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Sample records for nursing diagnosis

  1. Knowledge-based nursing diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Claudette; Hay, D. Robert

    1991-03-01

    Nursing diagnosis is an integral part of the nursing process and determines the interventions leading to outcomes for which the nurse is accountable. Diagnoses under the time constraints of modern nursing can benefit from a computer assist. A knowledge-based engineering approach was developed to address these problems. A number of problems were addressed during system design to make the system practical extended beyond capture of knowledge. The issues involved in implementing a professional knowledge base in a clinical setting are discussed. System functions, structure, interfaces, health care environment, and terminology and taxonomy are discussed. An integrated system concept from assessment through intervention and evaluation is outlined.

  2. A nursing diagnosis based model: guiding nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Krenz, M; Karlik, B; Kiniry, S

    1989-05-01

    Fiscal uncertainty, anxiety about nursing retention, and public scrutiny characterize the hospital milieu. During times such as these, introducing a conceptual model may appear inpractical and untimely. However, the conceptual model at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital has demonstrated many practical applications. It guides nursing practice and provides a framework for quality assurance, documentation of nursing care, and education of nurses in the hospital. Future plans include using the model as a basis for developing a computerized care planning system and a method for cost accounting for nursing. The authors describe how the model serves to unify, give direction, simplify, and improve nursing practice. PMID:2723785

  3. Heart Failure: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, Medical Treatment Guidelines, and Nursing Management.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Chad; Bush, Nathania

    2015-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a debilitating chronic disease and is expected to increase in upcoming years due to demographic changes. Nurses in all settings have an essential role in supporting patients in managing this disease. This article describes the pathophysiology of HF, diagnosis, medical management, and nursing interventions. It is crucial for nurses to understand the pathophysiology of HF and the importance that nursing actions have on enhancing medical management to alleviate symptoms and to deter the advancement of the pathophysiologic state. Such an understanding can ultimately reduce morbidity and mortality and optimize quality of life in patients with HF. PMID:26596665

  4. High-permeability pulmonary edema: nursing assessment, diagnosis, and interventions.

    PubMed

    Roberts, S L

    1990-05-01

    High-permeability pulmonary edema (HPPE) is a problem affecting 150,000 to 200,000 critically ill patients yearly. In HPPE the alveolar-capillary membrane is injured. The resulting increased permeability of the alveolar-capillary membrane allows shifts of fluid and protein into the interstitial fluid space and alveolus. As hypoxemia develops, the nurse assesses cardinal signs and symptoms derived from the physical examination and observations. Clinical data consisting of results from various laboratory and diagnostic studies confirm the diagnosis of HPPE. Finally, nursing diagnoses can be delineated as the basis on which expert nursing care is planned and implemented. PMID:2187834

  5. Nursing Process in Post Tonsillectomy Pain Diagnosis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Soleymanifard, Fateme; Khademolhoseyni, Seyyed Mohamad; Nouri, Jamile Mokhtari

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Tonsillectomy is the most common surgery in the field of ENT. Pain is the most common post tonsillectomy complaint. Considering the importance of nursing cares in relieving post-surgery pain in general and post-tonsillectomy pain in particular, this study is conducted with the aim of presenting nursing process in post tonsillectomy pain diagnosis for decreasing loss of appropriate opportunities in nursing cares and achieving appropriate results in taking care of the patients. Methods: This study is a targeted systematic review focusing on “effective nursing measures in relieving children’s post tonsillectomy pain”. The main stages of searching strategy included searching in electronic sources of Latin databases; Pub Med, Science Direct, and EMBASE and Persian databases; SID, Iran medex, ISC to find published articles from 2009 to 2014. In the end, final synthesis was done on eight articles in English. Findings: Effective nursing measurements for relieving post tonsillectomy pain include: decreasing children’s anxiety through children and their families’ psychological preparation by nurses and other caregivers, using cold compress to reduce neck and jaw pain, presenting distraction techniques, offering fluids and cold foods immediately in the period after surgery, creating a comfortable environment for the children, avoiding too much of talking and adequate sleep. Conclusion: It is recommended to the nursing managers and nurses to perform cares achieved from this systematic review to achieve appropriate results in relieving post tonsillectomy pain. PMID:25560345

  6. Cross-mapping the Finnish Classification of Nursing Diagnosis, Nursing Interventions and the Oulu Patient Classification.

    PubMed

    Liljamo, Pia; Kaakinen, Pirjo

    2009-01-01

    The structure of nursing documentation in Finland is based on the nursing process model and nursing diagnosis, interventions and outcomes are documented using a standardized nursing terminology. Patient related information is produced and stored in an electronic form at multiple sites. Patient care intensity classification is one of the essential pieces of nursing core data belonging to the structural data of an electronic patient record supported by the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health. The purpose of this paper is to describe the process of cross-mapping Finnish Classification of Nursing Diagnosis/Needs (FiCND), Nursing Interventions (FiCNI) and the most commonly used patient intensity classification in Finland, the Oulu Patient Classification (OPC). These databases enable evaluation, analysis and utilisations of data for administrative and research purposes. The end product is a cross-mapped classification material in The Institute for Health and Welfare (before National Research and Development Centre for Welfare and Health, STAKES) to use in every electronic patient record systems in Finland. PMID:19592974

  7. Establishing competency in the use of North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, Nursing Outcomes Classification, and Nursing Interventions Classification terminology.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Gail; Falan, Sharie; Heath, Crystal; Treder, Marcy

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a 16-hour intervention designed to build clinician competency in the use of North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA), Nursing Outcome Classification (NOC), and Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) (hereinafter: N3) among nurses with limited N3 knowledge. Each of 19 pairs of nurses independently selected N3 terms and rated the outcomes applicable to an actual patient for a specified time. A pair-through discussion then created a single consensus patient profile of the applicable terms. Before discussion, pairs agreed on 46% of the NANDA diagnoses, 30% of the NOC outcomes, and 20% of the NIC interventions selected. Eighty-nine percent of NOC label pair ratings were within 1 point. Building competency in N3 requires consistent use in written and oral communication with peers across time. Inter-rater reliabilities (IRRs) for NOC label ratings support previous findings. PMID:15274525

  8. Cross-mapping the ICNP with NANDA, HHCC, Omaha System and NIC for unified nursing language system development. International Classification for Nursing Practice. International Council of Nurses. North American Nursing Diagnosis Association. Home Health Care Classification. Nursing Interventions Classification.

    PubMed

    Hyun, S; Park, H A

    2002-06-01

    Nursing language plays an important role in describing and defining nursing phenomena and nursing actions. There are numerous vocabularies describing nursing diagnoses, interventions and outcomes in nursing. However, the lack of a standardized unified nursing language is considered a problem for further development of the discipline of nursing. In an effort to unify the nursing languages, the International Council of Nurses (ICN) has proposed the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP) as a unified nursing language system. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the inclusiveness and expressiveness of the ICNP terms by cross-mapping them with the existing nursing terminologies, specifically the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA) taxonomy I, the Omaha System, the Home Health Care Classification (HHCC) and the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC). Nine hundred and seventy-four terms from these four classifications were cross-mapped with the ICNP terms. This was performed in accordance with the Guidelines for Composing a Nursing Diagnosis and Guidelines for Composing a Nursing Intervention, which were suggested by the ICNP development team. An expert group verified the results. The ICNP Phenomena Classification described 87.5% of the NANDA diagnoses, 89.7% of the HHCC diagnoses and 72.7% of the Omaha System problem classification scheme. The ICNP Action Classification described 79.4% of the NIC interventions, 80.6% of the HHCC interventions and 71.4% of the Omaha System intervention scheme. The results of this study suggest that the ICNP has a sound starting structure for a unified nursing language system and can be used to describe most of the existing terminologies. Recommendations for the addition of terms to the ICNP are provided. PMID:12094837

  9. Diagnosis and nursing management of coeliac disease in children.

    PubMed

    Paul, Siba Prosad; McVeigh, Lauren; Gil-Zaragozano, Elena; Basude, Dharamveer

    2016-02-01

    Coeliac disease is an autoimmune condition caused by the ingestion of gluten-containing foods and affects about 1% of children and young people in the UK. Classic symptoms include diarrhoea, bloating, weight loss and abdominal pain. However, extra-intestinal manifestations, such as iron deficiency anaemia, faltering growth, delayed puberty and mouth ulcers, are increasingly being recognised. Some children have an increased risk of developing coeliac disease, such as a strong family history, certain genetic conditions and type 1 diabetes, therefore there is a need for increased awareness and early diagnosis before symptoms occur. If coeliac disease is suspected, a child should have serological screening with anti-tissue transglutaminase titres. Diagnosis is traditionally confirmed by a small bowel biopsy while the child remains on a 'normal' diet that does not exclude gluten. More recently, for a selective group of children, modification of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition guidelines has enabled non-biopsy (serological) diagnosis of coeliac disease. Children's nurses have an important role in recognising and diagnosing coeliac disease earlier as well as offering ongoing dietary support. Enabling children to maintain a gluten-free diet is essential for general wellbeing and preventing long-term complications. PMID:26856574

  10. Conceptualization of an electronic system for documentation of nursing diagnosis, outcomes, and intervention.

    PubMed

    Peres, Heloisa Helena Ciqueto; de Almeida Lopes Monteiro da Cruz, Diná; Lima, Antônio Fernandes Costa; Gaidzinski, Raquel Rapone; Ortiz, Diley Cardoso Franco; Mendes e Trindade, Michelle; Tsukamoto, Rosangela; Batista de Oliveira, Neurilene

    2010-01-01

    Electronic nursing documentation constitutes technical, scientific, legal, and ethical documents. The objective of this study was to develop an electronic nursing documentation system. The system was developed in four phases (conceptualization, detailing, prototype building, implementation), and the knowledge base was based on domains and classes according to the NANDA-I, NIC, and NOC unified framework. The result is an electronic system (PROCEnf--USP--Nursing Process Electronic Documentation System of the University of São Paulo) which allows documenting nursing process generating reports of nursing process, besides supporting decisions on nursing diagnosis, expected outcomes, and interventions. Integration of different fields of knowledge, as well as the institutional feature of valuing continuous theoretical and practical improvement of nursing process were factors of success of this technological project. PMID:20841693

  11. Integrating Nursing Diagnostic Concepts into the Medical Entities Dictionary Using the ISO Reference Terminology Model for Nursing Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jee-In; Cimino, James J.; Bakken, Suzanne

    2003-01-01

    Objective: The purposes of the study were (1) to evaluate the usefulness of the International Standards Organization (ISO) Reference Terminology Model for Nursing Diagnoses as a terminology model for defining nursing diagnostic concepts in the Medical Entities Dictionary (MED) and (2) to create the additional hierarchical structures required for integration of nursing diagnostic concepts into the MED. Design and Measurements: The authors dissected nursing diagnostic terms from two source terminologies (Home Health Care Classification and the Omaha System) into the semantic categories of the ISO model. Consistent with the ISO model, they selected Focus and Judgment as required semantic categories for creating intensional definitions of nursing diagnostic concepts in the MED. Because the MED does not include Focus and Judgment hierarchies, the authors developed them to define the nursing diagnostic concepts. Results: The ISO model was sufficient for dissecting the source terminologies into atomic terms. The authors identified 162 unique focus concepts from the 266 nursing diagnosis terms for inclusion in the Focus hierarchy. For the Judgment hierarchy, the authors precoordinated Judgment and Potentiality instead of using Potentiality as a qualifier of Judgment as in the ISO model. Impairment and Alteration were the most frequently occurring judgments. Conclusions: Nursing care represents a large proportion of health care activities; thus, it is vital that terms used by nurses are integrated into concept-oriented terminologies that provide broad coverage for the domain of health care. This study supports the utility of the ISO Reference Terminology Model for Nursing Diagnoses as a facilitator for the integration process. PMID:12668692

  12. [Pediatric serial urinary cystoureterography. Needs, nursing diagnosis, and care protocol].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Lopera, María del Carmen; Esplá García, Leonardo

    2002-01-01

    The authors present the causes which lead to carrying out a Series of Urinal Tract Retrograde Cystography (CUMS) study in a child and they discuss some reasons which justify the elaboration of a nursing treatment protocol and the corresponding procedures in order to care for the child. To make a protocol for a procedure facilitates and enhances its execution. Nursing treatments, like any other activity, are susceptible to having a protocol and therefore can improve their quality. Nurses in the radio-diagnostic pediatrics ward at the University Hospital Reina Sofía in Cordoba are elaborating treatment protocols for every one of their radiological studies for the care of every child to whom we attend whom requires nursing care. In this article some protocols and procedures are commented on along with the reasons which justify their elaboration. PMID:13677766

  13. The Nursing Diagnosis of risk for pressure ulcer: content validation 1

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Cássia Teixeira; Almeida, Miriam de Abreu; Lucena, Amália de Fátima

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to validate the content of the new nursing diagnosis, termed risk for pressure ulcer. Method: the content validation with a sample made up of 24 nurses who were specialists in skin care from six different hospitals in the South and Southeast of Brazil. Data collection took place electronically, through an instrument constructed using the SurveyMonkey program, containing a title, definition, and 19 risk factors for the nursing diagnosis. The data were analyzed using Fehring's method and descriptive statistics. The project was approved by a Research Ethics Committee. Results: title, definition and seven risk factors were validated as "very important": physical immobilization, pressure, surface friction, shearing forces, skin moisture, alteration in sensation and malnutrition. Among the other risk factors, 11 were validated as "important": dehydration, obesity, anemia, decrease in serum albumin level, prematurity, aging, smoking, edema, impaired circulation, and decrease in oxygenation and in tissue perfusion. The risk factor of hyperthermia was discarded. Conclusion: the content validation of these components of the nursing diagnosis corroborated the importance of the same, being able to facilitate the nurse's clinical reasoning and guiding clinical practice in the preventive care for pressure ulcers. PMID:27305182

  14. [A short form of the positions on nursing diagnosis scale: development and psychometric testing].

    PubMed

    Romero-Sánchez, José Manuel; Paloma-Castro, Olga; Paramio-Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Pastor-Montero, Sonia María; O'Ferrall-González, Cristina; Gabaldón-Bravo, Eva Maria; González-Domínguez, Maria Eugenia; Castro-Yuste, Cristina; Frandsen, Anna J; Martínez-Sabater, Antonio

    2013-06-01

    The Positions on Nursing Diagnosis (PND) is a scale that uses the semantic differential technique to measure nurses' attitudes towards the nursing diagnosis concept. The aim of this study was to develop a shortened form of the Spanish version of this scale and evaluate its psychometric properties and efficiency. A double theoretical-empirical approach was used to obtain a short form of the PND, the PND-7-SV, which would be equivalent to the original. Using a cross-sectional survey design, the reliability (internal consistency and test-retest reliability), construct (exploratory factor analysis, known-groups technique and discriminant validity) and criterion-related validity (concurrent validity), sensitivity to change and efficiency of the PND-7-SV were assessed in a sample of 476 Spanish nursing students. The results endorsed the utility of the PND-7-SV to measure attitudes toward nursing diagnosis in an equivalent manner to the complete form of the scale and in a shorter time. PMID:24601134

  15. The most common nursing diagnosis among adults/seniors hospitalised with cancer: integrative review

    PubMed Central

    Jomar, Rafael Tavares; de Souza Bispo, Vitória Régia

    2014-01-01

    The nursing process, with emphasis on the diagnosis phase, is essential to oncology hospital services due to a high frequency of physical and psychological problems that compromise the quality of life of patients undergoing cancer treatment. The goal of this study was to identify, according to NANDA International, the most common nursing diagnosis among adults/seniors with cancer who are hospitalised. This study is an integrative review of the literature completed in 2013 using five electronic databases, resulting in the selection and analysis of nine articles. This review identified the following eight actual diagnoses and two risk diagnoses that are more common among hospitalised adults/seniors with cancer: anxiety, deficient knowledge, constipation, self-care deficit for bathing/hygiene, body image disturbance, acute/chronic pain, fear, disturbed sleep pattern, risk of infection, and risk of deficient fluid volume. The heterogeneity of the studies used in this review may not have allowed the identification of all the common nursing diagnoses in the practice of oncology nursing in hospitals. However, even though the results are not based on the highest possible level of scientific evidence, their correlation to clinical practice can contribute to the enhancement of the nursing process in oncology services provided by hospitals. PMID:25228918

  16. Testing a diagnosis-related group index for skilled nursing facilities

    PubMed Central

    Cotterill, Philip G.

    1986-01-01

    Interest in case-mix measures for use in nursing home payment systems has been stimulated by the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for short-term acute-care hospitals. Appropriately matching payment with care needs is important to equitably compensate providers and to encourage them to admit patients who are most in need of nursing home care. The skilled nursing facility (SNF) Medicare benefit covers skilled convalescent or rehabilitative care following a hospital stay. Therefore, it might appear that diagnosis-related groups (DRG's), the basis for patient classification in PPS, could also be used for the Medicare SNF program. In this study, a DRG-based case-mix index (CMI) was developed and tested to determine how well it explains cost differences among SNF's. The results suggest that a DRG-based SNF payment system would be highly problematic. Incentives of this system would appear to discourage placement of patients who require relatively expensive care. PMID:10311674

  17. Being an outsider: nurses' statements about a vignette of an elderly resident with a schizophrenia diagnosis and dementia behaviour.

    PubMed

    Hellzén, O; Kristiansen, L; Norbergh, K G

    2004-04-01

    In an exploratory study of nurses' approach to elderly people with a diagnosis of long-term schizophrenia, the aim was to investigate nurses' views of the care of an elderly fictitious person with long-term schizophrenia. All the nurses in one municipality in northern Sweden working at seven different units were investigated. A vignette, which was based on a case description in a previous study of an 84-year-old woman with severe dementia and problematic behaviour, was used after a minor alteration. In this study, the woman's age in the case description was changed from 84 to 68 years and the diagnosis was changed from severe dementia to long-term schizophrenia; otherwise, the description was the same as in the original case. The main finding was the nurses' inability to see the resident as anything other than what the 'label', the diagnosis, said. The nurses are interpreted as being caught in a dilemma of loyalty - on the one hand, the loyalty to the organization with its traditional goals and means and, on the other hand, the loyalty to the resident with her wishes in the forefront of their minds. PMID:15009498

  18. Clinical Validation of the "Sedentary Lifestyle" Nursing Diagnosis in Secondary School Students.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Marcos Renato; da Silva, Viviane Martins; Guedes, Nirla Gomes; de Oliveira Lopes, Marcos Venícios

    2016-06-01

    This study clinically validated the nursing diagnosis of "sedentary lifestyle" (SL) among 564 Brazilian adolescents. Measures of diagnostic accuracy were calculated for defining characteristics, and Mantel-Haenszel analysis was used to identify related factors. The measures of diagnostic accuracy showed that the following defining characteristics were statistically significant: "average daily physical activity less than recommended for gender and age," "preference for activity low in physical activity," "nonengagement in leisure time physical activities," and "diminished respiratory capacity." An SL showed statistically significant associations with the following related factors: insufficient motivation for physical activity; insufficient interest in physical activity; insufficient resources for physical activity; insufficient social support for physical activity; attitudes, beliefs, and health habits that hinder physical activity; and insufficient confidence for practicing physical exercises. The study highlighted the four defining characteristics and six related factors for making decisions related to SL among adolescents. PMID:26054358

  19. Fuzzy cognitive map in differential diagnosis of alterations in urinary elimination: A nursing approach

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes Lopes, Maria Helena Baena; Ortega, Neli Regina Siqueira; Silveira, Paulo Sérgio Panse; Massad, Eduardo; Higa, Rosângela; de Fátima Marin, Heimar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To develop a decision support system to discriminate the diagnoses of alterations in urinary elimination, according to the nursing terminology of NANDA International (NANDA-I). Methods A fuzzy cognitive map (FCM) was structured considering six possible diagnoses: stress urinary incontinence, reflex urinary incontinence, urge urinary incontinence, functional urinary incontinence, total urinary incontinence and urinary retention; and 39 signals associated with them. The model was implemented in Microsoft Visual C++® Edition 2005 and applied in 195 real cases. Its performance was evaluated through the agreement test, comparing its results with the diagnoses determined by three experts (nurses). The sensitivity and specificity of the model were calculated considering the expert’s opinion as a gold standard. In order to compute the Kappa’s values we considered two situations, since more than one diagnosis was possible: the overestimation of the accordance in which the case was considered as concordant when at least one diagnoses was equal; and the underestimation of the accordance, in which the case was considered as discordant when at least one diagnosis was different. Results The overestimation of the accordance showed an excellent agreement (kappa = 0.92, p < 0.0001); and the underestimation provided a moderate agreement (kappa = 0.42, p < 0.0001). In general the FCM model showed high sensitivity and specificity, of 0.95 and 0.92, respectively, but provided a low specificity value in determining the diagnosis of urge urinary incontinence (0.43) and a low sensitivity value to total urinary incontinence (0.42). Conclusions The decision support system developed presented a good performance compared to other types of expert systems for differential diagnosis of alterations in urinary elimination. Since there are few similar studies in the literature, we are convinced of the importance of investing in this kind of modeling, both from the theoretical and from

  20. Accuracy of clinical diagnosis of benign eyelid lesions: Is a dedicated nurse-led service safe and effective?

    PubMed

    Mohite, Abhijit A; Johnson, Andria; Rathore, Deepa S; Bhandari, Kamal; Crossman, Richard; Mehta, Purnima; Ahluwalia, Harpreet S

    2016-08-01

    This article compares an independent nurse-led benign lesion service with a doctor-led one, and assesses the impact of clinician seniority on diagnostic accuracy rates. Retrospective review of benign lesions referred to a teaching hospital and managed in either a doctor- or nurse-led lid service. All lesions were diagnosed clinically, excised and then sent for histological diagnosis. Lesions were categorized into subtypes. Pre-excision clinical diagnoses were compared with histological diagnoses. Sensitivity, specificity and missed malignancy rates were calculated for each subtype. Accuracy was compared between different grades of doctors and a specialist nurse. 264 and 332 lesions were managed in a doctor-led and nurse-led service, respectively. Rates of accurate sub-typing were 79.6% and 80.4% in the doctor- and nurse-led services, respectively (p > 0.05). Clinician seniority had no bearing. Missed malignancies or pre-malignancies accounted for 1.1% and 1.5% of lesions in the doctor and nurse-led services, respectively (p > 0.05). Overall, the remaining misdiagnoses were benign lesions of another subtype (13.6%) or non-specific histological findings (5.0%) and 98.6% of lesions were confirmed as benign on histology. Overall sensitivity and specificity values were: benign epithelial proliferations 95.6% and 92.2%, epidermal inclusion cysts 92.2% and 88.0%, xanthelasma 97.5% and 100.0%, cysts of Moll 66.7% and 96.6%, naevi 39.4% and 99.8% and molluscum 20.0% and 99.8%, respectively. A dedicated nurse-led service is as effective in managing a range of clinically benign lid lesions as a doctor-led one, and clinician seniority has little impact on the diagnostic accuracy of these lesions. PMID:27322204

  1. Application of 4G wireless network-based system for remote diagnosis and nursing of stomal complications

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiulian; Cao, Yingjuan; Luan, Xiaorong

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study aims to apply 4G wireless network in the remote diagnosis of stoma complications for the first time. Background: Remote diagnosis and nursing care for a variety of illnesses are urgently needed in clinical settings. Objectives: Combining with relevant clinical manifestations, an Android phone-based intelligent diagnosis system was designed to construct a universe, easy access to exploitation and human-computer interaction database and exploitation environment for applications and programs. Methods: “Production rule” and forward reasoning method were utilized to design arborescence structures and logic reasoner associated with stoma complications. Stoma physicians were responsible for delivering evaluation scores on patients’ health status using analytic hierarchy process. The emphasis of this study is to exploit an “Android phone-based system for remote diagnosis of stoma”, which is of certain universe usage. Results: Such system was tested in the Medicine Information Center of Qilu Hospital of Shandong University and initially applied in the city of De Zhou, Shandong province, China. Conclusions: These results collectively demonstrated that the system is easy to carry, of high utility and free from the limitations of wire network environment, etc. It provides clinical evidence for establishing a novel type model for the exchange between patients and physicians. PMID:25550986

  2. Revealing a cancer diagnosis to patients: attitudes of patients, families, friends, nurses, and physicians in Lebanon—results of a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Farhat, F.; Othman, A.; el Baba, G.; Kattan, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Disclosure of a cancer diagnosis to patients is a major problem for physicians in Lebanon. Our survey aimed to identify the attitudes of patients, families and friends, nurses, and physicians regarding disclosure of a cancer diagnosis. Methods Study participants included 343 physicians, nurses, cancer patients, families, and friends from clinics in two major hospitals in Lebanon. All completed a 29-item questionnaire that assessed, by demographic group, the information provided about cancer, opinions about the disclosure of the diagnosis to cancer patients, perceived consequences to patients, and the roles of family, friends, and religion. Results Overall, 7.8% of the patients were convinced that cancer is incurable. Nearly 82% preferred to be informed about their diagnosis. Similarly, 83% of physicians were in favour of disclosing a cancer diagnosis to their patients. However, only 14% of the physicians said that they revealed the truth to the patients themselves, with only 9% doing so immediately after confirmation of the diagnosis. Disclosure of a cancer diagnosis was preferred before the start of the treatment by 59% of the patients and immediately after confirmation of the diagnosis by 72% of the physicians. Overall, 86% of physicians, 51% of nurses, and 69% of patients and their families believed that religion helped with the acceptance of a cancer diagnosis. A role for family in accepting the diagnosis was reported by 74% of the patients, 56% of the nurses, and 88% of the physicians. All participants considered that fear was the most difficult feeling (63%) experienced by cancer patients, followed by pain (29%), pity (8%), and death (1%), with no statistically significant difference between the answers given by the participant groups. Conclusions The social background in Lebanese society is the main obstacle to revealing the truth to cancer patients. Lebanese patients seem to prefer direct communication of the truth, but families take the opposite

  3. Nurses as patient navigators in cancer diagnosis: review, consultation and model design.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, J E; Green, E; Lankshear, S; Hughes, E; Burkoski, V; Sawka, C

    2011-03-01

    The diagnostic phase of cancer care is an anxious time for patients. Patient navigation is a way of assisting and supporting individuals during this time. The aim of this review is to explore patient navigation and its role in the diagnostic phase of cancer care. We reviewed the literature for definitions and models of navigation, preparation for the role and impact on patient outcomes, specifically addressing the role of the nurse in patient navigation. Interviews and focus groups with healthcare providers and managers provided further insight from these stakeholder groups. Common to most definitions of navigation is the navigator's multifaceted role in facilitating processes of care, assisting patients to overcome barriers and providing information and support. Navigation may be provided by laypersons, clerical staff and/or healthcare professionals. In the diagnostic phase it has the potential to affect efficiency of diagnostic testing, patients' experience during this time and preparation for decision-making around treatment options. Patient care during the diagnostic phase requires various levels of navigation, according to individual informational, physical and psychosocial needs. Identifying those individuals who require more support--whether physical or psychosocial--during the diagnostic phase is of critical importance. PMID:20955374

  4. [Analisys of nursing diagnosis risk of falls in adults and children].

    PubMed

    Hernando Mate, Alba; Meneses Monroy, Alfonso

    2013-05-01

    Falls are a problem for all age groups but it affects children and the elderly in particular. Falls are a major public health problem as they not only have physical, social and economic consequences but also they are associated to high mortality rates. It has been proven that the cause of falls is multifactorial. Therefore, the implementation of a Multifactorial Fall Prevention Program is extremely important. For these reasons, this research study is done based on other studies already published. Falls linked to specific factors are analyzed in order to prove through evidence risk factors established by the NANDA for Risk Fall Diagnosis or if some of them can not be justified and, therefore, should not be classified as risk factors. PMID:23815056

  5. Standardized nursing language for healthcare information systems.

    PubMed

    Delaney, C; Mehmert, P A; Prophet, C; Bellinger, S L; Huber, D G; Ellerbe, S

    1992-08-01

    Since a substantial component of health care delivery is reflected in nursing's work, it is imperative that nursing expedites implementation of a standardized language that reflects nursing's work and ultimately allows outcome evaluation. This paper will summarize the state of development and related issues of standardized language in nursing, including: Nursing Minimum Data Set, Taxonomies of Nursing Diagnoses, Nursing Interventions, Outcomes, and the Nursing Management Minimum Data Set. The Nursing Minimum Data Set, including nursing care, patient or client demographic, and service elements, reflects a standardized collection of essential nursing data used by multiple data users in the health care delivery system across all types of settings. The nursing care elements include nursing diagnosis, nursing intervention, nursing outcome, and intensity of nursing care. Currently, more than 100 nursing diagnoses have been accepted for clinical testing by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA) and have been incorporated into a taxonomy of nursing diagnoses that reflects patient responses to actual or potential health problems that nursing can address. A current formulation of a taxonomy of nursing interventions for the treatment of the nursing diagnoses yielded 336 nursing intervention labels organized at three or four levels of abstraction. Concomitant with these endeavors is the necessity for identifying outcomes associated with each diagnosis and its treatment. Concepts and a classification for indicators of these outcomes are being reviewed. Last, to address the contextual covariates of patient outcomes, a collection of core variables needed by nurse managers to make management decisions and compare nursing effectiveness across institutions and geographic regions is under development. In summary, standardized measures to determine cost effective, high quality, appropriate outcomes of nursing care delivered across settings and sites are being

  6. Oncology nurse navigator.

    PubMed

    Case, Mary Ann B

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this integrative review is to explore the presence of the oncology nurse as navigator on measurable patient outcomes. Eighteen primary nursing research studies were found using combinations of the following key words: advocate, cancer, case manager, coach, certification, guide, navigator, nurse, oncology, patient navigator, pivot nurse, and continuity of care. Nurse researchers identified nursing-sensitive patient outcomes related to the time to diagnosis and appropriate treatment, effect on mood states, satisfaction, support, continuity of care, and cost outcomes. Navigator roles are expanding globally, and nurses should continue to embrace opportunities to ensure the safe passage of patients with cancer along the entire trajectory of illness and to evaluate the implications for educational preparation, research, and practice of navigators of all kinds. PMID:21278039

  7. Vigilance: the essence of nursing.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Geralyn; Lavin, Mary Ann

    2005-09-01

    Nursing, perhaps more than any other health care profession, claims caring as fundamental to its practice. Professional vigilance is the essence of caring in nursing. This article uses historical and theoretical bases to define professional vigilance and discuss its components. Two types of nursing diagnoses, central and surveillance, are proposed. Central diagnoses indicate the need for the nurse to plan and implement interventions for the achievement of outcomes. North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA)-approved diagnoses fall in this category. Surveillance diagnoses are those that recognize patient risks that are anticipated by the nurse, who remains ready to act in the event of occurrence. The profession, as a whole, and language developers, in particular, need to expand standardized nursing diagnosis terminology so that the contribution of nurses' vigilance to patient safety may be effectively communicated and documented. PMID:16225388

  8. Nursing Supplies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stages Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Nursing Supplies Page Content Article Body Throughout most of ... budget. (Nursing equipment also makes wonderful baby gifts.) Nursing Bras A well-made nursing bra that comfortably ...

  9. Taking action: An exploration of the actions of exemplary oncology nurses when there is a sense of hopelessness and futility perceived by registered nurses at diagnosis, during treatment, and in palliative situations.

    PubMed

    Janzen, Katherine J; Perry, Beth

    2015-01-01

    "There is nothing more that can be done" is a phrase that may occasionally cross the minds of oncology nurses. This paper reports on the actions of exemplary oncology nurses who were faced with such situations where their colleagues gave up or turned away. The research question, "What actions do exemplary clinical oncology nurses (RNs) undertake in patient-care situations where further nursing interventions seem futile?" prefaced data collection via a secure website where 14 Canadian clinical oncology registered nurses (RNs) provided narratives documenting their actions. Thematic analysis utilized QRS NVivo 10 software and hand coding. Four themes were generated from data analysis: advocacy, not giving up, genuine presence, and moral courage. Implications for practice and future research are provided. PMID:26638286

  10. Intensive care nursing scoring system. Part 1: Classification of nursing diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Pyykkö, A K; Laurila, J; Ala-Kokko, T I; Hentinen, M; Janhonen, S A

    2000-12-01

    The introduction of computer-based information management systems to intensive care units offers new possibilities to describe and document the content of nursing. In different countries and health care organizations, the hospital culture and the approach taken by nurses and medical colleagues determine what, how and to what extent nursing is documented. There are nursing diagnosis classifications that are used in North America, such as NANDA (North American Nursing Diagnosis Association), and the European Union Telenurse project will promote the use of the ICNP (International Classifications of Nursing Practice) throughout Europe. The above classifications are used to describe individual, family or community responses to potential or actual health problems or life processes. But there is no nursing diagnosis classification that would take into account both the aims and the unique context of intensive care nursing. This first article describes part of our research: the action research process and the result of the development of a nursing diagnosis classification compatible with the goals of intensive care in three adult intensive care units in the Oulu University Hospital. The classification of nursing diagnoses is part of the Intensive Care Nursing Scoring System (ICNSS) which was developed in the course of this study. The other parts deal with nursing outcomes and nursing interventions. ICNSS is used to facilitate information exchange in the process of intensive care nursing and to describe the nursing workload. PMID:11091466

  11. Nursing: What's a Nurse Practitioner?

    MedlinePlus

    ... nurses, or APNs) have a master's degree in nursing (MS or MSN) and board certification in their ... Nurse Practitioners (NAPNAP) and through local hospitals or nursing schools. In addition, many doctors share office space ...

  12. Nursing assessment in industry.

    PubMed Central

    Serafini, P

    1976-01-01

    In order to be able to offer nursing service to industry, a community health agency must have some knowledge of the industry and the daily problesm faced by both management and worker. The nursing process can serve as a framework for the gathering of necessary information and planning of sound care. The five-step nursing process, which includes assessment, diagnosis, planning, implementation and evaluation, is discussed and annotated model Assessment Guide for Nursing in Industry is given (Appendix A). The six areas from which information should be gathered when assessing an industry are the following: I. The community in which the industry is located: II. The industry, its historical development, policies, and projections; III. The plant or physical structure; IV. The working population; V. The industrial process of the plant; VII. The existing health program. Once the assessment is completed and a diagnosis formulated, services can be offered based on specific, defined needs. PMID:961943

  13. [Family oriented nursing care].

    PubMed

    Lima-Rodríguez, Joaquin Salvador; Lima-Serrano, Marta; Sáez-Bueno, Africa

    2009-01-01

    Nursing has experienced an important methodological development, in which it gives priority to the individual, although at a socioeconomic level a marked interest is seen in the health care of the family unit and the NANDA (North American Nursing Diagnosis Association), NIC (Nursing Interventions Classification) and NOC (Nursing Outcomes Classification) nursing guidelines, using diagnoses, criteria of results and interventions orientated towards this aim. We consider to the family as an opened system consisted of human elements, with a common history, which they form a functional unit been ruled by own procedure. In this paper we look at those aspects that must be taken into account in nursing assessment of families from a systemic perspective, including some tools for data collection and analysis of information. In addition, we identify specific areas of intervention. We believe that the family must be studied from a nursing care point of view with its own characteristics as opposed to those possessed individually by each of its members. We also believe that, when assessment is centred on the Henderson unaided activities study or the Gordon functional health patterns, they are not useful in assessing the family unit. This work offers an assessment method centred on the family unit, which helps to identify the nursing diagnoses applicable to it. Our proposal, which has been successfully used by nursing students over the last few years, hopes to contribute to quality clinical practice with a tool orientated towards the family. PMID:19726212

  14. [A study on the development of standardized nursing care plans for computerized nursing service].

    PubMed

    Kim, C J; Chun, C Y; Lim, Y S; Park, J W

    1990-12-01

    A central issue in the development of nursing practice is to describe the phenomenon with which nursing is concerned. To identify the health problems which can be diagnosed and managed by the nurse is the first step to organize and ensure the development of nursing science. Therefore the academic world has been discussing the application of the nursing diagnosis in nursing practice as a means of improving quality of care. The objectives of this study were to develop a standardized nursing care plan for ten selected nursing diagnoses to form a database for computerized nursing service. The research approach used in the study was (1) the selection of the ten nursing diagnoses which occur most frequently on medical-surgical wards, (2) the development of a standardized nursing care plan for the ten selected nursing diagnoses, (3) application of the plan to hospitalized patients and evaluation of the content validity by the nurses, and (4) evaluation of the clinical effects after the use of the standardized nursing care plans. The subjects were 56 nurses and 395 hospitalized patients on two medical and two surgical unit. The results of this study were as follows: 1) The ten selected nursing diagnoses for the development of the standardized nursing care plans were "PAIN, SLEEP DISTURBANCE, ALTERED HEALTH MAINTENANCE, ALTERATION IN NUTRITION, ANXIETY, CONSTIPATION, ALTERED PATTERNS OF URINARY ELIMINATION, DISTURBANCE IN BODY IMAGE, POTENTIAL FOR ACTIVITY INTOLERANCE AND ACTIVITY INTOLERANCE". 2. The developed standardized nursing care plans included the nursing diagnosis, definition, defining characteristics, etiologic or related factors that contribute to the condition, recording pattern, desired outcomes and nursing orders (nursing interventions). 3. The plan was used with hospitalized patients on medical-surgical wards to test for content validity. The patient's satisfaction with the nursing care and nurses' job satisfaction were investigated to evaluate the clinical

  15. Swedish ambulance nurses' experiences of nursing patients suffering cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Ricard; Engström, Åsa

    2013-04-01

    Effective pre-hospital treatment of a person suffering cardiac arrest is a challenging task for the ambulance nurses. The aim of this study was to describe ambulance nurses' experiences of nursing patients suffering cardiac arrest. Qualitative personal interviews were conducted during 2011 in Sweden with seven ambulance nurses with experience of nursing patients suffering cardiac arrests. The interview texts were analyzed using qualitative thematic content analysis, which resulted in the formulation of one theme with six categories. Mutual preparation, regular training and education were important factors in the nursing of patients suffering cardiac arrest. Ambulance nurses are placed in ethically demanding situations regarding if and for how long they should continue cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to accord with pre-hospital cardiac guidelines and patients' wishes. When a cardiac arrest patient is nursed their relatives also need the attention of ambulance nurses. Reflection is one way for ambulance nurses to learn from, and talk about, their experiences. This study provides knowledge of ambulance nurses' experiences in the care of people with cardiac arrest. Better feedback about the care given by the ambulance nurses, and about the diagnosis and nursing care the patients received after they were admitted to the hospital are suggested as improvements that would allow ambulance nurses to learn more from their experience. Further development and research concerning the technical equipment might improve the situation for both the ambulance nurses and the patients. Ambulance nurses need regularly training and education to be prepared for saving people's lives and also to be able to make the right decisions. PMID:23577977

  16. Preparing nurses to use standardized nursing language in the electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Müller-Staub, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Research demonstrated nurses' education needs to be able to document nursing diagnoses, interventions and patient outcomes in the EHR. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of Guided Clinical Reasoning, a learning method to foster nurses' abilities in using standardized language. In a cluster randomized experimental study, nurses from 3 wards received Guided Clinical Reasoning (GCR), a learning method to foster nurses in stating nursing diagnoses, related interventions and outcomes. Three wards, receiving Classic Case Discussions, functioned as control group. The learning effect was measured by assessing the quality of 225 nursing documentations by applying 18 Likert-type items with a 0-4 scale of the measurement instrument "Quality of Nursing Diagnoses, Interventions and Outcomes" (Q-DIO). T-tests were applied to analyze pre-post intervention scores. GCR led to significantly higher quality of nursing diagnosis documentation; to etiology-specific nursing interventions and to enhanced nursing-sensitive patient outcomes. Before GCR, the pre-intervention mean in quality of nursing documentation was = 2.69 (post-intervention = 3.70; p<.0001). Similar results were found for nursing interventions and outcomes. In the control group, the quality remained unchanged. GCR supported nurses' abilities to state accurate nursing diagnoses, to select effective nursing interventions and to reach enhanced patient outcomes. Nursing diagnoses (NANDA-I) with related interventions and patient outcomes provide a knowledgebase for nurses to use standardized language in the EHR. PMID:19592861

  17. Nursing, Nursing Education, and Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggers, Thompson; And Others

    In response to the current crisis in the field of nursing, a study examined nursing students' perceived work-related stress and differences among associate degree, diploma, and baccalaureate nursing programs in their preparation of nursing students. The 171 subjects, representing the three different nursing programs, completed a questionnaire…

  18. Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Nursing Homes Basic Facts & Information Nursing homes have changed ... physical health and/or mental disabilities. Is a Nursing Home Right for You? Almost half of all ...

  19. Nursing Positions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Nursing Positions KidsHealth > For Parents > Nursing Positions Print A ... and actually needs to feed. Getting Comfortable With Breastfeeding Nursing can be one of the most challenging ...

