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1

Applying Nursing Theory to Perioperative Nursing Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

The perioperative nursing role has evolved from that of task-oriented specialists to patient-centered professionals. The concept of caring is significant to perioperative nurses and is manifested by the many caring behaviors perioperative nurses demonstrate toward surgical patients. This article describes how the element of caring is an essential function of perioperative nursing and relates the perioperative nursing role to the

Veronica A. Gillette

1996-01-01

2

Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Program: Theories for Extended Pediatric Nursing Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A description is provided of "Theories for Extended Pediatric Nursing Practice," a required course for pediatric and family nurse practitioner students in a California state university program. The course description presents information on the curricular placement of the course, prerequisites, in-class time allotments, and the focus of the course…

Brady, Margaret A.

3

Nurse case management. The coming together of theory and practice.  

PubMed

Newman proves that theory can be a practical approach to nursing care delivery by applying a theory to the new nursing role of the case manager. The illustration applies Newman's theory of health and nursing and looks at its implications for various aspects of provider interface. PMID:1922978

Newman, M; Lamb, G S; Michaels, C

1991-10-01

4

Needed: Nurse Engineers to Link Theory and Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article explores the potential benefits that a new breed of nurse, the nurse engineer, can bring to the problem of clarifying the interrelationships among the three major foundation stones of nursing: theory, practice, and research. Potential roles of the nurse engineer are examined. (CT)

Harrell, Joanne S.

1986-01-01

5

Parse's theory of nursing in practice: a manager's perspective.  

PubMed

This article describes a nurse manager's participation in a research project evaluating Parse's theory of nursing in an acute care setting. The project favourably influenced quality of care and nurse satisfaction on a medical unit which led to the adoption of Parse's theory as the permanent theoretical guide. The manager describes the decision to test Parse's theory, the process of change and the differences for staff nurses and patients. It was discovered that theory based practice offered new direction and purpose for nursing practice. From the perspective of a manager Parse's theory offered the opportunity to develop a more cohesive and humanistic nursing unit and to challenge staff nurses to think seriously about what their "practice" of nursing really means. PMID:2059639

Mattice, M

1991-01-01

6

Using nursing theory to introduce change in practice.  

PubMed

This article outlines the theoretical basis of nursing using Carper's (1978) fundamental patterns of knowing and explains how this theory can be integrated with practice. The authors also describe how Carper's theory was used to introduce change related to the reduction in junior doctors' hours through the development, implementation and evaluation of nurse practitioners. Using a SWOT analysis exercise and various workshops, practitioners have been able to develop professionally and integrate the art and science of nursing. PMID:8949167

Bailey, J; Cassidy, A

1996-09-11

7

New graduate nurses as knowledge brokers in general practice in New Zealand: a constructivist grounded theory.  

PubMed

Practice nursing in New Zealand is not well described in the literature. One survey illustrated that most of the New Zealand practice nurses sampled did not know of the country's two premier evidence-based health websites. A recent review compared general practice in the UK, New Zealand and Australia and found that whereas there had been significant developments in empowering the practice nurse workforce to run nurse-led clinics in the UK, New Zealand and Australia lagged behind. The aim of this reported constructivist grounded theory study was to investigate practice nurses' use of information. Conducted in Auckland, New Zealand, data were collected through ethnographic techniques in one general practice between September 2009 and January 2010 to enhance theoretical sensitivity to the area of information use. Subsequently, six experienced practice nurses (one twice after moving jobs) and five new graduate nurses from five different general practices were interviewed, using open-ended questions, between January 2010 and August 2011. Concurrent data collection and analysis occurred throughout the study period. The use of memos, the constant comparative method, data categorisation and finally, data abstraction resulted in the final theory of reciprocal role modelling. Experienced practice nurses role modelled clinical skills to new graduate nurses. Unexpectedly, new graduate nurses were unconscious experts at sourcing information and role modelled this skill to experienced practice nurses. Once this attribute was acknowledged by the experienced practice nurse, mutual learning occurred that enabled both groups of nurses to become better practitioners. Graduate nurses of the millennial generation were identified as a resource for experienced practice nurses who belong to the baby boomer generation and generation X. PMID:23638795

Hoare, Karen J; Mills, Jane; Francis, Karen

2013-07-01

8

Contrasting two approaches in a community-based nursing practice with older adults: the medical model and Parse's nursing theory.  

PubMed

This article contrasts the assumptions and concepts of two distinct approaches, the medical model and Parse's human becoming theory, as applied in a nurse-managed capitated community healthcare program for older adults. Many nurses incorporate aspects of the medical model into their practice without fully appreciating the implications or being aware of alternative perspectives. Within capitated health programs a nursing practice based on a nursing theory which emphasizes an intersubjective dialogue with older adults as they move toward different meanings and free choice is seen as more likely to be associated with greater satisfaction and reduced healthcare expenditures than a nursing approach based on the medical model, which relies on the objectification of human experience. Nurses can best balance the problem-focused orientation of a medical model dominated healthcare system by adopting an approach committed to recognizing that persons are the coauthors of their existence. PMID:9335851

Baumann, S L

1997-01-01

9

Toward Inclusionary Practices in the Education of Nurses: A Critique of Transcultural Nursing Theory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes ongoing research engaged in an antiracist critique of transcultural nursing theory (TCN). TCN's core theme of cultural sensitivity organizes and reproduces White racial identity as a dominant but invisible presence in nursing texts. The research will test an instrument that supports nursing faculty and students in examining…

Gustafson, Diana L.

1999-01-01

10

[Nursing concepts and theories].  

PubMed

The theory framework of nursing science is built in a dynamic process that arises from practice and is reproduced through research, mainly by analysis and development of concepts and theories. This study presents a theory reflection on nursing knowledge construction and points out subsidies for future studies in the area. The interrelation among theory, research, and clinical practice is required for continuous development of nursing as a profession and science. Ideally, the practice must be based on theory that is validated by research. Therefore, theory, research, and practice affect each other reciprocally and continuously. PMID:24676120

Bousso, Regina Szylit; Poles, Kátia; da Cruz, Diná de Almeida Lopes Monteiro

2014-02-01

11

PHD IN NURSING SAMPLE FULL-TIME PROGRAM Student with an interest in Symptom Management in Adults; Theory & Practice Emphasis  

E-print Network

PHD IN NURSING SAMPLE FULL-TIME PROGRAM Student with an interest in Symptom Management in Adults Practice Nursing Theory: Adults and Older Adults 3 N703 Health Care & Public Policy 3 N815 Knowledge Development in Nursing 3 N803 Advanced Quantitative Design & Methods 3 N816 Proseminar in Nursing Research 1

Sheridan, Jennifer

12

A nursing theory for nursing leadership.  

PubMed

For many years nursing practice has found its foundations in nursing theory. A review of theorists such as D. E. Orem, C. Roy, B. Neumen, V. Henderson, M. E. Rogers and others reveals a focus on the management of patient care, not leadership. This has provided most nurses with a solid foundation in 'management', but little in terms of 'leadership.' In more recent years, theories such as the Deming Management Method, Managers as Developer Model, Shared Governance and Transactional Leadership have been introduced, none of which are nursing theories. This article discusses the conceptualized differences between management and leadership theory arguing that there is a difference between 'leadership and management'. A leadership theory is proposed utilizing Ida J. Orlando's model for nursing. This theory provides a nursing foundation for nursing leaders to utilize both in the management of patient care and in leadership. PMID:11051964

Laurent, C L

2000-03-01

13

Nursing Practice Instructors Faculty of Nursing  

E-print Network

Nursing Practice Instructors Faculty of Nursing The University of Calgary Faculty of Nursing is seeking applications for limited term Nursing Practice Instructors. We are seeking applicants with broad campus. For detailed information on these exciting opportunities please follow the link at http://nursing

Habib, Ayman

14

Nursing practice. Developing a philosophy.  

PubMed

The application of nursing models has been a recent theme in British nursing. Part of this process is the development of a nursing philosophy which underpins the model. Nurses at clinical level are often required to define their philosophy to meet clinical, educational and managerial objectives. The first part of this two-part article explores the significance of nursing philosophy to practice. In the second part, a case study is used to illustrate how clinical nurses can set about defining a philosophy of nursing for themselves. Dickoff et al (1) indicate that a philosophy is significant in the generation of theory. By identifying the nature of practice, theoretical relationships become apparent. It is also significant as Johnson (2) states in nursing's development as a profession. Johnson further asserts that nurses should use their beliefs to build a conceptual system of the person to be served and an abstract model for practice which allows such purpose to be fulfilled. However a nurse's beliefs and values about nursing may have no theoretical substance to them. They may be purely intuitive in nature. Writing a philosophy legitimates intuition. Kitson (3) considers that nurse theorists who believe that only developing a knowledge base through a scientific approach are at risk of throwing away the intuitive sources of knowledge within nursing. Yet gut reactions have been shown to be critical in the development of excellence in nursing (4). Kitson believes that intuitions can lead to developing 'grassroots standards of care' and a clearer definition of what nursing is.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2615864

Johns, C

1989-01-01

15

Ascertaining patient condition : a grounded theory study of diagnostic practice in nursing  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the past decade, much research has been conducted on the practice nurses engage in diagnosing the clinical condition of patients. Many of the studies suggest that diagnostic practices of nurses in simulation settings follow a hypothetical deductive model that similar to the clinical decision-making or diagnostic reasoning process. A second line of inquiry claims that experience used in conjunction

LEE Kok Long Joseph

2002-01-01

16

Health Occupations Curriculum. Skills and Theory for Practical Nurse. Units 14 and 15.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Part of a health occupations program, these instructional units consist of materials for use by those who are studying to become practical nurses. The first unit deals with the various aspects of pediatric nursing, including the growth and development levels of children, diseases and conditions specific to children, and the application of health…

Arizona State Dept. of Education, Phoenix.

17

Health Occupations Curriculum. Skills and Theory for Practical Nurse. Units 18, 19, and 20.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Part of a health occupations program, these instructional units consist of materials for use by those who are studying to become practical nurses. Covered in the units are the following: the nursing care of mothers and newborns (obstetrics, prenatal care and complications, patient needs, care of the newborn, prematurity, medications, and cultural…

Arizona State Dept. of Education, Phoenix.

18

[Applying the human dignity ideals of Confucianism and Kant to psychiatric nursing: from theory to practice].  

PubMed

Literature articles and clinical observation suggest disease and environmental factors as primary causes of the low self-esteem and stigmatization that typify most psychiatric patients. These patients are at risk of injury when subjected to inappropriate physical restraint. Hospital staffs, including nurses, are in immediate and close contact with psychiatric patients. Mencius's and Kant's thoughts on human dignity can enhance reflections on clinical nursing practices. Mencius's belief that preserving life is not the most desirable thing and death is not the most hated thing can help nurses realize the human dignity of psychiatric patients by understanding that, as an unrighteous act is more detestable than death, the meaning and value of righteousness are greater than life itself. In light of Kant's views on human dignity, nurses should treat patients as goals rather than means. Exploring such ideas can raise nursing quality, restore a positive sense of humanity to psychiatric patients, and develop nursing values and meaning to a higher plane. PMID:22469899

Lee, Mei-Hsiu; Lee, Shui-Chuen; Lee, Shu-Chen

2012-04-01

19

Social meanings and understandings in patient-nurse interaction in the community practice setting: a grounded theory study  

PubMed Central

Background The patient-nurse relationship is a traditional concern of healthcare research. However, patient-nurse interaction is under examined from a social perspective. Current research focuses mostly on specific contexts of care delivery and experience related to medical condition or illness, or to nurses’ speciality. Consequentially, this paper is about the social meanings and understandings at play within situated patient-nurse interaction in the community practice setting in a transforming healthcare service. Methods Grounded theory methodology was used and the research process was characterised by principles of theoretical sensitivity and constant comparative analysis. The field of study was four health centres in the community. The participants were patients and nurses representative of those attending or working in the health centres and meeting there by scheduled appointment. Data collection methods were observations, informal interviews and semi-structured interviews. Results Key properties of ‘Being a good patient, being a good nurse’, ‘Institutional experiences’ and ‘Expectations about healthcare’ were associated with the construction of a category entitled ‘Experience’. Those key properties captured that in an evolving healthcare environment individuals continually re-constructed their reality of being a patient or nurse as they endeavoured to perform appropriately; articulation of past and present healthcare experiences was important in that process. Modus operandi in role as patient was influenced by past experiences in healthcare and by those in non-healthcare institutions in terms of engagement and involvement (or not) in interaction. Patients’ expectations about interaction in healthcare included some uncertainly as they strived to make sense of the changing roles and expertise of nurses and, differentiating between the roles and expertise of nurses and doctors. Conclusions The importance of social meanings and understandings in patient-nurse interaction is not fully apparent to nurses, but important in the patient experience. Seeking understanding from a social perspective makes a contribution to enhancing knowledge about patient-nurse interaction with subsequent impact on practice, in particular the development of the patient-nurse relationship. The implications are that the meanings and understandings patients and nurses generate from experiences beyond and within their situated interaction are pivotal to the development of their relationship in the transforming community healthcare environment. PMID:22950713

2012-01-01

20

NURSE PRACTITIONERS AS AN ADVANCED PRACTICE NURSE ROLE POSITION STATEMENT  

Microsoft Academic Search

The term advanced practice nurse is a descriptor that includes nurse practitioners (NP), certified nurse-midwives (CNM), nurse anesthetists (CRNA) and clinical nurse specialists (CNS). Advanced practice nurses make independent and collaborative health care decisions. They are expert clinicians engaged in active clinical practice. The advanced practice nurse demonstrates leadership as a consultant, educator, administrator and researcher. An important leadership function

2002-01-01

21

Advanced practice in neonatal nursing.  

PubMed

The participation of advanced practice registered nurses in neonatal care continues to be accepted and supported by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Recognized categories of advanced practice neonatal nursing are the neonatal clinical nurse specialist and the neonatal nurse practitioner. PMID:19482773

Wallman, Carol

2009-06-01

22

Master of Nursing and Doctor of Nursing Practice Degrees in Advanced Practice Nursing & Health  

E-print Network

Master of Nursing and Doctor of Nursing Practice Degrees in Advanced Practice Nursing & Health Systems and Organizational Leadership For the love of practice #12;An advanced practice registered nurse nurses is that a significant component of the education and practice focuses on direct care

Chapman, Michael S.

23

Examination of the teaching styles of nursing professional development specialists, part I: best practices in adult learning theory, curriculum development, and knowledge transfer.  

PubMed

The American Nurses Association advocates for nursing professional development (NPD) specialists to have an earned graduate degree, as well as educational and clinical expertise. However, many NPD specialists have limited exposure to adult learning theory. Limited exposure to adult learning theory may affect NPD educational practices, learning outcomes, organizational knowledge transfer, and subsequently, the professional development of the nurses they serve and quality of nursing care. An examination of current teaching practices may reveal opportunities for NPD specialists to enhance educational methods to promote learning, learning transfer, and organizational knowledge and excellence. This article, the first in a two-part series, examines best practices of adult learning theories, nursing professional development, curriculum design, and knowledge transfer. Part II details the results of a correlational study that examined the effects of four variables on the use of adult learning theory to guide curriculum development for NPD specialists in hospitals. PMID:24779716

Curran, Mary K

2014-05-01

24

The professional practice of nursing administration. Integrated nursing practice.  

PubMed

The role of the nurse executive is dynamic, requiring a high degree of leadership skill and managerial competence linked with clinical nursing knowledge and research. Preparation for the role requires an integrated curriculum in nursing administration and life span leadership development. Recognition of the professional level of differentiated practice as nursing administration is essential if professional nursing is to remain vital in the 21st century. Transformed schools should be named schools of nursing administration, and the new product should be the nurse executive who has the ability to function in a wide variety of settings on earth and in space. PMID:2023011

Simms, L M

1991-05-01

25

The nature of advanced practice nursing.  

PubMed

In attempting to define "advanced practice," we argue that nursing as such is teleological or goal-directed with those goals being defined by the patient or client in interaction with the nurse. In helping the patient meet identified goals, the nurse requires 2 kinds of knowledge-general and particular. General includes theory (know what/why), pattern recognition (know what), and practical knowledge (know how). Particular (know who) is personal knowledge about the patient. The advanced practice nurse, by virtue of graduate education, is able to move beyond the familiar and experientially learned. He or she makes a deliberate attempt to situate self in a dialectic between general and particular knowledge in such a way that the interplay opens possibilities. Knowing when a particular action would be most helpful is defined as practical wisdom. We argue that a highly developed sense of practical wisdom is the hallmark of advanced practice. PMID:11416818

Oberle, K; Allen, M

2001-01-01

26

LSUHSC School of Nursing Doctor of Nursing Practice  

E-print Network

LSUHSC School of Nursing Doctor of Nursing Practice Fall 2012 The LSUHSC School of Nursing announces the Inaugural Class of the Doctor of Nursing Practice Students DNP Open House DNP Open House If you are a post-master's Family or Neonatal Nurse Practitioner, Nursing Administrator, CNS in Adult

27

Empowering Nurses for Professional Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Empowering teaching strategies encourage leadership, critical thinking, problem solving, and collegiality and discourage passivity, isolation, and subordination. Empowerment prepares nurses for professional practice in hospitals. (SK)

Carlson-Catalano, Judy

1992-01-01

28

Handbook of clinical nursing practice  

SciTech Connect

Written in outline format, this reference will help nurses further their understanding of advanced nursing procedures. Information is provided on the physiological, psychological, environmental, and safety considerations of nursing activities associated with diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Special consideration is given to the areas of pediatric nursing, nursing assessment, and selected radiologic and nuclear medicine procedures for each system. Contents: Clinical Introduction. Clinical Nursing Practice: Focus on Basics. Focus on Cardiovascular Function. Focus on Respiratory Function. Focus on Gastrointestinal Function. Focus on Renal and Genito-Urological Function. Focus on Neuro-Skeletal and Muscular Function. Appendices.

Asheervath, J.; Blevins, D.R.

1986-01-01

29

Mentoring practices benefiting pediatric nurses.  

PubMed

Previous studies examining predictors of pediatric nurse protégé mentoring benefits demonstrated that protégé perception of quality was the single best predictor of mentoring benefits. The ability to identify the mentoring practices that predict specific benefits for individual nurses provides a better understanding of how mentoring relationships can be leveraged within health care organizations promoting mutual mentoring benefits. This descriptive correlational, non-experimental study of nurses at a northeast Ohio, Magnet® recognized, free-standing pediatric hospital advances nursing science by demonstrating how mentoring practices benefit pediatric nurse protégés. PMID:25128577

Weese, Meghan M; Jakubik, Louise D; Eliades, Aris B; Huth, Jennifer J

2015-01-01

30

The Ottawa Charter--from nursing theory to practice: insights from the area of alcohol and other drugs.  

PubMed

This article aims to assist nursing services to use the Ottawa Charter as a framework for nursing practice. Incorporation of the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion into a nursing structure constitutes an innovation in nursing practice that was evaluated as a quality improvement exercise in a health-care organization responsible for providing services in the area of alcohol and other drugs. The evaluation consisted of two stages and sought to identify the degree to which the framework was effective in practice. This involved identifying issues surrounding the implementation of the Ottawa Charter as a framework for nursing practice as well as identifying the means by which quality improvements could occur. The evaluation involved an initial questionnaire to all nursing staff, followed by a series of focus groups. The data collected was both informative and enlightening and revealed a range of pertinent issues such as staff understanding and interpretation of the Ottawa Charter, expansion of the nurse's role and suggestions for organizational change. The Ottawa Charter strategies are discussed in relation to their relevance to the organization under evaluation and also expanded into recommendations to assist those contemplating using the Ottawa Charter as a framework for nursing practice. There was considerable agreement among the respondents that the Ottawa Charter provided a useful framework for nursing practice but was on occasions problematic. PMID:11261045

Smith, M; Cusack, L

2000-08-01

31

Nursing Home Work Practices and Nursing Assistants' Job Satisfaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: To estimate the impact of nursing home work practices, specifically compensation and working conditions, on job satisfaction of nursing assistants employed in nursing homes. Design and Methods: Data are from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey, responses by the nursing assistants' employers to the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey,…

Bishop, Christine E.; Squillace, Marie R.; Meagher, Jennifer; Anderson, Wayne L.; Wiener, Joshua M.

2009-01-01

32

Using Nursing Languages in School Nursing Practice. Second Edition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this updated manual is to define and describe standardized nursing languages, highlight how nursing languages are a part of the nursing process, and illustrate through case examples how nursing languages are used in school nursing practice. This manual also summarizes the history and development of three nursing classifications, the…

Denehy, Janice

2010-01-01

33

Doctor of Nursing Practice / Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing MSN DNP/PhD  

E-print Network

Doctor of Nursing Practice / Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing MSN ­ DNP/PhD Sample Schedule ­ Fall for the Health Sciences # NURS 646 Health Care Information Systems # NURS 650 Theories of Leadership & Organizational Management NURS 695A The Science and Practice of Nursing or NURS 695B DNP Forum NURS 705

Arizona, University of

34

Towards anti-oppressive practice in mental health nursing.  

PubMed

Working in Partnership, the Department of Health's report on the 1994 review of mental health nursing, implies that mental health nurses should develop anti-oppressive approaches to nursing practice. There is a notable absence of articles within the nursing literature which specifically address this issue. This is possibly because the historical and ideological issues which have informed the development of mental health nursing are complex and difficult to unravel. However, an integration of the theories of David Cooper and Frantz Fanon may provide an appropriate starting point for the development of a theory of anti-oppressive practice which addresses some of the issues specific to mental health nursing. PMID:9335656

Hopton, J

35

Demonstrating Theory in Practice: Examples of the McGill Model of Nursing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A workshop on the McGill Model of Nursing, which depicts nurses' role in developing and maintaining family health, was attended by 147 nurses. Increases in self-efficacy, behavior, and performance related to implementing the model were evident 6 months after the workshop. (SK)

Gaudine, Alice P.

2001-01-01

36

Blended roles: preparing the advanced practice nurse educator\\/clinician with a web-based nurse educator certificate program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Changing demographics, a nursing shortage, and various societal changes underscore the need for nurse educators and new nurse educator programs. This article describes a Web-based nurse educator program designed to prepare advanced practice nurses for faculty roles while simultaneously preparing them as clinicians. Guided by adult education theory and self-directed learning theory, the Web-based Nurse Educator Certificate (four Web-based nurse

Wanda B Bonnel; Carol K Starling; Karen A Wambach; Karen Tarnow

2003-01-01

37

[Rediscovering practical knowledge in nursing].  

PubMed

The author demythologizes some arguments which blamed the victim and he works on the path to rediscover practical knowledge in nursing in the sense that a nurse becomes a "constructor" or a "maker" of knowledge and not a mere applicator of knowledge. PMID:16130684

Medina Moya, José Luis

2005-01-01

38

Doctor of Nursing Practice Ph.D. in Nursing Focus Nursing Practice Nursing Research  

E-print Network

, and Advanced Specialty Practice Trajectories of Chronic Illness and Care Systems Core Courses Evidence Based with the tools and skills necessary to translate evidence gained through nursing research into practice, improve Focus Translation of evidence to practice, Transformation of health care, Health care leadership

Zhou, Pei

39

Clinical supervision and practice nurses.  

PubMed

practice nurses need clinical supervision to help them keep abreast of their expanding primary care role. Ali Farquharson, Gail Trotter and Sheila Nimmo report on a project that set out to provide a support model. PMID:9731148

Farquharson, A; Trotter, G; Nimmo, S

40

Doctor of Nursing Practice Academic Manual  

E-print Network

Doctor of Nursing Practice Academic Manual 2013 ­ 2014 #12;PURPOSE OF THE ACADEMIC MANUAL of the Doctor of Nursing Practice program in the School of Nursing, University policies, School of Nursing and in the School of Nursing catalog. Failure to read these sources will not excuse students from abiding

von der Heydt, Rüdiger

41

Popper and nursing theory.  

PubMed

Science seems to develop by inducing new knowledge from observation. However, it is hard to find a rational justification for induction. Popper offers one attempt to resolve this problem. Nursing theorists have tended to ignore or reject Popper, often on the false belief that he is a logical positivist (and hence hostile to qualitative research). Logical positivism claims that meaningful sentences containing any empirical content should ultimately be reducible to simple, observation statements. Popper refutes positivism by showing that there are no such simple statements. He is not a positivist. For Popper, the scientist begins with problems and puts forward trial solutions. These are subjected to rigorous testing aimed at falsifying them. A new theoretical position is then reached in which the scientist knows either that the trial solutions are false or that they have not yet been falsified. Science is characterized by the fact that it tests its ideas through attempted falsification. Non-science tests its ideas through attempted refutation. Nursing theory is a mixture of science and non-science. Popper's method requires rigorous testing of theory in both realms. As such, some nursing theory should be discarded. Popper's view faces at least two important criticisms. One is that a scientist can always reject an apparent falsification by instead altering some auxiliary hypothesis (e.g. denying the accuracy of the falsifying observation). Popper can deal with this argument by saying that defence of a theory in this way will eventually break down if the theory is false. The second criticism is that Popper's method does ultimately draw upon induction. This criticism is true, but his method can be usefully adapted. An adapted from of Popper's philosophy of science provides a good basis for nursing theory. PMID:14498963

Allmark, Peter

2003-04-01

42

An ontological view of advanced practice nursing.  

PubMed

Identifying, developing, and incorporating nursing's unique ontological and epistemological perspective into advanced practice nursing practice places priority on delivering care based on research-derived knowledge. Without a clear distinction of our metatheoretical space, we risk blindly adopting the practice values of other disciplines, which may not necessarily reflect those of nursing. A lack of focus may lead current advanced practice nursing curricula and emerging doctorate of nursing practice programs to mirror the logical positivist paradigm and perspective of medicine. This article presents an ontological perspective for advanced practice nursing education, practice, and research. PMID:16350595

Arslanian-Engoren, Cynthia; Hicks, Frank D; Whall, Ann L; Algase, Donna L

2005-01-01

43

Uncovering the evidence of non-expert nephrology nursing practice.  

PubMed

Expertise in nursing has been widely studied although there have been no previous studies into what constitutes expertise in nephrology (renal) nursing. This paper, which is abstracted from a larger study into the acquisition and exercise of nephrology nursing expertise, provides evidence of the characteristics and practices of non-expert nephrology nurses. Using the grounded theory method, the study took place in one renal unit in New South Wales, Australia, and involved six non-expert and 11 expert nurses. Sampling was purposive then theoretical. Simultaneous data collection and analysis using participant observation, review of nursing documentation and semistructured interviews was undertaken. The study revealed a three-stage skills-acquisitive process that was identified as non-expert, experienced non-expert and expert stages. Non-expert nurses showed superficial nephrology nursing knowledge and limited experience; they were acquiring basic nephrology nursing skills and possessed a narrow focus of practice. PMID:16529590

Bonner, Ann

2006-04-01

44

Doctoral education for WOC nurses considering advanced practice nursing.  

PubMed

Advanced practice nursing education is at a crossroads. Societal changes, increased health care demands, and leadership nursing organizations have identified the need of a doctor of nursing practice (DNP) degree as the advanced practice degree. WOC nurses need to examine DNP programs when considering returning for an advanced practice degree. This article explores nursing education at the doctorate level and areas the WOC nurse should consider when making a decision about attending a program. The WOC nurse needs to understand the similarities and differences of the doctor of philosophy and the DNP, issues about each program and its completion, personal factors, and the application process. Although selecting a doctoral program is a daunting experience, the education will provide opportunities for the WOC nurse to excel as a scholar, thus influencing the profession and the practice. PMID:22572897

Pieper, Barbara; Colwell, Janice

2012-01-01

45

Nursing knowledge, theory and method revisited.  

PubMed

With the approach of the 21st century, nursing is having to respond to diverse influences which are remoulding the professional landscape. Not least of these is the changing status of western economies which underpins a drive towards evidence-based practice and an increased emphasis on multidisciplinary approaches to health care delivery. Certainty in health care is now a thing of the past. Central to the way the nursing profession embraces the future is its underlying philosophy: that which articulates professional values and shapes practice, research, education and management. In a time of change it is therefore essential to revisit the philosophical framework which underpins nursing. The debate in nursing research and theory appears to have stressed the polarization of viewpoints. It may be the case that feminist writers, ethnographers, positivist researchers and nursing theorists, in defending their own points of view, diminish rather than enhance professional dialogue. This paper reviews the nature of this debate within nursing and considers the implications that a dichotomous position may have for knowledge, theory and research method within the current context of health care. It then suggests a philosophical framework which could be relevant and accessible across the whole spectrum of nursing activity. In so doing, the paper aims to contribute to the discussion around epistemology and method in a way which encompasses the diversity found within the broad church of nursing. PMID:9354995

Booth, K; Kenrick, M; Woods, S

1997-10-01

46

The Journal of Doctoral Nursing Practice  

E-print Network

-reviewed publication focused on clinical excellence in the application of evidence-based practice of doctoral nursing College of Nursing Practice Evidence H. Michael Dreher, PhD, RN Associate Professor, DepartmentThe Journal of Doctoral Nursing Practice CSRClinical Scholars Review www

Grishok, Alla

47

HEALTH POLICY AND SYSTEMS Nurses' Practice Environments, Error Interception Practices,  

E-print Network

was positively associated with error interception practices among nurses in the sample of medical-surgical units. Importantly, nurses' interception practices were inversely associated with medication error rates. Conclusions environments, nurses employ practices that can assist in interrupting medication errors before they reach

Xie, Minge

48

Understanding the domestic rupture in forensic psychiatric nursing practice.  

PubMed

The objective of this article is to examine the tensions that exist between care and custody in correctional environments by presenting the (im)possibilities of psychiatric nursing practice within this context. The analysis will be guided by empirical data obtained from a qualitative research conducted in a correctional setting. Semistructured interviews with nurses were conducted and used as the primary source of data for analysis. This article will explore the contextual characteristics of psychiatric nursing practice in correctional settings, describe the alienating effects of this context on nursing practice, theorize nurses' experience using Festinger's theory on cognitive dissonance, and, finally, explore how some nurses engage in the reconstruction of their care to counter the effects of working in correctional settings. PMID:24272741

Jacob, Jean Daniel

2014-01-01

49

Doctor of Nursing Practice / Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing MSN DNP/PhD (with Adult Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Specialty)  

E-print Network

Nurse Practitioner Specialty) Sample Schedule ­ Fall 2011 Program Total Units: 117 units minimum SummerDoctor of Nursing Practice / Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing MSN ­ DNP/PhD (with Adult Acute Care Systems # NURS 650 Theories of Leadership & Organizational Management NURS 695A The Science and Practice

Arizona, University of

50

Doctor of Nursing Practice / Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing BSN DNP/PhD (with Adult Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Specialty)  

E-print Network

Nurse Practitioner Specialty) Sample Schedule ­ Fall 2011 Program Total Units: 117 units minimum SummerDoctor of Nursing Practice / Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing BSN ­ DNP/PhD (with Adult Acute Care Systems NURS 650 Theories of Leadership & Organizational Management NURS 695A The Science and Practice

Arizona, University of

51

Nurse educators' perspectives on student development of reflection for psychiatric mental health nursing practice.  

PubMed

Psychiatric nursing, in various parts of the world, including regions of Canada, is recognized as a distinct nursing profession. In psychiatric mental health nursing practice, reflection is considered a foundational skill given the relational nature of nurses' therapeutic work. Communicating the significance of reflection for practice to students and teaching this intangible skill is challenging for educators. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore with psychiatric mental health nurse educators their views on how they develop reflective practitioners. Participants' perspectives and experiences in teaching reflective practice were captured in four themes: building the use of self as an agent of change, building skills of reflection/building the habit of reflection, building a bridge between theory and practice, and building a continuing reflective practice - from student to practitioner. Recommendations include a systematic incorporation of reflection into a curriculum and creating supportive learning environments that facilitate the development of reflective practitioners. PMID:23974046

Karpa, Jane V; Chernomas, Wanda M

2013-01-01

52

Characterizations of Advocacy by Practicing Nurses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For 17 practical nurses, client advocacy was not their primary role. However, the nurse-patient relationship was a salient feature of advocacy. Work environment barriers and physician attitudes hindered involvement in advocacy. (SK)

Chafey, Kathleen; Rhea, Marty; Shannon, Anna M.; Spencer, Sandra

1998-01-01

53

Does Faculty Incivility in Nursing Education Affect Emergency Nursing Practice?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Incivility in nursing education is a complicated problem which causes disruptions in the learning process and negatively affects future nursing practice. This mixed method research study described incivility as well as incivility's effects through extensive literature review and application of a modified Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey. The INE included six demographic items, four quantitative sections, and five open-ended questions. The survey examined emergency nurses' perceptions of incivility and how the experience affected their personal nursing practice. The INE was initially tested in a 2004 pilot study by Dr. Cynthia Clark. For this research study, modifications were made to examine specifically emergency nurse's perceptions of incivility and the effects on their practice. The population was a group of nurses who were members of the emergency nurses association in a Midwestern state. In the quantitative component of the Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey, the Likert scale questions indicated that the majority of the participants reported witnessing or experiencing the uncivil behaviors. In the qualitative section of the INE survey, the participants reported that although they have not seen incivility within their own academic career, they had observed faculty incivility with nursing students when the participants were assigned as preceptors as part of their emergency nursing practice.

Stokes, Pamela

54

Nursing Practice Environment and Registered Nurses' Job Satisfaction in Nursing Homes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Recruiting and retaining registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes is problematic, and little research is available to guide efforts to make nursing homes a more attractive practice environment for RNs. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between aspects of the nursing practice environment and job satisfaction among RNs…

Choi, JiSun; Flynn, Linda; Aiken, Linda H.

2012-01-01

55

Assisted living nursing practice: the language of dementia: theories and interventions.  

PubMed

The person with dementia uses behavior to communicate, but their behavior is altered by the combination of neurological damage and impairment, altered interpersonal relationships and reactions of others, and the individual's loss or weakening of their lifelong defenses or coping mechanisms. This article discusses the routes by which behavior can be understood and describes a constellation of needs of a person with dementia that has a unique fit with person-centered care. Three evidence-based models (theories) and interventions specific to dementia behaviors are discussed: the Need-Driven Dementia-Compromised Behavior Model, the Progressively Lowered Stress Threshold Model, and the utilization of self-identity roles. Montessori-based activities are another approach to person-centered dementia care that respect, as do the models, the dignity, worthiness and interests of the person afflicted with dementia. The models discussed in this article all seek to improve the quality of life of the person with dementia. Other than those at the profound end stage of dementia, most sufferers can communicate feelings. Subjective quality of life must be determined based on the self-report of the person suffering with dementia so that treatment interventions and effectiveness are grounded in that person's reality. PMID:17923285

Mitty, Ethel; Flores, Sandi

2007-01-01

56

Improving nursing practice, education, and research.  

PubMed

Nurse executive leadership in academic health centers is essential to the improvement of nursing education, practice, and research. The author raises questions to highlight the dilemmas in which nursing finds itself at this time of dramatic transformation of health systems. The framework of the "learning organization" is used to examine the way in which leaders are defined in nursing and the way in which they perceive their roles. Comparisons are drawn between educational and practice administrators, and similarities and differences between these two groups are discussed. Integrative faculty practice roles are summarized, and innovations in advanced nursing practice are described briefly. Specific aspects of the research enterprise discussed are collaboration among members of the nursing discipline and examination and evaluation of quality-of-care issues. For improvement to occur, the author advocates involved, participatory problem solving by nurse colleagues in education and practice. PMID:8618122

Fagin, C M

1996-03-01

57

Nurse-perceived Patient Adverse Events and Nursing Practice Environment  

PubMed Central

Objectives: To evaluate the occurrence of patient adverse events in Korean hospitals as perceived by nurses and examine the correlation between patient adverse events with the nurse practice environment at nurse and hospital level. Methods: In total, 3096 nurses working in 60 general inpatient hospital units were included. A two-level logistic regression analysis was performed. Results: At the hospital level, patient adverse events included patient falls (60.5%), nosocomial infections (51.7%), pressure sores (42.6%) and medication errors (33.3%). Among the hospital-level explanatory variables associated with the nursing practice environment, ‘physician- nurse relationship’ correlated with medication errors while ‘education for improving quality of care’ affected patient falls. Conclusions: The doctor-nurse relationship and access to education that can improve the quality of care at the hospital level may help decrease the occurrence of patient adverse events. PMID:25284199

Kang, Jeong-Hee; Kim, Chul-Woung; Lee, Sang-Yi

2014-01-01

58

The Journey to Integrate Watson's Caring Theory with Clinical Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes the process of integrating Jean Watson's (1985, 1988, 1999) caring theory with nursing practice. Strategies to transition the theory from a multihospital system conceptual level to a departmental-specific operational level are discussed. Benefits and barriers in implementing nursing theory within the practice setting are also revealed. In the spring of 2003, the notion of integrating a nursing

Linda A. Ryan

59

Evidence-Based Practice and School Nursing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

School nurses need to demonstrate that their practice is based on the best evidence available, which is usually data obtained from research. Evidence-based practice involves combining the best evidence available with nursing expertise and patient and family preferences to determine optimum care. Evidence-based practice guidelines are developed by…

Adams, Susan; McCarthy, Ann Marie

2005-01-01

60

The University of Texas at Austin School of Nursing Professional and Technical Standards for Nursing Practice  

E-print Network

The University of Texas at Austin School of Nursing Professional, and clinical agencies. Practicing nurses and nursing students are held to very high of nursing practice include "behaviors indicating honesty, accountability, trustworthiness

Johnston, Daniel

61

Practice nurses' workload and consultation patterns.  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND. There are calls for the role of the practice nurse to be developed and extended. Before areas for further training and education can be identified, baseline data are needed on practice nurses' current activity and workload. AIM. A study was undertaken to analyse the activity of practice nurses in two large inner city general practices and to assess the skills mix of the nursing staff required to meet the needs of the practices. METHOD. The study practices had a combined list of 26,000 patients, 80% of patients attracting a deprivation allowance. Each practice employed three practice nurses. A nurse activity index with 45 codes was constructed to describe patient-nurse consultations. Activity codes were categorized into traditional treatment tasks, extended role tasks or diagnosis and management tasks. For eight months, practice nurses in practices Y and Z recorded activity index codes for each patient consultation. Practice Y also recorded the source of referral and the age and sex of the patient. RESULTS. There were 13,898 practice nurse consultations during the study period, equivalent to an annual nurse consultation rate of 0.8 per patient. Compared with the practice population as a whole, the patients attending the practice nurses in practice Y were older (mean age 43 years versus 37 years, P < 0.001). Those attending the practice nurses in practice Y were also more likely to be female (61% of consultations were with female patients compared with 50% of the practice population as a whole, P < 0.001). In practice Y, patients referred themselves to the practice nurse in 42% of consultations, 32% were follow-up consultations and in 25% of cases the patient had been referred by a doctor. The most common reasons for nurse consultation were blood tests (15% of procedures in practice Y and 18% in practice Z) and dressings (13% in both practices). Most procedures in practices Y and Z were in the traditional treatment category (61%), 26% were in the extended role category and 9% in the diagnosis and management category (3% coded 'other', 1% uncoded). Between practices, the greatest difference in recorded procedures was for asthma check ups (7% of procedures in practice Y compared with 2% in practice Z). CONCLUSION. This study describes the workload of practice nurses in two inner city practices over eight months. Other practices could use the activity index to make comparisons over time and between practices. Up to 60% of nurses' work in the study practices could be done by a nurse without extended training and up to 30% could be done by a health care assistant, but with some loss of quality. It is suggested that half the nursing hours available to a practice should be offered by a nurse with extended training in order to undertake and develop extended role tasks and diagnosis and management tasks. PMID:7576846

Jeffreys, L A; Clark, A L; Koperski, M

1995-01-01

62

FACULTY PRACTICE IN A TEACHING NURSING HOME  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two approaches were used to define and develop faculty practice in a teaching nursing home. The problems encountered included role conflicts, communication gaps, and differences between faculty and nursing staff goals. Benefits included the availability of new nursing care services as well as increased opportunities for students and faculty to conduct clinical research.

Felicitus Ferington; Carol Panicucci

1986-01-01

63

Faculty Practice in a Teaching Nursing Home.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes two approaches used to define and develop faculty practice in a teaching nursing home. Problems include role conflicts, communication gaps, and differences between faculty and nursing staff goals. Benefits include availability of new nursing care services and increased opportunities for conducting clinical research. (Author/ABB)

Ferington, Felicitus; Panicucci, Carol

1986-01-01

64

Managing ethical distress in nursing practice.  

