guo-Yuan; Li, Ting; Jiang, Zhi-Hong; Bai, Li-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Two new dimacrolide sesquiterpene pyridine alkaloids (DMSPAs), dimacroregelines A (1) and B (2), were isolated from the stems of Tripterygium regelii. The structures of both compounds were characterized by extensive 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic analyses, as well as HRESIMS data. Compounds 1 and 2 are two rare DMSPAs possessing unique 2-(3'-carboxybutyl)-3-furanoic acid units forming the second macrocyclic ring, representing the first example of DMSPAs bearing an extra furan ring in their second macrocyclic ring system. Compound 2 showed inhibitory effects on the proliferation of human rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblast cell (MH7A) at a concentration of 20 μM. PMID:27589701

  5. Hybrid Pyrrole-Imidazole Alkaloids from the Sponge Agelas sceptrum.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Julie; Köck, Matthias

    2016-02-26

    A chemical investigation of the tropical sponge Agelas sceptrum from Plana Cays (Bahamas) led to the isolation of two hybrid pyrrole-imidazole alkaloids (PIAs), 15'-oxoadenosceptrin (1) and decarboxyagelamadin C (2). Herein, we report their challenging structure elucidation established by NMR and ECD spectroscopy. 15'-Oxoadenosceptrin (1) shows sceptrin merged with an adenine moiety, not yet encountered in the PIA family, whereas decarboxyagelamadin C (2) is a close derivative of agelamadins C to E recently isolated from an Agelas sp. from Okinawa. PMID:26872204

  6. Biosynthesis and regulation of terpenoid indole alkaloids in Catharanthus roseus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianhua; Wang, Mingxuan; Wen, Wei; Yu, Rongmin

    2015-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus produces a wide range of terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIA). Many of them, such as vinblastine and vincristine, have significant bioactivity. They are valuable chemotherapy drugs used in combination with other drugs to treat lymphoma and leukemia. The TIA biosynthetic pathway has been investigated for many years, for scientific interest and for their potential in manufacturing applications, to fulfill the market demand. In this review, the progress and perspective of C. roseus TIA biosynthesis and its regulating enzymes are described. In addition, the culture condition, hormones, signaling molecules, precursor feeding on the accumulation of TIA, and gene expression are also evaluated and discussed. PMID:26009689

  7. Biosynthesis and regulation of terpenoid indole alkaloids in Catharanthus roseus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jianhua; Wang, Mingxuan; Wen, Wei; Yu, Rongmin

    2015-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus produces a wide range of terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIA). Many of them, such as vinblastine and vincristine, have significant bioactivity. They are valuable chemotherapy drugs used in combination with other drugs to treat lymphoma and leukemia. The TIA biosynthetic pathway has been investigated for many years, for scientific interest and for their potential in manufacturing applications, to fulfill the market demand. In this review, the progress and perspective of C. roseus TIA biosynthesis and its regulating enzymes are described. In addition, the culture condition, hormones, signaling molecules, precursor feeding on the accumulation of TIA, and gene expression are also evaluated and discussed. PMID:26009689

  8. One-pot synthesis of vinca alkaloids-phomopsin hybrids.

    PubMed

    Gherbovet, Olga; Coderch, Claire; García Alvarez, María Concepción; Bignon, Jérôme; Thoret, Sylviane; Guéritte, Françoise; Gago, Federico; Roussi, Fanny

    2014-06-26

    Hybrids of vinca alkaloids and phomopsin A have been elaborated with the aim of interfering with the "vinca site" and the "peptide site" of the vinca domain in tubulin. They were synthesized by an efficient one-pot procedure that directly links the octahydrophomopsin lateral chain to the velbenamine moiety of 7'-homo-anhydrovinblastine. In their modeled complexes with tubulin, these hybrids were found to superimpose nicely on the tubulin-bound structures of vinblastine and phomopsin A. This good matching can account for the fact that two of them are very potent inhibitors of microtubules assembly and are cytotoxic against four cancer cell lines. PMID:24871162

  9. Anti-Acetylcholinesterase Alkaloids from Annona glabra Leaf.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shoei-Sheng; Wu, Dong-Yi; Tsai, Sheng-Fa; Chen, Chien-Kuang

    2015-06-01

    Bioassay guided fractionation and separation of the EtOH extract of Annona glabra leaf against acetylcholinesterse led to the characterization of 15 alkaloids. Among them, (-)-actinodaphnine (2) and (-)-(6aS,7R)-7-hydroxyactinodaphnine (9) are new aporphines, although (+)-2 and (±)-2 have been found in several plants. Their structures were established by spectroscopic analysis. (-)-Anolobine (5) and (-)-roemeroline (8) showed moderate inhibitory activity against eel acetylcholinesterase with IC50 values of 22.4 and 26.3 μM, respectively. PMID:26197510

  10. Inhibition of nonenzymic lipid peroxidation by benzylisoquinoline alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Martínez, L A; Ríos, J L; Payá, M; Alcaraz, M J

    1992-01-01

    A group of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids, including five simple benzylisoquinolines, three phtalideisoquinolines, six aporphines, three protoberberines, and two benzophenanthridines, have been studied as inhibitors of lipid peroxidation stimulated by Fe2+/cysteine in rat liver microsomal fractions. Protopapaverine, apomorphine, laudanosoline, tetrahydroberberine, isoboldine, bulbocapnine, boldine, anonaine, glaucine, and stepholidine showed antiperoxidative effects, and structure-activity relationships were established. In simple benzylisoquinolines, the presence of phenolic hydroxyls or similar reactive groups is necessary for inhibition of peroxidation, while in aporphines and protoberberines nonhydroxylated compounds can exert antiperoxidative effects. The phtalideisoquinolines and benzophenanthridines tested were inactive. PMID:1577331

  11. Bromotyrosine-derived alkaloids from the Caribbean sponge Aplysina lacunosa.

    PubMed

    Göthel, Qun; Sirirak, Thanchanok; Köck, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Three new bromotyrosine-derived alkaloids 14-debromo-11-deoxyfistularin-3 (1), aplysinin A (2), and aplysinin B (3), together with 15 known compounds (4-18) were isolated from the sponge Aplysina lacunosa collected from Stirrup Cay, Bahamas. The structures of the isolated compounds were identified on the basis of MS and NMR data analysis. The (13)C NMR assignment of spirocyclohexadienylisoxazoline moieties of 1 and 2 were confirmed by an 1,1-ADEQUATE experiment. Compounds 1 and 2 showed a mild to moderate cytotoxic activities against KB-31 and FS4-LTM cell lines. Only aplysinin A (2) exhibited cytotoxicity against MCF-7 cells. PMID:26734082

  12. Three new monoterpenoid indole alkaloids from Vinca major.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Jun; Du, Ru-Nan; He, Juan; Wu, Xing-De; Li, Yan; Li, Rong-Tao; Zhao, Qin-Shi

    2016-04-01

    Three new monoterpenoid indole alkaloids, 19-hydroxyl-10-methoxy-19, 20-dihydrovinorine (1), 19-O-acetyl-10-methoxy-19, 20-dihydrovinorine (2), and 19, 21α-dihydroxyl-10-methoxy-19, 20-dihydrovinorine (3), along with five known analogues (4-8), were isolated from the whole plants of Vinca major. The new structures were elucidated by extensive NMR and MS analysis and comparison with known compounds. In addition, compounds 1-3 were evaluated for their cytotoxicities against five human cancer cell lines. PMID:26700398

  13. Ampullosine, a new isoquinoline alkaloid from Sepedonium ampullosporum (Ascomycetes).

    PubMed

    Quang, Dang Ngoc; Schmidt, Jürgen; Porzel, Andrea; Wessjohann, Ludger; Haid, Mark; Arnold, Norbert

    2010-06-01

    A new isoquinoline alkaloid, ampullosine (3-methyl-isoquinoline-6-carboxylic acid, 1), was isolated from Sepedonium ampullosporum and characterized by spectroscopic analysis and chemical reactions. This compound is responsible for the deep yellow color of the culture fluid of this species. Moreover, the known compounds sepedonin (2) and anhydrosepedonin (3) were detected. Twelve strains belonging to eight species of Sepedonium have been screened for these three metabolites by LC/ESI-SRM (selected reaction monitoring). Ampullosine (1) could be detected in almost all species in Sepedonium, but not in the phylogenetically more distant species S. brunneum and S. tulasneanum. Anhydrosepedonin (3) showed antifungal activity against the phytopathogenic fungus Cladosporium cucumerinum. PMID:20614812

  14. Antifungal alkaloids and limonoid derivatives from Dictamnus dasycarpus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, W; Wolfender, J L; Hostettmann, K; Xu, R; Qin, G

    1998-01-01

    From the root bark of Dictamnus dasycarpus (Rutaceae), four limonoid derivatives, two furoquinoline alkaloids, five limonoids, two sesquiterpenes and three steroids were isolated and their structures elucidated on the basis of various spectroscopic methods. Among the identified compounds, one was determined to be a new natural product, 6 beta-hydroxyfraxinellone, while six compounds were found to be active against the plant pathogenic fungus Cladosporium cucumerinum. The relationship between the structures of limonoid derivatives and their inhibitory activity against fungal growth was investigated. PMID:9429316

  15. The Effect of Polyhydroxylated Alkaloids on Maltase-Glucoamylase

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Qian; Xiang, Junfeng; Zhang, Hong; Li, Qian; Tang, Yalin

    2013-01-01

    One of the most important carbohydrate-splitting enzymes is themaltase-glucoamylase which catalyzes the hydrolysis of alpha-glucosidic linkages. Maltase-glucoamylase inhibitors during the last few years have aroused medical interests in the treatment of diabetes. They contribute to a better understanding of the mechanism of maltase-glucoamylase. At present there are many different classes of maltase-glucoamylase inhibitors. This paper focuses on alkaloidal inhibitors of maltase-glucoamylase and structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies between them in order to discover some drugs with better efficiency and lower toxicity for treating diabetes. PMID:23967118

  16. Bromotyrosine-derived alkaloids from the Caribbean sponge Aplysina lacunosa

    PubMed Central

    Göthel, Qun; Sirirak, Thanchanok

    2015-01-01

    Summary Three new bromotyrosine-derived alkaloids 14-debromo-11-deoxyfistularin-3 (1), aplysinin A (2), and aplysinin B (3), together with 15 known compounds (4–18) were isolated from the sponge Aplysina lacunosa collected from Stirrup Cay, Bahamas. The structures of the isolated compounds were identified on the basis of MS and NMR data analysis. The 13C NMR assignment of spirocyclohexadienylisoxazoline moieties of 1 and 2 were confirmed by an 1,1-ADEQUATE experiment. Compounds 1 and 2 showed a mild to moderate cytotoxic activities against KB-31 and FS4-LTM cell lines. Only aplysinin A (2) exhibited cytotoxicity against MCF-7 cells. PMID:26734082

  17. Hypolipidemic Effects of Alkaloids from Rhizoma Coptidis in Diet-Induced Hyperlipidemic Hamsters.

    PubMed

    He, Kai; Kou, Shuming; Zou, Zongyao; Hu, Yinran; Feng, Min; Han, Bing; Li, Xuegang; Ye, Xiaoli

    2016-05-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the antihyperlipidemic activity of five major alkaloids in Rhizoma Coptidis using high-fat- and high-cholesterol-induced hyperlipidemic hamsters. Hyperlipidemic hamsters were treated with coptisine, berberine, jatrorrhizine, palmatine, epiberberine, and total Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids with a dose of 46.7 mg/kg × day for 140 days. Serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and total bile acids were examined after alkaloid treatment. The results showed that all therapy agents prevented body weight gain, reduced the serum total cholesterol, and increased the high-density lipoprotein cholesterol of hamsters. Berberine, jatrorrhizine, and total Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids decreased the triglyceride level in hyperlipidemic hamsters, while coptisine, jatrorrhizine, palmatine, and total Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids significantly suppressed the elevation of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level. The fecal excretion of bile acids was significantly elevated by berberine, coptisine, jatrorrhizine, palmatine, total Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids, and orlistat. Notably, total Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids possess a much stronger lipid-lowering effect than the pure Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids could retard the synthesis of cholesterol by downregulating the mRNA expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl glutaryl coenzyme A reductase and accelerate the clearance of lipids by upregulating the low-density lipoprotein receptor, cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, and uncoupling protein-2 expression. These findings highlight the critical role of Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids in hyperlipidemia treatment. Thus, they need to be considered in future therapeutic approaches. PMID:26848702

  18. Bovine lateral saphenous veins exposed to ergopeptine alkaloids do not relax.

    PubMed

    Pesqueira, A; Harmon, D L; Branco, A F; Klotz, J L

    2014-03-01

    The ergot alkaloid ergovaline has demonstrated a persistent and sustained contractile response in several different vascular models. It was hypothesized that different alkaloids isolated from tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum) will contribute to this contractile response differently. The objective was to compare contractile-response patterns of single additions of the ergoline alkaloids lysergic acid, lysergol, and ergonovine and the ergopeptine alkaloids ergotamine, ergocristine, ergocryptine, ergocornine, and ergovaline (provided as tall fescue seed extract). Lateral saphenous veins were collected from 6 Holstein steers (BW = 397 ± 28 kg) immediately after slaughter, sliced into cross-sections, and suspended in myograph chambers containing oxygenated Krebs-Henseleit buffer (95% O2/5% CO2; pH = 7.4; 37°C). Treatments were added at 0 min and buffer was replaced in 15-min intervals for a 120-min incubation. In addition to maximum tension and time to reach maximum tension, percent relaxation and rate of relaxation were determined following maximum tension for each treatment. All compounds tested produced significant contractile responses (P < 0.05). All ergoline alkaloids reached maximum response in less time (P < 0.05) than the remaining compounds and began to relax immediately after first buffer change. Lysergic acid had the greatest (P < 0.05) percent relaxation and ergonovine had the greatest (P < 0.05) rate of relaxation. The ergopeptine alkaloids ergovaline, ergotamine, ergocristine, ergocryptine, and ergocornine had slower developing contractile responses with a longer (P < 0.05) interval until maximum tension was achieved compared to the ergoline alkaloids. Maximal responses to all the ergopeptine alkaloids, however, all persisted for the 120-min duration with negligible relaxation occurring. The different classes of alkaloids differed greatly in the type of contractile response generated in the lateral saphenous vein. Persistence of contractile response is

  19. BILL E. KUNKLE INTERDISCIPLINARY BEEF SYMPOSIUM: Physiologic effects of ergot alkaloids: What happens when excretion does not equal consumption?

    PubMed

    Klotz, J L

    2015-12-01

    Increased persistence of tall fescue () infested with an endophytic fungus, (formerly ), in forage-based agriculture has led to increased effort in understanding the negative effects caused by consumption of ergot alkaloids by animals consuming this forage. Ergot alkaloids have been shown to have an extremely short plasma half-life, but this does not necessarily equate to total clearance. Studies that measured consumption and excretion of alkaloids have demonstrated that in the case of ergovaline, less is excreted than is consumed. The fate of ergot alkaloids that leave circulation but are not excreted is not well understood. Consequently, these "alkaloid balance studies" have led to speculation that ergovaline might bioaccumulate in the animal. Unfortunately, few data indisputably support this outcome. Progress has been slowed by the fact that the fungus produces a multitude of different ergot alkaloids that can bind to a variety of different receptors. Binding studies have shown that ergot alkaloids have unusually slow receptor dissociation rates that have been described as irreversible and contribute to a persistent signaling effect. In vitro analyses have revealed a potential for accumulation of ergot alkaloids through repetitive exposures to low concentrations creating a "depot" of alkaloids available to interact with receptors. The specific high binding affinity of ergot alkaloids combined with the potential turnover of alkaloids bound nonspecifically could extend residual effects of these compounds. Interestingly, cattle exposed to ergot alkaloids in vivo have a consistently lower vascular response to agonists that target receptors known to bind ergot alkaloids. If these same receptors are blocked with an antagonist, contractile response to ergopeptine alkaloids is also reduced significantly (>60% reduction). This observation that alkaloid exposure interrupts normal function of a receptor can persist 5 to 6 wk after animals have been removed from an ergot

  20. Bioactive pyridoacridine alkaloids from the micronesian sponge Oceanapia sp.

    PubMed

    Eder, C; Schupp, P; Proksch, P; Wray, V; Steube, K; Müller, C E; Frobenius, W; Herderich, M; van Soest, R W

    1998-02-01

    The Micronesian sponge Oceanapia sp. afforded three pyridoacridine alkaloids: the known compounds kuanoniamine C (1) and kuanoniamine D (2), as well as the new N-deacyl derivative (3) of the kuanoniamines. Compounds 1 and 2 exhibited insecticidal activity toward neonate larvae of the polyphagous pest insect Spodoptera littoralis (LC50 of 156 and 59 ppm, respectively), when incorporated into artificial diet. Both compounds also showed toxicity in the brine shrimp lethality test with a LC50 of 37 micrograms/mL (compound 1) and 19 micrograms/mL (compound 2), respectively. The N-deacyl derivative did not show any remarkable effect in both bioassays. Cytotoxcity of the alkaloids was studied in vitro, using two human cell lines. The new derivative (3) appeared to be active in the same range of concentrations as kuanoniamine C (1) and D (2). The IC50 of 3 was 1.2 micrograms/mL toward HeLa cells and 2.0 micrograms/mL toward MONO-MAC 6 cells. In receptor binding assays compound 2 showed affinity to A1- and A2A-adenosine receptors with Ki values of 2.94 and 13.7 microM, respectively. Compound 1 was less active than compound 2, whereas compound 3 showed no affinity toward adenosine receptors. In addition, compounds 1-3 exhibited moderate affinity to benzodiazepine binding sites of GABAA receptors. PMID:9514015

  1. Cytotoxic Alkaloids from the Stem of Xylopia laevigata.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Leociley R A; Costa, Cinara O D Sousa; Rodrigues, Ana Carolina B da C; Santo, Felipe R do E; Nepel, Angelita; Dutra, Lívia M; Silva, Felipe M A; Soares, Milena B P; Barison, Andersson; Costa, Emmanoel V; Bezerra, Daniel P

    2016-01-01

    Xylopia laevigata (Annonaceae), known locally as "meiú" or "pindaíba", is widely used in folk medicine in Northeastern Brazil. In the present work, we performed phytochemical analyses of the stem of X. laevigata, which led to the isolation of 19 alkaloids: (-)-roemerine, (+)-anonaine, lanuginosine, (+)-glaucine, (+)-xylopine, oxoglaucine, (+)-norglaucine, asimilobine, (-)-xylopinine, (+)-norpurpureine, (+)-N-methyllaurotetanine, (+)-norpredicentrine, (+)-discretine, (+)-calycinine, (+)-laurotetanine, (+)-reticuline, (-)-corytenchine, (+)-discretamine and (+)-flavinantine. The in vitro cytotoxic activity toward the tumor cell lines B16-F10 (mouse melanoma), HepG2 (human hepatocellular carcinoma), K562 (human chronic myelocytic leukemia) and HL-60 (human promyelocytic leukemia) and non-tumor peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was tested using the Alamar Blue assay. Lanuginosine, (+)-xylopine and (+)-norglaucine had the highest cytotoxic activity. Additionally, the pro-apoptotic effects of lanuginosine and (+)-xylopine were investigated in HepG2 cells using light and fluorescence microscopies and flow cytometry-based assays. Cell morphology consistent with apoptosis and a marked phosphatidylserine externalization were observed in lanuginosine- and (+)-xylopine-treated cells, suggesting induction of apoptotic cell death. In addition, (+)-xylopine treatment caused G₂/M cell cycle arrest in HepG2 cells. These data suggest that X. laevigata is a potential source for cytotoxic alkaloids. PMID:27399666

  2. New cycloartane saponin and monoterpenoid glucoindole alkaloids from Mussaenda luteola.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Shaymaa M; Backheet, Enaam Y; Bayoumi, Soad A; Ross, Samir A

    2016-04-01

    A new cycloartane-type saponin with unusual hydroxylation at C-17 and a unique side chain, 9 (R), 19, 22 (S), 24 (R) bicyclolanost-3β, 12α, 16β, 17α tetrol-25-one 3-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-glucopyranoside (1) and two new monoterpenoid glucoindole alkaloids, 10-methoxy pumiloside (2) and the previously chemically synthesized, 10-methoxy strictosidine (3) along with other five known compounds, 7α-morroniside (4), 7-epi-loganin (5), (7β)-7-O-methylmorroniside (6), 5(S)-5-carboxystrictisidine (7) and apigenin-7-O-neohesperidoside (8) were isolated from the aerial parts of Mussaenda luteola (Rubiaceae). The structural elucidation of the isolates was accomplished by extensive (1D and 2D NMR) spectroscopic data analysis and HR-ESI-MS. Compounds 4-8 were reported for the first time from the genus Mussaenda. Interestingly, this is the first report for the occurrence of the monoterpenoid glucoindole-type alkaloids in the genus which might be useful for the chemotaxonomic evaluation of the genus Mussaenda. All isolates were evaluated for their antiprotozoal activities. Compound 7 showed good antitrypanosomal activity with IC50 and IC90 values of 13.7 and 16.6 μM compared to IC50 and IC90 values of 13.06 and 28.99 μM for the positive control DFMO, difluoromethylornithine. PMID:26969788

  3. Biosynthetic pathway of terpenoid indole alkaloids in Catharanthus roseus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoxuan; Zeng, Xinyi; Sun, Chao; Chen, Shilin

    2014-09-01

    Catharanthus roseus is one of the most extensively investigated medicinal plants, which can produce more than 130 alkaloids, including the powerful antitumor drugs vinblastine and vincristine. Here we review the recent advances in the biosynthetic pathway of terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs) in C. roseus, and the identification and characterization of the corresponding enzymes involved in this pathway. Strictosidine is the central intermediate in the biosynthesis of different TIAs, which is formed by the condensation of secologanin and tryptamine. Secologanin is derived from terpenoid (isoprenoid) biosynthetic pathway, while tryptamine is derived from indole biosynthetic pathway. Then various specific end products are produced by different routes during downstream process. Although many genes and corresponding enzymes have been characterized in this pathway, our knowledge on the whole TIA biosynthetic pathway still remains largely unknown up to date. Full elucidation of TIA biosynthetic pathway is an important prerequisite to understand the regulation of the TIA biosynthesis in the medicinal plant and to produce valuable TIAs by synthetic biological technology. PMID:25159992

