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Sample records for nursing theory practice

  1. Empowerment in School Nursing Practice: A Grounded Theory Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broussard, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    Professional empowerment is vital to nurses' productivity and job satisfaction. A grounded theory study was conducted to describe the basic social process experienced by school nurses in relation to professional empowerment. Interviews with 10 school nurses led to the development of a situation-specific theory of school nurse empowerment, "Making…

  2. New graduate nurses as knowledge brokers in general practice in New Zealand: a constructivist grounded theory.

    PubMed

    Hoare, Karen J; Mills, Jane; Francis, Karen

    2013-07-01

    Practice nursing in New Zealand is not well described in the literature. One survey illustrated that most of the New Zealand practice nurses sampled did not know of the country's two premier evidence-based health websites. A recent review compared general practice in the UK, New Zealand and Australia and found that whereas there had been significant developments in empowering the practice nurse workforce to run nurse-led clinics in the UK, New Zealand and Australia lagged behind. The aim of this reported constructivist grounded theory study was to investigate practice nurses' use of information. Conducted in Auckland, New Zealand, data were collected through ethnographic techniques in one general practice between September 2009 and January 2010 to enhance theoretical sensitivity to the area of information use. Subsequently, six experienced practice nurses (one twice after moving jobs) and five new graduate nurses from five different general practices were interviewed, using open-ended questions, between January 2010 and August 2011. Concurrent data collection and analysis occurred throughout the study period. The use of memos, the constant comparative method, data categorisation and finally, data abstraction resulted in the final theory of reciprocal role modelling. Experienced practice nurses role modelled clinical skills to new graduate nurses. Unexpectedly, new graduate nurses were unconscious experts at sourcing information and role modelled this skill to experienced practice nurses. Once this attribute was acknowledged by the experienced practice nurse, mutual learning occurred that enabled both groups of nurses to become better practitioners. Graduate nurses of the millennial generation were identified as a resource for experienced practice nurses who belong to the baby boomer generation and generation X. PMID:23638795

  3. PHD IN NURSING SAMPLE FULL-TIME PROGRAM Student with an interest in Symptom Management in Adults; Theory & Practice Emphasis

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    PHD IN NURSING SAMPLE FULL-TIME PROGRAM Student with an interest in Symptom Management in Adults; Theory & Practice Emphasis Year 1 Fall Spring Course Title Credits Course Title Credits N722 Advanced Practice Nursing Theory: Adults and Older Adults 3 N703 Health Care & Public Policy 3 N815 Knowledge

  4. Health Occupations Curriculum. Skills and Theory for Practical Nurse. Units 16 and 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Education, Phoenix.

    Part of a health occupations program, these instructional units consist of materials for use by those who are studying to become practical nurses. Unit 16 deals with basic concepts in the nursing of the aged, in community health, and in the legal responsibilities of the practical nurse. Covered next are nursing care procedures for adults with the…

  5. Intention in Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Sofhauser, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this column is to explore the meaning of intention in nursing practice and distinguish it from the concept of intentionality. The notion that nurses engage in a purposeful act of setting intention prior to delivery of nursing care is introduced, and nursing implications for setting intention in practice is offered. PMID:26660773

  6. Fundamentals of Nursing Models, Theories and Practice McKenna Hugh P , Pajnkihar Majda and Murphy Fiona A Fundamentals of Nursing Models, Theories and Practice 248pp £26.99 Wiley Blackwell 9780470657768 0470657766 [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    2015-11-25

    BEING ABLE to understand how nursing models and theories were developed, and acquiring the skills to evaluate them, enables students to consider the validity of these for application in practice. PMID:26602472

  7. Keeping vigil over the profession: a grounded theory of the context of nurse anaesthesia practice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Nurse anaesthetists in the US have faced continued, repeated challenges to their profession. Regardless, they have met these challenges and have established themselves as major anaesthesia care providers. In this paper we address the research question: How do certified registered nurse anaesthetists (CRNAs) manage the socio-political context in which they provide care for their patients? Methods Grounded theory was used to explore how nurse anaesthetists protect and promote their profession. Purposive, snowball, and theoretical sampling was used and data were collected through participant observation and interviews conducted at a conference of the professional association, an educational program, by telephone, email exchanges, and time spent in operating rooms and an outpatient surgical clinic. Analysis included coding at increasingly abstract levels and constant comparison. Results The basic social process identified was Keeping Vigil Over the Profession, which explains how nurse anaesthetists protect and promote their profession. It is comprised of three contextual categories: Establishing Public Credibility through regulatory and educational standards, Political Vigilance and taking action in governmental and policy arenas, and Tending the Flock through a continuous information loop between local and administrative/political levels. Conclusions From our study of the context of nurse anaesthesia practice, it is clear that CRNAs are dedicated to protecting their ability to provide high quality patient care by maintaining constant vigilance over their profession. PMID:20633286

  8. Clinical Nurse Leader Integration Into Practice: Developing Theory To Guide Best Practice

    E-print Network

    Bender, M

    2015-01-01

    Improvement in patient quality indicators (falls, pressurepatient care processes, lengths of stay, and nursing sensitive quality indicators such as fallsfall rates, pressure ulcer rates, restraint use, nursing turnover, nursing hours per patient

  9. [Applying the human dignity ideals of Confucianism and Kant to psychiatric nursing: from theory to practice].

    PubMed

    Lee, Mei-Hsiu; Lee, Shui-Chuen; Lee, Shu-Chen

    2012-04-01

    Literature articles and clinical observation suggest disease and environmental factors as primary causes of the low self-esteem and stigmatization that typify most psychiatric patients. These patients are at risk of injury when subjected to inappropriate physical restraint. Hospital staffs, including nurses, are in immediate and close contact with psychiatric patients. Mencius's and Kant's thoughts on human dignity can enhance reflections on clinical nursing practices. Mencius's belief that preserving life is not the most desirable thing and death is not the most hated thing can help nurses realize the human dignity of psychiatric patients by understanding that, as an unrighteous act is more detestable than death, the meaning and value of righteousness are greater than life itself. In light of Kant's views on human dignity, nurses should treat patients as goals rather than means. Exploring such ideas can raise nursing quality, restore a positive sense of humanity to psychiatric patients, and develop nursing values and meaning to a higher plane. PMID:22469899

  10. What GUIDES Your NURSING PRACTICE?

    PubMed

    Hountras, Stacy C

    2015-01-01

    Nurses' personal belief systems or philosophies about nursing and people guides their nursing care, especially in difficult situations. Defining and articulating a personal philosophy helps the nurse better understand the motivation and reasoning behind his or her work. In this article, a nurse shares her philosophy of nursing, underlying beliefs, and discusses how this guides her practice. Questions to help nurses articulate their own personal philosophy of nursing are included. PMID:26211305

  11. Traffic control: nursing practice calendar.

    PubMed

    Rus, Linda; Cheesebro, Kathy; Nagra, Erica; Neff, Alaina

    2013-01-01

    Educating nurses on the multitude of new and updated best practices, changes in regulatory standards, new equipment, and enhanced technology creates an "information traffic jam." Multiple practice changes occurring simultaneously pose challenges for nurses to retain information to practice safely and effectively. An absence of coordination between various nursing and allied health teaching initiatives compounds this problem. A nursing practice calendar was developed to facilitate the prioritization, communication, and education of hospital-wide initiatives affecting nursing practice. PMID:23657036

  12. The Attending Nurse Caring Model: integrating theory, evidence and advanced caring-healing therapeutics for transforming professional practice.

    PubMed

    Watson, Jean; Foster, Roxie

    2003-05-01

    This paper presents a proposed model: The Attending Nursing Caring Model (ANCM) as an exemplar for advancing and transforming nursing practice within a reflective, theoretical and evidence-based context. Watson's theory of human caring is used as a guide for integrating theory, evidence and advanced therapeutics in the area of children's pain. The ANCM is offered as a programme for renewing the profession and its professional practices of caring-healing arts and science, during an era of decline, shortages, and crises in care, safety, and hospital and health reform. The ANCM elevates contemporary nursing's caring values, relationships, therapeutics and responsibilities to a higher/deeper order of caring science and professionalism, intersecting with other professions, while sustaining the finest of its heritage and traditions of healing. PMID:12709110

  13. Jacques Lacan's theory of the subject as real, symbolic and imaginary: how can Lacanian theory be of help to mental health nursing practice?

    PubMed

    McSherry, A

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents an outline of Lacan's theory of the human subject, in particular focusing on Lacan's concepts of the real, symbolic and imaginary registers, and how an understanding of these can inform change and practice in mental health nursing. Mental health nursing is under pressure to define itself as a practice distinct from other professions in the field, and to respond in new ways to promoting mental health to the individual and a wider public. Lacan's theory of the subject is of particular relevance to mental health nurses working with mental distress but has received little attention in mental health nursing literature. Six implications for practice are outlined in terms of: against normalization, the importance of the function of the symptom, what cannot be known, meaning as ever-changing, against empathy and against holistic ideas of the self. PMID:23145967

  14. Master of Nursing and Doctor of Nursing Practice Degrees in Advanced Practice Nursing & Health

    E-print Network

    Chapman, Michael S.

    Master of Nursing and Doctor of Nursing Practice Degrees in Advanced Practice Nursing & Health Systems and Organizational Leadership For the love of practice #12;An advanced practice registered nurse nurses is that a significant component of the education and practice focuses on direct care

  15. Health Practices of School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petch-Levine, Deborah; Cureton, Virginia Young; Canham, Daryl; Murray, Meg

    2003-01-01

    The health practices of school nurses affect our role as advocates and educators to promote the health of youth. This study describes the health practices of a convenience sample of 388 school nurses who attended the business meeting at an annual school nurse conference. A self-administered, 40-item questionnaire identified health practices of…

  16. Development of Gerontological Nursing Theory. Applying the Man-Living-Health Theory of Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heine, Christine

    1991-01-01

    Describes Rosemary Rizzo Parse's Man-Living-Health theory that was used to describe how gerontological nursing knowledge could be developed through a nursing conceptual model that includes a defined practice and research methodology. (Author/JOW)

  17. Advanced practice nursing and conceptual models of nursing.

    PubMed

    Fawcett, Jacqueline; Newman, Diana M L; McAllister, Margaret

    2004-04-01

    This column focuses on advanced practice nursing. A definition and central competency of advanced practice are given and four roles assumed by advanced practice nurses are identified. Questions related primarily to the advanced practice role of nurse practitioner are raised. Two nurse scholars who teach and practice discuss their experiences as advanced practice nurses, with an emphasis on the importance of using a conceptual model of nursing as a guide for their practice. PMID:15090089

  18. Valuing the gap: a dialectic between theory and practice in graduate nursing education from a constructive educational approach.

    PubMed

    Moss, Cheryle; Grealish, Laurie; Lake, Sarah

    2010-05-01

    Within nursing education, graduate pedagogies are relatively unexplored, with research commonly focused upon undergraduate and continuing education. In order to address the increasingly complex organisational challenges in the workplace, mid-career nurses and midwives are turning to graduate education. In one graduate course on cultures of learning in the workplace, a constructivist approach to learning was adopted. Post-course analysis of data, from the feedback on the course from students, student choice of assignment topics, and reflections of the course facilitators, revealed three pedagogies unique to graduate education. The pedagogies were labelled 'keeping the space open', 'theoretical concepts as tools', and 'resonance and action as praxis'. The intended outcome of the course is revealed in a fourth theme, 'developing practice in the workplace'. This evaluation suggests that constructivist pedagogies used with graduate students may be different to those pedagogies used with undergraduate and continuing education students. We argue that graduate pedagogies move nursing education beyond strategies that seek integration of theory and practice, towards a dialectic between theory and practice. PMID:19969401

  19. Nursing: Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurses

    MedlinePLUS

    ... LVNs and unlicensed medical staff. <- Summary Work Environment -> Work Environment About this section In some states, licensed ... as can dealing with ill and injured people. Work Schedules Most licensed practical and licensed vocational nurses ...

  20. Simulations in nursing practice: toward authentic leadership.

    PubMed

    Shapira-Lishchinsky, Orly

    2012-06-01

    shapira-lishchinsky o. (2012) Journal of Nursing Management Simulations in nursing practice: toward authentic leadership Aim? This study explores nurses' ethical decision-making in team simulations in order to identify the benefits of these simulations for authentic leadership. Background? While previous studies have indicated that team simulations may improve ethics in the workplace by reducing the number of errors, those studies focused mainly on clinical aspects and not on nurses' ethical experiences or on the benefits of authentic leadership. Methods? Fifty nurses from 10 health institutions in central Israel participated in the study. Data about nurses' ethical experiences were collected from 10 teams. Qualitative data analysis based on Grounded Theory was applied, using the atlas.ti 5.0 software package. Findings? Simulation findings suggest four main benefits that reflect the underlying components of authentic leadership: self-awareness, relational transparency, balanced information processing and internalized moral perspective. Conclusions? Team-based simulation as a training tool may lead to authentic leadership among nurses. Implications for nursing management? Nursing management should incorporate team simulations into nursing practice to help resolve power conflicts and to develop authentic leadership in nursing. Consequently, errors will decrease, patients' safety will increase and optimal treatment will be provided. PMID:23410036

  1. Handbook of clinical nursing practice

    SciTech Connect

    Asheervath, J.; Blevins, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Written in outline format, this reference will help nurses further their understanding of advanced nursing procedures. Information is provided on the physiological, psychological, environmental, and safety considerations of nursing activities associated with diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Special consideration is given to the areas of pediatric nursing, nursing assessment, and selected radiologic and nuclear medicine procedures for each system. Contents: Clinical Introduction. Clinical Nursing Practice: Focus on Basics. Focus on Cardiovascular Function. Focus on Respiratory Function. Focus on Gastrointestinal Function. Focus on Renal and Genito-Urological Function. Focus on Neuro-Skeletal and Muscular Function. Appendices.

  2. Childrearing Practices of Nurses: Implications for the Classroom Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everett, Lou

    A study was made to determine whether nurses apply scientific theories in rearing their children or whether social class values have more influence on their childrearing practices. Surveyed were 119 registered nurses whose educational levels ranged from a diploma to a doctorate in nursing; 62 percent of the nurses responded. A questionnaire was…

  3. Using Nursing Languages in School Nursing Practice. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denehy, Janice

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this updated manual is to define and describe standardized nursing languages, highlight how nursing languages are a part of the nursing process, and illustrate through case examples how nursing languages are used in school nursing practice. This manual also summarizes the history and development of three nursing classifications, the…

  4. Nursing Home Work Practices and Nursing Assistants' Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Christine E.; Squillace, Marie R.; Meagher, Jennifer; Anderson, Wayne L.; Wiener, Joshua M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the impact of nursing home work practices, specifically compensation and working conditions, on job satisfaction of nursing assistants employed in nursing homes. Design and Methods: Data are from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey, responses by the nursing assistants' employers to the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey,…

  5. Popper and nursing theory.

    PubMed

    Allmark, Peter

    2003-04-01

    Science seems to develop by inducing new knowledge from observation. However, it is hard to find a rational justification for induction. Popper offers one attempt to resolve this problem. Nursing theorists have tended to ignore or reject Popper, often on the false belief that he is a logical positivist (and hence hostile to qualitative research). Logical positivism claims that meaningful sentences containing any empirical content should ultimately be reducible to simple, observation statements. Popper refutes positivism by showing that there are no such simple statements. He is not a positivist. For Popper, the scientist begins with problems and puts forward trial solutions. These are subjected to rigorous testing aimed at falsifying them. A new theoretical position is then reached in which the scientist knows either that the trial solutions are false or that they have not yet been falsified. Science is characterized by the fact that it tests its ideas through attempted falsification. Non-science tests its ideas through attempted refutation. Nursing theory is a mixture of science and non-science. Popper's method requires rigorous testing of theory in both realms. As such, some nursing theory should be discarded. Popper's view faces at least two important criticisms. One is that a scientist can always reject an apparent falsification by instead altering some auxiliary hypothesis (e.g. denying the accuracy of the falsifying observation). Popper can deal with this argument by saying that defence of a theory in this way will eventually break down if the theory is false. The second criticism is that Popper's method does ultimately draw upon induction. This criticism is true, but his method can be usefully adapted. An adapted from of Popper's philosophy of science provides a good basis for nursing theory. PMID:14498963

  6. Mental health nurses: changing practice?

    PubMed

    Tingle, Alison

    2002-09-01

    Project 2000 envisaged that the nurse practitioner of the future should act as an "agent for change", using research evidence to address those aspects of practice deemed detrimental to patient care. A Department of Health funded study investigating the careers of nurse diplomates provides information on the extent to which newly qualified nurses were able to change aspects of practice, what factors inhibited changes and which personnel played a key role in facilitating change. Key factors which inhibited newly qualified nurses acting as change agents were lack of experience and confidence, as well as attitudes of other members of staff. Staff of a higher grade, immediate line managers and healthcare assistants all played a key role in facilitating change. PMID:12201893

  7. Culturally Competent School Nurse Practice.

    PubMed

    Carr, Bette; Knutson, Stephanie

    2015-11-01

    School nurses are among the professional specialty disciplines in the school environment that have the unique opportunity of exploring and building upon effective practices when working and providing service to diverse populations. As such, school nurses must not only acquire the skills to survive in the culture of education; they must also develop cultural competence by engaging in self-identity and reflection, understanding cultural differences, being culturally responsive, identifying social injustices, and engaging in life-long learning experiences. PMID:26515571

  8. Assisted living nursing practice: admission assessment.

    PubMed

    Mitty, Ethel; Flores, Sandi

    2007-01-01

    Admission assessment, generally conducted by a registered nurse, is autonomous, without opportunity for dialogue with colleagues and other health care professionals and bounded by the nurse's knowledge and skills, state regulations, facility practices, and marketing. The fact that some states permit admission and retention of nursing home level-of-care residents and provision of end-of-life care means that the assessment has to be able to predict the resident's likely trajectory of well-being as well as chronic illness exacerbation. The nurse must have a clear perspective on staff competencies and judge whether additional education or training will be necessary. This article reviews assessment standards of practice as put forth by the American Assisted Living Nurses Association as part of its application for recognition of assisted living nursing as specialty nursing practice by the American Nurses Association. The role of the Licensed Practical Nurse/Licensed Vocational Nurse in resident assessment is also discussed. PMID:17292794

  9. Psychological factors associated with weight loss maintenance: theory-driven practice for nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Valek, Rebecca M; Greenwald, Beverly J; Lewis, Carolyn C

    2015-04-01

    The authors discuss the psychological factors associated with weight loss maintenance and the use of Pender's health promotion model as a guide for the construction of clinical interventions to address these factors. The psychological factors include internal drive for weight maintenance, ongoing self-monitoring, long-term flexibility, positive mood and emotions, appropriate goals, and management of external stimuli. Nurse practitioners can help combat obesity trends through caring for patients in a holistic manner. Periodic psychological needs-assessments for patients who desire to maintain weight loss may further promote long-term success in weight management. PMID:25805385

  10. Nursing Practice Environment and Registered Nurses' Job Satisfaction in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, JiSun; Flynn, Linda; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recruiting and retaining registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes is problematic, and little research is available to guide efforts to make nursing homes a more attractive practice environment for RNs. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between aspects of the nursing practice environment and job satisfaction among RNs…

  11. Does Faculty Incivility in Nursing Education Affect Emergency Nursing Practice?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, Pamela

    Incivility in nursing education is a complicated problem which causes disruptions in the learning process and negatively affects future nursing practice. This mixed method research study described incivility as well as incivility's effects through extensive literature review and application of a modified Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey. The INE included six demographic items, four quantitative sections, and five open-ended questions. The survey examined emergency nurses' perceptions of incivility and how the experience affected their personal nursing practice. The INE was initially tested in a 2004 pilot study by Dr. Cynthia Clark. For this research study, modifications were made to examine specifically emergency nurse's perceptions of incivility and the effects on their practice. The population was a group of nurses who were members of the emergency nurses association in a Midwestern state. In the quantitative component of the Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey, the Likert scale questions indicated that the majority of the participants reported witnessing or experiencing the uncivil behaviors. In the qualitative section of the INE survey, the participants reported that although they have not seen incivility within their own academic career, they had observed faculty incivility with nursing students when the participants were assigned as preceptors as part of their emergency nursing practice.

  12. Nurse-perceived Patient Adverse Events and Nursing Practice Environment

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jeong-Hee; Kim, Chul-Woung; Lee, Sang-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the occurrence of patient adverse events in Korean hospitals as perceived by nurses and examine the correlation between patient adverse events with the nurse practice environment at nurse and hospital level. Methods: In total, 3096 nurses working in 60 general inpatient hospital units were included. A two-level logistic regression analysis was performed. Results: At the hospital level, patient adverse events included patient falls (60.5%), nosocomial infections (51.7%), pressure sores (42.6%) and medication errors (33.3%). Among the hospital-level explanatory variables associated with the nursing practice environment, ‘physician- nurse relationship’ correlated with medication errors while ‘education for improving quality of care’ affected patient falls. Conclusions: The doctor-nurse relationship and access to education that can improve the quality of care at the hospital level may help decrease the occurrence of patient adverse events. PMID:25284199

  13. Assisted living nursing practice: the language of dementia: theories and interventions.

    PubMed

    Mitty, Ethel; Flores, Sandi

    2007-01-01

    The person with dementia uses behavior to communicate, but their behavior is altered by the combination of neurological damage and impairment, altered interpersonal relationships and reactions of others, and the individual's loss or weakening of their lifelong defenses or coping mechanisms. This article discusses the routes by which behavior can be understood and describes a constellation of needs of a person with dementia that has a unique fit with person-centered care. Three evidence-based models (theories) and interventions specific to dementia behaviors are discussed: the Need-Driven Dementia-Compromised Behavior Model, the Progressively Lowered Stress Threshold Model, and the utilization of self-identity roles. Montessori-based activities are another approach to person-centered dementia care that respect, as do the models, the dignity, worthiness and interests of the person afflicted with dementia. The models discussed in this article all seek to improve the quality of life of the person with dementia. Other than those at the profound end stage of dementia, most sufferers can communicate feelings. Subjective quality of life must be determined based on the self-report of the person suffering with dementia so that treatment interventions and effectiveness are grounded in that person's reality. PMID:17923285

  14. Linking theory to practice in introductory practice learning experiences.

    PubMed

    Fotheringham, Diane; Lamont, David; Macbride, Tamsin; MacKenzie, Laura

    2015-03-01

    Nurse educators internationally are challenged with finding a sufficient number of suitable practice learning experiences for student nurses. This paper reports on a study which aimed to evaluate the utilisation of specialised and highly technical environments ("new" environments) as first practice learning experiences for adult nursing students in the UK. A survey was conducted on 158 first year student nurses who were allocated to either "new" or "old" (those that have been traditionally used) environments. Data analysis was conducted using Mann-Whitney U test and exploratory factor analysis was performed. Results have demonstrated that all environments afford novice nurses the opportunity to observe or practice the essential skills of nursing. In addition, the "new" environments have revealed greater opportunity to observe and practice aspects of practice related to governance of care. This paper concludes that a nursing curriculum which makes clear association between the essential nature of nursing and practice based learning outcomes will help the student to appreciate contemporary nursing practice and to link nursing theory with practice. Further research is required to explain the observation that aspects of practice related to governance are more visible within highly technical areas of practice. PMID:25481982

  15. State Regulations for School Nursing Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Praeger, Susan; Zimmerman, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present a state-by-state summary of rules and regulations governing school nursing practice in the United States. Official government and agency sites were reviewed to determine providers of services in schools, criteria for becoming a school nurse, protection of titling, mandates for school nursing, and the…

  16. [Nursing practice based on theoretical models: a qualitative study of nurses' perception].

    PubMed

    Amaducci, Giovanna; Iemmi, Marina; Prandi, Marzia; Saffioti, Angelina; Carpanoni, Marika; Mecugni, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Many faculty argue that theory and theorizing are closely related to the clinical practice, that the disciplinary knowledge grows, more relevantly, from the specific care context in which it takes place and, moreover, that knowledge does not proceed only by the application of general principles of the grand theories to specific cases. Every nurse, in fact, have  a mental model, of what may or may not be aware, that motivate and substantiate every action and choice of career. The study describes what the nursing theoretical model is; the mental model and the tacit  knowledge underlying it. It identifies the explicit theoretical model of the professional group that rapresents nursing partecipants, aspects of continuity with the theoretical model proposed by this degree course in Nursing.. Methods Four focus groups were made which were attended by a total of 22 nurses, rapresentatives of almost every Unit of Reggio Emilia Hospital's. We argue that the theoretical nursing model of each professional group is the result of tacit knowledge, which help to define the personal mental model, and the theoretical model, which explicitly underlying theoretical content learned applied consciously and reverted to / from nursing practice. Reasoning on the use of theory in practice has allowed us to give visibility to a theoretical model explicitly nursing authentically oriented to the needs of the person, in all its complexity in specific contexts. PMID:23900146

  17. Transitions theory: a trajectory of theoretical development in nursing.

    PubMed

    Im, Eun-Ok

    2011-01-01

    There have been very few investigations into how any single nursing theory has actually evolved historically. In this paper, a trajectory of theoretical development in nursing is explored through reviewing the theoretical development of a single nursing theory-transitions theory. The literature related to transitions theory was searched and retrieved using multiple databases. Ninety-nine papers were analyzed according to type of theory, populations of interest, sources of theorizing, and theoretical methods. Transitions theory originated in research but was initially borrowed. It also arose in research with immigrants and from national and international collaborative research efforts. A product of mentoring, transitions theory is used widely in nursing education, research, and practice. Diverse thoughts related to transitions theory coexist. For future theoretical development in nursing, we need to remain open to new ideas and continue to engage in multiple collaborative efforts. PMID:21703651

  18. Advanced Practice Nursing Education: Challenges and Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Cynthia; Kantrowitz-Gordon, Ira; Katz, Janet; Hirsch, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Nursing education programs may face significant difficulty as they struggle to prepare sufficient numbers of advanced practice registered nurses to fulfill the vision of helping to design an improved US healthcare system as described in the Institute of Medicine's “Future of nursing” report. This paper describes specific challenges and provides strategies to improve advanced practice nursing clinical education in order to ensure that a sufficient number of APRNs are available to work in educational, practice, and research settings. Best practices are identified through a review of classic and current nursing literature. Strategies include intensive interprofessional collaborations and radical curriculum revisions such as increased use of simulation and domestic and international service work. Nurse educators must work with all stakeholders to create effective and lasting change. PMID:22220273

  19. Practice nurses should take the initiative to attract recruits.

    PubMed

    Massey, Marie Therese

    2015-11-01

    As a general practice and nursing educator I do get really fed up when I hear from colleagues, GPs and practice managers that practice nursing is not suitable for newly qualified nurses. PMID:26530583

  20. Accountability in district nursing practice: key concepts.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Richard

    2015-03-01

    Public trust and confidence in district nurses is essential to the nurse-patient relationship that underpins effective care and treatment. That trust and confidence has even greater focus for district nurses who care for patients in their own homes. Those patients need to be able to count on the professionalism and probity of their district nurses. The professionalism and probity of district nurses is based on their accountability, which protects the public by imposing standards on district nurses and holds them answerable for their acts and omissions. This is the first of a series of articles on accountability in district nursing practice to mark the introduction of the revised Nursing and Midwifery Code on the 31 March 2015. This month's article considers the key concepts of accountability. PMID:25754783

  1. Is practical nursing experience necessary in administration, education, and research?

    PubMed

    Storch, J L

    1999-02-01

    Because nursing is a practice discipline involving a relationship between nurse and client based on moral commitments of nurse to client, it is critically important that nurse administrators, educators, and researchers have experienced that relationship in practice. Nurse administrators need that basis to found a vision of nursing required to lead and guide. Nurse educators need to have experienced nursing practice to engage nursing students in praxis, that act of reflection and action. Nurse researchers need to have practiced nursing to identify critical areas of focus in nursing practice and to give meaning to the interpretation of findings. The author urges greater convergence and clarity in identifying the nonnegotiables of nursing's art and science, including the importance of nursing practice as foundational to nursing work. PMID:11512161

  2. Nurses' spiritual care practices: becoming less religious?

    PubMed

    Delgado, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    Research indicates that nurses do not consistently provide spiritual care, feel ill equipped to do so, and there is a lack of information as to the type of spiritual care practices nurses use. This exploratory descriptive study surveyed nurses (N = 123) about their spiritual care practices and perceptions of effectiveness, followed by qualitative interviews with volunteers (n = 5) from the surveyed group. The nurses favored spiritual interventions that are not overtly religious, but conveyed concern and support, such as listening and providing comforting touch. PMID:25898449

  3. Towards an understanding of nurses leaving nursing practice in China : a qualitative exploration of nurses leaving nursing practice from recruitment to final exit 

    E-print Network

    Zhu, Junhong

    2012-11-28

    The nursing shortage in China is more serious than in most developed countries, but the loss of nurses through their voluntarily leaving nursing practice has not attracted much attention in Chinese society. The aim of ...

  4. Religion, bioethics and nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Marsha D

    2009-07-01

    This article calls nursing to engage in the study of religions and identifies six considerations that arise in religious studies and the ways in which religious faith is expressed. It argues that whole-person care cannot be realized, neither can there be a complete understanding of bioethics theory and decision making, without a rigorous understanding of religious-ethical systems. Because religious traditions differ in their cosmology, ontology, epistemology, aesthetic, and ethical methods, and because religious subtraditions interact with specific cultures, each religion and subtradition has something distinctive to offer to ethical discourse. A brief example is drawn from Native American religions, specifically their view of ;speech' and ;words'. Although the example is particular to an American context, it is intended to demonstrate a more general principle that an understanding of religion per se can yield new insights for bioethics. PMID:19528097

  5. Patterns of knowing: proposing a theory for nursing leadership.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Janet R; Clements, Paul T; Averill, Jennifer B; Zimbro, Kathie

    2009-01-01

    In a time of chaotic and unpredictable health care, it is vital for nursing to employ a nursing leadership theory that is specifically applicable to nurses and will holistically, and comprehensively address and support both the science and art of this honored profession. The authors propose that Nursing Leadership Knowing can address and impact the myriad issues confronting managers and administrators within the turbulent health care industry, with the ultimate goals of quality comprehensive patient care and improved employee satisfaction. They believe that Nursing Leadership Knowing, grounded in the realties of nursing experience, is a logical theoretical extension that can be translated into nursing leadership practice particular and specific focus on empirics and evidence-based practice will not attend to the robust and multidimensional underpinnings of the lived experience that is so vital to nursing as a caring profession. The ideal of nursing leadership theory is not a single-focused shadow of its history, but a rich, inclusive, multi-faceted network of knowing. As such, Nursing Leadership Knowing provides a forum for leaders to enhance their practice, as well as their relationship with their employees, which ultimately translates into optimal care for the patients we serve. PMID:19558075

  6. A qualitative study of nursing student experiences of clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Farkhondeh; Masoumi, Sara

    2005-01-01

    Background Nursing student's experiences of their clinical practice provide greater insight to develop an effective clinical teaching strategy in nursing education. The main objective of this study was to investigate student nurses' experience about their clinical practice. Methods Focus groups were used to obtain students' opinion and experiences about their clinical practice. 90 baccalaureate nursing students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery) were selected randomly from two hundred students and were arranged in 9 groups of ten students. To analyze the data the method used to code and categories focus group data were adapted from approaches to qualitative data analysis. Results Four themes emerged from the focus group data. From the students' point of view," initial clinical anxiety", "theory-practice gap"," clinical supervision", professional role", were considered as important factors in clinical experience. Conclusion The result of this study showed that nursing students were not satisfied with the clinical component of their education. They experienced anxiety as a result of feeling incompetent and lack of professional nursing skills and knowledge to take care of various patients in the clinical setting. PMID:16280087

  7. Privacy Questions from Practicing School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergren, Martha Dewey

    2004-01-01

    This Question and Answer (Q&A) article addresses practice issues related to school health records and school nursing documentation that were posed by school nurses in the field. Specifically, the questions addressed concern the following: education records, medication privacy issues, sharing of sensitive health information, privacy of individual…

  8. Practical Nursing, Volume I. Health Occupations Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Helen W.; And Others

    This curriculum guide provides teachers with up-to-date information and skill-related applications needed by the practical nurse. The volume contains three sections and 24 instructional units: Personal Vocational Relationships (6 units), Nutrition (3 units), and Basic Nursing Principles and Applied Skills (15 units covering such topics as…

  9. Maintaining practice: Challenges for nurse educators?

    PubMed

    Wray, Julie; Wild, Karen

    2011-01-01

    To reiterate the purpose of this editorial was not to delve into, and debate, the research evidence to substantiate or refute the purpose of ‘linking with practice’, in fact quite the opposite. Based upon our experiences we hope to encourage further debate on the purpose of nurse educators being in practice. It could be argued that as each author self-selected to work in practice for a week, there was a positive bias towards success. Indeed without exception this opportunity to ‘be a nurse and do nursing’, albeit undersupervision, had the desired outcome in that we achieved our predetermined goals and expectations. On an individual basis, it was a success. We eagerly became learners and absorbed information like a ‘good’ student should and received excellent feedback from practitioners. Moreover, our ability to recall and draw upon our years of nursing experience rapidly came to the fore thus enabling integration and participation in the work of nursing practice from a critical and in-depth perspective. We therefore conclude that being in practice, engaging in nursing and caring for people not only was/is a privilege but serves to enrich nurse educator’s knowledge base. By origin we are all nurses, this was how we began and we feel strongly that this ‘route or link in’ should be strong, valued and respected as meaningful to being a nurse educator. After all we are not, (to coin the phrase rejected by the Royal College of Nursing in 2004) ‘too posh to wash or too clever to care’, in fact the opposite is the reality. PMID:20732831

  10. Developing nursing practice in platelet transfusions.

    PubMed

    McSporran, Wendy; Watson, Denise

    2014-11-18

    The number of platelet transfusions has risen steadily over the past five years. This article addresses some of the reasons for this increase and examines current transfusion practice in relation to findings of national audits of platelet use and current research. It explores the extended role of the nurse in platelet transfusions, including nurse authorisation, and presents an overview of education material available to inform practice and to ensure judicious use of platelet transfusions with maximum benefit for the patient. PMID:25388736

  11. Integrated Practical Education for Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silberberg, Roger B.

    2000-01-01

    Investigates effective technology-based education in the field of nursing in South Africa. Specifically describes and analyzes the results of an experiment to assess the value of using specialized hands-on equipment in nurse training and education as an addition to current computer-based training systems. (Author/WRM)

  12. Learning to nurse: combining simulation with key theory.

    PubMed

    Bevan, Ann L; Joy, Rosalyn; Keeley, Sarah; Brown, Petra

    Following a recent Nursing and Midwifery Council revalidation of a university undergraduate nursing programme, simulation skills sessions and anatomy and physiology theory were integrated into one unit (module). This was done in order to integrate the basis for patient assessment and care provision with the anatomical and physiological theory and thereby enhance student learning and nursing practice. Students evaluated the new unit well and valued the close link between theory and practice simulation. Improvements were seen in the simulation skills sessions as students were better able to apply their underlying theory to their actions. Learning was enhanced as both simulation and theory were seen as more meaningful to practice and patient care. PMID:26266445

  13. Theorizing Practice and Practicing Theory

    E-print Network

    Feldman, Martha S.

    his paper describes the emerging field of practice theory as it is practiced in relation to organizational phenomena. We identify three approaches—empirical, theoretical, and philosophical—that relate to the what, the how, ...

  14. Evidence-Based Practice Guidelines and School Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Susan; McCarthy, Ann Marie

    2007-01-01

    The use of evidence-based practice (EBP) has become the standard of health care practice. Nurses are expected to use best evidence on a wide range of topics, yet most nurses have limited time, resources, and/or skills to access and evaluate the quality of research and evidence needed to practice evidence-based nursing. EBP guidelines allow nurses

  15. Practical strategies for nursing education program evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lewallen, Lynne Porter

    2015-01-01

    Self-evaluation is required for institutions of higher learning and the nursing programs within them. The literature provides information on evaluation models and instruments, and descriptions of how specific nursing education programs are evaluated. However, there are few discussions in the nursing education literature of the practical aspects of nursing education program evaluation: how to get started, how to keep track of data, who to involve in data collection, and how to manage challenging criteria. This article discusses the importance of program evaluation in the academic setting and provides information on practical ways to organize the evaluation process and aggregate data, and strategies for gathering data from students, graduates, alumni, and employers of graduates. PMID:25839953

  16. Nursing Education Leaders' Perceived Leadership Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLong, Dianne

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the leadership practices perceived by nursing education leaders as measured by the Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI). The framework used was a contemporary transformational leadership model described in "The Leadership Challenge" ("4th ed.") by Dr. James Kouzes and Dr. Barry Posner, which identifies the…

  17. A Trial of Nursing Cost Accounting using Nursing Practice Data on a Hospital Information System.

    PubMed

    Miyahira, Akiko; Tada, Kazuko; Ishima, Masatoshi; Nagao, Hidenori; Miyamoto, Tadashi; Nakagawa, Yoshiaki; Takemura, Tadamasa

    2015-01-01

    Hospital administration is very important and many hospitals carry out activity-based costing under comprehensive medicine. However, nursing cost is unclear, because nursing practice is expanding both quantitatively and qualitatively and it is difficult to grasp all nursing practices, and nursing cost is calculated in many cases comprehensively. On the other hand, a nursing information system (NIS) is implemented in many hospitals in Japan and we are beginning to get nursing practical data. In this paper, we propose a nursing cost accounting model and we simulate a cost by nursing contribution using NIS data. PMID:26262246

  18. Learning theories application in nursing education

    PubMed Central

    Aliakbari, Fatemeh; Parvin, Neda; Heidari, Mohammad; Haghani, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    Learning theories are the main guide for educational systems planning in the classroom and clinical training included in nursing. The teachers by knowing the general principles of these theories can use their knowledge more effectively according to various learning situations. In this study, Eric, Medline, and Cochrane databases were used for articles in English and for the Persian literature, Magiran, Iran doc, Iran medex, and Sid databases were used with the help of keywords including social cognitive learning, learning theory, behavioral theory, cognitive theory, constructive theory, and nursing education. The search period was considered from 1990 to 2012. Some related books were also studied about each method, its original vision, the founders, practical application of the training theory, especially training of nursing and its strengths and weaknesses. Behaviorists believe that learning is a change in an observable behavior and it happens when the communication occurs between the two events, a stimulus and a response. Among the applications of this approach is the influence on the learner's emotional reactions. Among the theories of this approach, Thorndike and Skinner works are subject to review and critique. Cognitive psychologists unlike the behaviorists believe that learning is an internal process objective and they focus on thinking, understanding, organizing, and consciousness. Fundamentalists believe that learners should be equipped with the skills of inquiry and problem solving in order to learn by the discovery and process of information. Among this group, we will pay attention to analyze Wertheimer, Brunner, Ausubel theories, Ganyeh information processing model, in addition to its applications in nursing education. Humanists in learning pay attention to the feelings and experiences. Carl Rogers support the retention of learning-centered approach and he is believed to a semantic continuum. At the other end of the continuum, experiential learning is located with the meaning and meaningful. It applies the minds and feelings of the person. From this group, the main focus will be on the works of Rogers and Novels. Finally, it could be concluded that the usage of any of these theoriesin its place would be desired and useful. PMID:25767813

  19. [Nurses in private practice in France].

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Elodie; Allemand, Hélène; Teitelbaum, Juan; Lévy, Danièle

    2005-01-01

    In the French health care system, most nurses work in hospitals as salaried, but a number are also salaried in health centers or operate in their private offices. About 48,000 are private practitioners, they provide nearly all the ambulatory nursing care to the population. A survey undertaken in early 2004 shows that on the average, their weekly working time is 40 hours: 10 hours are devoted to injections, 9 to dressings, 17 to nursing care and 4 to other activities. Out of 10 nurses in private practice, 3 think that their workload is too heavy. Moreover, 19% declare that they are willing to leave private practice over the 3 coming years. If all the individual plans become reality, more that 9000 private nurses would disappear during the coming years from a workforce of 48,000:2900 would retire, 2700 would become salaried in hospitals, 3200 would take up an other job and 400 would become temporary workers in interim companies. Will the tasks they let be carried out by their remaining colleagues? No doubt that this will not be the case only 7% of the surveyed professionals declare that they are willing to increase their workload. As nurses shortage in French hospitals is evident nowadays, it seems that shortage in ambulatory care is unavoidable. The surveyed nurses point out 3 important difficulties they are encountering. One nurse out of 4 complain about the heavy administrative procedures i.e. the numerous and complex forms they have to fill out. One out of 6 complains about the lack of locum tenets. Furthermore, one out of 15 are in favour of suppressing the official "Nursing Care Approach" which was promoted recently, precisely to highlight the importance of their professional work. PMID:16605059

  20. Implementing a Gerontological Clinical Nursing Practice with an Interdisciplinary Focus: Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahlke, Sherry; Fehr, Cindy

    2010-01-01

    A gerontological clinical nursing practice with an interdisciplinary focus was developed to provide opportunities for student nurses to expand their knowledge about aging, hone assessment skills, and critically examine beliefs about older adults. The practice included theory about older adults and a rotation through a variety of clinical settings…

  1. Cultivating a narrative sensibility in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Beuthin, Rosanne E

    2015-03-01

    Stories hold meaning, and when persons tell of their experiences of living with illness, they are afforded an opportunity to make sense of all that is happening. As nurses, we have the privilege of hearing the particular, gaining understanding, and creating a powerful encounter that has healing and health benefits. This is a call for nurses to more intentionally invite and listen to the stories of persons living with illness. The mnemonic STORIED is offered to help nurses weave together essential elements of a narrative practice approach: Subjective, Tell/Listen, Openness, Reflection, Invite/Intention, Engage, and Document. Nurses are the voice of the vulnerable, and to learn to listen to our patients' stories such that what is gleaned contributes to their healing is nothing less than a call to excellent care of the unique person before us. PMID:24904044

  2. Transformational leadership in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Doody, Owen; Doody, Catriona M

    Traditionally, nurses have been over-managed and led inadequately, yet today they face unprecedented challenges and opportunities. Organisations constantly face changes that require an increasingly adaptive and flexible leadership. This type of adaptive leadership is referred to as 'transformational'; under it, environments of shared responsibilities that influence new ways of knowing are created. Transformational leadership motivates followers by appealing to higher ideas and moral values, where the leader has a deep set of internal values and ideas. This leads to followers acting to sustain the greater good, rather than their own interests, and supportive environments where responsibility is shared. This article focuses on transformational leadership and its application to nursing through the four components of transformational leadership. These are: idealised influence; inspirational motivation; intellectual stimulation; and individual consideration. PMID:23132001

  3. Role-playing in nursing theory: engaging online students.

    PubMed

    Levitt, Cheryle; Adelman, Deborah S

    2010-04-01

    The teaching and learning of nursing theory, at all program levels, is challenging due to the complexity and abstract nature of its content, the dry nature in which the study of theory often is approached, a perception of disconnect from practice, and faculty discomfort and avoidance of the subject matter. Adapting creative educational strategies to the online environment is an ongoing challenge for educators. Role-play relates well to the constructivist basis of creating personal meaning based on the individual's experiences. This article examines the use of role-play as an educational strategy for teaching nursing theory in an online baccalaureate program. In a core professional issues course, students adopt the persona of a specific nursing theorist, interacting with other "nursing theorists" played by their peers. Student engagement and active learning reflect excitement and interest, and course evaluations have been extremely positive for this content and method. PMID:20055329

  4. Theory and practice: beyond the dichotomy.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, P D; Longmate, M A

    1993-10-01

    Equipping students with the means to bring theoretical understanding to bear on the implementation of practical nursing skills has been an enduring problem for nurse educators. The problem is partly born out of a clinical culture in which the 'merely theoretical' tends to be dismissed. The aim of this paper is to show ways of thinking about theory and practice which actually avoid fruitless dichotomy. Theoretical reflection and practical action are in reality richly interconnected (Heidegger 1962). In the case of the expert practitioner (Benner 1984) theory and practice may be impossible to distinguish. New thinking on this problem is particularly urgent in the light of the Project 2000 initiative. It is hard to see how this new approach to nurse education can be entirely successful if students are allowed to get into the way of contrasting the reality of practice with the 'merely theoretical'. PMID:8232139

  5. Practical Nursing. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for practical nursing. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that…

  6. Physicians' and Nurses' Own Health Practices

    PubMed Central

    Janes, Ronald D.; Wilson, Douglas M.C.; Singer, Joel

    1992-01-01

    We sent an anonymous self-report questionnaire on personal health practices to 141 nurses, 72 family physicians, and 171 specialists in the greater Hamilton area. All groups had similar lifestyle behaviors; differences between groups and between men and women were found for disease detection and prevention and health care use. Health professionals could significantly improve personal health practices, benefiting both themselves and their patients. PMID:21221254

  7. Eliciting reflections on caring theory in elderly caring practice

    PubMed Central

    Elisabeth Ranheim, Albertine; Kärner, Anita; Berterö, Carina

    2011-01-01

    Caring theories are the description and conceptualization of the care that is given in caring practise by nurses and other professional caregivers with the aim of verbalizing and communicating caring phenomena. Intermittently, a theorypractice gap is given expression- that theory does not go along with clinical practice in caring. The aim of this study was an investigation into the possible disparity between theory and practice in caring by analysing nurses’ lived experience of the understanding of caring theory in practice in the context of municipal elderly care. Hermeneutical phenomenology was the research approach used to explore the lived experience of caring science theories in caring practice from the perspective of 12 nurses working in municipal care for elderly. The findings shows that the nurses Impulsively described their experience of detachment to caring theory, but when describing their caring intentions, the relationship to theory became apparent, and even confirmed their practice. As such, a seedbed exists for caring theory to be reflected on and cultivated in caring praxis. However, as the nurses describe, the caring theory must be sensitive enough for the nursing practitioners to accept. The gap revealed itself on an organisational level, as the nurses’ commission in municipal care did not correspond with their caring intention. We believe it is important to seriously consider what we want to achieve as a caring profession. We have to reflect on our responsibility as culture carriers and knowledge developers. We must make the disparate forces of intention and organisation become one intertwining force. PMID:21866232

  8. The Attending Nurse: An Evolving Model for Integrating Nursing Education and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Fulmer, Terry; Cathcart, Eloise; Glassman, Kimberly; Budin, Wendy; Naegle, Madeline; Devanter, Nancy Van

    2011-01-01

    The discipline of nursing continues to evolve in keeping with the dramatic expansion of scientific knowledge, technology, and a concomitant increase in complexity of patient care in all practice settings. Changing patient demographics require complex planning for co-morbidities associated with chronic diseases and life-saving advances that have altered mortality in ways never before imagined. These changes in practice, coupled with findings from sophisticated nursing research and the continuous development of new nursing knowledge, call for realignments of the relationships among academic faculty in schools of nursing, advanced practice nurse administrators, and staff nurses at the forefront of practice. This article offers a model designed to bridge the gaps among academic settings, administrative offices and the euphemistic “bedsides” where staff nurses practice. Here we describe the nurse attending model in place at the New York University Langone Medical Center (NYULMC) and provide qualitative data that support progress in our work. PMID:21660179

  9. Reflective practice groups for nurses: a consultation liaison psychiatry nursing initiative: part 1--The model.

    PubMed

    Dawber, Chris

    2013-04-01

    In the present study, we outline the evolution of a process-focused reflective practice group (RPG) model for nurses working in clinical settings. The groups were initiated at Redcliffe and Caboolture hospitals by the consultation liaison psychiatry nurse and author. An associated article provides an evaluation of these RPG. The literature review identifies the key themes and theories on which the model is based, and the article outlines the process and practicalities of facilitating RPG in critical care, midwifery, and oncology specialties over a 3-year period. The model proposes that the effectiveness and sustainability of RPG arises from adequate preparation and engagement with prospective participants. Group rules, based on principles of confidentially, supportiveness, and diversity, were collaboratively developed for each group. Facilitation utilized a group-as-a-whole approach to manage process and stimulate reflection. While the purpose of RPG was a reflection on interpersonal aspects of nursing, contextual workplace issues were frequently raised in groups. Acknowledgement and containment of such issues were necessary to maintain clinical focus. The literature highlights facilitator credibility and style as crucial factors in the overall success of RPG, and it is proposed that reflective practice as a process-focused model for groups succeeds when nurse facilitators are trained in group process and receive concurrent supervision. PMID:23009276

  10. inPractice: A Practical Nursing Package for Clinical Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ip, Barry; Cavanna, Annlouise; Corbett, Beverley

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the recent development of a computer-assisted learning program--in Practice--at the School of Health Science, in the University of Wales Swansea. The project, which began in 2001, was developed in close collaboration with The Meningitis Trust, the aim being to produce a software package to increase nursing students' knowledge…

  11. Obesity Prevention Practices of Elementary School Nurses in Minnesota: Findings from Interviews with Licensed School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison-Sandberg, Leslie F.; Kubik, Martha Y.; Johnson, Karen E.

