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1

A case for nursing theory in practice.  

PubMed

The discipline of nursing is on a slippery slope with regard to the ever increasing lack of nursing theory in its work. The misguided attempt to eliminate the use of nursing theory as the underpinning of practice is degrading nursing as a viable profession, ultimately affecting patient care. A clarion call to the discipline regarding the need for theory in research and practice is required. Nursing will soon become just another set of tasks rather than the profession needed by patients and their families. PMID:24740945

Karnick, Paula M

2014-04-01

2

Needed: Nurse Engineers to Link Theory and Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article explores the potential benefits that a new breed of nurse, the nurse engineer, can bring to the problem of clarifying the interrelationships among the three major foundation stones of nursing: theory, practice, and research. Potential roles of the nurse engineer are examined. (CT)

Harrell, Joanne S.

1986-01-01

3

Critical theory as a framework for academic nursing practice.  

PubMed

In academic centers of nursing, faculty or academic practice has become more widespread and integrated into the expectations and criteria for appointment and promotion. Yet, the concept of academic practice is not fully embraced among all schools of nursing. Numerous models of academic nursing practice have evolved and vary widely according to the clinical site, the roles of the practitioners, and the systems for generating revenue. Although most models are related to the mission statements of the schools of nursing, few seem to be based on a distinct philosophy of practice. In this article, a consideration of critical theory that provides a framework for practice-based nursing education is presented. By applying the philosophical underpinnings and assumptions of practice that are guided by critical theory, educators may begin to better identify the values of academic nursing practice and incorporate this activity more fully into the educational environment. PMID:24708051

Swartz, Martha K

2014-05-01

4

A Self-Care Practice Theory of Nursing the Elderly.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a practice theory of nursing for the elderly which focuses on maintaining the maximum amount of independence of elderly patients through a nursing focus on the full range of human functional abilities. Interrelates varied health related characteristics and requirements of the elderly with theoretical components of self-care nursing

Sullivan, Toni J.; Munroe, Donna J.

1986-01-01

5

Nurse triage in theory and in practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

'Nurse Triage' refers to the formal process of early assessment of patients attending an accident and emergency (A&E) department by a trained nurse, to ensure that they receive appropriate attention, in a suitable location, with the requisite degree of urgency. The benefits claimed for nurse triage include better patient outcomes, through clinical management reaching those in greatest need of it

S George; S Read; L Westlake; B Williams; P Pritty; A Fraser-Moodie

1993-01-01

6

Empowerment in School Nursing Practice: A Grounded Theory Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Professional empowerment is vital to nurses' productivity and job satisfaction. A grounded theory study was conducted to describe the basic social process experienced by school nurses in relation to professional empowerment. Interviews with 10 school nurses led to the development of a situation-specific theory of school nurse empowerment, "Making…

Broussard, Lisa

2007-01-01

7

Performance-related Pay in Nursing : Theory, Practice and Prospect  

Microsoft Academic Search

Examines the introduction of PRP into occupations like nursing. Essentially a literature review, examines the theoretical case for and practical problems of PRP in its “natural setting” in the private sector and highlights the issues of performance measurement, motivation and control in nursing. Generally concludes that any attempt to force individualized PRP into nursing that does not recognize the contingencies

Graeme Martin

1994-01-01

8

Practical ethical theory for nurses responding to complexity in care.  

PubMed

In the context of health care system complexity, nurses need responsive leadership and organizational support to maintain intrinsic motivation, moral sensitivity and a caring stance in the delivery of patient care. The current complexity of nurses' work environment promotes decreases in work motivation and moral satisfaction, thus creating motivational and ethical dissonance in practice. These and other work-related factors increase emotional stress and burnout for nurses, prompting both new and seasoned nurse professionals to leave their current position, or even the profession. This article presents a theoretical conceptual model for professional nurses to review and make sense of the ethical reasoning skills needed to maintain a caring stance in relation to the competing values that must coexist among nurses, health care administrators, patients and families in the context of the complex health care work environments in which nurses are expected to practice. A model, Nurses' Ethical Reasoning Skills, is presented as a framework for nurses' thinking through and problem solving ethical issues in clinical practice in the context of complexity in health care. PMID:20444776

Fairchild, Roseanne Moody

2010-05-01

9

Nursing Theory in Perspective.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Problems with nursing theory include a gap between theory and practice, theory as ideology, theory's inability to reflect reality, and theory as a limiting force. Models of diversity may make theory a more useful tool. (SK)

Koziol-McLain, Jane; Maeve, M. Katherine

1993-01-01

10

Preparation for Advanced Nursing Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Lehman College's graduate nursing program uses theory-based courses to prepare advanced nurse practitioners. Students increase scholarly inquiry skills and clinical decision making; use of nursing conceptual models helped them plan and evaluate their practice. (SK)

Frik, Seigina M.; Pollock, Susan E.

1993-01-01

11

Toward Inclusionary Practices in the Education of Nurses: A Critique of Transcultural Nursing Theory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes ongoing research engaged in an antiracist critique of transcultural nursing theory (TCN). TCN's core theme of cultural sensitivity organizes and reproduces White racial identity as a dominant but invisible presence in nursing texts. The research will test an instrument that supports nursing faculty and students in examining…

Gustafson, Diana L.

1999-01-01

12

[Nursing concepts and theories].  

PubMed

The theory framework of nursing science is built in a dynamic process that arises from practice and is reproduced through research, mainly by analysis and development of concepts and theories. This study presents a theory reflection on nursing knowledge construction and points out subsidies for future studies in the area. The interrelation among theory, research, and clinical practice is required for continuous development of nursing as a profession and science. Ideally, the practice must be based on theory that is validated by research. Therefore, theory, research, and practice affect each other reciprocally and continuously. PMID:24676120

Bousso, Regina Szylit; Poles, Kátia; da Cruz, Diná de Almeida Lopes Monteiro

2014-02-01

13

The gift of true presence: a nursing story where theory and practice meet.  

PubMed

Nursing theories have long existed to guide nursing practice but, in reality, can be challenging to achieve. In this paper the application of Parse's theory on Human Becoming is seen through a nurse's experience with an oncology patient and her family. Her reflection highlights how the concepts and paradoxes of the theory can meet practice. An attitude of true presence enables the nurse to provide quality patient-centred care. Over a period of a year the focus evolves from the perspective of the patient's illness to that of life outside the illness. During that transition, new light is shed on the situation whereby the ultimate meaning changes and transformation occurs for the nurse, the patient and her family. PMID:23362661

Palmieri, Gesua; Kiteley, Cathy

2012-01-01

14

PHD IN NURSING SAMPLE FULL-TIME PROGRAM Student with an interest in Symptom Management in Adults; Theory & Practice Emphasis  

E-print Network

PHD IN NURSING SAMPLE FULL-TIME PROGRAM Student with an interest in Symptom Management in Adults Practice Nursing Theory: Adults and Older Adults 3 N703 Health Care & Public Policy 3 N815 Knowledge Development in Nursing 3 N803 Advanced Quantitative Design & Methods 3 N816 Proseminar in Nursing Research 1

Sheridan, Jennifer

15

Minding the gap: some theory-practice disjunctions in nursing education research.  

PubMed

Nursing and nurse education are currently experiencing 'turbulence' as a result of the rapid, unpredictable and often divergent forces in the macro- and micro-institutional settings. Research-based knowledge seeks to 'smooth-over' this 'turbulence', which the literature cites as 'gaps' between the rhetorical ideals and practical realities. This paper deconstructs three influential ENB-sponsored research projects. It is argued that these research reports introduce forms of 'Utopianism', reinserting theory-practice gaps they sought to close down. Finally, as a result of the idealism revealed by the deconstruction, five key issues for future development in nursing research are discussed. These issues are of significance to educationalists since educational policy and practice in nursing are often developed from research findings. PMID:11148839

Stark, S; Cooke, P; Stronach, I

2000-02-01

16

Student Assessment System. Domain Referenced Tests. Allied Health Occupations/Practical Nursing. Volume II: Theory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These written domain referenced tests (DRTs) for the area of allied health occupations/practical nursing test cognitive abilities or knowledge of theory. Introductory materials describe domain referenced testing and test development. Each multiple choice test includes a domain statement, describing the behavior and content of the domain, and a…

Campbell, Gene, Comp.; Simpson, Bruce, Comp.

17

A nursing theory for nursing leadership.  

PubMed

For many years nursing practice has found its foundations in nursing theory. A review of theorists such as D. E. Orem, C. Roy, B. Neumen, V. Henderson, M. E. Rogers and others reveals a focus on the management of patient care, not leadership. This has provided most nurses with a solid foundation in 'management', but little in terms of 'leadership.' In more recent years, theories such as the Deming Management Method, Managers as Developer Model, Shared Governance and Transactional Leadership have been introduced, none of which are nursing theories. This article discusses the conceptualized differences between management and leadership theory arguing that there is a difference between 'leadership and management'. A leadership theory is proposed utilizing Ida J. Orlando's model for nursing. This theory provides a nursing foundation for nursing leaders to utilize both in the management of patient care and in leadership. PMID:11051964

Laurent, C L

2000-03-01

18

Nursing Education and Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Three issues directly influence the relationship between nurses and physicians: the nature of nursing practice, the education of registered nurses, and the American Medical Association proposal for registered care technicians. Nursing education programs should focus their programs and objectives so as to prepare their graduates for different…

Lindeman, Carol A.

1989-01-01

19

Nursing Practice Instructors Faculty of Nursing  

E-print Network

Nursing Practice Instructors Faculty of Nursing The University of Calgary Faculty of Nursing is seeking applications for limited term Nursing Practice Instructors. We are seeking applicants with broad campus. For detailed information on these exciting opportunities please follow the link at http://nursing

Habib, Ayman

20

An evaluation of problem-based learning in a nursing theory and practice module  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interest in Problem-Based Learning (PBL) within nurse education has increased internationally in recent years. The expectations of this teaching\\/learning strategy are that it will enable nurses to develop skills required for professional practice including: enquiry, reasoning, interpersonal and lifelong learning skills. However, to date, there is little empirical evidence within nursing literature to support such expectations.This study evaluated the reiterative

Elizabeth J Barrow; Geraldine Lyte; Tony Butterworth

2002-01-01

21

Keeping vigil over the profession: a grounded theory of the context of nurse anaesthesia practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Nurse anaesthetists in the US have faced continued, repeated challenges to their profession. Regardless, they have met these challenges and have established themselves as major anaesthesia care providers. In this paper we address the research question: How do certified registered nurse anaesthetists (CRNAs) manage the socio-political context in which they provide care for their patients? METHODS: Grounded theory was

Rita S Schreiber; Marjorie A MacDonald

2010-01-01

22

Theory before practice: implicit assumptions about clinical nursing education in Australia as revealed through a shared critical reflection.  

PubMed

The transfer of nursing education into the higher education sector occurred over a 10-year period in Australia (1985-1994). Australian nurse leaders settled on a single outcome measure to be applied for all nursing graduates in the form of national competency standards. While this move enabled diversity, the lack of consistency in curriculum design has subsequently led to increasing confusion for clinicians who support students' learning in clinical placements. Using a shared critical reflection method, the authors reviewed (1) the evaluation comments from nurses in one nursing unit of a hospital in one Australian jurisdiction and (2) an historical review of nursing literature at the time of the transfer of nursing education into the higher education sector. The reflection suggests that the aim of the transfer, to create critical thinking graduates, has been undermined by the implicit clinical education practices that have since emerged. In order to address the contemporary challenges for clinical staff working with students from multiple universities, as well as increased student numbers to address the nursing shortage, we recommend a new approach to curriculum design: a national clinical curriculum drawn from social, as well as cognitive, learning theory that at once informs clinicians of students' potential abilities and provides the scope to accommodate the increasingly difficult and critical learning requirements of tertiary-based nursing students. PMID:21955266

Grealish, Laurie; Smale, Lacey Anne

2011-08-01

23

[Applying the human dignity ideals of Confucianism and Kant to psychiatric nursing: from theory to practice].  

PubMed

Literature articles and clinical observation suggest disease and environmental factors as primary causes of the low self-esteem and stigmatization that typify most psychiatric patients. These patients are at risk of injury when subjected to inappropriate physical restraint. Hospital staffs, including nurses, are in immediate and close contact with psychiatric patients. Mencius's and Kant's thoughts on human dignity can enhance reflections on clinical nursing practices. Mencius's belief that preserving life is not the most desirable thing and death is not the most hated thing can help nurses realize the human dignity of psychiatric patients by understanding that, as an unrighteous act is more detestable than death, the meaning and value of righteousness are greater than life itself. In light of Kant's views on human dignity, nurses should treat patients as goals rather than means. Exploring such ideas can raise nursing quality, restore a positive sense of humanity to psychiatric patients, and develop nursing values and meaning to a higher plane. PMID:22469899

Lee, Mei-Hsiu; Lee, Shui-Chuen; Lee, Shu-Chen

2012-04-01

24

Moral accountability and integrity in nursing practice.  

PubMed

The therapeutic nature of the nurse-patient relationship is grounded in an ethic of caring. Florence Nightingale envisioned nursing as an art and a science...a blending of humanistic, caring presence with evidence-based knowledge and exquisite skill. In this article, the author explores the caring practice of nursing as a framework for understanding moral accountability and integrity in practice. Being morally accountable and responsible for one's judgment and actions is central to the nurse's role as a moral agent. Nurses who practice with moral integrity possess a strong sense of themselves and act in ways consistent with what they understand is the right thing to do. A review of the literature related to caring theory, the concepts of moral accountability and integrity, and the documents that speak of these values and concepts in professional practice (eg, Code of Ethics for Nurses with Interpretive Statements, Nursing's Social Policy Statement) are presented in this article. PMID:19850179

LaSala, Cynthia Ann

2009-12-01

25

Master of Nursing and Doctor of Nursing Practice Degrees in Advanced Practice Nursing & Health  

E-print Network

Master of Nursing and Doctor of Nursing Practice Degrees in Advanced Practice Nursing & Health Systems and Organizational Leadership For the love of practice #12;An advanced practice registered nurse nurses is that a significant component of the education and practice focuses on direct care

Chapman, Michael S.

26

Examination of the teaching styles of nursing professional development specialists, part I: best practices in adult learning theory, curriculum development, and knowledge transfer.  

PubMed

The American Nurses Association advocates for nursing professional development (NPD) specialists to have an earned graduate degree, as well as educational and clinical expertise. However, many NPD specialists have limited exposure to adult learning theory. Limited exposure to adult learning theory may affect NPD educational practices, learning outcomes, organizational knowledge transfer, and subsequently, the professional development of the nurses they serve and quality of nursing care. An examination of current teaching practices may reveal opportunities for NPD specialists to enhance educational methods to promote learning, learning transfer, and organizational knowledge and excellence. This article, the first in a two-part series, examines best practices of adult learning theories, nursing professional development, curriculum design, and knowledge transfer. Part II details the results of a correlational study that examined the effects of four variables on the use of adult learning theory to guide curriculum development for NPD specialists in hospitals. PMID:24779716

Curran, Mary K

2014-05-01

27

Holistic nursing as a specialty: holistic nursing - scope and standards of practice.  

PubMed

This article describes the Holistic Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice. It defines holistic nursing, its five core values, and its practice standards. These include holistic philosophy, theory, and ethics; holistic caring process; holistic communication, therapeutic environment, and cultural diversity; holistic education and research; and holistic nurse self-care. Educational preparation for holistic nursing and settings in which holistic nurses practice are also explored. PMID:17544677

Mariano, Carla

2007-06-01

28

Development of Gerontological Nursing Theory. Applying the Man-Living-Health Theory of Nursing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes Rosemary Rizzo Parse's Man-Living-Health theory that was used to describe how gerontological nursing knowledge could be developed through a nursing conceptual model that includes a defined practice and research methodology. (Author/JOW)

Heine, Christine

1991-01-01

29

LSUHSC School of Nursing Doctor of Nursing Practice  

E-print Network

LSUHSC School of Nursing Doctor of Nursing Practice Fall 2012 The LSUHSC School of Nursing announces the Inaugural Class of the Doctor of Nursing Practice Students DNP Open House DNP Open House If you are a post-master's Family or Neonatal Nurse Practitioner, Nursing Administrator, CNS in Adult

30

Web learning in post registration nurse education: application and theory. A practical experience of combining humanistic, educational and technological considerations  

Microsoft Academic Search

As healthcare becomes more knowledge intensive, nurses are challenged to effectively manage clinical information and keep abreast of professional knowledge (Procter 2001; Snyder – Halpern et al 2001; Pare & Elam 1998). Rapid proliferation of new knowledge, expanding professional practice expectations and changing practice environments require that nurses become lifelong learners capable of constantly reflecting on and modifying their practice.

Paul Linsley; John Hurley

2003-01-01

31

Nursing Theory across Curricula: A Status Report from Midwest Nursing Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An informal survey with 51 respondents from Midwest nursing schools found great consistency in teaching about nursing theory at the baccalaureate and doctoral levels. Only 34% of baccalaureate programs required nursing theory. Faculty with nursing doctorates tended to emphasize theory-practice linkages in undergraduate teaching. (Contains 27…

Algase, Donna L.; Newton, Sarah E.; Higgins, Patricia A.

2001-01-01

32

The Journal of Doctoral Nursing Practice  

E-print Network

of practice, standards and competencies for the advanced practice nurse, ICN regulation series. GenevaThe Journal of Doctoral Nursing Practice CSRClinical Scholars Review www practice, A Nurse Practitioner / Advanced Practice Nurse is a registered nurse who has acquired the expert

Grishok, Alla

33

Handbook of clinical nursing practice  

SciTech Connect

Written in outline format, this reference will help nurses further their understanding of advanced nursing procedures. Information is provided on the physiological, psychological, environmental, and safety considerations of nursing activities associated with diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Special consideration is given to the areas of pediatric nursing, nursing assessment, and selected radiologic and nuclear medicine procedures for each system. Contents: Clinical Introduction. Clinical Nursing Practice: Focus on Basics. Focus on Cardiovascular Function. Focus on Respiratory Function. Focus on Gastrointestinal Function. Focus on Renal and Genito-Urological Function. Focus on Neuro-Skeletal and Muscular Function. Appendices.

Asheervath, J.; Blevins, D.R.

1986-01-01

34

Mentoring Practices Benefiting Pediatric Nurses.  

PubMed

Previous studies examining predictors of pediatric nurse protégé mentoring benefits demonstrated that protégé perception of quality was the single best predictor of mentoring benefits. The ability to identify the mentoring practices that predict specific benefits for individual nurses provides a better understanding of how mentoring relationships can be leveraged within health care organizations promoting mutual mentoring benefits. This descriptive correlational, non-experimental study of nurses at a northeast Ohio, Magnet® recognized, free-standing pediatric hospital advances nursing science by demonstrating how mentoring practices benefit pediatric nurse protégés. PMID:25128577

Weese, Meghan M; Jakubik, Louise D; Eliades, Aris B; Huth, Jennifer J

2014-07-31

35

Nursing Home Work Practices and Nursing Assistants' Job Satisfaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: To estimate the impact of nursing home work practices, specifically compensation and working conditions, on job satisfaction of nursing assistants employed in nursing homes. Design and Methods: Data are from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey, responses by the nursing assistants' employers to the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey,…

Bishop, Christine E.; Squillace, Marie R.; Meagher, Jennifer; Anderson, Wayne L.; Wiener, Joshua M.

2009-01-01

36

Using Nursing Languages in School Nursing Practice. Second Edition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this updated manual is to define and describe standardized nursing languages, highlight how nursing languages are a part of the nursing process, and illustrate through case examples how nursing languages are used in school nursing practice. This manual also summarizes the history and development of three nursing classifications, the…

Denehy, Janice

2010-01-01

37

School Nursing Practice: Roles and Standards.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is an application of the American Nurses' Association's (ANA's) "Standards of Clinical Nursing Practice" (1991) to the specialty of school nursing. It identifies specialty standards of practice for the school nurse subsumed under the standards of clinical practice which apply to all nurses. Chapter One focuses on the ANA standards…

Proctor, Susan Tonskemper; And Others

38

Demonstrating Theory in Practice: Examples of the McGill Model of Nursing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A workshop on the McGill Model of Nursing, which depicts nurses' role in developing and maintaining family health, was attended by 147 nurses. Increases in self-efficacy, behavior, and performance related to implementing the model were evident 6 months after the workshop. (SK)

Gaudine, Alice P.

2001-01-01

39

Educating Advanced Practice Nurses for Practice Reality.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explains why content related to role acquisition and transition is critical in preparing advanced practice nurses. Recommends teaching strategies and timing and placement options for role content in graduate education. (Contains 26 references.) (SK)

Hamric, Ann B.; Hanson, Charlene M.

2003-01-01

40

Professional practice skills for nurses.  

PubMed

Nurses work in a healthcare system in which different partners in care have different expectations of them. Demands to provide compassionate care that is patient-centred and responsive while adhering to budget constraints are contributing to 'compassion fatigue' and adversely affecting nurses' mood and effectiveness. This article discusses how an understanding of professional practice skills, communication skills and teamwork can help nurses to cope with these conflicting demands and compassion fatigue while performing their professional roles and responsibilities. This approach is discussed in the context of nursing discourse and related professional and government recommendations. PMID:25182923

Groves, Winnifred

2014-09-01

41

Nurses' understanding of physical science in nursing practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

When science educators teach nurses, their primary aim should be to help them to developunderstanding of their world of nursing. From a study of registered nurses' conceptions of the physical science underlying their clinical practice, we assert that nurses' understanding of the physical sciences is inadequate in terms of the competencies required of them as nurses. Rather than respond to

Lesley M. Wilkes; Judith E. Batts

1998-01-01

42

Doctor of Nursing Practice Ph.D. in Nursing Focus Nursing Practice Nursing Research  

E-print Network

, and Advanced Specialty Practice Trajectories of Chronic Illness and Care Systems Core Courses Evidence Based with the tools and skills necessary to translate evidence gained through nursing research into practice, improve Focus Translation of evidence to practice, Transformation of health care, Health care leadership

Zhou, Pei

43

Nursing Practice Environment and Outcomes for Oncology Nursing  

PubMed Central

Background It is commonly assumed that oncology nurses experience high job-related burnout and high turnover because their work involves inherent stressors such as caring for patients with serious and often life-threatening illness. Objectives The objectives of this study were to examine the differences in outcomes such as job dissatisfaction and burnout between oncology nurses and medical-surgical nurses, and to identify factors that affect oncology nurse outcomes. Methods A secondary analysis of nurse survey data collected in 2006 including 4047 nurses from 282 hospitals in 3 states was performed; t test and ?2 test compared differences between oncology nurses and medical-surgical nurses in nurse outcomes and their assessments of nurse practice environment, as measured by the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index. Logistic regression models estimated the effect of nurse practice environment on 4 nurse-reported outcomes: burnout, job dissatisfaction, intention to leave the current position, and perceived quality of care. Results Oncology nurses reported favorable practice environments and better outcomes than did medical-surgical nurses. All 4 subscales of the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index studied were significantly associated with outcomes. Specifically, nurses who reported favorable nursing foundations for quality of care (eg, active in-service or preceptorship programs) were less likely to report burnout and leave their current position. Conclusions Better practice environments, including nurse foundations for quality care, can help to achieve optimal nurse outcomes. Implications for Practice Improving hospital practice environments holds significant potential to improve nurse well-being, retention, and quality of care. Specifically, hospitals should consider preceptor programs and continuing education and increase nurses’ participation in hospital decision making. PMID:22751101

Shang, Jingjing; Friese, Christopher R.; Wu, Evan; Aiken, Linda H.

2012-01-01

44

Nursing theory: everything the artist spits is art?  

PubMed

This paper explores the concept and utility of nursing theory in and for the practice of nursing. Working from the premise that many nurse practitioners appear uncertain as to the value of theory in relation to their everyday working experience, the paper investigates the contribution nursing theory makes in terms of sustaining and developing nursing as a practice discipline. The fact that nursing theory remains at once poorly evaluated, articulated or understood appears to be compounded by a general perception of nurse theorists as being removed from the realities of the practice setting and by the confusion precipitated, not least, by the semantic ambiguity engendered by their writings. The paper reviews the complex relationships extant between the development of nursing theory in regard to its utility for nursing practice, and concludes by suggesting a practice-led perspective by which nursing theory may be better articulated and assimilated within the discipline. In order to facilitate the study, it has been necessary to investigate the historical, theoretical and philosophical imperatives pertaining not only to the development of nursing theory but to nursing research and nursing practice per se. PMID:8732533

Timpson, J

1996-05-01

45

Doctoral education for WOC nurses considering advanced practice nursing.  

PubMed

Advanced practice nursing education is at a crossroads. Societal changes, increased health care demands, and leadership nursing organizations have identified the need of a doctor of nursing practice (DNP) degree as the advanced practice degree. WOC nurses need to examine DNP programs when considering returning for an advanced practice degree. This article explores nursing education at the doctorate level and areas the WOC nurse should consider when making a decision about attending a program. The WOC nurse needs to understand the similarities and differences of the doctor of philosophy and the DNP, issues about each program and its completion, personal factors, and the application process. Although selecting a doctoral program is a daunting experience, the education will provide opportunities for the WOC nurse to excel as a scholar, thus influencing the profession and the practice. PMID:22572897

Pieper, Barbara; Colwell, Janice

2012-01-01

46

A Critical Feminist Perspective of the Health Belief Model: Implications for Nursing Theory, Research, Practice, and Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Most nursing research is based on empiricism or logical positivism; the social behaviorist approach of the Health Belief Model does little to promote awareness or examine power issues. A critical feminist perspective aids understanding of health practices based on contextual knowledge and a holistic approach. (JOW)

Thomas, Linda W.

1995-01-01

47

The Journal of Doctoral Nursing Practice  

E-print Network

-reviewed publication focused on clinical excellence in the application of evidence-based practice of doctoral nursing College of Nursing Practice Evidence H. Michael Dreher, PhD, RN Associate Professor, DepartmentThe Journal of Doctoral Nursing Practice CSRClinical Scholars Review www

Grishok, Alla

48

Development of Clinical Practice Standards for Nurses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nursing, with leadership from the American Nurses Association (ANA), has a long-standing com mitment to the development of standards. The first nursing practice standards were published in 1973. Since that time, both the ANA and specialty nursing organizations have developed standards. However, the proliferation of standards, reflecting a wide di vergence of intent, format, and scope, has limited their usefulness.

Joyce Waterman Taylor

1991-01-01

49

The certified psychiatric nurse practitioner: advanced practice psychiatric nursing reclaimed  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the decade of the 1990s, health care reform, market forces, population needs, new knowledge in neuroscience and changes in advanced practice regulation provided the impetus for the development of the role of the psychiatric nurse practitioner. Debate about issues of role, scope of practice, educational preparation, titling, and credentialing for the advanced practice psychiatric nurse (APPN) of the future

Pamela Bjorklund

2003-01-01

50

Nurse Career-Pattern Study. Part I: Practical Nursing Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The overall nurse career-patterns study actually consists of four concurrent longitudinal studies relating to the four kinds of nursing programs in which, if possible, each subject will be followed from the time of entrance through a 15-year period after graduation. The practical nurse study seeks to determine whether certain biographical data or…

Tate, Barbara L.; Knopf, Lucille

51

How State Laws Recognize Advanced Nursing Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews modifications in state health practice statutes to recognize the expanded scope of nursing practice in view of the disparity between medical functions actually performed by nurses and those considered within the legal definition. Various state approaches indicate a trend to give legal validity to acts performed by nurses. (MF)

Trandel-Korenchuk, Darlene M.; Trandel-Korenchuk, Keith M.

1978-01-01

52

Does Faculty Incivility in Nursing Education Affect Emergency Nursing Practice?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Incivility in nursing education is a complicated problem which causes disruptions in the learning process and negatively affects future nursing practice. This mixed method research study described incivility as well as incivility's effects through extensive literature review and application of a modified Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey. The INE included six demographic items, four quantitative sections, and five open-ended questions. The survey examined emergency nurses' perceptions of incivility and how the experience affected their personal nursing practice. The INE was initially tested in a 2004 pilot study by Dr. Cynthia Clark. For this research study, modifications were made to examine specifically emergency nurse's perceptions of incivility and the effects on their practice. The population was a group of nurses who were members of the emergency nurses association in a Midwestern state. In the quantitative component of the Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey, the Likert scale questions indicated that the majority of the participants reported witnessing or experiencing the uncivil behaviors. In the qualitative section of the INE survey, the participants reported that although they have not seen incivility within their own academic career, they had observed faculty incivility with nursing students when the participants were assigned as preceptors as part of their emergency nursing practice.

Stokes, Pamela

53

Understanding the domestic rupture in forensic psychiatric nursing practice.  

PubMed

The objective of this article is to examine the tensions that exist between care and custody in correctional environments by presenting the (im)possibilities of psychiatric nursing practice within this context. The analysis will be guided by empirical data obtained from a qualitative research conducted in a correctional setting. Semistructured interviews with nurses were conducted and used as the primary source of data for analysis. This article will explore the contextual characteristics of psychiatric nursing practice in correctional settings, describe the alienating effects of this context on nursing practice, theorize nurses' experience using Festinger's theory on cognitive dissonance, and, finally, explore how some nurses engage in the reconstruction of their care to counter the effects of working in correctional settings. PMID:24272741

Jacob, Jean Daniel

2014-01-01

54

Public Health Nursing Practice--An Educator's View.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Posits that students in public health nursing must be well grounded in nursing theory and practice before planning for group health care. Discusses curriculum planning and content, roles and functions of master's program graduates, faculty-agency relationships, and clinical research. (JOW)

Barkauskas, Violet H.

1982-01-01

55

Advanced Practice in Nursing: Conceptual Issues.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the development of the roles of nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialist and evaluates the strengths and weaknesses of each role in current practice and education. Concludes that inadequate justification exists for continuing both roles. (Author/JOW)

Rasch, Randolph F. R.; Frauman, Annette C.

1996-01-01

56

Nursing Practice Environment and Registered Nurses' Job Satisfaction in Nursing Homes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Recruiting and retaining registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes is problematic, and little research is available to guide efforts to make nursing homes a more attractive practice environment for RNs. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between aspects of the nursing practice environment and job satisfaction among RNs…

Choi, JiSun; Flynn, Linda; Aiken, Linda H.

2012-01-01

57

Nurse educators' perspectives on student development of reflection for psychiatric mental health nursing practice.  

PubMed

Psychiatric nursing, in various parts of the world, including regions of Canada, is recognized as a distinct nursing profession. In psychiatric mental health nursing practice, reflection is considered a foundational skill given the relational nature of nurses' therapeutic work. Communicating the significance of reflection for practice to students and teaching this intangible skill is challenging for educators. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore with psychiatric mental health nurse educators their views on how they develop reflective practitioners. Participants' perspectives and experiences in teaching reflective practice were captured in four themes: building the use of self as an agent of change, building skills of reflection/building the habit of reflection, building a bridge between theory and practice, and building a continuing reflective practice - from student to practitioner. Recommendations include a systematic incorporation of reflection into a curriculum and creating supportive learning environments that facilitate the development of reflective practitioners. PMID:23974046

Karpa, Jane V; Chernomas, Wanda M

2013-01-01

58

Social epistemology, gender and nursing theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

A major claim for nursing theory is that it contributes to the generation of a body of nursing knowledge that will be important in the definition of nursing's boundaries. It is argued here that the epistemic authority of nursing knowledge is determined by factors such as the gender structure of nursing. This means the knowledge products of nursing will be

Keith Cash

1997-01-01

59

Linking theory to practice in introductory practice learning experiences.  

PubMed

Nurse educators internationally are challenged with finding a sufficient number of suitable practice learning experiences for student nurses. This paper reports on a study which aimed to evaluate the utilisation of specialised and highly technical environments ("new" environments) as first practice learning experiences for adult nursing students in the UK. A survey was conducted on 158 first year student nurses who were allocated to either "new" or "old" (those that have been traditionally used) environments. Data analysis was conducted using Mann-Whitney U test and exploratory factor analysis was performed. Results have demonstrated that all environments afford novice nurses the opportunity to observe or practice the essential skills of nursing. In addition, the "new" environments have revealed greater opportunity to observe and practice aspects of practice related to governance of care. This paper concludes that a nursing curriculum which makes clear association between the essential nature of nursing and practice based learning outcomes will help the student to appreciate contemporary nursing practice and to link nursing theory with practice. Further research is required to explain the observation that aspects of practice related to governance are more visible within highly technical areas of practice. PMID:25481982

Fotheringham, Diane; Lamont, David; Macbride, Tamsin; MacKenzie, Laura

2014-11-26

60

Nursing Practice Models: Implications for IS Design  

PubMed Central

Nursing Practice Models describe the structural and contextual features of nursing practice environments. They offer direction in the design of information systems for practice. As part of a larger study, using a modified Delphi process, an expert panel identified 11 higher order factors characterizing and addressing the communication demands, scope of practice and nature of interdisciplinary collaboration needed for contemporary practice. These factors provide a model that IS design and implementation teams can use to specify features of the clinical practice environment that IS applications should support. Support for this work came from a grant, Variations in Nursing Practice Models, M Anthony, PI (NR 8723).

Brennan, Patricia Flatley; Anthony, Mary

1997-01-01

61

Gatekeeping practices of nurses in operating rooms  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores the gatekeeping practices used by operating room nurses to control information flow in their everyday clinical practice. In nursing, gatekeeping appears only sporadically in the literature and usually emerges as a secondary concept rather than being the primary focus of studies. As gatekeeping is a communication practice that has the potential to impact directly on patient safety,

Robin Riley; Elizabeth Manias

2009-01-01

62

Evidence-Based Practice and School Nursing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

School nurses need to demonstrate that their practice is based on the best evidence available, which is usually data obtained from research. Evidence-based practice involves combining the best evidence available with nursing expertise and patient and family preferences to determine optimum care. Evidence-based practice guidelines are developed by…

Adams, Susan; McCarthy, Ann Marie

2005-01-01

63

The regulation of nursing practice today  

Microsoft Academic Search

The interface and complexity of licensure and scope of practice issues with professional standards of practice can be very confusing, particularly because they vary from state to state. This article provides an overview of the influences of regulatory boards, professional nursing organizations, and employers on the nursing practice. The roles of both regulatory boards and professional organizations are reviewed, including

Carol A. Roe

2000-01-01

64

State Regulations for School Nursing Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this article is to present a state-by-state summary of rules and regulations governing school nursing practice in the United States. Official government and agency sites were reviewed to determine providers of services in schools, criteria for becoming a school nurse, protection of titling, mandates for school nursing, and the…

Praeger, Susan; Zimmerman, Barbara

2009-01-01

65

Medication Administration Practices of School Nurses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Assessed medication administration practices among school nurses, surveying members of the National Association of School Nurses. Respondents were extremely concerned about medication administration. Errors in administering medications were reported by 48.5 percent of respondents, with missed doses the most common error. Most nurses followed…

McCarthy, Ann Marie; Kelly, Michael W.; Reed, David

2000-01-01

66

Characterising M?ori nursing practice.  

PubMed

This paper summarises research which addresses the question What might constitute M?ori nursing practice? The research design adopted was influenced by Kaupapa M?ori methodology and used a semi-structured, qualitative, in-depth interview process. It was found that by understanding the current experiences of M?ori registered nurses, their reflections on their preparation for practice, and their current practice, we are able to identify the present and future training and practice needs of M?ori nurses. M?ori nursing practice can be characterised as having five features: the promotion of cultural affirmation including cultural awareness and identity; the support of, and access to M?ori networks; the adoption of M?ori models of health; the enabling of visibility and pro-activity as M?ori nurses; and, the validation of M?ori nurses as effective health professionals. Three recommendations for promoting M?ori nursing practice are made in relation to staff in the workplace and in nurse education programmes. All nursing staff need to be alert to: 1. The impact of western scientific models on M?ori healthcare; 2. The (often passive) non-acceptance of M?ori within mainstream institutions; and 3. The benefits of valuing Indigenous nursing programmes. PMID:17026427

Simon, Victoria

2006-09-01

67

Thoughtful nursing practice: reflections on nurse delegation decision-making.  

PubMed

This article discusses delegation challenges and legal and regulatory oversight associated with delegation in the clinical practice setting. The authors address moral and legal attributes of the roles and responsibilities of health care providers regarding delegating health care interventions. The article also explores guiding principles and rules of delegation within professional standards, national practice guidelines, and state nurse practice acts. Nurse experts provide thoughtful reflection on nursing models and the role of delegation, emphasizing the critical role of delegation in extending the role of the health care professional in patient care services. PMID:19850182

McInnis, Leigh Ann; Parsons, Lynn C

2009-12-01

68

The Journal of Doctoral Nursing Practice  

E-print Network

..................................................................................................................12 Courtney E. Reinisch and Jeffrey Kwong PRACTICE EVIDENCE Awareness of Heuristics in Clinical Knowledge: An Evidence-Based Change Project .............................................42 Marie A. CobbThe Journal of Doctoral Nursing Practice CSRClinical Scholars Review www

Columbia University

69

School Nursing: A Framework for Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This 1978 paper provides school nurses with a conceptual framework for structuring their practice. In discussing each of the five concepts, the paper presents a definition, a rationale for its inclusion, and examples illustrating its applicability to school nursing practice. The five concepts are: public health, adaptation, helping relationships,…

Wold, Susan J.; Dagg, Nancy V.

2001-01-01

70

Nurses' Perceptions of Evidence-Based Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evidence-based practice (EBP) has emerged as a marker for health care quality. However, several barriers prevent the transition of nursing research to practice, such as lack of knowledge, lack of time, and little perceived value. The purpose of this descriptive study was to examine the extent of current understanding of EBP, knowledge\\/skills, and attitudes among registered nurses in an urban

Karen D. Lehman

71

Nurses' clinical reasoning: processes and practices of medication safety.  

PubMed

In this article, we describe the depth of knowledge and skill nurses used in making decisions regarding the safe processes and practices of medication administration. Using grounded theory, we identified the essence of medication safety by nurses as the theme of clinical reasoning. Nurses used two medication safety processes within the clinical reasoning theme-maintaining medication safety and managing the environment-together with six categories of patient-focused medication safety practices in the first process and four categories of environmental-focused safety practices within the second process. These processes and practices present an emerging model of safe medication administration developed from the narratives of 50 medical-surgical nurses. This model provides researchers with the basis for the development of systemic policies for safer medication administration for patients. Health care professional educators might also find the results useful in developing curricula focused on patient safety as the foundation of quality care. PMID:21873283

Dickson, Geri L; Flynn, Linda

2012-01-01

72

Developing an Expert System for Nursing Practice  

PubMed Central

The American Nurses' Association has set eight Standards of Nursing Practice related to the nursing process. Computer-aided information systems intended to facilitate the nursing process must be designed to promote adherence to these professional standards. For each of the eight standards, the paper tells how a hypothetical expert system could help nurses to meet the standard. A prototype of such an expert system is being developed. The paper describes issues in conceptualizing clinical decision-making and developing decision strategies for the prototype system. The process of developing the prototype system is described.

Ozbolt, Judy G.; Schultz, Samuel; Swain, Mary Ann P.; Abraham, Ivo L.; Farchaus-Stein, Karen

1984-01-01

73

Nursing Theory Utilization and Application Alligood Martha Raile Nursing Theory Utilization and Application 560pp £42.99 Elsevier Fifth edition 9780323091893 032309189X [Formula: see text].  

PubMed

THIS BOOK has a logical format making it easy to follow. It begins with the conceptualisation of nursing knowledge by discussing the nature of knowledge, nursing models, theories, philosophies and practice. PMID:25253319

2014-09-25

74

The University of Texas at Austin School of Nursing Professional and Technical Standards for Nursing Practice  

E-print Network

in certain organs and tissues. Communication Requirements: Nursing studentsThe University of Texas at Austin School of Nursing Professional and Technical Standards for Nursing Practice Responsibilities and standards in nursing

Johnston, Daniel

75

Nursing leadership: interprofessional education and practice.  

