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Sample records for nursing theory practice

  1. The relationship between nursing theory and nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Miller, A

    1985-09-01

    During the past two decades, redefinition of many of the beliefs and assumptions which underly nursing appears to have contributed to an increasing divergence between nursing theory and nursing practice. Nurses who are theorists and educationalists, and nurses who are engaged in nursing practice tend to use different vocabularies, to have differing perceptions of patients and of nursing, and to value different kinds of nursing knowledge. Some of the divergences between nursing theory and nursing practice are considered, and suggestions made about how theory and practice might be reconciled. PMID:3850907

  2. The carrier bag theory of nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Maeve, M K

    1994-06-01

    The carrier bag theory of nursing practice is a reinterpretation of how nursing is known and practiced that explicitly acknowledges and values nursing's oral and experiential traditions. An assumption of this work is that the region of experience that is nursing has been effectively divided into two worlds--academia and the world of practice. This has resulted in a theory-practice gap and an elite class-working class gap, as well as a gap between epistemes, or "knowing that" versus "knowing how." This article describes the development of reflective practice and resulting narratives from a critical perspective as a way of creating a pathway between the two worlds of nursing and honoring scholarship in all the ways nursing is known and practiced. PMID:8092815

  3. Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Program: Theories for Extended Pediatric Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Margaret A.

    A description is provided of "Theories for Extended Pediatric Nursing Practice," a required course for pediatric and family nurse practitioner students in a California state university program. The course description presents information on the curricular placement of the course, prerequisites, in-class time allotments, and the focus of the course…

  4. Linking theory and practice in teaching basic nursing skills.

    PubMed

    Smith, B E

    1992-01-01

    In an attempt to integrate theory and practice in baccalaureate nursing education, students were taught nursing skills with two cognitive strategies (Vee heuristics and concept maps) that consciously identify and reinforce connections between scientific theory and practice. The research showed that students using Vee heuristics and concept maps, rather than traditional modes, were significantly better able to identify scientific principles to describe why specific steps of a nursing skill were done. PMID:1312143

  5. Concept maps: linking nursing theory to clinical nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Daley, B J

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to offer a different methodology for teaching and learning in continuing nursing education and staff development. This article describes a qualitative research study that analyzed how linkages are made between theoretical material and clinical nursing practice. Findings indicate that nursing students did not link the elements of nursing process together, that clinical preparation was not linked to theoretical material, that the meaning students made of the information was different than the instructors' and that concepts from the basic sciences were not incorporated into student meaning structures. Implications for the use of concept maps as an educational strategy in continuing nursing education are drawn. PMID:8576492

  6. Integration of theory and practice in learning mental health nursing.

    PubMed

    Munnukka, T; Pukuri, T; Linnainmaa, P; Kilkku, N

    2002-02-01

    This article describes an action research project that aimed at a better integration of theory and practice in the education of mental health nursing students. Two partners, an institute of nursing and health care and a university hospital, collaborated to develop a new educational programme for mental health nursing. The blocks of theoretical studies were implemented simultaneously with practical training, and the theory content was taught by nursing teachers as well as by nurse practitioners who worked on the teaching wards. In addition, the students had their own personal nurse-preceptors on the wards. The nurse managers were responsible for the educational level of the teaching wards and the director of nursing planned the teaching arrangements together with the nursing teachers. In all, the project involved over 50 different actors and several researchers. The results are encouraging: all the participants - students, preceptors, nurse managers and nursing teachers - found the project rewarding and they want to continue to develop and improve the level of teaching and learning in mental health nursing education. All the participants grew and developed professionally during the project. PMID:11896851

  7. A Self-Care Practice Theory of Nursing the Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Toni J.; Munroe, Donna J.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a practice theory of nursing for the elderly which focuses on maintaining the maximum amount of independence of elderly patients through a nursing focus on the full range of human functional abilities. Interrelates varied health related characteristics and requirements of the elderly with theoretical components of self-care nursing…

  8. Nurse triage in theory and in practice.

    PubMed Central

    George, S; Read, S; Westlake, L; Williams, B; Pritty, P; Fraser-Moodie, A

    1993-01-01

    'Nurse Triage' refers to the formal process of early assessment of patients attending an accident and emergency (A&E) department by a trained nurse, to ensure that they receive appropriate attention, in a suitable location, with the requisite degree of urgency. The benefits claimed for nurse triage include better patient outcomes, through clinical management reaching those in greatest need of it first. A recent study of nurse triage in a British A&E department failed to demonstrate the benefits claimed: patients undergoing triage were delayed, especially those in the most urgent groups. No differences were noted between the two study groups in levels of satisfaction with the A&E process. The results brought forth criticism from all quarters. In this paper the points made by the critics are considered, and an attempt to answer them is made. PMID:8216599

  9. Student nurse socialisation in compassionate practice: a Grounded Theory study.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Katherine; Horton, Khim; Smith, Pam

    2012-10-01

    Compassionate practice is expected of Registered Nurses (RNs) around the world while at the same time remaining a contested concept. Nevertheless, student nurses are expected to enact compassionate practice in order to become RNs. In order for this to happen they require professional socialisation within environments where compassion can flourish. However, there is concern that student nurse socialisation is not enabling compassion to flourish and be maintained upon professional qualification. In order to investigate this further, a glaserian Grounded Theory study was undertaken using in-depth, digitally recorded interviews with student nurses (n=19) at a university in the north of England during 2009 and 2010. Interviews were also undertaken with their nurse teachers (n=5) and data from National Health Service (NHS) patients (n=72,000) and staff (n=290,000) surveys were used to build a contextual picture of the student experience. Within the selected findings presented, analysis of the data indicates that students aspire to the professional ideal of compassionate practice although they have concerns about how compassionate practice might fit within the RN role because of constraints on RN practice. Students feel vulnerable to dissonance between professional ideals and practice reality. They experience uncertainty about their future role and about opportunities to engage in compassionate practice. Students manage their vulnerability and uncertainty by balancing between an intention to uphold professional ideals and challenge constraints, and a realisation they might need to adapt their ideals and conform to constraints. This study demonstrates that socialisation in compassionate practice is compromised by dissonance between professional idealism and practice realism. Realignment between the reality of practice and professional ideals, and fostering student resilience, are required if students are to be successfully socialised in compassionate practice and enabled

  10. Pain theories and their relevance to nursing practices.

    PubMed

    Gedaly-Duff, V

    1988-10-01

    Pain is a feared but universal experience. Early pain theories focused on locating neurological pain fibers. However, when surgical interventions failed to control the pain, other explanations were sought. The interplay between practice and research has advanced our understanding and management of pain. Current pain theories explain pain as a physical, psychological and social experience. Nursing interventions that are multidimensional will have a better chance at ameliorating a patient's pain. PMID:3226638

  11. Theories in action and how nursing practice changed.

    PubMed

    Jasovsky, Deborah A; Morrow, Mary R; Clementi, Pamela S; Hindle, Paula A

    2010-01-01

    Rogers' theoretical framework of diffusion of innovation guided the successful infusion of the educational training and implementation of the Magis model of care at a 570 bed hospital in the Chicagoland area. The Magis model of care was derived from several nursing theories along with information from the Institute of Family-Centered Care. By incorporating the components that relate to the institution's values and Magnet theme, the stages of innovation were readily adopted and sustained over the first year of implementation. The model has spread beyond the original and sister units as demonstrated by another department creating the Magnet poster with the various elements that they have incorporated into daily care delivery. What is so invigorating to the nursing administration is hearing how nursing staff articulates the care they give to the various components of the model and the theory that supports this practice. PMID:20026725

  12. Practical ethical theory for nurses responding to complexity in care.

    PubMed

    Fairchild, Roseanne Moody

    2010-05-01

    In the context of health care system complexity, nurses need responsive leadership and organizational support to maintain intrinsic motivation, moral sensitivity and a caring stance in the delivery of patient care. The current complexity of nurses' work environment promotes decreases in work motivation and moral satisfaction, thus creating motivational and ethical dissonance in practice. These and other work-related factors increase emotional stress and burnout for nurses, prompting both new and seasoned nurse professionals to leave their current position, or even the profession. This article presents a theoretical conceptual model for professional nurses to review and make sense of the ethical reasoning skills needed to maintain a caring stance in relation to the competing values that must coexist among nurses, health care administrators, patients and families in the context of the complex health care work environments in which nurses are expected to practice. A model, Nurses' Ethical Reasoning Skills, is presented as a framework for nurses' thinking through and problem solving ethical issues in clinical practice in the context of complexity in health care. PMID:20444776

  13. A strategy for implementing genomics into nursing practice informed by three behaviour change theories.

    PubMed

    Leach, Verity; Tonkin, Emma; Lancastle, Deborah; Kirk, Maggie

    2016-06-01

    Genomics is an ever increasing aspect of nursing practice, with focus being directed towards improving health. The authors present an implementation strategy for the incorporation of genomics into nursing practice within the UK, based on three behaviour change theories and the identification of individuals who are likely to provide support for change. Individuals identified as Opinion Leaders and Adopters of genomics illustrate how changes in behaviour might occur among the nursing profession. The core philosophy of the strategy is that genomic nurse Adopters and Opinion Leaders who have direct interaction with their peers in practice will be best placed to highlight the importance of genomics within the nursing role. The strategy discussed in this paper provides scope for continued nursing education and development of genomics within nursing practice on a larger scale. The recommendations might be of particular relevance for senior staff and management. PMID:27241441

  14. A practice theory approach to understanding the interdependency of nursing practice and the environment: implications for nurse-led care delivery models.

    PubMed

    Bender, Miriam; Feldman, Martha S

    2015-01-01

    Nursing has a rich knowledge base with which to develop care models that can transform the ways health is promoted and valued. However, theory linking the environment domain of the nursing metaparadigm with the real-world environments where nurses practice and patients experience their health care is tenuous. Practice theory is used to foreground the generative role of nursing practice in producing environments of care, providing the basis for a metaparadigm relational proposition explicitly linking nursing practice and environment metaparadigm domains. A theoretical and empirical focus on the significance of nursing practice dynamics in producing environments of care that promote health and healing will strengthen present and future nursing care models. PMID:25932817

  15. 200 years of nursing--a chief nurse's reflections on practice, theory, policy, education, and research.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Jeanette Ives

    2012-01-01

    This bimonthly department, sponsored by the AONE, presents information to assist nurse leaders in shaping the future of healthcare through creative and innovative leadership. The strategic priorities of AONE anchor the editorial content. They reflect contemporary healthcare and nursing practice issues that challenge nurse executives as they strive to meet the needs of patients. PMID:22157375

  16. Clinical Nurse Leader Integration Into Practice: Developing Theory To Guide Best Practice.

    PubMed

    Bender, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Numerous policy bodies have identified the clinical nurse leader (CNL) as an innovative new role for meeting higher health care quality standards. Although there is growing evidence of improved care environment and patient safety and quality outcomes after redesigning care delivery microsystems to integrate CNL practice, significant variation in CNL implementation has been noted across reports, making it difficult to causally link CNL practice to reported outcomes. This variability reflects the overall absence in the literature of a well-defined CNL theoretical framework to help guide standardized application in practice. To address this knowledge gap, an interpretive synthesis with a grounded theory analysis of CNL narratives was conducted to develop a theoretical model for CNL practice. The model clarifies CNL practice domains and proposes mechanisms by which CNL-integrated care delivery microsystems improve health care quality. The model highlights the need for a systematic approach to CNL implementation including a well-thought out strategy for care delivery redesign; a consistent, competency-based CNL workflow; and sustained macro-to-micro system leadership support. CNL practice can be considered an effective approach to organizing nursing care that maximizes the scope of nursing to influence the ways care is delivered by all professions within a clinical microsystem. PMID:26802589

  17. The theory-practice gap and skill acquisition: an issue for nursing education.

    PubMed

    Scully, Natashia Josephine

    2011-01-01

    Matching textbook descriptions of clinical situations with the reality of practice is an ongoing problem faced by members of the nursing profession and is commonly referred to as the "theory-practice gap". This ubiquitous gap is inevitably encountered by all nurses at various times; yet it is widely agreed that it is student nurses--given their novice, rule governed status--who find themselves in the midst of the theory-practice void. This paper will discuss the nature of the theory-practice gap and skill acquisition, in relation to a personal experience of mine as an undergraduate nursing student, and its significance in relation to student anxiety levels, nurse education (specifically the roles of the classroom teacher and clinical educators), teaching methods and the responsibility of the student to become accountable for their own education. I intend to communicate how my personal situation was dealt with and evaluate that experience in relation to current nursing literature. Ultimately, this discussion will demonstrate the value of reflection underpinning the development of competency in nursing and its role in bridging the theory-practice gap. PMID:21706997

  18. Standardized nursing work: works in practice but not in theory?

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Rune; Ellingsen, Gunnar; Monteiro, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Socio-technical approaches have established that ICT-supported standardization of healthcare work is difficult, if not impossible. We argue that standardization is neither straightforward nor uncontroversial, but discuss an interpretative case study where standardization of nursing work--to an interesting degree--has been achieved. Our case suggests that co-constructing of the standards is essential to standardization in practice. This is partly imposed from the top, and partly accomplished through the active involvement and ingenuity of users. PMID:20543373

  19. Preparation for Advanced Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frik, Seigina M.; Pollock, Susan E.

    1993-01-01

    Lehman College's graduate nursing program uses theory-based courses to prepare advanced nurse practitioners. Students increase scholarly inquiry skills and clinical decision making; use of nursing conceptual models helped them plan and evaluate their practice. (SK)

  20. Why do we need sleep? Relating theory to nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, L A

    1991-12-01

    By reviewing the literature, this paper explores the nature and function of sleep. Most of the evidence for the functional theories of sleep has been obtained as a result of examining the effects of sleep deprivation, the physiological, emotional and behavioural effects of which are discussed. There is a discussion on how an awareness of the theoretical knowledge may help in the nursing care of patients with advanced cancer and other chronic diseases, as well as their carers. The physiological effects of stress, and the possible relationship to patients and their carers, leads the author to highlight the need for further research, and possible benefit of proactive intervention for the bereaved. The effects of poor nutrition and common symptoms such as pain and dyspnoea on sleep, and the iatrogenic causes of sleep disturbances, are discussed. The importance of individualized patient care is stressed. The conclusion is drawn that although researchers do not seem to have been able to prove conclusively any essential function of sleep, the nurse is in a unique position to facilitate and enable patients and their carers to cope during the waking hours, without the added stress that sleep disruption and deprivation bring. PMID:1791260

  1. Interactional nursing--a practice-theory in the dynamic field between the natural, human and social sciences.

    PubMed

    Scheel, Merry Elisabeth; Pedersen, Birthe D; Rosenkrands, Vibeke

    2008-12-01

    Nursing is often described from the point of view of either the natural or the human sciences. In contrast to this, the value foundation in Interactional nursing practice is understood from the point of view of the natural sciences as well as that of the human and social sciences. This article presents many-faceted practice-theory of nursing, which is situated in the dynamic field between these three sciences. The focus of the theory is on interaction and practice resulting in a caring practice. Here practice is based on Taylor's and MacIntyre's interpretation of this concept. Action in nursing is based on Habermas' three varied modes of action seen in the light of an understanding of the world as a system world and a life world. Nursing as an interactional practice-theory is presented with examples of interpretative nursing science, seen in the ethical action-oriented, socio-cultural framework of Taylor and Habermas. It is concluded that phenomenologic and socio-cultural research into caring practice as well as an in-depth, comprehensive interpretation of nursing practice are both highly suited to forming the fundamental theoretical framework in nursing, here seen as an interpretative nursing science. Finally, a comparison is drawn between Interactional nursing practice and Benner's theory of nursing practice. PMID:19068053

  2. Student Assessment System. Domain Referenced Tests. Allied Health Occupations/Practical Nursing. Volume II: Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Gene, Comp.; Simpson, Bruce, Comp.

    These written domain referenced tests (DRTs) for the area of allied health occupations/practical nursing test cognitive abilities or knowledge of theory. Introductory materials describe domain referenced testing and test development. Each multiple choice test includes a domain statement, describing the behavior and content of the domain, and a…

  3. Applications of complex systems theory in nursing education, research, and practice.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Thomas R; Effken, Judith A; Pesut, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The clinical and administrative processes in today's healthcare environment are becoming increasingly complex. Multiple providers, new technology, competition, and the growing ubiquity of information all contribute to the notion of health care as a complex system. A complex system (CS) is characterized by a highly connected network of entities (e.g., physical objects, people or groups of people) from which higher order behavior emerges. Research in the transdisciplinary field of CS has focused on the use of computational modeling and simulation as a methodology for analyzing CS behavior. The creation of virtual worlds through computer simulation allows researchers to analyze multiple variables simultaneously and begin to understand behaviors that are common regardless of the discipline. The application of CS principles, mediated through computer simulation, informs nursing practice of the benefits and drawbacks of new procedures, protocols and practices before having to actually implement them. The inclusion of new computational tools and their applications in nursing education is also gaining attention. For example, education in CSs and applied computational applications has been endorsed by The Institute of Medicine, the American Organization of Nurse Executives and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing as essential training of nurse leaders. The purpose of this article is to review current research literature regarding CS science within the context of expert practice and implications for the education of nurse leadership roles. The article focuses on 3 broad areas: CS defined, literature review and exemplars from CS research and applications of CS theory in nursing leadership education. The article also highlights the key role nursing informaticists play in integrating emerging computational tools in the analysis of complex nursing systems. PMID:18922279

  4. The Partnering with Patients Model of Nursing Interventions: A First Step to a Practice Theory

    PubMed Central

    Moyle, Wendy; Rickard, Claire M.; Chambers, Suzanne K.; Chaboyer, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    The development of a body of knowledge, gained through research and theory building, is one hallmark of a profession. This paper presents the “Partnering with Patients Model of Nursing Interventions”, providing direction towards how complex nursing interventions can be developed, tested and subsequently adopted into practice. Coalescence of understanding of patient-centred care, the capabilities approach and the concept of complex healthcare interventions led to the development of the model assumptions and concepts. Application of the model to clinical practice is described, including presentation of a case study, and areas for future research including understanding both patients’ and nurses’ perceptions and experiences when the model is in use, and testing the effect of nursing interventions based on the model are recommended. PMID:27417760

  5. Health Occupations Curriculum. Skills and Theory for Practical Nurse. Units 16 and 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Education, Phoenix.

    Part of a health occupations program, these instructional units consist of materials for use by those who are studying to become practical nurses. Unit 16 deals with basic concepts in the nursing of the aged, in community health, and in the legal responsibilities of the practical nurse. Covered next are nursing care procedures for adults with the…

  6. Actor-Network Theory as a sociotechnical lens to explore the relationship of nurses and technology in practice: methodological considerations for nursing research.

    PubMed

    Booth, Richard G; Andrusyszyn, Mary-Anne; Iwasiw, Carroll; Donelle, Lorie; Compeau, Deborah

    2016-06-01

    Actor-Network Theory is a research lens that has gained popularity in the nursing and health sciences domains. The perspective allows a researcher to describe the interaction of actors (both human and non-human) within networked sociomaterial contexts, including complex practice environments where nurses and health technology operate. This study will describe Actor-Network Theory and provide methodological considerations for researchers who are interested in using this sociotechnical lens within nursing and informatics-related research. Considerations related to technology conceptualization, levels of analysis, and sampling procedures in Actor-Network Theory based research are addressed. Finally, implications for future nursing research within complex environments are highlighted. PMID:26531190

  7. Shared Decision-Making Models Acknowledging an Interprofessional Approach: A Theory Analysis to Inform Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Krystina B; Stacey, Dawn; Squires, Janet E; Carroll, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Patient engagement in collaboration with health professionals is essential to deliver quality health care. A shared decision-making (SDM) approach requires that patients are involved in decisions regarding their health. SDM is expanding from the patient-physician dyad to incorporate an interprofessional perspective. Conceptual models can be used to better understand theoretical underpinnings for application in clinical practice. The aim of this article was to conduct a theory analysis of conceptual models using an interprofessional approach to SDM and discuss each model's relevance to nursing practice. Walker and Avant's theory analysis approach was used. Three conceptual models were eligible. For all models, the decision-making process was considered iterative. The development process was described for 1 model. All models were logical, parsimonious, and generalizable. One was supported by empirical testing. No model described how partnerships are enacted to achieve interprofessional SDM. Also, there was limited articulation as to how nurses' roles and contributions differ from other team members. This theory analysis highlights the need for a model that explains how partnerships among interprofessional team members are enacted to better understand the operationalization of interprofessional SDM. Implications for nursing practice at all system levels are offered and supported by the 3 models. PMID:27024998

  8. Using theory and evidence to drive measurement of patient, nurse and organizational outcomes of professional nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Jeffs, Lianne; Sidani, Souraya; Rose, Donald; Espin, Sherry; Smith, Orla; Martin, Kirsten; Byer, Charlie; Fu, Kaiyan; Ferris, Ella

    2013-04-01

    An evolving body of literature suggests that the implementation of evidence based clinical and professional guidelines and strategies can improve patient care. However, gaps exist in our understanding of the effect of implementation of guidelines on outcomes, particularly patient outcomes. To address this gap, a measurement framework was developed to assess the impact of an organization-wide implementation of two nursing-centric best-practice guidelines on patient, nurse and organizational level outcomes. From an implementation standpoint, we anticipate that our data will show improvements in the following: (i) patient satisfaction scores and safety outcomes; (ii) nurses ability to value and engage in evidence based practice; and (iii) organizational support for evidence-informed nursing care that results in quality patient outcomes. Our measurement framework and multifaceted methodological approach outlined in this paper might serve as a blueprint for other organizations in their efforts to evaluate the impacts associated with implementation of clinical and professional guidelines and best practices. PMID:23577971

  9. Nursing, knowledge and practice.

    PubMed

    Allen, D

    1997-07-01

    Recent commentators have suggested that academic knowledge is irrelevant to nursing practice and may actually undermine nursing's traditional caring ethos. Furthermore, by making nursing more academic, it is claimed that 'natural' but non-academic carers are prevented from pursuing a career in nursing. Debates about the relationship between nursing, knowledge and practice have a long history and have to be understood in terms of wider political and economic issues relating to nursing, its status within society and the changing role of nurses within the health services division of labour. One crucial issue is nursing's status as women's work. Critics of developments in nurse education draw an ideological equation between nursing work and the traditional female role. From this perspective the qualities that make a good nurse cannot be taught, rather they are founded on 'natural' feminine skills. Irrespective of whether caring is 'natural' or not, it is questionable as to whether, for today's nurses, being caring is sufficient. The shape of nursing jurisdiction is a long way removed from its origins in the Victorian middle-class household. In addition to their traditional caring role, contemporary nurses may also have complex clinical, management and research responsibilities, as well as being crucial coordinators of service provision. It is suggested that these and future developments in health services make the need for an educated nursing workforce even more pressing. In order to adequately prepare nurses for practice, however, it is vital that nurse education reflects the reality of service provision. PMID:10180381

  10. Health Occupations Curriculum. Skills and Theory for Practical Nurse. Units 18, 19, and 20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Education, Phoenix.

    Part of a health occupations program, these instructional units consist of materials for use by those who are studying to become practical nurses. Covered in the units are the following: the nursing care of mothers and newborns (obstetrics, prenatal care and complications, patient needs, care of the newborn, prematurity, medications, and cultural…

  11. [Applying the human dignity ideals of Confucianism and Kant to psychiatric nursing: from theory to practice].

    PubMed

    Lee, Mei-Hsiu; Lee, Shui-Chuen; Lee, Shu-Chen

    2012-04-01

    Literature articles and clinical observation suggest disease and environmental factors as primary causes of the low self-esteem and stigmatization that typify most psychiatric patients. These patients are at risk of injury when subjected to inappropriate physical restraint. Hospital staffs, including nurses, are in immediate and close contact with psychiatric patients. Mencius's and Kant's thoughts on human dignity can enhance reflections on clinical nursing practices. Mencius's belief that preserving life is not the most desirable thing and death is not the most hated thing can help nurses realize the human dignity of psychiatric patients by understanding that, as an unrighteous act is more detestable than death, the meaning and value of righteousness are greater than life itself. In light of Kant's views on human dignity, nurses should treat patients as goals rather than means. Exploring such ideas can raise nursing quality, restore a positive sense of humanity to psychiatric patients, and develop nursing values and meaning to a higher plane. PMID:22469899

  12. Theory before practice: implicit assumptions about clinical nursing education in Australia as revealed through a shared critical reflection.

    PubMed

    Grealish, Laurie; Smale, Lacey Anne

    2011-08-01

    The transfer of nursing education into the higher education sector occurred over a 10-year period in Australia (1985-1994). Australian nurse leaders settled on a single outcome measure to be applied for all nursing graduates in the form of national competency standards. While this move enabled diversity, the lack of consistency in curriculum design has subsequently led to increasing confusion for clinicians who support students' learning in clinical placements. Using a shared critical reflection method, the authors reviewed (1) the evaluation comments from nurses in one nursing unit of a hospital in one Australian jurisdiction and (2) an historical review of nursing literature at the time of the transfer of nursing education into the higher education sector. The reflection suggests that the aim of the transfer, to create critical thinking graduates, has been undermined by the implicit clinical education practices that have since emerged. In order to address the contemporary challenges for clinical staff working with students from multiple universities, as well as increased student numbers to address the nursing shortage, we recommend a new approach to curriculum design: a national clinical curriculum drawn from social, as well as cognitive, learning theory that at once informs clinicians of students' potential abilities and provides the scope to accommodate the increasingly difficult and critical learning requirements of tertiary-based nursing students. PMID:21955266

  13. Jacques Lacan's theory of the subject as real, symbolic and imaginary: how can Lacanian theory be of help to mental health nursing practice?

    PubMed

    McSherry, A

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents an outline of Lacan's theory of the human subject, in particular focusing on Lacan's concepts of the real, symbolic and imaginary registers, and how an understanding of these can inform change and practice in mental health nursing. Mental health nursing is under pressure to define itself as a practice distinct from other professions in the field, and to respond in new ways to promoting mental health to the individual and a wider public. Lacan's theory of the subject is of particular relevance to mental health nurses working with mental distress but has received little attention in mental health nursing literature. Six implications for practice are outlined in terms of: against normalization, the importance of the function of the symptom, what cannot be known, meaning as ever-changing, against empathy and against holistic ideas of the self. PMID:23145967

  14. Implications of nursing taxonomies for middle-range theory development.

    PubMed

    Blegen, M A; Tripp-Reimer, T

    1997-03-01

    Given the broad acceptance for the need to develop middle-range theory to support nursing practice, nursing scientists must consider how to proceed with dispatch to develop these theories. This article suggests using the concepts in the newly developing taxonomies of nursing knowledge as the building blocks for these theories. Taxonomies of nursing diagnoses (NANDA), nursing interventions (NIC), and nursing outcomes (NOC) can speed the construction of the theories needed for nursing practice. PMID:9055029

  15. Best nursing practice.

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    As part of this year's centenary celebrations, the RCN is showcasing the best nursing practice, focusing on that which often goes unobserved. Nurses, healthcare assistants and nursing students are asked to share ideas and innovations for improving practice and patient care. These will contribute to the development of a library of good practice and the RCN will invest in a small number of the successful projects. The closing date is 31 December. PMID:27581898

  16. From theory to practice: community health nursing in a public health neighborhood team.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, L O; Schultz, P R

    2000-12-01

    An interdisciplinary team in a local public health district tested its ability to implement the core public health functions of assessment, policy development, and assurance by changing its practice to a community-driven model of building partnerships for health with groups and communities in a designated locale. Evaluation of this innovation revealed that the public health nurse members of the team enacted their community health nursing knowledge to strengthen agency to cocreate health. Interdisciplinary collaboration was essential to the team's community mobilization efforts. Additional findings suggested that this organizational innovation was associated with developing a more participatory organizational climate, increasing system effectiveness, and building community capacity. PMID:11104324

  17. A critical feminist perspective of the health belief model: implications for nursing theory, research, practice, and education.

    PubMed

    Thomas, L W

    1995-01-01

    The health care system is in a state of crisis, and nursing is in a unique position to influence the decisions that are made regarding health care reform. However, without transforming our ways of knowing and being, the changes that are needed to meet the challenges of the future may not become a reality. Nursing theory, research, and practice reflect the historical, social, and political ideologies of western tradition. Consequently, the knowledge gained from the majority of nursing research has primarily developed from an empiricism or logical positivist philosophy. The underlying assumption of this school of thought is that only empirically quantifiable and measurable matters yield the truth, suggesting that there is only one reality. Because one cannot be socially critical as an empiricist, nurse educators have begun to question the adequacy of the empiricist philosophy and method of research for meeting changing societal demands. Social behavioral theories in general and the Health Belief Model in particular have frequently guided nursing research in an attempt to increase knowledge of health-related behaviors. Too often these theories have done little to increase our knowledge of women and people of color. For the most part, they have contributed to the oppression of individuals and groups. A critical feminist perspective can be useful in the understanding of health practices that are based on contextual knowledge. The purpose of this article is to increase awareness and understanding of the underlying assumptions, constraints, and contradictions that are embedded within social behavioral theories such as the Health Belief Model.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7665800

  18. Development of Gerontological Nursing Theory. Applying the Man-Living-Health Theory of Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heine, Christine

    1991-01-01

    Describes Rosemary Rizzo Parse's Man-Living-Health theory that was used to describe how gerontological nursing knowledge could be developed through a nursing conceptual model that includes a defined practice and research methodology. (Author/JOW)

  19. Valuing the gap: a dialectic between theory and practice in graduate nursing education from a constructive educational approach.

    PubMed

    Moss, Cheryle; Grealish, Laurie; Lake, Sarah

    2010-05-01

    Within nursing education, graduate pedagogies are relatively unexplored, with research commonly focused upon undergraduate and continuing education. In order to address the increasingly complex organisational challenges in the workplace, mid-career nurses and midwives are turning to graduate education. In one graduate course on cultures of learning in the workplace, a constructivist approach to learning was adopted. Post-course analysis of data, from the feedback on the course from students, student choice of assignment topics, and reflections of the course facilitators, revealed three pedagogies unique to graduate education. The pedagogies were labelled 'keeping the space open', 'theoretical concepts as tools', and 'resonance and action as praxis'. The intended outcome of the course is revealed in a fourth theme, 'developing practice in the workplace'. This evaluation suggests that constructivist pedagogies used with graduate students may be different to those pedagogies used with undergraduate and continuing education students. We argue that graduate pedagogies move nursing education beyond strategies that seek integration of theory and practice, towards a dialectic between theory and practice. PMID:19969401

  20. Bandura's self-efficacy theory: a guide for cardiac rehabilitation nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Jeng, C; Braun, L T

    1994-12-01

    To help patients achieve the greatest benefit from cardiac rehabilitation programs, nurses must assist them to modify unhealthy behaviors. Many cardiac rehabilitation programs, however, lack a theoretical foundation; therefore, interventions are usually executed without accounting for the complexities of human behavior, and little consideration is given to the difficulties encountered in altering unhealthy behavior patterns. Bandura's self-efficacy theory is considered a suitable model for cardiac rehabilitation because it provides a systematic direction which allows one to interpret, modify, and predict patients' behaviors. This article describes the development of and conceptual framework for Bandura's theory, how it provides a basis for measurement of self-efficacy, and how it may be applied to the study of cardiac rehabilitation. Finally, some research issues, which are related to applications of self-efficacy theory in cardiac rehabilitation are discussed. PMID:7722281

  1. Nursing in Malawi: nursing theory in the movement to professionalize nursing.

    PubMed

    Bultemeier, Kaye I

    2012-04-01

    Nursing in Malawi has been predominately a technical trade and only recently has begun the transition to a profession with autonomy and advanced degree preparation. Nursing theories provide a framework for the evolution of nursing to an independent profession. Theories provide a means for the articulation of the nursing role to other members of the healthcare team including consumers. Healthcare and human needs are basic and the guidance provided by nursing theories, including Nightingale's, gives language and structure to the education of nurses as the profession moves into advanced practice in a developing country. PMID:22451639

  2. Demonstrating Theory in Practice: Examples of the McGill Model of Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudine, Alice P.

    2001-01-01

    A workshop on the McGill Model of Nursing, which depicts nurses' role in developing and maintaining family health, was attended by 147 nurses. Increases in self-efficacy, behavior, and performance related to implementing the model were evident 6 months after the workshop. (SK)

  3. Popper and nursing theory.

    PubMed

    Allmark, Peter

    2003-04-01

    Science seems to develop by inducing new knowledge from observation. However, it is hard to find a rational justification for induction. Popper offers one attempt to resolve this problem. Nursing theorists have tended to ignore or reject Popper, often on the false belief that he is a logical positivist (and hence hostile to qualitative research). Logical positivism claims that meaningful sentences containing any empirical content should ultimately be reducible to simple, observation statements. Popper refutes positivism by showing that there are no such simple statements. He is not a positivist. For Popper, the scientist begins with problems and puts forward trial solutions. These are subjected to rigorous testing aimed at falsifying them. A new theoretical position is then reached in which the scientist knows either that the trial solutions are false or that they have not yet been falsified. Science is characterized by the fact that it tests its ideas through attempted falsification. Non-science tests its ideas through attempted refutation. Nursing theory is a mixture of science and non-science. Popper's method requires rigorous testing of theory in both realms. As such, some nursing theory should be discarded. Popper's view faces at least two important criticisms. One is that a scientist can always reject an apparent falsification by instead altering some auxiliary hypothesis (e.g. denying the accuracy of the falsifying observation). Popper can deal with this argument by saying that defence of a theory in this way will eventually break down if the theory is false. The second criticism is that Popper's method does ultimately draw upon induction. This criticism is true, but his method can be usefully adapted. An adapted from of Popper's philosophy of science provides a good basis for nursing theory. PMID:14498963

  4. Nursing faculty practice: benefits vs costs.

    PubMed

    Budden, L

    1994-06-01

    The transfer of nurse education from the hospital setting to the university sector has increased the dichotomy between theory and practice. Nurse academics have been exploring methods of maintaining clinical competence and credibility through organizational structures such as faculty practice. Faculty practice is a formal arrangement which exists between a clinical setting and a university which allows nurse academics to consult and deliver client care resulting in research and scholarly outcomes. The most important advantage of faculty practice is its potential to contribute to nursing knowledge and validate theories through the use of reflective practice and professional journaling by nurse academics which can help demystify and analyse the intricate elements of nursing. Other advantages of faculty practice are described as improving student's learning and client care through the application of an advanced knowledge base and facilitation by a faculty member. It also facilitates communication with clinical staff and assists in the professional development of nurse academics. The major barriers which need to be addressed to facilitate faculty practice are the allocation of time in the nurse academic's workload which incorporates consultation and faculty practice, organization and administrative support and the recognition of clinical competence in the promotion and tenure process of universities. PMID:7930106

  5. Advanced practice registered nurse certification.

    PubMed

    Alleman, Kim; Houle, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) in nephrology began to be certified through the Nephrology Nursing Certification Commission (NNCC) in 2006. Since that time, the APRN Consensus Model has been developed, which addresses licensure, accreditation, certification, and education and which strongly recommends specialty certification for advanced practice nurses. This article discusses NNCC certification for advanced practice in nephrology nursing and describes the major components of the APRN Consensus Model. PMID:23923801

  6. Teaching practice experience: linking theory to practice.

    PubMed

    Ayer, S J

    1986-09-01

    This paper analyses the relationship between the theory and practice of the art of teaching as experienced by the author during a period of teaching practice in a school of nursing. It examines such concepts as 'aims', 'objectives', 'scheme of work' and 'lesson plans' and sets these in the context of practical classroom teaching. PMID:3639891

  7. Wilber's Integral Theory and Dossey's Theory of Integral Nursing: An Examination of Two Integral Approaches in Nursing Scholarship.

    PubMed

    Shea, Linda; Frisch, Noreen

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine Dossey's theory of integral nursing in relation to its major theoretical source, Wilber's integral theory. Although several nursing scholars have written about integral theory in relation to nursing scholarship and practice, Dossey's theory of integral nursing may be influencing how nurses take up integral theory in a significant way due to an extensive outreach in the holistic nursing community. Despite this wide circulation, the theory of integral nursing has yet to be reviewed in the nursing literature. This article (a) compares Dossey's theory of integral nursing with Wilber's integral theory and (b) contrasts Dossey's integral approach with another integral approach used by other scholars of integral theory. PMID:26453531

  8. Understanding Influence within the Context of Nursing: Development of the Adams Influence Model Using Practice, Research, and Theory.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jeffrey M; Natarajan, Sudha

    2016-01-01

    Acquiring influence, and knowing how to use it, is a required competency for nurse leaders, yet the concept of influence and how it works is not well described in the nursing literature. In this article, the authors examine what is known about influence and present an influence model specific to nurse leaders. The Adams Influence Model was developed through an iterative process and is based on a comprehensive review of the influence literature, expert commentary, multiple pilot studies, evaluation of nursing theories, and validation by an external data source. Rather than defining "how to" influence, the model serves as a guide for personal reflection, helping nurse leaders understand and reflect on the influence process and factors, tactics, and strategies they can use when seeking to influence others. PMID:27490886

  9. Advanced practice: the clinical nurse specialist.

    PubMed

    Sparacino, P

    1992-01-01

    Historically, the clinically expert nurse who wanted to continue in direct patient care had few career options. That dilemma is changing in response to the recognised need for greater knowledge and clinical expertise in the domain of patient care. The clinical nurse specialist role is an answer to this concern. The clinical nurse specialist practices within a framework of theoretically-based knowledge and combines that knowledge with clinical expertise. The role is also pivotal in the promotion of patient care focused scientific inquiry and in the generation and refinement of nursing theories. Career options are more versatile than for the educator, researcher, or administrator. While the clinical nurse specialist is an essential person in influencing quality care in the traditional practice settings, there are now opportunities with clientele and practice settings which have expanded beyond the conventional boundaries. PMID:1528295

  10. Handbook of clinical nursing practice

    SciTech Connect

    Asheervath, J.; Blevins, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Written in outline format, this reference will help nurses further their understanding of advanced nursing procedures. Information is provided on the physiological, psychological, environmental, and safety considerations of nursing activities associated with diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Special consideration is given to the areas of pediatric nursing, nursing assessment, and selected radiologic and nuclear medicine procedures for each system. Contents: Clinical Introduction. Clinical Nursing Practice: Focus on Basics. Focus on Cardiovascular Function. Focus on Respiratory Function. Focus on Gastrointestinal Function. Focus on Renal and Genito-Urological Function. Focus on Neuro-Skeletal and Muscular Function. Appendices.

  11. Watson's theory of transpersonal caring: factors impacting nurses professional caring.

    PubMed

    Vandenhouten, Christine; Kubsch, Sylvia; Peterson, Margaret; Murdock, Jennifer; Lehrer, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    This study's purpose was to identify factors impacting nurses' perceived professional caring. The sample of 242 nurses completed a researcher-developed survey based on Watson's theory of transpersonal caring. Results showed that experienced, hospital-based nurses and those demonstrating greater familiarity with Watson's theory had higher caring scores. Implications for education, practice, and research are suggested. PMID:23075749

  12. When practice precedes theory - A mixed methods evaluation of students' learning experiences in an undergraduate study program in nursing.

    PubMed

    Falk, Kristin; Falk, Hanna; Jakobsson Ung, Eva

    2016-01-01

    A key area for consideration is determining how optimal conditions for learning can be created. Higher education in nursing aims to prepare students to develop their capabilities to become independent professionals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of sequencing clinical practice prior to theoretical studies on student's experiences of self-directed learning readiness and students' approach to learning in the second year of a three-year undergraduate study program in nursing. 123 nursing students was included in the study and divided in two groups. In group A (n = 60) clinical practice preceded theoretical studies. In group (n = 63) theoretical studies preceded clinical practice. Learning readiness was measured using the Directed Learning Readiness Scale for Nursing Education (SDLRSNE), and learning process was measured using the revised two-factor version of the Study Process Questionnaire (R-SPQ-2F). Students were also asked to write down their personal reflections throughout the course. By using a mixed method design, the qualitative component focused on the students' personal experiences in relation to the sequencing of theoretical studies and clinical practice. The quantitative component provided information about learning readiness before and after the intervention. Our findings confirm that students are sensitive and adaptable to their learning contexts, and that the sequencing of courses is subordinate to a pedagogical style enhancing students' deep learning approaches, which needs to be incorporated in the development of undergraduate nursing programs. PMID:26070493

  13. Nursing knowledge, theory and method revisited.

    PubMed

    Booth, K; Kenrick, M; Woods, S

    1997-10-01

    With the approach of the 21st century, nursing is having to respond to diverse influences which are remoulding the professional landscape. Not least of these is the changing status of western economies which underpins a drive towards evidence-based practice and an increased emphasis on multidisciplinary approaches to health care delivery. Certainty in health care is now a thing of the past. Central to the way the nursing profession embraces the future is its underlying philosophy: that which articulates professional values and shapes practice, research, education and management. In a time of change it is therefore essential to revisit the philosophical framework which underpins nursing. The debate in nursing research and theory appears to have stressed the polarization of viewpoints. It may be the case that feminist writers, ethnographers, positivist researchers and nursing theorists, in defending their own points of view, diminish rather than enhance professional dialogue. This paper reviews the nature of this debate within nursing and considers the implications that a dichotomous position may have for knowledge, theory and research method within the current context of health care. It then suggests a philosophical framework which could be relevant and accessible across the whole spectrum of nursing activity. In so doing, the paper aims to contribute to the discussion around epistemology and method in a way which encompasses the diversity found within the broad church of nursing. PMID:9354995

  14. Nursing Home Work Practices and Nursing Assistants' Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Christine E.; Squillace, Marie R.; Meagher, Jennifer; Anderson, Wayne L.; Wiener, Joshua M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the impact of nursing home work practices, specifically compensation and working conditions, on job satisfaction of nursing assistants employed in nursing homes. Design and Methods: Data are from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey, responses by the nursing assistants' employers to the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey,…

  15. Using Nursing Languages in School Nursing Practice. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denehy, Janice

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this updated manual is to define and describe standardized nursing languages, highlight how nursing languages are a part of the nursing process, and illustrate through case examples how nursing languages are used in school nursing practice. This manual also summarizes the history and development of three nursing classifications, the…

  16. Awareness of self and expanding consciousness: using nursing theories to prepare nurse-therapists.

    PubMed

    Vandemark, Lisa M

    2006-07-01

    Psychotherapy is an accepted role of the advanced practice psychiatric nurse. Nursing theorists, notably Hildegard Peplau and Margaret Newman, offer guidance on the psychological and professional development of the nurse. This paper examines Newman's theory of health as expanding consciousness and the concept of awareness of self in Peplau's theory, and suggests that psychiatric advanced practice nursing programs consider the need for nurses to develop self-knowledge to facilitate the nurse-patient relationship and to improve outcomes of patient care in psychotherapy. PMID:16923732

  17. [Bibliographies on Dorothea Orem's nursing theory].

    PubMed

    Spirig, R; Bischoff Willhelm, A

    1995-09-01

    Bibliography on the subject of Dorothea Orem's nursing theory Dorothea Orem's theory is now well known in Switzerland. In many first level and continuing education courses it is taught, dealt with and critically examined. Various attempts are made to translate it into practice. This compilation shows, in the form of abstracts of various articles, how Orem's self-care-deficit theory is applied, discussed and reflected upon. Part of this paper compares Orem's theory with other nursing theories. This bibliography, like that already published in Pflege, Vol. 7, 1994, Nr. 3, was compiled in the context of the topic "Pain", as part of the Higher Professional Education Course, level 2, of the Advanced School of Nursing, Aarau. PMID:7548626

  18. Aggression prevention training for student nurses: differential responses to training and the interaction between theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Beech, Bernard

    2008-03-01

    Workplace violence is of great concern to all health care professionals. Nurses are major targets for incidents of violence, with student nurses being clearly recognised as a high-risk sub-group. Training is widely advocated as the appropriate organisational response but the effects and effectiveness of training are inadequately studied. A recently completed Ph.D study used a longitudinal research design to evaluate the effects of a three-day 'aggression prevention and management training programme' on various learning domains of three cohorts of UK student nurses destined for adult, child, mental health and learning disability specialities [N=243] in their first year of nurse training. A purpose-designed questionnaire was used to collect data on knowledge, attitudes, confidence, and self-assessed competence at four time points, two before and two following the educational input. This paper focuses on the differences detected in student nurses' responses to different sections of the questionnaire, at various time points, in relation to recorded demographic variables, namely, their age, gender, destined speciality, and previous relevant training experience. It also considers the 'interaction' between theoretical preparation and clinical practice. These finding may also have wider relevance to skills training and understanding of the reality of student nurse experience in clinical settings. PMID:18291326

  19. A Critical Feminist Perspective of the Health Belief Model: Implications for Nursing Theory, Research, Practice, and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Linda W.

    1995-01-01

    Most nursing research is based on empiricism or logical positivism; the social behaviorist approach of the Health Belief Model does little to promote awareness or examine power issues. A critical feminist perspective aids understanding of health practices based on contextual knowledge and a holistic approach. (JOW)

  20. School Nursing Practice: Roles and Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proctor, Susan Tonskemper; And Others

    This document is an application of the American Nurses' Association's (ANA's) "Standards of Clinical Nursing Practice" (1991) to the specialty of school nursing. It identifies specialty standards of practice for the school nurse subsumed under the standards of clinical practice which apply to all nurses. Chapter One focuses on the ANA standards…

  1. The concept of intentionality in human science nursing theories.

    PubMed

    Pilkington, F Beryl

    2005-04-01

    Nursing as a human science focuses on life and health as humanly experienced. Intentionality is a philosophical idea of particular significance to nursing as a human science, particularly within Parse's theory of human becoming and Watson's theory of human caring. These two theorists' interpretations of intentionality are explored in relation to their respective theories and the implications for research and practice. PMID:15802739

  2. Envisioning human dignity to enhance practice while journeying with Rwandan women: student nurses teaching-learning Parse's theory of humanbecoming.

    PubMed

    Oaks, Geneva; Drummond, Susan

    2009-07-01

    California Baptist University School of Nursing opened in September 2006 as the first baccalaureate nursing education program in Riverside, California. Under the direction of Dr. Constance Milton, the curriculum was cocreated using Parse's humanbecoming school of thought as a framework. In August 2008, nursing students traveled to Rwanda where they bore witness to the transformation after the 1994 genocide. Dimensions and processes of Parse's practice methodology-illuminating meaning by explicating what is with languaging, synchronizing rhythms while dwelling with ups and downs in the struggle of connecting-separating, and mobilizing transcendence as moving beyond with the not-yet while transforming- emerged in the students' journaling as lived all-at-once amid reverence that honored the dignity and worth of the Rwandan people. PMID:19567728

  3. [Rediscovering practical knowledge in nursing].

    PubMed

    Medina Moya, José Luis

    2005-01-01

    The author demythologizes some arguments which blamed the victim and he works on the path to rediscover practical knowledge in nursing in the sense that a nurse becomes a "constructor" or a "maker" of knowledge and not a mere applicator of knowledge. PMID:16130684

  4. Communication in Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    Kourkouta, Lambrini; Papathanasiou, Ioanna V.

    2014-01-01

    Good communication between nurses and patients is essential for the successful outcome of individualized nursing care of each patient. To achieve this, however, nurses must understand and help their patients, demonstrating courtesy, kindness and sincerity. Also they should devote time to the patient to communicate with the necessary confidentiality, and must not forget that this communication includes persons who surround the sick person, which is why the language of communication should be understood by all those involved in it. Good communication also is not only based on the physical abilities of nurses, but also on education and experience. PMID:24757408

  5. [Nurses' practice in health audit].