    2011-01-01

    Elementary schools are an optimal setting to provide obesity prevention interventions, yet little is known about the obesity prevention practices of elementary school nurses. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into current obesity-related school nursing practice in elementary schools in Minnesota, opinions regarding school nurse-led…

  12. The Historical Evolution of Theories and Conceptual Models for Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Joellen W.

    The development of nursing models can be traced to the inception of nursing as a profession. Florence Nightingale laid the foundation for current nursing practice and differentiated nursing from medicine. The late 19th and early 20th centuries contributed a number of important nurse theorists, better known for other contributions to the neophyte…

  13. EmpowEr your practicE mastEr of NursiNg

    E-print Network

    Matrajt, Graciela

    EmpowEr your practicE mastEr of NursiNg #12;mastEr of NursiNg (mN) The UniversiTy of WashingTon BoThell MasTer of nUrsing prograM prepares nurses for advanced leadership roles in health care practice and elective credits support a wide range of nursing interests that allow a custom fit to your individual goals

  14. Anxiety and surplus in nursing practice: lessons from Lacan and Bataille.

    PubMed

    Evans, Alicia M; Glass, Nel; Traynor, Michael

    2014-07-01

    It is well established, following Menzies' work, that nursing practice produces considerable anxiety. Like Menzies, we bring a psychoanalytic perspective to a theorization of anxiety in nursing and do so in order to consider nursing practice in the light of psychoanalytic theory, although from a Lacanian perspective. We also draw on Bataille's notion of 'surplus'. These concepts provide the theoretical framework for a study investigating how some clinical nurses are able to remain in clinical practice rather than leave the profession or seek work at a distance from the bedside. We conducted focus groups and present here an analysis of two fragments of nurses' speech. We found the nurses responded from one of two positions. In the first position, the nurses focus on doctors, complain about the surplus afforded them, and call for it to be eliminated. In this way, the nursing group is similar to other groups, considered by Bataille, who also attempt to get rid of a surplus. However, in the second position, the nurses stay with the surplus, tolerating it as they nurse the patient. This latter position is one where the nurse practises with a focus on the patient rather than being distracted by their dispute over the doctor's privilege. The importance of this paper is in its illustration of two distinct positions from which the nurse can practise: one that is not optimal because the nurse is distracted and the other that is more focused on practice, and thus the nurse is in a position to provide the best care possible to patients. PMID:24460865

  15. Nurse Midwifery/Post-Baccalaureate/Doctor of Nursing Practice Program of Study for: Students Matriculating 2014 [2014-2017

    E-print Network

    Chapman, Michael S.

    Nurse Midwifery/Post-Baccalaureate/Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Program of Study for: Students: Evaluating Evidence for Advanced Nursing Practice 3 NURS 517: Health Assessment & Physical Diagnosis for Advanced Practice Nursing 4 NURS 519 Principles of Pharmacology & Prescribing for Advanced Practice

  16. The College of Nursing is a world leader in educating nurses in interprofessional health care, research, practice, innovation,

    E-print Network

    Saskatchewan, University of

    in interprofessional health care, research, practice, innovation, capacity building and policy development. Mission graduate Master of Nursing (MN) Primary Health Care Nurse Practitioner (NP) Post-Graduate Nurse As University nursing faculty in Saskatchewan, the College of Nursing strengthens nursing, health and the health

  17. A Phenomenographic Study Exploring Nursing Education and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Degen, Greta M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to illuminate the qualitatively different ways in which three nurses with an associate degree (ADN) and three nurses with a baccalaureate degree (BSN) experience, conceptualize, perceive, and understand their own nursing practice within the context of their educational background. Using a phenomenographic methodology…

  18. [Assessing the experience of practice placement nurse tutors].

    PubMed

    Carrey, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Focused for many years on the quality of the supervision of student nurses during their practice placements, the teams of the American Hospital of Paris carried out an original survey around the new nurse training reference framework, questioning nurse tutors and young frontline professionals. PMID:26365646

  19. Pain Management: Knowledge and Attitudes of Senior Nursing Students and Practicing Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messmer, Sherry

    2009-01-01

    Despite scientific advances in pain management, inadequate pain relief in hospitalized patients continues to be an on-going phenomenon. Although nurses do not prescribe medication for pain, the decision to administer pharmacological or other interventions for pain relief is part of nursing practice. Nurses play a critical role in the relief of…

  20. University of Hawaii Hilo School of Nursing DOCTOR OF NURSING PRACTICE

    E-print Network

    Wiegner, Tracy N.

    University of Hawaii Hilo School of Nursing DOCTOR OF NURSING PRACTICE Supplementary Application Name First Name MI Gender (optional) Male Female TG Address: (street) City State Zip Home: Phone: Cell) UH ID Number (if known): Yes NoDo you currently hold an active registered nurse (RN) license

  1. Workplace practices for retaining older hospital nurses: implications from a study of nurses with eldercare responsibilities.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Peri

    2007-05-01

    Attempts to address the nursing shortage must consider the aging nursing supply and the decreased labor participation among nurses at age 55 and older. Efforts to retain older, experienced nurses have been meager, and little attention is paid to the role of eldercare in decisions to leave the profession. This pilot study examines current workplace practices that may contribute to early withdrawal of older nurses from the hospital workforce. Interviews with 28 elder caregiving registered nurses and assistive nursing personnel at a New York hospital were conducted. Respondents reported that successful management of their dual roles rests on identifying units and shifts that suit their needs, erecting clear boundaries between home and work, and their love of nursing. "Caregiver-friendly" practices such as creative, flexible scheduling; access to social workers; financial and legal services; and increased awareness among managers about caregiver strains were recommended. PMID:17652629

  2. National nursing workforce survey of nursing attitudes, knowledge and practice in genomics

    PubMed Central

    Calzone, Kathleen A; Jenkins, Jean; Culp, Stacey; Bonham, Vence L; Badzek, Laurie

    2013-01-01

    Aim Genomics has the potential to improve personalized healthcare. Nurses are vital to the utilization of genomics in practice. This study assessed nursing attitudes, receptivity, confidence, competency, knowledge and practice in genomics to inform education efforts. Materials & methods Cross-sectional study of registered nurses who completed an online Genetic/Genomic Nursing Practice Survey posted on a national nursing organization website. Results A total of 619 registered nurses participated. The largest proportion of education level were nurses with a baccalaureate degree (39%). Most (67.5%) considered genomics very important to nursing practice. However, 57% reported their genomic knowledge base to be poor or fair. The mean total knowledge score correct response rate was 75%. Yet 60% incorrectly answered that diabetes and heart disease are caused by a single gene variant. Most (64%) had never heard of the Essential Nursing Competencies and Curricula Guidelines in Genomics. Higher academic education or post licensure genetic education increased family history collection in practice. Conclusion Most nurses are inadequately prepared to translate genomic information into personalized healthcare. Targeted genomic education is needed to assure optimal workforce preparation for genomics practice integration. PMID:24363765

  3. Nurse work engagement impacts job outcome and nurse-assessed quality of care: model testing with nurse practice environment and nurse work characteristics as predictors

    PubMed Central

    Van Bogaert, Peter; van Heusden, Danny; Timmermans, Olaf; Franck, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To explore the mechanisms through which nurse practice environment dimensions, such as nurse–physician relationship, nurse management at the unit level and hospital management and organizational support, are associated with job outcomes and nurse-assessed quality of care. Mediating variables included nurse work characteristics of workload, social capital, decision latitude, as well as work engagement dimensions of vigor, dedication and absorption. Background: Understanding how to support and guide nurse practice communities in their daily effort to answer complex care most accurate, alongside with the demand of a stable and healthy nurse workforce, is challenging. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Method: Based on earlier empirical findings, a structural equation model, designed with valid measurement instruments, was tested. The study population included registered acute care hospital nurses (N = 1201) in eight hospitals across Belgium. Results: Nurse practice environment dimensions predicted nurses’ ratings of job outcome variables as well as quality of care. Features of nurses’ work characteristics, e.g., perceived workload, decision latitude, social capital, and the three dimension of work engagement, played mediating roles between nurse practice environment and outcomes. A revised model, using various fit measures, explained 60% of job outcomes and 47% of nurse-assessed quality of care. Conclusion: The findings in this study show that nurse work characteristics as workload, decision latitude, and social capital, alongside with nurse work engagement (e.g., vigor, dedication, and absorption) influence nurses’ perspective of their nurse practice environment, job outcomes, and quality of care. The results underline aspects to considerate for various stakeholders, such as executives, nurse managers, physicians, and staff nurses, in setting up and organizing health care services. PMID:25431563

  4. Factors influencing scope of practice in nursing centers.

    PubMed

    Phillips, D L; Steel, J E

    1994-01-01

    During the past 20 years, models of autonomous nursing practice, referred to as nursing centers or nurse-managed centers (NMC), have been reported with increasing frequency in the literature. This review of the NMC literature focused on five factors influencing the scope of practice in these settings. Scope of practice was influenced by the purpose of the NMC, whether for faculty practice, community service, or as a setting for specialty nursing practice. A majority of NMCs appear to include nurses in advanced practice, although registered nurses do fulfill a variety of roles. Although the relationship an NMC maintains with the medical community is ideally characterized by collaboration and mutual acceptance, issues of competition arise. NMCs typically target underserved populations or candidates for specialty nursing care such as geriatric or cardiac rehabilitation patients. Finally, the scope of practice defined by an NMC is affected by the center's need to generate income. A survival strategy for NMCs would appear to require (1) provision of high-quality nursing services; (2) public and community support; (3) healthy, collaborative relationships with other health care providers; and (4) documentation of patient outcomes through NMC-based nursing research. PMID:8027484

  5. Potentials Unlimited: Nursing Practice, Education and Administration. Nursing Research Conference Proceedings (1st, Fresno, California, April 8, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen-Webb, Marilyn-Lu, Ed.

    The purposes of this conference were: (1) to present research representing a variety of topics and study designs; (2) to disseminate findings of nursing research; and (3) to stimulate the use of research and theory as a basis for clinical, educational, and administrative practice. The keynote address and two invited presentations are presented in…

  6. CE: Incorporating Acupressure into Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Judy

    2015-12-01

    Rooted in traditional Chinese medicine, the use of acupressure to alleviate symptoms, support the healing process, promote relaxation, and improve overall health has grown considerably in the West. The effects of acupressure-like those of acupuncture, with which it shares a theoretical framework-cannot always be explained in terms of Western anatomical and physiologic concepts, but this noninvasive practice involves minimal risk, can be easily integrated into nursing practice, and has been shown to be effective in treating nausea as well as low back, neck, labor, and menstrual pain. The author discusses potential clinical indications for the use of acupressure, describes the technique, explains how to evaluate patient outcomes, and suggests how future research into this integrative intervention might be improved. PMID:26559160

  7. The career development internship program. Pathway to enhanced nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Verhey, M P; Valentine, N; Harrison, S

    1992-01-01

    Nurse administrators can enhance nursing practice and improve patient care by providing clinical nurses with ways to develop and share their expertise in areas such as education, management, quality assurance, advanced clinical practice, and research. The authors describe the Career Development Internship Program that grew out of the Management Internship Program. This creative program allows for professional growth in specific fields while also developing leadership capability. PMID:1729453

  8. Relationship of a pelvic floor rehabilitation program for urinary incontinence to Orem's Self-Care Deficit Theory of Nursing: Part 1.

    PubMed

    Bernier, Francie

    2002-12-01

    Urinary incontinence is considered a significant social problem affecting many individuals' quality of life. Nursing theory is a set of concepts or propositions derived from philosophical beliefs about the phenomena of interest to the discipline. The ability to use theory to guide nursing practice brings reasoning and logic to professional nursing practice. Orem's Self-Care Deficit Theory of Nursing gets to the heart of what nursing is and how continence nursing care can be offered and delivered as a broadly inclusive professional, rather than narrowly procedural, practice offering individual care targeting the self-care agent (client) rather than the medical diagnosis. PMID:12593228

  9. Put Theory into Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaeger, Audrey J.; Dunstan, Stephany; Thornton, Courtney; Rockenbach, Alyssa B.; Gayles, Joy G.; Haley, Karen J.

    2013-01-01

    When making decisions that impact student learning, college educators often consider previous experiences, precedent, common sense, and advice from colleagues. But how often do they consider theory? At a recent state-level educators' meeting, the authors of this article asked 50 student affairs educators about the use of theory in their practice.…

  10. Perceived Readiness for Practice of Senior Baccalaureate Nursing Students

    E-print Network

    Reagor, Janet

    2010-04-20

    experiences. This mixed method study examined the psychometric properties of a readiness for practice tool, and explored the effects of a clinical internship experience on the perception of readiness for practice of 483 senior baccalaureate nursing students...

  11. Knowledge Sources for Evidence-Based Practice in Rheumatology Nursing.

    PubMed

    Neher, Margit; Ståhl, Christian; Ellström, Per-Erik; Nilsen, Per

    2015-12-01

    As rheumatology nursing develops and extends, knowledge about current use of knowledge in rheumatology nursing practice may guide discussions about future knowledge needs. To explore what perceptions rheumatology nurses have about their knowledge sources and about what knowledge they use in their practice, 12 nurses working in specialist rheumatology were interviewed using a semi-structured interview guide. The data were analyzed using conventional qualitative content analysis. The analysis yielded four types of knowledge sources in clinical practice: interaction with others in the workplace, contacts outside the workplace, written materials, and previous knowledge and experience. Colleagues, and physicians in particular, were important for informal learning in daily rheumatology practice. Evidence from the medical arena was accessed through medical specialists, while nursing research was used less. Facilitating informal learning and continuing formal education is proposed as a way toward a more evidence-based practice in extended roles. PMID:25059719

  12. Seminar: Legal Perspectives of Nursing Practice. Nursing 89.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Odette P.

    This course outline provides information to be used by students in conjunction with Nursing 89, a seminar on the legal aspects of nursing to be offered starting in Spring 1982 at Diablo University (California). General information is provided first, including a class calendar, a statement defining the purpose of the course, an outline of…

  13. Authentic leaders creating healthy work environments for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Shirey, Maria R

    2006-05-01

    Implementation of authentic leadership can affect not only the nursing workforce and the profession but the healthcare delivery system and society as a whole. Creating a healthy work environment for nursing practice is crucial to maintain an adequate nursing workforce; the stressful nature of the profession often leads to burnout, disability, and high absenteeism and ultimately contributes to the escalating shortage of nurses. Leaders play a pivotal role in retention of nurses by shaping the healthcare practice environment to produce quality outcomes for staff nurses and patients. Few guidelines are available, however, for creating and sustaining the critical elements of a healthy work environment. In 2005, the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses released a landmark publication specifying 6 standards (skilled communication, true collaboration, effective decision making, appropriate staffing, meaningful recognition, and authentic leadership) necessary to establish and sustain healthy work environments in healthcare. Authentic leadership was described as the "glue" needed to hold together a healthy work environment. Now, the roles and relationships of authentic leaders in the healthy work environment are clarified as follows: An expanded definition of authentic leadership and its attributes (eg, genuineness, trustworthiness, reliability, compassion, and believability) is presented. Mechanisms by which authentic leaders can create healthy work environments for practice (eg, engaging employees in the work environment to promote positive behaviors) are described. A practical guide on how to become an authentic leader is advanced. A research agenda to advance the study of authentic leadership in nursing practice through collaboration between nursing and business is proposed. PMID:16632768

  14. PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING IN MISSISSIPPI: CHANGES IN CONTEXT AND PRACTICE

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Betty L.; Zahner, Susan J.; Simani, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Current standards and competencies guiding public health nursing (PHN) practice promote population-focused practice, but few studies have examined the extent to which change toward this type of practice has occurred. A cross-sectional, mail-back survey was conducted among public health nurses in Mississippi to examine recent changes in their practice, contextual factors related to population-focused practice, and recommendations for improving practice and educational preparation for practice. The survey response rate was 54% (n=150 [of 277]). Participants were predominantly female (95%), White (85%), 46 years or older (62%) and held an associate degree in nursing (69%). Most experienced nurses (n=106, 70%) reported perceived practice changes compared to five years prior, but did not consistently report changes toward greater population-focused practice. Participants reported funding decreases and negative effects on practice stemming from the nursing shortage. Recommendations for improving practice conditions included increasing resources, improving workplace environment and management practices, changing the focus of services, and promoting awareness of public health and PHN. Recommendations for improving education included providing more clinical experiences in public health settings and increasing financial supports and distance learning options. Additional research is needed to determine the nature and characteristics of population-focused PHN as practiced in Mississippi and elsewhere. PMID:21243042

  15. Management education for nurses: hospital executives' opinions and hiring practices.

    PubMed

    Weisman, C S; Minnick, A F; Dienemann, J A; Cassard, S D

    1995-01-01

    Because registered nurses are assuming expanded roles in hospital management, the appropriate educational preparation for these roles has become a widely debated issue. A national survey of hospital CEOs and CNOs was conducted to assess their personal preferences for management education for nurses and to gather information about their hospitals' policies and practices in hiring nurses for management positions at various levels within the hospital (from unit-level management to executive level). Both CEOs and CNOs preferred the joint MSN/MBA degree option as the best model for graduate management education for nurses, and they perceived greater demand in the future for hospital nurses with graduate management degrees. However, hospital policies and practices with regard to degree requirements and preferences for nurses hired in management positions at all levels varied widely. PMID:10143037

  16. Considerations for the Doctor of Nursing Practice Degree.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Elizabeth S

    2016-01-01

    Today's progressively complex healthcare landscape increasingly demands leaders who are adept at managing change in uncertain environments. Representing this country's largest group of healthcare workers, RNs influence how research translates to practice and ensure quality patient outcomes. Doctoral programs provide prospective nursing students with opportunities to pursue degrees focused on research or practice. The doctor of nursing practice (DNP) degree emphasizes leadership in clinical settings.?. PMID:26679441

  17. Crossmapping of Nursing Problem and Action Statements in Telephone Nursing Consultation Documentations with International Classification for Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Jung

    2010-01-01

    Objectives This study is to cross-map telephone nursing consultation documentations with International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP; ver. 1.0 concepts). Methods The narrative telephone nursing consultation documentations of 170 ophthalmology nursing unit patients were analyzed. The nursing statements were examined and cross-mapped with the Korean version of the ICNP ver. 1.0. If all the concepts of a statement were mapped to ICNP concepts, it was classified as 'completely mapped'. If any concept of a statement wasnot mapped, it was classified as 'partially mapped'. If none of the concepts were mapped, it was classified as 'not mapped'. Results A total of 738 statements wereused for documenting telephone nursing consultations. These statements were divided into 3 groups according to their content: 1) 294 nursing phenomena-related statements (72 unique statements), 2) 440 nursing actions-related statements (76 unique statements), and 3) 4 other statements (2 unique statements). In total, 189 unique nursing concepts extracted from 150 unique statements and 108 concepts (62.44%) were mapped onto ICNP concepts. Conclusions This study demonstrated the feasibility of computerizing narrative nursing documentations for electronic telephone triagein the ophthalmology nursing unit. PMID:21818446

  18. From Practice to Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langberg, Arnold

    1984-01-01

    Describes the individualized program of Mountain Open High School which at first coincidentally resembed Maurice Gibbons'"Walkabout" concept and was subsequently more consciously shaped by theory. Students move through three phases culminating in challenging independent projects of practical use. (MJL)

  19. How can radio frequency identification technology impact nursing practice?

    PubMed

    Billingsley, Luanne; Wyld, David

    2014-12-01

    Radio frequency identification (RFID) technology can save nurses time, improve quality of care, en hance patient and staff safety, and decrease costs. However, without a better understanding of these systems and their benefits to patients and hospitals, nurses may be slower to recommend, implement, or adopt RFID technology into practice. PMID:25695118

  20. Australian Nurse Educators Identify Gaps in Expert Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelletier, Dianne; Duffield, Christine; Adams, Anne; Nagy, Sue; Crisp, Jackie; Mitten-Lewis, Suzanne

    2000-01-01

    A Delphi panel of 28 Australian nurse educators and 42 clinicians identified 58 practice items in which reality was far from ideal. In particular, for 16 items related to patient empowerment, nursing research, and technology policy, clinical behavior was rated below the median. (SK)

  1. Transitions in nursing education: a model for designing practical/vocational nursing curriculum.

    PubMed

    Watson, M F

    1997-12-01

    Health care reform will change not only the way health care is delivered in the United States but it will bring about fundamental changes in the way health care providers will be educated and trained. Transitions in health care education are expected to occur at all levels, impacting all professional groups including doctors, pharmacists, registered nurses and licensed practical nurses. Watson's Model for the development of practical nursing curriculum is intended to help practical nurse educators design programs that will be technically futuristic, yet embedded in the traditional values of nursing. The model, which is still being tested, hopes to blend the best of two worlds: the proven effectiveness of behaviorism and the essence of humanistic caring. PMID:9444197

  2. Nurse residency programs: outcome comparisons to best practices.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Debra; Ledbetter, Carol

    2014-01-01

    First-year turnover of newly licensed registered nurses is reported as high as 40%-60%. Turnover can be reduced to 10% or less with a nurse residency program. This study compared three best practices within a single health system. The three aims were to determine first-year turnover of newly licensed registered nurses for three sites, compare outcomes after one-year posthire, and examine intent to stay. Although there were only a few statistically significant differences, the trend was positive for the site with a nurse residency program. PMID:24658039

  3. OPT: Transformation of Nursing Process for Contemporary Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pesut, Daniel J.; Herman, JoAnne

    1998-01-01

    The Outcome-Present State-Test reasoning model emphasizes reflection, outcome specification, and testing within clinical narratives. This clinical reasoning model is more relevant to contemporary nursing practice. (SK)

  4. e-Learning competency for practice nurses: an evaluation report.

    PubMed

    Heartfield, Marie; Morello, Andrea; Harris, Melanie; Lawn, Sharon; Pols, Vincenza; Stapleton, Carolyn; Battersby, Malcolm

    2013-01-01

    Practice nurses in Australia are now funded to facilitate chronic condition management, including self-management support. Chronic disease management requires an established rapport, support and proactivity between general practitioners, patients and the practice nurses. To achieve this, training in shared decision making is needed. e-Learning supports delivery and achievement of such policy outcomes, service improvements and skill development. However, e-learning effectiveness for health care professionals' is determined by several organisational, economic, pedagogical and individual factors, with positive e-learning experience linked closely to various supports. This paper reinforces previous studies showing nurses' expanding role across general practice teams and reports on some of the challenges of e-learning. Merely providing practice nurses with necessary information via web-based learning systems does not ensure successful learning or progress toward improving health outcomes for patients. PMID:24134876

  5. The Impact of a Staff Development Offering on Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foglesong, Dianne H.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a problem-focused audit used to measure the impact of a staff development offering on pain relief. Concludes that the audit provided concrete evidence that the class on pain did influence nursing practice and affected patients directly. (NRJ)

  6. Work engagement in nursing practice: a relational ethics perspective.

    PubMed

    Keyko, Kacey

    2014-12-01

    The concept of work engagement has existed in business and psychology literature for some time. There is a significant body of research that positively correlates work engagement with organizational outcomes. To date, the interest in the work engagement of nurses has primarily been related to these organizational outcomes. However, the value of work engagement in nursing practice is not only an issue of organizational interest, but of ethical interest. The dialogue on work engagement in nursing must expand to include the ethical importance of engagement. The relational nature of work engagement and the multiple levels of influence on nurses' work engagement make a relational ethics approach to work engagement in nursing appropriate and necessary. Within a relational ethics perspective, it is evident that work engagement enables nurses to have meaningful relationships in their work and subsequently deliver ethical care. In this article, I argue that work engagement is essential for ethical nursing practice. If engagement is essential for ethical nursing practice, the environmental and organizational factors that influence work engagement must be closely examined to pursue the creation of moral communities within healthcare environments. PMID:24714045

  7. A model to develop nurse leaders for rural practice.

    PubMed

    Hauenstein, Emily J; Glick, Doris F; Kane, Catherine; Kulbok, Pamela; Barbero, Edie; Cox, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    Rural health disparities are due in part to access barriers to health care providers. Nursing education has been extended into rural areas, yet a limited rural research and practice literature informs the content and delivery of these educational programs. The University Of Virginia School of Nursing through a grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration developed the Nursing Leadership in Rural Health Care (NLRHC) Program. The transformational nursing leadership in rural health care (TNLRHC) model guided the development of NLRHC program content and teaching methods. This article describes the TNLRHC model and how it has steered the integration of rural content into advanced practice nursing (APN) education. The capacity of the TNLRHC model for promoting innovation in APN education is described. Recommendations regarding the future development of APN education are presented. PMID:25455327

  8. Nursing practice implications of the year of ethics.

    PubMed

    Harris, Karen T

    2015-01-01

    e 2015 ANA Code of Ethics is foundational to professional nursing practice and is aligned with AWHONN’s core values, standards of care and position statement on ethical decision-making in the clinical setting. Understanding the roles and responsibilities of nurses to ensure an ethical practice environment is critical to perinatal health outcomes and sta engagement and to the prevention of moral distress. PMID:25900582

  9. Transfer-of-Care Communication: Nursing Best Practices.

    PubMed

    Chard, Robin; Makary, Martin A

    2015-10-01

    The successful and safe transfer of the patient from one phase of care to another is contingent on optimal communication by all team members. Nurses are often in a natural leadership position to improve safe practices during hand overs. A holistic understanding of the patient allows the perioperative nurse the opportunity to identify issues and choose a nursing diagnosis based on key elements of a patient's needs and goals--information that should be relayed during patient transfers. This article reviews best practices in transfer-of-care communication to enable perioperative RNs to take an active, leading role in hand-over processes. PMID:26411818

  10. Promoting a Strategic Approach to Clinical Nurse Leader Practice Integration.

    PubMed

    Williams, Marjory; Avolio, Alice E; Ott, Karen M; Miltner, Rebecca S

    2016-01-01

    The Office of Nursing Services of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) piloted implementation of the clinical nurse leader (CNL) into the care delivery model and established a strategic goal in 2011 to implement the CNL role across the VA health care system. The VA Office of Nursing Services CNL Implementation and Evaluation (CNL I&E) Service was created as one mechanism to facilitate that goal in response to a need identified by facility nurse executives for consultative support for CNL practice integration. This article discusses strategies employed by the CNL I&E consultative team to help facility-level nursing leadership integrate CNLs into practice. Measures of success include steady growth in CNL practice capacity as well as positive feedback from nurse executives about the value of consultative engagement. Future steps to better integrate CNL practice into the VA include consolidation of lessons learned, collaboration to strengthen the evidence base for CNL practice, and further exploration of the transformational potential of CNL practice across the care continuum. PMID:26636231

  11. The Coppin State University Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Program.

    PubMed

    Tilghman, Joan S

    2015-01-01

    The Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program development was identified as a pivotal part of the Coppin State University (CSU) Helene Fuld School of Nursing's' Strategic Plan. The program was launched as early as 2009 with plans to be implemented before 2015. The program was developed in response to the October 2004 endorsement of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) position statement which recognizes the DNP as the appropriate credential for all advanced nursing practice roles by 2015. The Helene Fuld School of Nursing began its inaugural doctoral program in May 2015. The CSU DNP program will prepare graduates to address current and future practice issues. This program will prepare post baccalaureate graduates of nursing programs and post Master's advanced practice nurses to earn the DNP degree. The curriculum balances didactics, and clinical application in actual patient care facilities and health agencies relevant to course content. The DNP program fulfills CSU's goal to prepare graduates who distinguish themselves as leaders and service providers in critical and essential professions that offer life-long diverse employment, professional growth, and service opportunities. PMID:26665500

  12. Ethics in Nursing Practice and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benoliel, Jeanne Quint

    1983-01-01

    The fact that ethics has become important to nurses is a reflection of two types of developments: (1) rapid expansion and application of biomedical technology, and (2) the human rights movement. Therefore, nursing involves an increasing number of activities with both moral and technical implications. (SSH)

  13. Factors enabling advanced practice nursing role integration in Canada.

    PubMed

    DiCenso, Alba; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Donald, Faith; Abelson, Julia; Bourgeault, Ivy; Kilpatrick, Kelley; Carter, Nancy; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Harbman, Patricia

    2010-12-01

    Although advanced practice nurses (APNs) have existed in Canada for over 40 years and there is abundant evidence of their safety and effectiveness, their full integration into our healthcare system has not been fully realized. For this paper, we drew on pertinent sections of a scoping review of the Canadian literature from 1990 onward and interviews or focus groups with 81 key informants conducted for a decision support synthesis on advanced practice nursing to identify the factors that enable role development and implementation across the three types of APNs: clinical nurse specialists, primary healthcare nurse practitioners and acute care nurse practitioners. For development of advanced practice nursing roles, many of the enabling factors occur at the federal/provincial/territorial (F/P/T) level. They include utilization of a pan-Canadian approach, provision of high-quality education, and development of appropriate legislative and regulatory mechanisms. Systematic planning to guide role development is needed at both the F/P/T and organizational levels. For implementation of advanced practice nursing roles, some of the enabling factors require action at the F/P/T level. They include recruitment and retention, role funding, intra-professional relations between clinical nurse specialists and nurse practitioners, public awareness, national leadership support and role evaluation. Factors requiring action at the level of the organization include role clarity, healthcare setting support, implementation of all role components and continuing education. Finally, inter-professional relations require action at both the F/P/T and organizational levels. A multidisciplinary roundtable formulated policy and practice recommendations based on the synthesis findings, and these are summarized in this paper. PMID:21478695

  14. Translation to practice: developing an evidence-based practice nurse internship program.

    PubMed

    Selig, Patricia M; Lewanowicz, Walter

    2008-01-01

    Creating a culture of inquiry in which nurses are engaged in the pursuit of the best evidence to support nursing practice ultimately improves patient care and clinical outcomes. So, how do we do that? Implementation of an evidence-based practice nurse internship program has proven to be a key ingredient for success in stimulating critical thinking and subsequent analysis of the evidence behind nursing practice. A pragmatic approach to developing and sustaining an evidence-based practice nurse internship program can be a helpful guide for those who are considering a similar proposition. The recruitment process, education, clinical projects, and lessons learned are detailed in this article as a resource to nursing colleagues in the spirit of professional growth. PMID:18670208

  15. Future realities in nursing: partnerships, practice, and economics.

    PubMed

    Bechtel, G A; Davidhizar, R; Tiller, C M; Quinn, M E

    1999-01-01

    Health care reform, innovations in technology, and the need to make health care cost-effective have affected all aspects of health care practice and education. Critical thinking skills, interpersonal and communication skills, leadership and motivation skills, computer literacy, and cultural sensitivity are all capabilities nursing graduates must now possess if they are to practice effectively in the complex and competitive contexts that today define the health care marketplace. Partnerships with community agencies are essential if faculty are to prepare a new generation of nurses who will be proficient in the skills that 21st-century nursing practice will demand. Although academic institutions have made some changes to meet marketplace demands, nursing educators, practitioners, and researchers must thoroughly reconceptualize their philosophies and retool their curricula in response to these changes. PMID:10401398

  16. Leaving from and returning to nursing practice: contributing factors.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, Isabel; Taua, Chris

    2009-07-01

    Many nurses leave nursing and never return. Others return after a period of time. Given the global shortage of nurses a better understanding of these movements is needed. The present study focused on nurses who had been out of nursing for more than five years, and explored factors that influenced their leaving and return to practice. All the nurses who had undertaken a Competency Assessment Programme at a given New Zealand tertiary institution during 2005 were invited to participate. Of the 70 questionnaires mailed out 32 (44.5%) were completed and returned. Quantitative data were analysed using Microsoft Excel, and the qualitative data were coded and analysed by means of content analysis. For each, leaving and returning, three key issues emerged. Nurses left for personal reasons, to seek a career change, or because of poor working conditions. They returned when they had the personal freedom to do so, for fiscal reasons, or because they were motivated by some sense of unfinished business. These findings indicate that it is important for educators involved with Competency Assessment Programmes to collaborate with employers in ensuring that there are opportunities for re-entry to positive work environments, with a degree of flexibility that suits the demographic characteristics of those nurses returning to practice. PMID:19928648

  17. Ambiguity in knowledge transfer: The role of theory-practice gap

    PubMed Central

    Cheraghi, Mohammad Ali; Salsali, Mahvash; Safari, Mahmoud

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In spite of much literature written about the theory-practice gap in the international nursing journals, there is evidence that indicates this subject has not been probed comprehensively since nursing education was transferred to universities in Iran. In the recent years, the public and the government have criticized Iranian nurses because of poor quality of patient care. Although this subject has been lamented by some researchers, there is no comprehensive work on how this gap resulted. In the process of a larger study on “nursing knowledge translation to practice”, of one PhD thesis, this process was explored. METHODS: Using grounded theory analysis, indepth interviews were undertaken with a purposive sample of 29 nurses, with different levels of experience, from the school of nursing in Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2006 from January to August. Data were analyzed using the constant comparative method. RESULTS: Three main themes emerging from this study included clinical behavior structure, paradoxical knowledge and practice, and divergent nursing organization. CONCLUSIONS: It seems that nursing education with some praxis and paradoxes in the realm of nursing knowledge and practice, along with divergent organizational structure have decreased nurses’ ability in applying their professional knowledge and skills in order to bridge the gap between theory and practice. Moreover, in spite of increased academic input into nursing education, clinical behaviors of both education and practice settings was perceived as “traditional routine-based”. PMID:21589789

  18. Israeli nurse practice environment characteristics, retention, and job satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is an international nursing shortage. Improving the practice environment has been shown to be a successful strategy against this phenomenon, as the practice environment is associated with retention and job satisfaction. The Israeli nurse practice environment has not been measured. The purpose of this study was to measure practice environment characteristics, retention and job satisfaction and to evaluate the association between these variables. Methods A demographic questionnaire, the Practice Environment Scale, and a Job Satisfaction Questionnaire were administered to Israeli acute and intensive care nurses working in 7 hospitals across the country. Retention was measured by intent to leave the organization and work experience. A convenience sample of registered nurses was obtained using a bi-phasic, stratified, cluster design. Data were collected based on the preferences of each unit, either distribution during various shifts or at staff meetings; or via staff mailboxes. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the sample and results of the questionnaires. Pearson Product Moment Correlations were used to determine significant associations among the variables. A multiple regression model was designed where the criterion variable was the practice environment. Analyses of variance determined differences between groups on nurse practice environment characteristics. Results 610 nurses reported moderate levels of practice environment characteristics, where the lowest scoring characteristic was ‘appropriate staffing and resources’. Approximately 9% of the sample reported their intention to leave and the level of job satisfaction was high. A statistically significant, negative, weak correlation was found between intention to leave and practice environment characteristics, with a moderate correlation between job satisfaction and practice environment characteristics. ‘Appropriate staffing and resources’ was the only characteristic found to be statistically different based on hospital size and geographic region. Conclusions This study supports the international nature of the vicious cycle that includes a poor quality practice environment, decreased job satisfaction and low nurse retention. Despite the extreme nursing shortage in Israel, perceptions of the practice environment were similar to other countries. Policy makers and hospital managers should address the practice environment, in order to improve job satisfaction and increase retention. PMID:24565045

  19. Examining the Cultural Measurement Equivalence of the Practice Environment Scale - Nursing Work Index

    E-print Network

    Nunez, Franchesca

    2015-08-31

    The study aimed to evaluate the cultural measurement equivalence of the Practice Environment Scale – Nursing Work Index (PES-NWI) between two groups, registered nurses (RN) reporting as Asian/Pacific Islander and White/Non-Hispanic. The nursing...

  20. Postgraduate nurse practitioner residency programs: supporting transition to practice.

    PubMed

    Wiltse Nicely, Kelly L; Fairman, Julie

    2015-06-01

    The 2010 Institute of Medicine report The Future of Nursing recommended residency programs for nurses. The number of such postgraduate residencies for nurse practitioners (NPs) is increasing in community settings; still, the Institute of Medicine's recommendation departs from the tradition of direct entry into practice after the completion of a formal nursing program. Research shows that residencies support NPs' transition to practice, but very few data support their impact on patient care. Postgraduate residencies are controversial, and the authors of this Commentary discuss the naming, funding mechanisms, and possible mandating of these programs.The authors believe that residencies should not be mandated but encouraged for new NPs and for those moving to new clinical settings. Team-based residencies provide both an opportunity to improve collaboration and a model of patient-centered care. PMID:25551860

  1. Preparing emotionally intelligent doctor of nursing practice leaders.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Michelle T; Rutledge, Carolyn; Shepherd, Laurel

    2012-08-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) identified the need for interdisciplinary teams that collaborate, communicate, and integrate care across settings to improve health care delivery. Focusing on innovative strategies that address leadership skills in graduate nursing education could have an effect on interdisciplinary partnerships, transformation of patient care, and new styles of leadership to change current practice models. In response to the IOM guidelines, we incorporated emotional intelligence as a component in our Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) leadership curriculum. This article describes a new action-oriented leadership model that prepares the DNP graduate for leadership roles to serve the public and the nursing discipline during a time of radical changes in health care. Behavioral profile, nontraditional readings, and online discussions form the basis of the model. The principles and strategies in this article can be applied to nursing education in multiple arenas, at both the undergraduate and graduate settings. PMID:22624564

  2. The bright future for clinical nurse specialist practice.

    PubMed

    Patten, Stephen; Goudreau, Kelly A

    2012-06-01

    This article discusses the past, present and future of Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) practice and education and identifies how 4 major shifts will impact CNS practice: 1) the APRN Consensus Paper, 2) the Affordable Care Act, 3) the Institute of Medicine's 'Future of Nursing' paper, and finally 4) the journey to Magnet status for many institutions. Each of these documents and/or themes has had, and will continue to have, a major impact on the future of CNS practice. The future is bright for CNSs as the role has an extremely important part to play in ensuring high quality patient outcomes. PMID:22579055

  3. Reflections by clinical nurse specialists on changing ward practice.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Catherine; Ramcharan, Angie

    In September 2010, palliative care clinical nurse specialists at North Middlesex University Hospital Trust introduced competencies for all nurses in setting up and using syringe drivers. This was done after the trust identified a high level of clinical incidents involving syringe drivers. This article discusses how the competencies were implemented and assessed, explores the importance of understanding change management to achieve change, and how different leadership styles affect changes to practice. PMID:21957520

  4. Putting it into practice: Infection Control Professionals' perspectives on early career nursing graduates' microbiology and infection control knowledge and practice.

    PubMed

    Cox, Jennifer L; Simpson, Maree Donna; Letts, Will; Cavanagh, Heather Ma

    2014-11-10

    Abstract Background: The microbiology component of Australian undergraduate nursing programs varies considerably. Any actual or potential impact of this variation on infection control practice, as a nursing graduate, is relatively unknown. Aims: The aim of this study was to explore Infection Control Professionals' perceptions of the importance of microbiology and infection control training in undergraduate nursing curricula and the perceived retention of that knowledge and its transferability to practice. Method: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight infection control professionals from a range of hospital settings in Australia. Findings: Four main themes emerged: theory versus practice, importance of role modelling, disjunction between university curricula and 'the real world', and learning in context. Conclusion: As the underpinning element of infection control practice, the role of microbiology education and training in nursing education will benefit from review. Further discussions about the nature and timing of theoretical microbiology content and assessment of undergraduate students' microbiology knowledge to ensure retention and appropriate application of that knowledge in practice are urgently needed. PMID:25382059

  5. Closing the practice gap: preparing staff nurses for the preceptor role.

    PubMed

    Sharpnack, Patricia A; Moon, Hope M; Waite, Pam

    2014-01-01

    Today's practicing nurse faces many challenges and opportunities, and as a result, new graduate readiness for practice has increasing importance. Research completed by the Nursing Executive Center, the Advisory Board's research membership serving nursing administrators, acknowledged a considerable disparity between graduate nurse competencies and the expectation of employing healthcare systems. A pilot project designed to guide preceptors in the role of educator fostered the development of new nurse competencies that helped facilitate transition to professional practice. PMID:25237918

  6. Evaluation of Evidence-based Nursing Pain Management Practice.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenjia; Eaton, Linda H; Gordon, Debra B; Hoyle, Christine; Doorenbos, Ardith Z

    2015-08-01

    It is important to ensure that cancer pain management is based on the best evidence. Nursing evidence-based pain management can be examined through an evaluation of pain documentation. The aim of this study was to modify and test an evaluation tool for nursing cancer pain documentation, and describe the frequency and quality of nursing pain documentation in one oncology unit via the electronic medical system. A descriptive cross-sectional design was used for this study at an oncology unit of an academic medical center in the Pacific Northwest. Medical records were examined for 37 adults hospitalized during April and May 2013. Nursing pain documentations (N = 230) were reviewed using an evaluation tool modified from the Cancer Pain Practice Index to consist of 13 evidence-based pain management indicators, including pain assessment, care plan, pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions, monitoring and treatment of analgesic side effects, communication with physicians, and patient education. Individual nursing documentation was assigned a score ranging from 0 (worst possible) to 13 (best possible), to reflect the delivery of evidence-based pain management. The participating nurses documented 90% of the recommended evidence-based pain management indicators. Documentation was suboptimal for pain reassessment, pharmacologic interventions, and bowel regimen. The study results provide implications for enhancing electronic medical record design and highlight a need for future research to understand the reasons for suboptimal nursing documentation of cancer pain management. For the future use of the data evaluation tool, we recommend additional modifications according to study settings. PMID:26256215

  7. Transforming nursing home culture: evidence for practice and policy.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Sheryl; Shier, Victoria; Saliba, Debra

    2014-02-01

    The nursing home culture change movement aims to improve resident quality of life and quality of care by emphasizing the deinstitutionalization of nursing home culture and focusing on person-centered care. This article briefly reviews the history of culture change, discusses some of the challenges related to culture change in nursing homes, and overviews the conceptualization and select models of culture change. Building from this background, it critiques current understanding, identifies critical research questions, and notes key issues arising during a workshop that addressed existing and emerging evidence in the field. This review and analysis provide a context for how 9 accompanying papers in this supplemental issue of The Gerontologist fill identified evidence gaps and provide evidence for future practice and policies that aim to transform nursing home culture. PMID:24443601

  8. Reflective practice groups for nurses: a consultation liaison psychiatry nursing initiative: part 2--the evaluation.

    PubMed

    Dawber, Chris

    2013-06-01

    This paper outlines an evaluation of reflective practice groups (RPG) involving nurses and midwives from three clinical nursing specialties at Redcliffe and Caboolture Hospitals, Queensland, Australia. The groups were facilitated by the consultation liaison psychiatry nurse and author using a process-focused, whole-of-group approach to explore clinical narrative in a supportive group setting. This was a preliminary evaluation utilizing a recently-developed tool, the Clinical Supervision Evaluation Questionnaire, along with externally-facilitated focus groups. Nurses and midwives responded favourably to RPG, reporting a positive impact on clinical practice, self-awareness, and resilience. The majority of participants considered RPG had positive implications for team functioning. The focus groups identified the importance of facilitation style and the need to address aspects of workplace culture to enable group development and enhance the capacity for reflection. Evaluation of the data indicates this style of RPG can improve reflective thinking, promote team cohesion, and provide support for nurses and midwives working in clinical settings. Following on from this study, a second phase of research has commenced, providing more detailed, longitudinal evaluation across a larger, more diverse group of nurses. PMID:23020828

  9. Transformation of a nursing culture through actualization of a nursing professional practice model.

    PubMed

    Jost, Sandra G; Rich, Victoria L

    2010-01-01

    Leading and effecting meaningful change in a nursing division culture, such as the type required to achieve Magnet designation, entails senior nurse executives to be well-acquainted not only with the facts and figures of their business but also with the nuances, myths, and cultures that either enable or block a change from occurring. Expert nurse leaders embrace the story being told by data on dashboards and the quality outcomes achieved and look beyond those points of information out to the edges of their division. These nurse executives also seek to understand the pivotal, perhaps seemingly inconsequential things (notions, beliefs, cultural beliefs, and stories) that will block or tip a culture to change and achieve success. At the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (HUP), a Magnet-designated organization, the road to Magnet was not straightforward. Instead, the path was a winding, learning journey. Through authentic leadership and the conception and actualization of a professional practice model, the HUP Nursing Excellence in Professional Practice (HUP NEPP) model, Magnet designation was achieved and a nursing culture was transformed. PMID:20023559

  10. Use of Evidence-Based Practice in School Nursing: Survey of School Nurses at a National Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Primary and acute care settings are the focus of a concerted effort to implement evidence-based practice (EBP) in health care; yet, little attention has been given to use of EBP among school nurses. The aims of this study were to (a) describe current use of EBP among school nurses attending a national school nurse conference, (b) describe…

  11. Interpreters: a double-edged sword in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Maltby, H J

    1999-07-01

    The provision of health services for all Australians is based on equality of access to health care services, regardless of cultural origin or linguistic skill, and on the responsibility of the health system to respond appropriately. Lack of fluency in the English language and lack of bilingual or multilingual nurses are major sources of miscommunication, even with the use of interpreters and translated health information. Many immigrant women find the use of interpreters unacceptable. Nurses are concerned with legal issues. These two viewpoints make the use of interpreters a double-edged sword in practice. The findings of recent research and the literature in relation to language skills and the use of interpreters and translations in the Australian context are explored. Potential resolutions for transcultural nursing practice are provided. PMID:10693412

  12. Knowledge for the good of the individual and society: linking philosophy, disciplinary goals, theory, and practice.

    PubMed

    McCurry, Mary K; Revell, Susan M Hunter; Roy, Sr Callista

    2010-01-01

    Nursing as a profession has a social mandate to contribute to the good of society through knowledge-based practice. Knowledge is built upon theories, and theories, together with their philosophical bases and disciplinary goals, are the guiding frameworks for practice. This article explores a philosophical perspective of nursing's social mandate, the disciplinary goals for the good of the individual and society, and one approach for translating knowledge into practice through the use of a middle-range theory. It is anticipated that the integration of the philosophical perspective and model into nursing practice will strengthen the philosophy, disciplinary goal, theory, and practice links and expand knowledge within the discipline. With the focus on humanization, we propose that nursing knowledge for social good will embrace a synthesis of the individual and the common good. This approach converges vital and agency needs described by Hamilton and the primacy of maintaining the heritage of the good within the human species as outlined by Maritain. Further, by embedding knowledge development in a changing social and health care context, nursing focuses on the goals of clinical reasoning and action. McCubbin and Patterson's Double ABCX Model of Family Adaptation was used as an example of a theory that can guide practice at the community and global level. Using the theory-practice link as a foundation, the Double ABCX model provides practising nurses with one approach to meet the needs of individuals and society. The integration of theory into nursing practice provides a guide to achieve nursing's disciplinary goals of promoting health and preventing illness across the globe. When nursing goals are directed at the synthesis of the good of the individual and society, nursing's social and moral mandate may be achieved. PMID:20017882

  13. Nurses in Practice: A Perspective on Work Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Marcella Z., Ed.; And Others

    A major portion of the collection of 20 readings authored by practicing professionals consists of field observations presented both as raw data (field notes) and as analyzed and organized data. About the work of nurses in a variety of settings, a recurrent theme is that work behavior is greatly influenced by organizational and structural elements…

  14. [The ethical concerns of the private practice nurse].