PubMed

The column presents a scholarly dialogue about nursing's role in interprofessional education, practice, and collaboration. Susan Hassmiller, PhD, RN, FAAN, is the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) senior adviser for nursing. In this role, she shapes and leads the foundation's strategies to address nurse and nurse faculty shortages and ensures that RWJF's commitments in nursing have a broad and lasting national impact. In partnership with AARP, Hassmiller directs the foundation's Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action. This effort, active in 50 states plus the District of Columbia, strives to implement the recommendations of the Institute of Medicine's 2011 report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, for which Hassmiller served as the study director. PMID:24085670

Clarke, Pamela N; Hassmiller, Susan

2013-10-01

76

Doctor of Nursing Practice Student Outcomes  

E-print Network

as the basis for advanced level nursing practice. 2. Develop and evaluate new practice approaches based the evaluation of evidence to determine and implement best practice. 5. Function as a practice specialist, and accountability in designing, delivering, and evaluating evidence-based care to improve patient outcomes. 10

Sheridan, Jennifer

77

A qualitative study of nursing student experiences of clinical practice  

PubMed Central

Background Nursing student's experiences of their clinical practice provide greater insight to develop an effective clinical teaching strategy in nursing education. The main objective of this study was to investigate student nurses' experience about their clinical practice. Methods Focus groups were used to obtain students' opinion and experiences about their clinical practice. 90 baccalaureate nursing students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery) were selected randomly from two hundred students and were arranged in 9 groups of ten students. To analyze the data the method used to code and categories focus group data were adapted from approaches to qualitative data analysis. Results Four themes emerged from the focus group data. From the students' point of view," initial clinical anxiety", "theory-practice gap"," clinical supervision", professional role", were considered as important factors in clinical experience. Conclusion The result of this study showed that nursing students were not satisfied with the clinical component of their education. They experienced anxiety as a result of feeling incompetent and lack of professional nursing skills and knowledge to take care of various patients in the clinical setting. PMID:16280087

Sharif, Farkhondeh; Masoumi, Sara

2005-01-01

78

Practical Nursing, Volume I. Health Occupations Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This curriculum guide provides teachers with up-to-date information and skill-related applications needed by the practical nurse. The volume contains three sections and 24 instructional units: Personal Vocational Relationships (6 units), Nutrition (3 units), and Basic Nursing Principles and Applied Skills (15 units covering such topics as…

Rogers, Helen W.; And Others

79

Theory to practice: the humanbecoming leading-following model.  

PubMed

Guided by the humanbecoming leading-following model, the author designed a nursing theories course with the intention of creating a meaningful nursing theory to practice link. The author perceived that with the implementation of Situation-Background-Assessment-Recommendations (SBAR) communication, nursing staff had drifted away from using the Kardex™ in shift to shift reporting. Nurse students, faculty, and staff members supported the creation of a theories project which would engage nursing students in the pursuit of clinical excellence. The project chosen was to revise the existing Kardex™ (predominant nursing communication tool). In the project, guided by a nursing theory, nursing students focused on the unique patient's experience, depicting the specific role of nursing knowledge and the contributions of the registered nurse to the patient's healthcare journey. The emphasis of this theoretical learning was the application of a nursing theory to real-life clinical challenges with communication of relevant, timely, and accurate patient information, recognizing that real problems are often complex and require multi-perspective approaches. This project created learning opportunities where a nursing theory would be chosen by the nursing student clinical group and applied in their clinical specialty area. This practice activity served to broaden student understandings of the role of nursing knowledge and nursing theories in their professional practice. PMID:25520461

Ursel, Karen L

2015-01-01

80

Practice nurses: social and occupational characteristics  

PubMed Central

Three hundred practice nurses in the West Midlands responded to a questionnaire survey about their social and occupational characteristics. The nurses were mainly married women with children and had had considerable hospital experience. They were largely satisfied with their job and felt that their own general practitioner colleagues were supportive, though doctors in general might not be so. Large variations in patterns of work were revealed and in some cases there was a considerable extension of the traditional nursing role. Almost two-thirds of practice nurses were undertaking breast and vaginal examinations, 70% were carrying out cervical smears and a number of nurses were diagnosing, investigating and managing common ailments. Nurses expressed a desire for further extension of their role to allow them to undertake broader aspects of patient care and to be less task-centred, but felt that they would require further training to do so. There was evidence of a need for better definition of the practice nurse's role and for more support from health authorities and the nurses' own professional body. PMID:3448225

Greenfield, S.; Stilwell, B.; Drury, M.

1987-01-01

81

Tobacco cessation education for advanced practice nurses.  

PubMed

The predicted shortfall of primary care physicians and the millions of newly insured beginning in 2014 call for an increase in the number of advanced practice nurses (APRNs). Advanced practice nurses can significantly improve their clients' quality of life and increase their life expectancy through tobacco cessation education. The purpose of this study was to educate APRN students on smoking information and techniques to assist clients with quitting smoking in the primary care setting. PMID:24867074

Whitehead, Diane; Zucker, Steven B; Stone, Jennifer

2014-01-01

82

Theorizing Practice and Practicing Theory  

E-print Network

his paper describes the emerging field of practice theory as it is practiced in relation to organizational phenomena. We identify three approaches—empirical, theoretical, and philosophical—that relate to the what, the how, ...

Feldman, Martha S.

83

Teaching Research Synthesis to Advanced Practice Nurses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A process for teaching research synthesis to advanced practice nurses includes two courses: a first research applications course in which students build bibliographic databases, practice statistical analysis, and develop search skills; and a second course in which they complete literature reviews or meta analyses of research on clinical practice

Upchurch, Sandra; Brosnan, Christine A.; Grimes, Deanna E.

2002-01-01

84

Best Faculty Practice Plan Model for a Small College of Nursing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Bridging the gap between theory and practice has been a priority with universities and colleges of nursing. A mechanism for bridging this gap has been the establishment of faculty practices. Faculty practices have provided nurse practitioner faculty opportunities to mentor students, augment income, implement evidence-based research, provide…

Conrad, Sharyn Neiman

2010-01-01

85

Implementing a Gerontological Clinical Nursing Practice With an Interdisciplinary Focus: Lessons Learned  

Microsoft Academic Search

A gerontological clinical nursing practice with an interdisciplinary focus was developed to provide opportunities for student nurses to expand their knowledge about aging, hone assessment skills, and critically examine beliefs about older adults. The practice included theory about older adults and a rotation through a variety of clinical settings where students had practice opportunities with older adults. Based on the

Sherry Dahlke; Cindy Fehr

2010-01-01

86

Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP) Earn Your Doctorate & Advance the Profession of Nursing  

E-print Network

Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP) Earn Your Doctorate & Advance the Profession of Nursing degree in nursing is the perfect way to enhance your practice and advance the profession of nursing will help you achieve your career goals. Points of Pride The UC College of Nursing is dedicated

Papautsky, Ian

87

Nurse practice centers in academia: an emerging subsystem.  

PubMed

Nurse practice centers have been instituted by numerous schools of nursing throughout the United States. This study was done in part to better identify their components as well as the forces constraining and stimulating their development. General systems theory was used as the theoretical base. Academically-based nursing centers were identified as a subsystem of both the health care system and the higher education system in America. As a subsystem of both of these systems, the nurse practice center operated by a school of professional nursing represents an entity that has the capacity to foster all components of professional nursing including scholarly practice, education and research. Forty such centers were found to be sites for a wide variety of care, research and learning involving faculty and students. Forces stimulating the development of such centers were faculty clinical practice, clinical learning experiences and service opportunities. Constraining forces were time management and role ambiguity. Faculty members' job satisfaction correlated significantly with the budget at the .007 level. PMID:8926522

Boettcher, J H

1996-02-01

88

Certification and Regulation of Advanced Practice Nurses. Position Statement.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This position statement of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing asserts that the nursing profession must develop a standardized national advanced practice nursing certification process by 2000. Professional certification validates and standardizes the qualifications and practice competencies of the advanced practice nurse. (Author/JOW)

Journal of Professional Nursing, 1996

1996-01-01

89

LPN's, 1967; An Inventory of Licensed Practical Nurses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The data in this report are the result of the first in a series of five proposed inventories of licensed practical nurses. The study revealed a total of 343,635 practical nurses holding licenses to practice at the time of the study. About 74 percent reported they were employed in nursing, 20 percent indicated they were not employed in nursing, and…

Marshall, Eleanor D.; Moses, Evelyn B.

90

Evidence-Based Practice Guidelines and School Nursing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The use of evidence-based practice (EBP) has become the standard of health care practice. Nurses are expected to use best evidence on a wide range of topics, yet most nurses have limited time, resources, and/or skills to access and evaluate the quality of research and evidence needed to practice evidence-based nursing. EBP guidelines allow nurses

Adams, Susan; McCarthy, Ann Marie

2007-01-01

91

Conceptualizations of health in nursing practice.  

PubMed

There are many ways of living health as individuals describe it from unique perspectives. With the intent of serving others, healthcare professionals rely on a specific conceptualization of health consistent with a practice methodology. Hence, for the advancement of innovative scientific knowledge health can be viewed from distinct paradigmatic perspectives and must be founded on a congruent ontological-epistemological-methodological link in professional practice. The purpose of this column is to describe conceptualizations of health with congruent practice methodologies from three distinct nursing paradigmatic perspectives. The authors consider that these distinct paradigmatic nursing perspectives offer diverse disciplinary knowledge of social utility to nursing professional practice for the betterment of the ones being served. PMID:24740946

Doucet, Thomas J; Merlin, Marjolaine Dionne

2014-04-01

92

The Journal of Doctoral Nursing Practice  

E-print Network

College of Nursing Practice Evidence H. Michael Dreher, PhD, RN Associate Professor, Department .................................................................................6 Denise Davis, Vernell DeWitty, and Catherine Millett PRACTICE EVIDENCE Effects of Educating Women Roubion-Johnson and Donna L. Williams Evidence-Based Clinical Guidelines and Their Impact on Prevention

Qian, Ning

93

Advanced Practice Nursing: Parameters for Successful Integration  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article analyzes advanced practice nursing roles through a literature review and a pilot stakeholder survey in relation to five strategic areas: (1) definitions and scope of practice; (2) education, credentialing and regulation; (3) new roles in healthcare; (4) costs and benefits in health reform; and (5) implementation and relationships. The Canadian health services environment is best served by a

Michael K. Howlett; Deborah Tamlyn

1999-01-01

94

From the perspective of new nurses: what do effective mentors look like in practice?  

PubMed

New nurses entering practice experience a challenging transition, one that can be moderated by the presence of mentors in the practice setting. Seeking mentors who enter into informal mentoring relationships with new nurses can be difficult for those new nurses who don't know what to look for in a mentor. In this Grounded Theory study, the author explored nurses' perspectives on what makes a mentor effective, and how they engaged in mentoring relationships with their informal mentors. Two key factors in the development of these mentoring relationships was 1) the relational connection that existed between new nurses and one of their more experienced colleagues in the practice setting, and 2) the perception of new nurses of the quality of the experienced nurses' practices. New nurses entered practice expecting to learn from their more experienced colleagues but recognized that they wanted to emulate the practice of experienced nurses who practiced nursing in the way new nurses idealized. In this article, the author describes the characteristics of effective mentors, from the perspectives of nurses who had mentors, and described their processes of engaging with their mentors. PMID:21159558

Ferguson, Linda M

2011-03-01

95

Qualitative Distinctions and Similarities in the Practice of Clinical Nurse Specialists and Nurse Practitioners.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A comparison of results of two studies regarding the actual practice of clinical nurse specialists and nurse practitioners revealed a shared core of advanced practice competencies as well as distinct differences between practice roles. (JOW)

Fenton, Mary V.; Brykczynski, Karen A.

1993-01-01

96

Measuring nursing informatics competencies of practicing nurses in Korea: nursing informatics competencies questionnaire.  

PubMed

Informatics competencies are a necessity for contemporary nurses. However, few researchers have investigated informatics competencies for practicing nurses. A full set of Informatics competencies, an instrument to measure these competencies, and potential influencing factors have yet to be identified for practicing nurses. The Nursing Informatics Competencies Questionnaire was designed, tested for psychometrics, and used to measure beginning and experienced levels of practice. A pilot study using 54 nurses ensured item comprehension and clarity. Internal consistency and face and content validity were established. A cross-sectional survey was then conducted on 230 nurses in Seoul, Korea, to determine construct validity, describe a complete set of informatics competencies, and explore possible influencing factors on existing informatics competencies. Principal componentsanalysis, descriptive statistics, and multiple regression were used for data analysis. Principal components analysis gives support for the Nursing Informatics Competencies Questionnaire construct validity. Survey results indicate that involvement in a managerial position and self-directed informatics-related education may be more influential for improving informatics competencies, whereas general clinical experience and workplace settings are not. This study provides a foundation for understanding how informatics competencies might be integrated throughout nurses' work lives and how to develop appropriate strategies to support nurses in their informatics practice in clinical settings. PMID:25393832

Chung, Seon Yoon; Staggers, Nancy

2014-12-01

97

How reflective practice improves nurses' critical thinking ability.  

PubMed

Purposeful reflection is consistent with adult learning theory. It is known to lead to a deeper understanding of issues and to develop judgment and skill. Required by law to ensure members' competence in their professional practice, the College of Nurses of Ontario recommends and has developed a tool for evaluating reflective practice. The tool focuses on key attributes said to be demonstrated by competent practitioners, including critical thinking (CT) and job knowledge. This study aimed to determine whether nurses engage in reflective practice and whether they perceive that it enhances their CT ability. Surveys were sent to 60 gastroenterology nurses at a large teaching hospital; 34 surveys were anonymously returned. All respondents engaged in reflective practice, and 24 reported using the college's tool. Nineteen respondents strongly agreed that their nursing practice had improved as a result. Critical thinking is difficult to assess because of a lack of clear-cut performance criteria. Improvement of CT was difficult to evaluate from the responses, even though all respondents participated in reflective practice. Both CT and reflective practice need to be better defined in order to examine and explain their relationship. PMID:18156956

Cirocco, Maria

2007-01-01

98

The theoretical basis for nurse-midwifery practice in the United States: a critical analysis of three theories.  

PubMed

The relatively recent effort of midwifery scholars has resulted in the development of three middle-range midwifery theories in the United States. This article examines the three theoretical models that have been developed to describe the essential components of midwifery practice. The three theorists demonstrate remarkable consistency in the identification of concepts important to the discipline, which includes the following essential characteristics of the midwifery paradigm of care: 1) acknowledgment of connections between the mind and body and the person to the person's life and world; 2) assuming the perspective of the woman to investigate meaning and her experience of symptoms or conditions, so that a plan of care is developed by midwife and woman together; and 3) protection and nurturance of the "normal" in processes related to women's health, implying a judicious use of technology and intervention. PMID:15351327

Cragin, Leslie

2004-01-01

99

Perinatal Safety: From Concept to Nursing Practice  

PubMed Central

Communication and teamwork problems are leading causes of documented preventable adverse outcomes in perinatal care. An essential component of perinatal safety is the organizational culture in which clinicians work. Clinicians’ individual and collective authority to question the plan of care and take action to change the direction of a clinical situation in the patient’s best interest can be viewed as their “agency for safety.” However, collective agency for safety and commitment to support nurses in their advocacy role is missing in many perinatal care settings. This paper draws from Organizational Accident Theory, High Reliability Theory, and Symbolic Interactionism to describe the nurse’s role in maintaining safety during labor and birth in acute care settings, and suggests actions for supporting the perinatal nurse at individual, group, and systems levels to achieve maximum safety in perinatal care. PMID:20147827

Kennedy, Holly Powell

2010-01-01

100

Administrative Protocol Page 1 of 2 Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

/Assistant. 2. Appropriate and timely communication must be maintained with on duty Nursing Manager/NursingAdministrative Protocol Page 1 of 2 Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROTOCOL FOR: Charge Nurse Responsibilities POLICY: 1

Oliver, Douglas L.

101

Do educational outcomes correspond with the requirements of nursing practice: educators' and managers' assessments of novice nurses' professional competence  

PubMed Central

Objective This study evaluated weather educational outcomes of nurse education meet the requirements of nursing practice by exploring the correspondence between nurse educators' and nurse managers' assessments of novice nurses' professional competence. The purpose was to find competence areas contributing to the acknowledged practice–theory gap. Design A cross-sectional, comparative design using the Nurse Competence Scale was applied. Subjects The sample comprised nurse educators (n = 86) and nurse managers (n = 141). Methods Descriptive and inferential statistics were used in the data analysis. Main outcome measures Educators assessed novice nurses' competence to a significantly higher level than managers in all competence areas (p < 0.001). The biggest correspondence between educators' and mangers' assessments were in competencies related to immediate patient care, commitment to ethical values, maintaining professional skills and nurses' care of the self. The biggest differences were in competencies related to developmental and evaluation tasks, coaching activities, use of evidence-based knowledge and in activities which required mastering a comprehensive view of care situations. However, differences between educators' and managers' assessments were strongly associated with their age and work experience. Active and improved collaboration should be focused on areas in which the differences between educators' and managers' assessments greatly differ in ensuring novice nurses? fitness for practice. PMID:24512685

Numminen, Olivia; Laine, Tuija; Isoaho, Hannu; Hupli, Maija; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Meretoja, Riitta

2014-01-01

102

Clinical simulation using deliberate practice in nursing education: a Wilsonian concept analysis.  

PubMed

Effective use of simulation is dependent on a complete understanding of simulation's central conceptual elements. Deliberate practice, a constituent of Ericsson's theory of expertise, has been identified as a central concept in effective simulation learning. Deliberate practice is compatible with simulation frameworks already being suggested for use in nursing education. This paper uses Wilson's Method of concept analysis for the purpose of exploring the concept of deliberate practice in the context of clinical simulation in nursing education. Nursing education should move forward in a manner that reflects best practice in nursing education. PMID:24120521

Chee, Jennifer

2014-05-01

103

The Institute for Johns Hopkins Nursing: A Collaborative Model for Nursing Practice and Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Institute for Johns Hopkins Nursing was developed collaboratively by the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing and the Johns Hopkins Hospital Department of Nursing. The institute prepares nurses for practice, keeps practitioners current, and provides nursing staff development programs. (Contains 11 references.) (JOW)

Sabatier, Kathleen Hartman

2002-01-01

104

Hiring and incorporating doctor of nursing practice-prepared nurse faculty into academic nursing programs.  

PubMed

Semistructured interviews were conducted with 15 deans and directors of nursing programs across the United States to gain an understanding of how Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP)-prepared nurses seeking academic positions are hired and used in schools of nursing. Interviews sought to gain information regarding (a) differences and similarities in the roles and responsibilities of DNP- and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)-prepared faculty, (b) educational advancement and mentoring of DNP-prepared nurse faculty, (c) recruitment of doctorally prepared nurse faculty, and (d) shortages of nursing faculty. DNP- and PhD-prepared nurse faculty are hired for varying roles in baccalaureate and higher degree schools of nursing, some similar to other faculty with master's degrees and others similar to those with PhDs; in associate degree in nursing programs, they are largely hired for the same type of work as nurse faculty with master's degrees. Regardless of program or degree type, the main role of DNP-prepared faculty is teaching. PMID:25050562

Agger, Charlotte A; Oermann, Marilyn H; Lynn, Mary R

2014-08-01

105

Identification of Desired Outcomes for School Nursing Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The "Scope and Standards of Professional School Nursing Practice" states that school nurses should evaluate the quality and effectiveness of their practice. School nurses have not yet identified and adopted outcomes by which this effectiveness can be measured. This study used focus groups during a national meeting of school nurse leaders to…

Selekman, Janice; Guilday, Patricia

2003-01-01

106

Implementing a Gerontological Clinical Nursing Practice with an Interdisciplinary Focus: Lessons Learned  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A gerontological clinical nursing practice with an interdisciplinary focus was developed to provide opportunities for student nurses to expand their knowledge about aging, hone assessment skills, and critically examine beliefs about older adults. The practice included theory about older adults and a rotation through a variety of clinical settings…

Dahlke, Sherry; Fehr, Cindy

2010-01-01

107

The National Nursing Model from the Nursing Practice Perspective – Results from a Finnish Evaluation Study  

PubMed Central

The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of the national nursing model in Finland. The feasibility evaluation was carried out with nurses using interviews and patient case scenarios in primary, specialized and private healthcare. The nursing process model showed to be feasible in nursing practice but the current national nursing classification (FinCC) was considered to be too detailed, multi-layered and difficult to understand and use. Overall, electronic nursing documentation improves the legal protection of patients and health professionals and makes nursing care transparent, but the nursing documentation systems do not support multi-professional care or information exchange. This study resulted in that the nursing model should conform better to nursing practices and support better nurses in their care interventions. An essential improvement for nursing practice would be specific templates that are easy to apply in specific situations with homogenous patient groups. PMID:24199092

Kuusisto, Anne; Kaipio, Johanna; Nykänen, Pirkko

2012-01-01

108

Cultivating a narrative sensibility in nursing practice.  

PubMed

Stories hold meaning, and when persons tell of their experiences of living with illness, they are afforded an opportunity to make sense of all that is happening. As nurses, we have the privilege of hearing the particular, gaining understanding, and creating a powerful encounter that has healing and health benefits. This is a call for nurses to more intentionally invite and listen to the stories of persons living with illness. The mnemonic STORIED is offered to help nurses weave together essential elements of a narrative practice approach: Subjective, Tell/Listen, Openness, Reflection, Invite/Intention, Engage, and Document. Nurses are the voice of the vulnerable, and to learn to listen to our patients' stories such that what is gleaned contributes to their healing is nothing less than a call to excellent care of the unique person before us. PMID:24904044

Beuthin, Rosanne E

2015-03-01

109

Transformational leadership in nursing practice.  

PubMed

Traditionally, nurses have been over-managed and led inadequately, yet today they face unprecedented challenges and opportunities. Organisations constantly face changes that require an increasingly adaptive and flexible leadership. This type of adaptive leadership is referred to as 'transformational'; under it, environments of shared responsibilities that influence new ways of knowing are created. Transformational leadership motivates followers by appealing to higher ideas and moral values, where the leader has a deep set of internal values and ideas. This leads to followers acting to sustain the greater good, rather than their own interests, and supportive environments where responsibility is shared. This article focuses on transformational leadership and its application to nursing through the four components of transformational leadership. These are: idealised influence; inspirational motivation; intellectual stimulation; and individual consideration. PMID:23132001

Doody, Owen; Doody, Catriona M

110

Why we do what we do: a theoretical evaluation of the integrated practice model for forensic nursing science.  

PubMed

An evaluation of the Integrated Practice Model for Forensic Nursing Science () is presented utilizing methods outlined by . A brief review of nursing theory basics and evaluation methods by Meleis is provided to enhance understanding of the ensuing theoretical evaluation and critique. The Integrated Practice Model for Forensic Nursing Science, created by forensic nursing pioneer Virginia Lynch, captures the theories, assumptions, concepts, and propositions inherent in forensic nursing practice and science. The historical background of the theory is explored as Lynch's model launched the role development of forensic nursing practice as both a nursing and forensic science specialty. It is derived from a combination of nursing, sociological, and philosophical theories to reflect the grounding of forensic nursing in the nursing, legal, psychological, and scientific communities. As Lynch's model is the first inception of forensic nursing theory, it is representative of a conceptual framework although the title implies a practice theory. The clarity and consistency displayed in the theory's structural components of assumptions, concepts, and propositions are analyzed. The model is described and evaluated. A summary of the strengths and limitations of the model is compiled followed by application to practice, education, and research with suggestions for ongoing theory development. PMID:25144581

Valentine, Julie L

2014-01-01

111

Thinking creatively: from nursing education to practice.  

PubMed

Creative thinking is a critical link in the teaching-learning process, one that enhances problem solving in nursing practice. This article describes a conceptualization of creativity based on focus groups with 12 post-RN students and two nurse educators. Inherent within the major theme, striving for balance, were three subthemes-enhancing self-esteem, working within structure, and making time for reflection (i.e., process). When participants achieved balance, both personally and professionally, they experienced increased creative energy that resulted in creative expression, subsequently displayed in educational endeavors and clinical practice (i.e., product). Strategies for fostering creativity and criteria for evaluating creativity are offered, and implications for nurse educators, managers, and practitioners are examined. PMID:12180769

Kalischuk, Ruth Grant; Thorpe, Karran

2002-01-01

112

75 FR 75689 - National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice for Request for Nominations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Nursing, Bureau of Health Professions (BHPr), Health Resources...Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice...issues relating to the nurse workforce, nursing...Nursing, Bureau of Health Professions, Health Resources and...of issues relating to nurse supply,...

2010-12-06

113

Practical Nursing. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for practical nursing. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that…

Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

114

School Nursing--A Framework for Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A conceptual framework for school nurses in structuring their practice is provided. The following five concepts are considered as part of the framework: public health, adaptation, helping relationships, systematic process, and tools. Each concept is defined, a rationale for its inclusion is given, and examples illustrating its applicability to…

Wold, Susan J.; Dagg, Nancy V.

1979-01-01

115

Theory into Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The importance of putting theory into practice can be addressed and advocated to educators and gifted students through the presentation of a Continuum of Practice. Articulating the sequence and phases of practice can underscore how practice can take place; it also can change the perspective and meaning of practice.

Kaplan, Sandra N.

2012-01-01

116

Documentation of Nursing Practice Using a Computerized Medical Information System  

PubMed Central

This paper discusses a definition of the content of the computerized nursing data base developed by the Nursing Department for the Clinical Center Medical Information System at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. The author describes the theoretical framework for the content and presents a model to describe the organization of the nursing data components in relation to the process of nursing care delivery. Nursing documentation requirements of Nurse Practice Acts, American Nurses Association Standards of Practice and the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals are also addressed as they relate to this data base. The advantages and disadvantages of such an approach to computerized documentation are discussed.

Romano, Carol

1981-01-01

117

The Relevance of Standards of Professional School Nursing Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This descriptive correlational study assessed school nurses' knowledge of and perceived relevance of the "Standards of Professional School Nursing Practice". Of the 1,162 Ohio school nurses sent questionnaires, 345 returned usable questionnaires (30%). The typical respondent was a 50-year-old Caucasian woman with 24 years of nursing experience, 12…

Rice, Susan K.; Biordi, Diana L.; Zeller, Richard A.

2005-01-01

118

The Quad Council practice competencies for public health nursing.  

PubMed

This article describes the most recent efforts by the Quad Council of Public Health Nursing organizations to review and revise the competencies for PHN practice, and highlights the implications of these competencies for practice, education, and research. The Quad Council is a coalition of four nursing organizations with a focus on public health nursing and includes the Association of Community Health Nursing Educators; the Association of Public Health Nursing (known prior to July 1, 2012 as the Association of State and Territorial Directors of Nursing); the Public Health Nursing section of the American Public Health Association; and the Council on Economics and Practice of the American Nurses' Association. The Quad Council competencies are based on the Council on Linkages competencies for public health professionals and were designed to ensure that public health nursing fits in the domain of public health science and practice. PMID:24579712

Swider, Susan M; Krothe, Joyce; Reyes, David; Cravetz, Michelle

2013-01-01

119

Eliciting reflections on caring theory in elderly caring practice  

PubMed Central

Caring theories are the description and conceptualization of the care that is given in caring practise by nurses and other professional caregivers with the aim of verbalizing and communicating caring phenomena. Intermittently, a theorypractice gap is given expression- that theory does not go along with clinical practice in caring. The aim of this study was an investigation into the possible disparity between theory and practice in caring by analysing nurses’ lived experience of the understanding of caring theory in practice in the context of municipal elderly care. Hermeneutical phenomenology was the research approach used to explore the lived experience of caring science theories in caring practice from the perspective of 12 nurses working in municipal care for elderly. The findings shows that the nurses Impulsively described their experience of detachment to caring theory, but when describing their caring intentions, the relationship to theory became apparent, and even confirmed their practice. As such, a seedbed exists for caring theory to be reflected on and cultivated in caring praxis. However, as the nurses describe, the caring theory must be sensitive enough for the nursing practitioners to accept. The gap revealed itself on an organisational level, as the nurses’ commission in municipal care did not correspond with their caring intention. We believe it is important to seriously consider what we want to achieve as a caring profession. We have to reflect on our responsibility as culture carriers and knowledge developers. We must make the disparate forces of intention and organisation become one intertwining force. PMID:21866232

Elisabeth Ranheim, Albertine; Kärner, Anita; Berterö, Carina

2011-01-01

120

76 FR 14033 - National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice...National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice (NACNEP...is to address diversity in nurse education and practice. The...of diverse students into the profession of nursing; (4)...

2011-03-15

121

["Out of interest in reasonable conditions... " Relevance and constitutive elements of a critical theory in nursing science].  

PubMed

Nursing practice needs a theoretical foundation. As in any other discipline, theories form the core of nursing science. They contribute to the definition of nursing and to the evolution of professional domains. Depending on their level of abstraction and their range ("grand theories") they can guide actions, have an orientating, but also a critical function. Furthermore, theories serve to legitimate and justify nursing in the public. This is especially important, if politics and society have high expectations in the nursing profession. The current concept of a critical theory of nursing science has a critical focus on repressions and deficits in nursing practice, but also is aimed at achieving reasonable nursing practice. This theory is emancipatorical and normative as well. It is following Foucault's analysis of power and explicating the "Frankfurt School of Critical Theory" as a critique of the conditions of working, understanding, recognising, self, time and nature. PMID:22134911

Friesacher, Heiner

2011-12-01

122

Nurses and the wise organisation: techne and phronesis in Australian general practice.  

PubMed

This paper draws on classical theories of wisdom to explore the organisational impact of nurses on Australian general practice. Between 2004 and 2008, numbers of general practice nurses doubled, the most rapid influx of nurses into any Australian workplace over the decade. Using data from the Australian General Practice Nurses Study, we argue that nurses had a positive impact because they introduced techne at the organisational level and amplified phronesis in clinical activities. In its Hippocratic formulation, techne refers to a field of definable knowledge, which is purposeful and useful and requires mastery of rational principles. Nursing, with its focus on system and accountability, brought techne out of the GP's consulting room and into the general practice as a whole. Nurses also exemplify phronesis, an Aristotelian virtue connoting a reasoned and honourable capacity to make judgements: the practical wisdom that defines the interaction between clinician and patient in general practice. At a time of significant GP shortage, doctors and nurses began to collaborate around their more complex and time-consuming patients, leading to a deepening of phronesis in the workplace. By bringing techne to bear on the organisation, and complementing and enhancing phronesis, nurses propel organisational wisdom in general practices. PMID:22571814

Phillips, Christine; Hall, Sally

2013-06-01

123

The clinical nurse leader: a response from practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

In October 2003, over 200 nurse leaders from education and practice met at the invitation of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing. A newly released white paper, describing the role of the clinical nurse leader, was discussed at the conference. This article outlines a response to that white paper from one practice setting. The article shares information about another

Karen Neil Drenkard

2004-01-01

124

The case for concordance: value and application in nursing practice.  

PubMed

This is the first of two articles exploring the concept of concordance in practice. This first paper draws on psychology, research in clinical practice and social participation theory to argue for a concordant approach to nursing care. Where most writers have confined discussions on concordance to medicines management, the author seeks to widen the debate to explore the value of the principle across the whole spectrum of nursing practice. Studies describing patient involvement are mapped against Arnstein's model of citizen participation to determine true levels of patient-practitioner working. The outcomes of care delivered in a paternalistic way are compared with those arising from patient-practitioner partnership working across a range of healthcare settings. The values underpinning concordance and the relationships and skills necessary to achieve and sustain it are considered. A recommendation for practice is that concordance needs to be taught as a central part of the healthcare process rather than merely an ethical principle in healthcare education. The power of the nurse-patient relationship on which concordance is built needs to be recognised and valued. The principle of concordance will be more feasible in practice when accompanied by other initiatives that promote public participation in education review commissioning and standard setting. PMID:24261092

McKinnon, John

125

The Attending Nurse: An Evolving Model for Integrating Nursing Education and Practice  

PubMed Central

The discipline of nursing continues to evolve in keeping with the dramatic expansion of scientific knowledge, technology, and a concomitant increase in complexity of patient care in all practice settings. Changing patient demographics require complex planning for co-morbidities associated with chronic diseases and life-saving advances that have altered mortality in ways never before imagined. These changes in practice, coupled with findings from sophisticated nursing research and the continuous development of new nursing knowledge, call for realignments of the relationships among academic faculty in schools of nursing, advanced practice nurse administrators, and staff nurses at the forefront of practice. This article offers a model designed to bridge the gaps among academic settings, administrative offices and the euphemistic “bedsides” where staff nurses practice. Here we describe the nurse attending model in place at the New York University Langone Medical Center (NYULMC) and provide qualitative data that support progress in our work. PMID:21660179

Fulmer, Terry; Cathcart, Eloise; Glassman, Kimberly; Budin, Wendy; Naegle, Madeline; Devanter, Nancy Van

2011-01-01

126

Part 1: Transforming Family Nursing Theory: From Mechanicism to Contextualism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although the systems metaphor has been useful in conceptualizing families, at this time in our evolution offamily nursing theory and practice it is essential that we begin to broaden our understanding and conceptualization offamily. Evolving out of a contextual worldview, this article presents an alternate metaphor to address aspects of family that are not captured by the systems metaphor. Based

Gwen A. Hartrick

1995-01-01

127

Obesity Prevention Practices of Elementary School Nurses in Minnesota: Findings from Interviews with Licensed School Nurses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Elementary schools are an optimal setting to provide obesity prevention interventions, yet little is known about the obesity prevention practices of elementary school nurses. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into current obesity-related school nursing practice in elementary schools in Minnesota, opinions regarding school nurse-led…

Morrison-Sandberg, Leslie F.; Kubik, Martha Y.; Johnson, Karen E.

2011-01-01

128

Nursing Practice, Knowledge, Attitudes and Perceived Barriers to Evidence-Based Practice at an Academic Medical Center  

E-print Network

evidence-based practice. International Journal of Nursingevidence-based practice: An organizational approach. Journal of Nursingevidence-based practice questionnaire for nurses. Journal of Advanced Nursing.

Brown, Caroline E.; Wickline, Mary; Ecoff, Laurie; Glaser, Dale

2009-01-01

129

The doctor of nursing practice and nursing education: highlights, potential, and promise.  

PubMed

The success of the doctor of nursing practice (DNP) programs have exceeded everyone's expectations and resulted in increased interest in doctoral education in nursing. A shortage of doctorally prepared nurse educators continues to plague the profession and has a severe impact on the ability of schools of nursing to educate future generations of nurses. As a terminal degree in nursing practice, there is little focus on DNP graduates who are prepared as educators. To remedy this deficit, this article will therefore discuss and highlight (a) the significant potential of the DNP to mitigate the current nursing faculty shortage and to close the practice-education gap, (b) the specialized role of DNP graduates as educators and leaders in nursing education, and (c) the implications of the DNP for nursing scholarship. PMID:21925464

Danzey, Ida Maria; Ea, Emerson; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J; Garbutt, Susan J; Rafferty, Margaret; Zychowicz, Michael E

2011-01-01

130

Critical practice in nursing care: analysis, action and reflexivity.  

PubMed

This article examines critical practice and its underlying principles: analysis, action and reflexivity. Critical analysis involves the examination of knowledge that underpins practice. Critical action requires nurses to assess their skills and identify potential gaps in need of professional development. Critical reflexivity is personal analysis that involves challenging personal beliefs and assumptions to improve professional and personal practice. Incorporating these aspects into nursing can benefit nursing practice. PMID:16786927

Timmins, F

131

Kuwaiti high school students' perceptions of nursing as a profession: implications for nursing education and practice.  

PubMed

The shortage of nurses in Kuwait is attributed to low production of indigenous nurses, resignation and emigration of foreign nurses, and expansion of health care facilities. This study explored Kuwaiti high school students' perceptions of nursing as a profession, their sources of information about nursing, and factors that affected their choice of nursing as a future career. Questionnaires from 289 students attending seven all-female high schools in Kuwait were analyzed. The results revealed that all of the participants were knowledgeable about the functional aspects of the nursing profession, and 35% of them received this information through contact with nurses during hospital visits. However, only 19% indicated they might consider nursing as a future career. The implications of the study for nursing education and practice, and strategies to attract and retain indigenous high school graduates into nursing programs in Kuwait are discussed. PMID:16402735

Al-Kandari, Fatimah H; Lew, Irene

2005-12-01

132

Toward Standard Classification Schemes for Nursing Language: Recommendations of the American Nurses Association Steering Committee on Databases to Support Clinical Nursing Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

The American Nurses Association (ANA) Cabinet on Nursing Practice mandated the formation of the Steering Committee on Databases to Support Clinical Nursing Practice. The Committee has established the process and the criteria by which to review and recommend nursing classification schemes based on the ANA Nursing Process Standards and elements contained in the Nursing Minimum Data Set (NMDS) for inclusion

Kathleen A McCormick; Norma Lang; Rita Zielstorff; D Kathy Milholland; Virginia Saba; Ada Jacox

1994-01-01

133

EmpowEr your practicE mastEr of NursiNg  

E-print Network

EmpowEr your practicE mastEr of NursiNg #12;mastEr of NursiNg (mN) The UniversiTy of WashingTon BoThell MasTer of nUrsing prograM prepares nurses for advanced leadership roles in health care practice and elective credits support a wide range of nursing interests that allow a custom fit to your individual goals

Manchak, John

134

A midrange theory of empowered holistic nursing education: a pedagogy for a student-centered classroom.  

PubMed

The purpose of this article is to propose Empowered Holistic Nursing Education (EHNE) as a midrange theory--developed through induction, explication, deduction, and retroduction--to help nurse educators teach holistically and create a student-centered classroom, to establish a theoretical basis for a nursing pedagogy reflecting nursing's foundational principles, and to guide future research. The model's 5 core concepts, how to use the model as a pedagogy for practice, and its application to research will be presented. Holistic nursing will be defined, and traditional holistic nursing, holistic pedagogy, and emancipatory pedagogy will each be described. PMID:24730192

Love, Katie

2014-01-01

135

Nursing-sensitive patient outcomes: the development of the Putting Evidence into Practice resources for nursing practice.  

PubMed

The Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) has worked diligently to improve the care of patients with cancer and their families. A recent project that demonstrates this commitment toquality care is the development of nursing-sensitive patient outcomes resources. ONS has teamed researchers, advanced practice nurses, and staff nurses to develop Putting Evidence Into Practice resources that provide guidance for nursing interventions based on the evidence. The ability to provide evidence for nursing interventions is critical to all aspects of patient care, including patient teaching, development of patient care policies and procedures, and provision of direct patient care. PMID:17063616

Gobel, Barbara Holmes; Beck, Susan L; O'Leary, Colleen

2006-10-01

136

"Negotiating, navigating, and networking": three strategies used by nursing leaders to shape the adoption and incorporation of simulation into nursing curricula-a grounded theory study.  

PubMed

Background. Implementing simulation requires a substantial commitment of human and financial resources. Despite this, little is known about the strategies used by academic nursing leaders to facilitate the implementation of a simulation program in nursing curricula. Methods. A constructivist grounded theory study was conducted within 13 nursing programs in Ontario, Canada. Perspectives of key stakeholders (n = 27) including nursing administrators (n = 6), simulation leaders (n = 9), and nursing faculty (n = 12) were analyzed using the constant comparison method. Results. Nursing leaders, specifically nursing administrators and simulation leaders who successfully led the adoption and incorporation of simulation into nursing curricula, worked together and utilized negotiating, navigating, and networking strategies that impacted the adoption and incorporation of simulation into nursing curricula. Conclusions. Strategies that were found to be useful when planning and executing the adoption and incorporation of an innovation, specifically simulation, into nursing curricula provide practical approaches that may be helpful to nurse leaders when embarking upon an organizational change. PMID:25093122

Taplay, Karyn; Jack, Susan M; Baxter, Pamela; Eva, Kevin; Martin, Lynn

2014-01-01

137

Woman-Centered Maternity Nursing Education and Practice  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this Heideggerian phenomenological study was to uncover the meanings of the clinical experiences of registered nurses working in maternity settings after they studied maternity nursing from a woman-centered, feminist perspective in a generic baccalaureate nursing program. Purposeful sampling was conducted to locate and recruit nurses who had graduated from this nursing program between the December 1996 and December 1998 semesters and were currently working in a maternal-newborn clinical setting. Each participant had taken the required woman-centered, maternity-nursing course during her/his undergraduate education. Data collection included an individual, open-ended interview that focused on the nurses' descriptions of their everyday practices as maternity nurses. Nineteen maternal-newborn nurses between the ages of 23 and 43 years who had been in practice from six months to three years were interviewed. The constitutive patterns identified from the interviews were: “Otherness,” “Being and Becoming Woman-Centered,” and “Tensions in Practicing Woman-Centered Care.” Findings revealed that the nurses had a raised awareness of oppressive maternity care practices and applied ideology of woman-centeredness as a framework for providing more humanistic care. Creating woman-centered maternity care meant negotiating tensions and barriers in medically focused maternity settings and looking for opportunities for advocacy and woman-empowerment. The barriers the nurses faced in implementing woman-centered care exposed limitations to childbearing choices and nursing practices that remain problematic in maternity care. PMID:17273327

Giarratano, Gloria

2003-01-01

138

Scholarly publication practices of Doctor of Nursing Practice-prepared nurses.  

PubMed

Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) graduates are expected to contribute to nursing knowledge through empirically based studies testing the effectiveness of practice approaches that ultimately benefit patients and health care systems. This article describes publication practices of DNP graduates in the scholarly literature. Published studies (2005 to 2012) with at least one author with a DNP degree were identified. The search yielded 300 articles in 59 journals; 175 met the inclusion criteria and were included in this study. A codebook, consisting of 15 major categories, was used to extract relevant information. Original clinical investigations were the most frequent, followed by practice-focused patient and provider studies. The number of studies published in peer-reviewed journals with DNP-prepared authors increased over time. We recommend greater integration of translational science models into DNP curricula to achieve the goal of publishing scholarly products that use evidence to improve either practice or patient outcomes. PMID:23855342

Broome, Marion E; Riner, Mary E; Allam, Eman S

2013-08-01

139

Anxiety and surplus in nursing practice: lessons from Lacan and Bataille.  

