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1

Critical theory as a framework for academic nursing practice.  

PubMed

In academic centers of nursing, faculty or academic practice has become more widespread and integrated into the expectations and criteria for appointment and promotion. Yet, the concept of academic practice is not fully embraced among all schools of nursing. Numerous models of academic nursing practice have evolved and vary widely according to the clinical site, the roles of the practitioners, and the systems for generating revenue. Although most models are related to the mission statements of the schools of nursing, few seem to be based on a distinct philosophy of practice. In this article, a consideration of critical theory that provides a framework for practice-based nursing education is presented. By applying the philosophical underpinnings and assumptions of practice that are guided by critical theory, educators may begin to better identify the values of academic nursing practice and incorporate this activity more fully into the educational environment. PMID:24708051

Swartz, Martha K

2014-05-01

2

Using nursing theory to introduce change in practice.  

PubMed

This article outlines the theoretical basis of nursing using Carper's (1978) fundamental patterns of knowing and explains how this theory can be integrated with practice. The authors also describe how Carper's theory was used to introduce change related to the reduction in junior doctors' hours through the development, implementation and evaluation of nurse practitioners. Using a SWOT analysis exercise and various workshops, practitioners have been able to develop professionally and integrate the art and science of nursing. PMID:8949167

Bailey, J; Cassidy, A

1996-09-11

3

Communication in nursing: the theory-practice relationship.  

PubMed

The theory-practice relationship and the use of communication and interpersonal skills in nursing have been recurrently identified as issues causing concern. Four research questions form the basis of this small-scale exploratory study investigating the views of nurse teachers, mentors and students into the theory-practice relationship with regard to the communication and interpersonal skills theme of the Project 2000 common foundation programme (CFP) for British nursing students. Hierarchical focusing, involving individual interviews with teachers and mentors and small-group interviews with students, was undertaken. Volunteer sampling was used. Qualitative data analysis was undertaken using content analysis. Results are summarized with regard to each main research question. There was little consensus of opinion amongst participants, and the nature of the theory-practice relationship with regard to the communication and interpersonal skills theme for the CFP remains unclear. However, there was agreement that communication is fundamental to nursing and that the socialization process strongly influences the development of communication and interpersonal skills. There appears to be a reliance on mentors to assess student progress and determine whether they have knowledge underpinning practice. Classroom teaching was recognized as idealistic but the divisions in participants' opinions led to difficulty in determining whether a theory-practice gap actually exists. The main influences on the theory-practice relationship were the mentor's knowledge of the curriculum and mentoring system, the short amount of time spent in each placement and relationships between teachers, mentors and students. Recommendations include the need to ensure the reliability and validity of progressive assessment. PMID:7714289

Brereton, M L

1995-02-01

4

The perceptions of nurse teachers, student nurses and preceptors of the theory-practice gap in nurse education  

Microsoft Academic Search

The theory-practice gap has been the subject of much debate within nursing. Issues include: where the gap is, whether it is a positive or negative phenomenon and whether attempts should be made to bridge it. This paper describes a research study adopting an innovative approach to exploring the theory-practice gap by investigating it from the perspectives of three different groups:

Jo Corlett

2000-01-01

5

Nursing agency: the link between practical nursing science and nursing practice.  

PubMed

The relationship of nursing science and nursing practice has been the topic of numerous discussions over the past decades. According to Orem, nursing science is a practical science, meaning that knowledge is developed for the sake of nursing practice. Within Orem's self-care deficit nursing theory, the concept of nursing agency links nursing science and nursing practice. Nursing agency refers to the power or ability of the nurse to design and produce systems of care. The relationship of practical nursing science, nursing practice, and nursing agency is examined in this article. Suggestions for further work related to nursing agency are provided. PMID:21220575

Banfield, Barbara E

2011-01-01

6

Preparation for Advanced Nursing Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Lehman College's graduate nursing program uses theory-based courses to prepare advanced nurse practitioners. Students increase scholarly inquiry skills and clinical decision making; use of nursing conceptual models helped them plan and evaluate their practice. (SK)

Frik, Seigina M.; Pollock, Susan E.

1993-01-01

7

PHD IN NURSING SAMPLE FULL-TIME PROGRAM Student with an interest in Symptom Management in Adults; Theory & Practice Emphasis  

E-print Network

PHD IN NURSING SAMPLE FULL-TIME PROGRAM Student with an interest in Symptom Management in Adults Practice Nursing Theory: Adults and Older Adults 3 N703 Health Care & Public Policy 3 N815 Knowledge Development in Nursing 3 N803 Advanced Quantitative Design & Methods 3 N816 Proseminar in Nursing Research 1

Sheridan, Jennifer

8

Nursing Practice Instructors Faculty of Nursing  

E-print Network

Nursing Practice Instructors Faculty of Nursing The University of Calgary Faculty of Nursing is seeking applications for limited term Nursing Practice Instructors. We are seeking applicants with broad experience across a variety of areas as well as applicants with focused practice experience in acute care

Habib, Ayman

9

Bandura's Self-Efficacy TheoryA Guide for Cardiac Rehabilitation Nursing Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

To help patients achieve the greatest benefit from cardiac rehabilitation programs, nurses must assist them to modify unhealthy behaviors. Many cardiac rehabilitation programs, however, lack a theoretical foundation; therefore, interventions are usually executed without accounting for the complexities of human behavior, and little consideration is given to the difficulties encountered in altering unhealthy behavior patterns. Bandura's self-efficacy theory is considered

Chii Jeng; Lynne T. Braun

1994-01-01

10

Using King's interacting systems theory to link emotional intelligence and nursing practice.  

PubMed

King's theory is a broad theory designed to provide a framework for nursing (I.M. King, 1981), whereas emotional intelligence (EI; J.D. Mayer & P. Salovey, 2004) is a theory that is specific for addressing potential competency in dealing with emotions and emotional information. J.D. Mayer, P. Salovey, D.R. Caruso, and G. Sitarenios (2001) defined EI as the "ability to recognize the meaning of emotions and their relationships and to use them as a basis for reasoning and problem solving" (p. 234). These researchers believed that EI is related to cognitive intellect through the ability to use reasoning by way of information to find meaning. J.D. Mayer and P. Salovey (2004) argued that the skills that comprise EI were likely enhanced through obtaining a liberal education infused with values exploration. J.D. Mayer, P. Salovey, D.R. Caruso, and G. Sitarenios (2001) contended that there are 4 branches of abilities that create EI: (a) the skill of perceiving emotion within oneself and others, (b) assimilation of an emotion to facilitate thinking, (c) understanding and knowledge of emotion, and (d) conscious regulation of emotion. Each level or branch builds upon the previous one, and awareness of what each branch offers the individual in enhancing relationships with others is a key component of healthy emotional interactions. This article will provide a theoretic foundation based upon King's interacting systems theory (IST; 1981) that embraces EI as a crucial component in the nurse's ability to provide holistic care for patients, peers, and themselves. King's IST underscores the necessity of nurses possessing abilities of EI as they care for others but does not fully describe a mechanism to understand and incorporate emotions within the complex nurse-patient interactions and communications that are part of the nursing process. PMID:23706971

Shanta, Linda L; Connolly, Maria

2013-01-01

11

Dorthea Orem's self care theory as related to nursing practice in hemodialysis.  

PubMed

Dorthea Orem believed that people have a natural ability for self care, and nursing should focus on affecting that ability. Using a literature search of studies involving adults receiving hemodialysis for end stage renal disease (ESRD) in an outpatient dialysis setting and self-care/management publications in peer-reviewed journals and dissertations, this article explores the implementation of Dorthea Orem's Self Care Theory in the hemodialysis setting, considering the ways it relates to a population in which self-management is critical for patients' positive quality of life, nurses' ability to promote self care for this population, and potential health outcomes. In order to maximize the health of patients with ESRD, considerable lifestyle changes must be made. As healthcare professionals who provide direct care, nurses can assist with these changes by providing educational opportunities and strategies that increase self-care agency, thus making a positive impact on patient quality of life. PMID:19715109

Simmons, Laurie

2009-01-01

12

Development of Gerontological Nursing Theory. Applying the Man-Living-Health Theory of Nursing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes Rosemary Rizzo Parse's Man-Living-Health theory that was used to describe how gerontological nursing knowledge could be developed through a nursing conceptual model that includes a defined practice and research methodology. (Author/JOW)

Heine, Christine

1991-01-01

13

Valuing the gap: a dialectic between theory and practice in graduate nursing education from a constructive educational approach.  

PubMed

Within nursing education, graduate pedagogies are relatively unexplored, with research commonly focused upon undergraduate and continuing education. In order to address the increasingly complex organisational challenges in the workplace, mid-career nurses and midwives are turning to graduate education. In one graduate course on cultures of learning in the workplace, a constructivist approach to learning was adopted. Post-course analysis of data, from the feedback on the course from students, student choice of assignment topics, and reflections of the course facilitators, revealed three pedagogies unique to graduate education. The pedagogies were labelled 'keeping the space open', 'theoretical concepts as tools', and 'resonance and action as praxis'. The intended outcome of the course is revealed in a fourth theme, 'developing practice in the workplace'. This evaluation suggests that constructivist pedagogies used with graduate students may be different to those pedagogies used with undergraduate and continuing education students. We argue that graduate pedagogies move nursing education beyond strategies that seek integration of theory and practice, towards a dialectic between theory and practice. PMID:19969401

Moss, Cheryle; Grealish, Laurie; Lake, Sarah

2010-05-01

14

Health Practices of School Nurses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The health practices of school nurses affect our role as advocates and educators to promote the health of youth. This study describes the health practices of a convenience sample of 388 school nurses who attended the business meeting at an annual school nurse conference. A self-administered, 40-item questionnaire identified health practices of…

Petch-Levine, Deborah; Cureton, Virginia Young; Canham, Daryl; Murray, Meg

2003-01-01

15

Applying Orem's Self-Care Deficit Theory of Nursing to continence care: Part 2.  

PubMed

Theory based nursing practice provides a framework for initiation of the research process. Orem's Self-Care Deficit Theory of Nursing clearly relates and can be easily applied to continence care. Orem's Theory guides nursing practice with theoretical concepts and goal setting providing a foundation upon which nurses can question the practice and expand the avenue for nursing research. PMID:12593229

Bernier, Francie

2002-12-01

16

Postflood Disaster Management and the Home Health Nurse: Using Theory to Guide Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Few frameworks exist to guide home health nurses during the response and recovery phases of disasters such as flooding. The Double ABCX Model of Family Adaptation is offered as an example of a guiding framework for nurses in postflood management. Phases of the model are linked to the nursing process, and management strategies are applied to individuals and families living

Susan M. Hunter Revell; Mary K. McCurry

2010-01-01

17

Advanced practice nursing role: nurse practitioner.  

PubMed

Nurse Practitioners are advanced practice nurses (APNs) who provide primary and acute care to individuals in many settings. The NP diagnoses and treats medical and surgical conditions that require acute, short-term management and chronic, long-term treatment. States vary in regulating processes regarding collaborative agreements, prescriptive authority, medical staff privileges, and insurance/third party reimbursement. PMID:10095652

Pastorino, C

1998-01-01

18

Simulations in nursing practice: toward authentic leadership.  

PubMed

shapira-lishchinsky o. (2012) Journal of Nursing Management Simulations in nursing practice: toward authentic leadership Aim? This study explores nurses' ethical decision-making in team simulations in order to identify the benefits of these simulations for authentic leadership. Background? While previous studies have indicated that team simulations may improve ethics in the workplace by reducing the number of errors, those studies focused mainly on clinical aspects and not on nurses' ethical experiences or on the benefits of authentic leadership. Methods? Fifty nurses from 10 health institutions in central Israel participated in the study. Data about nurses' ethical experiences were collected from 10 teams. Qualitative data analysis based on Grounded Theory was applied, using the atlas.ti 5.0 software package. Findings? Simulation findings suggest four main benefits that reflect the underlying components of authentic leadership: self-awareness, relational transparency, balanced information processing and internalized moral perspective. Conclusions? Team-based simulation as a training tool may lead to authentic leadership among nurses. Implications for nursing management? Nursing management should incorporate team simulations into nursing practice to help resolve power conflicts and to develop authentic leadership in nursing. Consequently, errors will decrease, patients' safety will increase and optimal treatment will be provided. PMID:23410036

Shapira-Lishchinsky, Orly

2012-06-01

19

LSUHSC School of Nursing Doctor of Nursing Practice  

E-print Network

LSUHSC School of Nursing Doctor of Nursing Practice Fall 2012 The LSUHSC School of Nursing announces the Inaugural Class of the Doctor of Nursing Practice Students DNP Open House DNP Open House If you are a post-master's Family or Neonatal Nurse Practitioner, Nursing Administrator, CNS in Adult

20

Clinical concept maps in nursing education: An effective way to link theory and practice.  

PubMed

Historically, nursing care plans have been utilized in nursing education to identify actual and potential health problems. The rigid structure of these plans often makes it challenging for students to assimilate data to identify and understand the many diverse patient problems. To promote critical thinking, improve problem-solving skills and foster understanding of the interrelationships among patient's health concerns, second year baccalaureate students developed and implemented concept maps using the nursing process in the clinical setting. An overview of what concept maps are, how the concept maps were developed and utilized in the clinical setting, implications for clinical teaching and outcomes of the experience are highlighted. PMID:19040844

Hicks-Moore, Sandee L

2005-11-01

21

Primary Health Care Theory to Practice: Experience of First-Year Nursing Students in Hong Kong.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Eight first-year nursing students in Hong Kong implemented a primary health care project involving health assessments of older adults. Clients improved health knowledge and were satisfied with assessments. Students demonstrated high competence in health assessment, needs assessment, evaluation strategies, and health promotion skills. (Contains 27…

Simpson, Peggy; Chan, Mun Che; Cheung, Lai Yin; Hui, Tze Shau; Li, Ka Ying; Tang, Hiu Tung; Tong, Hoi Ning; Wong, Sik Kwan; Wong, Po Ming

2002-01-01

22

Using Nursing Languages in School Nursing Practice. Second Edition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this updated manual is to define and describe standardized nursing languages, highlight how nursing languages are a part of the nursing process, and illustrate through case examples how nursing languages are used in school nursing practice. This manual also summarizes the history and development of three nursing classifications, the…

Denehy, Janice

2010-01-01

23

Nursing Home Work Practices and Nursing Assistants' Job Satisfaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: To estimate the impact of nursing home work practices, specifically compensation and working conditions, on job satisfaction of nursing assistants employed in nursing homes. Design and Methods: Data are from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey, responses by the nursing assistants' employers to the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey,…

Bishop, Christine E.; Squillace, Marie R.; Meagher, Jennifer; Anderson, Wayne L.; Wiener, Joshua M.

2009-01-01

24

Communication in Nursing Practice  

PubMed Central

Good communication between nurses and patients is essential for the successful outcome of individualized nursing care of each patient. To achieve this, however, nurses must understand and help their patients, demonstrating courtesy, kindness and sincerity. Also they should devote time to the patient to communicate with the necessary confidentiality, and must not forget that this communication includes persons who surround the sick person, which is why the language of communication should be understood by all those involved in it. Good communication also is not only based on the physical abilities of nurses, but also on education and experience. PMID:24757408

Kourkouta, Lambrini; Papathanasiou, Ioanna V.

2014-01-01

25

Professional practice skills for nurses.  

PubMed

Nurses work in a healthcare system in which different partners in care have different expectations of them. Demands to provide compassionate care that is patient-centred and responsive while adhering to budget constraints are contributing to 'compassion fatigue' and adversely affecting nurses' mood and effectiveness. This article discusses how an understanding of professional practice skills, communication skills and teamwork can help nurses to cope with these conflicting demands and compassion fatigue while performing their professional roles and responsibilities. This approach is discussed in the context of nursing discourse and related professional and government recommendations. PMID:25182923

Groves, Winnifred

2014-09-01

26

Nurses' understanding of physical science in nursing practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

When science educators teach nurses, their primary aim should be to help them to developunderstanding of their world of nursing. From a study of registered nurses' conceptions of the physical science underlying their clinical practice, we assert that nurses' understanding of the physical sciences is inadequate in terms of the competencies required of them as nurses. Rather than respond to

Lesley M. Wilkes; Judith E. Batts

1998-01-01

27

Humor in nursing practice: a phenomenological study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Humor is an important but underutilized resource in nurse-patient interaction. The multidimensional value of humor in providing nursing care has recently begun to receive attention. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to describe the meaning of nurses' use of humor in their nursing practice. Twenty-one registered nurses enrolled in a graduate nursing program described in detail an experience they

Cheryl Tatano Beck

1997-01-01

28

Celebrating excellence in nursing practice.  

PubMed

The "Nursing Excellence in Practice Awards" encourages nurses to share their research, evidence-based projects, practice innovations, publishing successes, and patient education programs with their colleagues. All projects are presented in poster format, and evaluation teams judge each poster. Cash prizes are awarded to the best projects in each category in this annual Nurses Week celebration. In addition, a pin and certificate are awarded to each participant, and a compendium is printed with the summaries of all projects. The author will describe the planning, funding, educational resources, evaluation criteria, recognition ceremony, and challenges of this program in the community hospital. PMID:18349767

Kennedy, Kimberly A

2008-01-01

29

Assisted living nursing practice: the language of dementia: theories and interventions.  

PubMed

The person with dementia uses behavior to communicate, but their behavior is altered by the combination of neurological damage and impairment, altered interpersonal relationships and reactions of others, and the individual's loss or weakening of their lifelong defenses or coping mechanisms. This article discusses the routes by which behavior can be understood and describes a constellation of needs of a person with dementia that has a unique fit with person-centered care. Three evidence-based models (theories) and interventions specific to dementia behaviors are discussed: the Need-Driven Dementia-Compromised Behavior Model, the Progressively Lowered Stress Threshold Model, and the utilization of self-identity roles. Montessori-based activities are another approach to person-centered dementia care that respect, as do the models, the dignity, worthiness and interests of the person afflicted with dementia. The models discussed in this article all seek to improve the quality of life of the person with dementia. Other than those at the profound end stage of dementia, most sufferers can communicate feelings. Subjective quality of life must be determined based on the self-report of the person suffering with dementia so that treatment interventions and effectiveness are grounded in that person's reality. PMID:17923285

Mitty, Ethel; Flores, Sandi

2007-01-01

30

Training Advanced Practice Palliative Care Nurses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the role and responsibilities of advanced-practice nurses in palliative care and nursing's initiative in promoting high-quality care through the educational preparation of these nurses. (JOW)

Sherman, Deborah Witt

1999-01-01

31

What constitutes a nursing practical skill?  

PubMed

Practical nursing skills ensure patients' physical comfort, hygiene, and safe medical treatment. The learning, performance, or significance of nursing practical skills are seldom a theme in theoretical and philosophical debate or the topic of research within nursing. This might be due to a long-standing behavioristic tradition in nursing of viewing nursing practical skills in a simplistic way, only as correctly sequenced motor movement. The purpose of this article is to bring forth an argument for a broader understanding of the constitution of nursing practical skills. This argument is substantiated by a review of past and present conceptualizations of nursing practical skills as well as by philosophical reflections on the value of practical skills in the nursing profession. Nursing practical skills embrace dimensions of performance, intention, and nursing "disciplined" understanding. PMID:11512159

Bjřrk, I T

1999-02-01

32

State regulations for school nursing practice.  

PubMed

The purpose of this article is to present a state-by-state summary of rules and regulations governing school nursing practice in the United States. Official government and agency sites were reviewed to determine providers of services in schools, criteria for becoming a school nurse, protection of titling, mandates for school nursing, and the requirements for continuing to practice as a school nurse. Trends were identified after verifying regulatory information. The majority of states credential school nurses for practice, with Departments of Education being the most frequent authorizing agency. Almost half (n = 23, 45%) of the states refer to the role of licensed practical nurses in the school setting. Requirements for becoming a school nurse range from licensed practical or vocational nurse (LPN) to registered nurse-bachelor of science degree in nursing with additional education and experience. Limitations related to data collection issues and implications for practice, education, and leadership are discussed. PMID:19934027

Praeger, Susan; Zimmerman, Barbara

2009-12-01

33

The Journal of Doctoral Nursing Practice  

E-print Network

The Journal of Doctoral Nursing Practice CSRClinical Scholars Review www.springerpub.com/csr SPRINGER PUBLISHING COMPANY Volume 5, Number 2, 2012 ISSN 1939-2095 Columbia University School of Nursing of Clinical Nursing Director, Center for Clinical Practice Columbia University School of Nursing Associate

Grishok, Alla

34

The Journal of Doctoral Nursing Practice  

E-print Network

The Journal of Doctoral Nursing Practice CSRClinical Scholars Review www of Nursing #12;Clinical Scholars Review The Journal of Doctoral Nursing Practice Volume 5, Number 1, 2012.springerpub.com/csr SPRINGER PUBLISHING COMPANY Volume 5, Number 1, 2012 ISSN 1939-2095 Columbia University School of Nursing

Qian, Ning

35

Doctoral education for WOC nurses considering advanced practice nursing.  

PubMed

Advanced practice nursing education is at a crossroads. Societal changes, increased health care demands, and leadership nursing organizations have identified the need of a doctor of nursing practice (DNP) degree as the advanced practice degree. WOC nurses need to examine DNP programs when considering returning for an advanced practice degree. This article explores nursing education at the doctorate level and areas the WOC nurse should consider when making a decision about attending a program. The WOC nurse needs to understand the similarities and differences of the doctor of philosophy and the DNP, issues about each program and its completion, personal factors, and the application process. Although selecting a doctoral program is a daunting experience, the education will provide opportunities for the WOC nurse to excel as a scholar, thus influencing the profession and the practice. PMID:22572897

Pieper, Barbara; Colwell, Janice

2012-01-01

36

Negotiated care--fundamental to nursing practice.  

PubMed

This paper focuses on negotiation in nursing. It suggests that negotiation, in the form of negotiated care, is a key element of nursing practice in the many contexts in which it takes place. To support this statement the process of negotiated care is illustrated by three examples. These examples portray negotiated care as it occurs between nurse manager (or leader) and nurse clinicians, in an interdisciplinary context, and between nurses, other health practitioners and patients/relatives. These examples demonstrate that negotiation which is aimed at achieving quality patient care pervades nursing practice. Nevertheless, it is suggested that nurses often do not recognise the centrality of negotiation in their nursing practice, nor are its implications for long-held beliefs about the role of the nurse considered. This paper also suggests that the successful outcome of negotiation in the context of nursing is dependent on nurses' confidence in, and their ability to articulate their knowledge about, nursing practice. It also relies on their commitment to the therapeutic nature of nursing practice and nurses' awareness that their practice is an essential component to patient care. The specialist nature of negotiation in nursing care, and its fundamental role in the care process, suggests that negotiation in nursing is more accurately termed negotiated care. PMID:9515457

Keatinge, D

1998-01-01

37

Genomics and nurse practitioner practice.  

PubMed

The public expects nurse practitioners (NPs) to be informed about scientific advances and adjust practice as disease screening and management evolves with new research findings. No discipline has evolved more quickly than genomics. This article describes six areas in genomics in which NPs should be competent, concluding with three case studies. PMID:25208040

Seibert, Diane C

2014-10-15

38

Starting a nursing consultation practice.  

PubMed

Because the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) role has been changed or eliminated in many hospital organizations, many CNSs in career transition are considering establishing collaborative or independent nursing consultation practices. Opportunities for consultants exist in diverse practice settings and specialties. Before starting a consultation practice, the CNS should carefully examine goals, identify resources, and begin contacting potential referral sources. He or she must also decide what form of business organization to establish and write a business plan to solidify ideas and prepare for the unexpected. Most CNS consultants rely on personal savings to cover initial business and personal expenses, and many continue working as a CNS until the consultation practice is established. Fees can be set based on community standards, what the market will bear, desired projected income, or a third-party payor's fee schedule. The consultation practice can be marketed by word of mouth, inexpensive advertising techniques such as distributing flyers and business cards, direct mall, and media advertising. In today's healthcare marketplace, opportunities abound for the CNS risk-taker interested in starting a nursing consultation practice. PMID:10382408

Schulmeister, L

1999-03-01

39

Nurses' intention to apply clinical practice guidelines.  

PubMed

Using Ajzen and Madden's Theory of Planned Behavior, this study investigates factors which influence nurses' intention to apply clinical practice guidelines in their daily ward work. A convenience sample of 91 nurses in internal medicine wards in three Israeli hospitals answered four questionnaires. Data were processed by Pearson correlation coefficients and multivariate regression. The main findings were that burnout was negatively correlated with the intention to work according to guidelines and that professionalism (in the sense of a tendency to follow taught procedure rather than personal judgment) was positively correlated with it. Furthermore, nurses who perceive their behavioral control and subjective norms to be positive will be the most determined to work according to guidelines, provided they personally command the necessary resources to do so. PMID:23447906

Kogan, Ella; Tabak, Nili

2012-12-01

40

Theorizing Practice and Practicing Theory  

E-print Network

his paper describes the emerging field of practice theory as it is practiced in relation to organizational phenomena. We identify three approaches—empirical, theoretical, and philosophical—that relate to the what, the how, ...

Feldman, Martha S.

41

The University of Texas at Austin School of Nursing Professional and Technical Standards for Nursing Practice  

E-print Network

patient care. Technical Standards for Nursing Practice NursingThe University of Texas at Austin School of Nursing Professional and Technical Standards for Nursing Practice Responsibilities and standards in nursing

Johnston, Daniel

42

Introducing a New Competency Into Nursing Practice  

PubMed Central

As science advances, new competencies must be integrated into nursing practice to ensure the provision of safe, responsible, and accountable care. This article utilizes a model for integrating a new complex competency into nursing practice, using genomics as the exemplar competency. Nurses working at 23 Magnet® Recognition Program hospitals participated in a 1-year new competency integration effort.The aim of the study was to evaluate nursing workforce attitudes, receptivity, confidence, competency, knowledge, and practices regarding genomics. Results were analyzed using descriptive statistical techniques. Respondents were 7,798 licensed registered nurses. The majority (89%) said it was very or somewhat important for nurses to become more educated in the genetics of common diseases. Overall, the respondents felt genomics was important, but a genomic nursing competency deficit affecting all nurses regardless of academic preparation or role was observed. The study findings provide essential information to help guide the integration of a new competency into nursing practice. PMID:25343056

Calzone, Kathleen A.; Jenkins, Jean; Culp, Stacey; Caskey, Sarah; Badzek, Laurie

2014-01-01

43

The certified psychiatric nurse practitioner: advanced practice psychiatric nursing reclaimed  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the decade of the 1990s, health care reform, market forces, population needs, new knowledge in neuroscience and changes in advanced practice regulation provided the impetus for the development of the role of the psychiatric nurse practitioner. Debate about issues of role, scope of practice, educational preparation, titling, and credentialing for the advanced practice psychiatric nurse (APPN) of the future

Pamela Bjorklund

2003-01-01

44

Does Faculty Incivility in Nursing Education Affect Emergency Nursing Practice?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Incivility in nursing education is a complicated problem which causes disruptions in the learning process and negatively affects future nursing practice. This mixed method research study described incivility as well as incivility's effects through extensive literature review and application of a modified Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey. The INE included six demographic items, four quantitative sections, and five open-ended

Pamela Stokes

2010-01-01

45

Nursing Theory Utilization and Application Alligood Martha Raile Nursing Theory Utilization and Application 560pp Ł42.99 Elsevier Fifth edition 9780323091893 032309189X [Formula: see text].  

PubMed

THIS BOOK has a logical format making it easy to follow. It begins with the conceptualisation of nursing knowledge by discussing the nature of knowledge, nursing models, theories, philosophies and practice. PMID:25253319

2014-09-25

46

The Journal of Doctoral Nursing Practice  

E-print Network

The Journal of Doctoral Nursing Practice CSRClinical Scholars Review www The Journal of Doctoral Nursing Practice Volume 6, Number 2, 2013 COMMENTARY/EDITORIAL From the Editor.springerpub.com/csr SPRINGER PUBLISHING COMPANY Volume 6, Number 2, 2013 ISSN 1939-2095 Columbia University School of Nursing

Grishok, Alla

47

Licensed practical nurses in the PACU.  

PubMed

Recommended staffing standards were developed by ASPAN to guide decisions for optimal outcomes and efficiency in a PACU. In the midst of a nursing shortage, providing optimal staffing can be challenging. Licensed practical nurses can be educated to meet evidence-based standards for optimal patient recovery. Determining critical skills and competencies and performing a thorough interview assists in selecting suitable licensed practical nurse candidates. Supplying a high-quality orientation contributes to team success. High-performing teams promote greater efficiency in patient care and consequently improve quality of care and staff morale. This article provides details of a model of care that includes licensed practical nurses in the nurse staff mix. Suitability qualities, orientation program, and scope of practice of licensed practical nurses will be discussed. Improved patient experience and efficiency can be successfully achieved with mixed registered and licensed practical nurse PACU staffing. PMID:19962102

DeWitt, Lori

2009-12-01

48

Does Faculty Incivility in Nursing Education Affect Emergency Nursing Practice?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Incivility in nursing education is a complicated problem which causes disruptions in the learning process and negatively affects future nursing practice. This mixed method research study described incivility as well as incivility's effects through extensive literature review and application of a modified Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey. The INE included six demographic items, four quantitative sections, and five open-ended questions. The survey examined emergency nurses' perceptions of incivility and how the experience affected their personal nursing practice. The INE was initially tested in a 2004 pilot study by Dr. Cynthia Clark. For this research study, modifications were made to examine specifically emergency nurse's perceptions of incivility and the effects on their practice. The population was a group of nurses who were members of the emergency nurses association in a Midwestern state. In the quantitative component of the Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey, the Likert scale questions indicated that the majority of the participants reported witnessing or experiencing the uncivil behaviors. In the qualitative section of the INE survey, the participants reported that although they have not seen incivility within their own academic career, they had observed faculty incivility with nursing students when the participants were assigned as preceptors as part of their emergency nursing practice.

Stokes, Pamela

49

Evidence-based practice and orthopaedic nursing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evidence-based practice has become part of the language of health care. This article illustrates the professional implications for orthopaedic nurses and the challenges it raises for current and future practice development. The article suggests steps for developing an evidence-based approach to orthopaedic practice, the necessary skills nurses need to develop, and the benefits of a multidisciplinary view in developing practice.

Julia Kneale

2000-01-01

50

Faculty practice plan entrance strategy for nursing.  

PubMed

Nursing is a practice discipline that places great value on members of the profession who excel as providers of direct care. With health care reform, nursing faculty have unprecedented opportunities for advanced practice and are implementing entrepreneurial ventures to meet their commitments to practice. The purpose of this article is to describe a nursing faculty practice plan in conjunction with a decentralized medical school plan. The major benefits and barriers to its adoption are addressed. PMID:9087037

Parsons, M A; Felton, G M; Chassie, M B

1996-01-01

51

Specialty practice entrepreneur: the advanced practice nurse.  

PubMed

There are many opportunities in the health care arena to make a difference. The structured sense of change is "old school." New "surfers" of the system will be entrepreneurial in spirit, energy, and flexibility. There is no job description for the perfect person, only a sense of excitement and innovation that gives one the feeling energetic change is about to happen. In nursing, the risk takers are abundant in the APN role. It is the reason why they walk the line of provider/nurse. Making a difference to patients is important. Riding the waves of clinical care is the excitement. The final results are "the big waves" of life--a patient's life. A provider who defines the reality of practice creates a vision and skillfully bridges the road between the two. Design the surfboard--catch the wave. PMID:9987328

Kowal, N

1998-01-01

52

Clinical practice: new challenges for the advanced practice nurse.  

PubMed

This report describes the challenges for advanced practice nurses (APNs) relative to supply and demand issues. The article also includes opportunities with the Balanced Budget Act, physician acceptance of Advanced Practice Nurses, and expanding practice opportunities. The challenges include the nursing shortage (both in nursing students and faculty), the aging of the nursing workforce, and a lag in nursing salaries; increased demand for nursing based on aging baby boomers, increasing patient acuity and technology, and new arenas for practice. The Balanced Budget Act of 1997 provided new opportunities for advanced practice nurses, including enhanced autonomy to provide services and bill independently of physicians. With these changes come new opportunities for advanced practice nurse entrepreneurs in the areas of independent practice, including opportunities to positively impact the health of families and communities in alignment with the Federal government's vision for "Healthy People 2010." As physician acceptance of advanced practice nurses continues to grow and in light of the changes in medical practice and education (residency reduction), opportunities to expand collaborative practice arrangements also exist. APNs are best suited to make the most of these changes. One example of an opportunity for independent practice, a Community Wellness Center, is developed as an entrepreneurial venture benefiting both the APN and the health of a community. Who better than registered nurses (RNs), especially those practicing at the advanced level, can ensure that these opportunities and challenges are addressed in an ethical manner and focused on the needs and health of the community? PMID:12029667

Bartel, J C; Buturusis, B

2000-12-01

53

Nurse-perceived Patient Adverse Events and Nursing Practice Environment  

PubMed Central

Objectives: To evaluate the occurrence of patient adverse events in Korean hospitals as perceived by nurses and examine the correlation between patient adverse events with the nurse practice environment at nurse and hospital level. Methods: In total, 3096 nurses working in 60 general inpatient hospital units were included. A two-level logistic regression analysis was performed. Results: At the hospital level, patient adverse events included patient falls (60.5%), nosocomial infections (51.7%), pressure sores (42.6%) and medication errors (33.3%). Among the hospital-level explanatory variables associated with the nursing practice environment, ‘physician- nurse relationship’ correlated with medication errors while ‘education for improving quality of care’ affected patient falls. Conclusions: The doctor-nurse relationship and access to education that can improve the quality of care at the hospital level may help decrease the occurrence of patient adverse events. PMID:25284199

Kang, Jeong-Hee; Kim, Chul-Woung; Lee, Sang-Yi

2014-01-01

54

Expanding the Capacity of Advanced Practice Nursing Education. Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The basic objective of the study is to provide information to the Division of Nursing about the feasibility of increasing the production of advanced practice nurses in four specialty areas: nurse practitioners (NPs), nurse-midwives (NMWs), clinical nurse ...

1995-01-01

55

Doctor of Nursing Practice Ph.D. in Nursing Focus Nursing Practice Nursing Research  

E-print Network

Objectives To create nursing leaders in interdisciplinary health care teams by providing students systems of care, and measure outcomes of patient groups, populations and communities. To prepare nurse Graduation Health care administration, clinical nurse faculty Nurse scientist, nursing faculty GRE Required

Zhou, Pei

56

Evidence-Based Practice and School Nursing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

School nurses need to demonstrate that their practice is based on the best evidence available, which is usually data obtained from research. Evidence-based practice involves combining the best evidence available with nursing expertise and patient and family preferences to determine optimum care. Evidence-based practice guidelines are developed by…

Adams, Susan; McCarthy, Ann Marie

2005-01-01

57

Gatekeeping practices of nurses in operating rooms  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores the gatekeeping practices used by operating room nurses to control information flow in their everyday clinical practice. In nursing, gatekeeping appears only sporadically in the literature and usually emerges as a secondary concept rather than being the primary focus of studies. As gatekeeping is a communication practice that has the potential to impact directly on patient safety,

Robin Riley; Elizabeth Manias

2009-01-01

58

Flight nursing expertise: towards a middle-range theory  

PubMed Central

Aim This paper presents a middle-range Theory of Flight Nursing Expertise. Background Rotary-wing (helicopter) medical transport has grown rapidly in the USA since its introduction, particularly during the past 5 years. Patients once considered too sick to transport are now being transported more frequently and over longer distances. Many limitations are imposed by the air medical transport environment and these require nurses to alter their practice. Data sources A literature search was conducted using Pubmed, Medline, CINAHL, secondary referencing and an Internet search from 1960 to 2008 for studies related to the focal concepts in flight nursing. Discussion The middle-range Theory of Flight Nursing Expertise is composed of nine concepts (experience, training, transport environment of care, psychomotor skills, flight nursing knowledge, cue recognition, pattern recognition, decision-making and action) and their relationships. Five propositions describe the relationships between those concepts and how they apply to flight nursing expertise. Implications for nursing After empirical testing, this theory may be a useful tool to assist novice flight nurses to attain the skills necessary to provide safe and competent care more efficiently, and may aid in designing curricula and programmes of research. Conclusion Research is needed to determine the usefulness of this theory in both rotary and fixed-wing medical transport settings, and to examine the similarities and differences related to expertise needed for different flight nurse team compositions. Curriculum and training innovations can result from increased understanding of the concepts and relationships proposed in this theory. PMID:20337803

Reimer, Andrew P.; Moore, Shirley M.

2010-01-01

59

Medication Administration Practices of School Nurses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Assessed medication administration practices among school nurses, surveying members of the National Association of School Nurses. Respondents were extremely concerned about medication administration. Errors in administering medications were reported by 48.5 percent of respondents, with missed doses the most common error. Most nurses followed…

McCarthy, Ann Marie; Kelly, Michael W.; Reed, David

2000-01-01

60

The Journal of Doctoral Nursing Practice  

E-print Network

The Journal of Doctoral Nursing Practice CSRClinical Scholars Review www.springerpub.com/csr SPRINGER PUBLISHING COMPANY Columbia University School of Nursing With the Compliments of Springer 61 http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/1939-2095.5.1.61 global perspectives International Postgraduate Nursing

Grishok, Alla

61

The Journal of Doctoral Nursing Practice  

E-print Network

The Journal of Doctoral Nursing Practice CSRClinical Scholars Review www.springerpub.com/csr SPRINGER PUBLISHING COMPANY Columbia University School of Nursing With the Compliments of Springer, the International Council of Nurses (ICN) sug- gested that the master's degree be required for entry into advanced

Grishok, Alla

62

Practice environments that attract and retain nurses.  

PubMed

Research shows that there is a direct correlation between the quality of nurses' work environments and the quality of client care. RNABC's newest policy statement, Nursing Practice Environments for Safe and Appropriate Care, identifies the key elements in an organization that are associated with improved client outcomes through attraction and retention of nurses. PMID:12152469

Winslow, W

2001-10-01

63

Nursing conceptualizations of research and practice  

PubMed Central

Despite the fact that computer use in health care and nursing is burgeoning, nurses often find that they have inadequate tools with which to manage information about complex phenomena. Family is one such complex phenomenon of interest to nurses. Commonly used computer tools for managing information about families may not be congruent with the ways that individuals define their families and may not be consistent with nursing conceptualization of families as dynamic groups not necessarily limited to biologically related individuals. Building nursing knowledge on incongruent conceptualizations will result in inaccurate knowledge. Communication and collaboration between nurse researchers, clinicians, and nursing informatics researchers are needed in order to produce tools that are consistent with nursing conceptualization and that will support nursing research and practice. PMID:19150266

Peace, Jane; Lutz, Kristin F.