    PubMed

    Pinto, Karina Araújo; de Melo, Cristina Maria Meira

    2010-09-01

    The objective of this investigation was to identify nurses' practice in heath audit. The hermeneutic-dialectic method was used for the analysis. The study was performed in three loci: the internal audit service of a hospital; the external audit service of a private health service buyer, and the state audit service of the public health system (SUS, acronym in Portuguese for Sistema Unico de Saúde-Unique Health System), in Bahia. Nine audit nurses were interviewed. In the SUS audit, the nurses report being fulfilled with their practice and with the valorization of their professional role. In the private audit--both inside and outside of health organizations--the nurses' activities are focused on meeting the interests of their contractors, and do not get much involved with the care delivered by the nursing team and with the needs of service users. PMID:20964043

  6. Assisted living nursing practice: the language of dementia: theories and interventions.

    PubMed

    Mitty, Ethel; Flores, Sandi

    2007-01-01

    The person with dementia uses behavior to communicate, but their behavior is altered by the combination of neurological damage and impairment, altered interpersonal relationships and reactions of others, and the individual's loss or weakening of their lifelong defenses or coping mechanisms. This article discusses the routes by which behavior can be understood and describes a constellation of needs of a person with dementia that has a unique fit with person-centered care. Three evidence-based models (theories) and interventions specific to dementia behaviors are discussed: the Need-Driven Dementia-Compromised Behavior Model, the Progressively Lowered Stress Threshold Model, and the utilization of self-identity roles. Montessori-based activities are another approach to person-centered dementia care that respect, as do the models, the dignity, worthiness and interests of the person afflicted with dementia. The models discussed in this article all seek to improve the quality of life of the person with dementia. Other than those at the profound end stage of dementia, most sufferers can communicate feelings. Subjective quality of life must be determined based on the self-report of the person suffering with dementia so that treatment interventions and effectiveness are grounded in that person's reality. PMID:17923285

  7. The influence of logical positivism on nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Whall, A L

    1989-01-01

    While logical positivism has been said to have had major influence on the development of nursing theory, whether this influence pervades other aspects of the discipline has not been discussed. One central aspect of logical positivism, the verificationist perspective, was used to examine texts, curricular guides and standards of practice that guided nursing practice in the decades in which logical positivism had influence on nursing theory construction. This review of the literature does not support the influence of logical positivism, as exemplified by the verificationist perspective, on nursing practice guidelines. PMID:2807333

  8. Nursing Practice Environment and Outcomes for Oncology Nursing

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jingjing; Friese, Christopher R.; Wu, Evan; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Background It is commonly assumed that oncology nurses experience high job-related burnout and high turnover because their work involves inherent stressors such as caring for patients with serious and often life-threatening illness. Objectives The objectives of this study were to examine the differences in outcomes such as job dissatisfaction and burnout between oncology nurses and medical-surgical nurses, and to identify factors that affect oncology nurse outcomes. Methods A secondary analysis of nurse survey data collected in 2006 including 4047 nurses from 282 hospitals in 3 states was performed; t test and χ2 test compared differences between oncology nurses and medical-surgical nurses in nurse outcomes and their assessments of nurse practice environment, as measured by the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index. Logistic regression models estimated the effect of nurse practice environment on 4 nurse-reported outcomes: burnout, job dissatisfaction, intention to leave the current position, and perceived quality of care. Results Oncology nurses reported favorable practice environments and better outcomes than did medical-surgical nurses. All 4 subscales of the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index studied were significantly associated with outcomes. Specifically, nurses who reported favorable nursing foundations for quality of care (eg, active in-service or preceptorship programs) were less likely to report burnout and leave their current position. Conclusions Better practice environments, including nurse foundations for quality care, can help to achieve optimal nurse outcomes. Implications for Practice Improving hospital practice environments holds significant potential to improve nurse well-being, retention, and quality of care. Specifically, hospitals should consider preceptor programs and continuing education and increase nurses’ participation in hospital decision making. PMID:22751101

  9. Delegation in Correctional Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, Frances

    2016-07-01

    Correctional nurses face daily challenges as a result of their work environment. Common challenges include availability of resources for appropriate care delivery, negotiating with custody staff for access to patients, adherence to scope of practice standards, and working with a varied staffing mix. Professional correctional nurses must consider the educational backgrounds and competency of other nurses and assistive personnel in planning for care delivery. Budgetary constraints and varied staff preparation can be a challenge for the professional nurse. Adequate care planning requires understanding the educational level and competency of licensed and unlicensed staff. Delegation is the process of assessing patient needs and transferring responsibility for care to appropriately educated and competent staff. Correctional nurses can benefit from increased knowledge about delegation. PMID:27302707

  10. Training Advanced Practice Palliative Care Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Deborah Witt

    1999-01-01

    Describes the role and responsibilities of advanced-practice nurses in palliative care and nursing's initiative in promoting high-quality care through the educational preparation of these nurses. (JOW)

  11. An ontological view of advanced practice nursing.

    PubMed

    Arslanian-Engoren, Cynthia; Hicks, Frank D; Whall, Ann L; Algase, Donna L

    2005-01-01

    Identifying, developing, and incorporating nursing's unique ontological and epistemological perspective into advanced practice nursing practice places priority on delivering care based on research-derived knowledge. Without a clear distinction of our metatheoretical space, we risk blindly adopting the practice values of other disciplines, which may not necessarily reflect those of nursing. A lack of focus may lead current advanced practice nursing curricula and emerging doctorate of nursing practice programs to mirror the logical positivist paradigm and perspective of medicine. This article presents an ontological perspective for advanced practice nursing education, practice, and research. PMID:16350595

  12. Culturally Competent School Nurse Practice.

    PubMed

    Carr, Bette; Knutson, Stephanie

    2015-11-01

    School nurses are among the professional specialty disciplines in the school environment that have the unique opportunity of exploring and building upon effective practices when working and providing service to diverse populations. As such, school nurses must not only acquire the skills to survive in the culture of education; they must also develop cultural competence by engaging in self-identity and reflection, understanding cultural differences, being culturally responsive, identifying social injustices, and engaging in life-long learning experiences. PMID:26515571

  13. Role modeling excellence in clinical nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Perry, R N Beth

    2009-01-01

    Role modeling excellence in clinical nursing practice is the focus of this paper. The phenomenological research study reported involved a group of 8 nurses identified by their colleagues as exemplary. The major theme revealed in this study was that these exemplary nurses were also excellent role models in the clinical setting. This paper details approaches used by these nurses that made them excellent role models. Specifically, the themes of attending to the little things, making connections, maintaining a light-hearted attitude, modeling, and affirming others are presented. These themes are discussed within the framework of Watson [Watson, J., 1989. Human caring and suffering: a subjective model for health services. In: Watson, J., Taylor, R. (Eds.), They Shall Not Hurt: Human Suffering and Human Caring. Colorado University, Boulder, CO] "transpersonal caring" and [Bandura, A., 1997. Social Learning Theory. Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ] "Social Learning Theory." Particular emphasis in the discussion is on how positive role modeling by exemplary practitioners can contribute to the education of clinical nurses in the practice setting. PMID:18590978

  14. A nursing diagnosis based model: guiding nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Krenz, M; Karlik, B; Kiniry, S

    1989-05-01

    Fiscal uncertainty, anxiety about nursing retention, and public scrutiny characterize the hospital milieu. During times such as these, introducing a conceptual model may appear inpractical and untimely. However, the conceptual model at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital has demonstrated many practical applications. It guides nursing practice and provides a framework for quality assurance, documentation of nursing care, and education of nurses in the hospital. Future plans include using the model as a basis for developing a computerized care planning system and a method for cost accounting for nursing. The authors describe how the model serves to unify, give direction, simplify, and improve nursing practice. PMID:2723785

  15. Practical Nursing: Where Are We Headed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandiford, Janice

    1977-01-01

    Due to a redefinition of nursing by the American Nursing Association and financial needs which are difficult to meet, postsecondary vocational health care programs, especially practical nursing, are in danger of being phased out. An appeal to vocational practical nurse educators and legislators to improve and continue these programs is made. (BM)

  16. Philosophic analysis of a theory of clinical nursing.

    PubMed

    Schafer, P J

    1987-01-01

    Knowledge in nursing requires development of theories that address both the science and art of the professional practice discipline. "A Theory of Clinical Nursing" was analyzed to explicate the epistemologic dimensions within an historic perspective. Epistemologic dimensions defined by the philosophy of science--approaches to theory development, sources of knowledge, and methodology--were characterized from two perspectives, scientific inquiry and historicism. The major perspectives in the scientific mode, namely, mechanism, empiricism, logical positivism, and logical empiricism, were analyzed along the three dimensions of theory development, sources of knowledge, and methodology. Trends in theoretical developments in nursing were related to the scientific and historic perspectives and to the epistemologic dimensions. Juxtaposing the diversity of knowledge required for nursing science and practice, and the values systems of the practitioners, revealed the inadequacy of the scientific model. Nursing knowledge explication required several modes of inquiry to articulate the scientific basis of the discipline and the art of delivery of the practice. The historicist approach framed scientific work with the prevailing World View. The Rubin theory was located within the matrix of approaches to inquiry and perspectives in nursing science. Labeled by the theorist as both a nursing research and a nursing care model, "A Theory of Clinical Nursing" represented a transition model of nursing, undergirded by the major conceptualizations and methodologies of field, psychoanalytic, and social behaviorist traditions, but implicitly coalescing the art with the science of nursing. The theory addressed core concepts of person, situation, and nursing care, as well as major process themes of change and interaction. Nursing theories of a more narrow range, such as maternal role attainment and maternal identity, nested within the theory, while subsequent theoretical clarifications and

  17. Effects of an advanced surgical nursing module on clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Frost, J

    1994-04-01

    1. Innovation and changes in practice can be developed through continuing education. 2. By adapting appropriate change strategies, theories learned in class can be applied in practice. 3. Excellence in quality can be achieved by all qualified nurses by applying theory to practice. PMID:7513891

  18. My practice evolution: an appreciation of the discrepancies between the idealism of nursing education and the realities of hospital practice.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Danielle E K

    2010-01-01

    Newly graduated registered nurses face a barrage of physical and mental challenges in their first few years of practice, especially in the hospital setting. This article explores discrepancies between student nurse practice and professional nursing practice and the challenges that new nurses face in bridging the gap between idealistic theory and realistic practice. The author's subsequent graduate nursing education and continued practice in the field resulted in a personal evolution of practice that elicited a profound sense of appreciation for the field and a desire to share these experiences with other practicing nurses and students. PMID:20333920

  19. Collaborative development of middle-range nursing theories: toward a theory of unpleasant symptoms.

    PubMed

    Lenz, E R; Suppe, F; Gift, A G; Pugh, L C; Milligan, R A

    1995-03-01

    One promising approach to strengthening theory-research and theory-practice linkages is to place greater emphasis on developing and using theories of the middle range to underpin nursing research and practice. In this article, a postpositivistic definition of middle-range theory is advanced, an argument is made for shifting nursing's theory development activities from discipline-defining grand theories to middle-range theories, and a collaborative and incremental approach to middle-range theory development is described and illustrated. A sustained substantive example is provided by the beginning development of a theory of unpleasant symptoms. PMID:7778887

  20. Starting a nursing consultation practice.

    PubMed

    Schulmeister, L

    1999-03-01

    Because the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) role has been changed or eliminated in many hospital organizations, many CNSs in career transition are considering establishing collaborative or independent nursing consultation practices. Opportunities for consultants exist in diverse practice settings and specialties. Before starting a consultation practice, the CNS should carefully examine goals, identify resources, and begin contacting potential referral sources. He or she must also decide what form of business organization to establish and write a business plan to solidify ideas and prepare for the unexpected. Most CNS consultants rely on personal savings to cover initial business and personal expenses, and many continue working as a CNS until the consultation practice is established. Fees can be set based on community standards, what the market will bear, desired projected income, or a third-party payor's fee schedule. The consultation practice can be marketed by word of mouth, inexpensive advertising techniques such as distributing flyers and business cards, direct mall, and media advertising. In today's healthcare marketplace, opportunities abound for the CNS risk-taker interested in starting a nursing consultation practice. PMID:10382408

  1. Nurses' intention to apply clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Kogan, Ella; Tabak, Nili

    2012-12-01

    Using Ajzen and Madden's Theory of Planned Behavior, this study investigates factors which influence nurses' intention to apply clinical practice guidelines in their daily ward work. A convenience sample of 91 nurses in internal medicine wards in three Israeli hospitals answered four questionnaires. Data were processed by Pearson correlation coefficients and multivariate regression. The main findings were that burnout was negatively correlated with the intention to work according to guidelines and that professionalism (in the sense of a tendency to follow taught procedure rather than personal judgment) was positively correlated with it. Furthermore, nurses who perceive their behavioral control and subjective norms to be positive will be the most determined to work according to guidelines, provided they personally command the necessary resources to do so. PMID:23447906

  2. Concept maps and nursing theory: a pedagogical approach.

    PubMed

    Hunter Revell, Susan M

    2012-01-01

    Faculty seek to teach nursing students how to link clinical and theoretical knowledge with the intent of improving patient outcomes. The author discusses an innovative 9-week concept mapping activity as a pedagogical approach to teach nursing theory in a graduate theory course. Weekly concept map building increased student engagement and fostered theoretical thinking. Unexpectedly, this activity also benefited students through group work and its ability to enhance theory-practice knowledge. PMID:22513774

  3. Towards a strong virtue ethics for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Alan E

    2006-07-01

    Illness creates a range of negative emotions in patients including anxiety, fear, powerlessness, and vulnerability. There is much debate on the 'therapeutic' or 'helping' nurse-patient relationship. However, despite the current agenda regarding patient-centred care, the literature concerning the development of good interpersonal responses and the view that a satisfactory nursing ethics should focus on persons and character traits rather than actions, nursing ethics is dominated by the traditional obligation, act-centred theories such as consequentialism and deontology. I critically examine these theories and the role of duty-based notions in both general ethics and nursing practice. Because of well-established flaws, I conclude that obligation-based moral theories are incomplete and inadequate for nursing practice. I examine the work of Hursthouse on virtue ethics' action guidance and the v-rules. I argue that the moral virtues and a strong (action-guiding) version of virtue ethics provide a plausible and viable alternative for nursing practice. I develop an account of a virtue-based helping relationship and a virtue-based approach to nursing. The latter is characterized by three features: (1) exercising the moral virtues such as compassion; (2) using judgement; and (3) using moral wisdom, understood to include at least moral perception, moral sensitivity, and moral imagination. Merits and problems of the virtue-based approach are examined. I relate the work of MacIntyre to nursing and I conceive nursing as a practice: nurses who exercise the virtues and seek the internal goods help to sustain the practice of nursing and thus prevent the marginalization of the virtues. The strong practice-based version of virtue ethics proposed is context-dependent, particularist, and relational. Several areas for future philosophical inquiry and empirical nursing research are suggested to develop this account yet further. PMID:16774598

  4. Cultural characteristics of nursing practice in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, Mayuko; Ishigaki, Kazuko; Yamamoto-Mitani, Noriko; Fujita, Junko; Katakura, Naoko; Ogata, Yasuko; Mochizuki, Yuki; Okamoto, Yuko; Shinohara, Yuko

    2016-04-01

    The population of Japan has become multi-cultural, and there is more demand for culturally competent nursing care. The purpose of this study was to explore cultural characteristics of nursing practice in Japan focusing on behaviour. We interviewed 25 professionals with experience in or knowledge of nursing practice both in Japan and either the United States, the United Kingdom, Sweden, Thailand or South Korea. Qualitative content analysis has yielded three themes for cultural characteristics of nursing practice in Japan: practice expectations, communication and relationships with patients. Practice expectations for nurses in Japan involved various aspects; nurses conducted a wide range of basic nursing tasks, including bed baths and toileting. They often relied on non-verbal communication to deliver thoughtfulness and perceptiveness. They typically show deference to doctors and colleagues, emphasizing building and maintaining harmony with them. This emphasis on a multifaceted, non-verbal, and harmonious approach seemed characteristic of practice among Japanese nurses. PMID:27184703

  5. Legal Considerations of Psychiatric Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Barloon, Linda Funk; Hilliard, Wanda

    2016-06-01

    There are major legal issues that affect psychiatric nursing and guidelines for practicing in a legal and responsible manner. Advances in understanding of psychiatric conditions and developments in how nurses care for psychiatric patients result in changes in regulations, case law, and policies that govern nursing practice. Professional development, keeping abreast of current research and literature regarding clinical practice and trends, and involvement in professional organizations are some of the ways that psychiatric nurses can meet the challenges of their profession. PMID:27229273

  6. Patient and nurse experiences of theory-based care.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Jane

    2009-04-01

    The pre-surgery nursing practice model derived from Newman's theory was developed to change the delivery of nursing care in a pre-surgical clinic. Guided by the theoretical knowledge of health as expanding consciousness, transpersonal caring, and reflective practice, key practice changes included a) incorporating Newman's praxis process, b) changing the physical space, and c) providing opportunities to reflect on practice. The purpose of this study was to utilize a phenomenological approach to evaluate a new model of care among 31 patients and 4 nurses. PMID:19342715

  7. Nursing Home Registered Nurses' and Licensed Practical Nurses' Knowledge of Causes of Falls.

    PubMed

    Gray-Miceli, Deanna; de Cordova, Pamela B; Crane, Giles L; Quigley, Patricia; Ratcliffe, Sarah J

    2016-01-01

    Reducing falls in nursing homes requires a knowledgeable nursing workforce. To test knowledge, 8 validated vignettes representing multifactorial fall causes were administered to 47 nurses from 3 nursing homes. Although licensed practical nurses scored higher than registered nurses in individual categories of falls, when we computed the average score of all 8 categories between groups of registered nurses and licensed practical nurses, registered nurses scored higher (F = 4.106; P < .05) in identifying 8 causal reasons for older adults to fall. PMID:26421775

  8. Leadership redefined: educating the Doctorate of Nursing Practice nurse leader through innovation.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Kathryn Lothschuetz

    2011-01-01

    In today's society, health care systems are characterized by change, unpredictability, increasing speed of information and knowledge exchanges, redefined organizational boundaries and hierarchy, emphasis on value, teamwork, interdisciplinary collaboration, diversity, and interconnectedness. This new reality has forced nurse educators to redefine nursing leadership and prepare the Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP) leader through innovative courses offering experiential learning based on complex adaptive systems and quantum leadership theory. This article describes the experiential learning approach and integrated learning experience for DNP students. PMID:21654485

  9. [German hospital nurses' attitudes concerning evidence-based nursing practice].

    PubMed

    Köpke, Sascha; Koch, Frauke; Behncke, Anja; Balzer, Katrin

    2013-06-01

    The relevance of nurses' attitudes for establishing an evidence-based nursing practice (EBP) has been proven internationally. For German-speaking countries so far only few data are available. The present survey aims at assessing nurses' perceptions of relevant context factors for implementing an EBP. Therefore, 1384 nurses in 21 hospitals in Northern-Germany received a self-developed questionnaire based on established instruments in March and April 2012. 1023 (74 %) nurses responded. In principal, results show a positive attitude towards EBP. The majority of participants regards research as relevant for nursing practice. Support from superiors and colleagues is seen as important prerequisite. However, implementation remains a challenge. Nurses are not informed about recent research results. Original articles are hardly used. Only a minority is prepared to spend own money on congresses or to start academic nursing training in the near future. For the first time in German-speaking countries, the study provides meaningful data on nurses' attitudes towards EBP. Nurses confirm the value of research for their own practice. However, there is a lack of basic requirements to identify and implement relevant research findings as for example the use of recent scientific evidence. Nursing education in Germany should therefore focus more strongly on building competencies required for EBP, for example through properly designed academic nursing training. PMID:23732313

  10. Sustaining excellence: clinical nurse specialist practice and magnet designation.

    PubMed

    Muller, Anne C; Hujcs, Marianne; Dubendorf, Phyllis; Harrington, Paul T

    2010-01-01

    Clinical nurse specialist practice is essential in providing the clinical expertise, leadership, and organizational influence necessary for attaining the excellence in care reflected by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Magnet designation. Clinical nurse specialists, prepared as advanced practice nurses, bring clinical expertise, knowledge of advanced physiology, and pathology and a system-wide vision for process improvements. This unique curriculum specifically prepares clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) to immediately practice as leaders of interdisciplinary groups to improve outcomes. Clinical nurse specialist graduates possess an understanding of complex adaptive systems theory, advanced physical assessment, and pathophysiology and knowledge of optimal learning modalities, all applicable to improving the health care environment. Their practice specifically links complex clinical data with multidisciplinary partnering and understanding of organizational systems. The basis for optimal clinical practice change and sustained process improvement, foundational to Magnet designation, is grounded in the combined educational preparation and systems impact of CNS practice. This article describes the role of the CNS in achieving and sustaining Magnet designation in an urban, academic quaternary care center. Using the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists model of spheres of influence, focus is on the CNS's contribution to improving clinical outcomes, nurse satisfaction, and patient satisfaction. Exemplars demonstrating use of a champion model to implement practice improvement and rapid adoption of optimal practice guidelines are provided. These exemplars reflect improved and sustained patient care outcomes, and implementation strategies used to achieve these improvements are discussed. PMID:20716978

  11. Does Faculty Incivility in Nursing Education Affect Emergency Nursing Practice?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, Pamela

    Incivility in nursing education is a complicated problem which causes disruptions in the learning process and negatively affects future nursing practice. This mixed method research study described incivility as well as incivility's effects through extensive literature review and application of a modified Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey. The INE included six demographic items, four quantitative sections, and five open-ended questions. The survey examined emergency nurses' perceptions of incivility and how the experience affected their personal nursing practice. The INE was initially tested in a 2004 pilot study by Dr. Cynthia Clark. For this research study, modifications were made to examine specifically emergency nurse's perceptions of incivility and the effects on their practice. The population was a group of nurses who were members of the emergency nurses association in a Midwestern state. In the quantitative component of the Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey, the Likert scale questions indicated that the majority of the participants reported witnessing or experiencing the uncivil behaviors. In the qualitative section of the INE survey, the participants reported that although they have not seen incivility within their own academic career, they had observed faculty incivility with nursing students when the participants were assigned as preceptors as part of their emergency nursing practice.

  12. Nursing Practice Environment and Registered Nurses' Job Satisfaction in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, JiSun; Flynn, Linda; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recruiting and retaining registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes is problematic, and little research is available to guide efforts to make nursing homes a more attractive practice environment for RNs. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between aspects of the nursing practice environment and job satisfaction among RNs…

  13. Scope of practice issues in forensic nursing.

    PubMed

    Evans, A M; Wells, D

    2001-01-01

    1. There is significant role variation, across the Western world, in relation to how forensic nurses practice. 2. The authors conducted a pilot survey of forensic nurses in Australia, New Zealand, the United States, and the United Kingdom to examine forensic nursing practice, role definition, and role boundaries. 3. Issues arising from the data include the visibility of forensic nurses, the client group, forensic-specific education, and role development. PMID:11197994

  14. Faculty practice plan entrance strategy for nursing.

    PubMed

    Parsons, M A; Felton, G M; Chassie, M B

    1996-01-01

    Nursing is a practice discipline that places great value on members of the profession who excel as providers of direct care. With health care reform, nursing faculty have unprecedented opportunities for advanced practice and are implementing entrepreneurial ventures to meet their commitments to practice. The purpose of this article is to describe a nursing faculty practice plan in conjunction with a decentralized medical school plan. The major benefits and barriers to its adoption are addressed. PMID:9087037

  15. Specialty practice entrepreneur: the advanced practice nurse.

    PubMed

    Kowal, N

    1998-01-01

    There are many opportunities in the health care arena to make a difference. The structured sense of change is "old school." New "surfers" of the system will be entrepreneurial in spirit, energy, and flexibility. There is no job description for the perfect person, only a sense of excitement and innovation that gives one the feeling energetic change is about to happen. In nursing, the risk takers are abundant in the APN role. It is the reason why they walk the line of provider/nurse. Making a difference to patients is important. Riding the waves of clinical care is the excitement. The final results are "the big waves" of life--a patient's life. A provider who defines the reality of practice creates a vision and skillfully bridges the road between the two. Design the surfboard--catch the wave. PMID:9987328

  16. Clinical practice: new challenges for the advanced practice nurse.

    PubMed

    Bartel, J C; Buturusis, B

    2000-12-01

    This report describes the challenges for advanced practice nurses (APNs) relative to supply and demand issues. The article also includes opportunities with the Balanced Budget Act, physician acceptance of Advanced Practice Nurses, and expanding practice opportunities. The challenges include the nursing shortage (both in nursing students and faculty), the aging of the nursing workforce, and a lag in nursing salaries; increased demand for nursing based on aging baby boomers, increasing patient acuity and technology, and new arenas for practice. The Balanced Budget Act of 1997 provided new opportunities for advanced practice nurses, including enhanced autonomy to provide services and bill independently of physicians. With these changes come new opportunities for advanced practice nurse entrepreneurs in the areas of independent practice, including opportunities to positively impact the health of families and communities in alignment with the Federal government's vision for "Healthy People 2010." As physician acceptance of advanced practice nurses continues to grow and in light of the changes in medical practice and education (residency reduction), opportunities to expand collaborative practice arrangements also exist. APNs are best suited to make the most of these changes. One example of an opportunity for independent practice, a Community Wellness Center, is developed as an entrepreneurial venture benefiting both the APN and the health of a community. Who better than registered nurses (RNs), especially those practicing at the advanced level, can ensure that these opportunities and challenges are addressed in an ethical manner and focused on the needs and health of the community? PMID:12029667

  17. Theory into Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Sandra N.

    2012-01-01

    The importance of putting theory into practice can be addressed and advocated to educators and gifted students through the presentation of a Continuum of Practice. Articulating the sequence and phases of practice can underscore how practice can take place; it also can change the perspective and meaning of practice.

  18. Transformational leadership in nursing service. A test of theory.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, C; Wolf, G A

    1992-02-01

    What are the leadership dimensions that result in low turnover or work satisfaction? Intellectual stimulation, charisma, and individual consideration constitute aspects of transformational leadership that are suggested to enhance retention and staff satisfaction. In this study, the authors tested transformational leadership theory in one nursing department with an executive, 11 midlevel administrators, and 77 staff registered nurses. Findings support the predictions. Composed of teachable components, transformational factors are similar to leadership qualities described in magnet hospitals, offering positive implications for nursing administration and professional nursing practice. PMID:1735808

  19. Factors affecting integration of midwifery nursing science theory with clinical practice in Vhembe District, Limpopo Province as perceived by professional midwives

    PubMed Central

    Malwela, Thivhulawi; Lebese, Rachel T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Professional midwives have an important role to play in midwifery training to produce a competent midwife. According to the social learning theory, professional midwives act as role models for students. When allocated for clinical learning experiences in the training hospitals, students will have the opportunity to observe the well-trained, skilled, and experienced professional midwives. The whole process will enable students to integrate theory with practice and they will become competent. Aim The aim of this study was to determine the factors affecting integration of midwifery nursing science theory with clinical practice as perceived by midwives. Setting The study was conducted at the training hospitals in Vhembe district of the Limpopo Province, South Africa. These hospitals were: Donald Fraser, Siloam, and Tshidzini. Methods A qualitative explorative, descriptive and contextual design was used. A Non-probability, convenient sampling method was used to select 11 midwives from the following hospitals: Donald Fraser, Siloam, and Tshidzini, in Vhembe district. In-depth individual interviews were conducted. Data were analysed through open coding method. Result One theme and five sub-themes emerged from the analysed data, namely: shortage of midwives, attitudes towards student midwives, reluctance to perform teaching functions, language barriers, and declining midwifery practice standards. Conclusion Shortage of midwives in the clinical areas led to fewer numbers of mentors whom the students could observe and imitate to acquire clinical skills. Some of the midwives were reluctant to teach students. Recommendations were made for both training institutions and hospitals to employ preceptors for students in the clinical practical. PMID:27380847

  20. Learning theories application in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Aliakbari, Fatemeh; Parvin, Neda; Heidari, Mohammad; Haghani, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    Learning theories are the main guide for educational systems planning in the classroom and clinical training included in nursing. The teachers by knowing the general principles of these theories can use their knowledge more effectively according to various learning situations. In this study, Eric, Medline, and Cochrane databases were used for articles in English and for the Persian literature, Magiran, Iran doc, Iran medex, and Sid databases were used with the help of keywords including social cognitive learning, learning theory, behavioral theory, cognitive theory, constructive theory, and nursing education. The search period was considered from 1990 to 2012. Some related books were also studied about each method, its original vision, the founders, practical application of the training theory, especially training of nursing and its strengths and weaknesses. Behaviorists believe that learning is a change in an observable behavior and it happens when the communication occurs between the two events, a stimulus and a response. Among the applications of this approach is the influence on the learner's emotional reactions. Among the theories of this approach, Thorndike and Skinner works are subject to review and critique. Cognitive psychologists unlike the behaviorists believe that learning is an internal process objective and they focus on thinking, understanding, organizing, and consciousness. Fundamentalists believe that learners should be equipped with the skills of inquiry and problem solving in order to learn by the discovery and process of information. Among this group, we will pay attention to analyze Wertheimer, Brunner, Ausubel theories, Ganyeh information processing model, in addition to its applications in nursing education. Humanists in learning pay attention to the feelings and experiences. Carl Rogers support the retention of learning-centered approach and he is believed to a semantic continuum. At the other end of the continuum, experiential learning is

  1. Learning theories application in nursing education

    PubMed Central

    Aliakbari, Fatemeh; Parvin, Neda; Heidari, Mohammad; Haghani, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    Learning theories are the main guide for educational systems planning in the classroom and clinical training included in nursing. The teachers by knowing the general principles of these theories can use their knowledge more effectively according to various learning situations. In this study, Eric, Medline, and Cochrane databases were used for articles in English and for the Persian literature, Magiran, Iran doc, Iran medex, and Sid databases were used with the help of keywords including social cognitive learning, learning theory, behavioral theory, cognitive theory, constructive theory, and nursing education. The search period was considered from 1990 to 2012. Some related books were also studied about each method, its original vision, the founders, practical application of the training theory, especially training of nursing and its strengths and weaknesses. Behaviorists believe that learning is a change in an observable behavior and it happens when the communication occurs between the two events, a stimulus and a response. Among the applications of this approach is the influence on the learner's emotional reactions. Among the theories of this approach, Thorndike and Skinner works are subject to review and critique. Cognitive psychologists unlike the behaviorists believe that learning is an internal process objective and they focus on thinking, understanding, organizing, and consciousness. Fundamentalists believe that learners should be equipped with the skills of inquiry and problem solving in order to learn by the discovery and process of information. Among this group, we will pay attention to analyze Wertheimer, Brunner, Ausubel theories, Ganyeh information processing model, in addition to its applications in nursing education. Humanists in learning pay attention to the feelings and experiences. Carl Rogers support the retention of learning-centered approach and he is believed to a semantic continuum. At the other end of the continuum, experiential learning is

  2. Collaborative practice: a critical theory perspective.

    PubMed

    McLain, B R

    1988-12-01

    The purpose of this critical theory study was to investigate the observed failure of nurses and physicians to collaborate, and the underlying meaning behind this failure. Using a phenomenological and participatory approach, 18 family nurse practitioners and physicians in joint practice were interviewed separately and together about their practice relationships. Transcribed interviews and data summaries were returned to the participants for review and validation. Emergent themes were analyzed using the critical theory of Jürgen Habermas. Results demonstrated that distorted communication and nonmeaningful interactions were promoted by both nurses and physicians. Elements identified as contributing to more successful collaborative practices included a willingness to move beyond basic information exchange in nurse/physician interactions, the willingness and ability to challenge distortions and assumptions in the relationship, and a belief system based on critical self-reflection. PMID:3231741

  3. Applications of a Nursing Knowledge Based System for Nursing Practice: Inservice, Continuing Education, and Standards of Care

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Sheila A.

    1983-01-01

    A knowledge base of nursing theory supports computerized consultation to nursing service administrators and staff about patient care. Three scenarios portray different nurses utilizing the system for inservice development, continuing education, and development of standards of care or protocols for practice. The advantages of the system including cost savings are discussed.

  4. Evidence-Based Practice and School Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Susan; McCarthy, Ann Marie

    2005-01-01

    School nurses need to demonstrate that their practice is based on the best evidence available, which is usually data obtained from research. Evidence-based practice involves combining the best evidence available with nursing expertise and patient and family preferences to determine optimum care. Evidence-based practice guidelines are developed by…

  5. Negotiating the role of the practice nurse in general practice.

    PubMed

    Atkin, K; Lunt, N

    1996-09-01

    The debate about the role of the practice nurse is not only about practice nursing per se, but raises broader issues about the organization of primary health care. Two related issues emerge as significant: the role of the practice nurse in providing primary health care; and the effective use of the practice nurse resource in the 'new' National Health Service. This paper, by drawing on material from a qualitative study, specifically examines the type of work performed by practice nurses and the factors that influence this. The responses of practice nurses, general practitioners, Family Health Service Authority (FHSA) advisers, community nurse purchasers and managers of community nursing provider units suggest that a consensus on the future development of practice nursing is unlikely. The different stakeholders emphasized different issues, reflecting their own priorities and backgrounds. Practice nurses' accounts of the future, for example, focused on professional issues. General practitioners stressed the importance of role development which met their General Medical Service responsibilities. Purchasing agencies, provider units and FHSAs adopted a wider perspective and were more concerned to develop an effective and integrated primary health care service. The tensions generated by their different interests and perspectives, and the subsequent organizational and policy initiatives that emerge, will provide the context in which the role of practice nurses will be negotiated. PMID:8876409

  6. Medication Administration Practices of School Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Ann Marie; Kelly, Michael W.; Reed, David

    2000-01-01

    Assessed medication administration practices among school nurses, surveying members of the National Association of School Nurses. Respondents were extremely concerned about medication administration. Errors in administering medications were reported by 48.5 percent of respondents, with missed doses the most common error. Most nurses followed…

  7. Marketing the nursing practice of obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Dill, P Z

    1991-01-01

    This article offers nurses a conceptual framework for marketing their skills and discusses how that framework can be applied to obstetric nursing practice. A thorough understanding of the framework presented will provide maternity nurses with the foundation they need to participate effectively in a marketing plan. Examples of the application of the framework to specific clinical situations are examined. PMID:1941295

  8. State Regulations for School Nursing Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Praeger, Susan; Zimmerman, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present a state-by-state summary of rules and regulations governing school nursing practice in the United States. Official government and agency sites were reviewed to determine providers of services in schools, criteria for becoming a school nurse, protection of titling, mandates for school nursing, and the…

  9. The theoretical basis for nurse-midwifery practice in the United States: a critical analysis of three theories.

    PubMed

    Cragin, Leslie

    2004-01-01

    The relatively recent effort of midwifery scholars has resulted in the development of three middle-range midwifery theories in the United States. This article examines the three theoretical models that have been developed to describe the essential components of midwifery practice. The three theorists demonstrate remarkable consistency in the identification of concepts important to the discipline, which includes the following essential characteristics of the midwifery paradigm of care: 1) acknowledgment of connections between the mind and body and the person to the person's life and world; 2) assuming the perspective of the woman to investigate meaning and her experience of symptoms or conditions, so that a plan of care is developed by midwife and woman together; and 3) protection and nurturance of the "normal" in processes related to women's health, implying a judicious use of technology and intervention. PMID:15351327

  10. Public Health Interventions for School Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Marjorie A; Anderson, Linda J W; Rising, Shannon

    2016-06-01

    School nurses (SNs) use public health nursing knowledge and skills to provide nursing services to school populations. The Public Health Intervention Wheel is a practice framework that can be used to explain and guide public health nursing interventions. SNs who were also members of the National Association of School Nurses completed an electronic survey on their use of public health interventions as defined by the wheel. Although 67% of the participants were not familiar with the Public Health Intervention Wheel, respondents reported conducting activities that were consistent with the Wheel interventions. Screening, referral and follow-up, case management, and health teaching were the most frequently performed interventions. Intervention use varied by educational level, age of nurse, years of practice, and student population. The Public Health Intervention Wheel is a relevant and useful framework that provides a language to explain population-based school nursing practice. PMID:26404552

  11. Crown II: the implications of nurse prescribing for practice nursing.

    PubMed

    Baird, A

    2000-09-01

    Certain limited prescribing rights have now been granted to district nurses and health visitors. Proposals to extend prescribing rights to other health professionals have recently been put forward in the Review of Prescribing. Supply and Administration of Medicines (DoH, 1999). Practice nurses are one group who are likely to apply for such rights. This article reports on selected findings from a small-scale qualitative study designed to investigate the current and potential future of practice nurse in prescribing. It was found that practice nurses exercise considerable influence over prescribing in diverse therapeutic areas within general practice. However, it may be difficult to accommodate the prescribing requirements inherent in such a broad scope of practice within the framework of the present proposals. Important issues of accountability and patient safety are raised, and recommendations made for policy, research and education. PMID:12192338

  12. Nurses' views on empowerment: a critical social theory perspective.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Y

    1997-09-01

    This is the first study which describes British nurses' views on the concept of empowerment. Despite the frequent call for nurses to empower patients there was no evidence in the literature about British nurses' views. The study was carried out prior to a course exploring empowerment for practice. Focus groups were used to gather the data. Critical social theory and the work of Paulo Freire (1972) and Jurgen Habermas (1971, 1979) was used as a theoretical framework to underpin the enquiry. Taped interview transcripts were analysed thematically. Four categories emerged from the data to provide the framework for the themes: 'empowerment', 'having personal power', 'relationships within the multidisciplinary team', and 'feeling right about oneself'. It is suggested that the nurses in this study manifested signs of being oppressed and striving for liberation. The limitations of the study are identified, but the overall conclusion is that the teaching of critical social theories as an empowerment paradigm is relevant in nurse education today. PMID:9378874

  13. Cultural Congruence and Infusion Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Abitz, Tracey L

    2016-01-01

    The importance of cultural competence in every nursing practice setting in today's world cannot be understated. Unconscious bias can have detrimental effects on therapeutic relationships and health outcomes. Nursing models of cultural competence by Purnell, Leininger, and Campinha-Bacote are reviewed. The Kleinman Model and LEARN Model offer questions and guidelines to facilitate assessment of patients' understanding of illness and treatment. The Infusion Nursing Standards of Practice contains elements of diversity and cultural competence throughout. Self-reflection of one's own values, beliefs, biases, and practice as an infusion nurse will promote the development of cultural competence. PMID:26934161

  14. Is compassion essential to nursing practice?

    PubMed

    Hem, Marit Helene; Heggen, Kristin

    2004-01-01

    The Norwegian Nurses' Association recently (2001) approved a new code of ethics that included compassion as one of the basic values in nursing care. This paper examines the idea of compassion in the context of the Bible story of the Good Samaritan using an analysis of qualitative data from nurses' clinical work with psychiatric patients. The aim is to show how the idea of compassion challenges nursing practice. Thereafter, the paper discusses the benefits of and premises for compassion in care work. The results show that nurses tend not to be guided by compassion in their work with patients. The organisation of the day-to-day work in the hospital ward, the division of labour between nurses and doctors, and the nurses' approach to nursing were identified as influencing this tendency. The study shows that compassion is a radical concept with a potential to promote greater respect for patients' dignity. PMID:17929733

  15. Assessing and redesigning the nursing practice environment.

    PubMed

    Eaton-Spiva, LeeAnna; Buitrago, Paola; Trotter, Lisa; Macy, Amy; Lariscy, Mary; Johnson, Donna

    2010-01-01

    With an aging population, aging nurse workforce, and high nurse vacancy rates, our hospital had a clear mandate to assess and redesign our practice environment. The authors describe a project created to provide a framework for current and ongoing evaluation of the practice environment. PMID:20010376

  16. Eliciting nursing knowledge from practice: the dualism of nursing.

    PubMed

    Ramprogus, Vince

    2002-01-01

    Nursing knowledge has traditionally been examined and developed through the main research approaches based on the positivist, interpretive or phenomenological philosophies. These approaches are used either from a single and individual stance or combined to address particular research questions. They all, however, retain a focus that deals primarily or exclusively with what can be measured, observed or expressed as a fundamental unit of analysis to reconstruct, interpret and explain nursing practice. In this paper, Vince Ramprogus challenges the traditional approach to how nursing knowledge is defined and the common understanding of the purpose of nursing research. It is argued that adhering to empirical rigour while investigating or measuring nursing practice interferes with the very act and experience of nursing. Indeed, it becomes an either/or situation. It is also argued that nursing is not an empirical subject, and, therefore, the purpose of researching nursing is not about seeking the truth but about improving practice to achieve better patient care. The arguments are intended to provoke discussion and debate rather than to present a set position. PMID:12405006

  17. School nurse practice: a decade of change.

    PubMed

    DeBell, Diane

    2006-10-01

    Good practice requires an evidence base and criteria for assessment, which was the subject of a scope review of school nurse practice across the four countries of the UK. The findings demonstrate a rich base of research into service practice, particularly in the last decade. School nursing practice has experienced a paradigm shift from a medical to a social model of care. The service now works from a public health ethos and has a preventive agenda. The focus is on the child rather than a service for schools and school nurses work in teams rather than alone. Under-resourcing continues to beleaguer school nurse practice and there are areas that need further study, particularly large-scale research into the costs and benefits of school nursing. PMID:17061663

  18. Part III. Reenvisioning undergraduate nursing students as opinion leaders to diffuse evidence-based practice in clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Cronje, Ruth J; Moch, Susan D

    2010-01-01

    Rogers's claims about the importance of social networks to the diffusion of innovations are reviewed in light of efforts to promote evidence-based practice (EBP) among nursing students and practicing nurses. We argue that nursing educators can take more deliberate advantage of the essentially social nature of the diffusion process by devising opportunities for nursing students to form meaningful social interactions with practicing nurses. We recommend curricular reforms that reenvision undergraduate nursing students as opinion leaders throughout the curriculum. Rogers's theory predicts that such ongoing interactions between nursing students and practicing nurses will better integrate EBP among both populations. PMID:20129589

  19. Lessons learned from advanced practice nursing payment.

    PubMed

    Sullivan-Marx, Eileen M

    2008-05-01

    For more than 25 years, advanced practice nurses have been incrementally included as a part of the health care financing structure. Following physician payment revisions at the federal level, advanced practice nurses were overtly recognized as Medicare providers and have participated in the establishment of current procedural terminology codes and the subsequent relative work values associated with payment. Success in this regard has been the result of business, political, and policy savvy that has important lessons for moving forward in any health care restructuring for both nurses and advanced practice nurses. Principles of valuing nurse work, time, and intensity in the Resource-Based Relative Value Scale are discussed with implications for future opportunities of measuring nursing work and any potential relationship to quality outcomes of care. PMID:18650417

  20. Developing an Expert System for Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    Ozbolt, Judy G.; Schultz, Samuel; Swain, Mary Ann P.; Abraham, Ivo L.; Farchaus-Stein, Karen

    1984-01-01

    The American Nurses' Association has set eight Standards of Nursing Practice related to the nursing process. Computer-aided information systems intended to facilitate the nursing process must be designed to promote adherence to these professional standards. For each of the eight standards, the paper tells how a hypothetical expert system could help nurses to meet the standard. A prototype of such an expert system is being developed. The paper describes issues in conceptualizing clinical decision-making and developing decision strategies for the prototype system. The process of developing the prototype system is described.