PubMed

In this monthly column, Aysha Mendes explores the many aspects of psychology interwoven into nursing practice. This month, she explores the causes of ethical distress in nursing, the effect it can have on nurses and what can be done to manage it. PMID:25492438

Mendes, Aysha

65

State Regulations for School Nursing Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this article is to present a state-by-state summary of rules and regulations governing school nursing practice in the United States. Official government and agency sites were reviewed to determine providers of services in schools, criteria for becoming a school nurse, protection of titling, mandates for school nursing, and the…

Praeger, Susan; Zimmerman, Barbara

2009-01-01

66

The Journal of Doctoral Nursing Practice  

E-print Network

The Journal of Doctoral Nursing Practice CSRClinical Scholars Review www.springerpub.com/csr SPRINGER PUBLISHING COMPANY Columbia University School of Nursing With the Compliments of Springer, the International Council of Nurses (ICN) sug- gested that the master's degree be required for entry into advanced

Grishok, Alla

67

The Journal of Doctoral Nursing Practice  

E-print Network

Assistant Clinical Professor Rutgers University College of Nursing Managing Editor Christina Bunner, BAThe Journal of Doctoral Nursing Practice CSRClinical Scholars Review www.springerpub.com/csr SPRINGER PUBLISHING COMPANY Volume 6, Number 2, 2013 ISSN 1939-2095 Columbia University School of Nursing

Grishok, Alla

68

Medication Administration Practices of School Nurses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Assessed medication administration practices among school nurses, surveying members of the National Association of School Nurses. Respondents were extremely concerned about medication administration. Errors in administering medications were reported by 48.5 percent of respondents, with missed doses the most common error. Most nurses followed…

McCarthy, Ann Marie; Kelly, Michael W.; Reed, David

2000-01-01

69

Nursings students’ attitudes towards rural nursing practice   

E-print Network

Background: Nursing shortage is a worldwide phenomenon; in rural areas, this shortage is exacerbated by geographical imbalances. Reducing the inequality of health outcomes between rural and urban areas requires improvement ...

Tao, Yuexian

2014-07-01

70

The Journal of Doctoral Nursing Practice  

E-print Network

..................................................................................................................12 Courtney E. Reinisch and Jeffrey Kwong PRACTICE EVIDENCE Awareness of Heuristics in Clinical Knowledge: An Evidence-Based Change Project .............................................42 Marie A. CobbThe Journal of Doctoral Nursing Practice CSRClinical Scholars Review www

Columbia University

71

Eliciting nursing knowledge from practice: the dualism of nursing.  

PubMed

Nursing knowledge has traditionally been examined and developed through the main research approaches based on the positivist, interpretive or phenomenological philosophies. These approaches are used either from a single and individual stance or combined to address particular research questions. They all, however, retain a focus that deals primarily or exclusively with what can be measured, observed or expressed as a fundamental unit of analysis to reconstruct, interpret and explain nursing practice. In this paper, Vince Ramprogus challenges the traditional approach to how nursing knowledge is defined and the common understanding of the purpose of nursing research. It is argued that adhering to empirical rigour while investigating or measuring nursing practice interferes with the very act and experience of nursing. Indeed, it becomes an either/or situation. It is also argued that nursing is not an empirical subject, and, therefore, the purpose of researching nursing is not about seeking the truth but about improving practice to achieve better patient care. The arguments are intended to provoke discussion and debate rather than to present a set position. PMID:12405006

Ramprogus, Vince

2002-01-01

72

Conceptualizing clinical nurse leader practice: An interpretive synthesis  

E-print Network

nurse leader practice is continuous clinical leadership,nurse leader stories: A phenomenological study about the meaning of leadershipnurse leader practice has been identified as continuous clinical leadership

Bender, M

2015-01-01

73

Practical guidelines for feminist research in nursing.  

PubMed

With increasing interests in oppressed groups, the number of feminist studies in nursing has steadily increased. Despite the increasing number of feminist studies, very few articles have been written to provide practical guidelines for feminist research in nursing. In this article, guidelines for feminist research in nursing are proposed on the basis of 3 previous feminist studies. First, characteristics of feminist research are concisely described. Then, the 3 studies that are the basis for the guidelines are described. Finally, practical guidelines for feminist nursing research are proposed on the basis of 10 idea categories related to issues/concerns from the 3 studies. PMID:23644265

Im, Eun-Ok

2013-01-01

74

Part III. Reenvisioning undergraduate nursing students as opinion leaders to diffuse evidence-based practice in clinical settings.  

PubMed

Rogers's claims about the importance of social networks to the diffusion of innovations are reviewed in light of efforts to promote evidence-based practice (EBP) among nursing students and practicing nurses. We argue that nursing educators can take more deliberate advantage of the essentially social nature of the diffusion process by devising opportunities for nursing students to form meaningful social interactions with practicing nurses. We recommend curricular reforms that reenvision undergraduate nursing students as opinion leaders throughout the curriculum. Rogers's theory predicts that such ongoing interactions between nursing students and practicing nurses will better integrate EBP among both populations. PMID:20129589

Cronje, Ruth J; Moch, Susan D

2010-01-01

75

Administrative Protocol Page 1 of 1 Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

Administrative Protocol Page 1 of 1 Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROTOCOL: Nursing Standards (Policies, Procedures, Protocols): Exceptions to POLICY: 1. Nursing practice is directed by the Department of Nursing Practice

Oliver, Douglas L.

76

Towards an understanding of nurses leaving nursing practice in China : a qualitative exploration of nurses leaving nursing practice from recruitment to final exit   

E-print Network

The nursing shortage in China is more serious than in most developed countries, but the loss of nurses through their voluntarily leaving nursing practice has not attracted much attention in Chinese society. The aim of ...

Zhu, Junhong

2012-11-28

77

Nursing leadership: interprofessional education and practice.  

PubMed

The column presents a scholarly dialogue about nursing's role in interprofessional education, practice, and collaboration. Susan Hassmiller, PhD, RN, FAAN, is the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) senior adviser for nursing. In this role, she shapes and leads the foundation's strategies to address nurse and nurse faculty shortages and ensures that RWJF's commitments in nursing have a broad and lasting national impact. In partnership with AARP, Hassmiller directs the foundation's Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action. This effort, active in 50 states plus the District of Columbia, strives to implement the recommendations of the Institute of Medicine's 2011 report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, for which Hassmiller served as the study director. PMID:24085670

Clarke, Pamela N; Hassmiller, Susan

2013-10-01

78

Development of clinical practice standards for nurses.  

PubMed

Nursing, with leadership from the American Nurses Association (ANA), has a long-standing commitment to the development of standards. The first nursing practice standards were published in 1973. Since that time, both the ANA and specialty nursing organizations have developed standards. However, the proliferation of standards, reflecting a wide divergence of intent, format, and scope, has limited their usefulness. In 1989, the ANA appointed a Task Force (now a Committee) to address this issue. The Committee, working with representatives of the specialty nursing organizations, has developed a framework for development of both nursing practice standards and guidelines. Standards and guidelines are defined and differentiated. The relationship of standard and guidelines development to the federal government's effectiveness initiative is discussed. PMID:1824446

Taylor, J W

1991-01-01

79

Doctor of Nursing Practice Student Outcomes  

E-print Network

as the basis for advanced level nursing practice. 2. Develop and evaluate new practice approaches based the evaluation of evidence to determine and implement best practice. 5. Function as a practice specialist, and accountability in designing, delivering, and evaluating evidence-based care to improve patient outcomes. 10

Sheridan, Jennifer

80

Theorizing Practice and Practicing Theory  

E-print Network

his paper describes the emerging field of practice theory as it is practiced in relation to organizational phenomena. We identify three approaches—empirical, theoretical, and philosophical—that relate to the what, the how, ...

Feldman, Martha S.

81

[Domains in the clinical practice of Clinical Nursing Experts in Germany and their correspondence with the internationally described "Advanced Nursing Practice"].  

PubMed

In spite of a growing trend toward academic education and increasing numbers of "nursing experts" functioning as change agents in Germany, actual nursing experts as in the internationally described Advanced Nursing Practice (ANP) are scarce. Drawing from a ten-year experience in implementing the international concept, the University Hospital Freiburg (UKF), Germany, constitutes a notable exception, as it presently employs ten clinically practicing nursing experts. Based on this background of educating nursing experts, this presentation aims at describing the implementation of the nursing expert's role and its fit and conformance with the international ANP. A 3-stage Delphi design was used for interviewing all the nursing experts at the hospital (n = 10) about their expert opinions; in addition, all nursing managers (n = 7) as well as unit and team leaders (n = 49) were asked about their opinion to relevant functions and domains of nursing experts. The following clinical practice domains of nursing experts were identified: Direct patient care, patient education, support and supervision of nurses, maintenance and expansion of professional skills and knowledge of the nursing staff, counselling of managers, quality assurance and organizational development, theory to practice transfer, nursing research, maintenance of own professional skills and knowledge and continuing education, and publicity work. Additionally, a three-year nursing education, a longer lasting professional experience, a degree in nursing science or nursing education, and specialist skills in the respective area of expertise were identified as credentials for nursing expert practice. The nursing expert concept at UKF shows elements of the international ANP with similarities to the role of a Clinical Nurse Specialist. PMID:19496033

Mendel, Simon; Feuchtinger, Johanna

2009-06-01

82

MSc Advanced Practice (Nursing) The MSc Advanced Practice (Nursing) has been designed to allow a flexible postgraduate pathway  

E-print Network

and practical capabilities within nursing and health care provision · Support from highly experienced academic and Social Care module 2. Nursing, Politics and Social Change (Core Nursing module) 3. Two optional modulesMSc Advanced Practice (Nursing) The MSc Advanced Practice (Nursing) has been designed to allow

Davidson, Fordyce A.

83

Practical Nursing, Volume I. Health Occupations Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This curriculum guide provides teachers with up-to-date information and skill-related applications needed by the practical nurse. The volume contains three sections and 24 instructional units: Personal Vocational Relationships (6 units), Nutrition (3 units), and Basic Nursing Principles and Applied Skills (15 units covering such topics as…

Rogers, Helen W.; And Others

84

Doctor of Nursing Practice Program Pediatric Clinical Courses  

E-print Network

Doctor of Nursing Practice Program Pediatric Clinical Courses Student Preceptor Guide 2014................................................................................................................................... 9! Honing Assessment Skills

Cui, Yan

85

The Nature of Advanced Practice Nursing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Advanced practice nurses are situated between general knowledge (knowing why, what, and how) and particular knowledge (knowing who--personal knowledge of patients). Integration of the two assists in knowing when a particular action would be most helpful. This practical wisdom is the hallmark of advanced practice. (Contains 45 references.) (SK)

Oberle, Kathleen; Allen, Marion

2001-01-01

86

Best Faculty Practice Plan Model for a Small College of Nursing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Bridging the gap between theory and practice has been a priority with universities and colleges of nursing. A mechanism for bridging this gap has been the establishment of faculty practices. Faculty practices have provided nurse practitioner faculty opportunities to mentor students, augment income, implement evidence-based research, provide…

Conrad, Sharyn Neiman

2010-01-01

87

North Dakota Statewide Nursing Study, Phase II. Delineation of Nursing Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nursing practice in North Dakota was studied as part the development of a statewide nursing resource planning system. In addition to the current scope of nursing practice, the study investigated: (1) specific competencies currently targeted by nursing education; (2) differences in specific competencies endorsed by nurses with various education…

Clark, Neil; Smith, David

88

Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP) Earn Your Doctorate & Advance the Profession of Nursing  

E-print Network

Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP) Earn Your Doctorate & Advance the Profession of Nursing degree in nursing is the perfect way to enhance your practice and advance the profession of nursing will help you achieve your career goals. Points of Pride The UC College of Nursing is dedicated

Papautsky, Ian

89

The nursing human resource planning best practice toolkit: creating a best practice resource for nursing managers.  

PubMed

Evidence of acute nursing shortages in urban hospitals has been surfacing since 2000. Further, new graduate nurses account for more than 50% of total nurse turnover in some hospitals and between 35% and 60% of new graduates change workplace during the first year. Critical to organizational success, first line nurse managers must have the knowledge and skills to ensure the accurate projection of nursing resource requirements and to develop proactive recruitment and retention programs that are effective, promote positive nursing socialization, and provide early exposure to the clinical setting. The Nursing Human Resource Planning Best Practice Toolkit project supported the creation of a network of teaching and community hospitals to develop a best practice toolkit in nursing human resource planning targeted at first line nursing managers. The toolkit includes the development of a framework including the conceptual building blocks of planning tools, manager interventions, retention and recruitment and professional practice models. The development of the toolkit involved conducting a review of the literature for best practices in nursing human resource planning, using a mixed method approach to data collection including a survey and extensive interviews of managers and completing a comprehensive scan of human resource practices in the participating organizations. This paper will provide an overview of the process used to develop the toolkit, a description of the toolkit contents and a reflection on the outcomes of the project. PMID:20463445

Vincent, Leslie; Beduz, Mary Agnes

2010-05-01

90

Nursing Education Options: Practical Nursing, Associate Degree Nursing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Contained in this curriculum guide are information and guidelines deemed essential to administrators and faculty for planning, implementing, and evaluating a community college Nursing Education Options Program. The document is divided into five sections covering: program development; students and student support services; facilities, equipment,…

Eller, Vercie M.; And Others

91

Protection: clarifying the concept for use in nursing practice.  

PubMed

The protection of patients is integral in any healthcare setting. Healthcare organizations are increasingly held accountable for preventable medical errors, the attitudes toward safety, and communication among all levels of providers, collaborative practices, and recognition of risks. The concept of protection is inherent in nursing practice. It provides a framework, that further defines healthcare provider's roles in meeting these imperatives. The scope of protection is considered both globally and individually prominent. Nurses protect patients from environmental hazards, themselves, and any perceived threat. In this analysis of the phenomenon, the concept is clarified, and an evidence-based approach to protection is utilized for theory development and concept measurement. PMID:17471049

Lorenz, Susan G

2007-01-01

92

Evidence-Based Practice Guidelines and School Nursing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The use of evidence-based practice (EBP) has become the standard of health care practice. Nurses are expected to use best evidence on a wide range of topics, yet most nurses have limited time, resources, and/or skills to access and evaluate the quality of research and evidence needed to practice evidence-based nursing. EBP guidelines allow nurses

Adams, Susan; McCarthy, Ann Marie

2007-01-01

93

Official Doctor of Nursing Practice Program of Study Form  

E-print Network

and Analytical Methods for Advanced Nursing Practice Total Hours DNP Leadership & PracticeOfficial Doctor of Nursing Practice Program of Study Form Eagle ID: 900 First MI Home Phone: ________________ Work Phone: _______________ GSU

Hutcheon, James M.

94

Consensus statements: ambulatory pediatric oncology nursing practice.  

PubMed

The pre-conference workshop at the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nursing, held in September 2008, focused on issues faced by pediatric oncology nurses in the ambulatory setting. The workshop was developed after several years of intense discussions at several forums. Therefore the need for an extended discussion period with ambulatory pediatric oncology nurses across the country to address these concerns was evident. There has been a major shift over the past ten years from inpatient to outpatient treatment in oncology (Chabot & Fox, 2005). This shift has resulted in numerous unique challenges for the pediatric oncology nurse. Challenges include lack of staffing resources for fluctuating patient volume and acuity, telephone triage volume and management, home care patient issues, scheduling systems, patient flow and wait time, and multi-institutional communication. This article reports the results of the APHON workshop which utilized the evidence from adult ambulatory oncology literature and standards and the recommendations of the expert pediatric oncology nurse participants to develop global statements about pediatric oncology ambulatory practice standards. The energy and productivity of the group was evidence of a common theme and demand for attention to the ambulatory nursing staff and practice. The ability to identify common threads and reach consensus with powerful statements of practice supports the continued use of such forums to move practice forward. PMID:19897837

Conley, Susanne B; O'Hanlon Curry, Joan; Hines, Melissa; Baker, Kelley; Schmidt, Kaye; Zwier, Kathy; Siever, Beth; Mirisola, Therese; Burke, Susie; Thom, Bridgette; Kline, Nancy E

2010-01-01

95

Practical strategies for nursing education program evaluation.  

PubMed

Self-evaluation is required for institutions of higher learning and the nursing programs within them. The literature provides information on evaluation models and instruments, and descriptions of how specific nursing education programs are evaluated. However, there are few discussions in the nursing education literature of the practical aspects of nursing education program evaluation: how to get started, how to keep track of data, who to involve in data collection, and how to manage challenging criteria. This article discusses the importance of program evaluation in the academic setting and provides information on practical ways to organize the evaluation process and aggregate data, and strategies for gathering data from students, graduates, alumni, and employers of graduates. PMID:25839953

Lewallen, Lynne Porter

2015-01-01

96

Nursing Education Leaders' Perceived Leadership Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to examine the leadership practices perceived by nursing education leaders as measured by the Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI). The framework used was a contemporary transformational leadership model described in "The Leadership Challenge" ("4th ed.") by Dr. James Kouzes and Dr. Barry Posner, which identifies the…

DeLong, Dianne

2010-01-01

97

The Journal of Doctoral Nursing Practice  

E-print Network

College of Nursing Practice Evidence H. Michael Dreher, PhD, RN Associate Professor, Department .................................................................................6 Denise Davis, Vernell DeWitty, and Catherine Millett PRACTICE EVIDENCE Effects of Educating Women Roubion-Johnson and Donna L. Williams Evidence-Based Clinical Guidelines and Their Impact on Prevention

Qian, Ning

98

Effective communication skills in nursing practice.  

PubMed

This article highlights the importance of effective communication skills for nurses. It focuses on core communication skills, their definitions and the positive outcomes that result when applied to practice. Effective communication is central to the provision of compassionate, high-quality nursing care. The article aims to refresh and develop existing knowledge and understanding of effective communication skills. Nurses reading this article will be encouraged to develop a more conscious style of communicating with patients and carers, with the aim of improving health outcomes and patient satisfaction. PMID:25467362

Bramhall, Elaine

2014-12-01

99

Professional resilience, practice longevity, and Parse's theory for baccalaureate education.  

PubMed

New nurses seem unable to find a means of flourishing professionally in acute care practice and, consequently, exit far earlier than expected. Worldviews of baccalaureate students have changed from previous generations; yet, the approaches to nursing education remain essentially the same. Just as clinical settings benefit from nursing theory as the basis for nursing practice and scientific inquiry, the science of nursing education would benefit from nursing theory as a basis for guiding educational practice. Parse's human science theory, the Human Becoming School of Thought, is a fitting theoretical framework for a model of teaching-learning for undergraduate baccalaureate nursing education. In addition, as a theory of dynamic relational synchrony, Parse's work provides an appropriate framework with which to promote professional resilience and career longevity by purposefully engaging students within student-faculty dyads to explore personal meanings and philosophies of caring, and to create strong professional identities. PMID:16402737

Hodges, Helen F; Keeley, Ann C; Grier, Elaine C

2005-12-01

100

Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing Definition of Faculty Practice  

E-print Network

Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing Definition of Faculty Practice Faculty practice, mentoring, leadership, collaboration, consultation and research. A faculty practice provides the opportunity

von der Heydt, Rüdiger

101

Perinatal Safety: From Concept to Nursing Practice  

PubMed Central

Communication and teamwork problems are leading causes of documented preventable adverse outcomes in perinatal care. An essential component of perinatal safety is the organizational culture in which clinicians work. Clinicians’ individual and collective authority to question the plan of care and take action to change the direction of a clinical situation in the patient’s best interest can be viewed as their “agency for safety.” However, collective agency for safety and commitment to support nurses in their advocacy role is missing in many perinatal care settings. This paper draws from Organizational Accident Theory, High Reliability Theory, and Symbolic Interactionism to describe the nurse’s role in maintaining safety during labor and birth in acute care settings, and suggests actions for supporting the perinatal nurse at individual, group, and systems levels to achieve maximum safety in perinatal care. PMID:20147827

Kennedy, Holly Powell

2010-01-01

102

Clinical simulation using deliberate practice in nursing education: a Wilsonian concept analysis.  

PubMed

Effective use of simulation is dependent on a complete understanding of simulation's central conceptual elements. Deliberate practice, a constituent of Ericsson's theory of expertise, has been identified as a central concept in effective simulation learning. Deliberate practice is compatible with simulation frameworks already being suggested for use in nursing education. This paper uses Wilson's Method of concept analysis for the purpose of exploring the concept of deliberate practice in the context of clinical simulation in nursing education. Nursing education should move forward in a manner that reflects best practice in nursing education. PMID:24120521

Chee, Jennifer

2014-05-01

103

Learning theories application in nursing education  

PubMed Central

Learning theories are the main guide for educational systems planning in the classroom and clinical training included in nursing. The teachers by knowing the general principles of these theories can use their knowledge more effectively according to various learning situations. In this study, Eric, Medline, and Cochrane databases were used for articles in English and for the Persian literature, Magiran, Iran doc, Iran medex, and Sid databases were used with the help of keywords including social cognitive learning, learning theory, behavioral theory, cognitive theory, constructive theory, and nursing education. The search period was considered from 1990 to 2012. Some related books were also studied about each method, its original vision, the founders, practical application of the training theory, especially training of nursing and its strengths and weaknesses. Behaviorists believe that learning is a change in an observable behavior and it happens when the communication occurs between the two events, a stimulus and a response. Among the applications of this approach is the influence on the learner's emotional reactions. Among the theories of this approach, Thorndike and Skinner works are subject to review and critique. Cognitive psychologists unlike the behaviorists believe that learning is an internal process objective and they focus on thinking, understanding, organizing, and consciousness. Fundamentalists believe that learners should be equipped with the skills of inquiry and problem solving in order to learn by the discovery and process of information. Among this group, we will pay attention to analyze Wertheimer, Brunner, Ausubel theories, Ganyeh information processing model, in addition to its applications in nursing education. Humanists in learning pay attention to the feelings and experiences. Carl Rogers support the retention of learning-centered approach and he is believed to a semantic continuum. At the other end of the continuum, experiential learning is located with the meaning and meaningful. It applies the minds and feelings of the person. From this group, the main focus will be on the works of Rogers and Novels. Finally, it could be concluded that the usage of any of these theoriesin its place would be desired and useful. PMID:25767813

Aliakbari, Fatemeh; Parvin, Neda; Heidari, Mohammad; Haghani, Fariba

2015-01-01

104

Learning theories application in nursing education.  

PubMed

Learning theories are the main guide for educational systems planning in the classroom and clinical training included in nursing. The teachers by knowing the general principles of these theories can use their knowledge more effectively according to various learning situations. In this study, Eric, Medline, and Cochrane databases were used for articles in English and for the Persian literature, Magiran, Iran doc, Iran medex, and Sid databases were used with the help of keywords including social cognitive learning, learning theory, behavioral theory, cognitive theory, constructive theory, and nursing education. The search period was considered from 1990 to 2012. Some related books were also studied about each method, its original vision, the founders, practical application of the training theory, especially training of nursing and its strengths and weaknesses. Behaviorists believe that learning is a change in an observable behavior and it happens when the communication occurs between the two events, a stimulus and a response. Among the applications of this approach is the influence on the learner's emotional reactions. Among the theories of this approach, Thorndike and Skinner works are subject to review and critique. Cognitive psychologists unlike the behaviorists believe that learning is an internal process objective and they focus on thinking, understanding, organizing, and consciousness. Fundamentalists believe that learners should be equipped with the skills of inquiry and problem solving in order to learn by the discovery and process of information. Among this group, we will pay attention to analyze Wertheimer, Brunner, Ausubel theories, Ganyeh information processing model, in addition to its applications in nursing education. Humanists in learning pay attention to the feelings and experiences. Carl Rogers support the retention of learning-centered approach and he is believed to a semantic continuum. At the other end of the continuum, experiential learning is located with the meaning and meaningful. It applies the minds and feelings of the person. From this group, the main focus will be on the works of Rogers and Novels. Finally, it could be concluded that the usage of any of these theoriesin its place would be desired and useful. PMID:25767813

Aliakbari, Fatemeh; Parvin, Neda; Heidari, Mohammad; Haghani, Fariba

2015-01-01

105

Faculty practice and roles of staff nurses and clinical faculty in nursing student learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

The perceptions of staff nurses and clinical nurse faculty on the roles they play in nursing student learning were examined. The study also sought to explore how faculty practice status affected these perceived roles. Nursing schools with generic baccalaureate nursing programs in the middle Atlantic region composed the study population. A convenience sample of two schools that expected their undergraduate

Joanne C. Langan

2003-01-01

106

Implementing a Gerontological Clinical Nursing Practice with an Interdisciplinary Focus: Lessons Learned  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A gerontological clinical nursing practice with an interdisciplinary focus was developed to provide opportunities for student nurses to expand their knowledge about aging, hone assessment skills, and critically examine beliefs about older adults. The practice included theory about older adults and a rotation through a variety of clinical settings…

Dahlke, Sherry; Fehr, Cindy

2010-01-01

107

Administrative Protocol Page 1 of 2 Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

Administrative Protocol Page 1 of 2 Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department assistance from Nursing Supervisor with staffing issues. f. Oversees completion of unit specific Protocol Page 2 of 2 Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing The University

Oliver, Douglas L.

108

Identification of Desired Outcomes for School Nursing Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The "Scope and Standards of Professional School Nursing Practice" states that school nurses should evaluate the quality and effectiveness of their practice. School nurses have not yet identified and adopted outcomes by which this effectiveness can be measured. This study used focus groups during a national meeting of school nurse leaders to…

Selekman, Janice; Guilday, Patricia

2003-01-01

109

Hiring and incorporating doctor of nursing practice-prepared nurse faculty into academic nursing programs.  

PubMed

Semistructured interviews were conducted with 15 deans and directors of nursing programs across the United States to gain an understanding of how Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP)-prepared nurses seeking academic positions are hired and used in schools of nursing. Interviews sought to gain information regarding (a) differences and similarities in the roles and responsibilities of DNP- and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)-prepared faculty, (b) educational advancement and mentoring of DNP-prepared nurse faculty, (c) recruitment of doctorally prepared nurse faculty, and (d) shortages of nursing faculty. DNP- and PhD-prepared nurse faculty are hired for varying roles in baccalaureate and higher degree schools of nursing, some similar to other faculty with master's degrees and others similar to those with PhDs; in associate degree in nursing programs, they are largely hired for the same type of work as nurse faculty with master's degrees. Regardless of program or degree type, the main role of DNP-prepared faculty is teaching. PMID:25050562

Agger, Charlotte A; Oermann, Marilyn H; Lynn, Mary R

2014-08-01

110

Theory into Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The importance of putting theory into practice can be addressed and advocated to educators and gifted students through the presentation of a Continuum of Practice. Articulating the sequence and phases of practice can underscore how practice can take place; it also can change the perspective and meaning of practice.

Kaplan, Sandra N.

2012-01-01

111

Transformational leadership in nursing practice.  

PubMed

Traditionally, nurses have been over-managed and led inadequately, yet today they face unprecedented challenges and opportunities. Organisations constantly face changes that require an increasingly adaptive and flexible leadership. This type of adaptive leadership is referred to as 'transformational'; under it, environments of shared responsibilities that influence new ways of knowing are created. Transformational leadership motivates followers by appealing to higher ideas and moral values, where the leader has a deep set of internal values and ideas. This leads to followers acting to sustain the greater good, rather than their own interests, and supportive environments where responsibility is shared. This article focuses on transformational leadership and its application to nursing through the four components of transformational leadership. These are: idealised influence; inspirational motivation; intellectual stimulation; and individual consideration. PMID:23132001

Doody, Owen; Doody, Catriona M

112

Commendations, conversations, and life-changing realizations: teaching and practicing family nursing.  

PubMed

This article embeds a piece of reflective writing and analysis from an undergraduate nursing student about the integration of course content to practice in the nursing of families. Surrounding the reflection of the student, the course professor discusses the content, intent, history, and delivery of the family nursing course and examines how the theory taught is necessarily mirrored in the way it is taught and the ways that students are invited into experiencing and "practicing" the skills, philosophies, theories, and beliefs of nursing families well. PMID:20335497

Moules, Nancy J; Johnstone, Hillary

2010-05-01

113

Thinking creatively: from nursing education to practice.  

PubMed

Creative thinking is a critical link in the teaching-learning process, one that enhances problem solving in nursing practice. This article describes a conceptualization of creativity based on focus groups with 12 post-RN students and two nurse educators. Inherent within the major theme, striving for balance, were three subthemes-enhancing self-esteem, working within structure, and making time for reflection (i.e., process). When participants achieved balance, both personally and professionally, they experienced increased creative energy that resulted in creative expression, subsequently displayed in educational endeavors and clinical practice (i.e., product). Strategies for fostering creativity and criteria for evaluating creativity are offered, and implications for nurse educators, managers, and practitioners are examined. PMID:12180769

Kalischuk, Ruth Grant; Thorpe, Karran

2002-01-01

114

Practical Nursing. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for practical nursing. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that…

Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

115

Physicians' and Nurses' Own Health Practices  

PubMed Central

We sent an anonymous self-report questionnaire on personal health practices to 141 nurses, 72 family physicians, and 171 specialists in the greater Hamilton area. All groups had similar lifestyle behaviors; differences between groups and between men and women were found for disease detection and prevention and health care use. Health professionals could significantly improve personal health practices, benefiting both themselves and their patients. PMID:21221254

Janes, Ronald D.; Wilson, Douglas M.C.; Singer, Joel

1992-01-01

116

Discovering determinants influencing faith community nursing practice.  

PubMed

Faith community nursing (FCN) is an important healthcare delivery system for individuals, families, and communities. Determinants are factors that might influence FCN care. A literature review isolated eight determinants that influence practice; however, there are no clear causal relationships linking specific determinants to specific practice changes. Research is needed to assess how determinants influence practice and outcomes, and provide evidence-based solutions to isolate and manage determinants. A Conceptual Model of FCN, Theoretical Definitions and a Diagram of Determinants of FCN Practice are provided. PMID:25296487

Ziebarth, Deborah Jean

2014-01-01

117

Effects of Nursing Practice Environments on Quality Outcomes in Nursing Homes  

PubMed Central

The objective of this study was to determine whether nurse staffing levels and modifiable characteristics of the nursing practice environment are associated with important quality indicators represented by the percentage of residents with pressure ulcers and numbers of deficiency citations in nursing homes. A cross-sectional design linked nurse survey data, aggregated to the facility level, with Nursing Home Compare, a publicly available federal database containing nursing home–level measures of quality. The facility sample consisted of 63 Medicare- and Medicaid-certified nursing homes in New Jersey, and the nurse survey sample comprised 340 registered nurses providing direct resident care. Characteristics of the practice environment were measured using the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index, included in the nurse survey. The total number of deficiency citations, the percentage of residents with pressure ulcers, nurse staffing levels, and facility characteristics were extracted from the Nursing Home Compare database. Results indicated that a supportive practice environment was inversely associated with the percentage of residents with pressure ulcers and fully mediated the effect of profit status on this important outcome. The nursing practice environment and facility size explained 25% of the variance in quality deficiencies. There were no associations between staffing levels and quality indicators. Findings indicate that administrative initiatives to create environments that support nursing practice may hold promise for improving quality indicators in nursing homes. PMID:21054327

Flynn, Linda; Liang, Yulan; Dickson, Geri L.; Aiken, Linda H.

2012-01-01

118

The Relationship Between Nursing Leadership Practices and Hospital Nursing Retention  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the current nursing shortage and the shrinkage of the American workforce, the challenges of recruiting and retaining nurses for hospital nursing are becoming increasingly difficult. Nursing leadership is responsible for the retention of nurses once they are recruited. Leadership styles exhibited by leaders are a major contributing factor to a nurse's decision to stay in a current position, transfer,

Cynthia M. Acree

2006-01-01

119

Eliciting reflections on caring theory in elderly caring practice  

PubMed Central

Caring theories are the description and conceptualization of the care that is given in caring practise by nurses and other professional caregivers with the aim of verbalizing and communicating caring phenomena. Intermittently, a theorypractice gap is given expression- that theory does not go along with clinical practice in caring. The aim of this study was an investigation into the possible disparity between theory and practice in caring by analysing nurses’ lived experience of the understanding of caring theory in practice in the context of municipal elderly care. Hermeneutical phenomenology was the research approach used to explore the lived experience of caring science theories in caring practice from the perspective of 12 nurses working in municipal care for elderly. The findings shows that the nurses Impulsively described their experience of detachment to caring theory, but when describing their caring intentions, the relationship to theory became apparent, and even confirmed their practice. As such, a seedbed exists for caring theory to be reflected on and cultivated in caring praxis. However, as the nurses describe, the caring theory must be sensitive enough for the nursing practitioners to accept. The gap revealed itself on an organisational level, as the nurses’ commission in municipal care did not correspond with their caring intention. We believe it is important to seriously consider what we want to achieve as a caring profession. We have to reflect on our responsibility as culture carriers and knowledge developers. We must make the disparate forces of intention and organisation become one intertwining force. PMID:21866232

Elisabeth Ranheim, Albertine; Kärner, Anita; Berterö, Carina

2011-01-01

120

Advanced practice nurse psychiatric bridging intervention.  

PubMed

Depression is a prevalent and treatable condition; however, extensive waiting periods for treatment are associated with high failure to attend initial psychiatric evaluation (IPE) appointments. This article describes the development, implementation, and pilot evaluation of the Advanced Practice Nurse (APN) Psychiatric Bridging Intervention. The project was grounded in Peplau's theory of interpersonal relations and designed to provide supportive psychoeducational counseling and initiation of psychotropic medication for clients with depressive symptoms during the time between intake and IPE. Project development was guided by Roger's Diffusion of Innovations framework used for adopting an evidence-based innovation into an organization. A two-group design allowed comparison of preintervention clients (38 clients who received standard care) and intervention clients (19 clients who participated in the bridging intervention). The difference in IPE appointment attendance rates between the two groups approached statistical significance (p = 0.08). An unanticipated finding was that APN Psychiatric Bridging Intervention clients required only 30-minute IPE appointments compared to the typical 60-minute appointment. PMID:23521115

Schaumberg, Laurie; Narayan, Suzanne M; Wright, Tracy

2013-05-01

121

Sifting, sorting and saturating data in a grounded theory study of information use by practice nurses: a worked example.  

PubMed

The terminology used to analyse data in a grounded theory study can be confusing. Different grounded theorists use a variety of terms which all have similar meanings. In the following study, we use terms adopted by Charmaz including: initial, focused and axial coding. Initial codes are used to analyse data with an emphasis on identifying gerunds, a verb acting as a noun. If initial codes are relevant to the developing theory, they are grouped with similar codes into categories. Categories become saturated when there are no new codes identified in the data. Axial codes are used to link categories together into a grounded theory process. Memo writing accompanies this data sifting and sorting. The following article explains how one initial code became a category providing a worked example of the grounded theory method of constant comparative analysis. The interplay between coding and categorization is facilitated by the constant comparative method. PMID:23181960

Hoare, Karen J; Mills, Jane; Francis, Karen

2012-12-01

122

Historical imagination, narrative learning and nursing practice: graduate nursing students' reader-responses to a nurse's storytelling from the past.  

PubMed

Storytelling and narrative are widely used in nurse education and the value of narrative-based curricula, such as those governed by narrative pedagogy, is well recognised. Storytelling stimulates students' imagination, a central feature of narrative learning. One form of story and imagination yet to be fully considered by educators is the historical story and historical imagination. The use of historical storytelling creates a temporal dissonance between the story and reader that stimulates readers' imagination and response, and enables them to gain rich insights which can be applied to the present. Reader-response theory can support educators when using narrative and storytelling. This article presents an analysis of graduate nursing students' reader-responses to a nurse's story from the past. This narrative learning group used their historical imagination in responding to the story and prompted and challenged each other in their interpretation and in translating their responses to their current nursing practice. The article discusses this analysis within the context of reader-response theory and its potential application to narrative-based learning in nurse education. Historical stories stimulate historical imagination and offer a different frame of reference for students' development of textual competence and for applying insights to the present. PMID:24875838

Wood, Pamela J

2014-09-01

123

Administrative Protocol Page 1 of 3 Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

be adversely affected b. for a nurse already working overtime on another unit c. if contract(s) prohibitAdministrative Protocol Page 1 of 3 Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROTOCOL FOR: Staffing: Permanent and Per Diem (Nurse

Oliver, Douglas L.

124

Administrative Procedure Page 1 of 2 Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

Administrative Procedure Page 1 of 2 Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital - Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROCEDURE FOR: Certification Bonus POLICIES: 1. All registered nurses employed by the John Dempsey Hospital who possess professional nursing certification

Oliver, Douglas L.

125

The practice doctorate in nursing: approaches to transform nurse practitioner education and practice.  

PubMed

Ongoing challenges caused by increased complexity of care, changing patient demographics, and shifting health care delivery systems are necessitating a transformation of advanced practice. The practice doctorate has the potential to prepare graduates to meet these challenges now and in the future. This article conceptualizes the practice doctorate curriculum for nurse practitioners (NPs), with particular focus on how it will prepare NPs as expert clinicians with enhanced leadership and research skills. Nurse practitioner doctoral education and practice is articulated and differentiated from current NP education and practice, with distinguishing features clearly identified. A compelling argument is made for how this educational preparation will facilitate NPs in meeting future societal needs. The purpose of this article is to provide guidance for all advanced practice educational programs considering adoption of a practice doctorate, and to contribute to the advancement of thinking about the practice doctorate for clinicians as well as educators. PMID:16759936

Draye, Mary Ann; Acker, Michele; Zimmer, Phyllis Arn

2006-01-01

126

Nurses and the wise organisation: techne and phronesis in Australian general practice.  

PubMed

This paper draws on classical theories of wisdom to explore the organisational impact of nurses on Australian general practice. Between 2004 and 2008, numbers of general practice nurses doubled, the most rapid influx of nurses into any Australian workplace over the decade. Using data from the Australian General Practice Nurses Study, we argue that nurses had a positive impact because they introduced techne at the organisational level and amplified phronesis in clinical activities. In its Hippocratic formulation, techne refers to a field of definable knowledge, which is purposeful and useful and requires mastery of rational principles. Nursing, with its focus on system and accountability, brought techne out of the GP's consulting room and into the general practice as a whole. Nurses also exemplify phronesis, an Aristotelian virtue connoting a reasoned and honourable capacity to make judgements: the practical wisdom that defines the interaction between clinician and patient in general practice. At a time of significant GP shortage, doctors and nurses began to collaborate around their more complex and time-consuming patients, leading to a deepening of phronesis in the workplace. By bringing techne to bear on the organisation, and complementing and enhancing phronesis, nurses propel organisational wisdom in general practices. PMID:22571814

Phillips, Christine; Hall, Sally

2013-06-01

127

inPractice: A Practical Nursing Package for Clinical Decisions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines the recent development of a computer-assisted learning program--in Practice--at the School of Health Science, in the University of Wales Swansea. The project, which began in 2001, was developed in close collaboration with The Meningitis Trust, the aim being to produce a software package to increase nursing students' knowledge…

Ip, Barry; Cavanna, Annlouise; Corbett, Beverley

2005-01-01

128

The case for concordance: value and application in nursing practice.  

PubMed

This is the first of two articles exploring the concept of concordance in practice. This first paper draws on psychology, research in clinical practice and social participation theory to argue for a concordant approach to nursing care. Where most writers have confined discussions on concordance to medicines management, the author seeks to widen the debate to explore the value of the principle across the whole spectrum of nursing practice. Studies describing patient involvement are mapped against Arnstein's model of citizen participation to determine true levels of patient-practitioner working. The outcomes of care delivered in a paternalistic way are compared with those arising from patient-practitioner partnership working across a range of healthcare settings. The values underpinning concordance and the relationships and skills necessary to achieve and sustain it are considered. A recommendation for practice is that concordance needs to be taught as a central part of the healthcare process rather than merely an ethical principle in healthcare education. The power of the nurse-patient relationship on which concordance is built needs to be recognised and valued. The principle of concordance will be more feasible in practice when accompanied by other initiatives that promote public participation in education review commissioning and standard setting. PMID:24261092

McKinnon, John

129

The clinical nurse leader: a response from practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

In October 2003, over 200 nurse leaders from education and practice met at the invitation of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing. A newly released white paper, describing the role of the clinical nurse leader, was discussed at the conference. This article outlines a response to that white paper from one practice setting. The article shares information about another

Karen Neil Drenkard

2004-01-01

130

Administrative Protocol Page 1 of 4 Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

Administrative Protocol Page 1 of 4 Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital-Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROTOCOL FOR: Standards of Clinical Practice: Development, Approval and Posting POLICY: 1. All clinical standards are written to reflect the nursing

Oliver, Douglas L.