2009-01-01

64

Hong Kong Nursing Students' Knowledge on Dyslexia: Implications for Nursing Education and Clinical Practices  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Nurses' dyslexia knowledge is crucial for early detection of dyslexia before referring suspected children for further assessment. This study aims to obtain a profile of nursing students' knowledge on dyslexia so as to explore the implications for nursing education for both nursing students and practicing nurses as well as for current and future nursing practices. Method: Nursing students (N=133)

CM TSUI

2007-01-01

65

Thoughtful nursing practice: reflections on nurse delegation decision-making.  

PubMed

This article discusses delegation challenges and legal and regulatory oversight associated with delegation in the clinical practice setting. The authors address moral and legal attributes of the roles and responsibilities of health care providers regarding delegating health care interventions. The article also explores guiding principles and rules of delegation within professional standards, national practice guidelines, and state nurse practice acts. Nurse experts provide thoughtful reflection on nursing models and the role of delegation, emphasizing the critical role of delegation in extending the role of the health care professional in patient care services. PMID:19850182

McInnis, Leigh Ann; Parsons, Lynn C

2009-12-01

66

Advanced Practice Nursing Education: Challenges and Strategies  

PubMed Central

Nursing education programs may face significant difficulty as they struggle to prepare sufficient numbers of advanced practice registered nurses to fulfill the vision of helping to design an improved US healthcare system as described in the Institute of Medicine's “Future of nursing” report. This paper describes specific challenges and provides strategies to improve advanced practice nursing clinical education in order to ensure that a sufficient number of APRNs are available to work in educational, practice, and research settings. Best practices are identified through a review of classic and current nursing literature. Strategies include intensive interprofessional collaborations and radical curriculum revisions such as increased use of simulation and domestic and international service work. Nurse educators must work with all stakeholders to create effective and lasting change. PMID:22220273

Fitzgerald, Cynthia; Kantrowitz-Gordon, Ira; Katz, Janet; Hirsch, Anne

2012-01-01

67

Practical Nursing. Post Secondary Curriculum Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This curriculum guide was designed for use in postsecondary practical nursing education programs in Georgia. Its purpose is to provide for the development of entry level skills in practical nursing in the areas of knowledge, theoretical structure, tool usage, diagnostic ability, related supportive skills, and occupational survival skills. The…

Simpson, Bruce; And Others

68

Courage and nursing practice: a theoretical analysis.  

PubMed

This article aims to deepen the understanding of courage through a theoretical analysis of classical philosophers' work and a review of published and unpublished empirical research on courage in nursing. The authors sought answers to questions regarding how courage is understood from a philosophical viewpoint and how it is expressed in nursing actions. Four aspects were identified as relevant to a deeper understanding of courage in nursing practice: courage as an ontological concept, a moral virtue, a property of an ethical act, and a creative capacity. The literature review shed light on the complexity of the concept of courage and revealed some lack of clarity in its use. Consequently, if courage is to be used consciously to influence nurses' ethical actions it seems important to recognize its specific features. The results suggest it is imperative to foster courage among nurses and student nurses to prepare them for ethical, creative action and further the development of professional nursing practices. PMID:20801958

Lindh, Inga-Britt; Barbosa da Silva, António; Berg, Agneta; Severinsson, Elisabeth

2010-09-01

69

Toward a theory of professional nursing caring: a unifying perspective.  

PubMed

This paradigm of professional nursing caring unifies aspects of humanistic and scientific perspectives. Through interconnections of the holistic nursing perspective, person-environment interactions, and the caring ethic, fusion occurs that reorganizes old orders and structures. From this dynamic, creative energies are generated and used in being, relating, and acting by the nurse through therapeutic use of self. Through professional nursing caring, the wholeness and integrity of a patient-client is maintained and assisted toward actualization, with wellness and illness outcomes altered, and more caring health-related environments restructured that preserve and support the humanness of patients and people in those environments. The professional nursing paradigm has been guided in organization by a holographic perspective of reality, a perspective that envisions two realms: the implicate and the explicate, with the implicate available to the explicate realm in dealing with reality. The two realities have been unified into a holonomic order in which the essences (qualities) and entities (actions) of professional nursing caring have been restructured into a new order. The paradigm opens avenues for constructing a nursing theory in which caring is systematically embedded in concepts, structure, and relations. The imperative for nursing education is to reconceptualize professional nursing caring and undertake the effort and energy required to place this essence in the heart of nursing theory, practice, education, and research. This is the profession's challenge for the coming decade. PMID:2308810

Koldjeski, D

1990-01-01

70

Use of nursing practice research findings.  

PubMed

Fourteen nursing research findings that meet the Conduct and Utilization of Research in Nursing (CURN) Project (1982) criteria for clinical use were identified from research journals and CURN publications. Data collected from 216 practicing nurses in small, medium, and large hospitals were analyzed to determine their awareness of, persuasion about, and use of the findings. The majority of nurses were aware of the average innovation, were persuaded about it, and used the average innovation at least sometimes. Use of the innovations had no relationship to hospital policies or procedures concerning the nursing research findings. PMID:3671121

Brett, J L

1987-01-01

71

Doctor of NursiNg Practice scholarly Projects ~ 2011  

E-print Network

Karen d'apolito, Phd,aPrN, NNP- BC, FaaN Professor of Nursing, Director Neonatal Nurse PractitionerDoctor of NursiNg Practice scholarly Projects ~ 2011 #12;Doctor of NursiNg Practice scholarly, FaaN Nancy and Hilliard Travis Professor of Nursing dean,Vanderbilt University School of Nursing #12

Bordenstein, Seth

72

Teaching and learning care--exploring nursing students' clinical practice.  

PubMed

Care has always been a key element of nursing. This paper presents findings from research on the following issue: What opportunities and limitations do nursing students encounter when learning nursing care? The study has a qualitative design with field methodology and the study of documents. Six nursing students have been closely monitored during their clinical studies in hospitals, nursing homes and home-based nursing. The study shows that nursing students are likely to possess the potential to provide care for sick and unknown people. The motivation for their commitment to patients may contain an egoistical orientation and runs contrary to former ideals of the nurse's self-sacrificing altruism. Moreover the study shows that there is a potential in the clinical field and in the university college to reflective considerations on experience of care. While clinical practice often has focus on practical problem-solving and procedures, the college tends to focus on abstract theory. Both of these promote the privatisation and neglect of the students' experience of care. The paper concludes with a call for teaching and learning strategies targeting the use of nursing students' personal experience of care. PMID:19581026

Solvoll, Betty-Ann; Heggen, Kristin M

2010-01-01

73

Practice patterns of licensed practical nurses in North Carolina.  

PubMed

In the United States, state laws develop basic practices to define the scopes of practice for registered nurses and licensed practical nurses (LPNs). The purpose of the study was to describe the actual practice patterns of LPNs working in North Carolina. The results of the study convey an unfavorable pattern regarding LPN scope of practice. Indications are that a paradigm shift might be required in order to reverse the pattern of overpractice by LPNs. PMID:22367015

Parnell, Elizabeth R; Kring, Daria L

2012-01-01

74

Critical thinking, nurse education and universities: some thoughts on current issues and implications for nursing practice.  

PubMed

When in the latter part of the 20th century nurse 'training' in the UK left the old schools of nursing (based within the health delivery system) and entered universities, the promise was not just a change of focus from training to education but an embracement of 'higher' education. Specifically, nurses were to be exposed to the demands of thinking rather than just doing - and critical thinking at that. However, despite a history of critical perspectives informing nursing theory, that promise may be turning sour. The insidious saturation of the university system in bureaucracy and managerialism has, we argue, undermined critical thinking. A major funding restructuring of higher education in the UK, coinciding with public concern about the state of nursing practice, is undermining further the viability of critical thinking in nursing and potentially the acceptability of university education for nurses. Nevertheless, while critical thinking in universities has decayed, there is no obvious educational alternative that can provide this core attribute, one that is even more necessary to understand health and promote competent nursing practice in an increasingly complex and globalising world. We propose that nurse academics and their colleagues from many other academic and professional disciplines engage in collegiate 'moral action' to re-establish critical thinking in UK universities. PMID:23218906

Morrall, Peter; Goodman, Benny

2013-09-01

75

Eliciting reflections on caring theory in elderly caring practice  

PubMed Central

Caring theories are the description and conceptualization of the care that is given in caring practise by nurses and other professional caregivers with the aim of verbalizing and communicating caring phenomena. Intermittently, a theorypractice gap is given expression- that theory does not go along with clinical practice in caring. The aim of this study was an investigation into the possible disparity between theory and practice in caring by analysing nurses’ lived experience of the understanding of caring theory in practice in the context of municipal elderly care. Hermeneutical phenomenology was the research approach used to explore the lived experience of caring science theories in caring practice from the perspective of 12 nurses working in municipal care for elderly. The findings shows that the nurses Impulsively described their experience of detachment to caring theory, but when describing their caring intentions, the relationship to theory became apparent, and even confirmed their practice. As such, a seedbed exists for caring theory to be reflected on and cultivated in caring praxis. However, as the nurses describe, the caring theory must be sensitive enough for the nursing practitioners to accept. The gap revealed itself on an organisational level, as the nurses’ commission in municipal care did not correspond with their caring intention. We believe it is important to seriously consider what we want to achieve as a caring profession. We have to reflect on our responsibility as culture carriers and knowledge developers. We must make the disparate forces of intention and organisation become one intertwining force. PMID:21866232

Elisabeth Ranheim, Albertine; Kärner, Anita; Berterö, Carina

2011-01-01

76

Nursing Interventions Core to Specialty Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The identification of nursing interventions that are core to each clinical specialty will be useful in the development of nursing information systems, staff education programs and evaluations, referral networks, certification and licensing examinations, curricula, and research and theory construction. (Author/JOW)

McCloskey, Joanne Comi; Donahue, William; Bulechek, Gloria M.

1998-01-01

77

Report on Doctor of Nursing Practice Essentials Examination  

E-print Network

Report on Doctor of Nursing Practice Essentials Examination Eagle ID: 900 __ ____ Name: _______________________________________ Degree: __Doctor of Nursing Practice___________________ Major: _Nursing Studies no later than one week prior to the last day of classes for the term during which

Hutcheon, James M.

78

MSc Advanced Practice (Nursing) The MSc Advanced Practice (Nursing) has been designed to allow a flexible postgraduate pathway  

E-print Network

and practical capabilities within nursing and health care provision · Support from highly experienced academic and Social Care module 2. Nursing, Politics and Social Change (Core Nursing module) 3. Two optional modulesMSc Advanced Practice (Nursing) The MSc Advanced Practice (Nursing) has been designed to allow

Davidson, Fordyce A.

79

Practical Nursing, Volume I. Health Occupations Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This curriculum guide provides teachers with up-to-date information and skill-related applications needed by the practical nurse. The volume contains three sections and 24 instructional units: Personal Vocational Relationships (6 units), Nutrition (3 units), and Basic Nursing Principles and Applied Skills (15 units covering such topics as…

Rogers, Helen W.; And Others

80

Privacy Questions from Practicing School Nurses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Question and Answer (Q&A) article addresses practice issues related to school health records and school nursing documentation that were posed by school nurses in the field. Specifically, the questions addressed concern the following: education records, medication privacy issues, sharing of sensitive health information, privacy of individual…

Bergren, Martha Dewey

2004-01-01

81

Returning to nursing practice: a learning journey.  

PubMed

In response to the current shortage in the Australian nursing workforce, educational strategies that support organisational investment in nurses returning to the workforce are described. For many of these nurses, contemporary roles and responsibilities present a dramatic departure from their previous experiences. This hospital-based Return to Practice Programme described in this paper is pivotal to the integration of formal learning with current clinical practice. The programme moves away from a need to fill vacant positions to a framework that overtly values the diversity of experience and knowledge that participants bring to the workplace, focusing on a person-environment fit with opportunities for clinical practice. The programme supports nurses who are returning to practice to identify their learning needs, to refresh their theoretical knowledge for contemporary nursing care delivery and provides structured, supported practice in the clinical setting. This paper describes programme participants' learning journeys which emerged through analysis of data using interpretive phenomenology, an approach that focuses on the meaning of an experience for the individual in relation to the context in which it occurred. From the exemplars used to illustrate some of these learning experiences, educators and practioners alike may better anticipate participants' learning and support requirements thus optimising their clinical learning opportunities while maximising the number of nurses that are recruited back into the nursing workforce. PMID:17563329

Elwin, Carolyn

2007-04-01

82

[Brazilian scientific production based on Orem's nursing theory: integrative review].  

PubMed

Integrative review, held in the databases LILACS, SciELO and BDENF from January 2005 to May 2009, aimed to summarize the Brazilian scientific production based on Orem's Nursing Theory. We obtained 23 articles, analyzed by simple descriptive statistics. It was found that 100% of the studies focused on adults. Of this total, 65,22% returned to the chronicle diseases. In 39,15% of the searches, the theory was used in full and in 34,80% one of the constructs. 91,30% of publications aimed to the construction and deployment of the structured and theoretically grounded practice of care. It was concluded that the theory has been used as theoretical and philosophical basis to justify the practice of nursing in a variety of situations in order to emphasize the role of the nurse in the care. PMID:23032347

Raimondo, Maria Lúcia; Fegadoli, Débora; Méier, Marineli Joaquim; Wall, Marilene Loewen; Labronici, Liliana Maria; Raimondo-Ferraz, Maria Isabel

2012-01-01

83

Developing nursing practice in platelet transfusions.  

PubMed

The number of platelet transfusions has risen steadily over the past five years. This article addresses some of the reasons for this increase and examines current transfusion practice in relation to findings of national audits of platelet use and current research. It explores the extended role of the nurse in platelet transfusions, including nurse authorisation, and presents an overview of education material available to inform practice and to ensure judicious use of platelet transfusions with maximum benefit for the patient. PMID:25388736

McSporran, Wendy; Watson, Denise

2014-11-12

84

[Innovative thinking in nursing practice].  

PubMed

The nursing profession is patient-centered and responsible to meet the disparate health needs of a wide range of client "groups". Ensuring continued innovation and change to further improve care quality in an evolving health care system is an important issue. A focus on resolving minor points rather than on achieving major change may be the best approach to realizing continuous innovation in nursing. The advantages include not only promoting nursing quality and decreasing costs and manpower, but also giving satisfaction and self-fulfillment to the innovator. Successful innovation is affected by environmental structural support as well as the characteristics of the innovation and innovator. A successful innovator is sensitive to each opportunity, but is not a risk creator. This article describes innovator characteristics and innovation execution, and investigates the content and process of nursing innovation from various points of view in order to create new ideas and values related to the traditional nursing role. PMID:23588694

Lin, Chia-Ling; Wang, Ya-Ni; Tsai, Hsiu-Min

2013-04-01

85

Nursing students learning to utilize nursing research in clinical practice.  

PubMed

The purpose of the study was to examine the significance of a learning assignment in relation to research skills and learning of nursing students in clinical practice. The learning assignment included an oral presentation of a nursing research article, which the students gave to their fellow students and ward nurses. The students also chaired the discussion after the presentation. The target group for the study was nursing students of a Finnish polytechnic who had been studying for 2-2 1/2 years and had accomplished a minimum of 120 ECTS credits of the total of 210 ECTS credits. When participating in the study, the students were completing a six-week clinical practice of optional studies. The data were collected with a questionnaire designed for the study. It consisted of six open-ended questions. Three of the questions were related to learning of research skills. Two questions were concerned with learning during the ongoing clinical practice. The final question inquired the students' views on the development of the learning assignment. The students received the questionnaire before the commencement of their clinical practice, and they returned it to the other researcher after their clinical practice. The questionnaire was given to 80 students, of which 50 returned it; the response rate was 63%. The data were analysed by content analysis question by question. According to the results, the learning assignment advanced the understanding of research concepts for the majority of the students. In particular, the students reported that the oral presentation clarified the research concepts, and the structure of a scientific article was also elucidated. The students stated that the assignment generated ideas concerning the development of nursing care. In relation to the ongoing clinical practice, the assignment advanced patient encounters and interaction, and bearing responsibility the most. Proposals for the further development of the learning assignment were expressed by more than half of the nursing students. Half of them suggested ensuring the interest in the topic from the ward. PMID:17064819

Mattila, Lea-Riitta; Eriksson, Elina

2007-08-01

86

Put Theory into Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When making decisions that impact student learning, college educators often consider previous experiences, precedent, common sense, and advice from colleagues. But how often do they consider theory? At a recent state-level educators' meeting, the authors of this article asked 50 student affairs educators about the use of theory in their practice.…

Jaeger, Audrey J.; Dunstan, Stephany; Thornton, Courtney; Rockenbach, Alyssa B.; Gayles, Joy G.; Haley, Karen J.

2013-01-01

87

Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP) Earn Your Doctorate & Advance the Profession of Nursing  

E-print Network

on the direct or indirect delivery of high quality nursing care and the improvement in outcomes of care Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP) Earn Your Doctorate & Advance the Profession of Nursing degree in nursing is the perfect way to enhance your practice and advance the profession of nursing

Papautsky, Ian

88

Towards an alternative to Benner's theory of expert intuition in nursing: A discussion paper  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several authors have highlighted the role of intuition in expertise. In particular, a large amount of data has been collected about intuition in expert nursing, and intuition plays an important role in the influential theory of nursing expertise developed by Benner [1984. From Novice to Expert: Excellence and Power in Clinical Nursing Practice. Addison–Wesley, Menlo Park, CA]. We discuss this

Fernand Gobet; Philippe Chassy

2008-01-01

89

Evidence-Based Practice Guidelines and School Nursing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The use of evidence-based practice (EBP) has become the standard of health care practice. Nurses are expected to use best evidence on a wide range of topics, yet most nurses have limited time, resources, and/or skills to access and evaluate the quality of research and evidence needed to practice evidence-based nursing. EBP guidelines allow nurses

Adams, Susan; McCarthy, Ann Marie

2007-01-01

90

Recognising advancing nursing practice: evidence from two observational studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Debates over title, grades and relationships across the profession has tended to dominate the literature in advancing nursing practice. Fewer research projects have attempted to study the activities of nurses who are designated as undertaking advancing nursing roles. One study evaluating Masters courses for Clinical Nursing Practice and a second addressing the impact of the ‘Scope of Professional Practice’ (United

Jennifer Wilson-Barnett; K. Louise Barriball; Heidi Reynolds; Sandra Jowett; Iain Ryrie

2000-01-01

91

The Essentials of Doctoral Education for Advanced Nursing Practice  

E-print Network

1 The Essentials of Doctoral Education for Advanced Nursing Practice TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Task Force on the Practice Doctorate in Nursing 4 Context of Graduate Education in Nursing 5 Roles 7 The Essentials of Doctoral Education for Advanced Nursing Practice 8 I. Scientific Underpinnings

Acton, Scott

92

The Doctor of Nursing Practice: A national workforce perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 2004, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) adopted a position statement concerning the future of advanced practice nursing education. A target date of 2015 was articulated as the point by which master’s preparation for advanced practice nurses would be replaced by doctoral level education. Seismic shifts in the realities surrounding nursing education and practice have occurred since

Linda Cronenwett; Kathleen Dracup; Margaret Grey; Linda McCauley; Afaf Meleis; Marla Salmon

2011-01-01

93

FACT SHEET for Licensed Practical Nurses Entering NEPS  

E-print Network

1 of 2 FACT SHEET for Licensed Practical Nurses Entering NEPS Frequently Asked Questions: 1. I am a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) interested in entering the Nursing Education Program of Saskatchewan (NEPS). What are the NEPS entrance requirements for LPNs? Licensed Practical Nurses currently registered

Saskatchewan, University of

94

LPN's, 1967; An Inventory of Licensed Practical Nurses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The data in this report are the result of the first in a series of five proposed inventories of licensed practical nurses. The study revealed a total of 343,635 practical nurses holding licenses to practice at the time of the study. About 74 percent reported they were employed in nursing, 20 percent indicated they were not employed in nursing, and…

Marshall, Eleanor D.; Moses, Evelyn B.

95

The Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory as a curriculum conceptual framework in baccalaureate education.  

PubMed

Although Dorothea Orem's Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory has been used for curricula framework for years, it was not until 2001 that Orem identified the nursing practice sciences and the foundational nursing sciences and specified the appropriate content for the two sciences. The broad purpose of this paper is to reinforce the importance of utilizing nursing theories as curricular conceptual frameworks. The specific purpose is to delineate the appropriate content for baccalaureate programs that adopt a Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory conceptual framework for their curriculum. PMID:21471038

Berbiglia, Violeta A

2011-04-01

96

An emancipatory theory of compassion for nursing.  

PubMed

The purpose of this article was to critique and synthesize the trajectory of the work of Dr Jane Georges in Advances in Nursing Science over the past decade in the development of an emancipatory theory of compassion, with implications for contemporary nursing. Specifically, this article (1) summarizes and critiques the work in each stage of its development, describing missing elements at each stage and subsequent development of ideas built upon previous work, and (2) proposes future directions for the work, including the proposal of a theory of compassion within the emancipatory paradigm to guide further scholarly inquiry in nursing. PMID:23370495

Georges, Jane M

2013-01-01

97

Healthy buildings: impact on nurses and nursing practice.  

PubMed

Mounting evidence indicates that buildings can be a significant cause of human illness and environmental degradation. According to the United States (US) Environmental Protection Agency, indoor air pollution is one of the top five environmental risks to public health in the US. This may be related, to a large extent, to the fact that US citizens spend as much as 95% of their time indoors. Health care leaders, designers, and architects, recognizing the connection between health and the buildings in which much time is spent, are engaging in sustainable design and construction for healthy, 'green' buildings. The purpose of this article is to assist nurses in understanding the impact that unhealthy buildings can have on nurses and nursing practice and to provide tools and resources to assist nurses in transforming the health care industry with the goal of creating healing environments and reducing the negative environmental impact of the health care industry. First definitions, current initiatives, and motivations related to sustainable designs will be presented. Next sustainable health care design strategies, such as site planning, clean transportation, water conservation, healthy materials selection, indoor environmental quality, and also the benefits of sustainable design will be discussed. The article will conclude by sharing a variety of resources nurses can use to create healing environments in health care settings. PMID:21848349

Guenther, Robin; Hall, Anna Gilmore

2007-05-01

98

The creative élan of nursing theory: indispensable to leadership.  

PubMed

The author discusses how nursing theoretical knowledge contributes to nursing leadership and how the use of nursing theory can build confidence in nurse leaders in all settings, drawing on examples from selected theorists' work. It is suggested that when nursing theory is not fully valued by the profession, not only knowledge is lost but also the language that helps nurses to lead. However, the vision and the voice of nursing theory will allow nurses to lead with creativity and to tap into innovation that facilitates contributions to healthcare. To be firmly, intellectually, and enthusiastically grounded in one's disciplinary knowledge sets the stage to being able to lead effectively. Four aspects of leadership are addressed: clinical, interdisciplinary, nursing education, and interpersonal nursing. Our accumulated nursing theories can help nurse leaders to meet contemporary healthcare challenges by providing answers that help to focus on improvement, patient-centered care, critical reflection, and caring. PMID:25248779

Donohue-Porter, Patricia

2014-10-01

99

Hiring and incorporating doctor of nursing practice-prepared nurse faculty into academic nursing programs.  

PubMed

Semistructured interviews were conducted with 15 deans and directors of nursing programs across the United States to gain an understanding of how Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP)-prepared nurses seeking academic positions are hired and used in schools of nursing. Interviews sought to gain information regarding (a) differences and similarities in the roles and responsibilities of DNP- and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)-prepared faculty, (b) educational advancement and mentoring of DNP-prepared nurse faculty, (c) recruitment of doctorally prepared nurse faculty, and (d) shortages of nursing faculty. DNP- and PhD-prepared nurse faculty are hired for varying roles in baccalaureate and higher degree schools of nursing, some similar to other faculty with master's degrees and others similar to those with PhDs; in associate degree in nursing programs, they are largely hired for the same type of work as nurse faculty with master's degrees. Regardless of program or degree type, the main role of DNP-prepared faculty is teaching. PMID:25050562

Agger, Charlotte A; Oermann, Marilyn H; Lynn, Mary R

2014-08-01

100

A Novel Theory for Nursing Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article discusses how aspects of a holistic comfort theory were adapted to create a taxonomic structure to apply its concepts to a fast-track nursing education program. The principles of learner-centered education were combined with comfort theory to develop strategies that appear to have produced positive influences on the attributes and con- texts of comfort within the learning community. With

Miki Goodwin; Susan H. Steiner

101

Administrative Protocol Page 1 of 3 Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

Administrative Protocol Page 1 of 3 Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department: Qualifications and Availability 1. To qualify as a NURSE PRO, the employee must: a. be licensed as a registered Page 2 of 3 Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing The University

Oliver, Douglas L.

102

The National Nursing Model from the Nursing Practice Perspective - Results from a Finnish Evaluation Study  

PubMed Central

The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of the national nursing model in Finland. The feasibility evaluation was carried out with nurses using interviews and patient case scenarios in primary, specialized and private healthcare. The nursing process model showed to be feasible in nursing practice but the current national nursing classification (FinCC) was considered to be too detailed, multi-layered and difficult to understand and use. Overall, electronic nursing documentation improves the legal protection of patients and health professionals and makes nursing care transparent, but the nursing documentation systems do not support multi-professional care or information exchange. This study resulted in that the nursing model should conform better to nursing practices and support better nurses in their care interventions. An essential improvement for nursing practice would be specific templates that are easy to apply in specific situations with homogenous patient groups. PMID:24199092

Kuusisto, Anne; Kaipio, Johanna; Nykanen, Pirkko

2012-01-01

103

University of Hawaii Hilo School of Nursing DOCTOR OF NURSING PRACTICE  

E-print Network

University of Hawaii Hilo School of Nursing DOCTOR OF NURSING PRACTICE Supplementary Application) UH ID Number (if known): Yes NoDo you currently hold an active registered nurse (RN) license certified as an Advanced Practice Nurse? IF YES, please specify: Agency & Expiration date: If you have

Wiegner, Tracy N.

104

The Historical Evolution of Theories and Conceptual Models for Nursing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The development of nursing models can be traced to the inception of nursing as a profession. Florence Nightingale laid the foundation for current nursing practice and differentiated nursing from medicine. The late 19th and early 20th centuries contributed a number of important nurse theorists, better known for other contributions to the neophyte…

Hawkins, Joellen W.

105

Advanced practice nursing and the role of the pediatric critical care nurse practitioner.  

PubMed

Advanced practice nursing, since its inception in the early 1960s, has constantly changed in an effort to establish standardized core graduate education, specialization of practice, and autonomy, now common in the 1990s. Nurse practitioners, nurse midwives, and certified registered nurse anesthetists have followed in the footsteps of the clinical nurse specialist by enhancing their practice through advanced education. Nurses in these advanced areas are graduating from established programs with a master's of science in nursing and a specialty in their chosen field. The pediatric critical care nurse practitioner is one such specialty. This article highlights the results of a national survey that described pediatric critical care nurse practitioner practice over a broad geographic area. With change as a constant, nurses will look to the future of advanced practice roles, which are ever changing, and continue to provide safe, quality care to patients. PMID:10646428

Delametter, G L

1999-02-01

106

Influencing undergraduate nursing students' attitudes toward mental health nursing: acknowledging the role of theory.  

PubMed

Most research designed to explore undergraduate nursing students' attitudes towards mental health nursing tends to uphold clinical experience as the decisive factor, with much less attention paid to the theoretical component. This paper presents the findings of a state-wide study conducted with undergraduate nursing students in Victoria, Australia. A pre- and post-test design was used to measure students' attitudes toward people with a mental illness and toward mental health nursing and their sense of preparedness for mental health practice. A questionnaire was administered at two time points; the first time point was following completion of the mental health nursing theoretical component, and the second was following the completion of clinical experience. An additional scale was added at the second time point to evaluate students' opinions about their clinical placement. The findings indicated significantly different attitudes and opinions depending on the university students attended. The amount of theory undertaken in the course accounts for some, but not all, of this variance. However, generally the students taking courses with a larger theoretical component tended to demonstrate higher scores (suggestive of more favourable attitudes) on all of the subscales, and that these differences were sustained following the completion of the clinical placement. These findings suggest that the amount of theory students receive in mental health nursing may be more influential than the relevant literature suggests. PMID:19148820

Happell, Brenda

2009-01-01

107

Clinical practice guidelines in the nursing home.  

PubMed

Clinical practice guidelines are an important tool for improving quality of care. This study determined whether and how guidelines are being used in nursing homes. We surveyed staff at 36 Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) nursing homes. Employees were asked whether they were familiar with guidelines as well as whether 5 specific guidelines had been read, were available, and had been adopted. Among 1065 respondents (60% of those surveyed), 79% reported familiarity with guidelines. The proportion of staff at a facility reporting adoption was generally less than 50%. Those nursing homes in which a high percentage of the staff reported adoption of one guideline were more likely to have adopted other guidelines. However, staff were not more likely to report adoption of a specific guideline when the nurse manager stated that it was adopted. We conclude that staff at VA nursing homes are familiar with guidelines. Guideline adoption at individual nursing homes, however, is not a systematic process involving the entire staff. PMID:11816849

Berlowitz, D R; Young, G J; Hickey, E C; Joseph, J; Anderson, J J; Ash, A S; Moskowitz, M A

2001-01-01

108

Discovering determinants influencing faith community nursing practice.  

PubMed

Faith community nursing (FCN) is an important healthcare delivery system for individuals, families, and communities. Determinants are factors that might influence FCN care. A literature review isolated eight determinants that influence practice; however, there are no clear causal relationships linking specific determinants to specific practice changes. Research is needed to assess how determinants influence practice and outcomes, and provide evidence-based solutions to isolate and manage determinants. A Conceptual Model of FCN, Theoretical Definitions and a Diagram of Determinants of FCN Practice are provided. PMID:25296487

Ziebarth, Deborah Jean

2014-01-01

109

How grounded theory can improve nursing care quality.  

PubMed

This article presents an overview of the grounded theory research method and demonstrates how nurses can employ specific grounded theories to improve patient care quality. Because grounded theory is derived from real-world experience, it is a particularly appropriate method for nursing research. An overview of the method and language of grounded theory provides a background for nurses as they read grounded theories and apply newly acquired understandings to predictable processes and patterns of behavior. This article presents 2 exemplar grounded theories with suggestions as to how nurses can apply these and other grounded theories to improve the provision of quality nursing care. PMID:17873733

Nathaniel, Alvita K; Andrews, Tom

2007-01-01

110

"Negotiating, Navigating, and Networking": Three Strategies Used by Nursing Leaders to Shape the Adoption and Incorporation of Simulation into Nursing Curricula--A Grounded Theory Study  

PubMed Central

Background. Implementing simulation requires a substantial commitment of human and financial resources. Despite this, little is known about the strategies used by academic nursing leaders to facilitate the implementation of a simulation program in nursing curricula. Methods. A constructivist grounded theory study was conducted within 13 nursing programs in Ontario, Canada. Perspectives of key stakeholders (n = 27) including nursing administrators (n = 6), simulation leaders (n = 9), and nursing faculty (n = 12) were analyzed using the constant comparison method. Results. Nursing leaders, specifically nursing administrators and simulation leaders who successfully led the adoption and incorporation of simulation into nursing curricula, worked together and utilized negotiating, navigating, and networking strategies that impacted the adoption and incorporation of simulation into nursing curricula. Conclusions. Strategies that were found to be useful when planning and executing the adoption and incorporation of an innovation, specifically simulation, into nursing curricula provide practical approaches that may be helpful to nurse leaders when embarking upon an organizational change. PMID:25093122

Jack, Susan M.; Martin, Lynn

2014-01-01

111

The academic nursing practice dean: an emerging role.  

PubMed

This article describes the contributions of academic nursing practice to nursing education; delineates the role characteristics and competencies needed by academic practice deans; and provides examples of the challenges and issues academic practice deans face related to nursing education, research, and practice. While schools' missions vary from a strong focus on education to multiple emphases on education, research, and practice, academic nursing practice has the potential to facilitate achievement in each of these areas. Academic nursing practice deans play important roles in advancing the missions of their schools through the clinical practice activities within the schools. Strong academic nursing practice programs can serve as catalysts for the development and refinement of new models of care delivery and for the development of future nursing leaders who are comfortable with innovation. PMID:14974512

Sebastian, Juliann G; Mosley, Carolyn W; Bleich, Michael R

2004-02-01

112

Impact of human resource management practices on nursing home performance.  

PubMed

Management scholars and practitioners alike have become increasingly interested in learning more about the ability of certain 'progressive' or 'high-performance' human resource management (HRM) practices to enhance organizational effectiveness. There is growing evidence to suggest that the contribution of various HRM practices to impact firm performance may be synergistic in effect yet contingent on a number of contextual factors, including workplace climate. A contingency theory perspective suggests that in order to be effective, HMR policies and practices must be consistent with other aspects of the organization, including its environment. This paper reports on empirical findings from research that examines the relationship between HRM practices, workplace climate and perceptions of organizational performance, in a large sample of Canadian nursing homes. Data from 283 nursing homes were collected by means of a mail survey that included questions on HRM practices, programmes, and policies, on human resource aspects of workplace climate, as well as a variety of indicators that include employee, customer/resident and facility measures of organizational performance. Results derived from ordered probit analysis suggest that nursing homes in our sample which had implemented more 'progressive' HRM practices and which reported a workplace climate that strongly values employee participation, empowerment and accountability tended to be perceived to generally perform better on a number of valued organizational outcomes. Nursing homes in our sample that performed best overall were found to be more likely to not only have implemented more of these HRM practices, but also to report having a workplace climate that reflects the seminal value that it places on its human resources. This finding is consistent with the conclusion that simply introducing HRM practices or programmes, in the absence of an appropriately supportive workplace climate, will be insufficient to attain optimal organizational performance. PMID:11507813

Rondeau, K V; Wagar, T H

2001-08-01

113

Sintering Theory and Practice  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although sintering is an essential process in the manufacture of ceramics and certain metals, as well as several other industrial operations, until now, no single book has treated both the background theory and the practical application of this complex and often delicate procedure. In Sintering Theory and Practice, leading researcher and materials engineer Randall M. German presents a comprehensive treatment of this subject that will be of great use to manufacturers and scientists alike. This practical guide to sintering considers the fact that while the bonding process improves strength and other engineering properties of the compacted material, inappropriate methods of control may lead to cracking, distortion, and other defects. It provides a working knowledge of sintering, and shows how to avoid problems while accounting for variables such as particle size, maximum temperature, time at that temperature, and other problems that may cause changes in processing. The book describes the fundamental atomic events that govern the transformation from particles to solid, covers all forms of the sintering process, and provides a summary of many actual production cycles. Building from the ground up, it begins with definitions and progresses to measurement techniques, easing the transition, especially for students, into advanced topics such as single-phase solid-state sintering, microstructure changes, the complications of mixed particles, and pressure-assisted sintering. German draws on some six thousand references to provide a coherent and lucid treatment of the subject, making scientific principles and practical applications accessible to both students and professionals. In the process, he also points out and avoids the pitfalls found in various competing theories, concepts, and mathematical disputes within the field. A unique opportunity to discover what sintering is all about--both in theory and in practice What is sintering? We see the end product of this thermal process all around us--in manufactured objects from metals, ceramics, polymers, and many compounds. From a vast professional literature, Sintering Theory and Practice emerges as the only comprehensive, systematic, and self-contained volume on the subject. Covering all aspects of sintering as a processing topic, including materials, processes, theories, and the overall state of the art, the book Offers numerous examples, illustrations, and tables that detail actual processing cycles, and that stress existing knowledge in the field Uses the specifics of various consolidation cycles to illustrate the basics Leads the reader from the fundamentals to advanced topics, without getting bogged down in various mathematical disputes over treatments and measurements Supports the discussion with critically selected references from thousands of sources Examines the sintering behavior of a wide variety of engineered materials--metals, alloys, oxide ceramics, composites, carbides, intermetallics, glasses, and polymers Guides the reader through the sintering processes for several important industrial materials and demonstrates how to control these processes effectively and improve present techniques Provides a helpful reference for specific information on materials, processing problems, and concepts For practitioners and researchers in ceramics, powder metallurgy, and other areas, and for students and faculty in materials science and engineering, this book provides the know-how and understanding crucial to many industrial operations, offers many ideas for further research, and suggests future applications of this important technology. This book offers an unprecedented opportunity to explore sintering in both practical and theoretical terms, whether at the lab or in real-world applications, and to acquire a broad, yet thorough, understanding of this important technology.

German, Randall M.

1996-01-01

114

Nursing as a caring practice from a phenomenological perspective.  

PubMed

Nursing is frequently described as a caring practice. What this concept means may be less clear. This paper considers nursing as a caring practice in three steps. First, the concept of practice based on Taylor's and MacIntyre's philosophical definitions of the term is described. Secondly, numerous notions of caring are presented; the call from some nurse researchers for quantification of the concept and why this is problematic is discussed; and an exposition of caring from a phenomenological perspective is provided. Finally, the notions of practice and caring are joined, and the concept of a caring practice is presented. Nursing as a public caring practice is illustrated with examples from an interpretive phenomenological study. In conclusion, it is claimed that a phenomenological view of caring combined with a comprehensive definition of practice is well suited to nursing, and allows for a description of nurses' caring practices from both a nursing and patient perspective. PMID:16324052

Spichiger, Elisabeth; Wallhagen, Margaret I; Benner, Patricia

2005-12-01

115

Practical Nursing, Volume III. Health Occupations Education. [Revised].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is a comprehensive guide for instructors to use in teaching the final phase of the practical nursing program. This revised volume contains information related to medical-surgical nursing, mental health nursing, and career success. The section on medical-surgical nursing is composed of many units, dealing with the following subjects:…

Reid, Jamee Noell

116

Doctor of NursiNg Practice scholarly Projects ~ 2011  

E-print Network

in Nursing Michele Salisbury, Phd, rN,wHNP Assistant Professor of Nursing, Lecturer in Women's Studies MavisDoctor of NursiNg Practice scholarly Projects ~ 2011 #12;Foreward Congratulations to the 2011 d health care system ­ to improve health care and advance the nursing profession. Colleen Conway-welch, Phd

Bordenstein, Seth

117

The Quad Council practice competencies for public health nursing.  