  20. Nursing: Registered Nurses

    MedlinePlus

    ... nurses for jobs in health planning and development, marketing, consulting, policy development, and quality assurance. Some RNs ... workers was $36,200. Recommend this page using: Facebook Twitter LinkedIn tools Areas at a Glance Industries ...

  1. The Opinions of Nursing Students Regarding the Nursing Process and Their Levels of Proficiency in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Taskın Yilmaz, Feride; Sabanciogullari, Selma; Aldemir, Kadriye

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Nursing process, as a scientific method of nursing practice, is an important tool for putting nursing knowledge into practice which increases the quality of nursing care. The study was aimed to determine the opinions of nursing students regarding the nursing process and their levels of proficiency. Methods: A total of 44 nursing students participated in this descriptive study. Data were collected by a three-part questionnaire including the opinion of students on nursing process, Gordon’s functional health patterns model and the NANDA diagnoses. Data were analyzed by SPSS software. Results: Most of the students (65.9%) believed that the nursing process was necessary. half of the students explained the diagnosis, 58.3% explained the planning, 41.3% explained the implementation, and 43.6% explained the evaluation sufficiently. Conclusion: It is suggested for instructors to use different teaching methods in order to develop critical thinking while teaching the nursing process. PMID:26744726

  2. Nursing Home Checklist

    MedlinePlus

    Nursing home checklist Name of nursing home: ____________________________________________________ Address: ________________________________________________________________ Phone number: __________________________________________________________ Date of visit: _____________________________________________________________ Basic information Yes No Notes Is the nursing home Medicare certified? Is the nursing ...

  3. Nursing Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

    A handbook with laws, rules, and regulations of the State Education Department of New York governing nursing practice is presented. It describes licensure requirements and includes complete application forms and instructions for obtaining license and first registration as a licensed practical nurse and professional registered nurse. Applicants are…

  4. American Nurses Association Nursing World

    MedlinePlus

    ... Annual Conference Join » Care Coordination: Capitalizing on the Nursing Role in Population Health --Register Now ! For more ... ANA » My ANA » Shop » ANA Nursing Knowledge Center Nursing Insider News 9/15/16 Update Your MyANA ...

  5. Nutrition for Nurses: Nursing 245.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palermo, Karen R.

    A description is presented of "Nutrition for Nurses," a prerequisite course for students anticipating entrance into the junior level of a state university registered nursing program. Introductory material highlights the course focus (i.e., the basics of good nutrition; nutrition through the life cycle; nursing process in nutritional care; and…

  6. [Nursing diagnoses in cardiac surgery patients].

    PubMed

    da Rocha, Luciana Alves; Maia, Ticiane Fernandes; da Silva, Lúcia de Fátima

    2006-01-01

    Exploratory and transversal research accomplished with postoperative patients outgoing coronary bypass. It was aimed at identifying nursing diagnoses according to Taxonomy II of NANDA and nursing interventions according to Nursing Interventions Classification, associating with the results of Nursing Outcomes Classification. The data were collected fom 22 patients using formularies and physical examination. The information made possible the identification of fifteen nursing diagnosis, according to Taxonomy II of NANDA. Among them, stand out: risk of infection; Risk of constipation; Deficit in self-care intimate hygiene and integrity of harmed skin. The study revealed being fundamental to develop studies about nursing diagnoses to direct analyses of problems that concern to the demanding patients of specific nursing actions, that contribute to the devepoment of the profession. PMID:17175721

  7. [Nursing classification systems and their application in care: an integrative literature review].

    PubMed

    Furuya, Rejane Kiyomi; Nakamura, Flávia Regina Yoshida; Gastaldi, Andréia Bendine; Rossi, Lídia Aparecida

    2011-03-01

    This study sought for scientific evidences on the use of nursing classification systems in care through an integrative literature review. The following databases were used LILACS and PubMed. The keywords used were classification, nursing, standardized language, system. Thirty-eight articles were selected. Five major classification systems, implemented in the services, were found: nursing diagnosis (North American Nursing Diagnosis Association International), nursing interventions (Nursing Interventions Classification), nursing outcomes (Nursing Outcomes Classification), the International Classificationfor Nursing Practice and the International Classificationfor NursingPractice in Colletive Health. The articles covered aspects related to implementation, assessment continuing education and validation of terms related to classification systems. The use of nursing classification systems provides benefits for care, improving it, the quality of information and service organization. PMID:21888218

  8. Using DRGs and standard costs to control nursing labor costs.

    PubMed

    Meeting, D T; Saunders, G; Curcio, R F

    1988-09-01

    Nursing care is a very significant part of a healthcare organization's costs. However, until recently, methods of controlling nursing costs were largely ineffective. With the implementation of the prospective payment system and the use of diagnosis related groups, budgeting and controlling nursing costs are now possible with the use of standard costing. In this article, methods and procedures are discussed and explained for controlling inpatient nursing costs with the use of DRGs and standard costs. PMID:10312677

  9. Using an Educational Electronic Documentation System to Help Nursing Students Accurately Identify Nursing Diagnoses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pobocik, Tamara J.

    2013-01-01

    The use of technology and electronic medical records in healthcare has exponentially increased. This quantitative research project used a pretest/posttest design, and reviewed how an educational electronic documentation system helped nursing students to identify the accurate related to statement of the nursing diagnosis for the patient in the case…

  10. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: School Nurse Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitto, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Initial symptoms and diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) usually occur between 10 and 20 years of age, although younger cases are reported. The complicated nature of IBD diagnosis and treatment can interfere with physical and emotional development that normally occurs in school-age children and adolescents. The school nurse should be…

  11. Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... up like a hospital. The staff provides medical care, as well as physical, speech and occupational therapy. ... relationships with residents. Some nursing homes have special care units for people with serious memory problems such ...

  12. Implementation of Free Text Format Nursing Diagnoses at a University Hospital's Medical Department. Exploring Nurses' and Nursing Students' Experiences on Use and Usefulness. A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Frigstad, Sigrun Aasen; Nøst, Torunn Hatlen; André, Beate

    2015-01-01

    Background. Nursing documentation has long traditions and represents core element of nursing, but the documentation is often criticized of being incomplete. Nursing diagnoses are an important research topic in nursing in terms of quality of nursing assessment, interventions, and outcome in addition to facilitating communication and continuity. Aim. The aim of this study was to explore the nurses' and nursing students' experiences after implementing free text format nursing diagnoses in a medical department. Method. The study design included educational intervention of free text nursing diagnoses. Data was collected through five focus group interviews with 18 nurses and 6 students as informants. The data was analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results. The informants describe positive experiences concerning free text format nursing diagnoses' use and usefulness; it promotes reflection and discussion and is described as a useful tool in the diagnostic process, though it was challenging to find the diagnosis' appropriate formulation. Conclusion. Our findings indicate a valid usability of free text format nursing diagnoses as it promotes the diagnostic process. The use seems to enhance critical thinking and may serve as valuable preparation towards an implementation of standardized nursing diagnoses. Use and support of key personnel seem valuable in an implementation process. PMID:26075091

  13. Nursing the patient with malignant melanoma: early intervention.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Tracey

    This article summarizes the key facts about cutaneous melanoma, including its causative factors, incidence, classification, diagnosis and management guidelines. The role of the nurse is then discussed, in particular health education post-diagnosis, the specific information required to improve safety in the sun, the teaching of self-examination techniques, and the provision of psychological support throughout diagnosis and follow-up. Since most melanomas have an excellent prognosis, the majority of nursing care is at the educational and supportive level, however, melanoma can be an aggressive disease, and some aspects of nursing the patient with advanced disease are also considered. PMID:19273989

  14. Nursing Leadership.

    PubMed

    Crisp, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Nurse transformational leaders can serve in academic settings and at local, national, international professional nursing organizations and community-based groups. As a transformational leader, nurses can lead in any workplace. According to a study by Stanley (2012), clinical leaders are not sought for their capacity to outline a vision, but for their values and beliefs on display that are easily recognized in their actions. This encompasses the moral component of transformational leadership. It is the APRNs duty to continue to strive towards a better vision for the well-being of all nurses, patients, and colleagues. Autonomous APRNs are happier, healthier, and better prepared to provide the best patient care to their patients. We should not be happy to sit back and let others fight this fight. APRNs need to be on the frontline, leading the way. This is only an insight that I have gained after many frustrating years of cheering our profession and then being made to feel inferior at the same time. Only nurses, who have that nurturing spirit, would hold back if they felt it might hurt others. Don't back off or hold back! It might hurt those that follow! PMID:27089563

  15. [To represent needs of nursing care using nursing diagnoses: potentials and restrictions of the NANDA classification and ICNP].

    PubMed

    Schilder, Michael

    2005-03-01

    Nursing diagnoses represent individual reactions to existing or potential changes in one's state of health. They are result of a diagnostic process, which is part of the dynamic nursing care process in its whole. Thus, as a basis of nursing interventions diagnoses have to be proved continuously. The classification of the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA) as well as the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP) can be account to the international well-known classifications of nursing diagnoses. Comparing their structures, some fundamental differences between both classifications become obvious. While the NANDA classification represents a systematic structured body of nursing knowledge with regard to human health reactions patterns, the ICNP reflects a more comprehensive part of the nursing reality, since it also contains nursing interventions and outcomes. Until the latest changes by establishing the taxonomy II, NANDA diagnoses have primarily focused deficits. But in contrast to the diagnoses of the ICNP they also comprise etiological factors. To prove the applicability of both classifications to nursing practice, they have been applied to a case study of a female resident living in a nursing home. The results of analysis show that because of their different structures the NANDA classification and ICNP have their own possibilities and limitations in covering the resident's individual needs of nursing care. These characteristic potentials and restrictions have to be taken into account when one of the classification systems is going to be implemented into nursing practice. PMID:15801705

  16. Terms used by nurses to describe patient problems: can SNOMED III represent nursing concepts in the patient record?

    PubMed Central

    Henry, S B; Holzemer, W L; Reilly, C A; Campbell, K E

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the terms used by nurses in a variety of data sources and to test the feasibility of using SNOMED III to represent nursing terms. DESIGN: Prospective research design with manual matching of terms to the SNOMED III vocabulary. MEASUREMENTS: The terms used by nurses to describe patient problems during 485 episodes of care for 201 patients hospitalized for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia were identified. Problems from four data sources (nurse interview, intershift report, nursing care plan, and nurse progress note/flowsheet) were classified based on the substantive area of the problem and on the terminology used to describe the problem. A test subset of the 25 most frequently used terms from the two written data sources (nursing care plan and nurse progress note/flowsheet) were manually matched to SNOMED III terms to test the feasibility of using that existing vocabulary to represent nursing terms. RESULTS: Nurses most frequently described patient problems as signs/symptoms in the verbal nurse interview and intershift report. In the written data sources, problems were recorded as North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA) terms and signs/symptoms with similar frequencies. Of the nursing terms in the test subset, 69% were represented using one or more SNOMED III terms. PMID:7719788

  17. Nursing process approach improves receivables management.

    PubMed

    Dias, K; Stockamp, D

    1992-09-01

    The "nursing process" is a systematic decision-making approach to problem solving based on open-system theory. This theory assumes that there is an on-going interchange between all system components. Components cannot be viewed in isolation, because decisions regarding one component will affect other components. Receivables management is similar to the nursing process, in that it involves constant diagnosis, assessment, and intervention in the work in process during all phases of the receivables cycle. In experiments that applied the nursing process concept to the management of accounts receivable in several hospitals, gross days in accounts receivable were reduced and cash flow was increased. PMID:10145682

  18. Socializing nurses for nursing entrepreneurship roles.

    PubMed

    Batra, C

    1990-01-01

    Whatever directions nursing takes in the future, it is likely that creative and motivated nurses, more and more, will seek to run their own businesses. Batra prepares the student nurse for this eventuality by devising a course that teaches the student how to organize an entrepreneurial nursing business. PMID:2300274

  19. Clinical research nurse or nurse researcher?

    PubMed

    Jones, Helen Claire

    This article gives an overview of two research-related roles that can form part of a nurse's career path: clinical research nurse and nurse researcher. It highlights the influences on both roles, and the skills and differences within them, as well as offering advice on how nurses can access either role. PMID:26182597

  20. Guide for Instructors of Practical Nursing in South Carolina, Phase 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    The South Carolina Department of Education has printed an instruction manual for teacher use in schools of nursing. The guide covers the areas of medical surgical nursing, diagnosis of disease, dealing with the surgical patient, care of the aged, rehabilitation and chronic illness, nursing the cancer patient, gynecological disorders, respiratory…

  1. How to set up a nurse-led clinic.

    PubMed

    Hatchett, Richard

    2016-05-11

    Nurse-led clinics are a vital part of UK health care. They are diverse and are therefore hard to define, but they involve nurses having their own patient caseload and increased autonomy, often using advanced clinical skills such as physical assessment, diagnosis and medicines management. PMID:27206209

  2. Nurses' Attitudes toward Gay and Hemophiliac Patients with AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strasser, Judith A.; Damrosch, Shirley

    A sample of nurses (N=183) enrolled in a School of Nursing's master degree program was randomly assigned to read one of six vignettes about a patient who differed only in terms of diagnosis and lifestyle. Possible diagnoses were Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), AIDS acquired by a hemophiliac through blood therapy, and leukemia; possible…

  3. Nursing Matters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamson, Charles

    A two-semester English-for-Special-Purposes (ESP) course designed for nursing students at a Japanese university is described, including the origins and development of the course, text development, and teaching methods. The content-based course was designed to meet licensure requirements for English language training, emphasized listening and…

  4. Evidence for the Existing American Nurses Association-Recognized Standardized Nursing Terminologies: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Tastan, Sevinc; Linch, Graciele C. F.; Keenan, Gail M.; Stifter, Janet; McKinney, Dawn; Fahey, Linda; Dunn Lopez, Karen; Yao, Yingwei; Wilkie, Diana J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the state of the science for the five standardized nursing terminology sets in terms of level of evidence and study focus. Design Systematic Review. Data sources Keyword search of PubMed, CINAHL, and EMBASE databases from 1960s to March 19, 2012 revealed 1,257 publications. Review Methods From abstract review we removed duplicate articles, those not in English or with no identifiable standardized nursing terminology, and those with a low-level of evidence. From full text review of the remaining 312 articles, eight trained raters used a coding system to record standardized nursing terminology names, publication year, country, and study focus. Inter-rater reliability confirmed the level of evidence. We analyzed coded results. Results On average there were 4 studies per year between 1985 and 1995. The yearly number increased to 14 for the decade between 1996–2005, 21 between 2006–2010, and 25 in 2011. Investigators conducted the research in 27 countries. By evidence level for the 312 studies 72.4% were descriptive, 18.9% were observational, and 8.7% were intervention studies. Of the 312 reports, 72.1% focused on North American Nursing Diagnosis-International, Nursing Interventions Classification, Nursing Outcome Classification, or some combination of those three standardized nursing terminologies; 9.6% on Omaha System; 7.1% on International Classification for Nursing Practice; 1.6% on Clinical Care Classification/Home Health Care Classification; 1.6% on Perioperative Nursing Data Set; and 8.0% on two or more standardized nursing terminology sets. There were studies in all 10 foci categories including those focused on concept analysis/classification infrastructure (n = 43), the identification of the standardized nursing terminology concepts applicable to a health setting from registered nurses’ documentation (n = 54), mapping one terminology to another (n = 58), implementation of standardized nursing terminologies into electronic health

  5. What Is Nursing Informatics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGonigle, D.; And Others

    Information technology has developed to the point of providing a means to manage nursing and related health-care data effectively for nursing administrators, educators, practitioners, and researchers. Therefore, the newly recognized area of nursing informatics is important to the nursing profession as a whole. Nursing informatics is defined as the…

  6. Camp Nursing: Student Internships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwood, Catherine Hoe; Van Hofwegen, Lynn

    2002-01-01

    Camps can meet or supplement their health care delivery needs by using student nurses. Three models for student nurse internships, basic information about nursing education, and tips for negotiating student nurse internships are described. Sidebars present resources for camp health centers, nursing student competence characteristics, types of…

  7. Leaders from Nursing's History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fondiller, Shirley H.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Looks at the lives and accomplishments of four leaders in professional nursing: (1) Loretta Ford, who championed the cause of nurse practitioners; (2) Mable Staupers, a pioneer in community health and nursing; (3) Janet Geister, a leader in private nursing; and (4) Isabel Stewart, who led the movement to standardize nursing education. (JOW)

  8. Consensus-validation study identifies relevant nursing diagnoses, nursing interventions, and health outcomes for people with traumatic brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Lunney, Margaret; McGuire, Maria; Endozo, Nancy; McIntosh-Waddy, Dorothy

    2010-01-01

    A consensus-validation study used action research methods to identify relevant nursing diagnoses, nursing interventions, and patient outcomes for a population of adults with traumatic brain injury (TBI) in long-term care. In meetings totaling 159 hours to reach 100% consensus through group discussions, the three classifications of NANDA International's (NANDA-I's) approved nursing diagnoses, the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC), and the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC) were used as the basis for three nurses experienced in working with adults with TBI to select the elements of nursing care. Among almost 200 NANDA-I nursing diagnoses, 29 were identified as relevant for comprehensive nursing care of this population. Each nursing diagnosis was associated with 3-11 of the more than 500 NIC interventions and 1-13 of more than 300 NOC outcomes. The nurses became aware of the complexity and the need for critical thinking. The findings were used to refine the facility's nursing standards of care, which were to be combined with the interdisciplinary plan of care and included in future electronic health records. PMID:20681391

  9. Training nurses and nursing students about prevention, diagnoses, and treatment of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Zoorob, Roger J; Durkin, Kristy M; Gonzalez, Sandra J; Adams, Susie

    2014-08-01

    Alcohol consumption during pregnancy can result in birth defects known as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. This study examined whether 1-h training sessions on alcohol screening, brief intervention, diagnoses, and treatment of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders could increase practical knowledge and confidence in nurses and student nurses. Data were collected from 420 nurses (n = 95) and student nurses (n = 325) in the southeastern United States, from 2009 to 2011. Pre- and post-test data were analyzed using chi-square tests and t-tests. The post-training response rate was 84%. Nurses were more likely to know what constitutes binge drinking, facial abnormalities associated with fetal alcohol syndrome, and criteria for diagnosis. Nurses were also more confident in educating about effects of prenatal alcohol use, identifying fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and utilizing resources. Training materials may need to be improved and/or longer training programs developed for student nurses, and nursing school programs should place more emphasis on educating and preparing student nurses regarding this topic area. PMID:24393607

  10. Child Psychiatric Nursing Option.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koehler, Mary Frances

    1981-01-01

    Describes a course at the Indiana University School of Nursing which allows senior students in a baccalaureate nursing program to concentrate on emotionally disturbed children in an advanced nursing course. Discusses course philosophy, clinical experiences, and program results. (CT)

  11. International Transplant Nurses Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Register for the 25th Annual ITNS Symposium The International Transplant Nurses Society (ITNS) cordially invites transplant nurses ... Barriers (PDF) This pocket guide, developed by the International Transplant Nurses Society (ITNS), provides an overview of ...

  12. Developing nursing care plans.

    PubMed

    Ballantyne, Helen

    2016-02-24

    This article aims to enhance nurses' understanding of nursing care plans, reflecting on the past, present and future use of care planning. This involves consideration of the central theories of nursing and discussion of nursing models and the nursing process. An explanation is provided of how theories of nursing may be applied to care planning, in combination with clinical assessment tools, to ensure that care plans are context specific and patient centred. PMID:26907149

  13. Analysis of the Nursing Documentation in Use in Portugal - Building a Clinical Data Model of Nursing Centered on the Management of Treatment Regimen.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Inês; Bastos, Fernanda; Pereira, Filipe; Silva, Abel; Sousa, Paulino

    2016-01-01

    The use of technology to support information produced by nurses, especially information and communication technologies, is a current reality, but the proliferation of different statements of nursing diagnosis has made it more difficult for the production of indicators, hindering semantic interoperability of data. This study analyzed all statements of diagnosis focused on the management of medication regimen, customized to the Nursing Practice Support System (SAPE®) that was being used in Portugal in 2013. A total of 598 statements of nursing diagnoses about the phenomenon under study were analyzed, through an a priori analysis model - the ISO 18104 standard: 2003. The purpose was to identify terms used by nurses to describe the range of diagnoses, thus avoiding conceptual redundancy. After a content analysis process conducted by researchers and a broader group of experts, and when excluded all conceptual redundancy, 30 statements of nursing diagnosis were identified. PMID:27332232

  14. Nursing Assessment Tool for People With Liver Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Gimenes, Fernanda Raphael Escobar; Reis, Renata Karina; da Silva, Patrícia Costa Dos Santos; Silva, Ana Elisa Bauer de Camargo; Atila, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the process of developing a nursing assessment tool for hospitalized adult patients with liver cirrhosis. A descriptive study was carried out in three stages. First, we conducted a literature review to develop a data collection tool on the basis of the Conceptual Model of Wanda Horta. Second, the data collection tool was assessed through an expert panel. Third, we conducted the pilot testing in hospitalized patients. Most of the comments offered by the panel members were accepted to improve the tool. The final version was in the form of a questionnaire with open-closed questions. The panel members concluded that the tool was useful for accurate nursing diagnosis. Horta's Conceptual Model assisted with the development of this data collection tool to help nurses identify accurate nursing diagnosis in hospitalized patients with liver cirrhosis. We hope that the tool can be used by all nurses in clinical practice. PMID:26425862

  15. Nursing Assessment Tool for People With Liver Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Renata Karina; da Silva, Patrícia Costa dos Santos; Silva, Ana Elisa Bauer de Camargo; Atila, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the process of developing a nursing assessment tool for hospitalized adult patients with liver cirrhosis. A descriptive study was carried out in three stages. First, we conducted a literature review to develop a data collection tool on the basis of the Conceptual Model of Wanda Horta. Second, the data collection tool was assessed through an expert panel. Third, we conducted the pilot testing in hospitalized patients. Most of the comments offered by the panel members were accepted to improve the tool. The final version was in the form of a questionnaire with open-closed questions. The panel members concluded that the tool was useful for accurate nursing diagnosis. Horta's Conceptual Model assisted with the development of this data collection tool to help nurses identify accurate nursing diagnosis in hospitalized patients with liver cirrhosis. We hope that the tool can be used by all nurses in clinical practice. PMID:26425862

  16. What nurses want: the nurse incentives project.

    PubMed

    Wieck, K Lynn; Dols, Jean; Northam, Sally

    2009-01-01

    Today's nurse executives are struggling with leadership challenges of managing the multigenerational workforce, financial imperatives to deliver better care for lower costs, and competition to provide the optimal work environment to retain nurses. The purpose of the Nurse Incentives Project was to determine satisfaction with current employment incentives and potential managerial actions which might decrease or delay turnover by registered nurses. This study spawned recommendations regarding the role of incentives in designing an environment where benefits and perks will be seen as incentives to stay and thrive in the current nursing workplace. The results show that nurses know what they want. Attention to generational priorities and flexible benefits programs may help to create the cohesive work environment that nurses seek. Investment into creating delivery arenas where satisfied nurses are caring for satisfied patients is a worthwhile goal. PMID:19558077

  17. Nursing Jobs in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torpey, Elka Maria

    2011-01-01

    The need for practical nurses who focus on caring for older people is growing. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the number of people ages 65 and older is expected to increase from 40 million to 72 million between 2010 and 2030. And the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projects that this increasing population will result in job growth for…

  18. Emergency preparedness: school nurses leading the way.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Elizabeth A

    2013-07-01

    Nurses are trained to think in terms of the nursing process, which encompasses the five steps of assessment, diagnosis, outcomes/planning, implementation, and evaluation. Cities and towns have developed emergency plans based on the "all-hazards" approach. School district plans are also formulated based on the all-hazards approach of hazard mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery, which mirrors the nursing process. Individual school efforts focus on thesefourprinciples to facilitate development of a comprehensive plan for each school. Utilizing the principles of education, collaboration, resource utilization, leadership, and advocacy throughout the evolution of an updated and functional plan allows for an inclusive and adaptable plan. Like the nursing process, these steps are not separate and distinct, but a continuous process. PMID:23937000

  19. Nursing, knowledge and practice.

    PubMed

    Allen, D

    1997-07-01

    Recent commentators have suggested that academic knowledge is irrelevant to nursing practice and may actually undermine nursing's traditional caring ethos. Furthermore, by making nursing more academic, it is claimed that 'natural' but non-academic carers are prevented from pursuing a career in nursing. Debates about the relationship between nursing, knowledge and practice have a long history and have to be understood in terms of wider political and economic issues relating to nursing, its status within society and the changing role of nurses within the health services division of labour. One crucial issue is nursing's status as women's work. Critics of developments in nurse education draw an ideological equation between nursing work and the traditional female role. From this perspective the qualities that make a good nurse cannot be taught, rather they are founded on 'natural' feminine skills. Irrespective of whether caring is 'natural' or not, it is questionable as to whether, for today's nurses, being caring is sufficient. The shape of nursing jurisdiction is a long way removed from its origins in the Victorian middle-class household. In addition to their traditional caring role, contemporary nurses may also have complex clinical, management and research responsibilities, as well as being crucial coordinators of service provision. It is suggested that these and future developments in health services make the need for an educated nursing workforce even more pressing. In order to adequately prepare nurses for practice, however, it is vital that nurse education reflects the reality of service provision. PMID:10180381

  20. Licensed Practical Nurses' Sex Role Stereotypes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallston, Barbara Strudler; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Examined whether sex-role stereotypes would affect nurses' (N=32) attitudes toward simulations of male and female patients. Emotional style and patients' diagnosis were manipulated. Results showed significant sex-role differences and stereotypical attitudes. Male patients were rated more positively, and were more likely to possess traditional male…

  1. Parish nursing: an innovative community nursing service.

    PubMed

    Laming, Eleanor; Stewart, Angela

    2016-07-13

    This article explains the concept of parish nursing and provides a historical perspective of this service. It describes the development of a parish nursing service in Heartsease, Norwich, which complements community nursing practice by focusing on the importance of providing spiritual care alongside physical, psychological and social care. Case studies are provided to illustrate the benefits of a parish nursing service to individuals and the community. PMID:27406519

  2. The Nurse as a Moral Missionary.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    : Editor's note: From its first issue in 1900 through to the present day, AJN has unparalleled archives detailing nurses' work and lives over the last century. These articles not only chronicle nursing's growth as a profession within the context of the events of the day, but they also reveal prevailing societal attitudes about women, health care, and human rights. Today's nursing school curricula rarely include nursing's history, but it's a history worth knowing. To this end, From the AJN Archives will be a frequent column, containing articles selected to fit today's topics and times.This month's article, from the December 1912 issue, shares a nurse's struggles with the limitations of her role (and with the "morals" of the household) while caring for a seriously ill toddler. Her nursing assessment points to a diagnosis that is ultimately proven accurate, but her concerns are brushed off by the attending physician, delaying the child's treatment. As the story unfolds, it becomes clear that this nurse is grappling with "moral distress" of a kind still encountered in health care today. In this issue, Cynda Hylton Rushton and colleagues offer a new perspective on these dilemmas in "Moral Distress: A Catalyst in Building Moral Resilience." PMID:27336998

  3. Professional Transition: Nurse to Nurse-Midwife

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulligan, Joan E.

    1976-01-01

    The article focuses on one nurse's experience in the nurse-midwife program at a large New York medical center. Terming the learning process a painful transition from academe to reality, the author discusses skills learned, conflicts with physicians' belief systems, rewards and frustrations, and the need for nurse-midwife identity. (Author/MS)

  4. Nursing 302: An Introduction to Psychiatric Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaustein, Jenna Rose

    A description is provided of "Introduction to Psychiatric Nursing," a 7-week course offered to juniors and seniors in a bachelor of science nursing program. The first sections present information on curricular placement, time assignments, and the targeted student population, and define psychiatric/mental health nursing. Next, the course…

  5. Cardiovascular nursing in Israel.

    PubMed

    Blaer, Yosef; Rosenberg, Orit; Reisin, Leonardo

    2003-01-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) nursing as an entity in Israel dates back to 1952, when the nurses in Tel-Hashomer hospital took care of postoperative heart surgery patients. The first intensive cardiac care units (ICCUs) were established in 1971. In 1982, the first ICCU course was established in Tel-Hashomer hospital nursing school. Today, most of the nursing staff in Israels ICCUs are graduates of ICCU courses. The nurses professional society, the Society for Nursing of Israel, was established in 1947. In 1989 the Society for Advancement of Cardiac Nursing in Israel (SACN) was established. The main goals of the society were: the exchange of CV nursing knowledge, CV nursing research, CV nursing education in nursing schools, education of nurses in other departments in the care of the cardiac patient, and CV nursing education in the community. The CV nurse takes a large role in the total care of the cardiac patient, which includes rehabilitation within the hospital and in the ambulatory setting and coordination of nursing in national and international multicenter clinical trials. In collaboration with the Ministry of Health Nursing Division, Israeli CV nurses participate in national and international projects to: develop and upgrade nursing education; train new CV nurses; develop, review, and revise nursing protocols and guidelines; and establish new, more advanced ICCUs in underdeveloped areas within Israel and around the world. Our vision for the future development of CV nursing in Israel includes coordination and management roles in the hospital setting, and the establishment and management of home-care programs. PMID:12624572

  6. Nurses' Attitudes towards Alcoholics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speer, Rita D.

    Nurses' attitudes toward the alcoholic can have a profound impact on the person suffering from alcoholism. These attitudes can affect the alcoholic's care and even whether the alcoholic chooses to recover. This study investigated attitudes of approximately 68 nurses employed in hospitals, 49 nurses in treatment facilities, 58 nursing students, and…

  7. Nursing's Image on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolley, Alma S.

    1981-01-01

    In studying the nurse's image at a liberal arts college, it was found that faculty and administrators view nurses as long-suffering drones. On the whole, the image of nursing was positive, with those who had the most contact with the nursing program having a more enlightened image. (CT)

  8. Measuring Nursing Care Value.

    PubMed

    Welton, John M; Harper, Ellen M

    2016-01-01

    The value of nursing care as well as the contribution of individual nurses to clinical outcomes has been difficult to measure and evaluate. Existing health care financial models hide the contribution of nurses; therefore, the link between the cost and quality o nursing care is unknown. New data and methods are needed to articulate the added value of nurses to patient care. The final results and recommendations of an expert workgroup tasked with defining and measuring nursing care value, including a data model to allow extraction of key information from electronic health records to measure nursing care value, are described. A set of new analytic metrics are proposed. PMID:27055306

  9. User Expectations: Nurses' Perspective.

    PubMed

    Gürsel, Güney

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare is a technology-intensive industry. Although all healthcare staff needs qualified computer support, physicians and nurses need more. As nursing practice is an information intensive issue, understanding nurses' expectations from healthcare information systems (HCIS) is a must issue to meet their needs and help them in a better way. In this study perceived importance of nurses' expectations from HCIS is investigated, and two HCIS is evaluated for meeting the expectations of nurses by using fuzzy logic methodologies. PMID:27332398

  10. Professional Behavior in Nursing.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Karren

    2016-04-01

    Being clear about what constitutes professional behavior is a pathway to effective leadership. Not all nurses come out of educational programs with an understanding about what aspects of behavior signal true professionalism. This article uses the American Organization of Nurse Executives' Nurse Executive Competency for Processional Behavior to help professional development nurse faculty identify role modeling behavior and other aspects that new nurses can use to help them advance in their careers, while improving care to patients and families. PMID:27031029

  11. Nursing in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Steven L

    2006-10-01

    The current discussion on the nursing shortage needs to focus as much on nursing job satisfaction and retention as on nursing recruitment and education. Selected aspects of the motivational psychology of Abraham Maslow, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, and Frederick Hertzberg are here discussed in light of the challenges-opportunities of nursing in Turkey and elsewhere. Also discussed is an innovative program to support the application of nursing theory and professional development in Toronto, Canada. PMID:16982724

  12. Value of intensified nursing

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Wilhelm; Konta, Brigitte; Prusa, Nina; Raymann, Cornelia

    2006-01-01

    The concept "intensified nursing" is mentioned in differentiation to concepts of "nursing care" or "nursing" which intensifies resources or patient contact. Especially psychic and social needs of patients are very appreciated in nursing. A similar type of nursing is known under the concept "advanced nursing practice" (ANP) which means, that a specialised, academically trained nurse offers an extended nursing care in which a focus on the published knowledge of evidence based research is made. From the thin literature to this topic a selection of predetermined topics was analysed where at least two articles with a sufficient high methodical quality were available. The selected topic groups were: „Infant and paediatric nursing", "gerontology" and "oncology". Generally the five publications concerning infant and paediatric nursing could conclusive show a benefit of intensified nursing. Further research is still needed to prove intensified nursing care. Two publications could be found to the gerontological intensified nursing; both used an extended nursing model and an enlarged use of resources. Both studies demonstrated a measurable success in the applied parameters. Two studies also could be analysed in the oncological field in which successes were also provable by the applied parameters. The success was given especially in a higher patient satisfaction, one study showed an improved scheduling (time planning) of nurses. There was not one article concerning economic questions of intensified nursing care. It has to be taken into account that the financial resources have to be used effectively also in nursing nowadays. It has to be assumed that the costs are driven by increased use of resources. Savings can be achieved, however, in the form of avoided therapies and days in hospital by intensified nursing. The intensified nursing can be considered as similar cost-effective as conventional models of nursing. Ethically it is necessary to consider that the possibilities of

  13. Nursing Home Work Practices and Nursing Assistants' Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Christine E.; Squillace, Marie R.; Meagher, Jennifer; Anderson, Wayne L.; Wiener, Joshua M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the impact of nursing home work practices, specifically compensation and working conditions, on job satisfaction of nursing assistants employed in nursing homes. Design and Methods: Data are from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey, responses by the nursing assistants' employers to the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey,…

  14. Using Nursing Languages in School Nursing Practice. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denehy, Janice

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this updated manual is to define and describe standardized nursing languages, highlight how nursing languages are a part of the nursing process, and illustrate through case examples how nursing languages are used in school nursing practice. This manual also summarizes the history and development of three nursing classifications, the…

  15. [Use of computers as a tool for the implementation of the nursing process].

    PubMed

    Crossetti, Maria da Graça; Rodegheri, Marilea; d'Avila, Myrna Löwenhaupt; Dias, Vera Lúcia

    2002-01-01

    A group of nurses of the Hospital of Clinics of Porto Alegre-RS, aware that the Process of Nursing is a theoretical model that it provides a logical structure and it bases the nursing actions, developed and it implanted a tool to facilitate the implementation of the stages of the nursing Process. This tool is part of a corporate system of attendance to the patient, it's have as focus the Diagnoses and Interventions of Nursing. The model is based on tables with the following contents, basic human needs, signs and symptoms, to cause, diagnoses and nursing interventions. The professionals' access feels through profiles and passwords. The system presents a positive acting as for the aspect activation in the determination of the diagnosis and prescription of the nursing interventions allowing the nurse to be close to the patient. PMID:12836448

  16. Nursing informatics competences still challenging nurse educators.

    PubMed

    Rajalahti, Elina; Saranto, Kaija

    2012-01-01

    In recent years nursing documentation has been one of the most important development areas of nursing informatics (NI) in Finland. The purpose of this study is to describe the development of the nurse educators' competences in nursing documentation during a project called eNNI. The eNNI project (2008-2010) was a cooperative project by nurse educators and working life experts. The goal of the project was to implement the national documentation model and thereby improve operational processes at workplaces. The study includes pre- and post-test questioning of NI applications with a web-based questionnaire (n=136). The data were analyzed with distribution, cross-tabulations and average tests and descriptive statistic multivariate method. According to the results, the ICT skills of the nurse educators were good at the end of the project, and they had good information literacy competence. On the other hand, their advanced NI skills left room for improvement. PMID:22874332

  17. [Implementation of the nursing process in a radiotherapy unit: development of a medical record].

    PubMed

    Vaz, Ana Francisca; Macedo, Denise Diniz; Montagnoli, Edina Tavares de Lima; Lopes, Maria Helena; Grion, Regina Célia

    2002-01-01

    The goal of our service is to systematize the nursing care provided to the clients with gynecological and mammary cancer who underwent radiation therapy, using the nursing process, the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA) taxonomy and collaborative problems in the diagnoses phase. Therefore, we created a record card in which we briefly reported the relevant data to nursing care, containing: anamnesis, general explanations about treatment, main collaborative problems, nursing diagnoses, interventions, outcomes and evolution. This card was tested in service and evaluated by the group that had created it regarding content and design, enabling the elaboration of its last version that is presented in the article. PMID:12817384

  18. [Nurses' uniforms as seen by patients, nurses and nursing faculty].

    PubMed

    da Silva, M J; Stefanelli, M C; Monetta, L; de Araujo, T L

    1995-04-01

    The exact role of the way people dress up on the nonverbal communication is still unknown. Nevertheless, we know that it influences the interpersonal answers and, in some situations, they are the main determinants of those answers. The objective of this study was to determinate differences between the perception os the nurse uniform through the answers of 100 patients, 30 nurses and 15 nursing school faculty. The data were collected by showing nine photographs of hospitals of the city of São Paulo (Brazil). White trousers and blouse was the favorite one among patients, nurses and nursing school faculty regarding personal care. White skirt above knees, white blouse and blazer was the most rejected one by three groups. PMID:8715721

  19. Call to Action for Nurses/Nursing

    PubMed Central

    Premji, Shahirose S.; Hatfield, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The 13 million nurses worldwide constitute most of the global healthcare workforce and are uniquely positioned to engage with others to address disparities in healthcare to achieve the goal of better health for all. A new vision for nurses involves active participation and collaboration with international colleagues across research practice and policy domains. Nursing can embrace new concepts and a new approach—“One World, One Health”—to animate nursing engagement in global health, as it is uniquely positioned to participate in novel ways to improve healthcare for the well-being of the global community. This opinion paper takes a historical and reflective approach to inform and inspire nurses to engage in global health practice, research, and policy to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. It can be argued that a colonial perspective currently informs scholarship pertaining to nursing global health engagement. The notion of unidirectional relationships where those with resources support training of those less fortunate has dominated the framing of nursing involvement in low- and middle-income countries. This paper suggests moving beyond this conceptualization to a more collaborative and equitable approach that positions nurses as cocreators and brokers of knowledge. We propose two concepts, reverse innovation and two-way learning, to guide global partnerships where nurses are active participants. PMID:27144160

  20. Call to Action for Nurses/Nursing.

    PubMed

    Premji, Shahirose S; Hatfield, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The 13 million nurses worldwide constitute most of the global healthcare workforce and are uniquely positioned to engage with others to address disparities in healthcare to achieve the goal of better health for all. A new vision for nurses involves active participation and collaboration with international colleagues across research practice and policy domains. Nursing can embrace new concepts and a new approach-"One World, One Health"-to animate nursing engagement in global health, as it is uniquely positioned to participate in novel ways to improve healthcare for the well-being of the global community. This opinion paper takes a historical and reflective approach to inform and inspire nurses to engage in global health practice, research, and policy to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. It can be argued that a colonial perspective currently informs scholarship pertaining to nursing global health engagement. The notion of unidirectional relationships where those with resources support training of those less fortunate has dominated the framing of nursing involvement in low- and middle-income countries. This paper suggests moving beyond this conceptualization to a more collaborative and equitable approach that positions nurses as cocreators and brokers of knowledge. We propose two concepts, reverse innovation and two-way learning, to guide global partnerships where nurses are active participants. PMID:27144160

  1. [Aging nurses. Reorganizing work to retain nurses].

    PubMed

    Curchod, Claude

    2012-03-01

    The nurse population is growing old in most occidental countries. Facing the physical and psychological loud of their job, many nurses aspire to get retired before the legal age. Such a process is likely to increase the present nursing shortage and so to endanger the care access for a part of the population. Different concepts such the Work ability or the Age management have been developed to allow a better response the professionals' needs. Their offer models and tools to redesign the work organization in a way so that nurses would be able to stay at work in good conditions. These approaches require nevertheless a real political and organizational willingness. PMID:22616361

  2. The nurse match instrument: Exploring professional nursing identity and professional nursing values for future nurse recruitment.