  4. Alkaloid delta agonist BW373U86 increases hypoxic tolerance.

    PubMed

    Bofetiado, D M; Mayfield, K P; D'Alecy, L G

    1996-06-01

    Activation of delta opioid receptors increases survival time during acute, lethal hypoxia in mice. delta Agonists therefore present a promising avenue for therapeutic application to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with clinical hypoxia in settings such as drowning, head injury apnea, and complicated childbirths. However, most delta agonists now available are peptides, and may have limited clinical utility. In the present study, we evaluate the neuroprotective ability of an alkaloid delta agonist, BW373U86. Alkaloid compounds, due to increased stability and increased systemic distribution, may be more favorable for clinical use. We found that BW373U86, like the peptide delta agonist, DPDPE ([D-Pen2, D-Pen5]-enkephalin), increases survival time of mice during lethal hypoxia. The mechanism of neuroprotection induced by delta receptor activation appears to involve decreasing body temperature. Further, using selective opioid receptor antagonists, it appears that BW373U86 exerts these neuroprotective effects by acting at delta-opioid receptors. PMID:8638797

  5. Plant-like biosynthesis of isoquinoline alkaloids in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Baccile, Joshua A; Spraker, Joseph E; Le, Henry H; Brandenburger, Eileen; Gomez, Christian; Bok, Jin Woo; Macheleidt, Juliane; Brakhage, Axel A; Hoffmeister, Dirk; Keller, Nancy P; Schroeder, Frank C

    2016-06-01

    Natural product discovery efforts have focused primarily on microbial biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs) containing large multimodular polyketide synthases and nonribosomal peptide synthetases; however, sequencing of fungal genomes has revealed a vast number of BGCs containing smaller NRPS-like genes of unknown biosynthetic function. Using comparative metabolomics, we show that a BGC in the human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus named fsq, which contains an NRPS-like gene lacking a condensation domain, produces several new isoquinoline alkaloids known as the fumisoquins. These compounds derive from carbon-carbon bond formation between two amino acid-derived moieties followed by a sequence that is directly analogous to isoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis in plants. Fumisoquin biosynthesis requires the N-methyltransferase FsqC and the FAD-dependent oxidase FsqB, which represent functional analogs of coclaurine N-methyltransferase and berberine bridge enzyme in plants. Our results show that BGCs containing incomplete NRPS modules may reveal new biosynthetic paradigms and suggest that plant-like isoquinoline biosynthesis occurs in diverse fungi. PMID:27065235

  6. The thermodynamics of vinca alkaloid-induced tubulin spirals formation.

    PubMed

    Lobert, Sharon; Ingram, Jeffrey W; Correia, John J

    2007-03-01

    Vinca alkaloids are antimitotic, anticancer agents that induce tubulin to form spiral polymers at physiological protein concentrations. We used sedimentation velocity to investigate the effects of six vinca alkaloids on tubulin spiraling. Fitting to a Wyman linkage model reveals a drug dependent change of over two orders of magnitude in spiraling potential, K(1)K(2). Thermodynamic analysis of LnK(1)K(2) data demonstrates large and positive DeltaS values, indicating that tubulin spiral formation is entropically-driven. From the curvature in van't Hoff plots of vinblastine data, we estimate DeltaC(p) for GTP and GDP conditions to be -439 and -396 cal/mol K. Partitioning of DeltaS into the hydrophobic effect, DeltaS(HE), change in rotational/translational freedom, DeltaS(RT) and change in protein conformation, DeltaS(other), demonstrates that the major driving force for tubulin spiral formation is burial of hydrophobic surfaces and that protein conformational changes do not make a significant contribution. Spiraling potential is an indicator of antimitotic activity in vivo, although turbidity studies indicate that there is no correlation between spiraling potential and microtubule inhibition in vitro. Mechanisms that explain this discrepancy are discussed. PMID:16757093

  7. Application of high performance capillary electrophoresis on toxic alkaloids analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Rong; Zhang, Yurong; Yu, Yunqiu

    2007-06-01

    We employed CE to identify mixtures of the toxic alkaloids lappaconitine, bullatine A, atropine sulfate, atropine methobromide, scopolamine hydrobromide, anisodamine hydrobromide, brucine, strychnine, quinine sulfate, and chloroquine in human blood and urine, using procaine hydrochloride as an internal standard. The separation employed a fused-silica capillary of 75 microm id x 60 cm length (effective length: 50.2 cm) and a buffer containing 100 mM phosphate and 5% ACN (pH 4.0). The sample was injected in a pressure mode and the separation was performed at a voltage of 16 kV and a temperature of 25 degrees C. The compounds were detected by UV absorbance at wavelengths of 195 and 235 nm. All the ten alkaloids were separated within 16 min. The method was validated with regard to precision (RSD), accuracy, sensitivity, linear range, LOD, and LOQ. In blood and urine samples, the detection limits were 5-40 ng/mL and linear calibration curves were obtained over the range of 0.02-10 microg/mL. The precision of intra- and interday measurements was less than 15%. Electrophoretic peaks could be identified either by the relative migration time or by their UV spectrum. PMID:17623479

  8. Vinca alkaloids in the therapeutic management of malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Ceresoli, Giovanni Luca; Zucali, Paolo Andrea

    2015-12-01

    Therapeutic options for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) are limited. Most patients are treated with chemotherapy during the course of their disease. The combination of pemetrexed with a platinum compound is the standard of care in the first-line setting, while no established treatment exists in the second and beyond-line setting. Vinca alkaloids are chemotherapeutic agents that have demonstrated clinical efficacy both as single agents and in combination in a broad spectrum of cancers, including MPM. Vinorelbine has shown activity in MPM patients as neoadjuvant therapy, first-line treatment, and in the second and third-line setting. Vinflunine is a derivative of vinorelbine that has been studied in MPM as first-line agent. While the role of vinca alkaloids in the first-line treatment of MPM seems marginal, treatment with vinorelbine remains a reasonable option for pemetrexed-pretreated patients in clinical practice, based on an acceptable rate of stable disease, confirmed by several trials. Ongoing studies on predictive biomarkers for vinorelbine will hopefully be able to individualize treatment, increasing response rates and survival outcomes. PMID:26526504

  9. Modulatory Effects of Eschscholzia californica Alkaloids on Recombinant GABAA Receptors.

    PubMed

    Fedurco, Milan; Gregorová, Jana; Šebrlová, Kristýna; Kantorová, Jana; Peš, Ondřej; Baur, Roland; Sigel, Erwin; Táborská, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The California poppy (Eschscholzia californica Cham.) contains a variety of natural compounds including several alkaloids found exclusively in this plant. Because of the sedative, anxiolytic, and analgesic effects, this herb is currently sold in pharmacies in many countries. However, our understanding of these biological effects at the molecular level is still lacking. Alkaloids detected in E. californica could be hypothesized to act at GABAA receptors, which are widely expressed in the brain mainly at the inhibitory interneurons. Electrophysiological studies on a recombinant α 1 β 2 γ 2 GABAA receptor showed no effect of N-methyllaurotetanine at concentrations lower than 30 μM. However, (S)-reticuline behaved as positive allosteric modulator at the α 3, α 5, and α 6 isoforms of GABAA receptors. The depressant properties of aerial parts of E. californica are assigned to chloride-current modulation by (S)-reticuline at the α 3 β 2 γ 2 and α 5 β 2 γ 2 GABAA receptors. Interestingly, α 1, α 3, and α 5 were not significantly affected by (R)-reticuline, 1,2-tetrahydroreticuline, codeine, and morphine-suspected (S)-reticuline metabolites in the rodent brain. PMID:26509084

  10. Acridone alkaloids as potent inhibitors of cathepsin V.

    PubMed

    Severino, Richele P; Guido, Rafael V C; Marques, Emerson F; Brömme, Dieter; da Silva, M Fátima das G F; Fernandes, João B; Andricopulo, Adriano D; Vieira, Paulo C

    2011-02-15

    Cathepsin V is a lysosomal cysteine peptidase highly expressed in thymus, testis and corneal epithelium. Eleven acridone alkaloids were isolated from Swinglea glutinosa (Bl.) Merr. (Rutaceae), with eight of them being identified as potent and reversible inhibitors of cathepsin V (IC(50) values ranging from 1.2 to 3.9 μM). Detailed mechanistic characterization of the effects of these compounds on the cathepsin V-catalyzed reaction showed clear competitive inhibition with respect to substrate, with dissociation constants (K(i)) in the low micromolar range (2, K(i)=1.2 μM; 6, K(i)=1.0 μM; 7, K(i)=0.2 μM; and 11, K(i)=1.7 μM). Molecular modeling studies provided important insight into the structural basis for binding affinity and enzyme inhibition. Experimental and computational approaches, including biological evaluation, mode of action assessment and modeling studies were successfully employed in the discovery of a small series of acridone alkaloid derivatives as competitive inhibitors of catV. The most potent inhibitor (7) has a K(i) value of 200 nM. PMID:21277783

  11. Modulatory Effects of Eschscholzia californica Alkaloids on Recombinant GABAA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Fedurco, Milan; Gregorová, Jana; Šebrlová, Kristýna; Kantorová, Jana; Peš, Ondřej; Baur, Roland; Sigel, Erwin; Táborská, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The California poppy (Eschscholzia californica Cham.) contains a variety of natural compounds including several alkaloids found exclusively in this plant. Because of the sedative, anxiolytic, and analgesic effects, this herb is currently sold in pharmacies in many countries. However, our understanding of these biological effects at the molecular level is still lacking. Alkaloids detected in E. californica could be hypothesized to act at GABAA receptors, which are widely expressed in the brain mainly at the inhibitory interneurons. Electrophysiological studies on a recombinant α1β2γ2 GABAA receptor showed no effect of N-methyllaurotetanine at concentrations lower than 30 μM. However, (S)-reticuline behaved as positive allosteric modulator at the α3, α5, and α6 isoforms of GABAA receptors. The depressant properties of aerial parts of E. californica are assigned to chloride-current modulation by (S)-reticuline at the α3β2γ2 and α5β2γ2 GABAA receptors. Interestingly, α1, α3, and α5 were not significantly affected by (R)-reticuline, 1,2-tetrahydroreticuline, codeine, and morphine—suspected (S)-reticuline metabolites in the rodent brain. PMID:26509084

  12. Antimicrobial, Antiparasitic and Cytotoxic Spermine Alkaloids from Albizia schimperiana

    PubMed Central

    Samoylenko, Volodymyr; Jacob, Melissa R.; Khan, Shabana I.; Zhao, Jianping; Tekwani, Babu L.; Midiwo, Jacob O.; Walker, Larry A.

    2013-01-01

    Albizia schimperianaOliv. (Leguminosae) is a tree distributed in the highland of Kenya, where it is used as a traditional medicine for the treatment of bacterial and parasitic infections, notably pneumonia and malaria, respectively. Bioassay guided isolation of the CH2Cl2–MeOH 1:1/MeOH-H2O 9:1 (mixed) extract of A. schimperiana afforded the new bioactive macrocyclic spermine alkaloid, namely 5,14-dimethylbudmunchiamine L1 1 and three known budmunchiamine analogs 2-4. The structures of the compounds 1-4 were determined by 1D and 2D NMR data, including COSY, HMQC, and HMBC experiments, and ESI-HRMS. Compounds 1 and 3 exhibited significant in vitro antimicrobial activity against a panel of microorganisms, including C. neoformans, methicillin-resistant S. aureus, E. coli, M. intracellulare, A. fumigatus. In addition, they demonstrated strong in vitro antimalarial activities against chloroquine-susceptible (D6) and -resistant (W2) strains of Plasmodium falciparum with IC50s ranging from 120–270 ng/mL. Compounds 1-4 were also evaluated for cytotoxic activity against selected human cancer cell lines and mammalian kidney fibroblasts (VERO cells). It was observed that hydroxyl substitution of the side chain of the budmunchiamines dramatically reduced the cytotoxicity and antimicrobial activity of the alkaloids 2 and 4 without decreasing antimalarial activity. PMID:19634324

  13. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids in food and feed on the Belgian market.

    PubMed

    Huybrechts, Bart; Callebaut, Alfons

    2015-01-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are widely distributed plant toxins with species dependent hepatotoxic, carcinogenic, genotoxic and pneumotoxic risks. In a recent European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) opinion, only two data sets from one European country were received for honey, while one feed data set was included. No data are available for food or feed samples from the Belgian market. We developed an LC-MS/MS method, which allowed the detection and quantification of 16 PAs in a broad range of matrices in the sub ng g(-1) range. The method was validated in milk, honey and hay and applied to honey, tea (Camellia sinensis), scented tea, herbal tea, milk and feed samples bought on the Belgian market. The results confirmed that tea, scented tea, herbal tea and honey are important food sources of pyrrolizidine alkaloid contamination in Belgium. Furthermore, we detected PAs in 4 of 63 commercial milk samples. A high incidence rate of PAs in lucerne (alfalfa)-based horse feed and in rabbit feed was detected, while bird feed samples were less contaminated. We report for the first time the presence of monocrotaline, intermedine, lycopsamine, heliotrine and echimidine in cat food. PMID:26373269

  14. New cycloartane saponin and monoterpenoid glucoindole alkaloids from Mussaenda luteola

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Shaymaa M.; Backheet, Enaam Y.; Bayoumi, Soad A.; Ross, Samir A.

    2016-01-01

    A new cycloartane-type saponin with unusual hydroxylation at C-17 and a unique side chain, 9 (R), 19, 22 (S), 24 (R) bicyclolanost-3β, 12α, 16β, 17α tetrol-25-one 3-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-glucopyranoside (1) and two new monoterpenoid glucoindole alkaloids, 10-methoxy pumiloside (2) and the previously chemically synthesized, 10-methoxy strictosidine (3) along with other five known compounds, 7α-morroniside (4), 7-epi-loganin (5), (7β)-7-O-methylmorroniside (6), 5(S)-5-carboxystrictisidine (7) and apigenin-7-O-neohesperidoside (8) were isolated from the aerial parts of Mussaenda luteola (Rubiaceae). The structural elucidation of the isolates was accomplished by extensive (1D and 2D NMR) spectroscopic data analysis and HR-ESI-MS. Compounds 4–8 were reported for the first time from the genus Mussaenda. Interestingly, this is the first report for the occurrence of the monoterpenoid glucoindole-type alkaloids in the genus which might be useful for the chemotaxonomic evaluation of the genus Mussaenda. All isolates were evaluated for their antiprotozoal activities. Compound 7 showed good antitrypanosomal activity with IC50 and IC90 values of 13.7 and 16.6 µM compared to IC50 and IC90 values of 13.06 and 28.99 µM for the positive control DFMO, difluoromethylornithine. PMID:26969788

  15. Pro-toxic dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids in the traditional Andean herbal medicine “asmachilca”

    PubMed Central

    Colegate, Steven M.; Boppré, Michael; Monzón, Julio; Betz, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance Asmachilca is a Peruvian medicinal herb preparation ostensibly derived from Eupatorium gayanum Wedd. = Aristeguietia gayana (Wedd.) R.M. King & H. Rob. (Asteraceae: Eupatorieae). Decoctions of the plant have a reported bronchodilation effect that is purported to be useful in the treatment of respiratory allergies, common cold and bronchial asthma. However, its attractiveness to pyrrolizidine alkaloid-pharmacophagous insects indicated a potential for toxicity for human consumers. Aim of the study To determine if commercial asmachilca samples, including fully processed herbal teas, contain potentially toxic 1,2-dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids. Materials and methods Two brands of “Asmachilca” herbal tea bags and four other commercial samples of botanical materials for preparing asmachilca medicine were extracted and analyzed using HPLC-esi(+)MS and MS/MS for the characteristic retention times and mass spectra of known dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids. Other suspected dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids were tentatively identified based on MS/MS profiles and high resolution molecular weight determinations. Further structure elucidation of isolated alkaloids was based on 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy. Results Asmachilca attracted many species of moths which are known to pharmacophagously gather dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids. Analysis of 5 of the asmachilca samples revealed the major presence of the dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloid monoesters rinderine and supinine, and their N-oxides. The 6th sample was very similar but did not contain supinine or its N-oxide. Small quantities of other dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloid monoesters, including echinatine and intermedine, were also detected. In addition, two major metabolites, previously undescribed, were isolated and identified as dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloid monoesters with two “head-to-tail” linked viridifloric and/or trachelanthic acids. Estimates of total pyrrolizidine alkaloid and N

  16. Effect of ergot alkaloids associated with fescue toxicosis on hepatic cytochrome P450 and antioxidant proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Settivari, Raja S.; Evans, Tim J.; Rucker, Ed; Rottinghaus, George E.; Spiers, Donald E.

    2008-03-15

    Intake of ergot alkaloids found in endophyte-infected tall fescue grass is associated with decreased feed intake and reduction in body weight gain. The liver is one of the target organs of fescue toxicosis with upregulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism and downregulation of genes associated with antioxidant pathways. It was hypothesized that short-term exposure of rats to ergot alkaloids would change hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP) and antioxidant expression, as well as reduce antioxidant enzyme activity and hepatocellular proliferation rates. Hepatic gene expression of various CYPs, selected nuclear receptors associated with the CYP induction, and antioxidant enzymes were measured using real-time PCR. Hepatic expression of CYP, antioxidant and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) proteins were measured using Western blots. The CYP3A1 protein expression was evaluated using primary rat hepatocellular cultures treated with ergovaline, one of the major ergot alkaloids produced by fescue endophyte, in order to assess the direct role of ergot alkaloids in CYP induction. The enzyme activities of selected antioxidants were assayed spectrophotometrically. While hepatic CYP and nuclear receptor expression were increased in ergot alkaloid-exposed rats, the expression and activity of antioxidant enzymes were reduced. This could potentially lead to increased oxidative stress, which might be responsible for the decrease in hepatocellular proliferation after ergot alkaloid exposure. This study demonstrated that even short-term exposure to ergot alkaloids can potentially induce hepatic oxidative stress which can contribute to the pathogenesis of fescue toxicosis.

  17. DNA topoisomerase-directed anticancerous alkaloids: ADMET-based screening, molecular docking, and dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Swati; Das, Tamal; Awasthi, Manika; Pandey, Veda P; Pandey, Brijesh; Dwivedi, Upendra N

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerases (Topo I and II) have been looked as crucial targets against various types of cancers. In the present paper, 100 anticancerous alkaloids were subjected to in silico absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity (ADMET) analyses to investigate their pharmacokinetic properties. Out of 100 alkaloids, only 18 were found to fulfill all the ADMET descriptors and obeyed the Lipinski's rule of five. All the 18 alkaloids were found to dock successfully within the active site of both Topo I and II. A comparison of the inhibitory potential of 18 screened alkaloids with those of selected drugs revealed that four alkaloids (oliveroline, coptisine, aristolactam, and piperine) inhibited Topo I, whereas six alkaloids (oliveroline, aristolactam, anonaine, piperine, coptisine, and liriodenine) inhibited Topo II more strongly than those of their corresponding drugs, topotecan and etoposide, respectively, with oliveroline being the outstanding. The stability of the complexes of Topo I and II with the best docked alkaloid, oliveroline, was further analyzed using 10 nSec molecular dynamics simulation and compared with those of the respective drugs, namely, topotecan and etoposide, which revealed stabilization of these complexes within 5 nSec of simulation with better stability of Topo II complex than that of Topo I. PMID:25594242

  18. HPLC-ESI-MS/MS of imidazole alkaloids in Pilocarpus microphyllus.

    PubMed

    Sawaya, Alexandra C H F; Abreu, Ilka Nacif; Andreazza, Nathalia Luiza; Eberlin, Marcos N; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2008-01-01

    Pilocarpine, an important imidazole alkaloid, is extracted from the leaves of Pilocarpus microphyllus (Rutaceae), known in Brazil as jaborandi and used mainly for the treatment of glaucoma. Jaborandi leaves also contain other imidazole alkaloids, whose pharmacological and physiological properties are unknown, and whose biosynthetic pathways are under investigation. In the present study, a HPLC method coupled with ESI-MS(n) was developed for their qualitative and quantitative analysis. This method permits the chromatographic separation of the imidazole alkaloids found in extracts of jaborandi, as well as the MS/MS analysis of the individual compounds. Thus two samples: leaves of P. microphyllus and a paste that is left over after the industrial extraction of pilocarpine; were compared. The paste was found to contain significant amounts of pilocarpine and other imidazole alkaloids, but had a slightly different alkaloid profile than the leaf extract. The method is suitable for the routine analysis of samples containing these alkaloids, as well as for the separation and identification of known and novel alkaloids from this family, and may be applied to further studies of the biosynthetic pathway of pilocarpine in P. microphyllus. PMID:18719522

  19. Alkaloids: an overview of their antibacterial, antibiotic-enhancing and antivirulence activities.

    PubMed

    Cushnie, T P Tim; Cushnie, Benjamart; Lamb, Andrew J

    2014-11-01

    With reports of pandrug-resistant bacteria causing untreatable infections, the need for new antibacterial therapies is more pressing than ever. Alkaloids are a large and structurally diverse group of compounds that have served as scaffolds for important antibacterial drugs such as metronidazole and the quinolones. In this review, we highlight other alkaloids with development potential. Natural, semisynthetic and synthetic alkaloids of all classes are considered, looking first at those with direct antibacterial activity and those with antibiotic-enhancing activity. Potent examples include CJ-13,136, a novel actinomycete-derived quinolone alkaloid with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 0.1 ng/mL against Helicobacter pylori, and squalamine, a polyamine alkaloid from the dogfish shark that renders Gram-negative pathogens 16- to >32-fold more susceptible to ciprofloxacin. Where available, information on toxicity, structure-activity relationships, mechanisms of action and in vivo activity is presented. The effects of alkaloids on virulence gene regulatory systems such as quorum sensing and virulence factors such as sortases, adhesins and secretion systems are also described. The synthetic isoquinoline alkaloid virstatin, for example, inhibits the transcriptional regulator ToxT in Vibrio cholerae, preventing expression of cholera toxin and fimbriae and conferring in vivo protection against intestinal colonisation. The review concludes with implications and limitations of the described research and directions for future research. PMID:25130096

  20. Enhanced anti-tumour effects of Vinca alkaloids given separately from cytostatic therapies

    PubMed Central

    Ehrhardt, H; Pannert, L; Pfeiffer, S; Wachter, F; Amtmann, E; Jeremias, I

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose In polychemotherapy protocols, that is for treatment of neuroblastoma and Ewing sarcoma, Vinca alkaloids and cell cycle-arresting drugs are usually administered on the same day. Here we studied whether this combination enables the optimal antitumour effects of Vinca alkaloids to be manifested. Experimental Approach Vinca alkaloids were tested in a preclinical mouse model in vivo and in vitro in combination with cell cycle-arresting drugs. Signalling pathways were characterized using RNA interference. Key Results In vitro, knockdown of cyclins significantly inhibited vincristine-induced cell death indicating, in accordance with previous findings, Vinca alkaloids require active cell cycling and M-phase transition for induction of cell death. In contrast, anthracyclines, irradiation and dexamethasone arrested the cell cycle and acted like cytostatic drugs. The combination of Vinca alkaloids with cytostatic therapeutics resulted in diminished cell death in 31 of 36 (86%) tumour cell lines. In a preclinical tumour model, anthracyclines significantly inhibited the antitumour effect of Vinca alkaloids in vivo. Antitumour effects of Vinca alkaloids in the presence of cytostatic drugs were restored by caffeine, which maintained active cell cycling, or by knockdown of p53, which prevented drug-induced cell cycle arrest. Therapeutically most important, optimal antitumour effects were obtained in vivo upon separating the application of Vinca alkaloids from cytostatic therapeutics. Conclusion and Implications Clinical trials are required to prove whether Vinca alkaloids act more efficiently in cancer patients if they are applied uncoupled from cytostatic therapies. On a conceptual level, our data suggest the implementation of polychemotherapy protocols based on molecular mechanisms of drug–drug interactions. Linked Article This article is commented on by Solary, pp 1555–1557 of this issue. To view this commentary visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph

  1. Structure-Activity Relationship of Benzophenanthridine Alkaloids from Zanthoxylum rhoifolium Having Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Luciana de C.; Zanon, Graciane; Weber, Andréia D.; Neto, Alexandre T.; Mostardeiro, Clarice P.; Da Cruz, Ivana B. M.; Oliveira, Raul M.; Ilha, Vinicius; Dalcol, Ionara I.; Morel, Ademir F.