PubMed

This article describes the most recent efforts by the Quad Council of Public Health Nursing organizations to review and revise the competencies for PHN practice, and highlights the implications of these competencies for practice, education, and research. The Quad Council is a coalition of four nursing organizations with a focus on public health nursing and includes the Association of Community Health Nursing Educators; the Association of Public Health Nursing (known prior to July 1, 2012 as the Association of State and Territorial Directors of Nursing); the Public Health Nursing section of the American Public Health Association; and the Council on Economics and Practice of the American Nurses' Association. The Quad Council competencies are based on the Council on Linkages competencies for public health professionals and were designed to ensure that public health nursing fits in the domain of public health science and practice. PMID:24579712

Swider, Susan M; Krothe, Joyce; Reyes, David; Cravetz, Michelle

2013-01-01

118

Application of a model of social information processing to nursing theory: how nurses respond to patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

AIM: This paper is a report of a study to assess the applicability of a theoretical model of social information processing in expanding a nursing theory addressing how nurses respond to patients.\\u000aBACKGROUND: Nursing communication affects patient outcomes such as anxiety, adherence to treatments and satisfaction with care. Orlando's theory of nursing process describes nurses' reactions to patients' behaviour as

Lisa Kennedy Sheldon; Lee Ellington

2008-01-01

119

inPractice: A Practical Nursing Package for Clinical Decisions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines the recent development of a computer-assisted learning program--in Practice--at the School of Health Science, in the University of Wales Swansea. The project, which began in 2001, was developed in close collaboration with The Meningitis Trust, the aim being to produce a software package to increase nursing students' knowledge…

Ip, Barry; Cavanna, Annlouise; Corbett, Beverley

2005-01-01

120

Maintaining Quality Care during a Nursing Shortage Using Licensed Practical Nurses in Acute Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Implications of an aging registered nurse workforce, coupled with an inadequate supply of new nurses, presented a unique challenge for the nurse executive in an acute care hospital. This article presents one possible solution: reintroduction of licensed practical nurses to the patient care setting. It describes a pilot project initiated to answer the following question: Is there a change in

Patricia A. Kenney

121

Attitudes of Nursing Home Licensed Practical Nurses Toward Sexually Active, Older Residents  

Microsoft Academic Search

The participants were 87 Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs) working in a nursing home for the elderly. Vignettes were used to elicit the LPNs' attitudes toward sexually active older nursing home residents. Each LPN was randomly assigned one of four versions of a vignette which either contained or excluded information about sexual activity in a 68-year-old male or female nursing home

Shirley Damrosch; Janet Cogliano

1994-01-01

122

Administrative Protocol Page 1 of 3 Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

. The Nursing Dept. reserves the right to change a schedule of hours, per union contracts. 8. AssignmentAdministrative Protocol Page 1 of 3 Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROTOCOL FOR: Scheduling: Practices POLICY: Routine

Oliver, Douglas L.

123

Standards of perianesthesia nursing practice: advocating patient safety  

Microsoft Academic Search

The practice continuum of perianesthesia nursing interacts in concert with other nursing and medical professional organizations. Professional standards of care establish frameworks that guide these practitioners in the delivery of care. ASPAN is charged with the ethical responsibility of defining and promulgating minimum standards of perianesthesia nursing practice. This article discusses the various definitions and uses of standards, as well

Myrna E Mamaril

2003-01-01

124

The private practice of nursing: the gift of entrepreneurialism.  

PubMed

The demands of the entrepreneur extend the opportunities and creativity of the nurse. The characteristics of independent practice are now the expectations of the role of every nurse. Understanding the gifts of the entrepreneurial experience helps facilitate the growth of nurses and their practice. PMID:9397841

Porter-O'Grady, T

1997-01-01

125

The clinical nurse leader: a response from practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

In October 2003, over 200 nurse leaders from education and practice met at the invitation of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing. A newly released white paper, describing the role of the clinical nurse leader, was discussed at the conference. This article outlines a response to that white paper from one practice setting. The article shares information about another

Karen Neil Drenkard

2004-01-01

126

Health practices of critical care nurses.  

PubMed

Little is known about the health practices of critical care nurses (CCNs). Because their health behaviors may influence their inclinations to counsel patients, it is important that CCNs engage in a healthy lifestyle and serve as health exemplars. The purpose of this survey was to describe the health practices of 499 CCNs. Data were gathered by questionnaires that elicited information regarding smoking habits, oral health and dietary practices, energy expenditure, seat belt use, alcohol consumption, and health surveillance behaviors. This article is a sequel to a previous manuscript that reported findings relative to the smoking practices of CCNs. Results of the study suggest that the CCNs surveyed were not fulfilling their roles as health exemplars. Although some reported favorable health practices, many indicated habits that were less than desirable. These data document the need to develop strategies for improving the health behaviors of CCNs, thereby protecting their future health. Ultimately, these strategies may benefit their patients. PMID:1592608

Haughey, B P; Kuhn, M A; Dittmar, S S; Wu, Y W

1992-05-01

127

Obesity Prevention Practices of Elementary School Nurses in Minnesota: Findings from Interviews with Licensed School Nurses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Elementary schools are an optimal setting to provide obesity prevention interventions, yet little is known about the obesity prevention practices of elementary school nurses. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into current obesity-related school nursing practice in elementary schools in Minnesota, opinions regarding school nurse-led…

Morrison-Sandberg, Leslie F.; Kubik, Martha Y.; Johnson, Karen E.

2011-01-01

128

Educational Progression of Licensed Practical Nurses to Registered Nursing Programs. Project Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A project was conducted to develop a structural mechanism for articulation between colleges and vocational schools in West Virginia. Such articulation would permit licensed practical nurses (LPNs) desiring to become registered nurses to transfer credits for their licensed practical nursing courses and thereby eliminate unnecessary repetition of…

Hosch, India, Comp.

129

An innovative course for licensed practical nurse–associate degree nursing articulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes the adaptation of a licensed practical nurse—associate degree in nursing articulation course to a distance format, specifically hybrid. Methods for evaluation of the course are described. For the most part, students were successful in the course and program progression, exhibited improvements in self-efficacy, and expressed satisfaction with the teaching methods. Expanding opportunities for licensed practical nurses to

Rebecca Jensen

2008-01-01

130

Relationship of a pelvic floor rehabilitation program for urinary incontinence to Orem's Self-Care Deficit Theory of Nursing: Part 1.  

PubMed

Urinary incontinence is considered a significant social problem affecting many individuals' quality of life. Nursing theory is a set of concepts or propositions derived from philosophical beliefs about the phenomena of interest to the discipline. The ability to use theory to guide nursing practice brings reasoning and logic to professional nursing practice. Orem's Self-Care Deficit Theory of Nursing gets to the heart of what nursing is and how continence nursing care can be offered and delivered as a broadly inclusive professional, rather than narrowly procedural, practice offering individual care targeting the self-care agent (client) rather than the medical diagnosis. PMID:12593228

Bernier, Francie

2002-12-01

131

EmpowEr your practicE mastEr of NursiNg  

E-print Network

Thell MasTer of nUrsing prograM prepares nurses for advanced leadership roles in health care practiceEmpowEr your practicE mastEr of NursiNg #12;mastEr of NursiNg (mN) The UniversiTy of WashingTon Bo and elective credits support a wide range of nursing interests that allow a custom fit to your individual goals

Manchak, John

132

Kuwaiti high school students' perceptions of nursing as a profession: implications for nursing education and practice.  

PubMed

The shortage of nurses in Kuwait is attributed to low production of indigenous nurses, resignation and emigration of foreign nurses, and expansion of health care facilities. This study explored Kuwaiti high school students' perceptions of nursing as a profession, their sources of information about nursing, and factors that affected their choice of nursing as a future career. Questionnaires from 289 students attending seven all-female high schools in Kuwait were analyzed. The results revealed that all of the participants were knowledgeable about the functional aspects of the nursing profession, and 35% of them received this information through contact with nurses during hospital visits. However, only 19% indicated they might consider nursing as a future career. The implications of the study for nursing education and practice, and strategies to attract and retain indigenous high school graduates into nursing programs in Kuwait are discussed. PMID:16402735

Al-Kandari, Fatimah H; Lew, Irene

2005-12-01

133

Exploring the expanded practice roles of community mental health nurses.  

PubMed

Significant changes to the delivery of mental health services have resulted in the expansion of the community mental health nursing role. This qualitative study was undertaken to explore the extent to which community mental health nurses are currently engaged in expanded forms of practice. Focus groups were undertaken with community mental health nurses (n = 27) from metropolitan and rural Victoria, Australia. Thematic analysis identified the following major themes: reported practice, consumers as beneficiaries of expanded practice, risk of harm and litigation, and barriers to expanded practice. The findings emphasize the need for significant changes in current legislation if expanded practice for nurses is to become a reality. PMID:17454291

Elsom, Stephen; Happell, Brenda; Manias, Elizabeth

2007-04-01

134

Nursing practice problems in private hospitals in Jordan: students' perspectives.  

PubMed

This paper grew from an exploration of clinical practice problems in a private hospital in Jordan. Senior nursing students in a governmental university studied these issues while focusing on leadership and management issues. The private sector is of a secondary focus in nursing research. In Jordan, nursing studies that explore the nursing profession and its related issues have been limited in the literature. A student assignment in the "Nursing Leadership and Management" course required the students to work in groups to identify a nursing practice problem, and its contributing causes and suggested solutions. The nursing shortage; job dissatisfaction; burnout; and turnover were the identified nursing practice problems. Causes and solutions of these problems were explored. PMID:17689428

Mrayyan, Majd T

2007-03-01

135

Re-reading nursing and re-writing practice: towards an empirically based reformulation of the nursing mandate.  

PubMed

This article examines field studies of nursing work published in the English language between 1993 and 2003 as the first step towards an empirically based reformulation of the nursing mandate. A decade of ethnographic research reveals that, contrary to contemporary theories which promote an image of nursing work centred on individualised unmediated caring relationships, in real-life practice the core nursing contribution is that of the healthcare mediator. Eight bundles of activity that comprise this intermediary role are described utilising evidence from the literature. The mismatch between nursing's culture and ideals and the structure and constraints of the work setting is a chronic source of practitioner dissatisfaction. It is argued that the profession has little to gain by pursuing an agenda of holistic patient care centred on emotional intimacy and that an alternative occupational mandate focused on the healthcare mediator function might make for more humane health services and a more viable professional future. PMID:15601415

Allen, Davina

2004-12-01

136

Scholarly publication practices of Doctor of Nursing Practice-prepared nurses.  

PubMed

Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) graduates are expected to contribute to nursing knowledge through empirically based studies testing the effectiveness of practice approaches that ultimately benefit patients and health care systems. This article describes publication practices of DNP graduates in the scholarly literature. Published studies (2005 to 2012) with at least one author with a DNP degree were identified. The search yielded 300 articles in 59 journals; 175 met the inclusion criteria and were included in this study. A codebook, consisting of 15 major categories, was used to extract relevant information. Original clinical investigations were the most frequent, followed by practice-focused patient and provider studies. The number of studies published in peer-reviewed journals with DNP-prepared authors increased over time. We recommend greater integration of translational science models into DNP curricula to achieve the goal of publishing scholarly products that use evidence to improve either practice or patient outcomes. PMID:23855342

Broome, Marion E; Riner, Mary E; Allam, Eman S

2013-08-01

137

Woman-Centered Maternity Nursing Education and Practice  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this Heideggerian phenomenological study was to uncover the meanings of the clinical experiences of registered nurses working in maternity settings after they studied maternity nursing from a woman-centered, feminist perspective in a generic baccalaureate nursing program. Purposeful sampling was conducted to locate and recruit nurses who had graduated from this nursing program between the December 1996 and December 1998 semesters and were currently working in a maternal-newborn clinical setting. Each participant had taken the required woman-centered, maternity-nursing course during her/his undergraduate education. Data collection included an individual, open-ended interview that focused on the nurses' descriptions of their everyday practices as maternity nurses. Nineteen maternal-newborn nurses between the ages of 23 and 43 years who had been in practice from six months to three years were interviewed. The constitutive patterns identified from the interviews were: “Otherness,” “Being and Becoming Woman-Centered,” and “Tensions in Practicing Woman-Centered Care.” Findings revealed that the nurses had a raised awareness of oppressive maternity care practices and applied ideology of woman-centeredness as a framework for providing more humanistic care. Creating woman-centered maternity care meant negotiating tensions and barriers in medically focused maternity settings and looking for opportunities for advocacy and woman-empowerment. The barriers the nurses faced in implementing woman-centered care exposed limitations to childbearing choices and nursing practices that remain problematic in maternity care. PMID:17273327

Giarratano, Gloria

2003-01-01

138

A pluralistic evaluation of nursing/practice development units.  

PubMed

Nursing/practice development units (N/PDU) are perceived as centres for pioneering, evaluating and disseminating innovative practice development and facilitating the professional development of practitioners. This paper reports on a pluralistic evaluation research study of the nursing/ practice development unit accreditation programme provided by the University of Leeds, UK. Individual and focus group interviews were undertaken with key stakeholders involved in six nursing/practice development units. These included: clinical leaders, team members, executive nurses, trust board members, general medical practitioners, nursing/practice development unit steering group members, and accreditation panel members. Stakeholder perceptions of what constituted a successful nursing/practice development unit were elicited and then used to judge the success of the programme. Seven criteria for judging the success of nursing/practice development units were identified. These were: achieving optimum practice; providing a patient-orientated service; disseminating innovative practice; team working; enabling practitioners to develop their full potential; adopting a strategic approach to change and autonomous functioning. The findings highlighted differences between the rhetoric of a successful nursing/practice development unit and the reality in which they function. Whereas all the units were actively involved in innovative practice development, evaluation, dissemination and networking activities, several factors influenced the success of the units, in particular, the role of the clinical leader, the motivation and commitment of nursing/practice development unit members, financial resources, and the nature of support from managers, medical staff and education institutions. Although the nursing/practice development units had made significant progress in developing both healthcare practice and practitioners, there is still a need to consider how the claim that nursing/practice development units benefit patients can be substantiated. PMID:11820228

Gerrish, K

2001-01-01

139

The practical nurse: a case for COMFORT communication training.  

PubMed

Licensed practical nurses provide the majority of bedside care in long-term care facilities and home care settings, and their communication with patients and families is pivotal to interventions aimed at reducing burdensome transitions to acute care settings. Although good communication skills are required for practical nurses, they receive limited instruction in their training. The goal of this study was to assess the effects of communication training for the practical nurse. A pre-post survey design was used to assess the COMFORT communication training curriculum provided to licensed practical nursing students. A comparison of mean scores on communication skills attitudes and perceived nursing competency revealed statistically significant improvement in attitudes and self-efficacy. This study shows promise for the feasibility and utilization of the COMFORT curriculum for nurse communication training. Further research should address the nurse's ability to perform COMFORT communication skills in the clinical setting. PMID:22584148

Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Goldsmith, Joy; Richardson, Brian; Hallett, Jennifer S; Clark, Raymond

2013-03-01

140

Nursing practice environment, quality of care, and morale of hospital nurses in Japan.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to describe Japanese hospital nurses' perceptions of the nursing practice environment and examine its association with nurse-reported ability to provide quality nursing care, quality of patient care, and ward morale. A cross-sectional survey design was used including 223 nurses working in 12 acute inpatient wards in a large Japanese teaching hospital. Nurses rated their work environment favorably overall using the Japanese version of the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index. Subscale scores indicated high perceptions of physician relations and quality of nursing management, but lower scores for staffing and resources. Ward nurse managers generally rated the practice environment more positively than staff nurses except for staffing and resources. Regression analyses found the practice environment was a significant predictor of quality of patient care and ward morale, whereas perceived ability to provide quality nursing care was most strongly associated with years of clinical experience. These findings support interventions to improve the nursing practice environment, particularly staffing and resource adequacy, to enhance quality of care and ward morale in Japan. PMID:23855754

Anzai, Eriko; Douglas, Clint; Bonner, Ann

2014-06-01

141

Human rights and district nursing practice.  

PubMed

The main provisions of the European Convention on Human Rights were incorporated into UK law in the Human Rights Act 1998. Human Rights were described by Lord Hoffman in 'Matthews v Ministry of Defence' [2003] as the rights essential to the life and dignity of the individual in a democratic society. The fundamental nature of the rights demand that district nurses must inform their practice with a clear understanding of the main provisions of the Act and how they apply to health care. PMID:15788950

Griffith, Richard

2005-02-01

142

Administrative Procedure Page 1 of 2 Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

Administrative Procedure Page 1 of 2 Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital - Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROCEDURE FOR: Evaluation: Staff POLICY: 1 of the agreement is sent to Human Resources. Staff nurses must successfully perform at the CNII level or LPN level

Oliver, Douglas L.

143

Administrative Procedure Page 1 of 2 Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

Administrative Procedure Page 1 of 2 Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital-Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROCEDURE FOR: Attendance: Sick Leave: Department of Nursing POLICY: 1. Use of sick leave will be monitored and utilized in the evaluation process. 2

Oliver, Douglas L.

144

Moving toward a Model for Nursing Education and Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One baccalaureate nursing program and five community college programs collaboratively developed a shared philosophy, curriculum design, and model for nursing education and practice. The model takes a holistic view of the client/patient's mind, body, and spirit engaged in life-changing transitions and depicts the role of nursing care. (SK)

Lusk, Marilyn; Decker, Ilene

2001-01-01

145

Clinical Procedure Page 1 of 5 Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

the nurse should be aware of the patient's diagnosis, baseline hemoglobin, hematocrit, ferritinClinical Procedure Page 1 of 5 Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROCEDURE FOR: PROCEDURE FOR: Therapeutic Phlebotomy

Oliver, Douglas L.

146

Building evidence-based practice with staff nurses through mentoring  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evidence- based practice (EBP) is an effective way for nurses to improve patient outcomes. Although EBP has gained popularity, barriers to implementation exist. This study explored whether mentoring neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) nurses in EBP would increase their participation in EBP. A sample of 20 nurses were mentored in an EBP project. The EBP Beliefs Scale and EBP Implementation

Kathleen DiGaudio Mariano; Linda M. Caley; Linda Eschberger; Ann Woloszyn; Patricia Volker; Michael S. Leonard; Ying Tung

2009-01-01

147

Doctor of NursiNg Practice scholarly Projects ~ 2010  

E-print Network

N,wHNP Assistant Professor of Nursing, Lecturer in Women's Studies Mavis Schorn, Phd, CNM Associate ProfessorDoctor of NursiNg Practice scholarly Projects ~ 2010 commemoratiNg our iNaugural ceNteNNial class-welch, Phd, CNM, FaaN Nancy and Hilliard Travis Professor of Nursing dean,Vanderbilt University School

Bordenstein, Seth

148

A Phenomenographic Study Exploring Nursing Education and Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to illuminate the qualitatively different ways in which three nurses with an associate degree (ADN) and three nurses with a baccalaureate degree (BSN) experience, conceptualize, perceive, and understand their own nursing practice within the context of their educational background. Using a phenomenographic methodology…

Degen, Greta M.

2010-01-01

149

Penn Macy Initiative To Advance Academic Nursing Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Penn School of Nursing and the Macy Foundation established a comprehensive institute and technical assistance program to help nursing schools advance academic nursing practice. The Penn School consulted with 21 participating schools, providing institutes, conferences, a listserv and a web-based knowledge center focused on integrating research,…

Lang, Norma M.; Evans, Lois K.; Swan, Beth Ann

2002-01-01

150

Clinical Protocol Page 1 of 1 Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

Clinical Protocol Page 1 of 1 Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing evaluated by psychiatry and a level of safe observation is determined. 2. Nursing should verify that a psychiatric consult has been ordered. 3. Staff will maintain awareness of patient's safety, especially during

Oliver, Douglas L.

151

Clinical Procedure Page 1 of 2 Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

being removed intraoperatively to maintain patient safety. APPROVAL: Nursing Standards CommitteeClinical Procedure Page 1 of 2 Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROTOCOL FOR: Jewelry: Wearing of Jewelry and Body

Oliver, Douglas L.

152

Implementing nursing best practice guidelines: Impact on patient referrals  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Although referring patients to community services is important for optimum continuity of care, referrals between hospital and community sectors are often problematic. Nurses are well positioned to inform patients about referral resources. The objective of this study is to describe the impact of implementing six nursing best practice guidelines (BPGs) on nurses' familiarity with patient referral resources and referral

Nancy Edwards; Barbara Davies; Jenny Ploeg; Tazim Virani; Jennifer Skelly

2007-01-01

153

Reflections on nursing practice science: the nature, the structure, and the foundation of nursing sciences.  

PubMed

In preparation for the self-care deficit nursing theory conference to be held in Ulm, Germany in 2004, Dorothea Orem and I reflected on the development of nursing science. Orem drafted this paper which I edited. The International Orem Society is sharing this paper with Nursing Science Quarterly as presented to the conference as a memorial to Orem and her work. PMID:21220574

Orem, Dorothea E; Taylor, Susan G

2011-01-01

154

Assuring Quality and Access in Advanced Practice Nursing: A Challenge to Nurse Educators.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Advanced practice nurses are assuming increasingly accountable roles in primary health care. A doctor of nursing practice degree would signify the high level of competency they achieve. Columbia University's training model is an example of the preparation needed for this level of professional practice. (SK)

Mundinger, Mary O.; Cook, Sarah Sheets; Lenz, Elizabeth R.; Piacentini, Karen; Auerhahn, Carolyn; Smith, Jennifer

2000-01-01

155

Tennessee advanced practice nurse compensation survey results 2006-2007.  

PubMed

In 2006, representatives from Middle Tennessee Advanced Practice Nurses (MTAPN), Greater Memphis Area Advanced Practice Nurses (GMAAPN), and Northeast Tennessee Nurse Practitioners Association (NETNPA) decided to poll APNs in Tennessee to compare data with the most recent results from the Advance for Nurse Practitioners national NP survey. Every other year, Advance for Nurse Practitioners publishes salary survey results from their survey. Most recently, in January 2006, an average nationwide salary for all APNs was reported at $74,812, with Tennessee's average at $71,068. PMID:17727212

Arnold, Kimberly

2007-01-01

156

The Journal of Doctoral Nursing Practice  

E-print Network

...............................................................10 Laura L. Ardizzone EDUCATION Implementing Simulation for Evaluation of Student Nurse Practitioner.............................................................................................30 Valarie A. Petersen, Peggy Ellis, Rebecca Lorenz, and Eric Armbrecht Nurses' Current Breastfeeding

Columbia University

157

Certified nurse-midwife and physician collaborative practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

This pilot study was designed to describe the clinical areas of collaboration, financial structures, and sources of conflict for certified nurse-midwives (CNMs) involved in nurse-midwife and physician collaborative practice (CP). A questionnaire was posted on an electronic bulletin board maintained by the Community-Based Nurse Midwifery Education Program of the Frontier School of Nursing. The nonrandom, convenience sample consisted of 78

Suellen Miller; Tekoa King; Peter Lurie; Paul Choitz

1997-01-01

158

MENTAL HEALTH AND PSYCHIATRIC NURSING IN PRACTICAL NURSE EDUCATION. FINAL REPORT.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THIRTY-ONE PROFESSIONAL NURSE EDUCATORS IN SCHOOLS OF PRACTICAL NURSING IN THE SOUTHEAST ATTENDED A TWO-WEEK CLINICAL WORKSHOP ON PSYCHIATRIC NURSING AT WESTERN STATE HOSPITAL, STAUNTON, VIRGINIA, IN AUGUST 1966. THEY RECONVENED FOR A THREE-DAY FOLLOW-UP CONFERENCE AT ATLANTA, GEORGIA, IN JANUARY 1967. THE PROJECT WAS UNDERTAKEN TO UPDATE THE…

CRAWFORD, ANNIE L.

159

Nursing-related information and data: what is the role of computers in nursing practice?  

PubMed

This is the final article in a series which examines the impact of computer technology on nursing and nursing practice. In it we briefly explore the concept of informatics and the role of a unified nursing language in data collection and statistical comparisons. PMID:9265492

Game, C

1996-07-01

160

Engaging staff nurses in evidence-based research to identify nursing practice problems and solutions  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article illustrates how one academic health science center in a large metropolitan area sought to improve the quality of patient care by soliciting the input of their nursing staff in devising an action plan for change. The research model incorporated both survey and focus group methods used by nursing leaders in administration and practice to identify and prioritize nursing

Peri Rosenfeld; Elizabeth Duthie; Jacqueline Bier; Susan Bowar-Ferres; Terry Fulmer; Linda Iervolino; Margaret L. McClure; Diane O. McGivern; Marianne Roncoli

2000-01-01

161

Upgrading Licensed Practical Nurse to Registered Nurse Program, September 1971 - June 1973. Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Twenty Licensed Practical Nurses (LPN) became Registered Nurses (RN) in a pilot program giving partial academic credit for their LPN training and building on their existing skills. The program revolved around three needs: (1) trained nurses; (2) eliminating the notion that jobs were dead-end; and (3) achieving upward mobility for hospital staff.…

Holloway, Sally

162

Perceived Dimensions of Nursing Practice: A Factor Analytic Study Using Nurse Educators.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The applicability of a factor analytic approach to explore the nature of a complex job performance criterion for nursing practice and to determine the dimensions of this criterion was investigated. A national sample of 1,038 nurse educators from 85 randomly selected programs judged performance criteria contained in the Clinical Nursing Rating…

Boss, Barbara J.

163

Faculty Practice and Roles of Staff Nurses and Clinical Faculty in Nursing Student Learning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Focus groups and interviews were conducted with 15 clinical faculty, 4 nursing education administrators, 22 nurses, and 4 hospital administrators involved in clinical placements. When nurses worked with practicing faculty, they experienced less role overload, conflict, and ambiguity. Lack of communication of expectations among administrators,…

Langan, Joanne C.

2003-01-01

164

Workplace practices for retaining older hospital nurses: implications from a study of nurses with eldercare responsibilities.  

PubMed

Attempts to address the nursing shortage must consider the aging nursing supply and the decreased labor participation among nurses at age 55 and older. Efforts to retain older, experienced nurses have been meager, and little attention is paid to the role of eldercare in decisions to leave the profession. This pilot study examines current workplace practices that may contribute to early withdrawal of older nurses from the hospital workforce. Interviews with 28 elder caregiving registered nurses and assistive nursing personnel at a New York hospital were conducted. Respondents reported that successful management of their dual roles rests on identifying units and shifts that suit their needs, erecting clear boundaries between home and work, and their love of nursing. "Caregiver-friendly" practices such as creative, flexible scheduling; access to social workers; financial and legal services; and increased awareness among managers about caregiver strains were recommended. PMID:17652629

Rosenfeld, Peri

2007-05-01

165

Health promotion overview: evidence-based strategies for occupational health nursing practice.  

PubMed

Health promotion practice has evolved over the past four decades in response to the rising rates of chronic disease. The focus of health promotion is attaining wellness by managing modifiable risk factors, such as smoking, diet, or physical activity. Occupational health nurses are often asked to conduct worksite health promotion programs for individuals or groups, yet may be unfamiliar with evidence-based strategies. Occupational health nurses should lead interprofessional groups in designing and implementing worksite health promotion programs. This article introduces occupational health nurses to health promotion concepts and discusses evidence-based theories and planning models that can be easily introduced into practice. PMID:25101931

Dombrowski, Jill J; Snelling, Anastasia M; Kalicki, Michelle

2014-08-01

166

[Changes in the practice of nursing in the 30s].  

PubMed

This report belongs to the research line "The professional practice and identity building of the Brazilian Nurse", developed by a group registered at the CNPq and Research Center of History of Brazilian Nursing (Nuphebras) of the School of Nursing Anna Nery, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. The objectives of this study are: correlate the institutional changes of Nursing in the Brazilian society of that time to the accentuated political and economical transition of the country; analyze the effects of those institutional changes in the nurse's labor market and in the characteristics of nursing practice; discuss the new articulation forms of nursing with other social practices inside the area of health. National public health nursing, in order to accompany the enlargement of the bureaucratic State, expanded and modified. At the same time, in a context of a protectionist policy to the worker, an incentive policy to the opening of new, public and private hospitals, was developed, although Nursing services of those institutions were not organized according to the patterns that characterized the modern Nursing. Thus, the practice of Nursing in the 30's is characterized as the beginning of the transition of a model of urban public health to a model of hospital assistance. PMID:12143803

Barreira, I A

1999-01-01

167

The scope of private practice nursing in an Australian sample.  

PubMed

The changing Australian health care system is creating new opportunities for nurses who work directly with clients in private practice settings. This study examines the scope of practice of a cohort of nurses in private practice. In a questionnaire sent to 106 self-employed nurse entrepreneurs, questions were asked pertaining to the participants' scope of practice, their clients, the types of services offered, and their fee structures. Questions about scope of practice were divided into domains of clinical practice, business consultancy, education, and research. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected for a final sample 54 eligible responses. Participants had been in private practice for an average of 7.6 years (range: 1-20) and reported a mean of 21 years of nursing experience (range: 4-42) before entering private practice. Over half held diplomas in specialty areas. Most participants reported clinical practice, consultancy, or education as the primary work domain; research was much less important as a work activity. Nurses reported difficulties with building client base and receiving adequate fees for service, particularly in clinical practice. Increasing awareness within the nursing profession and health sector about various aspects of private practice nursing could improve service quality for their clients. PMID:15363028

Wilson, Anne; Averis, Andrea; Walsh, Ken

2004-01-01

168

The influence of human rights on district nurse practice.  

PubMed

In the decade since its introduction, the Human Rights Act 1998 has had a profound effect on the way district nurses practice. New laws underpinning the principles and obligations of human rights law have seen a gradual legalisation of health care and a reigning in of the discretionary powers of health professionals such as district nurses.This article reflects on the Human Rights Act 1998's influence on district nurse practice. PMID:19966686

Griffith, Richard; Tengnah, Cassam

2009-10-01

169

Nursing students’opinions regarding the clinical practice guide  

Microsoft Academic Search

Clinic field experience provides the opportunities to nursing students to combine cognitive, psychomotor and affective skills, and problem-solving abilities.This study was definitively conducted to determine the opinions of nursing students regarding clinical practice guide.The universe and sampling of the study were made up of 79 students who were taking the Surgical Nursing Course.At the end of clinical practice,the students’opinions regarding

Nalan Özhan Elba?; Hülya Bulut; Sevil Güler Demir; Sevilay Yüceer

2010-01-01

170

[Case report: the practical use of the self-care deficit nursing theory for a patient with a neuroendocrine cancer of the duodenum].  

PubMed

This case describes the nursing care of a 66-year-old electively admitted patient who came to hospital for the treatment of a hepatic secondary neuroendocrine duodenum cancer. A typical liver resection with duodeno-pancreatectomy and sigmaresection was performed. Complications led to more than ten re-laparatomies with resection of the stomach and oesophagus. It was necessary to perform blind occlusion of the jejunum and the disposition of an oesophagus stoma. A diabetes mellitus was caused by the total resection of the pancreas. Mister B. got a percutaneous endoscope jejunostomy but it could not be used because of a new small intestine fistula into the abdominal cavity wherefore a port was implanted. The following different conceptions of the self-care deficit theory have been used to describe and analyse the patient situation as follows: Basic conditioning factors, self-care requisites, therapeutic self-care demands, self-care competence. The future self-management capabilities consist of the following: Care of the oesophagus stoma, care of the percutaneous endoscope jejunostomy, management of the diabetes mellitus, coping with the changed self-image, coping with the restriction of movement and with the needed prophylaxis. Support was given by the transfer of knowledge to the patient. Instructions were given during realisations of new activities and development of skills. It was evaluated if the patient is capable to reflect his actions and to assess if he is able to react on deviations from the normal standards in a correct and appropriate way. After dismissal it was secured by phone call that the patient successfully manages the new self-care demands independently. PMID:20112205

Holler, Eva-Maria; Paulsen, Annika

2010-02-01

171

Ambiguity in knowledge transfer: The role of theory-practice gap  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: In spite of much literature written about the theory-practice gap in the international nursing journals, there is evidence that indicates this subject has not been probed comprehensively since nursing education was transferred to universities in Iran. In the recent years, the public and the government have criticized Iranian nurses because of poor quality of patient care. Although this subject has been lamented by some researchers, there is no comprehensive work on how this gap resulted. In the process of a larger study on “nursing knowledge translation to practice”, of one PhD thesis, this process was explored. METHODS: Using grounded theory analysis, indepth interviews were undertaken with a purposive sample of 29 nurses, with different levels of experience, from the school of nursing in Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2006 from January to August. Data were analyzed using the constant comparative method. RESULTS: Three main themes emerging from this study included clinical behavior structure, paradoxical knowledge and practice, and divergent nursing organization. CONCLUSIONS: It seems that nursing education with some praxis and paradoxes in the realm of nursing knowledge and practice, along with divergent organizational structure have decreased nurses’ ability in applying their professional knowledge and skills in order to bridge the gap between theory and practice. Moreover, in spite of increased academic input into nursing education, clinical behaviors of both education and practice settings was perceived as “traditional routine-based”. PMID:21589789

Cheraghi, Mohammad Ali; Salsali, Mahvash; Safari, Mahmoud

2010-01-01

172

Nurse work engagement impacts job outcome and nurse-assessed quality of care: model testing with nurse practice environment and nurse work characteristics as predictors  

PubMed Central

Aim: To explore the mechanisms through which nurse practice environment dimensions, such as nurse–physician relationship, nurse management at the unit level and hospital management and organizational support, are associated with job outcomes and nurse-assessed quality of care. Mediating variables included nurse work characteristics of workload, social capital, decision latitude, as well as work engagement dimensions of vigor, dedication and absorption. Background: Understanding how to support and guide nurse practice communities in their daily effort to answer complex care most accurate, alongside with the demand of a stable and healthy nurse workforce, is challenging. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Method: Based on earlier empirical findings, a structural equation model, designed with valid measurement instruments, was tested. The study population included registered acute care hospital nurses (N = 1201) in eight hospitals across Belgium. Results: Nurse practice environment dimensions predicted nurses’ ratings of job outcome variables as well as quality of care. Features of nurses’ work characteristics, e.g., perceived workload, decision latitude, social capital, and the three dimension of work engagement, played mediating roles between nurse practice environment and outcomes. A revised model, using various fit measures, explained 60% of job outcomes and 47% of nurse-assessed quality of care. Conclusion: The findings in this study show that nurse work characteristics as workload, decision latitude, and social capital, alongside with nurse work engagement (e.g., vigor, dedication, and absorption) influence nurses’ perspective of their nurse practice environment, job outcomes, and quality of care. The results underline aspects to considerate for various stakeholders, such as executives, nurse managers, physicians, and staff nurses, in setting up and organizing health care services.

Van Bogaert, Peter; van Heusden, Danny; Timmermans, Olaf; Franck, Erik

2014-01-01

173

Family practice nurse views on barriers to immunising children  

Microsoft Academic Search

New Zealand (NZ) has low immunisation coverage for infants and children compared to many other westernised countries. Barriers to improving uptake are multifactorial, with health professional knowledge and attitudes identified as important modifiable factors. In NZ practice nurses give most childhood vaccinations in the primary health care setting. This study explored aspects of 150 family practice nurse views, knowledge and

Helen Petousis-Harris; Felicity Goodyear-Smith; Nikki Turner; Ben Soe

2005-01-01

174

78 FR 65342 - National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Administration National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice of Meeting...meeting: Name: National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice (NACNEP). Dates...Assistant, National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice, Parklawn...

2013-10-31

175

78 FR 2275 - National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Administration National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice of Meeting...meeting: Name: National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice (NACNEP). Dates...Specialist, National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice, Parklawn...

2013-01-10

176

78 FR 22890 - National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Administration National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice of Meeting...meeting: Name: National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice (NACNEP) Dates...Assistant, National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice, Parklawn...

2013-04-17

177

76 FR 64953 - National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Administration National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice of Meeting...meetings: Name: National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice (NACNEP). Dates...Officer, National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice, Parklawn...

2011-10-19

178

Practicing nurses perspectives of clinical scholarship: a qualitative study  

PubMed Central

Background There is a scarcity of research published on clinical scholarship. Much of the conceptualisation has been conducted in the academy. Nurse academics espouse that the practice of nursing must be built within a framework of clinical scholarship. A key concept of clinical scholarship emerging from discussions in the literature is that it is an essential component of enabling evidence–based nursing and the development of best practice standards to provide for the needs of patients/clients. However, there is no comprehensive definition of clinical scholarship from the practicing nurses. The aim of this study was to contribute to this definitional discussion on the nature of clinical scholarship in nursing. Methods Naturalistic inquiry informed the method. Using an interpretative approach 18 practicing nurses from Australia, Canada and England were interviewed using a semi-structured format. The audio-taped interviews were transcribed and the text coded for emerging themes. The themes were sorted into categories and the components of clinical scholarship described by the participants compared to the scholarship framework of Boyer [JHEOE 7:5-18, 2010]. Results Clinical scholarship is difficult to conceptualise. Two of the essential elements of clinical scholarship are vision and passion. The other components of clinical scholarship were building and disseminating nursing knowledge, sharing knowledge, linking academic research to practice and doing practice-based research. Conclusion Academic scholarship dominated the discourse in nursing. However, in order for nursing to develop and to impact on health care, clinical scholarship needs to be explored and theorised. Nurse educators, hospital-based researchers and health organisations need to work together with academics to achieve this goal. Frameworks of scholarship conceptualised by nurse academics are reflected in the findings of this study with their emphasis on reading and doing research and translating it into nursing practice. This needs to be done in a nonthreatening environment. PMID:24066801

2013-01-01

179

Nursing faculty mentors as facilitators for evidence-based nursing practice.  

PubMed

Increasing use of evidence-based practice (EBP) within complex healthcare organizations requires the identification of individuals who will support and facilitate new practice patterns. In a large Midwestern hospital, a diverse group of academic nursing faculty functioning as mentors to develop clinical nurses' skills in the use of EBP has demonstrated early success. This article highlights the context, challenges, and successes of faculty mentors for developing nursing staff's involvement in and use of EBP. PMID:18838895

Jeffers, Brenda Recchia; Robinson, Sherry; Luxner, Karla; Redding, Donna

2008-01-01

180

Authentic leaders creating healthy work environments for nursing practice.  

PubMed

Implementation of authentic leadership can affect not only the nursing workforce and the profession but the healthcare delivery system and society as a whole. Creating a healthy work environment for nursing practice is crucial to maintain an adequate nursing workforce; the stressful nature of the profession often leads to burnout, disability, and high absenteeism and ultimately contributes to the escalating shortage of nurses. Leaders play a pivotal role in retention of nurses by shaping the healthcare practice environment to produce quality outcomes for staff nurses and patients. Few guidelines are available, however, for creating and sustaining the critical elements of a healthy work environment. In 2005, the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses released a landmark publication specifying 6 standards (skilled communication, true collaboration, effective decision making, appropriate staffing, meaningful recognition, and authentic leadership) necessary to establish and sustain healthy work environments in healthcare. Authentic leadership was described as the "glue" needed to hold together a healthy work environment. Now, the roles and relationships of authentic leaders in the healthy work environment are clarified as follows: An expanded definition of authentic leadership and its attributes (eg, genuineness, trustworthiness, reliability, compassion, and believability) is presented. Mechanisms by which authentic leaders can create healthy work environments for practice (eg, engaging employees in the work environment to promote positive behaviors) are described. A practical guide on how to become an authentic leader is advanced. A research agenda to advance the study of authentic leadership in nursing practice through collaboration between nursing and business is proposed. PMID:16632768

Shirey, Maria R

2006-05-01

181

Reframing the Australian nurse teacher competencies: do they reflect the 'REAL' world of nurse teacher practice?  