  1. Representation of nurse's managerial practice in inpatient units: nursing staff perspective.

    PubMed

    Lima, Rogério Silva; Lourenço, Eliana Bernardes; Rosado, Sara Rodrigues; Fava, Silvana Maria Coelho Leite; Sanches, Roberta Seron; Dázio, Eliza Maria Rezende

    2016-03-01

    Objective To understand the meanings that nursing staff gives to nurse's managerial practice in the inpatient unit. Methods This is an exploratory and descriptive research with qualitative approach, conducted in a general hospital in a Southern city of Minas Gerais State. We used the Theory of Social Representations as theoretical framework. The study sample were composed by 23 nursing technicians and five nursing assistants. Data collection was conducted through semi-structured interviews, from December 2011 to January 2012. For data analysis we used the discourse analysis, according to social psychology framework. Results The meanings attributed to management occurred from the closeness/distance to staff and to patients` care actions. Conclusions The managerial nurse, perceived as a process apart from care, is classified as non familiar practice, of hard understanding and valuation. PMID:26934613

  2. Religion, bioethics and nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Marsha D

    2009-07-01

    This article calls nursing to engage in the study of religions and identifies six considerations that arise in religious studies and the ways in which religious faith is expressed. It argues that whole-person care cannot be realized, neither can there be a complete understanding of bioethics theory and decision making, without a rigorous understanding of religious-ethical systems. Because religious traditions differ in their cosmology, ontology, epistemology, aesthetic, and ethical methods, and because religious subtraditions interact with specific cultures, each religion and subtradition has something distinctive to offer to ethical discourse. A brief example is drawn from Native American religions, specifically their view of ;speech' and ;words'. Although the example is particular to an American context, it is intended to demonstrate a more general principle that an understanding of religion per se can yield new insights for bioethics. PMID:19528097

  3. Role-playing in nursing theory: engaging online students.

    PubMed

    Levitt, Cheryle; Adelman, Deborah S

    2010-04-01

    The teaching and learning of nursing theory, at all program levels, is challenging due to the complexity and abstract nature of its content, the dry nature in which the study of theory often is approached, a perception of disconnect from practice, and faculty discomfort and avoidance of the subject matter. Adapting creative educational strategies to the online environment is an ongoing challenge for educators. Role-play relates well to the constructivist basis of creating personal meaning based on the individual's experiences. This article examines the use of role-play as an educational strategy for teaching nursing theory in an online baccalaureate program. In a core professional issues course, students adopt the persona of a specific nursing theorist, interacting with other "nursing theorists" played by their peers. Student engagement and active learning reflect excitement and interest, and course evaluations have been extremely positive for this content and method. PMID:20055329

  4. Nurses' spiritual care practices: becoming less religious?

    PubMed

    Delgado, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    Research indicates that nurses do not consistently provide spiritual care, feel ill equipped to do so, and there is a lack of information as to the type of spiritual care practices nurses use. This exploratory descriptive study surveyed nurses (N = 123) about their spiritual care practices and perceptions of effectiveness, followed by qualitative interviews with volunteers (n = 5) from the surveyed group. The nurses favored spiritual interventions that are not overtly religious, but conveyed concern and support, such as listening and providing comforting touch. PMID:25898449

  5. A comprehensive mental health nursing assessment: variability of content in practice.

    PubMed

    Coombs, T; Crookes, P; Curtis, J

    2013-03-01

    Assessment is the foundation of mental health nursing practice, but little is known of how it is undertaken. This paper explores how mental health nurses describe the content of a comprehensive mental health nursing assessment. Eighteen nurses who worked in inpatient and community settings either as clinicians or managers, ranging from new graduates to nurses with greater than 20 years of experience, were interviewed and asked to describe the content of a comprehensive mental health nursing assessment. Transcribed interviews were analysed using a grounded theory methodology. The primary theme to emerge was one of variability. Most respondents hesitated and then identified different content areas that needed to be assessed as part of a comprehensive mental health nursing assessment. If the areas that are being assessed vary between nurses, then logically the types of interventions being offered will also vary. These results have implications for the education of nurses, their clinical practice, ongoing supervision and research into contemporary mental health nursing practice. PMID:22404368

  6. Evidence-based practice: how nurse leaders can facilitate innovation.

    PubMed

    Shirey, Maria R

    2006-01-01

    Evidence-based nursing practice (EBNP) is the wave of the future. Increasingly, EBNP is being identified as a key to quality and excellence in nursing services. Incorporating evidence into practice is necessary to deliver scientifically sound patient care. In addition, understanding the importance of evidence is crucial for meeting the excellence requirements of Magnet designation. Despite the growing popularity of EBNP and its documented significant benefits, the literature demonstrates that only 15% of the nursing workforce consistently practices within an EBNP framework. If EBNP adoption is to increase in the profession, it will require the active efforts of nurse leaders to pursue an aggressive innovation diffusion strategy. The purpose of this article is to discuss the nurse leader's role in facilitating EBNP in nursing using a theoretical framework grounded in innovation diffusion theory. The article develops 4 areas of focus. First, the components of innovation diffusion theory are discussed. Second, a pertinent empirical review of the EBNP adoption literature is presented. Third, strategies for applying innovation diffusion theory to facilitate EBNP adoption are proposed. Lastly, the article ends with a leadership call to action. PMID:16878011

  7. Advanced Practice Nursing Education: Challenges and Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Cynthia; Kantrowitz-Gordon, Ira; Katz, Janet; Hirsch, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Nursing education programs may face significant difficulty as they struggle to prepare sufficient numbers of advanced practice registered nurses to fulfill the vision of helping to design an improved US healthcare system as described in the Institute of Medicine's “Future of nursing” report. This paper describes specific challenges and provides strategies to improve advanced practice nursing clinical education in order to ensure that a sufficient number of APRNs are available to work in educational, practice, and research settings. Best practices are identified through a review of classic and current nursing literature. Strategies include intensive interprofessional collaborations and radical curriculum revisions such as increased use of simulation and domestic and international service work. Nurse educators must work with all stakeholders to create effective and lasting change. PMID:22220273

  8. Magnet hospital nurses describe control over nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Marlene; Schmalenberg, Claudia E

    2003-06-01

    Staff nurses describe control over nursing practice (C/NP) as a professional nursing function made up of a variety of activities and outcomes. Greater acclaim, status, and prestige for nursing in the organization are viewed as a result, not a precursor, of C/NP. Interviews with 279 staff nurses working in 14 magnet hospitals indicated that effective C/NP requires some kind of empowered, formal organizational structure, extends beyond clinical decision making at the patient care interface, and is the same as or highly similar to what the literature describes as professional autonomy. From constant comparative analysis of nurses' descriptions of C/NP activities, five ranked categories of this real-life event emerged. The basis for the categories and ranking was "who owned the problem, issue, and solution" and the "degree of effectiveness of control" as reflected in visibility, viability, and recognition of a formal structure allowing and encouraging nurses' control over practice. Hospital mergers and structural reorganization were reported to negatively affect the structure needed for effective C/NP. Almost 60% of these magnet hospital staff nurses stated and/or described little or no C/NP. PMID:12790058

  9. Intuition in nursing practice: deep connections.

    PubMed

    Leners, D W

    1992-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the phenomenon of intuition in nursing culture. The aims of the study were to (a) identify and describe terminology used with intuition in nursing care practice, (b) describe examples of experiential knowledge of intuition, (c) describe actions taken on intuitive experiences, (d) describe feelings associated with intuitive experience, and (e) compare and contrast patterns and processes of nursing intuition. The design of the study was ethnography. Sampling involved 40 nurses from all levels of the hospital and home health care practice. Intuition was found to (a) facilitate the depth of nurse-client relationships; (b) lead to a deeper understanding and connection with client patterns; (c) be acknowledged as a professional risk; (d) emphasize the significant influence of autonomy, independence, and assertiveness in nursing practice; and (e) contribute to excellence in nursing care. Intuition was identified as a manifestation of transpersonal caring in the art of nursing practice and was deeply connected to caring as the moral ideal of the nursing profession. PMID:1301422

  10. Nursing theory: the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Randell, B P

    1992-01-01

    On September 21, 1990, at the University of California, Los Angeles, Neuropsychiatric Institute and Hospital, six nurse theorists participated in a panel discussion on theory development for the 21st century. The theorists included Dorothy Johnson, Betty Neuman, Dorothea E. Orem, Rosemarie Rizzo Parse, Martha E. Rogers and Callista Roy. The panel provided the participants the opportunity to speculate on the course for future development of nursing knowledge. Three questions were posed to the panel relating to the development of their models, the direction nursing theory will take in the 21st century, and current research emerging from the extant theories. The panel also addressed questions from the audience. PMID:1454278

  11. Combining Theory With Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houa, Souen

    1975-01-01

    Using specific examples, the author discusses how the Chinese educators link theory with practice in order to associate education with the three great revolutionary motive forces--the class struggle, the drive towards productivity, and scientific experimentation. (Author/RM)

  12. [Domains in the clinical practice of Clinical Nursing Experts in Germany and their correspondence with the internationally described "Advanced Nursing Practice"].

    PubMed

    Mendel, Simon; Feuchtinger, Johanna

    2009-06-01

    In spite of a growing trend toward academic education and increasing numbers of "nursing experts" functioning as change agents in Germany, actual nursing experts as in the internationally described Advanced Nursing Practice (ANP) are scarce. Drawing from a ten-year experience in implementing the international concept, the University Hospital Freiburg (UKF), Germany, constitutes a notable exception, as it presently employs ten clinically practicing nursing experts. Based on this background of educating nursing experts, this presentation aims at describing the implementation of the nursing expert's role and its fit and conformance with the international ANP. A 3-stage Delphi design was used for interviewing all the nursing experts at the hospital (n = 10) about their expert opinions; in addition, all nursing managers (n = 7) as well as unit and team leaders (n = 49) were asked about their opinion to relevant functions and domains of nursing experts. The following clinical practice domains of nursing experts were identified: Direct patient care, patient education, support and supervision of nurses, maintenance and expansion of professional skills and knowledge of the nursing staff, counselling of managers, quality assurance and organizational development, theory to practice transfer, nursing research, maintenance of own professional skills and knowledge and continuing education, and publicity work. Additionally, a three-year nursing education, a longer lasting professional experience, a degree in nursing science or nursing education, and specialist skills in the respective area of expertise were identified as credentials for nursing expert practice. The nursing expert concept at UKF shows elements of the international ANP with similarities to the role of a Clinical Nurse Specialist. PMID:19496033

  13. What nurse leaders should know about complex adaptive systems theory.

    PubMed

    Penprase, Barbara; Norris, Diane

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of key concepts in understanding complex adaptive systems theory (CAS) and its application to nursing management. CAS concerns altering management practice and revolutionizing how nurse leaders think, behave, and problem solve. CAS discards former beliefs and embraces the concepts of self-organization and attractors (catalysts that allow new behaviors to emerge spontaneously) that enable order and creativity to emerge. Stressing that the most powerful processes begin at the micro level of an organization with the staff, complexity science offers nursing leadership new strategies for successfully navigating chaotic, complex times in health care management. PMID:16206697

  14. Diffusion of pain management research into nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Dooks, P

    2001-04-01

    The promotion of evidence based practice is a challenge within nursing. Pain management is a prime example of this practice research gap. There is solid evidence for 20 years to promote positive change in our methods of pain management, yet outdated approaches are still amazingly evident. Even among oncology nurses, who place a high value on promoting patient comfort, there is a lack of evidence-based pain management. Rogers' Diffusion of Innovation Theory provides an interesting framework for examining the issues and possible solutions to this complex problem. Rogers' theory examines how changes diffuse through a social system over time and also exposes some of the barriers and facilitators to this process. The theory looks at adopters, the nature of the innovation, the social system, and communication patterns. Identifying the barriers of the past will help nursing to overcome these same barriers and increase the adoption of evidence-based pain management approaches in the future. PMID:11318267

  15. Put Theory into Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaeger, Audrey J.; Dunstan, Stephany; Thornton, Courtney; Rockenbach, Alyssa B.; Gayles, Joy G.; Haley, Karen J.

    2013-01-01

    When making decisions that impact student learning, college educators often consider previous experiences, precedent, common sense, and advice from colleagues. But how often do they consider theory? At a recent state-level educators' meeting, the authors of this article asked 50 student affairs educators about the use of theory in their practice.…

  16. Nursing Interventions Core to Specialty Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCloskey, Joanne Comi; Donahue, William; Bulechek, Gloria M.

    1998-01-01

    The identification of nursing interventions that are core to each clinical specialty will be useful in the development of nursing information systems, staff education programs and evaluations, referral networks, certification and licensing examinations, curricula, and research and theory construction. (Author/JOW)

  17. Sifting, sorting and saturating data in a grounded theory study of information use by practice nurses: a worked example.

    PubMed

    Hoare, Karen J; Mills, Jane; Francis, Karen

    2012-12-01

    The terminology used to analyse data in a grounded theory study can be confusing. Different grounded theorists use a variety of terms which all have similar meanings. In the following study, we use terms adopted by Charmaz including: initial, focused and axial coding. Initial codes are used to analyse data with an emphasis on identifying gerunds, a verb acting as a noun. If initial codes are relevant to the developing theory, they are grouped with similar codes into categories. Categories become saturated when there are no new codes identified in the data. Axial codes are used to link categories together into a grounded theory process. Memo writing accompanies this data sifting and sorting. The following article explains how one initial code became a category providing a worked example of the grounded theory method of constant comparative analysis. The interplay between coding and categorization is facilitated by the constant comparative method. PMID:23181960

  18. Privacy Questions from Practicing School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergren, Martha Dewey

    2004-01-01

    This Question and Answer (Q&A) article addresses practice issues related to school health records and school nursing documentation that were posed by school nurses in the field. Specifically, the questions addressed concern the following: education records, medication privacy issues, sharing of sensitive health information, privacy of individual…

  19. Practical Nursing, Volume I. Health Occupations Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Helen W.; And Others

    This curriculum guide provides teachers with up-to-date information and skill-related applications needed by the practical nurse. The volume contains three sections and 24 instructional units: Personal Vocational Relationships (6 units), Nutrition (3 units), and Basic Nursing Principles and Applied Skills (15 units covering such topics as…

  20. Nursing control over practice and teamwork.

    PubMed

    Castner, Jessica; Ceravolo, Diane J; Foltz-Ramos, Kelly; Wu, Yow-Wu

    2013-01-01

    Nurses' control over practice is essential to nursing care quality and fosters teamwork at the point of care delivery. This article describes a study to measure the impact of nurses' control over their practice from the perspective of teamwork. The purpose of this study was to measure the relationship of control over practice to the five following dimensions of teamwork: team structure, leadership, situation monitoring, mutual support, and communication. The study method was a secondary analysis of 456 surveys from registered nurses working in a five-hospital system. Study results demonstrated that the global measure of teamwork correlated with control over practice and nursing experience, but not with teamwork training. All five individual dimensions of teamwork were perceived as better for those who had a high level of control over practice compared to those who did not. In the discussion section, we consider situation monitoring since this dimension demonstrated an interaction effect between teamwork training and control over practice. Nursing control over practice demonstrates a positive relationship with teamwork and should be considered in future education, policy, and research efforts. Further study is needed to understand control over practice as a potential moderator or mediator of other predecessors of effective teamwork. PMID:23758421

  1. Challenges facing internationalisation of nursing practice, nurse education and nursing workforce in Australia.

    PubMed

    Parker, Vicki; McMillan, Margaret

    2007-04-01

    This paper examines factors that have lead to increasing internationalisation in nursing workforce and nursing education and contends that education and support for nurse managers and nurse academics is required in order to better prepare them for the challenges they will face. There are many benefits to be gained from internationalisation of nursing, the most significant being greater cross-cultural understanding and improved practices in workplaces across countries. However, the way in which nursing and nurses contribute to the international agenda is crucial to maintaining standards of education and nursing care in Australia and in countries with whom Australians collaborate. Internationalisation poses numerous challenges that need to be carefully thought through. This paper seeks to unravel and scrutinize some of the issues central to internationalisation in nursing, particularly in the Australian context. PMID:17563321

  2. Closing the Gap between Research Evidence and Clinical Practice: Jordanian Nurses' Perceived Barriers to Research Utilisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Khalaileh, Murad; Al Qadire, Mohammad; Musa, Ahmad S.; Al-Khawaldeh, Omar A.; Al Qudah, Hani; Alhabahbeh, Atalla

    2016-01-01

    Background: The nursing profession is a combination of theory and practical skill, and nurses are required to generate and develop knowledge through implementing research into clinical practice. Considerable number of barriers could hind implementing research findings into practice. Barriers to research utilisation are not identified in the…

  3. Best Faculty Practice Plan Model for a Small College of Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrad, Sharyn Neiman

    2010-01-01

    Bridging the gap between theory and practice has been a priority with universities and colleges of nursing. A mechanism for bridging this gap has been the establishment of faculty practices. Faculty practices have provided nurse practitioner faculty opportunities to mentor students, augment income, implement evidence-based research, provide…

  4. Defining currency of practice for nurse educators.

    PubMed

    Fourie, Willem J; Olliver, Janet D; Andrew, Catherine M

    2002-11-01

    Recent Nursing Council of New Zealand (NCNZ) guidelines for competence-based practising certificates (NCNZ, 2001) and the fact that all nurse educators must have a current practising certificate prompted the Nursing Schools within the Tertiary Accord of New Zealand (TANZ) to explore issues surrounding current competency in practice and how this can be maintained by nurse educators. This is a topical debate as discussions related to competence-based practising certificates generally refer to competence only in terms of direct patient care. This article sets out to clarify the issue with specific reference to nurse educators who, by the nature of their scope of practice, often do not carry a patient caseload. The literature relating to currency of practice is explored to provide background to current definitions and existing strategies for maintaining competence. This article draws on the findings of a survey by the TANZ Nursing Schools and provides a position on how currency of practice applies to nurses working in educational settings. In addition, strategies to maintain clinical, teaching and scholarly currency are presented along with suggestions for providing evidence that currency of practice is maintained. PMID:12564520

  5. Ethical dilemmas in perioperative nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Reeder, J M

    1989-12-01

    Ethical dilemmas in perioperative nursing practice occur during all phases and in every practice setting. Awareness of commonly experienced dilemmas and understanding of a model available to analyze and resolve these dilemmas can benefit patients and perioperative nurses. Patients will benefit from nurse advocates who recognize and act to resolve actual and potential ethical dilemmas. Nurses will benefit when they are empowered with the knowledge and ethical skills to enhance patient autonomy, to protect dignity and confidentiality, and human rights. Perioperative nurses should reflect on previous dilemmas and use them to assist with resolution of similar dilemmas. They should be knowledgeable of personal, departmental, institutional, and professional resources available when faced with ethical dilemmas. The ANA code for Nurses and the AORN Statements of Competency in Perioperative Nursing are two resources available to perioperative nurses. In the increasingly complex, technologically laden surgical environment, patients who are sicker and living longer will require services of highly skilled and educated professionals. They are vulnerable in the surgical setting and need surgical teams to act on their behalf. Perioperative nurses with ethical skill are an asset to patients and other members of the surgical team when they seek to resolve ethical dilemmas in knowledgeable and systematic ways. PMID:2685781

  6. Nursing theory: the comparison of four theoretical proposals.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, E A

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: (1) to describe theory and its relationship to nursing knowledge and practice, and (2) to compare the theoretical proposals of Imogene King (1975), Dorothea Orem (1971), Martha Rogers (1970) and Sister Calista Roy (1970). PMID:6898233

  7. The Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory as a curriculum conceptual framework in baccalaureate education.

    PubMed

    Berbiglia, Violeta A

    2011-04-01

    Although Dorothea Orem's Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory has been used for curricula framework for years, it was not until 2001 that Orem identified the nursing practice sciences and the foundational nursing sciences and specified the appropriate content for the two sciences. The broad purpose of this paper is to reinforce the importance of utilizing nursing theories as curricular conceptual frameworks. The specific purpose is to delineate the appropriate content for baccalaureate programs that adopt a Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory conceptual framework for their curriculum. PMID:21471038

  8. Tobacco cessation education for advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Diane; Zucker, Steven B; Stone, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    The predicted shortfall of primary care physicians and the millions of newly insured beginning in 2014 call for an increase in the number of advanced practice nurses (APRNs). Advanced practice nurses can significantly improve their clients' quality of life and increase their life expectancy through tobacco cessation education. The purpose of this study was to educate APRN students on smoking information and techniques to assist clients with quitting smoking in the primary care setting. PMID:24867074

  9. Managing the professional nurse. Part I. The organizational theories.

    PubMed

    McClure, M L

    1984-02-01

    How do employment organizations outside the hospital field deal with issues such as staff productivity, motivation, burnout, and high turnover? In Part I of this two-part article, the author presents an overview of modern management theory and practice, drawn from the literature on organizational behavior. She shows how nursing administrators can use this scholarly foundation to better understand the organizing principles and problems of their departments. In Part II (to be published in March 1984), the author applies these classic and relevant theories to the specific challenges that face the manager of professional nurses. PMID:6561235

  10. Creating opportunities to support oncology nursing practice: surviving and thriving.

    PubMed

    Rashleigh, Laura; Cordon, Charissa; Wong, Jiahui

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence to support that specialization in nursing leads to improved outcomes for patients, including increased QOL, improved symptom management, and fewer hospital admissions. Oncology nurses face several challenges in pursuing specialization, due to individual and system issues such as limited time and resources. To address these challenges, de Souza Institute launched a province-wide study group for nurses in Ontario who planned to write the Canadian Nurses Association (CNA) Oncology Certification Exam. The study group was led by educators from de Souza and Princess Margaret Hospital and drew expertise from nursing leaders across Ontario who shared the same vision of oncology nursing excellence. The study group was innovative by embracing telemedicine and web-based technology, which enabled flexibility for nurses' work schedules, learning styles, physical location and practice experience. The study group utilized several theoretical perspectives and frameworks to guide the curriculum: Adult Learning Theories, Cooperative Learning, Generational Learning Styles, CANO standards for practice and the CNA exam competencies. This approach enabled 107 oncology nurses across the province in 17 different sites to connect, as a group, study interactively and fully engage in their learning. A detailed evaluation method was utilized to assess baseline knowledge, learning needs, cooperative group process, exam success rates, and document unexpected outcomes. Ninety-four per cent of participants passed the CNA Oncology Exam. Lessons learned and future implications are discussed. The commitment remains to enable thriving through generating new possibilities, building communities of practice, mentoring nurses and fostering excellence in oncology practice. PMID:21462874

  11. Ancient Ethical Practices of Dualism and Ethical Implications for Future Paradigms in Nursing.

    PubMed

    Milton, Constance L

    2016-07-01

    Paradigms contain theoretical structures to guide scientific disciplines. Since ancient times, Cartesian dualism has been a prominent philosophy incorporated in the practice of medicine. The discipline of nursing has continued the body-mind emphasis with similar paradigmatic thinking and theories of nursing that separate body and mind. Future trends for paradigm and nursing theory development are harkening to former ways of thinking. In this article the author discusses the origins of Cartesian dualism and implications for its current usage. The author shall illuminate what it potentially means to engage in dualism in nursing and discuss possible ethical implications for future paradigm and theory development in nursing. PMID:27271129

  12. Nursing Students' Integration of Theory and Practice: The Development and Implementation of a Practice and Theoretical Framework for Teaching--A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gassner, Lee-Anne; Wotton, Karen

    1998-01-01

    Use of the case study method to develop nursing students' skills in clinical decision making is discussed. The topic-development approach used in the course design included selection of appropriate cases, use of guidelines for analysis of cases, and development of interrelated formats for teaching. Students and lecturers reported satisfaction with…

  13. Nursing students learning to utilize nursing research in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Mattila, Lea-Riitta; Eriksson, Elina

    2007-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the significance of a learning assignment in relation to research skills and learning of nursing students in clinical practice. The learning assignment included an oral presentation of a nursing research article, which the students gave to their fellow students and ward nurses. The students also chaired the discussion after the presentation. The target group for the study was nursing students of a Finnish polytechnic who had been studying for 2-2 1/2 years and had accomplished a minimum of 120 ECTS credits of the total of 210 ECTS credits. When participating in the study, the students were completing a six-week clinical practice of optional studies. The data were collected with a questionnaire designed for the study. It consisted of six open-ended questions. Three of the questions were related to learning of research skills. Two questions were concerned with learning during the ongoing clinical practice. The final question inquired the students' views on the development of the learning assignment. The students received the questionnaire before the commencement of their clinical practice, and they returned it to the other researcher after their clinical practice. The questionnaire was given to 80 students, of which 50 returned it; the response rate was 63%. The data were analysed by content analysis question by question. According to the results, the learning assignment advanced the understanding of research concepts for the majority of the students. In particular, the students reported that the oral presentation clarified the research concepts, and the structure of a scientific article was also elucidated. The students stated that the assignment generated ideas concerning the development of nursing care. In relation to the ongoing clinical practice, the assignment advanced patient encounters and interaction, and bearing responsibility the most. Proposals for the further development of the learning assignment were expressed by

  14. The Nature of Advanced Practice Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberle, Kathleen; Allen, Marion

    2001-01-01

    Advanced practice nurses are situated between general knowledge (knowing why, what, and how) and particular knowledge (knowing who--personal knowledge of patients). Integration of the two assists in knowing when a particular action would be most helpful. This practical wisdom is the hallmark of advanced practice. (Contains 45 references.) (SK)

  15. Practice nurses experiences of mentoring undergraduate nursing students in Australian general practice.

    PubMed

    Halcomb, Elizabeth J; Peters, Kath; McInnes, Susan

    2012-07-01

    Internationally, the delivery of health services has shifted from secondary to primary care, necessitating an exponential growth of the nursing workforce and expansion of the nursing role in general practice. This growth, and the subsequent need to develop this workforce, has created a need to expose undergraduate nurses to general practice nursing as a viable career option. Concurrently, universities are struggling to find sufficient clinical places for their undergraduate students to gain clinical experience. It is logical, therefore, to increase the number of undergraduate nursing student placements in general practice. Through qualitative research methods, this paper seeks to explore the experiences of practice nurses mentoring undergraduate students on clinical placements within the general practice setting. Findings are presented in the following three themes: (1) Promoting Practice Nursing: We really need to get students in, (2) Mentoring future co-workers: Patience and reassurance, and (3) Reciprocity in learning: It's a bit of a two way street, which show the benefits of such placements. Clinical placements in general practice settings can be mutually beneficial in terms of providing quality teaching and learning experiences for students. Conversely, the experience provides an impetus for practice nurses to maintain currency of their clinical skills and knowledge through mentoring student nurses. PMID:21908081

  16. Fostering nurses' political knowledges and practices: education and political activation in relation to lesbian health.

    PubMed

    MacDonnell, Judith A

    2009-01-01

    This article describes findings from a qualitative policy study focused on female nurses' activism in relation to lesbian health. Critical feminist analysis and comparative life history methodology were applied to career histories obtained from 10 diversely situated female nurses across Ontario, Canada. The findings show that nursing activist practices are informed by advocacy experiences that foster inclusive professional and community education plus formal education processes that shape their political socialization. Implications for nursing theory include the development of political knowledges and practices that support caring science, sociopolitical knowing, and primary healthcare nursing practice in a community context. PMID:19461232

  17. Informed consent practices of Chinese nurse researchers.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Douglas P; Honghong Wang; Pang, Samantha

    2010-03-01

    Nursing research in China is at an early stage of development and little is known about the practices of Chinese nurse researchers. This interview study carried out at a university in central China explores the informed consent practices of Chinese nurse researchers and the cultural considerations of using a western technique. Nine semistructured interviews were conducted in English with assistance and simultaneous translation from a Chinese nurse with research experience. The interviews were analyzed by one western and two Chinese researchers and major themes were identified. All participants endorsed informed consent as ethically required. Differences were noted between some of the informed consent practices typically recommended in the USA and those identified in this study, such as: recruitment using local and government officials, recruiting directly from medical records without special permission, family consultation in consent and consent control, and not revealing randomization to intervention groups receiving different treatments. PMID:20185442

  18. Social capital, rural nursing and rural nursing theory.

    PubMed

    Lauder, William; Reel, Sally; Farmer, Jane; Griggs, Harvey

    2006-03-01

    The notion of social capital focuses attention on social connectedness within communities and the ways that this connectedness may affect health and well-being. There are many competing definitions of social capital but most suggest that it involves trust, social networks and reciprocity within communities, not necessarily geographically defined. The usefulness of social capital and related theories that help in understanding the function of nurses in rural communities are explored in this paper. Nurses and health service planners are becoming increasingly aware of the potential contribution of community nurses in rural and/or remote areas, as evidenced in the development of nurse practitioners. Through their interrelational role and status in rural communities, nurses are often 'immersed' or 'embedded' in the social networks that make up the fabric of rural life and may therefore be important contributors to social capital. For a concept such as social capital to be useful in nursing research, it must have distinct attributes, delineated boundaries, and well-described preconditions and outcomes in multiple contexts. PMID:16494669

  19. From Practice to Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langberg, Arnold

    1984-01-01

    Describes the individualized program of Mountain Open High School which at first coincidentally resembed Maurice Gibbons'"Walkabout" concept and was subsequently more consciously shaped by theory. Students move through three phases culminating in challenging independent projects of practical use. (MJL)

  20. Novices in clinical practice settings: student nurses stories of learning the practice of nursing.

    PubMed

    Orland-Barak, Lily; Wilhelem, Dalit

    2005-08-01

    Drawing on 24 stories of clinical practice in an apprenticeship context of training in Israel, this qualitative study examined student nurses' perspectives towards learning to become a nurse, as revealed through the language and content of their written stories of clinical practice. As our findings suggest, student nurses' stories of learning to become a nurse in practice settings, are characterized by procedural language, by medical rather than nursing terminology, and by a focus on actions rather than on interactions. We have learned that, despite the rich content that characterizes clinical practice settings, the apprenticeship orientation of the training program, combined with student nurses' state of being a novice, yielded representations of the experience of learning to nurse which were characterized by an instrumental perspective towards the practice. We interpret these findings through four interrelated insights that emerge from the study: (1) an 'instrumental practice' orientation in the setting of caring, (2) knowledge of clinical facts-not knowledge of clinical principles, (3) the fragmented character of novices' learning to nurse in practice, and (4) rich content of practice alone does not yield rich content of learning. PMID:16005116

  1. Development of the Family Nursing Practice Scale.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Peggy; Tarrant, Marie

    2006-11-01

    This article describes the development and testing of the Family Nursing Practice Scale (FNPS). This self-report questionnaire is designed to measure perceived changes in family nursing practice including attitudes toward working with families, critical appraisal of their family nursing practice and reciprocity in the nurse-family relationship. Categories were derived from a needs assessment, competence as effective application of knowledge and skill and theoretical foundations for family assessment and intervention. Psychometric testing (content, construct validity, internal consistency, and test-retest reliability) was undertaken with 140 psychiatric nurses in Hong Kong. Practice appraisal and nurse-family relationships accounted for 56.4% of the variance. Cronbach's alpha reliability coefficients were .88 and .73 for the two subscales, respectively, and .86 for the scale overall. Test-retest reliability ranged from .62 to .93 on the individual items. The results provide preliminary evidence of the reliability and validity of the FNPS. The instrument provides quantitative and qualitative evaluation components. PMID:17099118

  2. Motivating employees. Applying motivational theories to nursing.

    PubMed

    Pustai, I

    1989-12-01

    Managers provide the critical link between the delivery of nursing care and the administration. It is vital for nurse managers to provide a work environment that supports professional nursing practices. Staff nurses are taught how to carry out clinical functions. For them to develop and practice advanced clinical skills, managers have to buffer the pressures of daily operations. They must ask themselves, "Am I committed to my employees?" "Am I an enthusiastic role model for my employees?" "Do I use positive motivating techniques?" "Do I know each of my employees personally as a unique individual?" "What can I do to create an environment that supports my employees?" and "How can I make each of my employees feel respected and worthy?" If the manager, whether experienced or not, can answer these questions honestly and apply motivational techniques differently, he or she will be the best kind of manager: a true leader. PMID:2619295

  3. How reflective practice improves nurses' critical thinking ability.

    PubMed

    Cirocco, Maria

    2007-01-01

    Purposeful reflection is consistent with adult learning theory. It is known to lead to a deeper understanding of issues and to develop judgment and skill. Required by law to ensure members' competence in their professional practice, the College of Nurses of Ontario recommends and has developed a tool for evaluating reflective practice. The tool focuses on key attributes said to be demonstrated by competent practitioners, including critical thinking (CT) and job knowledge. This study aimed to determine whether nurses engage in reflective practice and whether they perceive that it enhances their CT ability. Surveys were sent to 60 gastroenterology nurses at a large teaching hospital; 34 surveys were anonymously returned. All respondents engaged in reflective practice, and 24 reported using the college's tool. Nineteen respondents strongly agreed that their nursing practice had improved as a result. Critical thinking is difficult to assess because of a lack of clear-cut performance criteria. Improvement of CT was difficult to evaluate from the responses, even though all respondents participated in reflective practice. Both CT and reflective practice need to be better defined in order to examine and explain their relationship. PMID:18156956

  4. Computer-Assisted Instruction in Practical Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Maureen

    1976-01-01

    Existing computer-assisted instructional programs for nursing students are studied and their application to the education of practical nurses is considered in the light of the recent history of nursing education. (Author)

  5. Effective communication skills in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Bramhall, Elaine

    2014-12-01

    This article highlights the importance of effective communication skills for nurses. It focuses on core communication skills, their definitions and the positive outcomes that result when applied to practice. Effective communication is central to the provision of compassionate, high-quality nursing care. The article aims to refresh and develop existing knowledge and understanding of effective communication skills. Nurses reading this article will be encouraged to develop a more conscious style of communicating with patients and carers, with the aim of improving health outcomes and patient satisfaction. PMID:25467362

  6. Mobile applications in nursing education and practice.

    PubMed

    Airth-Kindree, Norah; Vandenbark, R Todd

    2014-01-01

    Students in an RN-BSN completion program capstone course investigated and critically evaluated mobile medical applications using an information literacy conceptual framework. Students also analyzed their potential usefulness as a resource in nursing practice. Student evaluations focused on usability and applicability when recommending the use of mobile applications as a point-of-care reference tools. This pilot assignment offers an innovative teaching strategy for integrating 1 aspect of informatics instruction into the nursing curriculum. PMID:24937293

  7. How narratives can change nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Holly; Maw, Heather; Mee, Steve; Buckley, Alison; Corless, Louise

    This series has explored the value of patient narratives in enabling nurses to reflect on how their practice is perceived by, and affects, patients and their families. This article describes how two student learning disability nurses used patient and carer narratives to highlight the effect of a hospital trust's lack of toilet provision for people with physical impairments, using the stories to persuade the trust to develop appropriate facilities. PMID:27337789

  8. Nursing Education Leaders' Perceived Leadership Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLong, Dianne

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the leadership practices perceived by nursing education leaders as measured by the Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI). The framework used was a contemporary transformational leadership model described in "The Leadership Challenge" ("4th ed.") by Dr. James Kouzes and Dr. Barry Posner, which identifies the…

  9. Measuring nursing informatics competencies of practicing nurses in Korea: Nursing Informatics Competencies Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Chung, Seon Yoon; Staggers, Nancy

    2014-12-01

    Informatics competencies are a necessity for contemporary nurses. However, few researchers have investigated informatics competencies for practicing nurses. A full set of Informatics competencies, an instrument to measure these competencies, and potential influencing factors have yet to be identified for practicing nurses. The Nursing Informatics Competencies Questionnaire was designed, tested for psychometrics, and used to measure beginning and experienced levels of practice. A pilot study using 54 nurses ensured item comprehension and clarity. Internal consistency and face and content validity were established. A cross-sectional survey was then conducted on 230 nurses in Seoul, Korea, to determine construct validity, describe a complete set of informatics competencies, and explore possible influencing factors on existing informatics competencies. Principal components analysis, descriptive statistics, and multiple regression were used for data analysis. Principal components analysis gives support for the Nursing Informatics Competencies Questionnaire construct validity. Survey results indicate that involvement in a managerial position and self-directed informatics-related education may be more influential for improving informatics competencies, whereas general clinical experience and workplace settings are not. This study provides a foundation for understanding how informatics competencies might be integrated throughout nurses' work lives and how to develop appropriate strategies to support nurses in their informatics practice in clinical settings. PMID:25393832

  10. The Historical Evolution of Theories and Conceptual Models for Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Joellen W.

    The development of nursing models can be traced to the inception of nursing as a profession. Florence Nightingale laid the foundation for current nursing practice and differentiated nursing from medicine. The late 19th and early 20th centuries contributed a number of important nurse theorists, better known for other contributions to the neophyte…

  11. Implementing a Gerontological Clinical Nursing Practice with an Interdisciplinary Focus: Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahlke, Sherry; Fehr, Cindy

    2010-01-01

    A gerontological clinical nursing practice with an interdisciplinary focus was developed to provide opportunities for student nurses to expand their knowledge about aging, hone assessment skills, and critically examine beliefs about older adults. The practice included theory about older adults and a rotation through a variety of clinical settings…

  12. [Nurses' autonomy and vulnerability in the Nursing Assistance Systematization practice].

    PubMed

    Menezes, Silvia Regina Tamae; Priel, Margareth Rose; Pereira, Luciane Lucio

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study was to recognize the autonomy and vulnerability of nurses in the implementation of the Sistema da Assistência de Enfermagem (SAE) Nursing Care System through an integrative literature review, using content analysis. A survey was conducted, and 40 articles published between 1998 and 2008 were selected based on their relevance. Results showed two main categories of meaning: Benefits associated to the SAE practice (to patients, to the profession and to the institution) and Determinants for the Implementation of SAE (nurse's competence, training and education, record-instruments, infrastructure and collective sharing-construction). From the integration of the two categories, the highlights were the autonomy in acting with freedom and responsibility, science-based decision-making, and being valued for their social work, as well as the vulnerability expressed by interpersonal relationships, the wear generated by professional stress and the risk inherent to the service. PMID:21876898

  13. A Trial of Nursing Cost Accounting using Nursing Practice Data on a Hospital Information System.

    PubMed

    Miyahira, Akiko; Tada, Kazuko; Ishima, Masatoshi; Nagao, Hidenori; Miyamoto, Tadashi; Nakagawa, Yoshiaki; Takemura, Tadamasa

    2015-01-01

    Hospital administration is very important and many hospitals carry out activity-based costing under comprehensive medicine. However, nursing cost is unclear, because nursing practice is expanding both quantitatively and qualitatively and it is difficult to grasp all nursing practices, and nursing cost is calculated in many cases comprehensively. On the other hand, a nursing information system (NIS) is implemented in many hospitals in Japan and we are beginning to get nursing practical data. In this paper, we propose a nursing cost accounting model and we simulate a cost by nursing contribution using NIS data. PMID:26262246

  14. Nurse residency programs and the transition to child health nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Delack, Sandi; Martin, Jean; McCarthy, Ann Marie; Sperhac, Arlene M

    2015-06-01

    Nurse residency programs for newly licensed RNs are a critical component in bridging the clinical practice gap between education and practice. In May 2013, the Institute of Pediatric Nursing invited leaders from pediatric nursing organizations and children's hospitals to attend a forum on nurse residency programs for pediatric nurses. This article presents a summary of the discussions that occurred during the forum and makes recommendations for addressing issues related to nurse residency programs. PMID:26010285

  15. Influencing undergraduate nursing students' attitudes toward mental health nursing: acknowledging the role of theory.

    PubMed

    Happell, Brenda

    2009-01-01

    Most research designed to explore undergraduate nursing students' attitudes towards mental health nursing tends to uphold clinical experience as the decisive factor, with much less attention paid to the theoretical component. This paper presents the findings of a state-wide study conducted with undergraduate nursing students in Victoria, Australia. A pre- and post-test design was used to measure students' attitudes toward people with a mental illness and toward mental health nursing and their sense of preparedness for mental health practice. A questionnaire was administered at two time points; the first time point was following completion of the mental health nursing theoretical component, and the second was following the completion of clinical experience. An additional scale was added at the second time point to evaluate students' opinions about their clinical placement. The findings indicated significantly different attitudes and opinions depending on the university students attended. The amount of theory undertaken in the course accounts for some, but not all, of this variance. However, generally the students taking courses with a larger theoretical component tended to demonstrate higher scores (suggestive of more favourable attitudes) on all of the subscales, and that these differences were sustained following the completion of the clinical placement. These findings suggest that the amount of theory students receive in mental health nursing may be more influential than the relevant literature suggests. PMID:19148820

  16. Factors influencing evidence-based practice for community nurses.

    PubMed

    Baird, Lisa M Garland; Miller, Tess

    2015-05-01

    Factors influencing the development of evidence-based nursing practice (EBNP) were examined in Prince Edward Island, Canada. An adapted electronic questionnaire was distributed to practicing registered nurses and nurse practitioners (n=68). An analysis of variance revealed a significant difference between nurses' clinical practice setting and the EBNP scale. Significant differences were also found between age and education level when compared with the EBNP subscales where novice nurses were less likely to rely on experience and intuition, and expert nurses with a higher level of education reported being more skilful at synthesising and applying information from research findings into their nursing practice. PMID:25993372

  17. The Institute for Johns Hopkins Nursing: A Collaborative Model for Nursing Practice and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabatier, Kathleen Hartman

    2002-01-01

    The Institute for Johns Hopkins Nursing was developed collaboratively by the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing and the Johns Hopkins Hospital Department of Nursing. The institute prepares nurses for practice, keeps practitioners current, and provides nursing staff development programs. (Contains 11 references.) (JOW)

  18. Identification of Desired Outcomes for School Nursing Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selekman, Janice; Guilday, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    The "Scope and Standards of Professional School Nursing Practice" states that school nurses should evaluate the quality and effectiveness of their practice. School nurses have not yet identified and adopted outcomes by which this effectiveness can be measured. This study used focus groups during a national meeting of school nurse leaders to…

  19. Medical expansionism: some implications for psychiatric nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Barker, P; Baldwin, S; Ulas, M

    1989-06-01

    The paper discusses how health care models in general have been influenced by the authors' concept of 'medical expansionism'. Emphasis is given to addressing the impact of medical theory and practice on models of psychiatric nursing. The initial section discusses the concepts of medicalisation and medical imperialism, offering general health definitions and examination of mental health problems in more detail. From this analysis a definition is presented of a medical model in psychiatry. The effects of this model of health care on the future development of nursing models in psychiatry is discussed. PMID:2666847

  20. Developing perspectives on Korean nursing theory: the influences of Taoism.

    PubMed

    Shin, K R

    2001-10-01

    Nursing theory provides a systematic explanation and description of nursing phenomena. Western nursing theories have widely influenced Korean nursing. And yet, although nursing theory has universal aspects, the differences in philosophy and culture that are unique to each country need to be considered. This inquiry seeks to investigate the Korean cultural heritage, which integrates Confucianism, Buddhism, and Taoism, and how it provides a unique worldview of human beings, the universe, health, and nursing. Essential principles and therapies consistent with Taoist philosophy are also identified. This framework is proffered as the basis for establishing understanding between Korean nurses and patients. PMID:11873374

  1. Epistemic Authority in Nursing Practice vs. Doctors' Orders.

    PubMed

    Reed, Pamela G

    2016-07-01

    The practice policy of doctors' orders is still deeply embedded in 21st century professional nurse practice, despite its profound incongruence with nursing's perspective, standards of practice, and advanced knowledge. The author in this article elaborates on the doctors' orders policy in relation to nursing's disciplinary perspective and epistemic authority in professional practice. PMID:27271139

  2. Structures and practices enabling staff nurses to control their practice.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Marlene; Schmalenberg, Claudia; Maguire, Patricia; Brewer, Barbara B; Burke, Rebecca; Chmielewski, Linda; Cox, Karen; Kishner, Janice; Krugman, Mary; Meeks-Sjostrom, Diana; Waldo, Mary

    2008-08-01

    This mixed-methods study uses interviews, participant observations, and the CWEQII empowerment tool to identify structures and attributes of structures that promote control over nursing practice (CNP). Nearly 3,000 staff nurses completed the Essentials of Magnetism (EOM), an instrument that measures CNP, one of the eight staff nurse-identified essential attributes of a productive work environment. Strategic sampling is used to identify 101 high CNP-scoring clinical units in 8 high-EOM scoring magnet hospitals. In addition to 446 staff nurses, managers, and physicians on these high-scoring units, chief nursing officers, chief operating officers, and representatives from other professional departments are interviewed; participant observations are made of all unit/departmental/hospital council and interdisciplinary meetings held during a 4 to 6 day site visit. Structures and components of viable shared governance structures that enabled CNP are identified through constant comparative analysis of interviews and observations, and through analysis of quantitative measures. PMID:18195080

  3. Enhancing assertiveness in district nurse specialist practice.

    PubMed

    Green, Julie

    2016-08-01

    District nurse (DN) care delivery has undergone substantial change in recent years due to changing demographics and service delivery demands that have called for a move of care delivery from secondary to primary care. The title District Nurse is recorded with the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) on completion of the Specialist Practice Qualification in District Nursing (SPQ DN), which purports to be a 'transformational' course that prepares future caseload holders to manage their team and prioritise care delivery effectively. This article explores the need for assertiveness skills in this role in response to Australian research, and outlines the pedagogic interventions implemented during the SPQ DN course to enhance this skill. Assertiveness scores were monitored for the duration of the course and demonstrated a significant increase-a topic that is now the subject of a future, funded study. PMID:27479854

  4. Transformational leadership in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Doody, Owen; Doody, Catriona M

    Traditionally, nurses have been over-managed and led inadequately, yet today they face unprecedented challenges and opportunities. Organisations constantly face changes that require an increasingly adaptive and flexible leadership. This type of adaptive leadership is referred to as 'transformational'; under it, environments of shared responsibilities that influence new ways of knowing are created. Transformational leadership motivates followers by appealing to higher ideas and moral values, where the leader has a deep set of internal values and ideas. This leads to followers acting to sustain the greater good, rather than their own interests, and supportive environments where responsibility is shared. This article focuses on transformational leadership and its application to nursing through the four components of transformational leadership. These are: idealised influence; inspirational motivation; intellectual stimulation; and individual consideration. PMID:23132001

  5. Pediatric nurses' beliefs and pain management practices: an intervention pilot.

    PubMed

    Van Hulle Vincent, Catherine; Wilkie, Diana J; Wang, Edward

    2011-10-01

    We evaluated feasibility of the Internet-based Relieve Children's Pain (RCP) protocol to improve nurses' management of children's pain. RCP is an interactive, content-focused, and Kolb's experiential learning theory-based intervention. Using a one-group, pretest-posttest design, we evaluated feasibility of RCP and pretest-posttest difference in scores for nurses' beliefs, and simulated and actual pain management practices. Twenty-four RNs completed an Internet-based Pain Beliefs and Practices Questionnaire (PBPQ, alpha=.83) before and after they completed the RCP and an Acceptability Scale afterward. Mean total PBPQ scores significantly improved from pretest to posttest as did simulated practice scores. After RCP in actual hospital practice, nurses administered significantly more ibuprofen and ketorolac and children's pain intensity significantly decreased. Findings showed strong evidence for the feasibility of RCP and study procedures and significant improvement in nurses' beliefs and pain management practices. The 2-hr RCP program is promising and warrants replication with an attention control group and a larger sample. PMID:21172923

  6. Sintering Theory and Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    German, Randall M.

    1996-01-01

    Although sintering is an essential process in the manufacture of ceramics and certain metals, as well as several other industrial operations, until now, no single book has treated both the background theory and the practical application of this complex and often delicate procedure. In Sintering Theory and Practice, leading researcher and materials engineer Randall M. German presents a comprehensive treatment of this subject that will be of great use to manufacturers and scientists alike. This practical guide to sintering considers the fact that while the bonding process improves strength and other engineering properties of the compacted material, inappropriate methods of control may lead to cracking, distortion, and other defects. It provides a working knowledge of sintering, and shows how to avoid problems while accounting for variables such as particle size, maximum temperature, time at that temperature, and other problems that may cause changes in processing. The book describes the fundamental atomic events that govern the transformation from particles to solid, covers all forms of the sintering process, and provides a summary of many actual production cycles. Building from the ground up, it begins with definitions and progresses to measurement techniques, easing the transition, especially for students, into advanced topics such as single-phase solid-state sintering, microstructure changes, the complications of mixed particles, and pressure-assisted sintering. German draws on some six thousand references to provide a coherent and lucid treatment of the subject, making scientific principles and practical applications accessible to both students and professionals. In the process, he also points out and avoids the pitfalls found in various competing theories, concepts, and mathematical disputes within the field. A unique opportunity to discover what sintering is all about--both in theory and in practice What is sintering? We see the end product of this thermal

  7. Students' ideals for nursing older people in practice.

    PubMed

    Alabaster, Erica S

    2006-06-01

    Aim.  Drawing on research exploring nursing students' experiences of working with older people, this paper aims to demonstrate how context and culture can impact on the realization of their ideals. Background.  The principles underpinning individualized and person-centred approaches to care resonate with those focal to gerontologic nursing. Restrictive contexts of care and pervasive workplace cultures render nurses unable to deliver care in accord with these. Design and method.  This interpretive study was informed by phenomenological-hermeneutic theory. A purposive sample (n = 10) was recruited from a single educational institution. Data were generated in two phases using loosely structured interviews and supplementary activity. Themes explicating their experiences were identified via systematized detailed analysis and issues pertaining to nursing students' orientation towards older people cut across these. Findings and discussion.  Students perceived that older people were prone to depersonalization and marginalization, so sought to show respect by coming to know individuals, form human connections with them and personalize care accordingly. Giving respect, promoting personhood, asserting reciprocal identity and maintaining dignity were prominent features of this but were often frustrated by practices and cultures encountered in mainstream settings. Conclusions.  Nursing students' approaches to older people are contextual and reflect elements of person-centred ideology. Their attempts upholding their ideals are liable to be subverted by workplace norms. Preparatory education should address these, assist students to learn how to attend to personhood in restrictive environments and offer targeted placements in age-specific and non-acute services. Relevance to clinical practice.  Demographic trends mean that working with older people has increased significance for nurses in most settings. Person-centredness is seen as beneficial for older people but

  8. When the Mission Is Teaching: Does Nursing Faculty Practice Fit?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherwen, Laurie

    1998-01-01

    Asserts that nursing programs in liberal arts colleges must document that clinical practice is scholarship and conforms to the teaching mission. Discusses scholarly practice from nursing literature and from the work of Schon and Boyer. (SK)

  9. Advanced nursing practice: old hat, new design.

    PubMed

    De Grasse, C; Nicklin, W

    2001-01-01

    Advanced practice nurses positively impact the delivery of healthcare and client outcomes. However, in the past these positions have been seen to have variable value and were often vulnerable during budget cuts. Lack of a clear advanced nursing practice (ANP) framework probably contributed to the compromised effectiveness of these roles and evolution of roles with different titles, scopes of practice and reporting structures. To build the foundation for developing an ANP framework, a task force at The Ottawa Hospital (TOH) conducted a literature review related to ANP roles and completed a review of all clinical nursing roles at TOH. In addition, focus groups with nurses and other health professionals elicited ANP perceptions. The ANP framework includes a standardized job description that details competencies under five role components: clinical practice; consultation; research; education; and, leadership. Recommendations for assessment, implementation and evaluation of ANP roles are identified. The process undertaken by our ANP task force proved to be thorough and sound in developing a framework within which to move forward with ANP role implementation throughout TOH. This article, describing the process, may assist other organizations in defining ANP roles to better meet patient needs in changing health care environments. PMID:11803945

  10. Practical Nursing. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for practical nursing. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that…

  11. Practice management skills for the nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Sportsman, S; Hawley, L J; Pollock, S; Varnell, G

    2001-01-01

    The faculties of three schools of nursing involved in a collaborative family nurse practitioner (FNP) program designed a study to address issues involved in preparing the nurse practitioner for the challenges of practice management in the clinical environment. The purposes of the study were to (1) identify business concepts necessary to successfully manage a primary care practice; (2) determine which of these concepts should be incorporated into an FNP curriculum; and (3) clarify information to be taught regarding each identified concept. Fifty-four business concepts related to primary care were identified from a literature review. A survey was then developed to assess the extent to which the identified concepts were necessary for an FNP to effectively manage a practice. Seven experts and five FNP faculty responded to the survey. The Content Validity Index (CVI) defined by Lynn (1986) was applied and 20 concepts necessary for an FNP to effectively manage a practice were identified. A focus group that included nurse practitioners (both faculty and nonfaculty) from the three collaborative sites connected by interactive telecommunications determined that all 20 of the identified concepts should be included in an FNP curriculum. Additionally, the focus group clarified relevant information to be taught regarding each identified concept. PMID:11559878

  12. Practice Management Skills for the Nurse Practitioner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sportsman, Susan; Hawley, Linda J.; Pollock, Susan; Varnell, Gayle

    2001-01-01

    An expert panel identified 20 business concepts important for a family nurse practitioner curriculum. A focus group of practitioners verified the concepts and clarified relevant information to be taught. The business concepts center on management and operations of a clinical practice. (SK)

  13. Presence in nursing practice: a concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Hessel, Joy A

    2009-01-01

    Presence is an elusive concept in nursing practice that has been recognized as advantageous in the patient experience. Dictionary sources define presence as being with and attending to another; involvement, companionship. Nursing scholars and theorists have elaborated on the dictionary definition of presence to include a holistic definition inclusive of the patient experience and the connection experienced between both patient and provider. However, despite attempts to define presence as it relates to nursing practice, a definition that completely encompasses the substantial benefits on the patient experience is yet to be developed. As guided by Walker and Avant, this concept analysis was performed by selection of a concept, determination of the purpose of the analysis, evaluation of existing definitions, identification of defining attributes of the concept, formulation of patient cases that epitomize and contrast the concept, and identification of antecedents and empirical referents of the concept. Thus, in this concept analysis article, existing definitions of presence will be recognized and evaluated, cases demonstrating nursing presence explored, and a definition of presence in nursing developed. PMID:19713785

  14. Developing voluntary standards for district nurse education and practice.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Mary

    2016-05-01

    This article charts the development of a project, funded by the Queen's Nursing Institute and Queen's Nursing Institute Scotland, to develop voluntary standards that reflect the contemporary and future practice of district nurses. The standards are designed to enhance, but not replace, the Nursing and Midwifery Council standards for district nurse specialist practice. The project encompassed the four UK countries and gathered data from a wide range of sources to inform the new standards that were launched in September 2015. PMID:27170408

  15. Practice nursing: an evaluation of a training practice initiative.

    PubMed

    Stark, S; Warne, T; Street, C

    2001-05-01

    Globally, health care is moving towards a primary care approach. In the UK initiatives for nurses wishing to gain experience in primary and community care may be crucial with the advent of Primary Care Groups (PCGs) and Primary Care Trusts (PCTs). This paper outlines an initiative in practice nursing, developed as a pilot study by a Health Authority. The training practice initiative was aimed at nurses returning to practice and offered them an experiential and supportive career pathway into primary care. The evaluation (carried out over 1 year), highlighted that those primarily involved in the initiative--the trainees, educators and general practitioners--felt it had been successful, especially in relation to professional development issues. The funding bodies for the initiative, who previously had concerns over the recruitment and retention of practice nurses, were also optimistic that the support networks which developed as a result of the initiative had raised morale. The paper suggests several educational, organizational and professional issues which arose from the evaluation exercise. Further, it suggests how this initiative, in an extended form, could provide an effective basis for the training and development of nursing staff in PCGs/PCTs. PMID:11339872

  16. Evidence-Based Practice Guidelines and School Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Susan; McCarthy, Ann Marie

    2007-01-01

    The use of evidence-based practice (EBP) has become the standard of health care practice. Nurses are expected to use best evidence on a wide range of topics, yet most nurses have limited time, resources, and/or skills to access and evaluate the quality of research and evidence needed to practice evidence-based nursing. EBP guidelines allow nurses…

  17. The deconstructing angel: nursing, reflection and evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Rolfe, Gary

    2005-06-01

    This paper explores Jacques Derrida's strategy of deconstruction as a way of understanding and critiquing nursing theory and practice. Deconstruction has its origins in philosophy, but I argue that it is useful and relevant as a way of challenging the dominant paradigm of any discipline, including nursing. Because deconstruction is notoriously difficult to define, I offer a number of examples of deconstruction in action. In particular, I focus on three critiques of reflective practice by the meta-narrative of evidence-based practice (EBP) and attempt to show how those critiques can be directed back at EBP itself. I conclude with the observation that EBP is open to many of the criticisms that it directs at other discourses, including problems of a lack of empirical evidence, of distortions due to memory, and of falsification of the 'facts'. PMID:15892723

  18. Do educational outcomes correspond with the requirements of nursing practice: educators' and managers' assessments of novice nurses' professional competence

    PubMed Central

    Numminen, Olivia; Laine, Tuija; Isoaho, Hannu; Hupli, Maija; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Meretoja, Riitta

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated weather educational outcomes of nurse education meet the requirements of nursing practice by exploring the correspondence between nurse educators' and nurse managers' assessments of novice nurses' professional competence. The purpose was to find competence areas contributing to the acknowledged practice–theory gap. Design A cross-sectional, comparative design using the Nurse Competence Scale was applied. Subjects The sample comprised nurse educators (n = 86) and nurse managers (n = 141). Methods Descriptive and inferential statistics were used in the data analysis. Main outcome measures Educators assessed novice nurses' competence to a significantly higher level than managers in all competence areas (p < 0.001). The biggest correspondence between educators' and mangers' assessments were in competencies related to immediate patient care, commitment to ethical values, maintaining professional skills and nurses' care of the self. The biggest differences were in competencies related to developmental and evaluation tasks, coaching activities, use of evidence-based knowledge and in activities which required mastering a comprehensive view of care situations. However, differences between educators' and managers' assessments were strongly associated with their age and work experience. Active and improved collaboration should be focused on areas in which the differences between educators' and managers' assessments greatly differ in ensuring novice nurses′ fitness for practice. PMID:24512685

  19. [Systemic social practice of nurses in luhmann's perspective].