    PubMed

    Mazhindu, Deborah M; Griffiths, Lauren; Pook, Carol; Erskine, Allen; Ellis, Roger; Smith, Fleur

    2016-05-01

    From April 1st 2015 it will be mandatory for Higher Education Institutions (HEI) in the United Kingdom (UK) providing pre-qualifying health care higher education to use a Values Based Recruitment (VBR) tool, to ensure only the candidates with the "right" personal identity and values commensurate with the Professional Identity of Nursing (PIN) are accepted for nurse education. "Nurse Match" instrument was developed to enhance the recruitment and selection of candidates for pre-qualifying nursing. Action Research into PIN commenced with voluntary, purposive, convenience samples of qualified nurses (n = 30), Service Users (N = 10), postgraduate diploma nurses in mental health (N = 25), third year mental health branch students (N = 20) and adult and child student nurses in years 2 and 3 (N = 20) in Focus Groups. Data collection and analysis occurred concomitantly between July 2013 and October 2014, aided by NVivo 10 software and revealed Key Quality Indicators (KQIs) of the social construction of PIN. Construct development included a literature review spanning the last fifteen years, which identified four main themes; 1. Nursing's ethics and values. 2. Nursing's professional identity and caring. 3. Nursing's emotional intelligence. 4. Nursing's professionalism. Nurse Match offers an evidence-based enhancement to VBR, for future nurse recruitment locally, nationally and internationally. PMID:27235564

  3. Syphilis: clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Peate, Ian

    Syphilis is a sexually transmitted infection that is increasing in the U.K. If left untreated it can have a number of potentially devastating health-related sequelae. However, effective treatment is available. Nurses working in various healthcare settings should be aware of the signs and symptoms of the infection to make a prompt diagnosis and appropriate referral for treatment. PMID:18069500

  4. The relationship between nursing theory and nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Miller, A

    1985-09-01

    During the past two decades, redefinition of many of the beliefs and assumptions which underly nursing appears to have contributed to an increasing divergence between nursing theory and nursing practice. Nurses who are theorists and educationalists, and nurses who are engaged in nursing practice tend to use different vocabularies, to have differing perceptions of patients and of nursing, and to value different kinds of nursing knowledge. Some of the divergences between nursing theory and nursing practice are considered, and suggestions made about how theory and practice might be reconciled. PMID:3850907

  5. Nursing's Preferred Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydelotte, Myrtle K.

    1987-01-01

    The author discusses future trends for society and relates them to future roles and characteristics of nursing. She presents strategies that nursing professionals should use to be prepared for the stated trends. (CH)

  6. Alternatives to Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... this website may not be available. Alternatives to nursing homes Before you make any decisions about long ... live and what help you may need. A nursing home may not be your only choice. Discharge ...

  7. Psoriasis: Pregnancy and Nursing

    MedlinePlus

    ... to find out more! Email * Zipcode Pregnancy and Nursing In general, psoriasis does not affect the male ... psoriasis and birth » Treating psoriasis while pregnant or nursing There is little research on the impact of ...

  8. Pediatric Endocrinology Nurses Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... International Welcome to PENS The Pediatric Endocrinology Nursing Society (PENS) is committed to the development and advancement ... PENS@kellencompany.com • Copyright © 2016 Pediatric Endocrinology Nursing Society • ALL RIGHTS RESERVED • Privacy Policy • Admin

  9. Certified nurse-midwife

    MedlinePlus

    ... laws. As with other advanced practice nurses, license requirements for CNMs can vary from state to state. ... national organization and all states have the same requirements for professional practice standards. Only graduates of nurse- ...

  10. National Nursing Home Survey

    Cancer.gov

    The National Nursing Home Survey provides includes characteristics such as size of nursing home facilities, ownership, Medicare/Medicaid certification, occupancy rate, number of days of care provided, and expenses.

  11. Falls in Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... for health care providers. Learn More Falls in Nursing Homes Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ... 5 Why do falls occur more often in nursing homes? Falling can be a sign of other ...

  12. Nursing around the world.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Gemma; Boulton, Jacqueline; Long, Adele; Norris, Lucy

    2016-05-12

    In this section, nurses who have worked in countries such as Tanzania, Sierra Leone and Nepal share their experiences and photos of nursing in environments vastly different to those they are used to. PMID:27172494

  13. Gaps in nurse staffng and nursing home resident needs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning Jackie; Unruh, Lynn; Wan, Thomas T H

    2013-01-01

    Trends in nurse staffing levels in nursing homes from 1997 to 2011 varied across the category of nurse and the type of nursing home. The gaps found in this study are important to consider because nurses may become overworked and this may negatively affect the quality of services and jeopardize resident safety. Nursing home administrators should consider improving staffing strategically. Staffing should be based not only on the number of resident days, but also allocated according to particular resident needs. As the demand for nursing home care grows, bridging the gap between nurse staffing and resident nursing care needs will be especially important in light of the evidence linking nurse staffing to the quality of nursing home care. Until more efficient nursing care delivery exits, there may be no other way to safeguard quality except to increase nurse staffing in nursing homes. PMID:24592533

  14. Selected Publications of the Division of Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Health Service (DHEW), Arlington, VA. Div. of Nursing.

    Publications are organized under the following topics: (1) Division of Nursing Program, (2) Nurse Training Act of 1964, (3) Nursing (general interest), (4) Nursing Manpower, (5) Nursing Services in Hospitals, (6) Public Health Nursing, (7) Nursing Education, (8) Nursing Research and Research Training, and (9) Nurse Training Manuals. Single copies…

  15. Nursing informatics: the future now.

    PubMed

    Mamta

    2014-01-01

    Technological advancements in the health care field have always impacted the health care practices. Nursing practice has also been greatly influenced by the technology. In the recent years, use of information technology including computers, handheld digital devices, internet has advanced the nursing by bridging the gap from nursing as an art to nursing as science. In every sphere of nursing practice, nursing research, nursing education and nursing informatics play a very important role. If used properly it is a way to save time, helping to provide quality nursing care and increases the proficiency of nursing personnel. PMID:25924417

  16. Challenging a reductionistic paradigm as a foundation for nursing.

    PubMed

    Drew, N; Dahlberg, K

    1995-12-01

    Historically, nursing practice has been grounded in the objective, analytic philosophy of the natural sciences. Over the past decades, caring--a humanistic concept--has been espoused as the essence of nursing. Paradoxically, practice based on the theme of caring remains aligned with the philosophy of the natural sciences and continues to use tools such as nursing process and nursing diagnosis, products of the natural sciences paradigm. The authors have outlined the foundation for a philosophy of caring. The encounter between caregiver and patient is the central aspect of this philosophy and is elaborated with the related concepts of openness, nonreductionism, immediacy, and meaning. In addition, holistic nursing practice requires attention by caregivers to their own self-awareness and the personal growth that is necessary for the demands of encountering patients. Practice based on such a philosophy maintains the primacy of the caregiver-patient relationship and permits the incorporation of analytic tools without depersonalizing effects. PMID:8698978

  17. Understanding HIV-related stigma among Indonesian nurses.

    PubMed

    Waluyo, Agung; Culbert, Gabriel J; Levy, Judith; Norr, Kathleen F

    2015-01-01

    Evidence indicates widespread stigmatization of persons living with HIV (PLWH) in Indonesia. Such attitudes among health care workers could impede the country's policies for effective diagnosis and medical treatment of PLWH. Nonetheless, research to guide interventions to reduce stigma in health care settings is lacking. Also, the contributions of workplace, religion, and HIV knowledge to nurses' HIV-related stigma are poorly understood. Our cross-sectional study aimed to describe factors associated with nurses' stigmatizing attitudes toward PLWH. Four hundred nurses recruited from four hospitals in Jakarta, Indonesia, were surveyed using the Nurse AIDS Attitude Scale to measure stigma. Stigmatizing attitudes were significantly predicted by education, HIV training, perceived workplace stigma, religiosity, Islamic religious identification, and affiliation with the Islamic hospital. HIV knowledge was not a significant predictor of stigmatizing attitudes. Organization changes fostering workplace diversity are likely to substantially reduce stigmatizing attitudes in nurses. PMID:24759060

  18. [Catalogues of therapeutic nursing activities in neurological early rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Lautenschläger, S; Wallesch, C W

    2015-02-01

    Under the German DRG-system, hospital-based rehabilitation of still critically ill patients becomes increasingly important. The code for early neurological rehabilitation in the DRG-system's (Diagnosis Related Groups) list of operations and procedures requires an average daily therapeutic intensity of 300 min, part of which is being contributed by therapeutic nursing. As therapeutic aspects are integrated in other nursing activities, it is difficult to separate its time consumption. This problem is pragmatically resolved by catalogues of therapeutic nursing activities which assign plausible amounts of therapeutic minutes to each activity. The 4 catalogues that are used most often are described and compared. Nursing science has not focused yet on therapeutic nursing. PMID:25317957

  19. Nursing Research: Position Statement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copp, Laurel; And Others

    The role of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) in encouraging research through the programs and activities of the member schools is discussed. It is suggested that the dean or administrative head of a college of nursing is in a position to influence nursing research activities. The principal role of the academic dean in…

  20. Nursing Role Transition Preceptorship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batory, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    The preceptorship clinical experience in a practical nursing (PN) program at a Midwestern community college is considered crucial to the PN students' transition from novice nurse to professional nurse. However, no research has been available to determine whether the preceptorship clinical accomplishes its purpose. A case study was conducted to…

  1. Nursing in Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulcher, Roxanne

    2007-01-01

    Both the nation's health-care and nursing education systems are in crisis. While the care provided by registered nurses (RNs) is essential to patients' recovery from acute illness and to the effective management of their chronic conditions, the United States is experiencing a nursing shortage that is anticipated to increase as baby boomers age and…

  2. Research Issues: Nursing & Professionalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfeld, Peri

    Nursing has always been viewed as a "women's profession" as evidenced by the fact that 97 percent of the 1.9 million registered nurses in the United States are female. The values of helping others, altruism, compassion, and sacrifice are associated with women and with nursing. However, because many young people today do not view these values as…

  3. Marginalization and School Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Julia Ann

    2004-01-01

    The concept of marginalization was first analyzed by nursing researchers Hall, Stevens, and Meleis. Although nursing literature frequently refers to this concept when addressing "at risk" groups such as the homeless, gays and lesbians, and those infected with HIV/AIDS, the concept can also be applied to nursing. Analysis of current school nursing…

  4. Nurse-led discharge.

    PubMed

    Page, Carole

    2010-12-01

    Delayed discharges have financial implications for hospital trusts and cause dissatisfaction for patients and their families. This article looks at nurse-led discharge pathways at Milton Keynes Hospital's ambulatory care unit. It explains how giving nurses the responsibility to discharge has improved the patient experience, made nurses more accountable and saved money for the trust. PMID:21229868

  5. Participation in the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP) programme.

    PubMed

    Bartz, Claudia; Coenen, Amy; Hong, Woi-Hyun

    2006-01-01

    The International Council of Nurses (ICN) is a federation of 129 national nurses associations. The International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP) is a programme of the ICN. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and maintenance processes of the ICNP Programme that are used to increase participation. These include processes by which the ICNP was and continues to be developed, tested, distributed and implemented worldwide, with emphasis on the current version, ICNP Version 1.0. The ICNP is a unified nursing language that facilitates cross-mapping among local terms and existing terminologies. ICNP conforms to current terminology standards and criteria, for example, ISO standards and HL7. The ICNP Alpha and Beta Versions documented the progress of concept validation and classification of nursing phenomena and interventions. The ICNP Beta 2 Version was a combinatorial terminology organized in two multi-axial structures representing nursing phenomena and nursing actions. The ICNP Version 1.0, launched in 2005, changed the relatively straight-forward multi-axial structure into a compositional terminology through the application of description logics using Web Ontology Language (OWL) within Protégé, an ontology development environment. ICNP Version 1.0 is also represented in a multiaxial model (7-Axis) for nurses to compose nursing diagnosis, intervention and outcome statements. Language translations and clinical information systems applications are required to make the ICNP Version 1.0 available to nurses at the point of healthcare delivery. ICNP data collected in healthcare environments provide standardized terminology for nursing that allows comparison of nursing practice across health care settings, specialties and countries; facilitate data-based clinical and management decision making; and contribute to the development of guidelines and standards for best practices and optimal outcomes for patients, families and communities. PMID

  6. Nursing 436A: Pediatric Oncology for Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackman, Cynthia L.

    A description is provided of "Pediatric Oncology for Nurses," the first in a series of three courses offered to fourth-year nursing students in pediatric oncology. The first section provides a course overview, discusses time assignments, and describes the target student population. Next, a glossary of terms, and lists of course goals, long-range…

  7. Patient Education for Nurses: Nursing 200A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Maureen

    A description is provided of "Patient Education for Nurses," a required course for second-year nursing students which focuses on the assessment of the learning needs of adults, and the planning and and implemention of formal patient education. First, general information on the significance of the course and its place in the School of Nursing…

  8. Professionalism in Nursing Behaviors of Nurse Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Donna; Miller, Barbara K.

    2001-01-01

    A survey of 502 nurse practitioners found that more than half had written research proposals or participated in research projects recently; nearly 50% wrote their own job descriptions; 93% belonged to the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners; and maintaining certification was the motivation for some professional behaviors. (Contains 29…

  9. Nursing rituals: doing ethnography.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Z R

    1993-08-01

    Types of nursing rituals identified in this study include therapeutic and occupational rituals. Therapeutic rituals (Douglas, 1963, 1966, 1975; Turner, 1957, 1967, 1969) are identified as symbolic healing actions that improve the condition of patients. Occupational rituals or rituals of socialization include symbolic actions that facilitate the transition of professional neophytes into their professional role (Bosk, 1980; Fox, 1979; Zerubavel, 1979). Nursing rituals fulfill an important although not highly visible function in a nursing unit of a modern American hospital. They enable nurses to carry out caring activities for patients who are acutely or chronically ill, old, and dying. Rituals help to reaffirm values and beliefs of nurses. Explication of the implicit meanings of nursing rituals illuminates nursing for nurses and others who seek to understand nursing services. Descriptive analyses of nursing rituals direct attention to the hidden work of the hospital staff nurse, work sometimes taken for granted by professionals and the public who fail to see the many difficult, intimate, and risky aspects of nursing work and how certain ritual behavior promotes its accomplishment. Other studies on nursing ritual are needed to expand the theory of nursing ritual in this descriptive analysis, and to move it from descriptive to explanatory theory. For example, the transmission of the beliefs, rules of conduct, and customs that take place during change-of-shift report has not been extensively investigated. Neither have the more practical aspects of shift report been studied, including the types of information exchanged or the influence of shift report on planning and priority setting for the nurses who work during the ensuing shift. Also, few empirical studies examine the effects of bathing on patient outcomes, such as skin integrity, cardiac function, and comfort levels, and patient bathing preferences. This is surprising, because the bath is such an essential ritual

  10. The bone care nurse project.

    PubMed

    Casentini, Cristiana; Chiaramonti, Giuseppe; Amedei, Antonietta; Cioppi, Federica; Falchetti, Alberto; Masi, Laura; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2011-01-01

    In today's society, citizens are called to play an increasingly active role in decision planning related to the various aspects of work, social and political life. This trend has been also confirmed in the health's field. In fact, the citizen is also required to have the skills to take responsibility for his/her own health, to have knowledge of the health care system, understand the advice and instructions of health professionals, actively participating with them in the therapeutical path. The lack or an inadequate level of these skills will affect both the health of the individual and the costs related to the National Health System. The nursing staff that interfaces between physicians and patients plays a key role in health's promotion as an important determinant of health and welfare of the patient-citizen. With regard to osteoporosis, due to better knowledge of its determining causes, it is now possible an easy access to diagnosis and treatment options before fragility fractures occur, providing a real prevention to such complications. Prevention must be addressed to two different, but related, objectives: 1) prevention of osteoporosis; and 2) prevention of fragility fractures in patients with osteoporosis. In the context of both primary and secondary prevention, the nurse can better informed the patients and/or citizens about either the risks related to an inappropriate behavior or situations and events particularly dangerous to health, as well as provide information to simply and effectively implement protective measures. This project aims to raise awareness and create competent and specialized nurse figures, with a good understanding of the bone diseases, through the organization of seminars and training courses. Thus, it will be create clinical pathways and welfare in which the figure of the "Bone Care Nurse" will be responsible for administration of questionnaires relating to lifestyle and, for patients in drug treatment, questionnaires designed to assess

  11. Transfer-of-Care Communication: Nursing Best Practices.

    PubMed

    Chard, Robin; Makary, Martin A

    2015-10-01

    The successful and safe transfer of the patient from one phase of care to another is contingent on optimal communication by all team members. Nurses are often in a natural leadership position to improve safe practices during hand overs. A holistic understanding of the patient allows the perioperative nurse the opportunity to identify issues and choose a nursing diagnosis based on key elements of a patient's needs and goals--information that should be relayed during patient transfers. This article reviews best practices in transfer-of-care communication to enable perioperative RNs to take an active, leading role in hand-over processes. PMID:26411818

  12. Standards for nursing.

    PubMed

    Kamel, E; Elliott, E; Zaki, H

    1994-01-01

    In 1990, funded by a grant from the United States Agency for International Development, Project HOPE/Egypt began a three-year scheme for the development of professional nursing. The board consists of national medical and nursing leaders in the institutes of higher education, faculties of medicine, the nursing association, and ministries of health. A subcommittee works on the development of standards for nursing education, practice, and research, and produced a definition of nursing which conforms with Egyptian social values and the national strategy for health. Standards established by the American Nurses' Association and the International Council of Nurses provided guidance on format, structure, and modes of expression. It was decided that the development of the criteria would take place subsequently. There are sets of standards for nurses, clinical practice, research, and education accompanied by an explanatory statement. Professional development, collaboration and ethics are particularly important for nurses. They are expected to function with a degree of independence and to adopt leadership roles within interdisciplinary health teams. The standards for education are the most comprehensive in order to upgrade the nursing profession. The standards for nursing research remain the least comprehensive. In Egypt, research is still largely concerned with student nurses, while little attention is given to clinical practice. The standards for clinical practice were devised for a role that is not yet universal in Egypt. The English-language version of the standards was completed in July 1991. An Arabic translation was accepted by Project HOPE/Egypt to be distributed to the ministries concerned, directors of nursing in hospitals, higher institutes of nursing, and nursing schools. Feedback was gathered during 1992 and the subcommittee undertook a review in 1993 to refine the standards and develop criteria. This process is expected to be completed later in 1994. PMID

  13. From diagnosis to social diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Phil; Lyson, Mercedes; Jenkins, Tania

    2011-09-01

    In the past two decades, research on the sociology of diagnosis has attained considerable influence within medical sociology. Analyzing the process and factors that contribute to making a diagnosis amidst uncertainty and contestation, as well as the diagnostic encounter itself, are topics rich for sociological investigation. This paper provides a reformulation of the sociology of diagnosis by proposing the concept of 'social diagnosis' which helps us recognize the interplay between larger social structures and individual or community illness manifestations. By outlining a conceptual frame, exploring how social scientists, medical professionals and laypeople contribute to social diagnosis, and providing a case study of how the North American Mohawk Akwesasne reservation dealt with rising obesity prevalence to further illustrate the social diagnosis idea, we embark on developing a cohesive and updated framework for a sociology of diagnosis. This approach is useful not just for sociological research, but has direct implications for the fields of medicine and public health. Approaching diagnosis from this integrated perspective potentially provides a broader context for practitioners and researchers to understand extra-medical factors, which in turn has consequences for patient care and health outcomes. PMID:21705128

  14. [Nurse/midwife responsibility].

    PubMed

    Lagneaux, M-C

    2008-11-01

    Blood transfusion is a medical act which a nurse or midwife can do with a medical consent and only if a doctor can intercede when he is called. The following presentation reminds us of the nurse's and midwife's responsability when doing a blood transfusion. All the guidelines are laid down in the Public Health Code for nurses and midwifes as well as in the circular of the 15 December 2003. The nurse or midwife doing the transfusion must at all times respect the security guidelines, doing so along with close collaboration between nurse, midwife and doctor enables all transfusions to be conducted safely. PMID:18951056

  15. Enrolled nurse medication administration.

    PubMed

    Kimberley, Anne; Myers, Helen; Davis, Sue; Keogh, Penny; Twigg, Di

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes an initiative undertaken at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital in Perth, Western Australia to enhance the professional development of enrolled nurses to allow them to administer medications without the direct supervision of a registered nurse. This practice change proved to be a positive step for the hospital and for enrolled nurses. Benefits for patients were identified as greater continuity of care and increased timeliness of medication admiuistrqtion. The benefits for enrolled nurses were increased job satisfaction, improved morale and self esteem while the main benefit for registered nurses was decreased stres and workload. PMID:17929736

  16. Developing a virtual nurses' station for community-based nurses.

    PubMed

    Kiel, Joan M; Resick, Lenore K

    2013-01-01

    Nurses who work throughout the community need a nurses' station, just as nurses who work in a hospital. The nurses' station is the area where communication, information sharing, and documentation occur. This article describes how a virtual nurses' station was created using Blackboard technology to meet the needs of nurses who are scattered throughout a geographic area. These nurses work in several urban neighborhoods to conduct the outreach services offered through an academic nurse-managed wellness center to community-dwelling older adults. Results have been positive as the virtual nurses' station provides the nurses an area to exchange data and information, print patient health care information, and access nursing policies. Satisfaction surveys from the nurses give valuable input on the design and use of the virtual nurses' station. PMID:23384066

  17. Power for nursing education.

    PubMed

    Glen, S

    1990-11-01

    The topic of power and politics is a recurrent theme in the nursing literature, but not, I wish to suggest, in the nursing educational literature. This paper introduces the topic of power as a nursing educational issue. It is divided into three sections: (a) what a concept of power might mean for nursing education; (b) the nature and form of power relationships within nursing education; and (c) the nature, form and efficacy of the current professional strategies to gain power. First, two definitions of power for nursing education are explored: (a) the power inherent in organizational structures; and (b) the notion of practising nursing education as an empowering profession. Next, a theoretical framework is applied to specific examples of power relationships within nursing education. Two views of power and their inter-relationship with decision-making in curriculum matters are described: 'overt conflict' and 'control of the institution's agenda'. It is argued that these still fail to pick up important instances of the strategies to gain power. Finally, examples of strategies used to gain power in colleges of nursing are made explicit. Concurrently, questions are raised in relation to their efficacy and alternative strategies more congruent with the role of professional educator are advocated. It is argued that nursing education's most lasting form of power will rest in the development of pedagogical knowledge expertise and a research basis: in essence, the development of an academic identity in nursing education. PMID:2269757

  18. Nursing and Biobanking.

    PubMed

    Sanner, Jennifer; Yu, Erica; Nomie, Krystle

    2015-01-01

    Nurses are a pivotal component of the translational research movement and apply scientific discoveries to the healthcare and clinical practice fields. Biobanking is also an important factor in furthering translational research by providing biospecimens and related clinical data to the research community. The effectiveness of any biobanking effort necessitates the enrollment of large numbers of diverse participants, which signifies a need for the nursing profession to secure the knowledge necessary to impact biobanking practices and to promote participant advocacy. In addition, biobanks provide the volume, variety, veracity, and velocity of data that can address the challenges of nursing research. Nurse scientists, research nurse coordinators and clinical research and practice nurses must be informed about the various benefits and risks associated with biobanking in addition to ethical issues surrounding informed consent, participant privacy, and the release of research results. Ultimately, nurses need to possess competencies to facilitate biobanking practices both at the research bench and at the point of care. PMID:26420620

  19. Value, a nursing outcome.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Sharon H

    2013-01-01

    This era of health care reform calls for the ability of hospitals to provide quality patient care while managing costs. Nursing practice is a key determinant of patient care quality and associated costs, or simply put, creating value. The value of nursing has been addressed by multiple qualified authors, yet there is no clear, consistent meaning of the term. Researchers and authors have developed some theoretical foundation for the concept of value, which evolved into important research questions that establish value as an important outcome that is sensitive to nursing practice. The opportunity to attend 2 sessions at the Harvard Business School on health care value has prompted the need for nursing to adapt to common thinking on health care value and establish its meaning for the nursing profession. This report summarizes the nursing literature on value, reflects on the executive education, and proposes direction for nursing leaders in education and practice. PMID:23454991

  20. Workplace bullying in nursing.

    PubMed

    Ovayolu, Ozlem; Ovayolu, Nimet; Karadag, Gulendam

    2014-09-01

    This research was designed to determine whether nurses are bullied by other staff members and the effects of such behaviors on the nurse victims. This study reports on nurses' interpersonal workplace relationships in a culturally unique environment. The study was conducted with 260 nurses working in three public hospitals. Data were collected using a questionnaire. The majority of nurses were female with bachelor's degrees and reported being assigned duties outside their usual responsibilities, held responsible for coworkers' mistakes, and criticized for job performance although they thought they had done their work properly. Most of the nurses who were bullied experienced health and sleep problems,did not want to go to work, and had communication problems with other staff members. Nearly all of the study nurses received psychological support to solve their problems and believed that the best way to prevent bullying was education. PMID:25102477

  1. Nursing career fulfillment: statistics and statements from registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Reineck, Carol; Furino, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    A state-level survey of registered nurses confirmed national findings and raised new issues. Findings revealed that while nurses love the intrinsic reward of nursing, they report workplace, relationship, and stress issues which contribute to frustration and exhaustion. These issues may prevent registered nurses from giving the nursing care they desire to deliver, hastening preventable retirement and costly turnover decisions. PMID:15768781

  2. Development of a Nursing Data Set for School Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahrenkrug, Mary Ann

    2003-01-01

    School nurses need to clearly identify how they promote the health and educational achievement of children. School nurses contribute to student health by providing health assessment and nursing interventions, advocating for healthy living, and contributing to prevention of illness and disease management. A Nursing Data Set for School Nursing can…

  3. Computer Literacy Needs of Nurse Educators and Nurse Managers

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Jean M.; Bauer, Carol A.

    1985-01-01

    A questionnaire was used to survey the computer literacy needs of 445 nurse educators and nurse managers within a northeastern metropolitan area. There are commonalities and differences between nurse educators and nurse managers regarding advanced computer applications; but both groups expressed an urgent need for continuing nursing education courses at the advanced level.

  4. Nurses' perceptions of nurse residency: identifying barriers to implementation.

    PubMed

    Wierzbinski-Cross, Heather; Ward, Kristin; Baumann, Paula

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to describe the benefits and components of successful nurse residency programs, as well as gain insight into the perceptions of staff nurses, nurse educators, and nurse leaders regarding value, feasibility, and barriers to implementing nurse residency programs in acute care settings. This study has important implications for implementing an effective residency program. PMID:25608092

  5. Nursing care and nursing products: revenue or expenses?

    PubMed

    Stanton, L J

    1986-09-01

    Top level nursing administrators must clearly conceptualize professional nursing activities in a corporate context. The accounting and marketing practices utilized in established corporate entities provide a model for interpreting nursing activities. Definition of product and determination of nursing as revenue or expense centers are explored with an established non-nursing corporation as a source for comparison. PMID:3638338

  6. Use of the Internet by Patients: Not a Threat to Nursing, but an Opportunity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmons, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Patients' use of Internet health information raises concerns about reliability, access to information meant for clinicians, and self-diagnosis and treatment. Nurses should become informed and undertake patient education about consumer health informatics. (Contains 25 references.) (SK)

  7. Capability of Using Clinical Care Classification System to Represent Nursing Practice in Acute Setting in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Rung-Chuang; Tseng, Kuan-Jui; Yan, Hsiu-Fang; Huang, Hsiu-Ya; Chang, Polun

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the capability of the Clinical Care Classification (CCC) system to represent nursing record data in a medical center in Taiwan. Nursing care records were analyzed using the process of knowledge discovery in data sets. The study data set included all the nursing care plan records from December 1998 to October 2008, totaling 2,060,214 care plan documentation entries. Results show that 75.42% of the documented diagnosis terms could be mapped using the CCC system. A total of 21 established nursing diagnoses were recommended to be added into the CCC system. Results show that one-third of the assessment and care tasks were provided by nursing professionals. This study shows that the CCC system is useful for identifying patterns in nursing practices and can be used to construct a nursing database in the acute setting. PMID:24199066

  8. Academic Incivility in Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marlow, Sherri

    2013-01-01

    A well-documented and growing problem impacting the nursing shortage in the United States is the increasing shortage of qualified nursing faculty. Many factors contribute to the nursing faculty shortage such as retirement, dissatisfaction with the nursing faculty role and low salary compensation (American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN),…

  9. Nurse Reinvestment Act. Public Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    This document contains the text of the Nurse Reinvestment Act, which amends the Public Health Service Act to address the increasing shortage of registered nurses by instituting a series of policies to improve nurse recruitment and nurse retention. Title I details two initiatives to boost recruitment of nurses. The first initiative includes the…

  10. Differences in moral judgment between nursing students and qualified nurses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Soon; Park, Jin-Hee; Han, Sung-Suk

    2007-05-01

    This longitudinal study examined how nursing students' moral judgment changes after they become qualified nurses working in a hospital environment. The sample used was a group of 80 nursing students attending a university in Suwon, Korea, between 2001 and 2003. By using a Korean version of the Judgment About Nursing Decisions questionnaire, an instrument used in nursing care research, moral judgment scores based on Ketefian's six nursing dilemmas were determined. The results were as follows: (1) the qualified nurses had significantly higher idealistic moral judgment scores than the nursing students; (2) the qualified nurses showed significantly higher realistic moral judgment scores than the nursing students; and (3) when comparing idealistic and realistic moral judgment scores, both the qualified nurses and the nursing students had higher scores for idealistic moral judgment. Further study is recommended to examine changes in moral judgment. PMID:17459815

  11. Why a well-paid nurse is a better nurse.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Julie A; Folbre, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    In an article subtitled "Why is a Badly Paid Nurse a Good Nurse?" economist Anthony Heyes argues that nursing wages should be kept low. Counter arguments are provided based on what the authors consider more adequate economic analysis. PMID:16786826

  12. Standardized Nursing Documentation Supports Evidence-Based Nursing Management.

    PubMed

    Mykkänen, Minna; Miettinen, Merja; Saranto, Kaija

    2016-01-01

    Nursing documentation is crucial to high quality, effective and safe nursing care. According to earlier studies nursing documentation practices vary and nursing classifications used in electronic patient records (EPR) are not yet standardized internationally nor nationally. A unified national model for documenting patient care improves information flow in nursing practice, management, research and development toward evidence-based nursing care. Nursing documentation quality, accuracy and development requires follow-up and evaluation. An audit instrument is used in the Kuopio University Hospital (KUH) when evaluating nursing documentation. The results of the auditing process suggest that the national nursing documentation model fulfills nurses' expectations of electronic tools, facilitating their important documentation duty. This paper discusses the importance of using information about nursing documentation and how we can take advantage of structural information in evidence-based nursing management. PMID:27332244

  13. Nursing Home Registered Nurses' and Licensed Practical Nurses' Knowledge of Causes of Falls.

    PubMed

    Gray-Miceli, Deanna; de Cordova, Pamela B; Crane, Giles L; Quigley, Patricia; Ratcliffe, Sarah J

    2016-01-01

    Reducing falls in nursing homes requires a knowledgeable nursing workforce. To test knowledge, 8 validated vignettes representing multifactorial fall causes were administered to 47 nurses from 3 nursing homes. Although licensed practical nurses scored higher than registered nurses in individual categories of falls, when we computed the average score of all 8 categories between groups of registered nurses and licensed practical nurses, registered nurses scored higher (F = 4.106; P < .05) in identifying 8 causal reasons for older adults to fall. PMID:26421775

  14. Competency of Graduate Nurses as Perceived by Nurse Preceptors and Nurse Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    As newly graduated associate degree nurses (ADN) and baccalaureate degree nurses (BSN) enter into the workforce, they must be equipped to care for a complex patient population; therefore, the purpose of this study was to address the practice expectations and clinical competency of new nurses as perceived by nurse preceptors and nurse managers.…

  15. Perceptions of "Nursing" and "Nursing Care" in the United States by Dutch Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haloburdo, Esther P.; Thompson, Mary Ann

    2001-01-01

    In the opinions of 11 Dutch nursing students on a study tour of the United States, the U.S. emphasizes technical aspects of nursing and medical over nursing care, lacks team nursing and collegiality, and has a litigious environment. These negative images have implications for the use of U.S. nursing as a benchmark for global education and…

  16. Fault diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Kathy

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the research in this area of fault management is to develop and implement a decision aiding concept for diagnosing faults, especially faults which are difficult for pilots to identify, and to develop methods for presenting the diagnosis information to the flight crew in a timely and comprehensible manner. The requirements for the diagnosis concept were identified by interviewing pilots, analyzing actual incident and accident cases, and examining psychology literature on how humans perform diagnosis. The diagnosis decision aiding concept developed based on those requirements takes abnormal sensor readings as input, as identified by a fault monitor. Based on these abnormal sensor readings, the diagnosis concept identifies the cause or source of the fault and all components affected by the fault. This concept was implemented for diagnosis of aircraft propulsion and hydraulic subsystems in a computer program called Draphys (Diagnostic Reasoning About Physical Systems). Draphys is unique in two important ways. First, it uses models of both functional and physical relationships in the subsystems. Using both models enables the diagnostic reasoning to identify the fault propagation as the faulted system continues to operate, and to diagnose physical damage. Draphys also reasons about behavior of the faulted system over time, to eliminate possibilities as more information becomes available, and to update the system status as more components are affected by the fault. The crew interface research is examining display issues associated with presenting diagnosis information to the flight crew. One study examined issues for presenting system status information. One lesson learned from that study was that pilots found fault situations to be more complex if they involved multiple subsystems. Another was pilots could identify the faulted systems more quickly if the system status was presented in pictorial or text format. Another study is currently under way to

  17. Preparation for Advanced Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frik, Seigina M.; Pollock, Susan E.

    1993-01-01

    Lehman College's graduate nursing program uses theory-based courses to prepare advanced nurse practitioners. Students increase scholarly inquiry skills and clinical decision making; use of nursing conceptual models helped them plan and evaluate their practice. (SK)

  18. Best nursing practice.

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    As part of this year's centenary celebrations, the RCN is showcasing the best nursing practice, focusing on that which often goes unobserved. Nurses, healthcare assistants and nursing students are asked to share ideas and innovations for improving practice and patient care. These will contribute to the development of a library of good practice and the RCN will invest in a small number of the successful projects. The closing date is 31 December. PMID:27581898

  19. The nurse practitioner in family planning services: law and practice.

    PubMed

    Roemer, R

    1977-06-01

    Before 1971, when Idaho became the 1st state to authorize expanded scope of functions for registered nurses, nearly all states made it illegal for any nurse to perform diagnosis or prescribe treatment, creating an ambiguity as more and more nurses were equipped by education and technology to perform new tasks. Today 30 states have liberalized the scope of nursing functions, making it possible for nurses and nurse-midwives to assume, among other tasks, family planning functions. A table gives the status of legislation and regulations governing nurse practitioners and nurse-midwives in each state. The area of greatest controversy is the prescription of oral contraceptives. In some states it is allowed under doctor's supervision or in rural areas or in areas where clear need exists for a nurse to dispense such medication. Usually this dispensing is limited to a single course of treatment. Nurse-midwives are rapidly being accepted as extensions of scarce medical facilities. Generally nurse-midwives are authorized to provide prenatal and postpartum care, to handle normal deliveries, and do family planning work including fitting diaphragms and inserting and removing IUDs. An innovation is the family planning nurse practitioner. Several courses for such practitioners have been set up across the U.S. Graduates may, with medical direction, perform bimanual pelvic examinations and breast examinations, take blood pressure, prescribe contraception, fit diaphragms, insert IUDs, examine vaginal secretions microscopically, and refer patients with problems to physicians. In a California program both registered and nonregistered nurses are being trained as women's health specialists who may make routine examinations in both pregnant and nonpregnant women and give family planning advice. Non-RN family planning specialists being trained include licensed vocational nurses, baccalaureate degree holders in nonnursing fields, and qualified persons with less formal education. The 24-week

  20. Nurses: advocating, leading, caring!

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Stephanie L

    2013-01-01

    This speech was delivered on 27 October at the 2012 Conference and general meeting of the Italian Nurses Association CNAI (Consociazione nazionale delle Associazioni infermiere/i) held in Rome from 25 to 27 October 2012. The theme of the conference was "No Nurses No Future". The "No Nurses No Future" is a national campaign developed by the nurses of the Italian Nurses Association to fight for the rights of the profession to sustain not only the practice of the nurse, strong nursing education, research and regulation, but more importantly to ensure that in the future there will be enough nurses in the healthcare workforce to advocate, lead and care for the citizens of Italy.Italian nurses took advantage of the presence of prof. Ferguson and, before travelling to Rome, the Region Lombardy IPASVI Colleges (Coordinamento dei Collegi IPASVI della regione Lombardia) invited her to talk on the same topic during a jointed Conference with CNAI at Circolo della Stampa of Milan on 23rd October. PMID:24083500

  1. Developing emergency nursing competence.

    PubMed

    Proehl, Jean A

    2002-03-01

    Developing and maintaining the competence emergency nurses need is an important function of emergency clinical nurse specialists (CNS), educators, and other members of the emergency department (ED) leadership team. A thorough orientation is the first and most important step in developing the competence of emergency nurses. After orientation, the challenge is to maintain currency of practice in the face of incessant change such as new medications, new equipment, and new therapies in emergency care. This article focuses on the orientation of emergency nurses. A related article in this issue addresses assessment of competency. PMID:11818264

  2. Communication in Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    Kourkouta, Lambrini; Papathanasiou, Ioanna V.

    2014-01-01

    Good communication between nurses and patients is essential for the successful outcome of individualized nursing care of each patient. To achieve this, however, nurses must understand and help their patients, demonstrating courtesy, kindness and sincerity. Also they should devote time to the patient to communicate with the necessary confidentiality, and must not forget that this communication includes persons who surround the sick person, which is why the language of communication should be understood by all those involved in it. Good communication also is not only based on the physical abilities of nurses, but also on education and experience. PMID:24757408

  3. Modelling district nurse expertise.

    PubMed

    Burke, Michelle

    2014-12-01

    As changes in society and health provision mean that one in four people over the age of 75 will require nursing care at home, pre-registration adult nurse education increasingly prepares student nurses for a future career within the community. District nurses undertake complex, multidimensional health and social assessments and care in a non-clinical setting and work in partnership with patients and their significant others to promote practical and psychological coping mechanisms and self-care. The district nurse's first assessment visit is key to developing a therapeutic partnership and it is often during this visit that expertise in district nursing practice emerges. The holistic, contextual and dynamic aspects of nursing in the home setting can make district nursing expertise difficult to illustrate and demonstrate within the classroom setting. This article explores the ways in which an understanding of expertise development theory can enable the tacit expertise that occurs within the first assessment visit to be made visible to student nurses, using simulation and expert narrative as a pedagogical strategy. PMID:25475676

  4. [ICNP- International Classification of Nursing Practice: origin, structure and development].

    PubMed

    Marucci, Anna Rita; De Caro, Walter; Petrucci, Cristina; Lancia, Loreto; Sansoni, Julita

    2015-01-01

    ICNP is a standardized nursing terminology included within acknowledged terminologies by WHO, it is a relevant aspect of ICN programs and strategies. This paper aims to describe structure and characteristics of ICNP terminology as well as to highlight how this tool can be useful both in practice and in terms of nursing professional development. This version looks like a pyramid with seven axes describing different areas of nursing and related interventions, enriched by two special axes related to pre-coordinated Diagnosis / Outcomes (DC) and Operations (IC) which facilitate daily use in practice. In order to clarify how this tool can be actually be used in daily nursing practice some examples are provided, clarifying how adopting the current version of ICNP terminology (2015 release) Diagnosis/Outcomes and Interventions can be built. The ICNP Italian Centre is committed to introduce it to Italian nurses as a tool for sharing and disseminating terminology in our Country, having as main final aim to achieve even in Italy, professional visibility objectives promoted in different ways by the International Council of Nurses. PMID:26402233

  5. Nursing diagnoses in patients with immune-bullous dermatosis 1

    PubMed Central

    Brandão, Euzeli da Silva; dos Santos, Iraci; Lanzillotti, Regina Serrão; Ferreira, Adriano Menis; Gamba, Mônica Antar; Azulay-Abulafia, Luna

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: identify nursing diagnoses in patients with immune-bullous dermatosis. Method: a quantitative and descriptive research, carried out in three institutions located in Rio de Janeiro and Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, using the Client Assessment Protocol in Dermatology during a nursing consultation. Simple descriptive statistics was used for data analysis. Results: 14 subjects participated in the study, nine with a diagnosis of pemphigus vulgaris, pemphigus two and three of bullous pemphigoid. The age ranged between 27 and 82 years, predominantly females (11). 14 nursing diagnoses were discussed and identified from a clinical rationale in all study participants, representing the most common human responses in this sample. The application of the Assessment Protocol in Dermatology facilitated the comprehensive assessment, in addition to providing the identification of diagnostics according to the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association International. Conclusion: the nursing diagnoses presented confirm the necessity of interdisciplinary work during the care for this clientele. For better description of the phenomena related to the client in question, it is suggested the inclusion of two risk factors related in three diagnoses of this taxonomy. It is worth noting the contribution of the findings for the care, education and research in nursing in dermatology. PMID:27533274

  6. Nursing around the world: Australia.

    PubMed

    Stein-Parbury, J

    2000-01-01

    Early nursing in Australia was influenced strongly by the British nursing tradition, characterized by an apprenticeship style of nurse education. However, this influence has been replaced by the transfer of all registered nursing education into the higher education sector. This article will discuss the development of the discipline of nursing in Australia as well as the Australian health care system and nursing work force. Nursing educational programs, registration, organizations, and research will be will be described. Finally current issues in Australian nursing and health care will be presented. PMID:11453843

  7. Implementing nurse sensitive outcomes into care planning at a long-term care facility.

    PubMed

    Cox, R A

    1998-06-01

    This article describes one long-term care facility's efforts to implement standardized language in the care planning process. Federal regulations for long-term care mandate the use of a uniform comprehensive assessment tool. Eighteen Resident Assessment Protocols (RAPs) are identified for data collection. Computer databases were revised for care planning. Appropriate North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA) diagnoses were linked to each RAP. Nursing-Sensitive Outcomes (NOCs) were linked to each NANDA as goals. Nursing Interventions Classifications (NICs) were linked to NANDA diagnosis and NOC outcomes as approaches. The databases are illustrated, and frequently used NANDAs and NOCs are identified. PMID:9610013

  8. An Introduction to Key Event Mapping: A Primer for Nurse Researchers

    PubMed Central

    Carter-Harris, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    To fully understand the events leading to a diagnosis, retrospective recall can help nurse researchers reconstruct important health behavior-related events. However, retrospective recall can be a challenge. Key event mapping offers nurse researchers a method beyond retrospective chart review to elicit date data to explore the pre-diagnosis time frame of an illness. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the key event mapping method to nurse researchers in search of a method of eliciting date data from participants when designing research studies that include a retrospective recall component. PMID:25908543

  9. Dermatomyositis: Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of bundles of muscle fibers, and capillaries are scarce in these regions. About Dermatomyositis (DM) Signs and Symptoms Diagnosis Causes/Inheritance Medical Management Research Living With Dermatomyositis (DM) News Not Always Smooth Sailing- A Quest Article April 30, 2007 Putting Out the Fire- A ...