PubMed

It is well established, following Menzies' work, that nursing practice produces considerable anxiety. Like Menzies, we bring a psychoanalytic perspective to a theorization of anxiety in nursing and do so in order to consider nursing practice in the light of psychoanalytic theory, although from a Lacanian perspective. We also draw on Bataille's notion of 'surplus'. These concepts provide the theoretical framework for a study investigating how some clinical nurses are able to remain in clinical practice rather than leave the profession or seek work at a distance from the bedside. We conducted focus groups and present here an analysis of two fragments of nurses' speech. We found the nurses responded from one of two positions. In the first position, the nurses focus on doctors, complain about the surplus afforded them, and call for it to be eliminated. In this way, the nursing group is similar to other groups, considered by Bataille, who also attempt to get rid of a surplus. However, in the second position, the nurses stay with the surplus, tolerating it as they nurse the patient. This latter position is one where the nurse practises with a focus on the patient rather than being distracted by their dispute over the doctor's privilege. The importance of this paper is in its illustration of two distinct positions from which the nurse can practise: one that is not optimal because the nurse is distracted and the other that is more focused on practice, and thus the nurse is in a position to provide the best care possible to patients. PMID:24460865

Evans, Alicia M; Glass, Nel; Traynor, Michael

2014-07-01

140

The Historical Evolution of Theories and Conceptual Models for Nursing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The development of nursing models can be traced to the inception of nursing as a profession. Florence Nightingale laid the foundation for current nursing practice and differentiated nursing from medicine. The late 19th and early 20th centuries contributed a number of important nurse theorists, better known for other contributions to the neophyte…

Hawkins, Joellen W.

141

Communication standards: impact on nursing practice.  

PubMed

1. BACKGROUND INFORMATION. In order to meet the demands of processing large amounts of data, hospitals must look to innovative methods of information handling. One new method currently in use is the computerized patient record (CPR) (Dick & Steen, 1991). To successfully implement the CPR, many factors must be considered, including: (a) the fact that the database is dependent upon several different departments and resources for information; (b) the information needs of each department differs, making selection of a single information system that encompasses all users' needs difficult; and (c) operating systems may be incompatible, hampering the process of networking and exchanging, processing, and retrieving data in an integrated manner. Yet the integration of systems is central to the successful development of the CPR. 2. PURPOSE. Establishment of communication standards for health care promotes the effective integration of patient information across various computer systems (McDonald, 1990). To achieve this level of automation, standard organizations must unite in the development and implementation of communication standards for health care. This poster will explore: (a) data on communication standards; (b) the process of reaching standards; (c) established communication standards; and (d) the impact of communication standards on nursing practice. In addition, we will present a model for an integrated patient focused system of the future. Today, communication standards continue to evolve in health care. Many professional organizations share the goal of developing communication standards between clinical systems (McDonald, 1990). Standards to be explored in this poster include: the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), the Medical Data Interchange Standard (MEDIX), the Medical Information Bus (MIB), and Health Level (HL7). Evolving standards will define protocols and procedures for the effective exchange of easy integration of information systems. Once standards are established for health care, society will benefit from the ability to: (a) compare health care costs; (b) measure the effectiveness of treatment; and (c) provide clinicians with comprehensive patient information (Rishel, 1992). 3. IMPLICATIONS. There is very little in existing literature and research studies on the impact of communication standards on nursing practice. Nurse researchers willing to assume the challenge of conducting studies on the impact of communication standards on nursing practice will forge new territory. Implications for nursing from the development of communication standards include: (a) increased productivity, (b) definition of a clinical data set, (c) improved quality patient care, and (d) easier system implementations. PMID:8591452

Walker, A

1995-01-01

142

The creative élan of nursing theory: indispensable to leadership.  

PubMed

The author discusses how nursing theoretical knowledge contributes to nursing leadership and how the use of nursing theory can build confidence in nurse leaders in all settings, drawing on examples from selected theorists' work. It is suggested that when nursing theory is not fully valued by the profession, not only knowledge is lost but also the language that helps nurses to lead. However, the vision and the voice of nursing theory will allow nurses to lead with creativity and to tap into innovation that facilitates contributions to healthcare. To be firmly, intellectually, and enthusiastically grounded in one's disciplinary knowledge sets the stage to being able to lead effectively. Four aspects of leadership are addressed: clinical, interdisciplinary, nursing education, and interpersonal nursing. Our accumulated nursing theories can help nurse leaders to meet contemporary healthcare challenges by providing answers that help to focus on improvement, patient-centered care, critical reflection, and caring. PMID:25248779

Donohue-Porter, Patricia

2014-10-01

143

Informatics in the Doctor of Nursing Practice Curriculum  

PubMed Central

In 2006, The American Association of Colleges of Nursing approved a new doctoral degree for clinical leaders, the Doctor of Nursing Practice. These new advanced practice leaders will need sophisticated skills in informatics to acquire and use data, information, and knowledge in their roles. This paper proposes a foundational course for all Doctor of Nursing Practice students and some strategies for integrating informatics throughout the curriculum. PMID:18693859

Jenkins, Melinda; Wilson, Marisa; Ozbolt, Judy

2007-01-01

144

Impact of Evidence and Health Policy on Nursing Practice.  

PubMed

The story of evidence-based practice in nursing is long, with many successes, contributors, leaders, scientists, and enthusiasts. Nurse educators have great advantages offered from a wide variety of educational resources for evidence-based practice. These resources offer students the opportunity to connect their emerging competencies with clinical needs for best practices in clinical and microsystem changes. PMID:25458138

Geurden, Bart; Adriaenssens, Jef; Franck, Erik

2014-12-01

145

The Essentials of Doctoral Education for Advanced Nursing Practice  

E-print Network

1 The Essentials of Doctoral Education for Advanced Nursing Practice TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Introduction Background 3 Comparison Between Research-Focused and Practice-Focused Doctoral Education 3 AACN Roles 7 The Essentials of Doctoral Education for Advanced Nursing Practice 8 I. Scientific Underpinnings

Acton, Scott

146

Hallmarks of the Professional Nursing Practice Environment. AACN White Paper.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This white paper from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing depicts the current environment of nursing practice, including supply and demand. It describes work environments that support professional practice and outlines eight indicators for the practice environment. Contains 48 references and an appendix with suggested questions for…

Journal of Professional Nursing, 2002

2002-01-01

147

Practical Advice for Perioperative Travel Nurses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Travel nursing presents unique opportunities that permanent employees may never experience. Today's nursing shortage allows travel nurses to fill temporary staff positions while experiencing the sights, culture, and cuisine of a location of their choosing. This creates a beneficial situation for travel nurses, hospitals, travel companies, and, ultimately, pationis. Knowledgeable, flexible nurses and traveler-friendly hospitals can extend contracts if mutually

Cindy L. Brumley

2002-01-01

148

A Phenomenographic Study Exploring Nursing Education and Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to illuminate the qualitatively different ways in which three nurses with an associate degree (ADN) and three nurses with a baccalaureate degree (BSN) experience, conceptualize, perceive, and understand their own nursing practice within the context of their educational background. Using a phenomenographic methodology…

Degen, Greta M.

2010-01-01

149

Public Policy and Planning for Nurse Education and Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report focuses on nursing educational and practice issues that government officials may have to address in the near future. The report provides statistical information on nurses, compares statistics for white and black nurses, and recommends policies for the future. Data was gathered for the report during a three-year study of 5,175…

Feldbaum, Eleanor G.; Levitt, Morris J.

150

Building evidence-based practice with staff nurses through mentoring  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evidence- based practice (EBP) is an effective way for nurses to improve patient outcomes. Although EBP has gained popularity, barriers to implementation exist. This study explored whether mentoring neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) nurses in EBP would increase their participation in EBP. A sample of 20 nurses were mentored in an EBP project. The EBP Beliefs Scale and EBP Implementation

Kathleen DiGaudio Mariano; Linda M. Caley; Linda Eschberger; Ann Woloszyn; Patricia Volker; Michael S. Leonard; Ying Tung

2009-01-01

151

The Competencies in Nutrition Essential for Comprehensive Nursing Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Faculty of nursing education programs within the Georgia university system were surveyed to ascertain their opinions about the nutrition competencies that they consider essential for comprehensive nursing practice and the level of nursing education program(s) to which these competencies are best suited. The survey instrument, 56 competency…

Trooboff, Rebecca C.

152

Practical Nursing Education: Criteria and Procedures for Accreditation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The third in a series of pamphlets on practical nursing education, this document contains information on accreditation standards governing nursing programs. Included are announcements of: (1) available accreditation and consultation services, (2) policies regulating accreditation eligibility, (3) standards of ethics by which nursing programs are…

National Association for Practical Nurse Education and Service, Inc., New York, NY.

153

Addressing sexual violence through preventive nursing practice.  

PubMed

Approximately 1 in 20 women will experience sexual violence at some point in her life. The negative health consequences to women can be serious and lifelong, prompting the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization to declare sexual violence a public health problem. Nurses, in their provision of care to individuals and communities, can contribute to improved outcomes related to the problem of sexual violence through the application of preventive care practices. DOI: 10.1111/1751-486X.12160. PMID:25495968

Long, Denise Callahan

2014-12-01

154

Assuring Quality and Access in Advanced Practice Nursing: A Challenge to Nurse Educators.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Advanced practice nurses are assuming increasingly accountable roles in primary health care. A doctor of nursing practice degree would signify the high level of competency they achieve. Columbia University's training model is an example of the preparation needed for this level of professional practice. (SK)

Mundinger, Mary O.; Cook, Sarah Sheets; Lenz, Elizabeth R.; Piacentini, Karen; Auerhahn, Carolyn; Smith, Jennifer

2000-01-01

155

Pain Management: Knowledge and Attitudes of Senior Nursing Students and Practicing Registered Nurses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite scientific advances in pain management, inadequate pain relief in hospitalized patients continues to be an on-going phenomenon. Although nurses do not prescribe medication for pain, the decision to administer pharmacological or other interventions for pain relief is part of nursing practice. Nurses play a critical role in the relief of…

Messmer, Sherry

2009-01-01

156

Practical Nurses Five Years After Graduation. Nurse Career-Pattern Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To provide descriptive data of practical nursing manpower and develop hypotheses based on significant relationships between responses on the questionnaires, the National League for Nursing undertook a longitudinal study of men and women who entered nursing school in the fall of 1962. Data were obtained by a series of questionnaires which had been…

Knopf, Lucille; And Others

157

Put Theory into Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When making decisions that impact student learning, college educators often consider previous experiences, precedent, common sense, and advice from colleagues. But how often do they consider theory? At a recent state-level educators' meeting, the authors of this article asked 50 student affairs educators about the use of theory in their practice.…

Jaeger, Audrey J.; Dunstan, Stephany; Thornton, Courtney; Rockenbach, Alyssa B.; Gayles, Joy G.; Haley, Karen J.

2013-01-01

158

Potentials Unlimited: Nursing Practice, Education and Administration. Nursing Research Conference Proceedings (1st, Fresno, California, April 8, 1987).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purposes of this conference were: (1) to present research representing a variety of topics and study designs; (2) to disseminate findings of nursing research; and (3) to stimulate the use of research and theory as a basis for clinical, educational, and administrative practice. The keynote address and two invited presentations are presented in…

Jacobsen-Webb, Marilyn-Lu, Ed.

159

The scope of private practice nursing in an Australian sample.  

PubMed

The changing Australian health care system is creating new opportunities for nurses who work directly with clients in private practice settings. This study examines the scope of practice of a cohort of nurses in private practice. In a questionnaire sent to 106 self-employed nurse entrepreneurs, questions were asked pertaining to the participants' scope of practice, their clients, the types of services offered, and their fee structures. Questions about scope of practice were divided into domains of clinical practice, business consultancy, education, and research. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected for a final sample 54 eligible responses. Participants had been in private practice for an average of 7.6 years (range: 1-20) and reported a mean of 21 years of nursing experience (range: 4-42) before entering private practice. Over half held diplomas in specialty areas. Most participants reported clinical practice, consultancy, or education as the primary work domain; research was much less important as a work activity. Nurses reported difficulties with building client base and receiving adequate fees for service, particularly in clinical practice. Increasing awareness within the nursing profession and health sector about various aspects of private practice nursing could improve service quality for their clients. PMID:15363028

Wilson, Anne; Averis, Andrea; Walsh, Ken

2004-01-01

160

Sexual health and the practice nurse: a survey of reported practice and attitudes  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundPractice nurses have an important role in the provision of sexual health services in general practice.AimThis study set out to determine practice nurses' reported practice and training in sexual health, attitudes towards sexual health, barriers to discussing sexual health with patients, and training needs.MethodA confidential self-administered postal questionnaire survey was sent to all 298 practice nurses in one English health

Tim Stokes; Judith Mears

2000-01-01

161

78 FR 65342 - National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Administration National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice of Meeting...meeting: Name: National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice (NACNEP). Dates...Assistant, National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice, Parklawn...

2013-10-31

162

Ethics and Transcultural Nursing Care.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Argues that nursing practice and theory cannot be ethical unless cultural factors are taken into consideration and that ethical/transcultural nursing is central to the philosophy and practice of nursing. (Author)

Eliason, Michele J.

1993-01-01

163

Reimagining Nursing's Place in the History of Clinical Practice  

PubMed Central

This work posits how medical history might be conceptualized if nurses and nursing history was used as the analytical lens. Nursing is seen not as a separate part or subsection of medical history, but rather one that is deeply embedded in the relationships and social order of clinical practice. Nursing is an analytical category in and of itself. By approaching nursing as such a category, we enlarge “new notions of historical significance” to encompass personal, political, public, and private activities that constitute medical experiences. PMID:18375461

Fairman, Julie; D'Antonio, Patricia

2008-01-01

164

Perceptions of Liberal Education of Two Types of Nursing Graduates: The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), which defines the expectations of a new baccalaureate-prepared nurse, includes a liberal education as a desired outcome for bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) graduates. A liberal education is thought to provide the professional nurse with the skills needed to practice nursing, including…

DeBrew, Jacqueline Kayler

2010-01-01

165

Bridging nursing practice and education through a strategic global partnership.  

PubMed

To forge strong relationships among nurse scholars from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, PA (USA); University of Botswana School of Nursing, Gaborone, Botswana; the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; Princess Marina Hospital (PMH), Gaborone; and the Ministry of Health of Botswana, a strategic global partnership was created to bridge nursing practice and education. This partnership focused on changing practice at PMH through the translation of new knowledge and evidence-based practice. Guided by the National Institutes of Health team science field guide, the conceptual implementation of this highly successful practice change initiative is described in detail, highlighting our strategies, challenges and continued collaboration for nurses to be leaders in improving health in Botswana. PMID:25355182

Stringer, Marilyn; Rajeswaran, Lakshmi; Dithole, Kefalotse; Hoke, Linda; Mampane, Patricia; Sebopelo, Sheila; Molefe, Margret; Muecke, Marjorie A; Rich, Victoria L; Polomano, Rosemary C

2014-10-30

166

Knowledge, attitudes and competence in nursing practice of typhoon disaster relief work among Chinese nurses: A questionnaire survey.  

PubMed

The aim of this paper is to examine the relationships among nurses' knowledge of, attitudes towards and level of competence in nursing practice, as well as factors influencing nurses' competence in nursing practice, in typhoon disaster relief work. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted using a self-developed questionnaire to obtain data from 607 nurses working in four tertiary hospitals and two secondary hospitals in Fujian, China, in November 2011. Our findings show that the nurses' average percentage scores on their responses to questions in the domains of knowledge, attitudes and practice were 66.33%, 68.87% and 67.60%, respectively. The findings demonstrated a significant positive relationship between nurses' attitudes and their practice. Nurses' working unit, prior training in typhoon disaster relief, current position of employment and attitudes were significant predictors of nurses' competence in practice. The results indicate that strategies need to be developed for nurses to improve their knowledge, attitudes and practice. PMID:24219840

Jiang, Lin; He, Hong-Gu; Zhou, Wen-Guang; Shi, Su-Hua; Yin, Ting-Ting; Kong, Yue

2015-02-01

167

Pain assessment practices with nursing home residents.  

PubMed

The purpose of this research was to describe the kinds of pain assessments nursing home staff use with nursing home residents and the characteristics and behaviors of residents that staff consider as they assess pain. Twenty-one focus groups were held in 12 nursing homes. Nurses and other nursing home staff attended the focus groups. Coding techniques consistent with ethnographic methodology were used for data analysis. Four themes identified an underlying uncertainty in assessing residents' pain, the staff relationship-centered approach to pain assessment, the resident cues that alert staff to pain, and residents' characteristics important to the nursing assessment. Composition of focus groups made a difference in participation of certified nursing assistants in focus group discussion. Urban and rural differences were noted across the focus groups. Research is needed to further refine pain assessment techniques specifically for nursing home settings. PMID:15466611

Clark, Lauren; Jones, Katherine; Pennington, Karen

2004-11-01

168

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING IN MISSISSIPPI: CHANGES IN CONTEXT AND PRACTICE.  

PubMed

Current standards and competencies guiding public health nursing (PHN) practice promote population-focused practice, but few studies have examined the extent to which change toward this type of practice has occurred. A cross-sectional, mail-back survey was conducted among public health nurses in Mississippi to examine recent changes in their practice, contextual factors related to population-focused practice, and recommendations for improving practice and educational preparation for practice. The survey response rate was 54% (n=150 [of 277]). Participants were predominantly female (95%), White (85%), 46 years or older (62%) and held an associate degree in nursing (69%). Most experienced nurses (n=106, 70%) reported perceived practice changes compared to five years prior, but did not consistently report changes toward greater population-focused practice. Participants reported funding decreases and negative effects on practice stemming from the nursing shortage. Recommendations for improving practice conditions included increasing resources, improving workplace environment and management practices, changing the focus of services, and promoting awareness of public health and PHN. Recommendations for improving education included providing more clinical experiences in public health settings and increasing financial supports and distance learning options. Additional research is needed to determine the nature and characteristics of population-focused PHN as practiced in Mississippi and elsewhere. PMID:21243042

Kaiser, Betty L; Zahner, Susan J; Simani, Julie

2010-12-01

169

Is compassion essential to nursing practice?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Norwegian Nurses' Association recently (2001) approved a new code of ethics that included compassion as one of the basic values in nursing care.This paper examines the idea of compassion in the context of the Bible story of the Good Samaritan using an analysis of qualitative data from nurses' clinical work with psychiatric patients.The aim is to show how the

MARIT HELENE HEM; KRISTIN HEGGEN

2004-01-01

170

Child hearing health: practice of the Family Health Strategy nurses.  

PubMed

Objective Evaluating the practice of nurses of the Family Health Strategy (FHS) in child hearing health care. Method A normative assessment of structure and process, with 37 nurses in the Family Health Units, in the city of Recife, Pernambuco. The data collection instrument originated from the logical model of child hearing health care provided by nurses of the Family Health Strategy, and the matrix of indicators for evaluation of nursing practice. Results All the nurses identified the hearing developmental milestones. At least two risk factors were identified by 94.5% of the nurses, and 21.6% of them carried out educational activities. Conclusion The normative assessment was considered adequate despite existing limitations in the structure and process. PMID:25493491

Azevedo, Suelen Brito; Leal, Luciana Pedrosa; Lima, Maria Luiza Lopes Timóteo; Griz, Silvana Maria Sobral

2014-10-01

171

Toward clarification of the doctor of nursing practice degree.  

PubMed

The doctor of nursing practice (DNP) degree has been recommended by the American Association of College of Nursing (AACN) as the terminal degree in nursing practice by 2015 (AACN, 2004). However, confusion regarding this degree still exists. To promote understanding of this degree, the pertinent history of doctoral education in nursing is reviewed. In addition, a clear definition of the degree, including the competencies of the DNP degree, is provided. A comparison of the PhD in nursing and the DNP degree is also reviewed to provide further clarification. DNP graduates may engage in various roles such as leadership, health policy advocate, and scholarship. These roles will be reviewed as well as the relevant issues associated with this degree such as use of the title "Dr.," educating others about the degree, faculty shortages, and program enrollment. Finally, the implications for emergency nursing regarding the DNP degree are discussed. PMID:20118882

Chism, Lisa Astalos

2009-01-01

172

Nurse-led home visitation programme to improve health-related quality of life and reduce disability among potentially frail community-dwelling older people in general practice: a theory-based process evaluation.  

PubMed

BackgroundPopulation ageing fosters new models of care delivery for older people that are increasingly integrated into existing care systems. In the Netherlands, a primary-care based preventive home visitation programme has been developed for potentially frail community-dwelling older people (aged ¿75 years), consisting of a comprehensive geriatric assessment during a home visit by a practice nurse followed by targeted interdisciplinary care and follow-up over time. A theory-based process evaluation was designed to examine (1) the extent to which the home visitation programme was implemented as planned and (2) the extent to which general practices successfully redesigned their care delivery.MethodsUsing a mixed-methods approach, the focus was on fidelity (quality of implementation), dose delivered (completeness), dose received (exposure and satisfaction), reach (participation rate), recruitment, and context. Twenty-four general practices participated, of which 13 implemented the home visitation programme and 11 delivered usual care to older people. Data collection consisted of semi-structured interviews with practice nurses (PNs), general practitioners (GPs), and older people; feedback meetings with PNs; structured registration forms filled-out by PNs; and narrative descriptions of the recruitment procedures and registration of inclusion and drop-outs by members of the research team.ResultsFidelity of implementation was acceptable, but time constraints and inadequate reach (i.e., the relatively healthy older people participated) negatively influenced complete delivery of protocol elements, such as interdisciplinary cooperation and follow-up of older people over time. The home visitation programme was judged positively by PNs, GPs, and older people. Useful tools were offered to general practices for organising proactive geriatric care.ConclusionsThe home visitation programme did not have major shortcomings in itself, but the delivery offered room for improvement. General practices received useful tools to redesign their care delivery from reactive towards proactive care, but perceived barriers require attention to allow for sustainability of the home visitation programme over time. PMID:25344322

Stijnen, Mandy M N; Jansen, Maria W J; Duimel-Peeters, Inge G P; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J M

2014-10-25

173

Evaluation of nurse engagement in evidence-based practice.  

PubMed

The purpose of this project was to explore nurses' willingness to question and change practice. Nurses were invited to report practice improvement opportunities, and participants were supported through the process of a practice change. The project leader engaged to the extent desired by the participant. Meetings proceeded until the participant no longer wished to continue, progress was blocked, or practice was changed. Evaluation of the evidence-based practice change process occurred. Fifteen nurses reported 23 practice improvement opportunities. The majority (12 of 15) preferred to have the project leader review the evidence. Fourteen projects changed practice; 4 were presented at conferences. Multiple barriers were identified throughout the process and included loss of momentum, the proposed change involved other disciplines, and low level or controversial evidence. Practice issues were linked to quality metrics, cost of care, patient satisfaction, regulatory compliance, and patient safety. Active engagement by nurse leaders was needed for a practice change to occur. Participants identified important problems previously unknown to hospital administrators. The majority of nurses preferred involvement in practice change based on clinical problem solving when supported by others to provide literature review and manage the process through committees. Recommendations include supporting a culture that encourages employees to report practice improvement opportunities and provide resources to assist in navigating the identified practice change. PMID:24441453

Davidson, Judy E; Brown, Caroline

2014-01-01

174

Cultural relativism and cultural diversity: implications for nursing practice.  

PubMed

This article examines the doctrine of cultural relativism in nursing practice. To introduce the issue, an overview of the intellectual history of cultural relativism is presented. The academic themes of the debate surrounding cultural relativism are illustrated with an example of the social controversy in France involving cultural relativism as used to defend the practice of female genital excision among immigrant communities. The dilemma faced by nursing in making cross-cultural judgments is then examined in the light of the academic and social debates. The article concludes with a theoretical resolution of the issue of cultural relativism for nursing practice that is based on hermeneutic philosophy. PMID:9266012

Baker, C

1997-09-01

175

Protocol Page 1 of 2 Clinical Manual -Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

Protocol Page 1 of 2 Clinical Manual - Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROTOCOL FOR: Sensory Perception, Altered DESIRED PATIENT OUTCOME: CLINICAL ASSESSMENT AND CARE: 1. Impaired verbal communication: the patient

Oliver, Douglas L.

176

Fostering Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Evidence-based nursing practice is impeded by low numbers of baccalaureate nurses, lack of critical perspectives toward research, the volume of information, and conflicting worldviews. Teaching strategies to address the challenge include fostering the ability to question and initiating teacher/student dialog. (SK)

Rambur, Betty

1999-01-01

177

Representing nursing practice: evaluating the effectiveness of a nursing classification system.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP) in representing the contributions of nursing to health-care outcomes in Canada. The ICNP BetaVersion was used to code retrospective nursing data extracted from patient records originating in acute care, in-patient mental health care, home care, and long-term-care practice settings. In spite of wide variation in documentation practices, ICNP achieved matches with the majority of nursing data. The study revealed areas for improvement in the ICNP BetaVersion, specifically with regard to granularity related to the use of natural language terms and professional terms. Recommendations for further development through research in nursing-sensitive outcomes are discussed. PMID:17450705

Kennedy, Margaret Ann; Hannah, Kathryn

2007-03-01

178

Outcomes measurement in healthcare. New imperatives for professional nursing practice.  

PubMed

Quality of healthcare is measurable and nurses in all settings are increasingly being expected to actively participate in identifying and measuring patient outcomes. To do so requires an understanding of the tools and processes currently being used to measure the quality of healthcare in this country. This article provides an overview of current efforts in the healthcare field to develop a shared outcome language and standardized national quality indicators. The challenges professional nurses face in identifying and measuring nursing-sensitive patient outcomes and the responsibility to use that data to shape nursing practice are emphasized. PMID:10690106

Huston, C J

1999-01-01

179

Use of Three Evidence-Based Postoperative Pain Assessment Practices by Registered Nurses  

Microsoft Academic Search

To provide optimal postoperative pain relief, nursing practice should be based on the best evidence available. For over 20 years, results of studies regarding nurses' use of evidence-based practices, including postoperative pain assessment practices, have shown that nurses use the practices inconsistently. The present cross-sectional survey study was conducted to: 1) determine the extent to which registered nurses caring for

Cathy L. Carlson

2009-01-01

180

In all required nursing practice courses, students are evaluated by faculty via the Collaborative Nursing Practice Evaluation Instrument. This evaluation instrument is available to view at  

E-print Network

In all required nursing practice courses, students are evaluated by faculty via the Collaborative Nursing Practice Evaluation Instrument. This evaluation instrument is available to view at http://nursing.fau.edu/newnursingsite/handbook/forms/practiceevaluation.html. The instrument describes in detail the competencies of caring that are the foundation for the nursing program

Fernandez, Eduardo

181

Continuing Education: A National Imperative for School Nursing Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Competency-based continuing education is critical to the professional development of school nurses to ensure the application of timely, age-appropriate clinical knowledge and leadership skills in the school setting. School nurses are responsible for a large number of students with a variety of complex and diverse health care needs. Benner's theory

Vought-O'Sullivan, Victoria; Meehan, Nancy K.; Havice, Pamela A.; Pruitt, Rosanne H.

2006-01-01

182

A century of practice. Occupational health nursing. 1988.  

PubMed

Occupational health nursing has grown and developed throughout the last century, from the influence of a few nurses in the late 19th century to 1988. Today's occupational health nurses have a significant impact on millions of workers across the United States and worldwide in multinational corporations. Nurses currently enjoy expanded roles, including involvement in the political arena and policy-making decisions, development of health promotion programs, research, and education, as well as providing more traditional but equally important employee health services, counseling, and teaching. The American workforce, as well as management teams, have seen the outcomes of quality occupational health nursing care and contributions throughout the years. The practice of American occupational health nursing which began in very humble surroundings and conditions in the 19th century continues to thrive in the space age of the 1980s and 1990s and to plan for the challenges of the 21st century. PMID:12526625

Parker-Conrad, Jane E

2002-12-01

183

Work engagement in nursing practice: a relational ethics perspective.  

PubMed

The concept of work engagement has existed in business and psychology literature for some time. There is a significant body of research that positively correlates work engagement with organizational outcomes. To date, the interest in the work engagement of nurses has primarily been related to these organizational outcomes. However, the value of work engagement in nursing practice is not only an issue of organizational interest, but of ethical interest. The dialogue on work engagement in nursing must expand to include the ethical importance of engagement. The relational nature of work engagement and the multiple levels of influence on nurses' work engagement make a relational ethics approach to work engagement in nursing appropriate and necessary. Within a relational ethics perspective, it is evident that work engagement enables nurses to have meaningful relationships in their work and subsequently deliver ethical care. In this article, I argue that work engagement is essential for ethical nursing practice. If engagement is essential for ethical nursing practice, the environmental and organizational factors that influence work engagement must be closely examined to pursue the creation of moral communities within healthcare environments. PMID:24714045

Keyko, Kacey

2014-12-01

184

Practice environment for nurse practitioners in California. Identifying barriers.  

PubMed Central

Barriers exist that prevent nurse practitioners from using their primary health care knowledge and skills. We present the incidence of and specific barriers experienced by nurse practitioner respondents in California, the state with the largest number of nurse practitioners in the nation. A January 1995 survey was sent to all nurse practitioners certified in California to elicit their experiences regarding legal or social barriers in their practice, with space for an open-ended response. Of an estimated 3,895 nurse practitioners in California, 2,741 (70%) returned surveys. Most nurse practitioner (65%) respondents in California are providing primary care. Perceived barriers to practice are lack of prescriptive authority, lack of support from physicians, reimbursement difficulties, and lack of public awareness. Current barriers to nurse practitioner practice in California are similar to national barriers discovered in 1992 data. The development of interprofessional dialogue and the recognition of the contributions of all primary care professionals are some of the steps that can be taken to reduce these barriers and increase the use and effectiveness of nurse practitioners in primary care. PMID:8987426

Anderson, A L; Gilliss, C L; Yoder, L

1996-01-01

185

Important interactional strategies for everyday public health nursing practice.  

PubMed

This Clinical Concepts article concerns the relational tools required by public health nurses to establish relationships with single mothers living on public assistance, mothers who are vulnerable and often stigmatized. The implications of stigmatization for relationship building are highlighted based on previous research investigating how public health nurses working in Canadian jurisdictions establish professional caring relationships with this cohort of mothers. Public health nurses employed interactional strategies including engaging in a positive manner and offering verbal commendations which served as effective relational tools to break through mothers' walls of defensiveness and to resume the dynamic process of relationship building. Building Relationship is a key practice standard for public health nurses and is instrumental to their work at both individual and community levels to improve social determinants of health. The author concludes with recommendations to facilitate building relationships during everyday public health nursing practice. PMID:24320117

Porr, Caroline J

2015-01-01

186

Ethics education in advanced practice nursing: respect for human dignity.  

PubMed

Ethics education is an essential component of academic programs that prepare nurses for advanced practice; the concept of respect for human dignity is integral to this education. Sixty-three graduate students enrolled in their first course of a nurse practitioner program completed a researcher-developed Ethics Questionnaire that was designed to elicit their baseline ethics-related knowledge, including their understanding of the concept "respect for human dignity". Qualitative analysis of data yielded findings that validate the importance of using the American Nurses Association Code of Ethics for Nurses with Interpretive Statements as an essential foundation for ethics content and as a framework for understanding the meaning of human dignity in advanced practice nursing. Assessment and learning strategies are recommended. PMID:17715804

Kalb, Kathleen A; O'Conner-Von, Susan

2007-01-01

187

A model to develop nurse leaders for rural practice.  

PubMed

Rural health disparities are due in part to access barriers to health care providers. Nursing education has been extended into rural areas, yet a limited rural research and practice literature informs the content and delivery of these educational programs. The University Of Virginia School of Nursing through a grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration developed the Nursing Leadership in Rural Health Care (NLRHC) Program. The transformational nursing leadership in rural health care (TNLRHC) model guided the development of NLRHC program content and teaching methods. This article describes the TNLRHC model and how it has steered the integration of rural content into advanced practice nursing (APN) education. The capacity of the TNLRHC model for promoting innovation in APN education is described. Recommendations regarding the future development of APN education are presented. PMID:25455327

Hauenstein, Emily J; Glick, Doris F; Kane, Catherine; Kulbok, Pamela; Barbero, Edie; Cox, Kathleen

2014-01-01

188

Promotion of evidence-based practice by professional nursing associations: literature review  

Microsoft Academic Search

AIM: This paper reports a literature review examining the activities of professional nursing associations in the promotion of evidence-based practice. BACKGROUND: Professional nursing associations can play a role in the implementation and achievement of evidence-based practice as such associations aim to develop and further educate nurses professionally, build professional networks representing the interests of nurses and the nursing profession, influence

Gerda Holleman; Aart Eliens; Marjolein van Vliet; Theo van Achterberg

2006-01-01

189

Ethics in Nursing Practice and Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The fact that ethics has become important to nurses is a reflection of two types of developments: (1) rapid expansion and application of biomedical technology, and (2) the human rights movement. Therefore, nursing involves an increasing number of activities with both moral and technical implications. (SSH)

Benoliel, Jeanne Quint

1983-01-01

190

Medication errors and professional practice of registered nurses.  

PubMed

This Australian study identified and described the incidence of medication errors among registered nurses, the type and causes of these errors and the impact that administration of medications has on the professional practice of registered nurses. Mostly, medication errors were attributed to documentation issues, including: illegible handwriting, misunderstanding abbreviations, misplaced decimal point, misreading and misinterpreting written orders. Several human factors were attributed to potential causes of medication errors, including: stress, fatigue, knowledge and skill deficits. Environmental factors, namely, interruptions and distractions during the administration of medications, were also attributed to potential errors. The study found professional nursing practice involving administration of medications had a strong education, patient and ethical focus. Over a quarter of the respondents indicated that further training in medication administration would positively impact on their nursing practice. The registered nurses also highlighted they would appreciate more time to spend with patients when administering medications. Medication errors are not the sole responsibility of any single professional group, therefore, collaboration with other health professionals is central to establishing processes, policies, strategies and systems that will reduce their occurrence. The organisation and those nurses employed within it share an accountability to ensure safe administration of medications to patients. Based on study results, several recommendations are directed towards preventing or reducing medication errors and supporting nurses in providing best practice. PMID:16619902

Deans, Cecil

2005-01-01

191

Nursing Services Delivery Theory: an open system approach  

PubMed Central

meyer r.m. & o’brien-pallas l.l. (2010)Nursing services delivery theory: an open system approach. Journal of Advanced Nursing66(12), 2828–2838. Aim This paper is a discussion of the derivation of the Nursing Services Delivery Theory from the application of open system theory to large-scale organizations. Background The underlying mechanisms by which staffing indicators influence outcomes remain under-theorized and unmeasured, resulting in a ‘black box’ that masks the nature and organization of nursing work. Theory linking nursing work, staffing, work environments, and outcomes in different settings is urgently needed to inform management decisions about the allocation of nurse staffing resources in organizations. Data sources A search of CINAHL and Business Source Premier for the years 1980–2008 was conducted using the following terms: theory, models, organization, organizational structure, management, administration, nursing units, and nursing. Seminal works were included. Discussion The healthcare organization is conceptualized as an open system characterized by energy transformation, a dynamic steady state, negative entropy, event cycles, negative feedback, differentiation, integration and coordination, and equifinality. The Nursing Services Delivery Theory proposes that input, throughput, and output factors interact dynamically to influence the global work demands placed on nursing work groups at the point of care in production subsystems. Implications for nursing The Nursing Services Delivery Theory can be applied to varied settings, cultures, and countries and supports the study of multi-level phenomena and cross-level effects. Conclusion The Nursing Services Delivery Theory gives a relational structure for reconciling disparate streams of research related to nursing work, staffing, and work environments. The theory can guide future research and the management of nursing services in large-scale healthcare organizations. PMID:20831573

Meyer, Raquel M; O’Brien-Pallas, Linda L

2010-01-01

192

Utilizing Rogers' Theory of Self-Concept in mental health nursing.  

PubMed

The work of mental health nurse is interactive in nature, the priority of which is the effective development and maintenance of a therapeutic relationship with clients. This field of nursing bases its practice on theories from many schools of thought in order to provide clients with the highest quality of care. One such theory is that of Carl Rogers whose practice as a psychotherapist was based on his Theory of Self-Concept. This paper examines the development of the Theory of Self-Concept from the works of Cooley, Mead, Allport and Rogers and relates to the therapeutic alliance between a primary nurse and a client who has been medically diagnosed as being 'depressed'. The implications for practice are considered and some of the difficulties of utilizing Rogers' theory on an in-patient unit are explored. The paper emphasizes the need for nurses to be aware of the use of such theories in order to enrich the care that clients receive. It also highlights the need for nurses to be aware of their own 'self' when working with clients, a state that can only be achieved if the nurses themselves have adequate clinical supervision and an environment which is supportive of such work. PMID:8320395

Hosking, P

1993-06-01

193

Leaving from and returning to nursing practice: contributing factors.  

PubMed

Many nurses leave nursing and never return. Others return after a period of time. Given the global shortage of nurses a better understanding of these movements is needed. The present study focused on nurses who had been out of nursing for more than five years, and explored factors that influenced their leaving and return to practice. All the nurses who had undertaken a Competency Assessment Programme at a given New Zealand tertiary institution during 2005 were invited to participate. Of the 70 questionnaires mailed out 32 (44.5%) were completed and returned. Quantitative data were analysed using Microsoft Excel, and the qualitative data were coded and analysed by means of content analysis. For each, leaving and returning, three key issues emerged. Nurses left for personal reasons, to seek a career change, or because of poor working conditions. They returned when they had the personal freedom to do so, for fiscal reasons, or because they were motivated by some sense of unfinished business. These findings indicate that it is important for educators involved with Competency Assessment Programmes to collaborate with employers in ensuring that there are opportunities for re-entry to positive work environments, with a degree of flexibility that suits the demographic characteristics of those nurses returning to practice. PMID:19928648

Jamieson, Isabel; Taua, Chris

2009-07-01

194

Clinical Procedure Page 1 of 2 Clinical Manual Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

. Initiate transfusion. APPROVAL: Nursing Standards Committee Transfusion Committee Director of Transfusion Medicine #12;Clinical Procedure Page 2 of 2 Clinical Manual ­ Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital

Oliver, Douglas L.

195

Connecting congregations: technology resources influence parish nurse practice.  

PubMed

This descriptive pilot study evaluated the influence of health resource information education and the use of Web-based communication technology on the professional practice of the parish nurse in the congregational setting. Five parish nurse participants from varied denominations in rural and nonrural Virginia received a laptop computer, printer, video projector, and webcam along with high-speed Internet access in each congregational setting. The nurses attended two group education sessions that incorporated computer applications and training in accessing and using quality health information resources and communication applications such as a group "chat" software and webcam to communicate with others through high-speed Internet access. Qualitative analysis from semistructured interviews of nurses confirmed that participants found the project to be beneficial in terms of awareness, education, and applicability of technology use in parish nurse practice. Quantitative data from preproject and postproject surveys found significant differences in nurses' abilities and confidence with technology use and application. Findings showed that the knowledge and experience gained from this study enhanced parish nurse practice and confidence in using technology for communication, health education, and counseling. PMID:19411943

Zerull, Lisa M; Near, Kelly K; Ragon, Bart; Farrell, Sarah P

2009-01-01

196

Practical Nursing for High Schools. Curriculum Bulletin 1973-74 Series No. 5.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The bulletin, a revision of Practical Nursing for High Schools published in 1963, is a guide for the licensed teacher of nursing in educating the practical nurse student. The publication can be used as a resource for developing the program in individual schools of practical nursing or to develop the behavioral objectives for each procedure. Part…

New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Bureau of Curriculum Development.

197

Reducing medication errors in nursing practice.  

PubMed

Medication errors remain one of the most common causes of unintended harm to patients. They contribute to adverse events that compromise patient safety and result in a large financial burden to the health service. The prevention of medication errors, which can happen at every stage of the medication preparation and distribution process, is essential to maintain a safe healthcare system. One third of the errors that harm patients occur during the nurse administration phase: administering medication to patients is therefore a high-risk activity. This article highlights factors that contribute to medication errors, including the safety culture of institutions. It also discusses factors that relate specifically to nurses, such as patient acuity and nursing workload, the distractions and interruptions that can occur during medication administration, the complexity of some medication calculations and administration methods, and the failure of nurses to adhere to policies or guidelines. PMID:25585768

Cloete, Linda

2015-01-14

198

Nurse Manager Emotional Intelligence as a Predictor to Registered Nurse Job Satisfaction and RN Perceptions of the Practice Environment and the Relationship to Patient, Nursing and Hospital Outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to determine if the level of Nurse Manager (NM) emotional intelligence (EI) predicted registered nurse (RN) job satisfaction and RN perceptions of the practice environment. In addition, relationships to patient, nursing, and hospital outcomes were explored. Participants included RNs (N=659) and NMs (N=38) from 53 nursing units at eight hospitals located in the southeast

Jacqueline Cecilia Munro

2011-01-01

199

Setting the climate for evidence-based nursing practice: what is the leader's role?  