    PubMed

    Backes, Dirce Stein; Backes, Marli Stein; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini

    2011-03-01

    The objective was to understand the meaning of the social practice of nurses in Luhmann's perspective and allow for a discussion about the construction of a specific code for nursing; one that would go beyond the traditional health-disease code prevalent in the health system, whose relevant social communication is the disease. The Grounded Theory was the methodological framework. Data collection was performed by interviewing the 35 participants between May and December 2007. Data coding and analysis resulted revealed that assuming that nursing is as a functionally differentiated system implies on developing a binary code to enhance health as socially relevant communication and human beings as social beings who are part of a complex and multidimensional reality. PMID:21445497

  20. Nursing Students' Experiences of Learning Numeracy for Professional Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Rachel; Hodgen, Jeremy; Coben, Diana; Bretscher, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines nursing students' experiences of the teaching and assessment of numeracy for nursing. Data from interviews with eight student nurses at a large school of nursing in the United Kingdom are analysed using a constructivist grounded theory approach to explore their perceptions of any disjunctures between the ways in which numeracy…

  1. A synthesis of Vroom's model with other social theories: an application to nursing education.

    PubMed

    Gyurko, Charlene C

    2011-07-01

    In 2009, the National League for Nursing reported that there are over 3.4 million persons in the United States employed in nursing in the roles of Registered Nurses (RNs) and Advanced Practice Nurses (APRNs). In 2007, the Bureau of Labor Statistics also reported that in 2006, there were over 749,000 Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs) working in the United States with a projected increase of 14% by 2016. Buerhaus et al, in 2009, stated that between 2016 and 2025, it is estimated that the U.S. will need over 260,000 registered nurses (RNs) Using the conceptual framework of Vroom's expectancy theory on motivation as well as theories addressing student and career development, this paper demonstrates a synthesis of Vroom's model with other educational theories and its application to nursing education, specifically the prediction of motivation to advance one's nursing education. By putting Vroom's theory into a context, Vroom's fairly simple model could help nurse educators predict the factors that make for success in midcareer educational advancement--and even possibly manipulate those factors to increase that success. In today's economy, that practical part seems too good to lose. PMID:20832146

  2. Telephone nursing: an emerging practice area.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Sharon

    2007-01-01

    Governments across Canada and internationally are implementing nurse telephone advice services to their populations as a means to address healthcare access issues. This paper briefly reviews the international and Canadian history of telephone nursing services and outlines the research that has established the relative safety of these services to patients. The standards, competencies and decision systems that support safe tele-practice are reviewed. The paper focuses on the realities of this emerging nursing practice. A number of concerns related to the marriage of clinical practice and call centres are identified that require further dialogue, research and debate within the profession. The call centre environment can lead to a focus on efficiency measures, such as call length and quick turnaround to the next call, without evidence to ensure that these are safe or desirable standards. Quality of work life for staff in call centres is also raised as an issue that requires more research and dialogue. Other issues include cross-jurisdictional licensure, patient safety, privatization and the differing models of telephone nursing services that are being implemented in Canada. PMID:18303723

  3. NURSING EMERGING. ANA Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice, (2015) 3rd Edition.

    PubMed

    Mariano, Carla

    2016-04-01

    AHNA Past-President Carla Mariano recently had the privilege of serving on the American Nurses Association's (ANA) Nursing Scope and Standards Revision Workgroup. Representing the specialty practice of holistic nursing, Carla's presence within this workgroup contributed greatly to the inclusion of holistic principles and values throughout the new 2015 Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice, 3rd edition, the foundational document that informs and guides professional nursing practice within the United States. This is a significant step forward for holistic nursing and an indicator of our growing influence as specialty practice. PMID:27305802

  4. Documentation of Nursing Practice Using a Computerized Medical Information System

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Carol

    1981-01-01

    This paper discusses a definition of the content of the computerized nursing data base developed by the Nursing Department for the Clinical Center Medical Information System at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. The author describes the theoretical framework for the content and presents a model to describe the organization of the nursing data components in relation to the process of nursing care delivery. Nursing documentation requirements of Nurse Practice Acts, American Nurses Association Standards of Practice and the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals are also addressed as they relate to this data base. The advantages and disadvantages of such an approach to computerized documentation are discussed.

  5. Governance of professional nursing practice in a hospital setting: a mixed methods study1

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, José Luís Guedes; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to elaborate an interpretative model for the governance of professional nursing practice in a hospital setting. Method: a mixed methods study with concurrent triangulation strategy, using data from a cross-sectional study with 106 nurses and a Grounded Theory study with 63 participants. The quantitative data were collected through the Brazilian Nursing Work Index - Revised and underwent descriptive statistical analysis. Qualitative data were obtained from interviews and analyzed through initial, selective and focused coding. Results: based on the results obtained with the Brazilian Nursing Work Index - Revised, it is possible to state that nurses perceived that they had autonomy, control over the environment, good relationships with physicians and organizational support for nursing governance. The governance of the professional nursing practice is based on the management of nursing care and services carried out by the nurses. To perform these tasks, nurses aim to get around the constraints of the organizational support and develop management knowledge and skills. Conclusion: it is important to reorganize the structures and processes of nursing governance, especially the support provided by the organization for the management practices of nurses. PMID:26625992

  6. Identifying alternative linkages among philosophy, theory and method in nursing science.

    PubMed

    Kim, H S

    1993-05-01

    The major concerns expressed in the literature regarding the development and expansion of nursing science stem from questions related to 'what sorts of science' and 'which scientific methods' are appropriate for nursing. While there is a sector of nursing's scientific community that advocates a unified approach to philosophy and method, a growing sentiment for the position of philosophical and methodological pluralism is apparent. This paper addresses the nature of scientific pluralism by presenting a framework for alternative linkages possible among the philosophy, theory and method appropriate for nursing science. The nature of nursing knowledge that is produced within the discipline will thus depend on various forms of alternative linkages adopted by nursing scientists in addressing nursing's scientific questions. In turn, such pluralism presents problems of choice to nurses in practice with respect to knowledge utilization. PMID:8514936

  7. Impact of human resource management practices on nursing home performance.

    PubMed

    Rondeau, K V; Wagar, T H

    2001-08-01

    Management scholars and practitioners alike have become increasingly interested in learning more about the ability of certain 'progressive' or 'high-performance' human resource management (HRM) practices to enhance organizational effectiveness. There is growing evidence to suggest that the contribution of various HRM practices to impact firm performance may be synergistic in effect yet contingent on a number of contextual factors, including workplace climate. A contingency theory perspective suggests that in order to be effective, HMR policies and practices must be consistent with other aspects of the organization, including its environment. This paper reports on empirical findings from research that examines the relationship between HRM practices, workplace climate and perceptions of organizational performance, in a large sample of Canadian nursing homes. Data from 283 nursing homes were collected by means of a mail survey that included questions on HRM practices, programmes, and policies, on human resource aspects of workplace climate, as well as a variety of indicators that include employee, customer/resident and facility measures of organizational performance. Results derived from ordered probit analysis suggest that nursing homes in our sample which had implemented more 'progressive' HRM practices and which reported a workplace climate that strongly values employee participation, empowerment and accountability tended to be perceived to generally perform better on a number of valued organizational outcomes. Nursing homes in our sample that performed best overall were found to be more likely to not only have implemented more of these HRM practices, but also to report having a workplace climate that reflects the seminal value that it places on its human resources. This finding is consistent with the conclusion that simply introducing HRM practices or programmes, in the absence of an appropriately supportive workplace climate, will be insufficient to attain

  8. Practical Nursing, Volume III. Health Occupations Education. [Revised].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Jamee Noell

    This document is a comprehensive guide for instructors to use in teaching the final phase of the practical nursing program. This revised volume contains information related to medical-surgical nursing, mental health nursing, and career success. The section on medical-surgical nursing is composed of many units, dealing with the following subjects:…

  9. The Relevance of Standards of Professional School Nursing Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Susan K.; Biordi, Diana L.; Zeller, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    This descriptive correlational study assessed school nurses' knowledge of and perceived relevance of the "Standards of Professional School Nursing Practice". Of the 1,162 Ohio school nurses sent questionnaires, 345 returned usable questionnaires (30%). The typical respondent was a 50-year-old Caucasian woman with 24 years of nursing experience, 12…

  10. When the mission is teaching: does nursing faculty practice fit?

    PubMed

    Sherwen, L N

    1998-01-01

    As nursing faculty practice becomes a part of academic life, nursing programs in liberal arts colleges, where the primary mission is teaching, must document not only that practice is scholarship but also that practice conforms to the teaching mission of the institution. Discussions of scholarly practice from the nursing literature, as well as from Schon and Boyer, serve to validate that nursing faculty practice is scholarship. Attributes of scholarly practice, to be used to evaluate nursing practice outcomes, are identified. Finally, the concept of "scholarship in support of teaching"--the standard used to evaluate scholarship at The College of New Jersey, a medium-sized liberal arts college with a school of nursing--is analyzed as a model to document that nursing faculty practice is not only scholarship but also supports the teaching mission of the institution. PMID:9610021

  11. Child psychiatric nursing and the family. A critical theory perspective.

    PubMed

    Kendall, J

    1989-01-01

    Within the growing body of nursing literature, a relatively new method of inquiry, critical theory, has emerged. Critical theory is used as a framework toward understanding the social realities in which child psychiatric nurses must act when negotiating with family systems. Nursing's predominant view of the family, structural-functionalism, is examined by the use of the dialectic and Habermasian critique. PMID:2685224

  12. [Construction of terminology subsets: contributions to clinical nursing practice].

    PubMed

    Clares, Jorge Wilker Bezerra; de Freitas, Maria Célia; Guedes, Maria Vilaní Cavalcante; da Nóbrega, Maria Miriam Lima

    2013-08-01

    The International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP®) is a classification system that unifies the elements of nursing practice (diagnoses, interventions and outcomes), enabling elucidation of elements of a specific nursing language through the construction of terminology subsets. In this reflective essay, aspects relevant to the construction of ICNP® terminology subsets are highlighted, as well as their contributions to clinical nursing practice. The development of subsets as a tool that contributes to making nursing language universal, facilitates the communication process, as well as the scientific and technological advancement of the profession, is discussed. Therefore, its use by nurses worldwide is encouraged. PMID:24310697

  13. [Systems theory and nursing--a theoretical discussion].

    PubMed

    Andersson-Segesten, K

    1989-01-01

    Every nurse interested in nursing process models and nursing theory will sooner or later meet the general systems theory (GST). In this article the background of GST is briefly described. Further the key concepts of GST are defined; components, attributes, relations, borders, input, output, filtering, process, open system, closed system, subsystem, suprasystem, feedback and steady state. As examples of GST in nursing the Newman Health Care Systems Model, the Johnson Open System Model and Yura and Walsh way of using the theory are described in brief. Finally some advantages and disadvantages of using general systems theory in nursing are noticed. PMID:2487988

  14. The case for concordance: value and application in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    McKinnon, John

    This is the first of two articles exploring the concept of concordance in practice. This first paper draws on psychology, research in clinical practice and social participation theory to argue for a concordant approach to nursing care. Where most writers have confined discussions on concordance to medicines management, the author seeks to widen the debate to explore the value of the principle across the whole spectrum of nursing practice. Studies describing patient involvement are mapped against Arnstein's model of citizen participation to determine true levels of patient-practitioner working. The outcomes of care delivered in a paternalistic way are compared with those arising from patient-practitioner partnership working across a range of healthcare settings. The values underpinning concordance and the relationships and skills necessary to achieve and sustain it are considered. A recommendation for practice is that concordance needs to be taught as a central part of the healthcare process rather than merely an ethical principle in healthcare education. The power of the nurse-patient relationship on which concordance is built needs to be recognised and valued. The principle of concordance will be more feasible in practice when accompanied by other initiatives that promote public participation in education review commissioning and standard setting. PMID:24261092

  15. Reflective practice groups for nurses: a consultation liaison psychiatry nursing initiative: part 1--The model.

    PubMed

    Dawber, Chris

    2013-04-01

    In the present study, we outline the evolution of a process-focused reflective practice group (RPG) model for nurses working in clinical settings. The groups were initiated at Redcliffe and Caboolture hospitals by the consultation liaison psychiatry nurse and author. An associated article provides an evaluation of these RPG. The literature review identifies the key themes and theories on which the model is based, and the article outlines the process and practicalities of facilitating RPG in critical care, midwifery, and oncology specialties over a 3-year period. The model proposes that the effectiveness and sustainability of RPG arises from adequate preparation and engagement with prospective participants. Group rules, based on principles of confidentially, supportiveness, and diversity, were collaboratively developed for each group. Facilitation utilized a group-as-a-whole approach to manage process and stimulate reflection. While the purpose of RPG was a reflection on interpersonal aspects of nursing, contextual workplace issues were frequently raised in groups. Acknowledgement and containment of such issues were necessary to maintain clinical focus. The literature highlights facilitator credibility and style as crucial factors in the overall success of RPG, and it is proposed that reflective practice as a process-focused model for groups succeeds when nurse facilitators are trained in group process and receive concurrent supervision. PMID:23009276

  16. Perinatal Safety: From Concept to Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Holly Powell

    2010-01-01

    Communication and teamwork problems are leading causes of documented preventable adverse outcomes in perinatal care. An essential component of perinatal safety is the organizational culture in which clinicians work. Clinicians’ individual and collective authority to question the plan of care and take action to change the direction of a clinical situation in the patient’s best interest can be viewed as their “agency for safety.” However, collective agency for safety and commitment to support nurses in their advocacy role is missing in many perinatal care settings. This paper draws from Organizational Accident Theory, High Reliability Theory, and Symbolic Interactionism to describe the nurse’s role in maintaining safety during labor and birth in acute care settings, and suggests actions for supporting the perinatal nurse at individual, group, and systems levels to achieve maximum safety in perinatal care. PMID:20147827

  17. inPractice: A Practical Nursing Package for Clinical Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ip, Barry; Cavanna, Annlouise; Corbett, Beverley

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the recent development of a computer-assisted learning program--in Practice--at the School of Health Science, in the University of Wales Swansea. The project, which began in 2001, was developed in close collaboration with The Meningitis Trust, the aim being to produce a software package to increase nursing students' knowledge…

  18. Competencies of the Associate Degree Nurse on Entry into Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nursing Outlook, 1978

    1978-01-01

    A list developed by the Council of Associate Degree Programs, National League for Nursing, presents competencies of graduates of associate degree nursing programs entering practice. Roles of practice defined include provider of care, client teacher, communicator, manager of client care, and member within the profession of nursing. (MF)

  19. GUIDES FOR DEVELOPING CURRICULA FOR THE EDUCATION OF PRACTICAL NURSES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OREM, DOROTHEA E.

    THE RELATIVELY UNCHANGING FACTORS UNDERLYING NURSING AND ITS PRACTICE ARE PRESENTED AND APPLIED IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF CURRICULUMS FOR THE EDUCATION OF PRACTICAL NURSES. THE GUIDE FOR DEVELOPING CURRICULUMS WAS PREPARED BY A REGISTERED NURSE IN COOPERATION WITH SEVERAL GROUPS AND MANY INDIVIDUALS, INCLUDING TWO PROGRAM SPECIALISTS OF THE PRACTICAL…

  20. Nursing Services Delivery Theory: an open system approach

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Raquel M; O’Brien-Pallas, Linda L

    2010-01-01

    meyer r.m. & o’brien-pallas l.l. (2010)Nursing services delivery theory: an open system approach. Journal of Advanced Nursing66(12), 2828–2838. Aim This paper is a discussion of the derivation of the Nursing Services Delivery Theory from the application of open system theory to large-scale organizations. Background The underlying mechanisms by which staffing indicators influence outcomes remain under-theorized and unmeasured, resulting in a ‘black box’ that masks the nature and organization of nursing work. Theory linking nursing work, staffing, work environments, and outcomes in different settings is urgently needed to inform management decisions about the allocation of nurse staffing resources in organizations. Data sources A search of CINAHL and Business Source Premier for the years 1980–2008 was conducted using the following terms: theory, models, organization, organizational structure, management, administration, nursing units, and nursing. Seminal works were included. Discussion The healthcare organization is conceptualized as an open system characterized by energy transformation, a dynamic steady state, negative entropy, event cycles, negative feedback, differentiation, integration and coordination, and equifinality. The Nursing Services Delivery Theory proposes that input, throughput, and output factors interact dynamically to influence the global work demands placed on nursing work groups at the point of care in production subsystems. Implications for nursing The Nursing Services Delivery Theory can be applied to varied settings, cultures, and countries and supports the study of multi-level phenomena and cross-level effects. Conclusion The Nursing Services Delivery Theory gives a relational structure for reconciling disparate streams of research related to nursing work, staffing, and work environments. The theory can guide future research and the management of nursing services in large-scale healthcare organizations. PMID:20831573

  1. Obesity Prevention Practices of Elementary School Nurses in Minnesota: Findings from Interviews with Licensed School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison-Sandberg, Leslie F.; Kubik, Martha Y.; Johnson, Karen E.

    2011-01-01

    Elementary schools are an optimal setting to provide obesity prevention interventions, yet little is known about the obesity prevention practices of elementary school nurses. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into current obesity-related school nursing practice in elementary schools in Minnesota, opinions regarding school nurse-led…

  2. A closer look at the standards for nurse anesthesia practice.

    PubMed

    Neft, Michael; Quraishi, Jihan A; Greenier, Ewa

    2013-04-01

    As part of its ongoing work, the AANA's Practice Committee reviewed the Scope and Standards for Nurse Anesthesia Practice, particularly focusing on the Standards for Nurse Anesthesia Practice. Revisions and updates were made to the standards to ensure clarity and reflect current anesthesia practice. This article highlights several of the important revisions made to the Standards for Nurse Anesthesia Practice, specifically focusing on the importance of documentation, updates to Standard V-Patient Monitoring, and changes to other documents affected by the updates. This is not an exhaustive discussion of all changes made to the document. The updated Standards for Nurse Anesthesia Practice are presented in their entirety. PMID:23971226

  3. Kuwaiti high school students' perceptions of nursing as a profession: implications for nursing education and practice.

    PubMed

    Al-Kandari, Fatimah H; Lew, Irene

    2005-12-01

    The shortage of nurses in Kuwait is attributed to low production of indigenous nurses, resignation and emigration of foreign nurses, and expansion of health care facilities. This study explored Kuwaiti high school students' perceptions of nursing as a profession, their sources of information about nursing, and factors that affected their choice of nursing as a future career. Questionnaires from 289 students attending seven all-female high schools in Kuwait were analyzed. The results revealed that all of the participants were knowledgeable about the functional aspects of the nursing profession, and 35% of them received this information through contact with nurses during hospital visits. However, only 19% indicated they might consider nursing as a future career. The implications of the study for nursing education and practice, and strategies to attract and retain indigenous high school graduates into nursing programs in Kuwait are discussed. PMID:16402735

  4. Nurse drug diversion and nursing leader's responsibilities: legal, regulatory, ethical, humanistic, and practical considerations.

    PubMed

    Tanga, Hazel Y

    2011-01-01

    Nurses who divert drugs pose significant threats to patient safety, but also become a liability to healthcare organizations and the nursing department where the diversion occurred. Healthcare and nursing leaders have a responsibility to ensure that security systems are in place to prevent diversion and protect patients if nursing impairment is suspected as a result of drug diversion. Nursing leaders must consider legal, regulatory, ethical, humanistic, and practical considerations in resolving this issue. PMID:21343743

  5. Nursing practice: compassionate deception and the Good Samaritan.

    PubMed

    Tuckett, A

    1999-09-01

    This article reviews the literature on deception to illuminate the phenomenon as a background for an appraisal within nursing. It then describes nursing as a practice of caring. The character of the Good Samaritan is recommended as indicative of the virtue of compassion that ought to underpin caring in nursing practice. Finally, the article concludes that a caring nurse, responding virtuously, acts by being compassionate, for a time recognizing the prima facie nature of the rules or principles of truth telling. PMID:10696185

  6. A critique of Fawcett's 'Conceptual models and nursing practice: the reciprocal relationship'.

    PubMed

    Draper, P

    1993-04-01

    This paper offers a critique of Fawcett's paper 'Conceptual models and nursing practice: the reciprocal relationship' published in 1992, in which it is argued that 'conceptual models inform and transform nursing practice by informing and transforming the way in which nursing is experienced and understood, and that nursing practice informs and transforms conceptual models by informing and transforming the content of the conceptual model'. The critique begins by locating Fawcett's view of the relationship of nursing models to nursing practice within the intellectual tradition of positivism. For the purposes of the critique, Fawcett's positivism is not taken as being problematic in itself; however, it is argued that the standards of evidence upon which some of her arguments are based are not compatible with the practice of positivist social science, with the result that the paper is internally inconsistent. In particular, Fawcett's suggestion that nursing models are validated as evidence accumulates in their favour is contrasted with Popper's view that the validity of theoretical statements is established as they withstand attempts to demonstrate their falsity; and Fawcett's belief that nursing models are models in the scientific sense, which can be inferred from her adoption of the terminology of Kuhnian epistemology, is not found to be justified. If, for the positivist, the validity of practice is directly proportional to the validity of the theory upon which it is based, then nursing models which lack 'scientific' validity cannot be regarded as a proper basis for nursing practice. Finally, Fawcett has been criticized for failing to produce evidence of any kind to demonstrate that nursing models have a beneficial effect upon nursing outcomes. PMID:8496503

  7. Anxiety and surplus in nursing practice: lessons from Lacan and Bataille.

    PubMed

    Evans, Alicia M; Glass, Nel; Traynor, Michael

    2014-07-01

    It is well established, following Menzies' work, that nursing practice produces considerable anxiety. Like Menzies, we bring a psychoanalytic perspective to a theorization of anxiety in nursing and do so in order to consider nursing practice in the light of psychoanalytic theory, although from a Lacanian perspective. We also draw on Bataille's notion of 'surplus'. These concepts provide the theoretical framework for a study investigating how some clinical nurses are able to remain in clinical practice rather than leave the profession or seek work at a distance from the bedside. We conducted focus groups and present here an analysis of two fragments of nurses' speech. We found the nurses responded from one of two positions. In the first position, the nurses focus on doctors, complain about the surplus afforded them, and call for it to be eliminated. In this way, the nursing group is similar to other groups, considered by Bataille, who also attempt to get rid of a surplus. However, in the second position, the nurses stay with the surplus, tolerating it as they nurse the patient. This latter position is one where the nurse practises with a focus on the patient rather than being distracted by their dispute over the doctor's privilege. The importance of this paper is in its illustration of two distinct positions from which the nurse can practise: one that is not optimal because the nurse is distracted and the other that is more focused on practice, and thus the nurse is in a position to provide the best care possible to patients. PMID:24460865

  8. Children's student nurses' knowledge of spirituality and its implications for educational practice.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Gerard; Ashley, Martin

    2005-09-01

    Children's nurse educators have to rely predominantly on adult-based literature to guide their educational practice concerning spirituality in the nursing curriculum. The aim of this study was to get a children's nursing perspective. A questionnaire was designed around the main themes emerging from the adult literature on spirituality. This was distributed to children's nurses on the undergraduate curriculum at a UK university. The results showed that some of the challenges of delivering spirituality are common to both adult and children's nursing. However, there were also significant differences revolving around the impact that children and families had in informing students' understanding of spirituality, and the problems of seeking a unified theory of spirituality in a children's nursing context. It concludes that children's nursing has important lessons to learn from the adult literature; however, it must strive to construct its own insights and use this understanding to inform educational approaches to the topic. PMID:16076893

  9. A renal nursing professional practice model: the next generation.

    PubMed

    Harwood, Lori; Downing, Linda; Ridley, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Professional practice models provide a structure for excellence in nursing practice. Our centre has had a long tradition of working with a professional practice model with proven nursing outcomes such as job satisfaction, empowerment and perceptions of improved patient care. Our model, in place since 1999, has provided an opportunity to discuss and articulate a vision for nursing practice based on the values of accountability, evidence-informed care and empowerment. In order for the model to effectively guide nursing practice, a revision was necessary to keep pace with the changes in the renal program and the health care environment. The revised model needed to address the enhancements in nursing roles, practice environment, corporate requirements and patient care needs. This paper describes a revised professional practice model unique to nephrology nursing. PMID:24344518

  10. Curriculum: From Theory to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Null, Wesley

    2011-01-01

    "Curriculum: From Theory to Practice" introduces readers to curriculum theory and how it relates to classroom practice. Wesley Null provides a unique organization of the curriculum field into five traditions: systematic, existential, radical, pragmatic, and deliberative. He discusses the philosophical foundations of curriculum as well as…

  11. Re-reading nursing and re-writing practice: towards an empirically based reformulation of the nursing mandate.

    PubMed

    Allen, Davina

    2004-12-01

    This article examines field studies of nursing work published in the English language between 1993 and 2003 as the first step towards an empirically based reformulation of the nursing mandate. A decade of ethnographic research reveals that, contrary to contemporary theories which promote an image of nursing work centred on individualised unmediated caring relationships, in real-life practice the core nursing contribution is that of the healthcare mediator. Eight bundles of activity that comprise this intermediary role are described utilising evidence from the literature. The mismatch between nursing's culture and ideals and the structure and constraints of the work setting is a chronic source of practitioner dissatisfaction. It is argued that the profession has little to gain by pursuing an agenda of holistic patient care centred on emotional intimacy and that an alternative occupational mandate focused on the healthcare mediator function might make for more humane health services and a more viable professional future. PMID:15601415

  12. Intelligent nursing: accounting for knowledge as action in practice.

    PubMed

    Purkis, Mary E; Bjornsdottir, Kristin

    2006-10-01

    This paper provides an analysis of nursing as a knowledgeable discipline. We examined ways in which knowledge operates in the practice of home care nursing and explored how knowledge might be fruitfully understood within the ambiguous spaces and competing temporalities characterizing contemporary healthcare services. Two popular metaphors of knowledge in nursing practice were identified and critically examined; evidence-based practice and the nurse as an intuitive worker. Pointing to faults in these conceptualizations, we suggest a different way of conceptualizing the relationship between knowledge and practice, namely practice as being activated by contextualized knowledge. This conceptualization is captured in an understanding of the intelligent creation of context by the nurse for nursing practice to be ethical and effective. PMID:16965306

  13. Alliances of cooperation: negotiating New Hampshire nurse practitioners' prescribing practice.

    PubMed

    Sampson, Deborah A

    2009-01-01

    Nurse practitioner legislation varies among states, particularly in relation to practice without physician oversight, altering the legal environment within which nurse practitioners can use knowledge and skills to meet patient needs. Using New Hampshire as a case study, this historical analysis of nurse practitioners' negotiations over time for independent practice, defined in state practice acts, illuminates the complex social and economic factors affecting nurses' struggle to gain legal rights over their own professional practice without supervision and intervention from another profession. In New Hampshire, not only did organized medicine oppose nurses rights to practice, but pharmacists demanded the right to control all aspects of medication management, including who could prescribe and under what circumstances prescribing could occur. Shifting social and political terrain as well as changes in legislative and state professional board leadership affected the environment and negotiations of a small group of nurses who were ultimately successful in obtaining the right to define their own professional practice. PMID:20067085

  14. Advanced practice nursing in Latin America and the Caribbean: regulation, education and practice

    PubMed Central

    Zug, Keri Elizabeth; Cassiani, Silvia Helena De Bortoli; Pulcini, Joyce; Garcia, Alessandra Bassalobre; Aguirre-Boza, Francisca; Park, Jeongyoung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to identify the current state of advanced practice nursing regulation, education and practice in Latin America and the Caribbean and the perception of nursing leaders in the region toward an advanced practice nursing role in primary health care to support Universal Access to Health and Universal Health Coverage initiatives. Method: a descriptive cross-sectional design utilizing a web-based survey of 173 nursing leaders about their perceptions of the state of nursing practice and potential development of advanced practice nursing in their countries, including definition, work environment, regulation, education, nursing practice, nursing culture, and perceived receptiveness to an expanded role in primary health care. Result: the participants were largely familiar with the advanced practice nursing role, but most were unaware of or reported no current existing legislation for the advanced practice nursing role in their countries. Participants reported the need for increased faculty preparation and promotion of curricula reforms to emphasize primary health care programs to train advanced practice nurses. The vast majority of participants believed their countries' populations could benefit from an advanced practice nursing role in primary health care. Conclusion: strong legislative support and a solid educational framework are critical to the successful development of advanced practice nursing programs and practitioners to support Universal Access to Health and Universal Health Coverage initiatives. PMID:27508923

  15. An extended epistemology for fostering transformative learning in holistic nursing education and practice.

    PubMed

    Yorks, L; Sharoff, L

    2001-10-01

    The transformation from traditional nursing practice to holistic nursing is one that requires recognition of multiple ways of knowing. Transformative learning theory reflects a strong bias toward cognitive epistemology and propositional knowing. This epistemology, labeled here as truncated, rests on an understanding of experience derived from pragmatism. This article describes an extended epistemology derived from the work of John Heron that better reflects the full range of knowing utilized by holistic nurses. This epistemology provides a foundation for innovative approaches for the development of holistic awareness in the training and continuing professional development of nurses. One such approach, collaborative inquiry, is described. PMID:15559044

  16. Designing and Validating Procedures for Insuring Quality Adult Education in Nursing Homes and Convalescent Centers. Toward a Theory of Practice for Insuring Quality Education in Nursing Homes: A Section 310 Final Report, May 15, 1980-June 12, 1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Bill P.

    The Senior Adult Education Program (SAEP) for Monroe County, Michigan, conducted a documentation and analysis of the program component that provides high school completion classes in two local nursing homes. Three general research questions were (1) benefits to nursing home residents from the programs, (2) design of classes in nursing homes…

  17. Nursing practice. Report of a WHO expert committee.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    Nursing is remarkable for the scope of activities that it includes. Nursing practice involves so many things in so many places that finding a definition that includes everything and applies everywhere is no easy task. This report by the WHO Expert Committee on Nursing Practice describes the basic functions of nursing practice and how they are manifested in different socioeconomic situations. Whatever the environment, the report concludes, there are certain core elements that are the responsibility of nurses the world over. The influence that social attitudes and political and economic policies have on nursing practice is examined. The report is honest in its admission that the situation in many places is far from ideal and that in most there is clear room for improvement. Policy-makers, legislators, managers, educators, researchers, other professionals and nurses themselves have important roles to play in a comprehensive approach to the development of nursing practice proposed by the Expert Committee. The report emphasizes the importance of a well educated and highly skilled nursing workforce that is consistent in maintaining quality of care but is also responsive to change. It points the way to international standards in nursing practice and lays the foundation for new strategies to ensure that nurses will be fully equipped to meet future challenges in the delivery of health care. PMID:8686331

  18. Nursing practice environment, quality of care, and morale of hospital nurses in Japan.

    PubMed

    Anzai, Eriko; Douglas, Clint; Bonner, Ann

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe Japanese hospital nurses' perceptions of the nursing practice environment and examine its association with nurse-reported ability to provide quality nursing care, quality of patient care, and ward morale. A cross-sectional survey design was used including 223 nurses working in 12 acute inpatient wards in a large Japanese teaching hospital. Nurses rated their work environment favorably overall using the Japanese version of the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index. Subscale scores indicated high perceptions of physician relations and quality of nursing management, but lower scores for staffing and resources. Ward nurse managers generally rated the practice environment more positively than staff nurses except for staffing and resources. Regression analyses found the practice environment was a significant predictor of quality of patient care and ward morale, whereas perceived ability to provide quality nursing care was most strongly associated with years of clinical experience. These findings support interventions to improve the nursing practice environment, particularly staffing and resource adequacy, to enhance quality of care and ward morale in Japan. PMID:23855754

  19. Fit for Practice: Project 2000 Student Nurses' Views on How Well the Curriculum Prepares Them for Clinical Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulbrook, Paul; Rolfe, Gary; Albarran, John; Boxall, Frances

    2000-01-01

    Comparison of the perceptions of 55 student nurses whose curriculum emphasized academics over clinical practice with those of 39 in a revised curriculum emphasizing theory-practice links found only modest evidence that the newer curriculum improved student perceptions of their preparation for clinical placement. (SK)

  20. Hallmarks of the Professional Nursing Practice Environment. AACN White Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Professional Nursing, 2002

    2002-01-01

    This white paper from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing depicts the current environment of nursing practice, including supply and demand. It describes work environments that support professional practice and outlines eight indicators for the practice environment. Contains 48 references and an appendix with suggested questions for…

  1. Impact of evidence and health policy on nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Geurden, Bart; Adriaenssens, Jef; Franck, Erik

    2014-12-01

    The story of evidence-based practice in nursing is long, with many successes, contributors, leaders, scientists, and enthusiasts. Nurse educators have great advantages offered from a wide variety of educational resources for evidence-based practice. These resources offer students the opportunity to connect their emerging competencies with clinical needs for best practices in clinical and microsystem changes. PMID:25458138

  2. A Phenomenographic Study Exploring Nursing Education and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Degen, Greta M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to illuminate the qualitatively different ways in which three nurses with an associate degree (ADN) and three nurses with a baccalaureate degree (BSN) experience, conceptualize, perceive, and understand their own nursing practice within the context of their educational background. Using a phenomenographic methodology…

  3. The Competencies in Nutrition Essential for Comprehensive Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trooboff, Rebecca C.

    Faculty of nursing education programs within the Georgia university system were surveyed to ascertain their opinions about the nutrition competencies that they consider essential for comprehensive nursing practice and the level of nursing education program(s) to which these competencies are best suited. The survey instrument, 56 competency…

  4. Penn Macy Initiative To Advance Academic Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Norma M.; Evans, Lois K.; Swan, Beth Ann

    2002-01-01

    The Penn School of Nursing and the Macy Foundation established a comprehensive institute and technical assistance program to help nursing schools advance academic nursing practice. The Penn School consulted with 21 participating schools, providing institutes, conferences, a listserv and a web-based knowledge center focused on integrating research,…

  5. Reflections on nursing practice science: the nature, the structure, and the foundation of nursing sciences.

    PubMed

    Orem, Dorothea E; Taylor, Susan G

    2011-01-01

    In preparation for the self-care deficit nursing theory conference to be held in Ulm, Germany in 2004, Dorothea Orem and I reflected on the development of nursing science. Orem drafted this paper which I edited. The International Orem Society is sharing this paper with Nursing Science Quarterly as presented to the conference as a memorial to Orem and her work. PMID:21220574

  6. Potentials Unlimited: Nursing Practice, Education and Administration. Nursing Research Conference Proceedings (1st, Fresno, California, April 8, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen-Webb, Marilyn-Lu, Ed.

    The purposes of this conference were: (1) to present research representing a variety of topics and study designs; (2) to disseminate findings of nursing research; and (3) to stimulate the use of research and theory as a basis for clinical, educational, and administrative practice. The keynote address and two invited presentations are presented in…

  7. Satisfaction and comfort with nursing in Australian general practice.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    The practice nursing workforce has grown exponentially in recent years. Whilst evidence has shown the important contributions of nurses to general practice service delivery, the consumer perspective of nursing in general practice has received limited attention. Given that acceptability of nurses is influenced by patient satisfaction which can in turn improve both treatment adherence and clinical outcomes, this is an important area for investigation. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate consumer satisfaction with chronic disease management by nurses in general practice (NiGP) and comfort with the tasks undertaken by nurses in general practice. Consumers receiving chronic disease services from nurses in general practice participating in a larger study were recruited to complete a survey. The survey comprised of demographic information, and items related to satisfaction with the nurse encounter (SPN-9) and consumer comfort with nurse roles in general practice (CPN-18). Eighty-one consumers participated in the study. Cronbach's alpha values of the SPN-9 and the CPN-18 were 0.95 and 0.97 respectively. SPN-9 results demonstrated high levels of satisfaction with PN consultations. Bivariate analysis did not show any significant differences within the consumer group relating to satisfaction. However, those who presented for diabetes-related reasons were more likely to report high comfort levels with the nurse encounter compare to those who presented to general practice for other chronic disease conditions (38% versus 14%, p = 0.016). The results of this study demonstrate that consumers are generally satisfied with nursing consultations in general practice related to chronic disease. However, further research evaluating consumer confidence, comfort and satisfaction with nursing care is needed to ensure that nursing services meet consumer needs. PMID:26281408

  8. Enhancing nursing practice by utilizing voice recognition for direct documentation.

    PubMed

    Fratzke, Jason; Tucker, Sharon; Shedenhelm, Heidi; Arnold, Jackie; Belda, Tom; Petera, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Innovative strategies that preserve nursing time for direct patient care activities are needed. This study examined the utility, feasibility, and acceptability of voice recognition (VR) software to document nursing care and patient outcomes in an electronic health record in a simulated nursing care environment. A phase 1 trial included 5 iterative experiments with observations and nurse participant feedback to allow enhancements to the speech detection capabilities and refinement of the technology, software, and processes. Utility ratings improved over time; however, interference on nursing care remained a concern throughout. Nurse participants favored keyboard entry electronic health record, largely due to software and technical issues, but also relative to the culture shift the new technology brings to nursing practice. Successful adoption of VR technology by nursing will be dependent on receptiveness of the nurses and perceived benefits, timely access to education and training, and minimization of barriers to using the software. PMID:24451445

  9. [Interaction-directed nursing ethics. Sketch of an integrated theory, didactics and methodology of nursing ethics].

    PubMed

    Ach, J S

    1998-06-01

    The articles seeks to outline an integrated theory, didactics, and methodology of nursing ethics. To do so requires an analysis of the social and institutional situation in which nursing takes place as well as reflections on the theoretical status of nursing ethics as part of so-called applied ethics. From this starting point didactical and methodological conclusions may be drawn which finally lead to an interaction oriented ethics of nursing. PMID:9709120

  10. Collaborative graduate education: executive nurse practice and health care leadership.

    PubMed

    Elaine, Hardy; DeBasio, Nancy; Warmbrodt, Lynn; Gartland, Myles; Bassett, William; Tansey, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Research College of Nursing and the Rockhurst University Helzberg School of Management Health Care Initiative collaborated to offer the Executive Nurse Practice: Health Care Leadership track to Research College of Nursing graduate students. This effort was not only cost effective, but also offered expert faculty in both the fields of nursing and business. The curriculum is an integration of both fields and faculties from both institutions as they communicate and collaborate each semester to successfully coordinate the track. PMID:15495758

  11. The NCLex Examination: preparing for future nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Wendt, A; Brown, P

    2000-01-01

    One nursing organization that closely tracks the direction of healthcare and nursing practice is the National Council of State Boards of Nursing, Inc. As the developer of the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN examination), maintaining currency of the examination is of primary importance to the National Council. The authors discuss recent trends in the NCLEX-RN Test Plan. PMID:16646187

  12. MENTAL HEALTH AND PSYCHIATRIC NURSING IN PRACTICAL NURSE EDUCATION. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CRAWFORD, ANNIE L.

    THIRTY-ONE PROFESSIONAL NURSE EDUCATORS IN SCHOOLS OF PRACTICAL NURSING IN THE SOUTHEAST ATTENDED A TWO-WEEK CLINICAL WORKSHOP ON PSYCHIATRIC NURSING AT WESTERN STATE HOSPITAL, STAUNTON, VIRGINIA, IN AUGUST 1966. THEY RECONVENED FOR A THREE-DAY FOLLOW-UP CONFERENCE AT ATLANTA, GEORGIA, IN JANUARY 1967. THE PROJECT WAS UNDERTAKEN TO UPDATE THE…

  13. Nursing Practice Environment and Registered Nurses’ Job Satisfaction in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, JiSun; Flynn, Linda; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recruiting and retaining registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes is problematic, and little research is available to guide efforts to make nursing homes a more attractive practice environment for RNs. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between aspects of the nursing practice environment and job satisfaction among RNs in nursing homes. Design and Methods: The sample included 863 RNs working as staff RNs in 282 skilled nursing facilities in New Jersey. Two-level hierarchical linear modeling was used to account for the RNs nested by nursing homes. Results: Controlling for individual and nursing home characteristics, staff RNs’ participation in facility affairs, supportive manager, and resource adequacy were positively associated with RNs’ job satisfaction. Ownership status was significantly related to job satisfaction; RNs working in for-profit nursing homes were less satisfied. Implications: A supportive practice environment is significantly associated with higher job satisfaction among RNs working in nursing homes. Unlike other nursing home characteristics, specific dimensions of the nursing practice environment can be modified through administrative actions to enhance RN job satisfaction. PMID:21908803

  14. Pain Management: Knowledge and Attitudes of Senior Nursing Students and Practicing Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messmer, Sherry

    2009-01-01

    Despite scientific advances in pain management, inadequate pain relief in hospitalized patients continues to be an on-going phenomenon. Although nurses do not prescribe medication for pain, the decision to administer pharmacological or other interventions for pain relief is part of nursing practice. Nurses play a critical role in the relief of…

  15. Upgrading Licensed Practical Nurse to Registered Nurse Program, September 1971 - June 1973. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holloway, Sally

    Twenty Licensed Practical Nurses (LPN) became Registered Nurses (RN) in a pilot program giving partial academic credit for their LPN training and building on their existing skills. The program revolved around three needs: (1) trained nurses; (2) eliminating the notion that jobs were dead-end; and (3) achieving upward mobility for hospital staff.…

  16. Perceived Dimensions of Nursing Practice: A Factor Analytic Study Using Nurse Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boss, Barbara J.