    2014-01-01

    Zanthoxylum rhoifolium (Rutaceae) is a plant alkaloid that grows in South America and has been used in Brazilian traditional medicine for the treatment of different health problems. The present study was designed to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of the steam bark crude methanol extract, fractions, and pure alkaloids of Z. rhoifolium. Its stem bark extracts exhibited a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity, ranging from 12.5 to 100 µg/mL using bioautography method, and from 125 to 500 µg/mL in the microdilution bioassay. From the dichloromethane basic fraction, three furoquinoline alkaloids (1–3), and nine benzophenanthridine alkaloids (4–12) were isolated and the antimicrobial activity of the benzophenanthridine alkaloids is discussed in terms of structure-activity relationships. The alkaloid with the widest spectrum of activity was chelerythrine (10), followed by avicine (12) and dihydrochelerythrine (4). The minimal inhibitory concentrations of chelerythrine, of 1.50 µg/mL for all bacteria tested, and between 3.12 and 6.25 µg/mL for the yeast tested, show this compound to be a more powerful antimicrobial agent when compared with the other active alkaloids isolated from Z. rhoifolium. To verify the potential importance of the methylenedioxy group (ring A) of these alkaloids, chelerythrine was selected to represent the remainder of the benzophenanthridine alkaloids isolated in this work and was subjected to a demethylation reaction giving derivative 14. Compared to chelerythrine, the derivative (14) was less active against the tested bacteria and fungi. Kinetic measurements of the bacteriolytic activities of chelerythrine against the bacteria Bacillus subtilis (Gram-positive) and Escherichia coli (Gram-negative) were determined by optical density based on real time assay, suggesting that its mechanism of action is not bacteriolytic. The present study did not detect hemolytic effects of chelerythrine on erythrocytes and found a protective effect

  2. [Effects of alkaloids from Coptidis Rhizoma on mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xia; Peng, Yao-zong; Huang, Tao; Li, Ling; Mou, Shao-xia; Kou, Shu-ming; Li, Xue-gang

    2015-12-01

    This work was mainly studied the effects of the four alkaloids from Coptidis Rhizoma on the mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro and preliminarily discussed the regulating mechanisms. The effect of alkaloids from Coptidis Rhizoma on the vitality of macrophages was measured by the MTT assay. The effect of alkaloids on the phagocytosis of macrophages was determined by neutral red trial and respiratory burst activity was tested by NBT. The expressions of respiratory-burst-associated genes influenced by alkaloids were detected by qRT-PCR. The conformation change of membrane protein in macrophages by the impact of alkaloids was studied by fluorospectro-photometer. Results showed that the four alkaloids from Coptidis Rhizoma could increase the phagocytosis of macrophages in different level and berberine had the best effect. Berberine, coptisine and palmatine had up-regulation effects on respiratory burst activity of mouse peritoneal macrophages stimulated by PMA and regulatory activity on the mRNA expression of PKC, p40phox or p47phox, whereas the epiberberine had no significant influence on respiratory burst. Moreover, alkaloids from Coptidis Rhizoma could change the conformation of membrane protein and the berberine showed the strongest activity. The results suggested that the four alkaloids from Coptidis Rhizoma might activate macrophages through changing the conformation of membrane protein of macrophages and then enhanced the phagocytosis and respiratory burst activity of macrophages. Furthermore, the regulatory mechanism of alkaloids on the respiratory burst activity of macrophages may be also related to the expression level of PKC, p40phox and p47phox. PMID:27141680

  3. Pericolactines A–C, a New Class of Diterpenoid Alkaloids with Unusual Tetracyclic Skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yue-Hua; Chen, Guo-Dong; He, Rong-Rong; Wang, Chuan-Xi; Hu, Dan; Wang, Gao-Qian; Guo, Liang-Dong; Yao, Xin-Sheng; Gao, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Fusicoccane diterpenoids usually possess a fused 5-8-5 tricyclic ring system, which are biogenetically generated from geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGDP). In our report, three novel diterpenoid alkaloids with fusicoccane skeleton, pericolactines A–C (1–3), were isolated from Periconia sp.. Their structures with absolute configurations were determined by spectroscopic analyses and quantum chemical ECD calculation. Pericolactines A–C (1–3) are a new class of diterpenoid alkaloids with an unusual fused 5-5-8-5 tetracyclic ring system, which derive from a geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGDP) and serine conjugated biosynthesis. They belong to the atypical diterpenoid alkaloids. PMID:26611465

  4. [HPTLC separation and fluorodensitometric determination of isoquinoline alkaloids in Chelidonine majus L].

    PubMed

    Niu, C Q; He, L Y

    1992-01-01

    The quantitative analysis of isoquinoline alkaloids in Chelidonine majus L. was investigated and a HPTLC method has been established. Using this method, we separated and determined eight isoquinoline alkaloids, i.e. chelidonine, protopine, berberine, coptisine, tetrahydrocoptisine, 6-methoxydihydrochelerythrine, 6-methoxydihydrosanguinarine and dihydrosanguinarine. The HPTLC method developed used one developing system on high performance silica gel plate (10 x 10 cm). After separation of these eight alkaloids, fluorescence derivatization was carried out in situ. The content was determined by fluorescence scanning. TLC fluorescence derivatization, fluorescence enhancement and fluorescence stability have been studied. Experiments showed that this method is simple, fast, highly sensitive and highly selective. PMID:1529718

  5. [Ergotism due to simultaneous use of ergot alkaloids and high activity antiretroviral therapy].

    PubMed

    Cifuentes M, Daniel; Blanco L, Sergio; Ramírez F, Camila

    2016-06-01

    High activity antiretroviral therapy may exacerbate the activity of ergot alkaloids due to an inhibition of cytochrome P450. We report a 57 years old female with AIDS treated with lamivudine, zidovudine, atazanavir, ritonavir and cotrimoxazole presenting with ischemic signs in the four limbs. There was acrocyanosis and weak radial and ulnar pulses. A family member referred that the patient used ergot alkaloids for headaches. An ergotism due to the simultaneous use of ergot alkaloids and antiretroviral therapy was suspected. The latter was discontinued and intravenous nitroglycerin, nifedipine and pentoxifyline were started with good results. PMID:27598502

  6. Genotoxicity of the boldine aporphine alkaloid in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms.

    PubMed

    Moreno, P R; Vargas, V M; Andrade, H H; Henriques, A T; Henriques, J A

    1991-06-01

    The aporphine alkaloid boldine, present in Peumus boldus (boldo-do-Chile) widely used all over the world, was tested for the presence of genotoxic, mutagenic and recombinogenic activities in microorganisms. This alkaloid did not show genotoxic activity with or without metabolic activation in the SOS chromotest and Ames tester strains TA100, TA98 and TA102. It was not able to induce point and frameshift mutations in haploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. However, mitotic recombinational events such as crossing-over and gene conversion were weakly induced in diploid yeast cells by this alkaloid. Also, boldine was able to induce weakly cytoplasmic 'petite' mutation in haploid yeast cells. PMID:2046695

  7. Anti-inflammatory Activity of Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids from the Leaves of Madhuca pasquieri (Dubard).

    PubMed

    Hoang, Le Son; Tran, Manh Hung; Lee, Joo Sang; To, Dao Cuong; Nguyen, Van Thu; Kim, Jeong Ah; Lee, Jeong Hyung; Woo, Mi Hee; Min, Byung Sun

    2015-01-01

    A novel pyrrolizidine alkaloids, madhumidine A (1), and two known alkaloids, lindelofidine benzoic acid ester (2) and minalobine B (3) were isolated from the leaves of Madhuca pasquieri (Dubard) H. J. LAM. The chemical structures of these alkaloids were established mainly by NMR techniques and mass spectrometry. Their anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated against lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide production in macrophage RAW264.7 cell. In addition, the cytotoxic activity of all isolated compounds was tested against a panel of cancer cell lines. PMID:26027474

  8. Alkaloids from marine invertebrates as important leads for anticancer drugs discovery and development.

    PubMed

    Imperatore, Concetta; Aiello, Anna; D'Aniello, Filomena; Senese, Maria; Menna, Marialuisa

    2014-01-01

    The present review describes research on novel natural antitumor alkaloids isolated from marine invertebrates. The structure, origin, and confirmed cytotoxic activity of more than 130 novel alkaloids belonging to several structural families (indoles, pyrroles, pyrazines, quinolines, and pyridoacridines), together with some of their synthetic analogs, are illustrated. Recent discoveries concerning the current state of the potential and/or development of some of them as new drugs, as well as the current knowledge regarding their modes of action, are also summarized. A special emphasis is given to the role of marine invertebrate alkaloids as an important source of leads for anticancer drug discovery. PMID:25490431

  9. Influence of Some Heavy Metals on Growth, Alkaloid Content and Composition in Catharanthus roseus L.

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, N. K.; Srivastava, A. K.

    2010-01-01

    Shoot biomass production, alkaloid content and composition as influence by cadmium, manganese, nickel and lead at uniform dose of 5 mM were investigated in Catharanthus roseus plants grown in sand culture. Treatment with Mn, Ni, and Pb significantly enhanced total root alkaloid accumulation. Cd and Ni treatment resulted in two-fold where as Pb treatment resulted in three fold increase in serpentine content of roots. The non-significant affect on biomass suggests that plants can withstand metal stress at the level tested with positive affect on root alkaloid content. PMID:21969751

  10. [Research progress on alkaloids constituents from Zanthoxylum and their pharmacological activities].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hai-mei; Qiu, Lu; Xie, Zhen-jian; Zou, Liang; Zheng, Jin; Fu, Qiang

    2015-12-01

    There are 250 species of Zanthoxylum (Rutaceae) in the world. This genus distributed in tropical and subtropical regions. Alkaloids are the major and representative ingredients in these plants including quinolines, isoquinolines, and amide alkaloids, with such biological activities as anti-tumor, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, anti-virus, anti-platelet aggregation, anti-bacteria and anti- oxidant. These species have been used for a long time to treat toothache, urinary and venereal diseases, lumbago and rheumatism. This review summarizes the chemical constituents and pharmacological activities from the Z. sppplants, in an effort to the systematic research and application of the alkaloids of this genus. PMID:27141666

  11. Two unprecedented dibromotyrosine-derived alkaloids from the Brazilian endemic marine sponge Aplysina caissara.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Beatriz M; Granato, Ana Claudia; Berlinck, Roberto G S; Magalhães, Alviclér; Schefer, Alexandre B; Ferreira, Antonio G; Pinheiro, Ulisses S; Hajdu, Eduardo

    2002-05-01

    Two new bromotyrosine-derived alkaloids, caissarine A (1) and caissarine B (2), along with three known biogenetically related alkaloids, aeroplysinin-1, fistularin-3, and the artifact of isolation 2-(3,5-dibromo-4-dimethoxy-1-hydroxy-2,5-cyclohexadien-1-yl)ethanamide, have been isolated from Aplysina caissara, an endemic species of marine sponge from the Southeastern Brazilian coast. The alkaloids have been identified by analysis of spectroscopic data. While caissarine A has a 2-hydroxyagmatine moiety in its structure, caissarin B is the first naturally occurring compound encompassing the unprecedented 1,7-diamino-3-hydroxyheptane moiety. PMID:12027773

  12. An O-to-N intramolecular acyl migration in C₁₉-diterpenoid alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi-Feng; Jian, Xi-Xian; Chen, Qiao-Hong; Wang, Feng-Peng

    2012-01-01

    The O-acyl group at C-1 of two C₁₉-diterpenoid alkaloids 2 and 5 was transferred to the secondary amine nitrogen to form amides 3 and 6 in the basic condition. This kind of O-to-N intramolecular acyl migration could be caused by the near distance between the nucleophilic nitrogen atom and the carbonyl group of the ester at C-1 in the C₁₉-diterpenoid alkaloids, which is consistent with the conformation of rings A and E in the C₁₉-diterpenoid alkaloids. PMID:22568819

  13. Numerical Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sozio, Gerry

    2009-01-01

    Senior secondary students cover numerical integration techniques in their mathematics courses. In particular, students would be familiar with the "midpoint rule," the elementary "trapezoidal rule" and "Simpson's rule." This article derives these techniques by methods which secondary students may not be familiar with and an approach that…

  14. Numerical Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in numerical relativity have fueled an explosion of progress in understanding the predictions of Einstein's theory of gravity, General Relativity, for the strong field dynamics, the gravitational radiation wave forms, and consequently the state of the remnant produced from the merger of compact binary objects. I will review recent results from the field, focusing on mergers of two black holes.

  15. Alkaloids from an algicolous strain of Talaromyces sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Haibin; Li, Fang; Ji, Naiyun

    2016-03-01

    Compounds isolated and identified in a culture of the alga-endophytic fungus Talaromyces sp. cf-16 included two naturally occurring alkaloids, 2-[( S)-hydroxy(phenyl)methyl]-3-methylquinazolin-4(3H)-one ( 1a) and 2-[( R)-hydroxy(phenyl)methyl]-3-methylquinazolin-4(3H)-one ( 1b), that were identified for the first time. In addition, seven known compounds ( 2- 8) were obtained from the culture. Following chiral column chromatography, compounds 1a and 1b were identified as enantiomers by spectroscopic analyses and quantum chemical calculations. Bioassay results showed that 5 was more toxic to brine shrimp than the other compounds, and that 3- 6 could inhibit Staphylococcus aureus.

  16. Phenylbenzoisoquinolindione alkaloids accumulate in stamens of Xiphidium caeruleum Aubl. flowers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Paetz, Christian; Menezes, Riya C; Schneider, Bernd

    2016-08-01

    Xiphidium caeruleum (Haemodoraceae) flower organs such as carpels, pedicels, petals, and stamens were separately investigated for their phytochemical profile. The stamens appeared to be a rich source of previously undescribed phenylbenzoisoquinolindiones, a group of phenylphenalenone-derived alkaloids, also named aza-phenylphenalenones. Nine previously undescribed compounds with an identical aza-phenylphenalenone core structure but different amino acid-derived side chains at position 2 were isolated and their structures elucidated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and mass spectrometry (MS). In addition, some previously reported phenylbenzoisoquinolindiones, phenylbenzoisochromenones and flavonoids were found in stamens and other parts of the flowers. The specific occurrence of heterocyclic phenylphenalenone-type compounds in X. caeruleum suggests these are involved in physiological or ecological processes. PMID:27179683

  17. Penipyridones A-F, Pyridone Alkaloids from Penicillium funiculosum.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haibo; Li, Liyuan; Wu, Chongming; Kurtán, Tibor; Mándi, Attila; Liu, Yankai; Gu, Qianqun; Zhu, Tianjiao; Guo, Peng; Li, Dehai

    2016-07-22

    Six new pyridone alkaloids, named penipyridones A-F (1-6), were isolated from the fermentation broth of an Antarctic moss-derived fungus, Penicillium funiculosum GWT2-24. Their structures were elucidated from extensive NMR and MS data. Although they possess the same major chromophore and some of them presented almost mirror ECD spectra, their absolute configurations were found to be uniformly S, as evidenced by X-ray single-crystal diffraction analysis, stereocontrolled total synthesis, and chemical conversions. TDDFT-ECD calculations of compounds 3 and 6 revealed that subtle conformational changes are responsible for the significantly different ECD curves. None of the compounds were cytotoxic (IC50 > 50 μM), while compounds 1, 2, 5, and 7 elicited lipid-lowering activity in HepG2 hepatocytes. PMID:27359163

  18. Reviewing Colchicaceae alkaloids - perspectives of evolution on medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Sonny; Rønsted, Nina

    2014-01-01

    The subject of chemosystematics has provided insight to both botanical classification and drug development. However, degrees of subjectivity in botanical classifications and limited understanding of the evolution of chemical characters and their biosynthetic pathways has often hampered such studies. In this review an approach of taking phylogenetic classification into account in evaluating colchicine and related phenethylisoquinoline alkaloids from the family Colchicaceae will be applied. Following on the trends of utilizing evolutionary reasoning in inferring mechanisms in eg. drug resistance in cancer and infections, this will exemplify how thinking about evolution can influence selection of plant material in drug lead discovery, and how knowledge about phylogenetic relationships may be used to evaluate predicted biosynthetic pathways. PMID:24359194

  19. Engineering biosynthesis of the anticancer alkaloid noscapine in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanran; Smolke, Christina D.

    2016-01-01

    Noscapine is a potential anticancer drug isolated from the opium poppy Papaver somniferum, and genes encoding enzymes responsible for the synthesis of noscapine have been recently discovered to be clustered on the genome of P. somniferum. Here, we reconstitute the noscapine gene cluster in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to achieve the microbial production of noscapine and related pathway intermediates, complementing and extending previous in planta and in vitro investigations. Our work provides structural validation of the secoberberine intermediates and the description of the narcotoline-4′-O-methyltransferase, suggesting this activity is catalysed by a unique heterodimer. We also reconstitute a 14-step biosynthetic pathway of noscapine from the simple alkaloid norlaudanosoline by engineering a yeast strain expressing 16 heterologous plant enzymes, achieving reconstitution of a complex plant pathway in a microbial host. Other engineered yeasts produce previously inaccessible pathway intermediates and a novel derivative, thereby advancing protoberberine and noscapine related drug discovery. PMID:27378283

  20. In vitro antagonism between cisplatin and vinca alkaloids.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, K.; Tanaka, M.; Kanamaru, H.; Hashimura, T.; Yamamoto, I.; Konishi, J.; Kuze, F.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of the combination of cisplatin and other cytotoxic agents were studied in vitro. When A549 lung cancer cells were treated simultaneously with cisplatin and other cytotoxic agents, cisplatin additively increased the cytotoxic effects of etoposide, mitomycin C, adriamycin, 5-fluorouracil and 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine, but antagonised those of vincristine, vindesine, vinblastine and podophyllotoxin. The antagonism between cisplatin and vincristine was also observed with HT29 colon cancer cells. NC65 renal carcinoma cells and A431 epidermoid carcinoma cells when these cells were simultaneously exposed to both agents. When A549 cells were exposed to cisplatin and vincristine sequentially, the antagonism between them was evident when cells were pretreated with cisplatin but not when treated in the opposite sequence. Therefore, when combination chemotherapy including cisplatin and vinca alkaloids is given, possible antagonism between them should be considered, especially in determining the schedule of drug administration. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2757923

  1. Synthesis and biological evaluation of vinca alkaloids and phomopsin hybrids.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Quoc Anh; Roussi, Fanny; Cormier, Anthony; Thoret, Sylviane; Knossow, Marcel; Guénard, Daniel; Guéritte, Françoise

    2009-01-01

    Ten hybrids of vinca alkaloids and phomopsin A have been synthesized by linking the octahydrophomopsin lateral chain to the tertiary amine of the cleavamine moiety of anhydrovinblastine (AVLB) and vinorelbine. These compounds have been elaborated in order to obtain original products that may interfere with both binding sites of vinblastine (VLB) and phomopsin in tubulin. Although NMR and molecular modeling studies have shown that the orientation of the added peptide chains of these hybrids is not the same as those of phomopsin A, most of them are very potent inhibitors of microtubules assembly and they present good cytotoxicity against KB cell line. These interesting biological activities may eventually be explained by the fact that their lateral chain resides in a pocket distinct from that of the phomopsin A peptide, at the interface of tubulins beta and alpha. PMID:19072542

  2. DNA binding studies of Vinca alkaloids: experimental and computational evidence.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Prateek; Gupta, Surendra P; Pandav, Kumud; Barthwal, Ritu; Jayaram, B; Kumar, Surat

    2012-03-01

    Fluorescence studies on the indole alkaloids vinblastine sulfate, vincristine sulfate, vincamine and catharanthine have demonstrated the DNA binding ability of these molecules. The binding mode of these molecules in the minor groove of DNA is non-specific. A new parameter of the purine-pyrimidine base sequence specificty was observed in order to define the non-specific DNA binding of ligands. Catharanthine had shown 'same' pattern of 'Pu-Py' specificity while evaluating its DNA binding profile. The proton resonances of a DNA decamer duplex were assigned. The models of the drug:DNA complexes were analyzed for DNA binding features. The effect of temperature on the DNA binding was also evaluated. PMID:22545401

  3. Vitiquinolone--a quinolone alkaloid from Hibiscus vitifolius Linn.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, D; Saraswathy, A

    2014-02-15

    Phytochemical investigations of the powdered root of Hibiscus vitifolius Linn. (Malvaceae) was extracted successively with n-hexane and chloroform. Analysis of the n-hexane extract by GC-MS led to the identification of twenty-six components by comparison of their mass spectra with GC-MS library data. A novel quinolone alkaloid, vitiquinolone (5) together with eight known compounds viz. β-Amyrin acetate (1), n-octacosanol (2), β-Amyrin (3), stigmasterol (4), xanthyletin (6), alloxanthoxyletin (7), xanthoxyletin (8) and betulinic acid (9) were isolated from chloroform extract by column chromatography over silica gel. The structure of vitiquinolone was established on the basis of spectroscopic methods including UV, IR, 1D, 2D NMR and ESI-MS. The known compounds were identified on the basis of their physical and spectroscopic data as reported in the literature. PMID:24128571

  4. Fumigaclavine I, a new alkaloid isolated from endophyte Aspergillus terreus.

    PubMed

    Shen, Li; Zhu, Li; Luo, Qian; Li, Xiao-Wen; Xi, Ju-Qun; Kong, Gui-Mei; Song, Yong-Chun