PubMed

The Australian nurse teacher competencies were introduced in 1996; however, the researchers perceived that changes to the health care system and a nursing workforce shortage may have affected nurse teacher roles over the past decade. This study aimed to explore perceptions of nurse teachers on the applicability of the current Australian nurse teacher competencies to practice, and modify the nurse teacher competencies to better reflect current practice. Methodology utilized mixed methods, and data collection was via focus groups, telephone interviews, and survey data. Results revealed that participants were mostly positive about the original competency statements, although there were some variations between items. Themes that emerged from the qualitative data were: changing trends in health care; preparation for teaching; understanding of the competencies, contextual influences on education role; nurse teachers as change agents, and resource management. Conclusions were that the Australian nurse teacher competencies (1996) were reflective of the current generic roles of nurse teachers however some of the competencies needed reframing to meet the current needs of nurse teachers. However, changes needed to be made in areas such as reducing complex language, inclusion of technology, and cultural competencies. Nurse teachers were supportive of the research because they valued the teacher competencies for reflection on their practice and the development of portfolios, job descriptions and performance appraisals. PMID:21093124

Guy, Jacqui; Taylor, Christine; Roden, Janet; Blundell, Jennifer; Tolhurst, Gerda

2011-04-01

182

The recovery alliance theory of mental health nursing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The recovery alliance theory (RAT) is a mid-range theory of mental health nursing based on humanistic philosophy. The conception of the RAT was the outcome of collaboration among service users, practising mental health nurses, educationalists and managers and was developed in the context of a number of political and social changes as well as changes in the mental health field.

E. SHANLEY; M. JUBB-SHANLEY

2007-01-01

183

District nurse clinics: accountability and practice.  

PubMed

The numbers of district nurse clinics are continuing to grow in primary care and they provide timely and more cost effective intervention for patients. The clinics provide exciting opportunities for district nurses but also carry an increased risk of exposure to liability. This article discusses some of the key areas of accountability underpinning the duty of care of district nurses working in nurse-led clinics. PMID:23370845

Griffith, Richard; Tengnah, Cassam

2013-02-01

184

Returns to nursing education: rural and nonrural practice.  

PubMed

This study uses data from a national sample of registered nurses to compare earnings of nurses in rural and nonrural practice. The comparisons, conditioned by the nurses' education level, are analogous to the concept of "returns to human capital investment" used in labor economics. A general linear model is applied within a framework of labor economics analysis. Results show that nurses with more education receive less for their investment if they practice in rural areas. Work experience and employment setting are also related to lower annualized earnings for rural practice. One exception to the otherwise consistent findings is that returns to advanced practice nursing are higher in rural areas. Results and policy implications are discussed. PMID:10167769

Pan, S; Straub, L

1997-01-01

185

Strengthening Practice With Theory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Uses case studies of students to outline the theories related to cognitive development and different ways of understanding what knowledge is. Organizes four sets of concepts: (1) the construct of intelligence; (2) different ways of knowing; (3) the nature of constructivism; and (4) the active, strategic process of learning. Contains 19 references.…

Casazza, Martha E.

1998-01-01

186

The College of Nursing is a world leader in educating nurses in interprofessional health care, research, practice, innovation,  

E-print Network

graduate Master of Nursing (MN) Primary Health Care Nurse Practitioner (NP) Post-Graduate Nurse2013AnnuAl ImpAct #12;Vision The College of Nursing is a world leader in educating nurses in interprofessional health care, research, practice, innovation, capacity building and policy development. Mission

Saskatchewan, University of

187

Is compassion essential to nursing practice?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Norwegian Nurses' Association recently (2001) approved a new code of ethics that included compassion as one of the basic values in nursing care.This paper examines the idea of compassion in the context of the Bible story of the Good Samaritan using an analysis of qualitative data from nurses' clinical work with psychiatric patients.The aim is to show how the

MARIT HELENE HEM; KRISTIN HEGGEN

2004-01-01

188

Sovereignty in Theory and Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article deals with the theory and practice of sovereignty from the perspective of a trend in theoretical perspectives as well as the relevant trend in practice. The article provides a survey of the leading thinkers and philosophers views on the nature and importance of sovereignty. The concept of sovereignty is exceeding the complex. Unpacking its meanings and uses over

Winston P Nagan; Aitza M Haddad

2011-01-01

189

Approximation Theory Approximation Practice  

E-print Network

. Orthogonal polynomials, 123 18. Polynomial roots and colleague matrices, 132 19. Clenshaw­Curtis and Gauss-squares, 219 27. Pad´e approximation, 232 28. Analytic continuation and convergence acceleration, 247 Appendix. Everything is practical and fast, so we will routinely compute polynomial interpolants or Gauss quadrature

Morrow, James A.

190

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING IN MISSISSIPPI: CHANGES IN CONTEXT AND PRACTICE  

PubMed Central

Current standards and competencies guiding public health nursing (PHN) practice promote population-focused practice, but few studies have examined the extent to which change toward this type of practice has occurred. A cross-sectional, mail-back survey was conducted among public health nurses in Mississippi to examine recent changes in their practice, contextual factors related to population-focused practice, and recommendations for improving practice and educational preparation for practice. The survey response rate was 54% (n=150 [of 277]). Participants were predominantly female (95%), White (85%), 46 years or older (62%) and held an associate degree in nursing (69%). Most experienced nurses (n=106, 70%) reported perceived practice changes compared to five years prior, but did not consistently report changes toward greater population-focused practice. Participants reported funding decreases and negative effects on practice stemming from the nursing shortage. Recommendations for improving practice conditions included increasing resources, improving workplace environment and management practices, changing the focus of services, and promoting awareness of public health and PHN. Recommendations for improving education included providing more clinical experiences in public health settings and increasing financial supports and distance learning options. Additional research is needed to determine the nature and characteristics of population-focused PHN as practiced in Mississippi and elsewhere. PMID:21243042

Kaiser, Betty L.; Zahner, Susan J.; Simani, Julie

2010-01-01

191

Practice nursing in Glasgow after the new general practitioner contract.  

PubMed Central

Six months after the implementation of the new general practitioner contract in April 1990, practice nurses employed in greater Glasgow were surveyed using a self completed postal questionnaire. Of the 165 practice nurses employed in greater Glasgow 153 (93%) were identified and surveyed. Of these, 131 responded to the questionnaire (86%). The practice nurses were well qualified and experienced. Sixty per cent were under 40 years of age, 68% had been recruited within the previous year and 70% were employed for five sessions or more per week. Many carried out extended nursing duties, including health promotion activities. Many described inadequacies of their employment contract, practice facilities and the functioning of the primary health care team. If service quality is to be assured in practice nursing and practice nurses are to function as key primary health care team workers, then it is important that their role, professional skills, and working facilities are defined, supported and monitored. This should be addressed by general practitioners, practice nurses, and their professional bodies, in collaboration with the health board. PMID:8323796

Peter, A

1993-01-01

192

In search of applications of nursing theories: the Nursing Citation Index.  

PubMed Central

Cited author searches were conducted in Nursing Citation Index to determine its utility in locating clinical studies that apply the conceptual frameworks of Dorothea Orem, Callista Roy, Martha Rogers, Betty Neuman, and Dorothy Johnson. Fully 75 percent of the relevant papers would have been missed by a conventional subject/textword search in the MEDLINE or CINAHL databases. Had Nursing Citation Index not been available, only 22 percent of relevant papers could have been retrieved by cited author searches of Social Science Citation Index. In summary, Nursing Citation Index provides an important indexing link between nursing theory and nursing research. PMID:2655783

Johnson, E D

1989-01-01

193

Role of strategic communication in nursing theory and research.  

PubMed

Linking the process of nursing with theory and research in interpersonal competence is important in building a comprehensive theory of nursing. One dimension of interpersonal competence is the ability to use communication as a strategic mode of nursing intervention. The study of strategic communication can proceed by identifying communication-relevant nursing objectives, obstacles that inhibit the accomplishment of these objectives, and interpersonal strategies that can be employed to address these obstacles and facilitate goal attainment. The use of free response data collection procedures and theoretically grounded and hierarchically ordered message coding systems represents a viable method to analyze strategic communication. PMID:6435510

Kasch, C R; Lisnek, P M

1984-10-01

194

Continuing Education: A National Imperative for School Nursing Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Competency-based continuing education is critical to the professional development of school nurses to ensure the application of timely, age-appropriate clinical knowledge and leadership skills in the school setting. School nurses are responsible for a large number of students with a variety of complex and diverse health care needs. Benner's theory

Vought-O'Sullivan, Victoria; Meehan, Nancy K.; Havice, Pamela A.; Pruitt, Rosanne H.

2006-01-01

195

Knowledge for the good of the individual and society: linking philosophy, disciplinary goals, theory, and practice.  

PubMed

Nursing as a profession has a social mandate to contribute to the good of society through knowledge-based practice. Knowledge is built upon theories, and theories, together with their philosophical bases and disciplinary goals, are the guiding frameworks for practice. This article explores a philosophical perspective of nursing's social mandate, the disciplinary goals for the good of the individual and society, and one approach for translating knowledge into practice through the use of a middle-range theory. It is anticipated that the integration of the philosophical perspective and model into nursing practice will strengthen the philosophy, disciplinary goal, theory, and practice links and expand knowledge within the discipline. With the focus on humanization, we propose that nursing knowledge for social good will embrace a synthesis of the individual and the common good. This approach converges vital and agency needs described by Hamilton and the primacy of maintaining the heritage of the good within the human species as outlined by Maritain. Further, by embedding knowledge development in a changing social and health care context, nursing focuses on the goals of clinical reasoning and action. McCubbin and Patterson's Double ABCX Model of Family Adaptation was used as an example of a theory that can guide practice at the community and global level. Using the theory-practice link as a foundation, the Double ABCX model provides practising nurses with one approach to meet the needs of individuals and society. The integration of theory into nursing practice provides a guide to achieve nursing's disciplinary goals of promoting health and preventing illness across the globe. When nursing goals are directed at the synthesis of the good of the individual and society, nursing's social and moral mandate may be achieved. PMID:20017882

McCurry, Mary K; Revell, Susan M Hunter; Roy, Sr Callista

2010-01-01

196

A joint course for general practitioner and practice nurse trainers.  

PubMed Central

An experimental multidisciplinary course for prospective general practitioner and practice nurse trainers is described. Factual knowledge and attitudes were measured before and after the course and some of the changes measured emphasized the importance of multidisciplinary training. The ideas generated by the group of nurse trainers in terms of their future professional development were identified. PMID:2265007

Bolden, K J; Lewis, A P

1990-01-01

197

Clinical Protocol Page 1 of 4 Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

Clinical Protocol Page 1 of 4 Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing with POLICY: 1. All patients admitted with a primary diagnosis of Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) should have the CHF order set initiated. 2. All patients admitted with a primary diagnosis of CHF will have

Oliver, Douglas L.

198

The clinical nurse leader: a response from practice.  

PubMed

In October 2003, over 200 nurse leaders from education and practice met at the invitation of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing. A newly released white paper, describing the role of the clinical nurse leader, was discussed at the conference. This article outlines a response to that white paper from one practice setting. The article shares information about another role, that of team coordinator, that is similar to clinical nurse leader and has been implemented at an integrated not-for-profit health care system in 5 hospitals. The comparison of the team coordinator role to the clinical nurse leader role might assist in visualizing such a role in practice. Although the roles are not identical, many of the driving forces for change were similar; these included the need to meet the changing demands for improved patient outcomes and nurse retention. The team coordinator role has 4 domains of practice that are crosswalked against the clinical nurse leader 15 core competencies. An evaluation of the team coordinator role showed changes that need to be made, such as placing more emphasis on clinical progression of patients. Lessons learned are shared, including keeping the scope of the role manageable, providing documentation standards for new roles, and the leadership required of the nursing executive to implement change. PMID:15176010

Drenkard, Karen Neil

2004-01-01

199

Introduction to Genetics and Childhood Obesity: Relevance to Nursing Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: The aims for this article are to provide an overview of the current state of research on genetic contributions to the development of childhood obesity and to suggest genetic-focused nursing practices to prevent childhood obesity. Organizing Constructs: Genetic epidemiology of childhood obesity, modes to identifying obesity genes, types of human obesity genes, and nursing implications are discussed. Clinical Relevance:

Nuananong Seal

2011-01-01

200

Australian Nurse Educators Identify Gaps in Expert Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A Delphi panel of 28 Australian nurse educators and 42 clinicians identified 58 practice items in which reality was far from ideal. In particular, for 16 items related to patient empowerment, nursing research, and technology policy, clinical behavior was rated below the median. (SK)

Pelletier, Dianne; Duffield, Christine; Adams, Anne; Nagy, Sue; Crisp, Jackie; Mitten-Lewis, Suzanne

2000-01-01

201

Procedure Page 1 of 2 Clinical Manual / Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

Procedure Page 1 of 2 Clinical Manual / Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROCEDURE FOR: Blood Components: Type and Screen / ABO specimens will be rejected by the Blood Bank. This includes any discrepancies between the patient

Oliver, Douglas L.

202

Administrative Procedure Page 1 of 2 Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

of Command Notification DESIRED PATIENT OUTCOME: Timely and effective communication between appropriate. 2. The nurse notifies the responsible physician utilizing appropriate channels and chain of commandAdministrative Procedure Page 1 of 2 Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department

Oliver, Douglas L.

203

Licensed Practical Nurses in Occupational Health. An Initial Survey.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study, conducted in 1971, assessed characteristics of licensed practical nurses (LPN's) who worked in occupational health nursing. The survey instrument, a questionnaire, was returned by 591 LPN's in occupational health and provided data related to: personal characteristics, work and setting, administrative and professional functioning,…

Lee, Jane A.; And Others

204

Licensed practical nurse to registered nurse transition: developing a tailored orientation.  

PubMed

This article depicts the journey that the clinical educators of a 296-bed community hospital pursued to develop a specific orientation pathway for the licensed practical nurse to registered nurse transition. When the orientation templates were originally developed, the new hires transitioning from LPN to RN were placed in the experienced nurse pathway without considering that they would have specific developmental needs. This journey reflects the educational challenges and subsequent revisions that were made for this specific population. PMID:19820530

Goodwin-Esola, Marlene; Gallagher-Ford, Lynn

2009-01-01

205

Nursing Challenges in Motivating Nursing Students through Clinical Education: A Grounded Theory Study  

PubMed Central

Nurses are the first role models for students in clinical settings. They can have a significant role on students' motivation. The purpose of this study was to explore the understanding of nursing students and instructors concerning the role of nurses in motivating nursing students through clinical education. The sampling was first started purposefully and continued with theoretical sampling. The study collected qualitative data through semistructured and interactive interviews with 16 nursing students and 4 nursing instructors. All interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using grounded theory approach. One important pattern emerged in this study was the “concerns of becoming a nurse,” which itself consisted of three categories: “nurses clinical competency,” “nurses as full-scale mirror of the future,” and “Monitoring and modeling through clinical education” (as the core variable). The findings showed that the nurses' manners of performance as well as the profession's prospect have a fundamental role in the process of formation of motivation through clinical education. Students find an insight into the nursing profession by substituting themselves in the place of a nurse, and as result, are or are not motivated towards the clinical education. PMID:22830005

Nasrin, Hanifi; Soroor, Parvizy; Soodabeh, Joolaee

2012-01-01

206

Examination of Motivating Factors Attracting Licensed Practical Nurses into a Registered Nursing Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study identified characteristics and motivating factors that influenced licensed practical nurses (LPNs) to participate in a registered nursing (RN) upgrading program at a hospital in western Canada. A literature review considered the concepts of motivation, participation, adult learning, and life transitions and explored a variety of models and…

Care, Wm. Dean

207

Supporting patients' birth plans: theories, strategies & implications for nurses.  

PubMed

Pregnant women often create birth plans to specify their preferences for their labor and delivery. When nurses implement and advocate for women's birth plans, it increases women's autonomy and decision-making in the birth process and can lead to greater patient satisfaction. This article describes strategies for how nurses can help implement patients' birth plans, and discusses two psychological theories as a base for understanding nurses' roles in advocating for birth plans to improve patients' experiences. PMID:22697224

Anderson, Cynthia Jane; Kilpatrick, Caitlin

2012-01-01

208

Perceived Readiness for Practice of Senior Baccalaureate Nursing Students  

E-print Network

Nursing education is designed to assist students to become beginning practitioners and clinical experiences are essential to this process. As competition for clinical sites increases, educators need to establish best practices of clinical...

Reagor, Janet

2010-04-20

209

Caring as emancipatory nursing praxis: the theory of relational caring complexity.  

PubMed

In the culture of health care, nurses are challenged to understand their values and beliefs as humanistic within complex technical and economically driven bureaucratic systems. This article outlines the language of social justice and human rights and the advance of a Theory of Relational Caring Complexity, which offers insights into caring as emancipatory nursing praxis. Recommendations provide knowledge of the struggle to balance economics, technology, and caring. As nurses practice from a value-driven, philosophical, and ethical social justice framework, they will find "their voice" and realize the full potential that the power of caring has on patient and organizational outcomes. PMID:24786202

Ray, Marilyn A; Turkel, Marian C

2014-01-01

210

In all required nursing practice courses, students are evaluated by faculty via the Collaborative Nursing Practice Evaluation Instrument. This evaluation instrument is available to view at  

E-print Network

In all required nursing practice courses, students are evaluated by faculty via the Collaborative Nursing Practice Evaluation Instrument. This evaluation instrument is available to view at http://nursing.fau.edu/newnursingsite/handbook/forms/practiceevaluation.html. The instrument describes in detail the competencies of caring that are the foundation for the nursing program

Fernandez, Eduardo

211

Integrating human caring science into a professional nursing practice model.  

PubMed

This article shares the results of a 4-year project to reduce work intensity for hospital nurses and create a human caring environment in the acute care workplace. The research consisted of a two-phase interventional study using four medical units and four surgical comparison units at four hospitals within the Inova Health System. Key caring interventions were selected for implementation into professional nursing practice with measurement of patient satisfaction, nurse satisfaction and turnover, and registered nurses' vacancy rates on the pilot units. Results revealed a statistically significant increase in the nurses' perception of the health care environment overall, improvement in relationships with coworkers, and improvement in workload perception. Qualitative data revealed themes of improvement in nurses' job fulfillment because of the ability to spend time caring for their patients. PMID:19007706

Drenkard, Karen Neil

2008-12-01

212

Collaborative practice between Ontario nurses and physicians: is it possible?  

PubMed

Numerous historical, psychological, social and cultural factors have caused the development and endurance of an unequal relationship pattern between the physician and the nurse. Nurses have assumed a position of lower status and dependency on physicians, and have been viewed as physicians' helpers or "handmaidens". However, with today's rapid technological changes, ethical and moral dilemmas, and cost constraints, high quality patient care cannot occur without equal contribution of both nursing and medicine. A shift from the traditional physician dominated relationship to a more balanced nurse-physician collaboration is needed. In a collaborative relationship, the physician and nurse jointly assume responsibility and accountability for patient care. This paper addresses the barriers to establishing a nurse-physician collaborative practice in Ontario and how they may be overcome. PMID:2078561

Ornstein, H J

1990-01-01

213

A century of practice. Occupational health nursing. 1988.  

PubMed

Occupational health nursing has grown and developed throughout the last century, from the influence of a few nurses in the late 19th century to 1988. Today's occupational health nurses have a significant impact on millions of workers across the United States and worldwide in multinational corporations. Nurses currently enjoy expanded roles, including involvement in the political arena and policy-making decisions, development of health promotion programs, research, and education, as well as providing more traditional but equally important employee health services, counseling, and teaching. The American workforce, as well as management teams, have seen the outcomes of quality occupational health nursing care and contributions throughout the years. The practice of American occupational health nursing which began in very humble surroundings and conditions in the 19th century continues to thrive in the space age of the 1980s and 1990s and to plan for the challenges of the 21st century. PMID:12526625

Parker-Conrad, Jane E

2002-12-01

214

Making IT Work in Practice Integrating the EPR-based nursing record with  

E-print Network

of these efforts: nursing care and the formalization of nurse's written accounts in the EPR- based nursing record for delivering healthcare services, the contribution of the nursing profession to the overall delivery of careMaking IT Work in Practice Integrating the EPR-based nursing record with nursing work Glenn

Langseth, Helge

215

Promotion of evidence-based practice by professional nursing associations: literature review  

Microsoft Academic Search

AIM: This paper reports a literature review examining the activities of professional nursing associations in the promotion of evidence-based practice. BACKGROUND: Professional nursing associations can play a role in the implementation and achievement of evidence-based practice as such associations aim to develop and further educate nurses professionally, build professional networks representing the interests of nurses and the nursing profession, influence

Gerda Holleman; Aart Eliens; Marjolein van Vliet; Theo van Achterberg

2006-01-01

216

Theory into Practice Goes Exactly  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Dimensions of possible variation" is a phrase that now occupies a safe place in the literature describing the application of education theory to education practice: "asking yourself what could be changed [in the task], while using the same approach or technique, opens up dimensions of possible variation. A set of exercises forming a sequence of…

Griffiths, Jonny

2007-01-01

217

Educational Management: Theory and Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book provides the reader with principal theories and practices of management in educational organizations. It attempts to widen both the breadth and depth of the body of knowledge in this area of specialization. The work provides useful reference material for students and scholars at the undergraduate and postgraduate levels in universities…

Okumbe, J. A.

218

Model Checking: Theory into Practice  

E-print Network

Model Checking: Theory into Practice E. Allen Emerson ? Department of Computer Sciences and Computer Engineering Research Center The University of Texas at Austin, Austin TX­78712, USA emerson@cs.utexas.edu http://www.cs.utexas.edu/users/emerson/ Abstract. Model checking is an automatic method for verifying

Emerson, E. Allen

219

Practice Theory in Language Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ortega (2011) has argued that second language acquisition is stronger and better after the social turn. Of the post-cognitive approaches she reviews, several focus on the social context of language learning rather than on language as the central phenomenon. In this article, we present Practice Theory not as yet another approach to language…

Young, Richard F.; Astarita, Alice C.

2013-01-01

220

Teaching Rhetorica: Theory, Pedagogy, Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In their breakthrough anthology of women's rhetoric, "Available Means," Kate Ronald and Joy Ritchie presented the first comprehensive collection of women's rhetorical theory and practice from the third century B.C. to 2001. With that expansive gathering of women's rhetoric, they raised questions about gender, difference, and the rhetorical canon,…

Ronald, Kate, Ed.; Ritchie, Joy, Ed.

2006-01-01

221

MENTAL NURSING. LESSON PLANS PREPARED BY PRACTICAL NURSING INSTRUCTORS FOLLOWING JOINT CONFERENCE HELD AT THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE, KNOXVILLE.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THE LESSON PLANS FOR A UNIT ON MENTAL NURSING IN THE PRACTICAL NURSE EDUCATION PROGRAM WERE DEVELOPED BY A GROUP OF REGISTERED NURSES HOLDING TENNESSEE TEACHING CERTIFICATES. STUDENTS SELECTED FOR THE PROGRAM SHOULD BE HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES OR EQUIVALENT. THE LESSONS DESIGNED FOR USE BY A REGISTERED NURSE CERTIFIED FOR TEACHING GIVE OBJECTIVES,…

Tennessee State Board for Vocational Education, Murfreesboro. Vocational Curriculum Lab.

222

Authentic leadership: a new theory for nursing or back to basics?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – Authentic leadership is an emerging theoretical model purported to focus on the root component of effective leadership. The purpose of this paper is to describe the relevance of authentic leadership to the advancement of nursing leadership practice and research and address the question of whether this is a new theory for leadership or an old one in new

Carol Wong; Greta Cummings

2009-01-01

223

Simulation Methodology in Nursing Education and Adult Learning Theory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Simulation is often used in nursing education as a teaching methodology. Simulation is rooted in adult learning theory. Three learning theories, cognitive, social, and constructivist, explain how learners gain knowledge with simulation experiences. This article takes an in-depth look at each of these three theories as each relates to simulation.…

Rutherford-Hemming, Tonya

2012-01-01

224

Doctor of Nursing Practice Program DNP INTENSIVE  

E-print Network

FH Lunch Students are responsible for providing their own lunch -------------------------------------------------------------------- Elective Session: Nursing 460A - Obesity and Weight Control Part 1: Biology, Physiology and Epidemiology Heidi J. Silver, PhD, RD Boxed lunch provided

Bordenstein, Seth

225

Nursing education and research rounds: evaluation of a webinar-based education strategy to engage nurses and support practice.  

PubMed

Nursing Education and Research Rounds (NEARR), a webinar-based series of continuing education presentations focused on nursing research, was developed to engage nurses in discussion about evidence-based practice. Evaluation of NEARR indicated a large majority of participants considered the information provided useful in their practice and planned to attend future NEARR sessions. Nursing professional development specialists can use this approach to support evidence-based practice. PMID:24060661

Black, Agnes T; Clauson, Marion; Fraser, Shelley

2013-01-01

226

Connecting congregations: technology resources influence parish nurse practice.  

PubMed

This descriptive pilot study evaluated the influence of health resource information education and the use of Web-based communication technology on the professional practice of the parish nurse in the congregational setting. Five parish nurse participants from varied denominations in rural and nonrural Virginia received a laptop computer, printer, video projector, and webcam along with high-speed Internet access in each congregational setting. The nurses attended two group education sessions that incorporated computer applications and training in accessing and using quality health information resources and communication applications such as a group "chat" software and webcam to communicate with others through high-speed Internet access. Qualitative analysis from semistructured interviews of nurses confirmed that participants found the project to be beneficial in terms of awareness, education, and applicability of technology use in parish nurse practice. Quantitative data from preproject and postproject surveys found significant differences in nurses' abilities and confidence with technology use and application. Findings showed that the knowledge and experience gained from this study enhanced parish nurse practice and confidence in using technology for communication, health education, and counseling. PMID:19411943

Zerull, Lisa M; Near, Kelly K; Ragon, Bart; Farrell, Sarah P

2009-01-01

227

Clinical Procedure Page 1 of 2 Clinical Manual Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

. Initiate transfusion. APPROVAL: Nursing Standards Committee Transfusion Committee Director of Transfusion Medicine #12;Clinical Procedure Page 2 of 2 Clinical Manual ­ Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital

Oliver, Douglas L.

228

A comprehensive community nursing center model: maximizing practice income--a challenge to educators.  

PubMed

The potential role of community nursing centers to generate revenue through faculty practice is critical for the survival of nursing centers in the future. A nursing center entrepreneurial model for faculty practice within the University of Rochester School of Nursing uses sound business principles to enhance financial success and challenges current paradigms in education, practice, and research. PMID:8034852

Walker, P H

1994-01-01

229

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMMES Programme name BSc (Hons) Primary Care (Practice Nursing)  

E-print Network

SUMMARY The BSc (Hons) Primary Care (Practice Nursing) is available as a part time degree only. The degree is suitable for registered nurses, who are currently working as Practice Nurses. Primary care is experiencing the primary care sector that has lead to increasing educational and training requirements for Practice Nurses

Weyde, Tillman

230

Primer on the practice doctorate for neonatal nurse practitioners.  

PubMed

Recent advances in technology, research, and knowledge have amplified the need for longer and more in-depth education for neonatal nurse practitioners (NNPs). In this article we will briefly review the history of NNP's role and education, define the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP), and propose that the practice doctorate is the primary mechanism to meet that need and thus is the future of our profession. Doctor of Nursing Practice programs are designed to prepare the practitioner as an expert clinical NNP. Graduates obtain the highest level of practice expertise integrated with the ability to translate scientific knowledge into complex clinical interventions tailored to meet individual, family, and community health and illness needs. Doctor of Nursing Practice education also expands the scientific basis for practice and clinical practice education, and provides organization and system management and leadership, quality improvement, analytic methods to evaluate practice and apply evidence to practice, enhanced skills in information technology, health policy development, and interdisciplinary collaboration for enhanced patient outcomes. PMID:17208163

Bellflower, Bobby; Carter, Michael A

2006-12-01

231

Israeli nurse practice environment characteristics, retention, and job satisfaction  

PubMed Central

Background There is an international nursing shortage. Improving the practice environment has been shown to be a successful strategy against this phenomenon, as the practice environment is associated with retention and job satisfaction. The Israeli nurse practice environment has not been measured. The purpose of this study was to measure practice environment characteristics, retention and job satisfaction and to evaluate the association between these variables. Methods A demographic questionnaire, the Practice Environment Scale, and a Job Satisfaction Questionnaire were administered to Israeli acute and intensive care nurses working in 7 hospitals across the country. Retention was measured by intent to leave the organization and work experience. A convenience sample of registered nurses was obtained using a bi-phasic, stratified, cluster design. Data were collected based on the preferences of each unit, either distribution during various shifts or at staff meetings; or via staff mailboxes. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the sample and results of the questionnaires. Pearson Product Moment Correlations were used to determine significant associations among the variables. A multiple regression model was designed where the criterion variable was the practice environment. Analyses of variance determined differences between groups on nurse practice environment characteristics. Results 610 nurses reported moderate levels of practice environment characteristics, where the lowest scoring characteristic was ‘appropriate staffing and resources’. Approximately 9% of the sample reported their intention to leave and the level of job satisfaction was high. A statistically significant, negative, weak correlation was found between intention to leave and practice environment characteristics, with a moderate correlation between job satisfaction and practice environment characteristics. ‘Appropriate staffing and resources’ was the only characteristic found to be statistically different based on hospital size and geographic region. Conclusions This study supports the international nature of the vicious cycle that includes a poor quality practice environment, decreased job satisfaction and low nurse retention. Despite the extreme nursing shortage in Israel, perceptions of the practice environment were similar to other countries. Policy makers and hospital managers should address the practice environment, in order to improve job satisfaction and increase retention. PMID:24565045

2014-01-01

232

Theory into Practice: A Matter of Transfer  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article explores a new approach to taking theory into practice--one that offers a direct route from research to practice. Traditionally, theory makes its way to practice cloaked in particular curriculum interventions. We argue that taking theory into practice is essentially a matter of transfer--applying teaching and learning principles in…

Randi, Judi; Corno, Lyn

2007-01-01

233

Theory Into Practice: A Matter of Transfer  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article explores a new approach to taking theory into practice—one that offers a direct route from research to practice. Traditionally, theory makes its way to practice cloaked in particular curriculum interventions. We argue that taking theory into practice is essentially a matter of transfer—applying teaching and learning principles in new situations. New ideas about transfer have implications for both

Judi Randi; Lyn Corno

2007-01-01

234

Understanding and integrating mindfulness into psychiatric mental health nursing practice.  

PubMed

The practice of mindfulness is increasingly being integrated into Western clinical practice within the context of psychotherapy and stress management. Although it is based in ancient Buddhist philosophy, there remains confusion about the definition, antecedents, processes, and outcomes of mindfulness practice. This article reviews the literature on mindfulness, with a focus upon a clearer definition and understanding of the processes and integration into psychiatric mental health nursing practice. PMID:19766927

Tusaie, Kathleen; Edds, Kelly

2009-10-01

235

'Implementation deficit' and 'street-level bureaucracy': policy, practice and change in the development of community nursing issues.  

PubMed

The present paper examines the mechanisms by which health and social care policies put forward by the Government may be translated into community nursing practice. Data from a research project on community nurse case managers were re-examined in the light of two classic theories often cited by policy analysts (i.e. implementation theory and 'street-level bureaucracy'). It was found that the extent to which nurses adopted the case management role, and the model of choice, depended on four major interrelated variables, namely: (1) the clarity of policy guidance; (2) the extent to which it coincided with professional (nursing) values; (3) local practices and policies; and (4) the personal vision of the community nurse. It is argued that this framework may have wider relevance, and this was tested out in two ways. First, major change in one of these variables (Government policy) over time was analysed for its effect on case management practice via the remaining variables. Secondly, an unrelated, but policy-initiated, nursing issue (nurse prescribing) was briefly examined in the light of the framework. It is suggested that this framework may be of some use when considering the likely practice response to policy-related changes in community nursing. PMID:15717901

Bergen, Ann; While, Alison

2005-01-01

236

Task Analysis for Health Occupations. Cluster: Nursing. Occupation: Practical Nurse (L.P.N.). Education for Employment Task Lists.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Task analyses are provided for two duty areas for the occupation of practical nurse (licensed practical nurse) in the nursing cluster. The two duty areas are: (1) providing therapeutic measures (30 tasks); and (2) performing diagnostic measures (14 tasks). Each task analysis consists of these components: occupation; duty area; tasks; performance…

Lake County Area Vocational Center, Grayslake, IL.

237

Tanzanian Nurses Understanding and Practice of Spiritual Care  

PubMed Central

Spirituality, as a basic characteristic of humans and a contributor to human health, is regarded as part of nursing practice. The purpose of this study was to examine how Tanzanian nurses understand spirituality and spiritual care. Using the qualitative method of interpretive description, fifteen registered nurses engaged in clinical practice in a Tanzanian hospital were recruited to participate in this study. In-depth interviews using open-ended questions were carried out, tape-recorded, and transcribed verbatim. Data collection and inductive analysis occurred concurrently. In this paper, key findings are grouped under the following headings: meaning of spiritual care, recognition of spiritual needs, and interventions to respond to spiritual needs. Although there were some differences, overall participants' understanding of spirituality and spiritual care was similar to what is found in the literature about nurses in other countries. The provision of spiritual care also included some unique elements that may reflect the African context. PMID:22007322

Dhamani, Khairunnisa Aziz; Paul, Pauline; Olson, Joanne Kaye

2011-01-01

238

Preparing emotionally intelligent doctor of nursing practice leaders.  

PubMed

The Institute of Medicine (IOM) identified the need for interdisciplinary teams that collaborate, communicate, and integrate care across settings to improve health care delivery. Focusing on innovative strategies that address leadership skills in graduate nursing education could have an effect on interdisciplinary partnerships, transformation of patient care, and new styles of leadership to change current practice models. In response to the IOM guidelines, we incorporated emotional intelligence as a component in our Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) leadership curriculum. This article describes a new action-oriented leadership model that prepares the DNP graduate for leadership roles to serve the public and the nursing discipline during a time of radical changes in health care. Behavioral profile, nontraditional readings, and online discussions form the basis of the model. The principles and strategies in this article can be applied to nursing education in multiple arenas, at both the undergraduate and graduate settings. PMID:22624564

Renaud, Michelle T; Rutledge, Carolyn; Shepherd, Laurel

2012-08-01

239

Practical implications of pre-employment nurse assessments.  

PubMed

Hiring nurses is a difficult task that can have serious repercussions for medical facilities. If nurses without proper skills are hired, patients can suffer from insufficient quality of care and potentially life-threatening conditions. Nurse applicants' technical knowledge is extremely important to avoid negative outcomes; however, there are soft skills that factor into their success, such as bedside manner, personality, communication, and decision making. In order for medical facilities to select and maintain high-performing nurse staff, hiring managers must incorporate evaluations for these types of skills in their hiring process. The current study focused on using content/criterion-related validation design to create assessments by which nurse applicants can be evaluated for both technical knowledge/skills and soft skills. The study included participation of more than 876 nursing staff members. To rank applicants on divergent skills, 3 assessment types were investigated, resulting in the creation of an assessment with 3 components. The clinical, situational, and behavioral components that were created measure applicants' job knowledge, interpersonal competency in medical facility-related situations, and aspects of personality and behavior, respectively. Results indicate that using the assessment can predict 45% of a nurse applicant's future job performance. Practical implications include hiring and maintaining a higher quality of nurses and decreased hiring costs. PMID:23629042

Kuthy, James E; Ramon, Cheree; Gonzalez, Ronald; Biddle, Dan A

2013-01-01

240

Current Continuing Professional Education Practice among Malaysian Nurses  

PubMed Central

Nurses need to participate in CPE to update their knowledge and increase their competencies. This research was carried out to explore their current practice and the future general needs for CPE. This cross-sectional descriptive study involved registered nurses from government hospitals and health clinics from Peninsular Malaysia. Multistage cluster sampling was used to recruit 1000 nurses from four states of Malaysia. Self-explanatory questionnaires were used to collect the data, which were analyzed using SPSS version 16. Seven hundred and ninety-two nurses participated in this survey. Only 80% (562) of the nurses had engaged in CPE activities during the past 12 months. All attendance for the various activities was below 50%. Workshops were the most popular CPE activity (345, 43.6%) and tertiary education was the most unpopular activity (10, 1.3%). The respondents did perceive the importance of future CPE activities for career development. Mandatory continuing professional education (MCPE) is a key measure to ensure that nurses upgrade their knowledge and skills; however, it is recommended that policy makers and nurse leaders in the continuing professional development unit of health service facilities plan CPE activities to meet registered nurses' (RNs) needs and not simply organizational requirements. PMID:24523961

Chong, Mei Chan; Francis, Karen; Cooper, Simon; Abdullah, Khatijah Lim

2014-01-01

241

Current Continuing Professional Education Practice among Malaysian Nurses.  

PubMed

Nurses need to participate in CPE to update their knowledge and increase their competencies. This research was carried out to explore their current practice and the future general needs for CPE. This cross-sectional descriptive study involved registered nurses from government hospitals and health clinics from Peninsular Malaysia. Multistage cluster sampling was used to recruit 1000 nurses from four states of Malaysia. Self-explanatory questionnaires were used to collect the data, which were analyzed using SPSS version 16. Seven hundred and ninety-two nurses participated in this survey. Only 80% (562) of the nurses had engaged in CPE activities during the past 12 months. All attendance for the various activities was below 50%. Workshops were the most popular CPE activity (345, 43.6%) and tertiary education was the most unpopular activity (10, 1.3%). The respondents did perceive the importance of future CPE activities for career development. Mandatory continuing professional education (MCPE) is a key measure to ensure that nurses upgrade their knowledge and skills; however, it is recommended that policy makers and nurse leaders in the continuing professional development unit of health service facilities plan CPE activities to meet registered nurses' (RNs) needs and not simply organizational requirements. PMID:24523961

Chong, Mei Chan; Francis, Karen; Cooper, Simon; Abdullah, Khatijah Lim

2014-01-01

242

Community and participation for general practice: perceptions of general practitioners and community nurses.  