131

The Essentials of Doctoral Education for Advanced Nursing Practice  

E-print Network

for Advocacy in Health Care 13 VI. Interprofessional Collaboration for Improving Patient and Population Health1 The Essentials of Doctoral Education for Advanced Nursing Practice TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Task Force on the Practice Doctorate in Nursing 4 Context of Graduate Education in Nursing 5

Acton, Scott

132

CONTINUING PROFESSIONAL DEVELPEMENT FOR PRACTICE NURSES IN REPUBLIC IN IRELAND  

Microsoft Academic Search

A changing health care environment is impacting on the role of practice nurses. As a result of fundamental changes taking place in both health care and nurse education the clinical role of the practice nurse will need to extend and expand (Paxton et al 1996). New knowledge and skills will be a necessity. In the future one of the greatest

Catherine Meagher

133

Doctor of Nursing Practice / Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing BSN DNP/PhD (with Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Specialty)  

E-print Network

Doctor of Nursing Practice / Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing BSN ­ DNP/PhD (with Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Specialty) Sample Schedule ­ Fall 2011 Program Total Units: 115 units minimum Summer Term 1 Fall-based Practice or NURS 630 Statistics for the Health Sciences NURS 646 Health Care Information Systems NURS 650

Arizona, University of

134

Doctor of Nursing Practice / Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing MSN DNP/PhD (with Family Nurse Practitioner Specialty)  

E-print Network

Doctor of Nursing Practice / Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing MSN ­ DNP/PhD (with Family Nurse Practitioner Specialty) Sample Schedule ­ Fall 2011 Program Total Units: 117 units minimum Summer Term 1 Fall-based Practice or NURS 630 Statistics for the Health Sciences # NURS 646 Health Care Information Systems # NURS

Arizona, University of

135

Doctor of Nursing Practice / Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing BSN DNP/PhD (with Family Nurse Practitioner Specialty)  

E-print Network

Doctor of Nursing Practice / Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing BSN ­ DNP/PhD (with Family Nurse Practitioner Specialty) Sample Schedule ­ Fall 2011 Program Total Units: 117 units minimum Summer Term 1 Fall-based Practice or NURS 630 Statistics for the Health Sciences NURS 646 Health Care Information Systems NURS 650

Arizona, University of

136

Doctor of Nursing Practice / Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing MSN DNP/PhD (with Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Specialty)  

E-print Network

Doctor of Nursing Practice / Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing MSN ­ DNP/PhD (with Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Specialty) Sample Schedule ­ Fall 2011 Program Total Units: 115 units minimum Summer Term 1 Fall-based Practice or NURS 630 Statistics for the Health Sciences # NURS 646 Health Care Information Systems # NURS

Arizona, University of

137

Substantive theory on commitment to nurse teacherhood.  

PubMed

Nurse teacherhood is usually examined from the perspectives of nurse teachers' tasks, roles, skills and managing. The purpose of this study was to discuss how nurse teachers themselves describe their teacherhood. The purpose was also to generate a substantive theory of nurse teacherhood, its development, changes and manifestation. Nurse teachers from different polytechnics (today called universities of applied sciences) in Finland (N=34) were interviewed using a semi-structured interview. The data were analysed by employing the grounded theory method. Nurse teacherhood was found to be a dynamic process influenced by processes of change in the organisation, the operating culture of the health care working community, nurse teachers' professional self-esteem, the focus of nurse teachers' competence, their relationship with students, the future of their profession and requirements for staying in the profession. Commitment emerged as the core feature of nurse teacherhood. It was possible to distinguish eight types of commitment: (1) searching for new content in one's position, (2) being adapted to one's position, (3) trying to advance in one's position, (4) having found one's position, (5) searching for one's position, (6) withdrawing from one's position, (7) being satisfied with one's position and (8) being uncertain about one's position. PMID:17854953

Holopainen, Arja; Tossavainen, Kerttu; Kärnä-Lin, Eija

2008-05-01

138

Managing the professional nurse. Part I. The organizational theories.  

PubMed

How do employment organizations outside the hospital field deal with issues such as staff productivity, motivation, burnout, and high turnover? In Part I of this two-part article, the author presents an overview of modern management theory and practice, drawn from the literature on organizational behavior. She shows how nursing administrators can use this scholarly foundation to better understand the organizing principles and problems of their departments. In Part II (to be published in March 1984), the author applies these classic and relevant theories to the specific challenges that face the manager of professional nurses. PMID:6561235

McClure, M L

1984-02-01

139

Obesity Prevention Practices of Elementary School Nurses in Minnesota: Findings from Interviews with Licensed School Nurses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Elementary schools are an optimal setting to provide obesity prevention interventions, yet little is known about the obesity prevention practices of elementary school nurses. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into current obesity-related school nursing practice in elementary schools in Minnesota, opinions regarding school nurse-led…

Morrison-Sandberg, Leslie F.; Kubik, Martha Y.; Johnson, Karen E.

2011-01-01

140

Practice nurses as mentors for student nurses: An untapped educational resource?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes an evaluation process aimed at exploring the issues related to placing third year undergraduate students with Practice Nurses for their adult branch community placement. The evaluation process was based on an iterative action research cycle, demonstrating a reflective approach to the placement. This evaluation of student nurse placements with Practice Nurses intended to provide a useful contribution

Ina Machen

2003-01-01

141

Protocol Page 1 of 2 Clinical Manual -Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

Protocol Page 1 of 2 Clinical Manual - Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROTOCOL FOR: Sensory Perception, Altered DESIRED PATIENT OUTCOME: CLINICAL ASSESSMENT AND CARE: 1. Impaired verbal communication: the patient

Oliver, Douglas L.

142

Critical practice in nursing care: analysis, action and reflexivity.  

PubMed

This article examines critical practice and its underlying principles: analysis, action and reflexivity. Critical analysis involves the examination of knowledge that underpins practice. Critical action requires nurses to assess their skills and identify potential gaps in need of professional development. Critical reflexivity is personal analysis that involves challenging personal beliefs and assumptions to improve professional and personal practice. Incorporating these aspects into nursing can benefit nursing practice. PMID:16786927

Timmins, F

143

EmpowEr your practicE mastEr of NursiNg  

E-print Network

EmpowEr your practicE mastEr of NursiNg #12;mastEr of NursiNg (mN) The UniversiTy of WashingTon BoThell MasTer of nUrsing prograM prepares nurses for advanced leadership roles in health care practice and elective credits support a wide range of nursing interests that allow a custom fit to your individual goals

Manchak, John

144

“Negotiating, Navigating, and Networking”: Three Strategies Used by Nursing Leaders to Shape the Adoption and Incorporation of Simulation into Nursing Curricula—A Grounded Theory Study  

PubMed Central

Background. Implementing simulation requires a substantial commitment of human and financial resources. Despite this, little is known about the strategies used by academic nursing leaders to facilitate the implementation of a simulation program in nursing curricula. Methods. A constructivist grounded theory study was conducted within 13 nursing programs in Ontario, Canada. Perspectives of key stakeholders (n = 27) including nursing administrators (n = 6), simulation leaders (n = 9), and nursing faculty (n = 12) were analyzed using the constant comparison method. Results. Nursing leaders, specifically nursing administrators and simulation leaders who successfully led the adoption and incorporation of simulation into nursing curricula, worked together and utilized negotiating, navigating, and networking strategies that impacted the adoption and incorporation of simulation into nursing curricula. Conclusions. Strategies that were found to be useful when planning and executing the adoption and incorporation of an innovation, specifically simulation, into nursing curricula provide practical approaches that may be helpful to nurse leaders when embarking upon an organizational change. PMID:25093122

Jack, Susan M.; Martin, Lynn

2014-01-01

145

The Vanderbilt Professional Nursing Practice Program: part 1: Growing and supporting professional nursing practice.  

PubMed

Professional practice programs are designed to attract, retain, and reward nurses. This three-part series will describe Vanderbilt's performance-based career advancement system, the Vanderbilt Professional Nursing Practice Program (VPNPP). Part 1 outlines the overall program's foundation, philosophical background, and basic structure. The VPNPP is built upon Benner's work, distinguishing among four levels of practice: novice, competent, proficient, and expert. Work by many in the organization identified the expected behaviors for nurses at each level, which were then used to develop clear process evaluation criteria. Part 2 will examine the performance measurement and evaluation system created to support the program. The process of advancing within the program will be described in part 3. PMID:14501560

Robinson, Karen; Eck, Carol; Keck, Becky; Wells, Nancy

2003-09-01

146

The Historical Evolution of Theories and Conceptual Models for Nursing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The development of nursing models can be traced to the inception of nursing as a profession. Florence Nightingale laid the foundation for current nursing practice and differentiated nursing from medicine. The late 19th and early 20th centuries contributed a number of important nurse theorists, better known for other contributions to the neophyte…

Hawkins, Joellen W.

147

Nurses' views about returning to practice after a career break.  

PubMed

Shortages in nursing staff have led to recruitment campaigns targeting nurses who have left the profession. The present study explored reasons why career-break nurses decide for or against a return to practice, as well as perceptions of nursing following return. Semistructured interview were conducted with 24 nurses who had returned recently to the profession and 28 nurses on a "career break". Findings revealed that those who returned did so when their personal circumstances allowed, and half returned as bank nurses in order to work flexible, family-friendly hours. Some non-returners reported that they could not afford to return because of childcare costs. Although still a caring one, the nurse's role is seen by returners as becoming increasingly technologically and administratively demanding. Flexibility with regard to working practices, increased salaries and demonstrating that it values its staff, were highlighted by interviewees generally as priority issues for the NHS if it wishes to recruit career-break nurses. PMID:11984462

Durand, Mary Alison; Randhawa, Gurch

148

Woman-Centered Maternity Nursing Education and Practice  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this Heideggerian phenomenological study was to uncover the meanings of the clinical experiences of registered nurses working in maternity settings after they studied maternity nursing from a woman-centered, feminist perspective in a generic baccalaureate nursing program. Purposeful sampling was conducted to locate and recruit nurses who had graduated from this nursing program between the December 1996 and December 1998 semesters and were currently working in a maternal-newborn clinical setting. Each participant had taken the required woman-centered, maternity-nursing course during her/his undergraduate education. Data collection included an individual, open-ended interview that focused on the nurses' descriptions of their everyday practices as maternity nurses. Nineteen maternal-newborn nurses between the ages of 23 and 43 years who had been in practice from six months to three years were interviewed. The constitutive patterns identified from the interviews were: “Otherness,” “Being and Becoming Woman-Centered,” and “Tensions in Practicing Woman-Centered Care.” Findings revealed that the nurses had a raised awareness of oppressive maternity care practices and applied ideology of woman-centeredness as a framework for providing more humanistic care. Creating woman-centered maternity care meant negotiating tensions and barriers in medically focused maternity settings and looking for opportunities for advocacy and woman-empowerment. The barriers the nurses faced in implementing woman-centered care exposed limitations to childbearing choices and nursing practices that remain problematic in maternity care. PMID:17273327

Giarratano, Gloria

2003-01-01

149

Motivating employees. Applying motivational theories to nursing.  

PubMed

Managers provide the critical link between the delivery of nursing care and the administration. It is vital for nurse managers to provide a work environment that supports professional nursing practices. Staff nurses are taught how to carry out clinical functions. For them to develop and practice advanced clinical skills, managers have to buffer the pressures of daily operations. They must ask themselves, "Am I committed to my employees?" "Am I an enthusiastic role model for my employees?" "Do I use positive motivating techniques?" "Do I know each of my employees personally as a unique individual?" "What can I do to create an environment that supports my employees?" and "How can I make each of my employees feel respected and worthy?" If the manager, whether experienced or not, can answer these questions honestly and apply motivational techniques differently, he or she will be the best kind of manager: a true leader. PMID:2619295

Pustai, I

1989-12-01

150

Clerical frames for nursing practice: missionary nurses at Rehoboth.  

PubMed

This paper presents a discourse analysis of publications of the Christian Reformed Church regarding its Rehoboth Mission near Gallup, New Mexico, among the Navajo. All issues of The Banner, Acts of Synod of the Christian Reformed Church, the Rehoboth Hospital Bulletin, and the Annual Report of the Rehoboth Mission from 1880 to the present were reviewed for references to health-care at Rehoboth from 1903 to 1943. Four religiously framed discourses were identified: discourses justifying provision of health-care at the mission, discourses of the Navajos as immature and potentially dangerous, needing to be civilized, discourses of cleanliness, and discourses of calling. This paper adds to a growing body of knowledge about religious frames within which nurses have practiced in North America. PMID:12622802

Lagerwey, Mary D

2003-03-01

151

Impact of evidence and health policy on nursing practice.  

PubMed

The story of evidence-based practice in nursing is long, with many successes, contributors, leaders, scientists, and enthusiasts. Nurse educators have great advantages offered from a wide variety of educational resources for evidence-based practice. These resources offer students the opportunity to connect their emerging competencies with clinical needs for best practices in clinical and microsystem changes. PMID:25458138

Geurden, Bart; Adriaenssens, Jef; Franck, Erik

2014-12-01

152

Put Theory into Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When making decisions that impact student learning, college educators often consider previous experiences, precedent, common sense, and advice from colleagues. But how often do they consider theory? At a recent state-level educators' meeting, the authors of this article asked 50 student affairs educators about the use of theory in their practice.…

Jaeger, Audrey J.; Dunstan, Stephany; Thornton, Courtney; Rockenbach, Alyssa B.; Gayles, Joy G.; Haley, Karen J.

2013-01-01

153

Nursing practice environment, quality of care, and morale of hospital nurses in Japan.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to describe Japanese hospital nurses' perceptions of the nursing practice environment and examine its association with nurse-reported ability to provide quality nursing care, quality of patient care, and ward morale. A cross-sectional survey design was used including 223 nurses working in 12 acute inpatient wards in a large Japanese teaching hospital. Nurses rated their work environment favorably overall using the Japanese version of the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index. Subscale scores indicated high perceptions of physician relations and quality of nursing management, but lower scores for staffing and resources. Ward nurse managers generally rated the practice environment more positively than staff nurses except for staffing and resources. Regression analyses found the practice environment was a significant predictor of quality of patient care and ward morale, whereas perceived ability to provide quality nursing care was most strongly associated with years of clinical experience. These findings support interventions to improve the nursing practice environment, particularly staffing and resource adequacy, to enhance quality of care and ward morale in Japan. PMID:23855754

Anzai, Eriko; Douglas, Clint; Bonner, Ann

2014-06-01

154

A Phenomenographic Study Exploring Nursing Education and Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to illuminate the qualitatively different ways in which three nurses with an associate degree (ADN) and three nurses with a baccalaureate degree (BSN) experience, conceptualize, perceive, and understand their own nursing practice within the context of their educational background. Using a phenomenographic methodology…

Degen, Greta M.

2010-01-01

155

Public Policy and Planning for Nurse Education and Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report focuses on nursing educational and practice issues that government officials may have to address in the near future. The report provides statistical information on nurses, compares statistics for white and black nurses, and recommends policies for the future. Data was gathered for the report during a three-year study of 5,175…

Feldbaum, Eleanor G.; Levitt, Morris J.

156

Administrative Procedure Page 1 of 2 Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

Administrative Procedure Page 1 of 2 Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROCEDURE FOR: Change in Patient Condition: Chain caregivers regarding a patient's condition. POLICY: The nurse assigned to the patient or supervising the care

Oliver, Douglas L.

157

Administrative Protocol Page 1 of 3 Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

will insure that contract nursing staff completes the self assessment component of their assigned unit nurse. The self assessment on the orientation competency checklist is reviewed by the preceptorAdministrative Protocol Page 1 of 3 Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department

Oliver, Douglas L.

158

Approaches to gathering evidence for educational practices in nursing.  

PubMed

There are many initiatives under way to teach nursing staff about evidence-based practice, but how many educators seek evidence as a basis for their teaching? Nursing education needs more higher quality research, teachers willing to question their current practices, and nurse educators who ask whether there is a better way of promoting learning and performance. This article provides a perspective of how nurse educators can develop an evidence-based approach to their teaching using the research that is available in nursing education. PMID:18050981

Oermann, Marilyn H

2007-01-01

159

MENTAL HEALTH AND PSYCHIATRIC NURSING IN PRACTICAL NURSE EDUCATION. FINAL REPORT.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THIRTY-ONE PROFESSIONAL NURSE EDUCATORS IN SCHOOLS OF PRACTICAL NURSING IN THE SOUTHEAST ATTENDED A TWO-WEEK CLINICAL WORKSHOP ON PSYCHIATRIC NURSING AT WESTERN STATE HOSPITAL, STAUNTON, VIRGINIA, IN AUGUST 1966. THEY RECONVENED FOR A THREE-DAY FOLLOW-UP CONFERENCE AT ATLANTA, GEORGIA, IN JANUARY 1967. THE PROJECT WAS UNDERTAKEN TO UPDATE THE…

CRAWFORD, ANNIE L.

160

Pain Management: Knowledge and Attitudes of Senior Nursing Students and Practicing Registered Nurses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite scientific advances in pain management, inadequate pain relief in hospitalized patients continues to be an on-going phenomenon. Although nurses do not prescribe medication for pain, the decision to administer pharmacological or other interventions for pain relief is part of nursing practice. Nurses play a critical role in the relief of…

Messmer, Sherry

2009-01-01

161

Faculty Practice and Roles of Staff Nurses and Clinical Faculty in Nursing Student Learning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Focus groups and interviews were conducted with 15 clinical faculty, 4 nursing education administrators, 22 nurses, and 4 hospital administrators involved in clinical placements. When nurses worked with practicing faculty, they experienced less role overload, conflict, and ambiguity. Lack of communication of expectations among administrators,…

Langan, Joanne C.

2003-01-01

162

Certified nurse-midwife and physician collaborative practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

This pilot study was designed to describe the clinical areas of collaboration, financial structures, and sources of conflict for certified nurse-midwives (CNMs) involved in nurse-midwife and physician collaborative practice (CP). A questionnaire was posted on an electronic bulletin board maintained by the Community-Based Nurse Midwifery Education Program of the Frontier School of Nursing. The nonrandom, convenience sample consisted of 78

Suellen Miller; Tekoa King; Peter Lurie; Paul Choitz

1997-01-01

163

Potentials Unlimited: Nursing Practice, Education and Administration. Nursing Research Conference Proceedings (1st, Fresno, California, April 8, 1987).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purposes of this conference were: (1) to present research representing a variety of topics and study designs; (2) to disseminate findings of nursing research; and (3) to stimulate the use of research and theory as a basis for clinical, educational, and administrative practice. The keynote address and two invited presentations are presented in…

Jacobsen-Webb, Marilyn-Lu, Ed.

164

How grounded theory can improve nursing care quality.  

PubMed

This article presents an overview of the grounded theory research method and demonstrates how nurses can employ specific grounded theories to improve patient care quality. Because grounded theory is derived from real-world experience, it is a particularly appropriate method for nursing research. An overview of the method and language of grounded theory provides a background for nurses as they read grounded theories and apply newly acquired understandings to predictable processes and patterns of behavior. This article presents 2 exemplar grounded theories with suggestions as to how nurses can apply these and other grounded theories to improve the provision of quality nursing care. PMID:17873733

Nathaniel, Alvita K; Andrews, Tom

2007-01-01

165

Sexual health and the practice nurse: a survey of reported practice and attitudes  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundPractice nurses have an important role in the provision of sexual health services in general practice.AimThis study set out to determine practice nurses' reported practice and training in sexual health, attitudes towards sexual health, barriers to discussing sexual health with patients, and training needs.MethodA confidential self-administered postal questionnaire survey was sent to all 298 practice nurses in one English health

Tim Stokes; Judith Mears

2000-01-01

166

Nurse work engagement impacts job outcome and nurse-assessed quality of care: model testing with nurse practice environment and nurse work characteristics as predictors  

PubMed Central

Aim: To explore the mechanisms through which nurse practice environment dimensions, such as nurse–physician relationship, nurse management at the unit level and hospital management and organizational support, are associated with job outcomes and nurse-assessed quality of care. Mediating variables included nurse work characteristics of workload, social capital, decision latitude, as well as work engagement dimensions of vigor, dedication and absorption. Background: Understanding how to support and guide nurse practice communities in their daily effort to answer complex care most accurate, alongside with the demand of a stable and healthy nurse workforce, is challenging. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Method: Based on earlier empirical findings, a structural equation model, designed with valid measurement instruments, was tested. The study population included registered acute care hospital nurses (N = 1201) in eight hospitals across Belgium. Results: Nurse practice environment dimensions predicted nurses’ ratings of job outcome variables as well as quality of care. Features of nurses’ work characteristics, e.g., perceived workload, decision latitude, social capital, and the three dimension of work engagement, played mediating roles between nurse practice environment and outcomes. A revised model, using various fit measures, explained 60% of job outcomes and 47% of nurse-assessed quality of care. Conclusion: The findings in this study show that nurse work characteristics as workload, decision latitude, and social capital, alongside with nurse work engagement (e.g., vigor, dedication, and absorption) influence nurses’ perspective of their nurse practice environment, job outcomes, and quality of care. The results underline aspects to considerate for various stakeholders, such as executives, nurse managers, physicians, and staff nurses, in setting up and organizing health care services. PMID:25431563

Van Bogaert, Peter; van Heusden, Danny; Timmermans, Olaf; Franck, Erik

2014-01-01

167

Health promotion overview: evidence-based strategies for occupational health nursing practice.  

PubMed

Health promotion practice has evolved over the past four decades in response to the rising rates of chronic disease. The focus of health promotion is attaining wellness by managing modifiable risk factors, such as smoking, diet, or physical activity. Occupational health nurses are often asked to conduct worksite health promotion programs for individuals or groups, yet may be unfamiliar with evidence-based strategies. Occupational health nurses should lead interprofessional groups in designing and implementing worksite health promotion programs. This article introduces occupational health nurses to health promotion concepts and discusses evidence-based theories and planning models that can be easily introduced into practice. PMID:25101931

Dombrowski, Jill J; Snelling, Anastasia M; Kalicki, Michelle

2014-08-01

168

Primer on the Practice Doctorate for Neonatal Nurse Practitioners  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent advances in technology, research, and knowledge have amplified the need for longer and more in-depth education for neonatal nurse practitioners (NNPs). In this article we will briefly review the history of NNP's role and education, define the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP), and propose that the practice doctorate is the primary mechanism to meet that need and thus is

BOBBY BELLFLOWER; MICHAEL A. CARTER

2006-01-01

169

Family practice nurse views on barriers to immunising children  

Microsoft Academic Search

New Zealand (NZ) has low immunisation coverage for infants and children compared to many other westernised countries. Barriers to improving uptake are multifactorial, with health professional knowledge and attitudes identified as important modifiable factors. In NZ practice nurses give most childhood vaccinations in the primary health care setting. This study explored aspects of 150 family practice nurse views, knowledge and

Helen Petousis-Harris; Felicity Goodyear-Smith; Nikki Turner; Ben Soe

2005-01-01

170

A synthesis of Vroom's model with other social theories: an application to nursing education.  

PubMed

In 2009, the National League for Nursing reported that there are over 3.4 million persons in the United States employed in nursing in the roles of Registered Nurses (RNs) and Advanced Practice Nurses (APRNs). In 2007, the Bureau of Labor Statistics also reported that in 2006, there were over 749,000 Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs) working in the United States with a projected increase of 14% by 2016. Buerhaus et al, in 2009, stated that between 2016 and 2025, it is estimated that the U.S. will need over 260,000 registered nurses (RNs) Using the conceptual framework of Vroom's expectancy theory on motivation as well as theories addressing student and career development, this paper demonstrates a synthesis of Vroom's model with other educational theories and its application to nursing education, specifically the prediction of motivation to advance one's nursing education. By putting Vroom's theory into a context, Vroom's fairly simple model could help nurse educators predict the factors that make for success in midcareer educational advancement--and even possibly manipulate those factors to increase that success. In today's economy, that practical part seems too good to lose. PMID:20832146

Gyurko, Charlene C

2011-07-01

171

Financial literacy as an essential element in nursing management practice.  

PubMed

Grooming nurses at all levels of the organization to master health care executive skills is critical to the organization's success and the individual's growth. Selecting and executing next steps for nursing leadership team development is critical to success. Leaders must make it their responsibility to provide nurses with increased exposure to quality, safety, and financial data, thereby allowing nurses to translate data while achieving and sustaining successful outcomes. The work of the CNO Dashboard to measure, report, trend, and translate clinical and non-clinical outcomes must be integrated throughout all levels of nursing staff so that nursing practice is positioned to continually strive for best practice. The education and evolution of nurses as business managers is critical to building a strong RN workforce. PMID:23691748

Talley, Linda B; Thorgrimson, Diane H; Robinson, Nellie C

2013-01-01

172

Predictors of Practice Patterns for Lymphedema Care Among Oncology Advanced Practice Nurses  

PubMed Central

Lymphedema, a debilitating and chronic condition, is considered to be one of the most distressing adverse effects of cancer treatment. The purpose of this study was to understand the practice patterns in lymphedema care and identify predictors influencing those patterns among oncology nurses, with a focus on advanced practice nurses. Random and purposive sampling was utilized to recruit 238 oncology nurses who completed the Web-based study. Participants included advanced practice nurses (nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists), nurse navigators/case managers, staff nurses, and directors/managers/coordinators. Data focused on perceived knowledge of and perceived competence in risk reduction, treatment, and self-management of lymphedema and practice patterns in lymphedema care. Actual knowledge of lymphedema care was evaluated. Descriptive, comparative, and regression analyses were performed. The study showed that perceived knowledge and perceived competence were highly correlated. Perceived competence was a predictor of practicing lymphedema care. Advanced practice nurses scored in the midrange for perceived knowledge and perceived competence in risk reduction and self-management, but obtained lower scores in perceived knowledge and perceived competence for treatment. The odds of advanced practice nurses delivering lymphedema care were less than those of staff nurses. This study identifies gaps and opportunities for advanced practice nurses to play an important role in providing lymphedema care, an essential aspect of cancer survivorship. PMID:25031960

Ryan, Joanne C.; Cleland, Charles M.; Fu, Mei R.

2012-01-01

173

Eliciting reflections on caring theory in elderly caring practice.  

PubMed

Caring theories are the description and conceptualization of the care that is given in caring practise by nurses and other professional caregivers with the aim of verbalizing and communicating caring phenomena. Intermittently, a theory -practice gap is given expression- that theory does not go along with clinical practice in caring.The aim of this study was an investigation into the possible disparity between theory and practice in caring by analysing nurses' lived experience of the understanding of caring theory in practice in the context of municipal elderly care.Hermeneutical phenomenology was the research approach used to explore the lived experience of caring science theories in caring practice from the perspective of 12 nurses working in municipal care for elderly.The findings shows that the nurses Impulsively described their experience of detachment to caring theory, but when describing their caring intentions, the relationship to theory became apparent, and even confirmed their practice. As such, a seedbed exists for caring theory to be reflected on and cultivated in caring praxis. However, as the nurses describe, the caring theory must be sensitive enough for the nursing practitioners to accept.The gap revealed itself on an organisational level, as the nurses' commission in municipal care did not correspond with their caring intention.We believe it is important to seriously consider what we want to achieve as a caring profession. We have to reflect on our responsibility as culture carriers and knowledge developers. We must make the disparate forces of intention and organisation become one intertwining force. PMID:21866232

Elisabeth Ranheim, Albertine; Kärner, Anita; Berterö, Carina

2011-01-01

174

Authentic leaders creating healthy work environments for nursing practice.  

PubMed

Implementation of authentic leadership can affect not only the nursing workforce and the profession but the healthcare delivery system and society as a whole. Creating a healthy work environment for nursing practice is crucial to maintain an adequate nursing workforce; the stressful nature of the profession often leads to burnout, disability, and high absenteeism and ultimately contributes to the escalating shortage of nurses. Leaders play a pivotal role in retention of nurses by shaping the healthcare practice environment to produce quality outcomes for staff nurses and patients. Few guidelines are available, however, for creating and sustaining the critical elements of a healthy work environment. In 2005, the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses released a landmark publication specifying 6 standards (skilled communication, true collaboration, effective decision making, appropriate staffing, meaningful recognition, and authentic leadership) necessary to establish and sustain healthy work environments in healthcare. Authentic leadership was described as the "glue" needed to hold together a healthy work environment. Now, the roles and relationships of authentic leaders in the healthy work environment are clarified as follows: An expanded definition of authentic leadership and its attributes (eg, genuineness, trustworthiness, reliability, compassion, and believability) is presented. Mechanisms by which authentic leaders can create healthy work environments for practice (eg, engaging employees in the work environment to promote positive behaviors) are described. A practical guide on how to become an authentic leader is advanced. A research agenda to advance the study of authentic leadership in nursing practice through collaboration between nursing and business is proposed. PMID:16632768

Shirey, Maria R

2006-05-01

175

Perceptions of Liberal Education of Two Types of Nursing Graduates: The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), which defines the expectations of a new baccalaureate-prepared nurse, includes a liberal education as a desired outcome for bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) graduates. A liberal education is thought to provide the professional nurse with the skills needed to practice nursing, including…

DeBrew, Jacqueline Kayler

2010-01-01

176

Expert Holistic Nurses’ Advice to Nursing Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: The purposes of this study were to describe the advice that expert holistic nurses gave to nursing students regarding the theory and practice of holistic nursing and to describe nursing students’ experience and perceptions of their interaction with the experts. Design: This was a qualitative descriptive study. Methods: Nursing students who attended the 2008 and 2009 conferences of the

Glenda Christiaens; Jo Ann Abegglen; Andrea Gardner

2010-01-01

177

Reflective practice: a learning tool for student nurses.  

PubMed

Reflection is a vital skill in contemporary nursing with student nurses expected to engage in reflective learning from the very beginning of the nurse educational programme. This article demonstrates the meaningful learning that resulted as a consequence of using critical reflection on practice. Gibbs' (1988) cycle aided the process highlighting the practical application of this cyclical framework to the author - a first-year student nurse. Matters concerning gender issues in nursing and professional conduct emerged from the analysis and were inherently explored. The article concludes by demonstrating the personal benefits of using Gibbs' (1988) cycle to varying situations and thus promoting its excellence as a learning tool for student nurses worldwide as a consequence. PMID:18773590

Wilding, Peter Mark

178

Incorporating best practices into undergraduate critical care nursing education.  

PubMed

Incorporation of best clinical practices into the baccalaureate critical care nursing curriculum is important. At The College at Brockport, best clinical practices are introduced early in the semester and are reinforced throughout the semester in both class and clinical settings. Among the best clinical practices included are those recommended by the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses, The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, The Joint Commission, Quality and Safety Education for Nurses, the Surviving Sepsis Campaign, and the Institute for Safe Medication Practices. The culminating assignment of the semester requires students to focus on patient safety. Students describe the use of the National Patient Safety Goals and other best practices in the critical care setting. The role of the nurse leader and exploration of near-miss and work-around events also are described. Nursing students need to provide safe competent nursing care by incorporating best practices into their clinical practice now and in the future when they become registered professional nurses. PMID:24488891

Brenner, Zara R; Iafrati, Nancy S

2014-02-01

179

Evaluation of nurse engagement in evidence-based practice.  

PubMed

The purpose of this project was to explore nurses' willingness to question and change practice. Nurses were invited to report practice improvement opportunities, and participants were supported through the process of a practice change. The project leader engaged to the extent desired by the participant. Meetings proceeded until the participant no longer wished to continue, progress was blocked, or practice was changed. Evaluation of the evidence-based practice change process occurred. Fifteen nurses reported 23 practice improvement opportunities. The majority (12 of 15) preferred to have the project leader review the evidence. Fourteen projects changed practice; 4 were presented at conferences. Multiple barriers were identified throughout the process and included loss of momentum, the proposed change involved other disciplines, and low level or controversial evidence. Practice issues were linked to quality metrics, cost of care, patient satisfaction, regulatory compliance, and patient safety. Active engagement by nurse leaders was needed for a practice change to occur. Participants identified important problems previously unknown to hospital administrators. The majority of nurses preferred involvement in practice change based on clinical problem solving when supported by others to provide literature review and manage the process through committees. Recommendations include supporting a culture that encourages employees to report practice improvement opportunities and provide resources to assist in navigating the identified practice change. PMID:24441453

Davidson, Judy E; Brown, Caroline

2014-01-01

180

Entry-level Clinical Nurse Leader: Evaluation of Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Clinical Nurse Leader (CNL) is a master-prepared generalist accountable for patient outcomes through application of evidenced-based practice at the microsystem level. Accelerated nursing programs are educating entry level nurses as CNLs in a novel Model C program. This doctoral project evaluates entry-level master’s CNL graduates with the CNL end-of-program competencies to determine whether these graduates are able to have

Eira Ilse Klich-Heartt

2010-01-01

181

Predictors of excess heart failure readmissions: implications for nursing practice.  

PubMed

In this study of California, Massachusetts, and New York hospitals, 6 factors predicted 27.6% of readmissions for patients with heart failure (HF). We found that higher admissions per bed, teaching hospitals, and poor nurse-patient communication increased HF readmissions. Conversely, the HF readmissions were lower when nurse staffing was greater, more patients reported receiving discharge information, and among hospitals in California. The implications for nursing practice in the delivery of care to patients with HF are discussed. PMID:24378355

Stamp, Kelly D; Flanagan, Jane; Gregas, Matt; Shindul-Rothschild, Judith

2014-01-01

182

Doctor of NursiNg Practice scholarly Projects ~ 2010  

E-print Network

Doctor of NursiNg Practice scholarly Projects ~ 2010 commemoratiNg our iNaugural ceNteNNial class-welch, Phd, CNM, FaaN Nancy and Hilliard Travis Professor of Nursing dean,Vanderbilt University School of Nursing #12;FroM THe direCTor "i believe it the rarest, tho' by no means the highest talent, to be able

Bordenstein, Seth

183

Community Nurses' View of General Practice Attachment  

PubMed Central

An analysis of 98 health visitors and district nurses attached and non-attached to general practitioners in three local authority areas showed that most of them were aged over 40 and that many had entered domiciliary work because of the convenient hours or because of its intangible attractions. Adequate preparation for attachment was considered important, particularly a clear definition of the roles of the attached staff and their relationships to other workers in the practice. Attached staff were found to be much more satisfied with the information given by the general practitioner about their patients than were unattached staff, and the former usually had access to the patients' medical records. The principal advantages of attachment were listed as access to family history; improved co-ordination within the practice and co-operation with the social services; favourable patient response; and increased mileage and work-load; the impossibility of crossing local authority boundaries; and having to deal with families registered with more than one doctor. PMID:5803696

Walker, J. H.; McClure, L. M.

1969-01-01

184

Innovations in community health nursing: examples from practice.  

PubMed

The Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion is cited internationally as an appropriate conceptual framework for healthcare service delivery yet the literature reveals minimal evidence of nursing services interpreting and applying the Ottawa Charter strategies into nursing practice. Nurses with the community services of Noarlunga Health Services and the Drug and Alcohol Services Council of South Australia, however, do use the strategies to plan and implement their services. The Ottawa Charter strategies of developing personal skills; creating supportive environments; strengthening community action; building healthy public policy; and re-orienting services in the interest of health can be used as a tool to assist nurses to identify the purpose of their interventions and select a comprehensive range of nursing actions which address the needs of individuals while acknowledging the broader determinants of health. This article presents a nursing analysis of the Charter and provides examples of how the strategies are used to influence nursing practice in both organizations. The examples provided from the two different nursing services also demonstrate the adaptability and relevance of the strategies to diverse community nursing practice settings. PMID:9355440

Cusack, L; Smith, M; Byrnes, T

1997-06-01

185

Everyday Ethics: Ethical Issues and Stress in Nursing Practice  

PubMed Central

Aim This paper is a report of a study of the type, frequency, and level of stress of ethical issues encountered by nurses in their everyday practice. Background Everyday ethical issues in nursing practice attract little attention but can create stress for nurses. Nurses often feel uncomfortable in addressing the ethical issues they encounter in patient care. Methods A self-administered survey was sent in 2004 to 1000 nurses in four states in four different census regions of the United States of America. The adjusted response rate was 52%. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, cross-tabulations and Pearson correlations. Results A total of 422 questionnaires were used in the analysis. The five most frequently-occurring and most stressful ethical and patient care issues were protecting patients' rights; autonomy and informed consent to treatment; staffing patterns; advanced care planning; and surrogate decision-making. Other common occurrences were unethical practices of healthcare professionals; breaches of patient confidentiality or right to privacy; and end-of-life decision-making. Younger nurses and those with fewer years of experience encountered ethical issues more frequently and reported higher levels of stress. Nurses from different regions also experienced specific types of ethical problems more commonly. Conclusion Nurses face daily ethical challenges in the provision of quality care. To retain nurses, targeted ethics-related interventions that address caring for an increasingly complex patient population are needed. PMID:20735502

Ulrich, Connie M.; Taylor, Carol; Soeken, Karen; O'Donnell, Patricia; Farrar, Adrienne; Danis, Marion; Grady, Christine

2010-01-01

186

Improving nursing management and practice through quality circles.  

PubMed

Health care in general, and nursing in particular, is experiencing dramatic changes in worker values, economic realities, and management theory. All three areas of change move toward actively involving employees in organizational decision making. Although nursing managers have implemented a variety of systems to gain employee participation, "Quality Circles" seems to be the most promising method currently available. This article describes some techniques for effectively implementing Quality Circles within a nursing organization. PMID:6551430

Wine, J A; Baird, J E

1983-05-01

187

Administrative Protocol Page 1 of 1 Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROTOCOL FOR: Education, Annual System Wide MandatoryAdministrative Protocol Page 1 of 1 Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital - Department year due to a leave of absence, make-up needs to be scheduled immediately upon return to work

Oliver, Douglas L.

188

Administrative Procedure Page 1 of 1 Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

Administrative Procedure Page 1 of 1 Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital - Department (4) week period will receive an additional $8.00 for each shift over five (5). 3. The Staffing. 3. The Nursing Manager completes and signs the form. 3. The forms are sent to Staffing

Oliver, Douglas L.

189

Administrative Procedure Page 1 of 2 Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

Administrative Procedure Page 1 of 2 Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital is appropriate. The following information is used to make this determination: 1) unit/hospital activity 2) staffing guidelines 3) other available resources i.e. float, ACTION NURSE b. All requests for overtime

Oliver, Douglas L.

190

How can radio frequency identification technology impact nursing practice?  

PubMed

Radio frequency identification (RFID) technology can save nurses time, improve quality of care, en hance patient and staff safety, and decrease costs. However, without a better understanding of these systems and their benefits to patients and hospitals, nurses may be slower to recommend, implement, or adopt RFID technology into practice. PMID:25695118

Billingsley, Luanne; Wyld, David

2014-12-01

191

Designing and Validating Procedures for Insuring Quality Adult Education in Nursing Homes and Convalescent Centers. Toward a Theory of Practice for Insuring Quality Education in Nursing Homes: A Section 310 Final Report, May 15, 1980-June 12, 1981.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Senior Adult Education Program (SAEP) for Monroe County, Michigan, conducted a documentation and analysis of the program component that provides high school completion classes in two local nursing homes. Three general research questions were (1) benefits to nursing home residents from the programs, (2) design of classes in nursing homes…

McDermott, Bill P.

192

State boards of nursing and scope of practice of registered nurses performing complementary therapies.  

PubMed

This article provides a report of State Boards of Nursing (BONs) policies on the use of complementary therapies by registered nurses. This investigation was conducted for the White House Commission on Complementary Alternative Medicine Policy. The target sample for this report was fifty-three BONs in the United States. Forty-seven percent of the BONs had taken positions that permitted nurses to practice a range of complementary therapies; thirteen percent were in the process of discussing this matter; and forty percent, although they had not formally addressed the topic, did not necessarily discourage these practices. The results of this study can be used to encourage more discussion among the BONs and within states about nurses practice of complementary therapies. Nurses are encouraged to become aware of their state s position regarding complementary therapy and to facilitate the integration of complementary therapies into their work environment. PMID:11936949

Sparber, A

2001-01-01

193

Sintering Theory and Practice  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although sintering is an essential process in the manufacture of ceramics and certain metals, as well as several other industrial operations, until now, no single book has treated both the background theory and the practical application of this complex and often delicate procedure. In Sintering Theory and Practice, leading researcher and materials engineer Randall M. German presents a comprehensive treatment of this subject that will be of great use to manufacturers and scientists alike. This practical guide to sintering considers the fact that while the bonding process improves strength and other engineering properties of the compacted material, inappropriate methods of control may lead to cracking, distortion, and other defects. It provides a working knowledge of sintering, and shows how to avoid problems while accounting for variables such as particle size, maximum temperature, time at that temperature, and other problems that may cause changes in processing. The book describes the fundamental atomic events that govern the transformation from particles to solid, covers all forms of the sintering process, and provides a summary of many actual production cycles. Building from the ground up, it begins with definitions and progresses to measurement techniques, easing the transition, especially for students, into advanced topics such as single-phase solid-state sintering, microstructure changes, the complications of mixed particles, and pressure-assisted sintering. German draws on some six thousand references to provide a coherent and lucid treatment of the subject, making scientific principles and practical applications accessible to both students and professionals. In the process, he also points out and avoids the pitfalls found in various competing theories, concepts, and mathematical disputes within the field. A unique opportunity to discover what sintering is all about--both in theory and in practice What is sintering? We see the end product of this thermal process all around us--in manufactured objects from metals, ceramics, polymers, and many compounds. From a vast professional literature, Sintering Theory and Practice emerges as the only comprehensive, systematic, and self-contained volume on the subject. Covering all aspects of sintering as a processing topic, including materials, processes, theories, and the overall state of the art, the book Offers numerous examples, illustrations, and tables that detail actual processing cycles, and that stress existing knowledge in the field Uses the specifics of various consolidation cycles to illustrate the basics Leads the reader from the fundamentals to advanced topics, without getting bogged down in various mathematical disputes over treatments and measurements Supports the discussion with critically selected references from thousands of sources Examines the sintering behavior of a wide variety of engineered materials--metals, alloys, oxide ceramics, composites, carbides, intermetallics, glasses, and polymers Guides the reader through the sintering processes for several important industrial materials and demonstrates how to control these processes effectively and improve present techniques Provides a helpful reference for specific information on materials, processing problems, and concepts For practitioners and researchers in ceramics, powder metallurgy, and other areas, and for students and faculty in materials science and engineering, this book provides the know-how and understanding crucial to many industrial operations, offers many ideas for further research, and suggests future applications of this important technology. This book offers an unprecedented opportunity to explore sintering in both practical and theoretical terms, whether at the lab or in real-world applications, and to acquire a broad, yet thorough, understanding of this important technology.