    2015-12-01

    The present study was designed to isolate and purify chemical constituents from solid culture of endophyte Aspergillus terreus LQ, using silica gel column chromatography, gel filtration with Sephadex LH-20, and HPLC. Fumigaclavine I (1), a new alkaloid, was obtained, along with seven known compounds, including fumigaclavine C (2), rhizoctonic acid (3), monomethylsulochrin (4), chaetominine (5), spirotryprostatin A (6), asperfumoid (7), and lumichrome (8). The structure of compound 1 was elucidated by various spectroscopic analyses (UV, MS, 1D and 2D NMR). The in vitro cytotoxicity of compound 1 was determined by MTT assay in human hepatocarcinoma cell line SMMC-7721, showing weaker cytotoxicity, compared with cisplatin, a clinically used cancer chemotherapeutic agent. PMID:26721713

  5. Engineering biosynthesis of the anticancer alkaloid noscapine in yeast.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanran; Smolke, Christina D

    2016-01-01

    Noscapine is a potential anticancer drug isolated from the opium poppy Papaver somniferum, and genes encoding enzymes responsible for the synthesis of noscapine have been recently discovered to be clustered on the genome of P. somniferum. Here, we reconstitute the noscapine gene cluster in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to achieve the microbial production of noscapine and related pathway intermediates, complementing and extending previous in planta and in vitro investigations. Our work provides structural validation of the secoberberine intermediates and the description of the narcotoline-4'-O-methyltransferase, suggesting this activity is catalysed by a unique heterodimer. We also reconstitute a 14-step biosynthetic pathway of noscapine from the simple alkaloid norlaudanosoline by engineering a yeast strain expressing 16 heterologous plant enzymes, achieving reconstitution of a complex plant pathway in a microbial host. Other engineered yeasts produce previously inaccessible pathway intermediates and a novel derivative, thereby advancing protoberberine and noscapine related drug discovery. PMID:27378283

  6. Indole alkaloid glucosides from the roots of Isatis indigotica.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Feng; Chen, Ming-Hua; Lin, Sheng; Li, Yu-Huan; Zhang, Dan; Jiang, Jian-Dong; Shi, Jian-Gong

    2016-01-01

    Five new indole alkaloid glucosides named isatindigotindolosides A-E (1-5), along with three known analogs (6-8), were isolated from an aqueous extract of the Isatis indigotica roots. Their structures including the absolute configurations were determined based on comprehensive spectroscopic data analysis, combined with chemical methods and electronic circular dichroism spectra calculations. In the preliminary assays, compounds 1, 6 and 7 showed antiviral activity against influenza virus A/Hanfang/359/95 (H3N2) with IC50 values of 14.6-33.3 μM. Compound 1 also exhibited inhibitory effect against nitric oxide (NO) production in microglial cell BV2 with an inhibition ratio of 93.0% at 10 μM. PMID:26651370

  7. Cryptolepine hydrochloride: a potent antimycobacterial alkaloid derived from Cryptolepis sanguinolenta.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Simon; Fallah, Fatemeh; Wright, Colin W

    2003-04-01

    The activity of cryptolepine hydrochloride, a salt of the main indoloquinoline alkaloid from the West African medicinal plant Cryptolepis sanguinolenta, was assessed against the fast growing mycobacterial species Mycobacterium fortuitum, which has recently been shown to be of use in the evaluation of antitubercular drugs. The low minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of this compound (16 microg/mL) prompted further evaluation against other fast growing mycobacteria namely, M. phlei, M. aurum, M. smegmatis, M. bovis BCG and M. abcessus and the MICs ranged over 2-32 microg/mL for these species. The strong activity of this agent, the need for new antibiotics with activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, coupled with the ethnobotanical use of C. sanguinolenta extracts to treat infections, highlight the potential of the cryptolepine template for development of antimycobacterial agents. PMID:12722159

  8. Alkaloids from Pandanus amaryllifolius: Isolation and Their Plausible Biosynthetic Formation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Chi; Yu, Meng-Lun; El-Shazly, Mohamed; Beerhues, Ludger; Cheng, Yuan-Bin; Chen, Lei-Chin; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Chen, Hui-Fen; Chung, Yu-Ming; Hou, Ming-Feng; Wu, Yang-Chang; Chang, Fang-Rong

    2015-10-23

    Pandanus amaryllifolius Roxb. (Pandanaceae) is used as a flavor and in folk medicine in Southeast Asia. The ethanolic crude extract of the aerial parts of P. amaryllifolius exhibited antioxidant, antibiofilm, and anti-inflammatory activities in previous studies. In the current investigation, the purification of the ethanolic extract yielded nine new compounds, including N-acetylnorpandamarilactonines A (1) and B (2); pandalizines A (3) and B (4); pandanmenyamine (5); pandamarilactones 2 (6) and 3 (7), and 5(E)-pandamarilactonine-32 (8); and pandalactonine (9). The isolated alkaloids, with either a γ-alkylidene-α,β-unsaturated-γ-lactone or γ-alkylidene-α,β-unsaturated-γ-lactam system, can be classified into five skeletons including norpandamarilactonine, indolizinone, pandanamine, pandamarilactone, and pandamarilactonine. A plausible biosynthetic route toward 1-5, 7, and 9 is proposed. PMID:26461164

  9. Dichlorinated and Brominated Rugulovasines, Ergot Alkaloids Produced by Talaromyces wortmannii.

    PubMed

    de Medeiros, Lívia Soman; da Silva, José Vinícius; Abreu, Lucas Magalhães; Pfenning, Ludwig Heinrich; Silva, Carolina Lúcia; Thomasi, Sérgio Secherrer; Venâncio, Tiago; van Pée, Karl-Heinz; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Rodrigues-Filho, Edson

    2015-01-01

    UHPLC-DAD-HRMS based dereplication guided the detection of new halogenated alkaloids co-produced by Talaromyces wortmannii. From the fungal growth in large scale, the epimers 2,8-dichlororugulovasines A and B were purified and further identified by means of a HPLC-SPE/NMR hyphenated system. Brominated rugulovasines were also detected when the microbial incubation medium was supplemented with bromine sources. Studies from 1D/2D NMR and HRMS spectroscopy data allowed the structural elucidation of the dichlorinated compounds, while tandem MS/HRMS data analysis supported the rationalization of brominated congeners. Preliminary genetic studies revealed evidence that FADH₂ dependent halogenase can be involved in the biosynthesis of the produced halocompounds. PMID:26404231

  10. Antiphagocytic and antioxidant properties of plant alkaloid tetrandrine.

    PubMed

    Seow, W K; Ferrante, A; Li, S Y; Thong, Y H

    1988-01-01

    The effects of tetrandrine, a benzylisoquinoline alkaloid useful in the treatment of silicosis, on a broad range of human neutrophil activities was examined in vitro. Random movement, chemotaxis and phagocytosis were significantly suppressed. There was minimal but significant inhibition of lysosomal enzyme secretion from specific (secondary) but not azurophil (primary) granules. The same concentration of tetrandrine (10 micrograms/ml) caused marked depression of hexose-monophosphate shunt activity and hydrogen peroxide production, but inhibition of superoxide anion generation was observed even at a concentration of 0.1 microgram/ml. This discrepancy was attributed to the capacity of tetrandrine to scavenge oxygen radicals, as shown by experiments using hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase to generate superoxide. These potent antiphagocytic and antioxidant properties of tetrandrine may account for some of its remarkable anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:3356473

  11. Design, synthesis and antistaphylococcal activity of marine pyrrole alkaloid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Rane, Rajesh A; Sahu, Niteshkumar U; Shah, Chetan P; Shah, Nishant K

    2014-06-01

    A novel set of 16 hybrids of bromopyrrole alkaloids with aroyl hydrazone were designed, synthesized and evaluated for antibacterial and antibiofilm activities against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA; ATCC 43866), methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA; ATCC 35556) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (SE, S. epidermidis ATCC 35984). Of the 16 tested hybrids, 14 exhibited equal or superior antibiofilm activity against MSSA and MRSA relative to standard vancomycin. Compound 4m showed highest potency with antibiofilm activity of 0.39 µg/mL and 0.78 µg/mL against MSSA and MRSA, respectively. Thus, this compound could act as a potential lead for further development of new antistaphylococcal drugs. PMID:23663080

  12. Reviewing Colchicaceae Alkaloids – Perspectives of Evolution on Medicinal Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Sonny; Rønsted, Nina

    2014-01-01

    The subject of chemosystematics has provided insight to both botanical classification and drug development. However, degrees of subjectivity in botanical classifications and limited understanding of the evolution of chemical characters and their biosynthetic pathways has often hampered such studies. In this review an approach of taking phylogenetic classification into account in evaluating colchicine and related phenethylisoquinoline alkaloids from the family Colchicaceae will be applied. Following on the trends of utilizing evolutionary reasoning in inferring mechanisms in eg. drug resistance in cancer and infections, this will exemplify how thinking about evolution can influence selection of plant material in drug lead discovery, and how knowledge about phylogenetic relationships may be used to evaluate predicted biosynthetic pathways. PMID:24359194

  13. Determination of pyrrolizidine alkaloids in tea, herbal drugs and honey.

    PubMed

    Bodi, Dorina; Ronczka, Stefan; Gottschalk, Christoph; Behr, Nastassja; Skibba, Anne; Wagner, Matthias; Lahrssen-Wiederholt, Monika; Preiss-Weigert, Angelika; These, Anja

    2014-01-01

    Honey was previously considered to be one of the main food sources of human pyrrolizidine alkaloid (PA) exposure in Europe. However, comprehensive analyses of honey and tea sampled in the Berlin retail market revealed unexpected high PA amounts in teas. This study comprised the analysis of 87 honey as well as 274 tea samples including black, green, rooibos, melissa, peppermint, chamomile, fennel, nettle, and mixed herbal tea or fruit tea. Total PA concentrations in tea ranged from < LOD to 5647 µg kg(-1), while a mean value of about 10 µg kg(-1) was found in honey samples. Additionally, herbal drugs were investigated to identify the source of PA in teas. Results suggest that PA in tea samples are most likely a contamination caused by co-harvesting of PA-producing plants. In some cases such as fennel, anise or caraway, it cannot be excluded that these plants are able to produce PA themselves. PMID:25222912

  14. Mw Systematic Study of Alkaloids: the Distorted Tropane of Scopoline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecija, Patricia; Cocinero, Emilio J.; Basterretxea, Francisco J.; Fernandez, Jose A.; Castano, Fernando; Lesarri, Alberto

    2013-06-01

    Tropane alkaloids have diverse pharmacological uses and are well-known for their neurostimulant activity. Previous structure-activity-relationship established correlations between bioactivity and several aspects of ligand conformation and stereochemistry, including delicate intramolecular effects like nitrogen inversion^{a}. We have initiated a series of structural studies on tropane alkaloids^{b}, aimed to discerning their intrinsic stereochemical properties using rotational spectroscopy in supersonic jets^{c}. Here we extend these studies to the epoxytropanes, initially motivated to interrogate the influence of the epoxy group on nitrogen inversion and ring conformation. The rotational spectrum evidences a single structure in the gas phase, providing a first description of the (three ring) structurally-distorted tropane in scopoline. The determined rotational parameters of scopoline reveal the structural consequences of the intramolecular cyclation of scopine, which breaks the original epoxy group and creates a new ether bridge and a 7β-hydroxytropane configuration. The hydroxyl group further stabilizes the molecule by an O-H \\cdots N intramolecular hydrogen bond, which, in turn, forces the N-methyl group to the less stable axial form^{b}. The experimental work was supported by ab initio and DFT calculations. ^{a} i) S.Singh, Chem. Rev. 100, 925 (2000); ii) A. Krunic, D. Pan, W.J. Dunn III, S.V.S. Miariappan, Bioorg. & Med. Chem. 17, 811 (2009). ^{b} E.J. Cocinero, A. Lesarri, P. écija, J.-U. Grabow, J.A. Fernández, F. Castaño, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 12, 6076 (2010). ^{c} E.J. Cocinero, A. Lesarri, P. écija, J.-U. Grabow, J.A. Fernández, F. Castaño, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 12, 12486 (2010).

  15. Thesinine-4'-O-beta-D-glucoside the first glycosylated plant pyrrolizidine alkaloid from Borago officinalis.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Martina; Joppe, Holger; Schmaus, Gerhard

    2002-06-01

    The glycosylated pyrrolizidine alkaloid, thesinine-4'-O-beta-D-glucoside, has been isolated from the aqueous methanol extract of dried, defatted seeds of Borago officinalis (Boraginaceae). The structure was established by means of spectroscopic and chemical analysis. PMID:12031432

  16. Asexual endophytes in a native grass: Tradeoffs in mortality, growth, reproduction, and alkaloid production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neotyphodium endophytes are asexual, seed-borne fungal symbionts that are thought to interact mutualistically with their grass hosts. Benefits include increased growth, reproduction, and resistance of herbivores via endophytic alkaloids. Although these benefits are well established in infected int...

  17. Variability in the yield of benzophenanthridine alkaloids in wildcrafted vs cultivated bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis L.).

    PubMed

    Graf, Tyler N; Levine, Keith E; Andrews, Margaret E; Perlmutter, Jason M; Nielsen, Samara Joy; Davis, Jeanine M; Wani, Mansukh C; Oberlies, Nicholas H

    2007-02-21

    Populations of bloodroot [Sanguinaria canadensis L. (Papaveraceae)] are found throughout the eastern forests of North America, with particular abundance in the southern Appalachian Mountains. Increasingly, it is finding use in Europe as a nonantibiotic animal feed supplement to promote weight gain. As efforts to cultivate this herb are underway, there is a need to understand the effect of agronomic permutations on both the dry mass rhizome yield and the yield of benzophenanthridine alkaloids. Month-to-month variability of the concentration of the alkaloids sanguinarine and chelerythrine in both cultivated and wildcrafted bloodroot was examined. The alkaloid yield was consistently higher, but more variable, in wildcrafted plants. On average, cultivated rhizomes were both larger and more consistently sized than those that were wildcrafted. The concentration of a suite of trace elements was measured in soil that was collected concomitantly with each plant accession. Differences in element profiles were compared against alkaloid yields. PMID:17253712

  18. Studies of Genetic Variation of Essential Oil and Alkaloid Content in Boldo (Peumus boldus).

    PubMed

    Vogel, H; Razmilic, I; Muñoz, M; Doll, U; Martin, J S

    1999-02-01

    Boldo is a tree or shrub with medicinal properties native to Chile. The leaves contain alkaloids and essential oils. Variation of total alkaloid concentration, of the alkaloid boldine, and essential oil components were studied in different populations from northern, central, and southern parts of its geographic range and in their progenies (half-sib families). Total alkaloid concentration showed genetic variation between progenies of the central population but not between populations. Boldine content found in concentrations of 0.007 to 0.009% did not differ significantly between populations. Principal components of the essential oil were determined genetically, with highest values for ascaridole in the population of the north and for P-cymene in the south. Between half-sib families genetic variation was found in the central and northern populations for these components. The high heritability coefficients found indicate considerable potential for successful selection of individuals for these characters. PMID:17260243

  19. Poor alkaloid sequestration by arrow poison frogs of the genus Phyllobates from Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Mebs, Dietrich; Alvarez, Joseph Vargas; Pogoda, Werner; Toennes, Stefan W; Köhler, Gunther

    2014-03-01

    Frogs of the genus Phyllobates from Colombia are known to contain the highly toxic alkaloid batrachotoxin, but species from Central America exhibit only very low levels or are entirely free of this toxin. In the present study alcohol extracts from 101 specimens of Phyllobates lugubris and Phyllobates vittatus and 21 of three sympatric species (Dendrobates pumilio, Dendrobates auratus, Dendrobates granuliferus) from Costa Rica were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Whereas the extracts of the Dendrobates species exhibited typical profiles of toxic alkaloids, those of the two Phyllobates species contained low levels of few alkaloids only, batrachotoxin was not detected. Although the feeding pattern of the Dendrobates and Phyllobates species are similar as revealed by examination of their stomach content (mainly ants and mites), the Phyllobates species are poorly sequestering alkaloids from their food source in contrast to the Dendrobates frogs. PMID:24467995

  20. Lucidimine A-D, four new alkaloids from the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma lucidum.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhen-Zhu; Chen, He-Ping; Feng, Tao; Li, Zheng-Hui; Dong, Ze-Jun; Liu, Ji-Kai

    2015-01-01

    Four new polycylic alkaloids, lucidimine A-D, were isolated from the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma lucidum. Their chemical structures were established based on 1D and 2D NMR data as well as HREIMS/HRESIMS analyses. PMID:26666338

  1. The laser desorption/laser ionization mass spectra of some indole derivatives and alkaloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Kevin; Milnes, John; Gormally, John

    1992-06-01

    The laser desorption and laser ionization mass spectra of some indole derivatives and alkaloids are described with particular reference to their modes of fragmentation. Mass spectra of yohimbine, reserpine, quinine and quinidine are presented. Full experimental details are given.

  2. Indolizidine 239Q and Quinolizidine 275I. Major alkaloids in two Argentinian bufonid toads (Melanophryniscus)

    PubMed Central

    Daly, John W.; Garraffo, H. Martin; Spande, Thomas F.; Yeh, Herman J. C.; Peltzer, Paola M.; Cacivio, Pedro; Baldo, J. Diego; Faivovich, Julián

    2008-01-01

    Alkaloid profiles in skin of poison frogs/toads (Dendrobatidae, Mantellidae, Bufonidae, and Myobatrachidae) are highly dependent on diet and hence on the nature of habitat. Extracts of the two species of toads (Melanophryniscus klappenbachi and M. cupreuscapularis) from similar habitats in the Corrientes/Chaco Provinces of Argentina have similar profiles of alkaloids, which differ considerably from profiles from other Melanophryniscus species from Brazil, Uruguay and Argentina. Structures of two major alkaloids 239Q (1) and 275I (2) were determined by mass, FTIR, and NMR spectral analysis as 5Z,9Z-3-(1-hydroxybutyl)-5-propylindolizidine and 6Z,10E-4,6-di(pent-4-enyl) quinolizidine, respectively. A third alkaloid, 249F (3), is postulated to be a homopumiliotoxin with an unprecedented conjugated exocyclic diene moiety. PMID:18848574

  3. Safety concerns of herbal products and traditional Chinese herbal medicines: Dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids and aristolochic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In many countries, including the United States, herbal supplements, tisanes and vegetable products, including traditional Chinese medicines, are largely unregulated and their content is not registered, monitored or verified. Consequently, potent plant toxins including dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids ...

  4. Effect of ergot alkaloids on contractility of bovine right ruminal artery and vein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alkaloids produced by the Neotyphodium coenophialum endophyte associated with tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum) are imputed to cause symptoms of fescue toxicosis related to peripheral vasoconstriction. These compounds were hypothesized to correspondingly affect foregut vasculature. The objective of ...

  5. Alkaloids in Processed Rhizoma Corydalis and Crude Rhizoma Corydalis Analyzed by GC/MS

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Ru; Su, Huidan; Li, Yunlong

    2014-01-01

    The alkaloids in the processed Rhizoma Corydalis and the crude Rhizoma Corydalis were qualitatively and semiquantitatively analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method. The processing herb drug procedure was carried out according to the standard method of Chinese Pharmacopoeia. The samples were extracted using Soxhlet extractor with different solvents: methanol and acetone. The extraction effect on different solvents was investigated. The results showed that 11 kinds of alkaloids were identified from the crude Rhizoma Corydalis and only two were from the processed Rhizoma Corydalis. A total of 13 kinds of alkaloids were all based on two backbones. The alkaloids in the processed sample were less than those in the crude Rhizoma Corydalis significantly, while almost the corydaline has been changed in conformation after the sample had undergone processing, which provided support for the conclusion of reducing toxicity when the herbal medicine having been undergone a traditional drugs treatment process. PMID:25210643

  6. Sequestration of dietary alkaloids by the spongivorous marine mollusc Tylodina perversa.

    PubMed

    Thoms, Carsten; Ebel, Rainer; Hentschel, Ute; Proksch, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Specimens of the spongivorous Mediterranean opisthobranch Tylodina perversa that had been collected while feeding on Aplysina acerophoba were shown to sequester the brominated isoxazoline alkaloids of their prey. Alkaloids were stored in the hepatopancreas, mantle tissues, and egg masses in an organ-specific manner. Surprisingly, the known sponge alkaloid aerothionin which is found only in A. cavernicola but not in A. aerophoba was also among the metabolites identified in wild caught specimens of T. perversa as well as in opisthobranchs with a documented feeding history on A. aerophoba. Mollusc derived aerothionin is postulated to be derived from a previous feeding encounter with A. cavernicola as T. perversa was found to freely feed on both Aplysina sponges in aquarium bioassays. The possible ecological significance of alkaloid sequestration by T. perversa is still unknown. PMID:12872940

  7. Safety concerns of herbal products and traditional Chinese herbal medicines: Dehydopyrrolizidine alkaloids and aristolochic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In many countries, including the United States, herbal supplements, tisanes and vegetable products including traditional Chinese medicines are largely unregulated and their content is not registered, monitored or verified. Consequently potent plant toxins including dehydopyrrolizidine alkaloids and...