  10. Obtaining a Foundation for Nursing Care at the Time of Patient Admission: A Grounded Theory Study

    PubMed Central

    Jansson, Inger; Pilhammar, Ewa; Forsberg, Anna

    2009-01-01

    The nursing process can be viewed as a problem-solving model, but we do not know whether use of the whole process including care plans with interventions based on nursing diagnoses improves nurses’ ability to carry out assessments. Therefore, the aim of this study was to illuminate and describe the assessment and decision-making process performed by nurses who formulated individual care plans including nursing diagnosis, goals and interventions or who used standardized care plans when a patient was admitted to their ward for care, and those who did not. Data collection and analysis were carried out by means of Grounded theory. Nurses were observed while assessing patients, after which they were interviewed. The main concern of all nurses was to obtain a foundation for nursing care based on four strategies; building pre-understanding, creating a caring environment, collecting information on symptoms and signs and performing an analysis from different perspectives. It appeared that the most important aspect for nurses who did not employ care plans was the medical reason for the patient’s admission. The nurses who employed care plans discussed their decisions in terms of nursing problems, needs and risks. The results indicate that nurses who formulated care plans were more aware of their professional role. PMID:19746207

  11. Overview of depression: epidemiology and implications for community nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Lazarou, Chrystalleni; Kouta, Christiana; Kapsou, Margarita; Kaite, Charis

    2011-01-01

    Depressive disorders are among the most common psychological conditions currently affecting individuals living in the Westernized world. Yet, available data indicate that fewer than one third of adults with depression obtain appropriate professional treatment. This is attributed, among other reasons, to the under-recognition of the problem by health professionals, including district nurses. In order to improve recognition of the problem, it is imperative for nurses and especially those working in community settings, to appreciate the importance of prompt diagnosis which presumes both an understanding and knowledge of basic aspects of the problem and, an understanding of their role in dealing with depression. This overview presents epidemiological data and identifies the potential consequences of depression on daily functioning and other aspects of life among adults in Westernized countries, aiming to raise awareness and sensitize district nurses about the issue The article discusses how the role of district nurses can be enhanced to improve recognition rates. PMID:21278649

  12. [Mental health support for nurses].

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Yoshie

    2012-01-01

    Burnout specific to human service workers has been reported in the U.S. in the 1970s. Since then, such burnout has become widely known and the mental health of nurses has attracted attention. Stressors in the work environment and complexity have increased with advancement in increasingly complicated medical care. One of the major roles of a psychiatric liaison nurse is to provide support to improve the mental health of nurses. In our hospital, a psychiatric liaison nurse has a staff position under the direct supervision of the director of the nursing department but operates outside the chain of command. A psychiatric liaison nurse is not involved in the performance review of nurses. Thus, the nursing staff and the nursing manager can discuss their problems with the psychiatric liaison nurse without risks. Psychiatric liaison nurses provide support as counselors through individual and group interviews so that nurses can become re-energized about their work. In addition, psychiatric liaison nurses provide consultations and education. They perform coordination function to organize an environment to promote consultations regarding nurse support to the staff nurses and the nursing manager and to promote support by supervisors. For support after reinstatement of a nurse following a medical leave, it is particularly important to work with not only the individual nurse but also the entire nursing team. In our hospital, newly graduated nurses are given the GHQ-28 after one month of employment to assess the support they might need. In our study, nurses with high risks were divided into a group with a score of at least 6 points but less than 10 points and a group with a score of at least 10 points. The group with at least 10 points had significantly higher rates of leave of absence and resignation. Thus, early intervention was thought to be necessary in newly graduated nurses with a score of at least 10 points in the GHQ. PMID:22712205

  13. Assisted suicide: implications for nurses and nursing.

    PubMed

    Daly, B J; Berry, D; Fitzpatrick, J J; Drew, B; Montgomery, K

    1997-01-01

    Assisted suicide is an issue of great importance to nurses. This issue reflects our values and beliefs as a society, calls for a clear and precise response as a profession, and challenges individual nurses to think about their own moral views. The history of the debate and the compelling moral arguments on both sides attest to the complexity of the issue and also suggest that it will not soon be resolved. The current position of the profession, as expressed in the ANA Code for Nurses and a specific position statement, were reviewed. The dilemma faced by the individual nurse who perceives an obligation to adhere to the guidelines specified by his or her profession's code and yet whose conscience dictates an act in violation of this code has been discussed as an instance of conscientious objection. While this analysis has been necessarily brief, it was intended to illustrate the importance of being clear about one's personal moral views and equally clear about one's duty to fulfil the obligations stemming from the profession's public statements. It is essential that the profession continue to explore the moral issues involved in requests for assistance in dying and provide additional guidelines for practicing nurses, with sound rationale for the profession's position. PMID:9364530

  14. Nursing Practice Environment and Outcomes for Oncology Nursing

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jingjing; Friese, Christopher R.; Wu, Evan; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Background It is commonly assumed that oncology nurses experience high job-related burnout and high turnover because their work involves inherent stressors such as caring for patients with serious and often life-threatening illness. Objectives The objectives of this study were to examine the differences in outcomes such as job dissatisfaction and burnout between oncology nurses and medical-surgical nurses, and to identify factors that affect oncology nurse outcomes. Methods A secondary analysis of nurse survey data collected in 2006 including 4047 nurses from 282 hospitals in 3 states was performed; t test and χ2 test compared differences between oncology nurses and medical-surgical nurses in nurse outcomes and their assessments of nurse practice environment, as measured by the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index. Logistic regression models estimated the effect of nurse practice environment on 4 nurse-reported outcomes: burnout, job dissatisfaction, intention to leave the current position, and perceived quality of care. Results Oncology nurses reported favorable practice environments and better outcomes than did medical-surgical nurses. All 4 subscales of the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index studied were significantly associated with outcomes. Specifically, nurses who reported favorable nursing foundations for quality of care (eg, active in-service or preceptorship programs) were less likely to report burnout and leave their current position. Conclusions Better practice environments, including nurse foundations for quality care, can help to achieve optimal nurse outcomes. Implications for Practice Improving hospital practice environments holds significant potential to improve nurse well-being, retention, and quality of care. Specifically, hospitals should consider preceptor programs and continuing education and increase nurses’ participation in hospital decision making. PMID:22751101

  15. An educational strategy for teaching standardized nursing languages.

    PubMed

    Farren, Arlene T

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE. The aim of this paper is to describe an educational strategy for teaching standardized nursing languages (SNL) used in both the classroom and clinical components of a psychiatric-mental health nursing course at the associate degree level. DATA SOURCES. Data included a review of the relevant literature, teaching experiences, and faculty and student experiences. DATA SYNTHESIS. Enhancing associate degree student nurses' competency regarding diagnosis and interventions is essential to influence positive health outcomes. Use of diagnostic, outcome, and intervention classifications for learning nursing care promotes critical thinking, individualization of nursing care, and students' fluency with SNL. One possible teaching strategy to assist students to learn and use SNL was implemented through the use of a faculty-developed Student Nurse Documentation Packet. CONCLUSIONS. The educational strategy provided students opportunities to enhance their experience with the SNL to plan and document care of individuals experiencing psychiatric-mental health problems. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING. The educational strategy used in this program was judged to be successful. Research is needed to provide empirical evidence of the efficacy of this pedagogical strategy for increasing knowledge and enhancing students' competency. PMID:20132353

  16. Registered Nurse Education and the Registered Nurse Job Market.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Howard Allan

    This effort compares the graduates of the three types of Registered Nurse (RN) education programs (three-year Diploma in Nursing, two-year Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN), and four-year Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing). The basic objective is to determine whether they are perfect substitutes, especially whether ADN graduates can adequately…

  17. Nursing 2000: Collaboration to Promote Careers in Registered Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Connie S.; Mitchell, Barbara S.

    1999-01-01

    The effectiveness of the collaborative Nursing 2000 model in promoting nursing careers was evaluated through a survey of 1,598 nursing students (637 responses). Most effective techniques were the "shadow a nurse" program, publications, classroom and community presentations, and career-counseling telephone calls. (SK)

  18. Views of Student Nurses on Caring and Technology in Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodell, Elizabeth Becky

    2009-01-01

    Nurses entering the workforce are faced with many challenges, but today the multiple demands of patient care are complicated by a nurse's need to keep abreast of fast-changing technology. This research is universally relevant to nursing practice in educational settings and practice areas because nursing education needs to develop strategies to…

  19. Computers in Hospital Clinical Nursing: Implications for Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Thomas, Sister

    The use of computers in hospital clinical nursing and implications for the education of nurses were studied with a sample of 130 hospitals. Of concern was how computers were used, which hospital personnel used computers in health care, costs to educate staff nurses, and who teaches nurses about computers. Questionnaires completed by hospital data…

  20. Professional values and nursing.

    PubMed

    Sellman, Derek

    2011-05-01

    The values of nursing arise from a concern with human flourishing. If the desire to become a nurse is a reflection of an aspiration to care for others in need then we should anticipate that those who choose to nurse have a tendency towards the values we would normally associate with a caring profession (care, compassion, perhaps altruism, and so on). However, these values require a secure base if they are not to succumb to the corrupting pressures of the increasingly instrumental nature of the values of the institutions in which healthcare in general and nursing in particular takes place. One way of securing a base for withstanding the corrupting influences of the institution is to understand nursing as a practice in the sense in which Alasdair MacIntyre uses that term. In this brief paper I will outline ways in which the managerial imperative of meeting targets is both distorting practice and undermining nursing's values. I conclude that understanding nursing as a MacIntyrean practice provides a refuge from what might otherwise be overwhelming pressures for nurses to adopt instrumental values to the detriment of professional caring values. PMID:21061069

  1. Nursing Applicant Interview Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohn, Suzanne

    This manual is a tool for use in an interview for nursing student selection that will assist in sizing up the fitness or suitability of the candidate for nursing. It also includes tools and methods that could be used in the initial interview to assess what factors will predict those students most likely to stay in an Associate Degree nursing…

  2. AACC Nursing Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Community Colleges, Washington, DC.

    This document, presented in the form of PowerPoint print outs, indicates a total of 420 (nearly 60%) associate degree nursing (ADN) programs responded to a survey conducted by the American Association of Community Colleges' (AACC) Nursing and Allied Health Initiative (NAHI) for 2003. The sample is representative based on urbanicity and region.…

  3. nursing.standard.com.

    PubMed

    2016-08-10

    1 Nurses who have taken part in Widening Access Training scheme courses may be eligible for national insurance and tax rebates. One nurse received a rebate of £6,000, according to Moneysavingexpert.com . Read more: rcni.com/tax-rebate. PMID:27507360

  4. Standards for Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Nurses' Association, Kansas City, MO.

    In this publication on standards for nursing education, the major educational goals encompassing graduate education, basic education, and continuing education are presented. They provide a means of monitoring the quality of programs and of supporting innovation and testing of new roles in nursing. These standards focus on education for nursing…

  5. Why Men Choose Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, Julia L.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Male nursing students surveyed (n=146, 69 percent) responded that (1) career attributes (job security, opportunity, flexibility) were primary reasons for choosing nursing; (2) they had moderate to high support from significant others; and (3) they were more likely to be older and single. (SK)

  6. The Impaired Nurse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris County Vocational Technical School District, Denville, NJ.

    This mini-course for nurses is intended to establish an atmosphere conducive to the development of personal awareness of the ramifications of alcohol/substance abuse involving the nurse. Contents include the mini-course's goals and objectives, a course outline, copies of 11 handouts and a booklet written to provide information about nurse…

  7. Distance education in nursing.

    PubMed

    Billings, D M

    1996-01-01

    Although not for everyone, distance education is a "connecting point" for faculty and students who are separated by time and space. As technology becomes increasingly available to nurse educators, the instructional and public relations advantages become significant benefits to nurse educators. PMID:8718839

  8. School Nurse Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borja, Mary C.; Amidon, Christine; Spellings, Diane; Franzetti, Susan; Nasuta, Mary

    2009-01-01

    This article features school nurses from across the country who are championing for school-located influenza immunization within their communities. These nurses are: (1) Mary C. Borja; (2) Christine Amidon; (3) Diane Spellings; (4) Susan Franzetti; and (5) Mary Nasuta. (Contains 6 figures.)

  9. Registered Nurse (Associate Degree).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of registered nurse (with an associate degree), lists technical competencies and competency builders for 19 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 5 units specific to the occupation of registered nurse. The following…

  10. Problem Solving in Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karns, Phyllis Spear

    The relationship of educational preparation to the problem- solving performance of 55 hospital employed baccalaureate and associate degree nurses working in Wyoming hospitals was studied. Participant data were collected that might correlate with problem-solving ability: age, years of experience in nursing, years of work experience in a…

  11. Nursing. Occupational Simulation Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robb, Mary Kaye

    This career exploration instructional booklet on nursing as an occupation is one of several resulting from the rural southwestern Colorado CEPAC Project (Career Education Process of Attitude Change). Based on a job analysis and utilizing a programed instructional format, the following content is included: A brief description of what nursing is; 14…

  12. School Nursing Certification Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selekman, Janice; Wolfe, Linda C.

    2010-01-01

    The 2010 update to the resource you have been waiting for to help you prepare to take the National School Nurse Certification Exam. Dr. Janice Selekman DNSc, RN, NCSN, a recognized expert in pediatric nursing, and NASN Past President Linda C. Wolfe MEd, BSN, RN, NCSN, FNASN are the authors. This text was created in response to many years of…

  13. The School Nurse Practitioner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Igoe, Judith Bellaire

    1975-01-01

    Denver's four-month intensive course in primary health care for experienced nurses serving in disadvantaged areas, followed by inservice training with regular consultation available from a local physician, has produced school nurse practitioners who extend the traditional role to include comprehensive evaluations, management of minor illnesses,…

  14. Student Nurses and Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutton, B. Meriel

    For the safety of the public, it is essential that nurses are competent at least in the mathematics that enables them to calculate medications accurately. From a survey by G. Hek (1994), it is apparent that mathematics is not universally included in the nursing curricula, nor asked for as a pre-requisite to entry. Changes in the profile of the…

  15. Developing nursing care plans.

    PubMed

    Hooks, Robin

    2016-07-01

    What was the nature of the CPD activity and/or practice-related feedback and/or event or experience in your practice? The CPD article discussed the theories involved in developing nursing care plans. Care planning is a fundamental part of nursing, and aims to facilitate standardised, evidence-based and holistic care. PMID:27380704

  16. The New Nurse Influentials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinsey, Dianne C.

    1986-01-01

    Reports on a survey of 42 nurse leaders, which is compared to a 1977 survey that used the same questionnaire with 71 nurse leaders. Results report the current trends in occupational positions, location, habits, travel, career emphasis, mentor activity, sources of influence, publishing, activism, and research. (CH)

  17. Nurse Practitioner Pharmacology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waigandt, Alex; Chang, Jane

    A study compared the pharmacology training of nurse practitioner programs with medical and dental programs. Seventy-three schools in 14 states (40 nurse practitioner programs, 19 schools of medicine, and 14 schools of dentistry) were surveyed by mailed questionnaire about the number of hours devoted to the study of pharmacology. The major findings…

  18. [Implementation of the nursing process in a patient with hepatic cirrhosis using the standardized terminologies NANDA, NIC and NOC].

    PubMed

    Vargas, Rosimeire da Silva; França, Fabiana Cláudia de Vasconcelos

    2007-01-01

    This case study aimed at describing the implementation the implementation of the Nursing Process to a patient with hepatic cirrhosis, and report the difficulties found on the implementation of the assistance. The conceptual model of Horfa was used, NANDA--Nursing Diagnosis, Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) and Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC) were also applied in care composition. The present study was developed in a public hospital of Distrito Federal, in September 2005, at the Emergency Unit. Among the identified nursing diagnosis was included: acute confusion, constipation and knowledge deficit. Among the pointed difficulties, it was detached: the disinterest of the nursing team and of the pacient, knowledge deficit and unpreparedness of the professionals, lack of human and material resources to deliver the care. PMID:17684918

  19. Strengths-based nursing.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Laurie N

    2014-08-01

    Strengths-based nursing (SBN) is an approach to care in which eight core values guide nursing action, thereby promoting empowerment, self-efficacy, and hope. In caring for patients and families, the nurse focuses on their inner and outer strengths-that is, on what patients and families do that best helps them deal with problems and minimize deficits. Across all levels of care, from the primary care of healthy patients to the critical care of patients who are unconscious, SBN reaffirms nursing's goals of promoting health, facilitating healing, and alleviating suffering by creating environments that work with and bolster patients' capacities for health and innate mechanisms of healing. In doing so, SBN complements medical care, provides a language that communicates nursing's contribution to patient and family health and healing, and empowers the patient and family to gain greater control over their health and healing. PMID:25036663

  20. Melanoma Diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsch, Alexander

    The chapter deals with the diagnosis of the malignant melanoma of the skin. This aggressive type of cancer with steadily growing incidence in white populations can hundred percent be cured if it is detected in an early stage. Imaging techniques, in particular dermoscopy, have contributed significantly to improvement of diagnostic accuracy in clinical settings, achieving sensitivities for melanoma experts of beyond 95% at specificities of 90% and more. Automatic computer analysis of dermoscopy images has, in preliminary studies, achieved classification rates comparable to those of experts. However, the diagnosis of melanoma requires a lot of training and experience, and at the time being, average numbers of lesions excised per histology-proven melanoma are around 30, a number which clearly is too high. Further improvements in computer dermoscopy systems and their competent use in clinical settings certainly have the potential to support efforts of improving this situation. In the chapter, medical basics, current state of melanoma diagnosis, image analysis methods, commercial dermoscopy systems, evaluation of systems, and methods and future directions are presented.

  1. Socialization into nursing: nursing students as learners.

    PubMed

    Reutter, L; Field, P A; Campbell, I E; Day, R

    1997-04-01

    In this article, we describe how the functionalist and interactionist approaches to socialization are exemplified in the learning experiences of nursing students in a 4-year baccalaureate program. A qualitative longitudinal exploratory research design was used to study the socialization of baccalaureate nursing students in a large western Canadian university. The findings suggest that student learning reflects a combination of functionalist and interactionist approaches, with the relative emphasis of each approach varying over the 4 years. In the first year, functionalist learning predominates as students learn the "ideal." In second and third year, students are confronting and adapting to reality, which requires a more interactionist approach. Fourth year students look beyond their practice situation as they anticipate and prepare for a reality beyond the student world. This article concludes with implications for nursing education. PMID:9107592

  2. Nursing in Nazi Germany.

    PubMed

    Steppe, H

    1992-12-01

    German nursing did indeed change during the Nazi period. There were external changes, in terms of the improved social status of nursing, the tightening and unification of professional nursing organizations, the laws affecting nursing, and the politicization of the profession. Articles written by nurses at the time and more recent interviews suggest that there were internal changes as well. It appears that at least a portion of German nurses accepted the National Socialism reinterpretation of professional nursing ethics and humanitarian principles in the assumption that through their obedience they were doing good. This historical research points to clear lessons for contemporary nurses. Nurses in Nazi Germany were under the illusion that they were remaining true to their professional ethics, unaffected by the social change around them. This apolitical professional consciousness made it possible for the profession to be subsumed as a part of the larger political system. I believe that we must be clear that nursing never takes place in a value-free, neutral context; it is always a socially significant force. This means that we cannot simply observe what is taking place around us but must take a stand and get involved, helping to shape sociopolitical developments. I also believe that we must deal with the history of our profession, especially its darkest hours, so that we may remain sensitive to any signs of inhumanity. We must call into question traditional principles, such as obedience, and replace them with professional competence, professionalism, and creative self-consciousness. And not least, we have a moral obligation to the millions of victims of National Socialism, even if it only means that, through historical research, we assure that they are not forgotten. By taking responsibility for this part of our history, we can become more sensitive for the future, with eyes and ears open for all social injustices. PMID:1455849

  3. Issues and challenges in nursing and nursing education in Japan.

    PubMed

    Turale, Sue; Ito, Misae; Nakao, Fujiko

    2008-01-01

    In this editorial we discuss the challenges and issues in nursing and nurse education in Japan. These include a rapid growth in the number of universities offering nursing programs without sufficient time for preparation of faculty; issues in the traditional ways of teaching in classrooms; the appearance of nursing shortages in a country with the highest rate of longevity in the world; and the position of nursing faculty in a society that is largely male dominated. PMID:17719851

  4. Reconceptualizing the Baccalaureate Nursing Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mengel, Andrea

    A survey of nursing leaders was conducted to identify values, opinions and ideas about the baccalaureate nursing curriculum, and the views identified were analyzed from the perspective of curriculum theory. The population consisted of 488 registered nurses listed in the 1985 Directory of Fellows of the American Academy of Nursing. Data were…

  5. Quality Assurance and Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Mary Beth

    1978-01-01

    Preparation for quality assurance in nursing care must begin in basic nursing education, continue through the graduate and doctoral levels, and be provided for practicing nurses through continuing education activities, according to the author. She discusses the meaning of quality assurance and its integration into the nursing curriculum. (MF)

  6. Transforming Articulation Barriers in Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Verle

    Barriers to educational mobility for nurses have existed since the mid-1960s. In 1963, the National League for Nursing (NLN) adopted a position that ruled out articulation of any kind between associate degree in nursing (ADN) and bachelors in science in nursing (BSN) programs. In the mid-1970s, a countermovement took shape, supporting open…

  7. Choosing Pathways to Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edge, Sylvia C.

    This publication presents the text of a speech on nursing, stressing current trends and changes in the role of nursing and therefore in nursing education. Beginning by recalling the reasons many entered nursing in the past and the expectations of those workers, going on to look at the many issues of accountability that accompany the health…

  8. Who Will Teach the Nurses?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaRocco, Susan A.

    2006-01-01

    In 1999, most deans of nursing schools that belonged to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing reported that they did not have a faculty shortage. By 2005, however, 75 percent of U.S. nursing schools cited faculty shortages as the major reason for denying admission to qualified students. The average age of nurse educators holding PhDs is…

  9. Role of the School Nurse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Dept. of Health and Mental Hygiene, Baltimore.

    These guidelines on Maryland school nursing are based on recommendations of a Maryland committee composed of representatives from state and local health and education agencies, schools of nursing, the Board of Nursing, Maryland State School Health Council, directors of nursing, and a physician. The standards established by the American Nurses…

  10. Updating the nurse's bedside manner.

    PubMed

    Campbell-Heider, N; Hart, C A

    1993-01-01

    The current tendency for nurses to be on a first name basis with their patients and to wear less professional clothing provides new metaphors for interpreting nurses' work status. We argue that this prevailing social informality in communications and dress perpetuates themes that diminish the professional image of nurses, masks the cognitive nature of their work, threatens nurses' therapeutic effectiveness, and continues to reinforce the hierarchical relationship between nurses and physicians. Strategies are presented to help nurse educators, administrators, and clinicians transform nurses' work environments into clinical settings that enhance their professional presentation. PMID:8340122

  11. [Participated observation of nursing child health consultation].

    PubMed

    Loureiro, Fernanda Manuela; da Silva, José António Neto Ferreira; Quitério, Margarida Maria de Sousa Lourenço; Charepe, Zaida Borges

    2012-12-01

    Situation diagnosis using exploratory and descriptive scientific methodology (participant observation with descriptive statistical treatment) in order to identify nursing' practices in the area of health promotion during a nursing child health consultation. The 31 consultations observed (n = 31) showed that the majority of observations occurred in children younger than 2 years being the most discussed topic feed with predominant use of expository methodology. There was also little use of informational support and when used relate to the themes of security and nutrition. Most providers raised questions and there was limited registration of the interaction between provider and child with an expenditure averaging of 23 minutes per consultation. Given the results and reflecting about them stands out as intervention the construction of a health promotion manual with the integration of theory and evidence of good practice in this area. PMID:23380769

  12. Nursing Practice Environment and Registered Nurses' Job Satisfaction in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, JiSun; Flynn, Linda; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recruiting and retaining registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes is problematic, and little research is available to guide efforts to make nursing homes a more attractive practice environment for RNs. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between aspects of the nursing practice environment and job satisfaction among RNs…

  13. Universities and nursing education.

    PubMed

    Hayward, J

    1982-07-01

    Trends reflected by Department of Health and Social Security statistics on the nursing workforce are examined and the ratios between grades discussed. Recruitment into nursing degree courses in the UK is considered in relation to overall recruitment into nursing. The somewhat ambiguous position of nursing degree courses in the UK leads into consideration of policy statements by the universities and the nursing profession. The importance of such policies is emphasized in the current financial climate, as are the potential contributions of university departments to professional debate, for example standards of care. Comparisons are drawn between the goals of courses involving full-time studentships as opposed to part-time apprenticeships and the present boundaries between these noted, especially in relation to the expanding roles of courses. On-going research into the preparation of nurse-tutors in the UK is mentioned, together with a preliminary analysis of the academic basis in the biological sciences possessed by learners and tutors. Out of this is derived a suggestion that the present-day shortage of nurse teachers could be helped by varying the existing patterns of recruitment, especially involving subject specialists in the biological, behavioural and social sciences. PMID:6922880

  14. My Name is Nurse.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    : Editor's note: From its first issue in 1900 through to the present day, AJN has unparalleled archives detailing nurses' work and lives over more than a century. These articles not only chronicle nursing's growth as a profession within the context of the events of the day, but they also reveal prevailing societal attitudes about women, health care, and human rights. Today's nursing school curricula rarely include nursing's history, but it's a history worth knowing. To this end, From the AJN Archives offers articles selected to fit today's topics and times.This month's article, from the May 1993 issue, is a tongue-in-cheek editorial by former editor-in-chief Mary B. Mallison. In it, she introduces us to the "PerceptoPhone"-an imaginary device that allows the wearer to access the thoughts of nurses. PerceptoPhones are used to educate hospital trustees on nurses' essential but often invisible abilities: to identify early warning signs of complications; teach and encourage; and carefully assess, soothe, and heal-abilities that are "hard to quantify with usual accounting methods." More than 20 years later, we still look for better ways to teach the public about nursing. PMID:27123629

  15. Does vicarious traumatisation affect oncology nurses? A literature review.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Helen A H; Hamill, Conal

    2007-09-01

    traumatisation is a process through which the therapist's inner experience is negatively transformed through empathic engagement with client's traumatic material [Pearlman, L.A., Saakvitne, K.W., 1995a. Treating therapists with vicarious traumatization and secondary traumatic stress disorders. In: Figley, C.R. (Ed.), Compassion Fatigue: Coping with Secondary Traumatic Stress Disorder in Those Who Treat the Traumatized. Brunner/Mazel, New York, pp. 150-177]. Trauma not only affects individuals who are primarily present, but also those with whom they discuss their experience. If an individual has been traumatised as a result of a cancer diagnosis and shares this impact with oncology nurses, there could be a risk of vicarious traumatisation in this population. However, although Thompson [2003. Vicarious traumatisation: do we adequately support traumatised staff? The Journal of Cognitive Rehabilitation 24-25] suggests that vicarious traumatisation is a broad term used for workers from any profession, it has not yet been empirically determined if oncology nurses experience vicarious traumatisation. This purpose of this paper is to introduce the concept of vicarious traumatisation and argue that it should be explored in oncology nursing. The review will highlight that empirical research in vicarious traumatisation is largely limited to the mental health professions, with a strong recommendation for the need to empirically determine whether this concept exists in oncology nursing. PMID:17482879

  16. Introducing baccalaureate student nurses to gerontological nursing.

    PubMed

    Aud, Myra A; Bostick, Jane E; Marek, Karen Dorman; McDaniel, Roxanne W

    2006-01-01

    The faculty at the University of Missouri-Columbia Sinclair School of Nursing (MUSSON) developed and implemented a gerontological nursing care course, with support from the Health Resources and Services Administration, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, and the John A. Hartford Foundation. The course, with both didactic and clinical components, was mandatory for all students in the baccalaureate program. The course drew on two resources unique to the MUSSON: Senior Care, the school's home care agency, and TigerPlace, a retirement community closely linked to the school. Goals of the course were to increase knowledge of gerontology and gerontological nursing and to promote more positive student attitudes toward older adults. Evaluation of six semesters of pretest and posttest data found that knowledge increased although attitudes toward older adults did not become more positive. However, despite the lack of quantifiable improvement in attitudes, some students wrote positive comments on end-of-semester course evaluations about experiences and interactions with older adults during the course. PMID:16564470

  17. Compassion fatigue in nurses.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Elizabeth A

    2010-11-01

    Compassion fatigue, trigger situations, and coping strategies were investigated in hospital and home care nurses. The Professional Quality of Life Scale measured compassion fatigue, compassion satisfaction, and burnout. Narrative questions elicited trigger situations and coping strategies. Compassion fatigue scores were significantly different between nurses who worked 8- or 12-hour shifts. Fifteen percent of the participants had scores indicating risk of the compassion fatigue. There were significant differences in compassion satisfaction, depending on the unit worked and time as a nurse. The most common category of trigger situations was caring for the patient. Work-related and personal coping strategies were identified. PMID:21035028

  18. Compassion Competence in Nurses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngjin; Seomun, GyeongAe

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of study was to identify the attributes of the concept of compassion competence for nurses. A hybrid model was used to develop the concept, which included fieldwork performed. The concept of compassion competence was found to possess 3 dimensions: (a) acquisition of a wealth of knowledge; (b) development of skills of emotional communication, sensitivity, insight, and self-regulation; and (c) development of attitudes of respect and empathy, and maintenance of occupational distance. Compassion competence could be useful for developing ways to enhance the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for nurses to provide compassionate care in various nursing practices. PMID:27149235

  19. Presentation skills for nurses.

    PubMed

    Foulkes, Mark

    2015-02-20

    This article emphasises the importance of effective presentation skills. Such skills allow nurses to share knowledge and expertise and to communicate clearly in a range of workplace scenarios. Nurses are increasingly being asked to present in formal and informal situations, such as conferences, poster presentations, job interviews, case reports and ward-based teaching. This article explores the principles underpinning the development of these skills, discusses the situations in which they could be applied and demonstrates how nurses might improve and develop as presenters. PMID:25690236

  20. Nurses' representations of the positive and negative features of nursing.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, J A; Wearing, A J; Dodds, A E

    1996-08-01

    Nurses' representations of their work are defined as their cognitive 'work spaces', a theoretical concept derived from Newell & Simon's (1977) problem-solving model and Lewin's (1935) concept of interacting positive and negative valences. Using a structural equation modelling technique, a network of positive and negative features in nurses' work spaces is described in patterns of response to a questionnaire eliciting nurses' ratings of their professional opportunities and difficulties. The modelling technique revealed the dominance of positive over negative features, and the overall significance of social recognition for encouraging nurses to remain in nursing. Comparative analyses revealed that dominant features of work space representations did not differ for nurses from four city and country hospitals, nor in relation to positions in the nursing hierarchy. The importance of understanding the perceptions of nurses is discussed in relation to changes and development in nursing as a profession. PMID:8858444

  1. Leadership and ethics in nurse-nurse relationships.

    PubMed

    Milton, Constance L

    2009-04-01

    Qualities of nursing leadership may be reflected in the patterns of relating illuminated through communications between interdependent members of a discipline and interdisciplinary professional healthcare relationships. Authority and responsibility in leading-following reside with the designated leader. However, there is power with person in situation with the ever-present possibility of conflict. The author in this column will begin a discussion of conflict in nurse-nurse relationships and offer questions for straight thinking regarding the ethics of leading-following situations with nurse-nurse relationships from a humanbecoming nursing theoretical perspective. PMID:19342708

  2. Nursing victims of violence.

    PubMed

    Sekula, Kathleen

    2016-09-01

    Nurse executives are key to providing quality care to patients affected by violence, with the growth in crime being a critical consideration in designing patient care and fostering collaboration across teams. PMID:27581907

  3. Nursing by numbers.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Keith

    In the face of NHS budget cuts, nurses are being asked to justify their workforce numbers. Keith Hurst reviews some of the tools available for calculating staffing levels, examines their pros and cons, and discusses their application. PMID:17087410

  4. The drama of nursing.

    PubMed

    Holmes, C A

    1992-08-01

    This exploratory paper considers a few possibilities for conceiving nursing as a form of aesthetic praxis. More specifically, drawing on the works of Erving Goffman on dramaturgy, and Elizabeth Burns on theatre, it makes some suggestions concerning nursing as a form of dramatic performance, and briefly attempts to relate this to concepts of praxis drawn from the writings of Hannah Arendt and critical social theorists. In contrast to Goffman's dramaturgy, which stresses the artifice of social relations and suggests a cynical view of human interactions, a critical theory of dramatic praxis introduces a normative dimension in which performance may become self-realizing and emancipatory as it aspires to the status of aesthetic praxis. Conceived in such terms, nursing practice becomes a powerful form of self-expression which has the potential to become liberating for the nurse and the patient. PMID:1506545

  5. About Critical Care Nursing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Join Now Our Community Value of Belonging Member Benefits and Savings Awards Certification Apply Online Renew Your ... and traveling critical care nurses to fill staffing gaps in every part of the U.S. These requests ...

  6. Appreciation of holistic nursing.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kelly L

    2006-06-01

    The author's appreciation for holistic nursing has stemmed from working as a nurse for several years and coming to the realization that although patients may have the same illness or symptoms, their plan of care must be as unique as the individual. During the process of obtaining her Holistic Nursing Certification, she learned the importance of assessing the integrated dimensions of a person. She is discovering there are many ways to care for and nurture an individual. And what works well for one person may not work for the next. Nurses who incorporate the holistic philosophy into their practice will most definitely improve the outcome of the patient's care as well as the care of themselves. PMID:16740905

  7. The future of nursing.

    PubMed

    Moores, Y

    1999-01-01

    The White paper, "The New NHS, Modern-Dependable" has marked a turning point for the National Health Service and Nursing, replacing the internal market with integrated care, and sets out a vision of health service that meets the full range of patients' needs in all care settings. Assuring quality is an underpinning theme of the White paper, with nursing having a vital role in driving this agenda forward. Quality encompasses the environment of care, the professionalism, skill and compassion of staff, the effectiveness of treatments and respect and dignity of patients. This is an exciting time for nursing with many challenges, as the recognition and value for nursing grows. The profession has the ability to rise to these challenges and make a real difference to people's health and well being. PMID:10418368

  8. Nursing's role in nutrition.

    PubMed

    Henning, Michael

    2009-01-01

    There are not enough dietitians and nutritionists available to serve the entire healthcare industry. That means that nurses often fill the role of nutrition counselors. Nurses do not receive extensive education about nutrition, but there are great opportunities for nurses in nutrition, both as educators and researchers. One way this can happen is through the use of nutrition assessment tools. This article introduces a freeware nutritional assessment tool for use on Windows-based computers (available at http://nursing.jmu.edu). Unlike currently available tools, the Nutrition Analyzer is a stand-alone, Web-independent product, which builds a database of client data that can be manipulated for analysis and research. PMID:19726924

  9. American Nephrology Nurses' Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nurses Week (September 11-17) More News National Events Fall Meeting 2016 Oct 08, 2016 to Oct ... 2017 to Sep 25, 2017 Miami, Florida More Events Corporate-Plus Members View ANNA's Current Corporate Members ...

  10. [Smoking among nursing students].

    PubMed

    Kolleck, Bernd

    2004-04-01

    Smoking as a major public-health concern is still a widespread habit among nurses and young students of nursing. The hypothesis however, that professional environment positively influences smoking habit, could not be supported: smoking is less influenced by vocational training and practice than by the social environment of the students. The results of the survey also show, that a great part of the smokers have a critical attitude towards their habit and would agree to counteractions. Nursing schools could play an important role therein. The conception of nursing as a responsible health profession would demand to take over a more active part in considering the consequences, in smoking prevention and in supporting cessation. PMID:15137673

  11. Jurisdiction in community nursing services.

    PubMed

    Ellefsen, B

    1998-10-01

    This article focuses on community-health nursing services and their jurisdiction in Norway. The aim of the study was to analyze and gain a better understanding of community-nursing services' jurisdiction and jurisdictional pressure. The areas of investigation were degree of jurisdictional control, pattern of pressure in the jurisdiction, and nurses' strategies to deal with this pressure. The respondents were nurses in public health nursing service, home nursing service, and nursing homes. The results showed that nurses in the three different community-nursing services had different degrees of formal and informal control in their jurisdictions. Patterns of pressure were visible both inside and outside of the jurisdiction. Jurisdictional pressure led to strategies that strengthened control of the work, fortified professional status, or both. PMID:9775738

  12. 20 CFR 404.1029 - Student nurses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Student nurses. If you are a student nurse, your work for a hospital or nurses training school is excluded from employment if you are enrolled and regularly attending classes in a nurses training school...

  13. 20 CFR 404.1029 - Student nurses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Student nurses. If you are a student nurse, your work for a hospital or nurses training school is excluded from employment if you are enrolled and regularly attending classes in a nurses training school...

  14. 20 CFR 404.1029 - Student nurses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Student nurses. If you are a student nurse, your work for a hospital or nurses training school is excluded from employment if you are enrolled and regularly attending classes in a nurses training school...

  15. 20 CFR 404.1029 - Student nurses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Student nurses. If you are a student nurse, your work for a hospital or nurses training school is excluded from employment if you are enrolled and regularly attending classes in a nurses training school...

  16. 20 CFR 404.1029 - Student nurses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Student nurses. If you are a student nurse, your work for a hospital or nurses training school is excluded from employment if you are enrolled and regularly attending classes in a nurses training school...

  17. [Nursing care in prison].