German, Randall M.

1996-01-01

194

The Clinical Nurse Leader: Helping Psychiatric Mental Health Nurses Transform Their Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

The national movement to transform the health care delivery systems must include a focus on mental health treatment. To address similar deficits across other practice domains, the Clinical Nurse Leader (CNL) role has been created. The CNL is a master's degree that prepares a nurse to use a systems perspective to improve outcomes for a cohort of patient, deliver care

Mary S. Seed; Diane J. Torkelson; Judith F. Karshmer

2009-01-01

195

In all required nursing practice courses, students are evaluated by faculty via the Collaborative Nursing Practice Evaluation Instrument. This evaluation instrument is available to view at  

E-print Network

In all required nursing practice courses, students are evaluated by faculty via the Collaborative Nursing Practice Evaluation Instrument. This evaluation instrument is available to view at http://nursing.fau.edu/newnursingsite/handbook/forms/practiceevaluation.html. The instrument describes in detail the competencies of caring that are the foundation for the nursing program

Fernandez, Eduardo

196

The advanced practice nurse. Changing the practice law: what did we learn?  

PubMed

The nurse practice statute was changed in Connecticut during the 1999 Legislative session in an effort to more accurately reflect the current practice of advanced practice nurses. The effort to make changes began in 1990, when the psychiatric clinical nurse specialists organized and incorporated to improve the practice status of this nurse specialty group and to improve patient accessibility to their services. This article describes the changes that were made in the practice statute and the lessons that were learned along the way. It elaborates on the need for strong organizational identification, coalition building, choosing legal and lobbying support carefully, negotiating with the opposition, and grassroots lobbying. Compromise was reached and statutory changes were made so that advanced practice nurses moved from being under the direction of physicians to a mutually agreed-on collaborative relationship with physicians. The article provides insights and learning experiences that may help others moving along the road to more independent practice laws. PMID:11188556

Johnston, L

1999-09-01

197

Continuing Education: A National Imperative for School Nursing Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Competency-based continuing education is critical to the professional development of school nurses to ensure the application of timely, age-appropriate clinical knowledge and leadership skills in the school setting. School nurses are responsible for a large number of students with a variety of complex and diverse health care needs. Benner's theory

Vought-O'Sullivan, Victoria; Meehan, Nancy K.; Havice, Pamela A.; Pruitt, Rosanne H.

2006-01-01

198

[Building up nursing knowledge by means of reflexive practice].  

PubMed

After analyzing the prior questions which determine the nursing field contents, the authors propose "reflective practice" as the methodological and pedagogical philosophy of choice in the formation of nurses. According to the authors, the professor is responsible for developing the curriculum. As such, the professor makes decisions regarding course design, methodology, content development, and student evaluation in terms of aptitute, attitude and knowledge acquisition. Research studies seem to demonstrate that the knowledge which, in the end, aids in comprehending the context taught and which determines the decisions a professor takes, is that knowledge based on a reflective practice, a product of the professor's experiences, background, knowledge and active relationship with nursing practice. The contents in this article were presented as a conference in the Third Seminar of Professors of Nursing for General Practice and Surgery. PMID:9485855

Colina, J; Medina, J L

1997-12-01

199

Administrative Procedure Page 1 of 1 Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

Administrative Procedure Page 1 of 1 Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department as the schedule is developed. 2. Conference time may be denied based upon the staffing needs of the unit and

Oliver, Douglas L.

200

e-Learning competency for practice nurses: an evaluation report.  

PubMed

Practice nurses in Australia are now funded to facilitate chronic condition management, including self-management support. Chronic disease management requires an established rapport, support and proactivity between general practitioners, patients and the practice nurses. To achieve this, training in shared decision making is needed. e-Learning supports delivery and achievement of such policy outcomes, service improvements and skill development. However, e-learning effectiveness for health care professionals' is determined by several organisational, economic, pedagogical and individual factors, with positive e-learning experience linked closely to various supports. This paper reinforces previous studies showing nurses' expanding role across general practice teams and reports on some of the challenges of e-learning. Merely providing practice nurses with necessary information via web-based learning systems does not ensure successful learning or progress toward improving health outcomes for patients. PMID:24134876

Heartfield, Marie; Morello, Andrea; Harris, Melanie; Lawn, Sharon; Pols, Vincenza; Stapleton, Carolyn; Battersby, Malcolm

2013-01-01

201

OPT: Transformation of Nursing Process for Contemporary Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Outcome-Present State-Test reasoning model emphasizes reflection, outcome specification, and testing within clinical narratives. This clinical reasoning model is more relevant to contemporary nursing practice. (SK)

Pesut, Daniel J.; Herman, JoAnne

1998-01-01

202

Perceived Readiness for Practice of Senior Baccalaureate Nursing Students  

E-print Network

Nursing education is designed to assist students to become beginning practitioners and clinical experiences are essential to this process. As competition for clinical sites increases, educators need to establish best practices of clinical...

Reagor, Janet

2010-04-20

203

Future of advanced practice public health nursing education.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to conduct an assessment of the need for advanced practice, master's-prepared public health nurses in Michigan. A cross-sectional design was used to conduct interviews with former students, community leaders, and faculty. Content was analyzed qualitatively for themes. Participants were enthusiastic about the practice environment, but funding was a major concern. Almost all participants thought jobs were available and that public health nursing was cost-effective, yet there was concern about the aging work force and the need for higher education. Other disciplines serving in public health roles and hospitals were identified as competition to the public health nurse. Epidemiology, prevention, community assessment/program planning, health policy/law/ethics, leadership, health services, informatics, research, and grant writing were noted as skills needed. The results of this study are favorable for the future of advanced practice public health nursing practice and education. PMID:25802903

Duffy, Sonia A; McCullagh, Marjorie; Lee, Corinne

2015-02-01

204

Incorporating the Principles of Nursing Practice and the 6Cs.  

PubMed

This article will demonstrate how the Royal College of Nursing's (RCN's) Principles of Nursing Practice (2010) and the 6Cs ( Cummings and Bennett, 2012a ; 2012b ) can be applied to stoma care nursing. The multidimensional role of the stoma care nurse means that he or she is well placed to improve quality and standards in stoma nursing care. Stoma care nurses provide direct patient care and can play a vital part in helping patients with a stoma, a long-term condition, ensuring that their patients get the best possible care ( RCN, 2010 ). The poster contained within this article was displayed at the Association of Stoma Care Nurses (ASCN) national conference in Harrogate in October 2014 and was voted the overall winner. The authors of the article and the poster are stoma care nurses working in the acute and community settings and, between 2013 and 2014, they completed the RCN's Clinical Leadership Programme ( RCN, 2005 ). The NHS Plan ( Department of Health, 2000 ) identified the importance of leadership and the necessity of remodelling the NHS around the needs of service users. With this in mind, using the Principles of Nursing Practice and the 6Cs within stoma care demonstrates development with a consistent focus on patient care. PMID:25757740

Foulds, Louise; Timms, Katy; Barwell, Julie; Gunning, Amanda

2015-03-01

205

Making IT Work in Practice Integrating the EPR-based nursing record with  

E-print Network

of these efforts: nursing care and the formalization of nurse's written accounts in the EPR- based nursing record for delivering healthcare services, the contribution of the nursing profession to the overall delivery of careMaking IT Work in Practice Integrating the EPR-based nursing record with nursing work Glenn

Langseth, Helge

206

A century of practice. Occupational health nursing. 1988.  

PubMed

Occupational health nursing has grown and developed throughout the last century, from the influence of a few nurses in the late 19th century to 1988. Today's occupational health nurses have a significant impact on millions of workers across the United States and worldwide in multinational corporations. Nurses currently enjoy expanded roles, including involvement in the political arena and policy-making decisions, development of health promotion programs, research, and education, as well as providing more traditional but equally important employee health services, counseling, and teaching. The American workforce, as well as management teams, have seen the outcomes of quality occupational health nursing care and contributions throughout the years. The practice of American occupational health nursing which began in very humble surroundings and conditions in the 19th century continues to thrive in the space age of the 1980s and 1990s and to plan for the challenges of the 21st century. PMID:12526625

Parker-Conrad, Jane E

2002-12-01

207

Work engagement in nursing practice: a relational ethics perspective.  

PubMed

The concept of work engagement has existed in business and psychology literature for some time. There is a significant body of research that positively correlates work engagement with organizational outcomes. To date, the interest in the work engagement of nurses has primarily been related to these organizational outcomes. However, the value of work engagement in nursing practice is not only an issue of organizational interest, but of ethical interest. The dialogue on work engagement in nursing must expand to include the ethical importance of engagement. The relational nature of work engagement and the multiple levels of influence on nurses' work engagement make a relational ethics approach to work engagement in nursing appropriate and necessary. Within a relational ethics perspective, it is evident that work engagement enables nurses to have meaningful relationships in their work and subsequently deliver ethical care. In this article, I argue that work engagement is essential for ethical nursing practice. If engagement is essential for ethical nursing practice, the environmental and organizational factors that influence work engagement must be closely examined to pursue the creation of moral communities within healthcare environments. PMID:24714045

Keyko, Kacey

2014-12-01

208

A model to develop nurse leaders for rural practice.  

PubMed

Rural health disparities are due in part to access barriers to health care providers. Nursing education has been extended into rural areas, yet a limited rural research and practice literature informs the content and delivery of these educational programs. The University Of Virginia School of Nursing through a grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration developed the Nursing Leadership in Rural Health Care (NLRHC) Program. The transformational nursing leadership in rural health care (TNLRHC) model guided the development of NLRHC program content and teaching methods. This article describes the TNLRHC model and how it has steered the integration of rural content into advanced practice nursing (APN) education. The capacity of the TNLRHC model for promoting innovation in APN education is described. Recommendations regarding the future development of APN education are presented. PMID:25455327

Hauenstein, Emily J; Glick, Doris F; Kane, Catherine; Kulbok, Pamela; Barbero, Edie; Cox, Kathleen

2014-01-01

209

A critical lens on culture in nursing practice.  

PubMed

Increasing evidence demonstrates that the Aboriginal population experience greater health disparities and receive a lower quality of health care services. The Canadian Nurses Association (CNA) code of ethics states that nurses are required to incorporate culture into all domains of their nursing practice and ethical care. The aim of this article is to examine the concepts of cultural competency and cultural safety by way of relational ethics. To address these disparities in health care, cultural competency training programs are being widely advised. Recent research into cultural safety has not only recognized the importance of culture in nursing practice and organizational structures, but also extended the concepts to the culture of the client. In recognizing this diversity, nurses must pay close attention to their relationships with their clients. It is argued that the answers lie in relational ethics, which honors indigenous people's connection to self, others, the environment, and the universe. PMID:21673120

Bourque Bearskin, R Lisa

2011-07-01

210

Ethics education in advanced practice nursing: respect for human dignity.  

PubMed

Ethics education is an essential component of academic programs that prepare nurses for advanced practice; the concept of respect for human dignity is integral to this education. Sixty-three graduate students enrolled in their first course of a nurse practitioner program completed a researcher-developed Ethics Questionnaire that was designed to elicit their baseline ethics-related knowledge, including their understanding of the concept "respect for human dignity". Qualitative analysis of data yielded findings that validate the importance of using the American Nurses Association Code of Ethics for Nurses with Interpretive Statements as an essential foundation for ethics content and as a framework for understanding the meaning of human dignity in advanced practice nursing. Assessment and learning strategies are recommended. PMID:17715804

Kalb, Kathleen A; O'Conner-Von, Susan

2007-01-01

211

Important interactional strategies for everyday public health nursing practice.  

PubMed

This Clinical Concepts article concerns the relational tools required by public health nurses to establish relationships with single mothers living on public assistance, mothers who are vulnerable and often stigmatized. The implications of stigmatization for relationship building are highlighted based on previous research investigating how public health nurses working in Canadian jurisdictions establish professional caring relationships with this cohort of mothers. Public health nurses employed interactional strategies including engaging in a positive manner and offering verbal commendations which served as effective relational tools to break through mothers' walls of defensiveness and to resume the dynamic process of relationship building. Building Relationship is a key practice standard for public health nurses and is instrumental to their work at both individual and community levels to improve social determinants of health. The author concludes with recommendations to facilitate building relationships during everyday public health nursing practice. PMID:24320117

Porr, Caroline J

2015-01-01

212

Utilizing Rogers' Theory of Self-Concept in mental health nursing.  

PubMed

The work of mental health nurse is interactive in nature, the priority of which is the effective development and maintenance of a therapeutic relationship with clients. This field of nursing bases its practice on theories from many schools of thought in order to provide clients with the highest quality of care. One such theory is that of Carl Rogers whose practice as a psychotherapist was based on his Theory of Self-Concept. This paper examines the development of the Theory of Self-Concept from the works of Cooley, Mead, Allport and Rogers and relates to the therapeutic alliance between a primary nurse and a client who has been medically diagnosed as being 'depressed'. The implications for practice are considered and some of the difficulties of utilizing Rogers' theory on an in-patient unit are explored. The paper emphasizes the need for nurses to be aware of the use of such theories in order to enrich the care that clients receive. It also highlights the need for nurses to be aware of their own 'self' when working with clients, a state that can only be achieved if the nurses themselves have adequate clinical supervision and an environment which is supportive of such work. PMID:8320395

Hosking, P

1993-06-01

213

Implementing nursing best practice guidelines: Impact on patient referrals  

PubMed Central

Background Although referring patients to community services is important for optimum continuity of care, referrals between hospital and community sectors are often problematic. Nurses are well positioned to inform patients about referral resources. The objective of this study is to describe the impact of implementing six nursing best practice guidelines (BPGs) on nurses' familiarity with patient referral resources and referral practices. Methods A prospective before and after design was used. For each BPG topic, referral resources were identified. Information about these resources was presented at education sessions for nurses. Pre- and post-questionnaires were completed by a random sample of 257 nurses at 7 hospitals, 2 home visiting nursing services and 1 public health unit. Average response rates for pre- and post-implementation questionnaires were 71% and 54.2%, respectively. Chart audits were completed for three BPGs (n = 421 pre- and 332 post-implementation). Post-hospital discharge patient interviews were conducted for four BPGs (n = 152 pre- and 124 post-implementation). Results There were statistically significant increases in nurses' familiarity with resources for all BPGs, and self-reported referrals to specific services for three guidelines. Higher rates of referrals were observed for services that were part of the organization where the nurses worked. There was almost a complete lack of referrals to Internet sources. No significant differences between pre- and post-implementation referrals rates were observed in the chart documentation or in patients' reports of referrals. Conclusion Implementing nursing BPGs, which included recommendations on patient referrals produced mixed results. Nurses' familiarity with referral resources does not necessarily change their referral practices. Nurses can play a vital role in initiating and supporting appropriate patient referrals. BPGs should include specific recommendations on effective referral processes and this information should be tailored to the community setting where implementation is taking place. PMID:17598917

Edwards, Nancy; Davies, Barbara; Ploeg, Jenny; Virani, Tazim; Skelly, Jennifer

2007-01-01

214

Pediatric emergency nurses' self-reported medication safety practices.  

PubMed

Preventable adverse events occur more frequently in areas such as the emergency department with medication errors as the most frequently reported errors. A cross-sectional survey design was used to gather descriptive data of medication safety practices used by pediatric emergency nurses in the Midwest U.S. Participants completed an anonymous survey to identify nurses' understanding, implementation, and barriers to implementing the National Patient Safety Goals (NPSGs) for medication safety. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Participants identified several barriers to adopting and implementing the NPSGs. Additional interventions are needed to reduce the barriers to medication safety practices for pediatric emergency nurses. PMID:23583361

Mattei, Jennifer L; Gillespie, Gordon Lee

2013-01-01

215

Promoting cultures of thinking: transforming nursing education to transform nursing practice.  

PubMed

Contemporary nursing education is highly invested in the development of the academic, critical, and empirical aspects of education that represent the science of nursing, and concomitantly less attentive to the development of the creative, interpersonal aspects of education typically associated with the art of nursing. This represents a reversal of historic patterns in nursing education, but the pendulum may have swung so far that there could be costs to nursing practice unless the creative, interpersonal aspects of education can be reclaimed and balanced. Ideas and suggestions regarding how nurse educators might foster the creation of cultures of thinking, which represent whole-brain, integrated teaching approaches that are based on emerging neurocognitive evidence, are discussed. PMID:24494382

Freed, Patricia E; McLaughlin, Dorcas E

2013-01-01

216

Practice protocol: transition to community nursing practice revisited.  

PubMed

The purpose of this paper is to explore and describe the process of transition that nurses experience when moving from the acute sector to a specialist area of community nursing. Issues explored include the increased movement of nurses into the community sector, the experience of culture shock and changes in nursing roles. Transition issues including the need for effective management and infrastructure support, mentoring and preceptorship, skills acquisition and continuing education will be examined. Joint implementation of what is successful at both university and industry levels can improve the transition to community nursing. PMID:23050575

Ellis, Irene; Chater, Keri

2012-08-01

217

Future realities in nursing: partnerships, practice, and economics.  

PubMed

Health care reform, innovations in technology, and the need to make health care cost-effective have affected all aspects of health care practice and education. Critical thinking skills, interpersonal and communication skills, leadership and motivation skills, computer literacy, and cultural sensitivity are all capabilities nursing graduates must now possess if they are to practice effectively in the complex and competitive contexts that today define the health care marketplace. Partnerships with community agencies are essential if faculty are to prepare a new generation of nurses who will be proficient in the skills that 21st-century nursing practice will demand. Although academic institutions have made some changes to meet marketplace demands, nursing educators, practitioners, and researchers must thoroughly reconceptualize their philosophies and retool their curricula in response to these changes. PMID:10401398

Bechtel, G A; Davidhizar, R; Tiller, C M; Quinn, M E

1999-01-01

218

The College of Nursing is a world leader in educating nurses in interprofessional health care, research, practice, innovation,  

E-print Network

L, newborn and chiLd heaLth serVices in tanzania College of Nursing professor Dr. Pammla Petrucka, along in interprofessional health care, research, practice, innovation, capacity building and policy development. Mission As University nursing faculty in Saskatchewan, the College of Nursing strengthens nursing, health and the health

Saskatchewan, University of

219

MENTAL NURSING. LESSON PLANS PREPARED BY PRACTICAL NURSING INSTRUCTORS FOLLOWING JOINT CONFERENCE HELD AT THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE, KNOXVILLE.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THE LESSON PLANS FOR A UNIT ON MENTAL NURSING IN THE PRACTICAL NURSE EDUCATION PROGRAM WERE DEVELOPED BY A GROUP OF REGISTERED NURSES HOLDING TENNESSEE TEACHING CERTIFICATES. STUDENTS SELECTED FOR THE PROGRAM SHOULD BE HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES OR EQUIVALENT. THE LESSONS DESIGNED FOR USE BY A REGISTERED NURSE CERTIFIED FOR TEACHING GIVE OBJECTIVES,…

Tennessee State Board for Vocational Education, Murfreesboro. Vocational Curriculum Lab.

220

Leaving from and returning to nursing practice: contributing factors.  

PubMed

Many nurses leave nursing and never return. Others return after a period of time. Given the global shortage of nurses a better understanding of these movements is needed. The present study focused on nurses who had been out of nursing for more than five years, and explored factors that influenced their leaving and return to practice. All the nurses who had undertaken a Competency Assessment Programme at a given New Zealand tertiary institution during 2005 were invited to participate. Of the 70 questionnaires mailed out 32 (44.5%) were completed and returned. Quantitative data were analysed using Microsoft Excel, and the qualitative data were coded and analysed by means of content analysis. For each, leaving and returning, three key issues emerged. Nurses left for personal reasons, to seek a career change, or because of poor working conditions. They returned when they had the personal freedom to do so, for fiscal reasons, or because they were motivated by some sense of unfinished business. These findings indicate that it is important for educators involved with Competency Assessment Programmes to collaborate with employers in ensuring that there are opportunities for re-entry to positive work environments, with a degree of flexibility that suits the demographic characteristics of those nurses returning to practice. PMID:19928648

Jamieson, Isabel; Taua, Chris

2009-07-01

221

[Behavior theory and skill of outpatient department nursing administration].  

PubMed

51 nurses in the out patient department (OPD) were surveied by Eysenck Personality Questionaire and Cattle 16 Personality Factors. Some nurses' jobs were changed and the psychological principles were applied to improve the nurses' mental health by the manager according to the result. The management in the out patient department was more effective after behavior theory was adopted. PMID:8826189

Xu, Y L; Li, Z X; Liu, X

1996-03-01

222

Exploring incentives for RNs to return to practice: a partial solution to the nursing shortage.  

PubMed

Although many have suggested strategies to resolve the nursing shortage, few have considered inactive RNs. This pilot study investigated reasons why nurses leave the practice, the type of work environment and resources necessary to entice RNs to return to practice, and the specific skills required to assist RNs in feeling confident and competent to return to practice. Herzberg's Two-Factor Theory was used to study motivation and hygiene factors enticing RNs to practice. A screening questionnaire was sent to 1,004 randomly selected RNs in Missouri to determine who were licensed but not practicing. Fifty-two full questionnaires were mailed and 33 (63%) were returned. Quantitative data were analyzed using SPSS, whereas qualitative data were coded and analyzed using manifest content analysis. The lack of motivators such as recognition of one's work and achievements was one reason why RNs left the practice. The hygiene factors of money, improved working conditions, refresher courses, and health insurance would motivate RNs to return to practice. Those wishing to entice inactive nurses to practice will need to offer sign-on bonuses or make the hourly wages and benefits package very competitive. This study indicates that nurses value flexible working hours, part-time opportunities, consideration of family lives, and positive relationships with administrators. PMID:17292129

Langan, Joanne C; Tadych, Rita A; Kao, Chia-Chan

2007-01-01

223

Transformation of admission interview to documentation for nursing practice.  

PubMed

The admission interview is usually the first structured meeting between patient and nurse. The interview serves as the basis for personalised nursing and care planning and is the starting point for the clinic's documentation of the patient and his course of treatment. In this way, admission interviews constitute a basis for reporting by each nurse on the patient to nursing colleagues. This study examined how, by means of the admission interview, nurses constructed written documentation of the patient and his course of treatment for use by fellow nurses. A qualitative case study inspired by Ricoeur was conducted and consisted of five taped admission interviews, along with the written patient documentation subsequently worked out by the nurse. The findings were presented in four constructed themes: Admission interviews are the nurse's room rather than the patient's; Information on a surgical object; The insignificant but necessary contact; and Abnormalities must be medicated. It is shown how the nurse's documentation was based on the admission interview, the medical record details on the patient (facts that are essential to know in relation to disease and treatment), as well as the nurse's preconception of how to live a good life, with or without disease. Often, the patient tended to become an object in the nurse's report. It is concluded that in practice, the applied documentation system, VIPS, comes to act as the framework for what is important to the nurse to document rather than a tool that enables her to document what is important to the individual patient and his special circumstances and encounter with the health system. PMID:24033872

Højskov, Ida E; Glasdam, Stinne

2014-09-01

224

Nursing research reframed by the inescapable reality of practice: a personal encounter.  

PubMed

This paper describes how an innocent venture outside the confines of academia to update my nursing skills completely changed the focus of my research. I was deeply involved in the theoretical development of my thesis, which I thought was a feminist exploration of the meaning of health for mid-life women. I was immersed in feminist theory and was exploring the work of the French Feminists. I had written comprehensive draft chapters about nursing, women's bodies and science. While I was absorbed in my theoretical exploration I decided to venture back into practice to improve my nursing skills. I am still unsure why I chose to do this; however, in hindsight, my theoretical exploration was inexorably pushing me in that direction. While my conscious thinking was focused on my stated topic, my subconscious (my intuition) turned me towards another. Being confronted with the reality of nursing practice through working with staff nurses in a gynaecological ward caused a major disjunction in every aspect of my research: the topic, my methodology and the setting, and the experience challenged my feelings about nurses and nursing. This inevitably led to a dramatic and fundamental change in my research. PMID:8868730

Huntington, A

1996-09-01

225

Reducing medication errors in nursing practice.  

PubMed

Medication errors remain one of the most common causes of unintended harm to patients. They contribute to adverse events that compromise patient safety and result in a large financial burden to the health service. The prevention of medication errors, which can happen at every stage of the medication preparation and distribution process, is essential to maintain a safe healthcare system. One third of the errors that harm patients occur during the nurse administration phase: administering medication to patients is therefore a high-risk activity. This article highlights factors that contribute to medication errors, including the safety culture of institutions. It also discusses factors that relate specifically to nurses, such as patient acuity and nursing workload, the distractions and interruptions that can occur during medication administration, the complexity of some medication calculations and administration methods, and the failure of nurses to adhere to policies or guidelines. PMID:25585768

Cloete, Linda

2015-01-20

226

Primer on the practice doctorate for neonatal nurse practitioners.  

PubMed

Recent advances in technology, research, and knowledge have amplified the need for longer and more in-depth education for neonatal nurse practitioners (NNPs). In this article we will briefly review the history of NNP's role and education, define the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP), and propose that the practice doctorate is the primary mechanism to meet that need and thus is the future of our profession. Doctor of Nursing Practice programs are designed to prepare the practitioner as an expert clinical NNP. Graduates obtain the highest level of practice expertise integrated with the ability to translate scientific knowledge into complex clinical interventions tailored to meet individual, family, and community health and illness needs. Doctor of Nursing Practice education also expands the scientific basis for practice and clinical practice education, and provides organization and system management and leadership, quality improvement, analytic methods to evaluate practice and apply evidence to practice, enhanced skills in information technology, health policy development, and interdisciplinary collaboration for enhanced patient outcomes. PMID:17208163

Bellflower, Bobby; Carter, Michael A

2006-12-01

227

Inquiry in baccalaureate nursing education: fostering evidence-based practice.  

PubMed

With the increasing emphasis on evidence-based nursing practice, nurse educators need to more fully implement teaching strategies that help students gain critical thinking skills related to inquiry and understand the importance of evidence-based nursing practice. Research and scholarship emphases in one baccalaureate nursing program, student-identified benefits, and challenges associated with incorporating inquiry across the curriculum are described in this article. In clinical journal entries, students described the following benefits associated with curricular emphasis on inquiry: increased interest in evidence-based nursing practice and participating in the generation of research; enhanced critical thinking skills through the development of knowledge, experience, and competencies; increased motivation to continue professional growth and development by participating in lifelong learning; the desire to become better consumers of research findings; better understanding of the "real world" of clinical research; and increased desire to pursue graduate studies in nursing. The challenge to promote student growth toward competence in the application of evidence-based principles in clinical practice is ongoing. PMID:15719712

Callister, Lynn Clark; Matsumura, Gerry; Lookinland, Sandra; Mangum, Sandra; Loucks, Carol

2005-02-01

228

Nurse Manager Emotional Intelligence as a Predictor to Registered Nurse Job Satisfaction and RN Perceptions of the Practice Environment and the Relationship to Patient, Nursing and Hospital Outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to determine if the level of Nurse Manager (NM) emotional intelligence (EI) predicted registered nurse (RN) job satisfaction and RN perceptions of the practice environment. In addition, relationships to patient, nursing, and hospital outcomes were explored. Participants included RNs (N=659) and NMs (N=38) from 53 nursing units at eight hospitals located in the southeast

Jacqueline Cecilia Munro

2011-01-01

229

Train Practical Nurses to Become Registered Nurses: A Survey of the PN Point of View. Research Report Number 1.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To secure information about the characteristics of the practical nurse population and their opinions about registered nurse preparation, questionnaires were distributed to 2,923 practical nurses employed by the New York City Municipal Hospitals. Usable questionnaires numbered 2,361 or 81 percent of the employed PN population. Approximately 9…

Gilpatrick, Eleanor

230

Practice nurses and their 'lived experience' of clinical supervision.  

PubMed

Increased workload in primary care and the advent of primary care groups means that practice nurses (PNs) are experiencing a profusion of changes. As a result, PNs have taken on board many new skills, and this has increased the demands and stresses made upon them. Accordingly, this study investigated 17 PNs' lived experiences of clinical supervision following a 4-day training programme. It adopted a hermeneutic, phenomenological method. Data were collected by means of semistructured interviews within a series of focus groups. The data from the focus groups underwent a thematic analysis, which induced an emerging theory comprising five key themes: (1) providing support (2) nurturing and growth (3) enhancing and enriching practice (4) encountering a new experience, and (5) engaging in intellectually challenging and demanding work. The findings indicated that the central theme of the PNs' experience of clinical supervision was that of 'providing support', in that, without the presence and application of support, the effectiveness of the other themes appears to be diminished. The findings additionally indicated a range of issues, discussed under the headings: practice, education, policy, and further research. PMID:12170674

Cutcliffe, J; McFeely, S

231

Preparing emotionally intelligent doctor of nursing practice leaders.  

PubMed

The Institute of Medicine (IOM) identified the need for interdisciplinary teams that collaborate, communicate, and integrate care across settings to improve health care delivery. Focusing on innovative strategies that address leadership skills in graduate nursing education could have an effect on interdisciplinary partnerships, transformation of patient care, and new styles of leadership to change current practice models. In response to the IOM guidelines, we incorporated emotional intelligence as a component in our Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) leadership curriculum. This article describes a new action-oriented leadership model that prepares the DNP graduate for leadership roles to serve the public and the nursing discipline during a time of radical changes in health care. Behavioral profile, nontraditional readings, and online discussions form the basis of the model. The principles and strategies in this article can be applied to nursing education in multiple arenas, at both the undergraduate and graduate settings. PMID:22624564

Renaud, Michelle T; Rutledge, Carolyn; Shepherd, Laurel

2012-08-01

232

Implementing a Teaching Nursing Home: Lessons for Research and Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the National Institute on Aging Teaching Nursing Home (TNH) Program, devised to bring to long-term care research and training activities similar to those in teaching hospitals and thus develop an interface between research and practice. Conflicting goals, orientations, organizations, value systems, and practices are discussed. (JAC)

Aronson, Miriam K.

1984-01-01

233

Generating evidence for best nursing practice: getting your grooves.  

PubMed

Grooves are developmental pathways along the journey to discover new directions in our ever-evolving nursing careers. This is my story of how I got my grooves in wound and foot care and the various pathways taken toward the attainment of groovy--the generation of evidence for best practice nursing. I started to work on my first groove in 1984 after I became a gerontological clinical nurse specialist. Much to my delight, that groove has taken various twists and turns, ups and downs, with an occasional rut here and there. The journey has been most pleasurable and rewarding! PMID:18036496

Kelechi, Teresa

2007-12-01

234

Practical implications of pre-employment nurse assessments.  

PubMed

Hiring nurses is a difficult task that can have serious repercussions for medical facilities. If nurses without proper skills are hired, patients can suffer from insufficient quality of care and potentially life-threatening conditions. Nurse applicants' technical knowledge is extremely important to avoid negative outcomes; however, there are soft skills that factor into their success, such as bedside manner, personality, communication, and decision making. In order for medical facilities to select and maintain high-performing nurse staff, hiring managers must incorporate evaluations for these types of skills in their hiring process. The current study focused on using content/criterion-related validation design to create assessments by which nurse applicants can be evaluated for both technical knowledge/skills and soft skills. The study included participation of more than 876 nursing staff members. To rank applicants on divergent skills, 3 assessment types were investigated, resulting in the creation of an assessment with 3 components. The clinical, situational, and behavioral components that were created measure applicants' job knowledge, interpersonal competency in medical facility-related situations, and aspects of personality and behavior, respectively. Results indicate that using the assessment can predict 45% of a nurse applicant's future job performance. Practical implications include hiring and maintaining a higher quality of nurses and decreased hiring costs. PMID:23629042

Kuthy, James E; Ramon, Cheree; Gonzalez, Ronald; Biddle, Dan A

2013-01-01

235

Current Continuing Professional Education Practice among Malaysian Nurses.  

PubMed

Nurses need to participate in CPE to update their knowledge and increase their competencies. This research was carried out to explore their current practice and the future general needs for CPE. This cross-sectional descriptive study involved registered nurses from government hospitals and health clinics from Peninsular Malaysia. Multistage cluster sampling was used to recruit 1000 nurses from four states of Malaysia. Self-explanatory questionnaires were used to collect the data, which were analyzed using SPSS version 16. Seven hundred and ninety-two nurses participated in this survey. Only 80% (562) of the nurses had engaged in CPE activities during the past 12 months. All attendance for the various activities was below 50%. Workshops were the most popular CPE activity (345, 43.6%) and tertiary education was the most unpopular activity (10, 1.3%). The respondents did perceive the importance of future CPE activities for career development. Mandatory continuing professional education (MCPE) is a key measure to ensure that nurses upgrade their knowledge and skills; however, it is recommended that policy makers and nurse leaders in the continuing professional development unit of health service facilities plan CPE activities to meet registered nurses' (RNs) needs and not simply organizational requirements. PMID:24523961

Chong, Mei Chan; Francis, Karen; Cooper, Simon; Abdullah, Khatijah Lim

2014-01-01

236

Current Continuing Professional Education Practice among Malaysian Nurses  

PubMed Central

Nurses need to participate in CPE to update their knowledge and increase their competencies. This research was carried out to explore their current practice and the future general needs for CPE. This cross-sectional descriptive study involved registered nurses from government hospitals and health clinics from Peninsular Malaysia. Multistage cluster sampling was used to recruit 1000 nurses from four states of Malaysia. Self-explanatory questionnaires were used to collect the data, which were analyzed using SPSS version 16. Seven hundred and ninety-two nurses participated in this survey. Only 80% (562) of the nurses had engaged in CPE activities during the past 12 months. All attendance for the various activities was below 50%. Workshops were the most popular CPE activity (345, 43.6%) and tertiary education was the most unpopular activity (10, 1.3%). The respondents did perceive the importance of future CPE activities for career development. Mandatory continuing professional education (MCPE) is a key measure to ensure that nurses upgrade their knowledge and skills; however, it is recommended that policy makers and nurse leaders in the continuing professional development unit of health service facilities plan CPE activities to meet registered nurses' (RNs) needs and not simply organizational requirements. PMID:24523961

Chong, Mei Chan; Francis, Karen; Cooper, Simon; Abdullah, Khatijah Lim

2014-01-01

237

'Implementation deficit' and 'street-level bureaucracy': policy, practice and change in the development of community nursing issues.  

PubMed

The present paper examines the mechanisms by which health and social care policies put forward by the Government may be translated into community nursing practice. Data from a research project on community nurse case managers were re-examined in the light of two classic theories often cited by policy analysts (i.e. implementation theory and 'street-level bureaucracy'). It was found that the extent to which nurses adopted the case management role, and the model of choice, depended on four major interrelated variables, namely: (1) the clarity of policy guidance; (2) the extent to which it coincided with professional (nursing) values; (3) local practices and policies; and (4) the personal vision of the community nurse. It is argued that this framework may have wider relevance, and this was tested out in two ways. First, major change in one of these variables (Government policy) over time was analysed for its effect on case management practice via the remaining variables. Secondly, an unrelated, but policy-initiated, nursing issue (nurse prescribing) was briefly examined in the light of the framework. It is suggested that this framework may be of some use when considering the likely practice response to policy-related changes in community nursing. PMID:15717901

Bergen, Ann; While, Alison

2005-01-01

238

Everyday Excellence: A Framework for Professional Nursing Practice in Long-Term Care  

PubMed Central

Registered nurses make measurable contributions to the health and wellness of persons living in nursing homes. However, most nursing homes do not employ adequate numbers of professional nurses with specialized training in the nursing care of older adults to positively impact resident outcomes. As a result, many people never receive excellent geriatric nursing while living in a long-term care facility. Nurses have introduced various professional practice models into health care institutions as tools for leading nursing practice, improving client outcomes, and achieving organizational goals. Problematically, few professional practice models have been implemented in nursing homes. This article introduces an evidence-based framework for professional nursing practice in long-term care. The Everyday Excellence framework is based upon eight guiding principles: Valuing, Envisioning, Peopling, Securing, Learning, Empowering, Leading, and Advancing Excellence. Future research will evaluate the usefulness of this framework for professional nursing practice. PMID:20077966

Lyons, Stacie Salsbury; Specht, Janet Pringle; Karlman, Susan E.

2009-01-01

239

Putting it into practice: Infection Control Professionals' perspectives on early career nursing graduates' microbiology and infection control knowledge and practice.  

PubMed

Abstract Background: The microbiology component of Australian undergraduate nursing programs varies considerably. Any actual or potential impact of this variation on infection control practice, as a nursing graduate, is relatively unknown. Aims: The aim of this study was to explore Infection Control Professionals' perceptions of the importance of microbiology and infection control training in undergraduate nursing curricula and the perceived retention of that knowledge and its transferability to practice. Method: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight infection control professionals from a range of hospital settings in Australia. Findings: Four main themes emerged: theory versus practice, importance of role modelling, disjunction between university curricula and 'the real world', and learning in context. Conclusion: As the underpinning element of infection control practice, the role of microbiology education and training in nursing education will benefit from review. Further discussions about the nature and timing of theoretical microbiology content and assessment of undergraduate students' microbiology knowledge to ensure retention and appropriate application of that knowledge in practice are urgently needed. PMID:25382059

Cox, Jennifer L; Simpson, Maree Donna; Letts, Will; Cavanagh, Heather Ma

2014-11-10

240

Fever management practices of neuroscience nurses: what has changed?  

PubMed

Current evidence shows that fever and hyperthermia are especially detrimental to patients with neurologic injury, leading to higher rates of mortality, greater disability, and longer lengths of stay. Although clinical practice guidelines exist for ischemic stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and traumatic brain injury, they lack specificity in their recommendations for fever management, making it difficult to formulate appropriate protocols for care. Using survey methods, the aims of this study were to (a) describe how nursing practices for fever management in this population have changed over the last several years, (b) assess if institutional protocols and nursing judgment follow published national guidelines for fever management in neuroscience patients, and (c) explore whether nurse or institutional characteristics influence decision making. Compared with the previous survey administered in 2007, there was a small increase (8%) in respondents reporting having an institutional fever protocol specific to neurologic patients. Temperatures to initiate treatment either based on protocols or nurse determination did not change from the previous survey. However, nurses with specialty certification and/or working in settings with institutional awards (e.g., Magnet status or Stroke Center Designation) initiated therapy at a lower temperature. Oral acetaminophen continues to be the primary choice for fever management, followed by ice packs and fans. This study encourages the development of a stepwise approach to neuro-specific protocols for fever management. Furthermore, it shows the continuing need to promote further education and specialty training among nurses and encourage collaboration with physicians to establish best practices. PMID:25634653

Rockett, Hannah; Thompson, Hilaire J; Blissitt, Patricia A

2015-04-01

241

Nurse Education and Communities of Practice. Researching Professional Education Research Reports Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The processes whereby nurses develop the skills and knowledge required to deliver individualized and holistic care were examined in a 2-year study of nurses in a range of clinical settings and a university department of nursing in England. Members of two research teams of qualified nurses joined various communities of nursing practice as…

Burkitt, Ian; Husband, Charles; Mackenzie, Jennifer; Torn, Alison

242

Compass and Prerequisite Course Scores as Predictors of Success in Practical Nursing School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The nursing shortage is compounded by nursing student attrition. Schools of nursing have limited enrollment, making the admission process an important factor in resolving the ongoing nursing shortage. The purpose of this study was to identify preadmission criteria that accurately identify applicants to practical/vocational nursing (P/VN) schools…

Pritchard, Toni L. Early

2010-01-01

243

Nurse Responses to Re-tooling Practice, Education, and Management Roles.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Responses from 409 registered nurses, 105 nurse managers, 144 nurse educators, and 31 licensed practical nurses indicated that 92% were willing to retool, defined as prepare for evolving nursing roles. They were less likely to be aware of employer expectations or supports for retooling. Areas needing development included critical thinking,…

Kjervik, Diane K.; Leonard, Dianne J.