  8. New records of pyrrolizidine alkaloid-feeding insects. Hemiptera and Coleoptera on Senecio brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Klitzke; Trigo

    2000-04-01

    New records are reported for a Hemipteran (Largus rufipennis) and a Coleopteran (Chauliognathus fallax) feeding on Senecio brasiliensis (Asteraceae) and sequestering pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs). Both insects are warningly colored and rejected by predators. PMID:10725590

  9. Induction of micronuclei by alkaloids extracted from Senecio brasiliensis and stored for 23 years.

    PubMed

    Santos-Mello, R; Deimlimg, L I; Lauer Júnior, C M; Almeida, A

    2002-04-26

    In the present study, we report the results of an investigation on pyrrolizidine alkaloids extracted from Senecio brasiliensis (Sprengel) Less., which were stored for more than 23 years under variable conditions of temperature and humidity and exposed to light. Both the crude alkaloid (integerrimine+retrorsine+impurities) and pure integerrimine conserved the ability to induce acute toxicity in mice, leading to the death of the animals in less than 24h. The alkaloids also conserved the potential to induce significant increases in micronucleus frequencies in polychromatic erythrocytes of mouse bone marrow compared to the negative control. The administration of alkaloids to lymphocyte cultures blocked with cytochalasin-B showed no significant increase in micronucleus frequency in binucleated cells, probably due to the lack of a metabolic activation mechanism. However, an antimitotic effect was observed. PMID:11943607

  10. In vivo antimalarial efficacy of acetogenins, alkaloids and flavonoids enriched fractions from Annona crassiflora Mart.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Lúcia Pinheiro Santos; Garcia, Giani Martins; Gonçalves, Samuel Geraldo do Vale; Dionísio, Bárbara Lana; Braga, Erika Martins; Mosqueira, Vanessa Carla Furtado

    2014-01-01

    Annona crassiflora and Annonaceae plants are known to be used to treat malaria by traditional healers. In this work, the antimalarial efficacy of different fractions of A. crassiflora, particularly acetogenin, alkaloids and flavonoid-rich fractions, was determined in vivo using Plasmodium berghei-infected mice model and toxicity was accessed by brine shrimp assay. The A. crassiflora fractions were administered at doses of 12.5 mg/kg/day in a 4-day test protocol. The results showed that some fractions from woods were rich in acetogenins, alkaloids and terpenes, and other fractions from leaves were rich in alkaloids and flavonoids. The parasitaemia was significantly (p < 0.05, p < 0.001) reduced (57-75%) with flavonoid and alkaloid-rich leaf fractions, which also increased mean survival time of mice after treatment. Our results confirm the usage of this plant in folk medicine as an antimalarial remedy. PMID:24678811

  11. Pharmacological and therapeutic effects of Peganum harmala and its main alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Moloudizargari, Milad; Mikaili, Peyman; Aghajanshakeri, Shahin; Asghari, Mohammad Hossein; Shayegh, Jalal

    2013-01-01

    Wild Syrian rue (Peganum harmala L. family Zygophyllaceae) is well-known in Iran and various parts of this plant including, its seeds, bark, and root have been used as folk medicine. Recent years of research has demonstrated different pharmacological and therapeutic effects of P. harmala and its active alkaloids, especially harmine and harmaline. Analytical studies on the chemical composition of the plant show that the most important constituents of this plant are beta-carboline alkaloids such as harmalol, harmaline, and harmine. Harmine is the most studied among these naturally occurring alkaloids. In addition to P. harmala (Syrian rue), these beta-carbolines are present in many other plants such as Banisteria caapi and are used for the treatment of different diseases. This article reviews the traditional uses and pharmacological effects of total extract and individual active alkaloids of P. harmala (Syrian rue). PMID:24347928

  12. A journey under the sea: the quest for marine anti-cancer alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Tohme, Rita; Darwiche, Nadine; Gali-Muhtasib, Hala

    2011-01-01

    The alarming increase in the global cancer death toll has fueled the quest for new effective anti-tumor drugs thorough biological screening of both terrestrial and marine organisms. Several plant-derived alkaloids are leading drugs in the treatment of different types of cancer and many are now being tested in various phases of clinical trials. Recently, marine-derived alkaloids, isolated from aquatic fungi, cyanobacteria, sponges, algae, and tunicates, have been found to also exhibit various anti-cancer activities including anti-angiogenic, anti-proliferative, inhibition of topoisomerase activities and tubulin polymerization, and induction of apoptosis and cytotoxicity. Two tunicate-derived alkaloids, aplidin and trabectedin, offer promising drug profiles, and are currently in phase II clinical trials against several solid and hematologic tumors. This review sheds light on the rich array of anti-cancer alkaloids in the marine ecosystem and introduces the most investigated compounds and their mechanisms of action. PMID:22113577

  13. [Determination of 7 bio-active alkaloids in Stephania plants by RP-HPLC].

    PubMed

    Huang, J; Guo, J; Duan, G

    1998-07-01

    Seven bio-active alkaloids (stepholidine, sinoacutine, isocorydine, l-tetrahydropalmatine, crebanine, fanchinoline and tetrandrine) in Stephania plants were determined by RP-HPLC, using UV detection (282 nm) and gradient elution. The reversed phase system consisted of ODS column and methanol-water-triethylamine as mobile phase. The flow rate was 1.0 ml.min-1. Good linearity between peak heights and concentrations of the alkaloids was obtained in the concentration range. The HPLC method proved accurate, precise and sensitive. The results showed that there were some differences in the occurrence and content of the alkaloids between various species and between the same species from different habitats and collecting time. Based on the results, some species with high content of the 7 bio-active alkaloids were selected. The study provided some useful information for the utilization of medicinal plant resources in the genus Stephania. PMID:12016887

  14. Two New Oxindole Alkaloid Glycosides from the Leaves of Nauclea officinalis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Long; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Fan, Chun-Lin; Li, Guo-Qiang; Wu, Zhen-Long; Li, Shuo-Guo; He, Zhen-Dan; Wang, Ying; Ye, Wen-Cai

    2015-12-01

    Two new oxindole alkaloid glycosides, nauclealomide A and (3S,7R)-javaniside, were isolated from the leaves of Nauclea officinalis. Their structures and absolute configurations were elucidated by means of NMR, HRESIMS, X-ray diffraction, acid hydrolysis and quantum chemical CD calculation. Nauclealomide A is a novel monoterpenoid oxindole alkaloid possessing a rare tetrahydro-2H-1,3-oxazine ring. PMID:26882671

  15. Hyrtinadines C and D, New Azepinoindole-Type Alkaloids from a Marine Sponge Hyrtios sp.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Takaaki; Nakamura, Kenta; Sakai, Kanae; Fromont, Jane; Gonoi, Tohru; Kobayashi, Jun'ichi

    2016-01-01

    New bisindole alkaloids, hyrtinadines C (1) and D (2), have been isolated from an Okinawan marine sponge Hyrtios sp. The structures of hyrtinadines C (1) and D (2) were elucidated based on analyses of the spectral data. Hyrtinadines C (1) and D (2) were the relatively rare alkaloids possessing a 3,4-fused azepinoindole skeleton. Hyrtinadines C (1) and D (2) showed antimicrobial activity. PMID:27373657

  16. Myritonines A-C, Alkaloids from Myrioneuron tonkinensis Based on a Novel Hexacyclic Skeleton.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Jia-Hui; Li, Xiao-Nian; Cao, Ming-Ming; Di, Ying-Tong; Peng, Zong-Gen; Jiang, Jian-Dong; Hao, Xiao-Jiang

    2016-04-22

    Myritonines A-C (1-3), three new alkaloids bearing an unprecedented heterohexacyclic skeleton, were isolated from Myrioneuron tonkinensis. Their structures were determined by a combination of spectroscopic data and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Compound 3 represents the first Myrioneuron alkaloid featuring a unique trans-decahydroquinoline motif and was also found to possess a rare cyano functionality. Compounds 1 and 2 showed inhibition against the hepatitis C virus in vitro. PMID:26967892

  17. Concise Total Syntheses of the Lycopodium Alkaloids (±)-Nankakurines A and B via Luciduline

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiayun; Waters, Stephen P.

    2009-01-01

    Total syntheses of the Lycopodium alkaloids nankakurines A and B have been accomplished in 6 and 7 steps, respectively, via a sequence that passes through a third Lycopodium alkaloid, luciduline, and forgoes the use of protecting groups on nitrogen. Key features include a short preparation of luciduline followed by a concise and stereoselective aminoallylation/ring-closing metathesis protocol to fashion the spiropiperidine ring common to nankakurines A and B. PMID:20014779

  18. Evaluation of Immunomodulatory Activity of the Alkaloid Fraction of Trichopus zeylanicus Gaertn on Experimental Animals

    PubMed Central

    Bachhav, R. S.; Sambathkumar, R.

    2016-01-01

    Trichopus zeylanicus Gaertn, (Trichopodaceae) is also known as “Arogyappacha” meaning the greener of health by tribal inhabitants (Kani tribes). This plant used as health tonic and rejuvenator. The whole plant material of Trichopus zeylanicus is defatted and successively extracted with methanol. The alkaloid fraction of Trichopus zeylanicus was obtained from methanol extract. Up to the dose of 2000 mg/kg b.w. per orally alkaloid fraction of Trichopus zeylanicus did not show any mortality or toxicity. Immunomodulatory activity of alkaloid fraction of Trichopus zeylanicus Gaertn was evaluated using various in vivo models including neutrophil adhesion test, delayed type hypersensitivity reaction, and effect on hematological parameter like, total white blood cell's, red blood cell's and hemoglobin and cyclophosphamide induce immunosupression. Sheep red blood cells were used to immunized the animals. The percentage of neutrophils adhesion to the nylon fiber was dose dependently increased in alkaloid fraction of Trichopus zeylanicus75, 150 and 300 mg/kg, p.o treated groups (50.57, 52.99 and 54.21%), respectively compared to control group. A dose dependent potentiating of delayed type hypersensitivity reaction induced by sheep red blood cells was also observed from the alkaloid fraction of Trichopus zeylanicus. On chronic administration of alkaloid fraction of Trichopus zeylanicus (75, 150 and 300 mg/kg. p.o.) caused significant (P<0.001) increased in hematological parameter like, total white blood cell's, red blood cell's and hemoglobin. Alkaloid fraction of Trichopus zeylanicus also prevented the myelosupression in mice treated cyclophosphamide (30 mg/kg, p.o.). The result of present investigation suggested that alkaloid fraction of Trichopus zeylanicus stimulate defense system by modulating several immunological parameters. PMID:27168696

  19. Isolation and 2D NMR Studies of Alkaloids from Comptonella sessilifoliola1.

    PubMed

    Pusset, J; Lopez, J L; Pais, M; Neirabeyeh, M A; Veillon, J M

    1991-04-01

    Six known furanoquinoline alkaloids have been isolated from the wood and trunk bark of COMPTONELLA SESSILIFOLIOLA (Guillaumin) Hartley (Rutaceae). 2D NMR experiments gave the assignment of all the signals for both (1)H- and (13)C-NMR spectra. Pteleine and kokusaginine were used as models. The two-dimensional carbon-proton correlation experiments, performed for the first time on furanoquinoline alkaloids, led us to correct (13)C-NMR assignments previously described in the literature. PMID:17226139

  20. QM and QM/MD simulations of the Vinca alkaloids docked to tubulin.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Evan B; Tuszynski, Jack A; Klobukowski, M

    2011-09-01

    The Vinca alkaloids are a class of pharmaceutically relevant binary indole-indoline alkaloids based on and including natural extracts of the periwinkle plant, Catharanthus rosea. Two natural products, vinblastine and vincristine, have been in clinical use as important chemotherapy agents for over four decades. Two semi-synthetic Vinca alkaloids, vindesine and vinorelbine, are currently in investigational chemotherapy programs, and a third semi-synthetic, vinflunine, is in advanced clinical trials. In addition to these five compounds studied in the present work, there are hundreds of other natural and semi-synthetic Vinca alkaloids known, although most are not clinically advantageous. The Vinca alkaloids are anti-mitotic agents that affect the cellular protein tubulin and bind to a specific site known as the Vinca domain located on β-tubulin. While the Vinca domain is well established, the specific binding mode of each drug is not. However, there is much insight into the binding mode and this has provided a strong base of information to begin simulations and to make comparisons against. Complicating the issue, however, is the large size of the Vinca alkaloids and their complex molecular structure, including a rotatable single bond joining the indole and indoline portions of each compound. The differential geometric and tubulin-binding properties of the drugs are not fully known. In the present work, the projection of the potential energy surface on the major torsional angle was calculated at the semi-empirical AM1 level, through in vacuo geometry optimizations. QM/MD simulations were performed, with the drugs at the AM1 level, of each Vinca alkaloid free in TIP3P water, and also bound to β-tubulin. A single equilibrium structure, resembling a known crystallographic vinblastine structure, for the free drugs was found. Further, the 1Z2B crystal structure of vinblastine bound to tubulin appears to be a valid starting point for simulations of all five Vinca alkaloids

  1. Poisoning of chickens and ducks by pyrrolizidine alkaloids of Heliotropium europaeum.

    PubMed

    Pass, D A; Hogg, G G; Russell, R G; Edgar, J A; Tence, I M; Rikard-Bell, L

    1979-06-01

    The disease produced by feeding chickens and ducks a commercial poultry feed containing heliotrine and lasiocarpine, pyrrolizidine alkaloids of Heliotropium europaeum, is described. Illthrift, ascites and degenerative lesions in the liver were the major findings. Similar lesions occurred in chickens fed a diet containing H. europaeum. The source of the alkaloids in commercial poultry feed was probably the seeds of H. europaeum harvested with wheat. PMID:518422

  2. Indole alkaloids from cell suspension cultures of Tabernaemontana divaricata and Tabernanthe iboga.

    PubMed

    Pawelka, K H; Stöckigt, J

    1983-04-01

    From cell suspension cultures of Tabernaemontana divaricata and Tabernanthe iboga grown under standard conditions, six monoterpenoid indole alkaloids have been isolated and identified. T. divaricata synthesized apparicine, catharanthine, coronaridine, conoflorine, tubotaiwine and vinervine, whereas T. iboga produced tubotaiwine and conoflorine. Both cultures are a reasonable source for conoflorine, which is expected to be a good candidate for studying the mechanism of Aspidosperma type alkaloid formation at the cell-free level. PMID:24257961

  3. Geissoschizine methyl ether N-oxide, a new alkaloid with antiacetylcholinesterase activity from Uncaria rhynchophylla.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei-Wei; Su, Jia; Wu, Xing-De; He, Juan; Peng, Li-Yan; Cheng, Xiao; Zhao, Qin-Shi

    2015-01-01

    Geissoschizine methyl ether N-oxide, a new oxindole alkaloid, along with 14 known alkaloids, was isolated from the aerial part of Uncaria rhynchophylla. Their structures were identified by comprehensive spectral methods, including 2D NMR experiments, and confirmed by comparing with the literature data. In vitro acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity assay showed that the new compound exhibited anti-AChE activity with IC₅₀ value of 23.4 μM. PMID:25496282

  4. Cell Type–Specific Localization of Transcripts Encoding Nine Consecutive Enzymes Involved in Protoberberine Alkaloid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Samanani, Nailish; Park, Sang-Un; Facchini, Peter J.

    2005-01-01

    Molecular clones encoding nine consecutive biosynthetic enzymes that catalyze the conversion of l-dopa to the protoberberine alkaloid (S)-canadine were isolated from meadow rue (Thalictrum flavum ssp glaucum). The predicted proteins showed extensive sequence identity with corresponding enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of related benzylisoquinoline alkaloids in other species, such as opium poppy (Papaver somniferum). RNA gel blot hybridization analysis showed that gene transcripts for each enzyme were most abundant in rhizomes but were also detected at lower levels in roots and other organs. In situ RNA hybridization analysis revealed the cell type–specific expression of protoberberine alkaloid biosynthetic genes in roots and rhizomes. In roots, gene transcripts for all nine enzymes were localized to immature endodermis, pericycle, and, in some cases, adjacent cortical cells. In rhizomes, gene transcripts encoding all nine enzymes were restricted to the protoderm of leaf primordia. The localization of biosynthetic gene transcripts was in contrast with the tissue-specific accumulation of protoberberine alkaloids. In roots, protoberberine alkaloids were restricted to mature endodermal cells upon the initiation of secondary growth and were distributed throughout the pith and cortex in rhizomes. Thus, the cell type–specific localization of protoberberine alkaloid biosynthesis and accumulation are temporally and spatially separated in T. flavum roots and rhizomes, respectively. Despite the close phylogeny between corresponding biosynthetic enzymes, distinct and different cell types are involved in the biosynthesis and accumulation of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids in T. flavum and P. somniferum. Our results suggest that the evolution of alkaloid metabolism involves not only the recruitment of new biosynthetic enzymes, but also the migration of established pathways between cell types. PMID:15722473

  5. Evaluation of Immunomodulatory Activity of the Alkaloid Fraction of Trichopus zeylanicus Gaertn on Experimental Animals.

    PubMed

    Bachhav, R S; Sambathkumar, R

    2016-01-01

    Trichopus zeylanicus Gaertn, (Trichopodaceae) is also known as "Arogyappacha" meaning the greener of health by tribal inhabitants (Kani tribes). This plant used as health tonic and rejuvenator. The whole plant material of Trichopus zeylanicus is defatted and successively extracted with methanol. The alkaloid fraction of Trichopus zeylanicus was obtained from methanol extract. Up to the dose of 2000 mg/kg b.w. per orally alkaloid fraction of Trichopus zeylanicus did not show any mortality or toxicity. Immunomodulatory activity of alkaloid fraction of Trichopus zeylanicus Gaertn was evaluated using various in vivo models including neutrophil adhesion test, delayed type hypersensitivity reaction, and effect on hematological parameter like, total white blood cell's, red blood cell's and hemoglobin and cyclophosphamide induce immunosupression. Sheep red blood cells were used to immunized the animals. The percentage of neutrophils adhesion to the nylon fiber was dose dependently increased in alkaloid fraction of Trichopus zeylanicus75, 150 and 300 mg/kg, p.o treated groups (50.57, 52.99 and 54.21%), respectively compared to control group. A dose dependent potentiating of delayed type hypersensitivity reaction induced by sheep red blood cells was also observed from the alkaloid fraction of Trichopus zeylanicus. On chronic administration of alkaloid fraction of Trichopus zeylanicus (75, 150 and 300 mg/kg. p.o.) caused significant (P<0.001) increased in hematological parameter like, total white blood cell's, red blood cell's and hemoglobin. Alkaloid fraction of Trichopus zeylanicus also prevented the myelosupression in mice treated cyclophosphamide (30 mg/kg, p.o.). The result of present investigation suggested that alkaloid fraction of Trichopus zeylanicus stimulate defense system by modulating several immunological parameters. PMID:27168696

  6. Antiplasmodial activity of three bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids from the tuber of Stephania rotunda.

    PubMed

    Chea, Aun; Bun, Sok-Siya; Azas, Nadine; Gasquet, Monique; Bory, Sothavireak; Ollivier, Evelyne; Elias, Riad

    2010-11-01

    Three bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids were isolated for the first time from Stephania rotunda tuber. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods and their antiplasmodial activity was investigated in vitro on chloroquine resistant Plasmodium falciparum strain W2. These alkaloids were identified as 2-norcepharanthine (1), cepharanoline (2) and fangchinoline (3). In vitro, they displayed significant antiplasmodial activity with inhibitory concentration 50 values of 0.3, 0.2 and 0.3 µM. PMID:20981617

  7. Patterns of indole alkaloids synthesis in response to heat shock, 5-azacytidine and Na-butyrate treatment of cultured catharanthus roseus mesophyll protoplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Saleem, M.; Cutler, A.J.

    1986-04-01

    Alkaloids of C. roseus are in high demand for therapeutic and other reasons. Cultured Catharanthus cells can produce limited quantities of these alkaloids. The authors have found that cultured mesophyll protoplasts in the presence of /sup 14/C-Tryptamine are capable of synthesizing alkaloids. The pattern of alkaloids synthesis changes when protoplasts are subjected to a heat shock at 37/sup 0/C. The heat shocked protoplasts incorporated 33% more /sup 14/C-Tryptamine and produced 3 new types of alkaloids. Treatment of protoplasts with 5-azacytidine, a DNA hypomethylating agent and Na-butyrate which induces hyperacetylation of histones produced qualitative and quantitative changes in the alkaloid pattern. Four new alkaloids following the above treatments were detected by TLC and HPLC of the extracts. It is suggested that the alkaloid pattern of the cultured protoplasts can be altered by treatment with compounds known as regulators of gene expression. Work is in progress to isolate and identify these new alkaloids.

  8. 13,14-dihydrocoptisine--the genuine alkaloid from Chelidonium majus.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Jana; Yahyazadeh, Mahdi; Hänsel, Sophie; Kleinwächter, Maik; Ibrom, Kerstin; Selmar, Dirk

    2015-03-01

    The genuine major benzylisoquinoline alkaloid occurring in the traditional medicinal plant greater celandine (Chelidonium majus L.) is 13,14-dihydrocoptisine and not - as described previously - coptisine. Structure of 13,14-dihydrocoptisine was elucidated. The discrepancy between the alkaloid pattern of the living plants and that of detached and dried leaves is due to the rapid and prompt conversion of 13,14-dihydrocoptisine to coptisine in the course of tissue injuries. Indeed, apart from the major alkaloid, some minor alkaloids might also be converted; this however is not in the centre of focus of this paper. This conversion is initiated by the change of pH. In vivo 13,14-dihydrocoptisine is localized in the acidic vacuoles, where it is stable. In contrast, in the neutral milieu, which results when vacuoles are destroyed in the course of tissue injuries, the genuine alkaloid is oxidized to yield coptisine. Accordingly, when alkaloids from C.majus should be analyzed, any postmortal conversion of 13,14-dihydrocoptisine has to be prevented. PMID:25666130

  9. Currencies of mutualisms: sources of alkaloid genes in vertically transmitted epichloae.

    PubMed

    Schardl, Christopher L; Young, Carolyn A; Pan, Juan; Florea, Simona; Takach, Johanna E; Panaccione, Daniel G; Farman, Mark L; Webb, Jennifer S; Jaromczyk, Jolanta; Charlton, Nikki D; Nagabhyru, Padmaja; Chen, Li; Shi, Chong; Leuchtmann, Adrian

    2013-06-01

    The epichloae (Epichloë and Neotyphodium species), a monophyletic group of fungi in the family Clavicipitaceae, are systemic symbionts of cool-season grasses (Poaceae subfamily Poöideae). Most epichloae are vertically transmitted in seeds (endophytes), and most produce alkaloids that attack nervous systems of potential herbivores. These protective metabolites include ergot alkaloids and indole-diterpenes (tremorgens), which are active in vertebrate systems, and lolines and peramine, which are more specific against invertebrates. Several Epichloë species have been described which are sexual and capable of horizontal transmission, and most are vertically transmissible also. Asexual epichloae are mainly or exclusively vertically transmitted, and many are interspecific hybrids with genomic contributions from two or three ancestral Epichloë species. Here we employ genome-scale analyses to investigate the origins of biosynthesis gene clusters for ergot alkaloids (EAS), indole-diterpenes (IDT), and lolines (LOL) in 12 hybrid species. In each hybrid, the alkaloid-gene and housekeeping-gene relationships were congruent. Interestingly, hybrids frequently had alkaloid clusters that were rare in their sexual ancestors. Also, in those hybrids that had multiple EAS, IDT or LOL clusters, one cluster lacked some genes, usually for late pathway steps. Possible implications of these findings for the alkaloid profiles and endophyte ecology are discussed. PMID:23744053

  10. Determination of quinolizidine alkaloids in different Lupinus species by NACE using UV and MS detection.

    PubMed

    Ganzera, Markus; Krüger, Anja; Wink, Michael

    2010-12-15

    Lupin seeds are important for animal and human nutrition. However, they may contain toxic quinolizidine alkaloids (QA). Analytical methods for a reliable alkaloid determination are therefore of importance. Here the presented study reports on the first CE method for the analysis of QA in Lupinus species. A buffer system consisting of 100mM ammonium formate in methanol, acetonitrile, and small amounts of water and acetic acid enabled the baseline separation of sparteine, lupanine, angustifoline and 13alpha-hydroxylupanine in less than 10min. Applied voltage, temperature and detection wavelength were 25kV, 30 degrees C and 210nm, respectively. Additional compounds were identified in CE-MS experiments, in which all alkaloids could be assigned in positive ESI mode at corresponding [M+H](+) values. The CE method was validated for linearity, sensitivity, accuracy and precision, and then used to assess the seeds of seven different Lupinus species for their alkaloid content. Lupanine was present in all of them within a range from 0.02% (L. densiflorus, L. microcarpus) to 1.47% (L. albus). The highest percentage of an individual alkaloid was found in L. polyphyllus (3.28% of angustifoline), the content of total alkaloids ranged from 0.43% (L. microcarpus) to 5.13% in L. polyphyllus. The quantitative results were in good agreement with literature data. PMID:20580181

  11. Determination of Ephedra Alkaloids in Urine and Plasma by HPLC-UV: Collaborative Study

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Mark C.; Gray, D.; Laurensen, J.; Luo, G.; McClanahan, R.; Perez, R.; Roper, C.; Roscoe, V.; Shevchuk, C.; Suen, E.; Sullivan, D.