PubMed

Nurses are being challenged today to justify their practice. Many clinical and policy decisions in nursing are based upon isolated, ritualistic and unsystematic forms of clinical practice. The growing movement towards establishing evidence-based nursing practice (EBNP) is situated in a systematic appraisal of the best evidence available. Nurse leaders have an obligation to cultivate sound clinical and economic practices leading to quality patient care and positive work life environments for nurses. PMID:15656249

Udod, Sonia A; Care, W Dean

2004-11-01

200

Train Practical Nurses to Become Registered Nurses: A Survey of the PN Point of View. Research Report Number 1.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To secure information about the characteristics of the practical nurse population and their opinions about registered nurse preparation, questionnaires were distributed to 2,923 practical nurses employed by the New York City Municipal Hospitals. Usable questionnaires numbered 2,361 or 81 percent of the employed PN population. Approximately 9…

Gilpatrick, Eleanor

201

The process of community health nursing clinical clerkship: A grounded theory  

PubMed Central

Background: The performance of the community health nurse depends on a combination of scientific and practical competencies acquired by educational experiences during the nursing course. Curriculum planners of nursing education need to understand nursing education to train professional and community-oriented nurses. The aim of this article is to explore the experiences of nursing students during their community health nursing clinical clerkship courses. Materials and Methods: A grounded theory approach was used to conduct this study. Twelve nursing students, 13 health-care staff members, and 10 nursing instructors were interviewed individually in 2011-2012. The interviews were tape-recorded and later transcribed verbatim. The transcriptions were analyzed using the method of Strauss and Corbin. Results: Ambivalence of motivation was the main category and included five subcategories: Professional identity, educational atmosphere, educational management, motivation-based approaches, and inadequate productivity. This paper presents the aspects of the community health nursing clerkship course from the viewpoint of students in areas such as the role of the community health nurse, attitude toward the course, medical orientation, prerequisite skills/knowledge, poor administrative planning, rotation of students, insufficient activity for students, passiveness, providing service to clients, responsibility, and inproductivity. These categories could explain the nature of the community health nursing clerkship of the Mashhad Faculty of Nursing and probably others in Iran. Conclusions: The findings revealed inadequate productivity of the community health nursing education; so, it is suggested to define a position for nurses in this setting and remove barriers and provide conditions for them to play more important roles in the promotion of community health. PMID:24554943

Ildarabadi, Eshagh; Moonaghi, Hossein Karimi; Heydari, Abbas; Taghipour, Ali

2013-01-01

202

Tanzanian Nurses Understanding and Practice of Spiritual Care  

PubMed Central

Spirituality, as a basic characteristic of humans and a contributor to human health, is regarded as part of nursing practice. The purpose of this study was to examine how Tanzanian nurses understand spirituality and spiritual care. Using the qualitative method of interpretive description, fifteen registered nurses engaged in clinical practice in a Tanzanian hospital were recruited to participate in this study. In-depth interviews using open-ended questions were carried out, tape-recorded, and transcribed verbatim. Data collection and inductive analysis occurred concurrently. In this paper, key findings are grouped under the following headings: meaning of spiritual care, recognition of spiritual needs, and interventions to respond to spiritual needs. Although there were some differences, overall participants' understanding of spirituality and spiritual care was similar to what is found in the literature about nurses in other countries. The provision of spiritual care also included some unique elements that may reflect the African context. PMID:22007322

Dhamani, Khairunnisa Aziz; Paul, Pauline; Olson, Joanne Kaye

2011-01-01

203

Preparing emotionally intelligent doctor of nursing practice leaders.  

PubMed

The Institute of Medicine (IOM) identified the need for interdisciplinary teams that collaborate, communicate, and integrate care across settings to improve health care delivery. Focusing on innovative strategies that address leadership skills in graduate nursing education could have an effect on interdisciplinary partnerships, transformation of patient care, and new styles of leadership to change current practice models. In response to the IOM guidelines, we incorporated emotional intelligence as a component in our Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) leadership curriculum. This article describes a new action-oriented leadership model that prepares the DNP graduate for leadership roles to serve the public and the nursing discipline during a time of radical changes in health care. Behavioral profile, nontraditional readings, and online discussions form the basis of the model. The principles and strategies in this article can be applied to nursing education in multiple arenas, at both the undergraduate and graduate settings. PMID:22624564

Renaud, Michelle T; Rutledge, Carolyn; Shepherd, Laurel

2012-08-01

204

77 FR 59931 - Single Source Program Expansion Supplement Award to Nurse Education, Practice, Quality and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Expansion Supplement Award to Nurse Education, Practice, Quality and Retention...Academic Credit for Nursing Education Programs, and undertake a dissemination...program at TAMUCC-CONHS, an online nursing education program offered to...

2012-10-01

205

Mental health nurses in general practice - a personal perspective.  

PubMed

For the past 2 years I have been working as a mental health nurse (MHN) at Lyttleton Street Clinic, a general practice clinic in my hometown of Castlemaine in Victoria. My background is as a general and mental health nurse, more recently in the mental health sector at the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service. I also have postgraduate qualifications in women's health and have recently trained as a yoga teacher. My position at the clinic is supported by the national Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program (MHNIP). The role has proven to be immensely satisfying; I have never felt so useful. PMID:22962637

Condon, Cindy

2012-09-01

206

Practical implications of pre-employment nurse assessments.  

PubMed

Hiring nurses is a difficult task that can have serious repercussions for medical facilities. If nurses without proper skills are hired, patients can suffer from insufficient quality of care and potentially life-threatening conditions. Nurse applicants' technical knowledge is extremely important to avoid negative outcomes; however, there are soft skills that factor into their success, such as bedside manner, personality, communication, and decision making. In order for medical facilities to select and maintain high-performing nurse staff, hiring managers must incorporate evaluations for these types of skills in their hiring process. The current study focused on using content/criterion-related validation design to create assessments by which nurse applicants can be evaluated for both technical knowledge/skills and soft skills. The study included participation of more than 876 nursing staff members. To rank applicants on divergent skills, 3 assessment types were investigated, resulting in the creation of an assessment with 3 components. The clinical, situational, and behavioral components that were created measure applicants' job knowledge, interpersonal competency in medical facility-related situations, and aspects of personality and behavior, respectively. Results indicate that using the assessment can predict 45% of a nurse applicant's future job performance. Practical implications include hiring and maintaining a higher quality of nurses and decreased hiring costs. PMID:23629042

Kuthy, James E; Ramon, Cheree; Gonzalez, Ronald; Biddle, Dan A

2013-01-01

207

Current Continuing Professional Education Practice among Malaysian Nurses  

PubMed Central

Nurses need to participate in CPE to update their knowledge and increase their competencies. This research was carried out to explore their current practice and the future general needs for CPE. This cross-sectional descriptive study involved registered nurses from government hospitals and health clinics from Peninsular Malaysia. Multistage cluster sampling was used to recruit 1000 nurses from four states of Malaysia. Self-explanatory questionnaires were used to collect the data, which were analyzed using SPSS version 16. Seven hundred and ninety-two nurses participated in this survey. Only 80% (562) of the nurses had engaged in CPE activities during the past 12 months. All attendance for the various activities was below 50%. Workshops were the most popular CPE activity (345, 43.6%) and tertiary education was the most unpopular activity (10, 1.3%). The respondents did perceive the importance of future CPE activities for career development. Mandatory continuing professional education (MCPE) is a key measure to ensure that nurses upgrade their knowledge and skills; however, it is recommended that policy makers and nurse leaders in the continuing professional development unit of health service facilities plan CPE activities to meet registered nurses' (RNs) needs and not simply organizational requirements. PMID:24523961

Chong, Mei Chan; Francis, Karen; Cooper, Simon; Abdullah, Khatijah Lim

2014-01-01

208

Evidence-Based Practice Among Nurses in Italy  

Microsoft Academic Search

A cross-sectional survey was conducted among a random sample of 449 nurses in Italy, using a self-administered questionnaire to assess knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors regarding evidence-based practice (EBP). A significantly higher level of knowledge was observed among nurses who (a) did not work in medical and surgical wards; (b) believed that the evaluation of the efficacy of the health interventions

Alberico Filippini; Alessandra Sessa; Gabriella Di Giuseppe; Italo F. Angelillo

2011-01-01

209

Sexuality in nursing homes: practice and policy.  

PubMed

Older adults' sexuality and sexual expression are often overlooked in nursing home and residential care settings. Despite cultural beliefs that this population is asexual, sexual activity occurs frequently among residents in long-term care. This study, using written survey instrumentation, examines the scope of resident sexuality, staff reactions to sexual behavior, and the policies and guidelines used in 91 nursing homes to address residents' sexual activity. Eighty-five percent of respondents reported that sexual activity had occurred in their homes, and staff reactions to sexual activity were based on general guidelines. Many responses indicated that sexual expression of residents was considered non-normative. Issues of consent, especially concerning residents with dementia, and residents' right to privacy were addressed using existing general policies. Survey results demonstrate a need for specific policies and staff training regarding sexual expression to be developed with the input of nurses, family members, and residents. PMID:23614386

Doll, Gayle M

2013-07-01

210

Important issues in clinical practice: perspectives of oncology nurses.  

PubMed

As the 1990's draw to a close, the cancer care environment is undergoing rapid change. Many issues exist within the complex environment of cancer care that could create a challenge in providing quality nursing care to patients. This study examined the current challenges oncology nurses face in their daily practice. Surveys were mailed to members of the Canadian Association of Nurses in Oncology asking them to indicate on a list of 80 issues which were problems in their daily practice. From the responses of 249 oncology nurses, the following items were ranked as the top 10 problems: anxiety, coping/stress management, bereavement/death, fatigue, metastatic disease, comfort, pain control and management, quality of life, recurrence of primary cancer, and nurse burn-out. Principal component analysis was conducted to determine if patterns existed in the way problems had been rated. Five components explained 42% of the variance in the data set: comprehensive cancer care, communication, experience of loss, terminal illness, and signs and symptoms. Implications for nursing practice, education and research are highlighted. PMID:10786471

Fitch, M I; Bakker, D; Conlon, M

1999-01-01

211

Evidence-based practice among nurses in Italy.  

PubMed

A cross-sectional survey was conducted among a random sample of 449 nurses in Italy, using a self-administered questionnaire to assess knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors regarding evidence-based practice (EBP). A significantly higher level of knowledge was observed among nurses who (a) did not work in medical and surgical wards; (b) believed that the evaluation of the efficacy of the health interventions is needed in their activity; (c) believed that the clinical experience must be combined with the evidence; (d) attended a course about EBP in the last year; and (e) received information from courses and scientific journals. The perceived importance of the application of guidelines and protocols was significantly higher among nurses who (a) worked in medical wards; (b) agreed that the guidelines are useful in identifying and selecting interventions; (c) believed that the evaluation of the efficacy of the health interventions is needed in their activity; (d) believed that the clinical experience must be combined with the evidence; (e) attended a course about EBP in the last year; and (f) received information from courses and scientific journals. Nurses were more likely to have modified their practice in the last year if they attended a course about EBP in the last year and if they often/always read scientific journals and guidelines. While these data were cross-sectional and the response rate was only 49%, the results suggest that continuing education programs are needed for improving nurses' knowledge and practice of EBP among nurses in Italy. PMID:21138912

Filippini, Alberico; Sessa, Alessandra; Di Giuseppe, Gabriella; Angelillo, Italo F

2011-09-01

212

Nursing communication in nursing care to mastectomized women: a grounded theory study.  

PubMed

The goal was to understand the nurse/patient communication process, emphasizing nursing care to mastectomized women. Symbolic Interactionism and Grounded Theory were used to interview eight nurses from a referral institution in cancer treatment, using the guiding question: how do nurses perceive their communication process with mastectomized women? Data analysis allowed for the creation of a central theory: the meaning of communication in nursing care to women, constituted by three distinct but inter-related phenomena: perceiving communication, the relationship nurse/mastectomized woman and rethinking the communication nurse/mastectomized woman. With a view to satisfactory communication, professionals need to get involved and believe that their presence is as important as the performance of technical procedures that relieve situations of stress. PMID:20428697

de Almeida Araújo, Iliana Maria; da Silva, Raimunda Magalhães; Bonfim, Isabela Melo; Fernandes, Ana Fátima Carvalho

2010-01-01

213

Compass and Prerequisite Course Scores as Predictors of Success in Practical Nursing School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The nursing shortage is compounded by nursing student attrition. Schools of nursing have limited enrollment, making the admission process an important factor in resolving the ongoing nursing shortage. The purpose of this study was to identify preadmission criteria that accurately identify applicants to practical/vocational nursing (P/VN) schools…

Pritchard, Toni L. Early

2010-01-01

214

Shifting paradigms: The development of nursing identity in foreign-educated physicians retrained as nurses practicing in the United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

A unique breed of nurses for the US market is emerging-the Physician-Nurses. They are foreign-educated physicians who have retrained as nurses. The purpose of this study was to generate a theory that can explain the development of their nursing identity. Specific aims were to discover barriers that participants perceived as problematic in their transition to nursing and catalysts that influenced

Liwliwa Reyes Villagomeza

2009-01-01

215

A practical application of Katharine Kolcaba's comfort theory to cardiac patients.  

PubMed

Nursing approaches to care as based on Katharine Kolcaba's (2003) middle range nursing theory of comfort are discussed in reference to patients' suffering from symptoms related to the discomfort from cardiac syndromes. The specific intervention of "quiet time" is described for its potential use within this population as a comfort measure that addresses Kolcaba's four contexts of comfort: physical, psychospiritual, environmental and sociocultural. Without realizing it, many nurses may practice within Kolcaba's theoretical framework to promote patient comfort. Explicit applications of comfort theory can benefit nursing practice. Using comfort theory in research can provide evidence for quiet time intervention with cardiac patients. PMID:24637106

Krinsky, Robin; Murillo, Illouise; Johnson, Janet

2014-05-01

216

Toward standard classification schemes for nursing language: recommendations of the American Nurses Association Steering Committee on Databases to Support Clinical Nursing Practice.  

PubMed Central

The American Nurses Association (ANA) Cabinet on Nursing Practice mandated the formation of the Steering Committee on Databases to Support Clinical Nursing Practice. The Committee has established the process and the criteria by which to review and recommend nursing classification schemes based on the ANA Nursing Process Standards and elements contained in the Nursing Minimum Data Set (NMDS) for inclusion of nursing data elements in national databases. Four classification schemes have been recognized by the Committee for use in national databases. These classification schemes have been forwarded to the National Library of Medicine (NLM) for inclusion in the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) and to the International Council of Nurses for the development of a proposed International Classification of Nursing Practice. PMID:7850567

McCormick, K A; Lang, N; Zielstorff, R; Milholland, D K; Saba, V; Jacox, A

1994-01-01

217

Perceived Readiness for Practice of Senior Baccalaureate Nursing Students  

E-print Network

focus in this study. Theoretical Framework Bandura’s Theory of Self-efficacy was used to guide this study (see Appendix A). The Theory of Self-efficacy has its roots in Social Learning Theory, which was developed in the 1930’s. Albert Bandura... Faculty Shortage 32 Nursing School Enrollment 33 New Trends in Clinical Education 34 Clinical Partnerships 34 Simulation Experiences 35 Alternate Assignments 37 Bandura’s Theory of Self-efficacy 38 Self...

Reagor, Janet

2010-04-20

218

Comfort Theory: a unifying framework to enhance the practice environment.  

PubMed

The application of theory to practice is multifaceted. It requires a nursing theory that is compatible with an institution's values and mission and that is easily understood and simple enough to guide practice. Comfort Theory was chosen because of its universality. The authors describe how Kolcaba's Comfort Theory was used by a not-for-profit New England hospital to provide a coherent and consistent pattern for enhancing care and promoting professional practice, as well as to serve as a unifying framework for applying for Magnet Recognition Status. PMID:17099440

Kolcaba, Katharine; Tilton, Colette; Drouin, Carol

2006-11-01

219

Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders – a model for optimising the geriatric nursing practice environment  

PubMed Central

Aims and objectives To explain the relationship between a positive nurse practice environment (NPE) and implementation of evidence-based practices. To describe the components of NICHE (Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders) programmes that contribute to a positive geriatric nursing practice environment. Background The NPE is a system-level intervention for promoting quality and patient safety; however, there are population-specific factors that influence the nurses’ perception of their practice and its’ relationship with patient outcomes. Favourable perceptions of the geriatric-specific NPE are associated with better perceptions of geriatric care quality. Designs Discursive paper. Method In this selective critical analysis of the descriptive and empirical literature, we present the implementation of geriatric models in relation to the NPE and components of the NICHE programme that support hospitals’ systemic capacity to effectively integrate and sustain evidence-based geriatric knowledge into practice. Results Although there are several geriatric models and chronic care models available, NICHE has been the most successful in recruiting hospital membership as well as contributing to the depth of geriatric hospital programming. Conclusions Although all geriatric care models require significant nursing input, only NICHE focuses on the nursing staff’s perception of the care environment for geriatric practice. Studies in NICHE hospitals demonstrate that quality geriatric care requires a NPE in which the structure and processes of hospital services focus on specific patient care needs. Relevance to clinical practice The implementation of evidence-based models addressing the unique needs of hospitalised older adults requires programmes such as NICHE that serve as technical resources centre and a catalyst for networking among facilities committed to quality geriatric care. Unprecedented international growth in the ageing population compels us to examine how to adapt the successful components of NICHE to the distinctive needs of health systems throughout the world that serve older adults. PMID:23083387

Capezuti, Elizabeth; Boltz, Marie; Cline, Daniel; Dickson, Victoria Vaughn; Rosenberg, Marie-Claire; Wagner, Laura; Shuluk, Joseph; Nigolian, Cindy

2012-01-01

220

Faith community nursing scope of practice: extending access to healthcare.  

PubMed

The role of the Faith Community Nurse (FCN) is a multifaceted wholistic practice focused on individuals, families, and the faith and broader communities. The FCN is skilled in professional nursing and spiritual care, supporting health through attention to spiritual, physical, mental, and social health. FCNs can help meet the growing need for healthcare, especially for the uninsured, poor, and homeless. The contribution of FCNs on, primary prevention, health maintenance, and management of chronic disease deserves attention to help broaden understanding of the scope of FCN practice. PMID:25585467

Balint, Katherine A; George, Nancy M

2015-01-01

221

Defining neuroscience nursing practice: the 2001 role delineation study.  

PubMed

Studies that provided a blueprint for the Certified Neuroscience Registered Nurse (CNRN) examination were conducted in 1987, 1992, and 1997. In 2000, the American Board of Neuroscience Nursing (ABNN) formed a task force to re-examine the previous role delineation survey, obtain information to define current neuroscience nursing practice, and provide content validity for future CNRN examinations. Previous role delineation studies conducted by ABNN and a review of the literature provided the background for the study. The theoretical framework was the Nursing Intervention Classification (NIC) taxonomy and the methodology was a survey design. Computer Adaptive Technologies, Inc. (CAT), assisted the task force with survey development and data analysis. The survey, a three-part questionnaire, was mailed to 1,505 CNRNs and returned by 453 participants. PMID:12789716

Blissitt, Patricia A; Roberts, Stephen; Hinkle, Janice L; Kopp, Elaine M

2003-02-01

222

The recovery alliance theory of mental health nursing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The recovery alliance theory (RAT) is a mid-range theory of mental health nursing based on humanistic philosophy. The conception of the RAT was the outcome of collaboration among service users, practising mental health nurses, educationalists and managers and was developed in the context of a number of political and social changes as well as changes in the mental health field.

E. SHANLEY; M. JUBB-SHANLEY

2007-01-01

223

Accelerated second degree advanced practice nurses: how do they fare in the job market?  

PubMed

Accelerated, nontraditional, advanced practice nursing programs are an alternative way to increase the supply of nurse practitioners. This study profiles demographic and job characteristics of second degree, non-nurse college graduates who pursued graduate degrees in nursing. Graduates' sex, age, income, previous education, nursing experience, factors describing the scope of the advanced practice role, and quality of the educational experience were studied. Data were collected from 29 graduates (57%) from Virginia Commonwealth University's accelerated second-degree nursing program from 1995 through 1999. The findings have implications for nursing educators, health care administrators, employers, and other persons who plan and recruit for this type of nursing education program. PMID:11044296

White, K R; Wax, W A; Berrey, A L

2000-01-01

224

Oral care practices of intensive care nurses: a descriptive study.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to investigate intensive care unit (ICU) nurses' views and practices on oral care and to define the factors related to oral care measures. A study was carried out in eight ICUs of a teaching hospital in 2008. One hundred one nurses constituted the study sample. The data were collected using 'Oral Care Practices Survey' which included demographic characteristics (5 items) and current oral care practices (13 items). Oral care was given the highest priority by nearly 60% of the nurses. The most commonly used solution was sodium bicarbonate (79.2%), and the most frequently used equipment was foam swab (82.2%). Oral care was carried out less than every 4 h per day by 44.5% of the nurses. The oral care products and solutions were reported to be different in almost every unit. The relationship between the use of toothpaste and the place of employment was statistically significant (x(2) = 24.566, d.f. = 6, P = 0.000). There was a statistical significance between the clinics and frequency of oral care (x(2) = 81.486, d.f. = 42, P = 0.000). This study suggests that there is a wide variety of type and frequency of oral care measures among ICU nurses. Optimal oral care supported by evidence is an effective prevention method for eliminating oral complications. PMID:22845634

Türk, Gülengün; Kocaçal Güler, Elem; E?er, Ismet; Khorshid, Leyla

2012-08-01

225

Developing entry-to-practice nursing informatics competencies for registered nurses.  

PubMed

Information and communication technologies (ICT) have brought about significant changes to the processes of health care delivery and changed how nurses perform in clinical, administrative, academic, and research settings. Because the potential benefits of ICT are significant, it is critical that new nurses have the knowledge and skills in informatics to provide safe and effective care. Despite the prevalence of technology in our day to day lives, and the potential significant benefits to patients, new nurses may not be prepared to work in this evolving reality. An important step in addressing this need for ICT preparation is to ensure that new graduates are entering the work force ready for technology-enabled care environments. In this paper, we describe the process and outcomes of developing informatics entry-to-practice competencies for adoption by Canadian Schools of Nursing. PMID:24943567

Nagle, Lynn M; Crosby, Kristine; Frisch, Noreen; Borycki, Elizabeth; Donelle, Lorie; Hannah, Kathryn; Harris, Alexandra; Jetté, Sylvie; Shaben, Tracy

2014-01-01

226

Achieving army nursing evidence-based practice competencies through a civilian-military nurse partnership.  

PubMed

Despite the Institute of Medicine's goal of 90% of all practice being evidence-based by 2020, educational and practice institutions are not on target to achieve this goal. Evidence-based practice is one of 5 core elements of the Army Nurse Corps' patient care delivery system and a key focus of the Hawaii State Center for Nursing. In order to increase evidence-based practice (EBP), a civilian-military partnership was formed to include healthcare organizations in the state, optimize resources, and share strategies for successful practice changes statewide. The partnership has been successful in meeting each of these goals using national EBP competencies and Bloom's taxonomy as a guide. The article presents a discussion regarding the history, processes, and outcomes of this partnership. PMID:24488872

Siaki, Leilani A; Lentino, Cynthia V; Mark, Debra D; Hopkins-Chadwick, Denise L

2014-01-01

227

Achieving excellence in postgraduate community nurse practice placements.  

PubMed

This qualitative research using focus groups and an online questionnaire into excellent postgraduate community nurse placements concluded that student trainees need to be ensured of diverse and new experiences besides being recognized by practice staff as already qualified nurses with an array of existing experience. Their community practice teacher trainers need to be trained to cope with postgraduate versus pre-registration needs and especially aware of tailoring nurse experiences to the individual. This requires a finer awareness of their knowledge and student status along with ambivalent needs requiring guidance but space to work independently. Delphi Experts concluded trainer motivation and support most crucial elements in postgraduate placements along with clarity of expectations. Basic introduction and administration sets learning in motion and Start right, stay right! is a catchword to abide by. PMID:21240087

Jones, Kyle; Ewens, Ann

2010-12-01

228

The Doctor of Nursing Practice: defining the next steps.  

PubMed

The purpose of this article is to summarize the previous articles in this special issue of the Journal of Nursing Education that are based on the Committee on Institutional Cooperation's Dean's Conference on the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) and to identify areas of consensus, as well as areas of controversy. Areas of consensus include the high level of interest in DNP programs and the intent to expand the role of the advanced practice nurse to population health, policy, and leadership. Areas of controversy include the nature of the DNP product, the definition of clinical experiences, the nature of the capstone project, the outcomes of these new practitioners, and the impact on schools. Suggestions for achieving higher levels of consensus, including the need for respective, inclusive dialogue, are provided. PMID:23875725

Grey, Margaret

2013-08-01

229

Use of Evidence-Based Practice in School Nursing: Survey of School Nurses at a National Conference  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Primary and acute care settings are the focus of a concerted effort to implement evidence-based practice (EBP) in health care; yet, little attention has been given to use of EBP among school nurses. The aims of this study were to (a) describe current use of EBP among school nurses attending a national school nurse conference, (b) describe…

Adams, Susan

2009-01-01

230

Curriculum Models and Competencies. Associate Degree Nursing and Nursing Education Options: Associate Degree with Practical Nursing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Four associate degree nursing curriculums are presented, along with competencies, program guidelines, and job opportunities identified as those appropriate for the associate degree nursing programs offered in the North Carolina community college system. Chapter I introduces North Carolina's curriculum development project and the phases in which…

Hardee, Vercie M.; Worthington, Roger G.

231

Are we preparing student nurses for final practice placement?  

PubMed

The aims of this research were to illuminate student nurses' perceptions of preparedness for final practice placement, and to ascertain factors that supported and hindered preparation for final placement practice. This phenomenological qualitative research was carried out in a UK higher education institution (HEI) with eight adult branch student nurses maintaining written diaries for the first 4 weeks of their final 10-week practice placement. Data were then analysed by means of an interpretive phenomenological approach (IPA). Results showed that students felt ill-prepared for placement. Eight clear themes emerged, including: being used as 'an extra pair of hands'; mentors appearing to treat student practice documentation as unimportant; and high staff expectations. Other themes were: mentor importance; students feeling that they lacked knowledge; and students feeling unsupported and stressed. In conclusion, although students felt that they lacked knowledge and were used as an extra pair of hands, they did show clinical competence. PMID:24851915

Morrell, Nicola; Ridgway, Victoria

232

Intravenous Therapy Instruction for Licensed Practical Nurses. Instructor's Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Idaho instructor's guide lists tasks and enabling objectives, outlines instruction, and provides handout masters, overhead masters, and tests for intravenous therapy (IV) instruction for licensed practical nurses. Following an introduction and a list of criteria for successful completion of IV therapy courses, the document lists tasks and…

Springer, Pam; Carey, Jean

233

Nasogastric Tube Removal (from Lippincott Manual of Nursing Practice)  

E-print Network

Nasogastric Tube Removal (from Lippincott Manual of Nursing Practice) EQUIPMENT Towel Disposable difficulties. Recurrence of nausea or vomiting may require reinsertion of nasogastric tubing. Changes in vital gloves Lip pomade Mouth hygiene materials PROCEDURE Preparatory phase 1. Tube may not be discontinued

Oliver, Douglas L.

234

A Pilot of a Gerontological Advanced Practice Nurse Preventive Intervention  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Persons with an intellectual and developmental disability frequently face barriers in accessing preventive services in community-based health care systems. As they age into middle years, they are at increased risk for functional decline. This paper presents a description of an advanced practice nurse (APN) intervention used in a pilot…

Hahn, Joan Earle; Aronow, Harriet Udin

2005-01-01

235

Missouri Responses to the Advanced Practice Nurse Role.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A randomly drawn statewide sample of 891 Missouri consumers revealed overall support for the advance practice nurse role to be greater than 75%. Seeking health care consumers' reactions to proposed alternatives is a crucial step in planning and implementing a program of health care reform that will meet current and future health needs. (Author)

Armer, Jane M.

1997-01-01

236

The Graduate School Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Degree  

E-print Network

The Graduate School Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Degree Program of Study/Completion Form to the Graduate School. Please submit the completed, signed program of study to the School Graduate. More information on the Program can be found in Chapter 13 of the Graduate School's Policies and Procedures Manual

Collins, Gary S.

237

Vietnamese postpartum practices. Implications for nursing in the hospital setting.  

PubMed

Twenty Vietnamese families in Salt Lake City, Utah, were interviewed concerning postpartum practices. Results show that special dietary and activity proscriptions are widely accepted for Vietnamese primiparae and less rigidly accepted for multiparae. Activity proscriptions relate to the avoidance of cold, including drafts and showers, and avoidance of sexual intercourse. Bed rest and limitation of activity were also important to the subjects. Implications for nursing practice in the inpatient obstetrical unit are presented. PMID:6555395

Wadd, L

1983-01-01

238

Graduate Nursing Education as a Conduit to Embed Evidence-Based Practice in Home Health Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Historically, nurses have relied on traditions, clinical expertise, and expert opinion as a foundation for practice. Although these sources of knowledge are important and valued in nursing, the approach is unsystematic and not always based on scientific evidence. Although medicine used evidence-based practice (EBP) guidelines in their practice for decades, nurses have only recently embraced this concept. The purpose of

Donna Felber Neff; Elizabeth S. Kinion

2002-01-01

239

Addressing Sexuality-Related Needs in Practice: Perspectives of Maternal/Child and Women's Health Nurses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey of sexuality-related nursing practices was completed by 130 maternal/child and women's health nurses. A disparity was found between their agreement on nurses' role in sexuality-related practices and their actual practice; 46.5% felt only somewhat knowledgeable about sexuality. (SK)

Propst, Maureen G.; Phillips, Billie Rhea; Andrew, Michael E.

2001-01-01

240

Accountability in nursing: reflecting on ethical codes and professional standards of nursing practice from a global perspective.  

PubMed

The concept of accountability is a concept closely aligned with public trust and confidence with a healthcare discipline. It is of vital importance to the discipline of nursing to define and examine the obligations and duties of professional nurse. The term is referred to and often defined through international and national professional codes of nursing and in standards of nursing practice documents. This column will begin exploration of the concept with offering a definition from a humanbecoming perspective. PMID:18953006

Milton, Constance L

2008-10-01

241

Profiling Canadian nurses' preferred knowledge sources for clinical practice.  

PubMed

Several researchers have examined nurses' knowledge sources within the context of research utilization, but conclusions are equivocal. Common problems include a lack of replication, conflicting results, poor generalizability of results, and unclear implications for practice. The objectives of this study were to: (a) describe sources of knowledge and their frequency of use among staff nurses across 7 surgical units, (b) compare knowledge-source patterns across the units, (c) determine whether knowledge-source preferences correlate to research utilization scores, and (d) profile staff nurses' knowledge-source patterns over time. A total of 230 nurses in 5 adult and 2 pediatric surgical units from 4 hospitals in the Canadian provinces of Alberta and Ontario completed a self-administered survey. The results were compared to the findings of previous studies. Nurses' knowledge-source preferences were consistent across the 7 units despite differences in education and in research utilization scores. Across all units, nurses preferred to use knowledge gained through personal experience and interactions with co-workers and with individual patients rather than journal articles or textbooks. These findings are consistent with the longitudinal comparison in the 2 earlier studies. In contrast to the knowledge privileged by nurse clinicians, researchers tend to place greater value on research-based knowledge than on experience-based knowledge. To increase research utilization in the practice setting, researchers and others need first to understand the reasons behind clinicians' valuing of experiential and social knowledge sources and then to consider research dissemination and implementation strategies that are more closely aligned with clinician preferences. PMID:16092784

Estabrooks, Carole A; Chong, Huey; Brigidear, Kristin; Profetto-McGrath, Joanne

2005-06-01

242

Doctor of Nursing Practice Program DNP INTENSIVE  

E-print Network

Application of Evidence-Based Practice I Rene Love, DNP, PMHNP-BC Donna McArthur, PhD, FNP-BC, FAANP Patti:00-5:00 Nancy Wells, DNSc, RN, FAAN N450: Integrative Application of Evidence- Based Practice IV Susie Adams, Ph/Session Event/Session 8:00-10:00 a.m. 1st Year: 140FH 2nd Year: 144FH N422: Evidence-Based Practice II

Bordenstein, Seth

243

Influence of the Nursing Practice Environment on Job Satisfaction and Turnover Intention  

PubMed Central

Objectives: To examine whether the nursing practice environment at the hospital-level affects the job satisfaction and turnover intention of hospital nurses. Methods: Among the 11 731 nurses who participated in the Korea Health and Medical Workers’ Union’s educational program, 5654 responded to our survey. Data from 3096 nurses working in 185 general inpatient wards at 60 hospitals were analyzed using multilevel logistic regression modeling. Results: Having a standardized nursing process (odds ratio [OR], 4.21; p<0.001), adequate nurse staffing (OR, 4.21; p<0.01), and good doctor-nurse relationship (OR, 4.15; p<0.01), which are hospital-level variables based on the Korean General Inpatients Unit Nursing Work Index (KGU-NWI), were significantly related to nurses’ job satisfaction. However, no hospital-level variable from the KGU-NWI was significantly related to nurses’ turnover intention. Conclusions: Favorable nursing practice environments are associated with job satisfaction among nurses. In particular, having a standardized nursing process, adequate nurse staffing, and good doctor-nurse relationship were found to positively influence nurses’ job satisfaction. However, the nursing practice environment was not related to nurses’ turnover intention. PMID:25284197

Lee, Sang-Yi; Kim, Chul-Woung; Kang, Jeong-Hee; Yoon, Tae-Ho; Kim, Cheoul Sin

2014-01-01

244

Doctor of Nursing Practice / Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing MSN DNP/PhD (with Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Specialty)  

E-print Network

Care of the Well Child & Adolescent (2 units didactic, 1 unit practicum=90 clinical hours) NURS 753 for Clinical Nursing Research NURS 706 Theory Development & Evaluation 4 3 3 3 Total Units 13 Total Units 13 Spring Term 3 RISE (Begin NURS 642b Acute Conditions of Children & Adolescent with on-site Clinical

Arizona, University of

245

Doctor of Nursing Practice / Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing BSN DNP/PhD (with Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Specialty)  

E-print Network

of the Well Child & Adolescent (2 units didactic, 1 unit practicum=90 clinical hours) NURS 753 Emerging for Clinical Nursing Research NURS 706 Theory Development & Evaluation 4 3 3 3 Total Units 13 Total Units 13 RISE (Begin NURS 642b Acute Conditions of Children & Adolescent with on-site Clinical Skills Intensive

Arizona, University of

246

What Nurses Do: Use of the ISO Reference Terminology Model for Nursing Action as a Framework for Analyzing MICU Nursing Practice Patterns  

PubMed Central

This study utilized the ISO RTM for Nursing Action as a model to decompose nursing actions and as a framework for analyzing the practice patterns of nurses working in a medical intensive care unit (MICU). Observations were made in a 25-bed MICU and nursing actions recorded in terms of model attributes. 1013 actions were observed; decomposed into the ISO RTM categories, they represented 68 distinct actions, 166 targets, 6 recipients of care, 81 means, 16 routes and 115 sites. The most frequent actions were ‘assessing’ (19.1%) and ‘documenting’ (10.5%). The most frequent target was ‘medication’ (8.5%) and the most frequent recipient of care was ‘patient’ (94.1%). Data revealed nurses perform, yet do not document all actions. Thus in this setting, the existing documentation system does not adequately represent all aspects of nursing practice. The ISO RTM permits evaluation of the depth and breadth of nursing care by identifying all nursing actions. PMID:18693790

Andison, Margot; Moss, Jacqueline

2007-01-01

247

Nursing students' perceptions of learning in practice environments: a review.  

PubMed

Effective clinical learning requires integration of nursing students into ward activities, staff engagement to address individual student learning needs, and innovative teaching approaches. Assessing characteristics of practice environments can provide useful insights for development. This study identified predominant features of clinical learning environments from nursing students' perspectives across studies using the same measure in different countries over the last decade. Six studies, from three different countries, using the Clinical Leaning Environment Inventory (CLEI) were reviewed. Studies explored consistent trends about learning environment. Students rated sense of task accomplishment high. Affiliation also rated highly though was influenced by models of care. Feedback measuring whether students' individual needs and views were accommodated consistently rated lower. Across different countries students report similar perceptions about learning environments. Clinical learning environments are most effective in promoting safe practice and are inclusive of student learners, but not readily open to innovation and challenges to routine practices. PMID:21514982

Henderson, Amanda; Cooke, Marie; Creedy, Debra K; Walker, Rachel

2012-04-01

248

75 FR 64318 - National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...address diversity in nurse education and practice...diverse students into the profession of nursing; (4) identify...individuals within the nursing profession. Experts from professional...workforce and health professions. Day one of the meeting...presented on diversity in nurse education and...

2010-10-19

249

Development of a Practice Laboratory for the Writing of Nursing Care Plans. Curriculum Program Planning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A practice laboratory for writing nursing care plans to be utilized by first-year nursing faculty members was developed. Six first-year instructors of the Long Beach City (California) College Associate Degree Nursing Program were the participating panel of experts. A thorough literature review was conducted to obtain guidelines for writing nursing

Harrell, Brenda McCane

250

Clinical Procedure Page 1 of 3 Clinical Manual / Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

Clinical Procedure Page 1 of 3 Clinical Manual / Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROCEDURE FOR: Assessment: Scope of Nursing Physical Assessment: Adult Inpatient POLICY: 1. The scope of nursing care as well as the process utilized

Oliver, Douglas L.

251

[Towards understanding human ecology in nursing practice: a concept analysis].  

PubMed

Human ecology is an umbrella concept encompassing several social, physical, and cultural elements existing in the individual's external environment. The pragmatic utility method was used to analyze the "human ecology" concept in order to ascertain the conceptual fit with nursing epistemology and to promote its use by nurses in clinical practice. Relevant articles for the review were retrieved from the MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and CSA databases using the terms "human ecology," "environment," "nursing," and "ecology." Data analysis revealed that human ecology is perceived as a theoretical perspective designating a complex, multilayered, and multidimensional system, one that comprises individuals and their reciprocal interactions with their global environments and the subsequent impact of these interactions upon their health. Human ecology preconditions include the individuals, their environments, and their transactions. Attributes of this concept encompass the characteristics of an open system (e.g., interdependence, reciprocal). PMID:20608260

Huynh, Truc; Alderson, Marie

2010-06-01

252

How Do Dyslexic Nursing Students Cope with Clinical Practice Placements? The Impact of the Dyslexic Profile on the Clinical Practice of Dyslexic Nursing Students: Pedagogical Issues and Considerations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The safety of dyslexic nurses, and whether they are a danger to their patients, has been widely discussed. This empirical study sought to discover the impact of the dyslexic profile on clinical practice for nursing students. Two focus groups of third-year nursing students in higher education were set up: a control group and a dyslexic group. The…

Price, Geraldine A.; Gale, Anne

2006-01-01

253

School Nursing and Asthma: The Relationship between Evidence-Based Practice, Best Practice and Individualized Healthcare Plans  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to evaluate current research on evidence-based practice (EBP) and best practices for school nurses addressing student asthma, as well as how school nurses integrate those practices with the IHP, the IEP, and other factors in daily practice. The objective of this study was is to explicate the framework for a qualitative meta-analysis of the

Anne Akins Wood

2009-01-01

254

Nursing in Latvia from the perspective of Oppressed Theory.  

PubMed

Few nurses have the opportunity to witness the rebirth of a democratic state. The author, an American nurse of Latvian birth, served as a visiting professor at the Latvian Medical Academy, Department of Nursing, three weeks after Latvia had declared independence in August, 1991 during the coup d'etat of the Union of the Soviet Republics (USSR). In this article, the author shares and discusses her cultural experiences and reflections of Latvia from oppressed group theory perspectives. In an ever increasing pluralistic society, the author believes that nurses need the widening perspective of transcultural nursing to understand populations and changes in Eastern Europe. She further contends that nurses need a full understanding of what developed with the Latvians and what they have experienced during the last fifty years under communism. PMID:1466863

Kalnins, Z G

1992-01-01

255

Supporting student nurses in practice with additional online communication tools.  