2001-01-01

244

Nurse education regarding agitated patients and its effects on clinical practice.  

PubMed

This study identified the impact of an education program on nurses' practices for agitated patients and documented the changes in practice after completion of the training. Eighteen cardiac intensive care nurses were included to the study. Prior to nurses' participation in an education program, a pre-test indicating nurses' current practices for 40 agitated patients was evaluated with the 'Nurse Practice Form'. After the pre-test data collection period was completed, the 2-day training program on caring for agitated patients was conducted. The last step of the study was evaluation of post-test nurses' practices for 40 agitated patients using the 'Nurse Practice Form'. The findings indicated that instead of pre-test nurses' use of physical restraints for controlling agitated patients without a physician order, none of post-test nurses applied them. The training program provided nurses the knowledge and skills needed to evaluate and to manage the causes of agitation. PMID:20230178

Ozdemir, Leyla; Karabulut, Erdem

245

Moral distress: challenges for an autonomous nursing professional practice.  

PubMed

Constantly experiencing limiting situations that hinder a professional practice coherent with its principles - of autonomy and advocacy of users' interests -, and often conditioned to experience moral distress, the nursing profession plays a prominent role in the current health model because it has the characteristic of managing the care rendered to users in a perspective of social inclusion, both in the basic health network and in hospitals. Aiming at carrying out a reflection on the nursing practice and the difficulties present in its work routine, and considering its characteristics as a profession, this article sought to make a reflection between the practice of nursing and the numerous moral challenges imposed by the routine, resulting, in many cases, in a value crisis that can reverberate directly on the quality of the service rendered, and in abandonment of the ideals of advocacy for users. PMID:23743922

Barlem, Edison Luiz Devos; Lunardi, Valéria Lerch; Tomaschewski, Jamila Geri; Lunardi, Guilherme Lerch; Lunardi Filho, Wilson Danilo; Schwonke, Camila Rose Guadalupe Barcelos

2013-04-01

246

Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Nursing: A Practice Variation Study  

PubMed Central

Purpose/Objectives To examine practice variation in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) nursing and to identify the gap between recommended standards of practice and actual practice across settings. Additional practices relevant to HSCT nursing also were explored. Research Approach Cross-sectional, descriptive survey. Setting National and international cancer centers. Participants A convenience sample was obtained from the 2006 Oncology Nursing Society Blood and Marrow Stem Cell Transplant Special Interest Group membership list (N = 205). Most participants were women (94%) with a median age of 45 years. The primary role was bedside nurse (46%), with an adult-only population (78%) in an academic (84%), inpatient (68%-88%) center. 39 (94%) U.S. states and 7 (6%) non-U.S. countries were represented. Methodologic Approach Survey development was guided by Dillman Mail and Internet survey design. Electronic questionnaires were conducted with Zoomerang™ Market Tools. Main Research Variables Infection control practices across bone marrow transplantation settings. Findings Descriptive statistics revealed minimal practice variation regarding infection control across transplantation types or conditioning regimens. Practices regarding implementation of restrictions on patients’ hygiene, diet, and social interactions varied by phase of transplantation, with the greatest variations occurring during the post-transplantation phase. Sixty-two percent of respondents reported using published guidelines; 72% reported using organization-specific policies. Conclusions Although published standards are under consideration, practice variation exists across transplantation centers. Whether the variation is caused by a lack of compliance with published guidelines or by the poor delineation of details for providers to translate the guidelines into practice is not known. Interpretation Identifying gaps in the literature and inconsistencies in HSCT practices is an important first step in designing evidence-based projects that can be used to standardize practice and link best practices to improved patient outcomes. PMID:19887345

Bevans, Margaret; Tierney, D. Kathryn; Bruch, Coleen; Burgunder, Mary; Castro, Kathleen; Ford, Rosemary; Miller, Michelle; Rome, Sandra; Schmit-Pokorny, Kim

2012-01-01

247

Practice and education of nurse anaesthetists.  

PubMed Central

A survey was conducted of the anaesthesia services provided by nurses and the education available to them in this field in 107 countries. Among the procedures carried out were general anaesthesia, spinal blocks and tracheal intubation. The implications of the findings for health planning and policy-making are discussed with particular reference to workforce structure and women's involvement in it. PMID:10212519

Henry, B.; McAuliffe, M.

1999-01-01

248

Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders – a model for optimising the geriatric nursing practice environment  

PubMed Central

Aims and objectives To explain the relationship between a positive nurse practice environment (NPE) and implementation of evidence-based practices. To describe the components of NICHE (Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders) programmes that contribute to a positive geriatric nursing practice environment. Background The NPE is a system-level intervention for promoting quality and patient safety; however, there are population-specific factors that influence the nurses’ perception of their practice and its’ relationship with patient outcomes. Favourable perceptions of the geriatric-specific NPE are associated with better perceptions of geriatric care quality. Designs Discursive paper. Method In this selective critical analysis of the descriptive and empirical literature, we present the implementation of geriatric models in relation to the NPE and components of the NICHE programme that support hospitals’ systemic capacity to effectively integrate and sustain evidence-based geriatric knowledge into practice. Results Although there are several geriatric models and chronic care models available, NICHE has been the most successful in recruiting hospital membership as well as contributing to the depth of geriatric hospital programming. Conclusions Although all geriatric care models require significant nursing input, only NICHE focuses on the nursing staff’s perception of the care environment for geriatric practice. Studies in NICHE hospitals demonstrate that quality geriatric care requires a NPE in which the structure and processes of hospital services focus on specific patient care needs. Relevance to clinical practice The implementation of evidence-based models addressing the unique needs of hospitalised older adults requires programmes such as NICHE that serve as technical resources centre and a catalyst for networking among facilities committed to quality geriatric care. Unprecedented international growth in the ageing population compels us to examine how to adapt the successful components of NICHE to the distinctive needs of health systems throughout the world that serve older adults. PMID:23083387

Capezuti, Elizabeth; Boltz, Marie; Cline, Daniel; Dickson, Victoria Vaughn; Rosenberg, Marie-Claire; Wagner, Laura; Shuluk, Joseph; Nigolian, Cindy

2012-01-01

249

Identification of psychological morbidity in older people in primary care by practice nurses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Older people with psychological morbidity generally first present to health services in primary care, where they are increasingly seen by primary care nurses. In order to evaluate primary care nurses’ identification of psychological morbidity, 190 older patients attending eight practice nurses completed the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) and the practice nurses made an assessment as to the presence or absence

J. Cape; E. Morris; N. Adams; A. Fairbairns

2003-01-01

250

Faith community nursing scope of practice: extending access to healthcare.  

PubMed

The role of the Faith Community Nurse (FCN) is a multifaceted wholistic practice focused on individuals, families, and the faith and broader communities. The FCN is skilled in professional nursing and spiritual care, supporting health through attention to spiritual, physical, mental, and social health. FCNs can help meet the growing need for healthcare, especially for the uninsured, poor, and homeless. The contribution of FCNs on, primary prevention, health maintenance, and management of chronic disease deserves attention to help broaden understanding of the scope of FCN practice. PMID:25585467

Balint, Katherine A; George, Nancy M

2015-01-01

251

Practice nurse involvement in general practice clinical care: policy and funding issues need resolution.  

PubMed

In Australia, primary care-based funding initiatives have been implemented to encourage general practices to employ practice nurses. The aim of this paper is to discuss limitations of the current funding and policy arrangements in enhancing the clinical role of practice nurses in the management of chronic conditions. This paper draws on the results of a real-world economic evaluation, the Primary Care Services Improvement Project (PCSIP). The PCSIP linked routinely collected clinical and resource use data to undertake a risk-adjusted cost-effectiveness analysis of increased practice nurse involvement in clinical-based activities for the management of diabetes and obesity. The findings of the PCSIP suggested that the active involvement of practice nurses in collaborative clinical-based activities is cost-effective, as well as addressing general practice workforce issues. Although primary healthcare organisations (e.g. Medicare Locals) can play a key role in supporting enhanced practice nurse roles, improvements to practice nurse funding models could further encourage more efficient use of an important resource. PMID:24870661

Afzali, Hossein Haji Ali; Karnon, Jonathan; Beilby, Justin; Gray, Jodi; Holton, Christine; Banham, David

2014-06-01

252

Transforming nursing home culture: evidence for practice and policy.  

PubMed

The nursing home culture change movement aims to improve resident quality of life and quality of care by emphasizing the deinstitutionalization of nursing home culture and focusing on person-centered care. This article briefly reviews the history of culture change, discusses some of the challenges related to culture change in nursing homes, and overviews the conceptualization and select models of culture change. Building from this background, it critiques current understanding, identifies critical research questions, and notes key issues arising during a workshop that addressed existing and emerging evidence in the field. This review and analysis provide a context for how 9 accompanying papers in this supplemental issue of The Gerontologist fill identified evidence gaps and provide evidence for future practice and policies that aim to transform nursing home culture. PMID:24443601

Zimmerman, Sheryl; Shier, Victoria; Saliba, Debra

2014-02-01

253

Caring as emancipatory nursing praxis: the theory of relational caring complexity.  

PubMed

In the culture of health care, nurses are challenged to understand their values and beliefs as humanistic within complex technical and economically driven bureaucratic systems. This article outlines the language of social justice and human rights and the advance of a Theory of Relational Caring Complexity, which offers insights into caring as emancipatory nursing praxis. Recommendations provide knowledge of the struggle to balance economics, technology, and caring. As nurses practice from a value-driven, philosophical, and ethical social justice framework, they will find "their voice" and realize the full potential that the power of caring has on patient and organizational outcomes. PMID:24786202

Ray, Marilyn A; Turkel, Marian C

2014-01-01

254

Principled decision making in district nurse practice.  

PubMed

This article outlines a case study in which Sister Mary Newsome is in conflict with her district nurse colleague over the care of Margaret, 67, who they visit to monitor blood glucose levels and calculate the insulin dose to manage her diabetes. Recently, Margaret has been refusing to answer the door to the district nurses and has been eating sugary foods that have resulted in five admissions for diabetic ketoacidosis. While Sister Newsome believes continued care at home is best for Margaret, her colleague believes that only residential care will ensure Margaret maintains an appropriate diet and receives her insulin. Sister Newsome considers how best to resolve the conflict over the care of Margaret. PMID:25284188

Griffith, Richard

2014-10-01

255

Knowing nursing - The challenge of articulating knowing in practice.  

PubMed

Learning and teaching in the clinical environment is complex and challenging. Development of the ability to articulate knowing in practice is essential to allow exploration of the richness and complexity of this type of nursing knowledge. This paper describes an innovative approach developed in collaboration with practitioners to assist in revealing hitherto hidden aspects of knowing nursing. The interpretive paradigm provides one means of voicing nursing knowledge, specifically by accessing the lived-experience of nursing. The approach is qualitatively different to reflection and critical incident as it focuses on the taken-for-granted rather than being problem based or problem solving. Hermeneutic phenomenology and constructivism are combined in an innovative model that allows experience to be captured and meaning to be explored, thereby providing a means to articulate knowing in practice. Practitioners involved in operationalising this model considered that it allowed them to articulate a level of practice knowledge which they had previously experienced difficulty in accessing. This approach to knowledge articulation may therefore be useful in assisting to widen the horizon of nursing knowledge. PMID:19040842

Carr, Susan M

2005-11-01

256

Changes Resulting from Reflection Dialogues on Nursing Practice  

PubMed Central

Background Reflection is defined here as a process by which, through self-conversation, one’s self and one’s behavior acquire meaning. However, people have limitations in terms of what they can express and be aware of during reflection. This finding points to the importance of facilitators. The purpose of this study was to determine what changes can be brought about through reflection dialogues on nursing practice. Methods The Participants were 9 nurses who worked at three institutions in City A, each with about 200 beds. Workplace topics were examined through self-reflections and reflection dialogues. The depth of reflection was assessed using the three levels of reflection described by Mezirow—{reflecting on the content}, {reflecting on the process} and {reflecting on the assumptions}. Results In reflecting on nursing practice, the participants were also divided into those who had already reached the highest level, {reflecting on assumptions}, via self-reflection, and those who remained at the level of {reflecting on processes}, despite the use of reflection dialogues. Conclusion The development of reflective thinking on nursing practice was connected not only to the participants’ desire to explore ways of accepting their individual experiences, but may also be connected to whether or not they are able to question themselves about their thoughts and preconceptions about nursing work. PMID:25067874

Okuda, Reiko; Fukada, Mika

2014-01-01

257

The determinants of psychiatric nursing practice: a comparison of sociological perspectives.  

PubMed

This paper commences by observing that psychiatric nurses tend not to interact with their clients in a therapeutic fashion. It is not clear, however, whether this is due to the nature of psychiatric institutions or to the attitudes of individual nurses. Contrasting social theories which posit either the importance of social structures, or of individual interpretations as determinants of behaviour, are outlined. These are then applied to the problem of psychiatric nursing practice. It is argued that while there are strengths in both theoretical positions, neither on their own can adequately characterize the complexity of the problem. Rather than attempting to explain influences upon psychiatric nursing practice in terms of either structure or action, we should appreciate the importance of, and relationship between, both factors. Given the rapid changes occurring in mental health nursing, research into factors influencing practice will become increasingly important. In order to explain developments adequately, researchers will need to take account of the duality of structure and action. PMID:8263246

Porter, S

1993-10-01

258

The Graduate School Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Degree  

E-print Network

Specialty Track (Family Nurse Practitioner, Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner, or Advanced-baccalaureate DNP Specialty Track (Family Nurse Practitioner, Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner

Collins, Gary S.

259

Promising practices for faculty in accelerated nursing programs.  

PubMed

Accelerated nursing programs for college graduates have been graduating RNs since 1971. The question of how best to educate this cohort is a concern and even more of a priority because these students have different learning needs. Anecdotally, faculty know accelerated students tend to be challenging to teach. Administrators of nursing programs also are aware that some faculty prefers teaching this cohort and other faculty does not. This descriptive qualitative study collected data during focus groups using an open-ended interview guide. The focus groups consisted of accelerated second-degree nursing students. Participants identified six themes as best faculty practices: appreciate accelerated students as adult learners, communicate passion for the profession, challenge and motivate, practice while teaching and share their experiences, support accelerated students, and use varied teaching styles. PMID:20143760

Rico, Janet Sweeney; Beal, Judy; Davies, Terry

2010-03-01

260

The Doctor of Nursing Practice: defining the next steps.  

PubMed

The purpose of this article is to summarize the previous articles in this special issue of the Journal of Nursing Education that are based on the Committee on Institutional Cooperation's Dean's Conference on the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) and to identify areas of consensus, as well as areas of controversy. Areas of consensus include the high level of interest in DNP programs and the intent to expand the role of the advanced practice nurse to population health, policy, and leadership. Areas of controversy include the nature of the DNP product, the definition of clinical experiences, the nature of the capstone project, the outcomes of these new practitioners, and the impact on schools. Suggestions for achieving higher levels of consensus, including the need for respective, inclusive dialogue, are provided. PMID:23875725

Grey, Margaret

2013-08-01

261

Doing the right thing: nursing students, relational practice, and moral agency.  

PubMed

Registered nurses and nurse educators are often unaware of how nursing students experience the nursing profession. In the current practice climate of increased workloads, reduced funding, and higher patient acuity, nurse educators are likely to hear from colleagues how unprepared newly qualified nurses are for the needs of practice. It is difficult for many nursing students to see value in their practice because they become preoccupied with their perceived lack of knowledge and technical skills. Nurses and nurse educators should be aware of how this brands new graduates and informs their sense of developing professional identity. Despite their feelings of deficit in terms of skills and knowledge, it is clear that many nursing students are, in fact, effectively negotiating relational ethics. This article presents a collaborative account of the important relational work being undertaken by one group of nursing students in New Zealand. PMID:17302097

Beckett, Alesha; Gilbertson, Sarah; Greenwood, Sallie

2007-01-01

262

Nurse Coaching and Cartoon Distraction: An Efective and Practical Intervention to Reduce Child, Parent, and Nurse Distress During Immunizations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evaluated a low cost and practical intervention deigned to decrease children's, parents', and nurses' distress during children's immunizations. The intervention consisted of children viewing a popular cartoon movie and being coached by nurses and parents to attend to the movie. Ninety-two children, 4—6 years of age, and their parents were alternatively assigned to either a nurse coach interven- tion, a

Lindsey L. Cohen; Ronald L. Blount; Georgia Panopoulos

1997-01-01

263

Use of Evidence-Based Practice in School Nursing: Survey of School Nurses at a National Conference  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Primary and acute care settings are the focus of a concerted effort to implement evidence-based practice (EBP) in health care; yet, little attention has been given to use of EBP among school nurses. The aims of this study were to (a) describe current use of EBP among school nurses attending a national school nurse conference, (b) describe…

Adams, Susan

2009-01-01

264

Nursing Systems Management (NSM) Degree Plan: Upon admission nursing students must meet with faculty and staff advisors to develop plan of progression. Successful completion of core courses in theory and research are essential to success in all MSN majors  

E-print Network

, and the synthesis of theory and concepts from nursing and other disciplines for use in evidence-based practice. N with standards in nursing practice, education, and research. 5337 Health Care Financial Management's role. 5365 Managing Health Care Outcomes: Performance and outcome standards used by industry

Ward, Karen

265

Curriculum Models and Competencies. Associate Degree Nursing and Nursing Education Options: Associate Degree with Practical Nursing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Four associate degree nursing curriculums are presented, along with competencies, program guidelines, and job opportunities identified as those appropriate for the associate degree nursing programs offered in the North Carolina community college system. Chapter I introduces North Carolina's curriculum development project and the phases in which…

Hardee, Vercie M.; Worthington, Roger G.

266

Supporting patients' birth plans: theories, strategies & implications for nurses.  

PubMed

Pregnant women often create birth plans to specify their preferences for their labor and delivery. When nurses implement and advocate for women's birth plans, it increases women's autonomy and decision-making in the birth process and can lead to greater patient satisfaction. This article describes strategies for how nurses can help implement patients' birth plans, and discusses two psychological theories as a base for understanding nurses' roles in advocating for birth plans to improve patients' experiences. PMID:22697224

Anderson, Cynthia Jane; Kilpatrick, Caitlin

2012-01-01

267

Acute-care nurse practitioners: roles and practice profiles.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to explore aspects of the acute-care nurse practitioner (ACNP) role. The first certification examination for ACNPs was administered in December 1995. In January 1996, all applicants were mailed a study questionnaire about their practice. Responses were received from 125 of the 136 applicants (93% response rate). Work settings included hospital-based specialty and unit-based areas, urgent-care centers, and multipractice clinics. Predominant role components were conducting histories and physical examinations, prescribing treatments, and performing therapeutic procedures. Although long hours, resistance and uncertainty about the role, and perceived low salary exist, advantages identified reflect the role's autonomy, broad scope of practice, and contributions to collaborative care. Further exploration of roles, practice issues and outcomes of care will provide additional information about this new practitioner in advanced practice nursing. PMID:9086929

Kleinpell, R M

1997-02-01

268

Providing safe passage: rapid sequence intubation for advanced practice nursing.  

PubMed

Rapid sequence intubation (RSI) is a lifesaving technique performed by advanced practice nurses when patients require endotracheal intubation but are at risk for gastric aspiration. In the acute care setting, the procedure often is indicated when critically ill or injured patients exhibit difficulty maintaining a patent airway and/or are displaying inadequate oxygenation and ventilation. The goal of this article is to provide advanced practice nurses with information that promotes safe and effective clinical decision making during RSI on the basis of the current state of the science. Standard RSI practices in stable patients are reviewed, and the need for individualized modifications of this "ideal" practice in unstable, critically ill patients is addressed. Factors predisposing a patient to difficult airway management, proper equipment, and patient preparation are highlighted, along with the relevant pharmacology. Finally, prevention of potential complications during RSI in the acute care setting is discussed. PMID:22828060

Dalley, Carrie Bowman; Tola, Denise H; Kesten, Karen S

2012-01-01

269

Administrative Protocol Nursing Practice Manual Page 1 of 2  

E-print Network

Administrative Protocol Nursing Practice Manual Page 1 of 2 John Dempsey Hospital - Department appropriate payroll deductions. DECISION-MAKING/ IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS: 1. The Staffing Office will determine from the UCHC website. 9. Each quarter, the Human Resources Department will provide the Staffing Office

Oliver, Douglas L.

270

Administrative Procedure Page 1 of 1 Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

Administrative Procedure Page 1 of 1 Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department POLICY: 1. Private duty RNs, LPNs and CNAs may be utilized at John Dempsey Hospital under the following on arrival to the Staffing-Payroll Office. c. must show a current drivers license with picture ID. d. may

Oliver, Douglas L.

271

Administrative Procedure Nursing Practice Manual Page 1 of 1  

E-print Network

Administrative Procedure Nursing Practice Manual Page 1 of 1 John Dempsey Hospital - Department an unscheduled absence must notify the Staffing Office at least three hours prior to the start of the scheduled the Staffing Office when unable to report to work. 1. As much notice as possible should be given. At least

Oliver, Douglas L.

272

Nurses in Practice: A Perspective on Work Environments.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A major portion of the collection of 20 readings authored by practicing professionals consists of field observations presented both as raw data (field notes) and as analyzed and organized data. About the work of nurses in a variety of settings, a recurrent theme is that work behavior is greatly influenced by organizational and structural elements…

Davis, Marcella Z., Ed.; And Others

273

Training Gerontological Social Workers for Nursing Home Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

An escalating elderly population has necessitated a corresponding need for social workers trained in gerontology and who can practice in nursing homes. In order to enhance professional knowledge and skills, the authors present a teaching model that uses an apprenticeship framework to help students develop social work skills in working with elderly residents in long term care facilities. Responses to

Jack Paul Gesino; Elbert Siegel

1995-01-01

274

Mobile Learning in Nursing Practice Education: Applying Koole's FRAME Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We report here on an exploratory formative evaluation of a project to integrate mobile learning into a Western Canadian college nursing program. Third-year students used Hewlett Packard iPAQ mobile devices for five weeks in a practice education course in April-May, 2007. Koole's (2009) "Framework for the Rational Analysis of Mobile Education"…

Kenny, Richard F.; Van Neste-Kenny, Jocelyne M. C.; Park, Caroline L.; Burton, Pamela A.; Meiers, Jan

2009-01-01

275

A Pilot of a Gerontological Advanced Practice Nurse Preventive Intervention  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Persons with an intellectual and developmental disability frequently face barriers in accessing preventive services in community-based health care systems. As they age into middle years, they are at increased risk for functional decline. This paper presents a description of an advanced practice nurse (APN) intervention used in a pilot…

Hahn, Joan Earle; Aronow, Harriet Udin

2005-01-01

276

Practical Nursing. Volume II. Health Occupations Education. Revised.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This curriculum guide, revised from a 1975 edition, provides teachers with up-to-date information and skill-related applications needed by practical nurses. It includes 4 sections and 24 instructional units. Each unit of instruction consists of eight basic components: performance objectives, teacher activities, information sheets, assignment…

Rogers, Helen V.; Reid-Sloan, Jamee

277

Practical Nursing Curriculum Advisory Committee Report Including Suggested Philosophy, Suggested Competencies, Geriatric Care Curriculum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study was made of the current and future role of practical nurses and the curricula used to prepare these nurses in the 16 programs in Iowa. A statewide committee of 14 persons involved in hiring, employing, and controlling practical nurse practice was formed. Between Fall 1987 and Spring 1989, the committee gathered and analyzed information and…

Iowa Univ., Iowa City. Coll. of Education.

278

Addressing Sexuality-Related Needs in Practice: Perspectives of Maternal/Child and Women's Health Nurses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey of sexuality-related nursing practices was completed by 130 maternal/child and women's health nurses. A disparity was found between their agreement on nurses' role in sexuality-related practices and their actual practice; 46.5% felt only somewhat knowledgeable about sexuality. (SK)

Propst, Maureen G.; Phillips, Billie Rhea; Andrew, Michael E.

2001-01-01

279

The University of Iowa Nursing Collaboratory: A Partnership for Creative Education and Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A nursing college and its clinical partners created the Nursing Collaboratory to generate, disseminate, and apply knowledge to practice through four domains: education, research, practice, and informatics. It serves as an incubator for innovative products and services that enhance nursing education and practice. (SK)

Dreher, Melanie; Everett, Linda; Hartwig, Sally Mathis

2001-01-01

280

Developing best practice in critical care nursing: knowledge, evidence and practice.  

PubMed

Because the current drive towards evidence-based critical care nursing practice is based firmly within the positivist paradigm, experimentally derived research tends to be regarded as 'high level' evidence, whereas other forms of evidence, for example qualitative research or personal knowing, carry less weight. This poses something of a problem for nursing, as the type of knowledge nurses use most in their practice is often at the so-called 'soft' end of science. Thus, the 'Catch 22' situation is that the evidence base for nursing practice is considered to be weak. Furthermore, it is argued in this paper that there are several forms of nursing knowledge, which critical care nurses employ, that are difficult to articulate. The way forward requires a pragmatic approach to evidence, in which all forms of knowledge are considered equal in abstract but are assigned value according to the context of a particular situation. It is proposed that this can be achieved by adopting an approach to nursing in which practice development is the driving force for change. PMID:12859079

Fulbrook, Paul

2003-01-01

281

Advancing nursing practice through social media: a global perspective.  

PubMed

Social media has been used globally as a key vehicle for communication. As members of an innovative profession, many nurses have embraced social media and are actively utilizing its potential to enhance practice and improve health. The ubiquity of the Internet provides social media with the potential to improve both access to health information and services and equity in health care. Thus there are a number of successful nurse-led initiatives. However, the open and democratising nature of social media creates a number of potential risks, both individual and organisational. This article considers the use of social media within nursing from a global perspective, including discussion of policy and guidance documents. The impact of social media on both healthcare consumers and nurses is reviewed, followed by discussion of selected risks associated with social media. To help nurses make the most of social media tools and avoid potential pitfalls, the article conclusion suggests implications appropriate for global level practice based on available published guidance. PMID:23036062

Barry, Jean; Hardiker, Nicholas R

2012-09-01

282

Understanding partnership practice in child and family nursing through the concept of practice architectures.  

PubMed

A significant international development agenda in the practice of nurses supporting families with young children focuses on establishing partnerships between professionals and service users. Qualitative data were generated through interviews and focus groups with 22 nurses from three child and family health service organisations, two in Australia and one in New Zealand. The aim was to explore what is needed in order to sustain partnership in practice, and to investigate how the concept of practice architectures can help understand attempts to enhance partnerships between nurses and families. Implementation of the Family Partnership Model (FPM) is taken as a specific point of reference. Analysis highlights a number of tensions between the goals of FPM and practice architectures relating to opportunities for ongoing learning; the role of individual nurses in shaping the practice; relationships with peers and managers; organisational features; and extra-organisational factors. The concept of practice architectures shows how changing practice requires more than developing individual knowledge and skills, and avoids treating individuals and context separately. The value of this framework for understanding change with reference to context rather than just individual's knowledge and skills is demonstrated, particularly with respect to approaches to practice development focused on providing additional training to nurses. PMID:23336287

Hopwood, Nick; Fowler, Cathrine; Lee, Alison; Rossiter, Chris; Bigsby, Marg

2013-09-01

283

Doctor of Nursing Practice Program DNP INTENSIVE  

E-print Network

Application of Evidence-Based Practice I Rene Love, DNP, PMHNP-BC Donna McArthur, PhD, FNP-BC, FAANP Patti:00-5:00 Nancy Wells, DNSc, RN, FAAN N450: Integrative Application of Evidence- Based Practice IV Susie Adams, Ph/Session Event/Session 8:00-10:00 a.m. 1st Year: 140FH 2nd Year: 144FH N422: Evidence-Based Practice II

Bordenstein, Seth

284

Influence of the Nursing Practice Environment on Job Satisfaction and Turnover Intention  

PubMed Central

Objectives: To examine whether the nursing practice environment at the hospital-level affects the job satisfaction and turnover intention of hospital nurses. Methods: Among the 11 731 nurses who participated in the Korea Health and Medical Workers’ Union’s educational program, 5654 responded to our survey. Data from 3096 nurses working in 185 general inpatient wards at 60 hospitals were analyzed using multilevel logistic regression modeling. Results: Having a standardized nursing process (odds ratio [OR], 4.21; p<0.001), adequate nurse staffing (OR, 4.21; p<0.01), and good doctor-nurse relationship (OR, 4.15; p<0.01), which are hospital-level variables based on the Korean General Inpatients Unit Nursing Work Index (KGU-NWI), were significantly related to nurses’ job satisfaction. However, no hospital-level variable from the KGU-NWI was significantly related to nurses’ turnover intention. Conclusions: Favorable nursing practice environments are associated with job satisfaction among nurses. In particular, having a standardized nursing process, adequate nurse staffing, and good doctor-nurse relationship were found to positively influence nurses’ job satisfaction. However, the nursing practice environment was not related to nurses’ turnover intention. PMID:25284197

Lee, Sang-Yi; Kim, Chul-Woung; Kang, Jeong-Hee; Yoon, Tae-Ho; Kim, Cheoul Sin

2014-01-01

285

Vermont Nurse Internship Project. A Collaborative Enterprise Developed by Nurse Leaders from Education, Practice, and Regulation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two pilot studies tested a postgraduate internship model to prepare entry-level nurses with the support of clinical preceptors. Elements included preceptor training and a core competence assessment tool. The second pilot resulted in improvements in transition to practice and satisfaction with preceptors. (Contains 15 references.) (SK)

Boyer, Susan A.

2002-01-01

286

Overcoming nursing faculty shortages and bridging the gap between education and practice.  

PubMed

The nurse faculty shortage and new requirements for teaching have led to thousands of qualified applicants being turned away from prelicensure nursing programs. In response, the Chief Nursing Officer in one organization created nursing faculty consultant positions to collaborate with faculty, teach prelicensure students in clinical practice, ensure the consistency of care by students in the hospital system, and enhance the relationships between schools of nursing and the organization. In the past 4 years the nursing faculty consultants have been employed they have taught over 500 nursing students from six different nursing programs. PMID:22992633

Reinert, Jean; Bigelow, Andrea; Kautz, Donald D

2012-01-01

287

Clinical Procedure Page 1 of 1 Clinical Manual / Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

Clinical Procedure Page 1 of 1 Clinical Manual / Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROCEDURE FOR: Medication Administration: Student Nurses POLICY: 1. Student nurses may give medications only under the supervision of a faculty

Oliver, Douglas L.

288

Clinical Procedure Page 1 of 3 Clinical Manual / Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

­ Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROCEDURE FOR: Assessment: Scope of Nursing Physical Assessment: Adult Inpatient POLICY: 1. The scope of nursing care as well as the process utilized&O's) is assessed and documented hourly. #12;Clinical Procedure Page 2 of 3 Clinical Manual / Nursing Practice

Oliver, Douglas L.

289

Do calculation errors by nurses cause medication errors in clinical practice? A literature review  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review aims to examine the literature available to ascertain whether medication errors in clinical practice are the result of nurses’ miscalculating drug dosages. The research studies highlighting poor calculation skills of nurses and student nurses have been tested using written drug calculation tests in formal classroom settings [Kapborg, I., 1994. Calculation and administration of drug dosage by Swedish nurses,

Kerri Wright

2010-01-01

290

Development of a Practice Laboratory for the Writing of Nursing Care Plans. Curriculum Program Planning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A practice laboratory for writing nursing care plans to be utilized by first-year nursing faculty members was developed. Six first-year instructors of the Long Beach City (California) College Associate Degree Nursing Program were the participating panel of experts. A thorough literature review was conducted to obtain guidelines for writing nursing

Harrell, Brenda McCane

291

[Practice of hypnosis in the nurse care].  

PubMed

Hypnosis is practicing in hospital, especially in palliative care and in pain consultation. This technique is used in a well-defined field by doctors, psychologists and caregivers, all specificially trained. PMID:25710997

Vadrot, Georges Lambert

2014-12-01

292

[Nursing practice of care to patients undergoing elective surgery in the immediate preoperative period].  

PubMed

Research that aimed to analyze the care of nurses to patients, in the daily professional practice, provided in the preoperative period for patients undergoing elective surgery. It is a descriptive research with a qualitative approach that involved 15 nurses from Surgical Units and two nurses from the Surgical Centre of a hospital in the southern region of Brazil. Data was collected in semi-structured interviews conducted from April to July 2011. Data was analyzed using the Collective Subject Discourse (CSD) technique. The information obtained generated three CDS focused on the following ideas: administrative care, instruction in the preoperative period and surgical care in the immediate preoperative period. The results showed that caring consists mostly of giving instructions to the patient in the preoperative period. It is concluded that the care was directed to the physical aspects to the detriment of the psychological, in disagreement with the assistance methodology adopted in the hospital, supported by the Theory of Basic Human Needs. PMID:24344595

de Sena, Adnairdes Cabral; do Nascimento, Eliane Regina Pereira; Maia, Ana Rosete Camargo Rodrigues

2013-09-01

293

Development and reliability testing of a survey: measuring trusting and deference behaviors in microethical nursing practice.  

PubMed

Novice post-licensure nurses are frequently exposed to microethical nursing practice problems during their first 24 months of formative practice. Often, novice nurses trust the advice of experienced nurse coworkers, deferring to such advice even when they know the advice contradicts evidence-based practice. This study revealed the prevalence of deference behaviors and associated rationale. Study findings emphasize the importance of incorporating conflict management, effective communication techniques, ethical frameworks, and EBP standards within pre- and post-licensure education. PMID:25790362

Krautscheid, Lorretta C; Britton, Justin; Craig, Carol

2015-01-01

294

Preparing nurses for the 21st century: reenvisioning nursing education and practice 1 1 The views expressed in this article are Dr. Long’s and do not reflect the official position of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Significant advances in biomedical science and in the complexity of health care, coupled with a worsening nursing shortage and numerous reports of unsafe and inadequate patient care, have prompted concerns about both nursing education and nursing practice. Beginning in 2000, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) made a thorough study of nursing education, regulation, and practice issues. Input

Kathleen Ann Long

2004-01-01

295

Accessing best practice resources using mobile technology in an undergraduate nursing program: a feasibility study.  

PubMed

Mobile technology presents new opportunities for nursing education and ultimately the provision of nursing care. The aim of this study was to explore the utility of mobile technology in undergraduate nursing education. In this evaluation study, undergraduate nursing students were provided with iPod Touch devices containing best practice guidelines. Computer self-efficacy was assessed, and the Theory of Planned Behavior was used to identify potential predictors of the use of mobile technology. Questionnaires were completed at baseline (n = 33) and postimplementation (n = 23). Feedback on feasibility issues was recorded throughout the study period. Students generally found the devices useful, and few technical problems were identified; however, lack of skill in using the devices and lack of support from staff in the clinical setting were commonly identified issues. Self-efficacy scores were high throughout the study. Attitudes, perceptions of the desirability of use, perceived personal control over use, and intentions of using the device were lower postimplementation than at baseline. Attitude toward the technology predicted intention to use the device after graduation. Mobile technology may promote evidence-informed practice; however, supporting students' acquisition of related skills may optimize use. Successful integration of mobile technology into practice requires attention to factors that affect student attitudes. PMID:25636042

Mann, Elizabeth G; Medves, Jennifer; Vandenkerkhof, Elizabeth G

2015-03-01

296

Female genital mutilation: knowledge, attitude and practice among nurses.  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Female genital mutilation (FGM) and cutting is a subject of global interest, with many countries of the world still practicing it despite efforts by the WHO and other agencies to discourage the practice. The highest known prevalence is in Africa. OBJECTIVES: To determine the knowledge, attitude and practice of FGM among nurses in the ancient metropolis of Benin in a Nigerian state where FGM is illegal. RESULTS: One-hundred-ninety-three nurses in the study hospital were recruited in the study out of which 182 (94.3%) appropriately filled and returned the questionnaires. The average age of respondents was 37 years, and the average duration of postgraduation experience was 14.5 years. Most respondents are of Bini (36.8%) and Esan (34.1%) ethnic origin. All respondents identified at least one form of FGM, but only 12 respondents (6.6%) could correctly identify the four types of FGM. The harmful effects of FGM identified by the majority of respondents include hemorrhage, difficult labor/childbirth, genital tears, infections and scar/keloid formation. Forty-four (24.2%) of respondents were of the opinion that some forms of FGM are harmless. Eighty nurses admitted to having undergone FGM, for a prevalence of 44%. Five respondents (2.8%) view FGM as a good practice and will encourage the practice. Twelve respondents (6.6%) routinely perform FGM out of which seven (58.3%) viewed FGM as a bad practice. Nurses performing FGM routinely were those who had spent >20 years (59%) and 11-20 years (41%) in the profession. Another 26 (14.3%) had performed FGM before, though not on a routine basis. Of this latter group, 15 will perform FGM in the future when faced with certain circumstances. Reasons for FGM practice were mainly cultural. Eight of the respondents would have their daughters circumcised. CONCLUSION: Nurses perceive FGM in Benin as cultural. Almost half have had FGM themselves, and a small percentage recommend it to their daughters. Discouraging FGM practice will require culturally sensitive education of the healthcare providers and the population at large on the ill effects of FGM, including the risk to health and violations of human rights. PMID:16573307

Onuh, Sunday O.; Igberase, Gabriel O.; Umeora, Joaness O. U.; Okogbenin, Sylvanus A.; Otoide, Valentine O.; Gharoro, Etedafe P.

2006-01-01

297

Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Emergency Contraception on Nursing Personnel  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Emergency Contraception is a grossly underu–tilized option of prevention of pregnancy. It is a safe and effective method which can prevent unintended pregnancies, unsafe abortions and unwanted childbirth. Knowledge and attitude of Nursing personnel who are both service providers and health educators to the community can influence the contraceptive behavior of the people exposed to them. A few studies done in our country indicate that their awareness regarding EC is low. Aim: To explore the knowledge, attitude and practice of EC amongst Nursing Personnel in a medical college hospital. Materials and Methods: In this study, 185 nursing personnel participated. A predesigned, pretested questionnaire was used to collect their responses regarding knowledge, attitude and practice of EC. Descriptive analysis of data was done. Results : Out of the total, 52.43% of the participants had good knowledge regarding the general information of EC, 51.35% had positive attitude towards EC, 47.56% had expressed willingness to use EC if indicated whereas only 22.7% had ever used EC. 72.97% had expressed willingness to attend awareness programmes on EC. Conclusion :Even though knowledge and attitude towards EC among the participants was marginally good they had many misconceptions regarding specific aspects like mode of action, indications and timing of administration. More awareness programmes would definitely clear their misconceptions and apprehensions and encourage Nursing Personnel to personally use and promote EC to others. PMID:25386489

Shanthini N, Fatima

2014-01-01

298

Simulation Methodology in Nursing Education and Adult Learning Theory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Simulation is often used in nursing education as a teaching methodology. Simulation is rooted in adult learning theory. Three learning theories, cognitive, social, and constructivist, explain how learners gain knowledge with simulation experiences. This article takes an in-depth look at each of these three theories as each relates to simulation.…

Rutherford-Hemming, Tonya

2012-01-01

299

The Theory Into Practice Database  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Theory Into Practice (TIP) database contains summarized descriptions of 50 educational theories related to human learning and instruction. It was compiled by Dr. Greg Kearsley, and independent consultant specializing in online education who has a PhD in educational psychology. For each instructional theory, Kearsley provides a brief overview, explains its scope and application, outlines its principles, offers a theoretical example, and lists references. In addition, some of the overviews include Quicktime video clips of Dr. Kearsley or others lecturing on specific theories. The TIP database is accessible via three indices: an alphabetic index, a learning domain index, and a learning concepts index.

300

A nursing brief: emerging best practice in Department of Children and Families nursing.  