    2008-01-01

    Ten collaborating laboratories determined the ephedra alkaloid content (ephedrine, pseudoephedrine, norephedrine, norpseudoephedrine, methylephedrine, and methylpseudoephedrine) in 8 blind duplicates of human plasma and urine using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with UV detection. In addition to negative urine and plasma controls, urine samples were spiked with individual ephedra alkaloids ranging in concentration from about 1 to 5 μg/mL. Plasma samples were spiked with individual ephedra alkaloids ranging in concentration from about 100 to 400 ng/mL. Sample solutions were treated to solid-phase extraction using a strong-cation exchange column to help remove interferences. The HPLC analyses were performed on a polar-embedded phenyl column using UV detection at 210 nm. The ephedra alkaloids were not consistently detected in any of the spiked plasma samples. When ephedra alkaloids were detected in the plasma samples, reproducibility between blind replicate samples was very poor. Repeatability, reproducibility, and accuracy were also very poor for the spiked urine samples. On the basis of these re sults, the HPLC-UV method for the determination of ephedra alkaloids in human urine and plasma is not recommended for adoption as Official First Action. PMID:15084082

  12. Chemistry of venom alkaloids in someSolenopsis (Diplorhoptrum) species from Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Jones, T H; Torres, J A; Spande, T F; Garraffo, H M; Blum, M S; Snelling, R R

    1996-07-01

    A number of 15-carbon alkaloids have been identified in venom extracts of four Puerto Rican species of ants in the genusSolenopsis (Diplorhoptrum). Workers of a species from El Verde produced thecis andtrans isomers of 2-methyl-6-nonylpiperidine with the latter isomer predominating. The same compounds were identified in queens of a species from Río Grande, but in this species no alkaloids were detected in worker extracts. Workers of aDiplorhoptrum species collected on Mona Island produced primarily atrans-2-methyl-6-(Z-4-nonenyl)piperidine,3, with smaller amounts of thecis isomer, whereas the major compound found in the queens of the same species on Mona Island was (5Z,9Z)-3-hexyl-5-methylindolizidine, identical with the alkaloid produced by queens of a species collected on Cabo Rojo. Surprisingly, workers of the Cabo Rojo species produced (5Z,9Z)- and (5E,9E)-3-butyl-5-propylindolizidine (4 and5, respectively) reported earlier as the 223AB indolizidines from skins of dendrobatid frogs. The possible significance of the qualitative and quantitative differences in the venom alkaloids synthesized by queens and workers is discussed as is the possibility that ants containing such alkaloids may serve as a dietary source for the skin alkaloids used by certain frogs in chemical defense. PMID:24226081

  13. Binary stress induces an increase in indole alkaloid biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Yang, Bingxian; Komatsu, Setsuko; Lu, Xiaoping; Li, Ximin; Tian, Jingkui

    2015-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus is an important medicinal plant, which produces a variety of indole alkaloids of significant pharmaceutical relevance. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the potential stress-induced increase of indole alkaloid biosynthesis in C. roseus using proteomic technique. The contents of the detectable alkaloids ajmalicine, vindoline, catharanthine, and strictosidine in C. roseus were significantly increased under binary stress. Proteomic analysis revealed that the abundance of proteins related to tricarboxylic acid cycle and cell wall was largely increased; while, that of proteins related to tetrapyrrole synthesis and photosynthesis was decreased. Of note, 10-hydroxygeraniol oxidoreductase, which is involved in the biosynthesis of indole alkaloid was two-fold more abundant in treated group compared to the control. In addition, mRNA expression levels of genes involved in the indole alkaloid biosynthetic pathway indicated an up-regulation in their transcription in C. roseus under UV-B irradiation. These results suggest that binary stress might negatively affect the process of photosynthesis in C. roseus. In addition, the induction of alkaloid biosynthesis appears to be responsive to binary stress. PMID:26284098

  14. A Stereoselective Hydroxylation Step of Alkaloid Biosynthesis by a Unique Cytochrome P450 in Catharanthus roseus*

    PubMed Central

    Giddings, Lesley-Ann; Liscombe, David K.; Hamilton, John P.; Childs, Kevin L.; DellaPenna, Dean; Buell, C. Robin; O'Connor, Sarah E.

    2011-01-01

    Plant cytochrome P450s are involved in the production of over a hundred thousand metabolites such as alkaloids, terpenoids, and phenylpropanoids. Although cytochrome P450 genes constitute one of the largest superfamilies in plants, many of the catalytic functions of the enzymes they encode remain unknown. Here, we report the identification and functional characterization of a cytochrome P450 gene in a new subfamily of CYP71, CYP71BJ1, involved in alkaloid biosynthesis. Co-expression analysis of putative cytochrome P450 genes in the Catharanthus roseus transcriptome identified candidate genes with expression profiles similar to known terpene indole alkaloid biosynthetic genes. Screening of these candidate genes by functional expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae yielded a unique P450-dependent enzyme that stereoselectively hydroxylates the alkaloids tabersonine and lochnericine at the 19-position of the aspidosperma-type alkaloid scaffold. Tabersonine, which can be converted to either vindoline or 19-O-acetylhörhammericine, represents a branch point in alkaloid biosynthesis. The discovery of CYP71BJ1, which forms part of the pathway leading to 19-O-acetylhörhammericine, will help illuminate how this branch point is controlled in C. roseus. PMID:21454651

  15. Measurement of antiphotooxidative properties of isoquinoline alkaloids using transient thermal lens spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, J.; Castillo, J.; Laboren, I.; Rodríguez, M.; Hassegawa, M.

    2005-11-01

    The antiphotooxidative properties of boldine and chloride berberine were studied by time-resolved thermal lensing technique. These compounds belong to isoquinoline alkaloids possessing interesting biological activity (e.g. antibacterial, antimalarial, antitumor). Antiphotooxidative properties of the alkaloids were studied by mechanism of energy transference between powerful oxidizing agents such as singlet oxygen. Singlet oxygen was produced by energy transfer from chlorophyll-sensitized photooxidation of oil by exposure of high light intensities like laser. The lifetimes of singlet oxygen in dimethylsulfoxide, methanol and water were determined to confirm the assignment of the singlet molecular oxygen O II (1Δ g) in the experiments. In order to understand the effect of the alkaloids on active oxygen species, we carried out in detail an analysis of the thermal lensing signal. It was shown that the alkaloids can act as quenchers of singlet oxygen. To demonstrate the ability of the alkaloids to act efficient singlet oxygen acceptors, we have measured the fluorescence spectra of the studied alkaloids in the presence and in the absence of singlet oxygen. The antiphotooxidative activity of boldine and chloride berberine can be explained by the ability to quench singlet oxygen.

  16. [Thermodynamics of calmodulin and tubulin binding to the vinca-alkaloid vinorelbine].

    PubMed

    Tsvetkov, F O; Kulikova, A A; Devred, F; Zerniĭ, E Iu; Lafitte, D; Makarov, A A

    2011-01-01

    Vinca-alkaloids, such as vinblastine, and some of their derivatives, as for example vinorelbine, are widely used in clinical therapy of leukemia and several types of tumors. Their effects are associated with the disfunctioning of the mitotic spindle, which leads to mitosis blockage and a shutdown of the cell cycle. Their primary target is tubulin, however recent research has shown that some of the vinca-alkaloids inhibit calmodulin binding to its targets. Vinka-alkaloids binding with other proteins could be responsible for their efficiency and neuroprotection. Here we investigated the thermodynamics of vinorelbine interactions with calmodulin and tubulin. It was determined that unlike the other vinca-alkaloids both vinorelbine binding sites are located in the C-domain of calmodulin, and characterized by association constants of 4.0 x 10(5) and 5.4 x 10(4) M(-1). At the same time the thermodynamics of vinorelbine binding to tubulin are not much different from that of other vinca-alkaloids. These results will allow getting a better insight on the reaction mechanisms of vinca-alkaloids on a secondary protein target. PMID:21954603

  17. Binary stress induces an increase in indole alkaloid biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wei; Yang, Bingxian; Komatsu, Setsuko; Lu, Xiaoping; Li, Ximin; Tian, Jingkui

    2015-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus is an important medicinal plant, which produces a variety of indole alkaloids of significant pharmaceutical relevance. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the potential stress-induced increase of indole alkaloid biosynthesis in C. roseus using proteomic technique. The contents of the detectable alkaloids ajmalicine, vindoline, catharanthine, and strictosidine in C. roseus were significantly increased under binary stress. Proteomic analysis revealed that the abundance of proteins related to tricarboxylic acid cycle and cell wall was largely increased; while, that of proteins related to tetrapyrrole synthesis and photosynthesis was decreased. Of note, 10-hydroxygeraniol oxidoreductase, which is involved in the biosynthesis of indole alkaloid was two-fold more abundant in treated group compared to the control. In addition, mRNA expression levels of genes involved in the indole alkaloid biosynthetic pathway indicated an up-regulation in their transcription in C. roseus under UV-B irradiation. These results suggest that binary stress might negatively affect the process of photosynthesis in C. roseus. In addition, the induction of alkaloid biosynthesis appears to be responsive to binary stress. PMID:26284098

  18. Further Studies on Structure-Cardiac Activity Relationships of Diterpenoid Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhong-Tang; Jian, Xi-Xian; Ding, Jia-Yu; Deng, Hong-Ying; Chao, Ruo-Bing; Chen, Qiao-Hong; Chen, Dong-Lin; Wang, Feng-Peng

    2015-12-01

    The cardiac effect of thirty-eight diterpenoid alkaloids was evaluated on the isolated bullfrog heart model. Among them, twelve compounds exhibited appreciable cardiac activity, with compounds 3 and 35 being more active than the reference drug lanatoside. The structure-cardiac activity relationships of the diterpenoid alkaloids were summarized based on our present and previous studies [2]: i) 1α-OMe or 1α-OH, 8-OH, 14-OH, and NH (or NMe) are key structural features important for the cardiac effect of the aconitine-type C19-diterpenoid alkaloids without any esters. C18-diterpenoid alkaloids, lycoctonine-type C19-diterpenoid alkaloids, and the veatchine- and denudatine-type C20-diterpenoid alkaloids did not show any cardiac activity; ii) the presence of 3α-OH is beneficial to the cardiac activity; iii) the effect on the cardiac action of 6α-OMe, 13-OH, 15α-OH, and 16-demethoxy or a double bond between C-15 and C-16 depends on the substituent pattern on the nitrogen atom. PMID:26882669

  19. Occurrence of Ergot and Ergot Alkaloids in Western Canadian Wheat and Other Cereals.

    PubMed

    Tittlemier, Sheryl A; Drul, Dainna; Roscoe, Mike; McKendry, Twylla

    2015-07-29

    A new method was developed to analyze 10 ergot alkaloids in cereal grains. Analytes included both "ine" and "inine" type ergot alkaloids. Validation of the method showed it performed with good accuracy and precision and that minor enhancement due to matrix effects was present during LC-MS/MS analysis, but was mitigated by use of an internal standard. The method was used to survey durum and wheat harvested in 2011, a year in which ergot infection was particularly widespread in western Canada. A strong linear relationship between the concentration of ergot alkaloids and the presence of ergot sclerotia was observed. In addition, shipments of cereals from 2010-2012 were also monitored for ergot alkaloids. Concentrations of total ergot alkaloids in shipments were lower than observed in harvest samples, and averaged from 0.065 mg/kg in barley to 1.14 mg/kg in rye. In shipments, the concentration of ergot alkaloids was significantly lower in wheat of higher grades. PMID:26134095

  20. Structural and mechanistic bases of the anticancer activity of natural aporphinoid alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanjuan; Liu, Junxi; Di, Duolong; Li, Min; Fen, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Aporphinoid alkaloids, which encompass a large number of complicated structures, are an important group of natural products. The anticancer activity of aporphinoid alkaloids has become a hot pharmaceutical research area in recent years. Recent studies on the anticancer activity of these compounds are reviewed. The structure activity relationships (SARs) and anticancer mechanisms of aporphinoid alkaloids, as well as simple aporphine, oxoaporphine, dehydroaporphine and dimeric aporphine, have been summarized. The presence of a 1,2-methylenedioxy group and methylation of nitrogen are key features to the cytotoxicity of aporphinoid alkaloids. Oxidation and dehydrogenation of C7 could improve the anticancer activity. The contributions of chirality of hydrogen at C6a and the substitution pattern of other positions about aporphinoid alkaloids for anticancer activity remain unknown. Induced cancer cells apoptosis, prevention of cell proliferation, DNA topoisomerase inhibition, reducing the drug-resistant cellular side population (SP) or cancer stem cells (CSCs) and inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase seem to play important roles in the molecular mechanisms of anticancer activity about aporphinoid alkaloids. PMID:23978138

  1. Rapid Screening of Ergot Alkaloids in Sclerotia by MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sivagnanam, Kumaran; Komatsu, Emy; Patrick, Susan; Rampitsch, Christoph; Perreault, Hélène; Gräfenhan, Tom

    2016-07-01

    Ergot is a common disease of wheat and other cereal grains that is predominantly caused by Claviceps purpurea in the field, often affecting crop yield in addition to the environment. Infected grain can be contaminated with dark sclerotia, which contain fungal metabolites such as ergot alkaloids. The occurrence of ergot alkaloids in cereal grain is a major health concern for humans and livestock. Effective and rapid screening of these mycotoxins is crucial for producers, processors, and consumers of cereal-based food and feed grain. Established methods of ergot alkaloid screening based on LC-MS or GC-MS require laborious processes. A novel method using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI)-time-of-flight (TOF) MS was developed to identify four ergot alkaloids. Using dihydroxybenzoic acid as the matrix, ergosine, ergocornine, ergocryptine, and ergocristine were readily detected in individual sclerotia of C. purpurea. The accuracy of the identified ergot alkaloids was further confirmed by tandem MS analysis. MALDI-TOF MS is suitable for high-throughput screening of ergot alkaloids because it permits rapid and accurate identification, simple sample preparation, and no derivatization or chromatographic separation. PMID:27455930

  2. [Dynamic analysis of alkaloids and flavonoids in Genus Morus L. in China during different harvesting time].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-li; Bai, Yong-liang; Su, Shu-lan; Ou-Yang, Zhen; Liu, Li; Guo, Sheng; Qian, Da-wei; Duan, Jin-ao

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the optimum harvesting time and utilization of mulberry leaves during different growth periods based on the content of alkaloids and flavonoids, 88 samples of 11 species of mulberry leaves were collected and analyzed. UPLC-TQ/MS method was applied and the results showed that the ingredients of alkaloids and flavonoids in mulberry leaves are quite different in different growth periods and different species. There was a sharp decline of the average content of alkaloids in all samples from October, while the content of flavonoids dropped either from October but with less volatile. The content of flavonoids in M. atropurpurea was much higher than alkaloids, while M. australis was opposite completely. There was a sharp decline of alkaloids in M. cathayana and M. mongolica from Tuly to August, however, the content of alkaloids and flavonoids in M. alba is neither too high nor too low. In summary, it is more suitable to harvest tender mulberry leaves harvested from the end of September to beginning of October that provide a scientific evidence for rational harvest and comprehensive utilization of mulberry leaves. PMID:25898585

  3. Serum Elimination Profiles of Methyllycaconitine and Deltaline in Cattle Following Oral Administration of Larkspur (Delphinium barbeyi)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were to describe the simple elimination kinetics of two abundant norditerpenoid alkaloids in larkspur, MLA and deltaline, and measure the heart rate response of intoxicated cattle over 96 hours. Five Angus steers halter broke, gentled, and habituated to metabolism crate...

  4. Distribution of Delphinium occidentale chemotypes and their potential toxicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Larkspurs (Delphinium spp.) are poisonous plants found on rangelands in Western North America. Larkspur’s toxicity has been attributed to the norditerpenoid alkaloids which are divided into two main structural groups; the highly toxic (N-methylsuccinimido) anthranoyllycoctonine type (MSAL-type) and...

  5. The Biogeographical Distribution of Duncecap Larkspur (Delphinium occidentale) Chemotypes and Their Potential Toxicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Larkspurs (Delphinium spp.) are poisonous plants found on rangelands in Western North America. Larkspur’s toxicity has been attributed to the norditerpenoid alkaloids which are divided into two main structural groups; the highly toxic (N-methylsuccinimido) anthranoyllycoctonine type (MSAL-type) and...

  6. The effects of methyllycaconitine on the response of TE-671 cells to acetylcholine and epibatidine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyllycaconitine (MLA) is a norditerpenoid alkaloid found in Delphinium spp., and is a potent and selective antagonist of a7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Plants with high concentrations of MLA are responsible for many livestock poisonings in the Intermountain West of the United States of Am...

  7. Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Structural Identification of Sesquiterpene Alkaloids from the Stems of Dendrobium nobile Using LC-QToF.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Hong; Avula, Bharathi; Abe, Naohito; Wei, Feng; Wang, Mei; Ma, Shuang-Cheng; Ali, Zulfiqar; Elsohly, Mahmoud A; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2016-05-01

    Dendrobium nobile is one of the fundamental herbs in traditional Chinese medicine. Sesquiterpene alkaloids are the main active components in this plant. Due to weak ultraviolet absorption and low content in D. nobile, these sesquiterpene alkaloids have not been extensively studied using chromatographic methods. Herein, tandem mass spectrometry combined with liquid chromatography separation provides a tool for the identification and characterization of the alkaloids from D. nobile. A total of nine sesquiterpene alkaloids were characterized by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. These alkaloids can be classified into two subgroups that are represented by dendrobine and nobilonine. Tandem mass spectrometric studies revealed the fragmentation pathways of these two subgroup alkaloids that were used for the identification and characterization of other alkaloids in D. nobile. Characterization of these alkaloids using accurate mass and diagnostic fragments provided a reliable methodology for the analysis of D. nobile by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. The limit of detection was defined as the signal-to-noise ratio equal to 3 : 1. Limits of detection of dendrobine and nobilonine were less than 30 ng/mL. The developed method was applied for the analysis of various Dendrobium species and related dietary supplements. Alkaloids were identified from D. nobile, but not detected from commercial samples including 13 other Dendrobium species and the 7 dietary supplements. PMID:27054915

  8. Identification and quantification of the main active anticancer alkaloids from the root of Glaucium flavum.

    PubMed

    Bournine, Lamine; Bensalem, Sihem; Wauters, Jean-Noël; Iguer-Ouada, Mokrane; Maiza-Benabdesselam, Fadila; Bedjou, Fatiha; Castronovo, Vincent; Bellahcène, Akeila; Tits, Monique; Frédérich, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Glaucium flavum is used in Algerian folk medicine to remove warts (benign tumors). Its local appellations are Cheqiq el-asfar and Qarn el-djedyane. We have recently reported the anti-tumoral activity of Glaucium flavum root alkaloid extract against human cancer cells, in vitro and in vivo. The principal identified alkaloid in the extract was protopine. This study aims to determine which component(s) of Glaucium flavum root extract might possess potent antitumor activity on human cancer cells. Quantitative estimation of Glaucium flavum alkaloids was realized by HPLC-DAD. Glaucium flavum effect on human normal and cancer cell viability was determined using WST-1 assay. Quantification of alkaloids in Glaucium flavum revealed that the dried root part contained 0.84% of protopine and 0.07% of bocconoline (w/w), while the dried aerial part contained only 0.08% of protopine, glaucine as the main alkaloid, and no bocconoline. In vitro evaluation of the growth inhibitory activity on breast cancer and normal cells demonstrated that purified protopine did not reproduce the full cytotoxic activity of the alkaloid root extract on cancer cell lines. On the other hand, bocconoline inhibited strongly the viability of cancer cells with an IC50 of 7.8 µM and only a low cytotoxic effect was observed against normal human cells. Our results showed for the first time that protopine is the major root alkaloid of Glaucium flavum. Finally, we are the first to demonstrate a specific anticancer effect of Glaucium flavum root extract against breast cancer cells, which can be attributed, at least in part, to bocconoline. PMID:24317429

  9. Changes in plant defense chemistry (pyrrolizidine alkaloids) revealed through high-resolution spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Sabrina; Macel, Mirka; Schlerf, Martin; Moghaddam, Fatemeh Eghbali; Mulder, Patrick P. J.; Skidmore, Andrew K.; van der Putten, Wim H.

    2013-06-01

    Plant toxic biochemicals play an important role in defense against natural enemies and often are toxic to humans and livestock. Hyperspectral reflectance is an established method for primary chemical detection and could be further used to determine plant toxicity in the field. In order to make a first step for pyrrolizidine alkaloids detection (toxic defense compound against mammals and many insects) we studied how such spectral data can estimate plant defense chemistry under controlled conditions. In a greenhouse, we grew three related plant species that defend against generalist herbivores through pyrrolizidine alkaloids: Jacobaea vulgaris, Jacobaea erucifolia and Senecio inaequidens, and analyzed the relation between spectral measurements and chemical concentrations using multivariate statistics. Nutrient addition enhanced tertiary-amine pyrrolizidine alkaloids contents of J. vulgaris and J. erucifolia and decreased N-oxide contents in S. inaequidens and J. vulgaris. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids could be predicted with a moderate accuracy. Pyrrolizidine alkaloid forms tertiary-amines and epoxides were predicted with 63% and 56% of the variation explained, respectively. The most relevant spectral regions selected for prediction were associated with electron transitions and Csbnd H, Osbnd H, and Nsbnd H bonds in the 1530 and 2100 nm regions. Given the relatively low concentration in pyrrolizidine alkaloids concentration (in the order of mg g-1) and resultant predictions, it is promising that pyrrolizidine alkaloids interact with incident light. Further studies should be considered to determine if such a non-destructive method may predict changes in PA concentration in relation to plant natural enemies. Spectroscopy may be used to study plant defenses in intact plant tissues, and may provide managers of toxic plants, food industry and multitrophic-interaction researchers with faster and larger monitoring possibilities.