    The applicability of a factor analytic approach to explore the nature of a complex job performance criterion for nursing practice and to determine the dimensions of this criterion was investigated. A national sample of 1,038 nurse educators from 85 randomly selected programs judged performance criteria contained in the Clinical Nursing Rating…

  17. Articulation Matrix for Home Health Aide, Nursing Assistant, Patient Care Assistant, Practical Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Instructional Development and Services.

    This document demonstrates the relationships among four Florida nursing education programs (home health aide, nursing assistant, patient care assistant, and practical nursing) by listing student performance standards and indicating which ones are required in each program. The 268 student performance standards are arranged in 23 areas of…

  18. Health promotion overview: evidence-based strategies for occupational health nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Dombrowski, Jill J; Snelling, Anastasia M; Kalicki, Michelle

    2014-08-01

    Health promotion practice has evolved over the past four decades in response to the rising rates of chronic disease. The focus of health promotion is attaining wellness by managing modifiable risk factors, such as smoking, diet, or physical activity. Occupational health nurses are often asked to conduct worksite health promotion programs for individuals or groups, yet may be unfamiliar with evidence-based strategies. Occupational health nurses should lead interprofessional groups in designing and implementing worksite health promotion programs. This article introduces occupational health nurses to health promotion concepts and discusses evidence-based theories and planning models that can be easily introduced into practice. PMID:25101931

  19. Working Together Toward a Common Goal: A Grounded Theory of Nurse-Physician Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Fewster-Thuente, Lori

    2015-01-01

    Working together toward a common goal is an empirically derived theory that can guide education and practice to improve patient outcomes while saving money and lives. Grounded theory was used to explore nurses' and physicians' experiences with collaboration in order to understand the process intrinsically. PMID:26665873

  20. The Theory of Critical Thinking of Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Cheryl

    2002-01-01

    Nursing students (n=47), entry-level nurses (n=48), and expert nurses (n=54) viewed and analyzed simulated nursing incidents. Findings determined that critical thinking and decision making increased with the level of clinical expertise. Grade point average was also correlated with critical thinking and decision making. (Contains 22 references.)…

  1. CE: Incorporating Acupressure into Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Judy

    2015-12-01

    Rooted in traditional Chinese medicine, the use of acupressure to alleviate symptoms, support the healing process, promote relaxation, and improve overall health has grown considerably in the West. The effects of acupressure--like those of acupuncture, with which it shares a theoretical framework--cannot always be explained in terms of Western anatomical and physiologic concepts, but this noninvasive practice involves minimal risk, can be easily integrated into nursing practice, and has been shown to be effective in treating nausea as well as low back, neck, labor, and menstrual pain. The author discusses potential clinical indications for the use of acupressure, describes the technique, explains how to evaluate patient outcomes, and suggests how future research into this integrative intervention might be improved. PMID:26559160

  2. New Brunswick nurses' views on nursing research, and factors influencing their research activities in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Robichaud-Ekstrand, Sylvie

    2016-06-01

    New Brunswick became the first province in Canada to require a baccalaureate degree in nursing as the entry to practice, yet nursing research in hospital settings remains quite low. This study examined clinical nurses' views on nursing research, and identified some contributing factors to the research-practice gap. This descriptive, cross-sectional multicenter study involved 1081 nurses working in the Francophone Regional Health Authority in New Brunswick, Canada. Nurses were eager to identify nursing-care problems to improve patient care (92.9%), and to be involved in collecting data for nursing research studies (95.2%). However, without research supervision, few had engaged in basic research activities, such as formulating or refining research questions (24.5%), presenting at research conferences (6.9%), or changing their practice based on research findings (27.2%). Younger, more educated nurses, nurse managers, and educators participated more readily in research. Sharing research and clinical expertise, as well as infrastructures between academic and clinical institutions is the key to enduring successful patient-centered nursing research in clinical settings. Concrete actions are proposed to build clinical nursing research. PMID:26822438

  3. The Impact of the Nursing Practice Environment on Missed Nursing Care

    PubMed Central

    Hessels, Amanda J.; Flynn, Linda; Cimiotti, Jeannie P.; Cadmus, Edna; Gershon, Robyn R.M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Missed nursing care is an emerging problem negatively impacting patient outcomes. There are gaps in our knowledge of factors associated with missed nursing care. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the nursing practice environment and missed nursing care in acute care hospitals. Methods This is a secondary analysis of cross sectional data from a survey of over 7.000 nurses from 70 hospitals on workplace and process of care. Ordinary least squares and multiple regression models were constructed to examine the relationship between the nursing practice environment and missed nursing care while controlling for characteristics of nurses and hospitals. Results Nurses missed delivering a significant amount of necessary patient care (10–27%). Inadequate staffing and inadequate resources were the practice environment factors most strongly associated with missed nursing care events. Conclusions This multi-site study examined the risk and risk factors associated with missed nursing care. Improvements targeting modifiable risk factors may reduce the risk of missed nursing care.

  4. Advanced practice politics and the Oregon nurses' trail.

    PubMed

    Bifano, L C

    1996-01-01

    As health care reform continues to evolve, it is important to consider the context of politics, practice, and power through an examination of nursing's recent history and participation in legislative events. Through a retrospective chronicle that includes interviews, recorded events, and article reviews, the political and legislative history of Oregon nurses in establishing advanced practice for nurse practitioners within the Oregon Nurse Practice Act is described. Prescriptive authority, hospital admitting privileges, and important elements contained in the Oregon Health Plan and Medicare reform are discussed. Questions are posed for the future of health care reform, such as the role of government in determining the quality of care in managed health care. PMID:8710224

  5. Resource requirements for a quality Doctor of Nursing Practice program.

    PubMed

    Frantz, Rita A

    2013-08-01

    Fundamental to planning, implementing, and sustaining a quality Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program is access to the resources needed to foster a learning environment that prepares nurses for advanced practice and leadership in the future redesigned health care system. This creates formidable challenges for schools and colleges of nursing as they endeavor to address the nation's need for an increased supply of advanced practice nurses to provide access to high-quality, cost-effective care for an aging population. This article describes the essential resources needed to support the delivery of a DNP program and the proposed strategies needed to address the resource challenges. PMID:23855341

  6. The revised scope of nurse anesthesia practice embodies the broad continuum of nurse anesthesia services.

    PubMed

    Neft, Michael; Okechukwu, Kymika; Grant, Patricia; Reede, Lynn

    2013-10-01

    The AANA determines the scope of nurse anesthesia practice. It is important for all members to understand the scope of practice that governs their work to better practice their profession and mentorship. In January 2013, the AANA Board of Directors charged the Practice Committee to revise the Scope of Nurse Anesthesia Practice. A systematic review of literature, focus groups, and a survey were conducted. Major focus group themes were identified, and survey results were analyzed to identify relationships between variables. The literature search resulted in 8,739 abstracts. Forty-six articles were reviewed. Full scope of advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) practice was a recurrent theme across the literature. Focus group themes include: (1) elements of nurse anesthesia practice; (2) future practice opportunities; (3) interprofessional collaboration; (4) full scope of practice; (5) autonomous practice; and (6) barriers to practice and recommendations. Of the 4,200 CRNA survey respondents, 44.6% are not permitted to practice to their full scope of practice. The revised Scope of Nurse Anesthesia Practice embodies the comprehensive span of nurse anesthesia practice. PMID:24354069

  7. The influence of human rights on district nurse practice.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Richard; Tengnah, Cassam

    2009-10-01

    In the decade since its introduction, the Human Rights Act 1998 has had a profound effect on the way district nurses practice. New laws underpinning the principles and obligations of human rights law have seen a gradual legalisation of health care and a reigning in of the discretionary powers of health professionals such as district nurses.This article reflects on the Human Rights Act 1998's influence on district nurse practice. PMID:19966686

  8. The process of theory analysis: an examination of the nursing theory of Dorothea E. Orem.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, K A

    1983-01-01

    The process of theory analysis is undertaken examining the nursing theory of Dorothea E. Orem on three levels, using the analytic framework devised by Barbara J. Stevens. The commonplaces of the theory are described, the elements and principles are identified, the internal construction is examined, and the theory as a whole is then evaluated in terms of its relationship to modern nursing. PMID:6551778

  9. Applying research to practice. Practical guidelines for occupational health nurses.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Mary K

    2002-11-01

    Much has been written about the research practice gap--and there is no doubt this gap exists in occupational health nursing. It is an irony that the professionals who would benefit most from occupational health and safety research may be the ones who do not participate in or contribute to research. Closing the gap requires a commitment on the part of both practitioners and researchers. It behooves occupational health nurses to constantly seek ways to make the connection--to forge relationships that can continue to advance the specialty. Researchers must increase their efforts to conduct research in "real world" conditions, because this research is most likely to improve practice. Practitioners must be willing to familiarize themselves with research so they can become active participants in the ongoing effort to find answers to troubling occupational health and safety problems. Rosenheck (2001) presents an interesting perspective on the barriers to eliminating the research practice gap. He purports that, although professionals often are highly respectful of scientific endeavors, in reality, "daily decision making is shaped more by power structures, ingrained routines, and established resource configuration than by current scientific findings." In most organizations, standard operating procedures and behavioral norms are the major influences on workplace practices; scientific evidence plays a minor role (Rosenheck, 2001). Several reasons can be found for this lack of reliance on research as a basis for practice. Studies may demonstrate effectiveness among large groups. However, practitioners may not see the relevance or applicability of such studies to individuals or small groups of clients. Also, practitioners may fear that the implementation of new strategies will require more oversight than they are able to provide. Another logistical barrier is the application of the research may require the collaboration of multiple individuals--dynamic environments with

  10. Realities of mental health nursing practice in rural Australia.

    PubMed

    John Crowther, Andrew; Theresa Ragusa, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Mental health nursing as a distinct speciality has been in decline in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, for two decades. Arguably, this decline has worsened both consumer outcomes and the workplace experiences of mental health nurses. This article reports on a study designed to ascertain the nature of contemporary mental health nursing practice in New South Wales. The study utilised focus group research methodology, with participants recounting the realities of their day-to-day professional practice and perceptions of their professional identity. The findings indicate a contracting, if not moribund, profession; a decrease in the value attached to mental health nursing; and a pattern of persistent underfunding by successive governments of mental health services. An analysis of present and historical trends reveals there is a pressing need for a restructure and re-formation of mental health nursing in rural areas. This article links the shortage of mental health nurses in NSW to the closure of the mental health nursing register, a shift to comprehensive/generalist nurse education models, a perceived lack of nurses' professional standing, and natural attrition without suitably qualified replacements. Mental health nurses in this study perceived that they were not valued by other health professionals or by their own managers. Participants in this study reported mental health nursing in rural areas was an unattractive career choice. These findings are important to the understanding of recruitment and retention issues in rural mental health nursing in Australia. PMID:21767253

  11. Financial literacy as an essential element in nursing management practice.

    PubMed

    Talley, Linda B; Thorgrimson, Diane H; Robinson, Nellie C

    2013-01-01

    Grooming nurses at all levels of the organization to master health care executive skills is critical to the organization's success and the individual's growth. Selecting and executing next steps for nursing leadership team development is critical to success. Leaders must make it their responsibility to provide nurses with increased exposure to quality, safety, and financial data, thereby allowing nurses to translate data while achieving and sustaining successful outcomes. The work of the CNO Dashboard to measure, report, trend, and translate clinical and non-clinical outcomes must be integrated throughout all levels of nursing staff so that nursing practice is positioned to continually strive for best practice. The education and evolution of nurses as business managers is critical to building a strong RN workforce. PMID:23691748

  12. [Foundations and construction of the ethical approach in nursing practice].

    PubMed

    Moutel, Grégoire

    2015-12-01

    The evolution of science and our society raises ethical questions in medical and nursing practice. These give rise to the requirement for individual and collective reflection in order to consider the consequences of decisions and to judge on sometimes complex choices. This reflection concerns both nursing practices and the organisation of the health system. PMID:26675100

  13. A Study of Admission Procedures in Illinois Practical Nursing Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grippando, Gloria M.

    This study was designed to provide the College of Lake County with data to promote critical thinking and discussion about the revision of the present admission criteria for the practical nursing program. Subjects were the coordinators/directors of the 36 approved schools of practical nursing in Illinois. A letter and a questionnaire comprised of a…

  14. Making "cents" of the business side of nurse practitioner practice.

    PubMed

    Luster-Tucker, AtNena

    2016-03-15

    Nurse practitioners produce excellent patient outcomes and should be allowed to practice to the full extent of their education and training. In addition to clinical skills, nurse practitioners need to understand the business side of practice in order to ensure fair and equitable compensation. PMID:26886267

  15. Practicing nurses perspectives of clinical scholarship: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a scarcity of research published on clinical scholarship. Much of the conceptualisation has been conducted in the academy. Nurse academics espouse that the practice of nursing must be built within a framework of clinical scholarship. A key concept of clinical scholarship emerging from discussions in the literature is that it is an essential component of enabling evidence–based nursing and the development of best practice standards to provide for the needs of patients/clients. However, there is no comprehensive definition of clinical scholarship from the practicing nurses. The aim of this study was to contribute to this definitional discussion on the nature of clinical scholarship in nursing. Methods Naturalistic inquiry informed the method. Using an interpretative approach 18 practicing nurses from Australia, Canada and England were interviewed using a semi-structured format. The audio-taped interviews were transcribed and the text coded for emerging themes. The themes were sorted into categories and the components of clinical scholarship described by the participants compared to the scholarship framework of Boyer [JHEOE 7:5-18, 2010]. Results Clinical scholarship is difficult to conceptualise. Two of the essential elements of clinical scholarship are vision and passion. The other components of clinical scholarship were building and disseminating nursing knowledge, sharing knowledge, linking academic research to practice and doing practice-based research. Conclusion Academic scholarship dominated the discourse in nursing. However, in order for nursing to develop and to impact on health care, clinical scholarship needs to be explored and theorised. Nurse educators, hospital-based researchers and health organisations need to work together with academics to achieve this goal. Frameworks of scholarship conceptualised by nurse academics are reflected in the findings of this study with their emphasis on reading and doing research and translating it

  16. Predictors of practice patterns for lymphedema care among oncology advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Joanne C; Cleland, Charles M; Fu, Mei R

    2012-09-01

    Lymphedema, a debilitating and chronic condition, is considered to be one of the most distressing adverse effects of cancer treatment. The purpose of this study was to understand the practice patterns in lymphedema care and identify predictors influencing those patterns among oncology nurses, with a focus on advanced practice nurses. Random and purposive sampling was utilized to recruit 238 oncology nurses who completed the Web-based study. Participants included advanced practice nurses (nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists), nurse navigators/case managers, staff nurses, and directors/managers/coordinators. Data focused on perceived knowledge of and perceived competence in risk reduction, treatment, and self-management of lymphedema and practice patterns in lymphedema care. Actual knowledge of lymphedema care was evaluated. Descriptive, comparative, and regression analyses were performed. The study showed that perceived knowledge and perceived competence were highly correlated. Perceived competence was a predictor of practicing lymphedema care. Advanced practice nurses scored in the midrange for perceived knowledge and perceived competence in risk reduction and self-management, but obtained lower scores in perceived knowledge and perceived competence for treatment. The odds of advanced practice nurses delivering lymphedema care were less than those of staff nurses. This study identifies gaps and opportunities for advanced practice nurses to play an important role in providing lymphedema care, an essential aspect of cancer survivorship. PMID:25031960

  17. Predictors of Practice Patterns for Lymphedema Care Among Oncology Advanced Practice Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Joanne C.; Cleland, Charles M.; Fu, Mei R.

    2012-01-01

    Lymphedema, a debilitating and chronic condition, is considered to be one of the most distressing adverse effects of cancer treatment. The purpose of this study was to understand the practice patterns in lymphedema care and identify predictors influencing those patterns among oncology nurses, with a focus on advanced practice nurses. Random and purposive sampling was utilized to recruit 238 oncology nurses who completed the Web-based study. Participants included advanced practice nurses (nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists), nurse navigators/case managers, staff nurses, and directors/managers/coordinators. Data focused on perceived knowledge of and perceived competence in risk reduction, treatment, and self-management of lymphedema and practice patterns in lymphedema care. Actual knowledge of lymphedema care was evaluated. Descriptive, comparative, and regression analyses were performed. The study showed that perceived knowledge and perceived competence were highly correlated. Perceived competence was a predictor of practicing lymphedema care. Advanced practice nurses scored in the midrange for perceived knowledge and perceived competence in risk reduction and self-management, but obtained lower scores in perceived knowledge and perceived competence for treatment. The odds of advanced practice nurses delivering lymphedema care were less than those of staff nurses. This study identifies gaps and opportunities for advanced practice nurses to play an important role in providing lymphedema care, an essential aspect of cancer survivorship. PMID:25031960

  18. Knowledge sources for evidence-based practice in rheumatology nursing.

    PubMed

    Neher, Margit; Ståhl, Christian; Ellström, Per-Erik; Nilsen, Per

    2015-12-01

    As rheumatology nursing develops and extends, knowledge about current use of knowledge in rheumatology nursing practice may guide discussions about future knowledge needs. To explore what perceptions rheumatology nurses have about their knowledge sources and about what knowledge they use in their practice, 12 nurses working in specialist rheumatology were interviewed using a semi-structured interview guide. The data were analyzed using conventional qualitative content analysis. The analysis yielded four types of knowledge sources in clinical practice: interaction with others in the workplace, contacts outside the workplace, written materials, and previous knowledge and experience. Colleagues, and physicians in particular, were important for informal learning in daily rheumatology practice. Evidence from the medical arena was accessed through medical specialists, while nursing research was used less. Facilitating informal learning and continuing formal education is proposed as a way toward a more evidence-based practice in extended roles. PMID:25059719

  19. The Psychiatric Family Nurse Practitioner: A Collaborator in Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Patricia D.

    1999-01-01

    The potential of the psychiatric family nurse practitioner (Psych.F.N.P.) to contribute to family practice through physical care and mental health care exists in the here and now. This role is a synthesis of 2 advanced practice roles, the psychiatric clinical nurse specialist (Psych.C.N.S.) and family nurse practitioner (F.N.P.), both of which continue to have great utility independently. This synthesis is a practical application of concepts that have evolved to meet the changing patterns of health care delivery. At this time, dual certification as a Psych.C.N.S. and F.N.P. best reflects the broad practice expertise of the psychiatric family nurse practitioner. The experienced psychiatric family nurse practitioner provides direct care for both physical and psychological needs of patients in a family practice setting. PMID:15014701

  20. Barriers to Practical Learning in the Field: A Qualitative Study of Iranian Nursing Students’ Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Jahanpour, Faezeh; Azodi, Parviz; Azodi, Farzan; Khansir, Ali Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical training is an integral part of nursing education; however, some studies have shown that it is not always efficient. Objectives This study aimed to find out the factors that can impede nursing students’ clinical learning. Materials and Methods In this qualitative study, data were collected via reflective journal writing. Purposeful sampling was used, and 12 senior nursing students were recruited to the study. The data were analyzed using a content analysis method. Results Three main categories were derived, including inappropriate communication, ineffective role models, and theory-practice gaps. Students perceived that inappropriate communication between instructors, staff members, and students had the greatest impact on student learning. The competence of clinical instructors and staff is an important factor affecting students’ training. The clinical learning environment does not always integrate theory and practice together. Conclusions Nursing students did not experience effective clinical learning. Having expert instructors and supportive communication are important factors in creating a clinical learning environment. PMID:27579332

  1. Sustaining secondary school nursing practice in Australia: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Guzys, Diana; Kenny, Amanda; Bish, Melanie

    2013-09-01

    This interpretive descriptive, qualitative study explored secondary school nurses' perceptions of factors that impact on their role and their views on how their role can be best supported. Nine secondary school nurses from four Department of Human Services regions in Victoria, Australia, participated in semistructured, in-depth interviews. Purposive sampling was used, with participants required to have a minimum of 2 years' experience as secondary school nurses. Data were thematically analyzed, revealing a complex and challenging role. The findings identified key factors necessary to support quality practice. All stakeholders need a shared understanding of the purpose and principles underpinning the secondary school nurse role and the nurse's professional obligations. Knowledge and experience are required that recognize the breadth and depth necessary for secondary school nurses to work effectively within their scope of practice. The adoption of a model of critical companionship is recommended to provide facilitated reflection on practice as a support mechanism for the role. PMID:23480208

  2. Seminar: Legal Perspectives of Nursing Practice. Nursing 89.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Odette P.

    This course outline provides information to be used by students in conjunction with Nursing 89, a seminar on the legal aspects of nursing to be offered starting in Spring 1982 at Diablo University (California). General information is provided first, including a class calendar, a statement defining the purpose of the course, an outline of…

  3. Using the Framework for 21st-Century School Nursing Practice in Daily Practice.

    PubMed

    Maughan, Erin D; Duff, Carolyn; Wright, Janet

    2016-09-01

    NASN recently developed a Framework for 21st-Century School Nursing Practice (Framework) to guide school nursing activities. The principles and components of the Framework can be used as a guide in achieving high-quality school nurse practice. The purpose of this article is to share how school nurses can use the Framework in their daily practice, invite nurses to identify one new way the Framework can be used in your practice this school year, and implement and evaluate the change. PMID:27481475

  4. In search of applications of nursing theories: the Nursing Citation Index.

    PubMed

    Johnson, E D

    1989-04-01

    Cited author searches were conducted in Nursing Citation Index to determine its utility in locating clinical studies that apply the conceptual frameworks of Dorothea Orem, Callista Roy, Martha Rogers, Betty Neuman, and Dorothy Johnson. Fully 75 percent of the relevant papers would have been missed by a conventional subject/textword search in the MEDLINE or CINAHL databases. Had Nursing Citation Index not been available, only 22 percent of relevant papers could have been retrieved by cited author searches of Social Science Citation Index. In summary, Nursing Citation Index provides an important indexing link between nursing theory and nursing research. PMID:2655783

  5. In search of applications of nursing theories: the Nursing Citation Index.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, E D

    1989-01-01

    Cited author searches were conducted in Nursing Citation Index to determine its utility in locating clinical studies that apply the conceptual frameworks of Dorothea Orem, Callista Roy, Martha Rogers, Betty Neuman, and Dorothy Johnson. Fully 75 percent of the relevant papers would have been missed by a conventional subject/textword search in the MEDLINE or CINAHL databases. Had Nursing Citation Index not been available, only 22 percent of relevant papers could have been retrieved by cited author searches of Social Science Citation Index. In summary, Nursing Citation Index provides an important indexing link between nursing theory and nursing research. PMID:2655783

  6. Factors influencing evidence-based nursing utilization intention in Korean practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Park, Jee-Won; Ahn, Jeong-Ah; Park, Mi-Mi

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe Korean nurses' perceptions, attitudes and utilization intention for evidence-based nursing (EBN), and to explore what factors influence utilization intention. We conducted a cross-sectional survey in 2012. Registered nurses directly involved in clinical practice were recruited at a medical centre in Korea. A total of 420 nurses completed a self-report questionnaire. Results showed that participants reported moderate scores regarding their perceptions and attitudes towards EBN, and rated themselves as higher than the median for utilization intention. Furthermore, this study revealed that perceptions of and attitudes towards EBN, occupational view and previous EBN education were significant factors affecting utilization intention. Nurse educators and managers should encourage nurses to have better attitudes towards EBN, help them be more satisfied with their work and provide them with appropriate education for EBN to establish evidence-based practice as a part of daily nursing care. PMID:24689706

  7. Reframing the Australian nurse teacher competencies: do they reflect the 'REAL' world of nurse teacher practice?

    PubMed

    Guy, Jacqui; Taylor, Christine; Roden, Janet; Blundell, Jennifer; Tolhurst, Gerda

    2011-04-01

    The Australian nurse teacher competencies were introduced in 1996; however, the researchers perceived that changes to the health care system and a nursing workforce shortage may have affected nurse teacher roles over the past decade. This study aimed to explore perceptions of nurse teachers on the applicability of the current Australian nurse teacher competencies to practice, and modify the nurse teacher competencies to better reflect current practice. Methodology utilized mixed methods, and data collection was via focus groups, telephone interviews, and survey data. Results revealed that participants were mostly positive about the original competency statements, although there were some variations between items. Themes that emerged from the qualitative data were: changing trends in health care; preparation for teaching; understanding of the competencies, contextual influences on education role; nurse teachers as change agents, and resource management. Conclusions were that the Australian nurse teacher competencies (1996) were reflective of the current generic roles of nurse teachers however some of the competencies needed reframing to meet the current needs of nurse teachers. However, changes needed to be made in areas such as reducing complex language, inclusion of technology, and cultural competencies. Nurse teachers were supportive of the research because they valued the teacher competencies for reflection on their practice and the development of portfolios, job descriptions and performance appraisals. PMID:21093124

  8. Framework for 21st Century School Nursing Practice: National Association of School Nurses.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The National Association of School Nurses (NASN) developed the Framework for 21st Century School Nursing Practice to reflect current school nurse practice. The Framework of practice was introduced in June 2015, and feedback was requested and obtained from practicing school nurses in a variety of ways. The final version of the Framework is introduced in this article. This article updates (and replaces) the articles in the July 2015 NASN School Nurse related to the Framework. Central to the Framework is student-centered nursing care that occurs within the context of the students' family and school community. Surrounding the student, family, and school community are the nonhierarchical, overlapping key principles of Care Coordination, Leadership, Quality Improvement, and Community/Public Health.These principles are surrounded by the fifth principle, Standards of Practice, which is foundational for evidence-based and clinically competent quality care. Each of these principles is further defined by practice components. Suggestions are provided regarding how the Framework can be used in a variety of settings to articulate and prioritize school nursing practice. The ultimate goal is to provide a resource to guide school nurses in their practice to help students be healthy, safe, and ready to learn. PMID:26739934

  9. Authentic leaders creating healthy work environments for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Shirey, Maria R

    2006-05-01

    Implementation of authentic leadership can affect not only the nursing workforce and the profession but the healthcare delivery system and society as a whole. Creating a healthy work environment for nursing practice is crucial to maintain an adequate nursing workforce; the stressful nature of the profession often leads to burnout, disability, and high absenteeism and ultimately contributes to the escalating shortage of nurses. Leaders play a pivotal role in retention of nurses by shaping the healthcare practice environment to produce quality outcomes for staff nurses and patients. Few guidelines are available, however, for creating and sustaining the critical elements of a healthy work environment. In 2005, the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses released a landmark publication specifying 6 standards (skilled communication, true collaboration, effective decision making, appropriate staffing, meaningful recognition, and authentic leadership) necessary to establish and sustain healthy work environments in healthcare. Authentic leadership was described as the "glue" needed to hold together a healthy work environment. Now, the roles and relationships of authentic leaders in the healthy work environment are clarified as follows: An expanded definition of authentic leadership and its attributes (eg, genuineness, trustworthiness, reliability, compassion, and believability) is presented. Mechanisms by which authentic leaders can create healthy work environments for practice (eg, engaging employees in the work environment to promote positive behaviors) are described. A practical guide on how to become an authentic leader is advanced. A research agenda to advance the study of authentic leadership in nursing practice through collaboration between nursing and business is proposed. PMID:16632768

  10. Mapping the Future of Environmental Health and Nursing: Strategies for Integrating National Competencies into Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Laura S.; Butterfield, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Nurses are increasingly the primary contact for clients concerned about health problems related to their environment. In response to the need for nursing expertise in the field of environmental health, the Institute of Medicine (IOM), Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), and National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) have designed core competencies for the nursing profession. The IOM competencies focus on four areas: (1) knowledge and concepts; (2) assessment and referral; advocacy, ethics, and risk communication; and (4) legislation and regulation. The competencies establish a baseline of knowledge and awareness in order for nurses to prevent and minimize health problems associated with exposure to environmental agents. To address the known difficulties of incorporating new priorities into established practice, nurses attending an environmental health short course participated in a nominal group process focusing on the question, “What specific actions can we take to bring environmental health into the mainstream of nursing practice?” This exercise was designed to bring the concepts of the national initiatives (IOM, NINR, ATSDR) to the awareness of individual nurses involved in the direct delivery of care. Results include 38 action items nurses identified as improving awareness and utilization of environmental health principles. The top five ideas were: (1) get environmental health listed as a requirement or competency in undergraduate nursing education; (2) improve working relationships with interdepartmental persons—a team approach; (3) strategically place students in essential organizations such as NIOSH, ATSDR, or CDC; (4) educate nurse educators; and (5) create environmental health awards in nursing. The 38 original ideas were also reorganized into a five-tiered conceptual model. The concepts of this model include: (1) developing partnerships; (2) strengthening publications; (3) enhancing continuing education; (4) updating nursing

  11. Implementation of a State Legislative Fellowship for Doctor of Nursing Practice Students.

    PubMed

    Crowder, Sharron J; Ironside, Pamela M; Cangany, Martha; Roddy, Wanda Spann

    2016-01-01

    Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) students need to be effective health policy leaders and contribute their expertise to legislative discussions. Nursing faculty have unique opportunities to prepare future DNP health policy leaders through legislative experiential learning opportunities. Yet, the creation of legislative fellowships can seem challenging. This article describes a state legislative fellowship based on Kolb's experiential learning theory and explores ways faculty can support DNP student preparation. PMID:26771941

  12. Nursing faculties’ knowledge and attitude on evidence-based practice

    PubMed Central

    Mehrdad, Neda; Joolaee, Soodabeh; Joulaee, Azadeh; Bahrani, Naser

    2012-01-01

    Background: Evidence-based practice (EBP) is one of the main professional competencies for health care professionals and a priority for medicine and nursing curriculum as well. EBP leads to improve effective and efficient care and patient outcomes. Nurse educators have responsibility to teach the future nurses, and an opportunity to promote patient outcomes. Therefore, the aim of this study was to describe nurse educators’ knowledge and attitude on EBP. Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive study conducted in nursing faculties of two major universities of medical sciences affiliated to Ministry of Health and Medical Sciences in Tehran, Iran. Data were gathered using a three-section questionnaire. Content and face validity was further enhanced by submitting it to nursing research and education experts. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS 11 software. Results: According the results, nursing faculties’ knowledge of EBP was mainly moderate (47.1%). Significant statistical relationship was found between the level of knowledge with education and teaching experience in different nursing programs. Nurses generally held positive attitudes toward EBP (88.6%) and there was no statistical significant relationship with demographic variables. Conclusion: Nursing educators are in a position to influence nursing research in clinical practice in the future. Therefore, it is critical to achieve implementation of EBP and be a change agent for a paradigm shift toward EBP. PMID:23922597

  13. Perceptions of Liberal Education of Two Types of Nursing Graduates: The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBrew, Jacqueline Kayler

    2010-01-01

    The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), which defines the expectations of a new baccalaureate-prepared nurse, includes a liberal education as a desired outcome for bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) graduates. A liberal education is thought to provide the professional nurse with the skills needed to practice nursing, including…

  14. Ambiguity in knowledge transfer: The role of theory-practice gap

    PubMed Central

    Cheraghi, Mohammad Ali; Salsali, Mahvash; Safari, Mahmoud

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In spite of much literature written about the theory-practice gap in the international nursing journals, there is evidence that indicates this subject has not been probed comprehensively since nursing education was transferred to universities in Iran. In the recent years, the public and the government have criticized Iranian nurses because of poor quality of patient care. Although this subject has been lamented by some researchers, there is no comprehensive work on how this gap resulted. In the process of a larger study on “nursing knowledge translation to practice”, of one PhD thesis, this process was explored. METHODS: Using grounded theory analysis, indepth interviews were undertaken with a purposive sample of 29 nurses, with different levels of experience, from the school of nursing in Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2006 from January to August. Data were analyzed using the constant comparative method. RESULTS: Three main themes emerging from this study included clinical behavior structure, paradoxical knowledge and practice, and divergent nursing organization. CONCLUSIONS: It seems that nursing education with some praxis and paradoxes in the realm of nursing knowledge and practice, along with divergent organizational structure have decreased nurses’ ability in applying their professional knowledge and skills in order to bridge the gap between theory and practice. Moreover, in spite of increased academic input into nursing education, clinical behaviors of both education and practice settings was perceived as “traditional routine-based”. PMID:21589789

  15. Nursing practice as bricoleur activity: a concept explored.

    PubMed

    Gobbi, Mary

    2005-06-01

    The debates concerning the nature of nursing practice are often rooted in tensions between artistic, scientific and magical/mythical practice. It is within this context that the case is argued for considering that nursing practice involves bricoleur activity. This stance, which is derived from the work of Levi-Strauss, conceives elements of nursing practice as an embodied, bricoleur practice where practitioners draw on the 'shards and fragments' of the situation-at-hand to resolve the needs of the individual patient for whom they care. This conceptualisation of nursing practice will be analysed with a particular emphasis on its implication for nursing epistemology, pedagogy and praxis. The evidence to support this argument is drawn from empirical work that investigated nurses' use of intuition, the work of Levi-Strauss, and issues in nursing epistemology and ontology. The paper itself is written from the perspective of a bricoleur who uses 'bits and pieces' from the domains of nursing, philosophy, psychology, education, sociology and anthropology. PMID:15892727

  16. The Nursing Students' Experience of Psychiatric Practice in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Song, Eunju

    2015-10-01

    In 1995, South Korea passed the Mental Health Act, and since this time it has developed many mental health policies and facilities. The aim of this study is to understand and explore the experience of nursing students in the changed psychiatric practice environment since 1995. The present study is a qualitative thematic analysis. Interviews were conducted with 11 third and fourth grade nursing students who had experienced psychiatric practice in South Korea. A thematic analysis of 11 in-depth student interviews identified three themes: 'orientation before psychiatric practice', 'facing the mental hospital', and 'change and choice'. After practicing, nursing students developed positive attitude regarding psychiatry. Educators will have to focus more on education and support in order for the students to maintain positive attitude throughout their experience. The research herein shows that the role of the educators and psychiatric nurses is extremely important for nursing students in the elimination of a negative attitude towards psychiatry. PMID:26397441

  17. Bridging nursing practice and education through a strategic global partnership.

    PubMed

    Stringer, Marilyn; Rajeswaran, Lakshmi; Dithole, Kefalotse; Hoke, Linda; Mampane, Patricia; Sebopelo, Sheila; Molefe, Margret; Muecke, Marjorie A; Rich, Victoria L; Polomano, Rosemary C

    2016-02-01

    To forge strong relationships among nurse scholars from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, PA (USA); University of Botswana School of Nursing, Gaborone, Botswana; the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; Princess Marina Hospital (PMH), Gaborone; and the Ministry of Health of Botswana, a strategic global partnership was created to bridge nursing practice and education. This partnership focused on changing practice at PMH through the translation of new knowledge and evidence-based practice. Guided by the National Institutes of Health team science field guide, the conceptual implementation of this highly successful practice change initiative is described in detail, highlighting our strategies, challenges and continued collaboration for nurses to be leaders in improving health in Botswana. PMID:25355182

  18. Woman-Centered Maternity Nursing Education and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Giarratano, Gloria

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this Heideggerian phenomenological study was to uncover the meanings of the clinical experiences of registered nurses working in maternity settings after they studied maternity nursing from a woman-centered, feminist perspective in a generic baccalaureate nursing program. Purposeful sampling was conducted to locate and recruit nurses who had graduated from this nursing program between the December 1996 and December 1998 semesters and were currently working in a maternal-newborn clinical setting. Each participant had taken the required woman-centered, maternity-nursing course during her/his undergraduate education. Data collection included an individual, open-ended interview that focused on the nurses' descriptions of their everyday practices as maternity nurses. Nineteen maternal-newborn nurses between the ages of 23 and 43 years who had been in practice from six months to three years were interviewed. The constitutive patterns identified from the interviews were: “Otherness,” “Being and Becoming Woman-Centered,” and “Tensions in Practicing Woman-Centered Care.” Findings revealed that the nurses had a raised awareness of oppressive maternity care practices and applied ideology of woman-centeredness as a framework for providing more humanistic care. Creating woman-centered maternity care meant negotiating tensions and barriers in medically focused maternity settings and looking for opportunities for advocacy and woman-empowerment. The barriers the nurses faced in implementing woman-centered care exposed limitations to childbearing choices and nursing practices that remain problematic in maternity care. PMID:17273327

  19. Clinical nurse specialists driving research and practice through Research Roundtables.

    PubMed

    Harne-Britner, Sarah; Schafer, Deborah J

    2009-01-01

    Providing patient care based on the best evidence is a priority for healthcare institutions across the country to improve practice and patient outcomes. Creating a culture of evidence-based practice (EBP) within an organization can be a challenging task. Literature has identified numerous barriers to EBP including negative attitudes and perceptions among nurses and lack of organizational support, time, resources, and confidence with these skills. Creating programs that help nurses appreciate the value and importance of nursing research for practice can be an effective approach in changing the culture. Research Roundtable is a collaborative partnership between a healthcare system and a baccalaureate nursing program to promote EBP and research skills in nurses and nursing students. Initial goals of the program focused on increasing the nurses' knowledge base of the research process and applying research to actual clinical problems. Over the course of 3 years, Roundtable evolved from development and implementation of research projects to concentrating on the identification of clinical problems that could be analyzed and solved through the use of EBP processes. The program has resulted in the completion of research studies, implementation of practice changes based on evidence uncovered in group work, and the approval of research projects in data collection phases. The positive impacts of Roundtable have been identified at the level of the staff nurse and the organization as a whole. This article describes the role of the clinical nurse specialist in the development and implementation of the Research Roundtable. PMID:19858901

  20. The Theory of Practice and the Practice of Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, Michael L.; Murphy, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    As academics who interact with senior and mid-level business managers on a regular basis, both informally and as consultants, the authors often note that ideas of theory and practice are not well developed among people outside of academia. It is posited that this deficit offers the prospect of less than optimal approaches to matters such as…

  1. [Nursing development at the Solothurn hospitals. Towards clinically oriented nursing expertise and practice development].

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Ursi Barandun; Hirsbrunner, Therese; Jäger, Susanne; Näf, Ernst; Römmich, Sabine; Horlacher, Kathrin

    2011-02-01

    At the Solothurn Hospitals (soH), 13 academically educated nurses are responsible for the development of nursing care with the goal to improve patient-oriented, effective, appropriate, and economic care. The strategy contains three priorities: a) expert care of single patients in demanding situations, b) sustained application of organisational methods such as primary nursing, nursing process, and skill/grade mix, and c) design and management of practice development projects related to specific patient groups. A first evaluation with qualitative and quantitative methods showed that the exemplary care of single patients by expert nurses was evaluated as positive for the patients as well as for the teams on two wards by nurses who were interviewed. After the introduction of primary nursing, the application rate was 81 to 90 % and the introduction of fall prevention methods in geriatric rehabilitation decreased the fall rate from 8.2 to 5.5 per 1000 patient days. A comparision with the literature shows that the expert nurses of soH perform both, working at the bedside and being responsible for practice development projects, as specialised Advanced Practice Nurses (APNs). APNs at the Solothurn Hospitals work also as generalists when organisational methods need to be consolidated. Their successes depend from their integration into the hierarchy and both, into the nursing as well as into the interprofessional teams. Competencies in Transformational Leadership also are essential at all management levels. PMID:21274841

  2. [Linking learning theory with practice].

    PubMed

    Ávalos-Carranza, María Teresa; Amador-Olvera, Eric; Zerón-Gutiérrez, Lydia

    2016-01-01

    It is often said that it is easier to learn what is observed and practiced on a daily basis; to the need to effectively link theory with practice considered in the process of teaching and learning, many strategies have been developed to allow this process to be carried out in a more efficiently maner. It is, therefore, very important to recognize that an appropriate teacher/student relationship is essential for students to acquire the skills and abilities required. PMID:27428334

  3. Caring as emancipatory nursing praxis: the theory of relational caring complexity.

    PubMed

    Ray, Marilyn A; Turkel, Marian C

    2014-01-01

    In the culture of health care, nurses are challenged to understand their values and beliefs as humanistic within complex technical and economically driven bureaucratic systems. This article outlines the language of social justice and human rights and the advance of a Theory of Relational Caring Complexity, which offers insights into caring as emancipatory nursing praxis. Recommendations provide knowledge of the struggle to balance economics, technology, and caring. As nurses practice from a value-driven, philosophical, and ethical social justice framework, they will find "their voice" and realize the full potential that the power of caring has on patient and organizational outcomes. PMID:24786202

  4. Nursing Students' Empowerment in Distance Education: Testing Kanter's Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledwell, Elizabeth; Andrusyszyn, Mary-Anne; Iwasiw, Carroll

    2006-01-01

    This qualitative, explanatory study examined Post-RN baccalaureate nursing students' experiences of empowerment with distance education and computer conferencing (CC) for fit with the constructs of Kanter's (1977, 1993) Theory of Structural Power in Organizations. Seven post-RNs from Canadian distance education nursing programs were interviewed.…

  5. Predictors of excess heart failure readmissions: implications for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Stamp, Kelly D; Flanagan, Jane; Gregas, Matt; Shindul-Rothschild, Judith

    2014-01-01

    In this study of California, Massachusetts, and New York hospitals, 6 factors predicted 27.6% of readmissions for patients with heart failure (HF). We found that higher admissions per bed, teaching hospitals, and poor nurse-patient communication increased HF readmissions. Conversely, the HF readmissions were lower when nurse staffing was greater, more patients reported receiving discharge information, and among hospitals in California. The implications for nursing practice in the delivery of care to patients with HF are discussed. PMID:24378355

  6. Narrative pedagogy with evolving case study--A transformative approach to gerontic nursing practice for undergraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Laver, Shaorn; Croxon, Lyn

    2015-09-01

    Engaging nursing students in the complexities of care across community, acute, rehabilitation and residential aged care settings is challenging. Equally challenging is conceptualising and promoting diverse and comprehensive health assessments across care settings that reflect clinical reality, inform clinical decision making, traverse theory and practice, and transform clinical practice knowledge. This article describes the use of narrative and evolving case study as a teaching-learning tool utilised by the authors in a third year undergraduate gerontic nursing subject in a pre-service nursing degree at a rural university. Principles of transformative learning and strengths based nursing were drawn upon in the development of the case study. The aim of the approach was to draw on embedded knowledge and the experiences of students and academics from assorted practice settings to facilitate understanding of the lived experiences of an older community dwelling couple. Using social learning strategies students were encouraged to analyse and think critically and creatively about the situations they were presented with. They identified possible solutions that would be acceptable to the couple. Building on the older couple's strengths, achievements and personal social capital, the aim was to develop a positive paradigm for health and the way older people are viewed by nursing students. PMID:25960064

  7. Comparing nurses' intent to leave or stay: differences of practice environment perceptions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shu-Yuan; Chiang, Hui-Ying; Chen, Ia-Ling

    2011-12-01

    Few existing studies have compared nurses' perceptions of the practice environment in relation to intent to leave or stay in employment and nursing concurrently. This study compared the differences between Taiwanese nurses' intent to leave or stay in employment and nursing, as related to their perceptions of the practice environment. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted at four hospitals in southern Taiwan. Questionnaires including the Chinese Nursing Practice Environment Scale, regarding intention in employment and nursing, were distributed to 535 nurses who provided direct patient care in Taiwan hospitals. Taiwanese nurses with intent to stay perceived the practice environment as better than nurses with intent to leave employment and nursing. The influences of the nursing practice environment on nurses' intent in employment and nursing were supported preliminarily. Targeting interventions to enhance participation in hospital affairs and adequacy of staffing and resources could be beneficial for a stable nursing workforce. PMID:22011072

  8. Development of the role of director of advanced practice nursing.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Catherine A; Fusilero, Jane; Williams, Christine M

    2010-01-01

    Advanced practice nurses (APNs) are integral to cost-effective delivery of health care in large health care organizations. Development of the leadership position of director of advanced practice nurses in a large teaching institution provides leadership to APNs in various settings, contributes to staff satisfaction, facilitates increased professional growth, and provides improved quality and fiscal outcomes. Job satisfaction, productivity, accountability, and communication may be enhanced through implementation of the role of director of advanced practice nursing and a committee structure of APNs, as was found in this academic health system. PMID:20306882

  9. [From caring practices to nursing sciences].

    PubMed

    Pierre-Jeanguiot, Nicole

    2006-12-01

    Summary of the thesis: Nurse training was born in the 1870's spurred on by doctors from the Red Cross and in the state-owned hospitals of Paris. Leonie Chaptal played a fundamental role in the elaboration of the first curriculum, a curriculum based on the knowledge which is useful for the nurse to assist the doctor. However, school based in France from Florence Nightingale's trend emphasize the professional autonomy of the nurse. Nursing training and profession therefore evolve in an ambivalence which leads to develop either "caring techniques" close to medical techniques, or a financial autonomy claimed by the "appropriate role" and the nursing clinical approach. Today the nursing profession finds itself in the heart of reforms: transfer of competence, validation of the acquired knowledge from experience, reform of the curriculum with a possible connection with the university. Having defined the criteria of the science by taking example on the model of the sciences of education, the study of nursing research published in the ARSI from 1985 in 2005 shows that nursing research exits and gives a general idea of investigated subjects, often referred to human sciences; hence a first approach of reference sciences, on which nursing sciences can establish and develop, knowing that the title nursing sciences is only used in Quebec. PMID:17269611

  10. Teaching Rhetorica: Theory, Pedagogy, Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronald, Kate, Ed.; Ritchie, Joy, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    In their breakthrough anthology of women's rhetoric, "Available Means," Kate Ronald and Joy Ritchie presented the first comprehensive collection of women's rhetorical theory and practice from the third century B.C. to 2001. With that expansive gathering of women's rhetoric, they raised questions about gender, difference, and the rhetorical canon,…

  11. Linking HRD Theory and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This document contains four symposium papers on linking human resource development (HRD) theory and practice. "Reorienting the Theoretical Foundations of Human Resource Development: Building a Sustainable Profession and Society" (Tim Hatcher) examines the theoretical disciplines of economics, general systems, sociology, psychology, and ethics in…

  12. Practice Theory in Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Richard F.; Astarita, Alice C.

    2013-01-01

    Ortega (2011) has argued that second language acquisition is stronger and better after the social turn. Of the post-cognitive approaches she reviews, several focus on the social context of language learning rather than on language as the central phenomenon. In this article, we present Practice Theory not as yet another approach to language…

  13. Theory into Practice Goes Exactly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Jonny

    2007-01-01

    "Dimensions of possible variation" is a phrase that now occupies a safe place in the literature describing the application of education theory to education practice: "asking yourself what could be changed [in the task], while using the same approach or technique, opens up dimensions of possible variation. A set of exercises forming a sequence of…

  14. Educational Management: Theory and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okumbe, J. A.

    This book provides the reader with principal theories and practices of management in educational organizations. It attempts to widen both the breadth and depth of the body of knowledge in this area of specialization. The work provides useful reference material for students and scholars at the undergraduate and postgraduate levels in universities…

  15. Psychomotor Education - Theory and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naville, Suzanne; Blom, Gaston E.