    PubMed

    Pivot, Annie

    2015-12-01

    Ethics, by its definition, is a philosophical discipline which enables human beings to behave, to act and to be, in the best way possible, between themselves and towards their environment. In private nursing practice, the ethical dimension is based on personal reflection which enables each individual to adapt their attitude in order to act for the best. PMID:26675108

  15. Mobile Learning in Nursing Practice Education: Applying Koole's FRAME Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, Richard F.; Van Neste-Kenny, Jocelyne M. C.; Park, Caroline L.; Burton, Pamela A.; Meiers, Jan

    2009-01-01

    We report here on an exploratory formative evaluation of a project to integrate mobile learning into a Western Canadian college nursing program. Third-year students used Hewlett Packard iPAQ mobile devices for five weeks in a practice education course in April-May, 2007. Koole's (2009) "Framework for the Rational Analysis of Mobile Education"…

  16. [End-of-life support from a private practice nurse].

    PubMed

    Lecointre, Brigitte

    2015-11-01

    Eighty-one per cent of people say they would prefer to die at home. Several elements contribute to improving end-of-life care at home: an evolving society, ethical questioning, legislative changes, new methods of organisation, specialised and interdisciplinary training. However, this remains difficult. The private practice nurse provides clinical support and plays a major role in this care. PMID:26567072

  17. Power and knowledge in nursing practice: the contribution of Foucault.

    PubMed

    Henderson, A

    1994-11-01

    This paper explores the implications of Michel Foucault's philosophical analyses for understanding nursing practice. Foucault describes power within a given society as unfolding not through large-scale events but rather through a complex 'micro-physics'. Power operates upon the human body. With the increasing use of observation, in understanding both the natural and social world, the body has become the subject of the 'gaze'. The body as object, however, is neither a universal belief nor truth but a product of ways of perceiving and examining it. In relation to nursing, the subjection of the body to the 'gaze' and the practices of the institutional environment of the hospital are important for understanding the knowledge formulated. The power of practice is in the generation of knowledge. The nature and form of knowledge is instrumental in establishing the quality of nurse-patient relationships. This paper explores, through the particular exemplar of the patient in intensive care, the power of present practices to shape knowledge, and thereby dictate and limit the quality of the nurse-patient relationship. PMID:7745186

  18. Exploring nursing students’ experience of peer learning in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Ravanipour, Maryam; Bahreini, Masoud; Ravanipour, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Peer learning is an educational process wherein someone of the same age or level of experience level interacts with other students interested in the same topic. There is limited evidence specifically focusing on the practical use of peer learning in Iran. The aim of this study was to explore nursing students’ experiences of peer learning in clinical practice. Materials and Methods: A qualitative content analysis was conducted. Focus groups were used to find the students’ experiences about peerlearning. Twenty-eight baccalaureate nursing students at Bushehr University of Medical Sciences were selected purposively, and were arranged in four groups of seven students each. The focus group interviews were conducted using a semi-structured interview schedule. All interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using conventional content analysis method. Results: The analysis identified four themes: Paradoxical dualism, peer exploitation, first learning efficacy, and socialization practice. Gained advantages and perceived disadvantages created paradoxical dualism, and peer exploitation resulted from peer selection and peer training. Conclusion: Nursing students reported general satisfaction concerning peer learning due to much more in-depth learning with little stress than conventional learning methods. Peer learning is a useful method for nursing students for practicing educational leadership and learning the clinical skills before they get a job. PMID:26097860

  19. The University of Iowa Nursing Collaboratory: A Partnership for Creative Education and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dreher, Melanie; Everett, Linda; Hartwig, Sally Mathis

    2001-01-01

    A nursing college and its clinical partners created the Nursing Collaboratory to generate, disseminate, and apply knowledge to practice through four domains: education, research, practice, and informatics. It serves as an incubator for innovative products and services that enhance nursing education and practice. (SK)

  20. Practice of preventive dentistry for nursing staff in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Acuña-Reyes, Raquel; Cigarroa-Martínez, Didier; Ureña-Bogarín, Enrique; Orgaz-Fernández, Jose David

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Determine the domain of preventive dentistry in nursing personnel assigned to a primary care unit. Methods: Prospective descriptive study, questionnaire validation, and prevalence study. In the first stage, the questionnaire for the practice of preventive dentistry (CPEP, for the term in Spanish) was validated; consistency and reliability were measured by Cronbach's alpha, Pearson's correlation, factor analysis with intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). In the second stage, the domain in preventive dental nurses was explored. Results: The overall internal consistency of CPEP is ?= 0.66, ICC= 0.64, CI95%: 0.29-0.87 (p >0.01). Twenty-one subjects in the study, average age 43, 81.0% female, average seniority of 12.5 were included. A total of 71.5% showed weak domain, 28.5% regular domain, and there was no questionnaire with good domain result. The older the subjects were, the smaller the domain; female nurses showed greater mastery of preventive dentistry (29%, CI95%: 0.1-15.1) than male nurses. Public health nurses showed greater mastery with respect to other categories (50%, CI95%: 0.56-2.8). Conclusions: The CDEP has enough consistency to explore the domain of preventive dentistry in health-care staff. The domain of preventive dentistry in primary care nursing is poor, required to strengthen to provide education in preventive dentistry to the insured population. PMID:25386037

  1. Advanced nursing practice and Newton's three laws of motion.

    PubMed

    Sturgeon, David

    This article considers the reasons for the development of advanced practice roles among nurses and other healthcare professions. It explores the implications of financial constraints, consumer preferences and the development of new healthcare services on the reorganization of professional boundaries. It makes use of Sir Isaac Newton's three laws of motion to demonstrate how professional development in nursing has taken place in response to a number of external influences and demands. It also considers the significance of skill mix for the nursing profession, in particular the development and likely expansion of the physician assistant role. The application of different professionals and grades within a healthcare team or organization is central to the Government's Agenda for Change proposals and nurses have successfully adopted a number of roles traditionally performed by doctors. Nurses have demonstrated that they are capable of providing high quality care and contributing directly to positive patient outcome. Advanced nursing roles should not only reflect the changing nature of healthcare work, they should also be actively engaged in reconstructing healthcare boundaries. PMID:18773586

  2. Curriculum: From Theory to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Null, Wesley

    2011-01-01

    "Curriculum: From Theory to Practice" introduces readers to curriculum theory and how it relates to classroom practice. Wesley Null provides a unique organization of the curriculum field into five traditions: systematic, existential, radical, pragmatic, and deliberative. He discusses the philosophical foundations of curriculum as well as…

  3. Thinking Like a Nurse and Perceived Readiness for Professional Practice: A Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowdoin, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Thinking like a nurse (TLN) has been identified as a core competency of professional nursing practice. The term embraces the full context of the daily metacognitive process nurses use to provide competent nursing care and was theorized in this study to have four attributes: critical thinking, clinical judgment, moral reasoning, and professional…

  4. Spiritual Healing in the Aftermath of Childhood Maltreatment: Translating Men's Lived Experiences Utilizing Nursing Conceptual Models and Theory.

    PubMed

    Willis, Danny G; DeSanto-Madeya, Susan; Ross, Richard; Sheehan, Danielle Leone; Fawcett, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an explication of spiritual healing situated within 3 nursing conceptual models (Neuman's systems model, Rogers' science of unitary human beings, and Roy's adaptation model) and 1 middle-range theory (Watson's theory of human caring), all of which include a focus on spirituality. These models and the theory are the vehicle for translation of themes of spiritual healing extracted from data provided by 30 adult male survivors of childhood maltreatment into nursing practice. This discipline-specific translational scholarship advances the profession of nursing. PMID:26079298

  5. Preceptorship and Affirmation in the Intergenerational World of Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Vicki; Myrick, Florence; Yonge, Olive

    2012-01-01

    Research has shown that while preceptorship offers a reality-oriented learning environment and facilitates competence of students, there are inherent rewards and stressors associated with the experience. Students and preceptors can be from different generations, and as such, they may often come to the learning space with differing values and expectations. The nature of the preceptorship experience in this intergenerational context was explored in a recent phenomenological study with seven preceptors and seven nursing students in an undergraduate nursing program in Eastern Canada. Overall the experience was found to be inclusive of three main themes: being affirmed, being challenged, and being on a pedagogical journey. In this paper we explore the first of these themes, being affirmed. Highlighting the positive aspects of the preceptorship experience in the intergenerational context is necessary to promote a culture of openness and respect for generational differences within clinical nursing practice settings and to improving the overall quality of the educational experience. PMID:22778943

  6. Accessing best practice resources using mobile technology in an undergraduate nursing program: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Mann, Elizabeth G; Medves, Jennifer; Vandenkerkhof, Elizabeth G

    2015-03-01

    Mobile technology presents new opportunities for nursing education and ultimately the provision of nursing care. The aim of this study was to explore the utility of mobile technology in undergraduate nursing education. In this evaluation study, undergraduate nursing students were provided with iPod Touch devices containing best practice guidelines. Computer self-efficacy was assessed, and the Theory of Planned Behavior was used to identify potential predictors of the use of mobile technology. Questionnaires were completed at baseline (n = 33) and postimplementation (n = 23). Feedback on feasibility issues was recorded throughout the study period. Students generally found the devices useful, and few technical problems were identified; however, lack of skill in using the devices and lack of support from staff in the clinical setting were commonly identified issues. Self-efficacy scores were high throughout the study. Attitudes, perceptions of the desirability of use, perceived personal control over use, and intentions of using the device were lower postimplementation than at baseline. Attitude toward the technology predicted intention to use the device after graduation. Mobile technology may promote evidence-informed practice; however, supporting students' acquisition of related skills may optimize use. Successful integration of mobile technology into practice requires attention to factors that affect student attitudes. PMID:25636042

  7. Using career nurse mentors to support minority nursing students and facilitate their transition to practice.

    PubMed

    Banister, Gaurdia; Bowen-Brady, Helene M; Winfrey, Marion E

    2014-01-01

    The Clinical Leadership Collaborative for Diversity in Nursing was developed through an academe-service partnership focused on supporting minority nursing students and facilitating transition to practice. A key program element is mentoring. Students are paired with an experienced, minority clinical nurse or nurse leader from one of the partnering agencies, who helps guide the student throughout the junior and senior year of school and first year of employment. The mentoring component was evaluated through surveys in which mentors and mentees rated one another and offered open-ended comments on the program's impact. Aspects of mentees rated highest by mentors include manner (courteous and professional), ability to communicate and get along with others, preparation for meetings, and fully utilizing their time with mentors. Aspects of mentors rated highest by mentees include warmth, encouragement, and willingness to listen; enthusiasm for nursing and how they sparked the mentee's interest; and clarity regarding expectations for mentees and how they pushed mentees to achieve high standards. In the open-ended comments, mentees consistently identified mentoring as the program's strongest component. Sixty-four minority students have participated to date with a zero rate of attrition and very low job turnover among graduates. PMID:25150417

  8. Supporting student nurses in practice with additional online communication tools.

    PubMed

    Morley, Dawn A

    2014-01-01

    Student nurses' potential isolation and difficulties of learning on placement have been well documented and, despite attempts to make placement learning more effective, evidence indicates the continuing schism between formal learning at university and situated learning on placement. First year student nurses, entering placement for the first time, are particularly vulnerable to the vagaries of practice. During 2012 two first year student nurse seminar groups (52 students) were voluntarily recruited for a mixed method study to determine the usage of additional online communication support mechanisms (Facebook, wiki, an email group and traditional methods of support using individual email or phone) while undertaking their first five week clinical placement. The study explores the possibility of strengthening clinical learning and support by promoting the use of Web 2.0 support groups for student nurses. Results indicate a high level of interactivity in both peer and academic support in the use of Facebook and a high level of interactivity in one wiki group. Students' qualitative comments voice an appreciation of being able to access university and peer support whilst working individually on placement. Recommendations from the study challenge universities to use online communication tools already familiar to students to complement the support mechanisms that exist for practice learning. This is tempered by recognition of the responsibility of academics to ensure their students are aware of safe and effective online communication. PMID:23871299

  9. Female genital mutilation: knowledge, attitude and practice among nurses.

    PubMed Central

    Onuh, Sunday O.; Igberase, Gabriel O.; Umeora, Joaness O. U.; Okogbenin, Sylvanus A.; Otoide, Valentine O.; Gharoro, Etedafe P.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Female genital mutilation (FGM) and cutting is a subject of global interest, with many countries of the world still practicing it despite efforts by the WHO and other agencies to discourage the practice. The highest known prevalence is in Africa. OBJECTIVES: To determine the knowledge, attitude and practice of FGM among nurses in the ancient metropolis of Benin in a Nigerian state where FGM is illegal. RESULTS: One-hundred-ninety-three nurses in the study hospital were recruited in the study out of which 182 (94.3%) appropriately filled and returned the questionnaires. The average age of respondents was 37 years, and the average duration of postgraduation experience was 14.5 years. Most respondents are of Bini (36.8%) and Esan (34.1%) ethnic origin. All respondents identified at least one form of FGM, but only 12 respondents (6.6%) could correctly identify the four types of FGM. The harmful effects of FGM identified by the majority of respondents include hemorrhage, difficult labor/childbirth, genital tears, infections and scar/keloid formation. Forty-four (24.2%) of respondents were of the opinion that some forms of FGM are harmless. Eighty nurses admitted to having undergone FGM, for a prevalence of 44%. Five respondents (2.8%) view FGM as a good practice and will encourage the practice. Twelve respondents (6.6%) routinely perform FGM out of which seven (58.3%) viewed FGM as a bad practice. Nurses performing FGM routinely were those who had spent >20 years (59%) and 11-20 years (41%) in the profession. Another 26 (14.3%) had performed FGM before, though not on a routine basis. Of this latter group, 15 will perform FGM in the future when faced with certain circumstances. Reasons for FGM practice were mainly cultural. Eight of the respondents would have their daughters circumcised. CONCLUSION: Nurses perceive FGM in Benin as cultural. Almost half have had FGM themselves, and a small percentage recommend it to their daughters. Discouraging FGM practice will require culturally sensitive education of the healthcare providers and the population at large on the ill effects of FGM, including the risk to health and violations of human rights. PMID:16573307

  10. Establishing Policy Foundations and Regulatory Systems to Enhance Nursing Practice in the United Arab Emirates

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Lyndal H.; Aqtash, Salah; Day, Gary E.

    2015-01-01

    In 2009, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) established a Nursing and Midwifery Council with a mandate to develop standards for the registration and regulation of nursing and midwifery and to strengthen the nursing and midwifery workforce. Priorities included workforce Emiratization and the development of regulatory standards to support advanced and speciality nursing practice and new models of care—particularly for the management of noncommunicable diseases. This article provides background, context for, and best practice inputs to the effort to provide one unified framework of nursing regulation and licensure across the whole of the UAE. This article is intended for nurse leaders, policy makers, and regulators who are reviewing or developing nursing regulatory processes and advancing nursing workforce capacity building activities; and nurse educators and nurses wishing to work in the UAE. PMID:25944674

  11. Simulation Methodology in Nursing Education and Adult Learning Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutherford-Hemming, Tonya

    2012-01-01

    Simulation is often used in nursing education as a teaching methodology. Simulation is rooted in adult learning theory. Three learning theories, cognitive, social, and constructivist, explain how learners gain knowledge with simulation experiences. This article takes an in-depth look at each of these three theories as each relates to simulation.…

  12. Nurse coaching and cartoon distraction: an effective and practical intervention to reduce child, parent, and nurse distress during immunizations.

    PubMed

    Cohen, L L; Blount, R L; Panopoulos, G

    1997-06-01

    Evaluated a low cost and practical intervention designed to decrease children's, parents', and nurses' distress during children's immunizations. The intervention consisted of children viewing a popular cartoon movie and being coached by nurses and parents to attend to the movie. Ninety-two children, 4-6 years of age, and their parents were alternatively assigned to either a nurse coach intervention, a nurse coach plus train parent and child intervention, or a standard medical care condition. Based on previous findings of generalization of adult behaviors during medical procedures, it was hypothesized that training only the nurses to coach the children would cost-effectively reduce all participants levels of distress. Observational measures and subjective ratings were used to assess the following dependent variables: children's coping, distress, pain, and need for restraint; nurses' and parents' coaching behavior; and parents' and nurses' distress. Results indicate that, in the two intervention conditions, children coped more and were less distressed, nurses and parents exhibited more coping promoting behavior and less distress promoting behavior, and parents and nurses were less distressed than in the control condition. Although neither intervention was superior on any of the variables assessed in the study, nurse coach was markedly more practical and cost-effective. Therefore, nurses' coaching of children to watch cartoon movies has great potential for dissemination in pediatric settings. PMID:9212553

  13. Career Development: Theory and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montross, David H., Ed.; Shinkman, Christopher J., Ed.

    This book explores the latest developments in the theory and practice of career development, as seen by 21 professionals in the field. The study is organized in four parts that cover the following areas: the latest thinking about career theory; the career stages of exploration, establishment, maintenance, and decline; current thinking about the…

  14. Best Practice at Your Fingertips: The WISHeS School Nurse Procedure Website

    PubMed Central

    DuChateau, Teresa A.; Beversdorf, Sarah; Wolff, Marie

    2015-01-01

    School nurses are responsible for providing and supervising school nursing services for children with complex health concerns. Given school nurses frequently practice in isolation and may have limited access to clinical practice changes, they can benefit from up-to-date, evidence-based resources. Additionally, the resources must account for the fact that the nursing procedures will be performed in the unique setting of a school building and in many cases, will be performed by school personnel who have limited formal education in health care. This article provides an overview of a newly developed, easy to use, online school nursing procedures website for school nurses and other school personnel. PMID:25816427

  15. A study of quality management practices in nursing in universities in Australia.

    PubMed

    Cruickshank, Mary

    2003-01-01

    In Australia, the traditional Quality Assurance approach used in the hospital setting has played an important role in nursing practice. During the past decade, nurses have begun making a paradigm shift from Quality Assurance to Total Quality Management but scant attention has been paid to quality management practices in nursing in the higher education sector. This paper reports on a quantitative study examining the perceptions of nurse academics to the applicability of TQM to nursing in universities. The findings identified how TQM could be applied to suit the nursing culture in the higher education sector. PMID:15485391

  16. Development of the Massachusetts School Nurse Research Network (MASNRN): A Practice-Based Research Network to Improve the Quality of School Nursing Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vessey, Judith A.

    2007-01-01

    When school nurses embrace evidence-based practice (EBP), higher-quality care is provided to students, their families, and the larger community. Despite this, school nursing has been slow to embrace EBP. Practice-Based Research Networks (PBRNs), which capitalize on the combined strengths of clinicians and researchers to study clinical questions,…

  17. MOTHER AND INFANT CARE, PRACTICAL NURSE TRAINING PROGRAM, LESSON PLANS, PREPARED BY PRACTICAL NURSING INSTRUCTORS DURING CONFERENCE (UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE, AUGUST 14-18, 1961).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee State Board for Vocational Education, Murfreesboro. Vocational Curriculum Lab.

    PRACTICAL NURSE INSTRUCTORS, IN CONFERENCE, COMPILED THIS INDIVIDUALLY PLANNED AND TESTED MATERIAL TO BE USED IN PRACTICAL NURSE EDUCATION. THIRTY-TWO LESSON PLANS ON THE SUBJECT OF MOTHER AND INFANT CARE COVER TOPICS RANGING FROM THE REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEM TO COMPLICATIONS INVOLVING THE NEWBORN. EACH PLAN INCLUDES AIM, REFERENCES, MATERIALS,…

  18. Online tobacco cessation education to optimize standards of practice for psychiatric mental health nurses.

    PubMed

    Amole, Jacques; Heath, Janie; Joshua, Thomas V; McLear, Beth

    2012-03-01

    This article presents an overview of an online education offering to improve standards of practice for nurses intervening with tobacco-dependent mentally ill populations. Designed as a pilot study and guided by the theory of reasoned action framework, the pretest-posttest educational program was conducted to examine attitudes and beliefs, knowledge, and intentions to integrate tobacco cessation interventions into practice. Although positive attitudes and beliefs were demonstrated, knowledge gaps continued to exist after the online program. Strengths and challenges of the online education offering are presented with recommendations for future research. PMID:22289399

  19. NursesPractice Environment and Their Job Satisfaction: A Study on Nurses Caring for Older Adults in Shanghai

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Dong, Weizhen; Mauk, Kristen; Li, Peiying; Wan, Jin; Yang, Guang; Fang, Lyuying; Huan, Wan; Chen, Chun; Hao, Mo

    2015-01-01

    Aim To examine the job satisfaction of nurses who are caring for older adults in healthcare settings in Shanghai, and to explore the underlying factors in order to explain and predict nurses’ job satisfaction. Background China has the largest elderly population in the world, and its population is aging rapidly. Studies on job satisfaction of nurses providing care for the elderly in China can help to identify problem areas and develop strategies for the improvement of nurses’ working conditions. However, to date, this subject matter has not been thoroughly studied in the Chinese context. Previous studies in other countries show that many factors impact nurses’ job satisfaction, with the practice environment being a critical factor. There is a serious nursing shortage in China, especially in the big cities such as Shanghai. Given the increasing care demand of the aging population, learning about the job satisfaction level among nurses who are caring for older adults can provide essential information to help attract and retain nurses in this specialty area. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 444 nurses in 22 elderly care institutions in Shanghai. The Chinese version of the Index of Work Satisfaction (IWS) and the Nursing Practice Environment Scale were instruments used. Inferential statistical tests used to analyze the data included Spearman correlation analysis, one-way analysis of variance, and hierarchical regression tests. Results The average overall IWS (part B) score was 135.21 ± 19.34. Personality, job and organizational characteristics were found to be the most influential factors, and the practice environment was identified as having the strongest impact on job satisfaction (Beta = 0.494). Conclusion Job satisfaction level among nurses who are caring for older adults in Shanghai is moderate, but the data suggest that this could be greatly increased if the nursing practice environment was improved. PMID:26380980

  20. Creating a Healthy Practice Environment: A Call to Action for Oncology Nurses.

    PubMed

    Lacovara, Jane E

    2015-09-01

    When nurse researcher Marlene Kramer published Reality Shock: Why Nurses Leave Nursing in 1974, her seminal work launched a national discussion related to the distress felt by many baccalaureate-prepared novice nurses about leaving the academic setting and transitioning to the clinical setting. In particular, Kramer (1974) highlighted conflict between the values these new nurses had been taught in school and the reality of practicing as a professional nurse in a clinical setting. For example, in an educational setting, nursing students may focus on one or two patients at a time, whereas in the clinical setting, nurses must practice simultaneously with multiple patients with varied and numerous health deficits. This conflict is felt acutely by novice and experienced oncology nurses who are tasked with providing quality physical care, as well as emotional care and support to patients with cancer and their families?. PMID:26302285

  1. The Relationship of Patient Population and Nurses Certification Status on NursesPractices in Preparing Families for the End of Life

    PubMed Central

    Kehl, Karen A.

    2014-01-01

    While nurses usually prepare family for the patients’ final days, little is known about how this is done. The purpose of this study was to describe nurses’ beliefs and practices concerning family preparation for dying, focusing on strategies, tailoring, timing and content of preparation. Nurses’ preparatory practices were compared by patient population (hospice or palliative care) and the nurses’ certification status. A descriptive, comparative survey was conducted. All RN members of the Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association and who met the inclusion criteria (N=2706) were invited and 1434 (53.1%) participated. Nurses believe families can be prepared, and identified trust and repetition as important strategies. There are significant differences based on population regarding nurses’ beliefs about preparation, strategies, tailoring, timing and content. Tailoring differed based on certification status. This information can be compared to what is known about family preparatory needs to develop preparatory interventions that are tailored to patient and family characteristics. Revisiting the similarities and differences in the practice of nurses in hospice and palliative care is important as the specialty continues to mature to assure that adequate education and proper criteria for certification are being provided for all hospice and palliative care nurses. PMID:25414596

  2. Perspectives of Australian nursing directors regarding educational preparation for mental health nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Happell, Brenda; McAllister, Margaret

    2014-11-01

    There is an ongoing global shortage of mental health nurses. Within Australia, the principal strategy of offering a postgraduate education programme with various incentives to encourage nurses back to study has not been successful. This has led to the consideration of radical alternatives, including the return to pre-registration specialisation in mental health. The successful introduction of this strategy would require the full support of industry partners. To date, the voice of industry has not been heard in relation to this issue. The aim of this paper is to present the views of an Australian sample of mental health nursing directors regarding the resources and other factors required, should undergraduate specialist programmes in mental health be developed, to ensure they are relevant and likely to be successful. A qualitative exploratory research project was undertaken to explore the perspectives and opinions of industry partners. In-depth interviews were conducted with nursing directors (n = 12) in Queensland Australia. Five main themes were identified: relationships with universities; clinical placement preparation and support; workplace culture; facilitators and preceptors; and practical student learning. Genuine collaboration between the two organisations was considered crucial for delivering a quality programme and providing the required support for students. Transformative leadership could inform this collaboration by promoting acknowledgement of and respect for differences. PMID:25353302

  3. Influences on and outcomes of enacted scope of nursing practice: a new model.

    PubMed

    Déry, Johanne; D?Amour, Danielle; Blais, Régis; Clarke, Sean P

    2015-01-01

    Enacted scope of practice is a major issue for nursing administrators, given the potentially negative effect on accessibility, continuity, safety and quality of care, job satisfaction, and organizational costs of nurses working at reduced scope. Optimal deployment of nurses to a fuller enacted scope of nursing practice holds much promise for addressing all of these larger challenges. In this sense, new model of the Enacted Scope of Nursing Practice presented in this article provides a number of directions for interventions that could improve health system functioning. PMID:25932820

  4. [The practice of intensive care nursing: alliance among technique, technology and humanization].

    PubMed

    da Silva, Rafael Celestino; Ferreira, Márcia de Assunção

    2013-12-01

    A qualitative, field research study whose aim was to characterize the specific practice of intensive care nursing. Observation and interviews were conducted with 21 nurses in an intensive care unit. The results evidenced eight characteristics of this care, which included subjectivity and objectivity, translated into: interaction, dialogue, humanistic principles, vigilance, knowledge, and mastery of machinery. Because of this practice, subjectivity is not always expressed in a clear way, and objectivity requires training of nurses to perform intensive care. It is concluded that the practice of intensive care nursing combines technique, technology and humanization, which underlie the nursing care performed at the unit. PMID:24626375

  5. Current marketing practices in the nursing home sector.

    PubMed

    Calhoun, Judith G; Banaszak-Holl, Jane; Hearld, Larry R

    2006-01-01

    Marketing is widely recognized as an essential business function across all industries, including healthcare. While many long-term care facilities adopted basic healthcare marketing practices and hired marketing staff by the early 1990s, a paucity of research on nursing home marketing exists in the literature. This study examines the extent to which nursing homes have developed more formulated marketing and related communication and promotional strategies as market competition has increased in this sector during the past two decades. In addition, we explored managers' perceptions of their control over marketing decision making, the impact of competition on the use of marketing practices, and areas for enhanced competitive positioning. Administrators from 230 nursing homes in 18 Southeastern Michigan counties were surveyed regarding (1) the adoption level of approximately 40 literature-based, best-practice marketing strategies; (2) the types of staff involved with the marketing function; and (3) their perception of their level of control over marketing functions and of local competition. Results from 101 (44 percent) survey participants revealed that although respondents viewed their markets as highly competitive, their marketing practices remained focused on traditional and relatively constrained practices. In relation to the importance of customer relationship management, the majority of the administrators reported intensive efforts being focused on residents and their families, referrers, and staff, with minimal efforts being extended to insurers and other types of payers. A significant positive relation was found between the intensity of marketing initiatives and the size of the facility (number of beds), whereas significant negative correlations were revealed in relation to occupancy and the perceived level of control over the function. PMID:16770906

  6. A Case Study of Factors Leading to Student Success in an Accelerated Licensed Practical Nurse to Associate Degree Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sherry T.

    2012-01-01

    This case study attempted to discover and comprehend the relationship of students and contributing factors of success, of one Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) to Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) program, to formulate an understanding of which contributing factors are most beneficial to enable students to persist to graduation and/or successfully…

  7. Demonstrating the value of the advanced practice nurse: an evaluation model.

    PubMed

    Byers, J F; Brunell, M L

    1998-05-01

    Advanced practice nurses are challenged to assess comprehensively the value of their role and the impact of their practice. Value is defined as quality divided by cost. The correlations among the structure, strategies of care (process), and their objectives (outcome) are key to the assessment of the quality of care and the impact of the advanced practice nurse's role. Advanced practice nurses are challenged to provide high quality care for a competitive or decreased cost. For the profession of nursing, outcomes are the result of interventions based on the nurse's clinical judgment and theoretical, practical, or scientific knowledge. An evaluation model is presented that comprehensively measures the impact of advanced practice nurses on patients and families, and an example is presented. Using the model will give credibility and validity to the APNs' positive impact on the quality and financial outcomes of care for each patient and for entire patient populations. PMID:9633281

  8. Prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms in hospital nurse technicians and licensed practical nurses: associations with demographic factors

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Roberta F. C.; Sato, Tatiana O.; Foltran, Fabiana A.; Silva, Luciana C. C. B.; Coury, Helenice J. C. G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective : This cross-sectional study aimed at analyzing: 1. the main musculoskeletal symptoms (MSS) presented by hospital nursing workers and; 2. personal, occupational, and health factors related to MSS among them. Method : Two questionnaires were filled in by 245 nurse technicians (NTs) and licensed practical nurses (LPNs) (response rate 95%) associated with direct patient care sectors from a hospital. These questionnaires were: the standardized version of the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) and one including questions on 15 demographic independent variables potentially related to outcomes from the NMQ. Univariate analyses and binary logistic regression analyses were performed to identify which variables would explain the occurrence of MSS in different body regions. Results: The low back (57%), shoulder (52%), and neck (48%) were identified as the most affected regions. The logistic regression analysis showed that low back symptoms in the last 12 months were significantly associated with LPN activities (OR=2.36; CI=1.24-4.5) and previous sick leave due to MSS (OR=5.97; CI=1.2-29.1). Smoking was significantly associated with symptoms in the low back (OR=2.77; CI=1.13-6.8) and thoracic spine (OR=2.37; CI=1.04-5.40). Physical exercise showed a protective effect on the cervical spine (OR=0.42; CI=0.23-0.77). Previous sick leave was significantly associated with pain in the knees (OR=4.24; CI=1.33-13.5) and in the upper limbs (OR=5.36; CI=1.07-26.7). Conclusions: The nursing workers who were evaluated presented a high prevalence of MSS. Previous history of sick leave was strongly associated with the presence of symptoms in various body regions. These results indicate the need for preventive programs in the hospital environment in order to control more severe MSS in nursing professionals. PMID:25054385

  9. Measuring the impact of an interprofessional multimedia learning resource on Japanese nurses and nursing students using the Theory of Planned Behavior Medication Safety Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Omura, Mieko; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Stone, Teresa Elizabeth; Maguire, Jane; Lapkin, Samuel

    2015-12-01

    Interprofessional communication and teamwork are essential for medication safety; however, limited educational opportunities for health professionals and students to develop these skills exist in Japan. This study evaluated the impact of an interprofessional multimedia learning resource on registered nurses' and nursing students' intention to practice in a manner promoting medication safety. Using a quasi-experimental design, Japanese registered nurses and nursing students (n?=?203) were allocated to an experimental (n?=?109) or control group (n?=?94). Behavioral intentions of medication safety and the predictor variables of attitudes, perceived behavioral control, and subjective norms were measured using a Japanese version of the Theory of Planned Behavior Medication Safety Questionnaire. Registered nurses in the experimental group demonstrated a greater intention to collaborate and practice in a manner that enhanced medication safety, evidenced by higher scores than the control group on all predictor variables. The results demonstrate the potential for interprofessional multimedia learning resources to positively impact the behaviors of Japanese registered nurses in relation to safe medication practices. Further research in other contexts and with other cohorts is warranted. PMID:26138636

  10. Environment, ecosystems, and ecological behavior: a dialogue toward developing nursing ecological theory.

    PubMed

    Laustsen, Gary

    2006-01-01

    Current epistemological foundations of nursing theory incorporate minimal ecology theory. The purpose of this article is to present a nursing ecological theory with a goal to broaden current nursing perspectives by incorporating expanded concepts of global ecosystems, communities, and interrelationships derived from ecological sciences. A theory derivation process is utilized, and a nursing ecological model is proposed. Nurses face a challenge to translate global environment concern and ecological beliefs into professional activities. Elucidating a nursing ecological theory may guide our profession toward new directions in holistic care and will be good for the care of our patients, profession, and the Earth. PMID:16495687

  11. Voices That Care: Licensed Practical Nurses and the Emotional Labour Underpinning Their Collaborative Interactions with Registered Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Truc; Alderson, Marie; Nadon, Michelle; Kershaw-Rousseau, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    Recognizing the emotional labour underlying interprofessional collaborations (IPCs) could be considered a crucial step towards building a cohesive nursing team. Although IPCs between registered nurses (RNs) and licensed practical nurses (LPNs) have been linked to quality nursing care, little is known about the emotions experienced by LPNs during their interactions with RNs or those factors that influence IPCs. A questionnaire administered to 309?LPNs found that (1) the professional identity of LPNs has evolved into a that of a unique social group; (2) LPNs define IPC as an interpersonal process of exploring similar or dissimilar assessments of a patient's status with RNs and, together, establishing a course of nursing actions; (3) the primary organizational factor facilitating IPCs is inclusive nursing leadership; (4) the interpersonal factor promoting IPCs is the level of trust RNs extend to LPNs; and (5) an LPN's emotional labour (i.e., internal emotional regulation) is most tangible during uncollaborative interactions with RNs. PMID:22135732

  12. Minority nursing student success: A grounded theory case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mister, Brenda J.

    There has been a dramatic increase in the nation's racial and ethnic minority populations over recent years. This increase is placing a higher demand on the health care industry to provide culturally competent care to these diverse populations. This challenge is met with yet another problem as the nation faces a critical shortage of nurses, particularly minority nurses. This shortage is only expected to worsen over the next several years. As schools of nursing across the country are being asked to increase the number of nursing program graduates, specifically minorities, they are confronted with a double edged sword as retention rates are decreasing, and attrition rates are increasing. This is particularly troublesome when many racial and ethnic minority nursing students do not graduate. This qualitative study was implemented to assess and understand the perceived educational experiences of racial and ethnic minority nursing students enrolled in a rural community college nursing program on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. Eight voluntary nursing students who identified themselves as either a racial or ethnic minority participated in the study. Data were collected by: individual audio-taped interview sessions; audio-taped focus group sessions; and documentation of field notes. Participants also provided demographic information and were asked to provide a brief written response to a scenario regarding increasing the recruitment and retention rates of minority nursing students. All data were analyzed utilizing the constant comparative method. Results of the study revealed six different themes: personal support systems and peer relationships; college services and academic resources; faculty support; cultural understanding versus cultural insensitivity; personal attributes of self-efficacy/advice for future nursing students; and suggestions for college and nursing program improvement. After the major themes were examined one central theme, a grounded theory, was born. The theory proposes that when the minority nursing student bridges his or her personal attributes of self-efficacy with some or all identified support systems, this may be a conduit to fostering success in obtaining their educational goals as long as the resources are available, and a caring environment is present.

  13. Advanced practice nursing for enduring health needs management: a global perspective.

    PubMed

    Koskinen, Liisa; Mikkonen, Irma; Graham, Iain; Norman, Linda D; Richardson, Jim; Savage, Eileen; Schorn, Mavis

    2012-07-01

    Advanced practice nursing expertise has been acknowledged worldwide as one response to the challenges arising from changes in society and health care. The roots of advanced practice nursing education are at the University of Colorado where the first known programme started in 1965. In many countries advanced practice nurses (APNs) have taken responsibility for routine patient care formerly carried out by physicians in order to reduce their workload. However, more and more, APNs have taken responsibility for new service areas and quality programmes not previously provided. Chronic disease management is one of these new service areas because long-term diseases are increasingly challenging service systems globally. This article is based on an international APN partnership. The aim of the article is to describe how the partnership will design a 15 ECTS credit course on Enduring Health Need Management as a cross-cultural collaborative endeavour. The adaptation of an inquiry based learning framework will be described drawing on four main principles of the theory: authentic learning communities; student encouragement in analysing gradually more complicated problems; networking in knowledge creation and; student engagement and activity. The cross-cultural online course aims to increase APNs' intercultural competence as well as their global and international work orientation. PMID:21839552

  14. Knowledge and Practice of Nursing Staff towards Infection Control Measures in the Palestinian Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fashafsheh, Imad; Ayed, Ahmad; Eqtait, Faeda; Harazneh, Lubna

    2015-01-01

    Health care professionals are constantly exposed to microorganisms. Many of which can cause serious or even lethal infections. Nurses in particular are often exposed to various infections during the course of carrying out their nursing activities. Therefore nurses should have sound knowledge and strict adherence to infection control practice. Aim…

  15. Most Likely to Achieve: Predicting Early Success of the Practical Nurse Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cline, April P.

    2013-01-01

    It is important that practical nurse (PN) educators be able to identify which students are likely to be successful in their programs. However, the majority of literature related to predicting success of nursing students has been done on baccalaureate nursing students in the university setting. This study sought to determine whether the same…

  16. Tidewater Regional Model for Articulation and Coordination of Nursing Education. Task Analyses Guides for Licensed Practical Nurses Pursuing an Associate Degree in Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norfolk Public Schools, VA.

    This instructional guide includes the curriculum for two complete and separate courses to be taught at the associate degree level. The first six units of the guide are the course content for a 2-3 semester hour course, "Transition from Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) to Associate Degree Nursing (ADN)." The entire content of the guide, 19 units in…

  17. [Evidence-based practice in nursing curricula: the experience of nursing degree course of Reggio Emilia. A pilot study].

    PubMed

    Finotto, Stefano; Chiesi, Ivens; Mecugni, Daniela; Casali, Patrizia; Doro, Lucia Maria Grazia; Lusetti, Simona

    2010-01-01

    Given the lack of evidence in literature concerning the presence of Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) in nursing curricula, but considering its importance in order to educate future nurses to use critical thinking and to base their practice on scientific evidence, tutors and nursing teachers of the Nursing Degree Course of Reggio Emilia (Università degli Studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia), have decided to introduce a three-year laboratory of EBP. The purposes of this project are: to describe the three-year EBP laboratory of Nursing Degree, its objectives, its structure, its integration with practical training and nursing subjects and its students evaluation strategies; to get students verify the perception of the usefulness of the three-year EBP laboratory regarding the elaboration of the graduation thesis, the search for appropriatem answers for patients met during clinical trainings and the usefulness of the EBP process in view of the development of their professional career. The design of research of this pilot study is correlation-descriptive. It has been selected a sample of convenience consisting of 56 nurses graduated in the autumn session of the academic year 2007-2008. For data collection we have used an electronic questionnaire (Microsoft Word with closed fields) structured for the purpose. The laboratory has been effective in learning to use the database to search for evidences and to use the database to search for evidences related to nursing problems met in training placements. Finally, graduated nurses consider the EBP process an essential element of professional nursing luggage. Although the sample is restricted the results indicates the good educational choice made by our Nursing Degree Course of integrating the EBP Laboratory in the curriculum. PMID:21167112

  18. The Advanced Nursing Practice Team as a model for HIV/AIDS caregiving in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Spirig, Rebecca; Nicca, Dunja; Voggensperger, Jacqueline; Unger, Miriam; Werder, Vreni; Niepmann, Susanne

    2004-01-01

    To offer advanced nursing care for people living with HIV, a participatory action research project was initiated that enabled constant learning and change at the levels of (a) the culture and organization of an outpatient department, (b) clinical leadership and interdisciplinary collaboration, and (c) development of new services. In this project, the development of the Advanced Nursing Practice (ANP) Team not only affected the practice of individual nurses with advanced degrees but also created a team of nurses educated at different levels. Through a systematic process, the nurses on the team became more educated and refined their clinical expertise. An essential aspect of the ANP Team was the specialization of each nurse in a self-selected topic within HIV/AIDS care. As members of the ANP Team, the nurses offer state-of-the-art nursing care including patient assessment, medication management and adherence support, symptom management, health maintenance and prevention, and family support for persons living with HIV. PMID:15165375

  19. Pathways to fitness for practice: National Vocational Qualifications as a foundation of competence in nurse education.

    PubMed

    Grundy, L

    2001-05-01

    Nurse education is currently undergoing major change. This article seeks to examine how National Vocational Qualifications (NVQs) are contributing to the future of nurse education. Criticisms of Project 2000 (P2K) include failure of the programme to produce nurses who are 'fit for practice' at the point of registration. A major criticism was that there is not enough skills-based training included. Following a recent report, recommendations were made which included a move to introduce a competence-based approach in nurse education. This approach is becoming more evident in both pre- and post-registration nurse education. A mapping exercise demonstrated that many of the UKCC competencies for pre-registration nurse education could be mapped to care NVQs. The article concludes that the positive aspects of care NVQs and P2K education should be embraced to enable programmes of nurse education to prepare nurses who are 'fit for practice'. PMID:11339868

  20. Australian Nurse Practitioner Practice: Value Adding through Clinical Reflexivity

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Michelle; Murfet, Giuliana

    2015-01-01

    The role of the Australian Nurse Practitioner (NP) is in its infancy and at a crossroads where extensive research demonstrates effective quality care and yet the role remains underrecognised and underutilised. The translation of practice into “value” is critical for the sustainability of NP roles and requires the practitioner to adopt a systematic method of inquiry. Kim's (1999) “Critical Reflective Inquiry” (CRI) method was adapted by two Australian NPs who specialise in diabetes and chronic disease management. Kim highlights the intent of CRI as understanding the meaning of practice, delivering improvements to practice through self-reflection, and the critique of practice that can lead to practice changes and development of new models of care translated to “products” of value. Based on the thematically analysis of 3 years of CRI application, the authors formed 5 headings that represented the NP's practice as Specialised Care Access, Complications and Diagnostics Interventions, Pharmaceutical Treatment, Vulnerable Populations, and Leadership. The utility of CRI demonstrates how NP practice is integral to a continuous cycle of addressing health care services gaps, and the conversion of “products” into “value” and positions the NP to assimilate the role of the practitioner-researcher. PMID:25705517

  1. Narrative Inquiry: Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savin-Baden, Maggi; Van Niekerk, Lana

    2007-01-01

    This article offers an overview of the method of narrative inquiry and explores competing trends in the use of the approach. It not only examines the theories relating to the method but also offers practical guidance on using narrative inquiry, including an exploration of what might count as a narrative and ways of analysing narrative data. The…

  2. Film Studies: Theory and Practice

    E-print Network

    Little, Tony

    MLitt Film Studies: Theory and Practice School of Arts and Humanities http://stir.ac.uk/f2 #12 for . . . That's why I would have no hesitation in recommending the experience to anyone. Grahame Reid, Film and Media Development Officer, MacRobert Arts Centre, and Recent Graduate, MLitt Film Studies Is Film

  3. Educational Management: Theory and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okumbe, J. A.

    This book provides the reader with principal theories and practices of management in educational organizations. It attempts to widen both the breadth and depth of the body of knowledge in this area of specialization. The work provides useful reference material for students and scholars at the undergraduate and postgraduate levels in universities…

  4. Theory into Practice Goes Exactly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Jonny

    2007-01-01

    "Dimensions of possible variation" is a phrase that now occupies a safe place in the literature describing the application of education theory to education practice: "asking yourself what could be changed [in the task], while using the same approach or technique, opens up dimensions of possible variation. A set of exercises forming a sequence of…

  5. Practice Theory in Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Richard F.; Astarita, Alice C.

    2013-01-01

    Ortega (2011) has argued that second language acquisition is stronger and better after the social turn. Of the post-cognitive approaches she reviews, several focus on the social context of language learning rather than on language as the central phenomenon. In this article, we present Practice Theory not as yet another approach to language…

  6. Optimizing Java Theory and Practice

    E-print Network

    Budimliæ, Zoran

    Optimizing Java Theory and Practice Zoran Budimlic Ken Kennedy Rice University Computer Science popularity of the Internet has made an instant star of the Java programming language. Java's portability Java implementation, even with just­in­time compilation technology, is far behind the most popular

  7. Successful aging in the United States and China: a theoretical basis to guide nursing research, practice, and policy.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong; Ling, Jiying; McCarthy, Valerie Lander

    2015-03-01

    Successful aging is gaining increasing attention given the growth in the older adult population. Criteria and definitions within multiple disciplines vary greatly in Western literature, with no consensus on its meaning. Sociocultural, economic, and political differences between the Western view of successful aging and its view in China add to the confusion. Similarities and differences in the meaning of successful aging in the United States and China are examined, and potential for a common definition useful to nursing in both countries is explored. Using concept analysis, shared criteria for successful aging were the following: decreased incidence of disease and disability, life satisfaction, meaning and purpose in life, and ability to cope effectively to achieve goals based on personal values and priorities. A comprehensive, multidimensional definition of successful aging for nursing and a midrange nursing theory of successful aging were identified that may be useful to guide nursing research, practice, and policy. PMID:24841471

  8. ***Revised syllabus 4.6.2015*** WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF NURSING | DOCTOR OF NURSING PRACTICE

    E-print Network

    TITLE: Theory of Psychopharmacology and Safe Prescribing Practices CREDIT HOURS: 3 COURSE FORMAT Theoretical perspectives of psychopharmacology as they pertain to safe prescribing and monitoring patient, the theoretical underpinnings of psychopharmacology are presented. The course will introduce concepts of choosing

  9. Spiritual care competence for contemporary nursing practice: A quantitative exploration of the guidance provided by fundamental nursing textbooks.