  10. Anxiolytic-like effect of ethanolic extract of Argemone mexicana and its alkaloids in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Arcos-Martínez, Aideé Itzel; Muñoz-Muñiz, Omar David; Domínguez-Ortiz, Miguel Ángel; Saavedra-Vélez, Margarita Virginia; Vázquez-Hernández, Maribel; Alcántara-López, María Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Argemone mexicana is a Papaveracea plant; some reports have shown their antibacterial, anti-cancer, sedative and probably anti-anxiety properties. From their aerial parts, flavonoids and alkaloids have been isolated, which are intrinsically related to some actions on the central nervous system. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anxiolytic-like effects of the plant, using its ethanolic extract and alkaloid-enriched extract obtained from fresh leaves. Material and Methods: Phytochemical screening was carried out together with evaluation of antioxidant capacity and the enrichment of alkaloids present in the extract. Subsequently, 100 and 200 mg/kg doses of ethanolic extract and alkaloid-enriched extract (200 µg/kg) were intraperitoneally administered to female Wistar rats, which were exposed to elevated plus maze (EPM) test. Picrotoxin (1 mg/kg), a non-competitive gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) chloride channel antagonist, was used in experimental procedures to evaluate if this receptor is involved in the anxiolytic-like effects of A. mexicana. To discard motor effects associated with the treatments, the rats were evaluated by the locomotor activity test. Results: Only the ethanolic extract at 200 mg/kg and alkaloid-enriched extract (200 µg/kg) produced anxiolytic-like effects similarly to diazepam 2 mg/kg on EPM test, without affecting locomotor activity. Meanwhile, the administration of picrotoxin blocked anti-anxiety effect of alkaloid-enriched extract of the plant. Conclusion: These results showed that A. mexicana is a potential anxiolytic agent and we suggest that this effect is mediated by the GABAA receptor. These effects are related to the presence of alkaloids. PMID:27516989

  11. Identification of cellular and molecular factors determining the response of cancer cells to six ergot alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Mrusek, Marco; Seo, Ean-Jeong; Greten, Henry Johannes; Simon, Michael; Efferth, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    Ergot alkaloids are psychoactive and vasoconstricting agents of the fungus Claviceps purpurea causing poisoning such as ergotism in medieval times (St. Anthony's Fire). This class of substances also inhibits tumor growth in vitro and in vivo, though the underlying mechanisms are unclear as yet. We investigated six ergot alkaloids (agroclavine, ergosterol, ergocornin E, ergotamine, dihydroergocristine, and 1-propylagroclavine tartrate) for their cytotoxicity towards tumor cell lines of the National Cancer Institute, USA. 1-Propylagroclavine tartrate (1-PAT) revealed the strongest cytotoxicity. Out of 76 clinically established anticancer drugs, cross-resistance was found between the ergot alkaloids and 6/7 anti-hormonal drugs (=85.7 %) and 5/15 DNA-alkylating drugs (=33.3 %). The IC50 values for the six alkaloids were not correlated to well-known determinants of drug resistance, such as proliferative activity (as measured by cell doubling times, PCNA expression, and cell cycle distribution), the multidrug resistance-mediating P-glycoprotein/MDR1 and expression or mutations of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (EGFR, RAS, TP53). While resistance of control drugs (daunorubicin, cisplatin, erlotinib) correlated with these classical resistance mechanisms, ergot alkaloids did not. Furthermore, COMPARE and hierarchical cluster analyses were performed of mRNA microarray data to identify genes correlating with sensitivity or resistance to 1-PAT. Twenty-three genes were found with different biological functions (signal transducers, RNA metabolism, ribosome constituents, cell cycle and apoptosis regulators etc.). The expression of only 3/66 neuroreceptor genes correlated with the IC50 values for 1-PAT, suggesting that the psychoactive effects of ergot alkaloids may not play a major role for the cytotoxic activity against cancer cells. In conclusion, the cytotoxicity of ergot alkaloids is not involved in classical mechanisms of drug resistance opening the possibility to

  12. Identification and Quantification of the Main Active Anticancer Alkaloids from the Root of Glaucium flavum

    PubMed Central

    Bournine, Lamine; Bensalem, Sihem; Wauters, Jean-Noël; Iguer-Ouada, Mokrane; Maiza-Benabdesselam, Fadila; Bedjou, Fatiha; Castronovo, Vincent; Bellahcène, Akeila; Tits, Monique; Frédérich, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Glaucium flavum is used in Algerian folk medicine to remove warts (benign tumors). Its local appellations are Cheqiq el-asfar and Qarn el-djedyane. We have recently reported the anti-tumoral activity of Glaucium flavum root alkaloid extract against human cancer cells, in vitro and in vivo. The principal identified alkaloid in the extract was protopine. This study aims to determine which component(s) of Glaucium flavum root extract might possess potent antitumor activity on human cancer cells. Quantitative estimation of Glaucium flavum alkaloids was realized by HPLC-DAD. Glaucium flavum effect on human normal and cancer cell viability was determined using WST-1 assay. Quantification of alkaloids in Glaucium flavum revealed that the dried root part contained 0.84% of protopine and 0.07% of bocconoline (w/w), while the dried aerial part contained only 0.08% of protopine, glaucine as the main alkaloid, and no bocconoline. In vitro evaluation of the growth inhibitory activity on breast cancer and normal cells demonstrated that purified protopine did not reproduce the full cytotoxic activity of the alkaloid root extract on cancer cell lines. On the other hand, bocconoline inhibited strongly the viability of cancer cells with an IC50 of 7.8 μM and only a low cytotoxic effect was observed against normal human cells. Our results showed for the first time that protopine is the major root alkaloid of Glaucium flavum. Finally, we are the first to demonstrate a specific anticancer effect of Glaucium flavum root extract against breast cancer cells, which can be attributed, at least in part, to bocconoline. PMID:24317429

  13. Heterologous Expression of Lysergic Acid and Novel Ergot Alkaloids in Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Sarah L.

    2014-01-01

    Different lineages of fungi produce distinct classes of ergot alkaloids. Lysergic acid-derived ergot alkaloids produced by fungi in the Clavicipitaceae are particularly important in agriculture and medicine. The pathway to lysergic acid is partly elucidated, but the gene encoding the enzyme that oxidizes the intermediate agroclavine is unknown. We investigated two candidate agroclavine oxidase genes from the fungus Epichloë festucae var. lolii × Epichloë typhina isolate Lp1 (henceforth referred to as Epichloë sp. Lp1), which produces lysergic acid-derived ergot alkaloids. Candidate genes easH and cloA were expressed in a mutant strain of the mold Aspergillus fumigatus, which typically produces a subclass of ergot alkaloids not derived from agroclavine or lysergic acid. Candidate genes were coexpressed with the Epichloë sp. Lp1 allele of easA, which encodes an enzyme that catalyzed the synthesis of agroclavine from an A. fumigatus intermediate; the agroclavine then served as the substrate for the candidate agroclavine oxidases. Strains expressing easA and cloA from Epichloë sp. Lp1 produced lysergic acid from agroclavine, a process requiring a cumulative six-electron oxidation and a double-bond isomerization. Strains that accumulated excess agroclavine (as a result of Epichloë sp. Lp1 easA expression in the absence of cloA) metabolized it into two novel ergot alkaloids for which provisional structures were proposed on the basis of mass spectra and precursor feeding studies. Our data indicate that CloA catalyzes multiple reactions to produce lysergic acid from agroclavine and that combining genes from different ergot alkaloid pathways provides an effective strategy to engineer important pathway molecules and novel ergot alkaloids. PMID:25107976

  14. Effect of Drying Methods on the Steroidal Alkaloid Content of Potato Peels, Shoots and Berries.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mohammad B; Brunton, Nigel P; Rai, Dilip K

    2016-01-01

    The present study has found that dried potato samples yielded significantly higher levels of steroidal alkaloids such as α-solanine and α-chaconine than the corresponding fresh samples, as determined by the UPLC-MS/MS technique. Among the drying techniques used, air drying had the highest effect on steroidal alkaloid contents, followed by freeze drying and vacuum oven drying. There was no significant difference between the freeze dried and vacuum oven dried samples in their α-chaconine contents. However, freeze dried potato shoots and berries had significantly higher α-solanine contents (825 µg/g dry weight (DW) in shoots and 2453 µg/g DW in berries) than the vacuum oven dried ones (325 µg/g dry weight (DW) in shoots and 2080 µg/g DW in berries). The kinetics of steroidal alkaloid contents of potato shoots during air drying were monitored over a period of 21 days. Both α-solanine and α-chaconine content increased to their maximum values, 875 µg/g DW and 3385 µg/g DW, respectively, after 7 days of drying. The steroidal alkaloid contents of the shoots decreased significantly at day 9, and then remained unchanged until day 21. In line with the potato shoots, air dried potato tuber peels also had higher steroidal alkaloid content than the freeze dried and vacuum oven dried samples. However, a significant decrease of steroidal alkaloid content was observed in air dried potato berries, possibly due to degradation during slicing of the whole berries prior to air drying. Remarkable variation in steroidal alkaloid contents among different tissue types of potato plants was observed with the potato flowers having the highest content. PMID:27023503

  15. Differences in Tolerance to Host Cactus Alkaloids in Drosophila koepferae and D. buzzatii

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Ignacio M.; Carreira, Valeria P.; Corio, Cristian; Padró, Julián; Soto, Eduardo M.; Hasson, Esteban

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of cactophily in the genus Drosophila was a major ecological transition involving over a hundred species in the Americas that acquired the capacity to cope with a variety of toxic metabolites evolved as feeding deterrents in Cactaceae. D. buzzatii and D. koepferae are sibling cactophilic species in the D. repleta group. The former is mainly associated with the relatively toxic-free habitat offered by prickly pears (Opuntia sulphurea) and the latter has evolved the ability to use columnar cacti of the genera Trichocereus and Cereus that contain an array of alkaloid secondary compounds. We assessed the effects of cactus alkaloids on fitness-related traits and evaluated the ability of D. buzzatii and D. koepferae to exploit an artificial novel toxic host. Larvae of both species were raised in laboratory culture media to which we added increasing doses of an alkaloid fraction extracted from the columnar cactus T. terschekii. In addition, we evaluated performance on an artificial novel host by rearing larvae in a seminatural medium that combined the nutritional quality of O. sulphurea plus amounts of alkaloids found in fresh T. terschekii. Performance scores in each rearing treatment were calculated using an index that took into account viability, developmental time, and adult body size. Only D. buzzatii suffered the effects of increasing doses of alkaloids and the artificial host impaired viability in D. koepferae, but did not affect performance in D. buzzatii. These results provide the first direct evidence that alkaloids are key determinants of host plant use in these species. However, the results regarding the artificial novel host suggest that the effects of alkaloids on performance are not straightforward as D. koepferae was heavily affected. We discuss these results in the light of patterns of host plan evolution in the Drosophila repleta group. PMID:24520377

  16. Hobartine: a tetracyclic indole alkaloid extracted from Aristotelia chilensis (maqui).

    PubMed

    Paz Robles, Cristian; Badilla Vidal, Natalia; Suarez, Sebastián; Baggio, Ricardo

    2014-11-01

    The natural compound hobartine {systematic name: (1R)-3-[(1S,5S)-(4,4,8-trimethylbicyclo[3.3.1]non-7-en-2-yl)methyl]-2,3-dihydro-1H-indole}, C20H26N2, (I), is an indole alkaloid isolated from Aristotelia chilensis as part of a study of secondary metabolites from Chilean flora. The colourless compound has a tetracyclic structure closely related to the strongly coloured polymorphic structures discussed in Paz et al. [Acta Cryst. (2013), C69, 1509-1512] and Watson et al. [Acta Cryst. (1989), C45, 1322-1324]. The main differences reside in the absence of a keto group in (I) compared with the previous structures, as well as an endo double bond in (I) contrasting with the exo double bond found in the previous structures. The supramolecular structure of (I) in strongly related to the twofold screw axis, around which isolated chains build up, internally linked by an N-H···N hydrogen bond which is the only significant intermolecular interaction present in the structure. PMID:25370110

  17. Biosynthesis of ambiguine indole alkaloids in cyanobacterium Fischerella ambigua.

    PubMed

    Hillwig, Matthew L; Zhu, Qin; Liu, Xinyu

    2014-02-21

    Ambiguines belong to a family of hapalindole-type indole alkaloid natural products, with many of the members possessing up to eight consecutive carbon stereocenters in a fused pentacyclic 6-6-6-5-7 ring scaffold. Here, we report the identification of a 42 kbp ambiguine (amb) biosynthetic gene cluster that harbors 32 protein-coding genes in its native producer Fischerella ambigua UTEX1903. Association of the amb cluster with ambiguine biosynthesis was confirmed by both bioinformatic analysis and in vitro characterizations of enzymes responsible for 3-((Z)-2'-isocyanoethenyl) indole and geranyl pyrophosphate biosynthesis and a C-2 indole dimethylallyltransferase that regiospecifically tailors hapalindole G to ambiguine A. The presence of five nonheme iron-dependent oxygenase coding genes (including four Rieske-type oxygenases) within the amb cluster suggests late-stage C-H activations are likely responsible for the structural diversities of ambiguines by regio- and stereospecific chlorination, hydroxylation, epoxidation, and sp(2)-sp(3) C-C bond formation. PMID:24180436

  18. Cyclolization of D-lysergic acid alkaloid peptides.

    PubMed

    Havemann, Judith; Vogel, Dominik; Loll, Bernhard; Keller, Ullrich

    2014-01-16

    The tripeptide chains of the ergopeptines, a class of pharmacologically important D-lysergic acid alkaloid peptides, are arranged in a unique bicyclic cyclol based on an amino-terminal α-hydroxyamino acid and a terminal orthostructure. D-lysergyl-tripeptides are assembled by the nonribosomal peptide synthetases LPS1 and LPS2 of the ergot fungus Claviceps purpurea and released as N-(D-lysergyl-aminoacyl)-lactams. We show total enzymatic synthesis of ergopeptines catalyzed by a Fe²⁺/2-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase (EasH) in conjunction with LPS1/LPS2. Analysis of the reaction indicated that EasH introduces a hydroxyl group into N-(D-lysergyl-aminoacyl)-lactam at α-C of the aminoacyl residue followed by spontaneous condensation with the terminal lactam carbonyl group. Sequence analysis revealed that EasH belongs to the wide and diverse family of the phytanoyl coenzyme A hydroxylases. We provide a high-resolution crystal structure of EasH that is most similar to that of phytanoyl coenzyme A hydroxylase, PhyH, from human. PMID:24361048

  19. Antitumor effects of the benzophenanthridine alkaloid sanguinarine: Evidence and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Gaziano, Roberta; Moroni, Gabriella; Buè, Cristina; Miele, Martino Tony; Sinibaldi-Vallebona, Paola; Pica, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Historically, natural products have represented a significant source of anticancer agents, with plant-derived drugs becoming increasingly explored. In particular, sanguinarine is a benzophenanthridine alkaloid obtained from the root of Sanguinaria canadensis, and from other poppy Fumaria species, with recognized anti-microbial, anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Recently, increasing evidence that sanguinarine exibits anticancer potential through its capability of inducing apoptosis and/or antiproliferative effects on tumor cells, has been proved. Moreover, its antitumor seems to be due not only to its pro-apoptotic and inhibitory effects on tumor growth, but also to its antiangiogenic and anti-invasive properties. Although the precise mechanisms underlying the antitumor activity of this compound remain not fully understood, in this review we will focus on the most recent findings about the cellular and molecular pathways affected by sanguinarine, together with the rationale of its potential application in clinic. The complex of data currently available suggest the potential application of sanguinarine as an adjuvant in the therapy of cancer, but further pre-clinical studies are needed before such an antitumor strategy can be effectively translated in the clinical practice. PMID:26798435

  20. Identification of Toxic Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids and Their Common Hepatotoxicity Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xinmiao; Kang, Hong; Feng, Jun; Yang, Yiyan; Tang, Kailin; Zhu, Ruixin; Yang, Li; Wang, Zhengtao; Cao, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids (PAs) are currently one of the most important botanical hepatotoxic ingredients. Glutathion (GSH) metabolism is the most reported pathway involved in hepatotoxicity mechanism of PAs. We speculate that, for different PAs, there should be a common mechanism underlying their hepatotoxicity in GSH metabolism. Computational methods were adopted to test our hypothesis in consideration of the limitations of current experimental approaches. Firstly, the potential targets of 22 PAs (from three major PA types) in GSH metabolism were identified by reverse docking; Secondly, glutathione S-transferase A1 (GSTA1) and glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1) targets pattern was found to be a special characteristic of toxic PAs with stepwise multiple linear regressions; Furthermore, the molecular mechanism underlying the interactions within toxic PAs and these two targets was demonstrated with the ligand-protein interaction analysis; Finally, GSTA1 and GPX1 were proved to be significant nodes in GSH metabolism. Overall, toxic PAs could be identified by GSTA1 and GPX1 targets pattern, which suggests their common hepatotoxicity mechanism: the interfering of detoxication in GSH metabolism. In addition, all the strategies developed here could be extended to studies on toxicity mechanism of other toxins. PMID:26959016

  1. Tetrahydroprotoberberine alkaloids with dopamine and σ receptor affinity.

    PubMed

    Gadhiya, Satishkumar; Madapa, Sudharshan; Kurtzman, Thomas; Alberts, Ian L; Ramsey, Steven; Pillarsetty, Nagavara-Kishore; Kalidindi, Teja; Harding, Wayne W

    2016-05-01

    Two series of analogues of the tetrahydroprotoberberine (THPB) alkaloid (±)-stepholidine that (a) contain various alkoxy substituents at the C10 position and, (b) were de-rigidified with respect to (±)-stepholidine, were synthesized and evaluated for affinity at dopamine and σ receptors in order to evaluate effects on D3 and σ2 receptor affinity and selectivity. Small n-alkoxy groups are best tolerated by D3 and σ2 receptors. Among all compounds tested, C10 methoxy and ethoxy analogues (10 and 11 respectively) displayed the highest affinity for σ2 receptors as well as σ2 versus σ1 selectivity and also showed the highest D3 receptor affinity. De-rigidification of stepholidine resulted in decreased affinity at all receptors evaluated; thus the tetracyclic THPB framework is advantageous for affinity at dopamine and σ receptors. Docking of the C10 analogues at the D3 receptor, suggest that an ionic interaction between the protonated nitrogen atom and Asp110, a H-bond interaction between the C2 phenol and Ser192, a H-bond interaction between the C10 phenol and Cys181 as well as hydrophobic interactions of the aryl rings to Phe106 and Phe345, are critical for high affinity of the compounds. PMID:27032890

  2. N-alkenyl indoles as useful intermediates for alkaloid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Boonnak, Nawong; Padwa, Albert

    2011-11-18

    A mild cross-coupling reaction to access several N-alkenyl-substituted indoles has been developed. The coupling procedure involves treating a NH-indole with various alkenyl bromides using a combination of 10 mol % of copper(I) iodide and 20 mol % of ethylenediamine as the catalyst in dioxane at 110 °C in the presence of K(3)PO(4) as the base. When treated with acid, these unique enamines produce a dimeric product derived from a preferred protonation reaction at the enamine π-bond. A cationic cyclization reaction of the readily available 2-(2-(1H-indol-1-yl)allyl)cyclopentanol was utilized to construct tetracyclic indole derivatives with a quaternary stereocenter attached to the C(2)-position of the indole ring. An alternative strategy for selective functionalization at the C(2)-position of a N-alkenyl-substituted indole derivative that was also studied involves a radical cyclization of a xanthate derivative. The work described provides an attractive route to the tetracyclic core of some vinca alkaloids, including the tetrahydroisoquinocarbazole RS-2135. PMID:22007631

  3. Antitumor effects of the benzophenanthridine alkaloid sanguinarine: Evidence and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Gaziano, Roberta; Moroni, Gabriella; Buè, Cristina; Miele, Martino Tony; Sinibaldi-Vallebona, Paola; Pica, Francesca

    2016-01-15

    Historically, natural products have represented a significant source of anticancer agents, with plant-derived drugs becoming increasingly explored. In particular, sanguinarine is a benzophenanthridine alkaloid obtained from the root of Sanguinaria canadensis, and from other poppy Fumaria species, with recognized anti-microbial, anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Recently, increasing evidence that sanguinarine exibits anticancer potential through its capability of inducing apoptosis and/or antiproliferative effects on tumor cells, has been proved. Moreover, its antitumor seems to be due not only to its pro-apoptotic and inhibitory effects on tumor growth, but also to its antiangiogenic and anti-invasive properties. Although the precise mechanisms underlying the antitumor activity of this compound remain not fully understood, in this review we will focus on the most recent findings about the cellular and molecular pathways affected by sanguinarine, together with the rationale of its potential application in clinic. The complex of data currently available suggest the potential application of sanguinarine as an adjuvant in the therapy of cancer, but further pre-clinical studies are needed before such an antitumor strategy can be effectively translated in the clinical practice. PMID:26798435

  4. In vitro biological activities of alkaloids from Cryptolepis sanguinolenta.

    PubMed

    Cimanga, K; De Bruyne, T; Lasure, A; Van Poel, B; Pieters, L; Claeys, M; Berghe, D V; Kambu, K; Tona, L; Vlietinck, A J

    1996-02-01

    In our biological screening of higher plants, an aqueous and an 80% EtOH extract from the root bark of Cryptolepis sanguinolenta showed potent antibacterial, anticomplementary, and moderate antiviral activities, but no antifungal effect could be detected. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the 80% EtOH extract led to the isolation of three alkaloids: quindoline (1), hydroxycryptolepine (2), cryptolepine.HCl (3), and the corresponding base cryptolepine (4). All compounds strongly inhibited the growth of Gram-positive bacteria (MIC < or = 100 micrograms/ml) and showed a moderate (MIC = 125 or 250 micrograms/ml), a weak (MIC = 500 micrograms/ml), or no activity (MIC > 500 micrograms/ml) against selected Gram-negative bacteria. They also possessed a bactericidal effect depending on the bacterial strain. Compounds 1, 2 and 3 displayed a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on the classical pathway of the complement system while compounds 2 and 3 activated the alternative pathway, except for compound 1. Compound 3 was found to possess an antiherpetic activity. Compounds 1 and 4 showed no antiviral effect, but were quite cytotoxic in the antiviral test system down to a concentration of 1 microgram/ml. PMID:8720383

  5. Microwave Spectroscopy of Alkaloids: the Conformational Shapes of Nicotine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabow, Jens-Uwe; Mata, S.; López, J. C.; Peńa, I.; Cabezas, C.; Blanco, S.; Alonso, J. L.