PubMed

Student nurses' potential isolation and difficulties of learning on placement have been well documented and, despite attempts to make placement learning more effective, evidence indicates the continuing schism between formal learning at university and situated learning on placement. First year student nurses, entering placement for the first time, are particularly vulnerable to the vagaries of practice. During 2012 two first year student nurse seminar groups (52 students) were voluntarily recruited for a mixed method study to determine the usage of additional online communication support mechanisms (Facebook, wiki, an email group and traditional methods of support using individual email or phone) while undertaking their first five week clinical placement. The study explores the possibility of strengthening clinical learning and support by promoting the use of Web 2.0 support groups for student nurses. Results indicate a high level of interactivity in both peer and academic support in the use of Facebook and a high level of interactivity in one wiki group. Students' qualitative comments voice an appreciation of being able to access university and peer support whilst working individually on placement. Recommendations from the study challenge universities to use online communication tools already familiar to students to complement the support mechanisms that exist for practice learning. This is tempered by recognition of the responsibility of academics to ensure their students are aware of safe and effective online communication. PMID:23871299

Morley, Dawn A

2014-01-01

256

Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Emergency Contraception on Nursing Personnel  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Emergency Contraception is a grossly underu–tilized option of prevention of pregnancy. It is a safe and effective method which can prevent unintended pregnancies, unsafe abortions and unwanted childbirth. Knowledge and attitude of Nursing personnel who are both service providers and health educators to the community can influence the contraceptive behavior of the people exposed to them. A few studies done in our country indicate that their awareness regarding EC is low. Aim: To explore the knowledge, attitude and practice of EC amongst Nursing Personnel in a medical college hospital. Materials and Methods: In this study, 185 nursing personnel participated. A predesigned, pretested questionnaire was used to collect their responses regarding knowledge, attitude and practice of EC. Descriptive analysis of data was done. Results : Out of the total, 52.43% of the participants had good knowledge regarding the general information of EC, 51.35% had positive attitude towards EC, 47.56% had expressed willingness to use EC if indicated whereas only 22.7% had ever used EC. 72.97% had expressed willingness to attend awareness programmes on EC. Conclusion :Even though knowledge and attitude towards EC among the participants was marginally good they had many misconceptions regarding specific aspects like mode of action, indications and timing of administration. More awareness programmes would definitely clear their misconceptions and apprehensions and encourage Nursing Personnel to personally use and promote EC to others. PMID:25386489

Shanthini N, Fatima

2014-01-01

257

Improving the adoption of evidence-based practice among nurses in Army outpatient medical treatment facilities.  

PubMed

This quality improvement project implemented and evaluated an evidence-based practice (EBP) program at two Army outpatient health care facilities. The EBP program consisted of five implementation strategies that aimed to inculcate EBP into organizational culture as well as nursing practice and culture. A conceptual model of the "Diffusion of Innovations" theory was adapted to explain the application of the program. The Institutional Review Boards at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center and Duke University School of Medicine reviewed and exempted this quality improvement project. A pretest-posttest design was used with four instruments at each facility. The EBP program was successful in enhancing organizational culture and readiness for EBP (p < 0.01) and nursing staff's belief about the value of EBP and their ability to implement it (p < 0.05). Another indicator that the EBP program achieved its goals was the significant difference (p = 0.002) in the movement of the outpatient health care facilities toward an EBP culture. These results suggest that this EBP program may be an effective method for empowering outpatient nursing staff with the knowledge and tools necessary to use evidence-based nursing practice. PMID:24005550

Yackel, Edward E; Short, Nancy M; Lewis, Paul C; Breckenridge-Sproat, Sara T; Turner, Barbara S

2013-09-01

258

Using career nurse mentors to support minority nursing students and facilitate their transition to practice.  

PubMed

The Clinical Leadership Collaborative for Diversity in Nursing was developed through an academe-service partnership focused on supporting minority nursing students and facilitating transition to practice. A key program element is mentoring. Students are paired with an experienced, minority clinical nurse or nurse leader from one of the partnering agencies, who helps guide the student throughout the junior and senior year of school and first year of employment. The mentoring component was evaluated through surveys in which mentors and mentees rated one another and offered open-ended comments on the program's impact. Aspects of mentees rated highest by mentors include manner (courteous and professional), ability to communicate and get along with others, preparation for meetings, and fully utilizing their time with mentors. Aspects of mentors rated highest by mentees include warmth, encouragement, and willingness to listen; enthusiasm for nursing and how they sparked the mentee's interest; and clarity regarding expectations for mentees and how they pushed mentees to achieve high standards. In the open-ended comments, mentees consistently identified mentoring as the program's strongest component. Sixty-four minority students have participated to date with a zero rate of attrition and very low job turnover among graduates. PMID:25150417

Banister, Gaurdia; Bowen-Brady, Helene M; Winfrey, Marion E

2014-01-01

259

Incorporating Florence Nightingale's theory of nursing into teaching a group of preadolescent children about negative peer pressure.  

PubMed

Clinically based nurses often question the value of nursing theory, ultimately resulting in the reluctance to implement nursing theory into practice. This clinical practicum project successfully used Nightingale's primary tenets, such as building trust, self-assessment, and group leadership, as a theoretical framework in a nursing practice group for the purpose of teaching a group of preadolescent children about negative peer pressure. Preadolescent children are particularly vulnerable to peer group culture. Proactive strategies, as demonstrated through this project, can be used to positively influence children's behavior toward each other during the formative middle years. Group sessions addressed such topics as moral beliefs and values, bullying, and saying "no" to peer pressure and were structured using a variety of contemporary resources to develop interactive exercises that engaged the children and enhanced group communication. The children and their parents reported positive outcomes from the nurse-led group sessions. PMID:15185254

Sessanna, Loralee

2004-06-01

260

Promoting evidence-based practice: the roles and activities of professional nurses' associations  

Microsoft Academic Search

AIM: This paper reports a study exploring the role perceptions and current activities in evidence-based practice promotion of professional nurses' associations in the Netherlands. Background: The promotion of evidence-based practice contributes to professional standards in nursing and good quality care for patients. As professional nurses' associations can be key players in this process, the nature of their roles and current

Theo Van Achterberg; Gerda Holleman; Marit Van de Ven; Maria H. F. Grypdonck; Aart Eliens; Marjolein van Vliet

2006-01-01

261

A seven country comparison of nurses' perceptions of their professional practice environment.  

PubMed

Papastavrou E., Efstathiou G., Acaroglu R., da Luz M.D.A., Berg A., Idvall E., Kalafati M., Kanan N., Katajisto J., Leino-Kilpi H., Lemonidou C., Sendir M., Sousa V.D. & Suhonen R. (2011) Journal of Nursing Management A seven country comparison of nurses' perceptions of their professional practice environment Aims? To describe and compare nurses' perceptions of their professional practice environment in seven countries. Background? There is evidence of variation in the nursing professional practice environments internationally. These different work environments affect nurses' ability to perform and are linked to differing nurse and patient outcomes. Methods? A descriptive, comparative survey was used to collect data from orthopaedic and trauma nurses (n?=?1156) in Finland, Cyprus, Greece, Portugal, Sweden, Turkey and Kansas, USA using the 39-item Revised Professional Practice Environment instrument. Results? Differences were found between participants from the northern countries of Europe, Kansas, USA, and the Mediterranean countries regarding perceptions about control over practice. No between-country differences were reported in the internal work motivation among the nurses from any of the participating countries. Conclusions? Although between-country differences in nurses' professional practice environment were found, difficulties related to demographic, cultural and health system differences and the way in which nursing is defined in each country need to be considered in the interpretation of the results. Implications for Nursing Management? The results support investment to improve nurse's work environment, which is important for improving the quality of patient care, optimizing patient outcomes and developing the nursing workforce. PMID:22050114

Papastavrou, Evridiki; Efstathiou, Georgios; Acaroglu, Rengin; DA Luz, Maria Deolinda Antunes; Berg, Agneta; Idvall, Ewa; Kalafati, Maria; Kanan, Nevin; Katajisto, Jouko; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Lemonidou, Chryssoula; Sendir, Merdiye; Sousa, Valmi D; Suhonen, Riitta

2011-09-01

262

THE ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORD FUNCTIONALITIES IN THE STATE OF KANSAS WITH REGARD TO NURSING PRACTICE  

E-print Network

and integrator of information (Staggers & Thompson, 2002), nursing is in a distinct position to use technology to improve patient safety and provide quality care (Page, 2004). Nursing as the nation’s largest heath care profession (American Nurses Association... science, computer science, and communication science practiced within the health care 15 arena (Staggers &Thompson, 2002). Nurses, as the largest organized professional health care providers in the United States, (American Nurses Association, 2008...

Menninger-Corder, Mary Lynn

2010-04-27

263

Physician-nurse practitioner interaction patterns in primary care practices.  

PubMed Central

A new method is presented which describes and measures the problem-solving and collaborative efforts between physicians and nurse practitioners on primary care teams. Application of the method would allow the relationship between team interaction and outcomes of health care to be studied. The method relates clinical problem-solving between team members to a measure of collaboration. Team interaction data were collected in a two-stage process for the purpose of tool development and refinement. Six nurse practitioner-physician teams practicing in three primary care settings participated. Audiotapes of team interactions were analyzed for initiation of interaction, character of the decision-making process that led to the interaction between providers, and characteristics of the exchange between physician and nurse practitioner. Inter-rater agreement was 0.80 for scoring of the rationale for interaction and 0.70 for collaborative scores. The findings suggest that this method is an uncomplicated clinically relevant means of allowing professionals in primary care practices to examine their own practice patterns. Trends in the data reveal little interaction between practitioners, and minimal physician initiation of exchange on the team. PMID:6689837

Lamb, G S; Napodano, R J

1984-01-01

264

Beyond Behavioral Skills to Human-Involved Processes: Relational Nursing Practice and Interpretive Pedagogy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Behaviorist teaching of communication skills can interfere with learning of humanistic nursing. Interpretive inquiry can help students experience the transformative power for relationships and develop confidence and trust in their capacity for relational nursing practice. (Contains 20 references.) (SK)

Doane, Gweneth A. Hartrick

2002-01-01

265

Simulation Methodology in Nursing Education and Adult Learning Theory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Simulation is often used in nursing education as a teaching methodology. Simulation is rooted in adult learning theory. Three learning theories, cognitive, social, and constructivist, explain how learners gain knowledge with simulation experiences. This article takes an in-depth look at each of these three theories as each relates to simulation.…

Rutherford-Hemming, Tonya

2012-01-01

266

Development of the Massachusetts School Nurse Research Network (MASNRN): A Practice-Based Research Network to Improve the Quality of School Nursing Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When school nurses embrace evidence-based practice (EBP), higher-quality care is provided to students, their families, and the larger community. Despite this, school nursing has been slow to embrace EBP. Practice-Based Research Networks (PBRNs), which capitalize on the combined strengths of clinicians and researchers to study clinical questions,…

Vessey, Judith A.

2007-01-01

267

MOTHER AND INFANT CARE, PRACTICAL NURSE TRAINING PROGRAM, LESSON PLANS, PREPARED BY PRACTICAL NURSING INSTRUCTORS DURING CONFERENCE (UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE, AUGUST 14-18, 1961).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

PRACTICAL NURSE INSTRUCTORS, IN CONFERENCE, COMPILED THIS INDIVIDUALLY PLANNED AND TESTED MATERIAL TO BE USED IN PRACTICAL NURSE EDUCATION. THIRTY-TWO LESSON PLANS ON THE SUBJECT OF MOTHER AND INFANT CARE COVER TOPICS RANGING FROM THE REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEM TO COMPLICATIONS INVOLVING THE NEWBORN. EACH PLAN INCLUDES AIM, REFERENCES, MATERIALS,…

Tennessee State Board for Vocational Education, Murfreesboro. Vocational Curriculum Lab.

268

Practical approach to quality of life in Parkinson’s disease: the nurse’s role  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent years it has become apparent that nurses have several key roles in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. These\\u000a include the practice of skilled clinical care, the provision of advice and education, communicating with patients and carers,\\u000a and also between health and social care agencies. Their goals are to facilitate good clinical care, to reduce morbidity (both\\u000a physical and

Douglas G. MacMahon; Sue Thomas

1998-01-01

269

A study of quality management practices in nursing in universities in Australia.  

PubMed

In Australia, the traditional Quality Assurance approach used in the hospital setting has played an important role in nursing practice. During the past decade, nurses have begun making a paradigm shift from Quality Assurance to Total Quality Management but scant attention has been paid to quality management practices in nursing in the higher education sector. This paper reports on a quantitative study examining the perceptions of nurse academics to the applicability of TQM to nursing in universities. The findings identified how TQM could be applied to suit the nursing culture in the higher education sector. PMID:15485391

Cruickshank, Mary

2003-01-01

270

Exploring risk in professional nursing practice: an analysis of work refusal and professional risk.  

PubMed

This article explores risk in professional nursing practice. Professional risk refers to the threat of professional discipline if it is found that a registered nurse has violated professional nursing practice standards. We argue professional risk is socially constructed and understood differently by nurse regulatory bodies, unions, professional associations and frontline nurses. Regulatory bodies emphasize professional accountability of nurses; professional associations focus on system problems in health-care; unions undertake protecting nurses' right to health and safety; and frontline nurses experience fear and uncertainty in their attempt to interpret practice standards to avoid professional discipline. Perspectives of professional risk are investigated by analyzing three professional nursing bodies' views of professional codes governing the right of nurses to refuse unsafe work assignments. The workplace dynamics surrounding work refusal experienced by frontline nurses are illustrated primarily through the lens of the 2003 SARS influenza outbreak in Ontario, Canada. We conclude that frontline nurses in Ontario are required to manage risk by following professional protocols prioritizing patient care and professional accountability which disregard the systemic, unpredictable and hazardous circumstances in their everyday practice. Moreover, we argue professional protocols cannot anticipate every eventuality in clinical practice creating the fear of professional discipline for nurses. PMID:23992233

Beardwood, Barbara A; Kainer, Jan M

2015-03-01

271

Nursing as 'disobedient' practice: care of the nurse's self, parrhesia, and the dismantling of a baseless paradox.  

PubMed

In this paper, I discuss nurses' ongoing difficulty in engaging with politics and address the persistent belief that political positioning is antithetical to quality nursing care. I suggest that nurses are not faced with choosing either caring for their patients or engaging with politics. I base my discussion on the assumption that such dichotomy is meaningless and that engaging with issues of relationships firmly grounds nursing in the realm of politics. I argue that the ethical merit of nursing care relies instead on positioning nurses squarely at the centre of care activities, experiences, and functions. Such positioning makes possible what Foucault called 'practices of self-formation', that is, micro-level processes that balance out the ubiquitous economic, cultural, legal, and scientific technologies that steadily constitute subjects in this era of modernity. Nurses, then, become not a group that needs to be controlled and governed, but individuals who must care for their self before they may care for anyone else. PMID:23745657

Perron, Amélie

2013-07-01

272

[Breast Care Nurses - nursing experts for breast cancer care. A path to "Advanced Nursing Practice" in Germany?].  

PubMed

The role of Breast Care Nurses (BCNs) has been discussed since Breast Centres have been opened in Germany. This article introduces the concept of the Breast Care Nurses on a national and an international level in the context of Advanced Nursing Practice (ANP). Within a descriptive study, graduates of a German BCN-education programme were interrogated regarding their current work, their main activities as a BCN, about general conditions in their work environment, experienced barriers, and supporting factors. 122 questionnaires were evaluated. The return rate was 71 % (n = 171). Results showed that 58.1 % (n = 71) of the graduates were employed as a Breast Care Nurse, however only 28.1 % (n = 20) in a full-time and 35.2 % (n = 25) in a part-time position. This first German study about BCN-services showed a lack of basic work conditions, for example regarding a consultation room, access to literature, or templates for documentation. In the discussion part, the situation of the BCNs is reviewed in the German context and in relation to ANP concepts as well as regarding future demands for the position of a BCN. PMID:21154250

Gerlach, Anja; Wiedemann, Regina

2010-12-01

273

Factors Influencing the Intention of Perinatal Nurses to Adopt the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative in Southeastern Quebec, Canada: Implications for Practice  

PubMed Central

Nurses play a major role in promoting the baby-friendly hospital initiative (BFHI), yet the adoption of this initiative by nurses remains a challenge in many countries, despite evidences of its positive impacts on breastfeeding outcomes. The aim of this study was to identify the factors influencing perinatal nurses to adopt the BFHI in their practice. Methods. A sample of 159 perinatal nurses from six hospital-based maternity centers completed a survey based on the theory of planned behavior. Hierarchical multiple linear regression analyses were performed to assess the relationship between key independent variables and nurses' intention to adopt the BFHI in their practice. A discriminant analysis of nurses' beliefs helped identify the targets of actions to foster the adoption the BFHI among nurses. Results. The participants are mainly influenced by factors pertaining to their perceived capacity to overcome the strict criteria of the BFHI, the mothers' approval of a nursing practice based on the BFHI, and the antenatal preparation of the mothers. Conclusions. This study provides theory-based evidence for the development of effective interventions aimed at promoting the adoption of the BFHI in nurses' practice. PMID:25101173

2014-01-01

274

Perspectives of Australian nursing directors regarding educational preparation for mental health nursing practice.  

PubMed

There is an ongoing global shortage of mental health nurses. Within Australia, the principal strategy of offering a postgraduate education programme with various incentives to encourage nurses back to study has not been successful. This has led to the consideration of radical alternatives, including the return to pre-registration specialisation in mental health. The successful introduction of this strategy would require the full support of industry partners. To date, the voice of industry has not been heard in relation to this issue. The aim of this paper is to present the views of an Australian sample of mental health nursing directors regarding the resources and other factors required, should undergraduate specialist programmes in mental health be developed, to ensure they are relevant and likely to be successful. A qualitative exploratory research project was undertaken to explore the perspectives and opinions of industry partners. In-depth interviews were conducted with nursing directors (n = 12) in Queensland Australia. Five main themes were identified: relationships with universities; clinical placement preparation and support; workplace culture; facilitators and preceptors; and practical student learning. Genuine collaboration between the two organisations was considered crucial for delivering a quality programme and providing the required support for students. Transformative leadership could inform this collaboration by promoting acknowledgement of and respect for differences. PMID:25353302

Happell, Brenda; McAllister, Margaret

2014-11-01

275

Babies and machines that go 'beep': first-year nursing students' preferred areas of future practice.  

PubMed

Students of nursing enter their programmes of study with preconceived ideas of what a career in their chosen profession will entail. The literature suggests that images from the media and past experiences contribute to these perceptions. Although it is positive images of the profession that will usually attract an individual to a career in nursing, often more negative perceptions will direct students away from potentially rewarding areas of specialization. This paper describes career projections of nursing students enrolled in the first year of four preservice nursing programmes at the rural campus of one Australian university. Part of a larger study, the data reported here indicate that most respondents intend to practice in the areas of midwifery, paediatrics and emergency nursing. Oncology, community nursing, aged care and mental health nursing all ranked poorly across three rounds of surveys. These findings have implications for practicing nurses and nurse educators who seek to dispel inaccurate images of these important specializations. PMID:25157939

Birks, Melanie; Missen, Karen; Al-Motlaq, Mohammad; Marino, Emma

2014-08-01

276

Injection practices among nurses--Vâlcea, Romania, 1998.  

PubMed

In the early 1990s, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection associated with possible reuse of syringes and needles was reported among children in Romanian orphanages. These findings led health-care workers to use new disposable syringes and needles for administering injections. Bythe late 1990s, reports suggested that new disposable syringes and needles had become standard for all injections. However, surveillance data collected by the Romanian Ministry of Health (MoH) during 1997-1998 indicated that acute hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection was associated with receiving injections among children aged <5 years. In Romania, injection frequently is used to administer medication, and nurses administer most injections. To identify the practices that might have resulted in injection-associated HBV transmission, selected clinic and hospital nurses were surveyed. This report summarizes the findings of the survey, which indicated that although nurses used new disposable syringes and needles, other inadequate infection-control practices might explain injection-associated HBV transmission. Results of the survey were used by the Romanian Coalition to Prevent Nosocomial Infections to prepare standards for injection safety to protect patients and health-care workers from HBV infection. PMID:11243447

2001-02-01

277

Prior conditions influencing nurses' decisions to adopt evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices.  

PubMed

Over the past 30 years, postoperative pain relief has been shown to be inadequate. To provide optimal postoperative pain relief, it is imperative for nurses to use evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices. This correlational descriptive study was conducted to identify factors, termed prior conditions, that influenced nurses' decisions to adopt three evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices. A convenience sample of nurses who cared for adult postoperative patients in two Midwestern hospitals were surveyed, and 443 (46.9%) nurses responded. The previous practice and innovativeness of nurses were supportive of adoption of the three practices. Nurses felt that patients received adequate pain relief, which is unsupportive of adoption of the three practices because there is no impetus to change. Nurses who perceived the prior conditions as being supportive of adoption of pain management practices used multiple sources to identify solutions to clinical practice problems, and those who read professional nursing journals were more likely to have adopted the three practices and were more innovative. The number of sources used to identify solutions to clinical practice problems, previous practices, and innovativeness were predictive of nurses' adoption of the three evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices. Nurses need to be encouraged to use multiple sources, including professional nursing journals, to identify solutions to clinical practice problems. Innovative nurses may be considered to be opinion leaders and need to be identified to promote the adoption of evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices. Further exploration of the large unexplained variance in adoption of evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices is needed. PMID:21095599

Carlson, Cathy L

2010-12-01

278

Infant feeding practices among nursing personnel in Malaysia.  

PubMed

Concerned by the alarming decline in breast feeding in the urban and rural areas of Malaysia, we conducted a critical review of infant feeding practices among nursing personnel from representative centres using questionnaires. It was found that although 75% of mothers breast-fed their babies at birth only 19% did so at 2 months and 5% at 6 months respectively. Chinese mothers initiated breast feeding less frequently compared with Indian or Malay mothers. The prevalence of breast feeding was higher among lower category nurses, lower income groups and those from health centres. Decision for breast feeding was based in most instances on conviction derived from reading, lectures or advice from relatives. The vast majority of mothers listed "work' as the main reason for termination of breast feeding followed by "insufficient breast milk' and satisfactory past experience with bottle feeding. The ramifications of these findings and measures to improve the prevalence and duration of breast feeding are discussed. PMID:7446101

Sinniah, D; Chon, F M; Arokiasamy, J

1980-07-01

279

[Education and health regarding citizenship: a nurses' group practice].  

PubMed

This study was run in a community committee of Nossa Senhora da Aparecida, a surrounding city of Joao Pessoa, Paraiba. It aimed at characterizing nursing practice there and discussing its occurrence. The analysis was run based on eight inhabitants and four nurses speeches through semistructured interviews whose data were collected qualitatively. It focused on the discussion which evolved from questions regarding to education and health from the perspective of exercising citizenship. In the participants of the study representations, education seemed dynamic and implied awareness ... a question of life. Health is comprehended under 3 points of view: the one of welfare, the one of suffering and the one of biological balance. The perspective of citizenship exercise reveals itself sometimes as conformism, through silence or resignation and sometimes as resistance, through the ideal manifestation and courage for fighting for better life condition. PMID:10765333

de Lima, C B; Baptista, S de S

1997-01-01

280

Coaching to promote professional development in nursing practice.  

PubMed

This article presents coaching, which facilitates the highest form of learning, as a potential strategy for promoting professional development in nursing. In doing so, it sets out what coaching is and highlights its benefits in terms of team building, adaptation to changes, career planning and professional development. Having established the rudiments of coaching and identifying its qualities, the article then sets out strategies of coaching using three models: the 3-D Technique Model, The Practice Spiral Model and The Grow Model. Three case histories are presented to explain how these models could be used to implement coaching and personal learning plans (PLP). Directions are provided where training for coaching is available. It is concluded that coaching can be a powerful tool in enhancing nurses' and other health professionals' ability to contribute to the success of healthcare organisations. PMID:24933546

Narayanasamy, Aru; Penney, Vivian

281

A Case Study of Factors Leading to Student Success in an Accelerated Licensed Practical Nurse to Associate Degree Nursing Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This case study attempted to discover and comprehend the relationship of students and contributing factors of success, of one Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) to Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) program, to formulate an understanding of which contributing factors are most beneficial to enable students to persist to graduation and/or successfully…

Taylor, Sherry T.

2012-01-01

282

An overview of hospice and palliative care nursing models and theories.  

PubMed

Current literature reports that nurses are the members of the health-care team who have the most contact with patients facing a life-threatening illness. The multidisciplinary palliative care approach means that hospice and palliative care nurses require a consistent theoretical foundation in order to be confident of and able to explain their role. The aim of this paper is to describe existing palliative care and hospice nursing models and theories and to identify their core concepts. Literature published between 2002 and 2012 on such models was reviewed and subjected to content analysis. Ten core concepts were identified that fell into three categories: patient, nurse, and therapeutic relationship. The themes and values identified in the end-of-life nursing models and theories are congruent with palliative care best practices based on a patient-centred and an interdisciplinary teamwork approach. In developing a therapeutic relationship with patients, nurses have a 'privileged' experience that may lead to existential growth and job satisfaction. PMID:24577213

Dobrina, Raffaella; Tenze, Maja; Palese, Alvisa

2014-02-01

283

Awareness about infant feeding practices among nursing personnel.  

PubMed

The study examined knowledge of and attitudes toward breast and supplementary feeding of infants among 100 newly trained nurses in India. The nurses had recently completed three years of training in A-grade nursing skills. 100% of respondents agreed that breast feeding was the best option, and water was acceptable as the first feed. Feeding of infants was considered to be appropriate within the first 6 hours of birth and for 1-3 years. 60% preferred bottle feeding. 88% considered that the new-born should be kept with the mother rather than in the nursery. 66% knew that breast feeding was good for the mother's health. 68% preferred time-scheduled feeding. 90% desired milk diluted with water as a breast milk substitute. Respondents listed the following advantages of breast milk: nutritious (mentioned by 30% of respondents), good for the baby's health (20%), hygienic (20%), better for mother-child bonding (20%), time saving (18%), offering resistance against disease (18%), economical (11%), given at appropriate temperature (7%), easily digestible (6%), and easy to feed (2%). Respondents listed the following indications for bottle feeding: mother ill (mentioned by 40% of respondents), lactation failure (18%), cracked nipple (15%), other breast problems (11%), baby not sucking (8%), cleft lip/palate (6%), death of mother (6%), mother using oral contraceptives (4%). The study revealed a preference for 1/8 to 3/4 dilution of milk, because of milk's presumed heaviness. The practice of milk dilution is one of the important reasons for childhood malnutrition, and it demands urgent attention. There was a serious lack of knowledge about colostrum and techniques of feeding, burping, and weaning. Findings also confirmed the preference for bottle, cotton wicks, and fingers for providing milk substitutes. Continuing nursing education should provide better instruction on infant feeding practices. PMID:12319244

Singh, H; Soni, R K

1990-01-01

284

Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Degree 4-Yr Program of Study (NP Family/Individual)  

E-print Network

credits Year 2 Fall (Semester 4) 604 Evidence Based Practice I 4 606 Statistical Applications for Graduate Nursing 2 6 credits #12;Spring (Semester 5) 605 Evidence Based Practice II 3 612 Ethics, Law and Policy 3Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Degree 4-Yr Program of Study (NP Family/Individual) Year 1 Fall

Dyer, Bill

285

Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) 4 Yr Program of Study (NP Psych/Mental Health)  

E-print Network

2 Fall (Semester 4) 604 Evidence Based Practice I 4 606 Statistical Applications for Graduate Nursing 2 6 credits #12;Spring (Semester 5) 605 Evidence Based Practice II 3 612 Ethics, Law and Policy 3Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) 4 Yr Program of Study (NP Psych/Mental Health) Year 1 Fall

Maxwell, Bruce D.

286

Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Degree 4-Yr Program of Study (DNP Family/Individual)  

E-print Network

Fall (Semester 4) 604 Evidence Based Practice I 4 606 Statistical Applications for Graduate Nursing 2 6 credits Spring (Semester 5) 605 Evidence Based Practice II 3 608 Design of Health Care Delivery Systems 31 Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Degree 4-Yr Program of Study (DNP Family/Individual) Year 1 Fall

Dyer, Bill

287

Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Degree 3 Yr Program of Study (NP Family/Individual)  

E-print Network

/Pathophysiology 4 604 Evidence Based Practice I 4 606 Statistical Applications for Graduate Nursing 2 13 credits Spring (Semester 2) 603 Advanced Pharmacology I 2 605 Evidence Based Practice II 3 607 DiagnosticDoctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Degree 3 Yr Program of Study (NP Family/Individual) Fall (Semester

Dyer, Bill

288

Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Degree 3 Yr Program of Study (NP, Psych/Mental Health)  

E-print Network

/Pathophysiology 4 604 Evidence Based Practice I 4 606 Statistical Applications for Graduate Nursing 2 13 credits Spring (Semester 2) 603 Advanced Pharmacology I 2 605 Evidence Based Practice II 3 607 DiagnosticDoctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Degree 3 Yr Program of Study (NP, Psych/Mental Health) Fall

Dyer, Bill

289

Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) 4 Yr Program of Study (DNP Psych/Mental Health)  

E-print Network

4) 604 Evidence Based Practice I 4 606 Statistical Applications for Graduate Nursing 2 6 credits Spring (Semester 5) 605 Evidence Based Practice II 3 608 Design of Health Care Delivery Systems 3 6121 Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) 4 Yr Program of Study (DNP Psych/Mental Health) Year 1 Fall

Dyer, Bill

290

The motivation to care : Application and extension of motivation theory to professional nursing work  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this research is to describe a model of nurses' work motivation relevant to the human caring stance of professional nursing work. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The model was derived from selected theories of behavioral motivation and work motivation. Evidence-based theory addressing nurses' work motivation and nurses' motivational states and traits in relation to characteristics of organizational culture

Roseanne C. Moody; Daniel J. Pesut

2006-01-01

291

Advanced practice nursing for enduring health needs management: a global perspective.  

PubMed

Advanced practice nursing expertise has been acknowledged worldwide as one response to the challenges arising from changes in society and health care. The roots of advanced practice nursing education are at the University of Colorado where the first known programme started in 1965. In many countries advanced practice nurses (APNs) have taken responsibility for routine patient care formerly carried out by physicians in order to reduce their workload. However, more and more, APNs have taken responsibility for new service areas and quality programmes not previously provided. Chronic disease management is one of these new service areas because long-term diseases are increasingly challenging service systems globally. This article is based on an international APN partnership. The aim of the article is to describe how the partnership will design a 15 ECTS credit course on Enduring Health Need Management as a cross-cultural collaborative endeavour. The adaptation of an inquiry based learning framework will be described drawing on four main principles of the theory: authentic learning communities; student encouragement in analysing gradually more complicated problems; networking in knowledge creation and; student engagement and activity. The cross-cultural online course aims to increase APNs' intercultural competence as well as their global and international work orientation. PMID:21839552

Koskinen, Liisa; Mikkonen, Irma; Graham, Iain; Norman, Linda D; Richardson, Jim; Savage, Eileen; Schorn, Mavis

2012-07-01

292

Linking HRD Theory and Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains four symposium papers on linking human resource development (HRD) theory and practice. "Reorienting the Theoretical Foundations of Human Resource Development: Building a Sustainable Profession and Society" (Tim Hatcher) examines the theoretical disciplines of economics, general systems, sociology, psychology, and ethics in…

1999

293

Practice Theory in Language Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ortega (2011) has argued that second language acquisition is stronger and better after the social turn. Of the post-cognitive approaches she reviews, several focus on the social context of language learning rather than on language as the central phenomenon. In this article, we present Practice Theory not as yet another approach to language…

Young, Richard F.; Astarita, Alice C.

2013-01-01

294

Theory into Practice Goes Exactly  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Dimensions of possible variation" is a phrase that now occupies a safe place in the literature describing the application of education theory to education practice: "asking yourself what could be changed [in the task], while using the same approach or technique, opens up dimensions of possible variation. A set of exercises forming a sequence of…

Griffiths, Jonny

2007-01-01

295

Optimizing Java Theory and Practice  

E-print Network

Optimizing Java Theory and Practice Zoran Budimlic Ken Kennedy Rice University Computer Science popularity of the Internet has made an instant star of the Java programming language. Java's portability Java implementation, even with just­in­time compilation technology, is far behind the most popular

Budimliæ, Zoran

296

Distribution Theory Practice Exam 2011  

E-print Network

Distribution Theory Practice Exam 2011 April 7, 2011 Assume 40-45 minutes per question. 1. (a) Let (p = 1, 2, . . . ). Show that one can define a regularised distribution corresponding to f by ~Tf is a distribution such that ~Tf () = Tf () if 0 / supp().) In what circumstances can we take the limit b ? (b) Let

Dorlas, Teunis C.

297

[Centennial retrospective on the evolution and development of the nursing practice environment in Taiwan].  

PubMed

The practice environment for nurses has seen tremendous change over the past century due to the dedication and trailblazing work of nursing pioneers. This article describes how the nursing practice environment in Taiwan has evolved over this period. References used include nursing narratives, hospital accreditation standards, standard operating procedures, workplace safety standards, and worksite-related values and expectations. The efforts of the professional nursing community to realize a positive practice environment are further discussed. Over this century of change, the only thing that has remained unchanged is the commitment of nurses to "treat patients as one's own family". In the current as well as the previous periods of manpower shortages in nursing, the nursing community has managed to turn crisis into opportunity by using the situation to enhance pay and benefits. Nursing professionalism is widely respected and recognized throughout Taiwan society. The rapidly changing needs of the 21st century in aspects such as the advancement of high technology, the rapid growth of the elderly population, and the fast rate of social change seriously impact the development of the nursing profession. How to effectively apply high technology, simplify workflows, provide high quality and humanistic nursing care, build safe and quality workplaces, attract bright nursing students, and provide healthcare for the entire population will remain the responsibilities of nursing for generations to come. PMID:25125157

Lin, Shou-Ju; Huang, Lain-Hua

2014-08-01

298

Voices That Care: Licensed Practical Nurses and the Emotional Labour Underpinning Their Collaborative Interactions with Registered Nurses  

PubMed Central

Recognizing the emotional labour underlying interprofessional collaborations (IPCs) could be considered a crucial step towards building a cohesive nursing team. Although IPCs between registered nurses (RNs) and licensed practical nurses (LPNs) have been linked to quality nursing care, little is known about the emotions experienced by LPNs during their interactions with RNs or those factors that influence IPCs. A questionnaire administered to 309?LPNs found that (1) the professional identity of LPNs has evolved into a that of a unique social group; (2) LPNs define IPC as an interpersonal process of exploring similar or dissimilar assessments of a patient's status with RNs and, together, establishing a course of nursing actions; (3) the primary organizational factor facilitating IPCs is inclusive nursing leadership; (4) the interpersonal factor promoting IPCs is the level of trust RNs extend to LPNs; and (5) an LPN's emotional labour (i.e., internal emotional regulation) is most tangible during uncollaborative interactions with RNs. PMID:22135732

Huynh, Truc; Alderson, Marie; Nadon, Michelle; Kershaw-Rousseau, Sylvia

2011-01-01

299

Professor in residence program: a nursing faculty practice.  

PubMed

The Interdisciplinary Health Research Consultant-Professor in Residence Program is a partnership between the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ) School of Nursing (SN), the New Jersey Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) Center for Evidence Based Practice, and Morristown Memorial Hospital/Atlantic Health (MMH/AH). It provides MMH with the expert research and evidence-based practice (EBP) consultation and affiliation of a UMDNJ-SN faculty member and the resources of the New Jersey JBI Center for Evidence Based Practice. For the participating SN faculty member, it provides a clinical laboratory to pursue an individualized program of scientific research and scholarly publication. This research scholar works closely with the MMH/AH to (a) identify and evaluate existing mechanisms to support interdisciplinary health research and EBP at MMH; (b) develop and implement new mechanisms to support interdisciplinary health research and EBP; (c) implement the findings of published research using EBP strategies; (d) replicate interdisciplinary research studies; (e) conduct original interdisciplinary research studies; (f) seek intra- or extramural funding to support interdisciplinary research studies; and (g) support requirements for American Nurses' Credentialing Center accreditation for Magnet designation. The program has been successful in its first year of implementation. PMID:18804080

Forrester, David Anthony; O'Keefe, Trish; Torres, Sara

2008-01-01

300

Providing Assistance to the Victims of Adolescent Dating Violence: A National Assessment of School Nurses' Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: This study assessed the perceptions and practices of school nurses regarding adolescent dating violence (ADV). Methods: The membership list of the National Association of School Nurses was used to identify a national random cross-sectional sample of high school nurses in the United States (N?=?750). A valid and reliable survey…

Khubchandani, Jagdish; Telljohann, Susan K.; Price, James H.; Dake, Joseph A.; Hendershot, Candace

2013-01-01

301

Addressing Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome in Advanced Practice Nursing Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey of 23 advanced practice nursing programs showed only 3 had HIV-specific graduate-level nursing courses. Recommendations were made for HIV-specific courses, integration of HIV content into other courses, use of Centers for Disease Control and Occupational Safety and Health Administration guidelines, and subspecialties in HIV nursing. (SK)

Nokes, Kathleen M.; Stein, Gary L.

1997-01-01

302

Tel-eNurse Practice. Quality of care and patient outcomes.  

PubMed

As a growing specialty, telephone nursing practice requires definition, standardization, and identification of quality indicators and nursing-sensitive outcomes. An informal study was conducted to explore the relationship between telephone nursing quality indicators-assessment, critical thinking, use of protocols, and continuity of care-found in documentation and nursing-sensitive patient outcomes. Findings provide insight into the telephone process of care and application of critical thinking reflected in documentation and greater understanding of the complexity of telephone nursing practice and integration of care and outcomes. PMID:11263064

Larson-Dahn, M L

2001-03-01

303

Impact of Doctor of Nursing Practice education in shaping health care systems for the future.  

PubMed

The approval of the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing in 2004 and publication of The Essentials of Doctoral Education for Advanced Nursing Practice in 2006 promised significant benefit to nursing and to shaping health care systems. Currently, 229 DNP programs exist and more are planned. This article provides an overview of program types, graduates, and postgraduation placement, using Pennsylvania as an exemplar, to describe the potential impact of DNP education in health care systems. Nurse educators need to consider whether our current directions enable us to realize opportunities for shaping health care systems or whether we need to make course corrections. [ PMID:23875726

Dunbar-Jacob, Jacqueline; Nativio, Donna G; Khalil, Heba

2013-08-01

304

Political dreams, practical boundaries: the case of the Nursing Minimum Data Set, 1983-1990.  

PubMed

The initial development of the Nursing Minimum Data Set (NMDS) was analyzed based on archival material from Harriet Werley and Norma Lang, two nurses involved with the project, and American Nurses Association materials. The process of identifying information to be included in the NMDS was contentious. Individual nurses argued on behalf of particular data because of a strong belief in how nursing practice (through information collection) should be structured. Little attention was paid to existing practice conditions that would ultimately determine whether the NMDS would be used. PMID:21329148

Hobbs, Jennifer

2011-01-01

305

A novel theory for nursing education: holistic comfort.  

PubMed

This article discusses how aspects of a holistic comfort theory were adapted to create a taxonomic structure to apply its concepts to a fast-track nursing education program. The principles of learner-centered education were combined with comfort theory to develop strategies that appear to have produced positive influences on the attributes and contexts of comfort within the learning community. With emphasis on balanced academic exposure to the art of comfort as well as the rigorous science of nursing, students and teachers developed a mutually rewarding learning partnership. The resulting grid, adapted from Kolcaba's taxonomic structure, exposes educators and students to the application of holistic comfort theory. It is anticipated that this adaptation may assist students to transform into professional nurses who are comfortable and comforting in their roles and who are committed to the goal of lifelong learning. PMID:18029969

Goodwin, Miki; Sener, India; Steiner, Susan H

2007-12-01

306

Following the funding trail: Financing, nurses and teamwork in Australian general practice  

PubMed Central

Background Across the globe the emphasis on roles and responsibilities of primary care teams is under scrutiny. This paper begins with a review of general practice financing in Australia, and how nurses are currently funded. We then examine the influence on funding structures on the role of the nurse. We set out three dilemmas for policy-makers in this area: lack of an evidence base for incentives, possible untoward impacts on interdisciplinary functioning, and the substitution/enhancement debate. Methods This three year, multimethod study undertook rapid appraisal of 25 general practices and year-long studies in seven practices where a change was introduced to the role of the nurse. Data collected included interviews with nurses (n = 36), doctors (n = 24), and managers (n = 22), structured observation of the practice nurse (51 hours of observation), and detailed case studies of the change process in the seven year-long studies. Results Despite specific fee-for-service funding being available, only 6% of nurse activities generated such a fee. Yet the influence of the funding was to focus nurse activity on areas that they perceived were peripheral to their roles within the practice. Conclusions Interprofessional relationships and organisational climate in general practices are highly influential in terms of nursing role and the ability of practices to respond to and utilise funding mechanisms. These factors need to be considered, and the development of optimal teamwork supported in the design and implementation of further initiatives that financially support nursing in general practice. PMID:21329506

2011-01-01

307

An exploration of content on legal aspects of practice in nursing programs.  

PubMed

The paucity of literature on legal content in nursing curricula was used to frame the research question that guided this study. In what ways and to what extent are nursing educators addressing the subject of legal aspects of nursing practice? This study was designed to explore the area of legal aspects of nursing practice in nursing programs curricula. The researchers gathered information on numerous areas, including course content, methods of delivery, topics covered, and time devoted to legal content. The results revealed that content on legal aspects of nursing practice is commonly a component of nursing programs curricula and provided information on many areas; however, the results also revealed other areas that need to be researched. PMID:10609584

Smith-Pittman, M H; Richardson, J T; Lin, C J

1999-12-01

308

Successful Aging in the United States and China: A Theoretical Basis to Guide Nursing Research, Practice, and Policy.  