    PubMed

    Timmins, Fiona; Neill, Freda; Murphy, Maryanne; Begley, Thelma; Sheaf, Greg

    2015-11-01

    Spirituality is receiving unprecedented attention in the nursing literature. Both the volume and scope of literature on the topic is expanding, and it is clear that this topic is of interest to nurses. There is consensus that the spiritual required by clients receiving health ought to be an integrated effort across the health care team. Although undergraduate nurses receive some education on the topic, this is ad hoc and inconsistent across universities. Textbooks are clearly a key resource in this area however the extent to which they form a comprehensive guide for nursing students and nurses is unclear. This study provides a hitherto unperformed analysis of core nursing textbooks to ascertain spirituality related content. 543 books were examined and this provides a range of useful information about inclusions and omissions in this field. Findings revealed that spirituality is not strongly portrayed as a component of holistic care and specific direction for the provision of spiritual care is lacking. Fundamental textbooks used by nurses and nursing students ought to inform and guide integrated spiritual care and reflect a more holistic approach to nursing care. The religious and/or spiritual needs of an increasingly diverse community need to be taken seriously within scholarly texts so that this commitment to individual clients' needs can be mirrored in practice. PMID:25819014

  10. Tips for starting your own nurse practitioner practice.

    PubMed

    Calmelat, A

    1993-04-01

    The decision to open a nurse practitioner practice is often difficult to make. Success depends on the possession of specific resources, such as adequate skills, finances, emotional support and the desire to be one's own boss. These skills will be critical as the NP develops a business plan and a budget, and makes important decisions, such as the form the business will take: sole proprietorship, partnership or corporation. Using external resources such as attorneys and accountants is also useful, especially when tackling issues of licenses, taxes and insurance. Start-up costs can be kept to a minimum with creativity and used equipment. In-house laboratories and reference laboratories must conform to strict regulations. A practice without established patients will need to market services aggressively through a successful mix of product, price, place and promotion. Patients' acceptance of the NP office will be enhanced by smooth patient flow, adequate space and cleanliness. PMID:8292127

  11. Patients first! Engaging the hearts and minds of nurses with a patient-centered practice model.

    PubMed

    Small, Deborah C; Small, Robert M

    2011-05-01

    Like every healthcare system today, the Cleveland Clinic health system is a combination of medical hospitals, institutes, and services in which the implementation of uniform care methodologies faces significant barriers. The guiding principle of the Cleveland Clinic, 'Patients First,' focuses on the principle of patient- and family-centered care (PFCC) but deliberately lacks details due to the wide scope of care delivered by the organization. The Stanley Shalom Zielony Institute of Nursing Excellence (the Nursing Institute) at the Cleveland Clinic was charged with standardizing nursing practice across a system with 11,000 registered nurses and 800 advanced practice nurses. The challenge involved providing firm direction on delivering PFCC that was appropriate for all clinical disciplines and could be implemented quickly across existing practices and technologies. Successful implementation required full engagement in the concept of PFCC by what the Institute for Healthcare Improvement has termed the 'hearts and minds' of nurses. To achieve these ends, development of a systemwide nursing practice model was initiated. In this article the authors identify the essence of PFCC, consider barriers to PFCC, review their process of developing PFCC, and describe how the Cleveland Clinic health system has implemented a PFCC nursing practice model. In doing so the authors explore how the concept of 'Passion for Nursing' was used to stimulate nurse engagement in PFCC. PMID:22088151

  12. Toward a Consensus in Ethics Education for the Doctor of Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Laabs, Carolyn A

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to begin to develop a consensus as to the essential content and methods of ethics education for advanced practice nurses. An online Delphi technique was used to survey ethics experts to determine whether items were essential, desirable, or unnecessary to ethics education for students in doctor of nursing practice programs. Only the American Nurses Association Code of Ethics and ethics terminology were deemed essential foundational knowledge. PMID:26328294

  13. Cost-effectiveness of a WOC Advanced Practice Nurse in the Acute Care and Outpatient Setting

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Increasing numbers of advanced practice nurses who practice within the WOC specialty are challenged by the need to justify their role by demonstrating clinical and fiscal benefits to the employing agency. This View From Here column describes the steps I took while completing such an analysis for a position for a nurse practitioner with WOC certification in upstate New York. PMID:24918767

  14. An Investigation of NCLEX-PN Performance and Student Perceptions among Practical Nursing Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abston-Coleman, Sharon L.; Levy, Dessie R.

    2010-01-01

    Students in practical nursing programs require 32 weeks of coursework (1 academic year) and completion of a national licensing exam (NCLEX-PN) to secure employment. The purpose of this study was to identify selected academic variables that were related to NCLEX-PN performance for first-time test takers of two types of practical nursing programs at…

  15. Cost-effectiveness of a WOC advanced practice nurse in the acute care and outpatient setting.

    PubMed

    Medley, Jenny A

    2014-01-01

    Increasing numbers of advanced practice nurses who practice within the WOC specialty are challenged by the need to justify their role by demonstrating clinical and fiscal benefits to the employing agency. This View From Here column describes the steps I took while completing such an analysis for a position for a nurse practitioner with WOC certification in upstate New York. PMID:24918767

  16. Nursing Minimum Data Set for School Nursing Practice. Position Statement. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denehy, Janice

    2012-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) to support the collection of essential nursing data as listed in the Nursing Minimum Data Set (NMDS). The NMDS provides a basic structure to identify the data needed to delineate nursing care delivered to clients as well as relevant characteristics of those clients. Structure…

  17. School Nursing Documentation: Knowledge, Attitude, and Barriers to Using Standardized Nursing Languages and Current Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yearous, Sharon Kay Guthrie

    2011-01-01

    The independent, complex role of a school nurse requires accurate documentation of assessments, interventions, and outcomes. Consistent documentation by all school nurses is crucial to study the impact of nursing interventions on children's health and success in school. While standardized nursing languages are available, the actual use of…

  18. Postcolonial theory, nursing knowledge, and the development of emancipatory knowing.

    PubMed

    Bickford, Deanna

    2014-01-01

    Nurses must assume a leadership role in confronting inequitable access to health care. This imperative is realizable through contributions to the knowledge of the discipline, reflecting on the profession's mandate for social justice and elimination of health inequities, as well as embracing the diversity of nursing's fundamental patterns of knowing. Emancipatory knowing involves critically examining social, political, and institutional structures to uncover social injustices and inequities and disrupt the status quo, as well as asking critical questions. Postcolonial theory, aligned with these foundational principles, can be used to answer such critical questions, thus contributing to the advancement of disciplinary knowledge. PMID:25102212

  19. Leadership and management skills of general practice nurses: experience or education?

    PubMed

    Lau, Rosalind; Cross, Wendy; Moss, Cheryle; Campbell, Annie; De Castro, Magali; Oxley, Victoria

    2014-12-01

    A key finding of this qualitative exploratory descriptive study into advanced nursing for general practice nurses (Australian setting) revealed that participants viewed leadership and management as best learnt 'apprenticeship' style on the job by years of experience. Participants (48) comprised of general practice nurses, practice managers and general practitioners from metropolitan Melbourne were interviewed. Other findings demonstrated that the participants generally had limited awareness that postgraduate education can assist in the development of leadership and management in advanced nursing practice. The participants lacked clarity about professional competencies and generally did not connect these to leadership and management. Professional bodies need to take the opportunity to promote awareness of the national competency standards. All three groups of participants expressed hopes about the future provision of professional development opportunities and support by the Medicare Local for leadership and management aspirations within advanced practice nursing. PMID:25679023

  20. Strategic Planning and Doctor Of Nursing Practice Education: Developing Today's and Tomorrow's Leaders.

    PubMed

    Falk, Nancy L; Garrison, Kenneth F; Brown, Mary-Michael; Pintz, Christine; Bocchino, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Strategic planning and thinking skills are essential for today's nurse leaders. Doctor of nursing practice (DNP) programs provide an opportunity for developing effective nurse strategists. A well-designed strategy course can stimulate intellectual growth at all levels of Bloom's Taxonomy. Discussion forums in online education provide new opportunities for rich interaction among peers en route to development of well-informed strategic plans. An interprofessional perspective adds a rich and vital aspect to doctoral nursing education and it serves to inform strategic plan development. A roadmap for teaching strategic planning to current and future nursing leaders will guide the integration of essential content into DNP programs. PMID:26625577

  1. Spanning the Gap between Theory and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Richard E.

    1982-01-01

    Suggests that new developments in prescriptive theory offer an opportunity for instructional designers to combine research and practice in developing instruction. Ways in which instructional theories can facilitate practical applications are suggested. (MER)

  2. [Healthcare practices in Nursing and Communication: a review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Spagnuolo, Regina Stella; Pereira, Maria Lúcia Toralles

    2007-01-01

    Changes in nurse healthcare practices, especially for projects such as Brazil's Family Health Program, prompted us to study the related communication processes. A review of the literature from January 1994 through to December 2004 examined 26 papers in Brazilian and international periodicals, four dissertations, three theses and four books in the BIREME data-bases (LILACS and SCIELO-Br). Using 'Communication', 'Family Health Program' and 'Nursing' as key words, 373 mentions were found for 'Communication' and 'Nursing', twelve mentions for 'Family Health Program' and 'Communication' (LILACS); eighteen mentions for 'Communication' and 'Nursing'; and no mentions for 'Family Health Program' and 'Communication' (SCIELO-Br). In order to analyze these findings, the publications located through this search were grouped under four trends in the links between Communication and Nursing practices: Communication within the Family Health Program teams; Communication in professional Nursing practice; Communication as a leadership tool for Nurses; and Communication in Nursing education. This study showed that although the most usual communication model for healthcare practices is still unilinear, there is already a clear trend towards more dialogue, which poses a challenge for nursing practices in the Family Health Program. PMID:18813496

  3. Prolog: A Practical Language for Decision Support Systems in Nursing?

    PubMed Central

    Ozbolt, Judy G.

    1987-01-01

    Developing decision support systems for nursing has been limited by difficulties in defining and representing nursing's knowledge base and by a lack of knowledge of how nurses make decisions. Recent theoretical and empirical work offers solutions to those problems. The challenge now is to represent nursing knowledge in a way that is comprehensible to both nurse and computer and to design decision support modalities that are accurate, efficient, and appropriate for nurses with different levels of expertise. This paper reviews the issues and critically evaluates Prolog as a tool for meeting the challenge.

  4. An evidence-based curriculum to prepare students for global nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Veenema, T G

    2001-01-01

    This article describes a curriculum designed to prepare nurses for global public health practice. Designed to be adapted to meet the needs of either undergraduate or graduate students, the curriculum uses the Internet to provide the knowledge and skills needed by nurses to effectively practice in areas around the globe. This course offering integrates the disciplines of nursing and public health with state-of-the-art technology to teach nurses how to identify the health care needs of populations, prioritize national and international responses, and design health care delivery services to meet these needs. PMID:16370253

  5. Practice Theory: Viewing Leadership as Leading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Jane; Kemmis, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by Theodore Schatzki's "societist" approach--in which he advocates a notion of "site ontologies"--in this article, we outline our theory of practice architectures (a theory about what practices are composed of) and ecologies of practices (how practices relate to one another). Drawing on case studies of four Australian…

  6. Infusing Theory into Practice, Practice into Theory: Small Wins and Big Gains for Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rog, Debra J.

    2015-01-01

    This article illustrates the synergistic role between practice and theory in evaluation. Using reflective practice, the author reviews her own work as well as the work of other evaluators to illustrate how theory can influence practice and, in turn, how evaluation practice can inform and grow theory, especially evaluation theory. The following…

  7. Social media and nursing practice: changing the balance between the social and technical aspects of work.

    PubMed

    Casella, Evan; Mills, Jane; Usher, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Modern communication methods are drastically changing the way people interact with each other. Professions such as nursing need to evolve to remain relevant as social infrastructure changes. In the 1960s, researchers developed a sociotechnical theory that stated workers were more motivated and productive if there was a good balance between the social and technical aspects of their work. Today's technology is blurring the boundaries between the social and the technical thereby transforming human contact and communication into a multi-method process. In Australia, people are adept at utilising social media technology to become more efficient, creative and connected; Australian nurses also need to embrace changing technology to capitalise on the professional opportunities offered by social media. This paper imagines a world where nurses integrate social media into assessing, diagnosing, planning, implementing and evaluating care. Discussion draws on a combination of real-world examples of best-practice and blue-sky thinking to demonstrate that evidence-based care must be combined with the adoption of future-forward technology. PMID:25109210

  8. Evidence-Guided Integration of Interprofessional Collaborative Practice into Nurse Managed Health Centers.

    PubMed

    Pilon, Bonita A; Ketel, Christian; Davidson, Heather A; Gentry, Chad K; Crutcher, Terri D; Scott, Aaron W; Moore, R Maldonado; Rosenbloom, S Trent

    2015-01-01

    The Division of Nursing, Bureau of Health Workforce, has spearheaded a 3-year effort to increase the skills of nurses to lead interprofessional collaborative practice (IPCP) teams. Since 2012, the Nurse Education, Practice, Quality and Retention program has funded 53 sites engaged in this work. The purposes of this report are to describe the IPCP framework undergirding implementation at one such site, describe the evaluation components and approach, describe how health professions students are integrated into this model, and discuss implications of IPCP for future nurse-managed/nurse-led initiatives within an evolving health care environment. Core team members include a family nurse practitioner, physician, pharmacist, social worker, and community health advocate. The clinic is located within a public housing complex; the target population is largely uninsured or underinsured with a historically high rate of emergency department utilization. PMID:26194966

  9. The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Colleges of Nursing, Washington, DC.

    This report presents recommendations of an American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) task force which revised existing guidelines for nursing education. An introduction provides background information and notes major trends in health care and nursing. Also provided is a summary of the revision process which included two invitational…

  10. Building an intercultural nursing terminology bank for the phenomenon, Violence, of the International Classification of Nursing Practice: a methodological perspective.

    PubMed

    Coler, M S

    2001-06-01

    The aim of this article was to present the methodology and results of an investigation into the intercultural evolution of the nursing phenomenon--Violence--from the identification phase to the summative evaluation phase, in order to contribute to the evolution of the International Classification of Nursing Practice (ICNP). The organizing construct was concept analysis of a nursing phenomenon. The identification of a universal problem in psychiatric-mental health nursing by a team of 10 international leaders in the speciality led from the phase of concept analysis to development of a postgraduate educational module. The results of the original analysis of the concept and findings from clinical and evaluation data resulted in further analysis and consequent synthesis of the concept. Results will be disseminated to the International Council of Nursing (ICN) for the International Classification of Nursing Practice (ICNP) to further the evolution of the phenomenon from a focus on the individual to that of the aggregate (social violence). The methodology pointed to a lack of transfer in the phenomenon from a focus on the individual to that of aggregates in the ICNP. There was also a paucity of intercultural components. The phenomena of Abuse and Aggression appear to have been used synonymously with Violence, without an explanation. The data, and the methods used for its collection and submission, will enhance the ICNP. PMID:11407468

  11. Nursing Fatigue: An Evidence-Based Practice Review for Oncology Nurses?.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Jordan

    2015-12-01

    Nursing fatigue is a current and well-researched topic. Many negative outcomes and consequences exist for patients and nurses that have been linked to nursing fatigue. Medical errors are one such consequence, and these errors have become one of the top three preventable deaths in the United States. Oncology nurses are not immune to fatigue, and the consequences of their fatigue can be much more harmful to patients. PMID:26583629

  12. An effort to upgrade perinatal nursing practice in Albania.

    PubMed

    Freda, M C; DeVore, N; Gibeau, A; Griggs, S; Valley-Haye, S; Russell, B

    1998-01-01

    In 1994 the Jacobi Medical Center in Bronx, New York, and the University Hospital in Tirana, Albania, entered into a partnership designed to upgrade certain aspects of the health care system in Albania. During a 2-week trip, an American contingent of nurses and nurse-midwives worked to increase the knowledge base of Albanian nurses about some of the most important issues in perinatal care and of the roles of nurses and nurse-midwives in the United States as patient advocates and educators. PMID:9549708

  13. Achieving Excellence Through Contemporary and Relevant Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing Standards of Practice.

    PubMed

    McInnis-Perry, Gloria; Greene, Ann; Mina, Elaine Santa

    2015-09-01

    Standards of practice (SOPs) comprise competency statements, which are grounded in current knowledge and research, and provide foundations for performance that support professional accountability. The nursing profession, and specifically the psychiatric-mental health specialty of nursing practice in Canada, develops and revises practice standards regularly. The current article describes the collaborative, evidence-informed journey of the Canadian Federation of Mental Health Nurses during its fourth revision of the Canadian Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing SOPs. An intraprofessional team of psychiatric-mental health nurses from the clinical, academic, research, and policy areas developed and nurtured collaborative processes that emphasize collegial and authentic relationships. Effective communication and a respectful learning environment supported the process for all members of the team. The current article provides recommendations for other professional organizations considering developing and/or revising SOPs. PMID:26325171

  14. Influence of perceptions on school nurse practices to prevent childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    Quelly, Susan B

    2014-08-01

    Comprehensive childhood obesity prevention (COP) strategies should include increasing school nurse involvement. This study was conducted to determine the influence of key school nurse perceptions (self-efficacy, perceived benefits, and perceived barriers) on participation in COP practices at the individual child and school level. Florida registered nurse (RN) school nurses (n = 171) anonymously completed online or paper questionnaires. Linear regression analyses identified a model of self-efficacy with perceived benefits and barriers that explained 12% and 9.1% (p < .001) of variance in child-level and school-level COP practices, respectively. Self-efficacy explained the most variance in both models (p < .001). Mediation testing identified perceived barriers as a partial mediator of the influence of self-efficacy on child-level practices. These findings support interventions and policy changes to increase self-efficacy and reduce perceived barriers to promote school nurse involvement in preventing childhood obesity. PMID:24128859

  15. Developing leadership practices in hospital-based nurse educators in an online learning community.

    PubMed

    Stutsky, Brenda J; Spence Laschinger, Heather K

    2014-01-01

    Hospital-based nurse educators are in a prime position to mentor future nurse leaders; however, they need to first develop their own leadership practices. The goal was to establish a learning community where hospital-based nurse educators could develop their own nursing leadership practices within an online environment that included teaching, cognitive, and social presence. Using a pretest/posttest-only nonexperimental design, 35 nurse educators from three Canadian provinces engaged in a 12-week online learning community via a wiki where they learned about exemplary leadership practices and then shared stories about their own leadership practices. Nurse educators significantly increased their own perceived leadership practices after participation in the online community, and teaching, cognitive, and social presence was determined to be present in the online community. It was concluded that leadership development can be enhanced in an online learning community using a structured curriculum, multimedia presentations, and the sharing and analysis of leadership stories. Educators who participated should now be better equipped to role model exemplary leadership practices and mentor our nurse leaders of the future. PMID:24256766

  16. Examining Harasim's Online Collaborative Learning Theory for Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breen, Henny

    2013-01-01

    Online nursing education has been evolving at a rapid pace as it is recognized as offering the flexibility needed for practicing associate degree (ADN) and diploma prepared Registered Nurses to return to school to earn their BSN. At the same time, there is a paradigm shift in how nursing education is delivered. The focus has shifted from content…

  17. A Workshop on the Environments of Nursing: Theoretical Framework, Part 1. Pathways to Practice: Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haase, Patricia T.; And Others

    Third in a series entitled "Pathways to Practice" published by the Regional Action to Improve Curriculums in Nursing Education, the volume deals with trends in feminism, higher education, and health care and their relevance to the special needs of nursing education. Each of the working papers on these topics demonstrates the rapid transformation…

  18. Influence of Perceptions on School Nurse Practices to Prevent Childhood Obesity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quelly, Susan B.

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive childhood obesity prevention (COP) strategies should include increasing school nurse involvement. This study was conducted to determine the influence of key school nurse perceptions (self-efficacy, perceived benefits, and perceived barriers) on participation in COP practices at the individual child and school level. Florida…

  19. Survey of Current Academic Practices for Full-Time Postlicensure Nursing Faculty Who Teach Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanford, Karen J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine current academic practices of compensation, workload, rewards, and tenure and promotion for nursing faculty who teach graduate and postlicensure programs that are delivered 50% to 100% online. Deans and directors who are members of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) were the…

  20. An Investigation of School Playground Safety Practices as Reported by School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Susan D.; Olsen, Heather M.; Thompson, Donna

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate school playground safety practices. The study used a purposeful sample of school nurses who attended a playground safety workshop at the 2006 National Association of School Nurses annual conference. Seventy-five questionnaires were distributed, and 64 useable questionnaires were returned. The responses…

  1. Putting Discourse to Work: Information Practices and the Professional Project of Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johannisson, Jenny; Sundin, Olof

    2007-01-01

    This article contributes to discourse-oriented, information-seeking research by showing how discourses, from a neopragmatist perspective, can be explored as tools that people employ when they actively engage in information practices in varied social contexts. A study of nurses and the nursing profession in Sweden is used as an empirical example of…

  2. Knowledge, attitudes and practice toward cervical cancer screening among Sikkimese nursing staff in India

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Hafizur; Kar, Sumit

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess baseline knowledge of cancer cervix, screening and practice of Pap smear screening among Sikkimese staff nurses in India. Materials and Methods: Between April 2012 and February 2013, a predesigned, pretested, self -administered multiple responses questionnaire survey was conducted among staff nurses’ working in various hospitals of Sikkim. Questionnaire contained information about their demographics, knowledge of cervical cancer, its risk factors, screening methods, attitudes toward cervical cancer screening and practice of Pap smear amongst themselves. Results: Overall, 90.4% nurses responded that they were aware of cancer cervix. Three quarter of the staff nurses were not aware of commonest site being cancer cervix in women. Of the 320 participants, who had heard of cancer cervix, 253 (79.1%) were aware of cancer cervix screening. Pap smear screening should start at 21 years or 3 years after sexual debut was known to only one-third of the nursing staff. Age was found to be a significant predictor of awareness of Pap smear screening among nursing staff. Awareness was significantly more prevalent among older staff (P < 0.007). Married nursing staffs were significantly more likely to be aware of screening methods, and nursing staff of Christian and Buddhist religion were 1.25 times and 2.03 times more likely to aware of screening methods than Hindu religion respectively. Only 16.6% nurses, who were aware of a Pap smear (11.9% of the total sample), had ever undergone a Pap smear test. Most common reason offered for not undergoing Pap smear test were, they felt they were not at risk (41%), uncomfortable pelvic examination (25%) and fear of a bad result (16.6%). Conclusion: Knowledge of cancer cervix, screening and practice of Pap smear was low among Sikkimese nursing staff in India. There is an urgent need for re-orientation course for working nurses and integration of cervical cancer prevention issues in the nurses’ existing curriculum in India and other developing countries. PMID:26157287

  3. Moral Exemplars in Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zagzebski, Linda

    2013-01-01

    In this article I outline an original form of ethical theory that I call exemplarist virtue theory. The theory is intended to serve the philosophical purposes of a comprehensive moral theory, but it is also intended to serve the practical purpose of moral education by structuring the theory around a motivating emotion--the emotion of admiration.…

  4. Anti-Oppressive Practice and Reflexive Lifeworld-Led Approaches to Care: A Framework for Teaching Nurses about Social Justice

    PubMed Central

    Hutchison, Jacqueline Sarah

    2015-01-01

    This paper was initially written for a European Academy of Caring Science workshop and aimed to provide clarity and direction about Caring Science by offering some ideas emerging from the philosophy, themes, and projects of EACS. An underpinning concept for the work of the Academy is the lifeworld. The focus of the workshop was to explore the lifeworld of the patient, student, and carer. The intention was to promote discussion around the need to provide alternative ways to conceptualise caring relevant knowledge, naming phenomena and practices central to caring sciences, and the educational curriculum and its adequacy for caring science. This paper seeks to identify concepts and approaches to understanding oppression, power, and justice which enable nurses to challenge the structures in health care environments which discriminate or disempower clients. Anti-oppressive practice theory and reflexive lifeworld-led approaches to care enable nurses to be critical of their practice. A framework for teaching social justice in health care is offered to augment teaching students to challenge oppressive practice and to assist nurses to reflect and develop conceptual models to guide practices which are central to promoting caring interactions. PMID:25838944

  5. Uncovering blind spots in education and practice leadership: towards a collaborative response to the nurse shortage.

    PubMed

    Regan, Sandra; Thorne, Sally; Mildon, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    As the nursing shortage becomes an increasingly prominent everyday pressure for practice leaders, the search for quick solutions has intensified. A widespread perception has emerged within the service sector that nursing education is failing to fulfill its responsibility to prepare the next generation of nurses. This perception is escalating tensions between leaders in the education and practice sectors, and creating new barriers towards finding collaborative solutions. Although the "job ready/practice ready" debate between practice and education has been a long-standing undercurrent within nursing, extreme shortages affecting practice sector performance across the country create conditions that fuel heightened distrust and division. In this context, it becomes increasingly important that nursing leaders in education and practice engage in thoughtful and respectful dialogue to ensure that tensions between the two sectors are managed and counterproductive schisms prevented. In this paper, we deconstruct some of the current thinking regarding responsibility for the current problem by describing differences in the distinct cultures and contexts of the practice and education sectors, noting potential "blind spots" that interfere with our mutual understanding and encouraging a better-informed, shared responsibility to promote constructive engagement in preparing tomorrow's nursing workforce. PMID:19521159

  6. Deliberate practice of motor skills in nursing education: CPR as exemplar.

    PubMed

    Oermann, Marilyn H; Kardong-Edgren, Suzan; Odom-Maryon, Tamara; Hallmark, Beth F; Hurd, Debbie; Rogers, Nancy; Haus, Carol; McColgan, Jacqueline Keegan; Snelson, Catherine; Dowdy, Sharon Wilson; Resurreccion, Leandro A; Kuerschner, Dawn R; LaMar, Jerrilee; Tennant, Monica Nelson; Smart, Denise A

    2011-01-01

    Our study explored the effects of deliberate practice on the retention ofcardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) psychomotor skills among nursing students. The practice sessions were short, six minutes a session one time a month. Differences in performance between students who had deliberate practice and a control group, with no practice beyond the initial training, were compared every three months for one year. The intervention group performed better than the control over the 12 months. There is a need in nursing education for deliberate practice of relevant and high-use skills for students to improve their performance and gradually develop their expertise. PMID:22029243

  7. Web-Based Virtual Patients in Nursing Education: Development and Validation of Theory-Anchored Design and Activity Models

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Research has shown that nursing students find it difficult to translate and apply their theoretical knowledge in a clinical context. Virtual patients (VPs) have been proposed as a learning activity that can support nursing students in their learning of scientific knowledge and help them integrate theory and practice. Although VPs are increasingly used in health care education, they still lack a systematic consistency that would allow their reuse outside of their original context. There is therefore a need to develop a model for the development and implementation of VPs in nursing education. Objective The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a virtual patient model optimized to the learning and assessment needs in nursing education. Methods The process of modeling started by reviewing theoretical frameworks reported in the literature and used by practitioners when designing learning and assessment activities. The Outcome-Present State Test (OPT) model was chosen as the theoretical framework. The model was then, in an iterative manner, developed and optimized to the affordances of virtual patients. Content validation was performed with faculty both in terms of the relevance of the chosen theories but also its applicability in nursing education. The virtual patient nursing model was then instantiated in two VPs. The students’ perceived usefulness of the VPs was investigated using a questionnaire. The result was analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results A virtual patient Nursing Design Model (vpNDM) composed of three layers was developed. Layer 1 contains the patient story and ways of interacting with the data, Layer 2 includes aspects of the iterative process of clinical reasoning, and finally Layer 3 includes measurable outcomes. A virtual patient Nursing Activity Model (vpNAM) was also developed as a guide when creating VP-centric learning activities. The students perceived the global linear VPs as a relevant learning activity for the integration of theory and practice. Conclusions Virtual patients that are adapted to the nursing paradigm can support nursing students’ development of clinical reasoning skills. The proposed virtual patient nursing design and activity models will allow the systematic development of different types of virtual patients from a common model and thereby create opportunities for sharing pedagogical designs across technical solutions. PMID:24727709

  8. 78 FR 39738 - National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice for Request for Nominations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice for Request for Nominations SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services...

  9. Applying the Adams influence model in nurse executive practice.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jeffrey M; Erickson, Jeanette Ives

    2011-04-01

    The ability to influence others is a required competency for nurse executives trying to achieve positive patient/organizational outcomes. The Adams Influence Model (AIM) is a framework for understanding the factors, attributes, and process of influence. The AIM is grounded in nursing and organizational literature and provides nurse leaders with a road map for developing an effective strategy to achieve influence with individuals and/or groups. The authors describe the AIM and present a case study illustrating its application by a chief nurse executive. PMID:21430468

  10. Infusing evidence-based instructional strategies to prepare today's military practical nurses for tomorrow's practice.

    PubMed

    Neilson, Richard A; Hopkins-Chadwick, Denise L

    2014-01-01

    Is there one best method to provide instruction to today's nursing students? The evidence found in the current literature clearly states the answer is no. The student of today is technology oriented. But for them, it's not about technology, it's about the learning that technology provides. With this understanding, this article provides a review of the efforts by the staff of the US Army Practical Nurse Course (68WM6) to infuse evidence-based instructional strategies into curriculum. Five strategies that were integrated into the curriculum are presented: computer assisted learning, gaming software, classroom response system, human patient simulators, and video recordings. All of the initiatives discussed in this article were implemented into the program of instruction over a 6-year period in an attempt to incorporate the use of appropriate technology in the learning process. The results are a testimony to the necessity of using a combination of strategies for teaching today's nursing students. In doing so, the organization not only improved the learning process, but found significant financial savings. PMID:24488873

  11. Nurses’ self-efficacy and practices relating to weight management of adult patients: a path analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Health professionals play a key role in the prevention and treatment of excess weight and obesity, but many have expressed a lack of confidence in their ability to manage obese patients with their delivery of weight-management care remaining limited. The specific mechanism underlying inadequate practices in professional weight management remains unclear. The primary purpose of this study was to examine a self-efficacy theory-based model in understanding Registered Nurses’ (RNs) professional performance relating to weight management. Methods A self-report questionnaire was developed based upon the hypothesized model and administered to a convenience sample of 588 RNs. Data were collected regarding socio-demographic variables, psychosocial variables (attitudes towards obese people, professional role identity, teamwork beliefs, perceived skills, perceived barriers and self-efficacy) and professional weight management practices. Structural equation modeling was conducted to identify correlations between the above variables and to test the goodness of fit of the proposed model. Results The survey response rate was 71.4% (n?=?420). The respondents reported a moderate level of weight management practices. Self-efficacy directly and positively predicted the weight management practices of the RNs (??=?0.36, p?practices. The final model constructed in this study demonstrated a good fit to the data [?2 (14) =13.90, p?=?0.46; GFI?=?0.99; AGFI?=?0.98; NNFI?=?1.00; CFI?=?1.00; RMSEA?=?0.00; AIC?=?57.90], accounting for 38.4% and 43.2% of the variance in weight management practices and self-efficacy, respectively. Conclusions Self-efficacy theory appears to be useful in understanding the weight management practices of RNs. Interventions targeting the enhancement of self-efficacy may be effective in promoting RNs’ professional performance in managing overweight and obese patients. PMID:24304903

  12. Understanding Jordanian Psychiatric Nurses' Smoking Behaviors: A Grounded Theory Study

    PubMed Central

    Aldiabat, Khaldoun M.; Clinton, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Smoking is prevalent in psychiatric facilities among staff and patients. However, there have been few studies of how contextual factors in specific cultures influence rates of smoking and the health promotion role of psychiatric nurses. This paper reports the findings of a classical grounded theory study conducted to understand how contextual factors in the workplace influences the smoking behaviors of Jordanian psychiatric nurses (JPNs). Method. Semi-structured individual interviews were conducted with a sample of eight male JPNs smokers at a psychiatric facility in Amman, Jordan. Findings. Constant comparative analysis identified becoming a heavy smoker as a psychosocial process characterized by four sub-categories: normalization of smoking; living in ambiguity; experiencing workplace conflict; and, facing up to workplace stressors. Conclusion. Specific contextual workplace factors require targeted smoking cessation interventions if JPNs are to receive the help they need to reduce health risks associated with heavy smoking. PMID:23844286

  13. The nature of nursing practice in rural and remote areas of Greenland

    PubMed Central

    Hounsgaard, Lise; Jensen, Anne Birgitte; Wilche, Julie Præst; Dolmer, Ilone

    2013-01-01

    Background The Greenlandic Healthcare Reform (2010) required improved quality of services for health promotion, prevention of infectious and lifestyle diseases, family nursing and evidence-based clinical nursing. Aim To investigate current nursing practice in Greenland and to identify whether it meets the requirements of healthcare reform. Design This ethnographic study utilised documentary analysis, participant observation and qualitative interviewing carried out in remote areas of Greenland during 2011–2012. Eight registered nurses, four women and four men, aged between 35 and 55, participated in this study. Four were working at healthcare centres in towns and four were working at nursing stations in villages. The nurses were educated in Greenland or a Nordic country and had been practicing nursing for at least 2 years in an Arctic region. They were observed for 1–5 days, and subsequently interviewed. Interviews included in-depth questioning, based on emerging outcomes from observation. Interviews were recorded and transcribed; they were analysed within a phenomenological–hermeneutic approach. Results Nurses in rural and remote areas navigate their health promotion and preventive work with conflict between health strategies and everyday realities, where unpredictable tasks often lead to prioritisation of urgent, acute work. There is interaction between personal and professional skills. Everyday life is characterised by opportunities and challenges in the grey areas, namely nursing, medical and social work. Conclusion The nature of nursing practice in rural and remote Greenland is characterised by a high degree of variability and complexity, with a requirement for a wide range of knowledge and skills. Nurses need to be better prepared with regard to acute medical care, preventive care, social work, humanistic approaches and information technology to implement the ideology of health strategies. PMID:23984291

  14. Informal Theory: The Ignored Link in Theory-to-Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Applying theory to practice in student affairs is dominated by the assumption that formal theory is directly applied to practice. Among the problems with this assumption is that many practitioners believe they must choose between their lived experiences and formal theory, and that graduate students are taught that their experience "does not…

  15. The Practical Value of Translation Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Komissarov, Vilen

    1985-01-01

    Discusses why translation theory has had an inadequate impact on translation practice and gives specific examples of ways in which translation theory can provide the translator with general principles and methods of translating idioms. (SED)

  16. Economic aspects of community-based academic-practice transition programs for unemployed new nursing graduates.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Jonalyn; Berman, Audrey; Karshmer, Judith; Prion, Susan; Van, Paulina; West, Nikki

    2014-01-01

    Four partnerships between schools of nursing and practice sites provided grant-funded 12- to 16-week transition programs to increase confidence, competence, and employability among new RN graduates who had not yet found employment in nursing. Per capita program costs were $2,721. Eighty-four percent of participants completing a postprogram employment survey became employed within 3 months; 55% of participants became employed at their program practice site. Staff development educators may find this model a useful adjunct to in-house nurse residency programs for new RN graduates. PMID:25237915

  17. Educational role of nurse practitioners in a family practice centre

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Allyn; Moore, Ainsley; Barber, Anne; Opsteen, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine the role of nurse practitioners (NPs) as educators of family medicine residents in order to better understand the interprofessional educational dynamics in a clinical teaching setting. Design A qualitative descriptive approach, using purposive sampling. Setting A family practice centre that is associated with an academic department of family medicine and is based in an urban area in southern Ontario. Participants First-year (8 of 9) and second-year (9 of 10) family medicine residents whose training program was based at the family practice centre, and all NPs (4 of 4) who worked at the centre. Methods Semistructured interviews were conducted, which were audiotaped and transcribed. An iterative approach was used for coding and analysis. Data management software guided organization and analysis of the data. Main findings Four interconnected themes were identified: role clarification, professional identity formation, factors that enhance the educational role of NPs, and factors that limit the educational role of NPs. Although residents recognized NPs’ value in team functioning and areas of specialized knowledge, they were unclear about NPs’ scope of practice. Depending on residents’ level of training, residents tended to respond differently to teaching by NPs. More of the senior residents believed they needed to think like physicians and preferred clinical teaching from physician teachers. Junior residents valued the step-by-step instructional approach used by NPs, and they had a decreased sense of vulnerability when being taught by NPs. Training in teaching skills was helpful for NPs. Barriers to providing optimal education included opportunity, time, and physician attitudes. Conclusion The lack of an intentional orientation of family medicine residents to NPs’ scope of practice and educational role can lead to difficulties in interprofessional education. More explicit recognition of the evolving professional identity of family medicine residents might decrease resistance to teaching by NPs and ensure that interprofessional teaching and learning strategies are effective. Faculty development opportunities for all educators are required to manage these issues, both to ensure teaching competencies and to reinforce positive interprofessional collaboration. PMID:24925966

  18. Informal Education: A Hidden Element of Clinical Nurse Consultant Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jannings, Wendy; Armitage, Sue

    2001-01-01

    A survey of 16 Australian clinical nurse consultants showed they spent substantial time in informal teaching, but only 3% of it is recorded as limited educational activity for accountability purposes. However, a survey of 58 nurses taught by the consultants demonstrates the gains derived from informal education. (SK)

  19. Understanding snacking through a practice theory lens.

    PubMed

    Twine, Richard

    2015-11-01

    This article approaches snacking from a practice theory perspective in order to understand how this reframing may afford new insights. In doing so it also contributes to sociological thinking on eating practices and their reproduction as well as reflecting upon the ontological assertions of practice theory and its theory of social change. In particular this article argues that the re-conceptualisation serves to clarify a sociological research agenda for eating practices associated with snacking. It is argued that setting snacking within routine temporalities and spatialities and as bound up in the recursivity between practices and relations is especially important for thinking about snacking sociologically. In common with applications of practice theory in the field of sustainability transitions the aim is to move beyond individualistic assumptions of behaviour change and instead situate snacking as an eating practice with health implications that has emerged within the social, temporal, economic and cultural organisation of everyday life. PMID:26283570

  20. Practice nursing in Australia: A review of education and career pathways

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Rhian M; Keleher, Helen M; Francis, Karen; Abdulwadud, Omar

    2009-01-01

    Background Nurses in Australia are often not educated in their pre registration years to meet the needs of primary care. Careers in primary care may not be as attractive to nursing graduates as high-tech settings such as intensive or acute care. Yet, it is in primary care that increasingly complex health problems are managed. The Australian government has invested in incentives for general practices to employ practice nurses. However, no policy framework has been developed for practice nursing to support career development and post-registration education and training programs are developed in an ad hoc manner and are not underpinned by core professional competencies. This paper reports on a systematic review undertaken to establish the available evidence on education models and career pathways with a view to enhancing recruitment and retention of practice nurses in primary care in Australia. Methods Search terms describing education models, career pathways and policy associated with primary care (practice) nursing were established. These search terms were used to search electronic databases. The search strategy identified 1394 citations of which 408 addressed one or more of the key search terms on policy, education and career pathways. Grey literature from the UK and New Zealand internet sites were sourced and examined. The UK and New Zealand Internet sites were selected because they have well established and advanced developments in education and career pathways for practice nurses. Two reviewers examined titles, abstracts and studies, based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. Disagreement between the reviewers was resolved by consensus or by a third reviewer. Results Significant advances have been made in New Zealand and the UK towards strengthening frameworks for primary care nursing education and career pathways. However, in Australia there is no policy at national level prepare nurses to work in primary care sector and no framework for education or career pathways for nurses working in that sector. Conclusion There is a need for national training standards and a process of accreditation for practice nursing in Australia to support the development of a responsive and sustainable nursing workforce in primary care and to provide quality education and career pathways. PMID:19473493

  1. The Influence of a Wound Care Teleassistance Service on Nursing Practice: A Case Study in Quebec

    PubMed Central

    Breton, Erik; Courcy, François; Quirion, Sonia; Côté, José; Paré, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Although telehealth is a promising solution for healthcare professionals who work in remote and rural regions, the influence of specific telehealth applications on the nursing workforce remains unknown. This case study aimed to explore the potential influence of a teleassistance service in wound care (the acronym in French is TASP) on nursing practices and on nurse retention in peripheral areas. Materials and Methods: We carried out an exploratory single case study based on 16 semistructured interviews with two promoters of TASP, five nursing managers, and nine nurses from three levels of expertise associated with this service. Results: According to participants, the main positive influences of TASP were observed in quality of care, professional autonomy, professional development, and decrease of professional isolation. Participants mentioned increased workload associated with global patient data collection at first consultation as a negative effect of TASP. Finally, three possible effects of TASP on nurse retention were identified: none or minimal, imprecise, or mostly positive. Conclusions: This case study highlights the positive influence of TASP on several dimensions of nursing practice, in addition to its essential role in improving the quality of care. However, it is important to consider that the service cannot be considered as a solution to or replacement for the shortage of nurses. PMID:24694008

  2. Holding children and young people: identifying a theory-practice gap.

    PubMed

    Page, Andrea; McDonnell, Andrew A

    Holding practices are employed to help a child or young person stay still during the administration of treatments, prevent treatment interference or to undertake an examination, which can sometimes be invasive. The aim of this study was to explore assumptions and practices of holding to develop theories about teaching practices following Grounded Theory methodology for undergraduate nursing students, university lecturers and clinical mentors. The practice of therapeutic holding is often covert and not considered to be part of the treatment per se, which has led to concealment and a reticence to discuss practices openly. This study identified that there is variance in the experiences and practices. Prominent themes that emerged were a lack of clarity and lack of training. It appears that therapeutic holding practices have moved from being viewed as 'uncontested' (practice is not disputed) to 'indifferent' (where there is denial about this practice). These findings have serious implications for current practice and future training. PMID:25904450

  3. Nursing consultations and control of diabetes in general practice: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Murrells, Trevor; Ball, Jane; Maben, Jill; Ashworth, Mark; Griffiths, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes affects around 3.6 million people in the UK. Previous research found that general practices employing more nurses delivered better diabetes care, but did not include data on individual patient characteristics or consultations received. Aim To examine whether the proportion of consultations with patients with diabetes provided by nurses in GP practices is associated with control of diabetes measured by levels of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c). Design and setting A retrospective observational study using consultation records from 319 649 patients with diabetes from 471 UK general practices from 2002 to 2011. Method Hierarchical multilevel models to examine associations between proportion of consultations undertaken by nurses and attaining HbA1c targets over time, controlling for case-mix and practice level factors. Results The proportion of consultations with nurses has increased by 20% since 2002 but patients with diabetes made fewer consultations per year in 2011 compared with 2002 (11.6 versus 16.0). Glycaemic control has improved and was more uniformly achieved in 2011 than 2002. Practices in which nurses provide a higher proportion of consultations perform no differently to those where nurse input is lower (lowest versus highest nurse contact tertile odds ratio [OR] [confidence interval {95% CI}]: HbA1c ?53 mmol/mol (7%) 2002, 1.04 [95% CI = 0.87 to 1.25] and 2011, 0.95 [95% CI = 0.87 to 1.03]; HbA1c ?86 mmol/mol (10%) 2002, 0.97 [95% CI = 0.73 to 1.29] and 2011, 0.95 [95% CI = 0.86 to 1.04]). Conclusion Practices that primarily use GPs to deliver diabetes care could release significant resources with no adverse effect by switching their services towards nurse-led care. PMID:26412840

  4. Global Use of the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index

    PubMed Central

    Warshawsky, Nora E.; Havens, Donna Sullivan

    2011-01-01

    Background Although the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index has been endorsed as a gauge of the quality of the nursing practice environment by several organizations in the United States promoting healthcare quality, there is no literature describing its use in different practice settings and countries. Objective To inform research by describing the modifications and use of the scale in a variety of practice settings and countries. Method The Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature and PubMed databases were searched for the years 2002-2010 to identify 37 research reports published since 2002 describing use, modification, and scoring variations in different practice settings and countries. Results The scale was modified for 10 practice settings in five countries and translated into three languages. Composite scores ranged from 2.48 to 3.17 (on a 1-4 scale). The Staffing and Resource Adequacy subscale most often scored lowest. A new nursing information technology subscale has been developed. New scoring methods to identify the favorability of practice environments are described. Over time, the nature of the research conducted using the measure has changed. Overall, most publications report significant associations between scale scores and multiple nurse, patient, and organizational outcomes. Discussion Scale use is growing across different clinical settings and countries. Recommendations for future research use include reducing scale length, employing consistent scoring methods, considering the impact of various modifications based on cultural and clinical setting nuances, and using the measure in longitudinal and intervention research designs. PMID:21127450

  5. Qualitative Environmental Navigation: Theory and Practice

    E-print Network

    Qualitative Environmental Navigation: Theory and Practice Il­Pyung Park CUCS­003­94 Submitted; ABSTRACT Qualitative Environmental Navigation: Theory and Practice Il­Pyung Park In this thesis we propose and investigate a new model for robot navigation in large unstructured environments. Current models which depend

  6. Theory Loves Practice: A Teacher Researcher Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hochtritt, Lisa; Thulson, Anne; Delaney, Rachael; Dornbush, Talya; Shay, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Once a month, art educators from the Denver metro area have been gathering together in the spirit of inquiry to explore issues of the perceived theory and daily practice divide. The Theory Loves Practice (TLP) group was started in 2010 by Professors Rachael Delaney and Anne Thulson from Metropolitan State University of Denver (MSU) and now has 40…

  7. Intervention Theory and Practice in School Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Ronald; Hall, Douglas T.