PubMed

In 2012, more than 400,000 children in the United States were in the child welfare system because of abuse or neglect. These children are uniquely vulnerable and present multiple health challenges to child welfare and health professionals. According to the most recent Child and Family Services Reviews (CFSR) from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Administration for Children and Families' Children's Bureau (2010), none of the 50 states, Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia were "in substantial conformity" in meeting the well-being outcome for the physical and mental health needs of the children in their care. To address this deficiency, Connecticut nurses caring for children involved with Department of Children and Families (DCF) collaborated to establish nursing standards of practice leading to improved health services for children in care and a mechanism to readily transfer health information. Post-implementation evaluation revealed improved quality of care and the availability of enhanced health information. These endeavors have led to the recognition that nurses working in DCF venues are members of an emerging professional nursing specialty: "nursing in child welfare." PMID:23540103

Kiwanuka, Anne; Boyar, Valerie; Jensen, Monica

2013-01-01

301

The psychiatric advanced practice nurse with prescriptive authority: role development, practice issues, and outcomes measurement.  

PubMed

Within the rapidly changing health care system, there is an increased need for professionals who can provide cost-effective primary health care for mentally ill patients. This article discusses the role of the Psychiatric Advanced Practice Nurse (APN) with Prescriptive Authority as a cost-effective, high-quality component of comprehensive mental health care delivery. Historical aspects of the development of the Nurse Practitioner (NP) role are discussed, as well as issues specific to the role in psychiatric nursing. The implementation of this role at Rochester is described, followed by recommendations for studying the impact of the psychiatric NP on care delivery, including process and outcome variables. PMID:9105105

Cornwell, C; Chiverton, P

1997-04-01

302

78 FR 65342 - National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice...National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice...Care Act and health care system redesign, and to formulate...logistical challenges of scheduling this meeting hindered...National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and...

2013-10-31

303

78 FR 22890 - National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice...National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice...Care Act and health care system redesign, and to formulate...logistical challenges of scheduling this meeting hindered...National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and...

2013-04-17

304

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION Programme name Advanced Practice in Health and Social Care (Ophthalmic Nursing)  

E-print Network

90 PROGRAMME SUMMARY The MSc Advanced Practice in Health and Social Care (Ophthalmic Nursing) is a flexible, professionally orientated programme for nurses working in ophthalmic health and eye care within, you qualify for the MSc in Advanced Practice in Health and Social Care: #12;Ophthalmic Nursing If you

Weyde, Tillman

305

Facilitation of evidence-based nursing practice during military operations.  

PubMed

The translation of research to clinical practice and health decision making is challenging. Under military operational conditions (e.g., the provision of care in the field), translation may be even more challenging. Two barriers that limit the use of evidence to guide practice, which are particularly germane under operational conditions, are conflicting or absent research results specific to the population of interest and relevant studies not being compiled in one place (Titler, 2007; Titler & Everett, 2001). The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Knowledge Transfer Framework (Nieva et al.,2005) provides a structure to facilitate evidence translation and to overcome these barriers. This article summarizes one aspect of a program of operational nursing research supported by the TriService Nursing Research Program, which exemplifies the three stages of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality framework. PMID:20010282

Bridges, Elizabeth

2010-01-01

306

Correctional nursing: a study protocol to develop an educational intervention to optimize nursing practice in a unique context  

PubMed Central

Background Nurses are the primary healthcare providers in correctional facilities. A solid knowledge and expertise that includes the use of research evidence in clinical decision making is needed to optimize nursing practice and promote positive health outcomes within these settings. The institutional emphasis on custodial care within a heavily secured, regulated, and punitive environment presents unique contextual challenges for nursing practice. Subsequently, correctional nurses are not always able to obtain training or ongoing education that is required for broad scopes of practice. The purpose of the proposed study is to develop an educational intervention for correctional nurses to support the provision of evidence-informed care. Methods A two-phase mixed methods research design will be used. The setting will be three provincial correctional facilities. Phase one will focus on identifying nurses’ scope of practice and practice needs, describing work environment characteristics that support evidence-informed practice and developing the intervention. Semi-structured interviews will be completed with nurses and nurse managers. To facilitate priorities for the intervention, a Delphi process will be used to rank the learning needs identified by participants. Based on findings, an online intervention will be developed. Phase two will involve evaluating the acceptability and feasibility of the intervention to inform a future experimental design. Discussion The context of provincial correctional facilities presents unique challenges for nurses’ provision of care. This study will generate information to address practice and learning needs specific to correctional nurses. Interventions tailored to barriers and supports within specific contexts are important to enable nurses to provide evidence-informed care. PMID:23799894

2013-01-01

307

Beyond Behavioral Skills to Human-Involved Processes: Relational Nursing Practice and Interpretive Pedagogy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Behaviorist teaching of communication skills can interfere with learning of humanistic nursing. Interpretive inquiry can help students experience the transformative power for relationships and develop confidence and trust in their capacity for relational nursing practice. (Contains 20 references.) (SK)

Doane, Gweneth A. Hartrick

2002-01-01

308

Education and implementing evidence-based nursing practice for diabetic patients  

PubMed Central

Background: Foot ulceration is one of the most common complications associated with diabetes that needs to be managed. In Iran, prevalence of diabetes foot ulcer is 3%. According to studies, evidence-based nursing (EBN) is an effective alternative to facilitate clinical decision making in patient care and may lead to quality improvement in nursing practice. The aims of this study are to assess the effects of EBN education on the knowledge, attitude, and practice of nurses who take care of patient with diabetes foot ulcer. Materials and Methods: A quasi-experimental study (based on IOWA model as a framework to improve nursing practice) was conducted using a before-and-after design. All of nurses (consisted of 19 baccalaureate nurses) who are working in an endocrinology ward were chosen and taught using EBN approach through different workshops. Before and after educational intervention, the data about nurses’ knowledge, attitude, and practice were gathered by questionnaire and then compared. The nurses’ performance in patient care was evaluated in 3 months by one checklist. The data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results: There were statistically significant differences in knowledge, attitude, and practice of nurses before and after intervention (P = 0.001). The nurses’ performance in caring for patient with diabetes foot ulcer, based on clinical guideline, showed the improvement in clinical practice. Conclusion: Education of EBN can improve the nurse's knowledge and attitude to EBN, and be used as a basis on which to influence the professional practice of nursing. PMID:23983764

Varaei, Shokoh; Salsali, Mahvash; Cheraghi, Mohammad Ali; Tehrani, Mohammad Reza Mohajeri; Heshmat, Ramin

2013-01-01

309

A new window into nurse manager development: teaching for the practice.  

PubMed

An important domain that emerged from the interpretation of 91 nurse manager (NM) narratives was achieving the right relationship between a NM and a recalcitrant staff member. This article depicts the qualitative distinctions in 2 stages of NM practice to show the importance of reflection on experiential learning in the development of expertise. This work confirms that NM development is more complex than teaching a curriculum of business and management theory and should include teaching for mastery of the skilled know-how of clinical leadership practice and formation of the person as manager. PMID:23151927

Cathcart, Eloise Balasco; Greenspan, Miriam

2012-12-01

310

Nursing home practices following resident death: The experience of Certified Nursing Assistants.  

PubMed

This study examined certified nursing assistants' (CNAs) experiences of nursing home practices following resident death. Participants were 140 CNAs who had experienced recent resident death. In semi-structured, in-person interviews, CNAs were asked about their experiences with the removal of the resident's body, filling the bed with a new resident, and how they were notified about the death. The facilities' practice of filling the bed quickly was most often experienced as negative. Responses to body removal and staff notification varied, but negative experiences were reported by a substantial minority. Being notified prior to returning to work was associated with a more positive experience. Learning about the death by walking into a room to find the bed empty or already filled was the most negative experience. Study findings suggest that more mindful approaches to the transitions related to resident deaths would be valued by CNAs and could improve their work experience. PMID:25554351

Barooah, Adrita; Boerner, Kathrin; van Riesenbeck, Isabelle; Burack, Orah R

2015-01-01

311

MOTHER AND INFANT CARE, PRACTICAL NURSE TRAINING PROGRAM, LESSON PLANS, PREPARED BY PRACTICAL NURSING INSTRUCTORS DURING CONFERENCE (UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE, AUGUST 14-18, 1961).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

PRACTICAL NURSE INSTRUCTORS, IN CONFERENCE, COMPILED THIS INDIVIDUALLY PLANNED AND TESTED MATERIAL TO BE USED IN PRACTICAL NURSE EDUCATION. THIRTY-TWO LESSON PLANS ON THE SUBJECT OF MOTHER AND INFANT CARE COVER TOPICS RANGING FROM THE REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEM TO COMPLICATIONS INVOLVING THE NEWBORN. EACH PLAN INCLUDES AIM, REFERENCES, MATERIALS,…

Tennessee State Board for Vocational Education, Murfreesboro. Vocational Curriculum Lab.

312

Development of the Massachusetts School Nurse Research Network (MASNRN): A Practice-Based Research Network to Improve the Quality of School Nursing Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When school nurses embrace evidence-based practice (EBP), higher-quality care is provided to students, their families, and the larger community. Despite this, school nursing has been slow to embrace EBP. Practice-Based Research Networks (PBRNs), which capitalize on the combined strengths of clinicians and researchers to study clinical questions,…

Vessey, Judith A.

2007-01-01

313

Promoting professional nursing practice: linking a professional practice model to performance expectations.  

PubMed

Professional practice models (PPMs) provide the conceptual framework for establishing professional nursing practice. Integrating a PPM requires complex organizational change. One strategy for integrating a PPM is to directly link the PPM with performance expectations to ensure that underlying beliefs are integrated into everyday practice. This article describes the development, implementation, and successful outcomes of a clinical advancement system that was aligned with a PPM. PMID:21320662

Murphy, Marcia; Hinch, Barbara; Llewellyn, Jane; Dillon, Paula J; Carlson, Elizabeth

2011-03-01

314

Best Practice at Your Fingertips: The WISHeS School Nurse Procedure Website.  

PubMed

School nurses are responsible for providing and supervising school nursing services for children with complex health concerns. Given that school nurses frequently practice in isolation and may have limited access to clinical practice changes, they can benefit from up-to-date, evidence-based resources. Additionally, the resources must account for the fact that the nursing procedures will be performed in the unique setting of a school building and, in many cases, will be performed by school personnel who have limited formal education in health care. This article provides an overview of a newly developed, easy to use, online school nursing procedures website for school nurses and other school personnel. PMID:25816427

DuChateau, Teresa A; Beversdorf, Sarah; Wolff, Marie

2015-05-01

315

A study of quality management practices in nursing in universities in Australia.  

PubMed

In Australia, the traditional Quality Assurance approach used in the hospital setting has played an important role in nursing practice. During the past decade, nurses have begun making a paradigm shift from Quality Assurance to Total Quality Management but scant attention has been paid to quality management practices in nursing in the higher education sector. This paper reports on a quantitative study examining the perceptions of nurse academics to the applicability of TQM to nursing in universities. The findings identified how TQM could be applied to suit the nursing culture in the higher education sector. PMID:15485391

Cruickshank, Mary

2003-01-01

316

Unlocking reflective practice for nurses: innovations in working with master of nursing students in Hong Kong.  

PubMed

Being reflective is well established as an important conduit of practice development, a desirable tertiary graduate quality and a core competency of health professional membership. By assisting students to be more effective in their ability to reflect, they are better able to formulate strategies to manage issues experienced within a professional context, which ultimately assists them to be better service providers. However, some students are challenged by the practice of reflection and these challenges are even more notable for international students. This paper presents a teaching initiative that focused specifically on enhancing the capacity of an international cohort of nursing students, to engage in reflective practice. The initiative centered on an evaluation of a reflective practice core subject, which was taught in a Master of Nursing programme delivered in Hong Kong. A learning-centered framework was used to evaluate the subject and identify innovative strategies that would better assist international students to develop reflective practices. The outcomes of curriculum and teaching analysis and proposed changes and innovations in teaching practice to support international students are presented and discussed. PMID:23232086

Joyce-McCoach, Joanne T; Parrish, Dominique R; Andersen, Patrea R; Wall, Natalie

2013-09-01

317

[Opinions of nursing students about various sexual practices].  

PubMed

This study sought to determine the beliefs of nursing students on human sexuality, their information sources, and persons influencing their opinion. A survey conducted December 1983 to January 1985 targeted female graduating students in Nursing and Obstetrics at the University of Sao Paulo (USP) School of Nursing; its findings were then compared to similar studies conducted among the general population. The findings show that the target population and general population opinions differ little, reflecting fear and prejudice about sexual practices. Also, the professional training of Brazil's nurses failed to include a fundamental understanding of human sexuality. The 42 respondents are characterized as follows: age 21 to 36 years; 95.2% single; 88% childless; 59.5% born in the city of Sao Paulo; 88% born in the state of Sao Paulo; 85.7% with long term residence in urban areas and state capitals; and 92.5% attended 4 years of nursing school at USP. Results showed: 47.6% favored premarital sex; 26.2% espoused premarital virginity for men and 19% for women; roughly 60% disapproved of extramarital relations for both sexes. 75% considered masturbation normal for both sexes; about 90% approved of contraceptive practices for men and women; 90.5% favored family planning; 26% were strictly against abortion; nearly 60% found prostitution unacceptable for both sexes; and homosexuality in both sexes was considered taboo by 42.8%, and acceptable by 14%. The vast majority favored sexual education at all levels. Regarding sources of sexual infomation: books, magazines and encyclopedias comprised 25%; male friends, 10%; girlfriends, 9.4%; boyfriends 8%; and, the University of Sao Paulo School of Nursing, a mere 6.5%. The persons who influenced their opinions were: first, boyfriend (23.7%) followed by mother, girlfriends and male friends; second, girlfriend (28.5%) followed by boyfriend and male friend; third, girlfriend, boyfriend, male friend, and teachers (7.1% each); fourth, brother (7.1%) followed by nursing instructor with a mere 2.4%; and fifth, divided among parents, schoolmates, father, and family (10% each). PMID:3851483

Egry, E Y

1985-04-01

318

Pacing the standard of nursing practice in radiation oncology.  

PubMed

Radiotherapy frequently is used to treat both breast and lung cancers. Because of recent technological advances, radiation oncologists can deliver increasingly higher amounts of radiation to these areas. Inevitably, some patients requiring radiation therapy will have histories of cardiac disease and temporarily or permanently implanted cardiac pacemakers. Pacemakers are not immune to radiation; damage to their internal circuitry can occur if safeguards are not in place. A recent informal telephone survey of radiation oncology departments in Pennsylvania, as well as four nationally recognized cancer centers, yielded varied and inconsistent nursing practices in caring for these patients. A review of the literature found recommendations that were developed originally in 1989, then updated in 1994 and 1998, to be incomplete from a nursing perspective. Radiation oncology nurses must take a proactive role to deliver quality consistent care, while minimizing their liability, when working with this patient population. This can be achieved by implementing a nursing policy that incorporates the 10 recommendations described in this article. PMID:11899625

Hogle, W P

2001-01-01

319

Factors Influencing the Intention of Perinatal Nurses to Adopt the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative in Southeastern Quebec, Canada: Implications for Practice  

PubMed Central

Nurses play a major role in promoting the baby-friendly hospital initiative (BFHI), yet the adoption of this initiative by nurses remains a challenge in many countries, despite evidences of its positive impacts on breastfeeding outcomes. The aim of this study was to identify the factors influencing perinatal nurses to adopt the BFHI in their practice. Methods. A sample of 159 perinatal nurses from six hospital-based maternity centers completed a survey based on the theory of planned behavior. Hierarchical multiple linear regression analyses were performed to assess the relationship between key independent variables and nurses' intention to adopt the BFHI in their practice. A discriminant analysis of nurses' beliefs helped identify the targets of actions to foster the adoption the BFHI among nurses. Results. The participants are mainly influenced by factors pertaining to their perceived capacity to overcome the strict criteria of the BFHI, the mothers' approval of a nursing practice based on the BFHI, and the antenatal preparation of the mothers. Conclusions. This study provides theory-based evidence for the development of effective interventions aimed at promoting the adoption of the BFHI in nurses' practice. PMID:25101173

2014-01-01

320

Optimizing Java Theory and Practice  

E-print Network

Optimizing Java Theory and Practice Zoran Budimlic Ken Kennedy Rice University Computer Science popularity of the Internet has made an instant star of the Java programming language. Java's portability Java implementation, even with just­in­time compilation technology, is far behind the most popular

Budimliæ, Zoran

321

The challenges of communicating research evidence in practice: perspectives from UK health visitors and practice nurses  

PubMed Central

Background Health practitioners play a pivotal role in providing patients with up-to-date evidence and health information. Evidence-based practice and patient-centred care are transforming the delivery of healthcare in the UK. Health practitioners are increasingly balancing the need to provide evidence-based information against that of facilitating patient choice, which may not always concur with the evidence base. There is limited research exploring how health practitioners working in the UK, and particularly those more autonomous practitioners such as health visitors and practice nurses working in community practice settings, negotiate this challenge. This research provides a descriptive account of how health visitors and practice nurses negotiate the challenges of communicating health information and research evidence in practice. Methods A total of eighteen in-depth telephone interviews were conducted in the UK between September 2008 and May 2009. The participants comprised nine health visitors and nine practice nurses, recruited via adverts on a nursing website, posters at a practitioner conference and through recommendation. Thematic analysis, with a focus on constant comparative method, was used to analyse the data. Results The data were grouped into three main themes: communicating evidence to the critically-minded patient; confidence in communicating evidence; and maintaining the integrity of the patient-practitioner relationship. These findings highlight some of the daily challenges that health visitors and practice nurses face with regard to the complex and dynamic nature of evidence and the changing attitudes and expectations of patients. The findings also highlight the tensions that exist between differing philosophies of evidence-based practice and patient-centred care, which can make communicating about evidence a daunting task. Conclusions If health practitioners are to be effective at communicating research evidence, we suggest that more research and resources need to be focused on contextual factors, such as how research evidence is negotiated, appraised and communicated within the dynamic patient-practitioner relationship. PMID:23835038

2013-01-01

322

An overview of hospice and palliative care nursing models and theories.  

PubMed

Current literature reports that nurses are the members of the health-care team who have the most contact with patients facing a life-threatening illness. The multidisciplinary palliative care approach means that hospice and palliative care nurses require a consistent theoretical foundation in order to be confident of and able to explain their role. The aim of this paper is to describe existing palliative care and hospice nursing models and theories and to identify their core concepts. Literature published between 2002 and 2012 on such models was reviewed and subjected to content analysis. Ten core concepts were identified that fell into three categories: patient, nurse, and therapeutic relationship. The themes and values identified in the end-of-life nursing models and theories are congruent with palliative care best practices based on a patient-centred and an interdisciplinary teamwork approach. In developing a therapeutic relationship with patients, nurses have a 'privileged' experience that may lead to existential growth and job satisfaction. PMID:24577213

Dobrina, Raffaella; Tenze, Maja; Palese, Alvisa

2014-02-01

323

Academic learning for specialist nurses: a grounded theory study.  

PubMed

The aim was to explore the major concerns of specialist nurses pertaining to academic learning during their education and initial professional career. Specialist nursing education changed in tandem with the European educational reform in 2007. At the same time, greater demands were made on the healthcare services to provide evidence-based and safe patient-care. These changes have influenced specialist nursing programmes and consequently the profession. Grounded Theory guided the study. Data were collected by means of a questionnaire with open-ended questions distributed at the end of specialist nursing programmes in 2009 and 2010. Five universities were included. Further, individual, pair and group interviews were used to collect data from 12 specialist nurses, 5-14 months after graduation. A major concern for specialist nurses was that academic learning should be "meaningful" for their professional future. The specialist nurses' "meaningful academic learning process" was characterised by an ambivalence of partly believing in and partly being hesitant about the significance of academic learning and partly receiving but also lacking support. Specialist nurses were influenced by factors in two areas: curriculum and healthcare context. They felt that the outcome of contribution to professional confidence was critical in making academic learning meaningful. PMID:25240945

Millberg, Lena German; Berg, Linda; Brämberg, Elisabeth Björk; Nordström, Gun; Ohlén, Joakim

2014-11-01

324

Exploring the experiences of general practice nurse peer appraisers.  

PubMed

Appraisals linked to personal development plans (PDPs) are a requirement for NHS organisations to carry out with all staff. NHS policy documents emphasise the importance of appraisal, professional development plans, lifelong learning and clinical supervision for nurses. However, there is limited research regarding appraisal for general practice nurses (GPNs). The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions and experiences of trained GPN appraisers when appraising nurse colleagues, with a particular focus on identifying the barriers and facilitators associated with the implementation of the appraisal process. Appraisals were undertaken using volunteer GPN peer appraisers (n=10) following a NES-approved appraiser course. Forty appraisals were carried out (3-5/appraiser). Following the appraisals, the appraisers were invited to participate in one of two focus groups. The focus groups were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Analysis of the data identified three main themes: role issues, reflection and appraisal interview practicalities. The findings highlighted that effective appraisal can be provided by GPNs and was highly valued by both appraisee and appraiser. The findings identified a number of barriers and facilitators to implementing peer appraisal. Given the unique and varied role GPNs undertake, this study has highlighted the importance of offering high-quality peer appraisal that encourages both reflection and the facilitation of more person-centred PDPs. PMID:25625834

Ferguson, Julie; Kennedy, Susan

2014-09-01

325

Perspectives of Australian nursing directors regarding educational preparation for mental health nursing practice.  

PubMed

There is an ongoing global shortage of mental health nurses. Within Australia, the principal strategy of offering a postgraduate education programme with various incentives to encourage nurses back to study has not been successful. This has led to the consideration of radical alternatives, including the return to pre-registration specialisation in mental health. The successful introduction of this strategy would require the full support of industry partners. To date, the voice of industry has not been heard in relation to this issue. The aim of this paper is to present the views of an Australian sample of mental health nursing directors regarding the resources and other factors required, should undergraduate specialist programmes in mental health be developed, to ensure they are relevant and likely to be successful. A qualitative exploratory research project was undertaken to explore the perspectives and opinions of industry partners. In-depth interviews were conducted with nursing directors (n = 12) in Queensland Australia. Five main themes were identified: relationships with universities; clinical placement preparation and support; workplace culture; facilitators and preceptors; and practical student learning. Genuine collaboration between the two organisations was considered crucial for delivering a quality programme and providing the required support for students. Transformative leadership could inform this collaboration by promoting acknowledgement of and respect for differences. PMID:25353302

Happell, Brenda; McAllister, Margaret

2014-11-01

326

Coaching to promote professional development in nursing practice.  

PubMed

This article presents coaching, which facilitates the highest form of learning, as a potential strategy for promoting professional development in nursing. In doing so, it sets out what coaching is and highlights its benefits in terms of team building, adaptation to changes, career planning and professional development. Having established the rudiments of coaching and identifying its qualities, the article then sets out strategies of coaching using three models: the 3-D Technique Model, The Practice Spiral Model and The Grow Model. Three case histories are presented to explain how these models could be used to implement coaching and personal learning plans (PLP). Directions are provided where training for coaching is available. It is concluded that coaching can be a powerful tool in enhancing nurses' and other health professionals' ability to contribute to the success of healthcare organisations. PMID:24933546

Narayanasamy, Aru; Penney, Vivian

327

A Case Study of Factors Leading to Student Success in an Accelerated Licensed Practical Nurse to Associate Degree Nursing Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This case study attempted to discover and comprehend the relationship of students and contributing factors of success, of one Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) to Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) program, to formulate an understanding of which contributing factors are most beneficial to enable students to persist to graduation and/or successfully…

Taylor, Sherry T.

2012-01-01

328

Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Degree 3 Yr Program of Study (NP, Psych/Mental Health)  

E-print Network

/Pathophysiology 4 604 Evidence Based Practice I 4 606 Statistical Applications for Graduate Nursing 2 13 credits Spring (Semester 2) 603 Advanced Pharmacology I 2 605 Evidence Based Practice II 3 607 DiagnosticDoctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Degree 3 Yr Program of Study (NP, Psych/Mental Health) Fall

Dyer, Bill

329

Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Degree 4-Yr Program of Study (NP Family/Individual)  

E-print Network

credits Year 2 Fall (Semester 4) 604 Evidence Based Practice I 4 606 Statistical Applications for Graduate Nursing 2 6 credits #12;Spring (Semester 5) 605 Evidence Based Practice II 3 612 Ethics, Law and Policy 3Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Degree 4-Yr Program of Study (NP Family/Individual) Year 1 Fall

Dyer, Bill

330

Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) 4 Yr Program of Study (DNP Psych/Mental Health)  

E-print Network

4) 604 Evidence Based Practice I 4 606 Statistical Applications for Graduate Nursing 2 6 credits Spring (Semester 5) 605 Evidence Based Practice II 3 608 Design of Health Care Delivery Systems 3 6121 Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) 4 Yr Program of Study (DNP Psych/Mental Health) Year 1 Fall

Dyer, Bill

331

Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) 4 Yr Program of Study (NP Psych/Mental Health)  

E-print Network

2 Fall (Semester 4) 604 Evidence Based Practice I 4 606 Statistical Applications for Graduate Nursing 2 6 credits #12;Spring (Semester 5) 605 Evidence Based Practice II 3 612 Ethics, Law and Policy 3Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) 4 Yr Program of Study (NP Psych/Mental Health) Year 1 Fall

Maxwell, Bruce D.

332

Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Degree 4-Yr Program of Study (DNP Family/Individual)  

E-print Network

Fall (Semester 4) 604 Evidence Based Practice I 4 606 Statistical Applications for Graduate Nursing 2 6 credits Spring (Semester 5) 605 Evidence Based Practice II 3 608 Design of Health Care Delivery Systems 31 Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Degree 4-Yr Program of Study (DNP Family/Individual) Year 1 Fall

Dyer, Bill

333

75 FR 64318 - National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...diversity in nurse education and practice. The objectives of the meeting...examine existing policies, practices and legal constraints that...NACNEP council members will deliberate on the content presented on diversity in nurse education and practice. This meeting will form...

2010-10-19

334

Family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures: Practices of critical care and emergency nurses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Increasingly, Patients' Families Are Remaining With Them During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation And Invasive Procedures, But This Practice Remains Controversial And Little Is Known About The Practices Of Critical Care And Emergency Nurses Related To Family Presence. Objective: To Identify The Policies, Preferences, And Practices Of Critical Care And Emergency Nurses For Having Patients' Families Present During Resuscitation And Invasive Procedures.

Susan L. MacLean; Cathie E. Guzzetta; Cheri White; Dorrie Fontaine; Dezra J. Eichhorn; Theresa A. Meyers; Pierre Désy

2003-01-01

335

Predictors of Physician Nursing Home Practice: Does What We Do in Residency Training Make a Difference?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined possible predictors of physician nursing home practice including residency experiences. A survey of 170 family physicians found physicians with an active nursing home practice were more likely to reside in a small community, have a hospital practice, see more outpatients, and work more hours but not necessarily residency experience of…

Gazewood, John D.; Mehr, David R.

2000-01-01

336

Knowing within: practice wisdom of clinical nurse educators.  

PubMed

The challenges nurse educators encounter and respond to while teaching undergraduate students in the clinical area require a unique set of skills and teaching expertise, different from those acquired through classroom teaching. As these educators encounter, make sense of, and move beyond these interruptions, a unique set of understandings and wisdom is acquired. In explicating this wisdom, philosophical literature on practical wisdom, tacit knowledge, smooth activity, and Unready to Hand immersions was accessed. Two layers of interviews were conducted with 9 educators (32 total interviews). An interpretive analysis of these stories elucidated the metaphor of Unready to Hand as Adventure, revealing three domains of practice: Preserving the Ideal, Salvaging Learning, and Sustaining Self. These domains clarify the professional teaching knowledge these educators acquired and offer insight into how one may respond within the everyday encounters that characterize this area of teaching practice. PMID:18019106

Paton, Brenda I

2007-11-01

337

A novel theory for nursing education: holistic comfort.  

PubMed

This article discusses how aspects of a holistic comfort theory were adapted to create a taxonomic structure to apply its concepts to a fast-track nursing education program. The principles of learner-centered education were combined with comfort theory to develop strategies that appear to have produced positive influences on the attributes and contexts of comfort within the learning community. With emphasis on balanced academic exposure to the art of comfort as well as the rigorous science of nursing, students and teachers developed a mutually rewarding learning partnership. The resulting grid, adapted from Kolcaba's taxonomic structure, exposes educators and students to the application of holistic comfort theory. It is anticipated that this adaptation may assist students to transform into professional nurses who are comfortable and comforting in their roles and who are committed to the goal of lifelong learning. PMID:18029969

Goodwin, Miki; Sener, India; Steiner, Susan H

2007-12-01

338

Australian Nurse Practitioner Practice: Value Adding through Clinical Reflexivity  

PubMed Central

The role of the Australian Nurse Practitioner (NP) is in its infancy and at a crossroads where extensive research demonstrates effective quality care and yet the role remains underrecognised and underutilised. The translation of practice into “value” is critical for the sustainability of NP roles and requires the practitioner to adopt a systematic method of inquiry. Kim's (1999) “Critical Reflective Inquiry” (CRI) method was adapted by two Australian NPs who specialise in diabetes and chronic disease management. Kim highlights the intent of CRI as understanding the meaning of practice, delivering improvements to practice through self-reflection, and the critique of practice that can lead to practice changes and development of new models of care translated to “products” of value. Based on the thematically analysis of 3 years of CRI application, the authors formed 5 headings that represented the NP's practice as Specialised Care Access, Complications and Diagnostics Interventions, Pharmaceutical Treatment, Vulnerable Populations, and Leadership. The utility of CRI demonstrates how NP practice is integral to a continuous cycle of addressing health care services gaps, and the conversion of “products” into “value” and positions the NP to assimilate the role of the practitioner-researcher. PMID:25705517

Woods, Michelle; Murfet, Giuliana

2015-01-01

339

Most Likely to Achieve: Predicting Early Success of the Practical Nurse Student  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is important that practical nurse (PN) educators be able to identify which students are likely to be successful in their programs. However, the majority of literature related to predicting success of nursing students has been done on baccalaureate nursing students in the university setting. This study sought to determine whether the same…

Cline, April P.

2013-01-01

340

Nursing Faculty Care Expressions, Patterns, and Practices Related to Teaching Culture Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this ethnonursing research study was to discover the care expressions, patterns, and practices of nursing faculty related to teaching culture care within the environmental context of urban and rural baccalaureate nursing programs in the Southeastern United States. The goal of the study was to discover faculty caring that facilitated teaching nursing students to provide culturally congruent and

Sandra J Mixer

2008-01-01

341

Clinical Procedure Page 1 of 2 Clinical Manual -Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

Clinical Procedure Page 1 of 2 Clinical Manual - Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROCEDURE FOR: Medication Administration IV for the most common IV medications administered. 2. For IV Medications not listed in the guidelines, the nurse

Oliver, Douglas L.

342

Clinical Procedure Page 1 of 2 Clinical Manual -Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

Clinical Procedure Page 1 of 2 Clinical Manual - Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROCEDURE FOR: Medication Administration. A discrepancy review is performed every shift. The charge nurse or designee will check to see that no open

Oliver, Douglas L.

343

Paradoxical pursuits in child health nursing practice: Discourses of scientific mothercraft  

Microsoft Academic Search

In New Zealand child health nurses are employed by a voluntary organization called the Royal New Zealand Plunket Society (RNZPS) and are called Plunket nurses. These nurses primarily work in the community with the parents of new babies and preschool children. Their work is called child health surveillance and this is considered to involve routine and unproblematic practices generally carried

Helen Vivien Wilson

2003-01-01

344

Clinical Protocol/Procedure Page 1 of 6 Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

, the nurse will perform a patient assessment to determine the clinical appropriateness of use of FlexiClinical Protocol/Procedure Page 1 of 6 Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROCEDURE FOR: Fecal Incontinence Management Using

Oliver, Douglas L.

345

Clinical Procedure Page 1 of 3 Clinical Manual -Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

individual who entered the data. 3. Adult physical assessment (documented on the nursing assessment formsClinical Procedure Page 1 of 3 Clinical Manual - Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROCEDURE FOR: Documentation: Admission

Oliver, Douglas L.

346

Clinical Protocol Page 1 of 2 Clinical Manual -Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

and medications on the Nursing Assessment Forms, MAR/MAK, Infusion Record, and Patient and Family Teaching RecordClinical Protocol Page 1 of 2 Clinical Manual - Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROTOCOL FOR: Patient Owned Pumps

Oliver, Douglas L.

347

The therapeutic role of the mental health nurse: implications for the practice of psychological therapies  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research project identifies therapeutic roles that nurses and consumers believe are most helpful in the nursing care of people with serious and ongoing mental illness, including identifying the knowledge concerning, attitudes towards and usage of evidence-based psychological therapies in mental health nursing practice. A critical realist perspective utilising a mixed-methods‘ approach was chosen in this study. Two Delphi studies

Jacklin Elisabet Monica Fisher

2011-01-01

348

Voices That Care: Licensed Practical Nurses and the Emotional Labour Underpinning Their Collaborative Interactions with Registered Nurses  

PubMed Central

Recognizing the emotional labour underlying interprofessional collaborations (IPCs) could be considered a crucial step towards building a cohesive nursing team. Although IPCs between registered nurses (RNs) and licensed practical nurses (LPNs) have been linked to quality nursing care, little is known about the emotions experienced by LPNs during their interactions with RNs or those factors that influence IPCs. A questionnaire administered to 309?LPNs found that (1) the professional identity of LPNs has evolved into a that of a unique social group; (2) LPNs define IPC as an interpersonal process of exploring similar or dissimilar assessments of a patient's status with RNs and, together, establishing a course of nursing actions; (3) the primary organizational factor facilitating IPCs is inclusive nursing leadership; (4) the interpersonal factor promoting IPCs is the level of trust RNs extend to LPNs; and (5) an LPN's emotional labour (i.e., internal emotional regulation) is most tangible during uncollaborative interactions with RNs. PMID:22135732

Huynh, Truc; Alderson, Marie; Nadon, Michelle; Kershaw-Rousseau, Sylvia

2011-01-01

349

A multilevel analysis of the effects of the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index on nurse outcomes.  

PubMed

Few researchers have examined how the components of the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index (PES-NWI) relate to nurses' well-being at multiple organizational levels. The objective of the study was to perform a multilevel assessment of the relationships of the PES-NWI subscales with three nurse outcomes: job satisfaction, emotional exhaustion, and turnover intentions. Additionally, we tested the multilevel factor structure of the PES-NWI. In a sample of 699 full-time registered nurses in 79 units and 9 branches of a hospital system, relationships of the NWI with nurse outcomes were fairly consistent across levels of analysis. However, subscales contributed differently to the three outcomes, demonstrating the complexity of environmental influences on nurses' work experience. PMID:24122833

Gabriel, Allison S; Erickson, Rebecca J; Moran, Christina M; Diefendorff, James M; Bromley, Gail E

2013-12-01

350

Minority nursing student success: A grounded theory case study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There has been a dramatic increase in the nation's racial and ethnic minority populations over recent years. This increase is placing a higher demand on the health care industry to provide culturally competent care to these diverse populations. This challenge is met with yet another problem as the nation faces a critical shortage of nurses, particularly minority nurses. This shortage is only expected to worsen over the next several years. As schools of nursing across the country are being asked to increase the number of nursing program graduates, specifically minorities, they are confronted with a double edged sword as retention rates are decreasing, and attrition rates are increasing. This is particularly troublesome when many racial and ethnic minority nursing students do not graduate. This qualitative study was implemented to assess and understand the perceived educational experiences of racial and ethnic minority nursing students enrolled in a rural community college nursing program on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. Eight voluntary nursing students who identified themselves as either a racial or ethnic minority participated in the study. Data were collected by: individual audio-taped interview sessions; audio-taped focus group sessions; and documentation of field notes. Participants also provided demographic information and were asked to provide a brief written response to a scenario regarding increasing the recruitment and retention rates of minority nursing students. All data were analyzed utilizing the constant comparative method. Results of the study revealed six different themes: personal support systems and peer relationships; college services and academic resources; faculty support; cultural understanding versus cultural insensitivity; personal attributes of self-efficacy/advice for future nursing students; and suggestions for college and nursing program improvement. After the major themes were examined one central theme, a grounded theory, was born. The theory proposes that when the minority nursing student bridges his or her personal attributes of self-efficacy with some or all identified support systems, this may be a conduit to fostering success in obtaining their educational goals as long as the resources are available, and a caring environment is present.

Mister, Brenda J.

351

A Case Study of a Longstanding Online Community of Practice Involving Critical Care and Advanced Practice Nurses  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aims of this study are: (1) to examine to what extent critical care and advanced practice nurses' participation in an online listserv constituted a community of practice, and (2) to explore how the nurses use electronic media to communicate with one another. Findings suggest that the online listserv environment, as a whole, did function as an online community of

Noriko Hara; Khe Foon Hew

2006-01-01

352

Succession planning for the future through an academic-practice partnership: a nursing administration master's program for emerging nurse leaders.  

PubMed

A global nursing leadership shortage is projected by the end of this decade. There is an urgent need to begin developing emerging nurse leaders now. This article describes the work of an academic-practice partnership collaborative of nurse leaders. The goal of the partnership is to develop and promote an innovative enhanced nursing administration master's program targeted to young emerging nurse leaders, who have not yet moved into formal leadership roles. An action research design is being used in program development and evaluation. Qualities needed by emerging leaders identified through research included a need to be politically astute, competency with business skills required of nurse leaders today, comfort with ambiguity, use of a caring approach, and leadership from a posture of innovation. The current curriculum was revised to include clinical immersion with a nurse leader from the first semester in the program, a change from all online to online/hybrid courses, innovative assignments, and a strong mentorship component. Eighteen young emerging nurse leaders began the program in January 2012. Early outcomes are positive. The emerging nurse leaders may be uniquely positioned, given the right skills sets, to be nurse leaders in the new age. PMID:23222750

Sherman, Rose; Dyess, Susan; Hannah, Ed; Prestia, Angela

2013-01-01

353

Tidewater Regional Model for Articulation and Coordination of Nursing Education. Task Analyses Guides for Licensed Practical Nurses Pursuing an Associate Degree in Nursing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This instructional guide includes the curriculum for two complete and separate courses to be taught at the associate degree level. The first six units of the guide are the course content for a 2-3 semester hour course, "Transition from Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) to Associate Degree Nursing (ADN)." The entire content of the guide, 19 units in…

Norfolk Public Schools, VA.

354

Story telling: a search for meaning within nursing practice.  

PubMed

Story telling has been used for centuries as a powerful vehicle for communication, education, recreation and the preservation of cultural identity. In this paper the appeal of stories is discussed, and placed in a nursing context, with reference to the health care environment, which is increasingly dominated by technology, and the collection of impersonal 'information' against a background of market forces and competition. It is argued that this environment alienates nurses from each other, and from their patients, leaving them emotionally impoverished and distanced from the basic humanity of their craft. The utility of storytelling as a professional development tool is discussed, and numerous examples reviewed, in relation to pre-registration, post registration and ongoing experiential learning situations. The simplicity and immediacy of the storytelling tradition is compared to the academically generated and rhetoric laden notion of 'reflective practice'. The paper concludes that storytelling is an accessible yet powerful tool which contextualises and humanises nursing knowledge, facilitating a deeper understanding of self and others. PMID:7494532

Bowles, N

1995-10-01

355

A model of collaboration and efficiency between neonatal nurse practitioner and neonatologist: application of collaboration theory.  

PubMed

A model of clinical practice involving neonatal nurse practitioners (NNP) and neonatologists is presented through the application of collaboration theory. This strategy has been used in business and other applications. In this article, the terms and principles of the model will be explained. The relevant features will be identified, including interdependence, communication, strategic negotiation, independent billing, NNP licensure support, semiformal systems, and radical tailorability. Recommendations for structure and components to ensure safe practice involving the unique contributions of the NNP will be highlighted. An example of such a successful practice will be described. PMID:21730898

Bosque, Elena

2011-04-01

356

[Evidence-based practice in nursing curricula: the experience of nursing degree course of Reggio Emilia. A pilot study].  

PubMed

Given the lack of evidence in literature concerning the presence of Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) in nursing curricula, but considering its importance in order to educate future nurses to use critical thinking and to base their practice on scientific evidence, tutors and nursing teachers of the Nursing Degree Course of Reggio Emilia (Università degli Studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia), have decided to introduce a three-year laboratory of EBP. The purposes of this project are: to describe the three-year EBP laboratory of Nursing Degree, its objectives, its structure, its integration with practical training and nursing subjects and its students evaluation strategies; to get students verify the perception of the usefulness of the three-year EBP laboratory regarding the elaboration of the graduation thesis, the search for appropriatem answers for patients met during clinical trainings and the usefulness of the EBP process in view of the development of their professional career. The design of research of this pilot study is correlation-descriptive. It has been selected a sample of convenience consisting of 56 nurses graduated in the autumn session of the academic year 2007-2008. For data collection we have used an electronic questionnaire (Microsoft Word with closed fields) structured for the purpose. The laboratory has been effective in learning to use the database to search for evidences and to use the database to search for evidences related to nursing problems met in training placements. Finally, graduated nurses consider the EBP process an essential element of professional nursing luggage. Although the sample is restricted the results indicates the good educational choice made by our Nursing Degree Course of integrating the EBP Laboratory in the curriculum. PMID:21167112

Finotto, Stefano; Chiesi, Ivens; Mecugni, Daniela; Casali, Patrizia; Doro, Lucia Maria Grazia; Lusetti, Simona

2010-01-01

357

Political dreams, practical boundaries: the case of the Nursing Minimum Data Set, 1983-1990.  