PubMed

Successful aging is gaining increasing attention given the growth in the older adult population. Criteria and definitions within multiple disciplines vary greatly in Western literature, with no consensus on its meaning. Sociocultural, economic, and political differences between the Western view of successful aging and its view in China add to the confusion. Similarities and differences in the meaning of successful aging in the United States and China are examined, and potential for a common definition useful to nursing in both countries is explored. Using concept analysis, shared criteria for successful aging were the following: decreased incidence of disease and disability, life satisfaction, meaning and purpose in life, and ability to cope effectively to achieve goals based on personal values and priorities. A comprehensive, multidimensional definition of successful aging for nursing and a midrange nursing theory of successful aging were identified that may be useful to guide nursing research, practice, and policy. PMID:24841471

Ji, Hong; Ling, Jiying; McCarthy, Valerie Lander

2014-05-19

309

Minority nursing student success: A grounded theory case study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There has been a dramatic increase in the nation's racial and ethnic minority populations over recent years. This increase is placing a higher demand on the health care industry to provide culturally competent care to these diverse populations. This challenge is met with yet another problem as the nation faces a critical shortage of nurses, particularly minority nurses. This shortage is only expected to worsen over the next several years. As schools of nursing across the country are being asked to increase the number of nursing program graduates, specifically minorities, they are confronted with a double edged sword as retention rates are decreasing, and attrition rates are increasing. This is particularly troublesome when many racial and ethnic minority nursing students do not graduate. This qualitative study was implemented to assess and understand the perceived educational experiences of racial and ethnic minority nursing students enrolled in a rural community college nursing program on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. Eight voluntary nursing students who identified themselves as either a racial or ethnic minority participated in the study. Data were collected by: individual audio-taped interview sessions; audio-taped focus group sessions; and documentation of field notes. Participants also provided demographic information and were asked to provide a brief written response to a scenario regarding increasing the recruitment and retention rates of minority nursing students. All data were analyzed utilizing the constant comparative method. Results of the study revealed six different themes: personal support systems and peer relationships; college services and academic resources; faculty support; cultural understanding versus cultural insensitivity; personal attributes of self-efficacy/advice for future nursing students; and suggestions for college and nursing program improvement. After the major themes were examined one central theme, a grounded theory, was born. The theory proposes that when the minority nursing student bridges his or her personal attributes of self-efficacy with some or all identified support systems, this may be a conduit to fostering success in obtaining their educational goals as long as the resources are available, and a caring environment is present.

Mister, Brenda J.

310

Improving the Nurse–Family Partnership in Community Practice  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Evidence-based preventive interventions are rarely final products. They have reached a stage of development that warrant public investment but require additional research and development to strengthen their effects. The Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP), a program of nurse home visiting, is grounded in findings from replicated randomized controlled trials. OBJECTIVE: Evidence-based programs require replication in accordance with the models tested in the original randomized controlled trials in order to achieve impacts comparable to those found in those trials, and yet they must be changed in order to improve their impacts, given that interventions require continuous improvement. This article provides a framework and illustrations of work our team members have developed to address this tension. METHODS: Because the NFP is delivered in communities outside of research contexts, we used quantitative and qualitative research to identify challenges with the NFP program model and its implementation, as well as promising approaches for addressing them. RESULTS: We describe a framework used to address these issues and illustrate its use in improving nurses’ skills in retaining participants, reducing closely spaced subsequent pregnancies, responding to intimate partner violence, observing and promoting caregivers’ care of their children, addressing parents’ mental health problems, classifying families’ risks and strengths as a guide for program implementation, and collaborating with indigenous health organizations to adapt and evaluate the program for their populations. We identify common challenges encountered in conducting research in practice settings and translating findings from these studies into ongoing program implementation. CONCLUSIONS: The conduct of research focused on quality improvement, model improvement, and implementation in NFP practice settings is challenging, but feasible, and holds promise for improving the impact of the NFP. PMID:24187112

Donelan-McCall, Nancy; O’Brien, Ruth; MacMillan, Harriet; Jack, Susan; Jenkins, Thomas; Dunlap, Wallace P.; O’Fallon, Molly; Yost, Elly; Thorland, Bill; Pinto, Francesca; Gasbarro, Mariarosa; Baca, Pilar; Melnick, Alan; Beeber, Linda

2013-01-01

311

Prior Conditions Influencing Nurses' Decisions to Adopt Evidence-Based Postoperative Pain Assessment Practices  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the past 30 years, postoperative pain relief has been shown to be inadequate. To provide optimal postoperative pain relief, it is imperative for nurses to use evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices. This correlational descriptive study was conducted to identify factors, termed prior conditions, that influenced nurses' decisions to adopt three evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices. A convenience sample of nurses

Cathy L. Carlson

2010-01-01

312

Structurational divergence theory as explanation for troublesome outcomes in nursing communication.  

PubMed

Structurational divergence (SD) theory captures negative communication cycles resulting from interpenetration of incompatible meaning structures. It is estimated that 12-15% of practicing nurses suffer from a problematic level of SD. With a sample of 713 nurses (57 departments) in a large hospital, this study tests a model positing SD as a root explanation of nursing job satisfaction and turnover. A number of variables long presumed to be explanations for job satisfaction and turnover were hypothesized as mediators between SD and those outcomes. Path analysis showed support for burnout, role conflict, bullying, and organizational identification as useful mediators, explaining 68% of the variance in job satisfaction, and 45% in intentions to leave. The study also explores relationships between SD and hospital quality indicators. SD is a concern because it powerfully explains a number of poor outcomes and provides an underlying explanation for a number of factors that predict job satisfaction and turnover. PMID:24926968

Nicotera, Anne M; Zhao, Xiaoquan; Mahon, Margaret M; Peterson, Emily B; Kim, Wonsun; Conway-Morana, Patricia

2015-04-01

313

Anglo-American nursing theory, individualism and mental health care: a social conflict perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper uses social conflict theory to reconsider the relationship of American nursing theory and individualised mental health care in the UK. It is argued that nursing theory has developed within a context of ‘American dream’ individualism, and that this ideology may be problematic for some UK mental health nurses and service users whose values and beliefs are those of

Kevin Leighton

2004-01-01

314

[The second-line nurse manager; a strategic role in the evolution of clinical practices].  

PubMed

Nurse clinicians still rarely base their practices on scientific knowledge. However, in order for them to be actively engaged in practice change, they must have constant and effective support from key players of trust within the organisation. PMID:25619090

Lefebvre, Héléne

2014-11-01

315

Vocational Choice and Satisfactions of Licensed Practical Nurses. League Exchange No. 87.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explores factors characterizing persons who have selected practical nursing as a career, the satisfactions of those who have remained in the field, and the reasons some individuals have left. All 1,139 graduates of the 12 1-year practical nurse programs in Minnesota for the years 1955, 1960, and 1964 were sent questionnaires, and 1,001…

Treece, Eleanor Mae Walters

316

Health Instruction Packages: Humanistic Nursing--Nurse/Patient Relations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in this set of four learning modules to instruct nurses and nursing students in humanistic, non-technical aspects of patient care. The first module, "Introduction to Humanistic Nursing Practice Theory" by Wanda L. Carpenter, draws upon the theories of existentialism and phenomenology to define…

Carpenter, Wanda L.; And Others

317

Nursing Systems Management (NSM) Degree Plan: Upon admission nursing students must meet with faculty and staff advisors to develop plan of progression. Successful completion of core courses in theory and research are essential to success in all MSN majors  

E-print Network

Theory and Culture: Examination of organizational and management theories and research that guide, particularly cultural diversity, is integrated into management theory and practice. Organizational culture to the delivery of nursing and health care in various settings. Specialty Courses (18 SCH) 5300 Organizational

Ward, Karen

318

Building scholarship capacity and transforming nurse educators' practice through institutional ethnography.  

PubMed

Institutional ethnography can be viewed as a method of inquiry for nurse educators to build scholarship capacity and advance the quality of nursing practice. Within a framework of the Boyer (1990) model and the domains of academic scholarship in nursing described by the Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing (2006), we discuss how a team of nurse educators participated as co-researchers in an institutional ethnographic study to examine the routine work of evaluating nursing students and discovered a contradiction between what was actually happening and what we value as nurse educators. The discovery, teaching, application, and integration dimensions of scholarship are examined for links to our emerging insights from the research and ramifications for our teaching practices. The article illuminates the expertise that developed and the transformations that happened as results of a collaborative institutional ethnography. PMID:21044033

Malinsky, Lynn; DuBois, Ruth; Jacquest, Diane

2010-01-01

319

Graduate registered nurse practice readiness in the Australian context: an issue worthy of discussion.  

PubMed

An ageing Australian population coupled with declining nursing numbers is predicted to have a significant impact on the Australian Healthcare industry, with numbers of nurses expected to be in greater demand at a time when the need for nursing care is on the rise. The report released recently by Health Workforce Australia predicted a potential shortage of approximately 110,000 nurses by 2025. In Queensland alone, the Queensland Nursing Union estimates the shortage of nurses to be closer to 10,000 positions by 2016 and 14,000 positions by 2020 based on the anticipated Queensland Health hospital expansions. The Commonwealth Government has responded by increasing funding to train more registered nurses across Australia. Hence a significant number of graduate registered nurses are expected and required to join the workforce. However, an analysis of the literature reveals that opinions differ between clinicians and education providers as to whether recently graduated registered nurses are adequately prepared for the challenges of the current healthcare system. Even though much research has been done in Australia on the issue of transition support programmes, graduate registered nurses' transition to practice remains problematic and is perceived to pose a significant challenge to healthcare industry. This paper contributes to the contemporary discourse on graduate registered nurses' practice readiness at a time when a forecasted nursing shortage, the difficulties in accessing sufficient quality clinical placements and the need for fiscal responsibility pose added challenges to education providers and the healthcare industry. PMID:24596992

El Haddada, May; Moxham, Lorna; Broadbent, Marc

2013-01-01

320

School Nursing Documentation: Knowledge, Attitude, and Barriers to Using Standardized Nursing Languages and Current Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The independent, complex role of a school nurse requires accurate documentation of assessments, interventions, and outcomes. Consistent documentation by all school nurses is crucial to study the impact of nursing interventions on children's health and success in school. While standardized nursing languages are available, the actual use of…

Yearous, Sharon Kay Guthrie

2011-01-01

321

Nursing Minimum Data Set for School Nursing Practice. Position Statement. Revised  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) to support the collection of essential nursing data as listed in the Nursing Minimum Data Set (NMDS). The NMDS provides a basic structure to identify the data needed to delineate nursing care delivered to clients as well as relevant characteristics of those clients. Structure…

Denehy, Janice

2012-01-01

322

Education for Nursing Practice; Report of the New York State Nurses Association 1966 Arden House Conference.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ninety-six nursing leaders participated in the conference to discuss nursing education, nursing service, and the role of the professional association. It was hoped that similar discussions on the local level would result. Speeches included "The Case for Creativity in Nursing" by Apollinia O. Adams and "Education for ????" separate presentations by…

New York State Nurses Association, Albany.

323

Use of three evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices by registered nurses.  

PubMed

To provide optimal postoperative pain relief, nursing practice should be based on the best evidence available. For over 20 years, results of studies regarding nurses' use of evidence-based practices, including postoperative pain assessment practices, have shown that nurses use the practices inconsistently. The present cross-sectional survey study was conducted to: 1) determine the extent to which registered nurses caring for postoperative patients experiencing pain used three evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices; and 2) identify relationships among the level of adoption of evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices and selected characteristics of registered nurses. Data were collected from a convenience sample of all nurses caring for adult postoperative patients in two Midwestern hospitals where 443 surveys (46.9%) were returned. Respondents were aware of, but not using, three evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices consistently. Registered nurses who used multiple sources to identify solutions to clinical practice problems or read one or two professional journals regularly were more likely to have adopted the three evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices. Registered nurses need to be encouraged to use multiple sources to identify solutions to clinical practice problems, including professional nursing journals. Innovative approaches to promote the application of research to education and practice settings are needed. It is important to identify opinion leaders, because opinion leaders are an important resource in overcoming the barriers so that adoption of pain of evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices can proceed. Additional research is needed to identify what variables effect the adoption of evidence-based practices and identify interventions to improve the level of adoption. PMID:19944373

Carlson, Cathy L

2009-12-01

324

Nursing theory-directed healthcare: modifying Kolcaba's comfort theory as an institution-wide approach.  

PubMed

The tradition of the nursing discipline borrowing theory from other disciplines is examined, and the idea of other healthcare disciplines borrowing nursing theory is proposed. A brief literature review of borrowed theory sets the stage to examine how a modification in the theoretical framework of Kolcaba's theory of comfort can guide the thinking and work of other healthcare disciplines. This change positions Kolcaba's theory as an acceptable blueprint to guide the activities of all health disciplines within an institution, transposing this theory from a theory for nursing to a theory for healthcare. In a healthcare climate that embraces interprofessional collaboration, a single theoretical framework has the potential to facilitate greater understanding between disciplines and greater continuity of care for healthcare recipients and their families. To clearly demonstrate this assertion, a hypothetical case example is presented. PMID:19258847

March, Angela; McCormack, Dianne

2009-01-01

325

Using partnerships to advance nursing practice and education: the precious prints project.  

PubMed

With the release of the Institute of Medicine's (2011) Future of Nursing report, nursing leaders recognized that strong academic-practice partnerships are critical to advancing the report's recommendations. Using established principles for academic-practice partnerships, a manufacturer, children's hospital, student nurses organization, and college of nursing created the Precious Prints Project (P(3)) to give families who have experienced the death of a child a sterling silver pendant of the child's fingerprint. This article outlines the background, implementation, and benefits of the P(3) partnership with the aim of encouraging readers to consider how similar programs might be implemented in their organizations. To date, the program has given pendants to more than 90 families. In addition, nurses and nursing students have been introduced to the provision of a tangible keepsake for families experiencing the loss of a child and participation in philanthropy and an academic practice partnership. PMID:25601245

Miller, Lynne H; Mixer, Sandra J; Lindley, Lisa C; Fornehed, Mary Lou; Niederhauser, Victoria; Barnes, Laura

2015-01-01

326

Transforming nursing education: a review of current curricular practices in relation to Benner's latest work.  

PubMed

Current societal and healthcare system trends highlight the need to transform nursing education to prepare nurses capable of outstanding practice in the 21st century. Patricia Benner and colleagues urged nurse educators to transform their practice in the 2010 publication Educating Nurses, A Call to Radical Transformation. Frequently utilized pedagogical frameworks in nursing education include behaviorism and constructivism. Much of the structure and basis for instruction and evaluation can be found rooted in these philosophies. By first exploring both behaviorism and constructivism and then relating their use in nursing education to the call to transform, educators can be encourage to examine current practice and possibly modify aspects to include more rich experiential learning. PMID:23092804

Handwerker, Sarah M

2012-01-01

327

[Advanced nursing practice: a must for the quality of care and mental health services].  

PubMed

New professional legislation and reorganization of mental health services have had a significant influence on mental health nursing practice. Many nurses have demonstrated clinical leadership and have been able to adapt their services to the needs of the population specially in the primary health care setting. However, many believe that the role of nurses is not sufficiently known and optimally utilized in mental health services. In this article we take a critical look at the mental health nursing practice in Quebec and at the essential requirements for its development. This review aims to: 1) describe current trends in the changing roles and the modernization of mental health nursing practice in Quebec, 2) provide an overview of the development of advanced nursing practice and its impact on the quality of mental health services; 3) clarify the concept of advanced nursing practice and position its development in Quebec and 4) propose various strategies for optimizing the role of nurses and their complementarity with other professionals providing mental health services. This review presents innovative practices developed by nurses in the context of the restructuring of mental health services. For example, new nursing roles have been developed to improve the collaboration with general practitioners groups in primary care settings and facilitate the evaluation and monitoring of patient presenting medical and psychological problems. Another interesting innovation was set up by nurses in developing a new service to allow timely access to integrated care for patients with substance abuse and mental health problems. The various testimonies reported in this article illustrate the potential contribution of these nursing innovations in improving the mental health services in Quebec. Also, in few countries, the reform of mental health services has been a good time to recognize this potential. Thus, some countries have repositioned the role of mental health nurses and supported the development of new models of advanced practice in mental health. These developments have been particularly significant in the United States and Australia. In United States, during the 1990s, at least four models of advanced practice in mental health nursing have been developed leading to wide variations in the roles, education, job titles, scope of practice and legal authorizations. Consequently, a consensus model of uniform standards of practice, accreditation and education has been proposed. This LACE model (Licensure, Accreditation, Certification, Education) will be in effect in 2015. Australia has adopted a more systematic approach, unified and progressive to facilitate the development of advanced mental health nursing practice. Australia who, through their many publications, retains more attention since a clear definition of the role of the nurse practitioner in mental health and a legal framework has been adopted at the national level. The Australian experience and the finding from studies suggest that mental health nurse practitioners and nurses who are specialized in mental health have the potential to make a significant contribution to enhancing access to and quality of mental health care through flexible an innovative approaches. So there are more and more evidence and indications that Quebec should invest in enhancing the skills of mental health nurses through the development of advanced nursing practice and integration of this new model in primary care. In addition, researches, funded by the Canadian Services Research Foundation (CHSRF, 2010), shows that the contribution of advanced nursing practice has never been stronger and there is a broad consensus to its value for the Canadian health care system (Dicenso.et Lukosius-Briant, 2010). The implementation of advanced practice nursing role in mental health is part of best practices required to improve care and mental health services and should be taken into account in future Action Plan 2014-2020. PMID:25120119

Ricard, Nicole; Page, Claire; Laflamme, France

2014-01-01

328

Occupational health nursing practice in the United Kingdom: the European influence.  

PubMed

Legislation introduced by the European Parliament has markedly affected the practice, education, and training of occupational health nurses. New health and safety legislation requires occupational health nurses to demonstrate and prove their competence to perform certain duties. The statutory body must create, for the first time, a definition of an occupational health nurse. A special body has been established to produce standard vocational qualifications for all workers. Occupational health nurses are the first members of the nursing profession to be involved in the process. PMID:8447858

Raper, J A

1993-02-01

329

Knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding emergency contraception among nurses and nursing students in two hospitals in Nairobi, Kenya.  

PubMed

A cross-sectional descriptive study on knowledge, attitudes, and practice about emergency contraception (EC) was conducted among nurses and nursing students using a self-administered questionnaire. One-hundred-sixty-seven qualified nurses and 63 nursing students completed the questionnaire. Over 95% listed at least one regular contraceptive method but only 2.6% spontaneously listed EC as a contraceptive method, whereas 48% of the respondents had heard of EC. Significantly more nursing students than qualified nurses were familiar with EC. Knowledge about the types of EC, applications, and side effects was poor and 49% of the respondents considered EC as an abortifacient. Of those familiar with EC, 77% approved its use for rape victims and 21% for adolescents and schoolgirls. Only 3.5% of all respondents had personally used EC in the past, 23% of those familiar with EC intend to use it in the future, whereas 53% intend to provide or promote it. The view that EC was abortifacient negatively influenced the decision to use or provide EC in the future. The present findings suggest that the level of knowledge of EC is poor and more information is needed. These findings indicate the potential to popularize emergency contraception in Kenya among nurses and nursing students. PMID:10457870

Gichangi, P B; Karanja, J G; Kigondu, C S; Fonck, K; Temmerman, M

1999-04-01

330

A spatial analysis of the expanding roles of nurses in general practice  

PubMed Central

Background Changes to the workforce and organisation of general practice are occurring rapidly in response to the Australian health care reform agenda, and the changing nature of the medical profession. In particular, the last five years has seen the rapid introduction and expansion of a nursing workforce in Australian general practices. This potentially creates pressures on current infrastructure in general practice. Method This study used a mixed methods, ‘rapid appraisal’ approach involving observation, photographs, and interviews. Results Nurses utilise space differently to GPs, and this is part of the diversity they bring to the general practice environment. At the same time their roles are partly shaped by the ways space is constructed in general practices. Conclusion The fluidity of nursing roles in general practice suggests that nurses require a versatile space in which to maximize their role and contribution to the general practice team. PMID:22870933

2012-01-01

331

A philosophical analysis of evidence-based practice in mental health nursing.  

PubMed

Mental health nurses need to be aware that their knowledge base does not exist in isolation from other cultural practices. They/I/we must become more willing to engage in theoretical problem solving that directly affects clinical practice issues such as the introduction of evidence-based practice. Critical discussion of evidence-based practice should be informed by the complex issues that permeate all our socio-cultural and linguistic practices. This paper examines some of the major philosophical problems in the debate over the use of evidence-based practice in mental health nursing using both Foucault's formulation of discourse analysis and Derrida's construal of deconstruction. The conclusion reached is that postmodern philosophy offers a way to rid nursing of incessant naiive attacks on either quantitative or qualitative research methods which underpin the debate over evidence-based practice in mental health nursing. PMID:11493288

Lines, K

2001-09-01

332

What Kind of Nurse Are You?  

PubMed

Once again the importance of nursing theory in practice comes to the forefront. By examining one's personal and professional beliefs in how one cares for people, it becomes apparent that nursing theory does guide nursing practice. The moral and ethical judgments one makes before or while caring for a person may reveal that personal bias can detract from the quality of care. PMID:24951521

Karnick, Paula M

2014-06-19

333

Prolog: A Practical Language for Decision Support Systems in Nursing?  

PubMed Central

Developing decision support systems for nursing has been limited by difficulties in defining and representing nursing's knowledge base and by a lack of knowledge of how nurses make decisions. Recent theoretical and empirical work offers solutions to those problems. The challenge now is to represent nursing knowledge in a way that is comprehensible to both nurse and computer and to design decision support modalities that are accurate, efficient, and appropriate for nurses with different levels of expertise. This paper reviews the issues and critically evaluates Prolog as a tool for meeting the challenge.

Ozbolt, Judy G.

1987-01-01

334

Practice nurses' workload, career intentions and the impact of professional isolation: A cross-sectional survey  

PubMed Central

Background Practice nurses have a key role within UK general practice, especially since the 2004 GMS contract. This study aimed to describe that role, identify how professionally supported they felt and their career intentions. An additional aim was to explore whether they felt isolated and identify contributory factors. Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire survey in one large urban Scottish Health Board, targeted all practice nurses (n = 329). Domains included demographics, workload, training and professional support. Following univariate descriptive statistics, associations between categorical variables were tested using the chi-square test or chi-square test for trend; associations between dichotomous variables were tested using Fisher's Exact test. Variables significantly associated with isolation were entered into a binary logistic regression model using backwards elimination. Results There were 200 responses (61.0% response rate). Most respondents were aged 40 or over and were practice nurses for a median of 10 years. Commonest clinical activities were coronary heart disease management, cervical cytology, diabetes and the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Although most had a Personal Development Plan and a recent appraisal, 103 (52.3%) felt isolated at least sometimes; 30 (15.5%) intended leaving practice nursing within 5 years. Isolated nurses worked in practices with smaller list sizes (p = 0.024) and nursing teams (p = 0.003); were less likely to have someone they could discuss a clinical/professional (p = 0.002) or personal (p < 0.001) problem with; used their training and qualifications less (p < 0.001); had less productive appraisals (p < 0.001); and were less likely to intend staying in practice nursing (p = 0.009). Logistic regression analysis showed that nurses working alone or in teams of two were 6-fold and 3.5-fold more likely to feel isolated. Using qualifications and training to the full, having productive appraisals and planning to remain in practice nursing all mitigated against feeling isolated. Conclusions A significant proportion of practice nurses reported feeling isolated, at least some of the time. They were more likely to be in small practices and more likely to be considering leaving practice nursing. Factors contributing to their isolation were generally located within the practice environment. Providing support to these nurses within their practice setting may help alleviate the feelings of isolation, and could reduce the number considering leaving practice nursing. PMID:20205777

2010-01-01

335

PHILOSOPHICAL SMOKE SIGNALS: THEORY AND PRACTICE IN  

E-print Network

these arguments we may be able to form a number of more rigorous theories of Information Systems, allowing usPHILOSOPHICAL SMOKE SIGNALS: THEORY AND PRACTICE IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS DESIGN David King and Chris, Information, Knowledge, Philosophy, Theory Abstract Although the gulf between the theory and practice

Kimble, Chris

336

An investigation of nurse educator's perceptions and experiences of undertaking clinical practice.  

PubMed

Educational policy (DOH, 1999. Making a difference: strengthening the nursing, midwifery and health visiting contribution to health and healthcare. Department of Health, London; UKCC, 1999. Fitness for Practice. United Kingdom Central Council for Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting, London; Nursing and Midwifery Council, 2006. Standards to support learning and assessment in practice. Nursing and Midwifery Council, London) and current nursing literature (Griscti, O., Jacono, B., Jacono, J., 2005. The nurse educator's clinical role. Journal of Advanced Nursing 50 (1), 84-92; Owen, S., Ferguson, K., Baguley, I., 2005. The clinical activity of mental health nurse lecturers. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing 12, 310-316), place increasing emphasis on nurse educators undertaking clinical practice to facilitate their clinical confidence and competence. This study investigated nurse educators' perceptions and experiences of undertaking clinical practice. A qualitative design and descriptive, exploratory approach were used. A purposive sample of 11 nurse educators in one nursing department, took part in two focus group interviews, one with 5 and the other with 6 respondents, to identify and discuss their perceptions and experiences of undertaking clinical practice. A process of thematic content analysis revealed three broad themes relating to the meaning and importance of clinical practice, perceived benefits and barriers which are examined and discussed. The paper concludes that despite policy recommendations, barriers highlighted in this study such as insufficient time, heavy workload and a lack of valuing of the clinical role have been raised over the past few decades. The effect of undertaking clinical practice, particularly on the quality of teaching is argued to be valuable armoury in the battle to secure sufficient resources to support engagement in clinical practice. Financial and organisational commitment; valuing of clinical practice and research evidence are crucial to realising clinical practice for nurse educators. Alternative interpretations of what may constitute the clinical role such as joint research projects and supporting and supervising students are offered, which need to be assessed against clear, specific and realistic aims for the clinical role of the nurse educator. PMID:18586358

Williams, Angela; Taylor, Cathy

2008-11-01

337

Postcolonial theory, nursing knowledge, and the development of emancipatory knowing.  

PubMed

Nurses must assume a leadership role in confronting inequitable access to health care. This imperative is realizable through contributions to the knowledge of the discipline, reflecting on the profession's mandate for social justice and elimination of health inequities, as well as embracing the diversity of nursing's fundamental patterns of knowing. Emancipatory knowing involves critically examining social, political, and institutional structures to uncover social injustices and inequities and disrupt the status quo, as well as asking critical questions. Postcolonial theory, aligned with these foundational principles, can be used to answer such critical questions, thus contributing to the advancement of disciplinary knowledge. PMID:25102212

Bickford, Deanna

2014-01-01

338

Promoting nurses' knowledge in evidence-based practice: do educational methods matter?  

PubMed

Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a mandate for nursing practice. Education on EBP has occurred in academic settings, but not all nurses have received this training. The authors describe a randomized controlled pretest/posttest design testing the differences in effectiveness of two educational methods to improve nurses' knowledge, attitudes, and practice of EBP. Results indicated both methods improved self-reported practice. On the basis of the study findings, staff development educators can select the teaching method that best complements their organizational environment. PMID:23877287

Toole, Belinda M; Stichler, Jaynelle F; Ecoff, Laurie; Kath, Lisa

2013-01-01

339

New quality regulations versus established nursing home practice: a qualitative study  

PubMed Central

Background Western governments have initiated reforms to improve the quality of care for nursing home residents. Most of these reforms encompass the use of regulations and national quality indicators. In the Norwegian context, these regulations comprise two pages of text that are easy to read and understand. They focus particularly on residents’ rights to plan their day-to-day life in nursing homes. However, the research literature indicates that the implementation of the new regulations, particularly if they aim to change nursing practice, is extremely challenging. The aim of this study was to further explore and describe nursing practice to gain a deeper understanding of why it is so hard to implement the new regulations. Methods For this qualitative study, an ethnographic design was chosen to explore and describe nursing practice. Fieldwork was conducted in two nursing homes. In total, 45 nurses and nursing aides were included in participant observation, and 10 were interviewed at the end of the field study. Results Findings indicate that the staff knew little about the new quality regulations, and that the quality of their work was guided by other factors rooted in their nursing practice. Further analyses revealed that the staff appeared to be committed to daily routines and also that they always seemed to know what to do. Having routines and always knowing what to do mutually strengthen and enhance each other, and together they form a powerful force that makes daily nursing care a taken-for-granted activity. Conclusion New regulations are challenging to implement because nursing practices are so strongly embedded. Improving practice requires systematic and deeply rooted practical change in everyday action and thinking. PMID:22676435

2012-01-01

340

Integrating oral health into professional nursing practice: an interprofessional faculty tool kit.  

PubMed

Millions of children and adults in the United States have unmet oral health care needs, and professional nurses can play a central role in reducing oral health disparities and expanding access to care. Interprofessional education is requisite to improving oral health care outcomes. Baccalaureate nursing programs need to prepare collaborative practice-ready professional nurses to improve oral health care especially for vulnerable and underserved individuals, communities, and populations. This article presents an interprofessional faculty tool kit that builds upon The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice as a framework for preparing professional nurses with basic knowledge, skills, and attitudes in oral health promotion and disease and injury prevention across the life cycle. Expectations for professional nursing practice are described within the context of The Essentials and contemporary oral health care issues. Exemplars of interprofessional teaching-learning strategies are provided to assist nurse faculty with integrating oral health into baccalaureate nursing curriculum. Nurse educators are called to prioritize oral health as an essential component of overall health and well-being, increase the visibility of evidence-based oral health promotion and disease and injury prevention in baccalaureate nursing curricula, and support interprofessional oral health education and collaborative care. PMID:24503317

Dolce, Maria C

2014-01-01

341

An information technology infrastructure to enable evidence-based nursing practice.  

PubMed

The movement toward evidence-based practice (EBP) poses new organizational challenges to provide the necessary infrastructure to promote effective nursing interventions based on the best available evidence. The purpose of this article is to describe a collaborative effort between nursing and library services to provide readily accessible information at the bedside to support nurses using the best available evidence. In collaboration with nursing, the Health Services Librarian created an information resource titled "Research-based Nursing Practice: Finding the Evidence," which enables nursing staff to access the resources at the bedside without having to perform lengthy searches. Every known resource that will educate nurses in defining EBP to providing them with the links to Web sites, published articles, and all the information resources is included in the tool. Much has been written about building the organizational infrastructure to promote EBP and finding the filtered, synthesized research evidence, but to our knowledge, little has been published on building the information technology infrastructure, which will give nurses real-time access at the point-of-care to the research evidence. The research-based nursing practice system is helping bridge the gap between evidence-based resources and practice by compiling the literature in one place and making it easily and readily accessible. PMID:19893445

Pochciol, Joan M; Warren, Joan I

2009-01-01

342

Social media and nursing practice: changing the balance between the social and technical aspects of work.  

PubMed

Modern communication methods are drastically changing the way people interact with each other. Professions such as nursing need to evolve to remain relevant as social infrastructure changes. In the 1960s, researchers developed a sociotechnical theory that stated workers were more motivated and productive if there was a good balance between the social and technical aspects of their work. Today's technology is blurring the boundaries between the social and the technical thereby transforming human contact and communication into a multi-method process. In Australia, people are adept at utilising social media technology to become more efficient, creative and connected; Australian nurses also need to embrace changing technology to capitalise on the professional opportunities offered by social media. This paper imagines a world where nurses integrate social media into assessing, diagnosing, planning, implementing and evaluating care. Discussion draws on a combination of real-world examples of best-practice and blue-sky thinking to demonstrate that evidence-based care must be combined with the adoption of future-forward technology. PMID:25109210

Casella, Evan; Mills, Jane; Usher, Kim

2014-01-01

343

A professional code of ethics provides guidance for genetic nursing practice.  

PubMed

While ethical quandaries and dilemmas are commonplace for nurses, recent advances in human genetics have and will continue to create new challenges and controversies. Throughout time, nursing has been an ethical endeavour, with nurses viewing the ethical mandates of their responsibilities on a par with other core dimensions of their professional life. The (American) profession's code of ethics, Code for nurses with interpretive statements, provides direction for practice and for the fulfillment of ethical obligations. The explication of these ethical norms and values that shape professional practice is necessary as nurses confront the integration of genetic services into health care. The goal of preserving professional integrity and ethical soundness in the context of genetic health care mandates that nurses rely on and act upon the profession's national and international codes of ethics. PMID:10986949

Scanlon, C

2000-05-01

344

[Limits and possibilities of the nursing auditory and its theoretical and practical aspects].  

PubMed

This article aims to make a critical-reflexive analysis about the nursing auditory, observing its limits and possibilities as well as its theoretical and practical aspects. The nursing auditory, nowadays, is practiced and advertised in public and private institutions, aiming to minimize material, medication, equipment and human resources loss. It is important to mention the presence of the nursing group which was fundamental to the auditory process. The professional nurse in auditory is responsible for the quality of the assistance directed towards the patient. There are many challenges involving the development of the nursing auditory, such as the discovery of a professional identity and the integration with auditory nurses all over the country, among others. PMID:23032348

Silva, Maria Verônica Sales da; Silva, Lucilane Maria Sales da; Dourado, Hanna Helen Matos; Nascimento, Adail Afrânio Marcelino do; Moreira, Thereza Maria Magalhães

2012-01-01

345

A critical analysis of the philosophy, knowledge and theory underpinning mouth care practice for the intensive care unit patient.  

PubMed

In the provision of high quality mouth care practice for the intensive care unit (ICU) patient, the nurse draws on philosophy, knowledge and theory. The complexity of mouth care for the ICU patient is compounded by their medical or surgical condition and the psychological effects of mouth care problems. Effective mouth care practice includes proactive prediction and prevention of complications, and prompt and skilled intervention in the problems arising. Therefore, critical analysis of the philosophy, knowledge and theory relevant to mouth care practice is important. The philosophical approach to mouth care requires the nurse to view the practice from different perspectives. Nursing knowledge has inextricable links with nursing practice that challenges the nurse in her/his everyday work. This application of knowledge to practice is conceptualised as ways of thinking, which is also based on what the nurse might know. Therefore, the judicious use of theory and the necessary skills are essential to provide high quality and effective mouth care practice. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the ways in which philosophy, knowledge and theory all have an impact on the practice of mouth care for the ICU patient. PMID:12405273

Wilkin, Kathleen

2002-06-01

346

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMMES Programme name BSc (Hons) Primary Care (Practice Nursing)  

E-print Network

and evidence based practice. To act as an advocate for the client, their carers and families. To assume with the use of reflective practice, how evidence based practice can be used to underpin the delivery of care Care (Practice Nursing) Award BSc (Hons) School School of Health Sciences Department or equivalent

Weyde, Tillman

347

Matriculation Plan Summary and Worksheet Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Program  

E-print Network

. Evidence-Based Practice I N651. Evidence-Based Practice II N652. Transforming the Nation's Health N653 Evidence-Based Practice II: Implementation and Evaluation N650 N655 Health Systems Transformation N402 #12Matriculation Plan Summary and Worksheet Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Program This document

Dolbow, John

348

Advanced Practice Psychiatric Nurses Legislative Update: State of the States, 2010  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article provides an update regarding individual state legislation for advanced practice psychiatric nursing, building on previous briefings. Specific attention is given to independent versus collaborative practice regulations, titling, and prescriptive authority. There is review of contemporary issues and focus on scope and standards of practice, workforce data, certification, and advanced practice regulatory models.

Leslie G. Oleck; Angela Retano; Christine Tebaldi; Teena M. McGuinness; Steven Weiss; Julie Carbray; Laura Rodgers; Emily E. Donelson; Lisa Lynn Ashton; Darcy Koehn; Patricia McCoy

2011-01-01

349

Understanding nursing practice in stroke units: a Q-methodological study.  

PubMed

Abstract Purpose: Nurses represent the largest professional group working with stroke-survivors, but there is limited evidence regarding nurses' involvement in post-stroke rehabilitation. The purpose of this study was to identify and explore the perspectives of nurses and other multidisciplinary stroke team members on nurses' practice in stroke rehabilitation. Method: Q-methodological study with 63 multidisciplinary stroke unit team members and semi-structured interviews with 27 stroke unit team members. Results: Irrespective of their professional backgrounds, participants shared the view that nurses can make an active contribution to stroke rehabilitation and integrate rehabilitation principles in routine practice. Training in stroke rehabilitation skills was viewed as fundamental to effective stroke care, but nurses do not routinely receive such training. The view that integrating rehabilitation techniques can only occur when nursing staffing levels were high was rejected. There was also little support for the view that nurses are uniquely placed to co-ordinate care, or that nurses have an independent rehabilitation role. Conclusions: The contribution that nurses with stroke rehabilitation skills can make to effective stroke care was understood. However, realising the potential of nurses as full partners in stroke rehabilitation is unlikely to occur without introduction of structured competency-based multidisciplinary training in rehabilitation skills. Implications for Rehabilitation Multidisciplinary rehabilitation in stroke units is a cornerstone of effective stroke care. Views of stroke unit team members on nurses' involvement in rehabilitation have not been reported previously. Nurses can routinely incorporate rehabilitation principles in their care. Specialist competency-based stroke rehabilitation training needs to be provided for nurses as well as for allied health professionals. PMID:25412737

Clarke, David J; Holt, Janet

2014-11-21

350

Role of the Advanced Practice Nurse in blood and marrow transplantation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The lecture will focus on the role of the Advanced Practice Nurse (Nurse Practitioner and Clinical Nurse Specialist), working\\u000a in the field of blood and marrow transplantation at a comprehensive cancer center in the United States. Discussion will include\\u000a components of the role, which are practitioner, educator, consultant, collaborator, and researcher. Identification of the\\u000a differences in the inpatient and outpatient

Joyce L. Neumann

2002-01-01

351

A National Informatics Agenda for Nursing Education and Practice. Report to the Secretary of the Department of Health & Human Services.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nursing informatics is a specialty whose activities center around information management and processing for the nursing profession. The Division of Nursing of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice (NACNEP) recognized a need to identify initiatives that would more…

National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice, Rockville, MD.

352

Preparing new nurse graduates for practice in multiple settings: a community-based academic-practice partnership model.  

PubMed

Responding to local and national concerns about the nursing workforce, the California Institute for Nursing and Health Care worked with private and public funders and community health care partners to establish community-based transition-to-practice programs for new RN graduates unable to secure nursing positions in the San Francisco Bay Area. The goals were to retain new RN graduates in nursing and further develop their skills and competencies to increase their employability. Leaders from academic and inpatient, ambulatory, and community-based practice settings, as well as additional community partners, collaboratively provided four 12- to 16-week pilot transition programs in 2010-2011. A total of 345 unemployed new nurse graduates enrolled. Eighty-four percent of 188 respondents to a post-program survey were employed in inpatient and community settings 3 months after completion. Participants and clinical preceptors also reported increases in confidence and competence. PMID:24779715

West, Nikki; Berman, Audrey; Karshmer, Judith; Prion, Susan; Van, Paulina; Wallace, Jonalyn

2014-06-01

353

Clinical Protocol-Nursing Practice Manual Page 1 of 17 John Dempsey Hospital Department of Nursing  

E-print Network

may initiate NPWT and may perform dressing changes, per order. Nurses may consult the wound nurses of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROTOCOL / PROCEDURE FOR: Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) Device: Dressing Removal and Application SUPPORTIVE DATA: 1. The NPWT therapy system

Oliver, Douglas L.

354

Discovering Ways That Influence the Older Nurse to Continue Bedside Practice  

PubMed Central

A descriptive qualitative approach was used to investigate older nurses practicing bedside nursing and to identify ways to influence older nurses to continue bedside practice. A purposive sample of 18 older nurses was recruited from a healthcare system located in the Southeastern United States. Interpretative analysis of interviews resulted in the identification of three constitutive patterns and eight themes. The first constitutive pattern identified was attributes of the older nurse. The themes comprising this pattern were (a) professional growth in confidence and skills through experience and (b) passion and love for nursing. The second constitutive pattern was enduring stress and frustration. The themes comprising this pattern were (a) physical and mental changes associated with aging, (b) increased patient acuity and patient load, (c) constant change, and (d) time constraints. The third constitutive pattern was enhancements needed for older nurses to continue bedside nursing. The themes comprising this pattern were (a) work environment enhancements and (b) organizational relationship enhancements. Findings may provide a better understanding of the older nurse's role in bedside nursing. PMID:21994841

Spiva, LeeAnna; Hart, Patricia; McVay, Frank

2011-01-01

355

Moral Exemplars in Theory and Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article I outline an original form of ethical theory that I call exemplarist virtue theory. The theory is intended to serve the philosophical purposes of a comprehensive moral theory, but it is also intended to serve the practical purpose of moral education by structuring the theory around a motivating emotion--the emotion of admiration.…

Zagzebski, Linda

2013-01-01

356

An outcome of evidence-based practice education: sustained clinical decision-making among bedside nurses.  

PubMed

This research described factors related to incorporating evidence-based practice for clinical decision-making by staff nurses who completed an evidence-based practice (EBP) scholars program. A phenomenological approach was used with focus groups to collect data. A semi-structured questionnaire and field notes comprised study instruments. Audio tapes were transcribed and semantic content analysis was used to code data. Programs to teach bedside nurses how to incorporate EBP into care delivery not only result in better outcomes for patients but also greatly contribute to the sustained enculturation of EBP as a foundation for nursing practice. PMID:22999987

Balakas, Karen; Sparks, Laurie; Steurer, Lisa; Bryant, Terry

2013-01-01

357

Nursing handover within mental health rehabilitation: an exploratory study of practice and perception.  