    PubMed

    Aujard, Ségolène; de Brisoult, Béatrice; Broussard, Daniel; Petitclerc-Roche, Solenne; Lefort, Hugues

    2016-03-01

    In France, nurses practising in the prison environment work in a health care unit, for somatic care, or in a regional medical-psychological unit for large facilities and psychological care. These units belong to the regional hospitals. Located at the heart of the prison, they cater for prisoner-patients. On the frontline, the nurse has specific autonomy and responsibility in this unique context. PMID:26975674

  18. Allomaternal nursing in humans.

    PubMed

    Hewlett, Barry S; Winn, Steve

    2014-04-01

    Few studies exist of allomaternal nursing in humans. It is relatively common among some cultures, such as the Aka and Efé hunter-gatherers of the Congo Basin, but it does not occur in other foragers such as the !Kung and Hadza of Southern and East Africa. This paper utilizes focal follow observations of Aka and Efé infants, interviews with Aka mothers, ethnographic reports from researchers working with hunter-gatherers, and a survey of the eHRAF cultures to try to answer the following questions: how often does allomaternal nursing occur, who provides it, and under what contexts does it take place? The study indicates that it occurs in many cultures (93% of cultures with data) but that it is normative in relatively few cultures; biological kin, especially grandmothers, frequently provide allomaternal nursing and that infant age, mother's condition, and culture (e.g., cultural models about if and when women other than the mother can nurse an infant or colostrum taboos) impact the nature and frequency of allomaternal nursing. The empirical results of this exploratory study are discussed in the context of existing hypotheses used to explain allomaternal nursing. PMID:24991682

  19. A nursing challenge: adult-onset Tay-Sachs disease.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, D

    1991-12-01

    Adult-onset GM2 gangliosidosis (AOG), also labelled Adult-Onset Tay-Sachs disease, is a slowly progressing disease caused by a gradual accumulation of the GM2 ganglioside in neurons due to defective hexosaminidase A. Recent research findings and clinical experiences suggest that AOG may be more widespread than previously believed. Moreover, the diagnosis of AOG is often delayed because patients present with psychotic symptoms that mimic dementia, schizophrenia, mania, and depression. Because AOG patients typically respond poorly to psychiatric drug therapy and the symptomatology is so diverse, nurses must design and implement nursing care that ensures safety, structure, and comfort. PMID:1759864

  20. Assessment of nursing care using indicators generated by software1

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Ana Paula Souza; Chianca, Tânia Couto Machado; Tannure, Meire Chucre

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to analyze the efficacy of the Nursing Process in an Intensive Care Unit using indicators generated by software. METHOD: cross-sectional study using data collected for four months. RNs and students daily registered patients, took history (at admission), performed physical assessments, and established nursing diagnoses, nursing plans/prescriptions, and assessed care delivered to 17 patients using software. Indicators concerning the incidence and prevalence of nursing diagnoses, rate of effectiveness, risk diagnoses, and rate of effective prevention of complications were computed. RESULTS: the Risk for imbalanced body temperature was the most frequent diagnosis (23.53%), while the least frequent was Risk for constipation (0%). The Risk for Impaired skin integrity was prevalent in 100% of the patients, while Risk for acute confusion was the least prevalent (11.76%). Risk for constipation and Risk for impaired skin integrity obtained a rate of risk diagnostic effectiveness of 100%. The rate of effective prevention of acute confusion and falls was 100%. CONCLUSION: the efficacy of the Nursing Process using indicators was analyzed because these indicators reveal how nurses have identified patients' risks and conditions, and planned care in a systematized manner. PMID:26039293

  1. Conceptual and theoretical approaches to patient care: associate versus baccalaureate degree prepared nurses.

    PubMed

    Giger, J N; Davidhizar, R E

    1990-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine if there is a relationship between types of entry-level preparatory nursing programmes in which a nurse receives basic nursing education and conceptual and theoretical approaches to patient care. A secondary purpose of the study was to determine if there is a relationship between entry-level basic preparatory nursing education and nursing leadership, the ability to make nursing diagnosis, and implementation, as well as evaluation of the nursing process. Three nursing practice categories were identified and included: professional, all-nurse and technical. Useable data collected by short-essay questionnaire from 343 out of 344 sample subjects were computed to determine the relationship, if any, between basic preparatory nursing education and conceptual and theoretical approaches to patient care. Decisions about three null hypotheses were made at the 0.05 level of significance utilizing analysis of covariance and the 0.01 level of significance utilizing chi-square analysis. For Hypothesis 1, the main effect for degree work when covaried with Verbal Scholastic Aptitude Test scores, Quantitative Scholastic Aptitude Test scores, time and age indicated a significance of 0.001 for all item associations in the professional, all-nurse and technical categories utilizing analysis of covariance, and 0.001 utilizing chi-square analysis. For Hypotheses 2 and 3, the main effect for degree work when covaried with the aforementioned variables indicated a significance of 0.001 utilizing analysis of covariance, and 0.001 utilizing chi-square analysis. In conclusion, the findings from the study suggest that graduates of baccalaureate degree programmes do vary in conceptual and theoretical approach to nursing care in specific nursing care situations.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2229698

  2. Synchronous connections: nursing's little secret.

    PubMed

    Krejci, J W

    1995-07-01

    As nurses prepare for their place in health care reform, it is becoming more important than ever to be clear about the unique contribution nurses make to health care outcomes. In our technology-driven society, however, some of nursing's most powerful contributions go unacknowledged. An unexpected finding of a study on nurse experts' perceptions of synchrony revealed that nurses themselves frequently do not document or even dialog about important contributions if they cannot be captured within the dominant paradigm of high-technology care. The article describes nurses "little secret" that must be exposed. PMID:7640383

  3. Caring in Nursing Professional Development.

    PubMed

    Martin, Mary Brigid

    2015-01-01

    Caring science has been identified and examined in the discipline of nursing for over 40 years. Within this period, the topic has been analyzed and studied resulting in theories, models, books, and articles published nationally and internationally. Although advancements have been made in caring knowledge development, opportunities to integrate caring science into all aspects of nursing abound, including the specialty of nursing professional development. The focus of this article is to present ways in which nursing professional development specialists may incorporate caring science into practice, using Ray's (2010) Transcultural Caring Dynamics in Nursing and Health Care model as an exceptional exemplar for understanding, awareness, and choice for nurses and patients. PMID:26381337

  4. Handbook of clinical nursing practice

    SciTech Connect

    Asheervath, J.; Blevins, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Written in outline format, this reference will help nurses further their understanding of advanced nursing procedures. Information is provided on the physiological, psychological, environmental, and safety considerations of nursing activities associated with diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Special consideration is given to the areas of pediatric nursing, nursing assessment, and selected radiologic and nuclear medicine procedures for each system. Contents: Clinical Introduction. Clinical Nursing Practice: Focus on Basics. Focus on Cardiovascular Function. Focus on Respiratory Function. Focus on Gastrointestinal Function. Focus on Renal and Genito-Urological Function. Focus on Neuro-Skeletal and Muscular Function. Appendices.

  5. Negotiation. A skill for nurses.

    PubMed

    Hrinkanic, J

    1998-11-01

    As cutbacks and health care reform bring changes to nurses' roles and health care structures, conflict almost invariably arises. Clashes stem from unclear expectations about new roles, poor communication between management and staff, a lack of clear jurisdiction over changing responsibilities, personal differences in approaches to nursing and conflicting interests as different departments struggle to maintain their share of the health care dollar. The friction could be at the individual or the group level; it might exist between shifts of nurses, between nurses and their managers, or between nurse managers and other administration. In all cases, you, the nurse, are the one who must deal with it. PMID:10025279

  6. Challenges facing internationalisation of nursing practice, nurse education and nursing workforce in Australia.

    PubMed

    Parker, Vicki; McMillan, Margaret

    2007-04-01

    This paper examines factors that have lead to increasing internationalisation in nursing workforce and nursing education and contends that education and support for nurse managers and nurse academics is required in order to better prepare them for the challenges they will face. There are many benefits to be gained from internationalisation of nursing, the most significant being greater cross-cultural understanding and improved practices in workplaces across countries. However, the way in which nursing and nurses contribute to the international agenda is crucial to maintaining standards of education and nursing care in Australia and in countries with whom Australians collaborate. Internationalisation poses numerous challenges that need to be carefully thought through. This paper seeks to unravel and scrutinize some of the issues central to internationalisation in nursing, particularly in the Australian context. PMID:17563321

  7. The global quest for nursing excellence.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Stephanie L

    2013-11-01

    In this month's column, Stephanie Ferguson, PhD, RN, FAAN, Director, International Council of Nurses' (ICN) Leadership for Change Programme; Facilitator, ICN Global Nursing Leadership Institute; ICN Consultant for Nursing and Health Policy; and World Health Organization Consultant, provides a perspective on the importance of global nursing excellence and highlights the American Nurses Credentialing Center's strategic global quest for nursing excellence. PMID:24153194

  8. The National Commission on Nursing Implementation Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Back, Vivien

    1991-01-01

    Outcomes of the National Commission on Nursing Implementation Project were (1) a study of cost-effective nursing delivery systems; (2) development of nursing information systems; (3) "Nursing's Vital Signs," which documented information collected; (4) the National Nursing Image Campaign; and (5) initiatives to redesign nursing education, practice,…

  9. Curriculum Development for Part-Time Programs for Certified Nurse Assistant to Licensed Vocational Nurse; and Licensed Vocational Nurse to Associate Degree Nurse Program (CNA-VN-RN).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saxe, Ellen; And Others

    This report describes the Imperial Valley College nursing program, a program developed to provide for the nursing needs of Imperial County, California. The program provides part-time education to help train nursing assistants and to allow nursing assistants to upgrade their skills to vocational nurse level and vocational nurses to become…

  10. Nurses' perceptions of patients' requirements for nursing resources.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Sandra V; Schmitz, Karl

    2005-01-01

    The study used semi-structured interviews in an interpretive research design to explore nurses' perceptions of patients requiring disproportionate amounts of nursing resources, and factors influencing those perceptions. A total of 50 senior nurses from a variety of medical and surgical settings, including a high dependency unit, were interviewed and the data analysed to determine common themes and differences between participants. The four major themes of patient characteristics, family needs, staffing and organisational context defined the factors nurses perceived as influencing their perceptions of patients' dependency. Patient requirements for nursing resources were seen as a continuum rather than a specific point, and were balanced on the combined influences of the four themes. At times, demands imposed on nursing resources lead to nurses' perceptions of delivering less than ideal care, stress and frustration. The latter applied particularly to factors that were outside of the control of nurses such as staffing levels and skill mix. PMID:16499239

  11. The Lived Experience of Nurses Working with Student Nurses in the Clinical Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathorn, Donna; Machtmes, Krisanna; Tillman, Ken

    2009-01-01

    One response to the nursing shortage is to increase promotion and retention in nursing programs: However, negative attitudes of nurses threaten student progression and retention. A phenomenological study explored the lived experience of nurses who worked with student nurses to discover "what" attitudes nurses had toward student nurses and "how"…

  12. Nursing in Malawi: nursing theory in the movement to professionalize nursing.

    PubMed

    Bultemeier, Kaye I

    2012-04-01

    Nursing in Malawi has been predominately a technical trade and only recently has begun the transition to a profession with autonomy and advanced degree preparation. Nursing theories provide a framework for the evolution of nursing to an independent profession. Theories provide a means for the articulation of the nursing role to other members of the healthcare team including consumers. Healthcare and human needs are basic and the guidance provided by nursing theories, including Nightingale's, gives language and structure to the education of nurses as the profession moves into advanced practice in a developing country. PMID:22451639

  13. The continuing quest for parity: HBCU nursing students' perspectives on nursing and nursing education.

    PubMed

    Talley, Costellia; Talley, Henry; Collins-McNeil, Janice

    2016-08-01

    The benefits of a diverse nursing workforce are well-recognized, yet, the attainment of a sustainable, competent and diverse nursing workforce continues to be a global challenge. In this qualitative study, we describe nursing students' perceptions on nursing and nursing education at a Historically Black College/University (HBCU). Focus groups were conducted with 16 graduate and undergraduate nursing students. Four themes emerged: communication, lack of resources, support systems and professional socialization. Mentoring and civility were identified as factors important to enhance a diverse workforce. PMID:27286940

  14. Oncology Nurse Navigation Role and Qualifications.

    PubMed

    2015-09-01

    In the early 1990s, women living in a medically underserved community acted as lay navigators to help other women overcome barriers to breast cancer screening and follow-up (Freeman, Muth, & Kerner, 1995). At that time, treatment for cancer was straightforward. Today, cancer treatment is complex, and understanding the diagnosis, treatment, and healthcare system requires the skill of an oncology nurse navigator (ONN). Navigation includes the entire healthcare continuum-from prevention, screening, diagnosis, treatment, and survivorship to end of life. The goal of navigation is to reduce cancer morbidity and mortality by eliminating barriers to timely access to cancer care, which may be financial, psychological, logistic, or related to communication or the healthcare delivery system. PMID:26302274

  15. Trends in State Regulation of Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants, 2001 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    Gadbois, Emily A.; Miller, Edward Alan; Tyler, Denise; Intrator, Orna

    2016-01-01

    Nurse practitioners and physician assistants can alleviate some of the primary care shortage facing the United States, but their scope-of-practice is limited by state regulation. This study reports both cross-sectional and longitudinal trends in state scope-of-practice regulations for nurse practitioners and physician assistants over a 10-year period. Regulations from 2001 to 2010 were compiled and described with respect to entry-to-practice standards, physician involvement in treatment/diagnosis, prescriptive authority, and controlled substances. Findings indicate that most states loosened regulations, granting greater autonomy to nurse practitioners and physician assistants, particularly with respect to prescriptive authority and physician involvement in treatment and diagnosis. Many states also increased barriers to entry, requiring high levels of education before entering practice. Knowledge of state trends in nurse practitioner and physician assistant regulation should inform current efforts to standardize scope-of-practice nationally. PMID:25542195

  16. Nurse Educators' Leadership Styles and Nurse Graduates' Licensure Passage Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Dianna Bailey

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlational research study was to examine the relationship between leadership styles of community college nurse educators in Texas and licensure passage rates of nursing community college graduates in Texas. Surveys were conducted to obtain the nurse educators' demographic data. The Multifactor Leadership…

  17. Changes in Students' Orientations to Nursing during Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanhansen, Liisa; Janhonen, Sirpa

    2000-01-01

    At the beginning and end of their studies, 19 Finnish student nurses were interviewed about their orientations to nursing (caring, nursing expertise, or life-career). Pre-education orientations typically remained the same. Contradictions between theory and practice were revealed. The educational system did not give much support for managing life…

  18. [German hospital nurses' attitudes concerning evidence-based nursing practice].

    PubMed

    Köpke, Sascha; Koch, Frauke; Behncke, Anja; Balzer, Katrin

    2013-06-01

    The relevance of nurses' attitudes for establishing an evidence-based nursing practice (EBP) has been proven internationally. For German-speaking countries so far only few data are available. The present survey aims at assessing nurses' perceptions of relevant context factors for implementing an EBP. Therefore, 1384 nurses in 21 hospitals in Northern-Germany received a self-developed questionnaire based on established instruments in March and April 2012. 1023 (74 %) nurses responded. In principal, results show a positive attitude towards EBP. The majority of participants regards research as relevant for nursing practice. Support from superiors and colleagues is seen as important prerequisite. However, implementation remains a challenge. Nurses are not informed about recent research results. Original articles are hardly used. Only a minority is prepared to spend own money on congresses or to start academic nursing training in the near future. For the first time in German-speaking countries, the study provides meaningful data on nurses' attitudes towards EBP. Nurses confirm the value of research for their own practice. However, there is a lack of basic requirements to identify and implement relevant research findings as for example the use of recent scientific evidence. Nursing education in Germany should therefore focus more strongly on building competencies required for EBP, for example through properly designed academic nursing training. PMID:23732313

  19. Diagnosis and Treatment of Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Henry, W. Desmond; Mann, Alan M.

    1965-01-01

    Delirium is not a clinical entity but a symptom-complex of manifold etiology. Its presence signifies acute cerebral insufficiency and often represents a medical and/or psychiatric emergency. Though some forms of delirium have distinctive features, the fundamental phenomena are common to all, with clouding of consciousness the sine qua non. The condition has two major components: (1) the basic “acute brain syndrome” and (2) associated release phenomena. Clinicians must first make the vital differentiation between delirium and “functional” mental disorder, then proceed with the elucidation of the underlying diagnosis and the concurrent organization of symptomatic and etiologic treatment. Proper treatment combines management of the acute brain syndrome with general and specific procedures for control of the underlying condition. Dealing with the symptom-complex itself involves the principles and practice of sedation, hydration, and nutrition, nursing care and supportive measures. Provided the basic organic condition is treatable, the prognosis today is usually good. PMID:5844423

  20. Ethnic Power Perspectives for Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchione, Joanne; Stearns, Susan J.

    1990-01-01

    Nurses can miss important cultural traditions and values that relate to sources of ethnic power in families. Continued efforts by nurses to learn about these values helps them assist families with health care decisions. (JOW)

  1. Nursing Students with Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selekman, Janice

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the following topics: identification and classification of learning disabilities (LD), effects of LD on nursing students, teaching and learning, LD legislation, and academic interventions for nursing students with LD. (SK)

  2. Skilled nursing or rehabilitation facilities

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000435.htm Skilled nursing or rehabilitation facilities To use the sharing features ... facility. Who Needs to go to a Skilled Nursing or Rehabilitation Facility? Your health care provider may ...

  3. Skilled nursing or rehabilitation facilities

    MedlinePlus

    ... may need to be transferred to a skilled nursing or rehabilitation facility. ... Common medical problems that often lead to skilled nursing or rehabilitation facility care include: Joint replacement surgery, ...

  4. Applying talent management to nursing.

    PubMed

    Haines, Sue

    To deliver the chief nursing officer for England's vision for compassionate care and embed the 6Cs effectively, the NHS must attract, develop and retain talented nurses with a diverse range of skills. This is particularly important given the predicted shortage of nurses and evidence that NHS providers need to increase skill mix ratios to deliver safe patient care. "Talent management" is increasingly discussed within the health service; we recently asked nurses and student nurses to identify their priorities for talent development. They highlighted the importance of strong ward leadership, effective personal appraisal, clearer career pathways, increased staff engagement and involvement in decision making, as well as a need for greater emphasis on the recognition and reward of nursing achievements. We concluded that these factors are crucial to attracting, retaining and developing talent in nursing. Nurse leaders can learn approaches to developing talent from business and wider healthcare settings. PMID:24380172

  5. Gilligan: a voice for nursing?

    PubMed Central

    Harbison, J

    1992-01-01

    The current reform of nursing education is resulting in major changes in the curricula of colleges of nursing. For the first time, ethical and moral issues are being seen as an important theme underpinning the entire course. The moral theorist with whose work most nurse teachers are acquainted is Kohlberg. In this paper, it is suggested that his work, and the conventions of morality which he exemplifies, may not be the most appropriate from which to address the moral issues facing the nurse. The author suggests that the work of Carol Gilligan of Harvard university is of great significance, not only for nurses involved in the teaching of ethics, but for all nurses. Gilligan's emphasis on caring and relationships accords with the common experience of the nurse, and echoes the current revival of interest within nursing in examining, and valuing, the phenomenon of caring. PMID:1460649

  6. Predictive validity of the Nursing Severity Index in patients with musculoskeletal disease. Nurses of University Hospitals of Cleveland.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, G E; Halloran, E J; Kiley, M; Landefeld, C S

    1995-02-01

    Prior studies have not examined the validity of severity of illness instruments in patients at low risk for mortality. We, therefore, examined the predictive validity of a newly developed instrument, the Nursing Severity Index in 5347 adult medical and surgical patients with musculoskeletal diagnoses admitted to an academic medical center in 1985-88. The Index is based on aggregating 34 clinical observations which were recorded by primary nurses during patient care; observations reflect biologic, functional, cognitive and psychosocial abnormalities. Other data, including patient demographic data and outcomes were obtained from hospital data bases. We found that, among all study patients, admission Nursing Severity Index scores were highly related (p < 0.001) to in-hospital death rates-which were 0, 0.4, 0.8, 2.6, 6.7 and 23.5% in six hierarchical strata defined by the Index-and to nursing home discharge rates. In multivariate analyses, adjusting for diagnosis and other important covariates, each strata was associated with a 2.5-fold increased risk of mortality and a 1.6-fold increased risk of nursing home discharge. In addition, the Nursing Severity Index was an independent predictor (p < 0.001) of hospital charges and length of stay. We conclude that the Nursing Severity Index assesses multiple dimensions of illness, can be easily recorded during routine patient care, and accurately predicts hospital outcomes in an important 'low risk' group of patients. The validity of the Nursing Severity Index in other clinical subgroups should be further studied. PMID:7869064

  7. Nursing homes in China.

    PubMed

    Chu, Leung-Wing; Chi, Iris

    2008-05-01

    China will face a dramatic transition from a young to an aged society in the coming 30 to 40 years. In 2000, there were 88,110,000 persons aged 65 years and older, which represented 7% of the population. This percentage is projected to increase to 23% in 2050. Regarding health and long-term care for older adults, the current challenge is to build a comprehensive system of care for older adults. Nursing home care is an inevitable care model for frail older adults in China, which is largely sponsored by the government of China with contributions from some nongovernment organizations and private investors. China is a large country. Within the country, long-term care varies greatly between rural and urban areas, and among the different economic developing areas. In urban and better-developed areas, the range of services exists; however, in rural and less-developed areas, the range of services is limited. The "Star Light Program" and "Beloved Care Engineering" were recent government initiatives to improve aged care. They were launched in 2001 and have dramatically increased the number of both senior centers and nursing homes for older adults. While the quantity of nursing homes is still inadequate with an additional mismatch problem between the supply and demand, the quality of care in most nursing homes is suboptimal. At present, most administrative and frontline workers in nursing homes have received little training in elder care. There is a need for good-quality structured training in long-term care for all types of staff. Moreover, quality standard for care, including standard setting, assessment, and monitoring, is an important issue and needs substantial improvement for nursing homes in China. Currently, 1.5% of older people live in nursing homes and apartments for older people. Because of the peculiar 4-2-1 family structure in China, we expect the prevalence of nursing home placement of older adults will increase in the coming years. The government of China has

  8. Advanced practice registered nurse certification.

    PubMed

    Alleman, Kim; Houle, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) in nephrology began to be certified through the Nephrology Nursing Certification Commission (NNCC) in 2006. Since that time, the APRN Consensus Model has been developed, which addresses licensure, accreditation, certification, and education and which strongly recommends specialty certification for advanced practice nurses. This article discusses NNCC certification for advanced practice in nephrology nursing and describes the major components of the APRN Consensus Model. PMID:23923801

  9. Academic dishonesty among nursing students.

    PubMed

    Gaberson, K B

    1997-01-01

    Student cheating on college campuses is believed to be a common occurrence, but academic dishonesty among nursing students is a source of legitimate concern to nursing faculty members because of its potential effect on present and future professional practice. Strategies are outlined that can promote academic honesty in the nursing program through moral and character development of nursing students, teaching moral decision-making skills, role-modeling of honest academic behavior, and developing and enforcing an appropriate academic integrity policy. PMID:9362877

  10. The elusive profession called nursing.

    PubMed

    Karnick, Paula M

    2014-10-01

    As a discipline, nursing continues the struggle to be recognized by others as a profession. Despite the fact that nursing has a unique body of knowledge with theory, scientific inquiry, practice, and a code of ethics, the litmus test for defining the profession remains elusive. The discipline is not valued. Much of the struggle is in part due to the criteria developed by non- nurses regarding what the nursing profession should be, not what it truly is. PMID:25248771

  11. Back disorders and lumbar load in nursing staff in geriatric care: a comparison of home-based care and nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Back pain is one of the most frequent complaints in the nursing profession. Thus, the 12-month prevalence of pain in the lumbar spine in nursing staff is as high as 76%. Only a few representative studies have assessed the prevalence rates of back pain and its risk factors among nursing staff in nursing homes in comparison to staff in home-based care facilities. The present study accordingly investigates the prevalence in the lumbar and cervical spine and determines the physical workload to lifting and caring in geriatric care. Methods 1390 health care workers in nursing homes and home care participated in this cross sectional survey. The nursing staff members were examined by occupational physicians according to the principals of the multistep diagnosis of musculoskeletal disorders. Occupational exposure to daily care activities with patient transfers was measured by a standardised questionnaire. The lumbar load was calculated with the Mainz-Dortmund dose model. Information on ergonomic conditions were recorded from the management of the nursing homes. Comparisons of all outcome variables were made between both care settings. Results Complete documentation, including the findings from the occupational physicians and the questionnaire, was available for 41%. Staff in nursing homes had more often positive orthopaedic findings than staff in home care. At the same time the values calculated for lumbar load were found to be significant higher in staff in nursing homes than in home-based care: 45% vs. 6% were above the reference value. Nursing homes were well equipped with technical lifting aids, though their provision with assistive advices is unsatisfactory. Situation in home care seems worse, especially as the staff often has to get by without assistance. Conclusions Future interventions should focus on counteracting work-related lumbar load among staff in nursing homes. Equipment and training in handling of assistive devices should be improved especially

  12. Humour in nursing care.

    PubMed

    Astedt-Kurki, P; Liukkonen, A

    1994-07-01

    Humour is an integral part of everyday life and therefore also a component of the care and treatment of patients in the modern health care system. This paper looks at the role of humour in practical nursing in the light of earlier research literature on the subject. It also describes some preliminary results of our studies on the meaning of humour to professional nurses. We opted to use a qualitative approach in this study because the focus of interest was on an issue that has received only little attention in earlier research. Nurses were presented with a set of unstructured, open-ended questions requiring short, essay-type answers. The data obtained were analysed using the qualitative method of content analysis. In the light of our findings here, humour can be described as a joie de vivre which is manifested in human interaction in the form of fun, jocularity and laughter. Humour is a meaningful factor, both with regard to the patient's well-being and to coping, and also with regard to the interaction of nurse and patient. Humour also allows for more job satisfaction and better motivation. Research should be continued and intensified into the role and use of humour in everyday life and particularly in nursing care. PMID:7930119

  13. Nursing and human freedom.

    PubMed

    Risjord, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Debates over how to conceptualize the nursing role were prominent in the nursing literature during the latter part of the twentieth century. There were, broadly, two schools of thought. Writers like Henderson and Orem used the idea of a self-care deficit to understand the nurse as doing for the patient what he or she could not do alone. Later writers found this paternalistic and emphasized the importance of the patient's free will. This essay uses the ideas of positive and negative freedom to explore the differing conceptions of autonomy which are implicit in this debate. The notion of positive freedom has often been criticized as paternalistic, and the criticisms of self-care in the nursing literature echo criticisms from political philosophy. Recent work on relational autonomy and on the relationship between autonomy and identity are used to address these objections. This essay argues for a more nuanced conception of the obligation to support autonomy that includes both positive (freedom to) and negative (freedom from) dimensions. This conception of autonomy provides a moral foundation for conceptualizing nursing in something like Henderson's terms: as involving the duty to expand the patient's capacities. The essay concludes by generalizing the lesson. Respect for autonomy on the part of any health care provider requires both respect for the patient's choices and a commitment to expand the patient's ability to actualize their choices. PMID:24320980

  14. [Nursing, simply complicated].

    PubMed

    Martínez Riera, José Ramón

    2005-04-01

    From a very young age, we played doctors and nurses. Back then, society was positive that a nursing profession existed. Now, is society's vision adequate? Evidently not. But, Why does this distortion exist? Fundamentally this occurs because the professionals themselves do not have a clear identity regarding their profession. And Why is this? Because the education transmitted has important lacks, the sanitary system dampens innovation and creativity, there are no appropriate leaders, lobbies transform into "wolves", and neither do we have a tradition which facilitates association and cooperation amongst professionals. These are some of the factors which the author develops in this deep, brave analysis about the reality of the nursing profession in order to arrive at the conclusion that we must have clear in our minds what nursing power is, a power which interacts with the community, and that this is important not only as a power in itself but rather as a means to increase the intrinsic value of nursing, none other than providing care. PMID:15941177

  15. Preparation of academic nurse educators.

    PubMed

    Booth, Tracy L; Emerson, Christi J; Hackney, Michele G; Souter, Sharon

    2016-07-01

    Nursing practice is diverse, with nurses serving in both direct and indirect patient care roles. For nurse educators, the realm of nursing practice extends beyond direct patient care to include preparing students for nursing practice. Academic nurse educators must be prepared to serve as educators, researchers, and to have experience in a clinical specialty area. For many nurse educators, advanced academic preparation often relates to a clinical area of practice rather than pedagogical practice. Graduate-level knowledge of evidence-based research and practice, teaching methods, and curriculum design and development form the foundation for academic practice. Because education and nursing are two distinctive disciplines, clinical expertise does not naturally result in teaching expertise. Lack of consensus regarding the educational preparation of nurse educators adds to the complexity of the nursing profession. The purpose of this article is to advocate for pedagogical preparation for academic nurse educators. Additionally, this article contains recommendations for pedagogical competencies indicative of academic nurse educator preparation. PMID:27428693

  16. Quality Assurance in Nursing Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balgopal, Pallassana R.; And Others

    This manual, developed for the nursing home employee, examines the concept of quality assurance in nursing homes, describes the benefits of an effective quality assurance program, and provides guidelines to aid nursing homes in developing an appropriate quality assurance program. After a brief introduction, a working definition of quality…

  17. 75 Hour Nurse Aide Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Univ., Iowa City. Coll. of Education.

    This 75-hour nurse aide course has been designed to meet the training requirements of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1987 for aides working in nursing facilities and skilled nursing facilities. Emphasis in the course is on students achieving a basic level of knowledge and demonstrating skills to provide safe, effective resident care. The…

  18. Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reighley, Joan

    A description is provided of a course, "Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing," designed to teach students at Level 3 of a two-year college nursing program about the role of the nurse in a psychiatric setting and about concepts of mental health and psychiatric disorders, using both classroom and clinical instruction. The first section of the course…

  19. Being Human: Transdisciplinarity in Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmons, Stephen; Edgley, Alison; Meal, Andy; Narayanasamy, Aru

    2016-01-01

    Nursing as an academic discipline typically draws on a wide range of other disciplines. There is debate about whether this is a sound basis for the discipline, or whether nursing needs to develop a distinctive body of knowledge. The concept of transdisciplinarity, though little discussed in nursing, is of considerable value in understanding…

  20. Establishing a sustainable nursing workforce.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Judie

    2010-07-01

    Occupational sustainability in healthcare services involves meeting the demands of a changing NHS without compromising the health and wellbeing of nurses. This article examines occupational sustainability in the nursing profession, focusing on issues of nursing workload, employee health and recruitment issues, and workforce diversity. PMID:20681404

  1. Competency Based Refresher Nurse Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardo, Mary C.

    This competency-based course is designed to update the skills and knowledge of inactive nurses desiring to return to active practice. Focus of the course is on organizing and managing patient care using the nursing process; performing nursing procedures, including medication administration; and reintegrating oneself into the professional…

  2. Innovating Traditional Nursing Administration Challenges.

    PubMed

    Joseph, M Lindell; Fowler, Debra

    2016-03-01

    The evolving and complex practice environment calls for new mindsets among nurse leaders, academics, and nurse innovators to envision innovative ways to manage and optimize traditional tasks and processes in nursing administration. The purpose of this article is to present 3 case studies that used linear programming and simulation to innovate staffing enterprises, financial management of healthcare systems, and curricula development. PMID:26906516

  3. [Private nursing in public institutions].

    PubMed

    Corradini, M; Milani, L

    1998-01-01

    In this article the authors review the two sides of the intramoenia private nursing profession: the italian laws and the disciplinary frame of nursing, in order to define bonds and opportunities offered to nursing profession by means of such a topic. PMID:10455775

  4. Nursing Principles & Skills. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This curriculum guide contains 14 units for a course on nursing principles and skills needed by practical nurses. The 14 units of instruction cover the following: (1) using medical terminology; (2) practicing safety procedures; (3) using the nursing process for care planning; (4) using infection control techniques; (5) preparing a patient…

  5. Teaching Spiritual Care to Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Linda A.

    1996-01-01

    Spiritual care that enhances patient well-being should be taught to nurses, but it is unclear how or if it is being taught, according to a survey of 685 Scottish nurses. Nurses should be aware of the spiritual dimension of their own lives, have experience and learning from crises, and collaborate with clergy in meeting patients' spiritual needs.…

  6. Legal Issues in Nursing Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapp, Marshall B.

    This paper examines the variety of legal rules and processes which have been established to assess and ensure that the quality of care provided in nursing homes satisfies an acceptable level. It begins with a general overview of nursing home law. Areas discussed in this section include: (1) sources of nursing home law; (2) theories of liability;…

  7. Understanding HIV-related stigma among Indonesian nurses

    PubMed Central

    Waluyo, Agung; Culbert, Gabriel J.; Levy, Judith; Norr, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    Evidence indicates widespread stigmatization of persons living with HIV (PLWH) in Indonesia. Such attitudes among health care workers could impede the country’s policies for effective diagnosis and medical treatment of PLWH. Nonetheless, research to guide interventions to reduce stigma in health care settings is lacking. Also, the contributions of workplace, religion, and HIV knowledge to nurses’ HIV-related stigma are poorly understood. Our cross-sectional study aimed to describe factors associated with nurses’ stigmatizing attitudes toward PLWH. Four hundred nurses recruited from 4 hospitals in Jakarta, Indonesia, were surveyed using the Nurse AIDS Attitude Scale (NAAS) to measure stigma. Stigmatizing attitudes were significantly predicted by education, HIV training, perceived workplace stigma, religiosity, Islamic religious identification, and affiliation with the Islamic hospital. HIV knowledge was not a significant predictor of stigmatizing attitudes. Organization changes fostering workplace diversity are likely to substantially reduce stigmatizing attitudes in nurses. PMID:24759060

  8. Does the Use of a Classification for Nursing Diagnoses Affect Nursing Students’ Choice of Nursing Interventions?

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Joakim; Björvell, Catrin

    2012-01-01

    The Swedish health care system stands before an implementation of standardized language. The first classification of nursing diagnoses translated into Swedish, The NANDA, was released in January 2011. The aim of the present study was to examine whether the usage of the NANDA classification affected nursing students’ choice of nursing interventions. Thirty-three nursing students in a clinical setting were divided into two groups. The intervention group had access to the NANDA classification text book, while the comparison group did not. In total 78 nursing assessments were performed and 218 nursing interventions initiated. The principle findings show that there were no statistical significant differences between the groups regarding the amount, quality or category of nursing interventions when using the NANDA classification compared to free text format nursing diagnoses. PMID:24199065

  9. Community-based Nursing Education and Nursing Accreditation by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Ort, Suzanne; Townsend, Julie

    2000-01-01

    Interprets the accreditation standards of the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (mission and governance, institutional commitment and resources, curriculum and teaching practices, student performance and faculty accomplishments) in terms of community-based nursing. (SK)

  10. What nursing diagnoses do nurses use in long term care?

    PubMed

    Daly, J M; Maas, M; Buckwalter, K

    1995-01-01

    The results of this survey validate that the NANDA nursing diagnoses classification is appropriate for use in long term care. Although ninety three percent of the current NANDA nursing diagnoses are used in practice, there remains a need for the development and testing of additional nursing diagnoses to describe patient problems encountered in long term care. Nurses in education and practice settings must work collaboratively to continue to identify, refine and validate the nursing diagnoses that are most appropriate for frail, older and/or chronically ill residents of long term care facilities. PMID:7648273

  11. Nursing culpability: a proposal for change in nursing regulation.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Rosemary

    2004-02-01

    Nurses make mistakes. They work in a complex environment which can sometimes be a contributory factor to a mistake being made. At present, Nurses' Boards in Australia have no mandate to investigate the circumstances in which a mistake is made. Their jurisdiction is limited to investigation of the individual nurse. This article sets out the argument for change in nursing legislation to allow for a broadening of the role of Nurses' Boards. It argues that an extension of their jurisdiction explicitly to allow them to investigate inadequacies in the health system would be a constructive development. PMID:15018211

  12. Concept maps: linking nursing theory to clinical nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Daley, B J

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to offer a different methodology for teaching and learning in continuing nursing education and staff development. This article describes a qualitative research study that analyzed how linkages are made between theoretical material and clinical nursing practice. Findings indicate that nursing students did not link the elements of nursing process together, that clinical preparation was not linked to theoretical material, that the meaning students made of the information was different than the instructors' and that concepts from the basic sciences were not incorporated into student meaning structures. Implications for the use of concept maps as an educational strategy in continuing nursing education are drawn. PMID:8576492

  13. Innovative Programs Promoting Careers in OR Nursing.

    PubMed

    Ceschini, Donna

    2016-06-01

    Much of the baby boomer workforce is approaching retirement, and nurses who are part of this generation will need to be replaced. The strain is especially notable in the perioperative nursing environment. To assist in recruiting new perioperative nurses, three programs were introduced at a rural academic medical center. Leaders at this facility developed a perioperative nursing course to train new graduate nurses and nurses without OR experience, an introduction to perioperative nursing course for junior and senior undergraduate nursing students, and an intraoperative learning experience for high school students interested in a career in nursing. These three programs provide an opportunity to expose new nurses, nursing students, and high school students to an OR nursing career path. The programs and their successful outcomes are shared as exemplars for enhancing the education of new OR nurses and generating interest in OR nursing as a career path. PMID:27234797

  14. Smartphones in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Phillippi, Julia C; Wyatt, Tami H

    2011-08-01

    Smartphones are a new technology similar to PDAs but with expanded functions and greater Internet access. This article explores the potential uses and issues surrounding the use of smartphones in nursing education. While the functions of smartphones, such as sending text messages, viewing videos, and access to the Internet, may seem purely recreational, they can be used within the nursing curriculum to engage students and reinforce learning at any time or location. Smartphones can be used for quick access to educational materials and guidelines during clinical, class, or clinical conference. Students can review instructional videos prior to performing skills and readily reach their clinical instructor via text message. Downloadable applications, subscriptions, and reference materials expand the smartphone functions even further. Common concerns about requiring smartphones in nursing education include cost, disease transmission, and equipment interference; however, there are many ways to overcome these barriers and provide students with constant access to current clinical evidence. PMID:21107240

  15. [Accidents in nursing homes].

    PubMed

    Mediås, I B; Fiskerud, R

    1991-08-20

    169 "injury situations" involving 61 patients were registered in a nursing home during one year. Four patients were sent to hospital. A few patients had several falls. Men were more prone to injury than women. Age itself seemed to be of no importance. Patients on shortterm admittance were at high risk. In general patients with dementia were not at higher risk but suffered the more serious injuries and were also involved in various episodes of patient violence. The risk of injuries is generally high in nursing homes. A certain risk must be accepted, but it is important to introduce prophylactic measures. A larger nursing staff might have prevented some of the situations. PMID:1926073

  16. The role of a clinical nurse consultant dementia specialist: A qualitative evaluation.

    PubMed

    Duane, Fleur M; Goeman, Dianne P; Beanland, Chris J; Koch, Susan H

    2015-07-01

    Delay in diagnosis and difficulties in accessing appropriate health care services plague dementia care delivery in the community setting, potentiating the risk for misdiagnosis, inappropriate management, poor psychological adjustment and reduced coping capacity and ability to forward plan. We evaluated a clinical nurse consultant role with a speciality in dementia to provide person-centred pre-diagnosis support in the community. Clients, with a six-month history of cognitive and functional decline in the absence of delirium but no formal diagnosis of dementia, were recruited from a Home Care Nursing Service and an Aged Care Assessment Service located in the Western Suburbs of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. The role of a clinical nurse consultant was highly regarded by clients and other health professionals. This paper discussing the CNC role and the outcomes of the role suggests it was successful in providing timely assistance and support for consumers and support for other health professionals. PMID:24339107

  17. Predictive factors for the Nursing Diagnoses in people living with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome 1

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Richardson Augusto Rosendo; Costa, Romanniny Hévillyn Silva; Nelson, Ana Raquel Cortês; Duarte, Fernando Hiago da Silva; Prado, Nanete Caroline da Costa; Rodrigues, Eduardo Henrique Fagundes

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to identify the predictive factors for the nursing diagnoses in people living with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome. Method: a cross-sectional study, undertaken with 113 people living with AIDS. The data were collected using an interview script and physical examination. Logistic regression was used for the data analysis, considering a level of significance of 10%. Results: the predictive factors identified were: for the nursing diagnosis of knowledge deficit-inadequate following of instructions and verbalization of the problem; for the nursing diagnosis of failure to adhere - years of study, behavior indicative of failure to adhere, participation in the treatment and forgetfulness; for the nursing diagnosis of sexual dysfunction - family income, reduced frequency of sexual practice, perceived deficit in sexual desire, perceived limitations imposed by the disease and altered body function. Conclusion: the predictive factors for these nursing diagnoses involved sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, defining characteristics, and related factors, which must be taken into consideration during the assistance provided by the nurse. PMID:27384466

  18. Developing nurse educators' computer skills towards proficiency in nursing informatics.

    PubMed

    Rajalahti, Elina; Heinonen, Jarmo; Saranto, Kaija

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assess nurse educators' competence development in nursing informatics (NI) and to compare their competence to the NI competence of other healthcare professionals. Electronic health records (EHR) have been in use for many years. However, the adoption of the nursing care plan finally made it possible for nurses in Finland to develop a model for structured documentation with nursing terminology. A total of n = 124 (n = 85 pre-test and n = 39 post-test) participants from Universities of Applied Sciences (UAS), hospitals, hospitals' information management and health centres were surveyed with a e-questionnaire designed to assess the development of their NI competences during the nursing documentation development project. The questionnaire included 145 structured questions and 6 open questions. Data analysis focused on classification and comparison of NI competences through data description and statistical parameters using figures and tables. The basic NI competences of the nurse educators were good at the end of project and the nurse educators had better information literacy and information management competences than other participants. The information retrieval skills varied greatly, but they improved evenly towards the end. The nurse educators mastered better evidence-based nursing and use of nursing process models in their work. PMID:24152130

  19. Exploring clinical nursing experiences: listening to student nurses.

    PubMed

    Pearcey, Patricia; Draper, Peter

    2008-07-01

    Student nurses spend one half of their educational programme in the clinical area. The success of an educationally sound clinical placement is crucial to forming a professional nursing identity that will encompass the seen and 'unseen' aspects of the nurses' role. The aim of this study was to explore the clinical nursing environment through the perceptions of first year student nurses. Semi-structured interviews were used to collect data from 12 student nurses who each had four weeks clinical experience, representing 21 wards and five hospitals. Results suggest that these student nurses were disillusioned with the reality of clinical nursing and that their expectations of nursing were not realised. They perceived that paperwork, completing tasks and meeting targets were dominant features of nursing work at the expense of patient contact and communication. A majority indicated that nursing was not as caring as they expected and vowed to hold on to their personal values of caring about patients and forming communicative, interpersonal relationships with them. PMID:17950499

  20. Does Faculty Incivility in Nursing Education Affect Emergency Nursing Practice?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, Pamela

    Incivility in nursing education is a complicated problem which causes disruptions in the learning process and negatively affects future nursing practice. This mixed method research study described incivility as well as incivility's effects through extensive literature review and application of a modified Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey. The INE included six demographic items, four quantitative sections, and five open-ended questions. The survey examined emergency nurses' perceptions of incivility and how the experience affected their personal nursing practice. The INE was initially tested in a 2004 pilot study by Dr. Cynthia Clark. For this research study, modifications were made to examine specifically emergency nurse's perceptions of incivility and the effects on their practice. The population was a group of nurses who were members of the emergency nurses association in a Midwestern state. In the quantitative component of the Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey, the Likert scale questions indicated that the majority of the participants reported witnessing or experiencing the uncivil behaviors. In the qualitative section of the INE survey, the participants reported that although they have not seen incivility within their own academic career, they had observed faculty incivility with nursing students when the participants were assigned as preceptors as part of their emergency nursing practice.