    This presentation introduced the theory and practice of psychomotor education as developed by de Ajuriaguerra and Naville at the University of Geneva. Some overlap of their concepts and principles with perceptual motor training methods occurred in the United States, according to the authors. The focus of the theoretical discussion integrated…

  16. The Efficacy of Three Learning Methods Collaborative, Context-Based Learning and Traditional, on Learning, Attitude and Behaviour of Undergraduate Nursing Students: Integrating Theory and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Hasanpour-Dehkordi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Communication skills training, responsibility, respect, and self-awareness are important indexes of changing learning behaviours in modern approaches. Aim The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of three learning approaches, collaborative, context-based learning (CBL), and traditional, on learning, attitude, and behaviour of undergraduate nursing students. Materials and Methods This study was a clinical trial with pretest and post-test of control group. The participants were senior nursing students. The samples were randomly assigned to three groups; CBL, collaborative, and traditional. To gather data a standard questionnaire of students’ behaviour and attitude was administered prior to and after the intervention. Also, the rate of learning was investigated by a researcher-developed questionnaire prior to and after the intervention in the three groups. Results In CBL and collaborative training groups, the mean score of behaviour and attitude increased after the intervention. But no significant association was obtained between the mean scores of behaviour and attitude prior to and after the intervention in the traditional group. However, the mean learning score increased significantly in the CBL, collaborative, and traditional groups after the study in comparison to before the study. Conclusion Both CBL and collaborative approaches were useful in terms of increased respect, self-awareness, self-evaluation, communication skills and responsibility as well as increased motivation and learning score in comparison to traditional method. PMID:27190926

  17. Fostering Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rambur, Betty

    1999-01-01

    Evidence-based nursing practice is impeded by low numbers of baccalaureate nurses, lack of critical perspectives toward research, the volume of information, and conflicting worldviews. Teaching strategies to address the challenge include fostering the ability to question and initiating teacher/student dialog. (SK)

  18. Psychiatric Nursing Faculty Practice: Care within the Community Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richie, Mary Fern; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Psychiatric nursing faculty practice offers the academic nurse opportunity to generate salary support and integrate students into the real world of mental health care. It promotes scholarship and knowledge-building and has a direct impact on the lives of patients. (Author/JOW)

  19. Licensed Practical Nurses in Occupational Health. An Initial Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jane A.; And Others

    The study, conducted in 1971, assessed characteristics of licensed practical nurses (LPN's) who worked in occupational health nursing. The survey instrument, a questionnaire, was returned by 591 LPN's in occupational health and provided data related to: personal characteristics, work and setting, administrative and professional functioning,…

  20. Australian Nurse Educators Identify Gaps in Expert Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelletier, Dianne; Duffield, Christine; Adams, Anne; Nagy, Sue; Crisp, Jackie; Mitten-Lewis, Suzanne

    2000-01-01

    A Delphi panel of 28 Australian nurse educators and 42 clinicians identified 58 practice items in which reality was far from ideal. In particular, for 16 items related to patient empowerment, nursing research, and technology policy, clinical behavior was rated below the median. (SK)

  1. Nurse-led general practice blazes a trail.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2016-02-24

    The nurse-led Cuckoo Lane Surgery in London has been rated outstanding by the Care Quality Commission. Nurses run the practice and deliver most of the care to patients. Patient satisfaction rates are very high, and staff say Cuckoo Lane is an exceptionally rewarding place to work. PMID:26907124

  2. Participation in the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP) programme.

    PubMed

    Bartz, Claudia; Coenen, Amy; Hong, Woi-Hyun

    2006-01-01

    The International Council of Nurses (ICN) is a federation of 129 national nurses associations. The International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP) is a programme of the ICN. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and maintenance processes of the ICNP Programme that are used to increase participation. These include processes by which the ICNP was and continues to be developed, tested, distributed and implemented worldwide, with emphasis on the current version, ICNP Version 1.0. The ICNP is a unified nursing language that facilitates cross-mapping among local terms and existing terminologies. ICNP conforms to current terminology standards and criteria, for example, ISO standards and HL7. The ICNP Alpha and Beta Versions documented the progress of concept validation and classification of nursing phenomena and interventions. The ICNP Beta 2 Version was a combinatorial terminology organized in two multi-axial structures representing nursing phenomena and nursing actions. The ICNP Version 1.0, launched in 2005, changed the relatively straight-forward multi-axial structure into a compositional terminology through the application of description logics using Web Ontology Language (OWL) within Protégé, an ontology development environment. ICNP Version 1.0 is also represented in a multiaxial model (7-Axis) for nurses to compose nursing diagnosis, intervention and outcome statements. Language translations and clinical information systems applications are required to make the ICNP Version 1.0 available to nurses at the point of healthcare delivery. ICNP data collected in healthcare environments provide standardized terminology for nursing that allows comparison of nursing practice across health care settings, specialties and countries; facilitate data-based clinical and management decision making; and contribute to the development of guidelines and standards for best practices and optimal outcomes for patients, families and communities. PMID

  3. Nurse work engagement impacts job outcome and nurse-assessed quality of care: model testing with nurse practice environment and nurse work characteristics as predictors

    PubMed Central

    Van Bogaert, Peter; van Heusden, Danny; Timmermans, Olaf; Franck, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To explore the mechanisms through which nurse practice environment dimensions, such as nurse–physician relationship, nurse management at the unit level and hospital management and organizational support, are associated with job outcomes and nurse-assessed quality of care. Mediating variables included nurse work characteristics of workload, social capital, decision latitude, as well as work engagement dimensions of vigor, dedication and absorption. Background: Understanding how to support and guide nurse practice communities in their daily effort to answer complex care most accurate, alongside with the demand of a stable and healthy nurse workforce, is challenging. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Method: Based on earlier empirical findings, a structural equation model, designed with valid measurement instruments, was tested. The study population included registered acute care hospital nurses (N = 1201) in eight hospitals across Belgium. Results: Nurse practice environment dimensions predicted nurses’ ratings of job outcome variables as well as quality of care. Features of nurses’ work characteristics, e.g., perceived workload, decision latitude, social capital, and the three dimension of work engagement, played mediating roles between nurse practice environment and outcomes. A revised model, using various fit measures, explained 60% of job outcomes and 47% of nurse-assessed quality of care. Conclusion: The findings in this study show that nurse work characteristics as workload, decision latitude, and social capital, alongside with nurse work engagement (e.g., vigor, dedication, and absorption) influence nurses’ perspective of their nurse practice environment, job outcomes, and quality of care. The results underline aspects to considerate for various stakeholders, such as executives, nurse managers, physicians, and staff nurses, in setting up and organizing health care services. PMID:25431563

  4. The Glass Menagerie as heuristic for explicating nursing theory.

    PubMed

    Pilkington, F Beryl; Frederickson, Keville; Velsasco-Whetsell, Martha

    2006-07-01

    Tennessee Williams' play, The Glass Menagerie, is interpreted through the lens of two different nursing theories, the Roy adaptation model and the human becoming theory. In the Roy adaptation model interpretation, adaptive levels of reality testing and stimuli that instigate withdrawal are explored, while in the human becoming theory interpretation, the themes of meaning, rhythmicity, and contranscendence are explicated. PMID:16757781

  5. Simulation Methodology in Nursing Education and Adult Learning Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutherford-Hemming, Tonya

    2012-01-01

    Simulation is often used in nursing education as a teaching methodology. Simulation is rooted in adult learning theory. Three learning theories, cognitive, social, and constructivist, explain how learners gain knowledge with simulation experiences. This article takes an in-depth look at each of these three theories as each relates to simulation.…

  6. Practical discourse in nursing: going beyond empiricism and historicism.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J L

    1985-07-01

    This discussion presents a critical appraisal of recent works in Advances in Nursing Science that have dealt with metatheoretical concerns. In metatheoretical analysis, such as that presented by Silva and Rothbart, nurses are beginning to focus on the traditions that have guided research. This process should be extended by reviewing historical stages of development in empiricist and postempiricist philosophy. Recent work in postempiricist philosophy is especially important since it can help nursing transcend historicist insights. Continental philosophy goes beyond historicist critique by focusing on practical discourse within a community of investigators. This is a stage of development that can be rationally decisive for the scientific development of nursing. PMID:3927830

  7. Best practices in nursing homes. Clinical supervision, management, and human resource practices.

    PubMed

    Dellefield, Mary Ellen

    2008-07-01

    Human resource practices including supervision and management are associated with organizational performance. Evidence supportive of such an association in nursing homes is found in the results of numerous research studies conducted during the past 17 years. In this article, best practices related to this topic have been culled from descriptive, explanatory, and intervention studies in a range of interdisciplinary research journals published between 1990 and 2007. Identified best practices include implementation of training programs on supervision and management for licensed nurses, certified nursing assistant job enrichment programs, implementation of consistent nursing assignments, and the use of electronic documentation. Organizational barriers and facilitators of these best practices are described. PMID:20077964

  8. Instructional Practices: Interpersonal Relationships in Nursing Practice: An Interdisciplinary Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morse, Ben W.; VanDenBerg, Evelyn

    1978-01-01

    Examines an interdisciplinary course offered by the Nursing and Speech Communication Departments at Miami University which is intended to supplement basic nursing education that doesn't include the concept of interpersonal relationships. (MH)

  9. [Building up nursing knowledge by means of reflexive practice].

    PubMed

    Colina, J; Medina, J L

    1997-12-01

    After analyzing the prior questions which determine the nursing field contents, the authors propose "reflective practice" as the methodological and pedagogical philosophy of choice in the formation of nurses. According to the authors, the professor is responsible for developing the curriculum. As such, the professor makes decisions regarding course design, methodology, content development, and student evaluation in terms of aptitute, attitude and knowledge acquisition. Research studies seem to demonstrate that the knowledge which, in the end, aids in comprehending the context taught and which determines the decisions a professor takes, is that knowledge based on a reflective practice, a product of the professor's experiences, background, knowledge and active relationship with nursing practice. The contents in this article were presented as a conference in the Third Seminar of Professors of Nursing for General Practice and Surgery. PMID:9485855

  10. e-Learning competency for practice nurses: an evaluation report.

    PubMed

    Heartfield, Marie; Morello, Andrea; Harris, Melanie; Lawn, Sharon; Pols, Vincenza; Stapleton, Carolyn; Battersby, Malcolm

    2013-01-01

    Practice nurses in Australia are now funded to facilitate chronic condition management, including self-management support. Chronic disease management requires an established rapport, support and proactivity between general practitioners, patients and the practice nurses. To achieve this, training in shared decision making is needed. e-Learning supports delivery and achievement of such policy outcomes, service improvements and skill development. However, e-learning effectiveness for health care professionals' is determined by several organisational, economic, pedagogical and individual factors, with positive e-learning experience linked closely to various supports. This paper reinforces previous studies showing nurses' expanding role across general practice teams and reports on some of the challenges of e-learning. Merely providing practice nurses with necessary information via web-based learning systems does not ensure successful learning or progress toward improving health outcomes for patients. PMID:24134876

  11. Practice environment for nurse practitioners in California. Identifying barriers.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, A L; Gilliss, C L; Yoder, L

    1996-01-01

    Barriers exist that prevent nurse practitioners from using their primary health care knowledge and skills. We present the incidence of and specific barriers experienced by nurse practitioner respondents in California, the state with the largest number of nurse practitioners in the nation. A January 1995 survey was sent to all nurse practitioners certified in California to elicit their experiences regarding legal or social barriers in their practice, with space for an open-ended response. Of an estimated 3,895 nurse practitioners in California, 2,741 (70%) returned surveys. Most nurse practitioner (65%) respondents in California are providing primary care. Perceived barriers to practice are lack of prescriptive authority, lack of support from physicians, reimbursement difficulties, and lack of public awareness. Current barriers to nurse practitioner practice in California are similar to national barriers discovered in 1992 data. The development of interprofessional dialogue and the recognition of the contributions of all primary care professionals are some of the steps that can be taken to reduce these barriers and increase the use and effectiveness of nurse practitioners in primary care. PMID:8987426

  12. Work engagement in nursing practice: a relational ethics perspective.

    PubMed

    Keyko, Kacey

    2014-12-01

    The concept of work engagement has existed in business and psychology literature for some time. There is a significant body of research that positively correlates work engagement with organizational outcomes. To date, the interest in the work engagement of nurses has primarily been related to these organizational outcomes. However, the value of work engagement in nursing practice is not only an issue of organizational interest, but of ethical interest. The dialogue on work engagement in nursing must expand to include the ethical importance of engagement. The relational nature of work engagement and the multiple levels of influence on nurses' work engagement make a relational ethics approach to work engagement in nursing appropriate and necessary. Within a relational ethics perspective, it is evident that work engagement enables nurses to have meaningful relationships in their work and subsequently deliver ethical care. In this article, I argue that work engagement is essential for ethical nursing practice. If engagement is essential for ethical nursing practice, the environmental and organizational factors that influence work engagement must be closely examined to pursue the creation of moral communities within healthcare environments. PMID:24714045

  13. Ethics in Nursing Practice and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benoliel, Jeanne Quint

    1983-01-01

    The fact that ethics has become important to nurses is a reflection of two types of developments: (1) rapid expansion and application of biomedical technology, and (2) the human rights movement. Therefore, nursing involves an increasing number of activities with both moral and technical implications. (SSH)

  14. Supporting Graduate Nurse Transition: Collaboration Between Practice and University.

    PubMed

    Bull, Rosalind; Shearer, Toniele; Phillips, Michelle; Fallon, Anne

    2015-09-01

    Making the transition from student to RN is challenging and demanding. In Australia, where nurses commonly graduate after 3 years in a Bachelor of Nursing program, graduate transition programs have been established in the workplace to support and socialize new graduates to nursing practice. These programs vary in content, rigor, and available support mechanisms, and no nationally agreed upon standards of expected graduate performance exist. Providing a structured, evidence-based, and clinically focused education and support program specific to the needs of graduate nurses contributes to quality care and patient safety and has significant benefits for the individual graduate, the employing organizations, and health care. This article presents the development and implementation of the Bachelor of Nursing With Clinical Honors (Transition to Practice) program offered by the University of Tasmania, in collaboration with St. Vincent's Private Hospital, Sydney, Australia. PMID:26352044

  15. Important interactional strategies for everyday public health nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Porr, Caroline J

    2015-01-01

    This Clinical Concepts article concerns the relational tools required by public health nurses to establish relationships with single mothers living on public assistance, mothers who are vulnerable and often stigmatized. The implications of stigmatization for relationship building are highlighted based on previous research investigating how public health nurses working in Canadian jurisdictions establish professional caring relationships with this cohort of mothers. Public health nurses employed interactional strategies including engaging in a positive manner and offering verbal commendations which served as effective relational tools to break through mothers' walls of defensiveness and to resume the dynamic process of relationship building. Building Relationship is a key practice standard for public health nurses and is instrumental to their work at both individual and community levels to improve social determinants of health. The author concludes with recommendations to facilitate building relationships during everyday public health nursing practice. PMID:24320117

  16. 78 FR 39738 - National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice for Request for Nominations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration National Advisory Council on Nurse Education... Education and Practice (NACNEP). Authority: The National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice is... including the range of issues relating to the nurse workforce, nursing education, and nursing...

  17. Perceptions and Attitudes towards Evidence Based Practice among Nurses and Nursing Students in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Karki, S; Acharya, R; Budhwani, H; Shrestha, P; Chalise, P; Shrestha, U; Gautam, K; Wilson, L

    2015-01-01

    Background As the evidence based practice (EBP) movement expands, there is a need for health leaders and educators in each country to assess the extent to which health professional students and practitioners are prepared to locate, evaluate, and apply evidence to guide their practice. Objective The study objective was to explore nurses' and nursing students' perceptions and attitudes towards EBP. Method This was a descriptive cross-sectional survey administered to all 273 nurses and nursing students from Nepal who attended an EBP conference. The survey instrument that was used by Majid in Singapore was adapted for use in this study with permission from the author. Result In total, 121 nurses participated in the study. The majority (93%) of respondents reported that they had no previous training in EBP. The respondents' perceptions of their EBP knowledge and skills were variable, but most of them demonstrated positive attitudes toward EBP. Respondents identified a number of barriers that limit the implementation of EBP in Nepal. The greatest barriers were lack of time and resources, difficulty understanding research articles and translating the findings to practice, and limited autonomy to change practice based on evidence. Conclusion Although respondents had positive attitudes towards EBP, their knowledge and skills were limited and barriers to implementation existed. Nursing faculty can use the findings to guide implementation of EBP into curricula, and nursing administrators and clinicians can use the findings to guide practice to promote EBP. PMID:27423280

  18. Advanced or advancing nursing practice: what is the future direction for nursing?

    PubMed

    Gray, Alastair

    Advanced nursing practice roles have emerged over the last 25 years in response to two major challenges: first, the significant reduction in available doctors; and, second, the rise in numbers of patients with complex health needs. It is suggested that, with a major drive to respond to the first problem, with its emphasis on the development of medical skills, the development of advanced nursing practice (which has the potential to have a significant impact on the second challenge of the rise in long-term conditions) has very much taken second place. Moreover, advanced nursing practice roles have become so medically focused that not only is advanced nursing practice not evident, but neither are the recognised sub-roles that are fundamental to advancing practice. These include innovation, education, research and clinical leadership. This article argues that in the current climate it is essential that advanced nurse practitioners not only demonstrate advanced practice, but also actively embrace the concept of 'advancing' nursing practice as the dominant feature of new roles. PMID:26768039

  19. Transfer-of-Care Communication: Nursing Best Practices.

    PubMed

    Chard, Robin; Makary, Martin A

    2015-10-01

    The successful and safe transfer of the patient from one phase of care to another is contingent on optimal communication by all team members. Nurses are often in a natural leadership position to improve safe practices during hand overs. A holistic understanding of the patient allows the perioperative nurse the opportunity to identify issues and choose a nursing diagnosis based on key elements of a patient's needs and goals--information that should be relayed during patient transfers. This article reviews best practices in transfer-of-care communication to enable perioperative RNs to take an active, leading role in hand-over processes. PMID:26411818

  20. Return-to-practice initiatives in nursing retention.

    PubMed

    Gould, Dinah

    Return-to-practice is an important issue for NHS employers and employees. However, little has been written on this area. This article reviews current literature from the perspective of nurses, employers and managers, and critiques a number of empirical studies. Findings from a recent telephone interview survey on the recruitment and retention of nurses in acute NHS trusts in England which was conducted as part of a larger study--the Nurses' Early Leaving Study (NEXT) commissioned by the European Union--are reported. This study may help to explain why return-to-practice programmes are not having the impact the government intended. PMID:16097197

  1. Promoting a Strategic Approach to Clinical Nurse Leader Practice Integration.

    PubMed

    Williams, Marjory; Avolio, Alice E; Ott, Karen M; Miltner, Rebecca S

    2016-01-01

    The Office of Nursing Services of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) piloted implementation of the clinical nurse leader (CNL) into the care delivery model and established a strategic goal in 2011 to implement the CNL role across the VA health care system. The VA Office of Nursing Services CNL Implementation and Evaluation (CNL I&E) Service was created as one mechanism to facilitate that goal in response to a need identified by facility nurse executives for consultative support for CNL practice integration. This article discusses strategies employed by the CNL I&E consultative team to help facility-level nursing leadership integrate CNLs into practice. Measures of success include steady growth in CNL practice capacity as well as positive feedback from nurse executives about the value of consultative engagement. Future steps to better integrate CNL practice into the VA include consolidation of lessons learned, collaboration to strengthen the evidence base for CNL practice, and further exploration of the transformational potential of CNL practice across the care continuum. PMID:26636231

  2. The Coppin State University Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Program.

    PubMed

    Tilghman, Joan S

    2015-01-01

    The Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program development was identified as a pivotal part of the Coppin State University (CSU) Helene Fuld School of Nursing's' Strategic Plan. The program was launched as early as 2009 with plans to be implemented before 2015. The program was developed in response to the October 2004 endorsement of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) position statement which recognizes the DNP as the appropriate credential for all advanced nursing practice roles by 2015. The Helene Fuld School of Nursing began its inaugural doctoral program in May 2015. The CSU DNP program will prepare graduates to address current and future practice issues. This program will prepare post baccalaureate graduates of nursing programs and post Master's advanced practice nurses to earn the DNP degree. The curriculum balances didactics, and clinical application in actual patient care facilities and health agencies relevant to course content. The DNP program fulfills CSU's goal to prepare graduates who distinguish themselves as leaders and service providers in critical and essential professions that offer life-long diverse employment, professional growth, and service opportunities. PMID:26665500

  3. Spiritual Healing in the Aftermath of Childhood Maltreatment: Translating Men's Lived Experiences Utilizing Nursing Conceptual Models and Theory.

    PubMed

    Willis, Danny G; DeSanto-Madeya, Susan; Ross, Richard; Sheehan, Danielle Leone; Fawcett, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an explication of spiritual healing situated within 3 nursing conceptual models (Neuman's systems model, Rogers' science of unitary human beings, and Roy's adaptation model) and 1 middle-range theory (Watson's theory of human caring), all of which include a focus on spirituality. These models and the theory are the vehicle for translation of themes of spiritual healing extracted from data provided by 30 adult male survivors of childhood maltreatment into nursing practice. This discipline-specific translational scholarship advances the profession of nursing. PMID:26079298

  4. Perceptions of the Role of the Doctor of Nursing Practice-Prepared Nurse: Clarity or Confusion.

    PubMed

    Udlis, Kimberly A; Mancuso, Josephine M

    2015-01-01

    Confusion and disagreement about the DNP degree and its implications continues despite the rapid and steady growth of DNP programs. There is a paucity of literature that examines nurses' perceptions of the role of the DNP-prepared nurse. The purpose of this study was to explore how nurses perceive the role of the DNP-prepared nurse and identify areas of ambiguity in understanding the roles that DNP-prepared nurses fulfill. A descriptive, cross-sectional design, using self-administered questionnaires, explored the perceptions of n = 340 nurses with various educational levels and backgrounds. Descriptives of the sample and instruments were conducted as well as chi-square analyses to detect differences in perceptions across levels of education. Results indicated that nurses clearly supported the DNP degree with a focus on the improvement of health care outcomes through the roles of leadership in health organizations, policy, interprofessionalism, and translation of evidence into practice. Multiple areas of confusion concerning the role of DNP-prepared nurse existed in academia, academia leadership, and scholarship. In order to reduce role ambiguity, the distinctive contributions of the DNP-prepared nurse must be embraced, valued, and operationalized. Otherwise, the role of the DNP-prepared nurse will continue to be discussed, debated, and challenged. PMID:26194957

  5. Advancing the quality of oncology nursing care: Interlink Community Cancer Nurses' model for reflective practice.

    PubMed

    Howell, D; Pelton, B

    2001-01-01

    Since 1996, Interlink Community Cancer Nurses have been using reflective practice as a team to share knowledge and experience amongst peers. The use of reflective practice enables the nurse to examine decision-making in patient situations and uncover the knowledge and artistry that is embedded in nursing practice. This article describes how reflection is practised by specialist cancer nurses to advance the quality of caregiving. The use of a structured framework for reflection which incorporates ways of knowing in nursing is an essential feature of the Interlink model for reflection. The development of a process for reflection within the Interlink program has at times been challenging. However, the Interlink nurses' experience with reflection is believed to be critical to the ongoing development of the program and the individual nurse. Interlink nurses have found that guided reflection, the creation of an environmental milieu for reflection and personal knowing, and self-evaluation are critical to the process of becoming a self-reflective practitioner. PMID:11842450

  6. Description of practice as an ambulatory care nurse: psychometric properties of a practice-analysis survey.

    PubMed

    Baghi, Heibatollah; Panniers, Teresa L; Smolenski, Mary C

    2007-01-01

    Changes within nursing demand that a specialty conduct periodic, appropriate practice analyses to continually validate itself against preset standards. This study explicates practice analysis methods using ambulatory care nursing as an exemplar. Data derived from a focus group technique were used to develop a survey that was completed by 499 ambulatory care nurses. The validity of the instrument was assessed using principal components analysis; reliability was estimated using Cronbach's alpha coefficient. The focus group with ambulatory care experts produced 34 knowledge and activity statements delineating ambulatory care nursing practice. The survey data produced five factors accounting for 71% of variance in the data. The factors were identified as initial patient assessment, professional nursing issues and standards, client care management skills, technical/clinical skills, and system administrative operations. It was concluded that practice analyses delineate a specialty and provide input for certification examinations aimed at measuring excellence in a field of nursing. PMID:17665821

  7. Factors enabling advanced practice nursing role integration in Canada.

    PubMed

    DiCenso, Alba; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Donald, Faith; Abelson, Julia; Bourgeault, Ivy; Kilpatrick, Kelley; Carter, Nancy; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Harbman, Patricia

    2010-12-01

    Although advanced practice nurses (APNs) have existed in Canada for over 40 years and there is abundant evidence of their safety and effectiveness, their full integration into our healthcare system has not been fully realized. For this paper, we drew on pertinent sections of a scoping review of the Canadian literature from 1990 onward and interviews or focus groups with 81 key informants conducted for a decision support synthesis on advanced practice nursing to identify the factors that enable role development and implementation across the three types of APNs: clinical nurse specialists, primary healthcare nurse practitioners and acute care nurse practitioners. For development of advanced practice nursing roles, many of the enabling factors occur at the federal/provincial/territorial (F/P/T) level. They include utilization of a pan-Canadian approach, provision of high-quality education, and development of appropriate legislative and regulatory mechanisms. Systematic planning to guide role development is needed at both the F/P/T and organizational levels. For implementation of advanced practice nursing roles, some of the enabling factors require action at the F/P/T level. They include recruitment and retention, role funding, intra-professional relations between clinical nurse specialists and nurse practitioners, public awareness, national leadership support and role evaluation. Factors requiring action at the level of the organization include role clarity, healthcare setting support, implementation of all role components and continuing education. Finally, inter-professional relations require action at both the F/P/T and organizational levels. A multidisciplinary roundtable formulated policy and practice recommendations based on the synthesis findings, and these are summarized in this paper. PMID:21478695

  8. MENTAL NURSING. LESSON PLANS PREPARED BY PRACTICAL NURSING INSTRUCTORS FOLLOWING JOINT CONFERENCE HELD AT THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE, KNOXVILLE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee State Board for Vocational Education, Murfreesboro. Vocational Curriculum Lab.

    THE LESSON PLANS FOR A UNIT ON MENTAL NURSING IN THE PRACTICAL NURSE EDUCATION PROGRAM WERE DEVELOPED BY A GROUP OF REGISTERED NURSES HOLDING TENNESSEE TEACHING CERTIFICATES. STUDENTS SELECTED FOR THE PROGRAM SHOULD BE HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES OR EQUIVALENT. THE LESSONS DESIGNED FOR USE BY A REGISTERED NURSE CERTIFIED FOR TEACHING GIVE OBJECTIVES,…

  9. Future realities in nursing: partnerships, practice, and economics.

    PubMed

    Bechtel, G A; Davidhizar, R; Tiller, C M; Quinn, M E

    1999-01-01

    Health care reform, innovations in technology, and the need to make health care cost-effective have affected all aspects of health care practice and education. Critical thinking skills, interpersonal and communication skills, leadership and motivation skills, computer literacy, and cultural sensitivity are all capabilities nursing graduates must now possess if they are to practice effectively in the complex and competitive contexts that today define the health care marketplace. Partnerships with community agencies are essential if faculty are to prepare a new generation of nurses who will be proficient in the skills that 21st-century nursing practice will demand. Although academic institutions have made some changes to meet marketplace demands, nursing educators, practitioners, and researchers must thoroughly reconceptualize their philosophies and retool their curricula in response to these changes. PMID:10401398

  10. Leaving from and returning to nursing practice: contributing factors.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, Isabel; Taua, Chris

    2009-07-01

    Many nurses leave nursing and never return. Others return after a period of time. Given the global shortage of nurses a better understanding of these movements is needed. The present study focused on nurses who had been out of nursing for more than five years, and explored factors that influenced their leaving and return to practice. All the nurses who had undertaken a Competency Assessment Programme at a given New Zealand tertiary institution during 2005 were invited to participate. Of the 70 questionnaires mailed out 32 (44.5%) were completed and returned. Quantitative data were analysed using Microsoft Excel, and the qualitative data were coded and analysed by means of content analysis. For each, leaving and returning, three key issues emerged. Nurses left for personal reasons, to seek a career change, or because of poor working conditions. They returned when they had the personal freedom to do so, for fiscal reasons, or because they were motivated by some sense of unfinished business. These findings indicate that it is important for educators involved with Competency Assessment Programmes to collaborate with employers in ensuring that there are opportunities for re-entry to positive work environments, with a degree of flexibility that suits the demographic characteristics of those nurses returning to practice. PMID:19928648

  11. Nursing education and research rounds: evaluation of a webinar-based education strategy to engage nurses and support practice.

    PubMed

    Black, Agnes T; Clauson, Marion; Fraser, Shelley

    2013-01-01

    Nursing Education and Research Rounds (NEARR), a webinar-based series of continuing education presentations focused on nursing research, was developed to engage nurses in discussion about evidence-based practice. Evaluation of NEARR indicated a large majority of participants considered the information provided useful in their practice and planned to attend future NEARR sessions. Nursing professional development specialists can use this approach to support evidence-based practice. PMID:24060661

  12. Providing empathetic care in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Alison; Corless, Louise; Mee, Steve

    The fifth in our seven-part series on patient narrative explores empathy. We focus on a patient story relevant to all fields of nursing and raise key issues about how health professionals convey empathy to patients. PMID:27400624

  13. Development of the Nurse Practitioner Standards for Practice Australia.

    PubMed

    Cashin, Andrew; Buckley, Thomas; Donoghue, Judith; Heartfield, Marie; Bryce, Julianne; Cox, Darlene; Waters, Donna; Gosby, Helen; Kelly, John; Dunn, Sandra V

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the context and development of the new Nurse Practitioner Standards for Practice in Australia, which went into effect in January 2014. The researchers used a mixed-methods design to engage a broad range of stakeholders who brought both political and practice knowledge to the development of the new standards. Methods included interviews, focus groups, surveys, and work-based observation of nurse practitioner practice. Stakeholders varied in terms of their need for detail in the standards. Nonetheless, they invariably agreed that the standards should be clinically focussed attributes. The pillars common in many advanced practice nursing standards, such as practice, research, education, and leadership, were combined and expressed in a new and unique clinical attribute. PMID:26162455

  14. Development of the Nurse Practitioner Standards for Practice Australia

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Thomas; Donoghue, Judith; Heartfield, Marie; Bryce, Julianne; Cox, Darlene; Waters, Donna; Gosby, Helen; Kelly, John; Dunn, Sandra V.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the context and development of the new Nurse Practitioner Standards for Practice in Australia, which went into effect in January 2014. The researchers used a mixed-methods design to engage a broad range of stakeholders who brought both political and practice knowledge to the development of the new standards. Methods included interviews, focus groups, surveys, and work-based observation of nurse practitioner practice. Stakeholders varied in terms of their need for detail in the standards. Nonetheless, they invariably agreed that the standards should be clinically focussed attributes. The pillars common in many advanced practice nursing standards, such as practice, research, education, and leadership, were combined and expressed in a new and unique clinical attribute. PMID:26162455

  15. The creative élan of nursing theory: indispensable to leadership.

    PubMed

    Donohue-Porter, Patricia

    2014-10-01

    The author discusses how nursing theoretical knowledge contributes to nursing leadership and how the use of nursing theory can build confidence in nurse leaders in all settings, drawing on examples from selected theorists' work. It is suggested that when nursing theory is not fully valued by the profession, not only knowledge is lost but also the language that helps nurses to lead. However, the vision and the voice of nursing theory will allow nurses to lead with creativity and to tap into innovation that facilitates contributions to healthcare. To be firmly, intellectually, and enthusiastically grounded in one's disciplinary knowledge sets the stage to being able to lead effectively. Four aspects of leadership are addressed: clinical, interdisciplinary, nursing education, and interpersonal nursing. Our accumulated nursing theories can help nurse leaders to meet contemporary healthcare challenges by providing answers that help to focus on improvement, patient-centered care, critical reflection, and caring. PMID:25248779

  16. Vaccination learning experiences of nursing students: a grounded theory study

    PubMed Central

    Ildarabadi, Eshagh; Moonaghi, Hossein Karimi; Heydari, Abbas; Taghipour, Ali; Abdollahimohammad, Abdolghani

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to explore the experiences of nursing students being trained to perform vaccinations. Methods: The grounded theory method was applied to gather information through semi-structured interviews. The participants included 14 undergraduate nursing students in their fifth and eighth semesters of study in a nursing school in Iran. The information was analyzed according to Strauss and Corbin’s method of grounded theory. Results: A core category of experiential learning was identified, and the following eight subcategories were extracted: students’ enthusiasm, vaccination sensitivity, stress, proper educational environment, absence of prerequisites, students’ responsibility for learning, providing services, and learning outcomes. Conclusion: The vaccination training of nursing students was found to be in an acceptable state. However, some barriers to effective learning were identified. As such, the results of this study may provide empirical support for attempts to reform vaccination education by removing these barriers. PMID:26084680

  17. Practical Nursing for High Schools. Curriculum Bulletin 1973-74 Series No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Bureau of Curriculum Development.

    The bulletin, a revision of Practical Nursing for High Schools published in 1963, is a guide for the licensed teacher of nursing in educating the practical nurse student. The publication can be used as a resource for developing the program in individual schools of practical nursing or to develop the behavioral objectives for each procedure. Part…

  18. A comprehensive community nursing center model: maximizing practice income--a challenge to educators.

    PubMed

    Walker, P H

    1994-01-01

    The potential role of community nursing centers to generate revenue through faculty practice is critical for the survival of nursing centers in the future. A nursing center entrepreneurial model for faculty practice within the University of Rochester School of Nursing uses sound business principles to enhance financial success and challenges current paradigms in education, practice, and research. PMID:8034852

  19. Improving perceptions of patient care--a nursing education and nursing practice initiative.

    PubMed

    Watson, Pamela G; Marshall, David R; Sexton, Karen H

    2006-01-01

    In January 2005, the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) School of Nursing and the UTMB Hospitals and Clinics launched the first phase of a project to improve perceptions of patient care on the part of nursing faculty and nursing clinicians. A finding on the UTMB annual employee satisfaction survey that nursing faculty and clinicians tended to rate quality of UTMB patient care lower than other UTMB employees provided the impetus for the initiative. When UTMB colleagues noticed the findings, various entities including human resources and the Faculty Senate called for explanations from the dean of the School of Nursing, the chief nursing officer, and the CEO for the hospitals and clinics. In the process of attempting to give reasons for the findings, each of us determined we would take definitive action to address the situation. This article describes our accomplishments for Phase 1 of the initiative. Beginning with a vision for a productive professional community characterized by a pedagogical partnership between nursing education and practice, we share the processes we followed to (1) achieve mutual understanding among task force members, (2) obtain input on perceptions from nursing colleagues, (3) identify the clinical and nursing education aspects of the perceptions, (4) reach consensus on target perceptions for Phase 2 of the project, and (5) outline the next steps for the project. PMID:16990119

  20. Promoting mHealth in Nursing Practice in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yisi; Wu, Ying; Gong, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to reveal the status quo of mHealth application in clinical settings in China, especially in reducing patient falls and pressure ulcers and discuss how patient safety could be enhanced in the context of global collaboration on patient safety. The literature search resulted in a total of 290 articles. A steady increase is witnessed in the field of mHealth, especially after the year 2010. Personal digital assistant and electronic cart are the two main devices used in mobile nursing workstation. mHealth was mainly focused on two clinical areas, nursing practice (60.69%) and nursing management (25.86%). mHealth has begun to change the way of nursing process in prevention of adverse nurse events with an encouraging results in reducing the rate of pressure ulcer and falls. Healthcare educators should fully recognize the characteristics of mHealth and enhance a clinical informatics component in the curricula. PMID:27332160

  1. 'Implementation deficit' and 'street-level bureaucracy': policy, practice and change in the development of community nursing issues.

    PubMed

    Bergen, Ann; While, Alison

    2005-01-01

    The present paper examines the mechanisms by which health and social care policies put forward by the Government may be translated into community nursing practice. Data from a research project on community nurse case managers were re-examined in the light of two classic theories often cited by policy analysts (i.e. implementation theory and 'street-level bureaucracy'). It was found that the extent to which nurses adopted the case management role, and the model of choice, depended on four major interrelated variables, namely: (1) the clarity of policy guidance; (2) the extent to which it coincided with professional (nursing) values; (3) local practices and policies; and (4) the personal vision of the community nurse. It is argued that this framework may have wider relevance, and this was tested out in two ways. First, major change in one of these variables (Government policy) over time was analysed for its effect on case management practice via the remaining variables. Secondly, an unrelated, but policy-initiated, nursing issue (nurse prescribing) was briefly examined in the light of the framework. It is suggested that this framework may be of some use when considering the likely practice response to policy-related changes in community nursing. PMID:15717901

  2. Nursing personnel's views on oral health from a health promotion perspective: a grounded theory analysis.

    PubMed

    Paulsson, Gun; Söderfeldt, Björn; Nederfors, Tommy; Fridlund, Bengt

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a model for how nursing personnel view oral health in general and the oral health of the care receivers in particular, applying a health promotion perspective and using grounded theory analysis. Data were collected through interviews with 17 nursing personnel, selected by strategic sampling. Analysis of the transcribed interviews showed that there were four strategies, related to staff education, hospital resources, and leadership motivation. The strategies were grounded in data and emerged from the interaction between the two main categories: 'the valuation of the importance of oral health' and 'the behavior towards oral health maintenance'. They were characterized as the routine, theoretical, practical, and flexible strategies, with the latter considered ideal. As increased knowledge is one important part in enhancing the nursing personnel's ability to perform oral hygiene procedures, there is a need for education among nursing personnel, primarily among those using a routine strategy. PMID:11902612

  3. Spanning the Gap between Theory and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Richard E.

    1982-01-01

    Suggests that new developments in prescriptive theory offer an opportunity for instructional designers to combine research and practice in developing instruction. Ways in which instructional theories can facilitate practical applications are suggested. (MER)

  4. Israeli nurse practice environment characteristics, retention, and job satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is an international nursing shortage. Improving the practice environment has been shown to be a successful strategy against this phenomenon, as the practice environment is associated with retention and job satisfaction. The Israeli nurse practice environment has not been measured. The purpose of this study was to measure practice environment characteristics, retention and job satisfaction and to evaluate the association between these variables. Methods A demographic questionnaire, the Practice Environment Scale, and a Job Satisfaction Questionnaire were administered to Israeli acute and intensive care nurses working in 7 hospitals across the country. Retention was measured by intent to leave the organization and work experience. A convenience sample of registered nurses was obtained using a bi-phasic, stratified, cluster design. Data were collected based on the preferences of each unit, either distribution during various shifts or at staff meetings; or via staff mailboxes. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the sample and results of the questionnaires. Pearson Product Moment Correlations were used to determine significant associations among the variables. A multiple regression model was designed where the criterion variable was the practice environment. Analyses of variance determined differences between groups on nurse practice environment characteristics. Results 610 nurses reported moderate levels of practice environment characteristics, where the lowest scoring characteristic was ‘appropriate staffing and resources’. Approximately 9% of the sample reported their intention to leave and the level of job satisfaction was high. A statistically significant, negative, weak correlation was found between intention to leave and practice environment characteristics, with a moderate correlation between job satisfaction and practice environment characteristics. ‘Appropriate staffing and resources’ was the only characteristic found to be

  5. Understanding and integrating mindfulness into psychiatric mental health nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Tusaie, Kathleen; Edds, Kelly

    2009-10-01

    The practice of mindfulness is increasingly being integrated into Western clinical practice within the context of psychotherapy and stress management. Although it is based in ancient Buddhist philosophy, there remains confusion about the definition, antecedents, processes, and outcomes of mindfulness practice. This article reviews the literature on mindfulness, with a focus upon a clearer definition and understanding of the processes and integration into psychiatric mental health nursing practice. PMID:19766927

  6. Pyrolysis: theory and industrial practice

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, L.F.; Crynes, B.L.; Corcoran, W.H.

    1983-01-01

    This book is useful for the study of pyrolysis from two perspectives: theory and industrial practice. Topics included are thermal decompositions and reactions of methane pyrolysis of ethane and propane, pyrolysis of n-butane, thermal reaction of olefins and diolefins, pyrolysis of heavy hydrocarbons, formation of aromatics, hydrogenolysis of toluene, mathematical modeling of hydrocarbon pyrolysis reactions, nonpetroleum feedstocks, formation and gasification of coke, surface reactions in pyrolysis units, pyrolysis furnace design, laboratory reactors for pyrolysis, and economic considerations in the design and operation of conventional pyrolysis furnaces.

  7. A patient safety focused registered nurse transition to practice program.

    PubMed

    Mellor, Peter; Greenhill, Jennene

    2013-12-21

    Abstract As undergraduate rural nursing students approach completion of their degree and become eligible for registration as a nurse they anticipate becoming part of a transition to practice program. Promises of clinical support, guidance and being welcomed into the profession are provided. Unfortunately the reality for new graduate registered nurses is often quite different. Promised clinical support does not eventuate and patient safety is often compromised. Graduate nurse transition programs need to have the physical and human resources to deliver the clinical support that was promised in their prospectus. This paper describes the nature of professional support experienced by participants of transition to practice programs. Three core elements are recommended to ensure patient safety. PMID:24359268

  8. Children's nurses' post-operative pain assessment practices.

    PubMed

    Panjganj, Donya; Bevan, Ann

    2016-06-01

    Pain assessment is crucial to achieving optimal pain management in children. Pain that is insufficiently controlled can have extensive short- and long-term repercussions. Many studies continue to report that children experience unnecessary post-operative pain when they are in hospital. The purpose of this literature review was to explore post-operative pain assessment practices used by children's nurses. A literature search of databases was undertaken and inclusion criteria identified. Four themes emerged: pain assessment tools; behavioural cues; documentation; and communication between child, parent/carer and nurse. The findings showed that pain assessment tools were inadequately used, that children's behavioural cues were misinterpreted, and that there was inconsistency in the documentation of pain scores and in communication about pain scores between children, parent/carer and nurse. Addressing the key issues identified from the articles reviewed can help improve nursing practice and care. PMID:27266751

  9. Preparing emotionally intelligent doctor of nursing practice leaders.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Michelle T; Rutledge, Carolyn; Shepherd, Laurel

    2012-08-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) identified the need for interdisciplinary teams that collaborate, communicate, and integrate care across settings to improve health care delivery. Focusing on innovative strategies that address leadership skills in graduate nursing education could have an effect on interdisciplinary partnerships, transformation of patient care, and new styles of leadership to change current practice models. In response to the IOM guidelines, we incorporated emotional intelligence as a component in our Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) leadership curriculum. This article describes a new action-oriented leadership model that prepares the DNP graduate for leadership roles to serve the public and the nursing discipline during a time of radical changes in health care. Behavioral profile, nontraditional readings, and online discussions form the basis of the model. The principles and strategies in this article can be applied to nursing education in multiple arenas, at both the undergraduate and graduate settings. PMID:22624564

  10. Compassion fatigue within nursing practice: a concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Coetzee, Siedine Knobloch; Klopper, Hester C

    2010-06-01

    "Compassion fatigue" was first introduced in relation to the study of burnout among nurses, but it was never defined within this context; it has since been adopted as a synonym for secondary traumatic stress disorder, which is far removed from the original meaning of the term. The aim of the study was to define compassion fatigue within nursing practice. The method that was used in this article was concept analysis. The findings revealed several categories of compassion fatigue: risk factors, causes, process, and manifestations. The characteristics of each of these categories are specified and a connotative (theoretical) definition, model case, additional cases, empirical indicators, and a denotative (operational) definition are provided. Compassion fatigue progresses from a state of compassion discomfort to compassion stress and, finally, to compassion fatigue, which if not effaced in its early stages of compassion discomfort or compassion stress, can permanently alter the compassionate ability of the nurse. Recommendations for nursing practice, education, and research are discussed. PMID:20602697

  11. The Development of a Regional Nursing History Collection: Its Relevance to Practice, Education, and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hezel, Linda F.; Linebach, Laura M.

    1991-01-01

    The Nursing History Collection at the University of Missouri-Kansas City preserves artifacts and memorabilia of regional nursing history. Such collections are essential to practice, education, and research in nursing. (SK)

  12. Jordanian Critical Care Nurses' Practices Regarding Enteral Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Hammad, Sawsam Mohammad; Al-Hussami, Mahmoud; Darawad, Muhammad Waleed

    2015-01-01

    In Jordan, there is a gap in literature regarding nurses' practices of enteral nutrition. Thus, the purpose of this study was to assess nurses' practices regarding enteral nutrition of critically ill adult patients. A descriptive, cross-sectional design was used to collect data through self-reported questionnaires and descriptive analyses were used to display the results of the study. The results revealed that some aspects of enteral nutrition practices were consistent with the current best evidences such as initiation time of enteral nutrition and backrest elevation. On the contrary, some aspects showed variations and inconsistency with current best evidences such as the amount of high gastric residual volume and its management. Nurses' practices regarding enteral nutrition were not consistent with international guidelines. This inconsistency can predispose patients to underfeeding. Enhancement of research utilization is highly recommended as well as establishing evidence-based guidelines. PMID:26226022

  13. Putting it into practice: Infection Control Professionals' perspectives on early career nursing graduates' microbiology and infection control knowledge and practice.

    PubMed

    Cox, Jennifer L; Simpson, Maree Donna; Letts, Will; Cavanagh, Heather Ma

    2014-11-10

    Abstract Background: The microbiology component of Australian undergraduate nursing programs varies considerably. Any actual or potential impact of this variation on infection control practice, as a nursing graduate, is relatively unknown. Aims: The aim of this study was to explore Infection Control Professionals' perceptions of the importance of microbiology and infection control training in undergraduate nursing curricula and the perceived retention of that knowledge and its transferability to practice. Method: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight infection control professionals from a range of hospital settings in Australia. Findings: Four main themes emerged: theory versus practice, importance of role modelling, disjunction between university curricula and 'the real world', and learning in context. Conclusion: As the underpinning element of infection control practice, the role of microbiology education and training in nursing education will benefit from review. Further discussions about the nature and timing of theoretical microbiology content and assessment of undergraduate students' microbiology knowledge to ensure retention and appropriate application of that knowledge in practice are urgently needed. PMID:25382059

  14. Models of clinical expertise in American nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Gordon, D R

    1986-01-01

    This paper analyzes nursing job descriptions that compose a career ladder. These job descriptions, an ethnomodel of expertise, are compared to the Dreyfus model that describes five stages of skill acquisition. While the Dreyfus model posits the replacement of analytic reasoning with intuitive response as the characteristic of expert practice, the ideal posited in the nursing model places theoretical knowledge at the apex. Nursing job descriptions can best be understood in the context of this profession's search for greater power and legitimacy. PMID:3738566

  15. Using evidence-based practice for managing clinical outcomes in advanced practice nursing.

    PubMed

    Glanville, I; Schirm, V; Wineman, N M

    2000-10-01

    Preparation of advanced practice nurses to assume leadership positions for clinical decision making requires that traditional ways of solving clinical problems be augmented with information from relevant, research-derived evidence. In this article, the authors describe how one graduate program prepares advanced practice nurses to use the best scientific evidence with clinical expertise to influence patient outcomes. The assignments that students complete in their program provide examples of evidence-based practice that apply quality improvement principles and science-based nursing interventions to create best practices. PMID:11008434

  16. Contemporary theories and contemporary nursing--advancing nursing care for those who are marginalized.

    PubMed

    Davis, K; Glass, N

    1999-06-01

    This paper critiques the topic of postmodernism and how it is represented in nursing and social science literature. This critique classified the debates into three identifiable constructs, those being: dissatisfaction; fragmentation and integration. The authors propose a solution from the integration debate by putting forward the notion of an 'integrated postmodern turn'. The 'solution' is situated within feminism and draws on modernist and postmodernist theory. The integrated model is grounded in nursing clinical examples which demonstrate the usefulness and workability of this approach when caring for those who are marginalized by nurses because of their ethnicity, gender, cultural and/or spiritual beliefs. PMID:11096793

  17. Reflections by clinical nurse specialists on changing ward practice.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Catherine; Ramcharan, Angie

    In September 2010, palliative care clinical nurse specialists at North Middlesex University Hospital Trust introduced competencies for all nurses in setting up and using syringe drivers. This was done after the trust identified a high level of clinical incidents involving syringe drivers. This article discusses how the competencies were implemented and assessed, explores the importance of understanding change management to achieve change, and how different leadership styles affect changes to practice. PMID:21957520

  18. Everyday Excellence: A Framework for Professional Nursing Practice in Long-Term Care

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Stacie Salsbury; Specht, Janet Pringle; Karlman, Susan E.