    The authors, representing the viewpoints of the academic and the practicing consultant, consider the integration of intervention theory and practice in public schools. The first part of the presentation discusses the intervention theory as a guide to the activities of the organizational change agent. The distinctive characteristics of the public…

  8. Mixed Methods in Nursing Research : An Overview and Practical Examples

    PubMed Central

    Doorenbos, Ardith Z.

    2014-01-01

    Mixed methods research methodologies are increasingly applied in nursing research to strengthen the depth and breadth of understanding of nursing phenomena. This article describes the background and benefits of using mixed methods research methodologies, and provides two examples of nursing research that used mixed methods. Mixed methods research produces several benefits. The examples provided demonstrate specific benefits in the creation of a culturally congruent picture of chronic pain management for American Indians, and the determination of a way to assess cost for providing chronic pain care. PMID:25580032

  9. Critical Theory: Implications for School Leadership Theory and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peca, Kathy

    The school leader's behaviors are inspired by theories, and theories are intrinsic to practice. This paper provides an overview of an emerging perspective in educational administration, critical theory. The paper first highlights the philosophies of Immanuel Kant, Fichte, Hegel, Marx, and the Frankfurt School. It then discusses critical theory

  10. Attentively Embracing Story: a middle-range theory with practice and research implications.

    PubMed

    Smith, M J; Liehr, P

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the middle-range theory of attentively embracing story. Attentively embracing story is connecting with self-in-relation through intentional dialogue to create ease. The theory emerged in the context of the neomodernist and simultaneity paradigms as the authors shared situations in practice and research and linked these encounters to the story literature. Practice implications with a client who has hypertension and research implications with a pregnant adolescent are presented. The proposed middle-range theory is offered for critical examination by the nursing community as a guide for practice and research aimed at the promotion of human growth and change. PMID:10628236

  11. The practice of intensive care nurses using the closed suctioning system: An observational study

    PubMed Central

    Haghighat, Somayeh; Yazdannik, AhmadReza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Endotracheal suctioning (ETS) is an essential procedure performed for mechanically ventilated patients. ETS can be either performed by open or closed suctioning system (CSS). There may be some concern on how closed-system ETS is practiced by intensive care nurses. This study was designed to investigate closed-system ETS practices of critical care nurses and to compare their practice with standard recommendations. Materials and Methods: A prospective observational study was conducted during August and December 2012 to establish how critical care nurses (N = 40) perform different steps in a typical ETS practice and to compare it with the current best practice recommendations through a 23-item structured checklist. The results were categorized into three sections: Pre-suctioning, suctioning, and post-suctioning practices. Results: Pre-suctioning, suctioning, and post-suctioning practices mean scores were 7.5, 11.75, and 8.5, respectively, out of 16, 16, and 12, respectively. The total suctioning practice score was 27.75 out of 44. Most discrepancies were observed in the patients’ assessment and preparation, infection control practices, and use of an appropriate catheter. Spearman correlation coefficient indicated a significant statistical positive correlation between suctioning education period and suctioning practice score (P < 0.0001) and between working experience and suctioning practice score (P = 0.02). Conclusions: The findings revealed that critical care nurses do not fully adhere to the best practice recommendation in CSS. We recommend that standard guidelines on ETS practice be included in the current education of critical care nurses. PMID:26457102

  12. Montana State University 1 Doctor of Nursing Practice

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    nursing services. 5. Enact leadership and effective communication in inter- and intra- professional, Outcomes, & Quality Improvement 3 NRSG 612 - Ethics, Law, and Policy for Advocacy in Healthcare 3 NRSG 613 and effective communication in inter- and

  13. Hearing, listening, action: Enhancing nursing practice through aural awareness education.

    PubMed

    Collins, Anita; Vanderheide, Rebecca; McKenna, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Noise overload within the clinical environment has been found to interfere with the healing process for patients, as well as nurses' ability to assess patients effectively. Awareness and responsibility for noise production begins during initial nursing training and consequently a program to enhance aural awareness skills was designed for graduate entry nursing students in an Australian university. The program utilized an innovative combination of music education activities to develop the students' ability to distinguishing individual sounds (hearing), appreciate patients' experience of sounds (listening) and improve their auscultation skills and reduce the negative effects of noise on patients (action). Using a mixed methods approach, students reported heightened auscultation skills and greater recognition of both patients' and clinicians' aural overload. Results of this pilot suggest that music education activities can assist nursing students to develop their aural awareness and to action changes within the clinical environment to improve the patient's experience of noise. PMID:25267133

  14. Hearing, Listening, Action: Enhancing nursing practice through aural awareness education.

    PubMed

    Collins, Anita; Vanderheide, Rebecca; McKenna, Lisa

    2014-03-29

    Abstract Noise overload within the clinical environment has been found to interfere with the healing process for patients, as well as nurses ability to effectively assess patients. Awareness and responsibility for noise production begins during initial nursing training and consequently a program to enhance aural awareness skills was designed for graduate entry nursing students in an Australian university. The program utilised an innovative combination of music education activities to develop the students' ability to distinguishing individual sounds (hearing), appreciate patient's experience of sounds (listening) and improve their auscultation skills and reduce the negative effects of noise on patients (action). Using a mixed methods approach, students' reported heightened auscultation skills and greater recognition of both patients' and clinicians' aural overload. Results of this pilot suggest that music education activities can assist nursing students to develop their aural awareness and to action changes within the clinical environment to improve the patient's experience of noise. PMID:24678720

  15. [The admission interview in addictology, nursing practices and skills].

    PubMed

    Girault, Yannick

    2015-01-01

    The reception of a patient in addictology determines how the care will proceed. The setting up of nurse-patient admission interviews adapted to the request for addiction treatment helps professionals meet the patients' needs in terms of listening, guidance, consideration and care. How should the nurse approach this call for help, this "desire" or this necessity for addicted patients to get help? What skills does she need to use? PMID:26144517

  16. NICU nurses’ ambivalent attitudes in skin-to-skin care practice

    PubMed Central

    Kymre, Ingjerd G.

    2014-01-01

    This article illuminates the essence of Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) nurses’ attitudes in skin-to-skin care (SSC) practice for preterm infants and their parents. Health care providers are in a unique position to influence the dynamic between infants and parents, and SSC affects both partners in the dyad. The design is descriptively phenomenological in terms of reflective lifeworld approach. Eighteen Swedish, Danish, and Norwegian nurses from NICUs offering varied possibilities and extents of SSC participated. NICU nurses’ attitudes in SSC practice are ambivalent. The nurses consider the sensory, wellness, and mutuality experiences to be primary and vital and enact SSC as much as possible. But “as much as possible” is a broad and varied concept, and their attitudes are ambivalent in terms of not always facilitating what they consider to be the optimal caring conditions. The source of NICU nurses’ ambivalent attitudes in SSC practice is a complex interplay of beliefs, norms, and evidence, which have a multidisciplinary basis. The ambivalent attitudes are, to a great extent, the result of the need to balance these multidisciplinary concerns. This needs to be acknowledged in considering SSC practice, as well as acknowledging that clinical judgments concerning optimal SSC depend on parents and infants unlimited access to each other, which NICU nurses can influence. PMID:24559549

  17. Bridging research and practice through the Nursing Research Facilitator Program in British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Plamondon, Katrina; Ronquillo, Charlene; Axen, Linda; Black, Agnes; Cummings, Lynn; Chakraborty, Bubli

    2013-12-01

    As Canadian health systems transform to meet changing needs, grounding nursing practice in evidence remains an essential goal for providing safe, high-quality care. nursing research facilitators (NRFs) are strengthening the use of evidence in nursing practice across the province of British Columbia. NRFs are nurses with a research background, whose work is focused on supporting people within health systems to use and do research in their practice and decision-making. Since this role was established in 2009, NRFs have provided facilitative support to over 50 funded research projects, led numerous workshops and journal clubs, and conducted more than 600 research-related consultations. In this paper, we discuss the role and offer exemplars of creative ways in which NRFs are strengthening nurses' engagement in doing and using research by developing capacity for research and evidence-informed practice, building meaningful partnerships and cultivating a culture of curiosity among nurses and other healthcare providers. We reflect on factors contributing to the success of this role and some of the challenges of integration. The paper concludes with a comment on the strategic value of the role. PMID:24377847

  18. Japanese development and testing of the network establishment practices scale for community and public health nurses.

    PubMed

    Koshida, Mihoko; Morita, Takae

    2013-03-01

    The practices required by community and public health nurses to establish community networks mainly involve communicative competencies. Assessment through development and testing of such competencies is necessary for community and public health nurse educators and practitioners around the world to create and maintain a mutual support network. The purpose of this study was to develop and test a scale for community and public health nurse practices to establish and maintain community networks, and to then determine construct validity in a factorial structure model. The participants were 3970 community and public health nurses in Japan. A 43-item list was developed from a literature review, individual interviews, and repeated examinations. The secondary structural model consisted of four factors with 21 items. The internal consistency of the 21 items was highly reliable (Cronbach's ??=?0.915). Confirmatory factor analysis by structural equation modeling showed the fit criteria to be statistically significant. Attributes of the community and public health nurses (age, years of experience, work municipalities, work positions, and educational institutions) showed significant relationships with the scale scores. The findings validated the efficacy of the Network Establishment Practices Scale to assess community and public health nurse practices to establish community networks. PMID:23205766

  19. ***Revised syllabus 4.6.2015*** WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF NURSING | DOCTOR OF NURSING PRACTICE

    E-print Network

    and diagnosis of mental illness. 6. Provide evidence based rationale for ageappropriate treatment plans CATALOG DESCRIPTION Introduction to assessment, diagnosis, and management of psychiatric illnesses common psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner (PMHNP) students to achieve initial competencies

  20. Factors influencing the development of evidence-based practice among nurses: a self-report survey

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Health authorities in several countries have decided that the health care services should be evidence-based. Recent research indicates that evidence-based practice may be more successfully implemented if the interventions overcome identified barriers. Aims The present study aimed to examine factors influencing the implementation of evidence-based practice among nurses in a large Norwegian university hospital. Methods Cross-sectional data was collected from 407 nurses during the period November 8 to December 3, 2010, using the Norwegian version of Developing Evidence-based Practice questionnaire (DEBP). The DEBP included data on various sources of information used for support in practice, on potential barriers for evidence-based practice, and on self-reported skills on managing research-based evidence. The DEBP was translated into Norwegian in accordance with standardized guidelines for translation and cultural adaptation. Results Nurses largely used experienced-based knowledge collected from their own observations, colleagues and other collaborators for support in practice. Evidence from research was seldom used. The greatest barriers were lack of time and lack of skills to find and manage research evidence. The nurse’s age, the number of years of nursing practice, and the number of years since obtaining the last health professional degree influenced the use of sources of knowledge and self-reported barriers. Self-reported skills in finding, reviewing and using different sources of evidence were positively associated with the use of research evidence and inversely related to barriers in use of research evidence. Conclusion Skills in evidence-based practice seem to reduce barriers to using research evidence and to increase use of research evidence in clinical practice. PMID:23092366

  1. Near patient testing in general practice: attitudes of general practitioners and practice nurses, and quality assurance procedures carried out.

    PubMed Central

    Hilton, S; Rink, E; Fletcher, J; Sibbald, B; Freeling, P; Szczepura, A; Davies, C; Stilwell, J

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The evaluation of near patient testing in British general practice has largely been confined to studies examining individual tests or comparing equipment. AIM. This study set out to determine the attitudes of practice staff to near patient testing, and the extent to which staff undertook quality assessment. METHOD. Four types of near patient testing machines were introduced into 12 general practices in two regions of England, south west Thames and west Midlands. General practitioner and practice nurse attitudes to near patient testing were assessed by semi-structured interview before and six months after the introduction of the machines. The extent to which routine quality assurance procedures were carried out within the surgery and as part of local and national schemes was examined. RESULTS. Although 80% of general practitioners anticipated changing patient management with near patient testing, only two fifths reported having done so after six months. Nurses generally were enthusiastic at the outset, although one third were unhappy about incorporating near patient testing into their work schedules. Time pressure was the most important factor restricting uptake of near patient testing. Nurses performed quality control regularly but complete local external quality assurance procedures were established in only half the practices. All the practices participated in a national scheme for cholesterol assays. CONCLUSION. General practitioners in this study did not find near patient testing a very useful addition to their resources. Pressure on nurses' time was the most frequently reported limitation. PMID:7748669

  2. Research Priorities in Correctional Nursing Practice: Results of a Three-Round Delphi Study.

    PubMed

    Schoenly, Lorry

    2015-10-01

    Correctional nursing has been recognized as a specialty since 1985, but research to describe and support nursing practice in the criminal justice system has been sparse. The development of a research agenda can stimulate the research necessary to provide an evidence base for specialty practice development. A three-round Delphi study was undertaken to elicit a prioritized list of research topics to guide future research efforts for meaningful results. Six predominant themes emerged from an analysis of top research questions generated by a panel of 18 correctional nursing experts. Research priorities include critical thinking and clinical judgment, competency and educational level, assessment, nursing protocols, effect on patient outcomes, and the environment of care. PMID:26285595

  3. The benefits of being a nurse in critical social research practice.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Helen; McAllister, Margaret

    2002-05-01

    In critical social research, or research that evokes feminist or critical epistemological positions, researchers must examine their own situatedness vis-à-vis their research participants and work toward methods that break down the hierarchies inherent in the research relationship and empower research participants. Such aspects of research practices necessitate strong interpersonal skills, characteristic of many nurses. Drawing on their experiences, the authors critically appraise the benefits of nursing in critical social research practice. Nurses can move beyond their own discipline to use their skills, identity, and intersubjective way of relating with others to gain access to participants and data. Through a unique process of building meaning and interpreting data, nurse researchers are well placed to take effective actions for change. PMID:11993565

  4. A Survey of Organizational Practices in North Carolina Schools of Nursing Libraries *

    PubMed Central

    Lomax, Verna Sigmon

    1971-01-01

    Prompted by the apparent unavailability of published information regarding the cataloging practices in North Carolina schools of nursing libraries, this study was conducted using a questionnaire sent to the thirty-eight schools of nursing in the state. The “average” North Carolina school of nursing library is an autonomous facility administered by nonprofessional personnel or by a person with an undergraduate degree in a nonlibrary field. The materials are organized by the National Library of Medicine Classification and Medical Subject Headings in combination with the Library of Congress classification and subject headings, except for bound journals which are shelved alphabetically by exact title. It is recommended that separate school of nursing and hospital or medical school libraries be consolidated under a trained librarian in order to standardize and unify cataloging practices on the local level and to gain the advantages available through regional and national cooperation of health sciences libraries. PMID:5128698

  5. Emotional knowing in nursing practice: In the encounter between life and death

    PubMed Central

    James, Inger; Andershed, Birgitta; Gustavsson, Bernt; Ternestedt, Britt-Marie

    2010-01-01

    Patients, next of kin and nurses in surgical wards often raise existential questions in the encounter between life and death. Nurses' emotional knowing at this encounter is crucial. Consequently, this study's purpose was to analyse and describe nurses' emotional knowing to reveal (a) how this knowing is expressed in daily work and (b) what emotions, thoughts and actions this knowing includes. This study used combined ethnographic and hermeneutic methodologies. Data were collected using participant observations, informal conversations and interviews. We found that nurses' emotional knowing could be interpreted in relation to various rooms of emotions, thoughts and actions. Nurses' judgements formed these rooms. They strived to do things correctly in the normative room; created a safe, secure milieu for patients and next of kin in the safety–security room; and questioned their actions in the critical room. They created affinity for co-operation that benefitted encounters with patients in their affinity room. And they demonstrated sensitivity and compassion to patients and next of kin; sensitivity and compassion were particularly evident in the closeness room. In our main interpretation, we found that nurses' judgements in various rooms (emotional knowing) constitute an expression of practical wisdom (phronesis) in nursing practice. PMID:20640014

  6. Primary care nurse practitioners and the interface with secondary care: a qualitative study of referral practice.

    PubMed

    Price, Anne; Williams, Anne

    2003-08-01

    In the United Kingdom nurse practitioners are assuming responsibilities traditionally considered to be within the domain of general practitioners. Important amongst these is the referral of patients to medical consultants in secondary care, a responsibility commonly associated with the general practitioner's role as 'gatekeeper' to health care. This paper describes a study designed to identify issues raised by the challenge that a developing nursing role presents to interprofessional working at the interface between primary and secondary care. When invited to comment, study participants (nurse practitioners, nurse educators, medical consultants and general practice registrars) related nursing referrals to issues associated with professional boundary changes, namely: teamwork, regulation of practice, communication, professional conflict and professional relationships. This paper discusses the views of primary and secondary care practitioners about who should take responsibility for the referral of patients in the light of concerns raised about professional competence and accountability. Individual nurse practitioners and their colleagues have found pragmatic ways to manage their work however, although UK government policy supports development of advanced clinical nursing, there remains much work to be done to provide the professional and legal infrastructure to support the role. PMID:12850875

  7. Integrating Practice-to-Theory and Theory-to-Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, R. Burke; Stefurak, Tres

    2012-01-01

    In "Towards a systemic theory of gifted education", Ziegler and Phillipson offer a useful critique of current research and the current paradigm in gifted education. They provide an interesting and useful merging of systems theory with their actiotope model, and using this paradigm they suggest many fruitful areas for future research. However, the…

  8. Leading Change in Tissue Viability Best Practice: An Action Learning Programme for Link Nurse Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellie, Jean; Henderson, Eileen; Milsom, Brian; Crawley, Hayley

    2010-01-01

    This account of practice reports on an action learning initiative designed and implemented in partnership between a regional NHS Acute Trust and a UK Business School. The central initiative was the implementation of an action learning programme entitled "Leading change in tissue viability best practice: a development programme for Link Nurse

  9. Evidence based practice beliefs and implementation among nurses: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Having a positive attitude towards evidence-based practice and being able to see the value of evidence-based practice for patients have been reported as important for the implementation of evidence-based practice among nurses. The aim of this study was to map self-reported beliefs towards EBP and EBP implementation among nurses, and to investigate whether there was a positive correlation between EBP beliefs and EBP implementation. Method We carried out a cross-sectional study among 356 nurses at a specialist hospital for the treatment of cancer in Norway. The Norwegian translations of the Evidence-based Practice Belief Scale and the Evidence-based Practice Implementation Scale were used. Results In total, 185 nurses participated in the study (response rate 52%). The results showed that nurses were positive towards evidence-based practice, but only practised it to a small extent. There was a positive correlation (r) between beliefs towards evidence-based practice and implementation of evidence-based practice (r?=?0.59, p?=?0.001). There was a statistical significant positive, but moderate correlation between all the four subscales of the EBP Beliefs Scale (beliefs related to: 1) knowledge, 2) resources, 3) the value of EBP and 4) difficulty and time) and the EBP Implementation Scale, with the highest correlation observed for beliefs related to knowledge (r?=?0.38, p?practice had significantly higher scores on the Evidence-based Practice Belief Scale than participants who were unfamiliar with evidence-based practice. Those involved in evidence-based practice working groups also reported significantly higher scores on the Evidence-based Practice Belief Scale than participants not involved in these groups. Conclusion This study shows that nurses have a positive attitude towards evidence-based practice, but practise it to a lesser extent. There was a positive correlation between beliefs about evidence-based practice and implementation of evidence-based practice. Beliefs related to knowledge appear to have the greatest effect on implementation of evidence-based practice. Having knowledge and taking part in evidence-based practice working groups seem important. PMID:24661602

  10. Knowing for Nursing Practice: Patterns of Knowledge and Their Emulation in Expert Systems

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Ivo L.; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J.

    1987-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of clinical knowledge in nursing, and the feasibility of emulating this knowledge into expert system technology. The perspective on patterns of knowing for nursing practice, advanced by Carper (1978), serves as point of departure. The four patterns of knowing -- empirics, esthetics, ethics, personal knowledge -- are evaluated as to the extent to which they can be emulated in clinical expert systems, given constraints imposed by the current technology of these systems.

  11. 21st century challenges faced by nursing faculty in educating for compassionate practice: embodied interpretation of phenomenological data.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Katherine

    2013-07-01

    Nursing faculty are facing challenges in facilitating student learning of complex concepts such as compassionate practice. Compassion is a stated expectation of Registered Nurse (RN) and student nurse practice, and yet how it is enabled and learned within the challenging environments of university and health service provider organisations are not yet understood. There is currently an international concern that student nurses are not being adequately prepared for compassion to flourish and for compassionate practice to be sustained upon professional qualification. In order to investigate the experiences of nursing faculty in their preparation of student nurses for compassionate practice, an exploratory aesthetic phenomenological research study was undertaken using in depth interviews with five nurse teachers in the North of England. Findings from this study were analysed and presented using embodied interpretation, and indicate that nurse teachers recognise the importance of the professional ideal of compassionate practice alongside specific challenges this expectation presents. They have concerns about how the economically constrained and target driven practice reality faced by RNs promotes compassionate practice, and that students are left feeling vulnerable to dissonance between learned professional ideals and the RNs' practice reality they witness. Nurse teachers also experience dissonance within the university setting, between the pressures of managing large student groups and the time and opportunity required for small group discussion with students that enables compassion to develop in a meaningful and emotionally sustainable way. Teachers also express discomfort due to a perceived promotion of an 'unachievable utopia' within practice, identifying how the constraints within practice could be better managed to support professional ideals. The nurse teachers within this exploratory study identify the need for strong nurse leadership in practice to challenge constraints and realign the reality of practice with professional ideals, and the need to foster student resilience for maintaining the professional ideals of compassionate practice. This exploratory study promotes the use of embodied interpretation for shared understanding of phenomenological research findings. PMID:23725910

  12. How do practice nurses see their role in childhood injury prevention?

    PubMed Central

    Kendrick, D.; Marsh, P.; Williams, E. I.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the knowledge of unintentional injury epidemiology, the attitudes towards, and current practices in injury prevention among practice nurses. SETTING: Practice nurses employed by general practitioners in Nottinghamshire, United Kingdom. METHOD: A postal questionnaire was sent to all practice nurses on the Family Health Services Authority list (n = 322) with questions covering sociodemographic details, occupational details, unintentional injury epidemiology, attitudes towards the injury prevention activities suggested by a government report as part of the role of the primary health care team, and current practices in injury prevention. RESULTS: A response rate of 71.1% was achieved. More than 50% knew that unintentional injuries were the most common cause of death in childhood. A similar per cent knew the site of most fatal injuries in the under 1 and 5-16 year age groups. More than two thirds correctly identified a range of risk factors for unintentional injury. However, only two fifths of nurses believed they could be effective in preventing injuries. There were considerable gaps between attitudes and practice for most activities. The activities most commonly undertaken include displaying posters and leaflets (69.4%), giving advice on prevention (51.1%), and advice on first aid (45.0%) during injury consultations. CONCLUSIONS: Most practice nurses hold positive attitudes towards injury prevention activities, but fewer undertake these activities regularly. The activities most commonly undertaken employ an educational model. Further research is needed on the barriers to practice nurses undertaking more injury prevention work, the effectiveness of systems to overcome such barriers, and the effectiveness of these injury prevention activities. PMID:9346018

  13. [Project evaluation of nursing interventions: an algorithm to support the practice of clinicians].

    PubMed

    Dubois, Sylvie; Larue, Caroline; Dubé, Véronique; Bérubé, Mélanie; Gélinas, Céline

    2013-03-01

    It is recognized that nurses regularly have to adapt their clinical practice compared to new scientific breakthroughs. However, changes in practice are possible by the implementation of clinical projects but can sometimes be long and difficult to achieve in health care settings, given the context of care or the profile of the clientele, the care organization, work organization, etc. An algorithmic approach (i.e., sequence of actions) to support nurses in the evaluation of new nursing intervention projects, including other members of the interdisciplinary team, researchers, and patients and their relatives, has been developed. This algorithm considers the clinical environment in which the project will operationalize nursing interventions and involves five steps: 1) identification and description of a care problem to solve or a care practice to improve; 2) the development or adaptation of appropriate nursing intervention, and 3) the choice of evaluation design for this nursing intervention, and 4) testing of the intervention and 5) implementation and reflection on the process. PMID:23671989

  14. Bridging the theory-practice gap: a practice-relevant research course for RN to BSN students.

    PubMed

    Tart, Rebecca Creech; Kautz, Donald D; Rudisill, Kimberly D; Beard, Edward L

    2011-01-01

    Wanting to create passion for research and evidence-based practice (EBP), the authors describe how a nursing instructor and the director for research and EBP in a community hospital partnered together to teach a practice-relevant research course for RN to BSN students. Students participated in the steps of the EBP process and presented formal reports in class of their EBP project results. One student described her research experience as awesome-evidence that this course bridged the theory-practice gap. PMID:21857344

  15. Examining the Effects of a National League for Nursing Core Competencies Workshop as an Intervention to Improve Nurse Faculty Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanBever Wilson, Robin R.

    2010-01-01

    Due to the complex challenges facing schools of nursing, a research study was implemented to introduce nurse faculty at one small rural northeastern Tennessee school of nursing to the NLN "Core Competencies for Nurse Educators". Utilizing Kalb's Nurse Faculty Self-Evaluation Tool as a pre- and post-intervention test, 30 nurse faculty members…

  16. Pediatric nurse practitioner salary and practice: results of a Midwest metropolitan area survey.

    PubMed

    Loman, Deborah G; Hung, Shu-Ling

    2007-01-01

    The St. Louis Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners has conducted a local biennial salary, practice, and benefits survey since the mid 1990s. This cross-sectional, descriptive study investigated demographic characteristics, salary, benefits, and practice patterns of pediatric nurse practitioners (PNPs) in the St. Louis area in fall, 2005. The survey was sent to 199 PNPs who lived within 100 miles of Saint Louis, with a return rate of 60%. The mean salary for full time PNPs engaged in practice was $72,788, which was a 6.3% increase from the 2003 survey results. PNPs with more years of experience received significantly higher salaries than those with less experience; however, there was no difference in salary based on type of practice (primary versus specialty care) or type of practice setting. Increasing numbers of PNPs are reporting their practice focus as specialty care (53%) rather than primary care (47%) in this region, with 70% of full time PNPs indicating specialty care. PNPs with less than 3 years experience were working equally in primary and specialty care. Practice challenges such as reimbursement and prescriptive issues were identified. Only 37% of PNPs indicated that they were credentialed by insurance plans. Nurse practitioners may find a local survey helpful as they negotiate changes in their salaries and benefits. Members of advance practice nursing organizations and educators may find the survey process useful as they observe local practice trends over time. It is essential that nursing education and continuing education conferences address the basic and continuing education needs of PNPs in both primary care and common specialty practices. PMID:17825727

  17. Strategies to promote practice nurse capacity to deliver evidence-based care.

    PubMed

    Dadich, Ann; Abbott, Penny; Hosseinzadeh, Hassan

    2015-11-16

    Purpose - Evidence-based practice is pivotal to effective patient care. However, its translation into practice remains limited. Given the central role of primary care in many healthcare systems, it is important to identify strategies that bolster clinician-capacity to promote evidence-based care. The purpose of this paper is to identify strategies to increase Practice Nurse capacity to promote evidence-based sexual healthcare within general practice. Design/methodology/approach - A survey of 217 Practice Nurses in an Australian state and ten respondent-interviews regarding two resources to promote evidence-based sexual healthcare - namely, a clinical aide and online training. Findings - The perceived impact of both resources was determined by views on relevance and design - particularly for the clinical aide. Resource-use was influenced by role and responsibilities within the workplace, accessibility, and support from patients and colleagues. Research limitations/implications - This is the first Australian study to reveal strategies to promote evidence-based sexual healthcare among Practice Nurses. The findings provide a platform for future research on knowledge translation processes, particularly among clinicians who might be disengaged from sexual healthcare. Practical implications - Given the benefits of evidence-based practices, it is important that managers recognize their role, and the role of their services, in promoting these. Without explicit support for evidence-based care and recognition of the Practice Nurse role in such care, knowledge translation is likely to be limited. Originality/value - Knowledge translation among Practice Nurses can be facilitated by: resources-deemed informative, relevant, and user-friendly, as well as support from patients, colleagues, and their workplace. PMID:26556164

  18. Exploring the compatibility of mental health nursing, recovery-focused practice and the welfare state.

    PubMed

    Conlon, M M M; Bush, C J; Ariyaratnam, M I; Brennan, G K; Owtram, R

    2015-06-01

    Mental health nurses are expected to adhere to a range of professional values. The values of social integration that mental health nurses practise are somewhat at odds with the values of the British welfare state. Alternative systems of welfare support are demonstrated in other countries. Mental health nurses must consider models of practice, such as that described by Clifton et?al. (2013b), to manage the disconnection between what is expected and what can be achieved. This discussion paper considers the implications for mental health nursing practice when working alongside individuals in receipt of state benefits. There is arguably a profound impact on an individual's recovery from mental ill health when that individual is also dependent on financial support from the government. Access to welfare benefits can have a significant impact on the recovery journey of that individual. This discussion paper will consider the practice implications for mental health nurses whose professional values include maxims such as 'challenging inequality' and 'respecting diversity', and will seek to examine the implications for practice when such values are divergent from those demonstrated in government policy. The paper will make comparisons with international welfare systems to demonstrate the way in which alternative configurations of state welfare can promote a system of social justice that is in greater equilibrium with the professional values of mental health nurses. Finally, the discussion will focus on the options for mental health nurses to either subscribe to government policy or to find compromise solutions that enable attention to remain focused and active on a strong value base of social justice and recovery-focused practice. PMID:26014831

  19. Domestic abuse as a transgressive practice: understanding nurses' responses through the lens of abjection.

    PubMed

    Bradbury-Jones, Caroline; Taylor, Julie

    2013-10-01

    Domestic abuse is a worldwide public health issue with long-term health and social consequences. Nurses play a key role in recognizing and responding to domestic abuse. Yet there is considerable evidence that their responses are often inappropriate and unhelpful, such as trivializing or ignoring the abuse. Empirical studies have identified several reasons why nurses' responses are sometimes wanting. These include organizational constraints, e.g. lack of time and privacy; and interpersonal factors such as fear of offending women and lack of confidence. We propose, however, that these factors present only a partial explanation. Drawing on the work of Julia Kristeva, we suggest that alternative understandings may be derived through applying the concept of abjection. Abjection is a psychological defence against any threat (the abject) to the clean and proper self that results in rejection of the abject. Using examples from our own domestic abuse research, we contend that exposure of nurses to the horror of domestic abuse evokes a state of abjection. Domestic abuse (the abject) transgresses established social boundaries of clean and proper. Thus when exposed to patients' and clients' experiences of it, some nurses subconsciously reject domestic abuse as a possibility (abjection). They do this to protect themselves from the horror of the act, but in so doing, render themselves unable to formulate appropriate responses. Rather than understanding the practice of some nurses as wilfully neglectful or ignorant, we argue that through a state of abjection, they are powerless to act. This does not refute existing evidence about nurses' responses to domestic abuse. Rather, as a relatively unknown concept in nursing, abjection provides an additional explanatory layer that accounts for why some nurses respond the way they do. Crucially, it elucidates the need for nurses to be supported emotionally when faced with the transgressive practice of abuse. PMID:24034160

  20. Practical knowledge of experienced nurses in critical care: a qualitative study of their narratives

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Scholars of nursing practices have claimed practical knowledge is source of knowledge in its own right, nevertheless we know little about this knowledge associated with day-to-day practice. The purpose of this study is to describe knowledge that the more experienced nurses the in ICU make use of and discover the components of care it includes. Understanding this knowledge can contribute to improving the working practices of nurses with less experience. Methods We used a phenomenologic and hermeneutic approach to conduct a qualitative study. Open in-depth dialogue interviews were conducted with 13 experienced ICU nurses selected by intentional sampling. Data was compiled on significant stories of their practice. The data analysis enabled units of meaning to be categorised and grouped into topics regarding everyday practical knowledge. Results Knowledge related to everyday practice was evaluated and grouped into seven topics corresponding to how the ICU nurses understand their patient care: 1) Connecting with, calming and situating patients who cannot communicate; 2) Situating and providing relief to patients in transitions of mechanical respiration and non-invasive ventilation; 3) Providing reassurance and guaranteeing the safety of immobilised patients; 4) The “connection” with patients in comas; 5) Taking care of the body; 6) The transition from saving life to palliative care; and 7) How to protect and defend the patient from errors. The components of caretaking that guarantee success include: the calm, care and affection with which they do things; the time devoted to understanding, situating and comforting patients and families; and the commitment they take on with new staff and doctors for the benefit of the patient. Conclusions These results show that stories of experiences describe a contextual practical knowledge that the more experienced nurses develop as a natural and spontaneous response. In critical patients the application of everyday practical knowledge greatly influences their well-being. In those cases in which the nurses describe how they have protected the patients from error, this practical knowledge can mean the difference between life and death. The study highlights the need to manage practical knowledge and undertake further research. The study is useful in keeping clinical practice up-to-date. PMID:25132455

  1. Private practice occupational therapy in the skilled nursing facility: creative alliance or mutual exploitation?

    PubMed

    Faust, L; Meaker, M K

    1991-07-01

    Occupational therapy private practice appears to play a major role in the provision of rehabilitation services in skilled nursing facilities. A critical look at the meaning of private practice, however, indicates that many of today's private practitioners lack characteristics traditionally associated with that term. Group private practices are well suited to retain the essential qualities of private practice while competing effectively in a corporate environment. They accomplish this difficult task by applying therapeutic principles of growth and change to the complex relationship between the group practice and the skilled nursing facility. Application of these principles allows the occupational therapy group private practice to behave consistently with its professional identity while addressing the competitive demands of the marketplace. PMID:1928278

  2. Quantum Cryptography: from Theory to Practice

    E-print Network

    Hoi-Kwong Lo; Norbert Lütkenhaus

    2007-03-13

    Quantum cryptography can, in principle, provide unconditional security guaranteed by the law of physics only. Here, we survey the theory and practice of the subject and highlight some recent developments.

  3. Exploring the influence of gestalt therapy training on psychiatric nursing practice: stories from the field.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Teresa; Howie, Linsey

    2011-08-01

    Psychiatric nurses interested in extending their interpersonal and psychotherapeutic skills sometimes undertake postgraduate training in gestalt therapy. Little is known about how this new knowledge and psychotherapeutic skill base informs their practice. This paper presents the findings of a qualitative study that aimed to explore the influence of gestalt therapy training on psychiatric nursing practice. Within a framework of narrative inquiry, four psychiatric nurses trained in gestalt therapy were invited to tell their stories of training in a gestalt approach to therapy, and recount their experiences of how it influenced their practice. In keeping with narrative analysis methods, the research findings were presented as a collection of four stories. Eight themes were derived from a thematic analysis conducted within and across the four stories. The discussion of the themes encapsulates the similarities and differences across the storied collection, providing a community and cultural context for understanding the individual stories. PMID:21429062

  4. Pain Management: A Practical Approach to Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wacker, Margaret S.; Pawasauskas, Joyce

    2002-01-01

    Nine brief onsite educational sessions of 10-20 minutes each trained nurses in pain management techniques. Participants recognized the value of brief presentations, but wanted more time to learn the material. The content was made available on disk for further study. (SK)

  5. Perceived Barriers to Nurse Practitioner Practice in Rural Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindeke, Linda E.; Jukkala, Angela; Tanner, Mary

    2005-01-01

    Rural residents experience the same incidence of acute illness as urban populations and have higher levels of chronic illness. Overall, access to adequate rural health care is limited. Nurse practitioners (NPs) have been identified as safe, cost-effective providers in meeting these challenges in rural settings. This replication study was conducted…

  6. The Role of Theory in Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyfer, Jean L.

    There are at least three ways in which educational theory can be used in practice: (1) to reexamine our traditional approaches, (2) to provide direction in future practice, and (3) to generate research. Reexamination of traditional approaches through analysis and utilization of theoretical methods is one means of promoting constant growth and…

  7. Influence of clinical practice on nursing students' mental and immune-endocrine functions.

    PubMed

    Lei, Jie; Jin, Hua; Shen, Simei; Li, Zhiling; Gu, Guixiong

    2015-08-01

    This work aims to evaluate the stressful effects of clinical learning environments on nursing students and to better understand the importance of reducing anxiety. Ninety-two female nursing students were randomly recruited. State Anxiety Inventory (SAI), General Self-Efficacy scale (GSES), Social Support Rating Scale (SSRS), General Maladjustment Scale (GM), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the personal information questionnaire were administered along with an immune-endocrine profile, red blood cells and plasma cortisol. The nursing students' state and trait anxiety scores were significantly higher in clinic than in school. With one-way ANOVA, nursing students from rural areas, not liking nurse work and being pessimistic to employment prospects, and not being assigned in an ideal teaching hospital had higher scores of SAI. High levels of anxiety were associated with low scores of GSES, objective support of SSRS and high scores of GM. Additionally, the subjects' anxiety related to poor sleep quality, and students with high levels of anxiety showed a significantly lower percentage of CD3 and CD4. In conclusion, clinical practice can raise nursing students' State-Trait Anxiety Inventory scores. The level of anxiety is related to some internal and external factors. Severe anxiety not only affects student's physical and mental health and successful practice, but also reduces T lymphocyte immune functions. PMID:24713036

  8. The Nurse as Advocate: A Grounded Theory Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sessler Branden, Pennie

    2012-01-01

    The nursing profession is entering an exciting time of new professional opportunities. As the United States of America (USA) deals with its health care crisis, nursing is positioned to determine the trajectory of health care and health policy. However, nurses are underrepresented in major forums where they could be change agents on this new path.…

  9. Toward a Grounded Theory of Nursing Student Attrition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Lenora

    2010-01-01

    Attrition of students from a nursing program is a significant concern. It is even more critical now because there are not enough nurses to fill all open positions in the healthcare industry. It is predicted the shortage will worsen in the next decade as an aging society increases the number of people requiring nursing care. While increasing the…

  10. To what extent do nurses use research in clinical practice? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In the past forty years, many gains have been made in our understanding of the concept of research utilization. While numerous studies exist on professional nurses' use of research in practice, no attempt has been made to systematically evaluate and synthesize this body of literature with respect to the extent to which nurses use research in their clinical practice. The objective of this study was to systematically identify and analyze the available evidence related to the extent to which nurses use research findings in practice. Methods This study was a systematic review of published and grey literature. The search strategy included 13 online bibliographic databases: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, HAPI, Web of Science, SCOPUS, OCLC Papers First, OCLC WorldCat, ABI Inform, Sociological Abstracts, and Dissertation Abstracts. The inclusion criteria consisted of primary research reports that assess professional nurses' use of research in practice, written in the English or Scandinavian languages. Extent of research use was determined by assigning research use scores reported in each article to one of four quartiles: low, moderate-low, moderate-high, or high. Results Following removal of duplicate citations, a total of 12,418 titles were identified through database searches, of which 133 articles were retrieved. Of the articles retrieved, 55 satisfied the inclusion criteria. The 55 final reports included cross-sectional/survey (n = 51) and quasi-experimental (n = 4) designs. A sensitivity analysis, comparing findings from all reports with those rated moderate (moderate-weak and moderate-strong) and strong quality, did not show significant differences. In a majority of the articles identified (n = 38, 69%), nurses reported moderate-high research use. Conclusions According to this review, nurses' reported use of research is moderate-high and has remained relatively consistent over time until the early 2000's. This finding, however, may paint an overly optimistic picture of the extent to which nurses use research in their practice given the methodological problems inherent in the majority of studies. There is a clear need for the development of standard measures of research use and robust well-designed studies examining nurses' use of research and its impact on patient outcomes. The relatively unchanged self-reports of moderate-high research use by nurses is troubling given that over 40 years have elapsed since the first studies in this review were conducted and the increasing emphasis in the past 15 years on evidence-based practice. More troubling is the absence of studies in which attempts are made to assess the effects of varying levels of research use on patient outcomes. PMID:21414206

  11. Theory into Practice: A Bridge Too Far?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defazio, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    This article proposes a research agenda that addresses the gap between theory and practice in the area of instructional theory. It reflects the beliefs of this writer and attempts to address current issues in the field of instructional technology. Citing the limited literature that currently exists, the purpose of this article is to bring to the…

  12. Educational Management: Theory and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Tony

    This document is a chapter in "The Principles and Practice of Educational Management," which aims to provide a systematic and analytical introduction to the study of educational management. The structure of the book reflects the main substantive areas of educational leadership and management, and most of the major themes are covered in the…

  13. Faculty Perceptions of Effective Practices for Utilizing a Framework to Develop a Concept-Based Curriculum in Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magorian, Kathryn G.

    2013-01-01

    All programs of healthcare education face increasing change and daunting challenges to prepare new graduates for the real world of practice as care providers in complex systems. The necessity for change in nursing education is at a critical level, called on from a variety of sources. New nurses must be able to enter practice as competent, safe,…

  14. Challenges of Applying Continuing Education in Tehran Hospital Practice as Viewed By Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, Laleh; Dehghan Nayeri, Nahid; Salehi, Tahmineh; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan

    2015-01-01

    Background Although many planners of professional continuing education programs believe that this type of education positively affects the nurses’ performance, the results obtained by conducted research do not confirm such a perspective. In fact, inadequate application of these trainings in clinical practice is among the most challenging areas in nursing practices. Hence, this study was conducted to describe the challenges nurses encounter in order to apply what they have learned during continuing education programs in clinical settings of TUMS hospitals. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on 400 medical-surgical nurses who worked in the hospitals of Tehran University of Medical sciences. For sampling, after listing all the general hospitals, their wards were selected in proportion to hospital. Nurses filled out a questionnaire about factors affecting the application of continuing education. The questionnaire contained 43 items and the dimensions were supportive-organizational, individual, professional, and educational program design factors. The analysis was carried out using parametric and non-parametric method using SPSS 16 package. Results The results showed while 48.5% and 53.8% of nurses mentioned organizational and professional factors, respectively as the most inhibiting factors; only 2.25% of the nurses believed that organizational factors are facilitating. Conclusion The results obtained in this study are important regarding the fact that organizational and professional factors have a key role in applying or lack of application of learned materials. Thus, hospital authorities as well as nursing managers can provide the necessary condition in application of continuing education through promotion of facilitating factors and eliminating the hindering ones.  PMID:26005692

  15. The AD Nurse: Prepared to be Prepared

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beverly, Lynne; Junker, Mary H.

    1977-01-01

    It is not enough for the new associate degree (AD) nursing graduate to know the theory and be willing to learn. She must also have some skill in providing basic nursing care. Examples of applicants, both ADNs and BSNs, are described to illustrate the nursing talent necessary to practice sensitively and effectively. (Editor/TA)

  16. Conceptualising the functional role of mental health consultation-liaison nurse in multi-morbidity, using Peplau's nursing theory.

    PubMed

    Merritt, Michael K; Procter, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the mental health consultation-liaison nursing (MHCLN) role and links this to the interpersonal relations theory of nurse theorist Hildegard Peplau. The paper argues that, as mental health nursing care around the world is increasingly focused upon meaningful therapeutic engagement, the role of the MHCLN is important in helping to reduce distressing symptoms, reduce the stigma for seeking help for mental health problems and enhancing mental health literacy among generalist nurses. The paper presents a small case exemplar to demonstrate interpersonal relations theory as an engagement process, providing patients with methodologies which allow them to work through the internal dissonance that exists in relation to their adjustment to changes in life roles precipitated by physical illness. This dissonance can be seen in the emergence of anxiety, depression and abnormal/psychogenic illness behaviours. This paper concludes arguing for considerable effort being given to the nurse-patient relationship that allows for the patient having freedom to use strategies that may help resolve the dissonance that exists. PMID:20509800

  17. Lack of Preparation: Iranian Nurses' Experiences During Transition From College to Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Jasemi, Madineh; Valizadeh, Leila; Keogh, Brian; Taleghani, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    Graduate nurse transition from college to professional practice is an important matter in a nurse's professional life. In many cases, this period is characterized by unhealthy physical and mental reactions, loss of interest in one's profession, and unacceptable caregiving. By examining the phenomenon from the point of view of experienced nurses, we can recognize the major factors in a successful transition from college life to professional life. This is a qualitative study and was conducted based on conventional qualitative content analysis method; 14 nurses were selected through purposive sampling, and the data were collected using semistructured interviews in teaching hospitals in Iran. Eight subthemes emerged from the analysis of the interviews: lack of practical skills, limited academic knowledge, inadequate social skills, poor self-confidence, lack of independence, frustration, stress, and loneliness. These items, in turn, fall under 3 themes: poor efficiency, low self-assurance, and unhealthy emotional reactions. The findings of this study indicate that the participants were not well prepared to assume their clinical roles, which in turn gives rise to other problems; to eliminate this defect, the curriculum needs to be revised, proper training programs should accompany the students' studies, and management in clinical environments recommended should be improved in order to facilitate nurses' transition from college to practice. PMID:26194969

  18. Counselling about HIV serological status disclosure: nursing practice or law enforcement? a Foucauldian reflection.

    PubMed

    O'Byrne, Patrick; Holmes, Dave; Roy, Marie

    2015-06-01

    Recently, focus groups and qualitative interviews with nurses who provide frontline care for persons living with HIV highlighted the contentiousness surrounding the seemingly innocuous activity of counselling clients about HIV-status disclosure, hereafter disclosure counselling. These empirical studies highlighted that while some nurses felt they should instruct clients to disclose their HIV-positive status if HIV transmission were possible, other nurses were equally adamant that such counselling was outside the nursing scope of practice. A review of these opposing perceptions about disclosure counselling, including an examination of the empirical evidence which supports each point, revealed that the dichotomous arguments needed to be nuanced. The empirical evidence about serostatus disclosure neither supported nor refuted either of these assertions; rather, it substantiated parts of each. To create this understanding, both empirical and theoretical works are used. First, the results of empirical studies about serostatus disclosure, or lack thereof and HIV transmission is presented; as part of this, Marks and Crepaz's HIV disclosure and exposure framework is examined. Second, the work of Michel Foucault on disciplinary and pastoral power is drawn from. The outcome is a nuanced understanding about the interrelationships between disclosure counselling and nursing practice and a final interpretation about what this understanding means for public health practice. PMID:25053169

  19. A Standardized Shift Handover Protocol: Improving Nurses’ Safe Practice in Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Malekzadeh, Javad; Mazluom, Seyed Reza; Etezadi, Toktam; Tasseri, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: For maintaining the continuity of care and improving the quality of care, effective inter-shift information communication is necessary. Any handover error can endanger patient safety. Despite the importance of shift handover, there is no standard handover protocol in our healthcare settings. Methods: In this one-group pretest-posttest quasi-experimental study conducted in spring and summer of 2011, we recruited a convenience sample of 56 ICU nurses. The Nurses’ Safe Practice Evaluation Checklist was used for data collection. The Content Validity Index and the inter-rater correlation coefficient of the checklist was 0.92 and 89, respectively. We employed the SPSS 11.5 software and the Mc Nemar and paired-samples t test for data analysis. Results: Study findings revealed that nurses’ mean score on the Safe Practice Evaluation Checklist increased significantly from 11.6 (2.7) to 17.0 (1.8) (P < 0.001). Conclusion: using a standard handover protocol for communicating patient’s needs and information improves nurses’ safe practice in the area of basic nursing care. PMID:25276725

  20. Literary Theory and Composition Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navarre, Joan

    Mikhail Bakhtin's literary theory, particularly his voice-oriented term, "heteroglossia," can easily be brought to bear on the teaching of voice in the composition classroom. Bakhtin not only likes the concept of voice, but at times even seems obsessed with it. The notion of heteroglossia suggests a diversity of discourses or voices, and denies…

  1. Sponsored Search: Theory and Practice

    E-print Network

    Baeza-Yates, Ricardo

    and Marketplace Group 10 August 2006 2 Outline · Why online advertising is important · A brief history of sponsored search · An auction theory view · The prediction problem #12;2 3 Why is Advertising Important ­ The right information, at the right time to the right person · Monetizes consumer services ­ Consumer pays

  2. Socioscientific Issues: Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeidler, Dana L.; Nichols, Bryan H.

    2009-01-01

    Drawing upon recent research, this article reviews the theory underlying the use of socioscientific issues (SSI) in science education. We begin with a definition and rationale for SSI and note the importance of SSI for advancing functional scientific literacy. We then examine the various roles of context, teachers, and students in SSI lessons as…

  3. [Professional practice of nurses who care for cancer patients in general hospitals].