  1. The lung cancer nurse role in the management of paraneoplastic syndromes in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) associated with lung cancer are well recognised, are often complex to diagnose, and have minimal evidence to promote nursing and medical management. This paper aims to help guide lung cancer nurses to identify the most common and rarer PNS together with basic clinical management advice to help develop nursing assessments and interventions. The issues regarding the pathway of care at diagnosis together with palliative and supportive care requirements will be addressed and will aim to promote best practice in patients diagnosed with PNS and lung cancer. PMID:27413699

  2. The aging nursing workforce: How to retain experienced nurses.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jeremye D

    2006-01-01

    In the face of an anticipated nursing shortage, healthcare organizations must evaluate their culture, operations, and compensation system to ensure that these elements align with organizational efforts to retain nurses who are approaching retirement age. Management should focus on enhancing elements of job satisfaction and job embeddedness that will motivate nurses to remain both in the workforce and with their employer. Although much of this responsibility falls on the nurse manager, nurse managers are often not provided the necessary support by top management and are neither recognized nor held accountable for nurse turnover. Other retention initiatives can include altering working conditions to reduce both physical and mental stress and addressing issues of employee health and safety. As for compensation, organizations may be well-served by offering senior nursing staff flexible working hours, salary structures that reward experience, and benefit programs that hold value for an aging workforce. PMID:16916117

  3. Reassessing nurse aide job satisfaction in a Texas nursing home.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Mark A; Horne, Kathleen K; Huerta, Timothy R

    2011-09-01

    This article reports a study that replicates and extends Castle's 2007 study by examining factors related to satisfaction of nurse aides at Carillon House, a 120-bed nonprofit skilled nursing facility in Lubbock, Texas. The Nursing Home Nurse Aide Job Satisfaction Questionnaire was adapted to allow for the collection of qualitative responses and administered to the nursing staff. The results suggest that satisfaction among nurse aides is related to rewards, workload, and the team environment created among coworkers. These findings differ from what is generally found in the literature and may be related to the higher-than-average satisfaction rating of nurse aides at this facility. The study provides evidence that large-scale surveys may have ignored a stratified effect where higher satisfaction organizations have different driving forces than what has been demonstrated in the literature to date. PMID:21634313

  4. Nursing: the hospital's competitive edge.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, F A; Preziosi, P

    1988-09-01

    The health care marketplace is becoming increasingly competitive. The hospital has a built-in marketing force with the nursing department, because nurses are in constant, direct contact with the customer. Nursing must identify the case mix profile of the community and focus the hospital product lines to meet community needs. The nursing department should decentralize, change, measure, and innovate the staff mix needed to operationalize these product lines. The development of nursing practice standards for the case mix will help to identify the staff mix needed and create systems to efficiently manage the product lines. Nursing management must become aware of cross-subsidization and downward skill substitution of nursing personnel. Nursing information systems must generate quality reports that invoke cost consciousness on the part of nursing staff. Quality assurance programs must become unit based and complete with frequent audits to correlate length of stay with nursing quality. Correlations must be determined between nursing productivity and case mix to determine the hospital's niche in the marketplace. The transformation of health care into a competitive business industry has created many opportunities for nursing. The health care industry's incentives for efficiency along with the decreasing demand for inpatient hospital services will be the forces driving health care toward a competitive marketplace. The hospital's nursing department should be strategically positioned to become accountable for increasing market share and enhancing quality patient outcomes. The focus has shifted from the theoretical to the tactical, which is a step in the right direction, particularly for nursing. Nursing, if strategically positioned, will not only thrive but will also excel in this chaotic environment by capturing the opportunities and being innovative. PMID:3047695

  5. Remodeling adult nursing.

    PubMed

    Mackie, J B; Graham, P B

    1996-01-01

    This article describes a nursing education experience in which a critical thinking approach was planned and implemented. Background discussion on critical thinking concepts and related research provides a foundation for presentation of the Mackie teaching model. The model uses a community-based, family-centered scenario as the basis for developing problem-focused nursing intervention skills from a holistic viewpoint. Role expectations of students and faculty are outlined, and related implementation difficulties, together with their resolution strategies, are described. Evaluation methods and outcomes are reviewed in the conclusion. PMID:9052186

  6. Comparing Perceptions of the Nursing Profession among Associate and Baccalaureate Nursing Students and Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovan, Sherry R.

    2009-01-01

    The inconsistencies between the perception of the profession of nursing and the reality of practice can lead to problems in student attrition or result in disillusionment with a career in nursing after a new graduate enters practice. With the nursing shortage reaching critical levels, it is important to examine possible discrepancies that exist…

  7. Software development to support decision making in the selection of nursing diagnoses and interventions for children and adolescents1

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Kenya de Lima; Évora, Yolanda Dora Martinez; Cintra, Camila Santana Justo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to report the development of a software to support decision-making for the selection of nursing diagnoses and interventions for children and adolescents, based on the nomenclature of nursing diagnoses, outcomes and interventions of a university hospital in Paraiba. Method: a methodological applied study based on software engineering, as proposed by Pressman, developed in three cycles, namely: flow chart construction, development of the navigation interface, and construction of functional expressions and programming development. Result: the software consists of administrative and nursing process screens. The assessment is automatically selected according to age group, the nursing diagnoses are suggested by the system after information is inserted, and can be indicated by the nurse. The interventions for the chosen diagnosis are selected by structuring the care plan. Conclusion: the development of this tool used to document the nursing actions will contribute to decision-making and quality of care. PMID:26487144

  8. Nursing students' attitudes toward science in the nursing curricula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maroo, Jill Deanne

    The nursing profession combines the art of caregiving with scientific concepts. Nursing students need to learn science in order to start in a nursing program. However, previous research showed that students left the nursing program, stating it included too much science (Andrew et al., 2008). Research has shown a correlation between students' attitudes and their performance in a subject (Osborne, Simon, & Collins, 2003). However, little research exists on the overall attitude of nursing students toward science. At the time of my study there existed no large scale quantitative study on my topic. The purpose of my study was to identify potential obstacles nursing students face, specifically, attitude and motivation toward learning science. According to research the nation will soon face a nursing shortage and students cite the science content as a reason for not completing the nursing program. My study explored nursing students' attitudes toward science and reasons these students are motivated to learn science. I ran a nationwide mixed methods approach with 1,402 participants for the quantitative portion and 4 participants for the qualitative portion. I validated a questionnaire in order to explore nursing students' attitudes toward science, discovered five different attitude scales in that questionnaire and determined what demographic factors provided a statistically significant prediction of a student's score. In addition, I discovered no statistical difference in attitude exists between students who have the option of taking nursing specific courses and those who do not have that option. I discovered in the qualitative interviews that students feel science is necessary in nursing but do not feel nurses are scientists. My study gives a baseline of the current attitude of nursing students toward science and why these students feel the need to learn the science.

  9. Perioperative Nurse Leaders and Professionalism.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, Dawn

    2016-08-01

    Professionalism in nursing leadership encompasses key elements that include a common body of knowledge, autonomous practice, self-regulation through education and licensure, a set code of ethics, and a commitment to altruism. Perioperative nurse leaders also must embrace collaboration, vision, accountability, and patient and staff member advocacy based on established ethics, values, and standards of care. Nurse leaders who are committed to professional development through pursuit of higher degrees, application of evidence-based practice, collaboration with colleagues, and certification show a strong commitment to their profession and serve as role models for staff members. This article discusses professionalism in nursing and offers information specific to perioperative nurse leaders. PMID:27472973

  10. Reflections on strategic nurse leadership.

    PubMed

    White, Jean

    2012-10-01

    This paper sets out some personal reflections by the Chief Nursing Officer for Wales on the challenges facing nurses and midwives as they undertake strategic leadership roles in NHS organisations. The paper looks at the national approach taken in Wales where behavioural competencies for executive nurse directors have been implemented. It considers the implications of the breadth of responsibilities executive nurse directors have and the importance of developing and supporting middle grade nurse managers and clinical directors. It concludes by looking at who is responsible for care within an organisation. PMID:23050616

  11. Nurses cut health care costs.

    PubMed

    Dunham-Taylor, J; Oldaker, J; DeCapua, T; Manley, N K; Oprian, B; Wrestler, J

    1993-12-01

    Nurses are a value-added and cost-savings component of health care, yet others frequently impede nurse efforts. Nurses, coupled with business, can contribute to cutting health care costs by (a) increasing dialogue with business leaders on effective cost-cutting measures across health care, (b) supporting nurse leaders who are capable of administering key community positions, (c) involving whole communities in wellness/health promotion and/or disease prevention programs, (d) encouraging more home health care alternatives; and (e) supporting nurse-related entrepreneurial efforts. PMID:8228142

  12. 42 CFR 405.2415 - Services and supplies incident to nurse practitioner, physician assistant, certified nurse...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... practitioner, physician assistant, certified nurse midwife, clinical psychologist, or clinical social worker... nurse practitioner, physician assistant, certified nurse midwife, clinical psychologist, or clinical..., certified nurse midwife, clinical psychologist, or clinical social worker service are payable under...

  13. Nursing perspectives for intensive care.

    PubMed

    Woodrow, P

    1997-06-01

    Within health care, market forces increasingly determine what services have economic value. For nursing to survive this economic onslaught, nurses must clarify their values and roles. While nurses working in intensive care develop useful technical skills and normally work within a constructive multi-disciplinary team framework, they have a potentially unique contribution to care, focusing on the patient as a whole person rather than intervening to solve a problem. The need for both physiological and psychological care creates a need for holistic values, best achieved through humanistic perspectives. Humanistic nursing places patients as people at the centre of nursing care, as illustrated by the limitations of reality orientation compared with the potentials of validation therapy. Intensive care nurses asserting and developing such patient-centred roles offer a valuable way forward for nursing to develop into the 21st century. PMID:9287577

  14. [Knowledge production about nursing outcomes].

    PubMed

    Seganfredo, Deborah Hein; Almeida, Miriam de Abreu

    2010-01-01

    This literature review aimed at identifying and analysing the knowledge production regarding nursing outcomes in a worldwide context. A systematized review was carried out using LILACS and MEDLINE databases. The following key words were used: outcomes, nursing and classification. No national production was identified. The main issues raised were: the use of the standardized outcomes classifications to measure changes in the patient's health condition; the use of the Nursing Outcomes Classifications (NOC) as the chosen terminology for nursing practice; the need to rank effectivity of nursing interventions by identifying the nursing-sensitive patient outcomes, as well as to make the nursing practice a profitable one to the institutions. It is important to develop and Brazilian studies addressing the issue. PMID:20339766

  15. [The nurse and patient's nudity].

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Regina Maria; Viana, Ivea Rayane M N; da Silva, Josefa Rita; Trezza, Maria Cristina Soares Figueiredo; Leite, Joséte Luzia

    2010-01-01

    This is a qualitative study about the relationship among nurses of a university hospital and their patients when they need to undress those patients to take care. The purpose was to analyze speech of seven nurses in this situation. The information was taken by transcribing the semi-structured interviews which were analyzed according Michel Foucault's thought. The results demonstrated that the relationship among nurses and patients at the time when nudity is needed to perform nursing care is full of power, to which the nurses don't feel always prepared. Also the nurses don't think that, acting as they act, they exert power over the patients. It is suggested to Nursing schools to perform seminars about the care with the naked body. PMID:21308217

  16. Diabetes management: optimizing roles for nurses in insulin initiation.

    PubMed

    Levich, Bridget R

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a major public health concern. Screening and early diagnosis followed by prompt and aggressive treatment interventions can help control progression of diabetes and its complications. Nurses are often the first healthcare team members to interact with patients and are being called on to apply their specialized knowledge, training, and skills to educate and motivate patients with diabetes about insulin use and practical ways to achieve treatment goals. Clinical nurse specialists possess specific training and skills to provide this level of care, while staff or office-based nurses may be trained by physicians to fulfill a task-specific role. This manuscript reviews the benefits of intensive glycemic control in type 2 diabetes, therapeutic goals and guidelines, advances in insulin therapy, and contribution of nurses in overcoming barriers to insulin initiation and related aspects of diabetes care. Nurses are particularly well positioned to fill the gap and improve efficiency in diabetes-related healthcare by assisting patients with insulin initiation and other aspects of glycemic self-management. PMID:21468244

  17. School Nurse Matters.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Craig

    2015-06-10

    Devised by the Bexley and Greenwich school nursing team in London, this app is aimed at secondary school pupils. Easy to download and simple to navigate, with appealing colours and graphics, themes can be changed via the settings button. PMID:26058641

  18. Nursing the Follicles.

    PubMed

    Chao, Jesse T; Niwa, Maho

    2016-04-01

    In a recent issue of Science, Lei and Spradling (2016) uncover how germ cells differentiate into oocytes in mouse embryos. Mouse germ cells form cysts, in which sister cells nurse the developing oocyte by donating their organelles and cytoplasmic materials. PMID:27046826

  19. Nursing Concepts. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This curriculum guide contains the materials required to teach a course to prepare students for employment as practical nurses. The following topics are covered in seven instructional units: successful learning skills, positive self-concept, techniques for a balanced lifestyle, communication skills, legal and ethical issues, organizational and…

  20. Nursing and spirituality.

    PubMed

    Hussey, Trevor

    2009-04-01

    Those matters that are judged to be spiritual are seen as especially valuable and important. For this reason it is claimed that nurses need to be able to offer spiritual care when appropriate and, to aid them in this, nurse theorists have discussed the nature of spirituality. In a recent debate John Paley has argued that nurses should adopt a naturalistic stance which would enable them to employ the insights of modern science. Barbara Pesut has criticized this thesis, especially as it is applied to palliative care. This paper re-examines this debate with particular attention to the meaning of 'spirituality' and the justification for accepting spiritual and religious theories. It is argued that when we take into consideration the great diversity among religious and spiritual ideas, the lack of rational means of deciding between them when they conflict, and the practicalities of nursing, we find that a spiritual viewpoint is less useful than a naturalistic one, when offering palliative care. PMID:19291195

  1. Academic Inbreeding in Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Michael H.

    1977-01-01

    Academic inbreeding, the employment for faculty positions of persons who receive their graduate training at the same academic institution, is considered detrimental to an institution's academic environment. Results of a study conducted at 54 universities revealed that almost half the faculty (48 percent) in collegiate nursing programs are drawn…

  2. Trusting patients, trusting nurses.

    PubMed

    Sellman, Derek

    2007-01-01

    The general expectation that patients should be willing to trust nurses is rarely explored or challenged despite claims of diminishing public trust in social and professional institutions. Everyday meanings of trust take account of circumstance and suggest that our understanding of what it means to trust is contextually bound. However, in the context of health care, to trust implies a particular understanding which becomes apparent when abuses of this trust are reported and acknowledged as scandals. The predominant assumption in the literature that trust is something that occurs between equally competent adults cannot explain trust in nursing precisely because of the unequal power relationships between patients on the one hand and healthcare professionals on the other. Moreover, the tendency to conflate terms such as trust, reliance, confidence and so on suggests that confusion permeates discussions of trust in nursing. In this paper, I argue in support of Annette Baier's requirement of good will (or lack of ill will) as the essential feature of trust, and outline how this account (i) enables us to make the necessary distinctions between trust on the one hand and 'trust pretenders' on the other; and (ii) lays the foundations for understanding trust in relationships, such as those between patients and nurses, where power differentials exist. PMID:17238998

  3. RX for School Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smolkin, Rachel

    2003-01-01

    Describes how some districts are coping with nursing shortages and tight budgets by employing several approaches to providing health services to students, including requesting additional services from existing staff, establishing partnerships with local health agencies and hospitals, and obtaining information about school-health programs from…

  4. Reference Sources for Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nursing Outlook, 1976

    1976-01-01

    The ninth revision (including a Canadian supplement) of a list of nursing reference works lists items in the following sections: abstract journals, audiovisuals, bibliographies, dictionaries, directories, drug lists and pharmacologies, educational programs, histories, indexes, legal guides, library administration and organization, research grants,…

  5. Research & Nursing: Ethical Reflections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinch, Winifred J.

    1996-01-01

    It is questionable whether research funding goals are truly driven by the most pressing societal problems. Women are not systematically included in studies where the results would have benefited them. Nurses should include women as appropriate in their research and influence organizations to maintain nonsexist research agendas. (JOW)

  6. nursing.standard.com.

    PubMed

    2016-07-27

    1 Nurses and other healthcare professionals must treat signs of sepsis with the same urgency as symptoms of a possible heart attack, the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence said in new guidance. Read more rcni.com/sepsis-guidance. PMID:27461293

  7. nursing.standard.com.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    1 The first-ever publication of statistics on female genital mutilation (FGM) has revealed 5,700 new cases in England over the past year. Nurses, midwives, doctors and teachers are legally required to report cases of FGM involving girls aged under 18 to the police. Read more rcni.com/FGM-reporting. PMID:27484528

  8. A Nursing School Cooperative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Carolyn; Polacsek, Barbara K.

    1975-01-01

    Faculty in five suburban Chicago nursing programs successfully joined together to share inservice programs and curtail duplication of resources and costs, through newsletters, computerized inventories of instructional materials and media owned by each, and inservice training luncheons. Coordinating the scheduling of students' clinical time at…

  9. Health Occupations. Nursing Assistant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Megow, Joye G.

    Materials contained in this package are designed for use with students interested in the occupation of nurses aide. The package has two sections, one which looks closely at the job and the student, and the other--the curriculum phase--which concerns actual student use of learning activity packages (LAPs). These two components together form a "job…

  10. Care: what nurses say and what nurses do.

    PubMed

    Warelow, Philip; Edward, Karen-Leigh; Vinek, Jeanette

    2008-01-01

    Caring is neither simply a set of attitudes or theories, nor does it comprise all that nurses do. Nursing care is determined by the way nurses use knowledge and skills to appreciate the uniqueness of the person they are caring for (changing the care noun into a caring verb). The purpose of this article is to present a range of contemporary nurse theorists' ideas on caring and to examine these ideas using the backdrop of nursing as practiced in both Australia and Canada to demonstrate a range of national and international similarities and theoretical beliefs. Caring relationships set up the conditions of trust that enable the one receiving the care to accept the help offered, underpinning the nurse-patient relationship or the therapeutic relationship. Caring is always specific and relational such as that found in the nurse-patient relationship. We believe that caring theory has much to offer nursing practice worldwide. Caring must be considered in the caring context because the nature of the caring relationship is central to most nursing interventions. Nurses need to be able to actually practice caring rather than just theorize about it-using caring theories to inform their practice. PMID:18453894

  11. Nursing Students’ Views of Nursing Education Quality: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Kermansaravi, Fatihe; Navidian, Ali; Yaghoubinia, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nursing education is currently facing challenges related to the application of nursing knowledge in clinical environments and inability of students in application of nursing procedures in clinical settings. Nursing students themselves represent the best means of identifying these challenges. This study was conducted aimed to understand the nursing students’ viewpoints and experiences concerning the challenges and deficiencies of the nursing education system. Methods: This qualitative study that has been carried out adopting conventional qualitative content analysis approach, 40 senior nursing students with sufficient experience of educational situations participated through purposive sampling. Eight focus group discussions were done with volunteer nursing students from School of Nursing and Midwifery in Zahedan (Iran). All of the interviews and discussions were recorded and then analyzed using the conventional content analysis approach. Results: Three themes were emerged from data analysis including theoretical education, clinical skills, and the gap between theoretical education and clinical skills. Conclusions: The students’ views and experiences of nursing education quality (theoretical, clinical, and the gap between theoretical education and clinical skills) demonstrated a need to pay careful attention to the selection and recruitment of clinical teachers, and the assessment and control of their educational performance and clinical skills, as well as to determination of standards and validation of education quality. PMID:25716411

  12. Innovation in transformative nursing leadership: nursing informatics competencies and roles.

    PubMed

    Remus, Sally; Kennedy, Margaret Ann

    2012-12-01

    In a recent brief to the Canadian Nurses Association's National Expert Commission on the Health of Our Nation, the Academy of Canadian Executive Nurses (ACEN) discussed leadership needs in the Canadian healthcare system, and promoted the pivotal role of nursing executives in transforming Canada's healthcare system into an integrated patient-centric system. Included among several recommendations was the need to develop innovative leadership competencies that enable nurse leaders to lead and advance transformative health system change. This paper focuses on an emerging "avant-garde executive leadership competency" recommended for today's health leaders to guide health system transformation. Specifically, this competency is articulated as "state of the art communication and technology savvy," and it implies linkages between nursing informatics competencies and transformational leadership roles for nurse executive. The authors of this paper propose that distinct nursing informatics competencies are required to augment traditional executive skills to support transformational outcomes of safe, integrated, high-quality care delivery through knowledge-driven care. International trends involving nursing informatics competencies and the evolution of new corporate informatics roles, such as chief nursing informatics officers (CNIOs), are demonstrating value and advanced transformational leadership as nursing executive roles that are informed by clinical data. PMID:23803423

  13. The Value of Trust to Nursing.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Marcella M

    2014-01-01

    Trust, one of nursing's intangible assets, impacts nurses' ability to form meaningful relationships with patients and this connection positively impacts health outcomes. Linking trust to the fabric of nursing and investing in its measurement will become essential to nursing's valuation and the resulting investment in nursing. Trust, as nursing's core value, should be fostered by nurse educators as they prepare the next generation of nurses. Nurse administrators should connect the trust a patient has for his or her nurse and patient cooperation and honest transparent communication between providers and the patient. Banking trust as a valuable nursing asset will substantiate nursing's marketing and support its worth. Nursing's trustworthiness is an intangible asset that warrants protection, as trust once lost is hard to recapture. PMID:26267958

  14. Standardized ET nursing database: imagine the possibilities.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, T

    1996-01-01

    A national database of the components of ET nursing practice currently does not currently exist. Justification for ET nurse services requires hard data that demonstrate quality and cost-effectiveness of care. Lacking hard data, the value of the services provided by ET nurses remains difficult to quantify. The Nursing Minimum Data Set is the first step in building a nursing database. The purpose of this article is to familiarize ET nurses with the concepts of nursing information systems, the Nursing Minimum Data Set, and classification systems. Implications for ET nursing practice are also presented. PMID:8704851

  15. Rationalisation of nursing education in Limpopo province : nurse educators' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Makhuvha, T R; Davhana-Maselesele, M; Netshandama, V O

    2007-12-01

    Nursing education institutions are facing a challenge of realigning its functioning according to the changes that are taking place within the country. The intention of the government post apartheid was to correct the imbalances which were brought about by the apartheid government and the following regulations and policies influenced the change in nursing education, that is, Reconstruction and Development Programme (RDP), White Paper on Higher Education (WPHE), and the National Qualification Framework (NQF) (South Africa, 1995:6). In 1996 the government introduced the first democratic constitution of the Republic of South Africa (RSA) according toAct 108 of 1996. In the light of those increasing changes in nursing education, led by political change, the experiences of nurse educators is a critical issue facing nursing campuses. The purpose of this study was two-fold; namely: to explore and describe the experiences of nurse educators with regard to the rationalisation of nursing education and to use information obtained to describe guidelines for the effective rationalisation of a nursing college in the Limpopo Province. A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual research design was used. Qualitative interviews were conducted with nurse educators who worked in nursing colleges before and after 1994. Measures to ensure trustworthiness were applied and ethical issues were adhered to throughout the research process. Data was analysed following Tesch's method (Creswell 1994:154-155). The research established that nurse educators experienced dissatisfaction in several areas relating to the rationalization of nursing education. Support was also expected from bureaucracy at higher level. This study developed guidelines to policy makers and nurse educators to ensure effective rationalisation process. PMID:18402422

  16. Is seeing a specialist nurse associated with positive experiences of care? The role and value of specialist nurses in prostate cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Tarrant, Carolyn; Sinfield, Paul; Agarwal, Shona; Baker, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Background Specialist nurses may play an important role in helping to improve the experiences of patients with prostate cancer, however there is concern that the specialist nurse role is under threat in the UK due to financial pressures in the NHS. This study explored the role and value of specialist nurses in prostate cancer care via a survey and patient interviews. Methods This paper reports findings from two studies. A survey of patients from three hospitals across the UK (289/481, 60%), investigated whether patients who saw a specialist nurse had different experiences of information provision and involvement in decision-making, to those who did not. Qualitative interviews were also carried out with 35 men recently tested or treated for prostate cancer, recruited from two hospitals in the UK. Interviews explored patients' views on the role and value of the specialist nurse. Results Survey findings indicated that patients who saw a specialist nurse had more positive experiences of receiving written information about tests and treatment, and about sources of advice and support, and were more likely to say they made the treatment decision themselves. In interviews, patients described specialist nurse input in their care in terms of providing information and support immediately post-diagnosis, as well as being involved in ongoing care. Two key aspects of the specialist nurse role were seen as unique: their availability to the patient, and their ability to liaise between the patient and the medical system. Conclusion This study indicates the unique role that specialist nurses play in the experience of patients with prostate cancer, and highlights the importance of maintaining specialist nurse roles in prostate cancer care. PMID:18371192

  17. Nursing and the nursing workplace in Queensland, 2001-2010: what the nurses think.

    PubMed

    Eley, Robert; Francis, Karen; Hegney, Desley

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to inform policy for reform in nursing. A survey mailed to members of the Queensland Nurses' Union four times between 2001 and 2010 elicited views on their employment and working conditions, professional development and career opportunities. Results across years and sectors of nursing consistently showed dissatisfaction in many aspects of employment, particularly by nurses working in aged care. However, views on staffing numbers, skill mix, workload, work stress, pay and staff morale all showed significant improvements over the decade. For example in 2001, 48.8% of nurses believed that their pay was poor, whereas in 2010, this had reduced to 35.2%. Furthermore, there was a significant rise throughout the decade in the opinion of the value of nursing as a good career. In light of the need to address nurse workforce shortages, the trends are encouraging; however, more improvements are required in order to support recruitment and retention. PMID:25157941

  18. Providing Nursing Care Women and Babies Deserve.

    PubMed

    Ruhl, Catherine; Golub, Zola; Santa-Donato, Anne; Cockey, Carolyn Davis; Bingham, Debra

    2016-01-01

    Nursing Care Women and Babies Deserve describes the core habits of character, also called virtues, that nurses can strive to incorporate into their care of women and newborns. This commentary provides background on the development of Nursing Care Women and Babies Deserve, as well as inspiring examples of how nurses incorporate these virtues into their nursing practice. PMID:27067929

  19. School Nurse Intention to Pursue Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broussard, Lisa; White, Debra

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, the Institute of Medicine recommended that 80% of the nurses possess a minimum of a bachelor of science in nursing by 2020 and double the number of doctorally prepared nurses. This has prompted a significant number of registered nurses to advance their educational level. School nurses in Louisiana are not required to have a…

  20. Strategies for Maintaining Associate Degree Nursing Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilton, Theodore

    As part of the national campaign of the American Nurses Association (ANA) to create two levels of nursing, one for bachelor of science nurses (BSN's) and one for associate degree nurses (ADN's), Illinois has been targeted for a legislative push to change the laws governing nurse licensure, which, if successful, would signal the beginning of the…

  1. School Nursing Practice: Roles and Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proctor, Susan Tonskemper; And Others

    This document is an application of the American Nurses' Association's (ANA's) "Standards of Clinical Nursing Practice" (1991) to the specialty of school nursing. It identifies specialty standards of practice for the school nurse subsumed under the standards of clinical practice which apply to all nurses. Chapter One focuses on the ANA standards…

  2. Bibliography of Nursing Monographs, 1970-1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewens, Wilma A., Comp.; And Others

    This list consists of titles published since 1970 on nursing, grouping them into five broad categories: (1) nursing practice, including clinical nursing, communication, community health, emergency care, family health, obstetrics, and universal self care; (2) nursing as a profession; (3) educational aspects of nursing; (4) basic health science…

  3. Standardized Nursing Languages. Position Statement. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duff, Carolyn; Endsley, Patricia; Chau, Elizabeth; Morgitan, Judith

    2012-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that standardized nursing languages (SNL) are essential communication tools for registered professional school nurses (hereinafter, school nurses) to assist in planning, delivery, and evaluation of quality nursing care. SNL help identify, clarify and document the nature and…

  4. 38 CFR 51.130 - Nursing services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Nursing services. 51.130... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.130 Nursing services. The facility management must provide an organized nursing service with a sufficient number of qualified nursing...

  5. 38 CFR 51.130 - Nursing services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nursing services. 51.130... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.130 Nursing services. The facility management must provide an organized nursing service with a sufficient number of qualified nursing...

  6. 38 CFR 51.130 - Nursing services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Nursing services. 51.130... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.130 Nursing services. The facility management must provide an organized nursing service with a sufficient number of qualified nursing...

  7. 38 CFR 51.130 - Nursing services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Nursing services. 51.130... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.130 Nursing services. The facility management must provide an organized nursing service with a sufficient number of qualified nursing...

  8. 38 CFR 51.130 - Nursing services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Nursing services. 51.130... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.130 Nursing services. The facility management must provide an organized nursing service with a sufficient number of qualified nursing...

  9. Perceptions of Novice Clinical Adjunct Nursing Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Himmelberg, Layna

    2011-01-01

    The anticipated nursing shortage in the United States is well documented and continues to be a topic of discussion. A nationwide solution has been for nursing programs to increase their enrollment of nursing students. This could be difficult for many nursing schools; as many have a shortage of qualified nursing faculty with which to instruct…

  10. Strengthening Preceptors' Competency in Thai Clinical Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mingpun, Renu; Srisa-ard, Boonchom; Jumpamool, Apinya

    2015-01-01

    The problem of lack of nurses can be solved by employing student nurses. Obviously, nurse instructors and preceptors have to work extremely hard to train student nurses to meet the standard of nursing. The preceptorship model is yet to be explored as to what it means to have an effective program or the requisite skills to be an effective…

  11. Determinants of Smoking Behavior among Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rausch, Judith Cartledge; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Reviews literature on determinants of smoking behavior among nurses, examining history and current trends of cigarette use among nurses. Cites national and international studies showing nurses to smoke more than any other health professionals. Discusses stress as primary theory of smoking causation among nurses. Considers role of nursing education…

  12. Nursing Training Act of 1975. Fact Sheets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Resources Administration (DHEW/PHS), Bethesda, MD. Div. of Nursing.

    The Nursing training Act of 1975 revises and extends the nursing training authorities provided under Title VIII of the Public Health Service Act for a three-year period, thus providing aid to nursing training through September 30, 1978. It provides two new, separate authorities for the support of Advanced Nursing Training and Nursing Practitioner…

  13. Nursing: Supply and Demand through 2020

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnevale, Anthony P.; Smith, Nicole; Gulish, Artem

    2015-01-01

    This report analyzes the growing need for qualified nurses. The study projects that the economy will create 1.6 million job openings for nurses through 2020. Yet, there will not be enough nurses to fill those openings. this report projects that the nursing workforce will be facing a shortfall of roughly 200,000 nursing professionals by 2020. One…

  14. Jurisdictional Control: The Regulation of Nurses' Aides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinhard, Susan C.

    1988-01-01

    The future of health care depends on a more unified nursing hierarchy. It makes sense to place the regulation of nurses' aides within the jurisdiction of the state nursing board, the agency charged with providing safe nursing care. Strengthening nursing's jurisdictional control will not only improve the quality of care, it will increase the…

  15. Building Trust Relationships in Nursing. Midwest Alliance in Nursing Program Meeting (Des Moines, Iowa, April 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minckley, Barbara B., Ed.; Walters, Mary Dale, Ed.

    Focusing on issues concerning trust relationships within the nursing field, the papers in these proceedings consider relationships between nursing service and nursing education, staff or faculty and nursing administration, rural and urban nursing agencies, and among intercultural nursing groups. The proceedings contain: (1) "Trust: An Idealistic…

  16. Use of personal phones by senior nursing students to access health care information during clinical education: staff nurses' and students' perceptions.

    PubMed

    Wittmann-Price, Ruth A; Kennedy, Lynn D; Godwin, Catherine

    2012-11-01

    Research indicates that having electronic resources readily available increases learners' ability to make clinical decisions and confidence in patient care. This mixed-method, descriptive pilot study collected data about senior prelicensure nursing students using smartphones, a type of mobile electronic device (MED), in the clinical area. The smartphones contained nursing diagnosis, pharmacology, and laboratory information; an encyclopedia; and the MEDLINE database. Student (n = 7) data about smartphone use during a 10-week clinical rotation were collected via student-recorded usage logs and focus group recordings. Staff nurses' (n = 5) perceptions of students' use of smartphones for clinical educational resources were collected by anonymous survey. Both the focus group transcript and staff surveys were evaluated and the themes summarized by content analysis. Positive results and barriers to use, such as cost and technological comfort levels, are discussed. The results may help nurse educators and administrators initiate further research of MEDs as a clinical resource. PMID:22978275

  17. Educating nurses for leadership roles.

    PubMed

    Heller, Barbara R; Drenkard, Karen; Esposito-Herr, Mary Beth; Romano, Carol; Tom, Sally; Valentine, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    As a result of the growing shortage of nurses and the dramatically changing role of the front-line nurse manager, leadership education for nurses is of critical importance. The purpose of the project described in this article was to design, implement, and evaluate an innovative model of nursing leadership development for students enrolled in registered nurse to bachelor of science in nursing or registered nurse to master of science in nursing programs. A guided "action-learning" course was designed that focused on both core knowledge and experiential learning. The course was developed with the assistance of an advisory panel of prominent nurse leaders with expertise in administration, health policy, informatics, and nursing education. The prototype course was offered for the first time as an elective in Spring 2003. Evaluation data indicated that the course was considered valuable by students and with modifications suggested by students, faculty, and advisory panel members, the course would be offered regularly as part of the curriculum. Recommendations also included adapting course content to a continuing education format. PMID:15481400

  18. Nurse attrition as a process.

    PubMed

    Crow, Stephen M; Hartman, Sandra J

    2005-01-01

    Problems with attracting and retaining nurses during a tight labor market are exacerbated by the fundamental issues related to attrition from the field. Many individuals leave the field prior to graduation or between graduation and placement. Significant attrition occurs during the first 5 years in the profession. One out of every 3 hospital nurses under the age of 30 is planning to leave the current job in the next year [Nursing Shortage Fact Sheet (March 2002). American College of Nursing. Available at: www.aacn.nche.edu/media/backgrounders/shortagefacts.htmaacn.nche.edu. Accessed January 3, 2003]. In this situation, it is of concern that we have been unable to identify any research which takes a holistic approach to issues of attrition. Instead, research is fragmentary, anecdotal, and treats problems in isolation. In this article, we take a conceptual approach and attempt to consider what is being said in the literature about the forms which nurse attrition takes at varying stages in the nursing career. Specifically, we begin a step-by-step examination of the process through which the individual first considers nursing as a career, to the application and acceptance processes, through the educational process and the nursing curriculum in general, to graduation and initial placement, and finally, to the fifth year when the nurse is fully engaged as a practicing nurse. At each stage, we discuss potential issues which may lead to attrition and develop hypotheses to guide further research. PMID:16131938

  19. [Teaching in undergraduate nursing: the contribution of Brazilian Nursing Association].

    PubMed

    Vale, Eucléa Gomes; Fernandes, Josicelia Dumêt

    2006-01-01

    The present study shows some of the most relevant actions of the Brazilian Association of Nursing in favor of the education process of the nursing professionals in Brazil, contextualizing those actions in the historical moment in which they occurred. In this manner, the study represents not only production of knowledge in the field, but also an element of record of the history of undergraduate nursing teaching in Brazil, offering instruments of analysis of the current situation of this teaching. The text highlights the contributions of the Brazilian Association of Nursing (ABEn) in the education process of the nursing professionals, and in the elaboration and sustainability of the National Curricular Guidelines of the Undergraduate Nursing Course. PMID:17165386

  20. Predictors of registered nurses' willingness to remain in nursing.

    PubMed

    Kirschling, Jane Marie; Colgan, Charles; Andrews, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    A major question about the adequacy of the future supply of nurses is how many will stay in the profession. The relationship between scheduling and propensity to stay or leave the nursing profession was examined in this study. This analysis suggests there are definite characteristics of the work schedules that can influence a nurse's inclination to stay or leave the profession. This is not simply a question of "overwork," but of matching work schedules and hours as closely as possible to employee expectations. This suggests management needs to find a way to pay attention when nurses request changes in hours. The mere fact of changing schedules will not solve the nursing shortage, but it is one action within the management control of any organization employing nurses that could have a positive effect on retention. PMID:21736174

  1. [Should nurses be managed by doctors or nurses?].

    PubMed

    Laquintana, Dario

    2015-01-01

    A recent verdict of the administrative court of Lazio Region abrogated a Decree that originally stated that nurse managers (and not the head of the medical department) should be responsible for the management of the nursing personnel, and that had set up the premises for the Nursing Departments. The verdict contrasts with a previous pronouncement of the same court (same members, same president) that supported the wards organized by intensity of care and run by nurses. The organization should be flexible and be shaped not by power struggles but by patients needs: while patients in acute care require mostly medical interventions, chronic patients require more educational and nursing interventions. The verdict is the occasion for reflections on the never ending contrasts between doctors and nurse, that often move to the background patients' priorities and care. PMID:26228506

  2. Making the move from nurse to nursing informatics consultant.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R L

    1998-05-01

    Health care is unique among industries because of the human component involved. That fact, coupled with the unique nursing qualities--critical thinking, caring, attention to detail, accountability and the ability to direct others--makes nurses highly suited o be information system consultants. This article will discuss the health care trends driving the demand for nurse consultants, where and when their skills can be applied, the pros and cons of the entrepreneurial life and What's required to entry consulting. PMID:9807406

  3. Nurse educators establishing new venues in global nursing education.

    PubMed

    Shishani, Kawkab; Allen, Carol; Shubnikov, Eugene; Salman, Khlood; Laporte, Ronald E; Linkov, Faina

    2012-01-01

    Nurses represent the largest number of health care workers worldwide, but they are currently underutilized for global health practices. This may be due to the fact that global health programs are not incorporated in nursing education in many countries. The World Health organization (WHO) recognized the importance of building capacity and having well-prepared nurses who are able to exchange knowledge and expertise worldwide, but did not offer practical solutions. A nursing Super course recognizes the gap between what WHO advocates for and what needs to be done in nursing education to achieve well prepared nurses. A solution suggested is to develop well-structured contents that are applicable and can be shared among nursing programs worldwide. A nursing Supercourse is proposed to provide lectures prepared by expert nursing educators and researchers in global health. The nursing Supercourse has emerged from the parent Supercourse that is a virtual library of lectures developed by world experts in public health and medicine. It represents a global library of over 4,300 public health and medical lectures and a network of over 56,000 public health professionals in 174 countries of the world. These lectures are written in different languages, prepared in easy format, and can be accessed through the internet. In other words does not require the usage of any advanced technology. The Supercourse educational technology has been used successfully in Epidemiology education focusing on multiple topics in public health such as non- communicable disease prevention (NCD), chronic diseases, disaster preparedness, environmental health, and others. Training of nursing students in global health while there are attending nursing programs needs to be a part of the national and international health efforts for disease prevention and health promotion. PMID:22459145

  4. Nurses' and Nursing Students' Knowledge and Attitudes regarding Pediatric Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Mario I.; Ponce-Monter, Héctor A.; Rangel-Flores, Eduardo; Castro-Gamez, Blanca; Romero-Quezada, Luis C.; O'Brien, Jessica P.; Romo-Hernández, Georgina; Escamilla-Acosta, Marco A.