    2009-01-01

    Registered nurses make measurable contributions to the health and wellness of persons living in nursing homes. However, most nursing homes do not employ adequate numbers of professional nurses with specialized training in the nursing care of older adults to positively impact resident outcomes. As a result, many people never receive excellent geriatric nursing while living in a long-term care facility. Nurses have introduced various professional practice models into health care institutions as tools for leading nursing practice, improving client outcomes, and achieving organizational goals. Problematically, few professional practice models have been implemented in nursing homes. This article introduces an evidence-based framework for professional nursing practice in long-term care. The Everyday Excellence framework is based upon eight guiding principles: Valuing, Envisioning, Peopling, Securing, Learning, Empowering, Leading, and Advancing Excellence. Future research will evaluate the usefulness of this framework for professional nursing practice. PMID:20077966

  19. [ICNP- International Classification of Nursing Practice: origin, structure and development].

    PubMed

    Marucci, Anna Rita; De Caro, Walter; Petrucci, Cristina; Lancia, Loreto; Sansoni, Julita

    2015-01-01

    ICNP is a standardized nursing terminology included within acknowledged terminologies by WHO, it is a relevant aspect of ICN programs and strategies. This paper aims to describe structure and characteristics of ICNP terminology as well as to highlight how this tool can be useful both in practice and in terms of nursing professional development. This version looks like a pyramid with seven axes describing different areas of nursing and related interventions, enriched by two special axes related to pre-coordinated Diagnosis / Outcomes (DC) and Operations (IC) which facilitate daily use in practice. In order to clarify how this tool can be actually be used in daily nursing practice some examples are provided, clarifying how adopting the current version of ICNP terminology (2015 release) Diagnosis/Outcomes and Interventions can be built. The ICNP Italian Centre is committed to introduce it to Italian nurses as a tool for sharing and disseminating terminology in our Country, having as main final aim to achieve even in Italy, professional visibility objectives promoted in different ways by the International Council of Nurses. PMID:26402233

  20. Fever management practices of neuroscience nurses: what has changed?

    PubMed

    Rockett, Hannah; Thompson, Hilaire J; Blissitt, Patricia A

    2015-04-01

    Current evidence shows that fever and hyperthermia are especially detrimental to patients with neurologic injury, leading to higher rates of mortality, greater disability, and longer lengths of stay. Although clinical practice guidelines exist for ischemic stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and traumatic brain injury, they lack specificity in their recommendations for fever management, making it difficult to formulate appropriate protocols for care. Using survey methods, the aims of this study were to (a) describe how nursing practices for fever management in this population have changed over the last several years, (b) assess if institutional protocols and nursing judgment follow published national guidelines for fever management in neuroscience patients, and (c) explore whether nurse or institutional characteristics influence decision making. Compared with the previous survey administered in 2007, there was a small increase (8%) in respondents reporting having an institutional fever protocol specific to neurologic patients. Temperatures to initiate treatment either based on protocols or nurse determination did not change from the previous survey. However, nurses with specialty certification and/or working in settings with institutional awards (e.g., Magnet status or Stroke Center Designation) initiated therapy at a lower temperature. Oral acetaminophen continues to be the primary choice for fever management, followed by ice packs and fans. This study encourages the development of a stepwise approach to neuro-specific protocols for fever management. Furthermore, it shows the continuing need to promote further education and specialty training among nurses and encourage collaboration with physicians to establish best practices. PMID:25634653

  1. Educational Changes to Support Advanced Practice Nursing Education

    PubMed Central

    LeFlore, Judy L.; Thomas, Patricia E.

    2016-01-01

    Educational factors limit the number of advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) graduates to meet the growing workforce demands. Healthcare dynamics are necessitating a shift in how nursing education envisions, creates, and implements clinical learning opportunities. The current clinical education model in APRN programs continues to be the same as it was 45 years ago when the student numbers were much smaller. New approaches in graduate nursing education are needed to address the shortage of APRNs in primary and acute care areas. Determining competency based on the number of clinical hours can be inefficient, ineffective, and costly and limits the ability to increase capacity. Little research exists in graduate nursing education to support the effectiveness and efficiency of current hours of clinical required for nurse practitioner students. Simulation and academic-practice partnership models can offer innovative approaches to nurse practitioner education for clinical training, with the goal of producing graduates who can provide safe, quality care within the complex practice-based environment of the nation's evolving healthcare system. PMID:27465446

  2. The informatics nurse specialist as change agent. Application of innovation-diffusion theory.

    PubMed

    Hilz, L M

    2000-01-01

    The informatics nurse specialist (INS) is often the primary change agent in facilitating the implementation of clinical information systems (CIS) in healthcare settings. The INS has a unique understanding of the nursing issues that can affect the change process, and thus is in a key position to facilitate positive implementation outcomes. Innovation-diffusion theory is particularly useful in its application to the change agent role of the INS. With this theoretical knowledge, the INS can design CIS training interventions according to the psychological phenomena of Rogers' Innovation-Decision Process. An understanding of the decision-making process and the distribution of different rates of innovation adoption within a given population enable the INS to anticipate and address influential factors that affect the implementation process. Thus, Innovation-Diffusion Theory may be used as a powerful cognitive tool for the INS in facilitating the diffusion process and nurses' adoption of the technology in practice. PMID:11105401

  3. Practice Theory: Viewing Leadership as Leading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Jane; Kemmis, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by Theodore Schatzki's "societist" approach--in which he advocates a notion of "site ontologies"--in this article, we outline our theory of practice architectures (a theory about what practices are composed of) and ecologies of practices (how practices relate to one another). Drawing on case studies of four Australian…

  4. Nurse Education and Communities of Practice. Researching Professional Education Research Reports Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkitt, Ian; Husband, Charles; Mackenzie, Jennifer; Torn, Alison

    The processes whereby nurses develop the skills and knowledge required to deliver individualized and holistic care were examined in a 2-year study of nurses in a range of clinical settings and a university department of nursing in England. Members of two research teams of qualified nurses joined various communities of nursing practice as…

  5. Compass and Prerequisite Course Scores as Predictors of Success in Practical Nursing School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, Toni L. Early

    2010-01-01

    The nursing shortage is compounded by nursing student attrition. Schools of nursing have limited enrollment, making the admission process an important factor in resolving the ongoing nursing shortage. The purpose of this study was to identify preadmission criteria that accurately identify applicants to practical/vocational nursing (P/VN) schools…

  6. Dealing with the patient's body in nursing: nurses' ambiguous experience in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Picco, Elisa; Santoro, Roberto; Garrino, Lorenza

    2010-03-01

    The core of nursing in western countries is interaction with the patient and with his/her body in particular. As all nursing practices revolve around caring for the patient's body, nurses need to understand the frailty of the body, the intimacy surrounding it, the story it tells, as well as the discomfort and difficulties both illness and close contact can generate in the nurse-patient relationship. With this study, we wanted to explore the ward experiences of a small group of nurses in their day-to-day interaction with patients and their bodies, to highlight their perceptions and possible difficulties in providing care. We collected qualitative data from in-depth interviews with 14 nurses working in departments of general internal medicine, neurology, and geriatrics. The interviews were conducted between April and June 2006 and interpreted using an interpretive phenomenological approach. Analysis of the interview transcripts revealed that while the nurses recognize the centrality of the body in nursing, they also expressed a certain ambiguity toward it: being able to improve a patient's well-being through attentive care to the body is a major source of job satisfaction, but various coping and defense strategies are deployed to overcome care-giving situations that elicit avoidance or refusal reactions to the patient's body. PMID:20137029

  7. Grounded theory in medical laboratory science expert practice development.

    PubMed

    Leibach, Elizabeth Kenimer

    2011-01-01

    Grounded theory and methods related to expert practice development in medical laboratory science were described using data from a large national survey of medical laboratory scientists (MLS) overlaid on findings from analysis of expert practice domains reported in nursing literature. An extensive focus group/expert review iterative process followed by a survey of MLS practitioners produced 25 critical thinking (CT) behaviors important in expert practice. Factor analysis was applied to discern common threads or themes linking the CT behaviors. The 25 important CT behaviors were reduced to a 7-factor structure representing constructs underlying the individual, observable CT behaviors. This 7-factor structure in MLS was compared to the 7 practice domains identified in expert nursing practice. The comparison yielded commonality between MLS and nursing in CT behaviors observed in the 7 expert practice domains of both professions: professional techniques, caring communication, growing professionally, setting priorities, practicing with judgment, anticipating/revising, and creating unique meaning. Emergent grounded theory is that (1) critical thinking is a metaprocess that facilitates learning by interlinking the more basic processes associated with different learning orientations: cognitivist, behaviorist, humanist (affective), and situated/contextual learning, (2) CT behaviors are observable events following from the CT metaprocess, and (3) observations of CT behaviors increase as practice advances from novice to expert. Identification and definition of CT behaviors, i.e., practice competencies, along the continuum of novice to expert can serve as the foundation for MLS curriculum and instructional design as well as measurement and evaluation in both formal and continuing education settings. PMID:22420229

  8. Licensed Practical Nurses' Sex Role Stereotypes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallston, Barbara Strudler; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Examined whether sex-role stereotypes would affect nurses' (N=32) attitudes toward simulations of male and female patients. Emotional style and patients' diagnosis were manipulated. Results showed significant sex-role differences and stereotypical attitudes. Male patients were rated more positively, and were more likely to possess traditional male…

  9. Infusing Theory into Practice, Practice into Theory: Small Wins and Big Gains for Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rog, Debra J.

    2015-01-01

    This article illustrates the synergistic role between practice and theory in evaluation. Using reflective practice, the author reviews her own work as well as the work of other evaluators to illustrate how theory can influence practice and, in turn, how evaluation practice can inform and grow theory, especially evaluation theory. The following…

  10. Minority nursing student success: A grounded theory case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mister, Brenda J.

    There has been a dramatic increase in the nation's racial and ethnic minority populations over recent years. This increase is placing a higher demand on the health care industry to provide culturally competent care to these diverse populations. This challenge is met with yet another problem as the nation faces a critical shortage of nurses, particularly minority nurses. This shortage is only expected to worsen over the next several years. As schools of nursing across the country are being asked to increase the number of nursing program graduates, specifically minorities, they are confronted with a double edged sword as retention rates are decreasing, and attrition rates are increasing. This is particularly troublesome when many racial and ethnic minority nursing students do not graduate. This qualitative study was implemented to assess and understand the perceived educational experiences of racial and ethnic minority nursing students enrolled in a rural community college nursing program on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. Eight voluntary nursing students who identified themselves as either a racial or ethnic minority participated in the study. Data were collected by: individual audio-taped interview sessions; audio-taped focus group sessions; and documentation of field notes. Participants also provided demographic information and were asked to provide a brief written response to a scenario regarding increasing the recruitment and retention rates of minority nursing students. All data were analyzed utilizing the constant comparative method. Results of the study revealed six different themes: personal support systems and peer relationships; college services and academic resources; faculty support; cultural understanding versus cultural insensitivity; personal attributes of self-efficacy/advice for future nursing students; and suggestions for college and nursing program improvement. After the major themes were examined one central theme, a grounded theory, was born. The

  11. The Personal Narrative of a Nurse: A Journey Through Practice.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Sharon L

    2016-06-01

    This article examines my phases of holistic learning concerning how I became a nurse, using story presented in a personal narrative style. I have incorporated my own stories to elaborate my journey. First, my early life in the East End of London and how this influenced my becoming a nurse. Second, I give an account of my journey through practice, where I examine how I developed my own learning from professional practice, drawing on some personal illustrations presented as stories. I have set out to explore how my stories of practice have influenced my progress, and I present a personal account of such learning in general from the lens of a nurse educator. PMID:26025093

  12. Moral Exemplars in Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zagzebski, Linda

    2013-01-01

    In this article I outline an original form of ethical theory that I call exemplarist virtue theory. The theory is intended to serve the philosophical purposes of a comprehensive moral theory, but it is also intended to serve the practical purpose of moral education by structuring the theory around a motivating emotion--the emotion of admiration.…

  13. Critical theory and its contribution to the nursing discipline.

    PubMed

    Mosqueda-Díaz, Angélica; Vílchez-Barboza, Vivian; Valenzuela-Suazo, Sandra; Sanhueza-Alvarado, Olivia

    2014-01-01

    This article reflects on the Critical theory, stemming from the most important philosophical concepts and the modifications it has endured over time. Thereafter, we expose the contribution of the Critical theory to Nursing. This emphasizes on the contextual analysis of the phenomena and it is a self-critique to prevent dogmatisms and totalitarianisms. It postulates that in order to establish a truth, we must consider the historical conditions within which said truth emerges. Jürgen Habermas, with his Theory of Communicative Action, reorients the original postulates of the Critical theory, making it more coherent from the social point of view, through the Guiding Interests of Knowledge. Nursing professionals who follow the Critical theory highlight the need to improve the description of the construction of knowledge with an emancipating and liberating purpose, which permits Nursing to provide responses to approach reality through a global and dialectic vision and from a democratic position of knowledge, construct research from the social situational reality that is part of its daily experience; everything that can be unified as a "Philosophy of Nursing Care", which should be incorporated onto the professional formation of the discipline and onto the research area. PMID:25230045

  14. Evaluation of Evidence-based Nursing Pain Management Practice.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenjia; Eaton, Linda H; Gordon, Debra B; Hoyle, Christine; Doorenbos, Ardith Z

    2015-08-01

    It is important to ensure that cancer pain management is based on the best evidence. Nursing evidence-based pain management can be examined through an evaluation of pain documentation. The aim of this study was to modify and test an evaluation tool for nursing cancer pain documentation, and describe the frequency and quality of nursing pain documentation in one oncology unit via the electronic medical system. A descriptive cross-sectional design was used for this study at an oncology unit of an academic medical center in the Pacific Northwest. Medical records were examined for 37 adults hospitalized during April and May 2013. Nursing pain documentations (N = 230) were reviewed using an evaluation tool modified from the Cancer Pain Practice Index to consist of 13 evidence-based pain management indicators, including pain assessment, care plan, pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions, monitoring and treatment of analgesic side effects, communication with physicians, and patient education. Individual nursing documentation was assigned a score ranging from 0 (worst possible) to 13 (best possible), to reflect the delivery of evidence-based pain management. The participating nurses documented 90% of the recommended evidence-based pain management indicators. Documentation was suboptimal for pain reassessment, pharmacologic interventions, and bowel regimen. The study results provide implications for enhancing electronic medical record design and highlight a need for future research to understand the reasons for suboptimal nursing documentation of cancer pain management. For the future use of the data evaluation tool, we recommend additional modifications according to study settings. PMID:26256215

  15. Oncology nurses' use of nondrug pain interventions in practice.

    PubMed

    Kwekkeboom, Kristine L; Bumpus, Molly; Wanta, Britt; Serlin, Ronald C

    2008-01-01

    Cancer pain management guidelines recommend nondrug interventions as adjuvants to analgesic medications. Although physicians typically are responsible for pharmacologic pain treatments, oncology staff nurses, who spend considerable time with patients, are largely responsible for identifying and implementing nondrug pain treatments. Oncology nurses' use of nondrug interventions, however, has not been well studied. The purpose of this study was to describe oncology nurses' use of four nondrug interventions (music, guided imagery, relaxation, distraction) and to identify factors that influence their use in practice. A national sample of 724 oncology staff nurses completed a mailed survey regarding use of the nondrug interventions in practice, beliefs about the interventions, and demographic characteristics. The percentages of nurses who reported administering the strategies in practice at least sometimes were 54% for music, 40% for guided imagery, 82% for relaxation, and 80% for distraction. Use of each nondrug intervention was predicted by a composite score on beliefs about effectiveness of the intervention (e.g., perceived benefit; P<0.025) and a composite score on beliefs about support for carrying out the intervention (e.g., time; P<0.025). In addition, use of guided imagery was predicted by a composite score on beliefs about characteristics of patients who may benefit from the intervention (e.g., cognitive ability; P<0.05). Some nurse demographic, professional preparation, and practice environment characteristics also predicted use of individual nondrug interventions. Efforts to improve application of nondrug interventions should focus on innovative educational strategies, problem solving to secure support, and development and testing of new delivery methods that require less time from busy staff nurses. PMID:17959348

  16. E-Mentoring: Confidence Intervention for Senior Nursing Students Preparing for Readiness to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaRose, Patrick S., Sr.

    2013-01-01

    The role of the registered nurse has evolved over the years as technology has changed and the practice of nursing has advanced. There are many factors that influence how a new nurse enters practice; however, confidence appears to play a large role in the way nursing students see themselves and how this self perception regulates transition to…

  17. [Nursing and the environmental question: proposal of a theoretical model for the professional practice].

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, M C; Bertolozzi, M R

    1999-01-01

    Considering the side effects of environmental changes over the population's health, a theoretical model is proposed in this study in order to incorporate ecologic matters into the nursing practices. The reference for this work is the eco-socialist-marxist theory. The model is based on the analysis of the capitalist economic process, its production technologies and consumption. It is known that this economic model generates ecoinequalities and anthropogenic impacts that rebound on the health-disease profile of the population. The nursing action, permeated by ecological awareness, can prevent and also combat ecoinequalities and destructive human actions on the environment. PMID:12138633

  18. Informal Theory: The Ignored Link in Theory-to-Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Applying theory to practice in student affairs is dominated by the assumption that formal theory is directly applied to practice. Among the problems with this assumption is that many practitioners believe they must choose between their lived experiences and formal theory, and that graduate students are taught that their experience "does not…

  19. An overview of Medicare reimbursement regulations for advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Frakes, Michael A; Evans, Tracylain

    2006-01-01

    The federal government spends nearly 15% of the budget on Medicare services annually, and advanced practice nurses are eligible for reimbursement from that pool. The regulations governing reimbursement are complex because of the social, political, and financial pressures involved in their development. Although economic viability and due diligence considerations make it incumbent on advanced practice nurses to understand the rules, the profession, as a whole, has knowledge deficits in this area. The essentials of regulatory development and structure are reviewed and considerations for optimizing reimbursement are described. PMID:16676748

  20. Evidence-Based Practice and Quality Improvement in Nursing Education.

    PubMed

    Balakas, Karen; Smith, Joan R

    2016-01-01

    For more than a decade, nursing education has experienced several significant changes in response to challenges faced by healthcare organizations. Accrediting organizations have called for improved quality and safety in care, and the Institute of Medicine has identified evidence-based practice and quality improvement as 2 core competencies to include in the curricula for all healthcare professionals. However, the application of these competencies reaches far beyond the classroom setting. For nurses to possess the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to apply evidence-based practice and quality improvement to the real-world setting, academic-clinical institution partnerships are vital. PMID:27465447

  1. Sharing best practice in stoma care nursing.

    PubMed

    Willams, Julia

    A problem shared is a problem halved; a very poignant proverb that forms the essence of this year's World Council of Enterostomal Therapists (WCET) UK conference in Coventry. Sharing experiences from practice is invalid if clinical practice is to grow and develop. It raises awareness, offering the opportunity to question and review practice. Sharing practice offers opportunities to enquiring minds. PMID:19797996

  2. Nurses' perceived barriers to the implementation of a Fall Prevention Clinical Practice Guideline in Singapore hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Serena SL; Manias, Elizabeth; Hutchinson, Alison M; Donath, Susan; Johnston, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Background Theories of behavior change indicate that an analysis of barriers to change is helpful when trying to influence professional practice. The aim of this study was to assess the perceived barriers to practice change by eliciting nurses' opinions with regard to barriers to, and facilitators of, implementation of a Fall Prevention clinical practice guideline in five acute care hospitals in Singapore. Methods Nurses were surveyed to identify their perceptions regarding barriers to implementation of clinical practice guidelines in their practice setting. The validated questionnaire, 'Barriers and facilitators assessment instrument', was administered to nurses (n = 1830) working in the medical, surgical, geriatric units, at five acute care hospitals in Singapore. Results An 80.2% response rate was achieved. The greatest barriers to implementation of clinical practice guidelines reported included: knowledge and motivation, availability of support staff, access to facilities, health status of patients, and, education of staff and patients. Conclusion Numerous barriers to the use of the Fall Prevention Clinical Practice Guideline have been identified. This study has laid the foundation for further research into implementation of clinical practice guidelines in Singapore by identifying barriers to change in acute care settings. PMID:18485235

  3. Changes Resulting from Reflection Dialogues on Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Reiko; Fukada, Mika

    2014-01-01

    Background Reflection is defined here as a process by which, through self-conversation, one’s self and one’s behavior acquire meaning. However, people have limitations in terms of what they can express and be aware of during reflection. This finding points to the importance of facilitators. The purpose of this study was to determine what changes can be brought about through reflection dialogues on nursing practice. Methods The Participants were 9 nurses who worked at three institutions in City A, each with about 200 beds. Workplace topics were examined through self-reflections and reflection dialogues. The depth of reflection was assessed using the three levels of reflection described by Mezirow—{reflecting on the content}, {reflecting on the process} and {reflecting on the assumptions}. Results In reflecting on nursing practice, the participants were also divided into those who had already reached the highest level, {reflecting on assumptions}, via self-reflection, and those who remained at the level of {reflecting on processes}, despite the use of reflection dialogues. Conclusion The development of reflective thinking on nursing practice was connected not only to the participants’ desire to explore ways of accepting their individual experiences, but may also be connected to whether or not they are able to question themselves about their thoughts and preconceptions about nursing work. PMID:25067874

  4. Finding common ground in public health nursing education and practice.

    PubMed

    Keller, Linda O; Schaffer, Marjorie A; Schoon, Patricia M; Brueshoff, Bonnie; Jost, Rose

    2011-01-01

    Preparation of the public health nursing (PHN) workforce requires public health nurses from academia and practice to collaborate. However, a shortage of PHN clinical sites may lead to competition between schools of nursing for student placements. The Henry Street Consortium, a group of 5 baccalaureate schools of nursing and 13 local health departments in the state of Minnesota, developed a model for collaboration between PHN education and practice. This paper describes the development process--the forming, storming, norming, and performing stages--experienced by the Henry Street Consortium members. The consortium developed a set of entry-level core PHN competencies that are utilized by both education and practice. It developed menus of learning opportunities that were used to design population-based PHN clinical experiences. In addition, the consortium created a model for training and sustaining a preceptor network. The members of the Henry Street Consortium collaborated rather than competed, used consensus for decision making, and respected and accepted different points of view. This collaboration significantly impacted how schools of nursing and local health departments work together. The consortium's ability to retain its relevance, energy, and momentum for both academic and agency partners sustains the collaboration. PMID:21535112

  5. Reflective practice groups for nurses: a consultation liaison psychiatry nursing initiative: part 2--the evaluation.

    PubMed

    Dawber, Chris

    2013-06-01

    This paper outlines an evaluation of reflective practice groups (RPG) involving nurses and midwives from three clinical nursing specialties at Redcliffe and Caboolture Hospitals, Queensland, Australia. The groups were facilitated by the consultation liaison psychiatry nurse and author using a process-focused, whole-of-group approach to explore clinical narrative in a supportive group setting. This was a preliminary evaluation utilizing a recently-developed tool, the Clinical Supervision Evaluation Questionnaire, along with externally-facilitated focus groups. Nurses and midwives responded favourably to RPG, reporting a positive impact on clinical practice, self-awareness, and resilience. The majority of participants considered RPG had positive implications for team functioning. The focus groups identified the importance of facilitation style and the need to address aspects of workplace culture to enable group development and enhance the capacity for reflection. Evaluation of the data indicates this style of RPG can improve reflective thinking, promote team cohesion, and provide support for nurses and midwives working in clinical settings. Following on from this study, a second phase of research has commenced, providing more detailed, longitudinal evaluation across a larger, more diverse group of nurses. PMID:23020828

  6. Developing entry-to-practice nursing informatics competencies for registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Nagle, Lynn M; Crosby, Kristine; Frisch, Noreen; Borycki, Elizabeth; Donelle, Lorie; Hannah, Kathryn; Harris, Alexandra; Jetté, Sylvie; Shaben, Tracy

    2014-01-01

    Information and communication technologies (ICT) have brought about significant changes to the processes of health care delivery and changed how nurses perform in clinical, administrative, academic, and research settings. Because the potential benefits of ICT are significant, it is critical that new nurses have the knowledge and skills in informatics to provide safe and effective care. Despite the prevalence of technology in our day to day lives, and the potential significant benefits to patients, new nurses may not be prepared to work in this evolving reality. An important step in addressing this need for ICT preparation is to ensure that new graduates are entering the work force ready for technology-enabled care environments. In this paper, we describe the process and outcomes of developing informatics entry-to-practice competencies for adoption by Canadian Schools of Nursing. PMID:24943567

  7. Simulation in nursing practice: the impact on patient care.

    PubMed

    Aebersold, Michelle; Tschannen, Dana

    2013-01-01

    Simulation has a well-known history in the military, nuclear power, and aviation. It is also a recommended teaching and learning strategy supported by several landmark studies. Although in the past 20 years simulation has become more integrated into the education of nurses and physicians, it has not been as well integrated into the development of skills for practicing nurses. This article will provide an overview of simulation techniques and uses and review of selected simulation research. Despite recommendations for using simulation and growing integration of simulation into education, we still lack empirical evidence of its impact on patient outcomes. Our discussion provides a review of the current uses of simulation in the nursing practice environment with several exemplars and offers recommendations to develop a simulation program. PMID:23758424

  8. Preparing African American nurses for graduate school: practical tips.

    PubMed

    Jones, Diana P

    2009-01-01

    Returning to school for an advanced degree in nursing is a major lifetime decision and a new phase in life, whether you set an academic, career or professional goal. As in any new experience some degree of anxiety is to be expected and could result in frustration and uncertainty. For some African American students navigating the application process can be a challenging experience. However by following a few practical tips and using a variety of resources, your experience can be an exhilarating and a successful accomplishment. The primary aim of this article is to delineate strategies for academic success with a focus on African American students who are considering graduate education in nursing. This article offers practical help on how to get started in selecting a graduate nursing program, details on navigating the application process, and suggested approaches for surviving in graduate school. PMID:19715227

  9. The Doctor of Nursing Practice: defining the next steps.

    PubMed

    Grey, Margaret

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to summarize the previous articles in this special issue of the Journal of Nursing Education that are based on the Committee on Institutional Cooperation's Dean's Conference on the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) and to identify areas of consensus, as well as areas of controversy. Areas of consensus include the high level of interest in DNP programs and the intent to expand the role of the advanced practice nurse to population health, policy, and leadership. Areas of controversy include the nature of the DNP product, the definition of clinical experiences, the nature of the capstone project, the outcomes of these new practitioners, and the impact on schools. Suggestions for achieving higher levels of consensus, including the need for respective, inclusive dialogue, are provided. PMID:23875725

  10. Curriculum Models and Competencies. Associate Degree Nursing and Nursing Education Options: Associate Degree with Practical Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardee, Vercie M.; Worthington, Roger G.

    Four associate degree nursing curriculums are presented, along with competencies, program guidelines, and job opportunities identified as those appropriate for the associate degree nursing programs offered in the North Carolina community college system. Chapter I introduces North Carolina's curriculum development project and the phases in which…

  11. Emergency nurse practitioners' perceptions of their role and scope of practice: is it advanced practice?

    PubMed

    McConnell, Donna; Slevin, Oliver D; McIlfatrick, Sonja J

    2013-04-01

    There are multiple interpretations of the nurse practitioner role which appear to be shaped by discourses within and outside the profession and its regulatory body. This study aimed to explore and clarify the role and scope of practice of emergency nurse practitioners in a region in the United Kingdom and determine if they fulfil the proposed criteria for Advanced Nurse Practitioners. A survey approach using questionnaires (n=42) was adopted. The sample included all emergency nurse practitioners working in Accident and Emergency Departments and Minor Injury Units in the region. Statistical data was analysed using SPSS for Windows and qualitative data was content analysed for themes. Results revealed a variation in education. Investigation of role typology and scope of practice revealed a relatively homogenous group where the clinical aspect of the role dominated. The scope of practice was perceived to be influenced by internal factors such as competence; however protocol use, referral rights and prescribing authority could be considered ways that nursing management and medical staff indirectly control the role. Findings suggested that emergency nurse practitioners were working at a level significantly beyond registration, yet do not fulfil the Nursing and Midwifery Council proposed criteria for Advanced Nurse Practitioner. PMID:23615513

  12. Use of Evidence-Based Practice in School Nursing: Survey of School Nurses at a National Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Primary and acute care settings are the focus of a concerted effort to implement evidence-based practice (EBP) in health care; yet, little attention has been given to use of EBP among school nurses. The aims of this study were to (a) describe current use of EBP among school nurses attending a national school nurse conference, (b) describe…

  13. Nursing Practice With Incarcerated Women: A Focused Comparative Review of the Nursing and Feminist Literature.

    PubMed

    Hardill, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    Nurses who practice with criminalized women will recognize this group as profoundly marginalized through multiple, intersecting mechanisms. The number of women imprisoned in North America, Latin America, Australia, and Western Europe continues to rise as it has for the past 20 years or more. As a nurse who has practiced almost exclusively with marginalized people, I have met and cared for many women whose health is made vulnerable by race, poverty, homelessness, mental health issues, and other factors. Many of them have been repeatedly incarcerated, experiencing chronically destabilizing cycles of getting arrested, going to jail, getting out, being homeless, getting arrested again, and repeating the cycle. To better understand the implications for nursing with respect to criminalized women, a focused review of the nursing and feminist scholarly literature on incarcerated women was conducted. The predominant themes and trends from both bodies of literature are presented and cross-compared. An analysis of what each body of scholarly work can offer to the other, including implications for nursing practice, concludes the literature review. PMID:26204484

  14. Achieving army nursing evidence-based practice competencies through a civilian-military nurse partnership.

    PubMed

    Siaki, Leilani A; Lentino, Cynthia V; Mark, Debra D; Hopkins-Chadwick, Denise L

    2014-01-01

    Despite the Institute of Medicine's goal of 90% of all practice being evidence-based by 2020, educational and practice institutions are not on target to achieve this goal. Evidence-based practice is one of 5 core elements of the Army Nurse Corps' patient care delivery system and a key focus of the Hawaii State Center for Nursing. In order to increase evidence-based practice (EBP), a civilian-military partnership was formed to include healthcare organizations in the state, optimize resources, and share strategies for successful practice changes statewide. The partnership has been successful in meeting each of these goals using national EBP competencies and Bloom's taxonomy as a guide. The article presents a discussion regarding the history, processes, and outcomes of this partnership. PMID:24488872

  15. NPACE nurse practitioner practice characteristics, salary, and benefits survey: 1999. Nurse Practitioner Associates for Continuing Education.

    PubMed

    Pulcini, J; Vampola, D

    2000-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to present the results of a practice characteristics, salary, and benefits survey of 1,557 nurse practitioners from the United States who attended national nurse practitioner conferences in Las Vegas, Nevada, Orlando, Florida, Chicago, Illinois, and Boston, Massachusetts, in 1999. Specific data are presented on the demographics of the population, practice characteristics and responsibilities, benefits for full- and part-time employees, and salary by region, years of practice, type of certification, and location of the practice. The salary data were compared with the 1995-1996 and 1996-1997 NPACE practice characteristics, salary, and benefits surveys (Pulcini & Fitzgerald, 1997; Pulcini, Vampola, & Fitzgerald, 1998). PMID:11858321

  16. Practice of preventive dentistry for nursing staff in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Acuña-Reyes, Raquel; Cigarroa-Martínez, Didier; Ureña-Bogarín, Enrique; Orgaz-Fernández, Jose David

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Determine the domain of preventive dentistry in nursing personnel assigned to a primary care unit. Methods: Prospective descriptive study, questionnaire validation, and prevalence study. In the first stage, the questionnaire for the practice of preventive dentistry (CPEP, for the term in Spanish) was validated; consistency and reliability were measured by Cronbach's alpha, Pearson's correlation, factor analysis with intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). In the second stage, the domain in preventive dental nurses was explored. Results: The overall internal consistency of CPEP is α= 0.66, ICC= 0.64, CI95%: 0.29-0.87 (p >0.01). Twenty-one subjects in the study, average age 43, 81.0% female, average seniority of 12.5 were included. A total of 71.5% showed weak domain, 28.5% regular domain, and there was no questionnaire with good domain result. The older the subjects were, the smaller the domain; female nurses showed greater mastery of preventive dentistry (29%, CI95%: 0.1-15.1) than male nurses. Public health nurses showed greater mastery with respect to other categories (50%, CI95%: 0.56-2.8). Conclusions: The CDEP has enough consistency to explore the domain of preventive dentistry in health-care staff. The domain of preventive dentistry in primary care nursing is poor, required to strengthen to provide education in preventive dentistry to the insured population. PMID:25386037

  17. Advanced nursing practice and Newton's three laws of motion.

    PubMed

    Sturgeon, David

    This article considers the reasons for the development of advanced practice roles among nurses and other healthcare professions. It explores the implications of financial constraints, consumer preferences and the development of new healthcare services on the reorganization of professional boundaries. It makes use of Sir Isaac Newton's three laws of motion to demonstrate how professional development in nursing has taken place in response to a number of external influences and demands. It also considers the significance of skill mix for the nursing profession, in particular the development and likely expansion of the physician assistant role. The application of different professionals and grades within a healthcare team or organization is central to the Government's Agenda for Change proposals and nurses have successfully adopted a number of roles traditionally performed by doctors. Nurses have demonstrated that they are capable of providing high quality care and contributing directly to positive patient outcome. Advanced nursing roles should not only reflect the changing nature of healthcare work, they should also be actively engaged in reconstructing healthcare boundaries. PMID:18773586

  18. Reforming the practice of nurses: decolonization or getting out from under.

    PubMed

    Huntington, A; Gilmour, J; O'Connell, A

    1996-08-01

    The practice of nurses has been formed and informed by many disciplinary discourses. We argue that this leads to the subjugation and colonization of nurses' practices and the discipline. By debating and challenging current development in knowledge the opportunity is created for nurses to reform representations of our practices in a way that can privilege diversity, complexity and ambiguity. In particular, modernism and postmodernism are critiqued to highlight the impact of particular philosophical traditions on the practices of nurses. PMID:8858442

  19. [Nurses and the Mercosul regulations and control of professional practice].

    PubMed

    Vieira, A L

    1998-01-01

    A study comparing the regulation and control of the professional practice of nurses in Brasil, Argentina, Uruguay and Paraguay, delineating their particularities, differences and similarities in the perspective of the implementation of the Cone Sul Common Market, which presupposes the free circulation of workers in the workplaces of the member-countries of the Ascnsion Treaty. PMID:10776275

  20. Exploring nursing students’ experience of peer learning in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Ravanipour, Maryam; Bahreini, Masoud; Ravanipour, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Peer learning is an educational process wherein someone of the same age or level of experience level interacts with other students interested in the same topic. There is limited evidence specifically focusing on the practical use of peer learning in Iran. The aim of this study was to explore nursing students’ experiences of peer learning in clinical practice. Materials and Methods: A qualitative content analysis was conducted. Focus groups were used to find the students’ experiences about peerlearning. Twenty-eight baccalaureate nursing students at Bushehr University of Medical Sciences were selected purposively, and were arranged in four groups of seven students each. The focus group interviews were conducted using a semi-structured interview schedule. All interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using conventional content analysis method. Results: The analysis identified four themes: Paradoxical dualism, peer exploitation, first learning efficacy, and socialization practice. Gained advantages and perceived disadvantages created paradoxical dualism, and peer exploitation resulted from peer selection and peer training. Conclusion: Nursing students reported general satisfaction concerning peer learning due to much more in-depth learning with little stress than conventional learning methods. Peer learning is a useful method for nursing students for practicing educational leadership and learning the clinical skills before they get a job. PMID:26097860

  1. Missouri Responses to the Advanced Practice Nurse Role.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armer, Jane M.

    1997-01-01

    A randomly drawn statewide sample of 891 Missouri consumers revealed overall support for the advance practice nurse role to be greater than 75%. Seeking health care consumers' reactions to proposed alternatives is a crucial step in planning and implementing a program of health care reform that will meet current and future health needs. (Author)

  2. [The ethical concerns of the private practice nurse].

    PubMed

    Pivot, Annie

    2015-12-01

    Ethics, by its definition, is a philosophical discipline which enables human beings to behave, to act and to be, in the best way possible, between themselves and towards their environment. In private nursing practice, the ethical dimension is based on personal reflection which enables each individual to adapt their attitude in order to act for the best. PMID:26675108

  3. Practical Nursing. Volume II. Health Occupations Education. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Helen V.; Reid-Sloan, Jamee

    This curriculum guide, revised from a 1975 edition, provides teachers with up-to-date information and skill-related applications needed by practical nurses. It includes 4 sections and 24 instructional units. Each unit of instruction consists of eight basic components: performance objectives, teacher activities, information sheets, assignment…

  4. Intravenous Therapy Instruction for Licensed Practical Nurses. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, Pam; Carey, Jean

    This Idaho instructor's guide lists tasks and enabling objectives, outlines instruction, and provides handout masters, overhead masters, and tests for intravenous therapy (IV) instruction for licensed practical nurses. Following an introduction and a list of criteria for successful completion of IV therapy courses, the document lists tasks and…

  5. Nurses in Practice: A Perspective on Work Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Marcella Z., Ed.; And Others

    A major portion of the collection of 20 readings authored by practicing professionals consists of field observations presented both as raw data (field notes) and as analyzed and organized data. About the work of nurses in a variety of settings, a recurrent theme is that work behavior is greatly influenced by organizational and structural elements…

  6. Mobile Learning in Nursing Practice Education: Applying Koole's FRAME Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, Richard F.; Van Neste-Kenny, Jocelyne M. C.; Park, Caroline L.; Burton, Pamela A.; Meiers, Jan

    2009-01-01

    We report here on an exploratory formative evaluation of a project to integrate mobile learning into a Western Canadian college nursing program. Third-year students used Hewlett Packard iPAQ mobile devices for five weeks in a practice education course in April-May, 2007. Koole's (2009) "Framework for the Rational Analysis of Mobile Education"…

  7. A Review of the Characteristics of Practical Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goard, Dean S.

    This paper describes the first part of a study concerned with student success in a practical nursing course offered in the British Columbia Vocational School in Nelson. The study resulted from a concern about the increased number of students who did not complete the training during the year 1969. The procedure involved transfering student data…

  8. Deweyan Inquiry: From Education Theory to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, James Scott

    2009-01-01

    This book presents John Dewey's theory of inquiry and applies it to various areas of the primary, middle, and secondary school curricula. "Deweyan Inquiry" brings Dewey's theory of inquiry together with educational theory and practice. James Scott Johnston uses Dewey's late masterpiece "Logic: The Theory of Inquiry" as a guide and looks at inquiry…

  9. Are we preparing student nurses for final practice placement?

    PubMed

    Morrell, Nicola; Ridgway, Victoria

    The aims of this research were to illuminate student nurses' perceptions of preparedness for final practice placement, and to ascertain factors that supported and hindered preparation for final placement practice. This phenomenological qualitative research was carried out in a UK higher education institution (HEI) with eight adult branch student nurses maintaining written diaries for the first 4 weeks of their final 10-week practice placement. Data were then analysed by means of an interpretive phenomenological approach (IPA). Results showed that students felt ill-prepared for placement. Eight clear themes emerged, including: being used as 'an extra pair of hands'; mentors appearing to treat student practice documentation as unimportant; and high staff expectations. Other themes were: mentor importance; students feeling that they lacked knowledge; and students feeling unsupported and stressed. In conclusion, although students felt that they lacked knowledge and were used as an extra pair of hands, they did show clinical competence. PMID:24851915

  10. Clinical placements in general practice: relationships between practice nurses and tertiary institutions.

    PubMed

    Peters, Kathleen; Halcomb, Elizabeth J; McInnes, Susan

    2013-05-01

    As a practice-based discipline a key component of undergraduate nurse education is clinical practice experience. The quality of clinical experiences has a significant impact on the students' ability to function competently post graduation. The relationship between higher education institutions (HEIs) and health service placement providers impacts upon the quality of clinical placements. In Australia, the growth of primary care nursing and the shortage of acute clinical places has prompted HEIs to explore the placement of students in general practice. Given the increasing attention being paid to non-traditional clinical placements, it is timely to explore how universities are establishing relationships and models of clinical placement. This paper uses qualitative research methods to explore the perspectives of 12 Australian general practice nurses who have experience in facilitating undergraduate clinical placements about the relationships between HEIs and nurses. Findings are presented in the following three themes: (1) Appropriate preparation for placement: They don't know what primary health really means, (2) Seeking greater consultation in the organisation of clinical placements: they've got to do it one way for everyone, and (3) Uncertainty and lack of support: I had no contact with the university. Clinical placements in general practice can be an innovative strategy providing non-traditional, yet high quality, teaching and learning experiences for undergraduate nursing students. To optimise the quality of these placements, however, it is essential that HEIs provide appropriate support to the practice nurses mentoring these students. PMID:23069694

  11. Postcolonial theory, nursing knowledge, and the development of emancipatory knowing.

    PubMed

    Bickford, Deanna

    2014-01-01

    Nurses must assume a leadership role in confronting inequitable access to health care. This imperative is realizable through contributions to the knowledge of the discipline, reflecting on the profession's mandate for social justice and elimination of health inequities, as well as embracing the diversity of nursing's fundamental patterns of knowing. Emancipatory knowing involves critically examining social, political, and institutional structures to uncover social injustices and inequities and disrupt the status quo, as well as asking critical questions. Postcolonial theory, aligned with these foundational principles, can be used to answer such critical questions, thus contributing to the advancement of disciplinary knowledge. PMID:25102212

  12. Reflection and moral maturity in a nurse's caring practice: a critical perspective.

    PubMed

    Sumner, Jane

    2010-07-01

    The likelihood of nurse reflection is examined from the theoretical perspectives of Habermas' Theory of Communicative Action and Moral Action and Sumner's Moral Construct of Caring in Nursing as Communicative Action, through a critical social theory lens. The argument is made that until the nurse reaches the developmental level of post-conventional moral maturity and/or Benner's Stage 5: expert, he or she is not capable of being inwardly directed reflective on self. The three developmental levels of moral maturity and Benner's stages are presented with discussion on whether or not there can be self-reflection because of an innate vulnerability that leads to self-protective behaviours. It is only when the confidence from mastery of practice has been achieved can the nurse be comfortable with reflection that enables him or her to become enlightened, emancipated, and empowered. The influences and constraints of the knowledge power between nurse and patient are acknowledged. The power hierarchy of the institution is recognized as constraining. PMID:20536765

  13. Analysis the Nursing Documentation of the Observation Plans and Practices of Breast Cancer Using Nursing NAVI.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Manami; Tsuru, Satoko; Omori, Miho; Sudo, Kumiko; Wako, Fumiko

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed in nursing observation planning and practices circumstances of a breast cancer patient using the Nursing NAVI® Contents. The result of this analyzed were clearly that the master plan item was satisfying a vital signature, so it could be practiced 100%. But even if the observation item of in-out balance were not records so the implementation rate of the 50%, comparison with the Nursing NAVI® Contents. About the item esteemed as required item, like, the thing with the low observation implementation rate became clear. We found that problem about estrangement of the difference between the planning the observation drafting and the implementation. The implementation item can see a little tendency much, and later, the plan item will be also a problem about the current state to which the necessary item is inferior. PMID:27332490

  14. Accountability in nursing: reflecting on ethical codes and professional standards of nursing practice from a global perspective.

    PubMed

    Milton, Constance L

    2008-10-01

    The concept of accountability is a concept closely aligned with public trust and confidence with a healthcare discipline. It is of vital importance to the discipline of nursing to define and examine the obligations and duties of professional nurse. The term is referred to and often defined through international and national professional codes of nursing and in standards of nursing practice documents. This column will begin exploration of the concept with offering a definition from a humanbecoming perspective. PMID:18953006

  15. Practical Nursing Curriculum Advisory Committee Report Including Suggested Philosophy, Suggested Competencies, Geriatric Care Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Univ., Iowa City. Coll. of Education.

    A study was made of the current and future role of practical nurses and the curricula used to prepare these nurses in the 16 programs in Iowa. A statewide committee of 14 persons involved in hiring, employing, and controlling practical nurse practice was formed. Between Fall 1987 and Spring 1989, the committee gathered and analyzed information and…

  16. The University of Iowa Nursing Collaboratory: A Partnership for Creative Education and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dreher, Melanie; Everett, Linda; Hartwig, Sally Mathis

    2001-01-01

    A nursing college and its clinical partners created the Nursing Collaboratory to generate, disseminate, and apply knowledge to practice through four domains: education, research, practice, and informatics. It serves as an incubator for innovative products and services that enhance nursing education and practice. (SK)

  17. Understanding partnership practice in child and family nursing through the concept of practice architectures.

    PubMed

    Hopwood, Nick; Fowler, Cathrine; Lee, Alison; Rossiter, Chris; Bigsby, Marg

    2013-09-01

    A significant international development agenda in the practice of nurses supporting families with young children focuses on establishing partnerships between professionals and service users. Qualitative data were generated through interviews and focus groups with 22 nurses from three child and family health service organisations, two in Australia and one in New Zealand. The aim was to explore what is needed in order to sustain partnership in practice, and to investigate how the concept of practice architectures can help understand attempts to enhance partnerships between nurses and families. Implementation of the Family Partnership Model (FPM) is taken as a specific point of reference. Analysis highlights a number of tensions between the goals of FPM and practice architectures relating to opportunities for ongoing learning; the role of individual nurses in shaping the practice; relationships with peers and managers; organisational features; and extra-organisational factors. The concept of practice architectures shows how changing practice requires more than developing individual knowledge and skills, and avoids treating individuals and context separately. The value of this framework for understanding change with reference to context rather than just individual's knowledge and skills is demonstrated, particularly with respect to approaches to practice development focused on providing additional training to nurses. PMID:23336287

  18. Tracing detached and attached care practices in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Soffer, Ann Katrine B

    2014-07-01

    The implementation of skills labs in Danish nursing education can, in itself, be viewed as a complexity. The students are expected to eventually carry out their work in a situated hospital practice, but they learn their professional skills in a different space altogether, detached and removed from the hospitals and practising on plastic dummies. Despite the apparent artificiality of the skills lab, this article will show that it is possible to analyse some of the fundamental aspects of care in nursing by ethnographically following this phenomenon of simulation-based training. These particular aspects of care are not explicated in the curriculum or textbooks; however, they surfaced once this crooked approach to studying care in a simulated practice was applied. The article start from the assertion that detached engagements are not recognized within the field of nursing education as an equal component to attachments. Yet empirical cases from the skills lab and hospitals illustrate how students sometimes felt emotionally attached to plastic dummies and how experienced nurses sometimes practised a degree of detachment in relation to human patients. Detached engagements will therefore be presented as part of care practices of nurses - rendering the ability to detach in engagement with patients a professional skill that students also need to learn. In the analysis to follow, attached and detached engagements are located on an equal plane by integrating both into the same conceptual framework, rather than imposing a priori notions about their dialectic relation. The analysis shows that it is the particular intertwinement of attachment and detachment that gives care its fundamental meaning. In conclusion, the need for a conceptual shift from a strong emphasis on attached engagement to a more balanced analytical approach to care work, as involving both attached and detached engagement within Danish nursing education, is advocated. PMID:24528597

  19. Cultural Diversity Training: The Necessity of Cultural Competence for Health Care Providers and in Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Young, Susan; Guo, Kristina L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the need to provide culturally sensitive care to the growing number of diverse health care consumers. A literature review of national standards and research on cultural competency was conducted and specifically focused on the field of nursing. This study supports the theory that cultural competence is learned over time and is a process of inner reflection and awareness. The domains of awareness, skill, and knowledge are essential competencies that must be gained by health care providers and especially for nurses. Although barriers to providing culturally sensitive care exist, gaining a better understanding of cultural competence is essential to developing realistic education and training techniques, which will lead to quality professional nursing practice for increasingly diverse populations. PMID:27111680

  20. Measuring the impact of an interprofessional multimedia learning resource on Japanese nurses and nursing students using the Theory of Planned Behavior Medication Safety Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Omura, Mieko; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Stone, Teresa Elizabeth; Maguire, Jane; Lapkin, Samuel

    2015-12-01

    Interprofessional communication and teamwork are essential for medication safety; however, limited educational opportunities for health professionals and students to develop these skills exist in Japan. This study evaluated the impact of an interprofessional multimedia learning resource on registered nurses' and nursing students' intention to practice in a manner promoting medication safety. Using a quasi-experimental design, Japanese registered nurses and nursing students (n = 203) were allocated to an experimental (n = 109) or control group (n = 94). Behavioral intentions of medication safety and the predictor variables of attitudes, perceived behavioral control, and subjective norms were measured using a Japanese version of the Theory of Planned Behavior Medication Safety Questionnaire. Registered nurses in the experimental group demonstrated a greater intention to collaborate and practice in a manner that enhanced medication safety, evidenced by higher scores than the control group on all predictor variables. The results demonstrate the potential for interprofessional multimedia learning resources to positively impact the behaviors of Japanese registered nurses in relation to safe medication practices. Further research in other contexts and with other cohorts is warranted. PMID:26138636

  1. On the night shift: advanced nurse practice in emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Jennifer

    2016-05-01

    Advanced nurse practitioners in the author's emergency department (ED) work autonomously and as part of a team to assess, diagnose and treat patients with unexplained and undiagnosed illnesses and injuries over a 24-hour cycle of care. The complexity of the role in EDs is often not fully understood, and expectations can vary between trusts and between different clinical areas within trusts. This article describes one night shift in the author's ED to explain the complexity of advanced nurse practitioners' roles in this environment. The article focuses on autonomous decision-making skills and the use of advanced clinical skills in the context of evidence-based practice. PMID:27165394

  2. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Practical Nursing Programs CIP: 51.1613--Practical Nurse (L.P.N. Training). Postsecondary Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the practical nursing program. Presented in the introductory section are a description of the program and suggested course sequence. Section I lists baseline competencies, and section II…

  3. The emancipatory potential of nursing practice in relation to sexuality: a systematic literature review of nursing research 2009-2014.