    PubMed

    da Silva, Josiane Travençolo; Matheus, Maria Clara Cassuli; Fustinoni, Suzete Maria; de Gutiérrez, Maria Gaby Rivero

    2012-01-01

    The present article discusses a qualitative study which aimed to understand the typical of nurses' professional practice caring for patient with cancer in general hospitals. In order to find out the reasons that motivate nurse's action, and to put in evidence what is original, significant, specific and typical about this phenomenon, we have taken into consideration the premises of the philosopher Alfred Schütz, which provide us with subsidies to unveil them. The data collected through semi-structured interviews reported that nurses admit not having the required theoretical knowledge and experience or enough practice to take care of a cancer patient. Thus, they don't feel capable of developing actions which may positively influence care on patients and their family members. PMID:23032337

  4. Making Things Right: Nurses' Experiences with Workplace Bullying—A Grounded Theory

    PubMed Central

    Gaffney, Donna A.; DeMarco, Rosanna F.; Hofmeyer, Anne; Vessey, Judith A.; Budin, Wendy C.

    2012-01-01

    While bullying in the healthcare workplace has been recognized internationally, there is still a culture of silence in many institutions in the United States, perpetuating underreporting and insufficient and unproven interventions. The deliberate, repetitive, and aggressive behaviors of bullying can cause psychological and/or physical harm among professionals, disrupt nursing care, and threaten patient safety and quality outcomes. Much of the literature focuses on categories of bullying behaviors and nurse responses. This qualitative study reports on the experiences of nurses confronting workplace bullying. We collected data from the narratives of 99 nurses who completed an open-ended question embedded in an online survey in 2007. A constructivist grounded theory approach was used to analyze the data and shape a theory of how nurses make things right when confronted with bullying. In a four-step process, nurses place bullying in context, assess the situation, take action, and judge the outcomes of their actions. While many nurses do engage in a number of effective yet untested strategies, two additional concerns remain: inadequate support among nursing colleagues and silence and inaction by nurse administrators. Qualitative inquiry has the potential to guide researchers to a greater understanding of the complexities of bullying in the workplace. PMID:22567223

  5. Ground Effect - Theory and Practice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pistolesi, E

    1937-01-01

    The conclusion of a previous article by Pistolesi is that the increment of lift due to ground effect is largely attributable to the effect of induction of the free vortices, and is practically equivalent to a virtual increase in aspect ratio. The ground clearance was of the order of magnitude comparable to the wing chord. New reports by Le Seur and Datwyler treat the case of minimum distance from the ground and is confined to the plane problem only. The author briefly reviews these reports and also one by Timotika. References to all the reviewed reports are in the attached bibliography.

  6. Comparing the Effect of Concept Mapping and Conventional Methods on Nursing Students’ Practical Skill Score

    PubMed Central

    Rasoul Zadeh, Nasrin; Sadeghi Gandomani, Hamidreza; Delaram, Masoumeh; Parsa Yekta, Zohre

    2015-01-01

    Background: Development of practical skills in the field of nursing education has remained a serious and considerable challenge in nursing education. Moreover, newly graduated nurses may have weak practical skills, which can be a threat to patients’ safety. Objectives: The present study was conducted to compare the effect of concept mapping and conventional methods on nursing students’ practical skills. Patients and Methods: This quasi-experimental study was conducted on 70 nursing students randomly assigned into two groups of 35 people. The intervention group was taught through concept mapping method, while the control group was taught using conventional method. A two-part instrument was used including a demographic information form and a checklist for direct observation of procedural skills. Descriptive statistics, chi-square, independent samples t-tests and paired t-test were used to analyze data. Results: Before education, no significant differences were observed between the two groups in the three skills of cleaning (P = 0.251), injection (P = 0.185) and sterilizing (P = 0.568). The students mean scores were significantly increased after the education and the difference between pre and post intervention of students mean scores were significant in the both groups (P < 0.001). However, after education, in all three skills the mean scores of the intervention group were significantly higher than the control group (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Concept mapping was superior to conventional skill teaching methods. It is suggested to use concept mapping in teaching practical courses such as fundamentals of nursing. PMID:26576441

  7. Safety in numbers: an introduction to the Nurse Education in Practice series.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Keith W; Sabin, Mike; Pontin, David; Woolley, Norman

    2013-03-01

    This paper introduces this Nurse Education in Practice 'Safety in Numbers' series. We introduce the background and seven papers that explore the outcomes of a 20-year programme of healthcare education translation research and education action research that focuses on medication dosage calculation problem-solving (MDC-PS) education. PMID:22795760

  8. Student Material for Competency-Based Education Curriculum for Licensed Practical Nurse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Associated Educational Consultants, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA.

    This curriculum for licensed practical nurse contains 18 units. Each unit is divided into modules comprised of task or job-related competencies. A student competency sheet (SCS) provided for each task is organized into this format: unit number and name, module letter and name of the group of related tasks, and number and name of task; performance…

  9. Student Assessment System. Domain Referenced Tests. Allied Health Occupations/Practical Nursing. Volume 1: Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Bruce; And Others

    These performance tests for the area of allied health occupations/practical nursing consist of a sampling technique (domain referenced tests) which covers all the possible performance situations. When used in total, they may also serve as a comprehensive test. Introductory materials discuss domain referenced testing, determining the domains, and…

  10. The Influence of Organizational Culture on Affinity for Knowledge Management Practices of Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    This study addressed the problems of hospitals' duplicated effort and ad hoc knowledge management (KM) practices. The purpose of this quantitative study was to examine the focus and type of organizational culture in order to describe and predict the relationship between organizational culture and the affinity for KM of nurses working in health…

  11. Practical Nursing. FasTrak Specialization Integrated Technical and Academic Competency (ITAC). Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Career-Technical and Adult Education.

    This document contains an introduction to the Ohio Integrated Technical and Academic Competency (ITAC) and Specialization ITAC; an overview of the field of practical nursing; a list acknowledging professionals who helped develop the competency list; and the comprehensive list of the professional or occupational competencies deemed essential for…

  12. Simulation to Practice: Developing Nursing Skills in Mental Health--An Australian Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edward, Karen-leigh; Hercelinskyj, Julie; Warelow, Philip; Munro, Ian

    2007-01-01

    A variety of developments in nursing education in Australia including some innovative and exciting models, educational enterprises between education and industry, and evidence of developing strengths in research and professional alliances on a national level have been discussed recently. This paper presents Simulation to Practice as an example of…

  13. Intravenous Fluid Therapy Course for the Licensed Practical Nurse. Instructor Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for a 10-unit intravenous (IV) therapy course for licensed practical nurses. Units contain from one to nine lessons. The first unit provides an introduction and orientation to the course. Subsequent units concern documentation, anatomy and physiology as applied to IV therapy, fundamental aspects of fluid…

  14. A Bridge between Two Cultures: Uncovering the Chemistry Concepts Relevant to the Nursing Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Corina E.; Henry, Melissa L. M.; Barbera, Jack; Hyslop, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on the undergraduate course that covers basic topics in general, organic, and biological (GOB) chemistry at a mid-sized state university in the western United States. The central objective of the research was to identify the main topics of GOB chemistry relevant to the clinical practice of nursing. The collection of data was…

  15. Practice in Computer-Based Testing and Performance on the National Certification Examination for Nurse Anesthetists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dosch, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    The general aim of the present retrospective study was to examine the test mode effect, that is, the difference in performance when tests are taken on computer (CBT), or by paper and pencil (PnP). The specific purpose was to examine the degree to which extensive practice in CBT in graduate students in nurse anesthesia would raise scores on a…

  16. The Influence of Leadership Practices on Faculty Job Satisfaction in Baccalaureate Degree Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afam, Clifford C.

    2012-01-01

    Using a correlational, cross-sectional study design with self-administered questionnaires, this study explored the extent to which leadership practices of deans and department heads influence faculty job satisfaction in baccalaureate degree nursing programs. Using a simple random sampling technique, the study survey was sent to 400 faculty…

  17. New Choices for Continuing Education: A Statewide Survey of the Practices and Preferences of Nurse Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Patricia A.; Mamary, Edward M.

    2002-01-01

    Responses from 103 licensed advanced practice nurses in Nevada showed that they used in-person and live satellite conferences most often for continuing education. However, they preferred in-person, print-based, and interactive video modes; satellite, Internet, and CD-ROM were least preferred. (SK)

  18. A Qualitative Analysis of an Advanced Practice Nurse-Directed Transitional Care Model Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradway, Christine; Trotta, Rebecca; Bixby, M. Brian; McPartland, Ellen; Wollman, M. Catherine; Kapustka, Heidi; McCauley, Kathleen; Naylor, Mary D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe barriers and facilitators to implementing a transitional care intervention for cognitively impaired older adults and their caregivers lead by advanced practice nurses (APNs). Design and Methods: APNs implemented an evidence-based protocol to optimize transitions from hospital to home. An…

  19. The DNP by 2015: A Study of the Institutional, Political, and Professional Issues That Facilitate or Impede Establishing a Post-Baccalaureate Doctor of Nursing Practice Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auerbach, David I.; Martsolf, Grant R.; Pearson, Marjorie L.; Taylor, Erin Audrey; Zaydman, Mikhail; Muchow, Ashley; Spetz, Joanne; Dower, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    In 2004, members of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) voted to endorse a position statement identifying the doctor of nursing practice (DNP) degree as the most appropriate degree for advanced-practice registered nurses (APRNs) to enter practice. At the same time, AACN members voted to approve the position that all master's…

  20. An interpretive study of the nurse teacher's role in practice placement areas.

    PubMed

    Duffy, K; Watson, H E

    2001-10-01

    The role of the nurse teacher in the clinical area is widely debated in the literature, however there are few research studies that focus exclusively on this issue. Of note is the particular dearth of research from a Scottish perspective. This article reports on a research study which was designed to illuminate nurse teachers' experiences regarding their role in the practice placement area. An interpretive research approach was used in order to gain an understanding of the role of the nurse teacher in the clinical area. The study involved 18 nurse teachers, from three nursing departments across Scotland, taking part in focus group interviews. Five main themes are reported in this article: being an advisor, being a supporter, being a regulator, being an interpreter and being a networker. Findings from the study revealed that the nurse teachers have a multifaceted role which includes providing advice and support to trained staff and students, regulating professional standards, interpreting assessment documentation and networking with clinical staff. PMID:11559009

  1. Specialized Nursing Practice for Chronic Disease Management in the Primary Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In response to the increasing demand for better chronic disease management and improved health care efficiency in Ontario, nursing roles have expanded in the primary health care setting. Objectives To determine the effectiveness of specialized nurses who have a clinical role in patient care in optimizing chronic disease management among adults in the primary health care setting. Data Sources and Review Methods A literature search was performed using OVID MEDLINE, OVID MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, OVID EMBASE, EBSCO Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Wiley Cochrane Library, and the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination database. Results were limited to randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews and were divided into 2 models: Model 1 (nurse alone versus physician alone) and Model 2 (nurse and physician versus physician alone). Effectiveness was determined by comparable outcomes between groups in Model 1, or improved outcomes or efficiency in Model 2. Results Six studies were included. In Model 1, there were no significant differences in health resource use, disease-specific measures, quality of life, or patient satisfaction. In Model 2, there was a reduction in hospitalizations and improved management of blood pressure and lipids among patients with coronary artery disease. Among patients with diabetes, there was a reduction in hemoglobin A1c but no difference in other disease-specific measures. There was a trend toward improved process measures, including medication prescribing and clinical assessments. Results related to quality of life were inconsistent, but patient satisfaction with the nurse-physician team was improved. Overall, there were more and longer visits to the nurse, and physician workload did not change. Limitations There was heterogeneity across patient populations, and in the titles, roles, and scope of practice of the specialized nurses. Conclusions Specialized nurses with an autonomous role in patient care had comparable outcomes to physicians alone (Model 1) based on moderate quality evidence, with consistent results among a subgroup analysis of patients with diabetes based on low quality evidence. Model 2 showed an overall improvement in appropriate process measures, disease-specific measures, and patient satisfaction based on low to moderate quality evidence. There was low quality evidence that nurses working under Model 2 may reduce hospitalizations for patients with coronary artery disease. The specific role of the nurse in supplementing or substituting physician care was unclear, making it difficult to determine the impact on efficiency. Plain Language Summary Nurses with additional skills, training, or scope of practice may help improve the primary care of patients with chronic diseases. This review found that specialized nurses working on their own could achieve health outcomes that were similar to those of doctors. It also found that specialized nurses who worked with doctors could reduce hospital visits and improve certain patient outcomes related to diabetes, coronary artery disease, or heart failure. Patients who had nurse-led care were more satisfied and tended to receive more tests and medications. It is unclear whether specialized nurses improve quality of life or doctor workload. PMID:24194798

  2. Advocating for nurses and nursing.

    PubMed

    Tomajan, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Every nurse has the opportunity to make a positive impact on the profession through day-to-day advocacy for nurses and the nursing profession. In this article the author defines advocacy; describes advocacy skills every nurse can employ to advocate for a safe and healthy work environment; and explains how nurses can advocate for nursing as part of their daily activity whether they are point-of-care nurses, nurse managers, or nurse educators. The advocacy practices discussed are applicable whether advocating on one's own behalf, for colleagues at the unit level, or for issues at the organizational or system level. PMID:22320880

  3. Understanding attitudes and their effects on nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Price, Bob

    2015-12-01

    Attitudes are of crucial importance in nursing. Attitudes help us to understand how people perceive issues and processes in care and determine what they deem important, good, relevant and appropriate. We should understand attitudes if we are to provide collaborative, patient-centred care; however, they are poorly understood. This article enables the reader to examine attitudes and their constituent beliefs and values. It explores the function of attitudes, considers how they are formed and reflects on the process of attitude change, examining how persuasion can be used to enable individuals to revisit behaviours that seem problematic or less effective. PMID:26647707

  4. Nursing culture: An enemy of evidence-based practice? A focus group exploration.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Ellen M; Fletcher, Margaret

    2015-12-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is challenging for most nurses due to the time constraints of caring for patients and the emerging pressures of a changing health service. To explore these challenges, and thus to establish possible means of overcoming them, three focus groups (n = 17) with children's nurses were conducted. Participants were asked how they would define EBP, what the barriers to EBP were, what skills they needed to help access evidence and how they could integrate evidence into everyday practice. Data were analysed thematically and the anticipated themes of definitions of EBP, barriers, education and nursing culture were determined. Important subthemes were personal and employer disengagement, passivity and lack of resource utilisation. Passive use of evidence readily available in patient folders and on the wards was common. It seemed that little consideration was given to how often this evidence was updated. Nurses define their access to evidence as primarily passive in nature. This is reinforced by a lack of ready access to ongoing education and a perceived lack of investment at institutional level in their continued engagement with evidence. Promoting EBP needs to engage more with those ritual and traditional aspects of nursing culture to challenge these perceptions. PMID:24812063

  5. Knowledge, beliefs and practices of African-American nurses regarding genetics/genomics.

    PubMed

    Spruill, Ida; Coleman, Bernice; Collins-McNeil, Janice

    2009-12-01

    In an effort to increase the awareness of genetics among African-American nurses, a pilot study was conducted with members of the National Black Nurses Association (NBNA) in order to assess the interest, knowledge, and practice of African-American nurses regarding genetics and to identify program needs. Self-administered surveys were distributed to a convenience sample of 77 African-American nurses (N=77) attending the 2006 Annual Conference of the National Black Nurses Association (NBNA) in Hollywood, Florida. Measures of central tendency and frequencies were used to analyze the data. Over half the sample (56%) self-reported their knowledge of genetics as being only fair or poor; however, 56% were interested in genetic awareness training, and 93.5% were willing to participate in planned genomic education. An unexpected finding was that 77.9% believed that genetic tests could be used to discriminate against minorities. Although this sample reported limited genetics/genomic knowledge, their interest in genetics training and the incorporation of genetics into daily practice was high. These data can be used to support the development and implementation of culturally appropriate genetic awareness training. Challenges for the organization include identification of the type of venue to use for genetic/genomic awareness training and identification of resources and partnerships to support NBNA members in gaining genetic awareness training. PMID:20364722

  6. Occupational Exposure to HIV: Perceptions and Preventive Practices of Indian Nursing Students

    PubMed Central

    Shivalli, Siddharudha

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Nurses have a frontier caring role that brings them in close contact with patients' blood and body fluids. An understanding of their professional behavior is essential to assess and minimize the occupational exposure to HIV among them. Objectives. (1) To appraise the knowledge, attitudes, and preventive practices of nursing students pertaining to occupational exposure to HIV. (2) To quantify the risk and correlates of exposure to HIV among them. Methodology. Cross-sectional study was conducted in a nursing college of Varanasi, India. A semistructured and pretested pro forma consisting of questions pertaining to modes of HIV transmission, universal precaution practices, and various aspects of nursing HIV patients was utilized. Independent sample t- and z-tests were applied to judge the association of study variables with the knowledge and risk of HIV. Results. The study sample consisted of 87 female and 16 male nurses. Participants' knowledge of HIV transmission was satisfactory. More than 80% of them had an exposure to blood/body fluid in the last year. Exposure rates for blood/body fluid did not show a significant association (P?>?0.05) with study variables. Conclusion. There were serious lacunae in implementation of the universal precautions despite satisfactory knowledge. Reinforcement of universal precautions is required. PMID:24987531

  7. Exploring Smoking Cessation Attitudes, Beliefs, and Practices in Occupational Health Nursing.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Ollie; Fortuna, Grace; Weinsier, Stephanie; Campbell, Kay; Cantrell, Jennifer; Furmanski, William L

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore occupational health nurses' attitudes, beliefs, and practices regarding the delivery of smoking cessation services to workers. The study included 707 members of the American Association of Occupational Health Nurses (AAOHN) who completed a one-time survey during the fall of 2012. Results indicated that occupational health nurses believed that evidence-based treatments are at least somewhat effective and that they should provide smoking cessation services to their workers; however, a majority of occupational health nurses reported that they did not have appropriate smoking cessation training or guidelines in their workplaces. Occupational health nurses would benefit from training in the use of smoking cessation guidelines and evidence-based smoking cessation interventions, which could be used in their clinical practice. Employers should ensure that workplace policies, such as providing coverage for cessation services, facilitate smokers' efforts to quit. Employers can benefit from many of these policies through cost savings via reduced health care costs and absenteeism. PMID:26187173

  8. Using a Mock Trial Method to Enhance Effectiveness of Teaching Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing.

    PubMed

    White, Cindy T

    2015-01-01

    Traditional teaching methodologies may deter adult learning because of passive the exchange of knowledge. Teaching to the "evidence" substantiating best practice requires a systematic approach to transfer knowledge into clinical inquiry. A mock trial simulated role-play activity was selected to show the value of learning through active engagement. The nurse "defendant" was challenged to substantiate practice based on the evidence. Seminar participants (the jury) scrutinized testimony through deliberation before delivering the final verdict. PMID:26580469

  9. Indoor Tanning Legislation: Shaping Policy and Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Donna W; Darcy, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Legislation exists regulating adolescents' use of tanning beds; however, the rate at which adolescents use these devices has not been reduced. The purpose of this study was to provide an analysis of indoor tanning bed legislation in the United States specifically related to legal issues and parental consent along with enforcement of current laws. The investigators collected data via review of state health department websites or telephone interviews of identified contacts for all 50 states. Findings reveal wide variation in legislation related to adolescents' access to tanning devices and enforcement of violation of legal statutes. Nurses and other health care professionals can play key roles in educating families and adolescents to the dangers from the use of tanning beds along with being role models for proper skin protective behaviors. In addition, nurses should become advocates by supporting legislative efforts that ban tanning salons for all minors, with the long-term goal of reducing skin cancer caused by ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure from the use of tanning salons today. PMID:26292452

  10. [Practical training of application in nursing training, professional representations and involvement of the actors: future nurses, trainers and people in charge/tutors of the practical training].

    PubMed

    Jouanchin, Nelly

    2010-06-01

    Whatever the programme reforms may be, a nursing training cannot be imagined without the clinical practical training because the profession has always been taught and will still be taught by the bed of the patient. This research work is interested in this essential training time that is the practical training of application in which the students, the people in charge: the training tutors and the trainers are involved. More particularly and in a psychosocial approach, it tries to enlighten the difficulties in practices, the communication and the collaboration among these training actors, and this, thanks to the theoretical models of professional representation (M. Bataille, 1997) and of professional involvement (C. Mias, 1998). Finally, from the analysis of the survey data, it proposes some actions to improve this dual education system enabling some work on the meaning, the landmarks, and the feeling of control about the practical training for each of them, so as to strengthen their collaboration and to make their strengths come together for the acknowledgement of the nurse skills and at the service of the patients. PMID:20608264

  11. Creating Positive Environments in Skilled Nursing Facilities to Support Best Practice Implementation: An Overview and Practical Suggestions.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Natalie F; Hickey, Ellen

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss various types of organizational cultures and climates in relationship to best practice implementation. Although not specific to speech-language pathology, positive organizational cultures and climates are associated with better clinician and patient outcomes in health care services than dysfunctional and/or hierarchical organizational cultures and climates. A goal of this article is to help the practicing speech-language pathologist (SLP) promote positive culture change in the skilled nursing facility (SNF) setting. Recommendations to improve the organizational culture and climate of SNFs will be presented through practical examples of collaborative practice. Further suggestions will be surmised from the organizational psychology and interprofessional education literature. The connection between organizational culture and climate, interprofessional education, collaborative practice, and SLPs' best practice implementation in the SNF setting will be discussed. Avenues for future work are suggested. PMID:26190508

  12. Assessment Plans College of Nursing

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Assessment Plans 9/18/2014 College of Nursing Dept Level Degree Program Plan Update LO Data Sched Nursing UG BS Nursing Y 2014 Y Y Y Nursing GR DNP Nursing Practice Y 2014 Y Y Y Nursing GR MN Nursing Y 2014 Y Y Y #12;Doctor of Nursing Practice Degree (DNP) Program Learning Outcomes a. Produce a scholarly

  13. Onboarding advanced practice nurses: development of an orientation program in a cardiac center.

    PubMed

    Goldschmidt, Karen; Rust, Donna; Torowicz, Deborah; Kolb, Susan

    2011-01-01

    The advanced practice nurse (APN) is critical to continuity of patient care, particularly in an innovative and research-intensive environment. The intensity of the environment, steep learning curve, and lack of a structured orientation can lead to difficulties in role assimilation and feelings of disconnectedness. This led the authors to undertake an improvement project to develop an onboarding program for APNs and develop strategies to orient them to their role. The authors describe the program and discuss how it was perceived by the APNs. Program evaluation and suggestions for future nursing research are identified. PMID:21157242

  14. A conceptual framework for advanced practice: an action research project operationalizing an advanced practitioner/consultant nurse role.

    PubMed

    Manley, K

    1997-05-01

    A preliminary conceptual framework for an advanced practice/consultant nurse role is presented which links the role to its context and outcomes. The conceptual framework was developed in the process of analysing data from a 3-year action research study involving the operationalization of an advanced practice/consultant nurse role in a Nursing Development Unit. The skills and knowledge base of consultancy, underpinned by a strong nursing foundation, augmented by strong leadership and combined with the educator and researcher functions, are presented as the attributes of the advanced practitioner/consultant nurse. The facilitation of a transformational culture is highlighted as central to the skills and processes used within the role. Implications for the preparation and accreditation of the advanced practitioner/consultant nurse are highlighted. PMID:9188335

  15. Practice sensitive quality indicators in RAI-MDS 2.0 nursing home data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In recent years, improving the quality of care for nursing home residents has generated a considerable amount of attention. In response, quality indicators (QIs), based on available evidence and expert consensus, have been identified within the Resident Assessment Instrument – Minimum Data Set 2.0 (RAI-MDS 2.0), and validated as proxy measures for quality of nursing home care. We sought to identify practice sensitive QIs; that is, those QIs believed to be the most sensitive to clinical practice. Method We enlisted two experts to review a list of 35 validated QIs and to select those that they believed to be the most sensitive to practice. We then asked separate groups of practicing physicians, nurses, and policy makers to (1) rank the items on the list for overall “practice sensitivity” and then, (2) to identify the domain to which the QI was most sensitive (nursing care, physician care, or policy maker). Results After combining results of all three groups, pressure ulcers were identified as the most practice sensitive QI followed by worsening pain, physical restraint use, the use of antipsychotic medications without a diagnosis of psychosis, and indwelling catheters. When stratified by informant group, although the top five QIs stayed the same, the ranking of the 13 QIs differed by group. Conclusions In addition to identifying a reduced and manageable set of QIs for regular reporting, we believe that focusing on these 13 practice sensitive QIs provides both the greatest potential for improving resident function and slowing the trajectory of decline that most residents experience. PMID:24220213

  16. SCHOOL OF NURSING Bachelor of Science (Nursing) -4 Year Option

    E-print Network

    Bowen, W. Don

    of Health Nursing 2280.03 ­ Care of Adults I SPRING/SUMMER INTERSESSION Nursing 2220.06 ­ Nursing Practice.03 ­ Mental Health Nursing Practice Nursing 4260.03 ­ Community Development and Advocacy SPRING INTERNSHIP Nursing 4240.06 ­ Nursing Practice IV (Internship: 8 weeks) Convocation May 2018 Support Sciences

  17. Mental health nurses can increase capability and capacity in primary care by educating practice nurses: an evaluation of an education programme in England.

    PubMed

    Hardy, S A; Kingsnorth, R

    2015-05-01

    Most people with a mental health problem in England are cared for by clinicians in primary care who may have had little or no training in this area. Our aim was to develop an accessible education programme which was appropriate to the learning needs of this workforce. A survey of the mental health and well-being training needs and preferred learning methods of practice nurses was undertaken, then a programme of education was developed by a primary care mental health expert. Teaching was delivered by mental health nurses who were trained as educators. Both the practice nurses and mental health nurses felt their clinical practice would improve as a result of being involved in this programme. To sustain the learning, mental health nurses were supported by attending and then leading their own action learning sets. This model of education can be adapted and used by health organizations both nationally and internationally. Research is required to find out whether training practice nurses using this programme has an impact on patients. PMID:25858036

  18. Action learning sets in a nursing and midwifery practice learning context: a realistic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Machin, Alison I; Pearson, Pauline

    2014-08-01

    Action learning sets (ALS) are used widely for organisational and workforce development, including in nursing (Anderson and Thorpe, 2004; Pounder, 2009; Young et al., 2010). In the United Kingdom, a multi-faceted educational Pilot programme for new nurses and midwives was implemented to accelerate their clinical practice and leadership development (NHS Education Scotland, 2010). Action Learning Sets were provided for peer support and personal development. The Realistic Evaluation study reported in this paper explored issues of context, mechanism and outcome (Pawson and Tilley, 1997) influencing the action learning experiences of: programme participants (recently qualified nurses and midwives, from different practice settings); and programme supporters. A range of data were collected via: online questionnaires from 66 participants and 29 supporters; three focus groups, each comprising between eight and 10 programme participants; and one focus group with three action learning facilitators. The qualitative data pertaining to the ALS are presented in this paper. Thematic data analysis of context, mechanism and outcome configurations, generated five themes: creating and sustaining a collective learning environment; challenging constructively; collective support; the role of feedback; and effectiveness of ALS. Study outcomes suggest nursing and midwifery action learning should (a) be facilitated positively to improve participants' experience; (b) be renamed to avoid learning methodology confusion; and (c) be outcome focused to evidence impact on practice. PMID:24480095

  19. An exploration of empowerment discourse within home-care nurses' accounts of practice.

    PubMed

    Funk, Laura M; Stajduhar, Kelli I; Purkis, Mary Ellen

    2011-03-01

    In this study, we explore how client and family caregiver 'empowerment' is interpreted by home-care nurses talking about their practice with palliative (and to a lesser extent, non-palliative) clients and families. We draw on secondary analysis of qualitative data collected through in-person interviews with 27 home-care nurses from a western Canadian health authority. First, we illustrate how the practice ideal of empowerment, in the sense of 'respecting autonomy and choices', can be understood as reflecting home-care nurses' needs to mitigate the emotional impact of feeling unable to effectively help palliative clients/families. Then, we illustrate how the practice ideal of empowerment, in the sense of 'promoting independence', can be understood to accomplish the need to shift responsibility for particular care tasks to clients and family members. Lastly, home-care nurses, talk about 'promoting choices' is also investigated. 'Choice' was framed narrowly with respect to allowing palliative clients and families to determine visit time and frequency. Findings are discussed in relation to the concept of 'responsibilization'. PMID:21281397

  20. Measuring Outcomes of Nursing Practice, Education, and Administration. Proceedings of the Annual SCCEN Research Conference (1st, Austin, Texas, December 4-5, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, William E., Jr., Ed.

    Thirty-five papers on the measurement of outcomes of nursing practice, education, and administration are presented from the 1981 research conference of the Southern Council on Collegiate Education for Nursing. Papers and authors include the following: "Why Nursing Research?" (Hildegard E. Peplau); "Job Satisfaction in Nurse Faculty: Test of a…

  1. A Systematic Review of Interventions to Change Staff Care Practices in Order to Improve Resident Outcomes in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Low, Lee-Fay; Fletcher, Jennifer; Goodenough, Belinda; Jeon, Yun-Hee; Etherton-Beer, Christopher; MacAndrew, Margaret; Beattie, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Background We systematically reviewed interventions that attempted to change staff practice to improve long-term care resident outcomes. Methods Studies met criteria if they used a control group, included 6 or more nursing home units and quantitatively assessed staff behavior or resident outcomes. Intervention components were coded as including education material, training, audit and feedback, monitoring, champions, team meetings, policy or procedures and organizational restructure. Results Sixty-three unique studies were broadly grouped according to clinical domain—oral health (3 studies), hygiene and infection control (3 studies), nutrition (2 studies), nursing home acquired pneumonia (2 studies), depression (2 studies) appropriate prescribing (7 studies), reduction of physical restraints (3 studies), management of behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (6 studies), falls reduction and prevention (11 studies), quality improvement (9 studies), philosophy of care (10 studies) and other (5 studies). No single intervention component, combination of, or increased number of components was associated with greater likelihood of positive outcomes. Studies with positive outcomes for residents also tended to change staff behavior, however changing staff behavior did not necessarily improve resident outcomes. Studies targeting specific care tasks (e.g. oral care, physical restraints) were more likely to produce positive outcomes than those requiring global practice changes (e.g. care philosophy). Studies using intervention theories were more likely to be successful. Program logic was rarely articulated, so it was often unclear whether there was a coherent connection between the intervention components and measured outcomes. Many studies reported barriers relating to staff (e.g. turnover, high workload, attitudes) or organizational factors (e.g. funding, resources, logistics). Conclusion Changing staff practice in nursing homes is possible but complex. Interventionists should consider barriers and feasibility of program components to impact on each intended outcome. PMID:26559675

  2. Nursing Faculty Teaching in the General Education Sequence: The Value of Liberal Arts as a Component of Professional Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthony, Mary L.; Templin, Martha A.

    1998-01-01

    At MacMurray, a liberal arts college, nursing faculty participate in teaching general education courses. Despite initial resistance from nonnursing faculty and students, the nursing faculty were able to model the importance of liberal arts for nursing majors, integrate academic content into nursing courses, improve students' communication skills,…

  3. DNA methylation in complex disease: applications in nursing research, practice, and policy.

    PubMed

    Wright, Michelle L; Ralph, Jody L; Ohm, Joyce E; Anderson, Cindy M

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenomic modification that is essential to normal human development and biological processes. DNA methylation patterns are heritable and dynamic throughout the life span. Environmental exposures can alter DNA methylation patterns, contributing to the development of complex disease. Identification and modulation of environmental factors influencing disease susceptibility through alterations in DNA methylation are amenable to nursing intervention and form the basis for individualized patient care. Here we describe the evidence supporting the translation of DNA methylation analyses as a tool for screening, diagnosis, and treatment of complex disease in nursing research and practice. The ethical, legal, social, and economic considerations of advances in genomics are considered as a model for epigenomic policy. We conclude that contemporary and informed nurse scientists and clinicians are uniquely poised to apply innovations in epigenomic research to clinical populations and develop appropriate policies that guide equitable and ethical use of new strategies to improve patient care. PMID:23849553

  4. CONFORMAL TILINGS I: FOUNDATIONS, THEORY, AND PRACTICE

    E-print Network

    CONFORMAL TILINGS I: FOUNDATIONS, THEORY, AND PRACTICE PHILIP L. BOWERS AND KENNETH STEPHENSON Abstract. This paper opens a new chapter in the study of planar tilings by introducing conformal tilings as concrete patterns of geometric shapes, the tiles. In the conformal case, however, these geometric tiles

  5. Online Collaborative Learning: Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Tim, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    "Online Collaborative Learning: Theory and Practice" provides a resource for researchers and practitioners in the area of online collaborative learning (also known as CSCL, computer-supported collaborative learning), particularly those working within a tertiary education environment. It includes articles of relevance to those interested in both…

  6. PHILOSOPHICAL SMOKE SIGNALS: THEORY AND PRACTICE IN

    E-print Network

    Kimble, Chris

    for Information Systems is not a bad idea. The problems start when we ask, "what kind of science might underpin Science and Information Systems were clearly distinct (Davis et al, 1996. For instance, in the AssociationPHILOSOPHICAL SMOKE SIGNALS: THEORY AND PRACTICE IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS DESIGN David King and Chris

  7. Leadership: Theory and Practice. Sixth Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northouse, Peter G.

    2012-01-01

    Adopted at more than 1,000 colleges and universities worldwide, the market-leading text owes its success to the unique way in which it combines an academically robust account of the major theories and models of leadership with an accessible style and practical exercises that help students apply what they learn. Each chapter of Peter…

  8. Designing Research for Theory and Practice

    E-print Network

    Shawcross, Judith K.; Ridgman, Tom W.

    2015-06-18

    of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK Twr20@cam.ac.uk Abstract: This paper reports on a doctoral study that has the dual aims of improving theory and practice within an Engineering Education context. The focus is on the development of students’ graduate-level work...

  9. Leadership Pedagogy: Putting Theory to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosch, David M.; Anthony, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Building leadership capacity in college students is both an art and a science. Knowledge of college student development and specifically college leadership development, as well as research in leadership theory and practices, can help college leadership educators become more effective. International Leadership Association (ILA) Guiding Questions…

  10. Pizza into Java: Translating theory into practice

    E-print Network

    Wadler, Philip

    Pizza into Java: Translating theory into practice Martin Odersky University of Karlsruhe Philip Wadler University of Glasgow Abstract Pizza is a strict superset of Java that incorporates three ideas types. Pizza is defined by translation into Java and compiles into the Java Virtual Machine

  11. Assisted living nursing practice: medication management: part 2 supervision and monitoring of medication administration by unlicensed assistive personnel.

    PubMed

    Mitty, Ethel; Flores, Sandi

    2007-01-01

    More than half the states permit assistance with or administration of medications by unlicensed assistive personnel or med techs. Authorization of this nursing activity (or task) is more likely because of state assisted living regulation than by support and approval of the state Board of Nursing. In many states, the definition of "assistance with" reads exactly like "administration of" thereby raising concern with regard to delegation, accountability, and liability for practice. It is, as well, a hazardous path for the assisted living nurse who must monitor and evaluate the performance of the individual performing this nursing task. This article, the second in a series on medication management, addresses delegation, standards of practice of medication administration, types of medication errors, the components of a performance evaluation tool, and a culture of safety. Maintaining professional standards of assisted living nursing practice courses throughout the suggested recommendations. PMID:17561014

  12. Training Needs of Nurses in Public Hospitals in Australia: Review of Current Practices and Future Research Agenda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlisle, Joanna; Bhanugopan, Ramudu; Fish, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to provide an overview of the concept of training needs analysis (TNA), current practice, models and the impact that training needs analysis currently has on nurses in public hospitals in Australia. Thus, the paper should aid future research in the area of TNA of nurses through helping researchers to clarify the…

  13. Evidence-Based Practice Beliefs and Behaviors of Nurses Providing Cancer Pain Management: A Mixed-Methods Approach

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Linda H.; Meins, Alexa R.; Mitchell, Pamela H.; Voss, Joachim; Doorenbos, Ardith Z.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To describe evidence-based practice (EBP) beliefs and behaviors of nurses who provide cancer pain management. Design Descriptive, cross-sectional with a mixed-methods approach. Setting Two inpatient oncology units in the Pacific Northwest. Sample 40 RNs. Methods Data collected by interviews and web-based surveys. Main Research Variables EBP beliefs, EBP implementation, evidence-based pain management. Findings Nurses agreed with the positive aspects of EBP and their implementation ability, although implementation level was low. They were satisfied with their pain management practices. Oncology nursing certification was associated with innovativeness, and innovativeness was associated with EBP beliefs. Themes identified were (a) limited definition of EBP, (b) varied evidence-based pain management decision making, (c) limited identification of evidence-based pain management practices, and (d) integration of nonpharmacologic interventions into patient care. Conclusions Nurses' low level of EBP implementation in the context of pain management was explained by their trust that standards of care and medical orders were evidence-based. Implications for Nursing Nurses' EBP beliefs and behaviors should be considered when developing strategies for sustaining evidence-based pain management practices. Implementation of the EBP process by nurses may not be realistic in the inpatient setting; therefore, hospital pain management policies need to be evidence-based and reinforced with nurses. PMID:25806883

  14. Comparison of Evidence-Based Practice between Physicians and Nurses: A National Survey of Regional Hospitals in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiu, Ya-Wen; Weng, Yi-Hao; Lo, Heng-Lien; Hsu, Chih-Cheng; Shih, Ya-Hui; Kuo, Ken N.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Although evidence-based practice (EBP) has been widely investigated, few studies compare physicians and nurses on performance. Methods: A structured questionnaire survey was used to investigate EBP among physicians and nurses in 61 regional hospitals of Taiwan. Valid postal questionnaires were collected from 605 physicians and 551…

  15. Effectiveness of organisational infrastructures to promote evidence-based nursing practice

    PubMed Central

    Flodgren, Gerd; Rojas-Reyes, Maria Ximena; Cole, Nick; Foxcroft, David R

    2014-01-01

    Background Nurses and midwives form the bulk of the clinical health workforce and play a central role in all health service delivery. There is potential to improve health care quality if nurses routinely use the best available evidence in their clinical practice. Since many of the factors perceived by nurses as barriers to the implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) lie at the organisational level, it is of interest to devise and assess the effectiveness of organisational infrastructures designed to promote EBP among nurses. Objectives To assess the effectiveness of organisational infrastructures in promoting evidence-based nursing. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, LILACS, BIREME, IBECS, NHS Economic Evaluations Database, Social Science Citation Index, Science Citation Index and Conference Proceedings Citation Indexes up to 9 March 2011. We developed a new search strategy for this update as the strategy published in 2003 omitted key terms. Additional search methods included: screening reference lists of relevant studies, contacting authors of relevant papers regarding any further published or unpublished work, and searching websites of selected research groups and organisations. Selection criteria We considered randomised controlled trials, controlled clinical trials, interrupted times series (ITSs) and controlled before and after studies of an entire or identified component of an organisational infrastructure intervention aimed at promoting EBP in nursing. The participants were all healthcare organisations comprising nurses, midwives and health visitors. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias. For the ITS analysis, we reported the change in the slopes of the regression lines, and the change in the level effect of the outcome at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months follow-up. Main results We included one study from the USA (re-analysed as an ITS) involving one hospital and an unknown number of nurses and patients. The study evaluated the effects of a standardised evidence-based nursing procedure on nursing care for patients at risk of developing healthcare-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPUs). If a patient’s admission Braden score was below or equal to 18 (i.e. indicating a high risk of developing pressure ulcers), nurses were authorised to initiate a pressure ulcer prevention bundle (i.e. a set of evidence-based clinical interventions) without waiting for a physician order. Re-analysis of data as a time series showed that against a background trend of decreasing HAPU rates, if that trend was assumed to be real, there was no evidence of an intervention effect at three months (mean rate per quarter 0.7%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7 to 3.3; P = 0.457). Given the small percentages post intervention it was not statistically possible to extrapolate effects beyond three months. Authors’ conclusions Despite extensive searching of published and unpublished research we identified only one low-quality study; we excluded many studies due to non-eligible study design. If policy-makers and healthcare organisations wish to promote evidence-based nursing successfully at an organisational level, they must ensure the funding and conduct of well-designed studies to generate evidence to guide policy. PMID:22336783

  16. Nurses' attitudes toward pain, pain assessment, and pain management practices in long-term care facilities.

    PubMed

    Mrozek, J E; Werner, J S

    2001-12-01

    This descriptive study was designed to identify attitudes regarding pain as well as pain assessment and management practices of nurses working with elderly residents in 10 long-term care facilities. Twenty-seven nurses from 10 facilities in the Midwest responded to a questionnaire. Findings indicate that more than half of the respondents reported that residents should be pain free; however, only 5 respondents defined pain free as no pain. Others defined it as being comfortable or able to perform activities of daily living. Nurses reported assessing the following aspects of pain more than three fourths of the time: onset, frequency, location, severity/intensity, facial expression, contortions, and medication effectiveness. Changes in weight, recreational activity, and concentration, as well as coping skills were assessed less than half of the time. When first learning residents were in pain, nurses reported doing further assessments, offering medication, giving emotional reassurance, and changing the resident's position. They reported substantial familiarity with basic nonpharmacologic practices but only asked residents to try these interventions (in addition to medication) an average of 38% of the time. PMID:11748550

  17. Critical thinking, educational preparation, and development of moral judgment among selected groups of practicing nurses.

    PubMed

    Ketefian, S

    1981-01-01

    The focus of this descriptive study was the relationship between critical thinking, educational preparation, and level of moral judgment in 79 practicing nurses. The Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal Test was used to measure critical thinking; information on the participating nurses' educational preparation was obtained from a personal information sheet. Moral judgment was measured by Rest's Defining Issues Test. The hypothesis that critical thinking would be positively related to moral judgment was tested by Pearson product moment correlation; the obtained coefficient of .5326 was significant at the .001 level. The hypothesis that there would be a difference between professional and technical nurses' moral judgments was tested through a one-way analysis of variance. The F ratio (F [1,77] = 9.6) was significant beyond the .01 level. Data also supported the hypothesis that critical thinking and educational preparation would predict greater variance in moral judgment than either variable alone, which was tested through multiple regression analysis (F [2,75] = 18.3, p = .01). Critical thinking and education together accounted for 32.9 percent of the variance in moral judgment. Implications of the findings are discussed for nursing research, practice, and education. PMID:6907870

  18. [Dialectics for humanized care in ICU's: contradictions between professional nursing discourse and practice].