    2015-01-01

    Nursing staff spend more time with patients with pain than any other health staff member. For this reason, the nurse must possess the basic knowledge to identify the presence of pain in patients, to measure its intensity and make the steps necessary for treatment. Therefore, a prospective, descriptive, analytical, and cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the knowledge and attitudes regarding pediatric pain in two different populations. The questionnaire, Pediatric Nurses Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain (PKNAS), was applied to 111 hospital pediatric nurses and 300 university nursing students. The final scores for pediatric nurses and nursing students were 40.1 ± 7.9 and 40.3 ± 7.5, respectively. None of the sociodemographic variables predicted the scores obtained by the participants (P > 0.05). There was a high correlation between the PKNAS scores of pediatric nurses and nursing students (r = 0.86, P < 0.001). It was observed that the degree of knowledge about pain and its treatment was very low in both groups. Due to this deficiency, pain in children remains inadequately managed, which leads to suffering in this population. It is necessary to increase the continued training in this subject in both areas. PMID:26543643

  5. Finnish nurses' attitudes towards nursing research and related factors.

    PubMed

    Kuuppelomäki, Merja; Tuomi, Jouni

    2005-02-01

    This study was concerned with Finnish nurses' attitudes to nursing research and with the associations of different background factors with these attitudes. The data were collected with a purpose-designed, structured questionnaire. The study was carried out in one central hospital, one central university hospital and 10 community health centres in Finland. A total of 400 nurses took part. The response rate was 67%. The data were analysed using SPSS statistical software. Attitudes to nursing research were generally quite positive, although over half of the nurses felt their own relationship to nursing science was quite distant. There were also shortfalls with respect to the information value and utilisation of research results. Only one-third took the view that doing research is an important part of the nurse's job. Age, the frequency of reading the professional literature, participation in training courses, training received in research and development, and the type of workplace were associated with attitudes. The results underline the importance of paying closer attention to the choice of research objects in the field of nursing science. Greater effort should also be invested in supporting and developing the application of research results. It is recommended that more courses on research methodology and other relevant training be made available to practical nurses. PMID:15680617

  6. Nursing students' attitudes about psychiatric mental health nursing.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Lauren; Weber, Tayler; Shattell, Mona; Harris, Barbara A

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe Masters entry nursing students' attitudes about psychiatric mental health clinical experiences; preparedness to care for persons with mental illness; students' perceived stigmas and stereotypes; and plans to choose mental health nursing as a career. A 31-item survey was administered to pre-licensure graduate nursing students who were recruited from a Masters entry nursing program from a university in a large city in the Midwestern US. Results indicated that clinical experiences provide valuable experiences for nursing practice, however, fewer students think that these experiences prepare them to work as a psychiatric mental health nurse and none plan to pursue careers as psychiatric mental health nurses. The findings support conclusions from other studies that increasing the amount of time in the clinical setting and adding specific content to the curriculum, particularly content related to the importance of psychiatric mental health nursing and the effects of stigma, may assist the profession's efforts to recruit and retain psychiatric mental health nurses. Further research is needed to determine the effectiveness of these strategies and to identify the best ways to implement them. PMID:25397970

  7. Contracting for nurse education: nurse leader experiences and future visions.

    PubMed

    Moule, P

    1999-02-01

    The integration of nurse education into higher education establishments following Working for Patients, Working Paper 10 (DOH 1989a) has seen changes to the funding and delivery of nurse education. The introduction of contracting for education initiated a business culture which subsumed previous relationships, affecting collaborative partnerships and shared understanding. Discourse between the providers and purchasers of nurse education is vital to achieve proactive curriculum planning, which supports the development of nursing practitioners who are fit for award and fit for purpose. Research employed philosophical hermeneutics to guide the interviewing of seven nurse leaders within one region. Data analysis occurred within a hermeneutic circle and was refined using NUDIST. Two key themes were seen as impacting on the development of an effective educational strategy. Firstly, the development of collaborative working was thought to have been impeded by communication difficulties between the Trusts and higher education provider. Secondly, there was concern that curriculum developments would support the future evolution of nursing, acknowledging the professional issues impacting on nursing roles. The research findings suggest purchasers and providers of nurse education must move towards achieving mutual understanding and collaborate in developing a curriculum which will prepare nurses for practice and for award. PMID:10335200

  8. California's minimum-nurse-staffing legislation and nurses' wages.

    PubMed

    Mark, Barbara; Harless, David W; Spetz, Joanne

    2009-01-01

    In 2004, California became the first state to implement minimum-nurse-staffing ratios in acute care hospitals. We examined the wages of registered nurses (RNs) before and after the legislation was enacted. Using four data sets-the National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses, the Current Population Survey, the National Compensation Survey, and the Occupational Employment Statistics Survey-we found that from 2000 through 2006, RNs in California metropolitan areas experienced real wage growth as much as twelve percentage points higher than the growth in the wages of nurses employed in metropolitan areas outside of California. PMID:19208658

  9. Nurses' and Nursing Students' Knowledge and Attitudes regarding Pediatric Pain.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Mario I; Ponce-Monter, Héctor A; Rangel-Flores, Eduardo; Castro-Gamez, Blanca; Romero-Quezada, Luis C; O'Brien, Jessica P; Romo-Hernández, Georgina; Escamilla-Acosta, Marco A

    2015-01-01

    Nursing staff spend more time with patients with pain than any other health staff member. For this reason, the nurse must possess the basic knowledge to identify the presence of pain in patients, to measure its intensity and make the steps necessary for treatment. Therefore, a prospective, descriptive, analytical, and cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the knowledge and attitudes regarding pediatric pain in two different populations. The questionnaire, Pediatric Nurses Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain (PKNAS), was applied to 111 hospital pediatric nurses and 300 university nursing students. The final scores for pediatric nurses and nursing students were 40.1 ± 7.9 and 40.3 ± 7.5, respectively. None of the sociodemographic variables predicted the scores obtained by the participants (P > 0.05). There was a high correlation between the PKNAS scores of pediatric nurses and nursing students (r = 0.86, P < 0.001). It was observed that the degree of knowledge about pain and its treatment was very low in both groups. Due to this deficiency, pain in children remains inadequately managed, which leads to suffering in this population. It is necessary to increase the continued training in this subject in both areas. PMID:26543643

  10. Keeping the nursing shortage from becoming a nursing crisis.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Jeanette Ives; Holm, Lauren J; Chelminiak, Lee

    2004-02-01

    Healthcare organizations are experiencing an unprecedented shortage of qualified nurses. How can we increase our understanding of how the potential labor pool views the nursing profession and identify recruitment themes to encourage young people and adult career switchers to choose a career in nursing? The authors discuss the results of a study that was conducted to gain a better understanding of the dynamics of career selection among these two target groups and identify what types of communication would motivate young people and career switchers to be drawn to the nursing profession. PMID:14770067

  11. Insights from nurse leaders to optimize retaining late career nurses.

    PubMed

    Jeffs, Lianne; Nincic, Vera; Hayes, Laureen; Jerome, Danielle; Malecki, Victoria

    2014-09-01

    In an effort to stem the loss of Ontario's late career nurses, the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care introduced the Late Career Nurse Initiative (LCNI) to implement a 0.20 full-time equivalent reduction of physically or psychologically demanding duties of nurses aged 55 or over and repurposing this time to enriching and less demanding activities. Fifty-nine nurse leaders were interviewed to explore their perceptions associated with implementing the LCNI in their respective organizations. Following a qualitative directed content analysis approach, three themes emerged: (1) having a strategic approach, (2) leveraging staff expertise and (3) securing organizational support. PMID:25676079

  12. Career mobility integral to cancer nursing.

    PubMed

    2016-07-13

    Why do many nurses find career progression difficult? Nicola James, writing in Cancer Nursing Practice, encourages nurses to consider why they do not benefit from mobility as much as other health professionals, such as doctors. PMID:27406525

  13. Skilled nursing and rehabilitation facilities - choosing

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000436.htm Skilled nursing and rehabilitation facilities - choosing To use the sharing ... you may need to go to a skilled nursing or rehabilitation facility . Skilled nursing facilities provide care ...

  14. Nursing a nation back to health.

    PubMed

    Agnew, Thelma

    England's top nurse for public health Viv Bennett discusses new opportunities for nurses and the benefits of moving responsibility for services to local government. Nurses' contribution to public health has been overlooked for too long, she says. PMID:23930527

  15. Communicating clinical nursing issues through the newspaper.

    PubMed

    Kalisch, B J; Kalisch, P A

    1981-01-01

    The information quality of nursing news is a critical factor in gaining public support for the acquisition of scarce resources necessary to undergird clinical nursing practice. A content analysis of 3,098 newspaper articles about nursing in 1978 was employed to examine the treatment of clinical nursing news. Among the variables studied were practice settings, educational levels, role clarity, professional activities, nurse-physician relationships, and degree of favorable image. Results revealed that the quality of news about clinical nursing varied by specialties, with maternity nursing and pediatric nursing news shown to be more progressive and community health nursing and medical-surgical nursing revealed as quite traditional. Psychiatric nursing received an inordinately low level of news coverage. Recommendations are offered to assist improvement in the amount and quality of news treatment of clinical nursing. PMID:6908956

  16. Reconstructing Nursing: Evidence, Artistry and the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks-Maran, Di

    1999-01-01

    The prevailing world view is shifting from positivism to postmodernism. A postmodern perspective on evidence-based nursing suggests that evidence for nursing decisions should be derived from research, patient and nurse values, reflection, intuition, and tacit knowledge. (SK)

  17. Training Advanced Practice Palliative Care Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Deborah Witt

    1999-01-01

    Describes the role and responsibilities of advanced-practice nurses in palliative care and nursing's initiative in promoting high-quality care through the educational preparation of these nurses. (JOW)

  18. Defining professional nursing accountability: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Krautscheid, Lorretta C

    2014-01-01

    Professional nursing accountability is described by both professional nursing organizations and nursing education credentialing agencies as a core aspect that underpins professional nursing practice. Although accountability is foundational to professional practice, a review of the literature revealed no consistent language or definition regarding professional nursing accountability. Instead, the literature itself reveals that professional nursing accountability is challenging to both describe and define. The ambiguity surrounding how to define professional nursing accountability contributes to challenges associated with both teaching and evaluating student nurse accountability within nursing education curricula. This article provides a reliable and comprehensive definition of professional nursing accountability derived from a synthesis of the literature. Recommendations for nursing education practice and recommendations for nursing education research are proposed. PMID:24503314

  19. [Nursing care in fluorescein angiography].

    PubMed

    Santos-Blanco, Feliciano

    2008-01-01

    Fluoresceinic angiography of the ocular fundus is a diagnostic technique to study retinal and choroidal circulation. This technique consists of parenteral administration of 500 mg of sodium fluorescein 10% and photographing the fluorescence in the eye vessels. Although this substance is fairly safe, it may also produce mild, moderate or severe local and/or general adverse reactions. The nursing process is routinely used in hospital units but not always in outpatient clinics, even through the use of invasive procedures with intravenous medication administration is common. Therefore, nurses, as those reponsible for intravenous administration, should use the nursing process to guarantee the quality of care required by the patient. To do this, we describe an individualized care plan based on evaluation by Marjorie Gordon's functional health patterns, NANDA's nursing diagnoses Taxonomy II, Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC), Nursing Interventions Classifications (NIC) and potential complications of the procedure. PMID:18579067

  20. Nursing informatics competencies: bibliometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Kokol, Peter; Blažun, Helena; Vošner, Janez; Saranto, Kaija

    2014-01-01

    Information and communication technology is developing rapidly and it is incorporated in many health care processes, but in spite of that fact we can still notice that nursing informatics competencies had received limited attention in basic nursing education curricula in Europe and especially in Eastern European countries. The purpose of the present paper is to present the results of a bibliometric analysis of the nursing informatics competencies scientific literature production. We applied the bibliometrics analysis to the corpus of 332 papers found in SCOPUS, related to nursing informatics competencies. The results showed that there is a positive trend in the number of published papers per year, indicating the increased research interest in nursing informatics competencies. Despite the fact that the first paper was published in Denmark, the most prolific country regarding the research in nursing informatics competencies is United States as are their institutions and authors. PMID:24943565

  1. Education of nurses in genetics.

    PubMed Central

    Forsman, I

    1988-01-01

    The need for education of nurses in genetics was articulated more than 25 years ago. This article reviews the knowledge of practicing nurses about genetics as well as the content of genetics in nursing curricula. Implementation of federal legislation that mandated increased availability of genetic services and genetics education provided support for the examination of genetics content in curricula for health professionals, including nurses, and for the development of model programs to expand this content. Recent efforts to begin to develop a pool of nurse faculty who are well prepared in genetics will be described, as well as programs to provide the necessary content through continuing-education efforts. These efforts are expected to substantially improve the capability of nurses to contribute more effectively in the delivery of genetic services. PMID:3177390

  2. Compassion fatigue: a nurse's primer.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Barbara; Eyre, Caryl

    2011-01-01

    Most nurses enter the field of nursing with the intent to help others and provide empathetic care for patients with critical physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual needs. Empathic and caring nurses, however, can become victims of the continuing stress of meeting the often overwhelming needs of patients and their families, resulting in compassion fatigue. Compassion fatigue affects not only the nurse in terms of job satisfaction and emotional and physical health, but also the workplace environment by decreasing productivity and increasing turnover. We begin this article with a case study of a reactive nurse who did not seek help for her continuing stress. This is followed by a review of Watson's theoretical perspective related to compassion fatigue. Next we delineate symptoms of, and describe interventions for addressing compassion fatigue. We conclude by presenting a case study of a proactive nurse who avoided developing compassion fatigue and a discussion of future research needed to better prevent and ameliorate compassion fatigue. PMID:21800934

  3. Genomics Nursing Faculty Champion Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Jean; Calzone, Kathleen A.

    2016-01-01

    Nurse faculty are challenged to keep up with the emerging and fast-paced field of genomics and the mandate to prepare the nursing workforce to be able to translate genomic research advances into routine clinical care. Using Faculty Champions and other options, the initiative stimulated curriculum development and promoted genomics curriculum integration. The authors summarize this yearlong initiative for undergraduate and graduate nursing faculty. PMID:24300251

  4. Telehealth Education in Nursing Curricula.

    PubMed

    Ali, Nagia S; Carlton, Kay Hodson; Ali, Omar S

    2015-01-01

    Telehealth care is a fast-growing avenue of providing health care services at a distance. A descriptive study was conducted to identify trends of telehealth education in 43 schools of nursing. Findings reflected inadequate integration of telehealth in classroom content, simulation, and clinical experiences. Interviews with 4 nursing leaders of telehealth provided some recommendations on how to integrate telehealth education in nursing curricula. PMID:25689080

  5. The Nurse Reinvestment Act revisited.

    PubMed

    Luther, Ann P

    2007-01-01

    The United States is in the midst of a widely recognized critical nursing shortage. In 2002 the "Nurse Reinvestment Act" was passed with overwhelming bipartisan support in an effort to address this serious public health threat. The Act is due for reauthorization of funding in 2007. This paper provides a brief overview of the programs contained within the Act and describes practical ways in which members of the nursing community can take action to insure renewed support for the Act. PMID:17691598

  6. Organ donation: a nursing perspective.

    PubMed

    Maher, M E; Strong, S

    1989-12-01

    The frequency and success rate of organ donation and transplant surgery has dramatically increased over the past several years. Since organ donors are drawn primarily from the traumatically brain-injured population this increase has a direct impact on neuroscience nurses. This article addresses the organ procurement process, nursing care of the organ donor and the interrelationship of organ donation and neuroscience nursing. PMID:2532669

  7. Treatment of heart failure in nursing home residents

    PubMed Central

    Daamen, Mariëlle AMJ; Hamers, Jan PH; Gorgels, Anton PM; Tan, Frans ES; Schols, Jos MGA; Rocca, Hans-Peter Brunner-la

    2016-01-01

    Background For the treatment of chronic heart failure (HF), both pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment should be employed in HF patients. Although HF is highly prevalent in nursing home residents, it is not clear whether the recommendations in the guidelines for pharmacological therapy also are followed in nursing home residents. The aim of this study is to investigate how HF is treated in nursing home residents and to determine to what extent the current treatment corresponds to the guidelines. Methods Nursing home residents of five large nursing home care organizations in the southern part of the Netherlands with a previous diagnosis of HF based on medical records irrespective of the left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) were included in this cross-sectional design study. Data were gathered on the (medical) records, which included clinical characteristics and pharmacological- and non-pharmacological treatment. Echocardiography was used as part of the study to determine the LVEF. Results Out of 501 residents, 112 had a diagnosis of HF at inclusion. One-third of them received an ACE-inhibitor and 40% used a β-blocker. In 66%, there was a prescription of diuretics with a preference of a loop diuretic. Focusing on the residents with a LVEF ≤ 40%, only 46% of the 22 residents used an ACE-inhibitor and 64% a β-blocker. The median daily doses of prescribed medication were lower than those that were recommended by the guidelines. Non-pharmacological interventions were recorded in almost none of the residents with HF. Conclusions The recommended medical therapy of HF was often not prescribed; if prescribed, the dosage was usually far below what was recommended. In addition, non-pharmacological interventions were mostly not used at all. PMID:26918012

  8. Effective consultation in nursing.

    PubMed

    McCutcheon, S; Perkin, K

    1996-01-01

    Given the fiscal challenges within health care today, nurse administrators, whether acting in the role of client or consultant, must determine the most effective and efficient way to solve problems and achieve goals. The consultation process can be viewed from both the client's and the consultant's perspective. This article is intended to provide a practical approach to addressing the issues within the consultation process. The steps of the consultation process are reviewed. The evolution from solving problems to achieving goals is described. The importance of the use of a screening tool when interviewing prospective consultants is emphasized and an example of a generic screening tool is provided. During the interview, consultants are advised to clearly determine the problem or goal, the outcomes which the client expects, possible barriers and risks, and the philosophical fit between both parties. Nurses practise consultation skills daily and, therefore, consultation is a viable opportunity for self-employment. PMID:8695611

  9. Spiritual aspects of nursing.

    PubMed

    Ross, L A

    1994-03-01

    In this paper the author relates how she initially became interested in spiritual care. A synopsis of a literature review is given in which the spiritual dimension is defined and evidence presented for its influence on health, well-being and quality of life. Spiritual care is also presented as part of the nurse's role. However, it is acknowledged that there is a lack of guidelines for the practice of spiritual care. A conceptual framework for the latter is, therefore, proposed by the author. As little is currently known about how nurses perceive the spiritual dimension and their role in spiritual care, the findings from a doctoral study, which examined these issues, are reported and discussed. The descriptive study was part of the author's PhD thesis (Waugh 1992). PMID:8014303

  10. A Guide to Screening for the Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment Program (EPSDT) Under Medicaid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankenburg, William K.; North, A. Frederick, Jr.

    The manual was designed to help public officials, physicians, nurses, and others to plan and implement an Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment (EPSDT) program under Medicaid. Procedures for carrying out components of an EPSDT program are recommended. Part 1 discusses organization and administration of screening, diagnosis, and…

  11. Popper and nursing theory.

    PubMed

    Allmark, Peter

    2003-04-01

    Science seems to develop by inducing new knowledge from observation. However, it is hard to find a rational justification for induction. Popper offers one attempt to resolve this problem. Nursing theorists have tended to ignore or reject Popper, often on the false belief that he is a logical positivist (and hence hostile to qualitative research). Logical positivism claims that meaningful sentences containing any empirical content should ultimately be reducible to simple, observation statements. Popper refutes positivism by showing that there are no such simple statements. He is not a positivist. For Popper, the scientist begins with problems and puts forward trial solutions. These are subjected to rigorous testing aimed at falsifying them. A new theoretical position is then reached in which the scientist knows either that the trial solutions are false or that they have not yet been falsified. Science is characterized by the fact that it tests its ideas through attempted falsification. Non-science tests its ideas through attempted refutation. Nursing theory is a mixture of science and non-science. Popper's method requires rigorous testing of theory in both realms. As such, some nursing theory should be discarded. Popper's view faces at least two important criticisms. One is that a scientist can always reject an apparent falsification by instead altering some auxiliary hypothesis (e.g. denying the accuracy of the falsifying observation). Popper can deal with this argument by saying that defence of a theory in this way will eventually break down if the theory is false. The second criticism is that Popper's method does ultimately draw upon induction. This criticism is true, but his method can be usefully adapted. An adapted from of Popper's philosophy of science provides a good basis for nursing theory. PMID:14498963

  12. [Aromatherapy in nursing homes].

    PubMed

    Barré, Lucile

    2015-01-01

    Pierre Delaroche de Clisson hospital uses essential oils as part of its daily organisation for the treatment of pain and the development of palliative care. The setting up of this project, in nursing homes and long-term care units, is the fruit of a complex mission carried out by a multidisciplinary team, which had to take into account the risks involved and overcome a certain amount of reluctance. PMID:26154352

  13. Nursing leadership in the boardroom.

    PubMed

    Thorman, Kathleen E

    2004-01-01

    It is critical that nurse leaders, including chief nurse executives and service line directors, be part of the institutional decision-making process about resource allocation, strategic direction, and planning for the future. Nurse leaders can use numerous strategies to influence decisions made in the boardroom that affect the women's service line, including perinatal and women's health. These strategies include building on the importance of women's services to the organization, working in collaboration with senior leaders and key physician leaders, marketing, and reaching out to governing boards with information. Nurse leaders must continue to prepare for the future to thrive in the increasingly complex health care environment. PMID:15180202

  14. A review of transcultural nursing.

    PubMed

    Narayanasamy, Aru; White, Ethelrene

    2005-02-01

    In this article, transcultural nursing is reviewed in the light of the literature mainly relevant to the British context. The key features of transcultural nursing are examined in the context of multicultural Britain as follows: definitions, racism, ethnocentrism, culture, diversity, transcultural health care practice and nurse education. Models of transcultural care practice and contemporary developments in cultural care are also explored. There is evidence from emerging literature that innovations are taking place in promoting transcultural care practice and education. However, the article concludes that much practice-based research is still needed to establish transcultural nursing in Britain. PMID:15701535

  15. Bringing nursing to the public.

    PubMed

    Kazis, Cornelia; Schwendimann, René

    2009-11-01

    For the past 5 years, an unusual program has been evolving in the University of Basel's Institute of Nursing Science master's program in Basel, Switzerland. A special course designed to help nurses master public communication skills requires students to play the roles of journalist, exhibition curator, conference organizer, radio reporter, and news producer. Two faculty members, an experienced radio and newspaper journalist and a nurse scientist, teach and support the students. By developing their competence in media relations, participants prepare themselves to tackle the course's long-term goal of bringing the nursing profession into the public eye. PMID:19731893

  16. Telecommunications and nursing education.

    PubMed

    Yeaworth, R C; Benschoter, R A; Meter, R; Benson, S

    1995-01-01

    Telecommunications are becoming increasingly important to nursing educators. At the University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Nursing, communication by two-way television, computers, facsimile machines, and telephone conferences is essential to the administration and operation of a school with four divisions located across 500 miles. Two-way television is available through one system that uses satellite and fiberoptic technology and another that uses telephone lines. The four campuses of the college share classes, administrative meetings, and conferences through television. Faculty members teaching via TV are oriented to designing instructional material for transmission and to the minor quirks of the technology. Students in TV classes must be aware of their responsibility for active involvement in learning. Studies have found no significant differences in the grades of students in "live" classrooms and those in TV classrooms, but both faculty and students prefer the face-to-face situation. The College of Nursing uses computers extensively on an internal network linking the four campuses for E-mail, file transfer, computer-assisted instruction, and administrative information sharing. Another computer network, Synapse Health Resources Online, links the college and the Medical Center with health professionals in rural areas throughout the state. PMID:7545192

  17. The Nurse's Medication Day

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Bonnie Mowinski; Sandelowski, Margarete; Mark, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The medication administration stage of the medication-use process is especially vulnerable to error because errors are least likely to be caught before reaching the patient. Medication administration, however, remains poorly understood. In this article we describe medication administration as observed in an ethnographic study conducted on one medical and one surgical unit. A central finding was that medication administration entailed a complex mixture of varied and often competing demands that temporally structured the nurses' entire workday. Articulation work was evident in time management strategies nurses used to handle demands from institutional policies, technical devices, patients, the physical environment, and the medications themselves. The average number of doses of medication per patient was more than double the number policy groups have indicated. Medication administration is neither simply the giving of drugs nor does it have clearly defined temporal boundaries. Because of its inseparability from other nurses' work, medication administration inherently entails interruption, thereby calling into question the current emphasis on reducing interruptions as a tactic to decrease medication errors. PMID:21693688

  18. South American legal perspective on professional nursing.

    PubMed

    Campos, Fagner Alfredo Ardisson Cirino; Nekrassovski, Oleg

    This study involved a literature review aimed at describing the professional duties, stipulated in federal legislation, of nursing professionals in South America. According to the federal legislation that regulates the professional nursing practice, nurses are supposed to apply their skills and knowledge in an autonomous and secure way. Since it is through this legislation that professional competence of nurses is determined, the laws of each South American nation were consulted, to see how professional nursing functions differ according to each. In general, according to the South American federal nursing legislations, professional nursing practice must be grounded in quality patient care and good nursing administration. PMID:24260995

  19. Nursing Research--Taking an Active Interest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleverly, Dankay

    1998-01-01

    In Britain, nurses' attitudes toward research are changing. Schools of nursing must consider the following research issues: funding, contracts, support, publication, and staff recruitment and retention. (SK)

  20. Laryngeal involvement causing dysphonia in a 29 year old nursing mother with lepromatous leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Fwoloshi, Sombo; Machona, Sharon Musonda; Mudenda, Victor; Ngalamika, Owen

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy is a granulomatous disease that mainly affects the skin and peripheral nerves. It is caused by infection with mycobacterium leprae or mycobacterium lepromatosus. In most instances, diagnosis of leprosy can easily be made based on the clinical signs and symptoms. However, when patients present with atypical features, clinical diagnosis can be a challenge. We report a case of a nursing mother with lepromatous leprosy who presented with dysphonia and skin lesions initially thought to be a deep cutaneous mycosis. PMID:26327983

  1. [Discourses on the nursing and psychiatric nurse models, published in the Annals of Nursing (1933-1951)].

    PubMed

    Pereira, Michelle de Macedo; Padilha, Maria Itayra; de Oliveira, Alexandre Barbosa; Santos, Tânia Cristina Franco; Filho, Antonio José de Almeida; Peres, Maria Angélica de Almeida

    2014-06-01

    Social-historical study aimed at discussing the nursing and psychiatric nurse models, from the discourses published in the Annals of Nursing.The historical sources were articles published in the Annals of Nursing journal, from 1933 to 1951. An analysis of the discourse was subsidized by the genealogy of power by Michel Foucault.The analysis showed that the discourse on nursing and the psychiatric nurse, in the first half of the 20th century, is set, on one side, by the propositions used by psychiatrists, who sought to reiterate stereotypes and vocations to practice nursing, and, on the other side, by the active participation of nurses seeking to legitimize expertise for psychiatric nursing. It was concluded that the discourses analyzed defined a psychiatric care focused on the nurse and not the rest of the nursing staff, at that time. PMID:25158460

  2. Development and evaluation of evidence-based nursing (EBN) filters and related databases*

    PubMed Central

    Lavin, Mary A.; Krieger, Mary M.; Meyer, Geralyn A.; Spasser, Mark A.; Cvitan, Tome; Reese, Cordie G.; Carlson, Judith H.; Perry, Anne G.; McNary, Patricia

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: Difficulties encountered in the retrieval of evidence-based nursing (EBN) literature and recognition of terminology, research focus, and design differences between evidence-based medicine and nursing led to the realization that nursing needs its own filter strategies for evidence-based practice. This article describes the development and evaluation of filters that facilitate evidence-based nursing searches. Methods: An inductive, multistep methodology was employed. A sleep search strategy was developed for uniform application to all filters for filter development and evaluation purposes. An EBN matrix was next developed as a framework to illustrate conceptually the placement of nursing-sensitive filters along two axes: horizontally, an adapted nursing process, and vertically, levels of evidence. Nursing diagnosis, patient outcomes, and primary data filters were developed recursively. Through an interface with the PubMed search engine, the EBN matrix filters were inserted into a database that executes filter searches, retrieves citations, and stores and updates retrieved citations sets hourly. For evaluation purposes, the filters were subjected to sensitivity and specificity analyses and retrieval set comparisons. Once the evaluation was complete, hyperlinks providing access to any one or a combination of completed filters to the EBN matrix were created. Subject searches on any topic may be applied to the filters, which interface with PubMed. Results: Sensitivity and specificity for the combined nursing diagnosis and primary data filter were 64% and 99%, respectively; for the patient outcomes filter, the results were 75% and 71%, respectively. Comparisons were made between the EBN matrix filters (nursing diagnosis and primary data) and PubMed's Clinical Queries (diagnosis and sensitivity) filters. Additional comparisons examined publication types and indexing differences. Review articles accounted for the majority of the publication type differences

  3. Magnet hospital nurses describe control over nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Marlene; Schmalenberg, Claudia E

    2003-06-01

    Staff nurses describe control over nursing practice (C/NP) as a professional nursing function made up of a variety of activities and outcomes. Greater acclaim, status, and prestige for nursing in the organization are viewed as a result, not a precursor, of C/NP. Interviews with 279 staff nurses working in 14 magnet hospitals indicated that effective C/NP requires some kind of empowered, formal organizational structure, extends beyond clinical decision making at the patient care interface, and is the same as or highly similar to what the literature describes as professional autonomy. From constant comparative analysis of nurses' descriptions of C/NP activities, five ranked categories of this real-life event emerged. The basis for the categories and ranking was "who owned the problem, issue, and solution" and the "degree of effectiveness of control" as reflected in visibility, viability, and recognition of a formal structure allowing and encouraging nurses' control over practice. Hospital mergers and structural reorganization were reported to negatively affect the structure needed for effective C/NP. Almost 60% of these magnet hospital staff nurses stated and/or described little or no C/NP. PMID:12790058

  4. Using Computerized Clinical Nursing Data Bases for Nursing Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nail, Lillian M.; Lange, Linda L.

    1996-01-01

    Addresses the recognition of differences between clinical and research data in using computerized clinical nursing databases and the issues of privacy and confidentiality for patients whose records are involved. Describes procedures for assessing the quality and usability of these data for nursing research. (SK)

  5. Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Program: Theories for Extended Pediatric Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Margaret A.

    A description is provided of "Theories for Extended Pediatric Nursing Practice," a required course for pediatric and family nurse practitioner students in a California state university program. The course description presents information on the curricular placement of the course, prerequisites, in-class time allotments, and the focus of the course…

  6. The Nurse as Patient Advocate: Implications for Nurse Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banja, John D.

    This essay examines ethical considerations in the nurse patient relationship, in particular the relationship between "professional morality" and the nurse's professional identity in the role of advocate for doctors, patients, and hospitals. A discussion of ethics and professionals explores professional ethics, the need for such ethics, and their…

  7. The Naïve nurse: revisiting vulnerability for nursing

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nurses in the Western world have given considerable attention to the concept of vulnerability in recent decades. However, nurses have tended to view vulnerability from an individualistic perspective, and have rarely taken into account structural or collective dimensions of the concept. As the need grows for health workers to engage in the global health agenda, nurses must broaden earlier works on vulnerability, noting that conventional conceptualizations and practical applications on the notion of vulnerability warrant extension to include more collective conceptualizations thereby making a more complete understanding of vulnerability in nursing discourse. Discussion The purpose of this paper is to examine nursing contributions to the concept of vulnerability and consider how a broader perspective that includes socio-political dimensions may assist nurses to reach beyond the immediate milieu of the patient into the dominant social, political, and economic structures that produce and sustain vulnerability. Summary By broadening nurse’s conceptualization of vulnerability, nurses can obtain the consciousness needed to move beyond a peripheral role of nursing that has been dominantly situated within institutional settings to contribute in the larger arena of social, economic, political and global affairs. PMID:22520841

  8. Beyond "Hot Lips" and "Big Nurse": Creative Writing and Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Sandra

    2005-01-01

    This essay describes a special topics creative writing course designed for nursing students, and argues that creative writing strategies work to improve nurses' compositional skills. Also discussed are other potential benefits from creatively writing patients' lives, notably, the blending of arts and sciences, and the ways in which medical schools…

  9. Nursing priorities for the 1980's: hospitals and nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Aiken, L H

    1981-02-01

    It is clear that the two institutions where nurses play a critical role--hospitals and nursing homes--are experiencing major problems. Patients in these institutions are not receiving the full benefits of the best health care America has to offer. Organized nursing has the opportunity and capacity to resolve these difficulties and in the process improve both patient care and the importance of our profession. The time is right for change. To date, nursing has not taken on this difficult leadership task. I believe we will remain dependent on other professions unless we take on significant responsibilities for resolving the problems facing these two institutions. The GMENAC report on health manpower suggests that out profession should not rely on others for public policy recommendations which will affect our future. Nursing has greater respect and national visibility than ever before. Within this decade, nursing has the potential ability to help resolve the crisis affecting these two institutions. The future of the nation's hospitals, nursing homes, those for whom we care, and of the nursing profession may depend upon how we respond to these two challenges in the years ahead. PMID:6906951

  10. Violence and the Nursing Curriculum: Nurse Educators Speak Out.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodtli, M. Anne; Breslin, Eileen T.

    1997-01-01

    Focus groups of 100 nurse educators and survey responses from 107 at a national convention revealed overwhelming agreement that nursing curricula do not adequately address violence and that faculty are not prepared to teach violence assessment and abuse reporting, despite agreement that it is a high-priority issue. (SK)

  11. Nursing as career choice: perceptions of Turkish nursing students.

    PubMed

    Başkale, Hatice; Serçekuş, Pınar

    2015-01-01

    Students' perceptions of nursing influence their choice of nursing as a career and whether they remain in the profession. The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of entry-level male and female nursing students and the reasons for choosing nursing as a career. A qualitative approach was used by focus group interviews with 31 nursing students, and socio-demographic data were collected by questionnaire. Thematic content analysis was used to analyse the data, and findings were grouped into categories and themes. The first category was 'choosing', which included the themes of 'desire to help', 'satisfactory income, and guaranteed employment', 'influence of family and friends' and 'being in a health-related profession'. The second category was 'others' reactions, which included the single theme 'response'. The third category was 'the image of nursing' which included the themes of 'job description' and 'gender'. The study concluded that although a growing amount of male students are enrolling in nursing programs, stereotypical ideas persist, and nursing is considered a female-dominated profession. There is further need to track student experiences during or after clinical practice and explore whether students' perceptions change over time. PMID:26073696

  12. Seminar: Legal Perspectives of Nursing Practice. Nursing 89.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Odette P.

    This course outline provides information to be used by students in conjunction with Nursing 89, a seminar on the legal aspects of nursing to be offered starting in Spring 1982 at Diablo University (California). General information is provided first, including a class calendar, a statement defining the purpose of the course, an outline of…

  13. Eliciting nursing knowledge from practice: the dualism of nursing.

    PubMed

    Ramprogus, Vince

    2002-01-01

    Nursing knowledge has traditionally been examined and developed through the main research approaches based on the positivist, interpretive or phenomenological philosophies. These approaches are used either from a single and individual stance or combined to address particular research questions. They all, however, retain a focus that deals primarily or exclusively with what can be measured, observed or expressed as a fundamental unit of analysis to reconstruct, interpret and explain nursing practice. In this paper, Vince Ramprogus challenges the traditional approach to how nursing knowledge is defined and the common understanding of the purpose of nursing research. It is argued that adhering to empirical rigour while investigating or measuring nursing practice interferes with the very act and experience of nursing. Indeed, it becomes an either/or situation. It is also argued that nursing is not an empirical subject, and, therefore, the purpose of researching nursing is not about seeking the truth but about improving practice to achieve better patient care. The arguments are intended to provoke discussion and debate rather than to present a set position. PMID:12405006

  14. Professional nursing values among baccalaureate nursing students in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Lui, May H L; Lam, Lai Wah; Lee, Iris F K; Chien, Wai Tong; Chau, Janita P C; Ip, Wan Yim

    2008-01-01

    The development of a nursing code of professional conduct is to guide nurses to make appropriate clinical decision, in particular when facing ethical dilemma. It is of paramount importance that nurse educators understand baccalaureate nursing students' perceptions of the importance of the code of professional conduct and the level of difficulties in implementing this code while preparing them for future practicing nurses. The Code of Professional Conduct in Hong Kong has been developed to guide nursing practice for over two decades. Nevertheless, no study has examined Hong Kong baccalaureate nursing students' perception about this professional code. The aim of this paper was to examine the perceptions of 263 baccalaureate nursing students about this professional code using a cross sectional survey design. The results indicated that most items in the professional code were rated as important and "provide safe and competent care" was rated as the most important one. A few areas that the students perceived as difficult to implement were discussed and future research was recommended. The significant differences identified among students from different years of study also highlighted areas for consideration in planning educational program to further equip students with the ability to deal with challenges in professional practice. PMID:17449144

  15. Nursing in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Nursing 205.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varton, Deborah M.

    A description is provided of a course, "Nursing in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit," offered for senior-level baccalaureate degree nursing students. The first section provides information on the place of the course within the curriculum, the allotment of class time, and target student populations. The next section looks at course content in…

  16. Foundations for a human science of nursing: Gadamer, Laing, and the hermeneutics of caring.

    PubMed

    Rolfe, Gary

    2015-07-01

    The professions of nursing and nurse education are currently experiencing a crisis of confidence, particularly in the UK, where the Francis Report and other recent reviews have highlighted a number of cases of nurses who no longer appear willing or able to 'care'. The popular press, along with some elements of the nursing profession, has placed the blame for these failures firmly on the academy and particularly on the relatively recent move to all-graduate status in England for pre-registration student nurses. This has come to be known in the UK as the 'too-posh-to-wash' argument, that there is an incommensurability between being educated to degree level and performing basic nursing tasks. I will argue in this paper that the diagnosis of the problem is substantively correct, but the formulation and the prescription are misguided and dangerous. I will suggest that the growing emphasis on research-based and evidence-based practice is the logical conclusion of an inappropriate scientific paradigm for nursing which is underpinned by the social sciences, by technical rationality, and by a focus on people. In contrast, I will suggest that a more fruitful way of thinking about and practising nursing and nurse education is to consider it as a human science with a focus on persons in which evidence for practice derives largely from practice itself. The history of the idea of a human science is traced from its roots in nineteenth century hermeneutics to the work of Gadamer and R.D. Laing in the 1960s, and I attempt to imagine a paradigm for nursing practice, scholarship, and education based on Laing's 'existential-phenomenological' approach with a focus on the endeavour to understand and relate to individual persons rather than to make broad prescriptions for practice based on statistical and other generalizations. PMID:25418786

  17. Comparing Methods to Identify Hip Fracture in a Nursing Home Population Using Medicare Claims

    PubMed Central

    Rigler, Sally K.; Ellerbeck, Edward; Whittle, Jeffrey; Mahnken, Jonathan; Cook-Wiens, Galen; Shireman, Theresa I.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives to examine the impact of varied operational definitions for identifying hip fracture hospitalizations in administrative claims data. Design retrospective examination of Medicare inpatient and outpatient claims data. Setting nursing home population. Participants Medicaid- and Medicare-eligible nursing home residents in 1999 in CA, FL, MO, NJ, and PA (n=197,514). Measurements number of hip fractures identified in using inpatient (Medicare A) diagnoses codes, subjected to definitions varying according to whether or not hip fracture was required to be the principal diagnosis and whether or not confirmatory imaging and procedure codes were identified in other (Medicare B) claims files. Results Hip fractures were found in any inpatient diagnosis position in 4,680 subjects, with 4,479 of these found in the principal diagnosis position. With either approach to diagnosis position, confirmatory imaging and procedure codes were identified for 95% of persons hospitalized with hip fracture. Conclusion The principal diagnosis alone will identify 96% of hip fracture diagnoses in hospitalized nursing home residents. Such diagnoses are confirmed at very high rates by other sources of claims data. Researchers may be confident using a simple approach to identifying hip fracture hospitalizations in this population, using inpatient claims alone and interrogating only the principal diagnosis position. PMID:20503037

  18. Measuring nursing informatics competencies of practicing nurses in Korea: Nursing Informatics Competencies Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Chung, Seon Yoon; Staggers, Nancy

    2014-12-01

    Informatics competencies are a necessity for contemporary nurses. However, few researchers have investigated informatics competencies for practicing nurses. A full set of Informatics competencies, an instrument to measure these competencies, and potential influencing factors have yet to be identified for practicing nurses. The Nursing Informatics Competencies Questionnaire was designed, tested for psychometrics, and used to measure beginning and experienced levels of practice. A pilot study using 54 nurses ensured item comprehension and clarity. Internal consistency and face and content validity were established. A cross-sectional survey was then conducted on 230 nurses in Seoul, Korea, to determine construct validity, describe a complete set of informatics competencies, and explore possible influencing factors on existing informatics competencies. Principal components analysis, descriptive statistics, and multiple regression were used for data analysis. Principal components analysis gives support for the Nursing Informatics Competencies Questionnaire construct validity. Survey results indicate that involvement in a managerial position and self-directed informatics-related education may be more influential for improving informatics competencies, whereas general clinical experience and workplace settings are not. This study provides a foundation for understanding how informatics competencies might be integrated throughout nurses' work lives and how to develop appropriate strategies to support nurses in their informatics practice in clinical settings. PMID:25393832

  19. International nurse migration: lessons from the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Brush, Barbara L; Sochalski, Julie

    2007-02-01

    Developed countries facing nursing shortages have increasingly turned to aggressive foreign nurse recruitment, primarily from developing nations, to offset their lagging domestic nurse supplies and meet growing health care demands. Few donor nations are prepared to manage the loss of their nurse workforce to migration. The sole country with an explicit nurse export policy and the world's leading donor of nurse labor - the Philippines - is itself facing serious provider maldistribution and countrywide health disparities. Examining the historical roots of Philippines nurse migration provides lessons from which other nurse exporting countries may learn. The authors discuss factors that have predicated nurse migration and policies that have eased the way. Furthermore, the authors analyze how various stakeholders influence migratory patterns, the implications of migration for nurses and the public in their care, and the challenges that future social policy and political systems face in addressing global health issues engendered by unfettered recruitment of nurses and other health workers. PMID:17470770

  20. [School nursing and sex education for adolescents].