PubMed

Nursing handover is an established practice that involves an interchange of information between nurses to inform of the condition of patients. It is essential to nursing practice in terms of continuity and quality of patient care. However, there is a lack of agreement about the quality, content, and process of handover and, in particular, a lack of information specific to mental health contexts. This paper reports the results of exploratory research of the practice and beliefs about verbal nursing handover within an inpatient mental health rehabilitation setting. Qualitative data were obtained from audiotaped handovers and interviews with nurses and analysed using content analysis. Handovers were found to lack structure and content, be retrospective, problem-focused and inconsistent. The findings were fairly consistent with the literature and would likely be applicable across nursing settings; however, the need to appraise nursing handover in unique contexts was also revealed. The study raised questions about how nursing handover reflects the goals and philosophies of mental health rehabilitation and whether nursing handover is an activity fully integrated with the focus of mental health rehabilitation. PMID:18666912

McCloughen, Andrea; O'Brien, Louise; Gillies, Donna; McSherry, Caroline

2008-08-01

358

Influence of Perceptions on School Nurse Practices to Prevent Childhood Obesity.  

PubMed

Comprehensive childhood obesity prevention (COP) strategies should include increasing school nurse involvement. This study was conducted to determine the influence of key school nurse perceptions (self-efficacy, perceived benefits, and perceived barriers) on participation in COP practices at the individual child and school level. Florida registered nurse (RN) school nurses (n = 171) anonymously completed online or paper questionnaires. Linear regression analyses identified a model of self-efficacy with perceived benefits and barriers that explained 12% and 9.1% (p < .001) of variance in child-level and school-level COP practices, respectively. Self-efficacy explained the most variance in both models (p < .001). Mediation testing identified perceived barriers as a partial mediator of the influence of self-efficacy on child-level practices. These findings support interventions and policy changes to increase self-efficacy and reduce perceived barriers to promote school nurse involvement in preventing childhood obesity. PMID:24128859

Quelly, Susan B

2013-10-14

359

Examining pedagogical practices in family systems nursing: intentionality, complexity, and doing well by families.  

PubMed

Teaching graduate family nursing students the important and delicate practice of entering into and mitigating families' illness suffering signifies an educational practice that is rigorous, intense, and contextual, yet not articulated as expounded knowledge. This study examined the pedagogical practices of the advanced practice of Family Systems Nursing (FSN) as taught to master's and doctoral nursing students at the Family Nursing Unit, University of Calgary, using observation of expert and novice clinical practice, live supervision, videotape review, presession hypothesizing, clinical documentation, and the writing of therapeutic letters to families. A triangulation of research methods and data collection strategies, interpretive ethnography, autoethnography, and hermeneutics, were used. Students reported an intensity of learning that had both useful and limiting consequences as they developed skills in therapeutic conversations with families experiencing illness. Faculty used an intentional pedagogical process to encourage growth in perceptual, conceptual, and executive knowledge and skills of working with families. PMID:22274936

Moules, Nancy J; Bell, Janice M; Paton, Brenda I; Morck, Angela C

2012-05-01

360

Current educational reforms in nursing in the United Kingdom and their impact on the role of nursing lecturers in practice: a case study approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores major developments in nurse education in the UK in the last 5 years and examinestheir impact on the role of nursing lecturers in practice. It builds upon the findings of an earlier study that described significant changes in the UK in the role and work of nurse teachers resulting from Project 2000 initiatives. Empirical data were collected

Sada Camiah

1998-01-01

361

Perceived knowledge, skills, attitude and contextual factors affecting evidence-based practice among nurse educators, clinical coaches and nurse specialists.  

PubMed

Evidence-based practice (EBP) in the clinical setting is recognized as an approach that leads to improved patient outcomes. Nurse educators (NEs), clinical coaches (CCs) and nurse specialists are in key positions to promote and facilitate EBP within clinical settings and have opportunities to advance practice. Therefore, it is important to understand their perceptions of factors promoting EBP and perceived barriers in facilitating EBP in clinical settings, before developing educational programmes. This paper reports findings from a study that aimed to explore NEs' , CCs' and nurse specialists' knowledge, skills and attitudes associated with EBP. This study used a questionnaire containing quantitative and a small number of qualitative questions to capture data collected from NEs, CCs and nurse specialists working at a tertiary health-care facility in Victoria, Australia. The questionnaire was distributed to a total of 435 people, of whom 135 responded (31%). Findings revealed that the three senior nurse groups relied heavily on personal experience, organizational policies and protocols as formal sources of knowledge. Furthermore, they had positive attitudes towards EBP. However, participants demonstrated lack of knowledge and skills in appraising and utilizing evidence into practice. They indicated a desire to seek educational opportunities to upskill themselves in the process of EBP. PMID:25355492

Malik, Gulzar; McKenna, Lisa; Plummer, Virginia

2014-10-30

362

Developing leadership practices in hospital-based nurse educators in an online learning community.  

PubMed

Hospital-based nurse educators are in a prime position to mentor future nurse leaders; however, they need to first develop their own leadership practices. The goal was to establish a learning community where hospital-based nurse educators could develop their own nursing leadership practices within an online environment that included teaching, cognitive, and social presence. Using a pretest/posttest-only nonexperimental design, 35 nurse educators from three Canadian provinces engaged in a 12-week online learning community via a wiki where they learned about exemplary leadership practices and then shared stories about their own leadership practices. Nurse educators significantly increased their own perceived leadership practices after participation in the online community, and teaching, cognitive, and social presence was determined to be present in the online community. It was concluded that leadership development can be enhanced in an online learning community using a structured curriculum, multimedia presentations, and the sharing and analysis of leadership stories. Educators who participated should now be better equipped to role model exemplary leadership practices and mentor our nurse leaders of the future. PMID:24256766

Stutsky, Brenda J; Spence Laschinger, Heather K

2014-01-01

363

Beyond Google: Finding and Evaluating Web-Based Information for Community-Based Nursing Practice*  

PubMed Central

Nurses are challenged to find and use reliable, credible information to support clinical decision-making and to meet expectations for evidence-based nursing practice. This project targeted practicing public health and school nurses, teaching them how to access and critically evaluate web-based information resources for frontline practice. Health sciences librarians partnered with nursing faculty to develop two participatory workshops to teach skills in searching for and evaluating web-based consumer and professional practice resources. The first workshop reviewed reliable, credible consumer web-resources appropriate to use with clients, using published criteria to evaluate website credibility. In the second workshop, nurses were taught how to retrieve and evaluate health-related research from professional databases to support evidence-based nursing practice. Evaluation data indicated nurses most valued knowing about the array of reliable, credible web-based health information resources, learning how to evaluate website credibility, and understanding how to find and apply professional research literature to their own practice. PMID:20812913

Miller, Louise C; Graves, Rebecca S.; Jones, Barbara B.; Sievert, Maryellen C

2010-01-01

364

The nature and purpose of the role of the nurse lecturer in practice settings.  

PubMed

This paper examines the role of lecturers in nursing in pre-registration education. It focuses on the nature and purpose of the nurse lecturer's contribution in the practice setting, with particular emphasis on the issues surrounding clinical credibility. This is particularly pertinent in the light of current recommendations, which emphasise the importance of clinical learning in pre-registration education programmes. The purpose of the lecturer's role in clinical practice settings is ill defined. This lack of clear consensus regarding the expected outcomes for lecturers (in practice), leads to difficulty outlining what they should do in practice settings. Although lecturers accept that they have an important part to play in maximizing the learning opportunities for students in both university and practice settings, they are less clear about how this should be achieved in the latter. This paper argues that: It is opportune to examine and realign the lecturers contribution in practice settings given that there has been a shift in the responsibility for clinical learning; nurse education is now embedded in the higher education sector and there is a need for a greater emphasis on practice development. Clinical credibility for lecturers is about the development of nursing practice through education which is not always achieved by 'hands on' care. For example, assisting nurses in a ward area to develop expertise in evidence based practice may not involve 'hands on' care giving but does involve being conversant with current research and practice issues. The lecturer's expertise in practice settings is in teaching and facilitating learning, rather than direct care giving. No one common model for practice may be either feasible or desirable. However, it is important that nurse lecturers do not follow a particular approach because the debate about the nurse lecturer's role in practice settings fails to acknowledge the strengths and weaknesses of each model. It is important that the approach is based on sound rationale. PMID:10827102

Humphreys, A; Gidman, J; Andrews, M

2000-05-01

365

Portfolio use as a tool to demonstrate professional development in advanced nursing practice.  

PubMed

A concrete way of recognizing and rewarding clinical leadership, excellence in practice, and personal and professional development of the advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) is lacking in the literature and healthcare institutions in the United States. This article presents the process of developing and evaluating a professional development program designed to address this gap. The program uses APRN Professional Performance Standards, Relationship-Based Care, and the Magnet Forces as a guide and theoretical base. A key tenet of the program is the creation of a professional portfolio. Narrative reflections are included that illustrate the convergence of theories. A crosswalk supports this structure, guides portfolio development, and operationalizes the convergence of theories as they specifically relate to professional development in advanced practice. Implementation of the program has proven to be challenging and rewarding. Feedback from APRNs involved in the program supports program participation as a meaningful method to recognize excellence in advanced practice and a clear means to foster ongoing professional growth and development. PMID:22016019

Hespenheide, Molly; Cottingham, Talisha; Mueller, Gail

2011-01-01

366

An Investigation of School Playground Safety Practices as Reported by School Nurses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to investigate school playground safety practices. The study used a purposeful sample of school nurses who attended a playground safety workshop at the 2006 National Association of School Nurses annual conference. Seventy-five questionnaires were distributed, and 64 useable questionnaires were returned. The responses…

Hudson, Susan D.; Olsen, Heather M.; Thompson, Donna

2008-01-01

367

Putting Discourse to Work: Information Practices and the Professional Project of Nurses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article contributes to discourse-oriented, information-seeking research by showing how discourses, from a neopragmatist perspective, can be explored as tools that people employ when they actively engage in information practices in varied social contexts. A study of nurses and the nursing profession in Sweden is used as an empirical example of…

Johannisson, Jenny; Sundin, Olof

2007-01-01

368

Survey of Current Academic Practices for Full-Time Postlicensure Nursing Faculty Who Teach Online  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine current academic practices of compensation, workload, rewards, and tenure and promotion for nursing faculty who teach graduate and postlicensure programs that are delivered 50% to 100% online. Deans and directors who are members of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) were the…

Hanford, Karen J.

2010-01-01

369

Clinical Procedure/Protocol Page 1 of 7 Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

Clinical Procedure/Protocol Page 1 of 7 Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROCEDURE / PROTOCOL FOR: Parenteral Nutrition (PN) and Intravenous Fat Emulsion Administration (IVFE) in Adults POLICY: 1. Orders for parenteral nutrition (PN

Oliver, Douglas L.

370

Nurse practitioner/physician collaborative practice: an integrative model for professional peer review.  

PubMed

As chief nursing officers partner with physician colleagues to create collaborative models of practice across the care continuum, the role of peer review in achieving quality outcomes cannot be overlooked. This article describes how an integrated healthcare system approached the creation of a unique integrative model for physician/nurse practitioner peer review. PMID:23708497

Clavelle, Joanne T; Bramwell, Kenneth

2013-06-01

371

Embedding evidence-based practice in a nursing curriculum: a benchmarking project  

Microsoft Academic Search

The development of a new nursing curriculum in one Australian university provided the opportunity for academic staff to consider the best ways to integrate the requirements of evidence-based practice (EBP) into nursing education and culminated in the development and conduct of a specific benchmarking project. Data collection for the project included the use of university documents, observations and informal discussions

Wendy Chaboyer; Ania Willman; Patricia Johnson; Lynette Stockhausen

2004-01-01

372

Clinical Protocol/Procedure Page 1 of 6 Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

Clinical Protocol/Procedure Page 1 of 6 Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROCEDURE FOR: Fecal Incontinence Management Using prior to insertion of device for all patients in CSDU, all Med-Surg and Oncology areas. Note: On off

Oliver, Douglas L.

373

Readiness for Evidence-Based Practice: Information Literacy Needs of Nurses in the United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper U.S. nurses' readiness to provide Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) as measured by their information literacy knowl- edge and skills is described. The Institute of Medicine directed health care providers to use EBP as a means to improve patient safety, efficiency and effectiveness of health care services. Infor- mation literacy has been identified as a nursing informatics competency for

Annelle Tanner; Susan Pierce; Diane Pravikoff

374

Clinical Procedure Page 1 of 3 Clinical Manual Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

staff as they work with the patient, family and interdisciplinary team to: a. Plan the patient's careClinical Procedure Page 1 of 3 Clinical Manual ­ Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROCEDURE FOR: Documentation: Patient Care

Oliver, Douglas L.

375

Geropsychiatric Nursing Practice in the United States: Present Trends and Future Directions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Demographic trends, diversification of geriatric health care service settings, and advances in education and science call for redefining the context and mission of geropsychiatric nursing (GPN) practice. The challenges of providing preventive, restorative, and palliative care for older adults who move across health care and residential settings demand that geropsychiatric nurses be theoretically well grounded, family centered, expert in multiple

Merrie J. Kaas; Elizabeth Beattie

2006-01-01

376

Influence of Perceptions on School Nurse Practices to Prevent Childhood Obesity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Comprehensive childhood obesity prevention (COP) strategies should include increasing school nurse involvement. This study was conducted to determine the influence of key school nurse perceptions (self-efficacy, perceived benefits, and perceived barriers) on participation in COP practices at the individual child and school level. Florida…

Quelly, Susan B.

2014-01-01

377

The Courage of One's Conviction: When Do Nurse Practitioners Report Unsafe Practices?  

Microsoft Academic Search

When and why do nurses report unsafe patient practices when they see them? This paper adds to our understanding of the characteristics of health care practitioners who report errors and their environment by introducing role identity as an important concept for understanding this communication behavior. We analyzed the results of a national survey of 330 nurses to address three questions:

Jean A. Grube; Jane A. Piliavin; Jeanine Warisse Turner

2010-01-01

378

Practical use of the nursing code of ethics: part I.  

PubMed

The Code (ANA, 2001) provides the nurse guidance for legal and ethical responsibilities to patients and, in the broader sense, to society. The first provision calls for honoring the human dignity in all patients and colleagues. It lays the groundwork for the importance of the essential ethical principle of autonomy, the right to self-determination. The second provision describes the importance of interdisciplinary collaboration and significance of appropriate nurse-patient boundaries. The importance of privacy and confidentiality in the nurse-patient relationship is the focus of the third provision. Without the nurse's honoring of privacy, the patient would be hesitant to share important information necessary to design an effective plan of care. The fourth provision primarily focuses on the importance of accountability for personal actions and for the actions of those to whom the nurse has delegated. By meeting these obligations, the nurse will remain the most trusted health care professional. PMID:19331301

Lachman, Vicki D

2009-01-01

379

[Nursing responsibility in the administration of medications: some thoughts about a safe practice with care quality].  

PubMed

A nursing role that is worthy of reflection is the administration of medications, as it involves legal and ethical aspects of impact on professional practice. Errors in the administration of medications point out the responsibility of the nursing category. An adequate performance of this role enables the prevention of real errors. The purpose of this study was to analyze nursing responsibilities in the administration of medications through a bibliographical research in the Medline and Lilacs data bases (1997/1999). Results showed the lack of published works on this theme and, therefore, the need for reflections on nursing professionals participation in the administration of medications, especially concerning publications. PMID:12040803

Coimbra, J A; Cassiani, S H

2001-03-01

380

Peer review for advanced practice nurses: what does it really mean?  

PubMed

Peer review has multiple manifestations and purposes. Two stated purposes are the demonstration of professionalism and clinical competency. The American Nurses Association (ANA) defines nursing peer-review as a process for evaluating the care provided by an individual according to accepted standards. Further, the ANA proposes that nurses with similar rank and clinical expertise should conduct these evaluations. Some local jurisdictions may also mandate that advanced practice nurses (APNs) review one another's care. Therefore, APNs should become familiar with sources for evaluation criteria and tool formats for APN peer review. The advantages and limitations of the various formats and processes of peer review should also be considered. PMID:15714013

Briggs, Linda A; Heath, Janie; Kelley, Jean

2005-01-01

381

Classroom to clinic: incorporating adolescent spiritual/faith assessment into nurse practitioner education & practice.  

PubMed

Although nursing is well grounded in the conceptualization of person as body-mind-spirit, there is little evidence that advanced practice nurses routinely address the spirit in giving patient care, especially with adolescents in the outpatient setting. The neglect of spiritual aspects of care may be related to lack of a framework, or education/incorporation into nurse practitioner preparation. This article describes one method of integrating adolescent spiritual/faith assessment into a nurse practitioner clinical course. Readings, assignments, and a grading rubric are offered. PMID:25296491

Haley, Janice M

2014-01-01

382

Infusing evidence-based instructional strategies to prepare today's military practical nurses for tomorrow's practice.  

PubMed

Is there one best method to provide instruction to today's nursing students? The evidence found in the current literature clearly states the answer is no. The student of today is technology oriented. But for them, it's not about technology, it's about the learning that technology provides. With this understanding, this article provides a review of the efforts by the staff of the US Army Practical Nurse Course (68WM6) to infuse evidence-based instructional strategies into curriculum. Five strategies that were integrated into the curriculum are presented: computer assisted learning, gaming software, classroom response system, human patient simulators, and video recordings. All of the initiatives discussed in this article were implemented into the program of instruction over a 6-year period in an attempt to incorporate the use of appropriate technology in the learning process. The results are a testimony to the necessity of using a combination of strategies for teaching today's nursing students. In doing so, the organization not only improved the learning process, but found significant financial savings. PMID:24488873

Neilson, Richard A; Hopkins-Chadwick, Denise L

2014-01-01

383

Nurses’ self-efficacy and practices relating to weight management of adult patients: a path analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Health professionals play a key role in the prevention and treatment of excess weight and obesity, but many have expressed a lack of confidence in their ability to manage obese patients with their delivery of weight-management care remaining limited. The specific mechanism underlying inadequate practices in professional weight management remains unclear. The primary purpose of this study was to examine a self-efficacy theory-based model in understanding Registered Nurses’ (RNs) professional performance relating to weight management. Methods A self-report questionnaire was developed based upon the hypothesized model and administered to a convenience sample of 588 RNs. Data were collected regarding socio-demographic variables, psychosocial variables (attitudes towards obese people, professional role identity, teamwork beliefs, perceived skills, perceived barriers and self-efficacy) and professional weight management practices. Structural equation modeling was conducted to identify correlations between the above variables and to test the goodness of fit of the proposed model. Results The survey response rate was 71.4% (n?=?420). The respondents reported a moderate level of weight management practices. Self-efficacy directly and positively predicted the weight management practices of the RNs (??=?0.36, p?practices. The final model constructed in this study demonstrated a good fit to the data [?2 (14) =13.90, p?=?0.46; GFI?=?0.99; AGFI?=?0.98; NNFI?=?1.00; CFI?=?1.00; RMSEA?=?0.00; AIC?=?57.90], accounting for 38.4% and 43.2% of the variance in weight management practices and self-efficacy, respectively. Conclusions Self-efficacy theory appears to be useful in understanding the weight management practices of RNs. Interventions targeting the enhancement of self-efficacy may be effective in promoting RNs’ professional performance in managing overweight and obese patients. PMID:24304903

2013-01-01

384

Roy's Adaptation Model of the Nursing Process: A Clinical Application for Wellness Promotion.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Due to the need for nurses to use nursing theories in nursing practice, a theory based nursing process for wellness promotion was applied to an individual in a study. The objectives of the study were to: describe the Roy Adaptation Model for the nursing process; utilize the model for organizing and analyzing assessment data; collect psychosocial,…

Walters, Norma J.

385

Evidence-based nursing practice: Both state of the art in general and specific to pressure sores  

Microsoft Academic Search

The importance of research-based practice in nursing has been frequently stressed, and a number of nursing studies have been conducted whose results enable nursing to improve knowledge and practice. This study reports a literature review in which the current status of knowledge and research utilization with regard to pressure sores is described. This review first gives an overview of studies

Inge C. Buss; Ruud J. G. Halfens; Huda Huyer Abu-Saad; Gerjo Kok

1999-01-01

386

Baccalaureate Nursing Faculty Performance of Nursing Computer Literacy Skills and Curriculum Integration of These Skills through Teaching Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Of 184 nurse educators surveyed, 50% reported that students performed well on 21 of 60 computer literacy skills. Only 3 of 60 were being integrated into teaching practice. Faculty competence in performing these skills was correlated with their integration into teaching. (SK)

Austin, Sandra I.

1999-01-01

387

Clinical coaching--an innovative role to improve marginal nursing students' clinical practice.  

PubMed

In order for undergraduate nursing students to demonstrate their ability to achieve the required level of competency with practice they must be able to integrate both the clinical skills and knowledge that are pivotal to safe and competent nursing practice. In response to ongoing concerns about students' level of competency expressed by the supervising clinical staff, one School of Nursing and Midwifery created a Clinical Coach (CC) role. The purpose of this paper is to present the data collected including outcomes achieved and the coaching strategies used when a CC role was implemented to support and develop nursing practice for the marginal performer or 'at risk' student. A literature review of the application of coaching to nursing, a detailed analysis and discussion of the outcomes identified from auditing of collected data and the specific coaching strategies that resulted in successful outcomes for students is presented. This model of Clinical Coaching for nursing students could readily be adopted by other Schools of Nursing and Midwifery. This account of the regime of coaching practices may also offer a transferable, adaptable and flexible approach for other health professions who require their undergraduate students to complete clinical placements in preparation for professional practice. PMID:25066808

Kelton, Moira F

2014-11-01

388

Description and evaluation of an initiative to develop advanced practice nurses in mainland China.  

PubMed

This paper describes an initiative to develop Advanced Practice Nurses (APNs) in mainland China and evaluation of the outcomes of the described programme. The pioneer project was an APN postgraduate programme involving 38 students conducted in Guangzhou, China during 2004-2005. Data related to curriculum content and process, student performance, self-reported competence and programme effects were collected. Quantitative data such as demographic data, student performance were analysed using descriptive statistics and the pre and post self-reported practice of competence was compared using chi-square test. Qualitative data such as case reports and interviews were examined using thematic analyses. Reflective journals and case studies revealed the attributes of APNs in managing clinical cases at advanced level, applying theory into practice and exercising evidence-based practice. The relatively modest self-reported practice of competence suggested that the graduates were novice APNs and needed continued development after the completion of the programme. This study reports the experience of an initiative in China and suggests a useful curriculum framework for educating APNs. PMID:19819051

Wong, Frances Kam Yuet; Peng, Gangyi; Kan, Eva C; Li, Yajie; Lau, Ada T; Zhang, Liying; Leung, Annie F; Liu, Xueqin; Leung, Vilna O; Chen, Weiju; Li, Ming

2010-05-01

389

Principles and practices of social entrepreneurship for nursing.  

PubMed

Although social justice and action for change are among the nursing profession's core values, curricular content on social entrepreneurship for nurses is not as well developed as it is in the educational programs for students in business, engineering, or public policy. This article describes an undergraduate honors elective course in social entrepreneurship offered at New York University College of Nursing. The course uses a seminar format and incorporates content from the humanities, business, and service-learning, with the goal of promoting participants' understanding of the sources of inequality in the United States and providing the requisite skills to promote effective nursing action for social change. PMID:24127177

Gilmartin, Mattia J

2013-11-01

390

Ideology, Scientific Theory, and Social Work Practice  

E-print Network

This article discusses the philosophical and ideological nature of theory and examines the ways ideology becomes infused into social work theory and practice. The use of critical thought and specific evaluation criteria ...

Robbins, Susan P.; Chatterjee, Pranab; Canda, Edward R.

1999-01-01

391

Research to support evidence-based practice in COPD community nursing.  

PubMed

Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a requirement of nurses through the generation of evidence to implementing it, in a bid to to improve clinical practice. However, EBP is difficult to achieve. This paper highlights an approach to generating evidence for enhancing community nursing services for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) through a collaborative partnership. A district nurse and two nursing lecturers formed a partnership to devise a systematic review protocol and perform a systematic review to enhance COPD practice. This paper illustrates the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) systematic review process, the review outcomes and the practitioner learning. Collaborative partnerships between academics, researchers and clinicians are a potentially useful model to facilitate enhanced outcomes in evidence-based practice and evidence application. PMID:23124376

Kirkpatrick, Pamela; Wilson, Ethel; Wimpenny, Peter

2012-10-01

392

Informal Theory: The Ignored Link in Theory-to-Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Applying theory to practice in student affairs is dominated by the assumption that formal theory is directly applied to practice. Among the problems with this assumption is that many practitioners believe they must choose between their lived experiences and formal theory, and that graduate students are taught that their experience "does not…

Love, Patrick

2012-01-01

393

Is there a case for tailoring graduate programs for nurses who have previously practiced as Enrolled Nurses?  

PubMed

The nursing workforce in Australia, the UK and New Zealand has traditionally comprised two levels of nurse - the Registered Nurse (RN) and the Enrolled Nurse (EN). There is a significant difference in the role and scope of practice between the two levels. This difference is clearly reflected in the education required which, in Australia, is delivered the Vocational Education and Training (VET) sector for ENs and in the tertiary education sector for RNs. In an attempt to redress worldwide shortage of RNs, conversion programs have been developed for ENs to upgrade to the RN qualification. In Australia a variety of such courses are on offer, yet these are not without their critics. There have been issues identified as to the appropriateness of credit awarded by universities for recognised prior learning as well as concerns raised regarding the difficult transfer of knowledge between the VET sector and the tertiary education system. This paper presents a review of published research exploring the development and implementation of EN conversion programs. While ENs have been identified as having 'specific' needs during their first year as Registered Nurses these 'specific' needs have not been articulated. Moreover, there is no evidence to suggest health care organisations address these needs in graduate programs. This paper therefore has highlighted a need to identify what the 'specific' needs are and then to develop a graduate program tailored specifically for the RN graduate who previously practiced as an EN. PMID:19640617

Cubit, Katrina A; Leeson, Bradley G

2009-11-01

394

Registered nurses' constructed meaning of concepts of solution and their use in clinical practice  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since the introduction of nursing into tertiary institutions in Australia in 1975, there has been increasing interest in the teaching of physical science to nurses. Various courses in physical science for nurse students have been developed. They vary in length and content but there is agreement that concepts taught should be closely related to nursing applications. The choice of relevant concepts tends to be made by individual curriculum developers. This paper reports an examination of the use of physical science concepts and their relevance from the perspective of registered nurses practising in general ward areas. Inherent in this study is the premise that for registered nurses to have ideas of the physical science underlying their practice they must have constructed meaning first for these concepts. Specific chemical concepts related to solutions are discussed in these terms.

Wilkes, Lesley M.; Batts, Judith E.

1991-12-01

395

Community care management. Advanced practice nurses as care managers.  

PubMed

A group of advanced practice nurses partnered with a major insurer in the design and implementation of a care coordination model for high-risk older adults. This article will discuss the process of such an undertaking, highlighting the successes and barriers encountered. The key elements of this program included early identification and regular reassessment of each member's acuity level; fostering close partnerships between individual or teams of APRNs and groups of physicians; and uninterrupted clinical management of high-risk members across the health care continuum. This model was designed to achieve the following outcomes: to support the physician management of high-risk, chronic individuals; to increase or maintain the health of members; and to reduce health care costs. Outcome studies have demonstrated a substantial net savings by decreasing acute care admissions by 54%, reducing hospital days by 42%, and trimming primary care physicians' and specialists' visit costs by 37%. There was a 33% reduction in the overall costs of health care for members enrolled in this program. Physicians and members both rated their satisfaction with the APRN-based model of care as very high. PMID:11398570

Waszynski, C M; Murakami, W; Lewis, M

2000-01-01

396

Humanist ideology and nurse education. I. Humanist educational theory.  

PubMed

Nurse education is dominated by the humanist perspective and the educational theory that it generates. Following a brief description of the perspective's phenomenological foundations and definition of humanist ideology, humanist educational theory is illustrated in an outline of the key contributions of John Dewey, Carl Rogers, Malcolm Knowles and Paulo Freire. The article concludes by noting Freire's sociological challenge to the individualism of the humanist perspective. This challenge recognizes the ideological and social control role of education in securing the reproduction of power relations and leads to questioning the function of individualism and the interests that humanist ideology may serve. PMID:9277158

Purdy, M

1997-06-01

397

Relationship-based nursing practice: transitioning to a new care delivery model in maternity units.  

PubMed

In a fast-paced, high-volume maternity unit, the goal for nursing care delivery is to provide care that is perceived by patients as personal and caring, is rewarding to nurses, and is in an environment of maximum patient safety. A care delivery model is the organizing structure that can facilitate this goal. Relationship-Based Nursing Practice is a care delivery model designed to transition nursing care from task-focused to relationship-based. A shared vision of the registered nurse as a professional member of the healthcare team, working in an optimally safe and family-centered care environment, inspired the model design. Three relationships-the nurse with the patient, the nurse with colleagues, and the nurse with self-provided the foundation for the creation of guiding principles. Guiding principles were operationalized to support 1 or more of the 3 relationships, contribute to improved patient safety, and actualize the role of the professional registered nurse, in daily patient care. Outcomes include improvement in patient safety, increased patient satisfaction, and perception of improved teamwork among nurses. The process for sustainability and ongoing evaluation of the model is discussed. PMID:22293640

Hedges, Cathleen C; Nichols, Amy; Filoteo, Lourdes

2012-01-01

398

A new mindset for quality and safety: the QSEN competencies redefine nurses' roles in practice.  

PubMed

Preventable errors are a major issue in health care. The complexity of health care requires interactions among numerous providers for any patient multiple times a day. Nurses are the constant presence with patients and have an important role in coordinating the contributions of the myriad of caregivers. Nurses are also the last line of defense. Increasingly, it is recognized that nurses need to be better prepared with quality and safety competencies to have a leading role in making our healthcare system safer.This article presents evidence related to quality and safety, describes the six core competencies from the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) project for integration in nursing practice, describes a practice based on inquiry and engagement, and presents a toolkit for developing a new mindset based on new quality and safety science. PMID:25279507

Sherwood, Gwen; Zomorodi, Meg

2014-10-01

399

Venous leg ulcer care: How evidence-based is nursing practice?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: The objectives of this study were to (1) determine how congruent community-provided leg ulcer care was with best practice for venous leg ulcers and (2) identify organizational and clinical factors associated with the provision of best practice for venous leg ulcers. Design: The practice variation study group was an audit of nursing agency client records to determine the provision

Karen R. Lorimer; Margaret B. Harrison; Ian D. Graham; Elaine Friedberg; Barbara Davies

2003-01-01

400

Evidence based practice – what is it and how can it be encouraged in orthopaedic nursing?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evidence based practice (EBP) has attained a position of importance as an integral part of good and effective healthcare practice. The author examines briefly the historical context of EBP. Then reviews some of the arguments against the use of EBP and explores some barriers to implementing EBP in orthopaedic nursing and reflects on possible ways forward.Evidence based practice is not

Premila Webster

2002-01-01

401

POST MASTERS DOCTOR OF NURSING PRACTICE (DNP) Thursday, July 25th  

E-print Network

Biostatisticsal Methods II Evidence Based Practice Health Policy & Politics Health Outcomes: Information Systems? This program will prepare advanced practice nurses to translate academic research, promote evidence based practice, and develop systems of care based on research utilization. Does the DNP have a place

402

Teaching Evidence-Based Practice to Undergraduate Nursing Students: Overcoming Obstacles  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Evidence-based practice is highly valued in health care literature at this time. But research suggests that U.S. RNs face many obstacles when implementing evidence-based practice including a lack of value for research in practice (Pravikoff et al, 2005). Additional obstacles may exist for traditional U.S. BSN nursing students who may not value the…

Martin, Sharon D.

2007-01-01

403

The nature of nursing practice in rural and remote areas of Greenland  

PubMed Central

Background The Greenlandic Healthcare Reform (2010) required improved quality of services for health promotion, prevention of infectious and lifestyle diseases, family nursing and evidence-based clinical nursing. Aim To investigate current nursing practice in Greenland and to identify whether it meets the requirements of healthcare reform. Design This ethnographic study utilised documentary analysis, participant observation and qualitative interviewing carried out in remote areas of Greenland during 2011–2012. Eight registered nurses, four women and four men, aged between 35 and 55, participated in this study. Four were working at healthcare centres in towns and four were working at nursing stations in villages. The nurses were educated in Greenland or a Nordic country and had been practicing nursing for at least 2 years in an Arctic region. They were observed for 1–5 days, and subsequently interviewed. Interviews included in-depth questioning, based on emerging outcomes from observation. Interviews were recorded and transcribed; they were analysed within a phenomenological–hermeneutic approach. Results Nurses in rural and remote areas navigate their health promotion and preventive work with conflict between health strategies and everyday realities, where unpredictable tasks often lead to prioritisation of urgent, acute work. There is interaction between personal and professional skills. Everyday life is characterised by opportunities and challenges in the grey areas, namely nursing, medical and social work. Conclusion The nature of nursing practice in rural and remote Greenland is characterised by a high degree of variability and complexity, with a requirement for a wide range of knowledge and skills. Nurses need to be better prepared with regard to acute medical care, preventive care, social work, humanistic approaches and information technology to implement the ideology of health strategies. PMID:23984291

Hounsgaard, Lise; Jensen, Anne Birgitte; Wilche, Julie Præst; Dolmer, Ilone

2013-01-01

404

Differences in preferences for rural job postings between nursing students and practicing nurses: evidence from a discrete choice experiment in Lao People’s Democratic Republic  

PubMed Central

Background A discrete choice experiment was conducted to investigate preferences for job characteristics among nursing students and practicing nurses to determine how these groups vary in their respective preferences and to understand whether differing policies may be appropriate for each group. Methods Participating students and workers were administered a discrete choice experiment that elicited preferences for attributes of potential job postings. Job attributes included salary, duration of service until promotion to permanent staff, duration of service until qualified for further study and scholarship, housing provision, transportation provision, and performance-based financial rewards. Mixed logit models were fit to the data to estimate stated preferences and willingness to pay for attributes. Finally, an interaction model was fit to formally investigate differences in preferences between nursing students and practicing nurses. Results Data were collected from 256 nursing students and 249 practicing nurses. For both groups, choice of job posting was strongly influenced by salary and direct promotion to permanent staff. As compared to nursing students, practicing nurses had significantly lower preference for housing allowance and housing provision as well as lower preference for provision of transportation for work and personal use. Conclusions In the Lao People’s Democratic Republic, nursing students and practicing nurses demonstrated important differences in their respective preferences for rural job posting attributes. This finding suggests that it may be important to differentiate between recruitment and retention policies when addressing human resources for health challenges in developing countries, such as Laos. PMID:23705805

2013-01-01

405

Student nurses' experiences of community-based practice placement learning: a qualitative exploration.  

PubMed

United Kingdom (UK) health policy has adopted an increasing community and primary care focus over recent years (Department of Health, 1997; Department of Health, 1999. Making a Difference: Strengthening the Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visitor Contribution to Health and Health Care. Department of Health, London; Department of Health, 2004. The NHS Knowledge and Skills Framework (NHS KSF). Department of Health, London). Nursing practice, education and workforce planning are called upon to adapt accordingly (Department of Health, 2004. The NHS Knowledge and Skills Framework (NHS KSF). Department of Health, London; Kenyon, V., Smith, E., Hefty, L., Bell, M., Martaus, T., 1990. Clinical competencies for community health nursing. Public Health Nursing 7(1), 33-39; United Kingdom Central Council for Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting, 1986. Project 2000: A New Preparation for Practice. UKCC, London). Such changes have major implications for pre-registration nursing education, including its practice placement element. From an educational perspective, the need for increased community nursing capacity must be balanced with adequate support for student nurses' learning needs during community-based placements. This qualitative study explored six second year student nurses' experiences of 12 week community-based practice placements and the extent to which these placements were seen to meet their perceived learning needs. The data came from contemporaneous reflective diaries, completed by participants to reflect their 'lived experience' during their practice placements (Landeen, J., Byrne, Brown, B., 1995. Exploring the lived experiences of psychiatric nursing students through self-reflective journals. Journal of Advanced Nursing 21(5), 878-885; Kok, J., Chabeli, M.M., 2002. Reflective journal writing: how it promotes reflective thinking in clinical nursing education: a students' perspective. Curationis 25(3), 35-42; Löfmark, A., Wikblad, K., 2001. Facilitating and obstructing factors for development of learning in clinical practice: a student perspective. Issues and innovations in Nursing Education. Journal of Advanced Nursing 34(1), 43-50; Priest, H., 2004. Phenomenology. Nurse Researcher 11(4), 4-6; Stockhausen, L., 2005. Learning to become a nurse: student nurses' reflections on their clinical experiences. Australian Journal of Nursing 22(3), 8-14). The data were analysed using content analysis techniques, exploring their contextual meaning through the development of emergent themes (Neuendorf, K.A., 2002. The Content Analysis Guidebook. Sage Publications, London). The identified themes related to elements of students' basic skill acquisition, the development of their working relationships with mentors, patients and others, the learning opportunities offered by community practice placements and the effects that such placements had on their confidence to practice. These themes are discussed with regard to the published literature, to arrive at conclusions and implications for future nursing education, practice and research. PMID:19570716

Baglin, M R; Rugg, Sue

2010-05-01

406

Procedure Page 1 of 2 Clinical Manual / Nursing Practice Manual  

E-print Network

PROCEDURE FOR: Blood Components: Type and Screen / ABO Rh Confirmation for Transfusion Purposes. APPROVAL: Nursing Standards Committee Director Transfusion of Medicine Blood Bank EFFECTIVE DATE: 10 of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROCEDURE FOR: Blood Components: Type and Screen / ABO

Oliver, Douglas L.

407

Economic aspects of community-based academic-practice transition programs for unemployed new nursing graduates.  

PubMed

Four partnerships between schools of nursing and practice sites provided grant-funded 12- to 16-week transition programs to increase confidence, competence, and employability among new RN graduates who had not yet found employment in nursing. Per capita program costs were $2,721. Eighty-four percent of participants completing a postprogram employment survey became employed within 3 months; 55% of participants became employed at their program practice site. Staff development educators may find this model a useful adjunct to in-house nurse residency programs for new RN graduates. PMID:25237915

Wallace, Jonalyn; Berman, Audrey; Karshmer, Judith; Prion, Susan; Van, Paulina; West, Nikki

2014-01-01

408

Practical use of the nursing Code of Ethics: part II.  

PubMed

The Code Provisions V through IX focus on a variety of responsibilities for the professional nurse. Provision V spotlights nurses' obligation to the same values and actions for themselves as are espoused in The Code for their patients. Provision VI addresses the responsibility of all nurses to maintain quality patient care, regardless of their roles in the health care system. Meeting professional obligations to maintain and forward the nursing profession can take a variety of forms, as indicated in Provision VII. Provision VIII reviews the macro level of professional nursing responsibility by centering on the issues of world hunger, pollution, and other violations of justice. Finally, Provision IX identifies the importance of involvement in professional associations and their efforts for social reform. The first two provisions of The Code address the boundaries of obligation and dependability (Lachman, 2009), and the last three address the duties outside individual patient experience. PMID:19591369

Lachman, Vicki D

2009-01-01

409

Self-assessment of nursing informatics competencies for doctor of nursing practice students.  

PubMed

This study examined the informatics competencies of doctor of nursing practice (DNP) students and whether these competencies differed between DNP students in the post-baccalaureate (BS) and post-master's (MS) tracks. Self-reported informatics competencies were collected from 132 DNP students (68 post-BS and 64 post-MS students) in their first year in the program (2007 to 2010). Students were assessed in 18 areas of 3 competency categories: computer skills, informatics knowledge, and informatics skills. Post-BS students were competent in 4 areas (computer skills in communication, systems, documentation, and informatics knowledge about impact of information management), whereas post-MS students were competent in only 1 area (computer skills in communication). Students in both tracks reported computer skills in decision support as their least competent area. Overall, post-BS students reported slightly higher than or similar competency scores as post-MS students, but scores were statistically significant in only 3 of 18 areas. The assessment indicated that knowledge and skills on informatics competencies need to be improved, especially in computer skills for data access and use of decision support systems. Strategies are suggested to integrate competencies into existing informatics course and DNP curricula. Further studies are recommended using an objective measure of informatics competencies. PMID:24267932

Choi, Jeungok; Zucker, Donna M

2013-01-01

410

The effect of a journal club on perceived barriers to the utilization of nursing research in a practice setting.  

PubMed

Professional accountability dictates that bedside nurses base their practice on the best available evidence from research findings. However, some staff nurses may be reluctant to read research and scholarly journals, suppressing their practice and self-development. Findings from this study suggest that perceptions of barriers to research utilization in practice may decrease through the use of unit-based journal clubs. The staff development educator can play a pivotal role in nursing practice progression by implementing journal clubs. PMID:21788742

O'Nan, Cathy L

2011-01-01

411

How experts practice: a novel test of deliberate practice theory.  