    PubMed

    de Pinho, Leandro Barbosa; dos Santos, Silvia Maria Azevedo

    2008-03-01

    This study attempts to unveil contradictions in humanized nursing care in ICUs. It is a qualitative, dialectic-based study involving 7 nurses, 4 family members and one patient of the Adult ICU of the Hospital of the Federal Universityof Santa Catarina. Participatory observation and semi-structured interviews were applied to collect the data. Marxist and Gramscian ideas of contradiction were used as the theoretical-philosophical reference. This study demonstrates that humanized care is part of a complex network, in which care knowledge seems to give way to closer network ties, while care practicefollows an impersonalized strategy within the logic of partitioned and routine health care production. The dissociation between knowledge and practice also contemplates the difficulties in dealing with the burdens of suffering and institutional-professional limitations. The conclusion is that knowledge of this reality should be a renewed, yet age-old challenge for the nurse in the search for the constant construction/ reconstruction of Nursing in terms of practice, knowledge and work relations. PMID:18450149

  19. Raising the topic of weight in general practice: perspectives of GPs and primary care nurses

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, Maxine; Stathi, Afroditi; Keogh, Edmund; Eccleston, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore general practitioners’ (GPs) and primary care nurses’ perceived barriers to raising the topic of weight in general practice. Design A qualitative study using the Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF). 34 semistructured interviews were conducted to explore views, opinions and experiences of initiating a discussion about weight. Content and thematic analyses were used to analyse the interview transcripts. Setting General practices located in one primary care trust in the South West of England. Participants 17 GPs and 17 nurses aged between 32 and 66?years. The modal age range for GPs was 30–39?years and for nurses, 40–49?years. Results Barriers were synthesised into three main themes: (1) limited understanding about obesity care, (2) concern about negative consequences, and (3) having time and resources to raise a sensitive topic. Most barriers were related to raising the topic in more routine settings, rather than when dealing with an associated medical condition. GPs were particularly worried about damaging their relationship with patients and emphasised the need to follow their patient's agenda. Conclusions Uncertainty about obesity, concerns about alienating patients and feeling unable to raise the topic within the constraints of a 10?min consultation, is adding to the reluctance of GPs and nurses to broach the topic of weight. Addressing these concerns through training or by providing evidence of effective interventions that are feasible to deliver within consultations may lead to greater practitioner engagement and willingness to raise the topic. PMID:26254471

  20. Pediatric Sedation: Using Secondary Data to Describe Registered Nurse Practice in Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Crego, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Children, often require sedation for procedures due to their developmental level and difficulty complying with positioning. There are few studies that describe nurse sedation practices or adverse events. Studies of pediatric sedation care have small sample sizes that are inadequate to detect adverse events. This study reports practices and outcomes of sedation delivered to children from infancy up to 14 years of age, that were monitored only by registered nurses (RNs) during diagnostic radiology procedures drawn from a sample of 12,584 cases from the Pediatric Sedation Research Consortium (PSRC) database. There were 727 adverse events (5.78%). However, no deaths, cardiac arrests, intubations or aspirations were reported in this sample. The most common adverse event was inadequate sedation/agitation/delirium 196 (155.8/10,000) and desaturation below baseline for greater than 30 seconds 173 (138/10,000). Further research comparing sedation practices and outcomes by type of providers, including nurses, are necessary to improve practice. PMID:25530734

  1. Organizational Culture Shapes the Adoption and Incorporation of Simulation into Nursing Curricula: A Grounded Theory Study

    PubMed Central

    Jack, Susan M.; Eva, Kevin; Martin, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To create a substantive mid-range theory explaining how the organizational cultures of undergraduate nursing programs shape the adoption and incorporation of mid-to high-level technical fidelity simulators as a teaching strategy within curricula. Method. A constructivist grounded theory was used to guide this study which was conducted in Ontario, Canada, during 2011-12. Semistructured interviews (n = 43) with participants that included nursing administrators, nursing faculty, and simulation leaders across multiple programs (n = 13) informed this study. Additionally, key documents (n = 67) were reviewed. Purposeful and theoretical sampling was used and data were collected and analyzed simultaneously. Data were compared among and between sites. Findings. The organizational elements that shape simulation in nursing (OESSN) model depicts five key organizational factors at the nursing program level that shaped the adoption and incorporation of simulation: (1) leaders working in tandem, (2) information exchange, (3) physical locale, (4) shared motivators, and (5) scaffolding to manage change. Conclusions. The OESSN model provides an explanation of the organizational factors that contributed to the adoption and incorporation of simulation into nursing curricula. Nursing programs that use the OESSN model may experience a more rapid or broad uptake of simulation when organizational factors that impact adoption and incorporation are considered and planned for. PMID:24818018

  2. The woven fabric - a metaphor of nursing care: the major subject in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Asp, Margareta; Fagerberg, Ingegerd

    2002-06-01

    The woven fabric - a metaphor of nursing care: the major subject in nursing education Society's future needs regarding health care present challenges to traditional nursing education. Today, the ambition is to create a nursing role that is appropriate to people's health care needs rather than the needs of the health care system. In nursing education, the major subject - nursing care - is central. Accordingly, there is a need for a consistent and clear articulation of this subject as well as the nursing profession. The aim of the present study was to interpret and describe the major subject, its content and structure in the nursing programme at Mälardalen University. With a hermeneutic approach an interpretation and application emerged as a metaphor of nursing care - the woven fabric. In this structure concepts function as bridges linking theory and practice, whereby it is possible to integrate different aspects of knowledge in order to think, feel and act nursing care. PMID:12000663

  3. ***Revised syllabus 4.6.2015*** WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF NURSING | DOCTOR OF NURSING PRACTICE

    E-print Network

    of evidence based theories of individual, group and family psychotherapy *** Revised Syllabus 4 psychotherapy, including group and family therapy modalities. 2. Identify indications of client motivation assessment and psychotherapy recommendations to client situations in varieties of settings across

  4. Certified Nurse Aides and Scope of Practice: Clinical Outcomes and Patient Safety.

    PubMed

    McMullen, Tara L; Resnick, Barbara; Hansen, Jennie Chin; Miller, Nancy; Rubinstein, Robert

    2015-12-01

    To understand the impact of scope of practice and allowable certified nurse aide (CNA) tasks across states, the current study compared clinical outcomes in states with a basic scope of practice versus those that allowed for an expanded scope. The current study used data from the Minimum Data Set as well as staffing data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Clinical outcomes included: (a) percent of residents whose need for help with daily activities has increased, (b) percent of high-risk residents with pressure ulcers, (c) percent of residents who self-report moderate to severe pain, (d) percent of residents experiencing one or more falls with major injury, and (e) CNA staffing hours. There was no difference in clinical outcomes between states with expanded or basic scopes. Many factors influence clinical outcomes among residents and additional staffing and facility characteristics should be considered in future studies. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 41(12), 32-39.]. PMID:26468657

  5. Motivations of physicians and nurses to practice voluntary euthanasia: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background While a number of reviews have explored the attitude of health professionals toward euthanasia, none of them documented their motivations to practice euthanasia. The objective of the present systematic review was to identify physicians’ and nurses’ motives for having the intention or for performing an act of voluntary euthanasia and compare findings from countries where the practice is legalized to those where it is not. Methods The following databases were investigated: MEDLINE/PubMed (1950+), PsycINFO (1806+), CINAHL (1982+), EMBASE (1974+) and FRANCIS (1984+). Proquest Dissertations and Theses (1861+) was also investigated for gray literature. Additional studies were included by checking the references of the articles included in the systematic review as well as by looking at our personal collection of articles on euthanasia. Results This paper reviews a total of 27 empirical quantitative studies out of the 1 703 articles identified at the beginning. Five studies were in countries where euthanasia is legal and 22 in countries where it is not. Seventeen studies were targeting physicians, 9 targeted nurses and 1 both health professionals. Six studies identified the motivations underlying the intention to practice euthanasia, 16 the behavior itself and 5 both intention and behavior. The category of variables most consistently associated with euthanasia is psychological variables. All categories collapsed, the four variables most frequently associated with euthanasia are past behavior, medical specialty, whether the patient is depressed and the patient’s life expectancy. Conclusions The present review suggests that physicians and nurses are motivated to practice voluntary euthanasia especially when they are familiar with the act of euthanasia, when the patient does not have depressive symptoms and has a short life expectancy and their motivation varies according to their medical specialty. Additional studies among nurses and in countries where euthanasia is legal are needed. PMID:24716567

  6. EVITEACH: a study exploring ways to optimise the uptake of evidence-based practice to undergraduate nurses.

    PubMed

    Hickman, Louise D; Kelly, Helen; Phillips, Jane L

    2014-11-01

    EVITEACH aimed to increase undergraduate nursing student's engagement with evidence-based practice and enhance their knowledge utilisation and translation capabilities. Building students capabilities to apply evidence in professional practice is a fundamental university role. Undergraduate nursing students need to actively engage with knowledge utilisation and translational skill development to narrow the evidence practice gap in the clinical setting. A two phase mixed methods study was undertaken over a three year period (2008-2010, inclusive) utilizing a Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) approach. Three undergraduate nursing cohorts (N = 188) enrolled in a compulsory knowledge translation and utilisation subject at one Australian university participated. Data collection comprised of subject evaluation data and reflective statements. Preliminary investigations identified priority areas related to subject: materials, resources, teaching and workload. These priority areas became the focus of action for two PDSA cycles. PDSA cycle 1 demonstrated significant improvement of the subject overall (p > 0.05), evaluation of the materials used (p > 0.001) and teaching sub-groups (p > 0.05). PDSA cycle 2 continued to sustain improvement of the subject overall (p > 0.05). Furthermore reflective statements collected during PDSA cycle 2 identified four themes: (1) What engages undergraduate nurses in the learning process; (2) The undergraduate nurses learning trajectory; (3) Undergraduate nurses' preconceptions of research and evidenced-based practice; and (4) Appreciating the importance of research and evidence-based practice to nursing. There is little robust evidence to guide the most effective way to build knowledge utilisation and translational skills. Effectively engaging undergraduate nursing students in knowledge translation and utilisation subjects could have immediate and long term benefits for nursing as a profession and patient outcomes. Developing evidence-based practice capabilities is important in terms of improving patient outcomes, organisational efficiencies and creating satisfying work environments. PMID:24953061

  7. ***Revised syllabus 4.6.2015*** WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF NURSING | DOCTOR OF NURSING PRACTICE

    E-print Network

    ***Revised syllabus 4.6.2015*** #12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE Prescribing CREDIT HOURS: 3 semester (didactic) credits COURSE FORMAT: Hybrid course (on-campus, in DESCRIPTION Pharmacology for clinical practice including decision-making, prescribing, drug monitoring

  8. Medical ethics as practiced by students, nurses and faculty members in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    BAZRAFCAN, LEILA; NABEIEI, PARISA; SHOKRPOUR, NASRIN; MOADAB, NEDA

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Assuming any social role has obligations and fulfilling the related responsibilities has ethical aspects that must be addressed carefully. Each role requires extensive training, which usually takes place in university institutions. Ethics is applied in at least three academic areas, including: a) in education of students' personal growth, b) in patient care, and c) in university communion in population-based health care. Given the importance of this issue in the moral domain, this study examines the correlation among the students, nurses and teacher's opinions regarding principles of medical ethics at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This is a descriptive-analytic and cross-sectional study conducted in 2010. The participants of this research consisted of all medical students, nurses in public hospitals, and faculty members in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. For validity evaluation, the expert panel method and for reliability evaluation, test-retest method was used. Results: Based on the medical ethics’ scores in these three groups, there was a significant relationship between the mean scores of student-nurses and employed nurses, but there was no significant relationship between those of student-faculties. Also the mean score of the students was the highest in medical ethics. Conclusion: In this study, we presented a list of virtues and moral characteristics of medical staff and found out the method of practicing medical ethics in everyday life of students to improve the moral reasoning of teachers, nurses and students. Moreover, medical ethics, with the presentation of specific criteria for ethical behavior in various domains of human life, especially in dealing with patients, can help practice ethical values in the medical community. PMID:25587553

  9. Promoting reflection in mental health nursing practice: a case illustration using problem-based learning.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Marie; Matarasso, Beth

    2005-12-01

    Reflective practice in nursing has been shown to improve both client care and nurses role satisfaction. Students require regular and guided opportunities to learn the necessary reflective skills that underpin best practice. Problem-based learning (PBL) processes based on comprehensive learning packages developed from actual clinical cases provide a contextualized and realistic means for students to develop and hone their reflective skills for use as mental health practitioners. This paper uses a case illustration to demonstrate the usefulness of PBL as a mechanism for developing reflective practice in the mental health context. Students analysed five cases drawn from actual documented clinical materials that included nursing, medical and allied health professionals' assessments, treatment regimes, and progress notes. One student's written analysis of the five cases and an interview with the student is presented as a case illustration. The case illustrates the student's reflections on the theme of 'hope' for the clients and identified three obstacles. These were: (i) a lack of acknowledgement by health professionals of traumatic life events; (ii) overlooking less tangible losses; and (iii) a central focus on drug treatment. Reflective learning strategies can be incorporated in on- and off-campus learning environments and used to assist the learner to practise critical reflective skills in a controlled and safe manner. Reflective processes are more meaningful if the PBL package that students encounter represents real clinical scenarios with comprehensive resource materials. PMID:16296991

  10. What Is Your KVO? Historical Perspectives, Review of Evidence, and a Survey About an Often Overlooked Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Paquet, France; Marchionni, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Like many nursing "sacred cows," the practice of keeping a vein open with a small infusion of intravenous solution does not have clear origins or robust evidence. A survey of Canadian nurses was conducted to determine current practices. More than 50% of respondents reported regularly using a keep-vein-open (KVO) rate between doses of intermittent medication. Frequently, the rate was not specified by the prescriber; in this case, nurses preferred 21 to 30 mL/h. Given the absence of evidence and the frequent use, it is important to ensure that KVO is used properly in the context of a medical prescription or an organizational protocol. PMID:26714117

  11. ***Revised syllabus 4.6.2015*** WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF NURSING | DOCTOR OF NURSING PRACTICE

    E-print Network

    . COURSE DESCRIPTION Examination of the foundational theories of psychotherapy including psychodynamic and group psychotherapy are explored. This course will provide the student the opportunity to examine psychotherapy in anticipation of future clinical experiences. Emphasis is placed on analysis of the legal

  12. 2008 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Postsecondary Practical Nursing. (Program CIP: 51.3901 - Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse Training)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNutt, Jana; Clowers, Pat; Collum, Lara; Canton, Dixie; Comfort, Sherri; Kron, Maxine; Mahaffey, Elizabeth; Hancock, Jane; Waldrup, Sandra; Walker, Sherri; Pearson, Lisa; Miller, Kelly; Cooper, Patti; Bedwell, Susan

    2008-01-01

    As the world economy continues to evolve, businesses and industries must adopt new practices and processes in order to survive. Quality and cost control, work teams and participatory management, and an infusion of technology are transforming the way people work and do business. Employees are now expected to read, write, and communicate…

  13. Education, philosophy and academic practice: nursing studies in the posthistorical university.

    PubMed

    Rolfe, Gary; Gardner, Lyn

    2006-12-01

    This paper is an amended and abridged version of a seminar given at the NET/NEP 1st Nurse Education International Conference in Vancouver, Canada. The topic of the paper arose from our growing concerns about the state of nurse education and its position in the university at the start of the twenty-first century. We share the fears expressed by Readings that the university has lost its way and is increasingly driven by a business agenda and a quest for ever-greater efficiency. Our biggest concern is with the impact that the so-called 'posthistorical university' is having on the study of nursing, particularly the growing pressure on nurse academics to focus their attention and energy on output at the expense of process, and on research at the expense of practice and practitioner development. We suggest that the solution might lie with Jean-Francois Lyotard's notion of postmodern philosophy as a way of opening up debate and, in his words, saving the honour of thinking. PMID:17028076

  14. Nurses' knowledge, attitudes, and current practice of daily oral hygiene care to patients on acute aged care wards in two Australian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Gibney, J; Wright, C; Sharma, A; Naganathan, V

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to identify nurses' knowledge, attitudes, and current practice in relation to oral hygiene (OH) by means of a questionnaire. It was conducted on the aged care wards of two acute tertiary referral hospitals in New South Wales, Australia. We found that 74% of nurses have a set OH practice. Fifty-four percent of nurses learn their OH practice at university or TAFE. The main nurse qualification is a registered nurse (72%). Denture cleaning, toothbrushing, and swabbing the mouth with a toothette are the main OH practices. Nurses (99%) considered OH to be important. The main barriers to conducting OH practices were patient behaviors, lack of time and staff, and patient physical difficulties. Nurses considered OH important however patient behaviors impact on their ability to undertake the task. Education institutions and hospitals should consider the joint development of a formal OH procedure and training package that can be used on acute geriatric care wards. PMID:26297474

  15. Compassion fatigue among registered nurses: connecting theory and research.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Kate

    2015-02-01

    Unresolved compassion fatigue often causes physical and emotional exhaustion, and can significantly impair job performance. It is also known to cause increased absenteeism and even turnover among health care providers such as registered nurses. Often those experiencing compassion fatigue attempt to self-medicate in order to numb the intense emotions, and distance themselves from patients, colleagues, friends, and even family. This article describes the challenges of applying one widely used conceptual model to research among nurses who are at risk for experiencing this important and debilitating phenomenon. Through two qualitative studies that explored compassion fatigue among registered nurses, symptoms were identified that fit within the conceptual model. Several additional elements were not adequately captured by the conceptual model, and the term was perceived as being stigmatizing. PMID:25434861

  16. Statistical testing of the full-range leadership theory in nursing.

    PubMed

    Kanste, Outi; Kääriäinen, Maria; Kyngäs, Helvi

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study is to test statistically the structure of the full-range leadership theory in nursing. The data were gathered by postal questionnaires from nurses and nurse leaders working in healthcare organizations in Finland. A follow-up study was performed 1 year later. The sample consisted of 601 nurses and nurse leaders, and the follow-up study had 78 respondents. Theory was tested through structural equation modelling, standard regression analysis and two-way anova. Rewarding transformational leadership seems to promote and passive laissez-faire leadership to reduce willingness to exert extra effort, perceptions of leader effectiveness and satisfaction with the leader. Active management-by-exception seems to reduce willingness to exert extra effort and perception of leader effectiveness. Rewarding transformational leadership remained as a strong explanatory factor of all outcome variables measured 1 year later. The data supported the main structure of the full-range leadership theory, lending support to the universal nature of the theory. PMID:19702652

  17. Professional practice in contested territory: child health nurses and maternal sadness.

    PubMed

    Belle, Melissa-Jane; Willis, Karen

    2013-02-01

    This research explored the extent to which Child and Family Health Nurses (CHNs) exercise autonomy as specialist health professionals within community health settings. Using postnatal depression (PND) as an example we examined if, and how, CHNs exercised autonomy within their practice, drawing on their specialised body of knowledge. A qualitative study was undertaken using in-depth interviews with 10 CHNs practising in Tasmania, Australia. We analysed the interview data thematically to identify how CHNs defined and discussed PND, the strategies they drew on in their practice, and indicators of professional identity and autonomy in their descriptions of practice as it pertained to PND. Three themes emerged from this analysis: alternative understandings of maternal sadness; technicality, indeterminancy and tacit knowledge; and identification of professional boundaries. We found that CHNs' autonomous practice was informed by understandings distinct from dominant perspectives, suggesting that this specialist area of nursing practice exhibits extensive indicators of professionalism that have been largely unrecognised. This has implications for both CHNs' professional identity and the provision of services available to new mothers and their babies. PMID:23485217

  18. eLearning, knowledge brokering, and nursing: strengthening collaborative practice in long-term care.

    PubMed

    Halabisky, Brenda; Humbert, Jennie; Stodel, Emma J; MacDonald, Colla J; Chambers, Larry W; Doucette, Suzanne; Dalziel, William B; Conklin, James

    2010-01-01

    Interprofessional collaboration is vital to the delivery of quality care in long-term care settings; however, caregivers in long-term care face barriers to participating in training programs to improve collaborative practices. Consequently, eLearning can be used to create an environment that combines convenient, individual learning with collaborative experiential learning. Findings of this study revealed that learners enjoyed the flexibility of the Working Together learning resource. They acquired new knowledge and skills that they were able to use in their practice setting to achieve higher levels of collaborative practice. Nurses were identified as team leaders because of their pivotal role in the long-term care home and collaboration with all patient care providers. Nurses are ideal as knowledge brokers for the collaborative practice team. Quantitative findings showed no change in learner's attitudes regarding collaborative practice; however, interviews provided examples of positive changes experienced. Face-to-face collaboration was found to be a challenge, and changes to organizations, systems, and technology need to be made to facilitate this process. The Working Together learning resource is an important first step toward strengthening collaboration in long-term care, and the pilot implementation provides insights that further our understanding of both interprofessional collaboration and effective eLearning. PMID:20736723

  19. The advanced practice nursing role with multisite responsibilities.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Mary A; Myers, Jolynne

    2002-09-01

    A multisite APN role presents a unique perspective. You may see this in terms of opportunities or as frustrations. Ultimately it is your response, not the situation, that determines the outcome. As with any major transition, it can be a catalyst to transform yourself and reenergize your practice. Careful attention to the elements presented here can give you a good start. From there, adaptability is the key, as Lao-tzu said "a good traveler has no fixed plans and is not intent upon arriving. A good artist lets his intuition lead him wherever it wants. A good scientist has freed himself of concepts and keeps his mind open to what is." PMID:12168710

  20. Practice what you preach’: Nurses’ perspectives on the Code of Ethics and Service Pledge in five South African hospitals

    PubMed Central

    White, Janine; Phakoe, Maureen; Rispel, Laetitia C.

    2015-01-01

    Background A recent focus of the global discourse on the health workforce has been on its quality, including the existence of codes of ethics. In South Africa, the importance of ethics and value systems in nursing was emphasised in the 2011 National Nursing Summit. Objective The study explored hospital nurses’ perceptions of the International Code of Ethics for Nurses; their perceptions of the South African Nurses’ Pledge of Service; and their views on contemporary ethical practice. Methods Following university ethics approval, the study was done at a convenience sample of five hospitals in two South African provinces. In each hospital, all day duty nurses in paediatric, maternity, adult medical, and adult surgical units were requested to complete a self-administered questionnaire. The questionnaire focused on their perceptions of the Code of Ethics and the Pledge, using a seven-point Likert scale. STATA® 13 and NVIVO 10 were used to analyse survey data and open-ended responses, respectively. Results The mean age of survey participants (n=69) was 39 years (SD=9.2), and the majority were female (96%). The majority agreed with a statement that they will promote the human rights of individuals (98%) and that they have a duty to meet the health and social needs of the public (96%). More nuanced responses were obtained for some questions, with 60% agreeing with a statement that too much emphasis is placed on patients’ rights as opposed to nurses’ rights and 32% agreeing with a statement that they would take part in strike action to improve nurses’ salaries and working conditions. The dilemmas of nurses to uphold the Code of Ethics and the Pledge in face of workplace constraints or poor working conditions were revealed in nurses’ responses to open-ended questions. Conclusion Continuing education in ethics and addressing health system deficiencies will enhance nurses’ professional development and their ethical decision-making and practice. PMID:25971398

  1. Factors associated with the use of advanced practice nurses/physician assistants in a fee-for-service nursing home practice: a comparison with primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Bakerjian, Debra; Harrington, Charlene

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine factors associated with the use of advanced practice nurse and physician assistant (APN/PA) visits to nursing home (NH) patients compared with those by primary care physicians (PCPs). This was a secondary analysis using Medicare claims data. General estimation equations were used to determine the odds of NH residents receiving APN/PA visits. Ordinary least squares analyses were used to examine factors associated with these visits. A total of 5,436 APN/PAs provided care to 27% of 129,812 residents and were responsible for 16% of the 1.1 million Medicare NH fee-for-service visits in 2004. APN/PAs made an average of 33 visits annually compared with PCPs (21 visits). Neuropsychiatric and acute diagnoses and patients with a long-stay status were associated with more APN/PA visits. APN/PAs provide a substantial amount of care, but regional variations occur, and Medicare regulations constrain the ability of APN/PAs to substitute for physician visits. PMID:22716651

  2. Developing a Culture to Facilitate Research Capacity Building for Clinical Nurse Consultants in Generalist Paediatric Practice

    PubMed Central

    Wilkes, Lesley; Cummings, Joanne; McKay, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports a research capacity building exercise with a group of CNCs practicing in the speciality of paediatrics in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. It explores the first step in building a research culture, through identifying the research priorities of members of the NSW Child Health Networks Paediatric Clinical Nurse Consultant group, and this forms the major focus of this paper. A nominal group technique (NGT) was utilised with sixteen members to identify research topics for investigation which were considered a priority for improving children's health care. The group reviewed and prioritised 43 research topics in children's health which were identified in the literature. As a result of conducting this research prioritisation exercise, the group chose two research topics to investigate: reasons for children representing to the Emergency Department and a comparison of the use of high-flow and low-flow nasal prongs in children with bronchiolitis. The research team will continue to mentor the nurses throughout their research projects which resulted from the NGT. One bridge to leadership development in enhancing patient care is translating knowledge to practice and policy development. This study leads the way for a group of CNCs in paediatric nursing to combine their research capacity and influence clinical knowledge. PMID:23956854

  3. Developing a culture to facilitate research capacity building for clinical nurse consultants in generalist paediatric practice.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Lesley; Cummings, Joanne; McKay, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports a research capacity building exercise with a group of CNCs practicing in the speciality of paediatrics in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. It explores the first step in building a research culture, through identifying the research priorities of members of the NSW Child Health Networks Paediatric Clinical Nurse Consultant group, and this forms the major focus of this paper. A nominal group technique (NGT) was utilised with sixteen members to identify research topics for investigation which were considered a priority for improving children's health care. The group reviewed and prioritised 43 research topics in children's health which were identified in the literature. As a result of conducting this research prioritisation exercise, the group chose two research topics to investigate: reasons for children representing to the Emergency Department and a comparison of the use of high-flow and low-flow nasal prongs in children with bronchiolitis. The research team will continue to mentor the nurses throughout their research projects which resulted from the NGT. One bridge to leadership development in enhancing patient care is translating knowledge to practice and policy development. This study leads the way for a group of CNCs in paediatric nursing to combine their research capacity and influence clinical knowledge. PMID:23956854

  4. A description of an occupational reproductive health nurse consultant practice and women's occupational exposures during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, J B; Tellier, L

    1996-10-01

    It is estimated that each year 20 million workers in the United States are potentially exposed to a variety of reproductive hazards. In 1986, Wisconsin implemented an advanced practice public health nurse role to serve as the occupational reproductive health consultant to employees, employers, health care professionals, unions, and others. This article describes this advanced practice role in public health nursing and the women who sought reproductive health consultation. Data on the types of workplace exposures that these consultees had during pregnancy are used to illustrate the occupational history and its importance for pre-conceptional and early-pregnancy counseling. The sample for analysis was limited to the 118 women, aged 19-43 years, who received consultation services between 1990 and 1993 and whose pregnancies resulted in live births. Data were abstracted from the consultant's records of telephone and written consultations and linked to birth certificate records to provide information on smoking and alcohol use during pregnancy. The findings are summarized using descriptive statistics. Implications of the findings for public health nursing are discussed. PMID:8918177

  5. Effectiveness of a Training Course for General Practice Nurses in Motivation Support in Type 2 Diabetes Care: A Cluster-Randomised Trial

    PubMed Central

    Juul, Lise; Maindal, Helle T.; Zoffmann, Vibeke; Frydenberg, Morten; Sandbaek, Annelli

    2014-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes is a common metabolic disease with the potential for prevention of complications. The prevention requires a high level of lasting actions from the patients, which may be burdensome. The aim of this trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of a training course for general practice nurses in motivation support at 18 months follow-up in the affiliated type 2 diabetes population. Methods Forty general practices with nurse-led diabetes consultations from the area of Aarhus, Denmark were randomised 1?1 to either intervention or usual practice. Intervention practices were offered a 16-hour Self-determination theory - based course including communication training for general practice nurses delivered over 10 months. The affiliated diabetes populations (aged 40–74 years) were identified from registers (intervention n?=?2,005; usual n?=?2,029). Primary outcomes were register-based glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) -, total cholesterol levels, and well-being measured by the Problem Areas In Diabetes scale (PAID) and the mental component summary score, SF12 (SF12, mcs). Intention-to-treat analyses were performed. Predefined subgroups analyses were performed. Results The differences between the intervention- and the control practices’ mean HbA1c and total cholesterol at follow-up adjusted for baseline values and clustering were respectively: ?0.02%-points (95% CI: ?0.11 to 0.07; p: 0.67); 0.08 mmol/l (95% CI: 0.01 to 0.15; p: 0.02). Differences in median scores adjusted for clustering were for PAID: 1.25; p?=?0.31 and SF12, mcs: 0.99; p?=?0.15. Women in intervention practices differed from women in usual practices on mean HbA1c: ?0.12%-points (?0.23 to ?0.02; p?=?0.02) and SF12, mcs: 2.6; p?=?0.01. Conclusions Offering a training course for general practice nurses in applying the Self-determination theory in current type 2 diabetes care had no effect compared with usual practice measured by HbA1c and total cholesterol levels and the well-being at 18 months of follow-up in a comprehensive register-based diabetes population. Subgroup analyses suggested a possible effect in women, which deserves further attention. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov (Identifier NCT01187069). PMID:24798419

  6. Gadamer's 'apologia for the art of healing': an application to gerontological nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Mitzi G

    2007-04-01

    This paper will discuss Hans-George Gadamer's 'The Enigma of Health' Chapter 2, 'Apologia for the Art of Healing's (1965). In this chapter, Gadamer defends the art of healing as essentially an ability to reproduce and re-establish the health of an ill person. He considers modern medicine's progressive reliance on technology as mechanical rather than an art of healing. In support of this concept, I will also refer to Gadamer's Chapter 6, 'Between Nature and Art' and briefly to Beardsworth's 'Practices of Procrastination'. First, I will discuss the above works showing how the authors make their arguments and what conclusions they draw, and then I will relate these arguments and conclusions to nursing, gerontological nursing in particular. PMID:17374073

  7. 2012 Beers criteria update: how should practicing nurses use the criteria?

    PubMed

    2012-06-01

    The continued development of explicit lists of medications to avoid in older adults, such as the Beers criteria, is a key initiative in geriatrics. The involvement of nurse in this endeavor is critical , and nursing research, education, and practice will help not only develop but also disseminate important pharmacological management information to the public and thereby decrease drug-related problems and improve the health of older adults. Lastly, we wish to acknowledge Dr. Mark Beers' tremendous leadership in conceptualizing the importance of medication management in older adults and in acknowledging the significance of the full-team approach in patient care. Mark, who passed away in 2009, was an incredible mentor and true champion of safe medication use in adults. PMID:22657720

  8. Performed Surgical Interventions After the 1999 Marmara Earthquake in Turkey, and Their Importance Regarding Nursing Practices.

    PubMed

    Gul, Asiye; Andsoy, Isil Isik

    2015-01-01

    Effectively dealing with earthquakes is especially important for the people who live in areas prone to earthquakes such as the country of Turkey. Trauma related to earthquakes has specific relevance to nursing practice. The purpose of this review was to describe the types of surgical interventions after the Marmara earthquake and to evaluate the implications for nursing care. English and Turkish articles about the Marmara earthquake were reviewed between May and July 2013. A total of 7 studies were evaluated. The number of patients admitted to the units, types of injuries, and surgical treatments were recorded, with a total of 2378 patients with earthquake-related injuries. The most commonly traumatized parts of the body were the extremities. Fasciotomy operations were performed on 286 patients and 75 patients underwent extremity amputations. Predetermining surgical problems and interventions may be useful in planning for possible future problems in the case of a disaster. PMID:26165875

  9. Expanding the knowledge base of resident and facility outcomes of care delivered by advanced practice nurses in long-term care: expert panel recommendations.

    PubMed

    Bourbonniere, Meg; Mezey, Mathy; Mitty, Ethel L; Burger, Sarah; Bonner, Alice; Bowers, Barbara; Burl, Jeffrey B; Carter, Diane; Dimant, Jacob; Jerro, Sarah A; Reinhard, Susan C; Ter Maat, Marilyn; Nicholson, Nicholas R

    2009-02-01

    In 2003, a panel of nationally recognized experts in geriatric practice, education, research, public policy, and long-term care convened to examine and make recommendations about care quality and safety issues related to advanced practice nurses (APNs) in nursing home practice. This article reports on the panel recommendation that addressed expanding the evidence base of resident and facility outcomes of APN nursing home practice. A review of the small but important body of research related to nursing home APN practice suggests a positive impact on resident care and facility outcomes. Recommendations are made for critically needed research in four key areas: (a) APN nursing home practice, (b) relative value unit coding, (c) outcomes related to geropsychiatric and mental health nursing services, and (d) outcomes related to geriatric specialization. The APN role could be significantly enhanced and executed if its specific contribution to resident and facility outcomes was more clearly delineated through the recommended rigorous research. PMID:19383619

  10. Ethical theory, ethnography, and differences between doctors and nurses in approaches to patient care.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, D W

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study empirically whether ethical theory (from the mainstream principles-based, virtue-based, and feminist schools) usefully describes the approaches doctors and nurses take in everyday patient care. DESIGN: Ethnographic methods: participant observation and interviews, the transcripts of which were analysed to identify themes in ethical approaches. SETTING: A British old-age psychiatry ward. PARTICIPANTS: The more than 20 doctors and nurses on the ward. RESULTS: Doctors and nurses on the ward differed in their conceptions of the principles of beneficence and respect for patient autonomy. Nurses shared with doctors a commitment to liberal and utilitarian conceptions of these principles, but also placed much greater weight on relationships and character virtues when expressing the same principles. Nurses also emphasised patient autonomy, while doctors were more likely to advocate beneficence, when the two principles conflicted. CONCLUSION: The study indicates that ethical theory can, contrary to the charges of certain critics, be relevant to everyday health care-if it (a) attends to social context and (b) is flexible enough to draw on various schools of theory. PMID:8910782

  11. Integrating interprofessional collaboration skills into the advanced practice registered nurse socialization process.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Kathleen; Payne, Camille; Heye, Mary

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of interprofessional collaboration and practice as a means to provide patient-centered care and to decrease the current fragmentation of health care services in the 21st century provides a clear and unique opportunity for the advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) to assume a key role. For APRNs and other health care providers, to participate effectively as team members requires an interprofessional mindset. Development of interprofessional skills and knowledge for the APRN has been hindered by a silo approach to APRN role socialization. The Institute of Medicine Report (IOM; 2010) states that current health care systems should focus on team collaboration to deliver accessible, high-quality, patient-centered health care that addresses wellness and prevention of illness and adverse events, management of chronic illness, and increased capacity of all providers on the team. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the need to incorporate interprofessional education (IPE) into the socialization models used in advanced practice nursing programs. IPE requires moving beyond profession-specific educational efforts to engage students of different health care professions in interactive learning. Being able to work effectively as member of a clinical team while a student is a fundamental part of that learning (Interprofessional Education Collaborative Expert Panel, 2011). The objective of IPE curriculum models in graduate nursing programs is to educate APRNs in the development of an interprofessional mindset. Interprofessional collaboration and coordination are needed to achieve seamless transitions for patients between providers, specialties, and health care settings (IOM, 2010). Achieving the vision requires the continuous development of interprofessional competencies by APRNs as part of the learning process, so that upon entering the workforce, APRNs are ready to practice effective teamwork and team-based care. Socialization of the professional APRN role must integrate interprofessional competencies and interactions to prepare APRNs accordingly. PMID:25601240

  12. Knowledge and nursing practice of critical care nurses caring for patients with delirium in intensive care units in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Hamdan-Mansour, Ayman M; Farhan, Ne'ameh Abbas; Othman, Elham Hani; Yacoub, Mohammed Ibrahim

    2010-12-01

    Delirium can have serious consequences in terms of morbidity, mortality, and increased health care costs. An extensive literature review showed that delirium is not well understood, recognized, or managed by medical and nursing professionals. The goal for this study was to determine the level of knowledge and management skills among critical care nurses caring for patients with delirium who were treated in intensive care units (ICUs) in Jordan. A total of 232 critical care nurses, employed in different ICUs in Jordan, completed self-reported questionnaires. The nurses in critical care units who completed the questionnaires identified a need for more delirium-specific knowledge and skills to assess and manage this condition more effectively. To enhance health outcomes for patients treated in the ICU who have delirium, nurses need to receive education on current assessment and management modalities. These regular education programs should be complemented with evaluative research focusing on both nursing care and patient outcomes. PMID:20704096

  13. Practice and Assessment in Nursing and Midwifery: Doing It for Real. Researching Professional Education Research Series Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Terry; Schostak, John; Tyler, Judith

    The assessment of practice in nursing and midwifery education programs across England was examined to determine its validity, reliability, fairness, and effectiveness in maintaining and developing the quality of care. The research was conducted in two phases. Phase 1 was designed to identify theoretical and practical areas of concern that would…

  14. Teachers' Accounts of Their Perceptions and Practices of Providing Written Feedback to Nursing Students on Their Assignments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iqbal, Sajid; Gul, Raisa; Lakhani, Arusa; Rizvi, Nusrat Fatima

    2014-01-01

    Written feedback can facilitate students' learning in several ways. However, the teachers' practices of written feedback may be affected by various factors. This study aimed to explore the nurse teachers' accounts of their perceptions and practices of providing written feedback. A descriptive exploratory design was employed in the study. A…

  15. Why and How Do Nursing Homes Implement Culture Change Practices? Insights from Qualitative Interviews in a Mixed Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Shield, Renée R.; Looze, Jessica; Tyler, Denise; Lepore, Michael; Miller, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To understand the process of instituting culture change (CC) practices in nursing homes (NHs). Methods NH Directors of Nursing (DONs) and Administrators (NHAs) at 4,149 United States NHs were surveyed about CC practices. Follow-up interviews with 64 NHAs were conducted and analyzed by a multidisciplinary team which reconciled interpretations recorded in an audit trail. Results The themes include: 1) Reasons for implementing CC practices vary; 2) NH approaches to implementing CC practices are diverse; 3) NHs consider resident mix in deciding to implement practices; 4) NHAs note benefits and few implementation costs of implementing CC practices; 5) Implementation of changes is challenging and strategies for change are tailored to the challenges encountered; 6) Education and communication efforts are vital ways to institute change; and 7) NHA and other staff leadership is key to implementing changes. Discussion Diverse strategies and leadership skills appear to help NHs implement reform practices, including CC innovations. PMID:24652888

  16. Endotracheal suctioning practices of nurses and respiratory therapists: How well do they align with clinical practice guidelines?

    PubMed Central

    Leddy, Rosanne; Wilkinson, Jenny M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A common procedure within intensive care units (ICUs) is the suctioning of respiratory secretions in patients who have been intubated or who have undergone tracheostomy. Previous studies have shown a wide variation in suctioning practices, and although current evidence does not support the routine practice of normal saline instillation (NSI), anecdotally, this is believed to be a common practice. OBJECTIVE: To examine the suctioning practices of registered nurses (RNs) and registered respiratory therapists (RRTs) in six hospital ICUs in Ontario, with special attention devoted to the use of NSI. METHODS: A 24-question, self-administered survey was distributed to 180 participants (90 RNs and 90 RRTs) working in the ICU of six hospitals in Ontario. The survey addressed individual suctioning practices within the ICU. RESULTS: The survey response rate was 96%. There were many similarities between the RRT and RN groups, with both reporting high use of NSI. Both groups observed side effects following NSI with suctioning including decreased oxygen saturation, patient agitation and increased volume of secretions. A significant number of participants from both the RN and RRT groups were unaware of the existence of suctioning and/or NSI protocols in the ICU. Some respondents reported that they routinely suctioned mechanically ventilated patients rather than as required. CONCLUSION: RNs and RRTs continue to practice NSI despite evidence-based practice guidelines suggesting that this therapy may be detrimental to patients. Increased awareness of best practices with respect to endotracheal tube suction generally, and NSI specifically, should be the focus of professional education in both groups of ICU staff. PMID:26283870

  17. Effect of an informatics for evidence-based practice curriculum on nursing informatics competencies.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, Karen S; Cook, Sarah Sheets; Jenkins, Melinda; Bakken, Suzanne

    2005-12-01

    Effective and appropriate use of information and communication technologies is an essential competency for all health care professionals. The purpose of this paper is to describe the effect of an evolving informatics for evidence-based practice (IEBP) curriculum on nursing informatics competencies in three student cohorts in the combined BS/MS program for non-nurses at the Columbia University School of Nursing. A repeated-measures, non-equivalent comparison group design was used to determine differences in self-rated informatics competencies pre- and post-IEBP and between cohorts at the end of the BS year of the combined BS/MS program. The types of Computer Skill competencies on which the students rated themselves as competent (> or =3) on admission were generic in nature and reflective of basic computer literacy. Informatics competencies increased significantly from admission to BS graduation in all areas for the class of 2002 and in all, but three areas, for the class of 2003. None of the three cohorts achieved competence in Computer Skills: Education despite curricular revisions. There were no significant differences between classes at the end of the BS year. Innovative educational approaches, such as the one described in this paper demonstrate promise as a method to achieve informatics competence. It is essential to integrate routine measurement of informatics competency into the curriculum so that approaches can be refined as needed to ensure informatics competent graduates. PMID:16125454

  18. An Incentive Pay Plan for Advanced Practice Registered Nurses: Impact On Provider and Organizational Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Catherine A; Bechtle, Mavis; McNett, Molly

    2015-01-01

    Advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) are integral to the provision of quality, cost-effective health care throughout the continuum of care. To promote job satisfaction and ultimately decrease turnover, an APRN incentive plan based on productivity and quality was formulated. Clinical productivity in the incentive plan was measured by national benchmarks for work relative value units for nonphysician providers. After the first year of implementation, APRNs were paid more for additional productivity and quality and the institution had an increase in patient visits and charges. The incentive plan is a win-win for hospitals that employ APRNs. PMID:26259336

  19. Enriching Practical Knowledge: Exploring Student Teachers' Competence in Integrating Theory and Practice of Mathematics Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oonk, Wil; Verloop, Nico; Gravemeijer, Koeno P. E.

    2015-01-01

    This study concentrated on the theory-practice problem in mathematics teacher education. We examined 13 student teachers' use of theory when they reflected on teaching practice in a class specifically designed to optimize the chance for theory use. We developed a Reflection Analysis Instrument with which the student teachers' use of theory could…

  20. Applying Adult Learning and Development Theories to Educational Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baskas, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the degree of correlation that adult learning theories and adult developmental theories have with educational practice. Two adult learning theories, Malcolm Knowles' phase theories and Daniel Levinson's developmental theories, were researched to determine their relevance to three components of a nontraditional…

  1. Connecting Theory and Practice in Teacher Education: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ünver, Gülsen

    2014-01-01

    Teachers have many problems transferring theoretical knowledge into practice. That's why teacher educators seek ways for connecting theory and practice in their pre-service teacher education programs. This study describes the activities and the effects of these activities for connecting theory and practice, as well as the recommendations of…

  2. Iranian nurses' constraint for research utilization

    PubMed Central

    Salsali, Mahvash; Mehrdad, Neda

    2009-01-01

    Background This paper identifies the views of Iranian clinical nurses regarding the utilization of nursing research in practice. There is a need to understand what restricts Iranian clinical nurses to use research findings. The aim of this study was to identify practicing nurses' view of aspects which they perceived constrain them from research utilization that summarizes and uses research findings to address a nursing practice problem. Methods Data were collected during 6 months by means of face-to face interviews follow by one focus group. Analysis was undertaken using a qualitative content analysis. Results Findings disclosed some key themes perceived by nurses to restrict them to use research findings: level of support require to be research active, to be research minded, the extent of nurses knowledge and skills about research and research utilization, level of educational preparation relating to using research, administration and executive challenges in clinical setting, and theory-practice gap. Conclusion This study identifies constraints that require to be overcome for clinical nurses to actively get involved in research utilization. In this study nurses were generally interested to use research findings. However they felt restricted because of lack of time, lack of peer and manager support and limited knowledge and skills of the research process. This study also confirms that research utilization and the change to research nursing practice are complex issues which require both organizational and educational efforts. PMID:19747399

  3. Living attentive presence and changing perspectives with a web-based nursing theory course.

    PubMed

    Aquino-Russell, Catherine; Strüby, Françoise V Maillard; Reviczky, Kathryn

    2007-04-01

    Online education can be a wonderful teaching-learning experience for professors and students alike. This column shares excerpts from postings that students and a professor wrote during an online nursing theories course with the intention to illuminate selected essences, paradoxes, and processes of Parse's teaching-learning model and to portray living attentive presence and changing perspectives with online teaching-learning strategies. This reflection was initiated in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania at the Institute of Human Becoming when two of the authors (Aquino-Russell and Maillard Strüby) were introduced to the human becoming teaching-learning model by nurse theorist Rosemarie Rizzo Parse. PMID:17442861

  4. Educating Artists: Theory and Practice in College Studio Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salazar, Stacey McKenna

    2014-01-01

    Salazar is drawing from observational research and survey data in order to propose her Five Pedagogical Ideals. Salazar suggests that potent theories might be extracted from current practices, informing theories that are yet-to-be. In this article, Salazar has attempted to summarize a significant amount of theory and practice so that readers,…

  5. The globalization of nursing knowledge.

    PubMed

    Holt, J; Barrett, C; Clarke, D; Monks, R

    2000-08-01

    External influences placed upon nurses working in universities and in clinical practice require them to attract research funding, carry out research, generate new knowledge and publish in national and international journals. While there does not appear to be an agreed, unified body of nursing knowledge, critical and scholarly debate is essential to generate knowledge, but this is not an activity in which the majority of nurses can effectively participate. Nevertheless, nurses in the Western world are free to communicate their research, theories or ideas, essentially uncensored, to a vast invisible audience, and there is global dissemination through a vast array of literature and educational materials. This paper challenges nurses to examine the implications of globalization and suggests that the continuing debate on the nature of nursing knowledge should be updated to include consideration of both a change in philosophical stance and the far reaching effects of global dissemination of information. PMID:10959129

  6. Instead of reconceptualizing the nursing process let's re-name it.

    PubMed

    Turkel, Marian C; Ray, Marilyn A; Kornblatt, Lynne

    2012-04-01

    The discipline of nursing embraces the unitary-transformative paradigm and its theories that focus on nursing with attention to the language of humanbecoming, holism, relationship, authentic presence, caring, ethical interaction, complexity, pattern, energy, and recognition. In hospital nursing practice the medical paradigm is more prevalent and focuses on regulatory compliance, the standardization of technical language of the electronic health record, and the implementation of evidence-based practice initiatives for patient safety and quality improvement. Nursing and nursing theories are considered a moral enterprise; they involve seeking the good or caring for patients, others, and complex systems. With the continued influence of the medical paradigm, the questions for nursing are: what kind of good does nursing want to promote, and what unique contribution to patient care do nurses provide through their language, theories, and practice? A new mnemonic of Recognizing, Connecting, Partnering, and Reflecting is proposed. PMID:22451642

  7. Leadership styles and theories.

    PubMed

    Giltinane, Charlotte Louise

    It is useful for healthcare professionals to be able to identify the leadership styles and theories relevant to their nursing practice. Being adept in recognising these styles enables nurses to develop their skills to become better leaders, as well as improving relationships with colleagues and other leaders, who have previously been challenging to work with. This article explores different leadership styles and theories, and explains how they relate to nursing practice. PMID:23905259

  8. [The Theory and Practice of Health Cultivation Qigong Exercise in Traditional Chinese Medicine].