PubMed

The initial development of the Nursing Minimum Data Set (NMDS) was analyzed based on archival material from Harriet Werley and Norma Lang, two nurses involved with the project, and American Nurses Association materials. The process of identifying information to be included in the NMDS was contentious. Individual nurses argued on behalf of particular data because of a strong belief in how nursing practice (through information collection) should be structured. Little attention was paid to existing practice conditions that would ultimately determine whether the NMDS would be used. PMID:21329148

Hobbs, Jennifer

2011-01-01

358

Successful aging in the United States and china: a theoretical basis to guide nursing research, practice, and policy.  

PubMed

Successful aging is gaining increasing attention given the growth in the older adult population. Criteria and definitions within multiple disciplines vary greatly in Western literature, with no consensus on its meaning. Sociocultural, economic, and political differences between the Western view of successful aging and its view in China add to the confusion. Similarities and differences in the meaning of successful aging in the United States and China are examined, and potential for a common definition useful to nursing in both countries is explored. Using concept analysis, shared criteria for successful aging were the following: decreased incidence of disease and disability, life satisfaction, meaning and purpose in life, and ability to cope effectively to achieve goals based on personal values and priorities. A comprehensive, multidimensional definition of successful aging for nursing and a midrange nursing theory of successful aging were identified that may be useful to guide nursing research, practice, and policy. PMID:24841471

Ji, Hong; Ling, Jiying; McCarthy, Valerie Lander

2015-03-01

359

Let's get certified: best practices for nurse leaders to create a culture of certification.  

PubMed

Certification benefits nurses, patients and their families, and hospitals. Nurses become certified for various reasons: personal challenge; self-improvement; advancement of knowledge and education; demonstration of mastery of skills, knowledge, and abilities; and commitment to lifelong learning and career growth. However, there are also barriers to certification. Fear of test taking or failure and lack of resources or organization recognition are reasons many nurses cite for not becoming certified. Nurse leaders play a pivotal role in supporting nurses to obtain and maintain specialty nursing certification. Nurse leaders may promote certification, support nurses who are on their certification journey, and reward and recognize those staff that become certified. This article will share practices to increase the number of specialty certified nurses in your unit or organization. PMID:21297392

Altman, Marian

2011-01-01

360

Following the funding trail: Financing, nurses and teamwork in Australian general practice  

PubMed Central

Background Across the globe the emphasis on roles and responsibilities of primary care teams is under scrutiny. This paper begins with a review of general practice financing in Australia, and how nurses are currently funded. We then examine the influence on funding structures on the role of the nurse. We set out three dilemmas for policy-makers in this area: lack of an evidence base for incentives, possible untoward impacts on interdisciplinary functioning, and the substitution/enhancement debate. Methods This three year, multimethod study undertook rapid appraisal of 25 general practices and year-long studies in seven practices where a change was introduced to the role of the nurse. Data collected included interviews with nurses (n = 36), doctors (n = 24), and managers (n = 22), structured observation of the practice nurse (51 hours of observation), and detailed case studies of the change process in the seven year-long studies. Results Despite specific fee-for-service funding being available, only 6% of nurse activities generated such a fee. Yet the influence of the funding was to focus nurse activity on areas that they perceived were peripheral to their roles within the practice. Conclusions Interprofessional relationships and organisational climate in general practices are highly influential in terms of nursing role and the ability of practices to respond to and utilise funding mechanisms. These factors need to be considered, and the development of optimal teamwork supported in the design and implementation of further initiatives that financially support nursing in general practice. PMID:21329506

2011-01-01

361

International classification for nursing practice (ICNP): most-frequently asked questions.  

PubMed

The International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP) is a collaborative project under the auspices of the International Council of Nurses. The alpha version is available online for comment in preparation for the release of the beta version in 1999. The authors answer the most-frequently asked questions about the ICNP and encourage nurses in the United States to participate in the revision by sending comments and suggestions to the American Nurses Association. PMID:9670130

Warren, J J; Coenen, A

1998-01-01

362

American Organization of Nurse Executives Care Innovation and Transformation program: improving care and practice environments.  

PubMed

The American Organization of Nurse Executives conducted an evaluation of the hospitals participating in the Care Innovation and Transformation (CIT) program. A total of 24 hospitals participated in the 2-year CIT program from 2012 to 2013. Reported outcomes include increased patient satisfaction, decreased falls, and reductions in nurse turnover and overtime. Nurses reported statistically significant improvements in 4 domains of the principles and elements of a healthful practice environment developed by the Nursing Organizations Alliance. PMID:25148395

Oberlies, Amanda Stefancyk

2014-09-01

363

A sociotechnical approach to successful electronic health record implementation: five best practices for clinical nurse specialists.  

PubMed

Rising healthcare costs coupled with patient safety considerations and quality of care have become major concerns for healthcare purchasers, providers, and policymakers. Health information technology, particularly the electronic health record (EHR), is posed as a solution to address these concerns by delivering greater efficiencies and improved quality of care. Despite the national movement toward EHR adoption, successful EHR implementation continues to be challenging for many healthcare organizations, both large and small. This article uses sociotechnical systems theory as a framework to discuss 5 best practice guidelines for EHR implementation and outlines what clinical nurse specialists can do to make the process successful. PMID:24107749

Irizarry, Taya; Barton, Amy J

2013-01-01

364

Structurational divergence theory as explanation for troublesome outcomes in nursing communication.  

PubMed

Structurational divergence (SD) theory captures negative communication cycles resulting from interpenetration of incompatible meaning structures. It is estimated that 12-15% of practicing nurses suffer from a problematic level of SD. With a sample of 713 nurses (57 departments) in a large hospital, this study tests a model positing SD as a root explanation of nursing job satisfaction and turnover. A number of variables long presumed to be explanations for job satisfaction and turnover were hypothesized as mediators between SD and those outcomes. Path analysis showed support for burnout, role conflict, bullying, and organizational identification as useful mediators, explaining 68% of the variance in job satisfaction, and 45% in intentions to leave. The study also explores relationships between SD and hospital quality indicators. SD is a concern because it powerfully explains a number of poor outcomes and provides an underlying explanation for a number of factors that predict job satisfaction and turnover. PMID:24926968

Nicotera, Anne M; Zhao, Xiaoquan; Mahon, Margaret M; Peterson, Emily B; Kim, Wonsun; Conway-Morana, Patricia

2015-04-01

365

Tips for starting your own nurse practitioner practice.  

PubMed

The decision to open a nurse practitioner practice is often difficult to make. Success depends on the possession of specific resources, such as adequate skills, finances, emotional support and the desire to be one's own boss. These skills will be critical as the NP develops a business plan and a budget, and makes important decisions, such as the form the business will take: sole proprietorship, partnership or corporation. Using external resources such as attorneys and accountants is also useful, especially when tackling issues of licenses, taxes and insurance. Start-up costs can be kept to a minimum with creativity and used equipment. In-house laboratories and reference laboratories must conform to strict regulations. A practice without established patients will need to market services aggressively through a successful mix of product, price, place and promotion. Patients' acceptance of the NP office will be enhanced by smooth patient flow, adequate space and cleanliness. PMID:8292127

Calmelat, A

1993-04-01

366

Development and Field Test of Competency Based Instructional Material for a Career Mobility Program for Licensed Practical Nurses. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Associate Degree Nursing Program at Bergen Community College developed and field tested competency-based instructional modules in a program designed to allow licensed practical nurses to qualify to take the certification examination for registered nurses after a year of study. Thirteen licensed practical nurses were enrolled in the first class…

Bergen Community Coll., Paramus, NJ.

367

Development of a nursing practice based competency model for the Flemish master of nursing and obstetrics degree.  

PubMed

The aim was to identify a set of competences for the Flemish academic Master of Nursing and Obstetrics degree that answer perceived needs in health care. The competency model was to demonstrate a degree of consensus among key nurses. The study was conducted in all Flemish hospitals registered to have 400 beds or more. Head nurses of surgery, geriatrics and intensive care units were eligible to participate, as well as one nurse from administration per hospital. A two round Delphi process allowed participants to comment on items identified in an analysis of existing international competency profiles of master level nurses and adapted to the Flemish context. Competences agreed to by 90% of the respondents were considered to have consensus. Fifteen out of 19 eligible hospitals were recruited in the study, 45 nurses participated in the Delphi panel. Consensus was reached on 31 competences that can be assigned to 5 nurse's roles: nursing expert, innovator, researcher, educator and manager. The resulting competency profile is in accordance with published profiles for similar programs. The reported study demonstrates a practical method to develop a consensus competency model for an academic master program based on the input of key individuals in mainstream nursing. PMID:20399547

De Clercq, Gerlinde; Goelen, Guido; Danschutter, Dirk; Vermeulen, Joeri; Huyghens, Luc

2011-01-01

368

Education of Advanced Practice Nurses Serving Vulnerable Populations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The master's of science in nursing curriculum at Seattle University leads to the designation Community Health Clinical Nurse Specialist. The School of Nursing's goal is to educate leaders in nursing who advocate for those least able to speak for themselves and least able to access resources available to the majority of people. (Author/JOW)

Vezeau, Toni M.; Peterson, Jane W.; Nakao, Constance; Ersek, Mary

1998-01-01

369

Ethical Codes of Nursing and the Practical Necessity in Iran  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nursing is a universal health care necessity. Nursing profession, similar to the other medical professions, is responsible to maintain public health promotion, prevent diseases, and also care and rehabilitate client, family and the society. The inher- ent nature of nursing is respect for moral values and human rights. However, clinical ethical dilemmas occur for nurses at all levels, not always

M Sanjari; F Zahedi; B Larijani

2008-01-01

370

[The secondary nurse manager; a strategic role in the evolution of clinical practices].  

PubMed

Nurse clinicians still rarely base their practices on scientific knowledge. However, in order for them to be actively engaged in practice change, they must have constant and effective support from key players of trust within the organisation. PMID:25619090

Lefebvre, Héléne

2014-11-01

371

The impact of clinical placement location on nursing students’ competence and preparedness for practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

The challenges confronting nurses in today’s health care environments have highlighted the necessity for graduating students to feel both competent and prepared for practice. The aim of the aspect of the study reported in this article was to determine the relationship between the location of clinical placements and competence and preparedness for practice from the perspective of the nursing students.

Helen Edwards; Sheree Smith; Mary Courtney; Kathleen Finlayson; Helen Chapman

2004-01-01

372

An Investigation of NCLEX-PN Performance and Student Perceptions among Practical Nursing Graduates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students in practical nursing programs require 32 weeks of coursework (1 academic year) and completion of a national licensing exam (NCLEX-PN) to secure employment. The purpose of this study was to identify selected academic variables that were related to NCLEX-PN performance for first-time test takers of two types of practical nursing programs at…

Abston-Coleman, Sharon L.; Levy, Dessie R.

2010-01-01

373

Cost-effectiveness of a WOC Advanced Practice Nurse in the Acute Care and Outpatient Setting  

PubMed Central

Increasing numbers of advanced practice nurses who practice within the WOC specialty are challenged by the need to justify their role by demonstrating clinical and fiscal benefits to the employing agency. This View From Here column describes the steps I took while completing such an analysis for a position for a nurse practitioner with WOC certification in upstate New York. PMID:24918767

2014-01-01

374

Using evidence-based practice to address gaps in nursing knowledge.  

PubMed

Implementing evidence based-practice and research findings into nursing care has been identified as a challenge to nursing staff. This article identifies key barriers to the use of research in the international literature, however, there are limited suggestions as to how to improve this in the clinical arena. This article aims to identify how nurses could optimize the implementation of evidence and research into their clinical care and reviews barriers to implementing and undertaking nursing research, suggesting a framework for improvement. It considers the widely varied levels of knowledge of research and equally varied critical appraisal skills present both at a pre and post-registration nursing level. The authors discuss an innovative, collaborative approach that considers the role of the nurse consultant, clinical academic and research facilitator posts. To ensure quality evidence-based practice is implemented into clinical nursing care a realistic and practical structure must be applied. With the appropriate framework, clinical structure and organizational support, promotion of evidence-based practice and research for patient benefit can be optimized. The implications for practice are also discussed. The implementation of a realistic research framework into clinical nursing practice has the potential to influence and develop a more active nursing research culture and promote evidence-based care within the workplace. PMID:19377394

Tagney, Jenny; Haines, Caroline

375

Occupational health nursing practice, education, and research in Korea. An international update.  

PubMed

1. In Korea, occupational health nurses have been working as health managers at the workplace and as part of a hospital based group occupational health service since 1991. The role of occupational health manager, required by law, includes providing preventive and primary care, safety management, and inspection of the work environment. 2. Recently, occupational health nursing practice-based lecture has increased, and more emphasis has been placed on the process of occupational health nursing in both undergraduate and graduate programs. 3. The Korean Association of Occupational Health Nurses and the Korean Academic Society of Occupational Health Nursing have been working to develop professional competence for occupational health nurses since 1991. 4. Until the mid 1990s, occupational health nursing research focused primarily on role and job satisfaction of occupational health nurses. However, the number of research studies has dramatically increased and, gradually, survey studies have been replaced by studies with experimental design. PMID:12655979

June, Kyung Ja; Hong, OiSaeng; Cho, Tong Ran

2003-02-01

376

Assistant practitioners: lessons learned from licensed practical nurses.  

PubMed

The role of the assistant practitioner (AP) needs to be defined so they have clear career pathways and opportunities for professional development. The author sought to learn from other countries where a sustained effort had been made to support practitioners fulfilling this intermediate role. The equivalent of an AP in Canada is the licensed practical nurse (LPN); LPNs are subject to clear regulation and practice within their remit of their license. The author travelled to Alberta, Canada, and performed a qualitative study to investigate the role of the LPN. LPNs undertake a 2-year diploma-level course and have the opportunity to enhance their careers through specialist courses or to train as a RN. LPNs benefit from careful regulation, enabling them to have a clear scope of practice, a career structure with opportunities for development and consistent ethical standards. Lessons can be learned from the LPN model and put in practice in the UK; APs need a consistent education programme, a career pathway that promotes development and effective regulation. PMID:23123896

Whittingham, Katrina

377

Nursing Minimum Data Set for School Nursing Practice. Position Statement. Revised  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) to support the collection of essential nursing data as listed in the Nursing Minimum Data Set (NMDS). The NMDS provides a basic structure to identify the data needed to delineate nursing care delivered to clients as well as relevant characteristics of those clients. Structure…

Denehy, Janice

2012-01-01

378

Education for Nursing Practice; Report of the New York State Nurses Association 1966 Arden House Conference.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ninety-six nursing leaders participated in the conference to discuss nursing education, nursing service, and the role of the professional association. It was hoped that similar discussions on the local level would result. Speeches included "The Case for Creativity in Nursing" by Apollinia O. Adams and "Education for ????" separate presentations by…

New York State Nurses Association, Albany.

379

School Nursing Documentation: Knowledge, Attitude, and Barriers to Using Standardized Nursing Languages and Current Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The independent, complex role of a school nurse requires accurate documentation of assessments, interventions, and outcomes. Consistent documentation by all school nurses is crucial to study the impact of nursing interventions on children's health and success in school. While standardized nursing languages are available, the actual use of…

Yearous, Sharon Kay Guthrie

2011-01-01

380

Using partnerships to advance nursing practice and education: the precious prints project.  

PubMed

With the release of the Institute of Medicine's (2011) Future of Nursing report, nursing leaders recognized that strong academic-practice partnerships are critical to advancing the report's recommendations. Using established principles for academic-practice partnerships, a manufacturer, children's hospital, student nurses organization, and college of nursing created the Precious Prints Project (P(3)) to give families who have experienced the death of a child a sterling silver pendant of the child's fingerprint. This article outlines the background, implementation, and benefits of the P(3) partnership with the aim of encouraging readers to consider how similar programs might be implemented in their organizations. To date, the program has given pendants to more than 90 families. In addition, nurses and nursing students have been introduced to the provision of a tangible keepsake for families experiencing the loss of a child and participation in philanthropy and an academic practice partnership. PMID:25601245

Miller, Lynne H; Mixer, Sandra J; Lindley, Lisa C; Fornehed, Mary Lou; Niederhauser, Victoria; Barnes, Laura

2015-01-01

381

Registered nurses' ideas of physical science concepts relevant to their clinical practice  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Experience in teaching science to nurses has raised the question of whether nurses' expressions of their understanding of concepts in physical science are adequate for professional practice. Nurses' descriptions of physical science concepts relevant to their practice must be explicated before educators can develop strategies to enhance nurses' learning of science. A cross-sectional study was undertaken to establish registered nurses' conceptions of physical science in their clinical practice. Data were collected using a multiple choice question survey, field work and focused interviews. Six categories of conceptions emerged from data analysis. Of the three which related to complexity of understanding “association” and “definition” were predominant and related in the main, to two of the three contextual categories “instrumentation/equipment” and “procedure.” There were few examples of the other two categories of “elaboration” and “body processes.” We argue that the conceptions held by the nurses were not adequate to allow them to fulfil their roles as professional practitioners in health care.

Wilkes, Lesley M.; Batts, Judith E.

1996-09-01

382

Transforming nursing education: a review of current curricular practices in relation to Benner's latest work.  

PubMed

Current societal and healthcare system trends highlight the need to transform nursing education to prepare nurses capable of outstanding practice in the 21st century. Patricia Benner and colleagues urged nurse educators to transform their practice in the 2010 publication Educating Nurses, A Call to Radical Transformation. Frequently utilized pedagogical frameworks in nursing education include behaviorism and constructivism. Much of the structure and basis for instruction and evaluation can be found rooted in these philosophies. By first exploring both behaviorism and constructivism and then relating their use in nursing education to the call to transform, educators can be encourage to examine current practice and possibly modify aspects to include more rich experiential learning. PMID:23092804

Handwerker, Sarah M

2012-01-01

383

[Advanced nursing practice: a must for the quality of care and mental health services].  

PubMed

New professional legislation and reorganization of mental health services have had a significant influence on mental health nursing practice. Many nurses have demonstrated clinical leadership and have been able to adapt their services to the needs of the population specially in the primary health care setting. However, many believe that the role of nurses is not sufficiently known and optimally utilized in mental health services. In this article we take a critical look at the mental health nursing practice in Quebec and at the essential requirements for its development. This review aims to: 1) describe current trends in the changing roles and the modernization of mental health nursing practice in Quebec, 2) provide an overview of the development of advanced nursing practice and its impact on the quality of mental health services; 3) clarify the concept of advanced nursing practice and position its development in Quebec and 4) propose various strategies for optimizing the role of nurses and their complementarity with other professionals providing mental health services. This review presents innovative practices developed by nurses in the context of the restructuring of mental health services. For example, new nursing roles have been developed to improve the collaboration with general practitioners groups in primary care settings and facilitate the evaluation and monitoring of patient presenting medical and psychological problems. Another interesting innovation was set up by nurses in developing a new service to allow timely access to integrated care for patients with substance abuse and mental health problems. The various testimonies reported in this article illustrate the potential contribution of these nursing innovations in improving the mental health services in Quebec. Also, in few countries, the reform of mental health services has been a good time to recognize this potential. Thus, some countries have repositioned the role of mental health nurses and supported the development of new models of advanced practice in mental health. These developments have been particularly significant in the United States and Australia. In United States, during the 1990s, at least four models of advanced practice in mental health nursing have been developed leading to wide variations in the roles, education, job titles, scope of practice and legal authorizations. Consequently, a consensus model of uniform standards of practice, accreditation and education has been proposed. This LACE model (Licensure, Accreditation, Certification, Education) will be in effect in 2015. Australia has adopted a more systematic approach, unified and progressive to facilitate the development of advanced mental health nursing practice. Australia who, through their many publications, retains more attention since a clear definition of the role of the nurse practitioner in mental health and a legal framework has been adopted at the national level. The Australian experience and the finding from studies suggest that mental health nurse practitioners and nurses who are specialized in mental health have the potential to make a significant contribution to enhancing access to and quality of mental health care through flexible an innovative approaches. So there are more and more evidence and indications that Quebec should invest in enhancing the skills of mental health nurses through the development of advanced nursing practice and integration of this new model in primary care. In addition, researches, funded by the Canadian Services Research Foundation (CHSRF, 2010), shows that the contribution of advanced nursing practice has never been stronger and there is a broad consensus to its value for the Canadian health care system (Dicenso.et Lukosius-Briant, 2010). The implementation of advanced practice nursing role in mental health is part of best practices required to improve care and mental health services and should be taken into account in future Action Plan 2014-2020. PMID:25120119

Ricard, Nicole; Page, Claire; Laflamme, France

2014-01-01

384

Improving medication calculation skills of practicing nurses and senior nursing students: a pilot study.  

PubMed

Medication administration is an essential nursing competency as calculation difficulties can lead to serious medication errors. Nurses involved in staff education need to be aware of methods to assess for computation difficulty and develop strategies for nurses to improve their computation abilities. The purposes of this quasi-experimental pilot study were to assess the medication calculation skills of nurses and nursing students and to determine the effectiveness of teaching strategies aimed at improving these skills. PMID:16885685

Harne-Britner, Sarah; Kreamer, Carolyn L; Frownfelter, Penny; Helmuth, Amy; Lutter, Stacy; Schafer, Deborah J; Wilson, Cyndy

2006-01-01

385

Moral Exemplars in Theory and Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article I outline an original form of ethical theory that I call exemplarist virtue theory. The theory is intended to serve the philosophical purposes of a comprehensive moral theory, but it is also intended to serve the practical purpose of moral education by structuring the theory around a motivating emotion--the emotion of admiration.…

Zagzebski, Linda

2013-01-01

386

An investigation of nurse educator's perceptions and experiences of undertaking clinical practice.  

PubMed

Educational policy (DOH, 1999. Making a difference: strengthening the nursing, midwifery and health visiting contribution to health and healthcare. Department of Health, London; UKCC, 1999. Fitness for Practice. United Kingdom Central Council for Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting, London; Nursing and Midwifery Council, 2006. Standards to support learning and assessment in practice. Nursing and Midwifery Council, London) and current nursing literature (Griscti, O., Jacono, B., Jacono, J., 2005. The nurse educator's clinical role. Journal of Advanced Nursing 50 (1), 84-92; Owen, S., Ferguson, K., Baguley, I., 2005. The clinical activity of mental health nurse lecturers. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing 12, 310-316), place increasing emphasis on nurse educators undertaking clinical practice to facilitate their clinical confidence and competence. This study investigated nurse educators' perceptions and experiences of undertaking clinical practice. A qualitative design and descriptive, exploratory approach were used. A purposive sample of 11 nurse educators in one nursing department, took part in two focus group interviews, one with 5 and the other with 6 respondents, to identify and discuss their perceptions and experiences of undertaking clinical practice. A process of thematic content analysis revealed three broad themes relating to the meaning and importance of clinical practice, perceived benefits and barriers which are examined and discussed. The paper concludes that despite policy recommendations, barriers highlighted in this study such as insufficient time, heavy workload and a lack of valuing of the clinical role have been raised over the past few decades. The effect of undertaking clinical practice, particularly on the quality of teaching is argued to be valuable armoury in the battle to secure sufficient resources to support engagement in clinical practice. Financial and organisational commitment; valuing of clinical practice and research evidence are crucial to realising clinical practice for nurse educators. Alternative interpretations of what may constitute the clinical role such as joint research projects and supporting and supervising students are offered, which need to be assessed against clear, specific and realistic aims for the clinical role of the nurse educator. PMID:18586358

Williams, Angela; Taylor, Cathy

2008-11-01

387

The Doctor of Nursing Practice capstone project: consensus or confusion?  

PubMed

Considerable diversity exists among Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) programs regarding capstone projects, which reflect the knowledge gained and the competency achieved during the immersion experience. This article describes a conversation of the DNP capstone project among participants of the Committee on Institutional Collaboration DNP Invitational Conference. The focus of the dialogue was to discuss the intent and breadth of the DNP capstone project and how it demonstrates competencies, to consider in what way it differs from the PhD dissertation, and to identify the similarities and differences among multiple forms of the project in terms of scope and expected deliverables, as well as to examine other related issues. The participants addressed eight salient questions in an effort to clarify the value, form, and key elements of the final project. Responses to these questions are presented, and the agenda for a national dialogue regarding the capstone project is considered. PMID:23909563

Kirkpatrick, Jane M; Weaver, Terri

2013-08-01

388

Finding evidence: refining literature searching skills for the advanced practice nurse.  

PubMed

With increasing interest in evidence-based healthcare, nurses are finding the need to improve skills in locating current, valid evidence to support clinical practice. Because of the holistic nature of nursing, gathering evidence requires searching a variety of sources within many different scientific disciplines. The diverse nature of this task requires effective skills for finding information from both print and electronic sources. This article identifies informational databases available to advanced practice nurses, reviews search terminology, and suggests practical strategies for successful database searches in support of evidence-based practice. PMID:11759428

Morrisey, L J; DeBourgh, G A

2001-11-01

389

The role of the advanced practice registered nurse in ensuring evidence-based practice.  

PubMed

The advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) is vital in role-modeling and ensuring evidence-based practice (EBP) engagement and application at the point of care. This article describes the formulation of national competencies for EBP, specific to the APRN level. The application of selected competencies is delineated and the creation of an APRN action plan to identify necessary EBP competencies is discussed. If EBP skills are lacking, the action plan is used for development of skills in the required areas. PMID:22579062

Moseley, Marthe J

2012-06-01

390

Shifting Patterns of Nursing Practice: Impact on Nursing Education. Papers Presented at the 1986 Annual Meeting of the Southern Council on Collegiate Education for Nursing (Atlanta, Georgia, October 28-30, 1986).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Changes in the delivery of health care services and their implications for nursing practice and nursing education are discussed in nine papers from the 1986 annual meeting of the Southern Council on Collegiate Education for Nursing. Titles and authors are as follows: "Changes in Health Care and Challenges for Nursing Education" (Jacquelyn S.…

Southern Council on Collegiate Education for Nursing, Atlanta, GA.

391

The application of the ideas of Frantz Fanon to the practice of mental health nursing.  

PubMed

This paper is based on an extensive review of the published literature which refers to the clinical and social psychology of Frantz Fanon, and seeks to establish the relevance of Fanon's psychological thought to the practice of mental health nursing in the 1990s. The writer sets out the key principles of Fanon's clinical and social psychology, and engages with the theoretical problems which arise from the close relationship between Fanon's psychological theories and his involvement with violent revolutionary politics. After discussing the links between Fanon's unique psychology and the work of the anti-psychiatrists of the 1960s and later critiques of mental health care, the writer argues that the development and adoption of a neo-Fanonist approach to the practice of mental health nursing would address many of the problems of current mental health care practice. In particular, the principles of Fanon's psychology address many of the concerns about disempowerment of service users which have been highlighted in work by feminist and anti-racist writers, and by members of the Mental Health Service Users' Movement. PMID:7797709

Hopton, J

1995-04-01

392

Binghamton University Decker School of Nursing  

E-print Network

Practice Critique research findings for applicability for evidence based nursing practice. !Provide theory, evidence-based practice, and research. MS Essential IV: Translating and Integrating Scholarship: Clinical Scholarship and Analytical Methods for Evidence-Based Practice Evaluates implementation

Suzuki, Masatsugu

393

Perceptions of professional practice and work environment of new graduates in a nurse residency program.  

PubMed

New nurses continue to face challenging work environments and high expectations for professional competence as they enter practice. Nurse residency programs are gaining prominence as a mechanism to ease new graduates' transition to practice. This study examined new graduates' perceptions of their professional practice competence and work environment throughout a yearlong nurse residency program. Employing a repeated measures design, data were collected at baseline, at 6 months, and at 12 months. Results showed that job satisfaction was significantly lowest at 6 months and highest at 12 months. Job stress was found to be lowest at 12 months and organizational commitment was highest at baseline. Of the variables related to professional practice, clinical decision-making was highest at 12 months and quality of nursing performance significantly increased at each measurement point. These data add to the growing evidence supporting the efficacy of nurse residency programs. PMID:21598850

Bratt, Marilyn Meyer; Felzer, Holly M

2011-12-01

394

Social media and nursing practice: changing the balance between the social and technical aspects of work.  

PubMed

Modern communication methods are drastically changing the way people interact with each other. Professions such as nursing need to evolve to remain relevant as social infrastructure changes. In the 1960s, researchers developed a sociotechnical theory that stated workers were more motivated and productive if there was a good balance between the social and technical aspects of their work. Today's technology is blurring the boundaries between the social and the technical thereby transforming human contact and communication into a multi-method process. In Australia, people are adept at utilising social media technology to become more efficient, creative and connected; Australian nurses also need to embrace changing technology to capitalise on the professional opportunities offered by social media. This paper imagines a world where nurses integrate social media into assessing, diagnosing, planning, implementing and evaluating care. Discussion draws on a combination of real-world examples of best-practice and blue-sky thinking to demonstrate that evidence-based care must be combined with the adoption of future-forward technology. PMID:25109210

Casella, Evan; Mills, Jane; Usher, Kim

2014-01-01

395

Exploring a model of skillful engagement in nursing practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prominent challenges facing nurse leaders are the growing shortage of nurses and the increasingly complex care required by acutely ill patients. In organizations that shortage is exacerbated by turnover and intent to leave. Unsatisfactory working conditions are cited by nurses when they leave their current jobs. Disengagement from the job leads to plateaued performance, decreased organizational commitment, and increased turnover.

Jan L Keller-Unger

2008-01-01

396

Touching Epistemologies: Meanings of Average and Variation in Nursing Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a study on the meanings of average and variation displayed by pediatric nurses. Traces how these meanings shape and are shaped by nurses' interpretations of trends in patient and population data. Suggests a theoretical framework for making sense of the data that compares and contrasts nurses' epistemology with that of official…

Noss, Richard; Pozzi, Stefano; Hoyles, Celia

1999-01-01

397

Administrative Protocol Page 1 of 3 Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

of hours. NURSE PROs are responsible for ensuring worked hours do not exceed 40 hours per week or 1000 hours per calendar year. 5. NURSE PROS must be available to work a minimum of 24 hours in a 4 week for a different day c. not to be rescheduled 2. NURSE PROs may be canceled 72 hours in advance of their scheduled

Oliver, Douglas L.

398

Ontology based modeling and execution of Nursing Care Plans and Practice Guidelines.  

PubMed

Nursing Care Plans (NCP) and Nursing Clinical Practice Guidelines (NCPG) promote evidence-based patient care, but in their paper form they are difficult to be applied at the point-of-care. We present our approach to generate patient-specific nursing care plans by modeling and computerizing these nursing knowledge resources. We present a Nursing CarePlan Ontology (NCO) that models the NCP and NCPG to realize an integrated knowledge base for designing and executing patient-specific nursing CarePlans. We adapted METHONTOLOGY methodology for ontology engineering to develop our OWL-based NCO, and instantiated a set of NCP and NCPG. We have developed an execution engine that provides recommendations to nurses based on the patient's data. NCO was successfully evaluated for representational accuracy and completeness using a set of test NCP and NCPG. PMID:20841855

Din, Muzammil Abdulrehman; Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza; Jafarpour, Borna

2010-01-01

399

Advanced practice role characteristics of the community/public health nurse specialist.  

PubMed

The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe the advanced practice role of nurses with master's degrees in community/public health nursing using their experiences and perspectives. The purposive sample consisted of 10 nurses who had master's degrees in community/public health nursing and were working in a variety of community health settings. Data were collected using audiotaped interviews and 1-day observations of study participants in their workplaces. An editing analysis technique was used to analyze the data. Findings indicated that role characteristics included advocacy and policy setting at the organizational, community, and state levels; a leadership style centered on empowerment; a broad sphere of influence; and high-level skills in large-scale program planning, project management, and building partnerships. Results provide important descriptive data about significant aspects of the advanced practice role of nurses with master's degrees in community/public health nursing. PMID:17978626

Robertson, Julie Fisher; Baldwin, Karen Brandt

2007-01-01

400

Matriculation Plan Summary and Worksheet Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Program  

E-print Network

. Evidence-Based Practice I N651. Evidence-Based Practice II N652. Transforming the Nation's Health N653 Evidence-Based Practice II: Implementation and Evaluation N650 N655 Health Systems Transformation N402 #12Matriculation Plan Summary and Worksheet Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Program This document

Dolbow, John

401

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMMES Programme name BSc (Hons) Primary Care (Practice Nursing)  

E-print Network

and evidence based practice. To act as an advocate for the client, their carers and families. To assume with the use of reflective practice, how evidence based practice can be used to underpin the delivery of care Care (Practice Nursing) Award BSc (Hons) School School of Health Sciences Department or equivalent

Weyde, Tillman

402

Informal Theory: The Ignored Link in Theory-to-Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Applying theory to practice in student affairs is dominated by the assumption that formal theory is directly applied to practice. Among the problems with this assumption is that many practitioners believe they must choose between their lived experiences and formal theory, and that graduate students are taught that their experience "does not…

Love, Patrick

2012-01-01

403

A National Informatics Agenda for Nursing Education and Practice. Report to the Secretary of the Department of Health & Human Services.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nursing informatics is a specialty whose activities center around information management and processing for the nursing profession. The Division of Nursing of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice (NACNEP) recognized a need to identify initiatives that would more…

National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice, Rockville, MD.

404

The first 20 years of nurse practitioner literature: an evolution of joint practice issues.  

PubMed

This study examines literature produced during the first 20 years of the nurse practitioner movement. The content of sampled articles suggests that the nurse practitioner/joint practice movement did not evolve in a social vacuum; historical situations and economic conditions limited or defined options. Licensure, clinical autonomy, prescriptive authority and third-party (insurance) payments are dominant issues within the many articles discussing dependent, independent and team-organized health care delivery. Whether joint practice or private practice will facilitate non-hierarchical relations among nurse practitioners and medical doctors, vs. acting as an ideological cover for continued inequality, remains to be determined. PMID:1542464

Koch, L W; Pazaki, S H; Campbell, J D

1992-02-01

405

Examining pedagogical practices in family systems nursing: intentionality, complexity, and doing well by families.  

PubMed

Teaching graduate family nursing students the important and delicate practice of entering into and mitigating families' illness suffering signifies an educational practice that is rigorous, intense, and contextual, yet not articulated as expounded knowledge. This study examined the pedagogical practices of the advanced practice of Family Systems Nursing (FSN) as taught to master's and doctoral nursing students at the Family Nursing Unit, University of Calgary, using observation of expert and novice clinical practice, live supervision, videotape review, presession hypothesizing, clinical documentation, and the writing of therapeutic letters to families. A triangulation of research methods and data collection strategies, interpretive ethnography, autoethnography, and hermeneutics, were used. Students reported an intensity of learning that had both useful and limiting consequences as they developed skills in therapeutic conversations with families experiencing illness. Faculty used an intentional pedagogical process to encourage growth in perceptual, conceptual, and executive knowledge and skills of working with families. PMID:22274936

Moules, Nancy J; Bell, Janice M; Paton, Brenda I; Morck, Angela C

2012-05-01

406

Nursing patients with acute chest pain: practice guided by the Prince Edward Island conceptual model for nursing.  

PubMed

Current research suggests that pain is a relatively common phenomenon with 60-90% of patients presenting to emergency departments reporting pain (e.g., chest pain, trauma, extremity fractures and migraine headache) that require treatment [Hogan, S.L., 2005. Patient satisfaction with pain management in the emergency department. Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal 27(4), 284-294]. This article explores the use of conceptual theoretical empirical (C-T-E) framework to guide a senior nursing student in a case study of patient with chest pain. The Middle Range Theory of Pain described by Good [Good, M., 1998. A middle-range theory of acute pain management: use in research. Nursing Outlook 46(3), 120-124] and Melzack's [Melzack, R., 1987. The short-form McGill pain questionnaire. Pain, 30, 191-197] short form McGill pain questionnaire were applied along with the Prince Edward Island conceptual model (PEICM) for nursing. Results indicate that the nursing student increased her ability to work in partnership, assess relevant and specific information, and identify a number of strategies to help the patient achieve pain control by using a complement of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions. Moreover, the C-T-E approach provided an organized and systematic theoretical approach for the nursing student to assist a patient in pain control. PMID:19394896

Blanchard, Janelle F; Murnaghan, Donna A

2010-01-01

407

Developing leadership practices in hospital-based nurse educators in an online learning community.  

PubMed

Hospital-based nurse educators are in a prime position to mentor future nurse leaders; however, they need to first develop their own leadership practices. The goal was to establish a learning community where hospital-based nurse educators could develop their own nursing leadership practices within an online environment that included teaching, cognitive, and social presence. Using a pretest/posttest-only nonexperimental design, 35 nurse educators from three Canadian provinces engaged in a 12-week online learning community via a wiki where they learned about exemplary leadership practices and then shared stories about their own leadership practices. Nurse educators significantly increased their own perceived leadership practices after participation in the online community, and teaching, cognitive, and social presence was determined to be present in the online community. It was concluded that leadership development can be enhanced in an online learning community using a structured curriculum, multimedia presentations, and the sharing and analysis of leadership stories. Educators who participated should now be better equipped to role model exemplary leadership practices and mentor our nurse leaders of the future. PMID:24256766

Stutsky, Brenda J; Spence Laschinger, Heather K

2014-01-01

408

Mentoring Relationships and Beginning Nursing Practice: A Study of Professional Socialization.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study was conducted of graduates of an associate degree nursing program at a community college to explore issues related to early professional socialization in beginning nursing practice and to determine the influences of mentoring relationships on professional socialization. Focus group interviews were conducted with a sample of 31 graduates…

Darby, Barbara Ann

409

Clinical Procedure Page 1 of 3 Clinical Manual -Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

_standards/docs/Medications%20- %20Double%20Check.pdf 12. Medications ordered and administered during a Code Blue or a RapidClinical Procedure Page 1 of 3 Clinical Manual - Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center POLICY FOR: Medication Documentation: Using

Oliver, Douglas L.

410

Clinical Procedure Page 1 of 3 Clinical Manual Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

Clinical Procedure Page 1 of 3 Clinical Manual ­ Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROCEDURE FOR: RhoGam POLICY: 1. All of childbearing age who are at risk for exposure of fetal blood to the maternal circulation will receive Rho

Oliver, Douglas L.

411

Readiness for Evidence-Based Practice: Information Literacy Needs of Nurses in the United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper U.S. nurses' readiness to provide Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) as measured by their information literacy knowl- edge and skills is described. The Institute of Medicine directed health care providers to use EBP as a means to improve patient safety, efficiency and effectiveness of health care services. Infor- mation literacy has been identified as a nursing informatics competency for

Annelle Tanner; Susan Pierce; Diane Pravikoff

412

Influence of Perceptions on School Nurse Practices to Prevent Childhood Obesity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Comprehensive childhood obesity prevention (COP) strategies should include increasing school nurse involvement. This study was conducted to determine the influence of key school nurse perceptions (self-efficacy, perceived benefits, and perceived barriers) on participation in COP practices at the individual child and school level. Florida…

Quelly, Susan B.

2014-01-01

413

Role performance of psychiatric nurses in advanced practice: a systematic review of the literature.  

PubMed

This paper discusses findings from a systematic review of literature pertaining to the role performance of psychiatric nurses in advanced practice. A search of 11 electronic databases was conducted to identify research involving interventions by psychiatric (or mental health) nurses in advanced practice. A total of 14 studies were identified. In this review, the role performance of psychiatric nurses in advanced practice was categorized into three themes: (1) the provision of psychosocial interventions; (2) the provision of nurse-directed services in health-care contexts; and (3) the provision of psychiatric nursing consultation services. Our results document that psychiatric nurses in advanced practice perform multifaceted roles and provide mental health-care services in various contexts. This systematic review reveals that the nurses obtain significant results in managing clients with depression and psychological stress, and demonstrates their value when developing partnerships with non-mental health service providers. One study, however, showed that the nurses had insignificant results in performing transitional care for pre-discharged mental health service users. PMID:24299195

Fung, Y L; Chan, Z; Chien, W T

2014-10-01

414

The Consistency of Change in the Development of Nursing Faculty Practice Plans.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The University of Texas-Houston Health Sciences Center uses a linkage model and a nursing center model for faculty practice. In addition to high quality educational opportunities and patient care, the models are based on sound financial and business principles and respond to the changing needs of the nursing school and clients. (JOW)

McNiel, Nancy O.; Mackey, Thomas A.