    PubMed

    Macleod, Catriona; Nhamo-Murire, Mercy

    2016-09-01

    Nurses play a key role in the provision of services in relation to sexuality in both primary and sexual and reproductive health-care. Given the intersection of sexualities with a range of social injustices, this study reviews research on nursing practice concerning sexuality from an emancipatory/social justice perspective. A systematic review of English articles published in nursing journals appearing on the Web of Science database from 2009 to 2014 was conducted. Thirty-eight articles met the inclusion criteria. Analysis consisted of a descriptive phase (types and location of studies, aspects of sexualities focused on, target health users and aspects of nursing practice focused on) and a critical/emancipatory phase. In terms of practice, our analysis revealed that: barriers exist to the integration of issues relating to sexuality in nursing practice; the social location of nurses and their personal feelings regarding sexuality influence their practice; content that addresses gendered norms and media that assist in communication underpin some emancipatory practices. Few studies locate analyses of nursing practice within gendered, cultural and social norms; consider advocacy as part of the practice of nurses; or analyse the promotion of health user participation in health services and structures. The implications for emancipatory practice are drawn out. PMID:27147132

  4. Thinking Like a Nurse and Perceived Readiness for Professional Practice: A Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowdoin, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Thinking like a nurse (TLN) has been identified as a core competency of professional nursing practice. The term embraces the full context of the daily metacognitive process nurses use to provide competent nursing care and was theorized in this study to have four attributes: critical thinking, clinical judgment, moral reasoning, and professional…

  5. Preceptorship and Affirmation in the Intergenerational World of Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Vicki; Myrick, Florence; Yonge, Olive

    2012-01-01

    Research has shown that while preceptorship offers a reality-oriented learning environment and facilitates competence of students, there are inherent rewards and stressors associated with the experience. Students and preceptors can be from different generations, and as such, they may often come to the learning space with differing values and expectations. The nature of the preceptorship experience in this intergenerational context was explored in a recent phenomenological study with seven preceptors and seven nursing students in an undergraduate nursing program in Eastern Canada. Overall the experience was found to be inclusive of three main themes: being affirmed, being challenged, and being on a pedagogical journey. In this paper we explore the first of these themes, being affirmed. Highlighting the positive aspects of the preceptorship experience in the intergenerational context is necessary to promote a culture of openness and respect for generational differences within clinical nursing practice settings and to improving the overall quality of the educational experience. PMID:22778943

  6. Matching purpose with practice: revolutionising nurse education with mita.

    PubMed

    Denny, Margaret; Weber, Ellen F; Wells, John; Stokes, Olga Redmond; Lane, Paula; Denieffe, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    Multiple intelligences have only recently entered the teaching dialogue in nurse education and research. It is argued that despite the rhetoric of a student centred approach nurse education remains wedded to conventional teaching approaches that fail to engage with the individual and unwittingly silence the student's voice. This paper will examine the concept of multiple intelligences (MI) and outline Gardner's contention that the brain functions using eight intelligences which can be employed to improve learning at an individual level. It will then outline the use of MI using a five phase model, developed by Weber, known as a multiple intelligence teaching approach (MITA). It is contended that MITA has great potential in nurse education, particularly in terms of reinforcing learning beyond the educational domain and into the individual's professional development and clinical practice. PMID:17459538

  7. [Practice of hypnosis in the nurse care].

    PubMed

    Vadrot, Georges Lambert

    2014-12-01

    Hypnosis is practicing in hospital, especially in palliative care and in pain consultation. This technique is used in a well-defined field by doctors, psychologists and caregivers, all specificially trained. PMID:25710997

  8. Nurses' attitudes to euthanasia: the influence of empirical studies and methodological concerns on nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Holt, Janet

    2008-10-01

    This paper introduces the controversy surrounding active voluntary euthanasia and describes the legal position on euthanasia and assisted suicide in the UK. Findings from studies of the nurses' attitudes to euthanasia from the national and international literature are reviewed. There are acknowledged difficulties in carrying out research into attitudes to euthanasia and hence the review of findings from the published studies is followed by a methodological review. This methodological review examines the research design and data collection methods used in the published studies, problems with understanding definitions of euthanasia and the measurement of attitudes. The paper concludes with a discussion of how research in this area may influence nursing practice. PMID:18798897

  9. Evaluation of Evidence-Based Nursing Pain Management Practice

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wenjia; Eaton, Linda H.; Gordon, Debra B.; Hoyle, Christine; Doorenbos, Ardith Z.

    2014-01-01

    Background It is important to ensure that cancer pain management is based on the best evidence. Nursing evidence-based pain management can be examined through an evaluation of pain documentation. Aims This study aimed to (a) modify and test an evaluation tool for nursing cancer pain documentation, and (b) describe the frequency and quality of nursing pain documentation in one oncology unit via electronic medical system. Design and Setting A descriptive cross-sectional design was used for this study at an oncology unit of an academic medical center in the Pacific Northwest. Methods Medical records were examined for 37 adults hospitalized during April and May of 2013. Nursing pain documentations (N = 230) were reviewed using an evaluation tool modified from the Cancer Pain Practice Index to consist of 13 evidence-based pain management indicators, including pain assessment, care plan, pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions, monitoring and treatment of analgesic side effects, communication with physicians, and patient education. Individual nursing documentation was assigned a score from 0 (worst possible) to 13 (best possible), to reflect the delivery of evidence-based pain management. Results The participating nurses documented 90% of the recommended evidence-based pain management indicators. Documentation was suboptimal for pain reassessment, pharmacologic interventions, and bowel regimen. Conclusions The study results provide implications for enhancing electronic medical record design and highlight a need for future research to understand the reasons for suboptimal nursing documentation of cancer pain management. For the future use of the data evaluation tool, we recommend additional modifications according to study settings. PMID:26256215

  10. Accessing best practice resources using mobile technology in an undergraduate nursing program: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Mann, Elizabeth G; Medves, Jennifer; Vandenkerkhof, Elizabeth G

    2015-03-01

    Mobile technology presents new opportunities for nursing education and ultimately the provision of nursing care. The aim of this study was to explore the utility of mobile technology in undergraduate nursing education. In this evaluation study, undergraduate nursing students were provided with iPod Touch devices containing best practice guidelines. Computer self-efficacy was assessed, and the Theory of Planned Behavior was used to identify potential predictors of the use of mobile technology. Questionnaires were completed at baseline (n = 33) and postimplementation (n = 23). Feedback on feasibility issues was recorded throughout the study period. Students generally found the devices useful, and few technical problems were identified; however, lack of skill in using the devices and lack of support from staff in the clinical setting were commonly identified issues. Self-efficacy scores were high throughout the study. Attitudes, perceptions of the desirability of use, perceived personal control over use, and intentions of using the device were lower postimplementation than at baseline. Attitude toward the technology predicted intention to use the device after graduation. Mobile technology may promote evidence-informed practice; however, supporting students' acquisition of related skills may optimize use. Successful integration of mobile technology into practice requires attention to factors that affect student attitudes. PMID:25636042

  11. Critical Theory: Implications for School Leadership Theory and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peca, Kathy

    The school leader's behaviors are inspired by theories, and theories are intrinsic to practice. This paper provides an overview of an emerging perspective in educational administration, critical theory. The paper first highlights the philosophies of Immanuel Kant, Fichte, Hegel, Marx, and the Frankfurt School. It then discusses critical theory…

  12. Theory Loves Practice: A Teacher Researcher Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hochtritt, Lisa; Thulson, Anne; Delaney, Rachael; Dornbush, Talya; Shay, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Once a month, art educators from the Denver metro area have been gathering together in the spirit of inquiry to explore issues of the perceived theory and daily practice divide. The Theory Loves Practice (TLP) group was started in 2010 by Professors Rachael Delaney and Anne Thulson from Metropolitan State University of Denver (MSU) and now has 40…

  13. Linking Theory with Practice in Basic Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Archie B.

    1974-01-01

    Instructors of management in higher education have not been cautious in explaining the relation between practice and theory in their basic courses. The author distinguished between the two in suggesting that management theory is based on observed practices and may or may not have broader application. (AG)

  14. Supporting student nurses in practice with additional online communication tools.

    PubMed

    Morley, Dawn A

    2014-01-01

    Student nurses' potential isolation and difficulties of learning on placement have been well documented and, despite attempts to make placement learning more effective, evidence indicates the continuing schism between formal learning at university and situated learning on placement. First year student nurses, entering placement for the first time, are particularly vulnerable to the vagaries of practice. During 2012 two first year student nurse seminar groups (52 students) were voluntarily recruited for a mixed method study to determine the usage of additional online communication support mechanisms (Facebook, wiki, an email group and traditional methods of support using individual email or phone) while undertaking their first five week clinical placement. The study explores the possibility of strengthening clinical learning and support by promoting the use of Web 2.0 support groups for student nurses. Results indicate a high level of interactivity in both peer and academic support in the use of Facebook and a high level of interactivity in one wiki group. Students' qualitative comments voice an appreciation of being able to access university and peer support whilst working individually on placement. Recommendations from the study challenge universities to use online communication tools already familiar to students to complement the support mechanisms that exist for practice learning. This is tempered by recognition of the responsibility of academics to ensure their students are aware of safe and effective online communication. PMID:23871299

  15. Doctor of nursing practice program development: reengineering health care.

    PubMed

    Wall, Barbra M; Novak, Julie C; Wilkerson, Sharon A

    2005-09-01

    In this article, we describe the developmental process of a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program that uses interdisciplinary resources to create unique DNP curriculum opportunities. Other schools may benefit from this experience in the development of their own DNP programs. The program delivers an innovative curriculum from post-baccalaureate to doctorate, emphasizing health care engineering and interdisciplinary collaboration among faculty, hospitals, community leaders, and policymakers. This DNP program is uniquely situated to provide leadership in solving complex clinical problems through its partnership with the Regenstrief Center for Healthcare Engineering, the School of Pharmacy, the Homeland Security Institute, and the Center on Aging and the Life Course. Doctoral coursework, interdisciplinary collaboration, health care engineering/systems approaches, and new knowledge result in uniquely qualified providers. Post-baccalaureate students complete the university's Adult Nurse Practitioner program or its developing Pediatric Nurse Practitioner program during the first 2 years of the 4-year curriculum. A total of 83 post-baccalaureate credit hours include 1,526 hours of supervised clinical practice, a health policy residency, and cognate residencies in an area of specialization. The seven core competencies recommended by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing are incorporated into the curriculum. PMID:16220646

  16. New graduate nurse practice readiness: perspectives on the context shaping our understanding and expectations.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Angela C; Pesut, Barbara; Regan, Sandra

    2010-02-01

    Workforce shortages, fiscal restraint, complex healthcare organizations, increasing patient acuity, the explosion of knowledge and technology and the ever expanding role of nurses in healthcare have reinforced the importance of new graduates arriving in the work setting with the ability to move seamlessly into practice. This idea of moving seamlessly into practice is often referred to as practice readiness. Differing perspectives exist between nurses in the practice and education sector about the practice readiness of new graduates. The aim of this study was to understand the perspectives of nurses about new graduate nurse practice readiness and the underlying context shaping these perspectives. Focus groups involving 150 nurses with varying years of experience in the practice, education and regulatory sector were conducted. The findings revealed that participants' expectations and understandings of new graduate practice readiness were influenced by the historical and social context within which nursing education and professional practice is grounded. These differences centered around three main areas: the educational preparation of nurses (diploma or degree), the preparation of the technical versus the professional nurse, and the perceived responsibilities and accountabilities of the education and practice sector for the educational preparation of nurses. To shift the discourse around practice readiness, nurses from all sectors must focus on unique, innovative and cooperative solutions to ensure the seamless transition of all nursing graduates in the 21st century healthcare system. PMID:19699561

  17. Female genital mutilation: knowledge, attitude and practice among nurses.

    PubMed Central

    Onuh, Sunday O.; Igberase, Gabriel O.; Umeora, Joaness O. U.; Okogbenin, Sylvanus A.; Otoide, Valentine O.; Gharoro, Etedafe P.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Female genital mutilation (FGM) and cutting is a subject of global interest, with many countries of the world still practicing it despite efforts by the WHO and other agencies to discourage the practice. The highest known prevalence is in Africa. OBJECTIVES: To determine the knowledge, attitude and practice of FGM among nurses in the ancient metropolis of Benin in a Nigerian state where FGM is illegal. RESULTS: One-hundred-ninety-three nurses in the study hospital were recruited in the study out of which 182 (94.3%) appropriately filled and returned the questionnaires. The average age of respondents was 37 years, and the average duration of postgraduation experience was 14.5 years. Most respondents are of Bini (36.8%) and Esan (34.1%) ethnic origin. All respondents identified at least one form of FGM, but only 12 respondents (6.6%) could correctly identify the four types of FGM. The harmful effects of FGM identified by the majority of respondents include hemorrhage, difficult labor/childbirth, genital tears, infections and scar/keloid formation. Forty-four (24.2%) of respondents were of the opinion that some forms of FGM are harmless. Eighty nurses admitted to having undergone FGM, for a prevalence of 44%. Five respondents (2.8%) view FGM as a good practice and will encourage the practice. Twelve respondents (6.6%) routinely perform FGM out of which seven (58.3%) viewed FGM as a bad practice. Nurses performing FGM routinely were those who had spent >20 years (59%) and 11-20 years (41%) in the profession. Another 26 (14.3%) had performed FGM before, though not on a routine basis. Of this latter group, 15 will perform FGM in the future when faced with certain circumstances. Reasons for FGM practice were mainly cultural. Eight of the respondents would have their daughters circumcised. CONCLUSION: Nurses perceive FGM in Benin as cultural. Almost half have had FGM themselves, and a small percentage recommend it to their daughters. Discouraging FGM practice

  18. Implementation of evidence-based practice by nurses working in community settings and their strategies to mentor student nurses to develop evidence-based practice: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Brooke, Joanne Mary; Mallion, Jaimee

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to explore how community nurses apply the best available evidence to their practice, and how they mentor student nurses to conceptualize and implement evidence-based practice in community settings. In the UK, the expansion of health-care provision in the community has supported the development of highly skilled community nurses. However, there is limited literature regarding the strategies used by community nurses to implement evidence-based practice and mentor student nurses to conceptualize evidence-based practice in community placements. An exploratory qualitative approach applying inductive reasoning to focus group data was used. As a result, nurses working for a community NHS Foundation Trust in South England with a mentor qualification were invited to participate in one of the seven focus groups, 33 nurses participated. Data were analyzed with thematic analysis. The themes discussed in this paper are: 'our practice is evidence-based' as guidelines and policies provided structure, but occasionally stifled autonomous clinical decision-making, and 'time' as a barrier and facilitator to mentoring student nurses in community settings. In conclusion, nurses need to develop the ability to incorporate patients' needs and wishes within evidence-based care. Time was a facilitator for some community mentors, but protected time is required to complete the necessary practice documentation of student nurses. PMID:27562665

  19. [Clinical practice as an arborescent and rhizomorphic practice in surgical nursing work].

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Lenice Dutra; Lunardi, Wilson Danilo Filho; Cezar-Vaz, Marta Regina; de Figueiredo, Paula Pereira

    2013-12-01

    A qualitative and exploratory case study was conducted in a surgery unit of a university hospital. The study aimed to analyze the nurses' work from the perspective of health care production and clinical practice. The subjects of the study were six nurses. Non-participant observations, documentary research and in-depth interviews were carried out, followed by discursive textual analysis. Nursing work is organized according to two interconnected and interdependent perspectives: a clinical model, which forms the central structure of its practice, and a structure formed by multiple and heterogeneous elements. in this way, the clinical model of health care is organized as a centered structure that enables the fulfillment of biological needs and acts as a basis for connecting disparate knowledge and practices that expand practice through interconnections with the work environment. PMID:24626366

  20. Using career nurse mentors to support minority nursing students and facilitate their transition to practice.

    PubMed

    Banister, Gaurdia; Bowen-Brady, Helene M; Winfrey, Marion E

    2014-01-01

    The Clinical Leadership Collaborative for Diversity in Nursing was developed through an academe-service partnership focused on supporting minority nursing students and facilitating transition to practice. A key program element is mentoring. Students are paired with an experienced, minority clinical nurse or nurse leader from one of the partnering agencies, who helps guide the student throughout the junior and senior year of school and first year of employment. The mentoring component was evaluated through surveys in which mentors and mentees rated one another and offered open-ended comments on the program's impact. Aspects of mentees rated highest by mentors include manner (courteous and professional), ability to communicate and get along with others, preparation for meetings, and fully utilizing their time with mentors. Aspects of mentors rated highest by mentees include warmth, encouragement, and willingness to listen; enthusiasm for nursing and how they sparked the mentee's interest; and clarity regarding expectations for mentees and how they pushed mentees to achieve high standards. In the open-ended comments, mentees consistently identified mentoring as the program's strongest component. Sixty-four minority students have participated to date with a zero rate of attrition and very low job turnover among graduates. PMID:25150417

  1. Discovering the nature of advanced nursing practice in high dependency care: a critical care nurse consultant's experience.

    PubMed

    Fairley, Debra

    2005-06-01

    This paper describes how a critical care nurse consultant's clinical role has evolved within a surgical high dependency unit (SHDU) in a large teaching hospitals trust. In order to provide some background to role development, an overview of the research exploring the nature of advanced nursing practice in the context of critical care will be presented. From the outset, advanced nursing practice was not perceived as the acquisition and application of technical procedures usually undertaken by doctors, but possibly an integration of medicine and nursing where holistic nursing assessment is combined with symptom-focused physical examination. A reflective account of practical problems encountered relating to role integration, professional autonomy, legal and consent issues, non-medical prescribing, and role evaluation will be presented. A model of working that can be applied to high dependency units, integrating the role of the advanced nurse practitioner within the clinical team, will be described. PMID:15907666

  2. Establishing Policy Foundations and Regulatory Systems to Enhance Nursing Practice in the United Arab Emirates

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Lyndal H.; Aqtash, Salah; Day, Gary E.

    2015-01-01

    In 2009, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) established a Nursing and Midwifery Council with a mandate to develop standards for the registration and regulation of nursing and midwifery and to strengthen the nursing and midwifery workforce. Priorities included workforce Emiratization and the development of regulatory standards to support advanced and speciality nursing practice and new models of care—particularly for the management of noncommunicable diseases. This article provides background, context for, and best practice inputs to the effort to provide one unified framework of nursing regulation and licensure across the whole of the UAE. This article is intended for nurse leaders, policy makers, and regulators who are reviewing or developing nursing regulatory processes and advancing nursing workforce capacity building activities; and nurse educators and nurses wishing to work in the UAE. PMID:25944674

  3. Establishing Policy Foundations and Regulatory Systems to Enhance Nursing Practice in the United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Brownie, Sharon M; Hunter, Lyndal H; Aqtash, Salah; Day, Gary E

    2015-01-01

    In 2009, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) established a Nursing and Midwifery Council with a mandate to develop standards for the registration and regulation of nursing and midwifery and to strengthen the nursing and midwifery workforce. Priorities included workforce Emiratization and the development of regulatory standards to support advanced and speciality nursing practice and new models of care-particularly for the management of noncommunicable diseases. This article provides background, context for, and best practice inputs to the effort to provide one unified framework of nursing regulation and licensure across the whole of the UAE. This article is intended for nurse leaders, policy makers, and regulators who are reviewing or developing nursing regulatory processes and advancing nursing workforce capacity building activities; and nurse educators and nurses wishing to work in the UAE. PMID:25944674

  4. A new window into nurse manager development: teaching for the practice.

    PubMed

    Cathcart, Eloise Balasco; Greenspan, Miriam

    2012-12-01

    An important domain that emerged from the interpretation of 91 nurse manager (NM) narratives was achieving the right relationship between a NM and a recalcitrant staff member. This article depicts the qualitative distinctions in 2 stages of NM practice to show the importance of reflection on experiential learning in the development of expertise. This work confirms that NM development is more complex than teaching a curriculum of business and management theory and should include teaching for mastery of the skilled know-how of clinical leadership practice and formation of the person as manager. PMID:23151927

  5. Care erosion in hospitals: Problems in reflective nursing practice and the role of cognitive dissonance.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Jan; Timmins, Fiona

    2016-03-01

    Care erosion - gradual decline in care level - is an important problem in health care today. Unfortunately, the mechanism whereby it occurs is complex and poorly understood. This paper seeks to address this by emphasising problems in reflective nursing practice. Critical reflection on quality of care which should drive good care instead spawns justifications, denial, and trivialisation of deficient care. This perpetuates increasingly poor care levels. We argue that cognitive dissonance theory provides a highly effective understanding of this process and suggest for this approach to be incorporated in all efforts to address care erosion. The paper includes a detailed discussion of examples and implications for practice, in particular the need to restore critical reflection in nursing, the importance of embracing strong values and standards, and the need for increased awareness of signs of care erosion. PMID:26733428

  6. 78 FR 65342 - National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration National Advisory Council on Nurse Education... Council on Nurse Education and Practice (NACNEP). Dates and Times: November 7, 2013, 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m... Jeanne Brown, Staff Assistant, National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice,...

  7. 76 FR 14033 - National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration National Advisory Council on Nurse Education... Council on Nurse Education and Practice (NACNEP). Dates and Times: April 11, 2011, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. April.... Purpose: The purpose of this meeting is to address diversity in nurse education and practice....

  8. 78 FR 22890 - National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration National Advisory Council on Nurse Education... Council on Nurse Education and Practice (NACNEP) Dates and Times: April 24 and 25, 2013, 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p... contact Jeanne Brown, Staff Assistant, National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice,...

  9. 75 FR 64318 - National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration National Advisory Council on Nurse Education... Council on Nurse Education and Practice (NACNEP). Dates and Times: November 17, 2010, 1 p.m.-5 p.m...: The purpose of this meeting is to address diversity in nurse education and practice. The objectives...

  10. 76 FR 64953 - National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration National Advisory Council on Nurse Education... Council on Nurse Education and Practice (NACNEP). Dates and Times: November 7, 2011, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m..., National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice, Parklawn Building, Room 9-61, 5600 Fishers...

  11. Career Mobility: Implementing the Ladder Concept in Associate Degree and Practical Nursing Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Story, Donna Ketchum

    Designing a career ladder curriculum is not simply taking an existing practical nurse curriculum and an associate degree nursing curriculum and placing one after the other. The curriculum is designed to produce students who are competent practitioners as practical nurses at the end of the first level and then allow them to continue for an…

  12. Nursing Faculty Decision Making about Best Practices in Test Construction, Item Analysis, and Revision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killingsworth, Erin Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    With the widespread use of classroom exams in nursing education there is a great need for research on current practices in nursing education regarding this form of assessment. The purpose of this study was to explore how nursing faculty members make decisions about using best practices in classroom test construction, item analysis, and revision in…

  13. [Implantable venous access ports, nursing practices].

    PubMed

    Ourliac, Maryse; Dijols-Lécuyer, Isabelle

    2016-05-01

    Following the publication of national recommendations regarding the handling of implantable venous access ports, an observation audit was carried out in a hospital in 2013. This enabled an assessment of the existing system to be performed, current practices to be compared with the hospital's protocol and adapted corrective measures to be put in place. A further audit carried out in 2015 was particularly encouraging. PMID:27157553

  14. Nurse residency programs: an evidence-based review of theory, process, and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Gwen; Hair, Carole; Todero, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Nursing shortages exist worldwide while job stress, dissatisfaction, lack of peer support and limited professional opportunities still contribute to attrition. The aim of this systematic review is to describe and evaluate the quality of the science, report recommendations and lessons learned about implementing and evaluating nurse residency programs (NRPs) designed to improve new graduate transitioning. Databases were searched between 1980 and 2010 using five search terms: nurse, intern, extern, transition and residency programs. Twenty studies reporting programs for new RNs fit the inclusion criteria. Three major discoveries include: 1. Wide variation in content, teaching and learning strategies make comparison across programs difficult; 2. Lack of theory in designing the educational intervention has limited the selection and development of new instruments to measure program effectiveness; and 3. Well designed quasi-experimental studies are needed. As a major nursing education redesign, NRPs could be used to test the principles, concepts and strategies of organizational transformation and experiential-interactive learning theory. By focusing on fiscal outcomes, current administrators of NRPs are missing the opportunity to implement an organizational strategy that could improve workplace environments. Healthcare organizations need to envision NRPs as a demonstration of positive clinical learning environments that can enhance intra- and interprofessional education and practice. PMID:22818190

  15. Social simulation theory: a framework to explain nurses' understanding of patients' experiences of ill-health.

    PubMed

    Nordby, Halvor

    2016-09-01

    A fundamental aim in caring practice is to understand patients' experiences of ill-health. These experiences have a qualitative content and cannot, unlike thoughts and beliefs with conceptual content, directly be expressed in words. Nurses therefore face a variety of interpretive challenges when they aim to understand patients' subjective perspectives on disease and illness. The article argues that theories on social simulation can shed light on how nurses manage to meet these challenges. The core assumption of social simulationism is that we do not understand other people by forming mental representations of how they think, but by putting ourselves in their situation in a more imaginative way. According to simulationism, any attempt to understand a patient's behavior is made on the basis of simulating what it is like to be that patient in the given context. The article argues that this approach to social interpretation can clarify how nurses manage to achieve aims of patient understanding, even when they have limited time to communicate and incomplete knowledge of patients' perspectives. Furthermore, simulation theory provides a normative framework for interpretation, in the sense that its theoretical assumptions constitute ideals for how nurses should seek to understand patients' experiences of illness. PMID:27198752

  16. Bearing relubrication theories -- A practical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lauer, D.A.

    1995-07-01

    There are many relubrication theories for grease lubrication of rolling element bearings. They range from the very simplistic, such as that in the NLGI handbook, to the extremely complex, such as the GfT Working Sheet. This presentation looks at various different theories and compares the assumptions required for each theory, as well as the variability in relubrication intervals. A practical approach to using these theories to answer the question, ``What is my relubrication interval?`` will be discussed.

  17. [Dialogue as a pressuposition in the humanistic nursing theory: relationship mother-nurse-newborn].

    PubMed

    Lúcio, Ingrid Martins Leite; Pagliuca, Lorita Marlena Freitag; Cardoso, Maria Vera Lúcia Moreira Leitão

    2008-03-01

    This is a critical-reflective study carried out in 2005 aiming at analyzing dialogue as a presupposition in Peterson and Zderad's Humanistic Theory. Using as a starting point two Master's degree theses, the authors adopted the Meleis Model of Analysis, in the scope of theory description, focusing on the unit of analysis named theory presuppositions. The authors clearly perceive the quest for and the construction of the dialogue in the stages of the theory's methodological process: Preparation in order to get to know, Knowing the other intuitively, Knowing the other scientifically, Complementary synthesis of the others' knowledge, Succession within the nurse from the many to the paradoxical one. The presupposition of dialogue was brought up in an explicit manner in the theory, grounded on the philosophical bases of existentialism, humanism, and phenomenology. There was a distinct behavior in each experience, in spite of the common aspects, such as having been experienced with neonates and in the same institution. PMID:18450163

  18. Reflections on ethnocentrism and racism: a challenge for advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Harris, S H; Cummings, S H

    1996-01-01

    As nurses and patient populations increasingly reflect the changing demographics of the United States, it will be necessary for nurses to address the critical issues surrounding a multicultural society. Nurses have been relatively quiet on the topic of ethnocentric and racist behavior. If advanced practice nurses are to be successful in assisting nurses and organizations to embrace cultural diversity, understanding ethnocentric and racist behaviors is key to developing strategies to facilitate the provision of culturally competent care. PMID:9447077

  19. [Therapeutic advances and nursing practices, 1914-1918].

    PubMed

    Debout, Christophe

    2014-06-01

    The production and transfer of knowledge in the healthcare field were key factors which enabled the fight against morbidity and mortality during the First World War to be carried out efficiently. The knowledge used to train nurses before the war soon became obsolete and had to be updated. Knowledge and practices were developed in order to meet as best as possible the specific needs of patients in the particular context of this war. PMID:25069355

  20. Factors Influencing the Intention of Perinatal Nurses to Adopt the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative in Southeastern Quebec, Canada: Implications for Practice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Nurses play a major role in promoting the baby-friendly hospital initiative (BFHI), yet the adoption of this initiative by nurses remains a challenge in many countries, despite evidences of its positive impacts on breastfeeding outcomes. The aim of this study was to identify the factors influencing perinatal nurses to adopt the BFHI in their practice. Methods. A sample of 159 perinatal nurses from six hospital-based maternity centers completed a survey based on the theory of planned behavior. Hierarchical multiple linear regression analyses were performed to assess the relationship between key independent variables and nurses' intention to adopt the BFHI in their practice. A discriminant analysis of nurses' beliefs helped identify the targets of actions to foster the adoption the BFHI among nurses. Results. The participants are mainly influenced by factors pertaining to their perceived capacity to overcome the strict criteria of the BFHI, the mothers' approval of a nursing practice based on the BFHI, and the antenatal preparation of the mothers. Conclusions. This study provides theory-based evidence for the development of effective interventions aimed at promoting the adoption of the BFHI in nurses' practice. PMID:25101173

  1. Beyond Behavioral Skills to Human-Involved Processes: Relational Nursing Practice and Interpretive Pedagogy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doane, Gweneth A. Hartrick

    2002-01-01

    Behaviorist teaching of communication skills can interfere with learning of humanistic nursing. Interpretive inquiry can help students experience the transformative power for relationships and develop confidence and trust in their capacity for relational nursing practice. (Contains 20 references.) (SK)

  2. Cross-mapping the ICNP with NANDA, HHCC, Omaha System and NIC for unified nursing language system development. International Classification for Nursing Practice. International Council of Nurses. North American Nursing Diagnosis Association. Home Health Care Classification. Nursing Interventions Classification.

    PubMed

    Hyun, S; Park, H A

    2002-06-01

    Nursing language plays an important role in describing and defining nursing phenomena and nursing actions. There are numerous vocabularies describing nursing diagnoses, interventions and outcomes in nursing. However, the lack of a standardized unified nursing language is considered a problem for further development of the discipline of nursing. In an effort to unify the nursing languages, the International Council of Nurses (ICN) has proposed the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP) as a unified nursing language system. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the inclusiveness and expressiveness of the ICNP terms by cross-mapping them with the existing nursing terminologies, specifically the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA) taxonomy I, the Omaha System, the Home Health Care Classification (HHCC) and the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC). Nine hundred and seventy-four terms from these four classifications were cross-mapped with the ICNP terms. This was performed in accordance with the Guidelines for Composing a Nursing Diagnosis and Guidelines for Composing a Nursing Intervention, which were suggested by the ICNP development team. An expert group verified the results. The ICNP Phenomena Classification described 87.5% of the NANDA diagnoses, 89.7% of the HHCC diagnoses and 72.7% of the Omaha System problem classification scheme. The ICNP Action Classification described 79.4% of the NIC interventions, 80.6% of the HHCC interventions and 71.4% of the Omaha System intervention scheme. The results of this study suggest that the ICNP has a sound starting structure for a unified nursing language system and can be used to describe most of the existing terminologies. Recommendations for the addition of terms to the ICNP are provided. PMID:12094837

  3. Greek mental health nurses' practices and attitudes in the management of acute cases.

    PubMed

    Koukia, Evmorfia; Mangoulia, Polyxeni; Stathopoulos, Theodore; Madianos, Michael

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to identify nurses' interventions, views, and attitudes concerning critical incidents. Using semi-structured interviews, a descriptive study was conducted among mental health nurses working in three major psychiatric hospitals. Analysis of nurses' audio-recorded data indicated that they had used a number of different interventions under six main categories: counseling, performing security practices, monitoring thinking disturbances, contacting the psychiatrist on-call, contacting the chief nurse on-call, and administering medication. The need for specialized training was noticed and problems like accountability, nurse-patient interactions, and nurse-doctor relationships were considered crucial by the mental health nurses. PMID:23477440

  4. NURSING HOME PRACTICES FOLLOWING RESIDENT DEATH: THE EXPERIENCE OF CERTIFIED NURSING ASSISTANTS

    PubMed Central

    Barooah, Adrita; Boerner, Kathrin; van Riesenbeck, Isabelle; Burack, Orah R.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined certified nursing assistants’ (CNAs) experiences of nursing home practices following resident death. Participants were 140 CNAs who had experienced recent resident death. In semi-structured, in-person interviews, CNAs were asked about their experiences with the removal of the resident's body, filling the bed with a new resident, and how they were notified about the death. The facilities’ practice of filling the bed quickly was most often experienced as negative. Responses to body removal and staff notification varied, but negative experiences were reported by a substantial minority. Being notified prior to returning to work was associated with a more positive experience. Learning about the death by walking into a room to find the bed empty or already filled was the most negative experience. Study findings suggest that more mindful approaches to the transitions related to resident deaths would be valued by CNAs and could improve their work experience. PMID:25554351

  5. Reiki: a supportive therapy in nursing practice and self-care for nurses.

    PubMed

    Gallob, Robin

    2003-01-01

    Reiki is a complementary, energy-based healing modality. It has ancient roots, but is uniquely suited to modern nursing practice. Reiki training offers a precise technique for tapping into healing energy, or ki, and transmitting it through touch. Reiki treatments are gently balancing and provide energy that supports the well-being of the recipient in a holistic and individualistic way. Relaxation, pain relief, physical healing, reduced emotional distress, and a deepened awareness of spiritual connection are among the benefits attributed to Reiki in anecdotes, case studies, and exploratory research, as summarized in this review of literature. Reiki is easily adaptable to nursing practice in a variety of settings, and can provide support for the practitioners of Reiki themselves, as well as benefiting those they treat with Reiki. PMID:14639776

  6. Factors associated with the use of primary care services: the role of practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Vallejo-Torres, Laura; Morris, Stephen

    2011-08-01

    Rising demand for and costs of health care have led to an increasing role of practice nurses in primary care in many countries, including the United Kingdom. Previous research has explored how practice nurse care differs from that provided by general practitioners (GPs) in terms of costs and health outcomes, and has highlighted the importance of matching skills and experience with roles and responsibilities. However, there has been little research to compare the characteristics of patients seen by GPs and practice nurses in primary care. We aim to investigate the factors associated with the use of practice nurse visits, and to compare these with the factors associated with GP use. We jointly model the use of practice nurse and GP visits using a bivariate probit regression model with a large set of covariates taken from two rounds of the Health Survey for England (2001, 2002). We find that practice nurse use is associated with age and gender, health, socioeconomic and supply variables. There are differences in the factors associated with practice nurse and GP use. Chronically ill patients are more likely to see a practice nurse, while acute ill health has a stronger association with the probability of seeing the GP. Practice nurse use is also correlated with a narrower range of health conditions compared with GP use. We also found differences between practice nurse and GP visits with respect to the association with economic activity, ethnic group, number of children, degree of urbanisation, and distance to practice. PMID:20496159

  7. Integrating Social Theory Into Public Health Practice

    PubMed Central

    Potvin, Louise; Gendron, Sylvie; Bilodeau, Angèle; Chabot, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    The innovative practice that resulted from the Ottawa Charter challenges public health knowledge about programming and evaluation. Specifically, there is a need to formulate program theory that embraces social determinants of health and local actors’ mobilization for social change. Likewise, it is imperative to develop a theory of evaluation that fosters reflexive understanding of public health programs engaged in social change. We believe advances in contemporary social theory that are founded on a critique of modernity and that articulate a coherent theory of practice should be considered when addressing these critical challenges. PMID:15798114

  8. Best Practice at Your Fingertips: The WISHeS School Nurse Procedure Website

    PubMed Central

    DuChateau, Teresa A.; Beversdorf, Sarah; Wolff, Marie

    2015-01-01

    School nurses are responsible for providing and supervising school nursing services for children with complex health concerns. Given school nurses frequently practice in isolation and may have limited access to clinical practice changes, they can benefit from up-to-date, evidence-based resources. Additionally, the resources must account for the fact that the nursing procedures will be performed in the unique setting of a school building and in many cases, will be performed by school personnel who have limited formal education in health care. This article provides an overview of a newly developed, easy to use, online school nursing procedures website for school nurses and other school personnel. PMID:25816427

  9. Best Practice at Your Fingertips: The WISHeS School Nurse Procedure Website.

    PubMed

    DuChateau, Teresa A; Beversdorf, Sarah; Wolff, Marie

    2015-05-01

    School nurses are responsible for providing and supervising school nursing services for children with complex health concerns. Given that school nurses frequently practice in isolation and may have limited access to clinical practice changes, they can benefit from up-to-date, evidence-based resources. Additionally, the resources must account for the fact that the nursing procedures will be performed in the unique setting of a school building and, in many cases, will be performed by school personnel who have limited formal education in health care. This article provides an overview of a newly developed, easy to use, online school nursing procedures website for school nurses and other school personnel. PMID:25816427

  10. MOTHER AND INFANT CARE, PRACTICAL NURSE TRAINING PROGRAM, LESSON PLANS, PREPARED BY PRACTICAL NURSING INSTRUCTORS DURING CONFERENCE (UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE, AUGUST 14-18, 1961).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee State Board for Vocational Education, Murfreesboro. Vocational Curriculum Lab.

    PRACTICAL NURSE INSTRUCTORS, IN CONFERENCE, COMPILED THIS INDIVIDUALLY PLANNED AND TESTED MATERIAL TO BE USED IN PRACTICAL NURSE EDUCATION. THIRTY-TWO LESSON PLANS ON THE SUBJECT OF MOTHER AND INFANT CARE COVER TOPICS RANGING FROM THE REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEM TO COMPLICATIONS INVOLVING THE NEWBORN. EACH PLAN INCLUDES AIM, REFERENCES, MATERIALS,…

  11. Development of the Massachusetts School Nurse Research Network (MASNRN): A Practice-Based Research Network to Improve the Quality of School Nursing Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vessey, Judith A.

    2007-01-01

    When school nurses embrace evidence-based practice (EBP), higher-quality care is provided to students, their families, and the larger community. Despite this, school nursing has been slow to embrace EBP. Practice-Based Research Networks (PBRNs), which capitalize on the combined strengths of clinicians and researchers to study clinical questions,…

  12. Nursing as 'disobedient' practice: care of the nurse's self, parrhesia, and the dismantling of a baseless paradox.

    PubMed

    Perron, Amélie

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, I discuss nurses' ongoing difficulty in engaging with politics and address the persistent belief that political positioning is antithetical to quality nursing care. I suggest that nurses are not faced with choosing either caring for their patients or engaging with politics. I base my discussion on the assumption that such dichotomy is meaningless and that engaging with issues of relationships firmly grounds nursing in the realm of politics. I argue that the ethical merit of nursing care relies instead on positioning nurses squarely at the centre of care activities, experiences, and functions. Such positioning makes possible what Foucault called 'practices of self-formation', that is, micro-level processes that balance out the ubiquitous economic, cultural, legal, and scientific technologies that steadily constitute subjects in this era of modernity. Nurses, then, become not a group that needs to be controlled and governed, but individuals who must care for their self before they may care for anyone else. PMID:23745657

  13. Reiki as a clinical intervention in oncology nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Bossi, Larraine M; Ott, Mary Jane; DeCristofaro, Susan

    2008-06-01

    Oncology nurses and their patients are frequently on the cutting edge of new therapies and interventions that support coping, health, and healing. Reiki is a practice that is requested with increasing frequency, is easy to learn, does not require expensive equipment, and in preliminary research, elicits a relaxation response and helps patients to feel more peaceful and experience less pain. Those who practice Reiki report that it supports them in self-care and a healthy lifestyle. This article will describe the process of Reiki, review current literature, present vignettes of patient responses to the intervention, and make recommendations for future study. PMID:18515247

  14. Promoting professional nursing practice: linking a professional practice model to performance expectations.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Marcia; Hinch, Barbara; Llewellyn, Jane; Dillon, Paula J; Carlson, Elizabeth

    2011-03-01

    Professional practice models (PPMs) provide the conceptual framework for establishing professional nursing practice. Integrating a PPM requires complex organizational change. One strategy for integrating a PPM is to directly link the PPM with performance expectations to ensure that underlying beliefs are integrated into everyday practice. This article describes the development, implementation, and successful outcomes of a clinical advancement system that was aligned with a PPM. PMID:21320662

  15. [Breast Care Nurses - nursing experts for breast cancer care. A path to "Advanced Nursing Practice" in Germany?].

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Anja; Wiedemann, Regina

    2010-12-01

    The role of Breast Care Nurses (BCNs) has been discussed since Breast Centres have been opened in Germany. This article introduces the concept of the Breast Care Nurses on a national and an international level in the context of Advanced Nursing Practice (ANP). Within a descriptive study, graduates of a German BCN-education programme were interrogated regarding their current work, their main activities as a BCN, about general conditions in their work environment, experienced barriers, and supporting factors. 122 questionnaires were evaluated. The return rate was 71 % (n = 171). Results showed that 58.1 % (n = 71) of the graduates were employed as a Breast Care Nurse, however only 28.1 % (n = 20) in a full-time and 35.2 % (n = 25) in a part-time position. This first German study about BCN-services showed a lack of basic work conditions, for example regarding a consultation room, access to literature, or templates for documentation. In the discussion part, the situation of the BCNs is reviewed in the German context and in relation to ANP concepts as well as regarding future demands for the position of a BCN. PMID:21154250

  16. Unlocking reflective practice for nurses: innovations in working with master of nursing students in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Joyce-McCoach, Joanne T; Parrish, Dominique R; Andersen, Patrea R; Wall, Natalie

    2013-09-01

    Being reflective is well established as an important conduit of practice development, a desirable tertiary graduate quality and a core competency of health professional membership. By assisting students to be more effective in their ability to reflect, they are better able to formulate strategies to manage issues experienced within a professional context, which ultimately assists them to be better service providers. However, some students are challenged by the practice of reflection and these challenges are even more notable for international students. This paper presents a teaching initiative that focused specifically on enhancing the capacity of an international cohort of nursing students, to engage in reflective practice. The initiative centered on an evaluation of a reflective practice core subject, which was taught in a Master of Nursing programme delivered in Hong Kong. A learning-centered framework was used to evaluate the subject and identify innovative strategies that would better assist international students to develop reflective practices. The outcomes of curriculum and teaching analysis and proposed changes and innovations in teaching practice to support international students are presented and discussed. PMID:23232086

  17. Perioperative Nursing Leaders Implement Clinical Practice Guidelines Using the Iowa Model of Evidence-Based Practice.

    PubMed

    White, Shawna; Spruce, Lisa

    2015-07-01

    Many health care organizations, nursing leaders, and individual clinicians are not providing care consistently based on evidence and many are not aware of the evidence that is available. Preventable complications have an adverse effect on hospital reimbursement and the burden is placed on hospital personnel and nursing leaders to use current evidence to improve care and prevent complications, such as surgical site infections. Using AORN resources, leadership involvement and ownership, and implementing a theoretical model will contribute to implementing daily evidence-based practice and help to decrease the chasm between research and practice. PMID:26119609

  18. Understanding Jordanian Psychiatric Nurses' Smoking Behaviors: A Grounded Theory Study

    PubMed Central

    Aldiabat, Khaldoun M.; Clinton, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Smoking is prevalent in psychiatric facilities among staff and patients. However, there have been few studies of how contextual factors in specific cultures influence rates of smoking and the health promotion role of psychiatric nurses. This paper reports the findings of a classical grounded theory study conducted to understand how contextual factors in the workplace influences the smoking behaviors of Jordanian psychiatric nurses (JPNs). Method. Semi-structured individual interviews were conducted with a sample of eight male JPNs smokers at a psychiatric facility in Amman, Jordan. Findings. Constant comparative analysis identified becoming a heavy smoker as a psychosocial process characterized by four sub-categories: normalization of smoking; living in ambiguity; experiencing workplace conflict; and, facing up to workplace stressors. Conclusion. Specific contextual workplace factors require targeted smoking cessation interventions if JPNs are to receive the help they need to reduce health risks associated with heavy smoking. PMID:23844286

  19. Socioscientific Issues: Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeidler, Dana L.; Nichols, Bryan H.

    2009-01-01

    Drawing upon recent research, this article reviews the theory underlying the use of socioscientific issues (SSI) in science education. We begin with a definition and rationale for SSI and note the importance of SSI for advancing functional scientific literacy. We then examine the various roles of context, teachers, and students in SSI lessons as…

  20. Gestalt therapy: theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Jones, A

    Gestalt therapy, a particular type of psychotherapy, draws on existential and various Eastern philosophies, and aims to enable the individual to seek his or her own solutions to personal problems. Literally translated as 'whole', Gestalt focuses the individual to appreciate and experience the present. This article examines the Gestalt theory and considers its application to a terminally ill client and his wife. PMID:1622832