PubMed

A central theme of health policy has concerned the public's participation in primary health care services, both as individual consumers and collectively as communities. In the U.K. primary care increasingly centres on general practice. This paper reports an exploratory study undertaken with practice teams in inner city Sheffield about community participation. The study design was influenced by a grounded theory approach to data collection and analysis. The main data collected was from interviews of 23 general practitioners, 20 practice nurses, 11 health visitors and 7 district nurses. Concepts of community and participation were explored by interview with these primary care workers. Typologies of community and participation for general practice are presented in the findings, along with associated strategic positions and political tensions. The discussion highlights a number of tensions and issues concerning community participation when primary care is organized around general practice. PMID:7939849

Brown, I

1994-08-01

243

THE ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORD FUNCTIONALITIES IN THE STATE OF KANSAS WITH REGARD TO NURSING PRACTICE  

E-print Network

The purpose of this study was to identify the electronic health record functionalities of acute care hospitals in the state of Kansas with regard to nursing practice. From the perspective of the Chief Nursing Officer, what was the nurses' role...

Menninger-Corder, Mary Lynn

2010-04-27

244

Use of competencies in training fertility nurses in clinical practice.  

PubMed

In this article, the value of clinical competencies in the role development of fertility nurses is discussed using the example of the Oxford Fertility Programme. Clinical competencies are incorporated into the training programme within the Oxford Fertility Unit to enable new staff to demonstrate their clinical ability and undergo assessment while learning new and expanded skills. New staff are required to explore both the theoretical and practical foundations that underpin clinical practice. Competencies are used in a structured programme in which staff have to provide evidence of the appropriate knowledge to perform new and expanded procedures. New staff work with a senior nurse, who is their lecturer and who assesses both their clinical and theoretical development. The new staff are also assigned a preceptor with whom they work on a daily basis to consolidate the practice explored with the lecturer. The Scope of Professional Practice produced by the United Kingdom Central Council for Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting (UKCC, 1992) places the emphasis on professional development for individual practitioners. Within the Oxford Fertility Unit, the nurses work collectively and as autonomous practitioners, which enables them to provide a specialized and personal service to their patients. Professional profiles are an integral element of an individual's professional development and are used in the training programme. They provide an accurate record of a nurse's abilities and knowledge and how he or she relates them to practice. PMID:11844318

Barber, Debbie

1999-01-01

245

At 3 am who the Hell do you Call? Case Management Issues in Sole Practice as a Rural Community Mental Health Nurse  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: This paper presents a section of data from a larger study into the sole practice of rural community mental health nurses, highlighting the uniqueness of the therapeutic model and the stresses associated with sole practice.Method: A grounded theory method was used that involved interviews with senior community mental health nurses from five rural and remote sites in New South

Heather Gibb; Lynnda Livesey; Walter Zyla

2003-01-01

246

Nurses' Perceptions of Physicians' Communication: The Relationship Among Communication Practices, Satisfaction, and Collaboration  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the relationships among nurses' perceptions of physician communication practices, nurse–physician collaboration, and nurses' job satisfaction. Two hundred five nurses employed at a pediatric hospital completed surveys on site that examined perceptions of nurse–physician and physician–patient communication, job satisfaction, and nurse–physician collaboration. Nurse reports of physicians who listened effectively and used clear, humorous, immediate, and empathic messages were

Melissa Bekelja Wanzer; Ann M. Wojtaszczyk; Jill Kelly

2009-01-01

247

Everyday Excellence: A Framework for Professional Nursing Practice in Long-Term Care  

PubMed Central

Registered nurses make measurable contributions to the health and wellness of persons living in nursing homes. However, most nursing homes do not employ adequate numbers of professional nurses with specialized training in the nursing care of older adults to positively impact resident outcomes. As a result, many people never receive excellent geriatric nursing while living in a long-term care facility. Nurses have introduced various professional practice models into health care institutions as tools for leading nursing practice, improving client outcomes, and achieving organizational goals. Problematically, few professional practice models have been implemented in nursing homes. This article introduces an evidence-based framework for professional nursing practice in long-term care. The Everyday Excellence framework is based upon eight guiding principles: Valuing, Envisioning, Peopling, Securing, Learning, Empowering, Leading, and Advancing Excellence. Future research will evaluate the usefulness of this framework for professional nursing practice. PMID:20077966

Lyons, Stacie Salsbury; Specht, Janet Pringle; Karlman, Susan E.

2009-01-01

248

Practice Makes Perfect Despite Imperfect Theory 89 Practice Makes Perfect  

E-print Network

Practice Makes Perfect Despite Imperfect Theory 89 Practice Makes Perfect Despite Imperfect Theory and Power highlight the difficulties theory encounters when practice progresses at a rapid pace. The effect sense of that effect. While the books ably document the changes in pedagogy, they do not take the logic

Chaudhuri, Sanjay

249

Licensed Practical Nurses' Sex Role Stereotypes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined whether sex-role stereotypes would affect nurses' (N=32) attitudes toward simulations of male and female patients. Emotional style and patients' diagnosis were manipulated. Results showed significant sex-role differences and stereotypical attitudes. Male patients were rated more positively, and were more likely to possess traditional male…

Wallston, Barbara Strudler; And Others

1983-01-01

250

The Journal of Doctoral Nursing Practice  

E-print Network

Nursing 69 where resilient systems of agriculture and water supply have been built up over the last 20 is in Somalia. Thousands of noncombatants are dying from multiple causes (famine, civil war), and solutions are com- peting for scarce dollars. Is it most effective to supply measles vaccine to children

Grishok, Alla

251

Compass and Prerequisite Course Scores as Predictors of Success in Practical Nursing School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The nursing shortage is compounded by nursing student attrition. Schools of nursing have limited enrollment, making the admission process an important factor in resolving the ongoing nursing shortage. The purpose of this study was to identify preadmission criteria that accurately identify applicants to practical/vocational nursing (P/VN) schools…

Pritchard, Toni L. Early

2010-01-01

252

Nurse Responses to Re-tooling Practice, Education, and Management Roles.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Responses from 409 registered nurses, 105 nurse managers, 144 nurse educators, and 31 licensed practical nurses indicated that 92% were willing to retool, defined as prepare for evolving nursing roles. They were less likely to be aware of employer expectations or supports for retooling. Areas needing development included critical thinking,…

Kjervik, Diane K.; Leonard, Dianne J.

2001-01-01

253

Returning to school: The challenges of the licensed practical nurse-to-registered nurse transition student  

Microsoft Academic Search

Licensed practical nurses (LPNs) play a vital role in the provision of health care but have limited career mobility. Completing the LPN-to-RN transition option provides expanded opportunities and meets the need for increased registered nurses (RN). Returning to school presents many challenges, and this study reports the issues faced by students at a mid-Atlantic community college. Identifying challenges faced by

Linda Cook; Cheryl Dover; Michele Dickson; Barbara Engh

2010-01-01

254

Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders - a model for optimising the geriatric nursing practice environment  

PubMed Central

Aims and objectives To explain the relationship between a positive nurse practice environment (NPE) and implementation of evidence-based practices. To describe the components of NICHE (Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders) programmes that contribute to a positive geriatric nursing practice environment. Background The NPE is a system-level intervention for promoting quality and patient safety; however, there are population-specific factors that influence the nurses’ perception of their practice and its’ relationship with patient outcomes. Favourable perceptions of the geriatric-specific NPE are associated with better perceptions of geriatric care quality. Designs Discursive paper. Method In this selective critical analysis of the descriptive and empirical literature, we present the implementation of geriatric models in relation to the NPE and components of the NICHE programme that support hospitals’ systemic capacity to effectively integrate and sustain evidence-based geriatric knowledge into practice. Results Although there are several geriatric models and chronic care models available, NICHE has been the most successful in recruiting hospital membership as well as contributing to the depth of geriatric hospital programming. Conclusions Although all geriatric care models require significant nursing input, only NICHE focuses on the nursing staff’s perception of the care environment for geriatric practice. Studies in NICHE hospitals demonstrate that quality geriatric care requires a NPE in which the structure and processes of hospital services focus on specific patient care needs. Relevance to clinical practice The implementation of evidence-based models addressing the unique needs of hospitalised older adults requires programmes such as NICHE that serve as technical resources centre and a catalyst for networking among facilities committed to quality geriatric care. Unprecedented international growth in the ageing population compels us to examine how to adapt the successful components of NICHE to the distinctive needs of health systems throughout the world that serve older adults. PMID:23083387

Capezuti, Elizabeth; Boltz, Marie; Cline, Daniel; Dickson, Victoria Vaughn; Rosenberg, Marie-Claire; Wagner, Laura; Shuluk, Joseph; Nigolian, Cindy

2012-01-01

255

Principled decision making in district nurse practice.  

PubMed

This article outlines a case study in which Sister Mary Newsome is in conflict with her district nurse colleague over the care of Margaret, 67, who they visit to monitor blood glucose levels and calculate the insulin dose to manage her diabetes. Recently, Margaret has been refusing to answer the door to the district nurses and has been eating sugary foods that have resulted in five admissions for diabetic ketoacidosis. While Sister Newsome believes continued care at home is best for Margaret, her colleague believes that only residential care will ensure Margaret maintains an appropriate diet and receives her insulin. Sister Newsome considers how best to resolve the conflict over the care of Margaret. PMID:25284188

Griffith, Richard

2014-10-01

256

Nurses' perceived barriers to the implementation of a Fall Prevention Clinical Practice Guideline in Singapore hospitals  

PubMed Central

Background Theories of behavior change indicate that an analysis of barriers to change is helpful when trying to influence professional practice. The aim of this study was to assess the perceived barriers to practice change by eliciting nurses' opinions with regard to barriers to, and facilitators of, implementation of a Fall Prevention clinical practice guideline in five acute care hospitals in Singapore. Methods Nurses were surveyed to identify their perceptions regarding barriers to implementation of clinical practice guidelines in their practice setting. The validated questionnaire, 'Barriers and facilitators assessment instrument', was administered to nurses (n = 1830) working in the medical, surgical, geriatric units, at five acute care hospitals in Singapore. Results An 80.2% response rate was achieved. The greatest barriers to implementation of clinical practice guidelines reported included: knowledge and motivation, availability of support staff, access to facilities, health status of patients, and, education of staff and patients. Conclusion Numerous barriers to the use of the Fall Prevention Clinical Practice Guideline have been identified. This study has laid the foundation for further research into implementation of clinical practice guidelines in Singapore by identifying barriers to change in acute care settings. PMID:18485235

Koh, Serena SL; Manias, Elizabeth; Hutchinson, Alison M; Donath, Susan; Johnston, Linda

2008-01-01

257

Pain medication management in nursing homes and nursing scope of practice.  

PubMed

Inadequate pain medication management is pervasive in nursing homes (NHs). Licensed practical nurses (LPNs) deliver the majority of licensed nursing care, but LPNs are neither trained nor licensed to provide comprehensive pain assessment and medication management. In this study, we describe how pain medication management occurs in NHs by exploring LPNs' management approaches, while considering scope-of-practice differences between RNs and LPNs. Using comparative case studies of 10 NHs in North Carolina and Minnesota, we found practice variations in pain detection, assessment, and medication administration. Differences clustered in three areas: (a) the extent to which RNs and LPNs connected formally and informally to provide pain care, (b) the degree to which RNs and LPNs were considered interchangeable with one another, and (c) the RN-to-LPN ratio. Results highlight quality issues and suggest ways to improve pain medication management in NHs. PMID:23445182

Corazzini, Kirsten N; Mueller, Christine; Anderson, Ruth A; Day, Lisa; Hunt-McKinney, Selina; Porter, Kristie

2013-04-01

258

Changes Resulting from Reflection Dialogues on Nursing Practice  

PubMed Central

Background Reflection is defined here as a process by which, through self-conversation, one’s self and one’s behavior acquire meaning. However, people have limitations in terms of what they can express and be aware of during reflection. This finding points to the importance of facilitators. The purpose of this study was to determine what changes can be brought about through reflection dialogues on nursing practice. Methods The Participants were 9 nurses who worked at three institutions in City A, each with about 200 beds. Workplace topics were examined through self-reflections and reflection dialogues. The depth of reflection was assessed using the three levels of reflection described by Mezirow—{reflecting on the content}, {reflecting on the process} and {reflecting on the assumptions}. Results In reflecting on nursing practice, the participants were also divided into those who had already reached the highest level, {reflecting on assumptions}, via self-reflection, and those who remained at the level of {reflecting on processes}, despite the use of reflection dialogues. Conclusion The development of reflective thinking on nursing practice was connected not only to the participants’ desire to explore ways of accepting their individual experiences, but may also be connected to whether or not they are able to question themselves about their thoughts and preconceptions about nursing work. PMID:25067874

Okuda, Reiko; Fukada, Mika

2014-01-01

259

Finding common ground in public health nursing education and practice.  

PubMed

Preparation of the public health nursing (PHN) workforce requires public health nurses from academia and practice to collaborate. However, a shortage of PHN clinical sites may lead to competition between schools of nursing for student placements. The Henry Street Consortium, a group of 5 baccalaureate schools of nursing and 13 local health departments in the state of Minnesota, developed a model for collaboration between PHN education and practice. This paper describes the development process--the forming, storming, norming, and performing stages--experienced by the Henry Street Consortium members. The consortium developed a set of entry-level core PHN competencies that are utilized by both education and practice. It developed menus of learning opportunities that were used to design population-based PHN clinical experiences. In addition, the consortium created a model for training and sustaining a preceptor network. The members of the Henry Street Consortium collaborated rather than competed, used consensus for decision making, and respected and accepted different points of view. This collaboration significantly impacted how schools of nursing and local health departments work together. The consortium's ability to retain its relevance, energy, and momentum for both academic and agency partners sustains the collaboration. PMID:21535112

Keller, Linda O; Schaffer, Marjorie A; Schoon, Patricia M; Brueshoff, Bonnie; Jost, Rose

2011-01-01

260

Grounded theory in medical laboratory science expert practice development.  

PubMed

Grounded theory and methods related to expert practice development in medical laboratory science were described using data from a large national survey of medical laboratory scientists (MLS) overlaid on findings from analysis of expert practice domains reported in nursing literature. An extensive focus group/expert review iterative process followed by a survey of MLS practitioners produced 25 critical thinking (CT) behaviors important in expert practice. Factor analysis was applied to discern common threads or themes linking the CT behaviors. The 25 important CT behaviors were reduced to a 7-factor structure representing constructs underlying the individual, observable CT behaviors. This 7-factor structure in MLS was compared to the 7 practice domains identified in expert nursing practice. The comparison yielded commonality between MLS and nursing in CT behaviors observed in the 7 expert practice domains of both professions: professional techniques, caring communication, growing professionally, setting priorities, practicing with judgment, anticipating/revising, and creating unique meaning. Emergent grounded theory is that (1) critical thinking is a metaprocess that facilitates learning by interlinking the more basic processes associated with different learning orientations: cognitivist, behaviorist, humanist (affective), and situated/contextual learning, (2) CT behaviors are observable events following from the CT metaprocess, and (3) observations of CT behaviors increase as practice advances from novice to expert. Identification and definition of CT behaviors, i.e., practice competencies, along the continuum of novice to expert can serve as the foundation for MLS curriculum and instructional design as well as measurement and evaluation in both formal and continuing education settings. PMID:22420229

Leibach, Elizabeth Kenimer

2011-01-01

261

The informatics nurse specialist as change agent. Application of innovation-diffusion theory.  

PubMed

The informatics nurse specialist (INS) is often the primary change agent in facilitating the implementation of clinical information systems (CIS) in healthcare settings. The INS has a unique understanding of the nursing issues that can affect the change process, and thus is in a key position to facilitate positive implementation outcomes. Innovation-diffusion theory is particularly useful in its application to the change agent role of the INS. With this theoretical knowledge, the INS can design CIS training interventions according to the psychological phenomena of Rogers' Innovation-Decision Process. An understanding of the decision-making process and the distribution of different rates of innovation adoption within a given population enable the INS to anticipate and address influential factors that affect the implementation process. Thus, Innovation-Diffusion Theory may be used as a powerful cognitive tool for the INS in facilitating the diffusion process and nurses' adoption of the technology in practice. PMID:11105401

Hilz, L M

2000-01-01

262

Time to talk, time to see: changing microeconomies of professional practice among nurses and doctors in Australian general practice.  

PubMed

In Australia, more nurses are entering general practice, and nurses' work is being funded in increasingly complex ways through Medicare. Little research has explored the ways doctors and nurses realign their priorities and activities when working together in general practice. We undertook rapid, intensive multimethod studies of 25 general practices to explore the ways in which the labour of nurses and doctors was structured, and the implicit decisions made by both professions about the values placed on different ways of working and on their time. Data collected included photographs, floor-plans, interviews with 37 nurses, 24 doctors and 22 practice managers, and 50 hours of structured observation. Nursing time was constructed by both nurses and doctors as being fluid and non-contingent; they were regarded as being 'available' to patients in a way that doctors were not. Compared to medical time, nursing time could be disposed more flexibly, underpinning a valorized attribute of nursing: deep clinical and personal contact with patients. The location of practice nurses' desks in areas of traffic, such as administrative stations, or in the treatment room, underpinned this valuable unstructured contact with patients. Changes to the practice nurse role through direct fee-for-service items for nurses may lead to greater congruence between the microeconomies of nursing and medicine in general practice. In a time of pressure upon a primary care workforce, this is likely to lead to more independent clinical work by nurses, but may also lead to a decrease in flexible contact with patients. PMID:18041994

Phillips, Christine; Dwan, Kathryn; Pearce, Christopher; Hall, Sally; Porritt, Julie; Yates, Rachel; Sibbald, Bonnie

2007-08-01

263

The Doctor of Nursing Practice: defining the next steps.  

PubMed

The purpose of this article is to summarize the previous articles in this special issue of the Journal of Nursing Education that are based on the Committee on Institutional Cooperation's Dean's Conference on the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) and to identify areas of consensus, as well as areas of controversy. Areas of consensus include the high level of interest in DNP programs and the intent to expand the role of the advanced practice nurse to population health, policy, and leadership. Areas of controversy include the nature of the DNP product, the definition of clinical experiences, the nature of the capstone project, the outcomes of these new practitioners, and the impact on schools. Suggestions for achieving higher levels of consensus, including the need for respective, inclusive dialogue, are provided. PMID:23875725

Grey, Margaret

2013-08-01

264

77 FR 59931 - Single Source Program Expansion Supplement Award to Nurse Education, Practice, Quality and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Administration Single Source Program Expansion Supplement Award to Nurse Education, Practice...Single Source Program Expansion Supplement Award to Nurse Education, Practice...non-competitive single source program expansion supplement award to the NEPQR Program grantee...

2012-10-01

265

Achieving army nursing evidence-based practice competencies through a civilian-military nurse partnership.  

PubMed

Despite the Institute of Medicine's goal of 90% of all practice being evidence-based by 2020, educational and practice institutions are not on target to achieve this goal. Evidence-based practice is one of 5 core elements of the Army Nurse Corps' patient care delivery system and a key focus of the Hawaii State Center for Nursing. In order to increase evidence-based practice (EBP), a civilian-military partnership was formed to include healthcare organizations in the state, optimize resources, and share strategies for successful practice changes statewide. The partnership has been successful in meeting each of these goals using national EBP competencies and Bloom's taxonomy as a guide. The article presents a discussion regarding the history, processes, and outcomes of this partnership. PMID:24488872

Siaki, Leilani A; Lentino, Cynthia V; Mark, Debra D; Hopkins-Chadwick, Denise L

2014-01-01

266

www.nursing.Virginia.edu 888-283-8703 434-924-0141 P.O. Box 800826 Charlottesville, VA 22908-0826 Doctor of Nursing Practice  

E-print Network

of health care settings, teach in nursing education programs, or assume upper-level nursing administrativewww.nursing.Virginia.edu 888-283-8703 434-924-0141 P.O. Box 800826 Charlottesville, VA 22908-0826 Doctor of Nursing Practice MSN - DNP PROGRAM OVERVIEW The Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program

Acton, Scott

267

Responding to uncertainty in nursing practice.  

PubMed

Uncertainty is a fact of life for practising clinicians and cannot be avoided. This paper outlines the model of uncertainty presented by Katz (1988, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK. pp. 544-565) and examines the descriptive and normative power of three broad theoretical and strategic approaches to dealing with uncertainty: rationality, bounded rationality and intuition. It concludes that nursing research and development (R&D) must acknowledge uncertainty more fully in its R&D agenda and that good-quality evaluation studies which directly compare intuitive with rational-analytical approaches for given clinical problems should be a dominant feature of future R&D. PMID:11524107

Thompson, C; Dowding, D

2001-10-01

268

Communities of practice in nursing academia: a growing need to practice what we teach.  

PubMed

Although the community of practice (CoP) concept has been heavily utilized in business literature since its inception in the 1990s, it has not been significantly featured in nursing research. With student-centered approaches increasingly infusing nursing classrooms, including opportunities for collaborative learning and the development of student learning communities, it may be time to ask: Do we practice what we teach? Nursing academia faces challenges related to recruitment and retention, scholarly productivity and engagement of new faculty, and increasing demands for collaborative research. Challenges, some would argue, that could be addressed through CoPs; a sentiment reflected in the recent expansion of nursing CoP literature. What is the current state of the application of this concept in nursing academia and what barriers present in the promotion and development of CoPs in the academy? This article addresses these questions and provides guidance for those in search of community. PMID:23969471

Risling, Tracie; Ferguson, Linda

2013-01-01

269

Moral Exemplars in Theory and Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article I outline an original form of ethical theory that I call exemplarist virtue theory. The theory is intended to serve the philosophical purposes of a comprehensive moral theory, but it is also intended to serve the practical purpose of moral education by structuring the theory around a motivating emotion--the emotion of admiration.…

Zagzebski, Linda

2013-01-01

270

Mobile Learning in Nursing Practice Education: Applying Koole's FRAME Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We report here on an exploratory formative evaluation of a project to integrate mobile learning into a Western Canadian college nursing program. Third-year students used Hewlett Packard iPAQ mobile devices for five weeks in a practice education course in April-May, 2007. Koole's (2009) "Framework for the Rational Analysis of Mobile Education"…

Kenny, Richard F.; Van Neste-Kenny, Jocelyne M. C.; Park, Caroline L.; Burton, Pamela A.; Meiers, Jan

2009-01-01

271

Intravenous Therapy Instruction for Licensed Practical Nurses. Instructor's Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Idaho instructor's guide lists tasks and enabling objectives, outlines instruction, and provides handout masters, overhead masters, and tests for intravenous therapy (IV) instruction for licensed practical nurses. Following an introduction and a list of criteria for successful completion of IV therapy courses, the document lists tasks and…

Springer, Pam; Carey, Jean

272

Current Issues and Their Implications for Practical Nursing Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Papers on "Current Issues and Their Implications for Practical Nurse Programs" included in the document were authored by Margaret McLaughlin, Ruth B. Edelson, and Kenneth G. Skaggs. Summaries of presentations by Robert M. Morgan and Helen K. Powers are also included. (JK)

National League for Nursing, New York, NY. Dept. of Practical Nursing Programs.

273

Power and knowledge in nursing practice: the contribution of Foucault.  

PubMed

This paper explores the implications of Michel Foucault's philosophical analyses for understanding nursing practice. Foucault describes power within a given society as unfolding not through large-scale events but rather through a complex 'micro-physics'. Power operates upon the human body. With the increasing use of observation, in understanding both the natural and social world, the body has become the subject of the 'gaze'. The body as object, however, is neither a universal belief nor truth but a product of ways of perceiving and examining it. In relation to nursing, the subjection of the body to the 'gaze' and the practices of the institutional environment of the hospital are important for understanding the knowledge formulated. The power of practice is in the generation of knowledge. The nature and form of knowledge is instrumental in establishing the quality of nurse-patient relationships. This paper explores, through the particular exemplar of the patient in intensive care, the power of present practices to shape knowledge, and thereby dictate and limit the quality of the nurse-patient relationship. PMID:7745186

Henderson, A

1994-11-01

274

Nurses in Practice: A Perspective on Work Environments.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A major portion of the collection of 20 readings authored by practicing professionals consists of field observations presented both as raw data (field notes) and as analyzed and organized data. About the work of nurses in a variety of settings, a recurrent theme is that work behavior is greatly influenced by organizational and structural elements…

Davis, Marcella Z., Ed.; And Others

275

Missouri Responses to the Advanced Practice Nurse Role.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A randomly drawn statewide sample of 891 Missouri consumers revealed overall support for the advance practice nurse role to be greater than 75%. Seeking health care consumers' reactions to proposed alternatives is a crucial step in planning and implementing a program of health care reform that will meet current and future health needs. (Author)

Armer, Jane M.

1997-01-01

276

[The evolution of national health and the development of the nursing practice in Taiwan].  

PubMed

Nursing is an applied science. While there is a wide range of nursing theories and nursing care models, resolving the health problems and meeting the health needs of clients is the common objective of all in the nursing profession. The nursing profession may be subdivided into hospital clinical nursing and community health nursing (CHN). CHN is further subdivided into public health nursing, school health nursing, and industrial health nursing. The past 60 years has been a period of significant growth and improvement in Taiwan that has enhanced the nation's socioeconomic condition, general living standards, and general public health. The nursing profession has seen profound progress as well, not only in terms of content but also in terms of nursing care models, which are increasingly framed around core public health needs and take into consideration different health perspectives. Nursing in Taiwan has gradually established its own professional function and autonomy. PMID:25125154

Yin, Teresa J C

2014-08-01

277

Clinical placements in general practice: relationships between practice nurses and tertiary institutions.  

PubMed

As a practice-based discipline a key component of undergraduate nurse education is clinical practice experience. The quality of clinical experiences has a significant impact on the students' ability to function competently post graduation. The relationship between higher education institutions (HEIs) and health service placement providers impacts upon the quality of clinical placements. In Australia, the growth of primary care nursing and the shortage of acute clinical places has prompted HEIs to explore the placement of students in general practice. Given the increasing attention being paid to non-traditional clinical placements, it is timely to explore how universities are establishing relationships and models of clinical placement. This paper uses qualitative research methods to explore the perspectives of 12 Australian general practice nurses who have experience in facilitating undergraduate clinical placements about the relationships between HEIs and nurses. Findings are presented in the following three themes: (1) Appropriate preparation for placement: They don't know what primary health really means, (2) Seeking greater consultation in the organisation of clinical placements: they've got to do it one way for everyone, and (3) Uncertainty and lack of support: I had no contact with the university. Clinical placements in general practice can be an innovative strategy providing non-traditional, yet high quality, teaching and learning experiences for undergraduate nursing students. To optimise the quality of these placements, however, it is essential that HEIs provide appropriate support to the practice nurses mentoring these students. PMID:23069694

Peters, Kathleen; Halcomb, Elizabeth J; McInnes, Susan

2013-05-01

278

Practice of preventive dentistry for nursing staff in primary care  

PubMed Central

Objectives: Determine the domain of preventive dentistry in nursing personnel assigned to a primary care unit. Methods: Prospective descriptive study, questionnaire validation, and prevalence study. In the first stage, the questionnaire for the practice of preventive dentistry (CPEP, for the term in Spanish) was validated; consistency and reliability were measured by Cronbach's alpha, Pearson's correlation, factor analysis with intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). In the second stage, the domain in preventive dental nurses was explored. Results: The overall internal consistency of CPEP is ?= 0.66, ICC= 0.64, CI95%: 0.29-0.87 (p >0.01). Twenty-one subjects in the study, average age 43, 81.0% female, average seniority of 12.5 were included. A total of 71.5% showed weak domain, 28.5% regular domain, and there was no questionnaire with good domain result. The older the subjects were, the smaller the domain; female nurses showed greater mastery of preventive dentistry (29%, CI95%: 0.1-15.1) than male nurses. Public health nurses showed greater mastery with respect to other categories (50%, CI95%: 0.56-2.8). Conclusions: The CDEP has enough consistency to explore the domain of preventive dentistry in health-care staff. The domain of preventive dentistry in primary care nursing is poor, required to strengthen to provide education in preventive dentistry to the insured population. PMID:25386037

Acuna-Reyes, Raquel; Cigarroa-Martinez, Didier; Urena-Bogarin, Enrique; Orgaz-Fernandez, Jose David

2014-01-01

279

Minority nursing student success: A grounded theory case study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There has been a dramatic increase in the nation's racial and ethnic minority populations over recent years. This increase is placing a higher demand on the health care industry to provide culturally competent care to these diverse populations. This challenge is met with yet another problem as the nation faces a critical shortage of nurses, particularly minority nurses. This shortage is only expected to worsen over the next several years. As schools of nursing across the country are being asked to increase the number of nursing program graduates, specifically minorities, they are confronted with a double edged sword as retention rates are decreasing, and attrition rates are increasing. This is particularly troublesome when many racial and ethnic minority nursing students do not graduate. This qualitative study was implemented to assess and understand the perceived educational experiences of racial and ethnic minority nursing students enrolled in a rural community college nursing program on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. Eight voluntary nursing students who identified themselves as either a racial or ethnic minority participated in the study. Data were collected by: individual audio-taped interview sessions; audio-taped focus group sessions; and documentation of field notes. Participants also provided demographic information and were asked to provide a brief written response to a scenario regarding increasing the recruitment and retention rates of minority nursing students. All data were analyzed utilizing the constant comparative method. Results of the study revealed six different themes: personal support systems and peer relationships; college services and academic resources; faculty support; cultural understanding versus cultural insensitivity; personal attributes of self-efficacy/advice for future nursing students; and suggestions for college and nursing program improvement. After the major themes were examined one central theme, a grounded theory, was born. The theory proposes that when the minority nursing student bridges his or her personal attributes of self-efficacy with some or all identified support systems, this may be a conduit to fostering success in obtaining their educational goals as long as the resources are available, and a caring environment is present.

Mister, Brenda J.

280

Supporting the learning curve for contemporary nursing practice.  

PubMed

Contemporary patient care demands expert nurses with advanced clinical judgment and reasoning abilities. Expertise develops for an extended experiential learning process of 5 years or more and cannot be accomplished through educational preparation alone. Current approaches to orientations, residencies, and care delivery do not support the learning curve to expert practice. The authors outline strategies for change in the practice setting to facilitate expertise development and safeguard patients while learning occurs. PMID:19898099

Burritt, Joan; Steckel, Cynthia

2009-11-01

281

Advancing nursing practice through social media: a global perspective.  

PubMed

Social media has been used globally as a key vehicle for communication. As members of an innovative profession, many nurses have embraced social media and are actively utilizing its potential to enhance practice and improve health. The ubiquity of the Internet provides social media with the potential to improve both access to health information and services and equity in health care. Thus there are a number of successful nurse-led initiatives. However, the open and democratising nature of social media creates a number of potential risks, both individual and organisational. This article considers the use of social media within nursing from a global perspective, including discussion of policy and guidance documents. The impact of social media on both healthcare consumers and nurses is reviewed, followed by discussion of selected risks associated with social media. To help nurses make the most of social media tools and avoid potential pitfalls, the article conclusion suggests implications appropriate for global level practice based on available published guidance. PMID:23036062

Barry, Jean; Hardiker, Nicholas R

2012-09-01

282

Addressing Sexuality-Related Needs in Practice: Perspectives of Maternal/Child and Women's Health Nurses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey of sexuality-related nursing practices was completed by 130 maternal/child and women's health nurses. A disparity was found between their agreement on nurses' role in sexuality-related practices and their actual practice; 46.5% felt only somewhat knowledgeable about sexuality. (SK)

Propst, Maureen G.; Phillips, Billie Rhea; Andrew, Michael E.

2001-01-01

283

The University of Iowa Nursing Collaboratory: A Partnership for Creative Education and Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A nursing college and its clinical partners created the Nursing Collaboratory to generate, disseminate, and apply knowledge to practice through four domains: education, research, practice, and informatics. It serves as an incubator for innovative products and services that enhance nursing education and practice. (SK)

Dreher, Melanie; Everett, Linda; Hartwig, Sally Mathis

2001-01-01

284

Virtual reality or real virtuality: the space of flows and nursing practice.  

PubMed

The use of virtual environments for the provision of health-care is on the increase, and with each new development brings debates about their impact on care, nursing and nursing practice. Such environments offer opportunities for extending care and improvements in communication. Others believe these developments threaten aspects of nursing they hold sacrosanct. This paper explores the development of an assemblage of computer networks, databases, information systems, software programs and management systems that together work to manage health-care in Australia, namely casemix. We contend that spatial theories on network society show how this assemblage co-ordinates and operates to manage care. We discuss how this assemblage affects care and suggest that changes in organisation may be a part of the shift in how bodily organisation occurs more generally, but more specifically in health-care. We also suggest how nurses are enrolled in and by such networks, leading to transformation in nurses' practices. Finally, we argue that using spatial forms of analysis allows an interpretation of such assemblages that may account for their strengths and their shortcomings. PMID:16359457

Barnes, Lynne; Rudge, Trudy

2005-12-01

285

Accountability in nursing: reflecting on ethical codes and professional standards of nursing practice from a global perspective.  

PubMed

The concept of accountability is a concept closely aligned with public trust and confidence with a healthcare discipline. It is of vital importance to the discipline of nursing to define and examine the obligations and duties of professional nurse. The term is referred to and often defined through international and national professional codes of nursing and in standards of nursing practice documents. This column will begin exploration of the concept with offering a definition from a humanbecoming perspective. PMID:18953006

Milton, Constance L

2008-10-01

286

Informal Theory: The Ignored Link in Theory-to-Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Applying theory to practice in student affairs is dominated by the assumption that formal theory is directly applied to practice. Among the problems with this assumption is that many practitioners believe they must choose between their lived experiences and formal theory, and that graduate students are taught that their experience “does not count.” What is missing in the discourse on

Patrick Love

2012-01-01

287

Informal Theory: The Ignored Link in Theory-to-Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Applying theory to practice in student affairs is dominated by the assumption that formal theory is directly applied to practice. Among the problems with this assumption is that many practitioners believe they must choose between their lived experiences and formal theory, and that graduate students are taught that their experience "does not…

Love, Patrick

2012-01-01

288

Influence of the Nursing Practice Environment on Job Satisfaction and Turnover Intention  

PubMed Central

Objectives: To examine whether the nursing practice environment at the hospital-level affects the job satisfaction and turnover intention of hospital nurses. Methods: Among the 11 731 nurses who participated in the Korea Health and Medical Workers’ Union’s educational program, 5654 responded to our survey. Data from 3096 nurses working in 185 general inpatient wards at 60 hospitals were analyzed using multilevel logistic regression modeling. Results: Having a standardized nursing process (odds ratio [OR], 4.21; p<0.001), adequate nurse staffing (OR, 4.21; p<0.01), and good doctor-nurse relationship (OR, 4.15; p<0.01), which are hospital-level variables based on the Korean General Inpatients Unit Nursing Work Index (KGU-NWI), were significantly related to nurses’ job satisfaction. However, no hospital-level variable from the KGU-NWI was significantly related to nurses’ turnover intention. Conclusions: Favorable nursing practice environments are associated with job satisfaction among nurses. In particular, having a standardized nursing process, adequate nurse staffing, and good doctor-nurse relationship were found to positively influence nurses’ job satisfaction. However, the nursing practice environment was not related to nurses’ turnover intention. PMID:25284197

Lee, Sang-Yi; Kim, Chul-Woung; Kang, Jeong-Hee; Yoon, Tae-Ho; Kim, Cheoul Sin

2014-01-01

289

State-Granted Practice Authority: Do Nurse Practitioners Vote with Their Feet?  

PubMed Central

Nurse practitioners have become an increasingly important part of the US medical workforce as they have gained greater practice authority through state-level regulatory changes. This study investigates one labor market impact of this large change in nurse practitioner regulation. Using data from the National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses and a dataset of state-level nurse practitioner prescribing authority, a multivariate estimation is performed analysing the impact of greater practice authority on the probability of a nurse practitioner moving from a state. The empirical results indicate that nurse practitioners in states that grant expanded practice are less likely to move from the state than nurse practitioners in states that have not granted expanded practice authority. The estimated effect is robust and is statistically and economically meaningful. This finding is in concert with and strengthens the wider literature which finds states that grant expanded practice authority to nurse practitioners tend to have larger nurse practitioner populations. PMID:23227322

Perry, John J.

2012-01-01

290

[Educational innovation on the practices for the subjects of community nursing, mental health nursing and geriatric nursing].  

PubMed

The new European space for higher education requires changes in education manners as well as execution. One of the main challenges is for the students to acquire competence in their professional life. For that purpose they require knowledge, but also skills and a proactive attitude towards learning. In this paper we tell the experience of the Virgen de las Nieves School of Nursing in Granada, with regards to the integration of the practices for the subjects of Community Nursing III, Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, and Geriatric Nursing, which are taken in the third year of the Diplomatura en Enfermería degree. Said practices, which were previously being offered separately within different contexts, will be merged in the same program whose scope will be Primary Care. We believe that the experience has been very positive by looking both at the results and the satisfaction of the students and the professional lecturers. It has been achieved an increase in the number of community care practice hours, and students have managed to acquire more autonomy in their learning and to incorporate critical reasoning in their education. In the methodology used, they have been the main evaluators and protagonists in their learning process, seeking the implication of professionals and teaching tutors in this change. The consensus on the objectives and methods, along with the obstacles which had to be overcome, constitutes one of the most interesting aspects of this experience. PMID:21188872

Heierle Valero, Cristina; Cano-Caballero Gálvez, María Dolores; Guillamet Lloveras, Ana; Celma Vicente, Matilde; Garach Mirasol, José Ignacio

2010-11-01

291

Preceptorship and Affirmation in the Intergenerational World of Nursing Practice  

PubMed Central

Research has shown that while preceptorship offers a reality-oriented learning environment and facilitates competence of students, there are inherent rewards and stressors associated with the experience. Students and preceptors can be from different generations, and as such, they may often come to the learning space with differing values and expectations. The nature of the preceptorship experience in this intergenerational context was explored in a recent phenomenological study with seven preceptors and seven nursing students in an undergraduate nursing program in Eastern Canada. Overall the experience was found to be inclusive of three main themes: being affirmed, being challenged, and being on a pedagogical journey. In this paper we explore the first of these themes, being affirmed. Highlighting the positive aspects of the preceptorship experience in the intergenerational context is necessary to promote a culture of openness and respect for generational differences within clinical nursing practice settings and to improving the overall quality of the educational experience. PMID:22778943

Foley, Vicki; Myrick, Florence; Yonge, Olive

2012-01-01

292

Do calculation errors by nurses cause medication errors in clinical practice? A literature review  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review aims to examine the literature available to ascertain whether medication errors in clinical practice are the result of nurses’ miscalculating drug dosages. The research studies highlighting poor calculation skills of nurses and student nurses have been tested using written drug calculation tests in formal classroom settings [Kapborg, I., 1994. Calculation and administration of drug dosage by Swedish nurses,

Kerri Wright

2010-01-01

293

Marginalization and symbolic violence in a world of differences: war and parallels to nursing practice.  