1995-01-01

415

A Comprehensive Community Nursing Center Model: Maximizing Practice Income--A Challenge to Educators.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The University of Rochester's community nursing center is an entrepreneurial model for faculty practice based on sound business principles to enhance financial success. These principles include development and pricing of the product of nursing services, consumer dialogue instead of advertising monologue, and a diversified income base. (SK)

Walker, Patricia Hinton

1994-01-01

416

Clinical Protocol Page 1 of 3 Clinical Manual -Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

Clinical Protocol Page 1 of 3 Clinical Manual - Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROTOCOL FOR: Seizures: Care of the Adult); most common among neonates and the elderly. d. Psychogenic seizures (pseudoseizures): symptoms

Oliver, Douglas L.

417

Survey of Current Academic Practices for Full-Time Postlicensure Nursing Faculty Who Teach Online  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine current academic practices of compensation, workload, rewards, and tenure and promotion for nursing faculty who teach graduate and postlicensure programs that are delivered 50% to 100% online. Deans and directors who are members of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) were the…

Hanford, Karen J.

2010-01-01

418

Clinical Protocol / Procedure Page 1 of 5 Clinical Manual -Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

Clinical Protocol / Procedure Page 1 of 5 Clinical Manual - Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROTOCOL / PROCEDURE FOR: Neurologic Assessment of the Adult Inpatient POLICY: 1. The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) (appendix A

Oliver, Douglas L.

419

Clinical Protocol Page 1 of 1 Clinical Manual Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

Clinical Protocol Page 1 of 1 Clinical Manual ­ Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROTOCOL FOR: Heimlich Valve (flutter valve will demonstrate improved respiratory status. CLINICAL ASSESSMENT AND CARE: 1. Assess the device every four hours

Oliver, Douglas L.

420

Clinical Procedure Page 1 of 2 Clinical Manual/Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

Clinical Procedure Page 1 of 2 Clinical Manual/Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROCEDURE FOR: Hand Off Communication ­ Background ­ Assessment ­ Recommendation. It is an evidence based communication model that assists

Oliver, Douglas L.

421

Putting Discourse to Work: Information Practices and the Professional Project of Nurses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article contributes to discourse-oriented, information-seeking research by showing how discourses, from a neopragmatist perspective, can be explored as tools that people employ when they actively engage in information practices in varied social contexts. A study of nurses and the nursing profession in Sweden is used as an empirical example of…

Johannisson, Jenny; Sundin, Olof

2007-01-01

422

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION Programme name Advanced Practice in Health and Social Care (Nursing)  

E-print Network

The MSc Advanced Practice in Health and Social Care (Nursing) is a flexible, professionally orientated in the latest theoretical and clinical developments relating to nursing and health and social care provision: Critically appraise the nature of health and social care provision and further develop your role

Weyde, Tillman

423

The habilitation nursing of children with developmental disabilities—Beyond traditional nursing practices and principles?  

PubMed Central

Research-based descriptions of the contents of the habilitation nursing of children with developmental disabilities are lacking. The objective of this qualitative study was to describe the habilitation nursing of children with developmental disabilities in a Finnish children's neurological ward. In addition, the purpose was to outline the principles that directed the nursing functions (which consisted of various nursing interventions). The data collection included observation, a retrospective think-aloud method with video-taped nursing situations, the nursing records, and an open-ended questionnaire. The data were analysed with a qualitative content analysis of the manifest and latent content. The findings show that habilitation nursing in a children's neurological ward consists of assessing the child's skills, supporting the child's development, and collaborating with the child's immediate adults. When implementing those functions with nursing interventions, the nurses demonstrated four principles: client-originated and professional-originated principles, and individual-centred and community-centred principles. Becoming conscious of these principles and the theoretical frameworks behind them enables the development of a nursing science–based model for habilitation nursing. PMID:24656260

Olli, Johanna; Vehkakoski, Tanja

2014-01-01

424

The effect of advanced practice nurse-modulated education on rehabilitation nursing staff knowledge.  

PubMed

Rehabilitation is a specialty area with defined competencies and discrete nursing knowledge. Nurses need to be educated in the basic competencies of rehabilitation to provide safe, quality care to patients with chronic illnesses and disabilities. A critical appraisal of the literature showed that education increased knowledge in a specialty area and had positive benefits for nurses, organizations, and patients. The purpose of this paper is to describe an evidence-based educational intervention. Self-study modules on 15 rehabilitation competencies were developed for 16 nurses working on a new inpatient unit. Outcomes were evaluated using pre and post tests via the online Association of Rehabilitation Nurses (ARN) Competency Assessment Tool (CAT). Data were analyzed using the SPSS14.0 statistical package. Paired t-tests demonstrated a significant difference between pre and post test scores on 14 of the 15 competencies measured. Findings suggested that education of nursing staff resulted in increased knowledge about rehabilitation nursing competencies. PMID:23529948

Mauk, Kristen L

2013-01-01

425

Humanist ideology and nurse education. I. Humanist educational theory.  

PubMed

Nurse education is dominated by the humanist perspective and the educational theory that it generates. Following a brief description of the perspective's phenomenological foundations and definition of humanist ideology, humanist educational theory is illustrated in an outline of the key contributions of John Dewey, Carl Rogers, Malcolm Knowles and Paulo Freire. The article concludes by noting Freire's sociological challenge to the individualism of the humanist perspective. This challenge recognizes the ideological and social control role of education in securing the reproduction of power relations and leads to questioning the function of individualism and the interests that humanist ideology may serve. PMID:9277158

Purdy, M

1997-06-01

426

Examining Harasim's Online Collaborative Learning Theory for Nursing Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Online nursing education has been evolving at a rapid pace as it is recognized as offering the flexibility needed for practicing associate degree (ADN) and diploma prepared Registered Nurses to return to school to earn their BSN. At the same time, there is a paradigm shift in how nursing education is delivered. The focus has shifted from content…

Breen, Henny

2013-01-01

427

Nurses’ self-efficacy and practices relating to weight management of adult patients: a path analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Health professionals play a key role in the prevention and treatment of excess weight and obesity, but many have expressed a lack of confidence in their ability to manage obese patients with their delivery of weight-management care remaining limited. The specific mechanism underlying inadequate practices in professional weight management remains unclear. The primary purpose of this study was to examine a self-efficacy theory-based model in understanding Registered Nurses’ (RNs) professional performance relating to weight management. Methods A self-report questionnaire was developed based upon the hypothesized model and administered to a convenience sample of 588 RNs. Data were collected regarding socio-demographic variables, psychosocial variables (attitudes towards obese people, professional role identity, teamwork beliefs, perceived skills, perceived barriers and self-efficacy) and professional weight management practices. Structural equation modeling was conducted to identify correlations between the above variables and to test the goodness of fit of the proposed model. Results The survey response rate was 71.4% (n?=?420). The respondents reported a moderate level of weight management practices. Self-efficacy directly and positively predicted the weight management practices of the RNs (??=?0.36, p?practices. The final model constructed in this study demonstrated a good fit to the data [?2 (14) =13.90, p?=?0.46; GFI?=?0.99; AGFI?=?0.98; NNFI?=?1.00; CFI?=?1.00; RMSEA?=?0.00; AIC?=?57.90], accounting for 38.4% and 43.2% of the variance in weight management practices and self-efficacy, respectively. Conclusions Self-efficacy theory appears to be useful in understanding the weight management practices of RNs. Interventions targeting the enhancement of self-efficacy may be effective in promoting RNs’ professional performance in managing overweight and obese patients. PMID:24304903

2013-01-01

428

Intelligent agents: Theory and practice  

E-print Network

The concept of an agent has become important in both Artificial Intelligence (AI) and mainstream computer science. Our aim in this paper is to point the reader at what we perceive to be the most important theoretical and practical issues associated with the design and construction of intelligent agents. For convenience, we divide these issues into three areas (though as the reader will see, the divisions are at times somewhat arbitrary). Agent theory is concerned with the question of what an agent is, and the use of mathematical formalisms for representing and reasoning about the properties of agents. Agent architectures can be thought of as software engineering models of agents; researchers in this area are primarily concerned with the problem of designing software or hardware systems that will satisfy the prop-erties specified by agent theorists. Finally, agent languages are software systems for programming and experimenting with agents; these languages may embody principles proposed by theorists. The paper is not intended to serve as a tutorial introduction to all the issues mentioned; we hope instead simply to identify the most important issues, and point to work that elaborates on them. The article includes a short review of current and potential applications of agent technology.

Michael Wooldridge; Nicholas R. Jennings

1995-01-01

429

Anti-Oppressive Practice and Reflexive Lifeworld-Led Approaches to Care: A Framework for Teaching Nurses about Social Justice  

PubMed Central

This paper was initially written for a European Academy of Caring Science workshop and aimed to provide clarity and direction about Caring Science by offering some ideas emerging from the philosophy, themes, and projects of EACS. An underpinning concept for the work of the Academy is the lifeworld. The focus of the workshop was to explore the lifeworld of the patient, student, and carer. The intention was to promote discussion around the need to provide alternative ways to conceptualise caring relevant knowledge, naming phenomena and practices central to caring sciences, and the educational curriculum and its adequacy for caring science. This paper seeks to identify concepts and approaches to understanding oppression, power, and justice which enable nurses to challenge the structures in health care environments which discriminate or disempower clients. Anti-oppressive practice theory and reflexive lifeworld-led approaches to care enable nurses to be critical of their practice. A framework for teaching social justice in health care is offered to augment teaching students to challenge oppressive practice and to assist nurses to reflect and develop conceptual models to guide practices which are central to promoting caring interactions. PMID:25838944

Hutchison, Jacqueline Sarah

2015-01-01

430

Theory Loves Practice: A Teacher Researcher Group  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Once a month, art educators from the Denver metro area have been gathering together in the spirit of inquiry to explore issues of the perceived theory and daily practice divide. The Theory Loves Practice (TLP) group was started in 2010 by Professors Rachael Delaney and Anne Thulson from Metropolitan State University of Denver (MSU) and now has 40…

Hochtritt, Lisa; Thulson, Anne; Delaney, Rachael; Dornbush, Talya; Shay, Sarah

2014-01-01

431

Description and evaluation of an initiative to develop advanced practice nurses in mainland China.  

PubMed

This paper describes an initiative to develop Advanced Practice Nurses (APNs) in mainland China and evaluation of the outcomes of the described programme. The pioneer project was an APN postgraduate programme involving 38 students conducted in Guangzhou, China during 2004-2005. Data related to curriculum content and process, student performance, self-reported competence and programme effects were collected. Quantitative data such as demographic data, student performance were analysed using descriptive statistics and the pre and post self-reported practice of competence was compared using chi-square test. Qualitative data such as case reports and interviews were examined using thematic analyses. Reflective journals and case studies revealed the attributes of APNs in managing clinical cases at advanced level, applying theory into practice and exercising evidence-based practice. The relatively modest self-reported practice of competence suggested that the graduates were novice APNs and needed continued development after the completion of the programme. This study reports the experience of an initiative in China and suggests a useful curriculum framework for educating APNs. PMID:19819051

Wong, Frances Kam Yuet; Peng, Gangyi; Kan, Eva C; Li, Yajie; Lau, Ada T; Zhang, Liying; Leung, Annie F; Liu, Xueqin; Leung, Vilna O; Chen, Weiju; Li, Ming

2010-05-01

432

How experts practice: a novel test of deliberate practice theory.  

PubMed

Performance improvement is thought to occur through engagement in deliberate practice. Deliberate practice is predicted to be challenging, effortful, and not inherently enjoyable. Expert and intermediate level Gaelic football players executed two types of kicks during an acquisition phase and pre-, post-, and retention tests. During acquisition, participants self-selected how they practiced and rated the characteristics of deliberate practice for effort and enjoyment. The expert group predominantly practiced the skill they were weaker at and improved its performance across pre-, post- and retention tests. Participants in the expert group also rated their practice as more effortful and less enjoyable compared to those in the intermediate group. In contrast, participants in the intermediate group predominantly practiced the skill they were stronger at and improved their performance from pretest to posttest but not on the retention test. Findings provide support for deliberate practice theory and give some insight into how experts practice and improve their performance beyond its current level. PMID:24001022

Coughlan, Edward K; Williams, A Mark; McRobert, Allistair P; Ford, Paul R

2014-03-01

433

Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Plan of Progression Fall Semester SCH Spring Semester SCH Summer Semester SCH  

E-print Network

Vision: "Leader in nursing practice, education and research" Mission: · Prepare Professional nursesDoctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Plan of Progression Fall Semester SCH Spring Semester SCH Summer hours) 8 NURS 6340 Adv. Seminar Clinical Genetics 3 NURS 6470 Chronic Illness & the Border 4 Total

Ward, Karen

434

Practical use of the nursing code of ethics: part I.  

PubMed

The Code (ANA, 2001) provides the nurse guidance for legal and ethical responsibilities to patients and, in the broader sense, to society. The first provision calls for honoring the human dignity in all patients and colleagues. It lays the groundwork for the importance of the essential ethical principle of autonomy, the right to self-determination. The second provision describes the importance of interdisciplinary collaboration and significance of appropriate nurse-patient boundaries. The importance of privacy and confidentiality in the nurse-patient relationship is the focus of the third provision. Without the nurse's honoring of privacy, the patient would be hesitant to share important information necessary to design an effective plan of care. The fourth provision primarily focuses on the importance of accountability for personal actions and for the actions of those to whom the nurse has delegated. By meeting these obligations, the nurse will remain the most trusted health care professional. PMID:19331301

Lachman, Vicki D

2009-01-01

435

Understanding quality patient care and the role of the practicing nurse.  

PubMed

Nurses play a vital role in improving the safety and quality of patient care. The authors provide the front-line nurse providers with an overview of critical concepts related to quality management of patient care. A historical approach provides the reader with an overview of the trajectory or the quality in health care movement. Furthermore, the article provides the nurse with a basic understanding of national and international organizations that focus on quality patient care. A brief introduction of measures of quality care is presented as well as implications for nursing practice. PMID:25680485

Owens, Laura D; Koch, Robert W

2015-03-01

436

Classroom to clinic: incorporating adolescent spiritual/faith assessment into nurse practitioner education & practice.  

PubMed

Although nursing is well grounded in the conceptualization of person as body-mind-spirit, there is little evidence that advanced practice nurses routinely address the spirit in giving patient care, especially with adolescents in the outpatient setting. The neglect of spiritual aspects of care may be related to lack of a framework, or education/incorporation into nurse practitioner preparation. This article describes one method of integrating adolescent spiritual/faith assessment into a nurse practitioner clinical course. Readings, assignments, and a grading rubric are offered. PMID:25296491

Haley, Janice M

2014-01-01

437

Deliberate practice of motor skills in nursing education: CPR as exemplar.  

PubMed

Our study explored the effects of deliberate practice on the retention ofcardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) psychomotor skills among nursing students. The practice sessions were short, six minutes a session one time a month. Differences in performance between students who had deliberate practice and a control group, with no practice beyond the initial training, were compared every three months for one year. The intervention group performed better than the control over the 12 months. There is a need in nursing education for deliberate practice of relevant and high-use skills for students to improve their performance and gradually develop their expertise. PMID:22029243

Oermann, Marilyn H; Kardong-Edgren, Suzan; Odom-Maryon, Tamara; Hallmark, Beth F; Hurd, Debbie; Rogers, Nancy; Haus, Carol; McColgan, Jacqueline Keegan; Snelson, Catherine; Dowdy, Sharon Wilson; Resurreccion, Leandro A; Kuerschner, Dawn R; LaMar, Jerrilee; Tennant, Monica Nelson; Smart, Denise A

2011-01-01

438

Holding children and young people: identifying a theory-practice gap.  

PubMed

Holding practices are employed to help a child or young person stay still during the administration of treatments, prevent treatment interference or to undertake an examination, which can sometimes be invasive. The aim of this study was to explore assumptions and practices of holding to develop theories about teaching practices following Grounded Theory methodology for undergraduate nursing students, university lecturers and clinical mentors. The practice of therapeutic holding is often covert and not considered to be part of the treatment per se, which has led to concealment and a reticence to discuss practices openly. This study identified that there is variance in the experiences and practices. Prominent themes that emerged were a lack of clarity and lack of training. It appears that therapeutic holding practices have moved from being viewed as 'uncontested' (practice is not disputed) to 'indifferent' (where there is denial about this practice). These findings have serious implications for current practice and future training. PMID:25904450

Page, Andrea; McDonnell, Andrew A

2015-04-23

439

Everyday nursing practice values in the NICU and their reflection on breastfeeding promotion.  

PubMed

In this ethnographic study I examined neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) nurses' everyday practice values and explored how breastfeeding promotion fit within this context. The study was conducted over a 14-month period and included participant observation and interviewing of 114 purposively selected nurses in a level-IV NICU in the United States. Uncertainty emerged as a central concern underlying everyday practice values. Three themes described these values: (a) maximizing babies' potentials in the midst of uncertainty; (b) relying on the sisterhood of NICU nurses to deal with uncertainty; and (c) confronting uncertainty through tight control of actions, reliance on technology, and maximal efficiency in use of time. A fourth theme demonstrated how these values were reflected in NICU breastfeeding practices. Although high-control, high-tech, and time-urgent practice values were helpful in confronting uncertainty, these values also posed challenges to ongoing nursing efforts to promote breastfeeding. These values must be addressed for effective breastfeeding promotion. PMID:20682967

Cricco-Lizza, Roberta

2011-03-01

440

Principles and practices of social entrepreneurship for nursing.  

PubMed

Although social justice and action for change are among the nursing profession's core values, curricular content on social entrepreneurship for nurses is not as well developed as it is in the educational programs for students in business, engineering, or public policy. This article describes an undergraduate honors elective course in social entrepreneurship offered at New York University College of Nursing. The course uses a seminar format and incorporates content from the humanities, business, and service-learning, with the goal of promoting participants' understanding of the sources of inequality in the United States and providing the requisite skills to promote effective nursing action for social change. PMID:24127177

Gilmartin, Mattia J

2013-11-01

441

Registered nurses' constructed meaning of concepts of solution and their use in clinical practice  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since the introduction of nursing into tertiary institutions in Australia in 1975, there has been increasing interest in the teaching of physical science to nurses. Various courses in physical science for nurse students have been developed. They vary in length and content but there is agreement that concepts taught should be closely related to nursing applications. The choice of relevant concepts tends to be made by individual curriculum developers. This paper reports an examination of the use of physical science concepts and their relevance from the perspective of registered nurses practising in general ward areas. Inherent in this study is the premise that for registered nurses to have ideas of the physical science underlying their practice they must have constructed meaning first for these concepts. Specific chemical concepts related to solutions are discussed in these terms.

Wilkes, Lesley M.; Batts, Judith E.

1991-12-01

442

Positioning mental health nursing practice within a positive health paradigm.  

PubMed

Mental health service provision has traditionally been dominated by biomedical models of illness and disorder, a problem-based orientation, and the assessment and management of risk. While psychotherapeutic approaches are numerous and have been widely utilized, psychotropic medications, either as monotherapy or in conjunction with psychological therapies, remain the mainstay for the 'treatment' of mental health problems. This is despite growing uncertainty over the effectiveness of psychotropic medications (particularly antidepressants), as well as their potential for enduring and debilitating side-effects. This discussion paper outlines the emerging field of positive health, which eschews a psychiatric disorder and illness focus, and is instead oriented towards the identification of strengths, abilities, hopes, and the individual's preferred future. The shift in positive health, from illness towards wellness, aims to build health literacy and the capacity of individuals to make decisions conducive to health, and thereby make more effective the use of health-care services. A positioning of mental health nursing practice within a positive health paradigm is promoted. By illustration, a number of solution-focused mental health assessment questions are tabled to contrast the current format for mental health assessment, which rather than being 'comprehensive', is predominantly concerned only with problem and risk identification, and the search for pathology in the individual. PMID:23020848

Wand, Timothy

2013-04-01

443

Web-Based Virtual Patients in Nursing Education: Development and Validation of Theory-Anchored Design and Activity Models  

PubMed Central

Background Research has shown that nursing students find it difficult to translate and apply their theoretical knowledge in a clinical context. Virtual patients (VPs) have been proposed as a learning activity that can support nursing students in their learning of scientific knowledge and help them integrate theory and practice. Although VPs are increasingly used in health care education, they still lack a systematic consistency that would allow their reuse outside of their original context. There is therefore a need to develop a model for the development and implementation of VPs in nursing education. Objective The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a virtual patient model optimized to the learning and assessment needs in nursing education. Methods The process of modeling started by reviewing theoretical frameworks reported in the literature and used by practitioners when designing learning and assessment activities. The Outcome-Present State Test (OPT) model was chosen as the theoretical framework. The model was then, in an iterative manner, developed and optimized to the affordances of virtual patients. Content validation was performed with faculty both in terms of the relevance of the chosen theories but also its applicability in nursing education. The virtual patient nursing model was then instantiated in two VPs. The students’ perceived usefulness of the VPs was investigated using a questionnaire. The result was analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results A virtual patient Nursing Design Model (vpNDM) composed of three layers was developed. Layer 1 contains the patient story and ways of interacting with the data, Layer 2 includes aspects of the iterative process of clinical reasoning, and finally Layer 3 includes measurable outcomes. A virtual patient Nursing Activity Model (vpNAM) was also developed as a guide when creating VP-centric learning activities. The students perceived the global linear VPs as a relevant learning activity for the integration of theory and practice. Conclusions Virtual patients that are adapted to the nursing paradigm can support nursing students’ development of clinical reasoning skills. The proposed virtual patient nursing design and activity models will allow the systematic development of different types of virtual patients from a common model and thereby create opportunities for sharing pedagogical designs across technical solutions. PMID:24727709

2014-01-01

444

Relationship-based nursing practice: transitioning to a new care delivery model in maternity units.  

PubMed

In a fast-paced, high-volume maternity unit, the goal for nursing care delivery is to provide care that is perceived by patients as personal and caring, is rewarding to nurses, and is in an environment of maximum patient safety. A care delivery model is the organizing structure that can facilitate this goal. Relationship-Based Nursing Practice is a care delivery model designed to transition nursing care from task-focused to relationship-based. A shared vision of the registered nurse as a professional member of the healthcare team, working in an optimally safe and family-centered care environment, inspired the model design. Three relationships-the nurse with the patient, the nurse with colleagues, and the nurse with self-provided the foundation for the creation of guiding principles. Guiding principles were operationalized to support 1 or more of the 3 relationships, contribute to improved patient safety, and actualize the role of the professional registered nurse, in daily patient care. Outcomes include improvement in patient safety, increased patient satisfaction, and perception of improved teamwork among nurses. The process for sustainability and ongoing evaluation of the model is discussed. PMID:22293640

Hedges, Cathleen C; Nichols, Amy; Filoteo, Lourdes

2012-01-01

445

Educational role of nurse practitioners in a family practice centre  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To examine the role of nurse practitioners (NPs) as educators of family medicine residents in order to better understand the interprofessional educational dynamics in a clinical teaching setting. Design A qualitative descriptive approach, using purposive sampling. Setting A family practice centre that is associated with an academic department of family medicine and is based in an urban area in southern Ontario. Participants First-year (8 of 9) and second-year (9 of 10) family medicine residents whose training program was based at the family practice centre, and all NPs (4 of 4) who worked at the centre. Methods Semistructured interviews were conducted, which were audiotaped and transcribed. An iterative approach was used for coding and analysis. Data management software guided organization and analysis of the data. Main findings Four interconnected themes were identified: role clarification, professional identity formation, factors that enhance the educational role of NPs, and factors that limit the educational role of NPs. Although residents recognized NPs’ value in team functioning and areas of specialized knowledge, they were unclear about NPs’ scope of practice. Depending on residents’ level of training, residents tended to respond differently to teaching by NPs. More of the senior residents believed they needed to think like physicians and preferred clinical teaching from physician teachers. Junior residents valued the step-by-step instructional approach used by NPs, and they had a decreased sense of vulnerability when being taught by NPs. Training in teaching skills was helpful for NPs. Barriers to providing optimal education included opportunity, time, and physician attitudes. Conclusion The lack of an intentional orientation of family medicine residents to NPs’ scope of practice and educational role can lead to difficulties in interprofessional education. More explicit recognition of the evolving professional identity of family medicine residents might decrease resistance to teaching by NPs and ensure that interprofessional teaching and learning strategies are effective. Faculty development opportunities for all educators are required to manage these issues, both to ensure teaching competencies and to reinforce positive interprofessional collaboration. PMID:24925966

Walsh, Allyn; Moore, Ainsley; Barber, Anne; Opsteen, Joanne

2014-01-01

446

Teaching Evidence-Based Practice to Undergraduate Nursing Students: Overcoming Obstacles  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Evidence-based practice is highly valued in health care literature at this time. But research suggests that U.S. RNs face many obstacles when implementing evidence-based practice including a lack of value for research in practice (Pravikoff et al, 2005). Additional obstacles may exist for traditional U.S. BSN nursing students who may not value the…

Martin, Sharon D.

2007-01-01

447

POST MASTERS DOCTOR OF NURSING PRACTICE (DNP) Thursday, July 25th  

E-print Network

Biostatisticsal Methods II Evidence Based Practice Health Policy & Politics Health Outcomes: Information Systems? This program will prepare advanced practice nurses to translate academic research, promote evidence based practice, and develop systems of care based on research utilization. Does the DNP have a place

448

Venous leg ulcer care: How evidence-based is nursing practice?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: The objectives of this study were to (1) determine how congruent community-provided leg ulcer care was with best practice for venous leg ulcers and (2) identify organizational and clinical factors associated with the provision of best practice for venous leg ulcers. Design: The practice variation study group was an audit of nursing agency client records to determine the provision

Karen R. Lorimer; Margaret B. Harrison; Ian D. Graham; Elaine Friedberg; Barbara Davies

2003-01-01

449

The nurse practitioner in family planning services: law and practice.  

PubMed

Before 1971, when Idaho became the 1st state to authorize expanded scope of functions for registered nurses, nearly all states made it illegal for any nurse to perform diagnosis or prescribe treatment, creating an ambiguity as more and more nurses were equipped by education and technology to perform new tasks. Today 30 states have liberalized the scope of nursing functions, making it possible for nurses and nurse-midwives to assume, among other tasks, family planning functions. A table gives the status of legislation and regulations governing nurse practitioners and nurse-midwives in each state. The area of greatest controversy is the prescription of oral contraceptives. In some states it is allowed under doctor's supervision or in rural areas or in areas where clear need exists for a nurse to dispense such medication. Usually this dispensing is limited to a single course of treatment. Nurse-midwives are rapidly being accepted as extensions of scarce medical facilities. Generally nurse-midwives are authorized to provide prenatal and postpartum care, to handle normal deliveries, and do family planning work including fitting diaphragms and inserting and removing IUDs. An innovation is the family planning nurse practitioner. Several courses for such practitioners have been set up across the U.S. Graduates may, with medical direction, perform bimanual pelvic examinations and breast examinations, take blood pressure, prescribe contraception, fit diaphragms, insert IUDs, examine vaginal secretions microscopically, and refer patients with problems to physicians. In a California program both registered and nonregistered nurses are being trained as women's health specialists who may make routine examinations in both pregnant and nonpregnant women and give family planning advice. Non-RN family planning specialists being trained include licensed vocational nurses, baccalaureate degree holders in nonnursing fields, and qualified persons with less formal education. The 24-week course was authorized under a California State Department of Health demonstration program. While there may be serious concern that nurse-practitioners or other trained personnel may be used in place of physicians in poor neighborhoods and rural areas, others feel that use of such personnel will help make family planning and well-baby services more generally available and conserve valuable physician time for those cases which need greater skill and training. PMID:12259979

Roemer, R

1977-06-01

450

Putting Theory to Practice and Practice to Theory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Continuing educators have several options for practice: (1) being clear about the nature of their business; (2) adopting a holistic approach; (3) building better preprofessional programs; (4) moving to where learning occurs; (5) legitimizing practical knowledge; and (6) addressing contextual influences. (SK)

Baskett, H. K. Morris; And Others

1992-01-01

451

The nature of nursing practice in rural and remote areas of Greenland  

PubMed Central

Background The Greenlandic Healthcare Reform (2010) required improved quality of services for health promotion, prevention of infectious and lifestyle diseases, family nursing and evidence-based clinical nursing. Aim To investigate current nursing practice in Greenland and to identify whether it meets the requirements of healthcare reform. Design This ethnographic study utilised documentary analysis, participant observation and qualitative interviewing carried out in remote areas of Greenland during 2011–2012. Eight registered nurses, four women and four men, aged between 35 and 55, participated in this study. Four were working at healthcare centres in towns and four were working at nursing stations in villages. The nurses were educated in Greenland or a Nordic country and had been practicing nursing for at least 2 years in an Arctic region. They were observed for 1–5 days, and subsequently interviewed. Interviews included in-depth questioning, based on emerging outcomes from observation. Interviews were recorded and transcribed; they were analysed within a phenomenological–hermeneutic approach. Results Nurses in rural and remote areas navigate their health promotion and preventive work with conflict between health strategies and everyday realities, where unpredictable tasks often lead to prioritisation of urgent, acute work. There is interaction between personal and professional skills. Everyday life is characterised by opportunities and challenges in the grey areas, namely nursing, medical and social work. Conclusion The nature of nursing practice in rural and remote Greenland is characterised by a high degree of variability and complexity, with a requirement for a wide range of knowledge and skills. Nurses need to be better prepared with regard to acute medical care, preventive care, social work, humanistic approaches and information technology to implement the ideology of health strategies. PMID:23984291

Hounsgaard, Lise; Jensen, Anne Birgitte; Wilche, Julie Præst; Dolmer, Ilone

2013-01-01

452

Differences in preferences for rural job postings between nursing students and practicing nurses: evidence from a discrete choice experiment in Lao People’s Democratic Republic  

PubMed Central

Background A discrete choice experiment was conducted to investigate preferences for job characteristics among nursing students and practicing nurses to determine how these groups vary in their respective preferences and to understand whether differing policies may be appropriate for each group. Methods Participating students and workers were administered a discrete choice experiment that elicited preferences for attributes of potential job postings. Job attributes included salary, duration of service until promotion to permanent staff, duration of service until qualified for further study and scholarship, housing provision, transportation provision, and performance-based financial rewards. Mixed logit models were fit to the data to estimate stated preferences and willingness to pay for attributes. Finally, an interaction model was fit to formally investigate differences in preferences between nursing students and practicing nurses. Results Data were collected from 256 nursing students and 249 practicing nurses. For both groups, choice of job posting was strongly influenced by salary and direct promotion to permanent staff. As compared to nursing students, practicing nurses had significantly lower preference for housing allowance and housing provision as well as lower preference for provision of transportation for work and personal use. Conclusions In the Lao People’s Democratic Republic, nursing students and practicing nurses demonstrated important differences in their respective preferences for rural job posting attributes. This finding suggests that it may be important to differentiate between recruitment and retention policies when addressing human resources for health challenges in developing countries, such as Laos. PMID:23705805

2013-01-01

453

One-on-one coaching to improve pain assessment and management practices of pediatric nurses.  

PubMed

Pain in children is infrequently assessed and managed by nurses. One-on-one coaching based on audit with feedback and the use of opinion leaders have been effective in changing professional health care practices. Coaching by an opinion leader for changing pediatric nurses' pain practices was tested in a clustered randomized trial in six Canadian pediatric hospitals. The rate of pain assessments, nurses' knowledge, and nonpharmacological interventions increased in the coaching group. However, there were significant site differences that could not be attributed to the coaching but to factors inherent in the sites. The context in which interventions are implemented will influence the effectiveness of individualized interventions. PMID:18036467

Johnston, C Céleste; Gagnon, Anita; Rennick, Janet; Rosmus, Christina; Patenaude, Hélène; Ellis, Jaqueline; Shapiro, Carla; Filion, Françoise; Ritchie, Judith; Byron, Jasmine

2007-12-01

454

Procedure Page 1 of 2 Clinical Manual / Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

PROCEDURE FOR: Blood Components: Type and Screen / ABO Rh Confirmation for Transfusion Purposes. APPROVAL: Nursing Standards Committee Director Transfusion of Medicine Blood Bank EFFECTIVE DATE: 10 of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROCEDURE FOR: Blood Components: Type and Screen / ABO

Oliver, Douglas L.

455

Population-based advanced practice nursing: where does oncology fit in?  

PubMed

A national work group met in 2004 to discuss the future of advanced practice nursing. The representatives were nursing education, certification, accreditation, and regulation experts, and the goal was to develop a consensus model for advanced practice nursing regulation (Nevidjon et al., 2010). As a result, a set of recommendations was published in an article that defined a new consensus model for advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) regulation (APRN Consensus Workgroup, 2008; Goudreau, 2009). The new model included six population-based focuses of practice (i.e., family and individual across the lifespan, adult and gerontology, neonatal, pediatrics, women's health- and gender-related, and psychiatric and mental health) (Johnson, Dawson, & Brassard, 2010). A goal of the new model was to standardize the licensure, certification, and regulation of nurse practitioners into specific focuses. State boards were facing an increasing number of requests to recognize nurse practitioner specialties (e.g., organ specific, body systems, diseases) (Johnson et al., 2010). The new model helped standardize education programs, which may help certifying agencies set up curriculum review processes to ensure appropriate credentials for APRNs (Johnson et al., 2010). It also supported the mission of nursing to meet future healthcare needs of the public and to protect the public (Johnson et al., 2010). Some advantages exist to delineating into population-based focuses, but the new model leaves out many specialties (e.g., oncology) that encompass the whole person as well as concentrate on certain diseases. PMID:24305476

Lattimer, Jennie Greco

2013-12-01

456

Practical use of the nursing Code of Ethics: part II.  

PubMed

The Code Provisions V through IX focus on a variety of responsibilities for the professional nurse. Provision V spotlights nurses' obligation to the same values and actions for themselves as are espoused in The Code for their patients. Provision VI addresses the responsibility of all nurses to maintain quality patient care, regardless of their roles in the health care system. Meeting professional obligations to maintain and forward the nursing profession can take a variety of forms, as indicated in Provision VII. Provision VIII reviews the macro level of professional nursing responsibility by centering on the issues of world hunger, pollution, and other violations of justice. Finally, Provision IX identifies the importance of involvement in professional associations and their efforts for social reform. The first two provisions of The Code address the boundaries of obligation and dependability (Lachman, 2009), and the last three address the duties outside individual patient experience. PMID:19591369

Lachman, Vicki D

2009-01-01

457

Integrating Practice-to-Theory and Theory-to-Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In "Towards a systemic theory of gifted education", Ziegler and Phillipson offer a useful critique of current research and the current paradigm in gifted education. They provide an interesting and useful merging of systems theory with their actiotope model, and using this paradigm they suggest many fruitful areas for future research. However, the…

Johnson, R. Burke; Stefurak, Tres

2012-01-01

458

Utilizing constructivism learning theory in collaborative testing as a creative strategy to promote essential nursing skills.  

PubMed

In nursing education, students participate in individual learner testing. This process follows the instructionist learning theory of a system model. However, in the practice of nursing, success depends upon collaboration with numerous people in different capacities, critical thinking, clinical reasoning, and the ability to communicate with others. Research has shown that collaborative testing, a constructivism learning activity and a form of collaborative learning, enhances students' abilities to master these areas. Collaborative testing is a clear, creative strategy which constructivists would say supports the socio-linguistic base of their learning theory. The test becomes an active implementation of peer-mediated learning where individual knowledge is enhanced through problem solving or defense of an individual position with the collaborative method. There is criticism for the testing method's potential of grade inflation and for students to receive grade benefits with little effort. After a review of various collaborative testing methods, this nursing faculty implemented a collaborative testing format that addresses both the positive and negative aspects of the process. PMID:23608232

Duane, Barbara T; Satre, Maria E

2014-01-01

459

Rural nurse specialists: clinical practice and the politics of care.  

PubMed

Doctor flight from rural areas is an international phenomenon that places great pressure on primary health care delivery. In New Zealand, the response to these empty doctors' surgeries has been the introduction of nurse-led rural health clinics that have attracted controversy both in the media and from urban-based doctors over whether such nurse-led care is a direct substitution of medical care. This article analyzes the reflections of nurses working in some of these clinics who suggest that their situation is more complex than a direct substitution of labor. Although the nurses indicate some significant pressures moving them closer to the work of doctoring, they actively police this cross-boundary work and labor simultaneously to shore up their nursing identities. My own conclusions support their assertions. I argue that it is the maintenance of a holistic professional habitus that best secures their professional identity as nurses while they undertake the cross-boundary tasks of primary rural health care. There are clear professional benefits and disadvantages for the nurses in these situations, which make the positions highly politicized. These recurring divisions of labor within medical care giving and the elaboration of new types of care worker form an appropriate although neglected topic of study for anthropologists. The study of the social organization of clinical medicine is much enriched by paying closer attention to its interaction with allied health professions and their associated understandings of "good" care. PMID:18663640

Fitzgerald, Ruth P

2008-01-01

460

Implementing Family Health Nursing in Tajikistan: from policy to practice in primary health care reform.  

PubMed

The health systems of former Soviet Union countries are undergoing reform away from the highly centralised, resource-intensive, specialised and hierarchical Soviet system, towards a more generalist, efficient health service with greater focus on primary health care. Family Health Nursing is a new model designed by WHO Europe in which skilled generalist community nurses deliver primary health care to local communities. This paper presents a qualitative evaluation of the implementation of Family Health Nursing in Tajikistan. Using Stufflebeam's 'Context, Input, Process, and Product' model, the paper aims to evaluate the progress of this reform, and to understand the factors that help or hinder its implementation. A four-phase research design investigates the development of the Family Health Nurse role over time. In 5 rural areas, 6 focus groups and 18 interviews with Family Health Nurses, 4 observations of their practice, 7 interviews with families and 9 interviews with physicians were carried out. Data were analysed according to the components of Stufflebeam's model. Although the legacy of the Soviet health system did not set a precedent for a nurse who is capable of decision-making and who works in partnership with the physician, Family Health Nurses were successfully implementing new practices. Crucial to their ability to do so were the co-operation of physicians and families. Physicians were impressed by the nurses' development of knowledge, and families were impressed that the nurses could offer real solutions to their problems. However, failure to pay the nurses regular salaries had led to serious attrition of the workforce. We conclude that the success of the Family Health Nurse role in other countries will depend upon its position in relation to the historical health care system. PMID:17651876

Parfitt, Barbara Ann; Cornish, Flora

2007-10-01

461

Depression case management by practice nurses in primary care: an audit  

PubMed Central

Introduction Depression is a common and debilitating condition. A body of evidence exists about improving depression outcomes in primary care, using collaborative care models. Such approaches, however, have not been routinely adopted within general practice settings. In this paper we outline the results of an audit of an enhanced care initiative that trained practice nurses to deliver such approaches. Method An audit of symptom outcome and satisfaction was conducted in depression case-management clinics run by practice nurses. Results were then benchmarked against appropriate randomised trial data. The cost of practice nurse time devoted to the delivery of the service was estimated by multiplying time by unit cost. Results A mean change of 9.07 (standard deviation (SD) 6.67, 95% confidence interval (CI) 7.93–10.22, P < 0.001) points on the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ9) score was observed in those who were using/had used the service. Clinical change demonstrated a shift from moderate-to-severe to mild depression. The results reflect the changes seen in randomised controlled trial data from similar interventions in similar samples, and are superior to expected treatment as usual outcomes. Overall, respondents were ‘very satisfied’ with the service on offer. The mean cost of practice nurse time was estimated at £45 per patient. Discussion While acknowledging the limitations of audit data, practice nurses in general practice appear to be able to offer effective and acceptable case management to patients experiencing depression. PMID:22477856

2008-01-01

462

This application form should only be used by applicants to the Licensed Practical Nurse Bridging Option, Nursing Education Program of Saskatchewan. There is a separate application form for the regular Nursing Education Program of Saskatchewan.  

E-print Network

This application form should only be used by applicants to the Licensed Practical Nurse Bridging Option, Nursing Education Program of Saskatchewan. There is a separate application form for the regular Nursing Education Program of Saskatchewan. This option is being offered at SIAST Wascana Campus (Regina

Saskatchewan, University of

463

A nurse-managed advocacy clinic in a Hispanic senior center: using a concept-based clinical practice site to enhance nursing education.  

PubMed

A nurse-managed advocacy clinic for vulnerable, low-income, non-English-speaking elderly Hispanic men and women was developed at a neighborhood community center as a clinical site for senior baccalaureate nursing students. In the clinic's 5 years of operation, nursing students and faculty provided health screenings and education as well as referrals to primary care providers, landlords, pharmacies, and social workers. In doing so, nursing students were introduced to the concept of patient advocacy in a real-world experiential clinical setting, providing an effective link between theoretical knowledge discussed in the classroom and professional nursing practice. PMID:25127079

Crowe, Mary Lind

2014-01-01