PubMed

Performance improvement is thought to occur through engagement in deliberate practice. Deliberate practice is predicted to be challenging, effortful, and not inherently enjoyable. Expert and intermediate level Gaelic football players executed two types of kicks during an acquisition phase and pre-, post-, and retention tests. During acquisition, participants self-selected how they practiced and rated the characteristics of deliberate practice for effort and enjoyment. The expert group predominantly practiced the skill they were weaker at and improved its performance across pre-, post- and retention tests. Participants in the expert group also rated their practice as more effortful and less enjoyable compared to those in the intermediate group. In contrast, participants in the intermediate group predominantly practiced the skill they were stronger at and improved their performance from pretest to posttest but not on the retention test. Findings provide support for deliberate practice theory and give some insight into how experts practice and improve their performance beyond its current level. PMID:24001022

Coughlan, Edward K; Williams, A Mark; McRobert, Allistair P; Ford, Paul R

2014-03-01

412

Web-Based Virtual Patients in Nursing Education: Development and Validation of Theory-Anchored Design and Activity Models  

PubMed Central

Background Research has shown that nursing students find it difficult to translate and apply their theoretical knowledge in a clinical context. Virtual patients (VPs) have been proposed as a learning activity that can support nursing students in their learning of scientific knowledge and help them integrate theory and practice. Although VPs are increasingly used in health care education, they still lack a systematic consistency that would allow their reuse outside of their original context. There is therefore a need to develop a model for the development and implementation of VPs in nursing education. Objective The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a virtual patient model optimized to the learning and assessment needs in nursing education. Methods The process of modeling started by reviewing theoretical frameworks reported in the literature and used by practitioners when designing learning and assessment activities. The Outcome-Present State Test (OPT) model was chosen as the theoretical framework. The model was then, in an iterative manner, developed and optimized to the affordances of virtual patients. Content validation was performed with faculty both in terms of the relevance of the chosen theories but also its applicability in nursing education. The virtual patient nursing model was then instantiated in two VPs. The students’ perceived usefulness of the VPs was investigated using a questionnaire. The result was analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results A virtual patient Nursing Design Model (vpNDM) composed of three layers was developed. Layer 1 contains the patient story and ways of interacting with the data, Layer 2 includes aspects of the iterative process of clinical reasoning, and finally Layer 3 includes measurable outcomes. A virtual patient Nursing Activity Model (vpNAM) was also developed as a guide when creating VP-centric learning activities. The students perceived the global linear VPs as a relevant learning activity for the integration of theory and practice. Conclusions Virtual patients that are adapted to the nursing paradigm can support nursing students’ development of clinical reasoning skills. The proposed virtual patient nursing design and activity models will allow the systematic development of different types of virtual patients from a common model and thereby create opportunities for sharing pedagogical designs across technical solutions. PMID:24727709

2014-01-01

413

The uniqueness of elderly care: registered nurses' experience as preceptors during clinical practice in nursing homes and home-based care.  

PubMed

The expected shortage of registered nurses with an advanced degree as specialists in geriatric care or gerontology is imminent. Previous studies report that clinical practice where student nurses are supervised by registered nurses has a direct impact on how students perceive nursing as a profession and future career choice. Considering the anticipated need for well-educated and specialised nurses it is therefore, relevant as well as necessary to describe clinical learning with a focus on preceptorship in geriatric nursing care. This paper is a report of a study describing registered nurses' experience of precepting undergraduate student nurses during clinical practice in nursing homes and home-based care. A qualitative design, based on seven focus group interviews, was employed with 30 registered nurses with preceptor experience from nursing homes and home-based care for the elderly. Our findings present three precepting strategies that are unique to elderly care: preparing students for end of life care, facilitating a respectful approach to the older person and promoting creativity and independent work. The findings are discussed using a socio-cultural perspective and illustrate how communities of elderly practice can be valuable learning environments. PMID:23954003

Carlson, Elisabeth; Bengtsson, Mariette

2014-04-01

414

Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy  

E-print Network

in Childhood. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy. Advance online publication. doi: 10Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy Physiological Stress Responses Predict in Childhood Cindy M. Meston and Tierney A. Lorenz Online First Publication, March 19, 2012. doi: 10.1037/a

Meston, Cindy

415

Theory Loves Practice: A Teacher Researcher Group  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Once a month, art educators from the Denver metro area have been gathering together in the spirit of inquiry to explore issues of the perceived theory and daily practice divide. The Theory Loves Practice (TLP) group was started in 2010 by Professors Rachael Delaney and Anne Thulson from Metropolitan State University of Denver (MSU) and now has 40…

Hochtritt, Lisa; Thulson, Anne; Delaney, Rachael; Dornbush, Talya; Shay, Sarah

2014-01-01

416

Clinical practice of new nurse graduates in Lebanon: challenges and perspectives through the eyes of preceptors.  

PubMed

New nurse graduates continue to experience difficulty balancing their preparation for practice with the expectations of the workplace. Few studies have explored the transition practices of nurse graduates through the challenges that they experience. This article presents the findings of a research study that explored the perceptions of preceptors regarding the clinical practice of nurse graduates using the qualitative multiple case study design. Twenty preceptors, selected from three recognized hospitals in Beirut, Lebanon, underwent semistructured interviews. Interview questions were based on an extensive literature review and on Tanner's (2006) judgment dimensions to categorize transition practices. An exhaustive discussion of the practices led to the identification of major themes that illustrate the clinical experiences of new nurse graduates: (1) inventory of competencies, (2) learning experience, (3) technical and theoretical mysteries, and (4) challenge of one's potential. The themes provide directives that curriculum leaders and executive nurses can use to plan initiatives that assist in the effective transition of new nurse graduates to the professional role. PMID:22880636

Kantar, Lina D

2012-11-01

417

Still looking for leadership--who is responsible for student nurses' learning in practice?  

PubMed

The study on which this paper reports examined how the widespread changes in the NHS workforce and in higher education which have transformed nurse education in recent decades have impacted on responsibility for the leadership of student nurse learning in clinical practice. Findings from this mixed methods case study carried out at four English higher education institutions between 2006 and 2007 suggest that link lecturers' presence in clinical areas is diminishing, and that practice nurses' involvement with pre-registration students' learning may be limited. Ward managers lead learning at ward level but changes to their role limit their presence on the wards, so that mentors lead student learning on a day to day basis, which they must balance with caring for patients. Changes to the nurse's role mean that modelling bedside care often falls to health care assistants. This deficit of leadership for learning may be understood as a manifestation of the 'uncoupling' of education and practice following the move of nurse education into higher education and subsequent changes to nursing roles. Strengthening leadership for learning is likely to be associated with recoupling practice and education and indicators to assess the quality of leadership for learning in clinical practice are suggested. PMID:20172633

O'Driscoll, M F; Allan, H T; Smith, P A

2010-04-01

418

Readiness for evidence-based practice: information literacy needs of nurses in the United States.  

PubMed

In this paper U.S. nurses' readiness to provide Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) as measured by their information literacy knowledge and skills is described. The Institute of Medicine directed health care providers to use EBP as a means to improve patient safety, efficiency and effectiveness of health care services. Information literacy has been identified as a nursing informatics competency for the basic nurse. As such, information literacy is an essential component in the application of EBP. The importance of developing information literacy skills is enhancement of the nurse's ability to use current best available research literature in the conduct of EBP with subsequent improvement in nursing sensitive patient outcomes. This study describes the level of nurses' information literacy knowledge and gaps in their skills for identifying, accessing, retrieving, evaluating and utilizing research evidence to provide best care for patients. The value of this study is to increase awareness among nurse administrators, educators, and clinicians of the need for information literacy education to enable evidence-based nursing practice and to guide development of supportive curricula and professional continuing education. PMID:15360950

Tanner, Annelle; Pierce, Susan; Pravikoff, Diane

2004-01-01

419

Triage of the autistic spectrum child utilizing the congruence of case management concepts and Orem's Nursing Theories.  

PubMed

The purpose of this project was to design and implement a case management framework for the benefit of children diagnosed with an autistic spectrum disorder (ASD). The process consisted of selecting two children exhibiting symptoms of an ASD and managing them across a continuum of care. Methodological structure was derived from case management standards of practice and Orem's Nursing Theories. Although some objectives sustained a slight delay because of variances, findings revealed successful outcomes based on progression toward measurable case management goals. The children were directed to appropriate school placements and habilitative therapies in an efficient manner. Their parents received support and education related to special needs children. The process yielded assurance that Orem's Nursing Theories and case management concepts articulate seamlessly within nursing care boundaries. PMID:12668924

Oliver, Catherine J

2003-01-01

420

Mixed Methods in Nursing Research : An Overview and Practical Examples  

PubMed Central

Mixed methods research methodologies are increasingly applied in nursing research to strengthen the depth and breadth of understanding of nursing phenomena. This article describes the background and benefits of using mixed methods research methodologies, and provides two examples of nursing research that used mixed methods. Mixed methods research produces several benefits. The examples provided demonstrate specific benefits in the creation of a culturally congruent picture of chronic pain management for American Indians, and the determination of a way to assess cost for providing chronic pain care.

Doorenbos, Ardith Z.

2014-01-01

421

Global Use of the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index  

PubMed Central

Background Although the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index has been endorsed as a gauge of the quality of the nursing practice environment by several organizations in the United States promoting healthcare quality, there is no literature describing its use in different practice settings and countries. Objective To inform research by describing the modifications and use of the scale in a variety of practice settings and countries. Method The Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature and PubMed databases were searched for the years 2002-2010 to identify 37 research reports published since 2002 describing use, modification, and scoring variations in different practice settings and countries. Results The scale was modified for 10 practice settings in five countries and translated into three languages. Composite scores ranged from 2.48 to 3.17 (on a 1-4 scale). The Staffing and Resource Adequacy subscale most often scored lowest. A new nursing information technology subscale has been developed. New scoring methods to identify the favorability of practice environments are described. Over time, the nature of the research conducted using the measure has changed. Overall, most publications report significant associations between scale scores and multiple nurse, patient, and organizational outcomes. Discussion Scale use is growing across different clinical settings and countries. Recommendations for future research use include reducing scale length, employing consistent scoring methods, considering the impact of various modifications based on cultural and clinical setting nuances, and using the measure in longitudinal and intervention research designs. PMID:21127450

Warshawsky, Nora E.; Havens, Donna Sullivan

2011-01-01

422

Talking the talk: a discourse analysis of mental health nurses talking about their practice.  

PubMed

Mental Health nursing exists as a discipline in the UK within the wider contemporary health care establishment. Throughout its history it has attempted to define itself in ways that differentiate mental health nursing practice from other health care professions and fields of nursing. However, it is not surprising in this climate of contemporary healthcare for individual professional identities to become 'lost' in the melange of interdisciplinary practice. This research presents a discourse analysis of individual mental health nurses' rhetorical constructions of their professional role(s) as they emerge in their talk with each other in focus group discussions. In particular, the focus in this paper is their discursive repertoires related to the historical legacy of mental health nursing and how this sits with what they consider to be a 'custodial and controlling' element of their role. The particular discourse analytic approach adopted in this study illustrates how individuals use language in a particular way to make justifications and explanations of mental health nursing identities. This analytic approach is ensconced within the domain of social psychology and lies at the interface of ethno-methodology and conversation analysis. It is concerned with structural units of discourse, beyond the level of the sentence, that emerge as the nurse participants engage in talking about their practice (Potter and Wetherell, 1987 p.53). PMID:15468606

Leishman, June L

2004-08-01

423

Barriers to evidence-based practice utilization in psychiatric/mental health nursing.  

PubMed

Many psychiatric/mental health nursing (PMHN) practices have been affected by old traditions and haphazard trial and error instead of by established scientific evidence. The purpose of this article is to explore and analyze the barriers surrounding evidence-based practice (EBP) in PMHN. I identify some strategies to overcome these barriers in an attempt to incorporate EBP within the framework of PMHN services. Barriers explain the lack of EBP in today's PMHN environment. The barriers identified in this research are: the nature of the evidence, the contribution of the psychiatric nursing researchers to EBP, the personal characteristics of psychiatric nurses, and organizational factors. While the barriers to EBP for PMHN practice are clearly apparent, the challenge, now, is to build up creative strategies through which psychiatric nurses are better able to provide EBP care as part of their everyday performance. Adaptation of a more dynamic form of EBP, increasing the number of PMHN researchers, conducting clinical research projects, choosing suitable journals for publication, training the psychiatric nurses about computer skills, integrating the EBP principles into nursing curricula, developing journal clubs, and offering organizational facilitators are essential prerequisites for the achievement of EBP in the PMHN field. It is no longer justifiable for psychiatric nurses to be deficient in knowledge and skill since the advantages of EBP for patients are well-documented. PMID:24502472

Alzayyat, Abdulkarim Subhi

2014-02-01

424

Utilizing constructivism learning theory in collaborative testing as a creative strategy to promote essential nursing skills.  

PubMed

In nursing education, students participate in individual learner testing. This process follows the instructionist learning theory of a system model. However, in the practice of nursing, success depends upon collaboration with numerous people in different capacities, critical thinking, clinical reasoning, and the ability to communicate with others. Research has shown that collaborative testing, a constructivism learning activity and a form of collaborative learning, enhances students' abilities to master these areas. Collaborative testing is a clear, creative strategy which constructivists would say supports the socio-linguistic base of their learning theory. The test becomes an active implementation of peer-mediated learning where individual knowledge is enhanced through problem solving or defense of an individual position with the collaborative method. There is criticism for the testing method's potential of grade inflation and for students to receive grade benefits with little effort. After a review of various collaborative testing methods, this nursing faculty implemented a collaborative testing format that addresses both the positive and negative aspects of the process. PMID:23608232

Duane, Barbara T; Satre, Maria E

2014-01-01

425

Hearing, listening, action: Enhancing nursing practice through aural awareness education.  

PubMed

Abstract Noise overload within the clinical environment has been found to interfere with the healing process for patients, as well as nurses' ability to assess patients effectively. Awareness and responsibility for noise production begins during initial nursing training and consequently a program to enhance aural awareness skills was designed for graduate entry nursing students in an Australian university. The program utilized an innovative combination of music education activities to develop the students' ability to distinguishing individual sounds (hearing), appreciate patients' experience of sounds (listening) and improve their auscultation skills and reduce the negative effects of noise on patients (action). Using a mixed methods approach, students reported heightened auscultation skills and greater recognition of both patients' and clinicians' aural overload. Results of this pilot suggest that music education activities can assist nursing students to develop their aural awareness and to action changes within the clinical environment to improve the patient's experience of noise. PMID:25267133

Collins, Anita; Vanderheide, Rebecca; McKenna, Lisa

2014-01-01

426

Hearing, Listening, Action: Enhancing nursing practice through aural awareness education.  

PubMed

Abstract Noise overload within the clinical environment has been found to interfere with the healing process for patients, as well as nurses ability to effectively assess patients. Awareness and responsibility for noise production begins during initial nursing training and consequently a program to enhance aural awareness skills was designed for graduate entry nursing students in an Australian university. The program utilised an innovative combination of music education activities to develop the students' ability to distinguishing individual sounds (hearing), appreciate patient's experience of sounds (listening) and improve their auscultation skills and reduce the negative effects of noise on patients (action). Using a mixed methods approach, students' reported heightened auscultation skills and greater recognition of both patients' and clinicians' aural overload. Results of this pilot suggest that music education activities can assist nursing students to develop their aural awareness and to action changes within the clinical environment to improve the patient's experience of noise. PMID:24678720

Collins, Anita; Vanderheide, Rebecca; McKenna, Lisa

2014-03-29

427

Exploring new advanced practice roles in community nursing: a critique.  

PubMed

Attempts to 'modernize' the English National Health Service (NHS) have included significant workforce re-design, including the development of new, advanced roles in nursing. There is a wealth of evidence documenting and evaluating such roles in hospital and, to a lesser extent, in community settings. This paper builds on this work, drawing on recent post structural and sociological analyzes to theorize these roles, locating them within broader social and cultural changes taking place in healthcare and exploring how understandings of new roles in community nursing are in the process of being constructed. Building on a literature review, the paper draws out what an analysis of new advanced nursing roles in the community reveals about competing conceptualizations of the nursing mandate, the ambivalence and ambiguity that practitioners experience in shaping 'new' identities (the shaping of subjectivities), and the often implicit ideological positions that underpin such developments. PMID:18271785

Aranda, Kay; Jones, Andrea

2008-03-01

428

Clinical practice in nursing homes as a key for progress  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the aging of the world’s population there has become a major need for the development of nursing homes throughout the\\u000a world. While some countries provide high quality care for the disabled elderly, in others this is not the case. Education\\u000a of a medical director has been shown to improve the quality of the nursing home. Physicians need to have

J. E. Morley

2010-01-01

429

Expanding American Nurses Association nursing quality indicators to community-based practices.  

PubMed

Continuing its commitment to patient care quality, the American Nurses Association appointed a committee in 1997 to expand nursing-sensitive quality indicators beyond acute care. This article is the final report describing the processes used to identify a core set of community-based quality indicators relevant to nurses across the care continuum and identifies next steps. The indicator categories are (a) change in symptom severity, (b) strength of the therapeutic alliance, (c) utilization of services, (d) client satisfaction, (e) risk reduction, (f) increase in protective factors, and (g) level of function/functional status. Potential indicators requiring further research and development are also described. PMID:11949514

Sawyer, Linda M; Berkowitz, Bobbie; Haber, Judith E; Larrabee, June H; Marino, Barbara L; Martin, Karen S; Mason, Katherine P; Mastal, Margaret F; Nilsson, Michael W; Walbridge, Sue Ellen; Walker, Mary K

2002-01-01

430

Learning the practice of nursing: views about preceptorship.  

PubMed

The provision of clinically based education for nursing students is an essential part of their learning needs. In this article, the opportunity to enhance clinically based learning by means of preceptors is discussed and investigated. A case study was conducted of one college of nursing after the introduction of the Preregistration Diploma of Higher Education in Nursing (Project 2000) course. The study involved preceptors (62), nursing students (15), ward managers (4), senior nurse managers (2) and nurse teachers (8). The investigation involved quantitative and qualitative approaches, data being gathered through questionnaires and interviews. The results indicate that preceptors included functions such as being a role model and supervision of learners' skills but not assessment as part of their role. These views were supported by students, teachers and managers. Knowledge of the clinical area and experience were reported to be preceptors' greatest assets for the role but lack of time to work with students was cited as the greatest barrier. Extra resources required were reported to be protected time for the student and preceptor to work together and further in-service education. The implications of these results for clinically based learning opportunities in the future are discussed. PMID:9165812

Coates, V E; Gormley, E

1997-04-01

431

NICU nurses’ ambivalent attitudes in skin-to-skin care practice  

PubMed Central

This article illuminates the essence of Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) nurses’ attitudes in skin-to-skin care (SSC) practice for preterm infants and their parents. Health care providers are in a unique position to influence the dynamic between infants and parents, and SSC affects both partners in the dyad. The design is descriptively phenomenological in terms of reflective lifeworld approach. Eighteen Swedish, Danish, and Norwegian nurses from NICUs offering varied possibilities and extents of SSC participated. NICU nurses’ attitudes in SSC practice are ambivalent. The nurses consider the sensory, wellness, and mutuality experiences to be primary and vital and enact SSC as much as possible. But “as much as possible” is a broad and varied concept, and their attitudes are ambivalent in terms of not always facilitating what they consider to be the optimal caring conditions. The source of NICU nurses’ ambivalent attitudes in SSC practice is a complex interplay of beliefs, norms, and evidence, which have a multidisciplinary basis. The ambivalent attitudes are, to a great extent, the result of the need to balance these multidisciplinary concerns. This needs to be acknowledged in considering SSC practice, as well as acknowledging that clinical judgments concerning optimal SSC depend on parents and infants unlimited access to each other, which NICU nurses can influence. PMID:24559549

Kymre, Ingjerd G.

2014-01-01

432

NICU nurses' ambivalent attitudes in skin-to-skin care practice.  

PubMed

This article illuminates the essence of Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) nurses' attitudes in skin-to-skin care (SSC) practice for preterm infants and their parents. Health care providers are in a unique position to influence the dynamic between infants and parents, and SSC affects both partners in the dyad. The design is descriptively phenomenological in terms of reflective lifeworld approach. Eighteen Swedish, Danish, and Norwegian nurses from NICUs offering varied possibilities and extents of SSC participated. NICU nurses' attitudes in SSC practice are ambivalent. The nurses consider the sensory, wellness, and mutuality experiences to be primary and vital and enact SSC as much as possible. But "as much as possible" is a broad and varied concept, and their attitudes are ambivalent in terms of not always facilitating what they consider to be the optimal caring conditions. The source of NICU nurses' ambivalent attitudes in SSC practice is a complex interplay of beliefs, norms, and evidence, which have a multidisciplinary basis. The ambivalent attitudes are, to a great extent, the result of the need to balance these multidisciplinary concerns. This needs to be acknowledged in considering SSC practice, as well as acknowledging that clinical judgments concerning optimal SSC depend on parents and infants unlimited access to each other, which NICU nurses can influence. PMID:24559549

Kymre, Ingjerd G

2014-01-01

433

Entry into community-based nursing practice: perceptions of prospective employers.  

PubMed

To better prepare new graduates for entry-level positions in community settings, faculty of one college of nursing gathered information using focus groups of prospective employers. The groups were to identify the skills and qualities nurses need to practice in the community and ways to redesign nursing curricula to better prepare undergraduates for community-based practice. Data for this qualitative study were collected in five separate focus groups conducted with prospective employers (N = 18) from four major areas of Kentucky. By collaborating with prospective employers in the community, a partnership was established between nurse educators and community health leaders to improve the marketability of baccalaureate graduates. Assessment was the most frequently named skill essential to nursing practice in the community. Independence, critical thinking, collaboration, and confidence consistently emerged as important skills and qualities. Prospective employers were positive about developing partnerships to improve under-graduate nursing curricula. Recommendations for curricula to better prepare undergraduates for community-based practice are suggested. PMID:9775638

Hahn, E J; Bryant, R; Peden, A; Robinson, K L; Williams, C A

1998-01-01

434

Implementation of evidence-based practice in nursing using action research: a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

As is often reported in the literature exploring the research-practice gap, applying the principles of evidence-based practice is easier said than done. Action research is a methodology with an explicit intent of linking the worlds of research and practice. This review attempts to answer the question: What is known about implementing evidence-based practice in nursing through action research? APPROACH: A

Guus Munten; Bogaard van den Joop; Karen Cox; Henk Garretsen; Inge Bongers

2010-01-01

435

Measuring the influence of professional nursing practice on global hospital performance in an organizational context.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to measure the influence of professional nursing practice (PNP) on global hospital performance (GHP). Evidence links PNP and positive outcomes for patients and nurses, however, little is known about PNP influence on GHP measures used for patient decision-making and hospital management resource allocation decisions. A quantitative study using multiple regression analysis to predict a composite measure of GHP was conducted. Two survey instruments measuring perspectives of the PNP environment were completed by 1815 (31.3%) Registered Nurses (RN) and 28 (100%) Senior Nurse Executives (SNE) at 28 northeastern US hospitals. Secondary data provided organizational attributes. The degree of PNP was consistently reported by RNs and SNEs. When regressed with organizational factors, PNP was not a significant predictor of GHP. Better GHP was associated with lower lengths of stay, lower profitability, less admission growth, and non-health system affiliation. Further research is needed to define a nursing-sensitive GHP measure. PMID:18374799

Fasoli, Dijon R

2008-01-01

436

Linking evidence-based nursing practice and patient-centered care through patient preferences.  

PubMed

Calls for both patient-centered care and evidence-based practice (EBP) have increased dramatically over the last decade despite a tension between the two. Patient preferences, one of the cornerstones of EBP, can provide the link between the two. Although current research supports the added value of patient preferences in care, there is currently a "gap" between EBP and patient-centered care, with the two often viewed as opposing ideas. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of patient preferences, summarize research on patient preferences, and discuss implications for nursing and nursing administration. Efforts to incorporate patient preferences into nursing care must be multifaceted, targeting multiple levels from individual nurses to organizations and systems. Four critical elements have been identified for integrating patient preferences into EBP: (1) health care redesign, (2) decision support, (3) empowered organizational culture, and (4) informed and empowered nurses. PMID:23744469

Burman, Mary E; Robinson, Barbara; Hart, Ann Marie

2013-01-01

437

Trends and opportunities in geropsychiatric nursing: enhancing practice through specialization and interprofessional education.  

PubMed

Forecasted changes in the demographics of the United States suggest there will be an unprecedented need for health care professionals with specific training in geropsychiatric care. An aging society, the dearth of geropsychiatric health care professionals, the shortage of educators, and the lack of interprofessional geropsychiatric education require new strategies for nursing education to address these issues. The vision of the Institute of Medicine serves as a foundation for transforming geropsychiatric nursing and interprofessional education to prepare the next generation of nurses and the geropsychiatric workforce to improve the mental health care of older adults. This article aims to describe the importance and implications of implementing the recently released Geropsychiatric Nursing Competency Enhancements and the Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative Practice to improve the mental health care of older Americans. A secondary aim is to discuss how to overcome barriers in implementing interprofessional education in geropsychiatric nursing care. PMID:23656377

Harris, Melodee; Mayo, Ann; Balas, Michele Christina; Aaron, Charlene S; Buron, Bill

2013-06-01

438

Nurses' perceptions of quality nursing care: a grounded theory study of overloading  

Microsoft Academic Search

This PhD study aimed to explore nurses’ perceptions of quality nursing care and why they were unable to provide this. The specific aims of this study were to; compare actual quality of care provided to patients by clinical nurses rather than perceived quality of care that should be provided; identify significant nursing care issues impacting on quality; and make recommendations

Jacqueline Flynn

2007-01-01

439

Expanding the scope of psychiatric nursing practice: devaluing the essence of psychiatric nursing?  

PubMed

Psychiatric Nurse Practitioners are quickly becoming sought after employees, especially in public mental health systems where a shrinking number of psychiatrists necessitate alternate access to prescribers. In addition, new guidelines necessitate greater attention to the follow up and monitoring of the medical problems of psychiatric patients. These events are occurring in the midst of declining reimbursement and rising litigation concerns in psychiatry. At the same time there is an increased focus on a recovery orientation to psychiatry alongside the primacy of psychotropic medicine as the most cost effective treatment, which can become competing aims for practitioners. It is important for psychiatric nurses and psychiatric nurse practitioners to consider how these opportunities might also have a negative impact on the core foundation of psychiatric nursing. PMID:23120800

Hogan, Beverly Kay

2012-09-01

440

Two approaches to bridging the knowledge-practice gap in oncology nursing.  

PubMed

The field of oncology nursing is continually changing. New drugs to aid in the fight against cancer are being developed, complementary therapies to ease symptoms are gaining prominence, and survivorship care is becoming a welcome yet challenging area of subspecialty. For oncology nurses to provide quality care and to develop improved care delivery systems, they must not only have access to the most current knowledge in the field, but also be equipped with the skills necessary to integrate that knowledge into practice for the benefit of patients and families (LoBiondo-Wood et al., 2014). The importance of nursing research and its relationship to the practice of oncology nursing cannot be minimized (Moore & Badger, 2014). Oncology nurse researchers advance knowledge and, consequently, improve the quality of care for patients with cancer and their families. For example, the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) regularly surveys its membership to identify key areas of research focus that then guide the work of nurse investigators (LoBiondo-Wood et al., 2014; ONS Research Agenda Team, 2009). Unfortunately, the shortage of nurse scientists, particularly in oncology nursing, continues to increase as senior doctoral faculty reach retirement age and doctoral education program development remains stagnant (Glasgow & Dreher, 2010; LoBiondo-Wood et al., 2014). This shortage has and will continue to lead to gaps in the generation and implementation of new knowledge, negatively affecting the quality of patient care. As a result, an urgent need exists for innovative and quality doctoral educational programs to develop nurse scientists (Moore & Badger, 2014). PMID:25542325

Peek, Gloanna J

2015-01-01

441

Evidence based practice beliefs and implementation among nurses: a cross-sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background Having a positive attitude towards evidence-based practice and being able to see the value of evidence-based practice for patients have been reported as important for the implementation of evidence-based practice among nurses. The aim of this study was to map self-reported beliefs towards EBP and EBP implementation among nurses, and to investigate whether there was a positive correlation between EBP beliefs and EBP implementation. Method We carried out a cross-sectional study among 356 nurses at a specialist hospital for the treatment of cancer in Norway. The Norwegian translations of the Evidence-based Practice Belief Scale and the Evidence-based Practice Implementation Scale were used. Results In total, 185 nurses participated in the study (response rate 52%). The results showed that nurses were positive towards evidence-based practice, but only practised it to a small extent. There was a positive correlation (r) between beliefs towards evidence-based practice and implementation of evidence-based practice (r?=?0.59, p?=?0.001). There was a statistical significant positive, but moderate correlation between all the four subscales of the EBP Beliefs Scale (beliefs related to: 1) knowledge, 2) resources, 3) the value of EBP and 4) difficulty and time) and the EBP Implementation Scale, with the highest correlation observed for beliefs related to knowledge (r?=?0.38, p?practice had significantly higher scores on the Evidence-based Practice Belief Scale than participants who were unfamiliar with evidence-based practice. Those involved in evidence-based practice working groups also reported significantly higher scores on the Evidence-based Practice Belief Scale than participants not involved in these groups. Conclusion This study shows that nurses have a positive attitude towards evidence-based practice, but practise it to a lesser extent. There was a positive correlation between beliefs about evidence-based practice and implementation of evidence-based practice. Beliefs related to knowledge appear to have the greatest effect on implementation of evidence-based practice. Having knowledge and taking part in evidence-based practice working groups seem important. PMID:24661602

2014-01-01

442

Practice nurses' workload, career intentions and the impact of professional isolation: A cross-sectional survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Practice nurses have a key role within UK general practice, especially since the 2004 GMS contract. This study aimed to describe that role, identify how professionally supported they felt and their career intentions. An additional aim was to explore whether they felt isolated and identify contributory factors. METHODS: A cross-sectional questionnaire survey in one large urban Scottish Health Board,

Catherine A O'Donnell; Hussein Jabareen; Graham CM Watt

2010-01-01

443

Effects of Educational Focus on a Graduate Nurse's Initial Choice of Practice Area.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey of 69 urban and 67 rural nursing school graduates indicated that students who attended programs focusing on rural areas were twice as likely to practice in those areas. Students' original place of residence also influenced their choice of practice area. (SK)

Wood, Danette

1998-01-01

444

Leading Change in Tissue Viability Best Practice: An Action Learning Programme for Link Nurse Practitioners  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This account of practice reports on an action learning initiative designed and implemented in partnership between a regional NHS Acute Trust and a UK Business School. The central initiative was the implementation of an action learning programme entitled "Leading change in tissue viability best practice: a development programme for Link Nurse

Kellie, Jean; Henderson, Eileen; Milsom, Brian; Crawley, Hayley

2010-01-01

445

Global considerations in measuring effectiveness of advanced practice nurses: A discussion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Documentation of advanced practice nurses’ (APNs) effectiveness globally is essential in developing educational programs and standards, regulations, titling, prescribing privileges, and scope and standards of practice. Based on the body of research on APN effectiveness to date, two major factors have emerged in developing future studies, (1) careful, deliberate choice of outcomes and (2) dose effects. The purpose of this

Dorothy Brooten; JoAnne M. Youngblut; Wannee Deosires; Kochaporn Singhala; Frank Guido-Sanz

446

78 FR 39738 - National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice for Request for Nominations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...issues relating to the nurse workforce, nursing...Nursing, Bureau of Health Professions, Health Resources and...nurse midwives, and nurse anesthetists), hospitals...of members shall be nurses. HRSA has special interest...between the nursing profession, including a...

2013-07-02

447

Emotional knowing in nursing practice: In the encounter between life and death  

PubMed Central

Patients, next of kin and nurses in surgical wards often raise existential questions in the encounter between life and death. Nurses' emotional knowing at this encounter is crucial. Consequently, this study's purpose was to analyse and describe nurses' emotional knowing to reveal (a) how this knowing is expressed in daily work and (b) what emotions, thoughts and actions this knowing includes. This study used combined ethnographic and hermeneutic methodologies. Data were collected using participant observations, informal conversations and interviews. We found that nurses' emotional knowing could be interpreted in relation to various rooms of emotions, thoughts and actions. Nurses' judgements formed these rooms. They strived to do things correctly in the normative room; created a safe, secure milieu for patients and next of kin in the safety–security room; and questioned their actions in the critical room. They created affinity for co-operation that benefitted encounters with patients in their affinity room. And they demonstrated sensitivity and compassion to patients and next of kin; sensitivity and compassion were particularly evident in the closeness room. In our main interpretation, we found that nurses' judgements in various rooms (emotional knowing) constitute an expression of practical wisdom (phronesis) in nursing practice. PMID:20640014

James, Inger; Andershed, Birgitta; Gustavsson, Bernt; Ternestedt, Britt-Marie

2010-01-01

448

Nurse Aide Empowerment Strategies and Staff Stability: Effects on Nursing Home Resident Outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: This study examines the moderating effect of staff stability on the relationship between manage- ment practices used to empower nurse aides and resident outcomes in a multistate sample of nursing homes. An adaptation of Kanter's theory of structural power in organizations guided the framework for the model used in this study. Design and Methods: Management practices and nurse aide

Diane Brannon; Vincent Mor

2005-01-01

449

Nurses’ perceptions of evidence-based practice: a quantitative study at a teaching hospital in Iran  

PubMed Central

Background: Evidence-based practice (EBP) provides nurses a method to use critically appraised and scientifically proven evidence for delivering quality health care and the best decision that leads to quality outcomes. The purpose of this study was to measure the practice, attitude and knowledge/skill of evidence-based practice of nurses in a teaching hospital in Iran. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2011.The study sample was composed of 195 nurses who were working at the Fatemeh Zahra Hospital affiliated to Bushehr University of Medical Sciences (BPUMS). The survey instrument was a questionnaire based on Upton and Upton study. This tool measures Nurses' perceptions in the three sub-scales of practice, attitude and knowledge/skill of evidence-based practice. Descriptive statistical analysis was used to analyze the data. Pearson correlation coefficients were used to examine the relationship between subscales. Results: The overall mean score of the evidence-based practice in this study was 4.48±1.26 from 7, and the three subscales of practice, attitude and knowledge/skill in evidence-based practice were, 4.58±1.24, 4.57±1.35 and 4.39±1.20, respectively. There was a strong relationship between knowledge and performance subscale (r=0.73,p<0.01). Conclusion: Findings of the study indicate that more training and education are required for evidence-based nursing. Successful implementation of evidence-based nursing depends on organizational plans and empowerment programs in hospitals. Hence, hospital managers should formulate a comprehensive strategy for improving EBP.

Shafiei, Ebrahim; Baratimarnani, Ahmad; Goharinezhad, Salime; Kalhor, Rohollah; Azmal, Mohammad

2014-01-01

450

Practice Environments of Nurses Employed in Ambulatory Oncology Settings: Measure Refinement  

PubMed Central

Purpose/Objectives To examine the reliability and validity of modified items from the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index (PES-NWI) for use in the understudied ambulatory oncology setting Design Cross-sectional mailed survey using a modified Dillman method. Sample and Setting Population-based statewide sample of oncology nurses who reported employment outside of hospital inpatient units. Methods After examining for non-response bias, confirmatory factor analysis using structural equation modeling and Cronbach coefficient alphas were employed to examine construct validity and internal consistency, respectively. After calculating revised subscale means for each nurse, we used t-tests to compare subscale means between nurses who reported their practice environment as favorable versus mixed or unfavorable. Main Research Variables Items were modified from the PES-NWI following focus groups, expert review, and cognitive interviewing. The final instrument included a reduced set of items used in the original subscales, plus one new scale with two items to measure the quality of medical assistant support. Findings Despite a response rate of 30.5 percent, no differences in demographic characteristics were observed between the analytic sample and non-responders. After reducing the number of items to 23, we achieved acceptable model fit with a comparative fit index of 0.95 and a root mean-square error of approximation of 0.057. All five existing PES-NWI subscales, plus the new medical assistant support subscale, were significantly higher for nurses who reported favorable practice environments, versus those who reported mixed or unfavorable environments. Conclusions A revised set of items that derive from the PES-NWI has acceptable reliability and validity to measure the quality of nursing practice environments in ambulatory oncology settings. Medical assistant support is a new contribution to the item pool. Implications for Nursing Further testing of this revised measure in diverse samples of nurses, including studies that correlate with patient outcomes, are necessary next steps. PMID:22374490

Friese, Christopher R.

2011-01-01

451

Development of communication skills workshop for oncology advanced practice nursing students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Communication skills have not traditionally been included in nursing curriculum. The best educational method to improve\\u000a health care providers’ practice in comunication skills is first, introduction of content, followed by continuous skills assessment\\u000a and mentored feedback.Methods. A communication skills workshop using standardized patients (SPs) was planned for oncology nurse practitioner students.\\u000a A 6-step development plan was used to design,

Margaret Rosenzweig; Maurice Clifton; Robert Arnold

2007-01-01

452

Knowing for Nursing Practice: Patterns of Knowledge and Their Emulation in Expert Systems  

PubMed Central

This paper addresses the issue of clinical knowledge in nursing, and the feasibility of emulating this knowledge into expert system technology. The perspective on patterns of knowing for nursing practice, advanced by Carper (1978), serves as point of departure. The four patterns of knowing -- empirics, esthetics, ethics, personal knowledge -- are evaluated as to the extent to which they can be emulated in clinical expert systems, given constraints imposed by the current technology of these systems.

Abraham, Ivo L.; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J.

1987-01-01

453

From competence to capability: a study of nurse practitioners in clinical practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims and objectives. This research aimed to understand the level and scope of practice of the nurse practitioner in Australia and New Zealand further using a capability framework.\\u000aBackground. The original study, from which the present paper was developed, sought to identify competency standards for the extended role of the nurse practitioner in Australia and New Zealand. In doing so

Anne Gardner; Stewart Hase; Glenn Gardener; Sandra V Dunn; Jenny Carryer

2008-01-01

454

Should Nurses Be Studying Bioscience? A Discussion Paper.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nursing education and theory lean toward behavioral sciences, but practice focuses on biomedical problems. Bioscience should be reintroduced to nursing theory through reflective practice. This may also rectify the symbol-object dichotomy in natural sciences, which inhabits the relationship of theory and practice. (SK)

Jordan, Sue

1994-01-01

455

Faculty of Nursing Nursing BScN  

E-print Network

Faculty of Nursing Nursing BScN Nursing is the science of applying nursing knowledge, the technical aspects of practice and the art of establishing a caring relationship. As a nurse, your role may in all areas of health care. Nursing is a vibrant and dynamic profession. Nurses make a difference! www.uwindsor.ca/nursing

456

Making the invisible visible - operating theatre nurses' perceptions of caring in perioperative practice.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to describe operating theatre nurses' (OTNs') perceptions of caring in perioperative practice. A qualitative descriptive design was performed. Data were collected with interviews were carried out with fifteen strategically selected operating theatre nurses from different operating theatres in the middle of Sweden. A phenomenographic analysis was used to analyse the interviews. The findings show that operating theatre nurses' perceptions of caring in perioperative practice can be summarised in one main category: To follow the patient all the way. Two descriptive categories emerged: To ensure continuity of patient care and keeping a watchful eye. The operating theatre nurses got to know the patient and as a result became responsible for the patient. They protected the patient's body and preserved patient dignity in perioperative practice. The findings show different aspects of caring in perioperative practice. OTNs wanted to be more involved in patient care and follow the patient throughout the perioperative nursing process. Although OTNs have the ambition to make the care in perioperative practice visible, there is today a medical technical approach which promotes OTNs continuing to offer care in secret. PMID:25250842

Blomberg, Ann-Catrin; Bisholt, Birgitta; Nilsson, Jan; Lindwall, Lillemor

2014-09-23

457

A model for international nursing collaboration.  

PubMed

This article describes arguments for the development of a model for exchange of experiences among nurses, nurse managers, and nurse educators from two countries based on theories of reflection and practice and Freire's theory of dialogical action and its characteristics. The collaboration focused on exchange of experiences within nursing practice, leadership and management, and nursing education. The model consists of several activities: careful selection of participants in the exchange program; participants' observations and studies of caring in nursing practice in the other culture; keeping a diary about one's own reflections, thoughts, and questions; and participation in reflective dialogue and meetings with colleagues. The model included selection and implementation of a subject and written assignments for planned change in nursing practice within participants' own clinical nursing setting. After an implementation period of 6 months to 1 year, the outcome of the implemented change was reported in seminars and workshops. PMID:20954566

Halabi, Jehad O; Majali, Sawsan; Carlsson, Lola; Bergbom, Ingegerd

2011-04-01

458

Behavior Modification: Theory and Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Attempts to give some idea of how reinforcement and other learning principles work in practice with students in ordinary schools by using as reference three workshops for teachers run by educational psychologists in Birmingham in 1975. (Author/RK)

Presland, John

1978-01-01