PubMed

Marginalization has been used as a guiding concept for nursing research, theory and practice. Its properties have been identified and updated in 1994 and 1999, respectively. This article re-examines marginalization, considering it to be a concept that changes with pivotal historical events. The events of September 11, 2001, and the war between the US/UK and Iraq are such pivotal events. The notion of the linguistic habitus and symbolic violence as outlined by Bourdieu provide new insights about the dynamics of marginalization. Specifically noted is the marginalization of persons and cultures based on their designation by the current US administration, and as interpreted through mainstream media, as actual or potential 'terrorists'. A parallel situation in nursing is discussed, beginning with nursing's own marginality, related to the dynamics of symbolic violence. Nursing is argued to be vulnerable to having essential words and practices co-opted by dominant institutions and altered in meaning, that is, made incongruent with the discipline's emphasis on core values of confidentiality, equity and care. In response to marginalization and exteriorization those affected can use voice and testimony to 'recreate the centre'. Suggestions for protecting our practices and philosophy are included. PMID:15043697

Hall, Joanne M

2004-04-01

294

Critical Theory: Implications for School Leadership Theory and Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The school leader's behaviors are inspired by theories, and theories are intrinsic to practice. This paper provides an overview of an emerging perspective in educational administration, critical theory. The paper first highlights the philosophies of Immanuel Kant, Fichte, Hegel, Marx, and the Frankfurt School. It then discusses critical theory

Peca, Kathy

295

How Do Dyslexic Nursing Students Cope with Clinical Practice Placements? The Impact of the Dyslexic Profile on the Clinical Practice of Dyslexic Nursing Students: Pedagogical Issues and Considerations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The safety of dyslexic nurses, and whether they are a danger to their patients, has been widely discussed. This empirical study sought to discover the impact of the dyslexic profile on clinical practice for nursing students. Two focus groups of third-year nursing students in higher education were set up: a control group and a dyslexic group. The…

Price, Geraldine A.; Gale, Anne

2006-01-01

296

Orem's self-care deficit nursing theory: its philosophic foundation and the state of the science.  

PubMed

There is a preponderance of descriptive studies, ranging from those using a simple descriptive correlational approach to multivariate approaches. Only one study is clearly identified as an experimental study (Moore, 1987) and two clearly identified as replication studies (Lenatsch, 1999; Schott-Baer, Fisher, & Gregory, 1995). Fewer than half make clear links between the variables being examined and situations of nursing practice; that is, they examine elements of the theory of self-care without making the link to nursing practice an explicit part of the study. While this work is increasing our knowledge about self-care (Stage II), further work needs to be done to put the results of these in the context of nursing practice as in Stages III, IV, or V. Most of the studies reviewed are Stage II and provide an enhanced or broader description of an element or component of the theory, empirically describing the relationships between or among age, gender, self-care actions, disease, and so forth. These studies add to our understanding of existing and known or proposed relationships within the extant theory. The majority of studies examine self-care and/or self-care deficits. There are many studies but little evidence that sustained research programs are developing and expanding the theory. The bricks are piling up around the framework, but only a few scholars are working on building the walls. These programs of research are occurring in universities where a critical mass of interested scholars and students can be found. The use of theoretical language is sometimes imprecise and at other times inaccurate. Valid new terms are introduced but the relationship to existing theoretical constructs is not always explicit. There is little critical review of research in the literature. Ongoing dialog among scholars is minimal. There is a need for nurse scholars to come together and to engage in such a dialogue to enhance the work. Given the relatively short history of nursing research and, more importantly, the conduct of nursing theory-based research, the number and quality of the work being conducted is quite remarkable. There has been a substantial amount of work produced and the quality of it has improved over time. Orem has provided nurse researchers with a theoretical system comprising an ontological structure, related epistemology, and numerous models that give direction to scholarly efforts. Scholars using this theoretical system would be well-advised to use these in conceptualizing and interpreting their work. PMID:11847693

Taylor, S G; Geden, E; Isaramalai, S; Wongvatunyu, S

2000-04-01

297

Deweyan Inquiry: From Education Theory to Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book presents John Dewey's theory of inquiry and applies it to various areas of the primary, middle, and secondary school curricula. "Deweyan Inquiry" brings Dewey's theory of inquiry together with educational theory and practice. James Scott Johnston uses Dewey's late masterpiece "Logic: The Theory of Inquiry" as a guide and looks at inquiry…

Johnston, James Scott

2009-01-01

298

The evolution and development of an instrument to measure essential professional nursing practices.  

PubMed

Nursing continues to evolve from a task-oriented occupation to a holistic professional practice. Increased professionalism requires accurate measurement of care processes and practice. Nursing studies often omit measurement of the relationship between structures in the work environment and processes of care or between processes of care and patient outcomes. Process measurement is integral to understanding and improving nursing practice. This article describes the development of an updated Essentials of Magnetism process measurement instrument for clinical nurses (CNs) practicing on inpatient units in hospitals. It has been renamed Essential Professional Nursing Practices: CN. PMID:25340921

Kramer, Marlene; Brewer, Barbara B; Halfer, Diana; Hnatiuk, Cynthia Nowicki; MacPhee, Maura; Schmalenberg, Claudia

2014-11-01

299

Female genital mutilation: knowledge, attitude and practice among nurses.  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Female genital mutilation (FGM) and cutting is a subject of global interest, with many countries of the world still practicing it despite efforts by the WHO and other agencies to discourage the practice. The highest known prevalence is in Africa. OBJECTIVES: To determine the knowledge, attitude and practice of FGM among nurses in the ancient metropolis of Benin in a Nigerian state where FGM is illegal. RESULTS: One-hundred-ninety-three nurses in the study hospital were recruited in the study out of which 182 (94.3%) appropriately filled and returned the questionnaires. The average age of respondents was 37 years, and the average duration of postgraduation experience was 14.5 years. Most respondents are of Bini (36.8%) and Esan (34.1%) ethnic origin. All respondents identified at least one form of FGM, but only 12 respondents (6.6%) could correctly identify the four types of FGM. The harmful effects of FGM identified by the majority of respondents include hemorrhage, difficult labor/childbirth, genital tears, infections and scar/keloid formation. Forty-four (24.2%) of respondents were of the opinion that some forms of FGM are harmless. Eighty nurses admitted to having undergone FGM, for a prevalence of 44%. Five respondents (2.8%) view FGM as a good practice and will encourage the practice. Twelve respondents (6.6%) routinely perform FGM out of which seven (58.3%) viewed FGM as a bad practice. Nurses performing FGM routinely were those who had spent >20 years (59%) and 11-20 years (41%) in the profession. Another 26 (14.3%) had performed FGM before, though not on a routine basis. Of this latter group, 15 will perform FGM in the future when faced with certain circumstances. Reasons for FGM practice were mainly cultural. Eight of the respondents would have their daughters circumcised. CONCLUSION: Nurses perceive FGM in Benin as cultural. Almost half have had FGM themselves, and a small percentage recommend it to their daughters. Discouraging FGM practice will require culturally sensitive education of the healthcare providers and the population at large on the ill effects of FGM, including the risk to health and violations of human rights. PMID:16573307

Onuh, Sunday O.; Igberase, Gabriel O.; Umeora, Joaness O. U.; Okogbenin, Sylvanus A.; Otoide, Valentine O.; Gharoro, Etedafe P.

2006-01-01

300

Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Emergency Contraception on Nursing Personnel  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Emergency Contraception is a grossly underu–tilized option of prevention of pregnancy. It is a safe and effective method which can prevent unintended pregnancies, unsafe abortions and unwanted childbirth. Knowledge and attitude of Nursing personnel who are both service providers and health educators to the community can influence the contraceptive behavior of the people exposed to them. A few studies done in our country indicate that their awareness regarding EC is low. Aim: To explore the knowledge, attitude and practice of EC amongst Nursing Personnel in a medical college hospital. Materials and Methods: In this study, 185 nursing personnel participated. A predesigned, pretested questionnaire was used to collect their responses regarding knowledge, attitude and practice of EC. Descriptive analysis of data was done. Results : Out of the total, 52.43% of the participants had good knowledge regarding the general information of EC, 51.35% had positive attitude towards EC, 47.56% had expressed willingness to use EC if indicated whereas only 22.7% had ever used EC. 72.97% had expressed willingness to attend awareness programmes on EC. Conclusion :Even though knowledge and attitude towards EC among the participants was marginally good they had many misconceptions regarding specific aspects like mode of action, indications and timing of administration. More awareness programmes would definitely clear their misconceptions and apprehensions and encourage Nursing Personnel to personally use and promote EC to others. PMID:25386489

Shanthini N, Fatima

2014-01-01

301

Culture care theory: a framework for expanding awareness of diversity and racism in nursing education.  

PubMed

As American society becomes increasingly diverse, and the nursing profession does not, there has been a focus on promoting both cultural competence and diversity within the profession. Although culture and diversity are widely discussed in nursing education, the issue of racism may be avoided or suppressed. Institutionalized racism within nursing education must be acknowledged and discussed before nursing education may be transformed. Madeleine Leininger's Culture Care Theory is an established nursing theory that emphasizes culture and care as essential concepts in nursing. Theoretical frameworks abound in nursing, and Culture Care Theory may be underutilized and misunderstood within nursing education. This article examines the issue of racism in nursing education and recommends Culture Care Theory as a relevant framework for enhancing both cultural competence and diversity. PMID:18504033

Lancellotti, Katherine

2008-01-01

302

Beginning the recovery journey in acute psychiatric care: using concepts from Orem's Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory.  

PubMed

A national agenda has been established for mental health systems to move toward a recovery model of care. Recovery principles are embedded in the foundations of nursing science and practice. Orem's Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory (SCDNT) is in alignment with the ideals of recovery and can provide a structure for changing cultures on inpatient psychiatric units. SCDNT can guide research activities that link a patient's self-care abilities to improved recovery model outcomes. This paradigm shift is an opportunity for psychiatric nursing to return to its roots and deliver care that is patient-centered and conducive to recovering from mental illness. PMID:22646204

Seed, Mary S; Torkelson, Diane J

2012-06-01

303

Promoting evidence-based practice: the roles and activities of professional nurses' associations  

Microsoft Academic Search

AIM: This paper reports a study exploring the role perceptions and current activities in evidence-based practice promotion of professional nurses' associations in the Netherlands. Background: The promotion of evidence-based practice contributes to professional standards in nursing and good quality care for patients. As professional nurses' associations can be key players in this process, the nature of their roles and current

Theo Van Achterberg; Gerda Holleman; Marit Van de Ven; Maria H. F. Grypdonck; Aart Eliens; Marjolein van Vliet

2006-01-01

304

Clinical Procedure Page 1 of 5 Clinical Manual Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

Clinical Procedure Page 1 of 5 Clinical Manual ­ Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital according to this standard. #12;Clinical Procedure Page 2 of 5 Clinical Manual ­ Nursing Practice Manual ­ Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROCEDURE FOR: Blood Components

Oliver, Douglas L.

305

Clinical Procedure Page 1 of 2 Clinical Manual -Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

Clinical Procedure Page 1 of 2 Clinical Manual - Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital receipt. The receipt must be signed by a nurse or other licensed practitioner and a Proof of Use sheet;Clinical Procedure Page 2 of 2 Clinical Manual - Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department

Oliver, Douglas L.

306

The Practice of the Everyday in the Literature of Nursing  

Microsoft Academic Search

If intense pain is “world-destroying,” as Elaine Scarry has argued, one of the ways nurses respond to that loss is by re-enacting the commonplace—both in practice and in writing—through daily, accumulating acts of care. Such care poses a critique of medicine’s emphasis on the exceptional moment and stresses forms of physical tending that are quotidian rather than heroic, ongoing rather

Robert Leigh Davis

2005-01-01

307

Implementation of evidence-based nursing practice for diabetic patients: an Iranian experience.  

PubMed

Evidence-based nursing is recognized as an indicator of quality in nursing practice, a basis for accountability and the gold standard of professional nursing care. The aim of this study was to explore nurses' experiences and perceptions about evidence-based nursing practice in giving care to patients with diabetic foot ulcers. A qualitative research design was adopted, and content analysis was used to analyse data. Semistructured interviews were held with 19 bachelor-degree nurses working in a teaching hospital in an urban area of Iran. During data analysis, two main themes developed: 'structural backgrounds of the organization' and 'empowerment'. Accordingly, it was concluded that successful implementation of evidence-based nursing requires the reconfiguration of the administrative structure in the hospital. In addition, it requires the support of nurse leaders to facilitate the implementation of evidence-based nursing in the practice. PMID:24090300

Varaei, Shokoh; Salsali, Mahvash; Cheraghi, Mohammad Ali

2013-09-01

308

Theory and Theory-Driven Practices of Activity Based Intervention  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Activity Based Intervention (ABI) is an approach used in many early childhood programs serving the special needs of young children and their families. The purpose of this article is to present theoretical underpinnings of ABI, and discusses theory-based ABI practices. ABI draws upon multiple and varied theories which in turn inform practice. At…

Macy, Marisa

2007-01-01

309

The Impact of Gagne's Theories on Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Robert Gagne's theories and research have had a significant impact on practitioners in general, especially instructional designers. He has influenced teaching and curriculum development and used standard practices as a stimulus for the development of theory. This paper explores Gagne's influence on practice by examining the relationship between…

Fields, Dennis

310

Factors influencing the intention of perinatal nurses to adopt the baby-friendly hospital initiative in southeastern quebec, Canada: implications for practice.  

PubMed

Nurses play a major role in promoting the baby-friendly hospital initiative (BFHI), yet the adoption of this initiative by nurses remains a challenge in many countries, despite evidences of its positive impacts on breastfeeding outcomes. The aim of this study was to identify the factors influencing perinatal nurses to adopt the BFHI in their practice. Methods. A sample of 159 perinatal nurses from six hospital-based maternity centers completed a survey based on the theory of planned behavior. Hierarchical multiple linear regression analyses were performed to assess the relationship between key independent variables and nurses' intention to adopt the BFHI in their practice. A discriminant analysis of nurses' beliefs helped identify the targets of actions to foster the adoption the BFHI among nurses. Results. The participants are mainly influenced by factors pertaining to their perceived capacity to overcome the strict criteria of the BFHI, the mothers' approval of a nursing practice based on the BFHI, and the antenatal preparation of the mothers. Conclusions. This study provides theory-based evidence for the development of effective interventions aimed at promoting the adoption of the BFHI in nurses' practice. PMID:25101173

Chabot, Guylaine; Lacombe, Marie

2014-01-01

311

Training Practices and Learning Theories.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Three contrasting schools of learning theory are briefly described and then related to training methods. The methods are behaviorist, humanistic, and cognitivist. The author concludes with the thought that no one theory is right for all training activity, and if a particular theory works, use it. (CT)

Jones, Merrick

1979-01-01

312

National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice Report to the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services on the Basic Registered Nurse Workforce.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice (NACNEP) initiated an examination of basic registered nurse workforce issues in December 1994. NACNEP took into account the environment in which registered nurses (RNs) would practice, the appropriate educational qualifications needed, and the status of the registered nurse population…

National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice, Rockville, MD.

313

Practice nurses’ beliefs about obesity and weight related interventions in primary care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To examine practice nurses’ beliefs about obesity and their current practices and the role of the weight management context and their own BMI on these factors. Design: Cross sectional questionnaire. Subjects: Questionnaires concerning beliefs about obesity and current practices were completed by 586 practice nurses. Results: The subjects rated lifestyle as the main cause and cardiovascular problems as the

R Hoppé; J Ogden

1997-01-01

314

Integrating Practice-to-Theory and Theory-to-Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In "Towards a systemic theory of gifted education", Ziegler and Phillipson offer a useful critique of current research and the current paradigm in gifted education. They provide an interesting and useful merging of systems theory with their actiotope model, and using this paradigm they suggest many fruitful areas for future research. However, the…

Johnson, R. Burke; Stefurak, Tres

2012-01-01

315

Development of the Massachusetts School Nurse Research Network (MASNRN): A Practice-Based Research Network to Improve the Quality of School Nursing Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When school nurses embrace evidence-based practice (EBP), higher-quality care is provided to students, their families, and the larger community. Despite this, school nursing has been slow to embrace EBP. Practice-Based Research Networks (PBRNs), which capitalize on the combined strengths of clinicians and researchers to study clinical questions,…

Vessey, Judith A.

2007-01-01

316

Greek mental health nurses' practices and attitudes in the management of acute cases.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to identify nurses' interventions, views, and attitudes concerning critical incidents. Using semi-structured interviews, a descriptive study was conducted among mental health nurses working in three major psychiatric hospitals. Analysis of nurses' audio-recorded data indicated that they had used a number of different interventions under six main categories: counseling, performing security practices, monitoring thinking disturbances, contacting the psychiatrist on-call, contacting the chief nurse on-call, and administering medication. The need for specialized training was noticed and problems like accountability, nurse-patient interactions, and nurse-doctor relationships were considered crucial by the mental health nurses. PMID:23477440

Koukia, Evmorfia; Mangoulia, Polyxeni; Stathopoulos, Theodore; Madianos, Michael

2013-03-01

317

The challenges of communicating research evidence in practice: perspectives from UK health visitors and practice nurses  

PubMed Central

Background Health practitioners play a pivotal role in providing patients with up-to-date evidence and health information. Evidence-based practice and patient-centred care are transforming the delivery of healthcare in the UK. Health practitioners are increasingly balancing the need to provide evidence-based information against that of facilitating patient choice, which may not always concur with the evidence base. There is limited research exploring how health practitioners working in the UK, and particularly those more autonomous practitioners such as health visitors and practice nurses working in community practice settings, negotiate this challenge. This research provides a descriptive account of how health visitors and practice nurses negotiate the challenges of communicating health information and research evidence in practice. Methods A total of eighteen in-depth telephone interviews were conducted in the UK between September 2008 and May 2009. The participants comprised nine health visitors and nine practice nurses, recruited via adverts on a nursing website, posters at a practitioner conference and through recommendation. Thematic analysis, with a focus on constant comparative method, was used to analyse the data. Results The data were grouped into three main themes: communicating evidence to the critically-minded patient; confidence in communicating evidence; and maintaining the integrity of the patient-practitioner relationship. These findings highlight some of the daily challenges that health visitors and practice nurses face with regard to the complex and dynamic nature of evidence and the changing attitudes and expectations of patients. The findings also highlight the tensions that exist between differing philosophies of evidence-based practice and patient-centred care, which can make communicating about evidence a daunting task. Conclusions If health practitioners are to be effective at communicating research evidence, we suggest that more research and resources need to be focused on contextual factors, such as how research evidence is negotiated, appraised and communicated within the dynamic patient-practitioner relationship. PMID:23835038

2013-01-01

318

Background and managerial practice of nurses: paths for transforming praxis.  

PubMed

Qualitative research using a dialectics view; the objective is to analyze the demands and the expectations from the setting of managerial practices in view of the Pedagogical Project and the strategies which may or may not favor the transforming praxis. It involves 11 students, 12 professors, and 12 service nurses who are the participants in the teaching-learning process of managerial knowledge, in the interceding space, in the fields of practice and in the curricular training programs, both in the hospital environment and in the basic health services and of the Nursing graduation course from a Federal University, from the city of Alfenas-MG. It uses the collecting technique by focal group and the analysis of the contents is subsided by two great discussions: background and work. The results point that the nurse's background and praxis must go through the work processes in the caring, managerial and educative dimensions as well as in the scientific investigation, building paths for the development of competences, in the teaching and service interaction, following the current National Curriculum Guidelines. PMID:18392534

Resck, Zélia Marilda Rodrigues; Gomes, Elizabeth Laus Ribas

2008-01-01

319

Perspectives of Australian nursing directors regarding educational preparation for mental health nursing practice.  

PubMed

There is an ongoing global shortage of mental health nurses. Within Australia, the principal strategy of offering a postgraduate education programme with various incentives to encourage nurses back to study has not been successful. This has led to the consideration of radical alternatives, including the return to pre-registration specialisation in mental health. The successful introduction of this strategy would require the full support of industry partners. To date, the voice of industry has not been heard in relation to this issue. The aim of this paper is to present the views of an Australian sample of mental health nursing directors regarding the resources and other factors required, should undergraduate specialist programmes in mental health be developed, to ensure they are relevant and likely to be successful. A qualitative exploratory research project was undertaken to explore the perspectives and opinions of industry partners. In-depth interviews were conducted with nursing directors (n = 12) in Queensland Australia. Five main themes were identified: relationships with universities; clinical placement preparation and support; workplace culture; facilitators and preceptors; and practical student learning. Genuine collaboration between the two organisations was considered crucial for delivering a quality programme and providing the required support for students. Transformative leadership could inform this collaboration by promoting acknowledgement of and respect for differences. PMID:25353302

Happell, Brenda; McAllister, Margaret

2014-11-01

320

Nurse residency programs: an evidence-based review of theory, process, and outcomes.  

PubMed

Nursing shortages exist worldwide while job stress, dissatisfaction, lack of peer support and limited professional opportunities still contribute to attrition. The aim of this systematic review is to describe and evaluate the quality of the science, report recommendations and lessons learned about implementing and evaluating nurse residency programs (NRPs) designed to improve new graduate transitioning. Databases were searched between 1980 and 2010 using five search terms: nurse, intern, extern, transition and residency programs. Twenty studies reporting programs for new RNs fit the inclusion criteria. Three major discoveries include: 1. Wide variation in content, teaching and learning strategies make comparison across programs difficult; 2. Lack of theory in designing the educational intervention has limited the selection and development of new instruments to measure program effectiveness; and 3. Well designed quasi-experimental studies are needed. As a major nursing education redesign, NRPs could be used to test the principles, concepts and strategies of organizational transformation and experiential-interactive learning theory. By focusing on fiscal outcomes, current administrators of NRPs are missing the opportunity to implement an organizational strategy that could improve workplace environments. Healthcare organizations need to envision NRPs as a demonstration of positive clinical learning environments that can enhance intra- and interprofessional education and practice. PMID:22818190

Anderson, Gwen; Hair, Carole; Todero, Catherine

2012-01-01

321

Advanced practice nursing for enduring health needs management: a global perspective.  

PubMed

Advanced practice nursing expertise has been acknowledged worldwide as one response to the challenges arising from changes in society and health care. The roots of advanced practice nursing education are at the University of Colorado where the first known programme started in 1965. In many countries advanced practice nurses (APNs) have taken responsibility for routine patient care formerly carried out by physicians in order to reduce their workload. However, more and more, APNs have taken responsibility for new service areas and quality programmes not previously provided. Chronic disease management is one of these new service areas because long-term diseases are increasingly challenging service systems globally. This article is based on an international APN partnership. The aim of the article is to describe how the partnership will design a 15 ECTS credit course on Enduring Health Need Management as a cross-cultural collaborative endeavour. The adaptation of an inquiry based learning framework will be described drawing on four main principles of the theory: authentic learning communities; student encouragement in analysing gradually more complicated problems; networking in knowledge creation and; student engagement and activity. The cross-cultural online course aims to increase APNs' intercultural competence as well as their global and international work orientation. PMID:21839552

Koskinen, Liisa; Mikkonen, Irma; Graham, Iain; Norman, Linda D; Richardson, Jim; Savage, Eileen; Schorn, Mavis

2012-07-01

322

Entrance Requirements and Program Characteristics as Predictors of the Success of Licensed Practical Nurses in Associate Degree Nursing Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a study of 230 licensed practical nurses in associate degree nursing programs in 5 states to determine the extent that admission requirements and program characteristics predicted student success. Finds that none of the admissions requirements predicted student success, while the only program characteristic related to student success was…

Grzegorczyk, Phyllis Bonk

1995-01-01

323

Training Nurse's Aides to Become Licensed Practical Nurses in Isolated Rural Hospitals. Final Report (May 1, 1971-April 30, 1972).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This 1-year pilot project in training nurse's aides to become eligible for licensing as practical nurses in isolated rural hospitals was designed to upgrade their skills, expand their theoretical knowledge, and aid in occupational mobility upon successful completion of the program and the State's examination. Conducted in a typical rural hospital…

Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock. Div. of Vocational Education.

324

How experts practice: a novel test of deliberate practice theory.  

PubMed

Performance improvement is thought to occur through engagement in deliberate practice. Deliberate practice is predicted to be challenging, effortful, and not inherently enjoyable. Expert and intermediate level Gaelic football players executed two types of kicks during an acquisition phase and pre-, post-, and retention tests. During acquisition, participants self-selected how they practiced and rated the characteristics of deliberate practice for effort and enjoyment. The expert group predominantly practiced the skill they were weaker at and improved its performance across pre-, post- and retention tests. Participants in the expert group also rated their practice as more effortful and less enjoyable compared to those in the intermediate group. In contrast, participants in the intermediate group predominantly practiced the skill they were stronger at and improved their performance from pretest to posttest but not on the retention test. Findings provide support for deliberate practice theory and give some insight into how experts practice and improve their performance beyond its current level. PMID:24001022

Coughlan, Edward K; Williams, A Mark; McRobert, Allistair P; Ford, Paul R

2014-03-01

325

Prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms in hospital nurse technicians and licensed practical nurses: associations with demographic factors  

PubMed Central

Objective : This cross-sectional study aimed at analyzing: 1. the main musculoskeletal symptoms (MSS) presented by hospital nursing workers and; 2. personal, occupational, and health factors related to MSS among them. Method : Two questionnaires were filled in by 245 nurse technicians (NTs) and licensed practical nurses (LPNs) (response rate 95%) associated with direct patient care sectors from a hospital. These questionnaires were: the standardized version of the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) and one including questions on 15 demographic independent variables potentially related to outcomes from the NMQ. Univariate analyses and binary logistic regression analyses were performed to identify which variables would explain the occurrence of MSS in different body regions. Results: The low back (57%), shoulder (52%), and neck (48%) were identified as the most affected regions. The logistic regression analysis showed that low back symptoms in the last 12 months were significantly associated with LPN activities (OR=2.36; CI=1.24-4.5) and previous sick leave due to MSS (OR=5.97; CI=1.2-29.1). Smoking was significantly associated with symptoms in the low back (OR=2.77; CI=1.13-6.8) and thoracic spine (OR=2.37; CI=1.04-5.40). Physical exercise showed a protective effect on the cervical spine (OR=0.42; CI=0.23-0.77). Previous sick leave was significantly associated with pain in the knees (OR=4.24; CI=1.33-13.5) and in the upper limbs (OR=5.36; CI=1.07-26.7). Conclusions: The nursing workers who were evaluated presented a high prevalence of MSS. Previous history of sick leave was strongly associated with the presence of symptoms in various body regions. These results indicate the need for preventive programs in the hospital environment in order to control more severe MSS in nursing professionals. PMID:25054385

Moreira, Roberta F. C.; Sato, Tatiana O.; Foltran, Fabiana A.; Silva, Luciana C. C. B.; Coury, Helenice J. C. G.

2014-01-01

326

The professional nursing practice environment and nurse-reported job outcomes in two European countries: a survey of nurses in Finland and the Netherlands.  

PubMed

The working environment of nurses is receiving international interest, because there is a growing consensus that identifying opportunities for improving working conditions in hospitals is essential to maintain adequate staffing, high-quality care, nurses' job satisfaction and hence their retention. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between nurse work environment characteristics and nurse-reported job outcomes in hospital settings in Finland and the Netherlands and to compare these results. A comparative cross-sectional nurse survey was conducted. Data were collected from the two countries randomly sampling the countries' National Nurses Association' membership databases. In this paper, the results from Registered Nurses working in hospital settings are used. In total, 869 hospital nurses participated: 535 from Finland and 334 from the Netherlands with the response rate of 44.9 and 33.4%, respectively. Fifty-five items from the Nursing Work Index-Revised were used as a main tool for the practice environment. Exploratory factor analysis was used to identify a set of internally consistent subscales. Further, logistic regression analysis and T-tests were used. Three practice environment characteristics were identified: adequacy of resources, supportiveness of management and assurance of care quality via collaborative relationships. Favourable evaluations of the adequacy of resources and supportiveness of management were positively correlated with nurse-assessed quality of care and job-related positive feelings and negatively correlated with intentions to leave a unit, organization or the entire profession. In neither of the participating countries were adverse incidents affecting nurses related to nurses' evaluations of their current professional practice environment. Compared with Finland, in the Netherlands, RN appears to evaluate the majority of work environment characteristics more positively; nevertheless, to some extent, the results were uniform as adequacy of resources and supportiveness of management were main predictors for nurse-reported job outcomes considered. PMID:22032723

Hinno, Saima; Partanen, Pirjo; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri

2012-03-01

327

Developing an advanced practice nurse-led liver clinic.  

PubMed

End-stage liver disease (ESLD) is a leading cause of digestive disease deaths in the United States and continues to increase exponentially every year. Best practice does not currently recognize or utilize a clinic practice model for ESLD management. Advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) can impact ESLD disease management by implementing an outpatient clinic care model to focus on treatment compliance, patient education, improvement of patient outcomes, and reduction in hospital admission rates for ESLD patients. A review of 15 research articles was completed to determine the impact APRNs can make on chronic care of ESLD patients. Results from the review support APRN analysis, assessment, diagnosis, treatment, intervention, and evaluation of ESLD patients. The literature reviewed also demonstrates that ESLD patients have improved symptom management when maintained in an outpatient setting, allowing for decreased hospital and insurance expenditures. Following evaluation of the evidence, it was concluded that an APRN-led ESLD clinic merits further study. PMID:22647802

McAfee, Jean L

2012-01-01

328

Administrative Procedure Page 1 of 1 Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROCEDURE FOR: Patient Care: Private Duty Nursing Care) for private duty nursing care. 4. John Dempsey Hospital Department of Nursing retains responsibility for overseeing the quality of patient care. Direct oversight of private duty nursing staff is the responsibility

Oliver, Douglas L.

329

The role of the chief nursing officer in leading the practice: lessons from the Benner tradition.  

PubMed

There is a real danger that measurable tasks and procedures can be misconstrued for nursing practice in contemporary healthcare organizations focused on the measurement of quality, safety, and productivity. This study uses the work of Patricia Benner to address the complex nature of nursing practice and discusses why the chief nursing officer must create an environment within the organization for the practice to be fully lived out if he or she is to be successful as the leader of the discipline. PMID:18360204

Cathcart, Eloise Balasco

2008-01-01

330

Predictors of Physician Nursing Home Practice: Does What We Do in Residency Training Make a Difference?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined possible predictors of physician nursing home practice including residency experiences. A survey of 170 family physicians found physicians with an active nursing home practice were more likely to reside in a small community, have a hospital practice, see more outpatients, and work more hours but not necessarily residency experience of…

Gazewood, John D.; Mehr, David R.

2000-01-01

331

Supporting student nurses learning in and through clinical practice: the role of the clinical guide  

Microsoft Academic Search

Practice learning is an important part of the curriculum and accounts for approximately 50% of the pre-qualifying nursing programme in the United Kingdom. However, the nature of practice learning is very often ill defined, and mentors and nurse teachers apply a range of models to enhance learning in practice settings.Supporting students to learn is an important function for both educators

Debbie Roberts

2003-01-01

332

The relative effectiveness of two styles of educational package to change practice nurses' management of obesity  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: To examine the impact of two styles of educational package on practice nurses’ management of obesity. SUBJECTS AND MEASURES: A questionnaire was completed by 66 practice nurses concerning their obesity related beliefs and the content and style of their weight related practices before and one month after being randomly allocated to either the ‘learner centred’ group (who received a

J Ogden; R Hoppe

1997-01-01

333

Tackling complex problems, building evidence for practice, and educating doctoral nursing students to manage the tension.  

PubMed

The mandate for evidence-based practice (EBP) arose in response to, among other catalysts, several Institute of Medicine reports beginning in the late 1990s. At the same time, the National Institutes of Health and others have recognized that the most complex, important, and challenging problems, termed "wicked problems," are inherently transdisciplinary and require thinking beyond the limits of existing theories. When nursing students are prepared for EBP, they operate within a fairly stable set of assumptions and they exercise a past orientation. Wicked problem-solving occurs within a context that is characterized as dynamic and ambiguous and requires a future orientation to imagine potential solutions to questions of "what if?" Both skills, EBP, and wicked problem-solving, are essential within the discipline of nursing. Students at all levels need to understand when each scientific approach is required. PhD students must be prepared to participate in wicked problem-solving. PMID:23402781

Sharts-Hopko, Nancy C

2013-01-01

334

Clinical Procedure Page 1 of 2 Clinical Manual / Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

. The progress/care plan note may be labeled using a nursing diagnosis, an event or symptom, or a variance. 5Clinical Procedure Page 1 of 2 Clinical Manual / Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROCEDURE FOR: Documentation: Progress

Oliver, Douglas L.

335

Clinical Protocol Page 1 of 6 Clinical Manual -Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

of restraint. Nursing: The comprehensive assessment should address patient safety, limitations in mobilityClinical Protocol Page 1 of 6 Clinical Manual - Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROTOCOL: Restraint Use for Non

Oliver, Douglas L.

336

Clinical Procedure Page 1 of 3 Clinical Manual / Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

. Temperature, heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate (Vital Signs, including Admission and Post-op vitalClinical Procedure Page 1 of 3 Clinical Manual / Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROCEDURE FOR: Assessment: Scope of Nursing

Oliver, Douglas L.

337

Voices That Care: Licensed Practical Nurses and the Emotional Labour Underpinning Their Collaborative Interactions with Registered Nurses  

PubMed Central

Recognizing the emotional labour underlying interprofessional collaborations (IPCs) could be considered a crucial step towards building a cohesive nursing team. Although IPCs between registered nurses (RNs) and licensed practical nurses (LPNs) have been linked to quality nursing care, little is known about the emotions experienced by LPNs during their interactions with RNs or those factors that influence IPCs. A questionnaire administered to 309?LPNs found that (1) the professional identity of LPNs has evolved into a that of a unique social group; (2) LPNs define IPC as an interpersonal process of exploring similar or dissimilar assessments of a patient's status with RNs and, together, establishing a course of nursing actions; (3) the primary organizational factor facilitating IPCs is inclusive nursing leadership; (4) the interpersonal factor promoting IPCs is the level of trust RNs extend to LPNs; and (5) an LPN's emotional labour (i.e., internal emotional regulation) is most tangible during uncollaborative interactions with RNs. PMID:22135732

Huynh, Truc; Alderson, Marie; Nadon, Michelle; Kershaw-Rousseau, Sylvia

2011-01-01

338

Voices that care: licensed practical nurses and the emotional labour underpinning their collaborative interactions with registered nurses.  

PubMed

Recognizing the emotional labour underlying interprofessional collaborations (IPCs) could be considered a crucial step towards building a cohesive nursing team. Although IPCs between registered nurses (RNs) and licensed practical nurses (LPNs) have been linked to quality nursing care, little is known about the emotions experienced by LPNs during their interactions with RNs or those factors that influence IPCs. A questionnaire administered to 309?LPNs found that (1) the professional identity of LPNs has evolved into a that of a unique social group; (2) LPNs define IPC as an interpersonal process of exploring similar or dissimilar assessments of a patient's status with RNs and, together, establishing a course of nursing actions; (3) the primary organizational factor facilitating IPCs is inclusive nursing leadership; (4) the interpersonal factor promoting IPCs is the level of trust RNs extend to LPNs; and (5) an LPN's emotional labour (i.e., internal emotional regulation) is most tangible during uncollaborative interactions with RNs. PMID:22135732

Huynh, Truc; Alderson, Marie; Nadon, Michelle; Kershaw-Rousseau, Sylvia

2011-01-01

339

Ideology, Scientific Theory, and Social Work Practice  

E-print Network

. Because most theorists write from their personal and cultural frame of reference, at­ tempts to generalize are often problematic, to say the least. Given that the vast majority of our theories have been classically authored by white, middle- to upper... early adoption of psychoanalytic and psychodynamic theory led to a narrow individual and intrapsychic view of people and ushered in a medical model of practice that represented a sharp departure from the socioeconomic base of practice that was appar...

Robbins, Susan P.; Chatterjee, Pranab; Canda, Edward R.

1999-01-01

340

Understanding Jordanian Psychiatric Nurses' Smoking Behaviors: A Grounded Theory Study  

PubMed Central

Purpose. Smoking is prevalent in psychiatric facilities among staff and patients. However, there have been few studies of how contextual factors in specific cultures influence rates of smoking and the health promotion role of psychiatric nurses. This paper reports the findings of a classical grounded theory study conducted to understand how contextual factors in the workplace influences the smoking behaviors of Jordanian psychiatric nurses (JPNs). Method. Semi-structured individual interviews were conducted with a sample of eight male JPNs smokers at a psychiatric facility in Amman, Jordan. Findings. Constant comparative analysis identified becoming a heavy smoker as a psychosocial process characterized by four sub-categories: normalization of smoking; living in ambiguity; experiencing workplace conflict; and, facing up to workplace stressors. Conclusion. Specific contextual workplace factors require targeted smoking cessation interventions if JPNs are to receive the help they need to reduce health risks associated with heavy smoking. PMID:23844286

Aldiabat, Khaldoun M.; Clinton, Michael

2013-01-01

341

Supporting primary health care nurse practitioners' transition to practice  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To examine role transition and support requirements for nurse practitioner (NP) graduates in their first year of practice from the perspectives of the NPs and coparticipants familiar with the NPs’ practices; and to make recommendations for practice, education, and policy. DESIGN Descriptive qualitative design informed by focused ethnography and narrative analysis using semistructured, in-depth, qualitative interviews. SETTING Primary health care (PHC) settings in Ontario in which NPs worked. PARTICIPANTS Twenty-three NPs who had graduated from the Ontario Primary Health Care Nurse Practitioner program, and 21 coparticipants including family physicians, NPs, and managers who were familiar with the NPs’ practices. METHODS Anglophone and francophone NPs in their first year of practice in PHC settings were contacted by e-mail or letter. Participating NPs nominated colleagues in the workplace who could comment on their practice. Interviews were conducted within the first 3 months, at 6 months, and at 12 months of the NPs’ first year of practice and were transcribed verbatim and coded. Job descriptions and organizational charts demonstrating the NPs’ organization positions were also analyzed. The researchers collaboratively analyzed the interviews using a systematic data analysis protocol. MAIN FINDINGS Familiarity of colleagues and employers with the NP role and scope of practice was an important element in successful NP role transition. Lack of preparation for integrating NPs into clinical settings and lack of infrastructure, orientation, mentorship, and awareness of the NP role and needs made the transition difficult for many. One-third of the NPs had changed employment, identifying interprofessional conflict or problems with acceptance of their role in new practice environments as reasons for the change. CONCLUSION The transition of NP graduates in Ontario was complicated by the health care environment being ill-prepared to receive them owing to rapid changes in PHC. Strategies for mentorship and for the integration of new NPs into PHC settings are available and need to be implemented by health professionals and administrators. Recommendations for family physicians to support NP graduate transition into practice are provided. PMID:21076001

Sullivan-Bentz, Maureen; Humbert, Jennie; Cragg, Betty; Legault, Frances; Laflamme, Celyne; Bailey, P.H.; Doucette, Suzanne

2010-01-01

342

Organizational climate and hospital nurses' caring practices: a mixed-methods study.  