    2010-06-01

    Nicotinoid alkaloids consist of two ring systems connected via a C-C σ-bond: Joining pyridine either with a (substituted) pyrrolidine or piperidine ring system, pyrrolidinic or piperidinic nicotinoids are formed. Nicotine itself, consisting of pyridine and N-methylpyrrolidine, is the prototype pyrrolidinic nicotinoid. Its coupled heteoaromatic and heteroaliphatic ring systems exhibit three sites that allow for conformational flexibility: (I) puckering of the pyrrolidine ring (Eq./Ax. positions of the pyridine), (II) inversion of the N-methyl group (Eq./Ax. positions of the hydrogen), and (III) relative orientation of the two rings (Syn-Anti). Two conformations of nicotine have been observed using the In-phase/quadrature-phase-Modulation Passage-Acquired-Coherence Technique (IMPACT) Fourier Transform Microwave (FTMW) spectrometer in Valladolid. The preferred conformations are characterized by an equatorial (Eq.) pyridine moiety and equatorial (Eq.) N-CH_3 stereochemistry. The planes of two rings are almost perpendicular with respect to each other while exhibiting two low energy conformations, Syn and Anti, that differ by a 180° rotation about the C-C σ-bond. The Eq.-Eq. conformational preference is likely due to a weak hydrogen bond interaction between the nitrogen lone pair at the N-methylpyrroline and the closest hydrogen in pyridine. Supporting quantum-chemical calculations are also provided. Lavrich, R. J.; Suenram, R. D.; Plusquellic, D. F.; Davis, S. 58th International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy, Columbus, OH 2003, RH13.

  6. Metabolic studies of the Amaryllidaceous alkaloids galantamine and lycorine based on electrochemical simulation in addition to in vivo and in vitro models.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Sandra; Seiwert, Bettina; Kretzing, Sascha; Abraham, Getu; Regenthal, Ralf; Karst, Uwe

    2012-12-01

    Alkaloids from the plant family of Amaryllidaceae, such as galantamine (GAL) and lycorine (LYC), are known to exhibit numerous promising biological and pharmacological activities like antibacterial, antiviral or anti-inflammatory effects. Nonetheless, studies on the biotransformation pathway are rare for this substance class, unless approval for use as medication exists. While GAL has become a prescription drug used to alleviate and delay the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease, LYC exhibits potential antitumor properties. However, it has also been linked to toxic effects resulting in nausea and emesis. Whereas there are few publications available describing the metabolic pathway of GAL in animals and humans, the metabolism of LYC is unknown. Therefore, this study is concerned with the investigation of the oxidative metabolism of GAL and LYC, which was achieved by means of three different approaches: electrochemical (EC) simulation coupled on-line to liquid chromatography (LC) with electrospray mass spectrometric (ESI-MS) detection was applied in addition to in vivo experiments in beagle dog analyzing plasma (BP) and in vitro incubations with rat liver microsomes (RLM). This way, it should be investigated if electrochemistry can be used to predict the oxidative metabolism of alkaloids. For GAL, the EC model was capable of predicting most metabolites observed during microsomal and plasma studies, including N-demethylated, dehydrogenated and oxygenated products or a combination of these. LYC was found to be metabolized far less than GAL in the animal-based approaches, but several EC oxidation products were generated. Some principal metabolic routes could successfully be correlated for this alkaloid as well, comprising dehydrogenation, dehydration to ungeremine and oxygenation reactions. PMID:23176740

  7. Biologically active vallesamine, strychnan, and rhazinilam alkaloids from Alstonia: Pneumatophorine, a nor-secovallesamine with unusual incorporation of a 3-ethylpyridine moiety.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jun-Lee; Sim, Kae-Shin; Yong, Kien-Thai; Loong, Bi-Juin; Ting, Kang-Nee; Lim, Siew-Huah; Low, Yun-Yee; Kam, Toh-Seok

    2015-09-01

    Four alkaloids comprising two vallesamine, one strychnan, and one pyranopyridine alkaloid, in addition to 32 other known alkaloids were isolated from two Malayan Alstonia species, Alstonia pneumatophora and Alstonia rostrata. The structures of these alkaloids were determined using NMR and MS analyses, and in one instance, confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis. The nor-6,7-secovallesamine alkaloid, pneumatophorine, is notable for an unusual incorporation of a 3-ethylpyridine moiety in a monoterpenoid indole. The rhazinilam-type alkaloids (rhazinicine, nor-rhazinicine, rhazinal, and rhazinilam) showed strong cytotoxicity toward human KB, HCT-116, MDA-MB-231, and MRC-5 cells, while pneumatophorine, the uleine alkaloid undulifoline, and the strychnan alkaloids, N4-demethylalstogustine and echitamidine, induced concentration dependent relaxation in phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings. PMID:26125941

  8. Alkaloids from Cassytha filiformis and related aporphines: antitrypanosomal activity, cytotoxicity, and interaction with DNA and topoisomerases.

    PubMed

    Hoet, Sara; Stévigny, Caroline; Block, Sébastien; Opperdoes, Frederik; Colson, Pierre; Baldeyrou, Brigitte; Lansiaux, Amélie; Bailly, Christian; Quetin-Leclercq, Joëlle

    2004-05-01

    Cassytha filiformis (Lauraceae), a widely distributed parasitic plant, contains several aporphine alkaloids and is often used in African folk medicine to treat cancer, African trypanosomiasis and other diseases. In a previous investigation, we showed that the alkaloid plant extract and the isolated aporphines possessed in vitro cytotoxic properties. In this paper, we evaluated the in vitro activity of the alkaloid extract (IC50 = 2.2 microg/mL) and its three major aporphine alkaloids (actinodaphnine, cassythine, and dicentrine) on Trypanosoma brucei brucei as well as four related commercially available aporphines (bulbocapnine, glaucine, isocorydine, boldine). Only the three alkaloids from Cassytha filiformis were active on the trypanosomes in vitro (IC50 = 3-15 microM). Additionally, we compared the cytotoxicity of these seven compounds on HeLa cells. Glaucine was the most cytotoxic compound on HeLa cells (IC50 = 8.2 microM) in the series. In order to elucidate their mechanism of action, the binding mode of these molecules to DNA was studied by UV absorption, circular and linear dichroism spectroscopy. The results of the optical measurements indicated that all seven aporphines effectively bind to DNA and behave as typical intercalating agents. Biochemical experiments showed that actinodaphnine, cassythine and dicentrine also interfere with the catalytic activity of topoisomerases in contrast to the four other aporphines. These interactions with DNA may explain, at least in part, the effects observed on cancer cells and on trypanosomes. PMID:15124084

  9. Optimization of Extraction and Enrichment of Steroidal Alkaloids from Bulbs of Cultivated Fritillaria cirrhosa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shu; Du, Qingdan; Wang, Nanyi; Liu, Simei; Wang, Xiaoxia; Jiang, Jinghui

    2014-01-01

    The bulbs of cultivated Fritillaria cirrhosa (BCFC) are used in China both for food and folk medicine due to its powerful biological activities. The aim of this study is to optimize the extraction and enrichment conditions of alkaloids from BCFC. Firstly, the orthogonal experimental design was used to optimize and evaluate four variables (ethanol concentration, solid-liquid ratio, extraction time, and temperature). Thereafter, resin adsorption was as a means to enrich alkaloids. Among 16 tested resins, H-103 resin presented higher adsorption capacity and desorption ratio. The equilibrium experimental data of the adsorption of total alkaloids, imperialine, and peimisine were well-fitted to the pseudo-first-order kinetics model, Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms models. Finally, in order to optimize the parameters for purifying alkaloids, dynamic adsorption and desorption tests were carried out. After one run treatment with H-103 resin, the contents of total alkaloids, imperialine, and peimisine in the product were 21.40-, 18.31-, and 22.88-fold increased with recovery yields of 94.43%, 90.57%, and 96.16%, respectively. PMID:24804207

  10. Recent Developments in the Isolation, Synthesis, and Bioactivities of Bispyrroloquinone Alkaloids of Marine Origin

    PubMed Central

    Nijampatnam, Bhavitavya; Dutta, Shilpa; Velu, Sadanandan E.

    2016-01-01

    The ocean continues to provide a plethora of unique scaffolds capable of remarkable biological applications. A large number of pyrroloiminoquinone alkaloids, including discorhabdins, epinardins, batzellines, makaluvamines, and veiutamine have already been isolated from marine organisms. A class of pyrroloiminoquinone-related alkaloids known as bispyrroloquinones is the focus of this review. This family of marine alkaloids, which contain an aryl substituted bispyrroloquinone ring system, includes three subclasses of alkaloids namely, wakayin, tsitsikammamines A-B and zyzzyanones A-D. Both wakayin and the tsitsikammamines contain a tetracyclic fused bispyrroloiminoquinone ring system, while zyzzyanones contain a fused tricyclic bispyrroloquinone ring system. The unique chemical structures of these marine natural products and their diverse biological properties, including antifungal and antimicrobial activity, as well as the potent, albeit generally nonspecific and universal cytotoxicities, have attracted great interest of synthetic chemists over the past three decades. Tsitsikammamines, wakayin, and several of their analogues show inhibition of topoisomerases. One additional possible mechanism of anticancer activity of tsitsikammamines analogues that was discovered recently is through the inhibition of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, an enzyme involved in tumoral immune resistance. This review discusses the isolation, synthesis, and bioactivities of bispyrroloquinone alkaloids and their analogues. PMID:26253489

  11. Bis and tris indole alkaloids from marine organisms: new leads for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Leena; Talwar, Archna; Chauhan, Prem M S

    2007-01-01

    The marine organisms are a rich source of varied natural products with unique functionality. Marine natural products chemistry has undergone an explosive growth during the past three decades. A variety of natural products of new molecular structures with diverse biological activities have been reported from marine flora and fauna, thus ensuring motivation in the search of newer natural products. The bis and trisindole alkaloids are a class of marine natural products that show unique promise in the development of new drug leads. 3-hydroxy staurosporine 51, an indolo carbazole having powerful antiproliferative activity. Hamacanthin A 1 and B 2, pyrazinone alkaloids have significant antimicrobial activity. Coscinamides 60-62 and Chondriamides 63-65 an indolic enamides which have anti-HIV and cytotoxic activity respectively. Gelluisine A 66 and B 67, trisindole alkaloids have strong anti-serotonin activity and strong affinity with somatostatin and neuropeptide Y receptors in receptor-binding assays. This report reviews the literature on these alkaloids of marine origin and highlights the isolation, structure, latest synthesis and specific biological activities including cytotoxicity, antiviral, antiparasitic, serotonin antagonism and other pharmacological activities of sixty-nine bis and trisindole alkaloids. PMID:17627517

  12. Alkaloid defenses of co-mimics in a putative Müllerian mimetic radiation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Polytypism in aposematic species is unlikely according to theory, but commonly seen in nature. Ranitomeya imitator is a poison frog species exhibiting polytypic mimicry of three congeneric model species (R. fantastica, R. summersi, and two morphs of R. variabilis) across four allopatric populations (a "mimetic radiation"). In order to investigate chemical defenses in this system, a key prediction of Müllerian mimicry, we analyzed the alkaloids of both models and mimics from four allopatric populations. Results In this study we demonstrate distinct differences in alkaloid profiles between co-mimetic species within allopatric populations. We further demonstrate that R. imitator has a greater number of distinct alkaloid types than the model species and more total alkaloids in all but one population. Conclusions Given that R. imitator is the more abundant species in these populations, R. imitator is likely driving the majority of predator-learned avoidance in these complexes. The success of Ranitomeya imitator as a putative advergent mimic may be a direct result of differences in alkaloid sequestration. Furthermore, we propose that automimicry within co-mimetic species is an important avenue of research. PMID:24707851

  13. Identification of QTLs for resistant starch and total alkaloid content in brown and polished rice.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Y W; Sun, D; Du, J; Pu, X Y; Yang, S M; Yang, X M; Yang, T; Yang, J Z

    2016-01-01

    An F3 population consisting of 117 F2:3 families derived from a cross between two varieties of rice, Gongmi No. 3 and Diantun 502, with a large difference in their resistant starch and total alkaloid content, was used for quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping. Two QTLs of resistant starch for rice (qRS7-1, qRS7-2) were identified in a linkage group on chromosome 7, which could explain phenotypic variance from 7.6 to 17.3%, due to additive effects for resistant starch from Gongmi No. 3 or over-dominance effects for qRS7-2 of the marker interval (RM3404-RM478) on chromosome 7 from Gongmi No. 3, accounting for 13.8-17.3% of the phenotypic variance. Two QTLs of total alkaloids for brown rice (qALb7-1, qALb7-2) were identified in the same linkage group, which could explain phenotypic variance from 7.7 and 19.3%, respectively, due to dominance or over-dominance effects for total alkaloids on chromosome 7 from Diantun 502. To our knowledge, these are the first QTLs to be identified, which are related to resistant starch and total alkaloid content in rice. These results are beneficial for understanding the genetic basis of, as well as for developing markers linked with, resistant starch and total alkaloids of functional components for marker-assisted selection breeding in rice. PMID:27525873

  14. Luminescence and binding properties of two isoquinoline alkaloids chelerythrine and sanguinarine with ctDNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junfen; Li, Baohong; Wu, Yanbo; Shuang, Shaomin; Dong, Chuan; Choi, Martin M. F.

    2012-09-01

    The binding mode and mechanism of the interactions between two planar cationic alkaloids chelerythrine (Che) and sanguinarine (San) with calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) were systematically investigated at pH 5.40 using UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. Che and San show strong fluorescence at 570 and 589 nm, respectively. Che displays fluorescence enhancement with ctDNA whereas the fluorescence of San is quenched on interaction with ctDNA. In addition, UV-vis spectra of both alkaloids show apparent hypochromicity and are bathochromic shifted, indicating that they could intercalate into ctDNA bases. The fluorescence polarization of Che and San increases in the presence of ctDNA, again implying the intercalation of two alkaloids with ctDNA. This conclusion was also supported by the results obtained from anion quenching and cyclic voltammetry. The binding constants of both alkaloids with ctDNA were calculated in the order of 105 L/mol. San binds with ctDNA 3-fold stronger than Che. The stoichiometric bindings are five nucleotides per Che or San. Electrostatic binding also exists between the alkaloids and DNA helix. Finally, theoretical calculations show that only certain parts of Che and San molecules intercalate into the DNA helix.

  15. How polyamine synthesis inhibitors and cinnamic acid affect tropane alkaloid production.

    PubMed

    Marconi, Patricia L; Alvarez, María A; Pitta-Alvarez, Sandra I

    2007-01-01

    Hairy roots of Brugmansia candida produce the tropane alkaloids scopolamine and hyoscyamine. In an attempt to divert the carbon flux from competing pathways and thus enhance productivity, the polyamine biosynthesis inhibitors cyclohexylamine (CHA) and methylglyoxal-bis-guanylhydrazone (MGBG) and the phenylalanine-ammonia-lyase inhibitor cinnamic acid were used. CHA decreased the specific productivity of both alkaloids but increased significantly the release of scopolamine (approx 500%) when it was added in the mid-exponential phase. However, when CHA was added for only 48 h during the exponential phase, the specific productivity of both alkaloids increased (approx 200%), favoring scopolamine. Treatment with MGBG was detrimental to growth but promoted release into the medium of both alkaloids. However, when it was added for 48 h during the exponential phase, MGBG increased the specific productivity (approx 200%) and release (250- 1800%) of both alkaloids. Cinnamic acid alone also favored release but not specific productivity. When a combination of CHA or MGBG with cinnamic acid was used, the results obtained were approximately the same as with each polyamine biosynthesis inhibitor alone, although to a lesser extent. Regarding root morphology, CHA inhibited growth of primary roots and ramification. However, it had a positive effect on elongation of lateral roots. PMID:17416978

  16. Studies on quantitative determination of total alkaloids and berberine in five origins of crude medicine "Sankezhen".

    PubMed

    Li, Luyang; Long, Weifang; Wan, Xiangluan; Ding, Qi; Zhang, Fei; Wan, Dingrong

    2015-02-01

    The roots of Berberis plants are widely used as a traditional Chinese medicine called "Sankezhen", having the activities of antibacterial and anti-inflammatory, and the ingredients are alkaloids. This work aims to study and compare the total alkaloids and individual alkaloid (berberine) contents in roots and stems from five origins of Berberis plants (Berberis soulieana Schneid., B. henryana Schneid., B. triacanthophora Fedde, B. gagnepainii Schneid. and B. bergmanniae Schneid.) and provides some references for resource and quality evaluation of the medicine. Acid dye colorimetry and high-performance liquid chromatography were used in the determination. The results showed that the contents for the total alkaloids in root and stem samples were in the range of 1.60-4.72% and 0.76-2.70%, while those of the berberine were 0.70-2.92% and 0.23-1.07%. With higher contents of the total alkaloids and berberine, the roots of B. soulieana, B. gagnepainii and B. bergmanniae were good sources of "Sankezhen". Meanwhile, the contents were also high in stems of the three plants, indicating that the stems were likely to be alternative sources of "Sankezhen" after further research. As the results of precision, stability and recovery tests shown, the methods were simple, rapid and reliable, and provided valuable basis for quality evaluation and new resource investigation of "Sankezhen". PMID:25013028

  17. Recent advances in isolation, synthesis, and evaluation of bioactivities of bispyrroloquinone alkaloids of marine origin.

    PubMed

    Nijampatnam, Bhavitavya; Dutta, Shilpa; Velu, Sadanandan E

    2015-08-01

    The ocean continues to provide a plethora of unique scaffolds capable of remarkable biological applications. A large number of pyrroloiminoquinone alkaloids, including discorhabdins, epinardins, batzellines, makaluvamines, and veiutamine, have been isolated from various marine organisms. A class of pyrroloiminoquinone-related alkaloids, known as bispyrroloquinones, is the focus of this review article. This family of marine alkaloids, which contain an aryl substituted bispyrroloquinone ring system, includes three subclasses of alkaloids namely, wakayin, tsitsikammamines A-B, and zyzzyanones A-D. Both wakayin and the tsitsikammamines contain a tetracyclic fused bispyrroloiminoquinone ring system, while zyzzyanones contain a fused tricyclic bispyrroloquinone ring system. The unique chemical structures of these marine natural products and their diverse biological properties, including antifungal and antimicrobial activity, as well as the potent, albeit generally nonspecific and universal cytotoxicities, have attracted great interest of synthetic chemists over the past three decades. Tsitsikammamines, wakayin, and several of their analogs show inhibition of topoisomerases. One additional possible mechanism of anticancer activity of tsitsikammamines analogs that has been discovered recently is through the inhibition of indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase, an enzyme involved in tumoral immune resistance. This review discusses the isolation, synthesis, and evaluation of bioactivities of bispyrroloquinone alkaloids and their analogs. PMID:26253489

  18. Influence of genetic factors on the ephedrine alkaloid composition ratio of Ephedra plants.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Masashi; Hirayama, Manabu; Ohtomi, Norihiro; Ohno, Takeshi; Nomura, Yukihiro; Iida, Osamu; Sugimura, Koji; Kawahara, Nobuo; Tsuchida, Takashi; Mikage, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the ephedrine alkaloid [(-)-ephedrine and (+)-pseudoephedrine] composition ratio of a crude Chinese herbal drug described in the Japanese Pharmacopoeia 'Ephedra herb (Chinese name: Mahuang)'. There were marked changes in the alkaloid composition ratio of wild plants in areas where both male and female clusters coexisted. However, in genetically homogeneous areas with the growth of male or female clusters alone, all of the coefficients of the regression lines were positive, but each gradient varied. This suggests that the alkaloid composition ratio has a clear tendency in each individual. Based on this, we cultivated individuals for vegetative propagation, and evaluated the alkaloid content ratio. Those propagated by separating the roots showed a specific tendency regardless of the cultivation area (Wakayama, Tanegashima). Those propagated by separating the herbaceous stem showed a specific tendency regardless of the soil or harvest time. In addition, we surveyed the (-)-ephedrine content ratio of 3- to 6-year-old strains. There was a high positive correlation coefficient between the previous and subsequent years. These findings suggest that the ephedrine alkaloid composition ratio of Ephedra herb depends on genetic factors, but not on environmental factors or the growth period. PMID:25115226

  19. Alkaloid variation among epichloid endophytes of sleepygrass (Achnatherum robustum) and consequences for resistance to insect herbivores.

    PubMed

    Shymanovich, Tatsiana; Saari, Susanna; Lovin, Mary E; Jarmusch, Alan K; Jarmusch, Scott A; Musso, Ashleigh M; Charlton, Nikki D; Young, Carolyn A; Cech, Nadja B; Faeth, Stanley H

    2015-01-01

    Epichloid endophytes are well known symbionts of many cool-season grasses that may alleviate environmental stresses for their hosts. For example, endophytes produce alkaloid compounds that may be toxic to invertebrate or vertebrate herbivores. Achnatherum robustum, commonly called sleepygrass, was aptly named due to the presence of an endophyte that causes toxic effects to livestock and wildlife. Variation in alkaloid production observed in two A. robustum populations located near Weed and Cloudcroft in the Lincoln National Forest, New Mexico, suggests two different endophyte species are present in these populations. Genetic analyses of endophyte-infected samples revealed major differences in the endophyte alkaloid genetic profiles from the two populations, which were supported with chemical analyses. The endophyte present in the Weed population was shown to produce chanoclavine I, paspaline, and terpendoles, so thus resembles the previously described Epichloë funkii. The endophyte present in the Cloudcroft population produces chanoclavineI, ergonovine, lysergic acid amide, and paspaline, and is an undescribed endophyte species. We observed very low survival rates for aphids feeding on plants infected with the Cloudcroft endophyte, while aphid survival was better on endophyte infected plants in the Weed population. This observation led to the hypothesis that the alkaloid ergonovine is responsible for aphid mortality. Direct testing of aphid survival on oat leaves supplemented with ergonovine provided supporting evidence for this hypothesis. The results of this study suggest that alkaloids produced by the Cloudcroft endophyte, specifically ergonovine, have insecticidal properties. PMID:25501262

  20. Phylogenetic Analyses Reveal Monophyletic Origin of the Ergot Alkaloid Gene dmaW in Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Miao; Panaccione, Daniel G.; Schardl, Christopher L.

    2009-01-01

    Ergot alkaloids are indole-derived mycotoxins that are important in agriculture and medicine. Ergot alkaloids are produced by a few representatives of two distantly related fungal lineages, the Clavicipitaceae and the Trichocomaceae. Comparison of the ergot alkaloid gene clusters from these two lineages revealed differences in the relative positions and orientations of several genes. The question arose: is ergot alkaloid biosynthetic capability from a common origin? We used a molecular phylogenetic approach to gain insights into the evolution of ergot alkaloid biosynthesis. The 4-γ,γ-dimethylallyltryptophan synthase gene, dmaW, encodes the first step in the pathway. Amino acid sequences deduced from dmaW and homologs were submitted to phylogenetic analysis, and the results indicated that dmaW of Aspergillus fumigatus (mitosporic Trichocomaceae) has the same origin as corresponding genes from clavicipitaceous fungi. Relationships of authentic dmaW genes suggest that they originated from multiple gene duplications with subsequent losses of original or duplicate versions in some lineages. PMID:19812724