    PubMed

    Felizari, G M

    1990-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to organize and testify the teaching of Sexual Education for Adolescents. Two groups of first level School adolescents were selected to be submitted to a diagnostic test; after being worked, they were submitted to a post-test about their knowledge of subject matter. It was concluded that the teenagers are very little informed about sexuality, although they are highly motivated and able to discuss and to receive information about the subject. The results of the research points to the necessity of a multidisciplinary approach, with the active participation of scholar nursing in its development. It is recommended that the Program of Sexual Education should also include some bio-psychosocial aspects and must be based on the diagnosis of students' needs. PMID:2130384

  1. Prenatal diagnosis of achondrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Golbus, M S; Hall, B D; Filly, R A; Poskanzer, L B

    1977-09-01

    Severe rhizomelic and mesomelic dwarfism was demonstrated in a 20-week gestation fetus by amniography. A systematic progressive approach to prenatal diagnosis in the absence of a definitive diagnosis and the use of contrast radiography is discussed. PMID:894421

  2. Pubic "Crab" Lice Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment FAQs Malathion FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ... Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ...

  3. Head Lice: Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment FAQs Malathion FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ... Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ...

  4. Body Lice Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment FAQs Malathion FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ... Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ...

  5. Tetanus: Diagnosis and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Links Tetanus Vaccination Maternal and Neonatal Tetanus Elimination Diagnosis and Treatment Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... should be given along with treatment. Related Page Diagnosis/Treatment for Clinicians Related Links Tetanus Vaccination Maternal ...

  6. Bell's Palsy Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Bell's Palsy Sections What Is Bell's Palsy? Bell's Palsy Symptoms ... Bell's Palsy? Bell's Palsy Diagnosis Bell's Palsy Treatment Bell's Palsy Diagnosis Reviewed by: Philip R Rizzuto, MD FACS ...

  7. Nursing home culture change: what does it mean to nurses?

    PubMed

    Bellot, Jennifer

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore, from the perspectives of licensed nurses, the organizational culture, work environment, and factors influencing culture change in two nursing homes participating in the Wellspring Program. All licensed nurses ≥ 0.25 full-time equivalent from two nursing homes were invited to complete the Organizational Culture Inventory and the Work Environment Scale. A subset of respondents was invited to participate in subsequent interviews. Data indicated unresolved conflict, low employee satisfaction, high work demands, and managerial control in the workplace. Qualitatively, three categories emerged: Confusion over culture change, role, and documentation; Conflict over the integration of traditional care with a resident-centered model; and Commitment to providing quality nursing care to the resident. To ensure the successful implementation of culture change, consideration must be given to clarity of communication, anticipation of role conflict, and building on the underlying strength of job commitment. PMID:22998657

  8. [Management of nursing personnel with job security: perceptions of nurses].

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Amanda Troca; Vaghetti, Helena Heidtmann; Lunardi Filho, Wilson Danilo; Gomes, Giovana Calcagno

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to identify a university hospital nurses' perception on the management of nursing personnel with job security, using data collected from a qualitative research developed with sixteen nurses, in 2010. The data, collected through semi-structured interviews, and analyzed by Thematic Analysis, produced two empirical categories: Security at work versus the impunity afforded by tenure; Job stability and (un)involvement in nursing work. It has been verified that job stability provides security of employment; security spawns impunity, and nurses are reluctant to conduct administrative proceedings. The conclusion are that the security of employment caused by stability can favour the break of hierarchies; impunity leads to the vulgarisation of transgressions by the lack of effective administrative measures toward the solution of problems; and job stability does not ensure the quality of assistance. PMID:22460493

  9. Parish nursing: a unique resource for community and district nurses.

    PubMed

    Wordsworth, Helen; Moore, Ros; Woodhouse, Daphne

    2016-02-01

    This paper examines the effect of parish nursing as a faith community initiative to support the work of district and community nurses and improve health outcomes. It discusses the reasons why faith communities might embark upon health initiatives, and describes the practice of parish nursing and its history and development in the UK. With reference to both quantitative and qualitative outcomes, the relevance of the practice in the UK health scene is assessed. The paper suggests that connecting with the third sector through parish nursing could enhance the work of community and district nurses; this would present additional sources of holistic care and health promotion and can be offered in an optional but complementary manner to the care provided through the NHS. PMID:26844600

  10. Nursing diagnoses, interventions, and patient outcomes for hospitalized older adults with pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Head, Barbara J; Scherb, Cindy A; Reed, David; Conley, Deborah Marks; Weinberg, Barbara; Kozel, Marie; Gillette, Susan; Clarke, Mary; Moorhead, Sue

    2011-04-01

    A study was conducted by academic and community hospital partners with clinical information systems that included the standardized nursing language classifications of the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association International (NANDA-I), Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC), and Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC). The aim of the study was to determine the frequency of NANDA-I, NIC, and NOC (NNN) terms documented for older adults with pneumonia who were discharged from three hospitals during a 1-year period. NNN terms were ranked according to frequency for each hospital, and then the rankings were compared with previous studies. Similarity was greater across hospitals in rankings of NANDA-I and NOC terms than in rankings of NIC terms. NANDA-I and NIC terms are influenced by reimbursement and regulatory factors as well as patient condition. The 10 most frequent NNN terms for each hospital accounted only for a small to moderate percentage of the terms selected. PMID:21544937

  11. Toward integrating a common nursing data set in home care to facilitate monitoring outcomes across settings.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Gail; Stocker, Julia; Barkauskas, Violet; Treder, Marcy; Heath, Crystal

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of our research is to identify a realistic subset of North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA), Nursing Outcome Classification (NOC), and Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) terms specific to the home care (HC) setting. A subset of 89 NOC outcomes were identified for study in HC through a baseline survey. Three research assistants then observed the care of 258 patients to whom the 89 NOC outcomes applied and recorded the associated NANDA and NIC terms. Follow-up surveys and focus groups were conducted with the nurses and research assistants. There were 81 different NANDA and 226 NIC labels used to describe study patients' care. Only 36 of the 89 NOC labels studied were deemed clinically useful for HC. We found that expert opinion about terminology usage before actual experience under practice conditions is unreliable. PMID:15274523

  12. Value-based resource management: a model for best value nursing care.

    PubMed

    Caspers, Barbara A; Pickard, Beth

    2013-01-01

    With the health care environment shifting to a value-based payment system, Catholic Health Initiatives nursing leadership spearheaded an initiative with 14 hospitals to establish best nursing care at a lower cost. The implementation of technology-enabled business processes at point of care led to a new model for best value nursing care: Value-Based Resource Management. The new model integrates clinical patient data from the electronic medical record and embeds the new information in care team workflows for actionable real-time decision support and predictive forecasting. The participating hospitals reported increased patient satisfaction and cost savings in the reduction of overtime and improvement in length of stay management. New data generated by the initiative on nursing hours and cost by patient and by population (Medicare severity diagnosis-related groups), and patient health status outcomes across the acute care continuum expanded business intelligence for a value-based population health system. PMID:23454987

  13. Nurse Migration: A Canadian Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Little, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    Objective To synthesize information about nurse migration in and out of Canada and analyze its role as a policy lever to address the Canadian nursing shortage. Principal Findings Canada is both a source and a destination country for international nurse migration with an estimated net loss of nurses. The United States is the major beneficiary of Canadian nurse emigration resulting from the reduction of full-time jobs for nurses in Canada due to health system reforms. Canada faces a significant projected shortage of nurses that is too large to be ameliorated by ethical international nurse recruitment and immigration. Conclusions The current and projected shortage of nurses in Canada is a product of health care cost containment policies that failed to take into account long-term consequences for nurse workforce adequacy. An aging nurse workforce, exacerbated by layoffs of younger nurses with less seniority, and increasing demand for nurses contribute to a projection of nurse shortage that is too great to be solved ethically through international nurse recruitment. National policies to increase domestic nurse production and retention are recommended in addition to international collaboration among developed countries to move toward greater national nurse workforce self sufficiency. PMID:17489918

  14. Handling Sexuality Concerns in Women with Gynecological Cancer: Egyptian Nurse's Knowledge and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansour, Suzan E.; Mohamed, Hanan E.

    2015-01-01

    Sexuality is an important part of normal human functioning. Gynecological cancer diagnosis and treatment has devastating effect on Sexual issues. Study aim was to investigate Oncology Nurses knowledge and attitudes in Relation to Provision of Sexual Health Care to Women Diagnosed with Gynecological Cancer. The study setting was conducted at…

  15. The leadership role of nurse educators in mental health nursing.

    PubMed

    Sayers, Jan; Lopez, Violeta; Howard, Patricia B; Escott, Phil; Cleary, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Leadership behaviors and actions influence others to act, and leadership in clinical practice is an important mediator influencing patient outcomes and staff satisfaction. Indeed, positive clinical leadership has been positioned as a crucial element for transformation of health care services and has led to the development of the Practice Doctorate Movement in the United States. Nurse educators in health care have a vital leadership role as clinical experts, role models, mentors, change agents, and supporters of quality projects. By enacting these leadership attributes, nurse educators ensure a skilled and confident workforce that is focused on optimizing opportunities for students and graduates to integrate theory and practice in the workplace as well as developing more holistic models of care for the consumer. Nurse educators need to be active in supporting staff and students in health care environments and be visible leaders who can drive policy and practice changes and engage in professional forums, research, and scholarship. Although nurse educators have always been a feature of the nursing workplace, there is a paucity of literature on the role of nurse educators as clinical leaders. This discursive article describes the role and attributes of nurse educators with a focus on their role as leaders in mental health nursing. We argue that embracing the leadership role is fundamental to nurse educators and to influencing consumer-focused care in mental health. We also make recommendations for developing the leadership role of nurse educators and provide considerations for further research such as examining the impact of clinical leaders on client, staff, and organizational outcomes. PMID:26440875

  16. [The diagnosis of insulin dependent diabetes in children and teenagers].

    PubMed

    Rocaboy, Claudette; Lebrun, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    The conditions of the announcement of the diagnosis of diabetes in children and teenagers are key to helping them live as best as possible with the constraints of this chronic disease. The psychologist works as a mediator in order that the suffering of the child and their family is listened to and contained within the nursing team. This support facilitates the adaptation and reorganisation of their day-to-day life. PMID:26776686

  17. Realizing a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder as an adult.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Laura Foran

    2016-08-01

    Many individuals with autism spectrum disorder are not diagnosed until adulthood, yet little is known about their experiences. This descriptive phenomenological study aimed to explore the experience of realizing a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder in adulthood. A purposive sample of 77 adults was asked to describe their experiences of realizing a diagnosis as adults via an open-ended online survey. Data were analysed using Colaizzi's method and six themes were derived: feeling different from others, riding an emotional rollercoaster, striving to accept themselves, strategizing to improve their lives, maintaining normalcy, and wandering into the future. Nurses must realize the importance of screening for depression following a new diagnosis. Barriers to reaching a formal diagnosis should also be evaluated. PMID:26940281

  18. Caring for patients with cancer in non-specialist wards: the nurse experience.

    PubMed

    Mohan, S; Wilkes, L M; Ogunsiji, O; Walker, A

    2005-07-01

    This study aims to describe the experiences of nurses caring for cancer patients in non-specialist wards. The study was conducted in a large (420 beds) and small (32 beds) hospital in an area health service with urban and rural populations in the west of Sydney. A qualitative descriptive approach was utilized to collect data from the nurses. Data were collected using a survey and in-depth interviews of nurses working in non-specialist cancer wards. Transcribed data were managed with Nudist Vivo software and analysed for common themes using process of constant comparison and contrast. Twenty-five surveys were returned and five nurses volunteered to be interviewed. The six major themes that emerged from analysis of data were: emotional nature of care, lack of time, lack of knowledge of cancer treatment, family support, environment not conducive to proper care and dealing with patient's non-acceptance of cancer diagnosis. The nurses in this study wished to provide quality supportive care for cancer patients and their families but the inconducive environment and inadequate relevant training hindered the nurses' efforts. This then presents further need of relevant training for nurses in cancer care and time management, to meet up with these challenges. PMID:15952970

  19. Usability of the Clinical Care Classification System for Representing Nursing Practice According to Specialty.

    PubMed

    Feng, Rung-Chuang; Chang, Polun

    2015-10-01

    This study examined the ability of the Clinical Care Classification system to represent nursing record data across various nursing specialties. The data comprised nursing care plan records from December 1998 to October 2008 in a medical center. The total number of care plan documentation we analyzed was 2 060 178, and we used a process of knowledge discovery in datasets for data analysis. The results showed that 75.42% of the documented diagnosis terms could be mapped using the Clinical Care Classification system. However, a difference in nursing terminology emerged among various nursing specialties, ranging from 0.1% for otorhinolaryngology to 100% for colorectal surgery and plastic surgery. The top five nursing diagnoses were identified as knowledge deficit, acute pain, infection risk, falling risk, and bleeding risk, which were the most common health problems in an acute care setting but not in non-acute care settings. Overall, we identified a total of 21 established nursing diagnoses, which we recommend adding to the Clinical Care Classification system, most of which are applicable to emergency and intensive care specialties. Our results show that Clinical Care Classification is useful for documenting patient's problems in an acute setting, but we suggest adding new diagnoses to identify health problems in specialty settings. PMID:26418298

  20. Should School Nurses Wear Uniforms?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of School Health, 2001

    2001-01-01

    This 1958 paper questions whether school nurses should wear uniforms (specifically, white uniforms). It concludes that white uniforms are often associated with the treatment of ill people, and since many people have a fear reaction to them, they are not necessary and are even undesirable. Since school nurses are school staff members, they should…

  1. Aerospace Nursing: The New Frontier.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polk-Walker, Glenda C.

    1989-01-01

    The physiological and psychological stresses that have an impact on the ability of humans to achieve space habitation and nursing's role in that endeavor are discussed. The nursing knowledge base needed to establish the discipline as a major contributor to space health science is discussed. (Author/MLW)

  2. Nursing Ethics: A Lifelong Commitment.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Susanne W; Jeschke, E Ann

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, the health-care context as well as the roles and responsibilities of nurses have drastically changed. Leaders in nursing around the world recognize that the health-care system is stressed and the well-being of the nursing workforce plagued by the pressures and challenges it faces in everyday practice. We do not intend to make a strong normative argument for why nursing ethics education should be done in a certain way, but instead show from where we have come and to where we can go, so that educators are positioned to address some of the current shortcomings in ethics education. Our goal is to provide an illustration of ethics education as an interwoven, ongoing, and essential aspect of nursing education and professional development. By developing professional identity as character, we hope that professional nurses are given the skills to stand in the face of adversity and to act in a way that upholds the core competencies of nursing. Ultimately, health-care organizations will thrive because of the support they provide nurses and other health-care professionals. PMID:26673373

  3. Nursing Procedures. NAVMED P-5066.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Medicine and Surgery (Navy), Washington, DC.

    The revised manual of nursing procedures covers fundamental nursing care, admission and discharge of the patient, assisting with therapeutic measures, pre- and postoperative care, diagnostic tests and procedures, and isolation technique. Each of the over 300 topics includes the purpose, equipment, and procedure to be used and, where relevant, such…

  4. Emergency Nursing--N421.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tate, Elizabeth

    A description is provided of "Emergency Nursing," an undergraduate nursing course designed to provide a concentrated learning experience in emergency care. The description first provides information on the curriculum placement of the course, allotment of class time, and the targeted student population, followed by a glossary of relevant terms. The…

  5. NLN: Celebrating Associate Degree Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoddick, Nancy A.

    1981-01-01

    Introduces a project celebrating the thirtieth anniversary of associate degree nursing (ADN) education. Reviews the efforts and plans of two national associations to identify and resolve recurring ADN issues and recognize the associate degree nurse's contributions. Describes the forums and publications planned to meet these objectives. Includes…

  6. Adversity and advancing nursing knowledge.

    PubMed

    Reed, Pamela G

    2008-04-01

    This column reports the theme of adversity addressed in reference to theoretical and metatheoretical considerations for advancing nursing knowledge. The development and content of three classic nursing theories are presented by Neuman representatives, and by theorists King and Roy. Topics for continued dialogue are identified as derived from the interface between philosophy of science issues and these theories. PMID:18378823

  7. Interaction in Distance Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boz Yuksekdag, Belgin

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine psychiatry nurses' attitudes toward the interactions in distance nursing education, and also scrunize their attitudes based on demographics and computer/Internet usage. The comparative relational scanning model is the method of this study. The research data were collected through "The Scale of Attitudes of…

  8. [Rediscovering practical knowledge in nursing].

    PubMed

    Medina Moya, José Luis

    2005-01-01

    The author demythologizes some arguments which blamed the victim and he works on the path to rediscover practical knowledge in nursing in the sense that a nurse becomes a "constructor" or a "maker" of knowledge and not a mere applicator of knowledge. PMID:16130684

  9. Computer Technology and Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Council on Collegiate Education for Nursing, Atlanta, GA.

    The influences of computer technology on college nursing education programs and health care delivery systems are discussed in eight papers. The use of computers is considered, with attention to clinical care, nursing education and continuing education, administration, and research. Attention is also directed to basic computer terminology, computer…

  10. Florida's Nurses Speak to Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCulloch, Etta S.

    A questionnaire was sent to 5000 Florida hospitals to obtain information from non-members of the Florida Nurses Association (FNA) and to compare the data with that of FNA members on questions relevant to nursing education. Among findings from the 22-item survey, 84 percent of which were returned, were that 80 percent disagreed that licensing…

  11. Nursing Homes for Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Alma L.; Mutzebaugh, Carole A.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a community college's development and implementation of a second-year nursing curriculum which involved clinical experience in an extended care facility in which learning took place in the following areas: the normal physical and developmental aging process; rehabilitation for chronic illness; and specific psychiatric nursing principles…

  12. Different Voices in Nurse Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokes, Gilian

    2007-01-01

    Nurse educators, like many of their health care professional colleagues, frequently face moral dilemmas when they identify a student as presenting an unacceptable risk to public safety. In this situation, the statutory requirement of nurse educators to protect the public, under the Health Practitioners Competence Assurance Act (2003), competes…

  13. Telecourses for nursing staff development.

    PubMed

    Clark, C E

    1989-01-01

    Instructional television is a viable option for meeting staff development needs in health care agencies. Telecourses produced by the Intercollegiate Center for Nursing Education provide staff development educators with an efficient and effective alternative for meeting selected educational needs of staff within health care institutions, as well as interested nurses throughout the community. Use of this instructional methodology is described. PMID:2732789

  14. Incivility Across the Nursing Continuum.

    PubMed

    Lynette, Jones; Echevarria, Ilia; Sun, Emily; Ryan, Jane Greene

    2016-01-01

    Incivility affects nurses throughout education and practice; it directly affects patient safety as well as nurses' decisions to remain in academia and clinical practice. This article reviews the current literature on incivility and proposes the application of social learning theory to evidence-based strategies that can be implemented to combat incivility. PMID:27501208

  15. Predicting Success in Nursing Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrera, Cheryl; Blair, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    As the U.S. population ages and policy changes emerge, such as the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, the U.S. will experience a significant shortage of Registered Nurses (RNs). Many colleges and universities are attempting to increase the size of nursing cohorts to respond to this imminent shortage. Notwithstanding a 2.6%…

  16. Building Interest in Nursing Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2005-01-01

    In February 2004, when the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics released its list of the 10 occupations with the largest projected job growth in the years 2002-2012, registered nurses (RNs) were at the top of the list. American Nurses Association President Barbara A. Blakeney noted at the time that it was not surprising given our aging population and…

  17. Career Preferences of Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Odette N.; MacLennan, Anna; Dupuis-Blanchard, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates novice and experienced student nurses' attitudes about caring for patients across the lifespan. Students were also asked why they would enjoy or not enjoy caring for children and older adults. Both novice (n = 114) and advanced (n = 56) nursing students were relatively positive about caring for patients across the lifespan.…

  18. Manual for Special Education Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnetter, Vicki A., Ed.

    This manual aims (1) to provide a standard, well-referenced resource for Iowa special education nurses and (2) to provide direction and continuity for health services to pupils with special needs. The first chapter provides an overview of the special education nurse's role, including philosophy, definitions of assignments, levels of service, and…

  19. Management and leadership by nurses.

    PubMed

    Henry, B; Lorensen, M; Hirschfeld, M J

    1994-01-01

    Good management and leadership by nurses is essential for the achievement of health for all. Well-prepared nurses are required locally and nationally who can identify problems and needs, work on interdisciplinary teams to formulate development plans for human resources, improve working conditions, and raise the quality of care at reasonable cost. PMID:8018279

  20. Perceived roles of oncology nursing.

    PubMed

    Lemonde, Manon; Payman, Naghmeh

    2015-01-01

    The Canadian Association of Nurses in Oncology (CANO) Standards of Care (2001) provides a framework that delineates oncology nursing roles and responsibilities. The purpose of this study was to explore how oncology nurses perceive their roles and responsibilities compared to the CANO Standards of Care. Six focus groups were conducted and 21 registered nurses (RNs) from a community-based hospital participated in this study. Transcripts were analyzed using qualitative inductive content analysis. Three themes were identified: (1) Oncology nurses perceive a gap between their defined roles and the reality of daily practice, as cancer care becomes more complex and as they provide advanced oncology care to more patients while there is no parallel adaptation to the health care system to support them, such as safe staffing; (2) Oncology nursing, as a specialty, requires sustained professional development and leadership roles; and (3) Oncology nurses are committed to providing continuous care as a reference point in the health care team by fostering interdisciplinary collaboration andfacilitating patient's navigation through the system. Organizational support through commitment to appropriate staffing and matching scope ofpractice to patient needs may lead to maximize the health and well-being of nurses, quality of patient care and organizational performance. PMID:26897865

  1. Vaccine Safety Resources for Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Shimabukuro, Tom T.; Hibbs, Beth F.; Moro, Pedro L.; Broder, Karen R.; Vellozzi, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Overview Nurses are on the front lines of health care delivery, and many of them routinely administer immunizations. The authors describe the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) vaccine safety monitoring systems, explaining how nurses can access inquiry channels and other immunization information resources. Examples of recent vaccine safety inquiries are also provided. PMID:26222474

  2. NATIONAL NURSING HOME SURVEY (NNHS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Nursing Home Survey (NNHS) is a continuing series of national sample surveys of nursing homes, their residents, and their staff.The survey was conducted in 1973-74, 1977, 1985, 1995, 1997, and 1999. Although each of these surveys emphasized different topics, they all...

  3. [Quantitative and qualitative nursing research].

    PubMed

    Nieminen, H; Sansoni, J

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this article is to open a discussion on Nursing research methods. Authors give some thoughts on qualitative nursing research and underlining the difference between positivistic and teleological vision. Relationship between inductive and deductive thinking is discussed. PMID:10474458

  4. The High School Nurse Practitioner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nader, Philip R.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Expanding the role of the high school nurse through pediatric nurse practitioner training, the addition of a full-time health aide, and the use of clinic management holds promise as one method of improving total health care for adolescents. (MJB)

  5. Reconnecting to nursing through Reiki.

    PubMed

    Natale, Glenda Watson

    2010-01-01

    Reiki and other energy modalities are included in the scope of nursing standards in many states and could address issues of stress, compassion fatigue, and burnout. Nurses are increasingly vulnerable to these conditions; Reiki could assist them in healing themselves and helping others. PMID:21140870

  6. Restorative Nurse Assistant. Instructor Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This curriculum material covers the basic orientation and necessary skills which would enable the practicing Certified Nurse Assistant to be trained as a Restorative Nurse Assistant. The shift in emphasis from maintenance care to restorative care in the long-term care setting has created a need for trained paraprofessionals who are competent in…

  7. Defining patient-nurse boundaries.

    PubMed

    Barrow, Rebecca; Mee, Steve; Buckley, Alison; Corless, Louise

    This series exploring how narratives can be used to reflect on practice has focused on patient narratives. This sixth article uses nurse narratives to explore professional boundaries between patients and nurses. These can be difficult to negotiate and can depend on individual circumstances: what may be appropriate in one situation may be unacceptable in another. PMID:27295800

  8. Breaking bad news: issues relating to nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Warnock, Clare

    2014-07-15

    The breaking of bad news was traditionally regarded to be the time when a doctor and nurse sat down with a patient and family members to provide information about, for example, a life-limiting diagnosis or a poor prognosis. However, breaking bad news is now generally accepted as a process, not a one-off event, and is considered to refer to any bad, sad or difficult information that alters patients' perceptions of their present and future. Nurses have an important role in the process of providing information and helping patients prepare for, receive, understand and cope with the bad news they have been given. This article aims to help nurses understand the process of breaking bad news and discuss the challenges and difficulties that nurses can face when they are involved with patients who have been given bad news. It also provides guidance with regard to preparing for breaking bad news, giving difficult information, responding to possible reactions, and supporting patients and their relatives after they have received bad news. PMID:25005417

  9. Delegation in Correctional Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, Frances

    2016-07-01

    Correctional nurses face daily challenges as a result of their work environment. Common challenges include availability of resources for appropriate care delivery, negotiating with custody staff for access to patients, adherence to scope of practice standards, and working with a varied staffing mix. Professional correctional nurses must consider the educational backgrounds and competency of other nurses and assistive personnel in planning for care delivery. Budgetary constraints and varied staff preparation can be a challenge for the professional nurse. Adequate care planning requires understanding the educational level and competency of licensed and unlicensed staff. Delegation is the process of assessing patient needs and transferring responsibility for care to appropriately educated and competent staff. Correctional nurses can benefit from increased knowledge about delegation. PMID:27302707

  10. Student Immersion in Perioperative Nursing.

    PubMed

    Penprase, Barbara; Monahan, Janean; Poly-Droulard, Lynda; Prechowski, Stephanie

    2016-02-01

    The aging workforce and the lack of perioperative clinical practice and theoretical content in nursing education programs are factors contributing to the perioperative nursing shortage. This article discusses the implementation of a creatively designed perioperative program, which includes a didactic course and a 210-hour clinical course, developed by the faculty members of a Michigan school of nursing in collaboration with administrators at area hospitals. The didactic content covers materials presented during the first three months of orientation for newly employed perioperative nurses. Interested baccalaureate nursing students in their senior year are selected to participate in the program after being interviewed by hospital personnel and university faculty members. To date, the program has 18 student graduates in two semesters; all have been offered positions in the perioperative setting, and 14 have accepted positions. The active learning strategies used in the course are described with examples. PMID:26849984

  11. [Research competencies in nursing specialties].

    PubMed

    Oltra-Rodríguez, Enrique; Rich-Ruiz, Manuel; Orts-Cortés, María Isabel; Sánchez-López, Dolores; González-Carrión, Pilar

    2013-01-01

    Since nursing became an university degree in 1977, there have been several regulations to develop specialties, all of them agreeing on the need to include skills in research. Indeed, the relevance of acquiring these skills in all current disciplines has led to Royal Decree 99/2011, which regulates the official PhD courses, and recognises specialist nurses as qualified to access PhD studies. Nowadays, students from six of the seven specialties included in the Royal Decree 450/2005 on nursing specialties, are performing their training. The acquisition of research skills is seen as an opportunity and a challenge. However, the organizational structure of training facilities (multiprofessional teaching units) and the incorporation of nurses as clinical tutors, who initiated this teaching activity, deserve special attention to ensure the correct acquisition of research skills in the training of specialist nurses. PMID:24011526

  12. [Nurses' practice in health audit].

    PubMed

    Pinto, Karina Araújo; de Melo, Cristina Maria Meira

    2010-09-01

    The objective of this investigation was to identify nurses' practice in heath audit. The hermeneutic-dialectic method was used for the analysis. The study was performed in three loci: the internal audit service of a hospital; the external audit service of a private health service buyer, and the state audit service of the public health system (SUS, acronym in Portuguese for Sistema Unico de Saúde-Unique Health System), in Bahia. Nine audit nurses were interviewed. In the SUS audit, the nurses report being fulfilled with their practice and with the valorization of their professional role. In the private audit--both inside and outside of health organizations--the nurses' activities are focused on meeting the interests of their contractors, and do not get much involved with the care delivered by the nursing team and with the needs of service users. PMID:20964043

  13. Humor as a nursing intervention.

    PubMed

    Hunt, A H

    1993-02-01

    This article describes the use of humor as a nursing intervention and asks if nurses can justify the integration of the use of humor into the repertoire of nursing interventions. Several uses for humor are illustrated, and humor is differentiated from laughter. The article quotes many nurse leaders' opinions about humor and identifies do's and do not's of appropriate humor; it discusses six research studies in which health care professionals used humor as a treatment protocol. The studies were in the areas of preoperative teaching, clinical evaluation, strategies to prevent hopelessness in adolescents with oncologic illness, and group cohesiveness. Results of these six studies give some evidence, although not robust, that humor is an effective intervention. Methods of determining and implementing humor as an appropriate nursing intervention are included. PMID:8457984

  14. Sensing kuuki among visiting nurses.

    PubMed

    Shimamura, Atsuko; Suwa, Sayuri; Tsujimura, Mayuko

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to explore how visiting nurses in Japan sense Kuuki (mood or atmosphere) in the homes of patients and families. Participants were 15 Japanese visiting nurses with experience sensing kuuki in homes of patients and families. Data were collected through two 90 min focus group interviews with experienced visiting nurses, and a qualitative content analysis was performed. The qualitative analysis showed that experienced visiting nurses sensed kuuki in eight ways. Kuuki differs based on type of illness, state of health and number of visits. Sensitivity to kuuki is thought to be linked to understanding of patient and family feelings, changes in the physical condition of patients and evaluation of nursing care delivery. Perception of kuuki also contributes to care planning especially on the very first home visit and when visiting terminally ill patients. PMID:27184700

  15. Leadership and mental health nursing.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Michelle; Horsfall, Jan; Deacon, Maureen; Jackson, Debra

    2011-01-01

    This discussion paper argues for the critical importance of successful leadership for effective mental health nursing, observing that nursing leadership has long been regarded problematically by the profession. Using empirical and theoretical evidence we debate what leadership styles and strategies are most likely to result in effective, recovery-orientated mental health nursing. Models of transformational and distributed leadership are found to be highly congruent with mental health nursing values, yet the literature suggests it is a type of leadership more often desired than experienced. We note how the scholarly literature tends to ignore the "elephant in the room" that is organizational power, and we question whether transformational leadership pursued within a specific clinical context can influence beyond those confines. Nevertheless it is within these contexts that consumers experience nursing, effective or otherwise, thus we should advocate what is known about effective leadership wherever it is required. PMID:21932925

  16. Nursing Delineation Pilot Study, 1981-1982. Volume 1: Methods Report. Kentucky Nursing Education Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky State Council on Higher Education, Frankfort.

    A methodology was developed for the systematic analysis of the nursing profession, as part of the Kentucky Nursing Education Project's Nursing Delineation Study. The methodology defined and ranked nursing tasks according to the degree of complexity in order to promote articulation in nursing practice and education and to better utilize the…

  17. Nursing Educator Retention: The Relationship between Job Embeddedness and Intent to Stay among Nursing Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamlin, Amy S.

    2013-01-01

    The United States is in the midst of an increasingly worsening shortage of registered nurses, due, in part, to the nursing educator shortage. Further, nursing programs nationwide are turning away qualified applicants because of a lack of nursing educators. Unfortunately, the nursing educator shortage is not a problem that will be easily fixed. As…

  18. Study of Nursing Manpower Requirements and Resources in Kentucky, 1981 and 1985. Kentucky Nursing Education Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky State Council on Higher Education, Frankfort.

    The Kentucky Nursing Manpower Requirements and Resources Study (1981 and 1985) is one segment of a nursing project designed to develop a coordinated statewide system of nursing education in Kentucky. The study determined the number and types of nurses needed and compared current and anticipated nursing manpower supply and demand. Calculations of…

  19. The Institute for Johns Hopkins Nursing: A Collaborative Model for Nursing Practice and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabatier, Kathleen Hartman

    2002-01-01

    The Institute for Johns Hopkins Nursing was developed collaboratively by the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing and the Johns Hopkins Hospital Department of Nursing. The institute prepares nurses for practice, keeps practitioners current, and provides nursing staff development programs. (Contains 11 references.) (JOW)

  20. Need of Knowledge in Nursing and Demand for Knowledge in Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansson, Britt

    An English summary of a study on nursing education which was written in Swedish is presented. Standards of medical and surgical knowledge required of student nurses were evaluated based on all written test items in medical and surgical nursing set during one year at Swedish schools of nursing. The views of teaching staff and student nurses on…

  1. An Assessment of Nursing Attitudes toward Computers in Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carl, David L.; And Others

    The attitudes and perceptions of practicing nurses, student nurses, and nurse educators toward computerization of health care were assessed using questionnaires sent to two general hospitals and five nursing education programs. The sample consisted of 83 first-year nursing students, 84 second-year nursing students, 52 practicing nurses, and 26…

  2. Airline advisory nursing.

    PubMed

    Mark, J A

    1994-02-01

    The commercial airliner cabin is a specialized environment, usually pressurized to an equivalent of 2,438-meter pressure altitude. Such an altitude can adversely affect people prone to hypoxia. Preflight attention to this and other problems by an advisory nurse (AN) can minimize or prevent in-flight emergencies. The AN can also facilitate travel for passengers with medical needs by being familiar with airline policies and federal regulations. By educating the patient/passenger, health care providers and airline personnel, the safety, comfort and dignity of all concerned can be maximized. PMID:10131607

  3. [RESILIENCE AND NURSE CARE].

    PubMed

    Bermejo Higuera, José Carlos; Alburquerque Medina, Eulalia

    2015-06-01

    Resilience is a dynamic and evolving process, that varies according to the circumstances, the features of the trauma, the context, the stage of life in which the person is, culture and learning we had. Largely depends on the art of extending the arm to ask for help and also the art to attempt it with significant relationships. From the belief that the nursing profession is called to provide resilience tutoring, we review the keys by which we consider these professionals potential resilience tutors. PMID:26591935

  4. Standards for Continuing Education in Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Nurses' Association, New York, NY.

    The quality of health care depends to a large degree on the knowledge, skills, and attitudes of practicing nurses. Continuing education is one way nurses can maintain competence and meet the standards of their profession. Continuing education in nursing consists of planned learning experiences beyond a basic nursing educational program. Providers…

  5. Practical Nursing: Where Are We Headed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandiford, Janice

    1977-01-01

    Due to a redefinition of nursing by the American Nursing Association and financial needs which are difficult to meet, postsecondary vocational health care programs, especially practical nursing, are in danger of being phased out. An appeal to vocational practical nurse educators and legislators to improve and continue these programs is made. (BM)

  6. Ethical Problems Experienced by School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solum, Linda L.; Schaffer, Marjorie A.

    2003-01-01

    This study explored school nurses' experience of ethical conflict in school nursing through interviews with six school nurses. The study examined how school nurses resolved ethical problems and the rationale used to resolve them. Emergent themes of ethical problems were professional relationship conflicts, delegation to and supervision of health…

  7. Resocialization: A Model for Nurse Practitioner Preparation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malkemes, Lois C.

    1973-01-01

    Conventional education programs socialize the nurse for one way of functioning, but, for effective practitioner performance, the nurse must develop a different concept of her nursing identity. Increased knowledge and skills will not alone make the nurse a practitioner; there must be a role change. (Author)

  8. Nurses' Resolutions of Six Ethical Dilemmas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Jeanette A.; Crisham, Patricia

    Six ethical dilemmas related to nursing practice were developed and presented to registered and trainee nurses for their resolution. A non-nurse group of university students also gave decisions about what a nurse should do in each ethically-loaded situation. A dilemma was classified as recurrent if its core problem was spontaneously mentioned by…

  9. 38 CFR 52.130 - Nursing services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Nursing services. 52.130... FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.130 Nursing services. The program management must provide an organized nursing service with a sufficient number of qualified nursing...

  10. 42 CFR 483.30 - Nursing services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nursing services. 483.30 Section 483.30 Public... Care Facilities § 483.30 Nursing services. The facility must have sufficient nursing staff to provide nursing and related services to attain or maintain the highest practicable physical, mental,...

  11. 42 CFR 483.30 - Nursing services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Nursing services. 483.30 Section 483.30 Public... Care Facilities § 483.30 Nursing services. The facility must have sufficient nursing staff to provide nursing and related services to attain or maintain the highest practicable physical, mental,...

  12. High Test Anxiety among Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driscoll, Richard; Evans, Ginger; Ramsey, Gary; Wheeler, Sara

    2009-01-01

    Nursing programs can be highly stressful, and the investigation was undertaken to see if nursing students are more test anxious than students in other fields. The Westside Test Anxiety Scale has administered to 298 nursing students at two colleges, and to a comparison group of 471 high school and college students. Fully 30% of nursing students…

  13. 38 CFR 52.130 - Nursing services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Nursing services. 52.130... FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.130 Nursing services. The program management must provide an organized nursing service with a sufficient number of qualified nursing...

  14. 38 CFR 52.130 - Nursing services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Nursing services. 52.130... FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.130 Nursing services. The program management must provide an organized nursing service with a sufficient number of qualified nursing...

  15. 42 CFR 483.30 - Nursing services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Nursing services. 483.30 Section 483.30 Public... Care Facilities § 483.30 Nursing services. The facility must have sufficient nursing staff to provide nursing and related services to attain or maintain the highest practicable physical, mental,...

  16. 42 CFR 483.30 - Nursing services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Nursing services. 483.30 Section 483.30 Public... Care Facilities § 483.30 Nursing services. The facility must have sufficient nursing staff to provide nursing and related services to attain or maintain the highest practicable physical, mental,...

  17. 42 CFR 483.30 - Nursing services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Nursing services. 483.30 Section 483.30 Public... Care Facilities § 483.30 Nursing services. The facility must have sufficient nursing staff to provide nursing and related services to attain or maintain the highest practicable physical, mental,...

  18. 38 CFR 52.130 - Nursing services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Nursing services. 52.130... FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.130 Nursing services. The program management must provide an organized nursing service with a sufficient number of qualified nursing...

  19. 38 CFR 52.130 - Nursing services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nursing services. 52.130... FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.130 Nursing services. The program management must provide an organized nursing service with a sufficient number of qualified nursing...

  20. An international definition for "nursing home".

    PubMed

    Sanford, Angela M; Orrell, Martin; Tolson, Debbie; Abbatecola, Angela Marie; Arai, Hidenori; Bauer, Juergen M; Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J; Dong, Birong; Ga, Hyuk; Goel, Ashish; Hajjar, Ramzi; Holmerova, Iva; Katz, Paul R; Koopmans, Raymond T C M; Rolland, Yves; Visvanathan, Renuka; Woo, Jean; Morley, John E; Vellas, Bruno

    2015-03-01

    There is much ambiguity regarding the term "nursing home" in the international literature. The definition of a nursing home and the type of assistance provided in a nursing home is quite varied by country. The International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics and AMDA foundation developed a survey to assist with an international consensus on the definition of "nursing home." PMID:25704126