PubMed

Organizational climate in healthcare settings influences patient outcomes, but its effect on nursing care delivery remains poorly understood. In this mixed-methods study, nurse surveys (N?=?292) were combined with a qualitative case study of 15 direct-care registered nurses (RNs), nursing personnel, and managers. Organizational climate explained 11% of the variation in RNs' reported frequency of caring practices. Qualitative data suggested that caring practices were affected by the interplay of organizational climate dimensions with patients and nurses characteristics. Workload intensity and role ambiguity led RNs to leave many caring practices to practical nurses and assistive personnel. Systemic interventions are needed to improve organizational climate and to support RNs' involvement in a full range of caring practices. PMID:24729389

Roch, Genevičve; Dubois, Carl-Ardy; Clarke, Sean P

2014-06-01

343

The Labor Supply of Nurses and Nursing Assistants in the United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

Employers of nurses and nursing aides often report shortages and seek public assistance to enable them to pay higher wages. Persis- tent shortages may in theory be due to monopsony power, rigidity of relative wages, or incomplete contracts. Consistent with rigidity of relative wages, time series for employment and earnings of registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs), and nursing

John P. Burkett

2004-01-01

344

An investigation of emotional wellbeing and its relationship to contemporary nursing practice.  

PubMed

This paper is an investigation of emotional wellbeing and its relationship to contemporary nursing practice for women community health nurses (CHNs) who are providing palliative care. Palliative care provision has been acknowledged as a source of job satisfaction for many nurses however emotional interactions place increasing strain on nurses' wellbeing. Psychosocial aspects of care are reported as having a personal as well as a professional impact. Work related stress places nurses at increased risk of harm and impaired wellbeing. An emancipatory methodology was chosen for this study. Semi-structured interviews and reflective journaling were the methods used. The data was collected over a 16-month period during 2006-2007. There were fifteen participants. This qualitative study explored Australian rural and urban community nurses' experiences with wellbeing, emotional work and their professional practice. The findings revealed opposing social forces, an inner 'dialectical' tension between the nurses' expectations of their professional practices and what is valued in their practice settings. In terms of emotional wellbeing, two overarching themes will be discussed: feeling balanced and feeling out of balance. Workplace environments that were not always conducive to healing increased the emotional strain on nurses. Nurses' work promotes the healing of others therefore to deny the healing of nurses' is to deny others of healing. The need for further qualitative research investigating the emotional wellbeing and professional practice of community nurses who provide palliative care is necessary. PMID:20141026

Rose, Jayln; Glass, Nel

2009-01-01

345

Socioscientific Issues: Theory and Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Drawing upon recent research, this article reviews the theory underlying the use of socioscientific issues (SSI) in science education. We begin with a definition and rationale for SSI and note the importance of SSI for advancing functional scientific literacy. We then examine the various roles of context, teachers, and students in SSI lessons as…

Zeidler, Dana L.; Nichols, Bryan H.

2009-01-01

346

Sponsored Search: Theory and Practice  

E-print Network

by attention ­ Basis for many large-scale consumer services 4 Online Advertising · Internet accounts for 30 and Marketplace Group 10 August 2006 2 Outline · Why online advertising is important · A brief history of sponsored search · An auction theory view · The prediction problem #12;2 3 Why is Advertising Important

Baeza-Yates, Ricardo

347

Health Instruction Packages: Humanistic Nursing--Nurse/Patient Relations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in this set of four learning modules to instruct nurses and nursing students in humanistic, non-technical aspects of patient care. The first module, "Introduction to Humanistic Nursing Practice Theory" by Wanda L. Carpenter, draws upon the theories of existentialism and phenomenology to define…

Carpenter, Wanda L.; And Others

348

Safe motherhood program evaluation: theory and practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Debate on the evaluation of safe motherhood programs has mainly focused on the outcome or process measure to be used. Less attention is paid to the application of different approaches to evaluation. This article reviews current theories of evaluation and provides examples of the extent to which these theories have been applied in the actual practice of evaluation. Most evaluations

Lesley Milne; Graham Scotland; Nargiz Tagiyeva-Milne; Julia Hussein

2004-01-01

349

Political dreams, practical boundaries: the case of the Nursing Minimum Data Set, 1983-1990.  

PubMed

The initial development of the Nursing Minimum Data Set (NMDS) was analyzed based on archival material from Harriet Werley and Norma Lang, two nurses involved with the project, and American Nurses Association materials. The process of identifying information to be included in the NMDS was contentious. Individual nurses argued on behalf of particular data because of a strong belief in how nursing practice (through information collection) should be structured. Little attention was paid to existing practice conditions that would ultimately determine whether the NMDS would be used. PMID:21329148

Hobbs, Jennifer

2011-01-01

350

Theory versus practice in employee publications  

E-print Network

purpose was to gather the facts and opinions concerning company editors and their publications. Twenty publications were then studied to see to what extent the actual magazines followed the theory concerning them. The paper is limited to a study..." as they have been nicknamed. Then the results of a questionnaire sent to practicing editors were compared with the theory set forth in order to determine to what extent the theory is applicable to actual publications. A study of the publications themselves...

Godwin, Robbie Don

2012-06-07

351

Travel motivation: linking theory to practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to review the relevant literature on travel motivation and provides a scenario-based discussion on the applications of travel motivation theories in the industry practice. The paper offers an invaluable practical interpretation of travel motivation and related management issues. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A comprehensive literature review on travel motivation is conducted to acknowledge the

Cathy H. C. Hsu

2009-01-01

352

The Role of Theory in Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There are at least three ways in which educational theory can be used in practice: (1) to reexamine our traditional approaches, (2) to provide direction in future practice, and (3) to generate research. Reexamination of traditional approaches through analysis and utilization of theoretical methods is one means of promoting constant growth and…

Pyfer, Jean L.

353

Seismic data processing: Theory and practice  

SciTech Connect

This book emphasizes the practical application of seismic data processing methods. It provides information on computer systems, data processing, time series analysis, seismic data processing, migration and inversion theory and practice. Relevant computer hardware and procedures in a seismic data processing laboratory are discussed.

Hatton, L.; Worthington, M.H.; Makin, J.

1986-01-01

354

Shortening the Path Between Theory and Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The three books reviewed in this article represent the continuous effort to make visible the significant bridge between theory and practice in the fields of literacy and children's literature. While the authors maintain distinct purposes for their creations, the texts each speak to a strong theoretical support for the practices they describe. The…

Mathis, Janelle

2006-01-01

355

Extracting Modules from Ontologies: Theory and Practice  

E-print Network

in a logic-based language such as OWL. Like software engineers, "ontology engineers" need to be supported for our ontology engineers (who are not medical experts) to understand. Thus, in practice, we needExtracting Modules from Ontologies: Theory and Practice (Technical Report) (revised version from

Kazakov, Yevgeny

356

The transition from student to new registered nurse in professional practice.  

PubMed

This qualitative study presents the transition experience of new registered nurses during the first year of professional practice. Four themes emerged: feelings of frustration and being overwhelmed, preceptors, fear, and the orientation process. The orientation process, quality, competent preceptors, and reducing lateral violence are key strategies to successfully retain new nurses. Nurse educators have a crucial role during nurse orientation, training preceptors, and reducing violent behaviors in the workplace. PMID:22992640

Thomas, Cynthia M; Bertram, Evelyn; Allen, Roberta L

2012-01-01

357

American Organization of Nurse Executives Care Innovation and Transformation program: improving care and practice environments.  

PubMed

The American Organization of Nurse Executives conducted an evaluation of the hospitals participating in the Care Innovation and Transformation (CIT) program. A total of 24 hospitals participated in the 2-year CIT program from 2012 to 2013. Reported outcomes include increased patient satisfaction, decreased falls, and reductions in nurse turnover and overtime. Nurses reported statistically significant improvements in 4 domains of the principles and elements of a healthful practice environment developed by the Nursing Organizations Alliance. PMID:25148395

Oberlies, Amanda Stefancyk

2014-09-01

358

A study of state and trait anxiety and perceived causes of anxiety identified by licensed practical nurses returning to an associate degree nursing program  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to identify the state and trait anxiety and the perceived causes of anxiety in licensed practical nurses (LPNs) returning to an associate degree nursing program in order to become registered nurses (RNs). The subjects for this study were 98 students enrolled in a transitional LPN\\/RN associate degree nursing program in two community colleges in

Sally Ann Weiss

1997-01-01

359

Improving the Nurse-Family Partnership in Community Practice  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Evidence-based preventive interventions are rarely final products. They have reached a stage of development that warrant public investment but require additional research and development to strengthen their effects. The Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP), a program of nurse home visiting, is grounded in findings from replicated randomized controlled trials. OBJECTIVE: Evidence-based programs require replication in accordance with the models tested in the original randomized controlled trials in order to achieve impacts comparable to those found in those trials, and yet they must be changed in order to improve their impacts, given that interventions require continuous improvement. This article provides a framework and illustrations of work our team members have developed to address this tension. METHODS: Because the NFP is delivered in communities outside of research contexts, we used quantitative and qualitative research to identify challenges with the NFP program model and its implementation, as well as promising approaches for addressing them. RESULTS: We describe a framework used to address these issues and illustrate its use in improving nurses’ skills in retaining participants, reducing closely spaced subsequent pregnancies, responding to intimate partner violence, observing and promoting caregivers’ care of their children, addressing parents’ mental health problems, classifying families’ risks and strengths as a guide for program implementation, and collaborating with indigenous health organizations to adapt and evaluate the program for their populations. We identify common challenges encountered in conducting research in practice settings and translating findings from these studies into ongoing program implementation. CONCLUSIONS: The conduct of research focused on quality improvement, model improvement, and implementation in NFP practice settings is challenging, but feasible, and holds promise for improving the impact of the NFP. PMID:24187112

Donelan-McCall, Nancy; O'Brien, Ruth; MacMillan, Harriet; Jack, Susan; Jenkins, Thomas; Dunlap, Wallace P.; O'Fallon, Molly; Yost, Elly; Thorland, Bill; Pinto, Francesca; Gasbarro, Mariarosa; Baca, Pilar; Melnick, Alan; Beeber, Linda

2013-01-01

360

Model Checking: Theory into Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Model checking is an automatic method for verifying correctness of reactive programs. Originally proposed as part of the dissertation\\u000a work of the author, model checking is based on efficient algorithms searching for the presence or absence of temporal patterns.\\u000a In fact, model checking rests on a theoretical foundation of basic principles from modal logic, lattice theory, as well as\\u000a automata

E. Allen Emerson

2000-01-01

361

Developing the nursing care plans using the "master file of standardized nursing practice terminology" in Japan.  

PubMed

A common language in nursing facilitates better communication among nurses and healthcare team, assuring better nursing care, hence better patient outcomes. As we developed and disseminated the standardized terminology of nursing which provided nurses with a set of terms to describe nursing observations and nursing actions, we developed a certain number of nursing care plans using the terms in it. The nursing care plans included those for the patients requiring medical (pharmaceutical)/surgical procedures or the patients showing some signs and symptoms. Generally, nurses found that the nursing care plans were useful and flexible enough to allow for the modification according to the needs of each individual patient. In conclusion, the nursing care plans based on the standardized terminology showed its relevance to the clinical settings. PMID:23920989

Wako, Fumiko; Tsuru, Satoko; Omori, Miho; Watanabe, Chitose; Uchiyama, Makiko; Asada, Miwa; Inoue, Kikumi

2013-01-01

362

There Is No Gap "Per Se" between Theory and Practice: Research Knowledge and Clinical Knowledge Are Developed in Different Contexts and Follow Their Own Logic.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Highlights relationships between theory and practice and the genesis of professional action in clinical nursing and among researchers. Suggests that clinical nurses learn from context, including each other, and are active producers of knowledge, not merely recipients. Concludes there is no research-practice gap as argued in the dominant barrier…

Larsen, Kristian; Adamsen, Lis; Bjerregaard, Lene; Madsen, Jan K.

2002-01-01

363

Tips for starting your own nurse practitioner practice.  

PubMed

The decision to open a nurse practitioner practice is often difficult to make. Success depends on the possession of specific resources, such as adequate skills, finances, emotional support and the desire to be one's own boss. These skills will be critical as the NP develops a business plan and a budget, and makes important decisions, such as the form the business will take: sole proprietorship, partnership or corporation. Using external resources such as attorneys and accountants is also useful, especially when tackling issues of licenses, taxes and insurance. Start-up costs can be kept to a minimum with creativity and used equipment. In-house laboratories and reference laboratories must conform to strict regulations. A practice without established patients will need to market services aggressively through a successful mix of product, price, place and promotion. Patients' acceptance of the NP office will be enhanced by smooth patient flow, adequate space and cleanliness. PMID:8292127

Calmelat, A

1993-04-01

364

Advanced practice nursing in performing arts health care.  

PubMed

Performing arts medicine is a growing health care profession specializing in the needs of performing artists. As part of the performing arts venue, the dancer, a combination of athlete and artist, presents with unique health care needs requiring a more collaborative and holistic health care program. Currently there are relatively few advanced practice nurses (APNs) who specialize in performing arts health care. APNs, with focus on collaborative and holistic health care, are ideally suited to join other health care professionals in developing and implementing comprehensive health care programs for the performing artist. This article focuses on the dancer as the client in an APN practice that specializes in performing arts health care. PMID:20644180

Weslin, Anna T; Silva-Smith, Amy

2010-06-01

365

Client characteristics and practice patterns of nurse practitioners and physicians.  

PubMed

This study's purpose was to describe the practice patterns of nurse practitioners (NPs) in Tennessee--specifically, the demographic characteristics and health problems of their clients and the therapeutic services they provide. A random sample of NPs practicing 20 or more hours per week in primary care in Tennessee provided data on a total of 680 clients seen during one selected day of care. An instrument adapted from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) allowed comparison of the NP findings with a national survey of office-based physicians in five areas: client demographics, client health status, diagnostic tests ordered, therapeutic interventions provided, and client disposition. Although many similarities were seen, differences included the tendency of NPs to care for more younger and female clients, to perform fewer office surgical procedures, and to provide more health teaching/counseling interventions. PMID:10100243

Moody, N B; Smith, P L; Glenn, L L

1999-03-01

366

The application of qualitative research findings to oncology nursing practice.  

PubMed

The Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) has established an ambitious research agenda and professional priorities based on a survey by LoBiondo-Wood et al. (2014). With the overall goal to "improve cancer care and the lives of individuals with cancer" (Moore & Badger, 2014, p. 93) through research activities, translating those research findings to direct clinical practice can be overwhelming. As clinicians, understanding how to critique research for quality prior to incorporating research findings into practice is important. The ultimate goal in this critique is to ensure that decisions made about patient care are based on strong evidence. However, the process for appraisal of qualitative research can be ambiguous and often contradictory as a result of the elusive aspect of quality in qualitative research methods (Seale, 1999). In addition, with more than 100 tools available to evaluate qualitative research studies (Higgins & Green, 2011), a lack of consensus exists on how to critically appraise research findings. PMID:25355024

Cuthbert, Colleen Ann; Moules, Nancy

2014-11-01

367

Public Health as the Foundation of School Nursing Practice Resolution Whereas, Whereas, Whereas, Whereas, Whereas,  

E-print Network

the founder of public health nursing, Lillian Wald, recognized from its conception in 1902 that the philosophy and principles of public health underlie school nursing practice; and school nursing services are provided in an educational setting where promoting and maintaining the optimal health status of students are critical to the success of the local education agency’s mission; and School Nursing Scope and Standards of Practice (ANA &NASN, 2011) supports the core functions of public health using knowledge from nursing, public health science, and education to provide primary, secondary and tertiary interventions to promote health and prevent disease within the school setting; and professional registered nurses enter the practice of school nursing from a variety of educational and work backgrounds and most often are supervised by an administrator without a nursing or healthcare background; and the American Nurses Association recognizes that the practice of school nursing is “grounded in core public health functions ” in providing care for youth and adults in the educational setting (ANA, 2007, p. 1); and school health services provide a channel for integrating public health into communities to improve population health as outlined by the Institute of Medicine (2012); and school nurses are uniquely positioned to engage a large percentage of our nation’s youth, their families and school community to promote health and prevent disease; therefore, be it

unknown authors

368

Development and Field Test of Competency Based Instructional Material for a Career Mobility Program for Licensed Practical Nurses. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Associate Degree Nursing Program at Bergen Community College developed and field tested competency-based instructional modules in a program designed to allow licensed practical nurses to qualify to take the certification examination for registered nurses after a year of study. Thirteen licensed practical nurses were enrolled in the first class…

Bergen Community Coll., Paramus, NJ.

369

Spirituality and spiritual self-care: expanding self-care deficit nursing theory.  

PubMed

The authors propose an integration of the concepts of spirituality and spiritual self-care within Orem's self-care deficit nursing theory as a critical step in theory development. Theoretical clarity is needed to understand the contributions of spirituality to health and well-being. Spirituality is the beliefs persons hold related to their subjective sense of existential connectedness including beliefs that reflect relationships with others, acknowledge a higher power, recognize an individual's place in the world, and lead to spiritual practices. Spiritual self-care is the set of spiritually-based practices in which people engage to promote continued personal development and well-being in health and illness. PMID:21220576

White, Mary L; Peters, Rosalind; Schim, Stephanie Myers

2011-01-01

370

Ground Effect - Theory and Practice  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The conclusion of a previous article by Pistolesi is that the increment of lift due to ground effect is largely attributable to the effect of induction of the free vortices, and is practically equivalent to a virtual increase in aspect ratio. The ground clearance was of the order of magnitude comparable to the wing chord. New reports by Le Seur and Datwyler treat the case of minimum distance from the ground and is confined to the plane problem only. The author briefly reviews these reports and also one by Timotika. References to all the reviewed reports are in the attached bibliography.

Pistolesi, E

1937-01-01

371

Digital Imaging: theory joins practice  

E-print Network

that, as potential contributors to the knowledge commons, all institutions need to follow accepted best practices in order to create high quality, sustainable digital images. But, there is a caveat, regardless of one’s level of confidence or knowledge of the subject. Given the tight budgets, minimal staffing and added... inevitably turn up in such a thorough examination of storage locations. Three departments (Asian & Ancient, Photography and Prints & Drawings) where chosen to participate in the project based on the straightforward demands of photographing works on paper. Establishing a quota of items to photograph on a...

Patzke, Karin; Thiel, Sarah Goodwin

2009-07-01

372

Feeding practices of Greek children with and without nursing caries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: This study was performed to examine the feeding prac- tices and demographic and nursing characteristics of Greek children with and without nursing caries. It was also intended to evaluate what dentists and pediatricians tell parents when they examine children with nursing caries. Methods: 260 children, ages 3-5 (130 with nursing caries, NC group, and 130 without, NNC group) participated

Constantine J. Oulis; Elias D. Berdouses; George Vadiakas; Nick A. Lygidakis

1999-01-01

373

Practice and Education: Partnering to Address the Perioperative Nursing Shortage  

Microsoft Academic Search

WITH THE GROWING SHORTAGE of nurses in the workforce, perioperative leaders are facing a significant challenge in recruiting new nurses who are committed to perioperative nursing.ONE MEDICAL CENTER in northern Florida developed a successful summer externship program to introduce nursing students to the perioperative environment. The program incorporates both didactic and clinical experiences.STUDENTS WHO COMPLETE the program are better prepared

Lucy B. Trice; Catherine Brandvold; Elizabeth Bruno

2007-01-01

374

Nursing students' evaluation of clinical experiences in a rural differentiated-practice setting.  

PubMed

This article describes nursing students' evaluations of clinical experiences in a rural nursing center that uses a differentiated practice model. The center provides clinical experiences for associate degree, baccalaureate degree, and master's degree nursing students. Learning objectives and student roles are differentiated according to educational level and reflect the practice model used by the nursing center. Student evaluations showed high levels of satisfaction for all three groups and indicated that experience at the center increased students' knowledge of rural health. Findings also showed that autonomy, independence, and a supportive staff are valued characteristics of this practice setting. PMID:12016659

Robertson, J F; Anderko, L; Uscian, M

2000-01-01

375

Advanced practice nurse entrepreneurs in a multidisciplinary surgical-assisting partnership.  

PubMed

CHANGES IN THE HEALTH CARE environment and reimbursement practices are creating opportunities for nurse entrepreneurs to be partners with other professional nurses and physicians. Advanced practice nurses (APNs) who want to step into an entrepreneurial role must have strong clinical expertise, specific personal characteristics, interpersonal skills, and business acumen. ESTABLISHING A MULTIDISCIPLINARY partnership for providing surgical assisting services has many benefits and presents many challenges. PMID:16309068

DeCarlo, Linda

2005-09-01

376

Black Holes Theory and Practice  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In recent years, observers have verified that black holes are common in binary X-ray sources in our galaxy (with masses about five to ten times that of the sun) and in the nuclei of galaxies, including our own, with masses of millions to billions of solar masses. There may also be many black holes of intermediate mass. Astronomers are now starting to explore the properties of these black holes and perhaps see peculiar features of Einstein's general theory of relativity in action. In particular, they may be detecting the spins of some black holes. The evidence for the existence of black holes will be reviewed and some of their astronomically interesting properties will be explained. In addition, some speculations concerning their role in stellar and galactic evolution will be briefly entertained.

Blandford, R. D.

2000-12-01

377

Evidence-based practice for pain identification in cognitively impaired nursing home residents.  

PubMed

Pain identification of cognitively impaired elderly is very challenging. This project aimed to identify best practices for pain assessment in nursing home residents with cognitive impairment and to establish a standardized pain assessment guide to optimize nursing practice and resident outcomes. The Iowa Model of Evidence-Based Practice to Promote Quality of Care guided the project's process. Phase I of the project analyzed data gained from chart reviews on current practices of pain assessment, and Phase II used the results of Phase I to develop, implement, and evaluate an evidence-based practice standard for nursing assessment of pain for cognitively impaired residents. PMID:25155534

Sacoco, Christina; Ishikawa, Sally

2014-09-01

378

Pain management knowledge, attitudes and clinical practice: The impact of nurses' characteristics and education  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the knowattitudes, and clinical practice of registered nurses (N = 120) regarding paint management Data were collected from nine varied clinical units in a large, univasity-effiliaated teaching hospital to an urban area of the Northeast. Demogrohic information was also collected to explore the relationship between nurses' characteristics, including previous pain education, clinical experience, area of clinical practice,

Ellen B. Clarke; Brian French; Mary Liz Bilodeau; Virginia C. Capasso; Annabel Edwards; Joanne Empoliti

1996-01-01

379

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION Programme name Advanced Practice in Health and Social Care (Nursing)  

E-print Network

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION KEY FACTS Programme name Advanced Practice in Health and Social Care The MSc Advanced Practice in Health and Social Care (Nursing) is a flexible, professionally orientated programme for nurses working across all health and social care provisions. It seeks to prepare a specialist

Weyde, Tillman

380

A Survey of Registered Nurses' Readiness for Evidence-Based Practice: A Multidisciplinary Project  

Microsoft Academic Search

Implementation of evidence-based practice assumes nurses have the skills and desire to incorporate research into their practice. How does the registered nurse with little formal research experience retrieve current evidence-based research? National studies have looked at institutional and individual barriers, but little is known about the actual dynamics of research utilization within a regional health care system. Using a descriptive

Heidi Beke-Harrigan; Rosanna Hess; Jo Ann Weinland

2008-01-01

381

Cost-effectiveness of a WOC Advanced Practice Nurse in the Acute Care and Outpatient Setting  

PubMed Central

Increasing numbers of advanced practice nurses who practice within the WOC specialty are challenged by the need to justify their role by demonstrating clinical and fiscal benefits to the employing agency. This View From Here column describes the steps I took while completing such an analysis for a position for a nurse practitioner with WOC certification in upstate New York. PMID:24918767

2014-01-01

382

The need for a new advanced nursing practice role for Australian adult critical care settings  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current deficit of knowledge related to advanced nursing practice in Australian adult critical care settings presents a barrier to future role development. This paper reports the findings of one theme identified by a research study that explored issues related to the potential for a new advanced nursing practice role for these settings. The qualitative approach of focus group methodology

Trudy Dwyer; L WILLIAMS

2002-01-01

383

Teacher's Guide for Competency-Based Education Curriculum for Licensed Practical Nurse.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This teacher's guide is designed to accompany the Licensed Practical Nurse Competency-Based Education Curriculum student materials available separately (see note). It contains an explanation of the curriculum and suggested usage, a list of competencies by job title (other occupations which use the same competencies), Licensed Practical Nurse

Associated Educational Consultants, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA.

384

Vocational Choice and Satisfactions of Licensed Practical Nurses. League Exchange No. 87.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explores factors characterizing persons who have selected practical nursing as a career, the satisfactions of those who have remained in the field, and the reasons some individuals have left. All 1,139 graduates of the 12 1-year practical nurse programs in Minnesota for the years 1955, 1960, and 1964 were sent questionnaires, and 1,001…

Treece, Eleanor Mae Walters

385

[Collaboration between science and practice: experiences of conducting a nursing intervention study].  

PubMed

In a five-year intervention study about the impact of pre-operative mobilisation training session of patients receiving an elective medial laparotomy experiences about the collaboration between practice (University Hospital Ulm) and science (Hessian Institute of Nursing Research) were made. During the project possibilities and borders of clinical nursing research became clear. A research question based on practice experiences of nurses helps to develop and maintain motivation to conduct a study at a nursing unit. There was a lack of nursing knowledge to develop the best possible design, e.g. outcome criteria for mobilisation and standardized assessment instruments. The cooperation with other health care professionals (human movement science, statistics) was important and without difficulties. In Germany, without doctors' agreement and common application it is impossible to conduct nursing intervention studies in hospitals. It is necessary to train nursing specialists with both scientific and clinical competence to explore systematically clinical research questions. PMID:19750976

Panfil, Eva-Maria; Kirchner, Elisabeth; Bauder-Missbach, Heidi; Haasenritter, Jörg; Eisenschink, Anna Maria

2009-09-01

386

Assistant practitioners: lessons learned from licensed practical nurses.  

PubMed

The role of the assistant practitioner (AP) needs to be defined so they have clear career pathways and opportunities for professional development. The author sought to learn from other countries where a sustained effort had been made to support practitioners fulfilling this intermediate role. The equivalent of an AP in Canada is the licensed practical nurse (LPN); LPNs are subject to clear regulation and practice within their remit of their license. The author travelled to Alberta, Canada, and performed a qualitative study to investigate the role of the LPN. LPNs undertake a 2-year diploma-level course and have the opportunity to enhance their careers through specialist courses or to train as a RN. LPNs benefit from careful regulation, enabling them to have a clear scope of practice, a career structure with opportunities for development and consistent ethical standards. Lessons can be learned from the LPN model and put in practice in the UK; APs need a consistent education programme, a career pathway that promotes development and effective regulation. PMID:23123896

Whittingham, Katrina

387

Graduate registered nurse practice readiness in the Australian context: an issue worthy of discussion.  

PubMed

An ageing Australian population coupled with declining nursing numbers is predicted to have a significant impact on the Australian Healthcare industry, with numbers of nurses expected to be in greater demand at a time when the need for nursing care is on the rise. The report released recently by Health Workforce Australia predicted a potential shortage of approximately 110,000 nurses by 2025. In Queensland alone, the Queensland Nursing Union estimates the shortage of nurses to be closer to 10,000 positions by 2016 and 14,000 positions by 2020 based on the anticipated Queensland Health hospital expansions. The Commonwealth Government has responded by increasing funding to train more registered nurses across Australia. Hence a significant number of graduate registered nurses are expected and required to join the workforce. However, an analysis of the literature reveals that opinions differ between clinicians and education providers as to whether recently graduated registered nurses are adequately prepared for the challenges of the current healthcare system. Even though much research has been done in Australia on the issue of transition support programmes, graduate registered nurses' transition to practice remains problematic and is perceived to pose a significant challenge to healthcare industry. This paper contributes to the contemporary discourse on graduate registered nurses' practice readiness at a time when a forecasted nursing shortage, the difficulties in accessing sufficient quality clinical placements and the need for fiscal responsibility pose added challenges to education providers and the healthcare industry. PMID:24596992

El Haddada, May; Moxham, Lorna; Broadbent, Marc

2013-01-01

388

School Nursing Documentation: Knowledge, Attitude, and Barriers to Using Standardized Nursing Languages and Current Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The independent, complex role of a school nurse requires accurate documentation of assessments, interventions, and outcomes. Consistent documentation by all school nurses is crucial to study the impact of nursing interventions on children's health and success in school. While standardized nursing languages are available, the actual use of…

Yearous, Sharon Kay Guthrie

2011-01-01

389

Nursing diagnoses, interventions and outcomes - application and impact on nursing practice: systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

AIM: This paper reports a systematic review on the outcomes of nursing diagnostics. Specifically, it examines effects on documentation of assessment quality; frequency, accuracy and completeness of nursing diagnoses; and on coherence between nursing diagnoses, interventions and outcomes. BACKGROUND: Escalating healthcare costs demand the measurement of nursing's contribution to care. Use of standardized terminologies facilitates this measurement. Although several studies

Maria Müller-Staub; Mary Ann Lavin; Ian Needham; Theo van Achterberg

2006-01-01

390

Improving medication calculation skills of practicing nurses and senior nursing students: a pilot study.  

PubMed

Medication administration is an essential nursing competency as calculation difficulties can lead to serious medication errors. Nurses involved in staff education need to be aware of methods to assess for computation difficulty and develop strategies for nurses to improve their computation abilities. The purposes of this quasi-experimental pilot study were to assess the medication calculation skills of nurses and nursing students and to determine the effectiveness of teaching strategies aimed at improving these skills. PMID:16885685

Harne-Britner, Sarah; Kreamer, Carolyn L; Frownfelter, Penny; Helmuth, Amy; Lutter, Stacy; Schafer, Deborah J; Wilson, Cyndy

2006-01-01

391

Transforming nursing education: a review of current curricular practices in relation to Benner's latest work.  

PubMed

Current societal and healthcare system trends highlight the need to transform nursing education to prepare nurses capable of outstanding practice in the 21st century. Patricia Benner and colleagues urged nurse educators to transform their practice in the 2010 publication Educating Nurses, A Call to Radical Transformation. Frequently utilized pedagogical frameworks in nursing education include behaviorism and constructivism. Much of the structure and basis for instruction and evaluation can be found rooted in these philosophies. By first exploring both behaviorism and constructivism and then relating their use in nursing education to the call to transform, educators can be encourage to examine current practice and possibly modify aspects to include more rich experiential learning. PMID:23092804

Handwerker, Sarah M

2012-01-01

392

The Family Life-path Theory: a Tool for Nurses Working in Partnership with Families  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this article is to describe the family life-path theory. The theory may offer nurses an alternative model for use in working in partnership with the family of a child with a long-term illness. It is important that nurses have a deep understanding of a family’s everyday life. The better nurses know the family and the context in

Pirkko Jokinen

2004-01-01

393

[Advanced nursing practice: a must for the quality of care and mental health services].  

PubMed

New professional legislation and reorganization of mental health services have had a significant influence on mental health nursing practice. Many nurses have demonstrated clinical leadership and have been able to adapt their services to the needs of the population specially in the primary health care setting. However, many believe that the role of nurses is not sufficiently known and optimally utilized in mental health services. In this article we take a critical look at the mental health nursing practice in Quebec and at the essential requirements for its development. This review aims to: 1) describe current trends in the changing roles and the modernization of mental health nursing practice in Quebec, 2) provide an overview of the development of advanced nursing practice and its impact on the quality of mental health services; 3) clarify the concept of advanced nursing practice and position its development in Quebec and 4) propose various strategies for optimizing the role of nurses and their complementarity with other professionals providing mental health services. This review presents innovative practices developed by nurses in the context of the restructuring of mental health services. For example, new nursing roles have been developed to improve the collaboration with general practitioners groups in primary care settings and facilitate the evaluation and monitoring of patient presenting medical and psychological problems. Another interesting innovation was set up by nurses in developing a new service to allow timely access to integrated care for patients with substance abuse and mental health problems. The various testimonies reported in this article illustrate the potential contribution of these nursing innovations in improving the mental health services in Quebec. Also, in few countries, the reform of mental health services has been a good time to recognize this potential. Thus, some countries have repositioned the role of mental health nurses and supported the development of new models of advanced practice in mental health. These developments have been particularly significant in the United States and Australia. In United States, during the 1990s, at least four models of advanced practice in mental health nursing have been developed leading to wide variations in the roles, education, job titles, scope of practice and legal authorizations. Consequently, a consensus model of uniform standards of practice, accreditation and education has been proposed. This LACE model (Licensure, Accreditation, Certification, Education) will be in effect in 2015. Australia has adopted a more systematic approach, unified and progressive to facilitate the development of advanced mental health nursing practice. Australia who, through their many publications, retains more attention since a clear definition of the role of the nurse practitioner in mental health and a legal framework has been adopted at the national level. The Australian experience and the finding from studies suggest that mental health nurse practitioners and nurses who are specialized in mental health have the potential to make a significant contribution to enhancing access to and quality of mental health care through flexible an innovative approaches. So there are more and more evidence and indications that Quebec should invest in enhancing the skills of mental health nurses through the development of advanced nursing practice and integration of this new model in primary care. In addition, researches, funded by the Canadian Services Research Foundation (CHSRF, 2010), shows that the contribution of advanced nursing practice has never been stronger and there is a broad consensus to its value for the Canadian health care system (Dicenso.et Lukosius-Briant, 2010). The implementation of advanced practice nursing role in mental health is part of best practices required to improve care and mental health services and should be taken into account in future Action Plan 2014-2020. PMID:25120119

Ricard, Nicole; Page, Claire; Laflamme, France

2014-01-01

394

Practice and education: partnering to address the perioperative nursing shortage.  

PubMed

With the growing shortage of nurses in the workforce, perioperative leaders are facing a significant challenge in recruiting new nurses who are committed to perioperative nursing. One medical center in northern Florida developed a successful summer externship program to introduce nursing students to the perioperative environment. The program incorporates both didactic and clinical experiences. Students who complete the program are better prepared and motivated to choose a career in perioperative nursing. The retention rate for nurses from the externship program who were hired into the OR in which the program was conducted was 89% after two years. PMID:17683723

Trice, Lucy B; Brandvold, Catherine; Bruno, Elizabeth

2007-08-01

395

Theoretical and practical knowledge of Nursing professionals on indirect blood pressure measurement at a coronary care unit.  

PubMed

Objective To determine and to analyze the theoretical and practical knowledge of Nursing professionals on indirect blood pressure measurement. Methods This cross-sectional study included 31 professionals of a coronary care unit (86% of the Nursing staff in the unit). Of these, 38.7% of professionals were nurses and 61.3% nurse technicians. A validated questionnaire was used to theoretical evaluation and for practice assessment the auscultatory technique was applied in a simulation environment, under a non-participant observation. Results To the theoretical knowledge of the stages of preparation of patient and environment, 12.9% mentioned 5-minute of rest, 48.4% checked calibration, and 29.0% chose adequate cuff width. A total of 64.5% of professionals avoided rounding values, and 22.6% mentioned the 6-month deadline period for the equipment calibration. On average, in practice assessment, 65% of the steps were followed. Lacks in knowledge were primary concerning lack of checking the device calibration and stethoscope, measurement of arm circumference to choose the cuff size, and the record of arm used in blood pressure measurement. Conclusion Knowledge was poor and had disparities between theory and practice with evidence of steps taken without proper awareness and lack of consideration of important knowledge during implementation of blood pressure measurement. Educational and operational interventions should be applied systematically with institutional involvement to ensure safe care with reliable values. PMID:25295455

Machado, Juliana Pereira; Veiga, Eugenia Velludo; Ferreira, Paulo Alexandre Camargo; Martins, José Carlos Amado; Daniel, Ana Carolina Queiroz Godoy; Oliveira, Amanda Dos Santos; Silva, Patrícia Costa Dos Santos da

2014-09-01

396

Implementing the ten-step monitoring and evaluation process in nursing practice.  

PubMed

Implementation of the ten-step monitoring and evaluation process as recommended by the Joint Commission leads to the development of a program that meets the requirements of the quality assurance standard. The Professional Practice Program at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital (New Brunswick, New Jersey) demonstrates the application of this process within the Nursing Division. A conceptual model of nursing practice based on nursing diagnosis provides the framework for the program. Responsibility for the system belongs to the professional nursing staff through the election of unit-based representatives. PMID:2120666

Tonges, M C; Bradley, M J; Brett, J L

1990-07-01

397

This application form should only be used by applicants to the Licensed Practical Nurse Bridging Option, Nursing Education Program of Saskatchewan. There is a separate application form for the regular Nursing Education Program of Saskatchewan.  

E-print Network

Option, Nursing Education Program of Saskatchewan. There is a separate application form for the regular Nursing Education Program of Saskatchewan. This option is being offered at SIAST Wascana Campus (Regina providers. Education Equity Month Year Nursing Education Program of Saskatchewan Licensed Practical Nurse

Saskatchewan, University of

398

Collaborative Web-Based Nursing Practice Learning System  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Nurses collaborate with other medical professionals including doctors, lab technicians, and other nurses to provide patient\\u000a care. Especially, the nurses often work as a team to take care of multiple patients. However, it is fairly often for the team\\u000a members to work at different time in different location as they are assigned to work in different shifts. Traditionally, the\\u000a nurses

Woojin Paik; Nam Mi Kang; Heejung Choi; Eunmi Ham

2005-01-01

399

Mindfulness for Depression Theory and Practice  

E-print Network

Mindfulness for Depression Theory and Practice Wesak Day, Mental Health Awareness Week and European weeks ďż˝ Energy lacking, with easy fatigue, feeling tired all the time ďż˝ Previously pleasurable weight) disrupted ďż˝ Sleep disturbance ďż˝ Suicidal thoughts or thoughts of death ďż˝ Inappropriate guilt

Swain, Peter

400

Online Collaborative Learning: Theory and Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Online Collaborative Learning: Theory and Practice" provides a resource for researchers and practitioners in the area of online collaborative learning (also known as CSCL, computer-supported collaborative learning), particularly those working within a tertiary education environment. It includes articles of relevance to those interested in both…

Roberts, Tim, Ed.

2004-01-01

401

Promoting women's sport: theory, policy and practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

While in recent years there has been a good deal of critique of the representation and participation of women in sport, there have been relatively few attempts to link theory and practice by means of cultural policy interventions. This article discusses a community-based research project designed principally to encourage teenage girls to engage voluntarily in sport by improving local media

David Rowe; Peter Brown

1994-01-01

402

Leadership Pedagogy: Putting Theory to Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Building leadership capacity in college students is both an art and a science. Knowledge of college student development and specifically college leadership development, as well as research in leadership theory and practices, can help college leadership educators become more effective. International Leadership Association (ILA) Guiding Questions…

Rosch, David M.; Anthony, Michael D.

2012-01-01

403

Scope of practice conflict in nursing: a new war or just the same battle?  

PubMed

The changing roles within health care teams reflect the rapid pace of change in contemporary health care environments. Traditional nursing roles and responsibilities are being challenged as fiscal constraints drive health reform. How nursing teams are configured in the future and the scope of practice of the individuals within those teams will require clear and unambiguous boundaries. This study explores the relationships in and between scope of practice and communication amongst teams of nurses. Six focus groups with both Registered and Enrolled Nurses were undertaken in three Sydney metropolitan hospitals in New South Wales. Nurses report that confusion surrounding scope of practice particularly in the areas of medication administration, patient allocation and workload are resulting in situations whereby nurses are feeling bullied, stressed and harassed. With the imminent widespread introduction of a third tier of nursing into acute care hospitals in Australia the findings of this study are timely and suggest that unless nursing team members clearly understand their roles and scope of practice there is potential for intra-professional workplace conflict. Furthermore the impact of the conflict may have consequences for both the individual nurse and their patients. PMID:21254825

Eagar, Sandy C; Cowin, Leanne S; Gregory, Linda; Firtko, Angela

2010-01-01

404

[A reflection upon an organizational system model for nursing care centered on best practices].  

PubMed

This article aims at reflecting on nursing best practices and these practices as a perspective of systemizing care. Quality of nursing becomes evident from management practices instituted as a result of its development throughout time. Thinkers of the management area have really influenced nursing both at professional acting and theoretical basis levels. It is imperative that nursing comes closer to best practices, which are considered as a non linear manner of perceiving the world, where structuring of its actions is centered on complex perspective; the use of registers as a way for planning organization and care to take effect, as well as professional identification with issues that transcend personal care and are closer to universal ethics. Best practices are linked to social responsibility, sustainability and ecology as an essence of human actions to conduct management practices. PMID:21574344

Kempfer, Silvana Silveira; Birolo, Ioná Vieira Bez; Meirelles, Betina Homer Schlindwein; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini

2010-09-01

405

Roy's Adaptation Model of the Nursing Process: A Clinical Application for Wellness Promotion.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Due to the need for nurses to use nursing theories in nursing practice, a theory based nursing process for wellness promotion was applied to an individual in a study. The objectives of the study were to: describe the Roy Adaptation Model for the nursing process; utilize the model for organizing and analyzing assessment data; collect psychosocial,…

Walters, Norma J.

406

Capability of Using Clinical Care Classification System to Represent Nursing Practice in Acute Setting in Taiwan  

PubMed Central

This study examines the capability of the Clinical Care Classification (CCC) system to represent nursing record data in a medical center in Taiwan. Nursing care records were analyzed using the process of knowledge discovery in data sets. The study data set included all the nursing care plan records from December 1998 to October 2008, totaling 2,060,214 care plan documentation entries. Results show that 75.42% of the documented diagnosis terms could be mapped using the CCC system. A total of 21 established nursing diagnoses were recommended to be added into the CCC system. Results show that one-third of the assessment and care tasks were provided by nursing professionals. This study shows that the CCC system is useful for identifying patterns in nursing practices and can be used to construct a nursing database in the acute setting. PMID:24199066

Feng, Rung-Chuang; Tseng, Kuan-Jui; Yan, Hsiu-Fang; Huang, Hsiu-Ya; Chang, Polun

2012-01-01

407

Capability of using clinical care classification system to represent nursing practice in acute setting in taiwan.  

PubMed

This study examines the capability of the Clinical Care Classification (CCC) system to represent nursing record data in a medical center in Taiwan. Nursing care records were analyzed using the process of knowledge discovery in data sets. The study data set included all the nursing care plan records from December 1998 to October 2008, totaling 2,060,214 care plan documentation entries. Results show that 75.42% of the documented diagnosis terms could be mapped using the CCC system. A total of 21 established nursing diagnoses were recommended to be added into the CCC system. Results show that one-third of the assessment and care tasks were provided by nursing professionals. This study shows that the CCC system is useful for identifying patterns in nursing practices and can be used to construct a nursing database in the acute setting. PMID:24199066

Feng, Rung-Chuang; Tseng, Kuan-Jui; Yan, Hsiu-Fang; Huang, Hsiu-Ya; Chang, Polun

2012-01-01

408

Ontology based modeling and execution of Nursing Care Plans and Practice Guidelines.  

PubMed

Nursing Care Plans (NCP) and Nursing Clinical Practice Guidelines (NCPG) promote evidence-based patient care, but in their paper form they are difficult to be applied at the point-of-care. We present our approach to generate patient-specific nursing care plans by modeling and computerizing these nursing knowledge resources. We present a Nursing CarePlan Ontology (NCO) that models the NCP and NCPG to realize an integrated knowledge base for designing and executing patient-specific nursing CarePlans. We adapted METHONTOLOGY methodology for ontology engineering to develop our OWL-based NCO, and instantiated a set of NCP and NCPG. We have developed an execution engine that provides recommendations to nurses based on the patient's data. NCO was successfully evaluated for representational accuracy and completeness using a set of test NCP and NCPG. PMID:20841855

Din, Muzammil Abdulrehman; Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza; Jafarpour, Borna

2010-01-01

409

Improving client outcomes through differentiated practice: a rural nursing center model.  

PubMed

The TriCounty Community Health Center (the Center) was created in 1994 with federal grant monies to increase access and to provide outreach and primary health care services for rural residents. The Center employs a differentiated practice model of nursing care in which all nurses use the nursing process targeted to client systems that match the nurse's level of educational preparation and competence. The model allows nurses to intervene with various client systems, including the individual, family, aggregate, and community. Program outcomes for the Center suggest that using a differentiated nursing practice model for outreach and primary care services appears to have a positive impact on the health of individuals, families, and aggregates in rural settings, using the Omaha Classification System as a framework for evaluation. PMID:10388333

Anderko, L; Uscian, M; Robertson, J F

1999-06-01

410

Implementing evidence-based practice in Taiwanese nursing homes: attitudes and perceived barriers and facilitators.  

PubMed

To date, there is a paucity of research investigating nurses' perceptions of evidence-based practice (EBP) in nursing homes, especially in non-Western countries. This descriptive, quantitative study investigated attitudes toward and perceived barriers and facilitators to research utilization among 89 Taiwanese RNs. The majority of nurses expressed positive attitudes toward research and EBP. The most frequently cited barriers were related to insufficient authority to change practice, difficulty understanding statistical analyses, and a perceived isolation from knowledgeable colleagues with whom to discuss the research. EBP facilitators included improved access to computers and Internet facilities in the workplace, more effective research training, and collaboration with academic nurses. These findings are similar to those from research conducted in Western countries and indicate that further education and training in research for nurses working in nursing homes would be beneficial. PMID:20047246

Chang, Hui Chen; Russell, Cherry; Jones, Mairwen K

2010-01-01

411

A professional code of ethics provides guidance for genetic nursing practice.  

PubMed

While ethical quandaries and dilemmas are commonplace for nurses, recent advances in human genetics have and will continue to create new challenges and controversies. Throughout time, nursing has been an ethical endeavour, with nurses viewing the ethical mandates of their responsibilities on a par with other core dimensions of their professional life. The (American) profession's code of ethics, Code for nurses with interpretive statements, provides direction for practice and for the fulfillment of ethical obligations. The explication of these ethical norms and values that shape professional practice is necessary as nurses confront the integration of genetic services into health care. The goal of preserving professional integrity and ethical soundness in the context of genetic health care mandates that nurses rely on and act upon the profession's national and international codes of ethics. PMID:10986949

Scanlon, C

2000-05-01

412

Outcomes of intended home births in nurse-midwifery practice: a prospective descriptive study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To describe the outcomes of intended home birth in the practices of certified nurse-midwives.Methods: Twenty-nine US nurse-midwifery practices were recruited for the study in 1994. Women presenting for intended home birth in these practices were enrolled in the study from late 1994 to late 1995. Outcomes for all enrolled women were ascertained. Validity and reliability of submitted data were

Patricia Aikins Murphy; Judith Fullerton

1998-01-01

413

Environment: a perspective of the self-care deficit nursing theory.  

PubMed

In this column the author presents an examination of Orem's conceptualization of environment as a metaparadigm concept, the role of environment in the theoretical structure of the self-care deficit nursing theory, and the creation of a developmental environment as one of the ways of helping another. Suggestions for further work related to the conceptualization of environment and the organization of existent knowledge are provided. Application of the concept of nursing agency and the environmental factor of healthcare system illustrate the utility of self-care deficit nursing theory in relation to the recommendations for changes in nursing education and for redesign of the healthcare system. PMID:21471028

Banfield, Barbara E

2011-04-01

414

Documenting nursing practice by using ICNP on the Web.  

PubMed

This paper presents the design and implementation of an internet based nursing care planning system which helps nursing professionals and students to study ICNP beta 2 version and to create nursing diagnoses, interventions and outcomes by selecting relevant terms from ICNP. This advanced web-based ICNP browser enables the authentication of the user, and the creation of a type of nursing care plan through the use of ICNP. It provides different ways for creating nursing diagnoses, interventions and outcomes, by selecting relevant ICNP terms through the tree-structure view, index and search components of the tool. The created diagnoses, interventions and outcomes are stored to a secured database. The system provides to the user the facility to build and manage nursing care plans by using both the English and the translated Greek ICNP versions. The first results of the implementation of this internet based nursing care planning system are presented. PMID:14664087

Liaskos, Joseph; Mantas, John

2003-01-01

415

NASN membership survey: Developing and providing leadership to advance the school nursing practice.  

PubMed

The NASN membership is fairly consistent. The majority of NASN members are female; NASN members share a common interest in the specialty of school nursing. The majority of members are involved in one of the following areas: school nurse services, school nurse administration or supervision, and regional or state nurse consultant within the educational system. School nursing practice varies among survey participants; there are school nurses who have spent as little as one year specifically practicing school nursing and those who have spent as much as 36 years or more. Eighty-three percent (83%) of NASN members are employed by public school districts, salaries among members vary between $19,000 or less per year and $129,999 or more per year. NASN members serve students in different geographical areas; school nurses may care for students in urban, suburban, rural, reservations, and overseas (DOD, military) areas. Nonetheless, some school nurses may care for students in more than one geographical area. Twenty-eight percent (28%) of NASN members provide school nursing services to students in elementary school. Student-to-school nurse ratios vary among members; in some areas school nurses may care for 125 students or fewer to as many as 5,100 students or more. NASN members spend most of their time caring for episodic minor illness and injury (headache, pain, hay fever, pm medication, etc.), acute injury and illness, health screenings (vision, hearing, body mass index), and chronic health (case management, care plans, emergency plans, and 504). In addition, there is a consensus on the resources that would most allow school nurses to deliver safer care to their students to include assistance with administrative tasks, lowering student-to-school nurse ratios, and funding for projects. NASN members place a high priority in continuing education programs, especially in topics pertaining to direct student services, such as mental health, chronic health care, and acute illness. NASN members value the reading resources such as the electronic PMID:20645590

Monsalve, Lina

2010-07-01

416

Matriculation Plan Summary and Worksheet Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Program  

E-print Network

. Evidence-Based Practice I N651. Evidence-Based Practice II N652. Transforming the Nation's Health N653 Evidence-Based Practice II: Implementation and Evaluation N650 N655 Health Systems Transformation N402 #12Matriculation Plan Summary and Worksheet Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Program This document

Dolbow, John

417

The 2011 NASN Membership Survey: developing and providing leadership to advance school nursing practice.  

PubMed

In 2011, NASN conducted a needs assessment to identify and analyze member demographic trends and identify priorities for current members. Ninety-five percent of survey respondents were currently registered nurses, 1% were licensed practical nurses, 3% were advance practice registered nurses, and 1% had other types of licensure. School nurses ages ranged between 21 and 66+ years of age with the highest concentration of school nurses (63%) older than 51 years of age. Thirty-one percent of respondents were nationally certified through the National Board for the Certification of School Nurses. Eighty-three percent had a bachelor's degree or higher. Fifteen percent had a master's in nursing, and another 15% held a master's in another field. Nine percent of respondents had an associate's degree in nursing and 4% had a registered nurse diploma as their highest level of education. The typical NASN member is a female, registered nurse with a bachelor's degree who is over the age of 50. PMID:22720478

Bergren, Martha Dewey; Monsalve, Lina

2012-01-01

418

Nurses’ self-efficacy and practices relating to weight management of adult patients: a path analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Health professionals play a key role in the prevention and treatment of excess weight and obesity, but many have expressed a lack of confidence in their ability to manage obese patients with their delivery of weight-management care remaining limited. The specific mechanism underlying inadequate practices in professional weight management remains unclear. The primary purpose of this study was to examine a self-efficacy theory-based model in understanding Registered Nurses’ (RNs) professional performance relating to weight management. Methods A self-report questionnaire was developed based upon the hypothesized model and administered to a convenience sample of 588 RNs. Data were collected regarding socio-demographic variables, psychosocial variables (attitudes towards obese people, professional role identity, teamwork beliefs, perceived skills, perceived barriers and self-efficacy) and professional weight management practices. Structural equation modeling was conducted to identify correlations between the above variables and to test the goodness of fit of the proposed model. Results The survey response rate was 71.4% (n?=?420). The respondents reported a moderate level of weight management practices. Self-efficacy directly and positively predicted the weight management practices of the RNs (??=?0.36, p?practices. The final model constructed in this study demonstrated a good fit to the data [?2 (14) =13.90, p?=?0.46; GFI?=?0.99; AGFI?=?0.98; NNFI?=?1.00; CFI?=?1.00; RMSEA?=?0.00; AIC?=?57.90], accounting for 38.4% and 43.2% of the variance in weight management practices and self-efficacy, respectively. Conclusions Self-efficacy theory appears to be useful in understanding the weight management practices of RNs. Interventions targeting the enhancement of self-efficacy may be effective in promoting RNs’ professional performance in managing overweight and obese patients. PMID:24304903

2013-01-01

419

The attitudes, concerns, gloving practices and knowledge of nurses in a Taiwanese hospital regarding AIDS and HIV.  

PubMed

Many studies have documented nurses' attitudes and concerns regarding AIDS/HIV, but little is known about Taiwanese nurses. We documented attitudes, concerns, gloving practices and practical AIDS/HIV knowledge of 1090 nurses from one metropolitan hospital in Changhua City, Taiwan. The response rate was 80.9%. Both HIV and hepatitis contraction in the workplace was nurses' main concern. Two hundred and ten nurses (19.3%) were seriously considering leaving nursing because of fear of contracting AIDS/HIV. Virtually all nurses considered it their right to be informed of the presence of HIV-positive patients in their direct work area and many believed that HIV testing of patients should be mandatory. Practical AIDS/HIV knowledge was deficient. These Taiwanese nurses have concerns and fears that might be related to deficiencies in practical AIDS/HIV knowledge. Continuous educational programmes are recommended to alleviate these nurses' attitudes and concerns regarding AIDS/HIV. PMID:14764020

Juan, Chi-Wen; Siebers, Robert; Wu, Francis Fu-Sheng; Wu, Chia-Ju; Chang, Yu-Jun; Chao, Cindy

2004-02-01

420

Attitudes, beliefs, and practices of Sri Lankan nurses toward cancer pain management: an ethnographic study.  

PubMed

Cancer pain is a serious problem that requires specialized nursing knowledge. In the present ethnographic study, we sought to explore the experiences and cancer pain management practices of nurses working at a government hospital in Sri Lanka. Data were collected from October 2007 to January 2008, and were obtained by observing the nurses in a cancer ward, conducting semistructured interviews with 10 participants, and maintaining a research diary. To analyze the data, the data were coded, and an integrative process was implemented to develop categories. The results suggested that Sri Lankan nurses perform poor cancer pain management practices due to a lack of resources, a shortage of nurses, and poor workload allocation within the hospital. Additionally, the nurses are not autonomous, and are required to refer to medical staff for cancer pain management strategies. The nurses work in a task-oriented system that rarely acknowledges cancer patients' pain management needs. This study might improve nursing pain management practices for cancer patients and lead to changes in the curriculum of nursing courses in Sri Lanka. PMID:21902777

De Silva, Badurakada Sunil Santha; Rolls, Colleen

2011-12-01

421

The impact of the Georgia Health Sciences University nursing faculty practice on tobacco cessation rates.  

PubMed

Nursing faculty practice groups can play a vital role in tobacco cessation in academic medical centers. Outcomes from the Georgia Health Sciences University Nursing Faculty Practice Group Tobacco Cessation Program revealed 64% abstinence outcomes at the end of treatment (N = 160) over a 2-year period from the campus-wide tobacco-free policy initiation. A nurse-led, evidence-based, interdisciplinary approach can be an effective strategy to make a difference in the lives of tobacco-dependent individuals, while at the same time integrating practice with education and research. PMID:22289393

Heath, Janie; Inglett, Sandra; Young, Sara; Joshua, Thomas V; Sakievich, Nita; Hawkins, James; Andrews, Jeannette O; Tingen, Martha S

2012-03-01

422

Obtaining a Foundation for Nursing Care at the Time of Patient Admission: A Grounded Theory Study  

PubMed Central

The nursing process can be viewed as a problem-solving model, but we do not know whether use of the whole process including care plans with interventions based on nursing diagnoses improves nurses’ ability to carry out assessments. Therefore, the aim of this study was to illuminate and describe the assessment and decision-making process performed by nurses who formulated individual care plans including nursing diagnosis, goals and interventions or who used standardized care plans when a patient was admitted to their ward for care, and those who did not. Data collection and analysis were carried out by means of Grounded theory. Nurses were observed while assessing patients, after which they were interviewed. The main concern of all nurses was to obtain a foundation for nursing care based on four strategies; building pre-understanding, creating a caring environment, collecting information on symptoms and signs and performing an analysis from different perspectives. It appeared that the most important aspect for nurses who did not employ care plans was the medical reason for the patient’s admission. The nurses who employed care plans discussed their decisions in terms of nursing problems, needs and risks. The results indicate that nurses who formulated care plans were more aware of their professional role. PMID:19746207

Jansson, Inger; Pilhammar, Ewa; Forsberg, Anna

2009-01-01

423

The habilitation nursing of children with developmental disabilities--Beyond traditional nursing practices and principles?  

PubMed Central

Research-based descriptions of the contents of the habilitation nursing of children with developmental disabilities are lacking. The objective of this qualitative study was to describe the habilitation nursing of children with developmental disabilities in a Finnish children's neurological ward. In addition, the purpose was to outline the principles that directed the nursing functions (which consisted of various nursing interventions). The data collection included observation, a retrospective think-aloud method with video-taped nursing situations, the nursing records, and an open-ended questionnaire. The data were analysed with a qualitative content analysis of the manifest and latent content. The findings show that habilitation nursing in a children's neurological ward consists of assessing the child's skills, supporting the child's development, and collaborating with the child's immediate adults. When implementing those functions with nursing interventions, the nurses demonstrated four principles: client-originated and professional-originated principles, and individual-centred and community-centred principles. Becoming conscious of these principles and the theoretical frameworks behind them enables the development of a nursing science–based model for habilitation nursing. PMID:24656260

Olli, Johanna; Vehkakoski, Tanja

2014-01-01

424

The habilitation nursing of children with developmental disabilities--beyond traditional nursing practices and principles?  

PubMed

Research-based descriptions of the contents of the habilitation nursing of children with developmental disabilities are lacking. The objective of this qualitative study was to describe the habilitation nursing of children with developmental disabilities in a Finnish children's neurological ward. In addition, the purpose was to outline the principles that directed the nursing functions (which consisted of various nursing interventions). The data collection included observation, a retrospective think-aloud method with video-taped nursing situations, the nursing records, and an open-ended questionnaire. The data were analysed with a qualitative content analysis of the manifest and latent content. The findings show that habilitation nursing in a children's neurological ward consists of assessing the child's skills, supporting the child's development, and collaborating with the child's immediate adults. When implementing those functions with nursing interventions, the nurses demonstrated four principles: client-originated and professional-originated principles, and individual-centred and community-centred principles. Becoming conscious of these principles and the theoretical frameworks behind them enables the development of a nursing science-based model for habilitation nursing. PMID:24656260

Olli, Johanna; Vehkakoski, Tanja; Salanterä, Sanna

2014-01-01

425

Readiness for Evidence-Based Practice: Information Literacy Needs of Nurses in the United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper U.S. nurses' readiness to provide Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) as measured by their information literacy knowl- edge and skills is described. The Institute of Medicine directed health care providers to use EBP as a means to improve patient safety, efficiency and effectiveness of health care services. Infor- mation literacy has been identified as a nursing informatics competency for

Annelle Tanner; Susan Pierce; Diane Pravikoff

426

Clinical Procedure Page 1 of 2 Clinical Manual-Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

Clinical Procedure Page 1 of 2 Clinical Manual-Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROCEDURE FOR: Ambulatory Patient Summary and will minimally include: a. Known Medical Diagnoses/Conditions and date of diagnosis/occurrence b. Known Surgeries

Oliver, Douglas L.

427

Clinical Protocol Page 1 of 1 Clinical Manual Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

Clinical Protocol Page 1 of 1 Clinical Manual ­ Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROTOCOL FOR: Hypertension: Care of the Patient with POLICY: 1. Any patient admitted to the hospital with an admission diagnosis of hypertension

Oliver, Douglas L.

428

Clinical Protocol/Procedure Page 1 of 2 Clinical Manual -Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

Clinical Protocol/Procedure Page 1 of 2 Clinical Manual - Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROTOCOL/ PROCEDURE FOR orthopedic procedure, surgery or trauma, then every 4 hours for 24 hours, then every shift, or per specific

Oliver, Douglas L.

429

Influence of Perceptions on School Nurse Practices to Prevent Childhood Obesity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Comprehensive childhood obesity prevention (COP) strategies should include increasing school nurse involvement. This study was conducted to determine the influence of key school nurse perceptions (self-efficacy, perceived benefits, and perceived barriers) on participation in COP practices at the individual child and school level. Florida…

Quelly, Susan B.

2014-01-01

430

An Investigation of School Playground Safety Practices as Reported by School Nurses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to investigate school playground safety practices. The study used a purposeful sample of school nurses who attended a playground safety workshop at the 2006 National Association of School Nurses annual conference. Seventy-five questionnaires were distributed, and 64 useable questionnaires were returned. The responses…

Hudson, Susan D.; Olsen, Heather M.; Thompson, Donna

2008-01-01

431

Towards establishing the meaning of advanced practice nursing in a mental health care trust  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports on a study undertaken in one mental health NHS foundation trust in the UK, which sought to examine to what extent advanced practice nursing could contribute to advancing new ways of working in the future. The literature on advanced nursing in the UK is critically discussed and where availability permits, reference is made to international literature. The

Julia Halpin; Patricia Wain; Peter Nolan

2008-01-01

432

Clinical Procedure Page 1 of 1 Clinical Manual -Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

Clinical Procedure Page 1 of 1 Clinical Manual - Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROCEDURE FOR: Insulin, Regular U500: Use of PURPOSE: The purpose of this policy is to standardize prescribing and ensure safety measures

Oliver, Douglas L.

433

Clinical Procedure Page 1 of 2 Clinical Manual -Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

Clinical Procedure Page 1 of 2 Clinical Manual - Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROCEDURE FOR: Allergies: Identification of Patient Allergies POLICY: CLINICAL ASSESSMENT AND CARE/SAFETY: DOCUMENTATION CPOE UNITS: NON-CPOE UNITS: 1

Oliver, Douglas L.

434

Daily Practice Teams in Nursing Homes: Evidence From New York State  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Most health care organizations, including nursing homes, report having teams. However, little is known about everyday practice teams among staff providing direct resident care. We assess the prevalence of such teams in nursing homes as reported by direct care staff and administrators, and examine characteristics of facilities that foster…

Temkin-Greener, Helena; Cai, Shubing; Katz, Paul; Zhao, Hongwei; Mukamel, Dana B.

2009-01-01

435

Clinical Policy Page 1 of 1 Clinical Manual -Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

Clinical Policy Page 1 of 1 Clinical Manual - Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROCEDURE FOR: Oxygen Therapy: Oxygen by a licensed person. A written order must be obtained by the responsible MD/LIP once the patient has been

Oliver, Douglas L.

436

Academic Service-Learning Spotlight NUR 4638L -Nursing Situations in Practice: Community  

E-print Network

June 2012 Academic Service-Learning Spotlight NUR 4638L - Nursing Situations in Practice: Community. Everyone at Pathways would like to thank Professor Rebecca Koszalinski's Academic Service-Learning Nursing Service-Learning project consisted of the installation of a transportation system that facilitated

Fernandez, Eduardo

437

Geropsychiatric Nursing Practice in the United States: Present Trends and Future Directions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Demographic trends, diversification of geriatric health care service settings, and advances in education and science call for redefining the context and mission of geropsychiatric nursing (GPN) practice. The challenges of providing preventive, restorative, and palliative care for older adults who move across health care and residential settings demand that geropsychiatric nurses be theoretically well grounded, family centered, expert in multiple

Merrie J. Kaas; Elizabeth Beattie

2006-01-01

438

Survey of Current Academic Practices for Full-Time Postlicensure Nursing Faculty Who Teach Online  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine current academic practices of compensation, workload, rewards, and tenure and promotion for nursing faculty who teach graduate and postlicensure programs that are delivered 50% to 100% online. Deans and directors who are members of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) were the…

Hanford, Karen J.

2010-01-01

439

Nursing Systems Management (NSM) Degree Plan: Upon admission nursing students must meet with faculty and staff advisors to develop plan of progression. Successful completion of core courses in theory and research are essential to success in all MSN majors  

E-print Network

management in health care systems. Emphasis is on managing diversity in recruiting, interviewing, evaluating to the delivery of nursing and health care in various settings. Specialty Courses (18 SCH) 5300 Organizational, particularly cultural diversity, is integrated into management theory and practice. Organizational culture

Ward, Karen

440

Toward a Grounded Theory of Nursing Student Attrition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Attrition of students from a nursing program is a significant concern. It is even more critical now because there are not enough nurses to fill all open positions in the healthcare industry. It is predicted the shortage will worsen in the next decade as an aging society increases the number of people requiring nursing care. While increasing the…

Cook, Lenora

2010-01-01

441

Principles and practices of social entrepreneurship for nursing.  

PubMed

Although social justice and action for change are among the nursing profession's core values, curricular content on social entrepreneurship for nurses is not as well developed as it is in the educational programs for students in business, engineering, or public policy. This article describes an undergraduate honors elective course in social entrepreneurship offered at New York University College of Nursing. The course uses a seminar format and incorporates content from the humanities, business, and service-learning, with the goal of promoting participants' understanding of the sources of inequality in the United States and providing the requisite skills to promote effective nursing action for social change. PMID:24127177

Gilmartin, Mattia J

2013-11-01

442

[Taiwan occupational health nursing: practices, policies and future trends].  

PubMed

The steady evolution of domestic industries and the continued expansion of the workforce have outdated Taiwan's traditional model of occupational health nursing, which focuses on preventing work-related diseases and ensuring workplace safety. Professional-competency evaluations, now widely used within the medical and other professional communities to confirm that individuals have mastered relevant knowledge and skills, are a fixture in service quality management and related strategies. Occupational health nurses have a critical role in promoting and ensuring the quality of occupational-health related services. A multifaceted strategy is needed to update the domestic model of occupational health nursing. This strategy should include: 1) Set professional standards and create standard teaching materials for national occupational health nurses; 2) Enhance the professional efficacy of nurses in this field; 3) Survey the relevant role functions and education/training needs of occupational health nurses; 4) Develop relevant elective courses; and 5) Format courses/curricula for e-learning and for multimedia platforms. Furthermore, after implementation of this strategy, the model should be evaluated in terms of the knowledge and skills acquired by occupational health nurses. It is hoped that by reflecting local needs and experiences this new model will update the field of occupational health nursing to meet the needs of the current and future workplace in Taiwan and increase nursing knowledge and skills in order to foster and sustain healthy workplace environments. PMID:24899556

Chang, Pei-Jen

2014-06-01

443

Classroom to clinic: incorporating adolescent spiritual/faith assessment into nurse practitioner education & practice.  

PubMed

Although nursing is well grounded in the conceptualization of person as body-mind-spirit, there is little evidence that advanced practice nurses routinely address the spirit in giving patient care, especially with adolescents in the outpatient setting. The neglect of spiritual aspects of care may be related to lack of a framework, or education/incorporation into nurse practitioner preparation. This article describes one method of integrating adolescent spiritual/faith assessment into a nurse practitioner clinical course. Readings, assignments, and a grading rubric are offered. PMID:25296491

Haley, Janice M

2014-01-01

444

Developing students' time management skills in clinical settings: practical considerations for busy nursing staff.  

PubMed

In clinical settings, nursing staff often find themselves responsible for students who have varying time management skills. Nurses need to respond sensitively and appropriately, and to teach nursing students how to prioritize and better allocate time. This is important not only for developing students' clinical skills but also for shaping their perceptions about the quality of the placement and their willingness to consider it as a potential work specialty. In this column, some simple, practical strategies that nurses can use to assist students with improving their time management skills are identified. PMID:21627057

Cleary, Michelle; Horsfall, Jan

2011-06-01

445

Anglo-American nursing theory, individualism and mental health care: a social conflict perspective.  

PubMed

This paper uses social conflict theory to reconsider the relationship of American nursing theory and individualised mental health care in the UK. It is argued that nursing theory has developed within a context of 'American dream' individualism, and that this ideology may be problematic for some UK mental health nurses and service users whose values and beliefs are those of different socio-political traditions. The paper explores the historical background of Anglo-American nursing theory, and then uses conflict theory to generate challenging propositions about the culture bias and political instrumentality of individualised care in mental health settings. In so doing, it critiques the 'scientific' and 'liberal' preconceptions of individualised care which have dominated mental health care policy for over a decade. PMID:14670391

Leighton, Kevin

2004-01-01

446

Mentoring overseas nurses: barriers to effective and non-discriminatory mentoring practices.  

PubMed

In this article it is argued that there are barriers to effective and non-discriminatory practice when mentoring overseas nurses within the National Health Service (NHS) and the care home sector. These include a lack of awareness about how cultural differences affect mentoring and learning for overseas nurses during their period of supervised practice prior to registration with the UK Nursing and Midwifery Council. These barriers may demonstrate a lack of effective teaching of ethical practice in the context of cultural diversity in health care. This argument is supported by empirical data from a national study. Interviews were undertaken with 93 overseas nurses and 24 national and 13 local managers and mentors from six research sites involving UK health care employers in the NHS and independent sectors in different regions of the UK. The data collected showed that overseas nurses are discriminated against in their learning by poor mentoring practices; equally, from these data, it appears that mentors are ill-equipped by existing mentor preparation programmes to mentor overseas-trained nurses from culturally diverse backgrounds. Recommendations are made for improving mentoring programmes to address mentors' ability to facilitate learning in a culturally diverse workplace and thereby improve overseas nurses' experiences of their supervised practice. PMID:20801962

Allan, Helen

2010-09-01

447

Nurses' use of research in practice at three US Army hospitals.  

PubMed

Translation of research into clinical nursing practice has been extensively studied with nurses in civilian institutions. However, limited examination has been made of research utilization in US military facilities. A quantitative survey approach, using Estabrooks's adapted Research Utilization Survey and Mylle's Organizational Climate Survey, was employed to determine the extent that registered nurses in selected US Army Medical Treatment Facilities (MTFs) use research findings for their own practice and to describe the factors, both professional and organizational, that enhance or hinder research utilization. This study found that nurses at the MTFs reported using research in their practice less than half the time. Variables most significantly correlated with research utilization were belief suspension and attitudes toward research. The variable of support correlated significantly with all types of research utilization except indirect. Other organizational factors influencing nurses' use of research findings in practice were time, accessibility to research and a champion to assist their efforts. Interestingly, the number of years worked in nursing and in the facilities correlated inversely with research utilization, suggesting that over time, nurses may begin to rely on past experience rather than seek out new knowledge for practice. PMID:16372787

Kenny, Deborah J

2005-01-01

448

A comparative analysis of the changes in nursing practice related to health sector reform in five countries of the Americas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. To identify changes in nursing practice and the nursing-practice environment that have occurred with implementation of health sector reform in five countries in the Americas. Methods. An exploratory study of selected settings in Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Mex- ico, and the United States of America was conducted between 1997 and 1999 to collect narra- tive data from 125 professional nurses

Edilma B. Guevara; Elnora P. Mendias

2002-01-01

449

Entry into Nursing Practice. Presentations Made at the Spring 1979 Meeting of the Council on Collegiate Education for Nursing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication includes six papers presented at the 1979 meeting of the Council on Collegiate Education for Nursing. Specific presentations made were (1) Entry into Practice: History, Trends, and Issues, by Virginia Barker; (2) The Appropriate Preparation for Licensure Is the Associate Degree, by Virginia Allen; (3) The Appropriate Preparation…

Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

450

Competence of accelerated second degree students after studying in a collaborative model of nursing practice education.  

PubMed

The article, "CAN-Care: An Innovative Model of Practice-Based Learning" was published in the International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship in 2006 (Article 20). Reported in this paper are the findings of a program evaluation study with 58 participants who completed a survey questionnaire at the end of the program of study and six-months post graduation. The data reveal that the model resulted in graduates who perceived themselves to be competent and effectively prepared for real-world nursing practice. This is contrary to the existing literature which reports graduates' perceived lack of readiness for RN practice. The participants in this study also identified the opportunity to work with a consistent unit-based nurse and having the nursing practice course experiences on consecutive days and for the entire 12-hour shift as significant factors in the effectiveness of their learning experience. PMID:19725804

Raines, Deborah A

2009-01-01

451

Cognitive behavioural therapy for clients with schizophrenia: implications for mental health nursing practice.  

PubMed

1. This paper discusses the application of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) in the treatment of clients with schizophrenia and the implications for mental health nursing practice. 2. The literature shows that CBT has positive effects for clients in improving mental state and reducing relapse rate. 3. Because of their direct client contact, mental health nurses are in the best position to assess, address and manage clients' psychotic symptoms and problems. 4. A nursing care plan is used to illustrate how the principles of CBT could be incorporated into nursing care. 5. Education and training are important to equip nurses with the necessary knowledge and skills to implement the therapy. 6. Nurses have to take into account cultural issues related to the use of CBT. 7. Culturally sensitive research needs to be conducted to assess the outcome of the therapy. PMID:11903721

Chan, Sally Wai-Chi; Leung, Jessie Ka-Yi

2002-03-01

452

Practicing in a university hospital. Perioperative nurses focus on patient care in a teaching setting.  

PubMed

The contributions to this article show that the perioperative nurse has become a knowledgeable highly skilled practitioner. Nurses with different backgrounds, nationalities, educational preparation, and professional experience show that the outcome--excellent patient care--is more important than the process. Since the individual perioperative practitioner has implemented the nursing process, perioperative nursing care of patients has improved. The primary lesson that the UCIMC administrators learned was that there are many ways to accomplish goals. Administrators commended the perioperative nurses for their knowledge, risk taking, input and assessments related to problems and decisions, and for accepting challenges with enthusiasm and vigor. The administrators also learned that they need to be facilitating supporters more than supervisors in the OR. This creates an appropriate environment for effective practice. In this manner, the perioperative nurse can achieve both personal and professional satisfaction. PMID:2712556

Ruof, S M; Zeller, P A; Vidauretta, I; Lee, H J; Holscher, A; Lathrop, R; Garcia, O

1989-04-01

453

[Nursing care for patients undergoing pharmacological stress echocardiography: implications for clinical practice].  

PubMed

The study aim was both to identify signs and symptoms previous to and during the pharmacological stress echocardiography test and to describe the nurse's role and nursing care principles for this exam. This is a descriptive study, carried out in cardiac care unit in a University Hospital in Porto Alegre, RS. Two hundred forty-six records of patients submitted to stress echocardiography were retrospectively reviewed, according to four different pharmacological schedules. The statistical comparison showed that signs and symptoms were related to the type of drug used during the exam, namely: typical angina, precordial ache, tiredness, headache and premature complexes. These results enabled a better understanding of pharmacological stress echocardiography and the instrumentalization of nurses in order to plan individualized and qualified nursing care assistance. Aside from helping develop nursing practices for the pharmacological stress echocardiography test this knowledge could also be used by nurses who carry out their activities in institutions that use this diagnostic method. PMID:23155576

de Goes, Marta Georgina Oliveira; Lautert, Liana; Lucena, Amália Fátima

2012-06-01

454

Nurse manager support: what is it? Structures and practices that promote it.  

PubMed

Professional nursing organizations identify nurse manager (NM) support of staff nurses as an essential component of a productive, healthy work environment. Role behaviors that constitute this support must be identified by staff nurses. In this mixed-method study, supportive role behaviors were identified by 2382 staff nurses who completed the investigator-developed Nurse Manager Support Scale. In addition, semistructured interviews were conducted with 446 staff nurses, managers, and physicians from 101 clinical units in 8 Magnet hospitals in which staff nurses had previously confirmed excellent nurse manager support. Through individual and focus group interviews with NM and chief nurse executives in the 8 participating hospitals, the organizational structures and practices that enabled NM to be supportive to staff were determined. The 9 most supportive role behaviors cited by interviewees were as follows: is approachable and safe, cares, "walks the talk," motivates development of self-confidence, gives genuine feedback, provides adequate and competent staffing, "watches our back," promotes group cohesion and teamwork, and resolves conflicts constructively. Supporting structures and programs identified by managers and leaders include the following: "support from the top," peer group support, educational programs and training sessions, a "lived" culture, secretarial or administrative assistant support, private office space, and computer classes and seminars. PMID:17909432

Kramer, Marlene; Maguire, Patricia; Schmalenberg, Claudia; Brewer, Barbara; Burke, Rebecca; Chmielewski, Linda; Cox, Karen; Kishner, Janice; Krugman, Mary; Meeks-Sjostrom, Diana; Waldo, Mary

2007-01-01

455

Exploring decision making in intellectual disability nursing practice: a qualitative study.  

PubMed

Due to the dearth of relevant research, intellectual disability nurses may have difficulty identifying sources of evidence on which they can base their clinical decisions. The aim of the present research was to explore how intellectual disability nurses make decisions and how their decisions are influenced by evidence. The method was guided by interpretative phenomenology and the analysis adopted an idiographic approach. Twelve National Health Service intellectual disability nurses in Wales participated in semi-structured interviews. Four key themes were identified: getting to know the person; working as a team; evidence to support decision making; and understanding of evidence-based practice. In the context of the myriad of other professionals involved in caregiving, the nurses conveyed a commitment towards ensuring that the person with intellectual disability is at the centre of decision making. Although using empirical evidence to support practice was acknowledged, these nurses considered person centred decision making to be paramount. PMID:21062857

Williams, Ruth W; Roberts, Gwerfyl W; Irvine, Fiona E; Hastings, Richard P

2010-09-01