    PubMed

    Chang, Mei-Ying

    2015-12-01

    The health cultivation qigong exercise in traditional Chinese medicine refers to a traditional, integrated method of illness prevention and body strengthening, which promotes the functions of qi and the blood, smooths the meridians (energy channels), and balances the viscera and bowels through the regulation of the mind, the breathing, and the body. The concept of using qi to cultivate human life is part of the health cultivation practices of ancient Chinese codes and of Chinese medicine. This concept includes the principles, methods, essences, and clinical applications of the practice. In addition, traditional health cultivation references the concepts of yinyang, viscera and bowels, qi and blood, meridians, and essential energy spirit theory in order to explain the human biological phenomena, the theoretical and practical perspectives of qigong, and the basis of the treatment principle. The health cultivation qigong exercise of Chinese medicine utilizes the concept of the "unity of nature and human beings" in traditional Chinese thinking in its practice, which emphasizes the conformity to nature and seasons. In order to fully leverage the benefits from the purpose of health cultivation in qigong practice, the priority is to understand the health cultivation mechanism, the essentials/matters, and the precautions of qigong practices. Recently, the evidence regarding both the biological and the psychological benefits of qigong practices have been demonstrated in numbers of research articles. In particular, qigong is currently considered to be one of the best mild exercises that is suited to all age groups. Professional nurses are suggested to include the health cultivation qigong exercise as part of activities that target health improvement and illness prevention. Due to the diversity in qigong as practiced by different health cultivation qigong exercise sects, it is essential to accumulate more clinical evidence by conducting greater numbers of rigorous studies that may be referenced in evidence-based nursing practices. PMID:26645440

  9. Teaching Strategies and Practices that Promote a Culturally Sensitive Nursing Education: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewald, Robin J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore teaching strategies that promote a culturally sensitive nursing education and culturally sensitive nursing. The diversity of Americans has increased. Thus, the nursing student population and patient population have both become more diverse. Nursing education programs, therefore, need to know the best…

  10. Procedural skills practice and training needs of doctors, nurses, midwives and paramedics in rural Victoria

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, David; Shepherd, Irwyn; McGrail, Matthew; Kassell, Lisa; Connolly, Marnie; Williams, Brett; Nestel, Debra

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Procedural skills are a significant component of clinical practice. Doctors, nurses, midwives and paramedics are trained to use a variety of procedural skills. Rural clinicians in particular are often required to maintain competence in some procedural skills that are used infrequently, and which may require regular and repeated rehearsal. This paper reports on a research project conducted in Gippsland, Victoria, to ascertain the frequency of use, and relevance to clinical practice, of a range of skills in the fields of medicine, nursing, midwifery, and paramedic practice. The project also gathered data on the attitudes of clinicians regarding how frequently and by what means they thought they needed to practice these skills with a particular focus on the use of simulation as an educational method. Methods The research was conducted following identification of a specific set of procedural skills for each professional group. Skills were identified by an expert steering committee. We developed online questionnaires that consisted of two parts: 1) demographic and professional characteristics, and 2) experience of procedural skills and perceived training needs. We sought to invite all practicing clinicians (doctors, nurses, midwives, paramedics) working in Gippsland. Online surveys were distributed between November 2011 and April 2012 with three follow-up attempts. The Monash University Human Research Ethics Committee approved the study. Results Valid responses were received from 58 doctors, 94 nurses, 46 midwives, and 30 paramedics, whom we estimate to represent not more than 20% of current clinicians within these professions. This response rate reflected some of the difficulties experienced in the conduct of the research. Results were tabulated for each professional group across the range of skills. There was significant correlation between the frequency of certain skills and confidence with maintenance of these skills. This did not necessarily correlate with perceptions of respondents as to how often they need to practice each skill to maintain mastery. The more complex the skill, the more likely the respondents were to report a need for frequent rehearsal of the skill. There was variation between the professional groups as to how to retain mastery; for some skills, professional groups reported skill maintenance through clinical observation and clinical practice; for other skills, simulation was seen to be more appropriate. Conclusion This project provided insight into the clinical application of procedural skills for clinicians comprising a relatively large professional population within a defined geographical region in rural Victoria, as well as attitudes to skills maintenance and competency. Although not the focus of the study, an unexpected outcome was the design of questionnaires on procedural skills. We believe that the questionnaires may have value in other rural settings. We acknowledge the limitations of the study in the text. The project provides some information on which to base planning for procedural skills education, including simulation-based training, and directions for further research. PMID:25834473

  11. Technology and the bedside nurse: an exploration and review of implications for practice.

    PubMed

    Elgin, Krisa Hoyle; Bergero, Cassandra

    2015-06-01

    Bedside technology pressures nurses to integrate and master a variety of new tools, devices, and methods of monitoring patient status. We review opportunities and challenges in the relationship between bedside nursing and technology. The increasing amount of available technology has impacted bedside nurses. The relationship between bedside nursing and technology is largely positive. Big data holds great potential for translating digital patient information into expanded knowledge tools for the bedside nurse, the development of which require nursing involvement. More research is needed to explore the concept of the nurse as advocate in high-technology patient care. PMID:25999067

  12. Safety and acceptability of practice-nurse-managed care of depression in patients with diabetes or heart disease in the Australian TrueBlue study

    PubMed Central

    Schlicht, K; Morgan, M A J; Fuller, J; Coates, M J; Dunbar, J A

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine the safety and acceptability of the TrueBlue model of nurse-managed care in the primary healthcare setting. Design A mixed methods study involving clinical record audit, focus groups and nurse interviews as a companion study investigating the processes used in the TrueBlue randomised trial. Setting Australian general practices involved in the TrueBlue trial. Participants Five practice nurses and five general practitioners (GPs) who had experienced nurse-managed care planning following the TrueBlue model of collaborative care. Intervention The practice nurse acted as case manager, providing screening and protocol-management of depression and diabetes, coronary heart disease or both. Primary outcome measures Proportion of patients provided with stepped care when needed, identification and response to suicide risk and acceptability of the model to practice nurses and GPs. Results Almost half the patients received stepped care when indicated. All patients who indicated suicidal ideations were identified and action taken. Practice nurses and GPs acknowledged the advantages of the TrueBlue care-plan template and protocol-driven care, and the importance of peer support for the nurse in their enhanced role. Conclusions Practice nurses were able to identify, assess and manage mental-health risk in patients with diabetes or heart disease. PMID:23572196

  13. Philosophical Smoke Signals: Theory and Practice in Information Systems Design

    E-print Network

    David King; Chris Kimble

    2008-04-17

    Although the gulf between the theory and practice in Information Systems is much lamented, few researchers have offered a way forward except through a number of (failed) attempts to develop a single systematic theory for Information Systems. In this paper, we encourage researchers to re-examine the practical consequences of their theoretical arguments. By examining these arguments we may be able to form a number of more rigorous theories of Information Systems, allowing us to draw theory and practice together without undertaking yet another attempt at the holy grail of a single unified systematic theory of Information Systems.

  14. PHD IN NURSING SAMPLE FULL-TIME PROGRAM Student with an interest in school-based care of children with asthma and parent-school-

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Course Title Credits Course Title Credits N741 Advanced Practice Nursing Theory: Family Process & Child Development 3 N703 Health Care & Public Policy 3 N815 Knowledge Development in Nursing 3 N803 Advanced

  15. Nurses' experiences, expectations, and preferences for mind-body practices to reduce stress

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Most research on the impact of mind-body training does not ask about participants' baseline experience, expectations, or preferences for training. To better plan participant-centered mind-body intervention trials for nurses to reduce occupational stress, such descriptive information would be valuable. Methods We conducted an anonymous email survey between April and June, 2010 of North American nurses interested in mind-body training to reduce stress. The e-survey included: demographic characteristics, health conditions and stress levels; experiences with mind-body practices; expected health benefits; training preferences; and willingness to participate in future randomized controlled trials. Results Of the 342 respondents, 96% were women and 92% were Caucasian. Most (73%) reported one or more health conditions, notably anxiety (49%); back pain (41%); GI problems such as irritable bowel syndrome (34%); or depression (33%). Their median occupational stress level was 4 (0 = none; 5 = extreme stress). Nearly all (99%) reported already using one or more mind-body practices to reduce stress: intercessory prayer (86%), breath-focused meditation (49%), healing or therapeutic touch (39%), yoga/tai chi/qi gong (34%), or mindfulness-based meditation (18%). The greatest expected benefits were for greater spiritual well-being (56%); serenity, calm, or inner peace (54%); better mood (51%); more compassion (50%); or better sleep (42%). Most (65%) wanted additional training; convenience (74% essential or very important), was more important than the program's reputation (49%) or scientific evidence about effectiveness (32%) in program selection. Most (65%) were willing to participate in a randomized trial of mind-body training; among these, most were willing to collect salivary cortisol (60%), or serum biomarkers (53%) to assess the impact of training. Conclusions Most nurses interested in mind-body training already engage in such practices. They have greater expectations about spiritual and emotional than physical benefits, but are willing to participate in studies and to collect biomarker data. Recruitment may depend more on convenience than a program's scientific basis or reputation. Knowledge of participants' baseline experiences, expectations, and preferences helps inform future training and research on mind-body approaches to reduce stress. PMID:21481259

  16. Assisted living nursing practice: medication management: Part 1. Assessing the resident for self-medication ability.

    PubMed

    Mitty, Ethel; Flores, Sandi

    2007-01-01

    Self-administration of medication suggests that individuals are functionally and cognitively competent to manage their health care. Older adults take a significant number of medications (borderline polypharmacy) as well as an unaccounted for number of over-the-counter, as necessary, and herbal remedies. Assisted living residences, moving from a social to a more medical model, are responsible for the safety and well-being of their residents. In addition, the prospect of aging-in-place in the residence is increasingly associated with appropriate medical and medication management. Assisted living services in most states include assistance with medication, but the nature of the assistance varies widely, at times approaching what even a nonclinical observer would regard as medication administration. Although state assisted living regulations can be quite specific regarding medication storage, there are scant guidelines about the components of a thorough assessment as to whether a resident can safely self-administer his or her medications. This article discusses assessment criteria of self-medication ability, drawn from a variety of instruments. In keeping with assisted living nursing standards of practice, the assisted living nurse has a critical responsibility in assessment of this self-care ability. PMID:17430743

  17. OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF NURSING

    E-print Network

    OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF NURSING GRADUATE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION DOCTOR OF NURSING PRACTICE CHECK ONE: _____________DNP Advance Practice _________DNP Nurse Executive DATE____ OR PART TIME____. 7. BACCALAUREATE PROGRAM IN NURSING NAME OF COLLEGE OR UNIVERSITY

  18. Nurse Aide Empowerment Strategies and Staff Stability: Effects on Nursing Home Resident Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Theresa; Brannon, Diane; Mor, Vincent

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines the moderating effect of staff stability on the relationship between management practices used to empower nurse aides and resident outcomes in a multistate sample of nursing homes. An adaptation of Kanter's theory of structural power in organizations guided the framework for the model used in this study. Design and…

  19. Professional Education: The Theory-Practice Issue Reconsidered

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morehead, Joseph H.

    1973-01-01

    Professional education exhibits a dichotomous nature that seeks to emphasize theory while recognizing the practical component. The question of theory versus practice that has informed the perennial debate is a false one. In several professions wide variation exists in ways theoretical studies and experential component are combined in curricula.…

  20. 2012 Dewey Lecture: Making Meaning Together beyond Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Educators frequently fret over how to bridge the gap between theory and practice. In an important sense, it is a false problem. Theory is simply the thoughtful, reflective phase of good practice. We will approach Dewey's philosophy as one of continuous creation and re-creation or even more precisely, social co-creation, that requires making…

  1. The Concept of Validity in Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolming, Simon; Wikstrom, Christina

    2010-01-01

    The concept of validity, as described in the literature, has changed over time to become a broad and rather complex issue. The purpose of this paper is to investigate if practice has followed theory, or if there is a gap between validity in theory and validity in practice. It compares the theoretical development of the concept of validity with the…

  2. The Theory-Practice Issue in Teacher Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, Gordon

    1980-01-01

    Examines three recurring features of the theory-practice debate: relevance; the association of theory with idealized practice; and the alleged inability of theoretical studies to alter teachers' classroom judgments. Points out misunderstandings which contribute to this debate. (Author/SJL)

  3. Experience, Theory, and Practical Wisdom in Teaching and Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunenberg, Mieke; Korthagen, Fred

    2009-01-01

    In this contribution, we discuss what it means to be a professional teacher with practical wisdom, and how practical wisdom is related to theory and experience. These questions are especially relevant as nowadays, in many countries, teacher education becomes more school-based. Building on theories on the functioning of the human mind in general,…

  4. The Designing and Development of a Program to Prepare Inactive Registered Nurses for Reentry into Practice. Curriculum Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belock, Shirley

    The planning and design of a course for the inactive registered nurse desiring to return to active practice is reported in this practicum paper. Current literature was reviewed with emphasis on the needs in rural states, such as Vermont, and characteristics of the target group. The first three modules of the course were developed, entitled: The…

  5. Breast Self-Examination in Terms of Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice among Nursing Students of Arab American University/Jenin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayed, Ahmad; Eqtait, Faeda; Harazneh, Lubna; Fashafsheh, Imad; Nazzal, Sewar; Talahmeh, Bian; Hajar, Deena; Awawdeh, Rrawan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Breast self-examination is a simple, very low cost, noninvasive with no special material/tool requirements; and it is an effective diagnostic method for breast cancer which only takes five minutes to apply. Aim of the Study: The study aimed to assess the level of BSE knowledge, attitude, and practice among female nursing students in…

  6. "There's More Unites Us than Divides Us!" A Further and Higher Education Community of Practice in Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayne, Wendy; Andrew, Nicola; Drury, Carol; Egan, Irene; Leitch, Anne; Malone, Marion

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, reflecting the strategic institutional imperative of widening participation and enhancing transition to health programmes, a Scottish nursing community of practice (CoP), was formed to bring together academics from further and higher education, initially for a period of six months. The community was funded by the Greater Glasgow…

  7. Development and Analysis of an Instrument to Assess Student Understanding of GOB Chemistry Knowledge Relevant to Clinical Nursing Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Corina E.; Hyslop, Richard M.; Barbera, Jack

    2015-01-01

    The General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry Knowledge Assessment (GOB-CKA) is a multiple-choice instrument designed to assess students' understanding of the chemistry topics deemed important to clinical nursing practice. This manuscript describes the development process of the individual items along with a psychometric evaluation of the…

  8. The Influence of International Service-Learning on Transcultural Self-Efficacy in Baccalaureate Nursing Graduates and Their Subsequent Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amerson, Roxanne

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explain how participation in an international service-learning project during a community health course influenced transcultural self-efficacy of baccalaureate nursing graduates following graduation and their subsequent clinical practice. A qualitative, explanatory case study was used to conduct telephone…

  9. Health Behavior Theory for Pressure Ulcer Prevention: Root-Cause Analysis Project in Critical Care Nursing.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kristen R; Ragnoni, Jennifer A; Bickmann, Jonathan D; Saarinen, Hannah A; Gosselin, Ann K

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to use a behavioral theory to examine pressure ulcer prevention by nurses in a critical care setting. A root-cause analysis approach was used, including an integrative literature review, operationalization of behavioral constructs into a survey, and root-cause analysis application in a cardiovascular intensive care unit. This article highlights an innovative approach to quality improvement in critical care. PMID:26111143

  10. Incorporating Salivary Biomarkers into Nursing Research: An Overview and Review of Best Practices

    PubMed Central

    Granger, Douglas A.; Johnson, Sara B.; Szanton, Sarah L.; Out, Dorothée; Schumann, Lynette Lau

    2014-01-01

    Analytes and biomarkers present in saliva may provide insight into individual differences in environmental chemical exposures, variation in reproductive hormones, therapeutic and illegal substance use, changes in stress-related physiology, and the immunologic footprints of infectious disease. The wealth of information provided by salivary analytes has the potential to enrich biobehavioral nursing research by enabling researchers to measure these individual differences in the clinic as well as in patients' and participants' everyday social worlds. In this paper we provide a roadmap for researchers new to this area who would like to learn more about integrating salivary biospecimens into the next generation of health research. In addition, we highlight best practices and strategies to avoid common pitfalls for researchers already engaged in this field. PMID:22593229

  11. The development of a model of education for casual academic staff who support nursing students in practice.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Maria T; Brown, Roy A; Joyce-McCoach, Joanne T; Smith, Kylie M

    2014-05-01

    Nursing is predominantly a practice based profession where clinical placement for pre-registration nursing students is a significant component of their programme, as this is pivotal in achieving work readiness of the graduate registered nurse. It is therefore important to ensure nursing students have high quality clinical placements that are supervised by well-prepared experienced registered nurses. This paper discusses one component of the reconnaissance phase of a wider action research project being undertaken in a metropolitan university in NSW, Australia seeking to enhance the development and support of casual academic staff known as clinical supervisors who support students in clinical placement. The outcomes attributed to this project are the development of a participation model which has resulted in a collaborative partnership between the university and clinical supervisors and secondly, the embedding of solution focused ways of working and practice development into the program. The information from the reconnaissance phase of this project confirms the need for further research into the implementation of the participatory model to ensure that future education and support process are developed through collaboration. PMID:24176600

  12. A case study of asthma care in school age children using nurse-coordinated multidisciplinary collaborative practices

    PubMed Central

    Procter, Susan; Brooks, Fiona; Wilson, Patricia; Crouchman, Carolyn; Kendall, Sally

    2015-01-01

    Aim To describe the role of school nursing in leading and coordinating a multidisciplinary networked system of support for children with asthma, and to analyze the strengths and challenges of undertaking and supporting multiagency interprofessional practice. Background The growth of networked and interprofessional collaborations arises from the recognition that a number of the most pressing public health problems cannot be addressed by single-discipline or -agency interventions. This paper identifies the potential of school nursing to provide the vision and multiagency leadership required to coordinate multidisciplinary collaboration. Method A mixed-method single-case study design using Yin’s approach, including focus groups, interviews, and analysis of policy documents and public health reports. Results A model that explains the integrated population approach to managing school-age asthma is described; the role of the lead school nurse coordinator was seen as critical to the development and sustainability of the model. Conclusion School nurses can provide strategic multidisciplinary leadership to address pressing public health issues. Health service managers and commissioners need to understand how to support clinicians working across multiagency boundaries and to identify how to develop leadership skills for collaborative interprofessional practice so that the capacity for nursing and other health care professionals to address public health issues does not rely on individual motivation. In England, this will be of particular importance to the commissioning of public health services by local authorities from 2015. PMID:25914542

  13. Nursing informatics: the future now.

    PubMed

    Mamta

    2014-01-01

    Technological advancements in the health care field have always impacted the health care practices. Nursing practice has also been greatly influenced by the technology. In the recent years, use of information technology including computers, handheld digital devices, internet has advanced the nursing by bridging the gap from nursing as an art to nursing as science. In every sphere of nursing practice, nursing research, nursing education and nursing informatics play a very important role. If used properly it is a way to save time, helping to provide quality nursing care and increases the proficiency of nursing personnel. PMID:25924417

  14. Exploration of the Practices of Credentialing of Nurse Practitioners in Acute Care Hospital Settings

    E-print Network

    Hronek, Carla M.

    2014-05-31

    Abstract The nursing shortage, physician shortage, advancing age of the population, and concerns about equalizing access to health care have supported the movement of the Nurse Practitioner (NP) role into the acute care hospital setting (ACHS...

  15. Development and validation of the competence in evidence based practice questionnaire (EBP-COQ) among nursing students

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nursing educators need rigorously developed instruments to assess competency in evidence based practice (EBP) at undergraduate level. This concept is defined as the capability to choose and use an integrated combination of knowledge, skills and attitudes with the intention to develop a task in a certain context. Also, we understand that EBP is gaining knowledge and skills, as well as increasing positive attitudes toward EBP that will promote a change in behaviour to implement EBP in practice. This study aims to develop a psychometric test of the Evidence Based Practice Evaluation Competence Questionnaire (EBP-COQ) among undergraduate nursing students. Methods The questionnaire was developed by item generation through a review of scientific literature and focus groups. The instrument was validated in terms of content validity through an expert review. The EBP-COQ was administered to a cohort of nursing students (n =100) to evaluate test reliability and select the best items. Psychometric properties of the final instrument were assessed in a sample of 261 nursing students. Results The EBP-COQ consisted of 25 items. A factorial analysis grouped the items into the three categories that define competence relating to EBP: attitude, knowledge and skills. Cronbach’s alpha was 0.888 for the entire questionnaire. The factor solution explained 55.55% of the variance. Conclusions EBP-COQ appears to measure with adequate reliability the attributes of undergraduate nursing students’ competence in EBP. The instrument is quick to disseminate and easy to score, making it a suitable instrument for nursing educators to evaluate students’ self-perceived competence in EBP. PMID:23391040

  16. High-Fidelity Simulation in Nursing Practice: The Impact on Nurses' Knowledge Acquisition, Satisfaction, and Self-Confidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Square, Nicole Decuir

    2012-01-01

    Nurses require ongoing opportunities to expand knowledge and skills; this expansion of knowledge and skills is one aspect of continued competence. One method that may be used to maintain and refine knowledge and skills is participation in continuing education activities. However, there has been little inquiry into creative strategies used in…

  17. Common denominators: shared governance and work place advocacy - strategies for nurses to gain control over their practice.

    PubMed

    Green, Alexia; Jordan, Clair

    2004-01-01

    It is important to the future of health care that we identify strategies that provide support for nurses as they take on the challenges of the new century. Shared governance has long been stressed as an effective strategy for enhancing autonomy and providing avenues for nurses to gain control over their practice. A newer strategy, defined at the local, state, and/or national level, is work place advocacy. This strategy builds upon many of the principles contained in shared governance. This article identifies common denominators found in both shared governance and work place advocacy. PMID:14998359

  18. Continuing the cultural competency journey through exploration of knowledge, attitudes, and skills with advanced practice psychiatric nursing students: an exemplar.

    PubMed

    Hoke, Mary M; Robbins, Leslie K

    2011-06-01

    Numerous training and education programs have evolved to address culturally competent health care delivery. This article describes an exemplar educational approach used to teach cultural competency to beginning graduate psychiatric mental health nursing students. Using interactive strategies delivered within the 4 phases of the curriculum, the approach has been shown to facilitate students' ongoing journey to cultural competence. Building on baccalaureate nursing competencies, the course addresses attitudes, knowledge, skills, and cultural humility to strengthen cultural self-assessment, cross-cultural clinical practice expertise, and the use of culturally appropriate research for graduate students. PMID:21501731

  19. Guide for Instructors of Practical Nursing in South Carolina, Phase 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    The South Carolina Department of Education has printed an instruction manual for teacher use in schools of nursing. The guide covers the areas of medical surgical nursing, diagnosis of disease, dealing with the surgical patient, care of the aged, rehabilitation and chronic illness, nursing the cancer patient, gynecological disorders, respiratory…

  20. 77 FR 59931 - Single Source Program Expansion Supplement Award to Nurse Education, Practice, Quality and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... Corpus Christi (TAMUCC), College of Nursing and Health Science (CONHS). SUMMARY: The Health Resources and... feasibility study, Transitioning Enlisted Health Care Training into Academic Credit for Nursing Education... training with civilian nursing program requirements. In fiscal year (FY) 2012, $178,374 will be...

  1. Elementary School Nurses' Perceptions and Practices regarding Body Mass Index Measurement in School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendershot, Candace; Telljohann, Susan K.; Price, James H.; Dake, Joseph A.; Mosca, Nancy W.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines elementary school nurses' perceived efficacy expectations, perceived barriers, and perceived benefits to measuring body mass index (BMI) in students in schools with mandated BMI policies versus schools without mandated policies. Of the 2,629 school nurses participating in the study, 67% believe nurses should measure BMI in…

  2. Pediatric Nurses’ Information and Applications Related To Ethical Codes

    PubMed Central

    Turkmen, Ayse Sonay; Savaser, Sevim

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ethics is defined as the entirety of moral principles that form the basis of individuals’ behavior; it can also be defined as “moral theory” or “theoretical ethics”. Objectives: To determinate information and applications related to ethical codes of pediatric nurses. Patients and Methods: Participants were nurses attending the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Nursing Course and the Pediatric Nursing Course conducted in Istanbul between September 2011 and December 2012. A total of nurses attending the courses at the specified dates and who agreed to participate in the study were included in the analysis. Data were collected through a questionnaire that we developed in accordance with current literature on nursing ethics. Results 140 nurses participated in this study. Information and applications were related to ethical codes of nurses including four categories; autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, justice. The principle of confidentiality/keeping secrets. Exactly 64.3% of nurses reported having heard of nursing ethical codes. The best-known ethical code was the principle of justice. Furthermore, while the rates were generally low, some nurses engaged in unethical practices such as patient discrimination and prioritizing acquaintances. Conclusions: We conclude that most nurses working in pediatric clinics act in compliance with ethical codes. We also found that the majority of nurses wanted to learn about ethical codes. For this reason, we recommended that nurses working in clinics and future nurses in training be informed of the appropriate ethical behavior and codes. PMID:26199697

  3. From Theory to Practice: A Crisis Simulation Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aertsen, Tamara; Jaspaert, Koen; Van Gorp, Baldwin

    2013-01-01

    In this article, an educational project is described that was formulated with the aim to give master's students in business communication the opportunity to experience how theory could be applied to shape practice. A 4-week project was developed in which students were urged to use communication theory and linguistic theory to manage the…

  4. Theory Development: A Bridge between Practice and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern, Stephen; Devlin, James

    2010-01-01

    Theory development is an intentional process by which marriage and family counselors may bridge the gap between research and practice. The theory building process includes inductive and deductive forms of reasoning, qualitative and quantitative approaches to knowledge development, and diffusion of innovations. Grounded theory provides an…

  5. Evaluating Theory from a Christian perspective: transformative learning theory.

    PubMed

    Adkins, Cherie S

    2015-01-01

    Christian nurses need to carefully evaluate a given theory for fit with their worldview before embracing it for use in professional practice. Evaluation of Transformative Learning Theory, from a Christian nurse's perspective through a biblical lens, reveals how this theory complements truths found in Scripture, in particular Romans 12:2. PMID:25898447

  6. The Teacherly Practice of Literary Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stibbs, Andrew

    1993-01-01

    Discusses ways in which literary theory supports and encourages innovative ways of looking at texts. Indicates evidence of cross-fertilization between theory and pedagogy. Argues that this should be fostered and encouraged. Provides numerous examples of how theory informs instruction constructively. (HB)

  7. Lines of Practice: A Practice-Centered Theory of Interest Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azevedo, Flavio S.

    2011-01-01

    Based on a three-year-long ethnography of the hobby of model rocketry, I present a practice-centered theory of interest relationships--that is, the pattern of long-term, self-motivated engagement in open-ended practices that has been theorized under the concept of "individual interests". In contrast to extant theories of individual interests, in…

  8. Views on and Practices of Integrating Theory and Practice in Teacher Education Programs in Atlantic Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falkenberg, Thomas; Goodnough, Karen; MacDonald, Ronald J.

    2014-01-01

    The need for and lack of integration of theory and practice in initial teacher education programs has been discussed as a central issue for teacher education. This article reports on a study that surveyed university-based teacher educators in Atlantic Canada on their perspectives regarding how theory and practice can be integrated, how they and…

  9. Activity Theory and Situated Learning Theory: Contrasting Views of Educational Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnseth, Hans Christian

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to offer a critical discussion of the practice turn in contemporary educational research. In order to make the discussion specific, I use two influential theories, namely activity theory and situated learning theory. They both turn to the notion of practice in order to overcome the limitations of mentalist and…

  10. Contemporary digital museum in theory and practice 

    E-print Network

    Agostino, Cristiano

    2014-06-27

    This dissertation investigates the interplay between a selected set of museum practices, such as online strategies, digitisation of artwork reproductions, and crowdsourcing, through a theoretically grounded perspective. ...

  11. Meeting The Future of Nursing Report Recommendations: A Successful Practice-Academic Partnership.

    PubMed

    Stout, Cindy; Short Nancy; Aldrich, Kelly; Cintron, R Jacob; Provencio-Vasquez, Elias

    2015-01-01

    In collaboration with the University of Texas at El Paso, nurse leadership at Del Sol Medical Center implemented an internship program for nursing students in the final semester of a bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) program. The medical center experienced an increase in the proportion of BSN-prepared nurses, decreased orientation full-time equivalents (FTE), and lowered operating costs. The university experienced highly satisfied and competent new graduate nurses. The nurse interns averaged a 91.9% in-hospital registered nurse (RN) competency completion rate during the internship. All interns accepted a RN position at the medical center. Total savings for salaries, benefits, and recruitment fees at the medical center were $599,040 with a total FTE savings of 23.4 FTEs per week, over 10 weeks. PMID:26259340

  12. Enhancing Learning by Integrating Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wrenn, Jan; Wrenn, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    Educators in professional degree programs are charged with multiple responsibilities in the classroom and in practice settings. We apply our professional knowledge in a variety of settings to serve our communities; we reflect on how to improve practice from our experiences in these settings; we observe our students engaging in learning experiences…

  13. Graduate Programs in Nursing The School of Nursing offers the Doctor of Nursing

    E-print Network

    Graduate Programs in Nursing The School of Nursing offers the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) and the Master of Science in Nursing (MSN). Both the DNP and MSN are approved by the Kansas State Board of Nursing and are fully accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE). Doctor

  14. Stress, sense of coherence and quality of life among Norwegian nurse students after a period of clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Natvig, Gerd Karin; Jepsen, Randi

    2015-01-01

    Background. Previous research has found that sense of coherence is significantly related to aspects of health, but studies on nurse students with a salutogenic approach are limited. Objectives. To investigate (1) if nurse students’ experience of stress differs among clinical practice in nursing homes and medical/surgical wards. (2) Whether sense of coherence and stress are associated with quality of life. (3) If sense of coherence acts as a moderator in the relationship between stress and quality of life. Participants. Data were collected from 227 nurse students between January and April 2014. Methods. Questionnaires measuring stress, sense of coherence and quality of life were completed after a period of clinical practice. Linear regression analyses were used to measure associations between stress, and sense of coherence respectively, and quality of life. Results. The results showed that 33.92% of the students experienced moderate or high levels of stress, and there was significantly more stress in hospital wards compared to nursing homes (p = 0.027). Sense of coherence was positively associated with quality of life in the simple and multiple regression analyses (p < 0.01). Stress was negatively associated with quality of life in the simple regression analysis (p < 0.01), but not in the multiple analyses when sense of coherence was included. However, when we included an interaction term, stress was no longer associated with quality of life and sense of coherence appeared to be a significant moderator in the relationship between stress and quality of life (p = 0.015). Thus, a negative association was seen among students with the lowest levels of sense of coherence. Conclusion. These findings suggest that sense of coherence could be seen as a resource that nurse educators can build upon when supporting students in coping with stress. PMID:26468439

  15. Process evaluation of appreciative inquiry to translate pain management evidence into pediatric nursing practice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Appreciative inquiry (AI) is an innovative knowledge translation (KT) intervention that is compatible with the Promoting Action on Research in Health Services (PARiHS) framework. This study explored the innovative use of AI as a theoretically based KT intervention applied to a clinical issue in an inpatient pediatric care setting. The implementation of AI was explored in terms of its acceptability, fidelity, and feasibility as a KT intervention in pain management. Methods A mixed-methods case study design was used. The case was a surgical unit in a pediatric academic-affiliated hospital. The sample consisted of nurses in leadership positions and staff nurses interested in the study. Data on the AI intervention implementation were collected by digitally recording the AI sessions, maintaining logs, and conducting individual semistructured interviews. Data were analysed using qualitative and quantitative content analyses and descriptive statistics. Findings were triangulated in the discussion. Results Three nurse leaders and nine staff members participated in the study. Participants were generally satisfied with the intervention, which consisted of four 3-hour, interactive AI sessions delivered over two weeks to promote change based on positive examples of pain management in the unit and staff implementation of an action plan. The AI sessions were delivered with high fidelity and 11 of 12 participants attended all four sessions, where they developed an action plan to enhance evidence-based pain assessment documentation. Participants labeled AI a 'refreshing approach to change' because it was positive, democratic, and built on existing practices. Several barriers affected their implementation of the action plan, including a context of change overload, logistics, busyness, and a lack of organised follow-up. Conclusions Results of this case study supported the acceptability, fidelity, and feasibility of AI as a KT intervention in pain management. The AI intervention requires minor refinements (e.g., incorporating continued follow-up meetings) to enhance its clinical utility and sustainability. The implementation process and effectiveness of the modified AI intervention require evaluation in a larger multisite study. PMID:21092118

  16. Advanced practice registered nurses, physician assistants and cancer prevention and screening: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background For more than two decades, integration of team-based approaches in primary care, including physicians, advanced practice registered nurses and physician assistants (APRN/PA), have been recommended for improving healthcare delivery, yet little is known about their roles in cancer screening and prevention. This study aims to review the current literature on the participation and roles of APRN/PAs in providing cancer screening and prevention recommendations in primary care settings in the United States. Methods We searched MEDLINE and CINAHL to identify studies published in 1990–2011 reporting on cervical, breast, and colorectal cancer screening and smoking cessation, diet, and physical activity recommendations by APRN/PAs in the United States. A total of 15 studies met all of our eligibility criteria. Key study, provider, and patient characteristics were abstracted as were findings about APRN/PA recommendations for screening and prevention. Results Most studies were cross-sectional, showed results from within a single city or state, had relatively small sample sizes, reported non-standardized outcome measures. Few studies reported any patient characteristics. APRN/PAs are involved in recommending cancer screening and prevention, although we found variation across screening tests and health behavior recommendations. Conclusions Additional research on the cancer prevention and screening practices of APRN/PAs in primary care settings using standardized outcome measures in relation to evidence-based guidelines may help strengthen primary care delivery in the United States. PMID:24521264

  17. Clinical intervention research in nursing.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Angus

    2009-04-01

    As a healthcare profession nursing has a duty to develop practices that contribute to the health and well being of patients. The aim of this paper is to discuss current issues in clinical research within nursing. The paper defines clinical interventions research as a theoretically based, integrated and sequential approach to clinical knowledge generation. The paper provides specific criteria for defining a clinical intervention together with an overview of the stages involved in clinical research from problem identification to implementing knowledge in practice. The paper also explored the extent to which nursing research was focussed on clinical issues, through a snapshot review of all the original research papers in Europe's three leading nursing research journals. In total of 517 different papers were included and classified in the review. Of these 88% (n=455) were classified as non-clinical intervention and 12% (n=62) as clinical intervention studies. The paper examined the intervention studies in detail examining: the underpinning theory; linkage to previous (pre-clinical) work; evidence of granularity; protocol clarity (generalisable and parsimonious); the phase of knowledge development; and evidence of safety (adverse event reporting). The paper discusses some of the shortcomings of interventions research in nursing and suggests a number of ideas to help address these problems, including: a consensus statement on interventions research in nursing; a register of nursing intervention studies; the need for nursing to develop clinical research areas in which to develop potential interventions (nursing laboratories); and a call for nursing researchers to publish more research in nursing specific journals. PMID:18930228

  18. ICU Nurses’ Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice Towards their Role in the Organ Donation Process from Brain-Dead Patients and Factors Influencing it in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Masoumian Hoseini, S. T.; Manzari, Z.; Khaleghi, I.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nowadays, ICU nurses play a significant role in the care of brain-dead patients and their families. Therefore, their knowledge, attitude and practice towards this issue are extremely important to the success of organ donation. Objective: To assess ICU nurses’ knowledge, attitude and practice towards their role in the organ donation process from brain-dead patients and factors influencing it in Iran. Methods: In a cross-sectional analytical study, 90 ICU nurses working in Ghaem and Emam Reza Hospitals affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences were selected through a stratified random sampling. Data were collected from the participants by a questionnaire included demographic information, and factors influencing the nurses knowledge, attitude, and practice towards their roles in the organ donation process. Results: 90 nurses participated in this study. 70% of the research subjects had spoken with their own families about organ donation; 20% had organ donation cards. The mean±SD score of nurses’ knowledge was 49.13±9.6, attitude 21.49±14.32, and practice was 3.66±6.04. 80% of nurses had a mean knowledge about their roles in the organ donation process; 82% agreed with their roles in this process, and 97% showed weak practice in this regard. Conclusion: Nurses did not have adequate knowledge, attitude, and practice towards their role in organ donation process. It is suggested to include nursing courses on the organ donation process and organ transplantation as well as educational programs to acquaint nurses with their roles in the organ donation process. PMID:26306156

  19. What is good mental health nursing? A survey of Irish nurses.

    PubMed

    Lakeman, Richard

    2012-06-01

    The practice, theory, and preparation associated with nursing people with mental health issues has changed in profound ways in recent decades. This has in part been reflected by a shift in nurses identifying as being mental health rather than psychiatric nurses. Context, theory, and values shape what it means to be a mental health nurse. Thirty experienced mental health nurses in Ireland completed a survey on what good mental health nursing is and a definition induced from their responses. Mental health nursing is a professional, client-centered, goal-directed activity based on sound evidence, focused on the growth, development, and recovery of people with complex mental health needs. It involves caring, empathic, insightful, and respectful nurses using interpersonal skills to draw upon and develop the personal resources of individuals and to facilitate change in partnership with the individual and in collaboration with friends, family, and the health care team. This appears to encapsulate the best of what it meant to be a psychiatric nurse, but challenges remain regarding how to reconcile or whether to discard coercive practices incompatible with mental health nursing. PMID:22633584

  20. Putting Transformative Learning Theory into Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Michael; Carey, Michael; Robertson, Ann; Grainger, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This paper elaborates on a number of key criticisms of Mezirow's transformative learning theory as well as providing arguments that validate it. Our paper exemplifies how Mezirow's theory can help adult educators and prospective school teachers understand that social structures and belief systems can influence student learning, that learners make…

  1. Ethical Decision Making: Developmental Theory and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panzl, Barbara; McMahon, Timothy

    This document is a compilation of materials from a presentation on ethical decision making. These components are included: (1) four sample moral dilemmas; (2) graphs of Kohlberg's six stages of moral growth; (3) graphs of Gilligan's Theory of Moral Judgments; (4) graphs of Kitchner's Theory of Ethical Principles; (5) a discussion of the four…

  2. Political Science Theory for Public Health Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Tyler

    2014-01-01

    Community health educators are well versed in the behavior sciences, including intervention theories. However, most public health professionals are not familiar with the policy theories related to political advocacy. Because health educators are engaging in policy advocacy more frequently, and as a result of the profession including policy…

  3. Educating nurses for the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Bartels, Jean E

    2005-12-01

    The current and projected demand for nurses and nursing services worldwide, coupled with dramatic changes in the delivery of health care, require nurses with more knowledge, more education, and more skills. Issues facing nursing require a reconceptualization of the approach and expectations for nursing practice and for the educational models and processes that lead to reformed nursing practice. New initiatives such as the Clinical Nurse Leader and the Doctor of Nursing Practice may lead the transformational process that is needed. PMID:16271127

  4. A survey of threats and violent behaviour by patients against registered nurses in their first year of practice.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Brian G; Poole, Suzette J; Smith, Naumai A; Coverdale, John H; Gale, Chris K

    2003-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the prevalence of aggressive behaviours by patients against nurses in the first year of practice, and to determine the psychological impact of this behaviour. An anonymous survey was sent to registered nurses in their first year of practice. From the 1169 survey instruments that were distributed, 551 were returned completed (a response rate of 47%). The most common inappropriate behaviour by patients involved verbal threats (n = 192, 35%), verbal sexual harassment (n = 167, 30%) and physical intimidation (n = 161, 29%). There were 22 incidents of assault requiring medical intervention and 21 incidents of participants being stalked by patients. Male graduates and younger nurses were especially vulnerable. Mental health was the service area most at risk. A most distressing incident was described by 123 (22%) of respondents. The level of distress caused by the incident was rated by 68 of the 123 respondents (55%) as moderate or severe. Only half of those who described a most distressing event indicated they had some undergraduate training in protecting against assault or in managing potentially violent incidents (n = 63 of 123; 51%). After registration, 45 (37%) indicated they had had such training. The findings of this study indicate priorities for effective prevention programmes. The issues highlighted need to be addressed in undergraduate nursing curricula and in the development of orientation programmes supporting new graduates. PMID:14685960

  5. Current Perspectives on Pronunciation. Practices Anchored in Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morley, Joan, Ed.

    A collection of essays on pronunciation instruction theory and practice includes: "Teaching Pronunciation as Communication" (Marianne Celce-Murcia); "Learner Variables and Prepronunciation Considerations in Teaching Pronunciation" (Rita Wong); "Pronunciation and Listening Comprehension" (Judy B. Gilbert); "Pronunciation Tutorials for Nonnative…

  6. Conflicts in Nurse Educators' Role Obligations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopala, Beverly

    1994-01-01

    Case studies of nurse educators suggest that client safety is primary; student learning takes precedence over nursing practice values; values hierarchy differs from that of practicing nurses; and important practice values may be compromised to provide appropriate learning experiences. (SK)

  7. How Theory Matters: Formative Assessment Theory and Practices and Their Different Relations to Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossouard, Barbara; Pryor, John

    2012-01-01

    The positioning of theory in relation to educational practice has provoked much recent debate, with some arguing that educational theory constrains thinking in education, while others dismiss "theory" out of hand as belonging to the world of the "academic," abstracted from the "realities" of the classroom. This paper views theory as necessarily…

  8. Pizza into Java: Translating theory into practice

    E-print Network

    Odersky, Martin

    Pizza into Java: Translating theory, Pizza is a strict superset of Java that incorporatesothreehigher-order function* *s, and ideas from.algebraic data types. Pizza is defined by translation into Java andPcompilesiintozza attempts to make

  9. Breastfeeding status and marketing practices of baby food manufactured in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Mathur, G P; Pandey, P K; Mathur, S; Mishra, V K; Singh, K; Bhatt, O P; Loomba, R K; Luthra, C; Taneja, S; Kapoor, R

    1993-11-01

    In January 1993 in Kanpur, India, a survey of 7 private nursing homes revealed that infant formula was given to most newborns (52.4%). The most common brands included Lactogen-I, Milk Care, Raptakos, Dexolac Special Care, and Lactodex. Staff at 5 nursing homes gave prelacteal feeds (water, glucose water, and infant formula) to newborns when they were separated from their mothers. Staff at only 2 nursing homes gave the newborn to the mother immediately after delivery. The longest period between delivery and giving the newborn to the mother was 24 hours. All but one of the nursing homes did not know about the government policy and the recent bill that bars free or low-cost infant formula supplies to hospitals. The administration of the nursing homes did not inform the procurement department, in writing, of the government policy. 4 nursing homes bought low-cost supplies of infant formula from the companies. The companies sold the infant formula to the nursing homes at a price 48.3% to 86.7% lower than the market price. Medical stores inside or outside the nursing homes sold the infant formula to parents at the other 3 homes. The nursing homes used, on average, 2-50 kg/month. Nestle (Lactogen-I) and Dalmia Industries (Milk Care) had a monopoly in infant formula in 4 and 3 nursing homes, respectively. Infant formula was in stock in 5 nursing homes. None of the nursing homes gave mothers free or low-cost infant formula at discharge. Lower than market price and increased number of calls to the hospitals and physicians by company personnel were marketing techniques used by the manufacturers to maintain market share. These results show that, despite government policy and the bill, hospitals continue to use infant formula. The government should use the mass media to increase awareness about its policy on infant foods and the concept of the Baby Friendly Hospital. PMID:8039859

  10. Utilizing grounded theory to explore the information-seeking behavior of senior nursing students

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Vicky; Holtslander, Lorraine

    2012-01-01

    Background: The ability to find and retrieve information efficiently is an important skill for undergraduate nursing students. Yet a number of studies reveal that nursing students are not confident in their library searching skills and encounter barriers to retrieving relevant information for assignments. Objectives: This grounded theory study examined strategies used by students to locate information for class assignments and identified barriers to their success. Methods: Purposive sampling was used to recruit eleven students, who were asked to record their searching processes while completing a class assignment, and semi-structured, open-ended, audiotaped interviews took place to discuss the students' journals and solicit additional data. Methods of information seeking, strategies used to find information, and barriers to searching were identified. Results: Students' main concern was frustration caused by the challenge of choosing appropriate words or phrases to query databases. The central theme that united all categories and explained most of the variation among the data was “discovering vocabulary.” Conclusions: Teaching strategies to identify possible words and phrases to use when querying information sources should be emphasized more in the information literacy training of undergraduate nursing students. PMID:22272155

  11. Teaching Organization Theory and Practice: An Experiential and Reflective Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Mark; Turkiewicz, Rita M.; Holdaway, Britt A.; Bill, Jacqueline S.; Goodman, Jessica; Bonner, Aisha; Daly, Stacey; Cohen, Michael D.; Lorenz, Cassandra; Wilson, Paul R.; Rusk, James

    2009-01-01

    The organization is often the overlooked level in social work's ecological perspective. However, organizational realities exert a profound influence on human development and well-being as well as the nature and quality of social work practice. This article describes a model of teaching organization theory and practice which requires master's…

  12. An Introduction to Music Therapy: Theory and Practice. Third Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, William B.; Gfeller, Kate E.; Thaut, Michael H.

    2008-01-01

    "An Introduction to Music Therapy: Theory and Practice, Third Edition," provides a comprehensive overview of the practice of music therapy for the 21st century. It looks at where we have been, where we are today, and where we might be in the future. Combining sound pedagogy with recent research findings, this new edition has been updated and…

  13. Evaluators' Decision Making: The Relationship between Theory, Practice, and Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tourmen, Claire

    2009-01-01

    How do evaluation practitioners make choices when they evaluate a program? What function do evaluation theories play in practice? In this article, I report on an exploratory study that examined evaluation practices in France. The research began with observations of practitioners' activities, with a particular focus on the phases of evaluation…

  14. Learning from Cases and Bridging Some "Theory-Practice" Gaps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mizukami, Maria da Graca Nicoletti

    This study described the professional learning of teacher educators in graduate schools which allowed, by the consideration of different pedagogical practices, the construction of bridges between those practices and theories supporting them. It analyzed the effectiveness of teaching and learning case studies in promoting teachers' personal…

  15. Roundtable: Theory, Policy and Practice in Lifelong Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Sabine, Ed.

    This document contains outlines of 14 presentations at a roundtable discussion on theory, policy, and practice in lifelong learning that was held during a conference on human resource development (HRD) research and practice across Europe. Outlines of the following presentations and discussions are included: "Discourses on HRD and Lifelong…

  16. Engineers' Professional Learning: A Practice-Theory Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reich, Ann; Rooney, Donna; Gardner, Anne; Willey, Keith; Boud, David; Fitzgerald, Terry

    2015-01-01

    With the increasing challenges facing professional engineers working in more complex, global and interdisciplinary contexts, different approaches to understanding how engineers practice and learn are necessary. This paper draws on recent research in the social sciences from the field of workplace learning, to suggest that a practice-theory

  17. The chemistry of defense: theory and practice.

    PubMed Central

    Berenbaum, M R

    1995-01-01

    Defensive chemicals used by organisms for protection against potential consumers are generally products of secondary metabolism. Such chemicals are characteristic of free-living organisms with a limited range of movement or limited control over their movements. Despite the fact that chemical defense is widespread among animals as well as plants, the vast majority of theories advanced to account for patterns of allocation of energy and materials to defensive chemistry derive exclusively from studies of plant-herbivore interactions. Many such theories place an undue emphasis on primary physiological processes that are unique to plants (e.g., photosynthesis), rendering such theories limited in their utility or predictive power. The general failure of any single all-encompassing theory to gain acceptance to date may indicate that such a theory might not be a biologically realistic expectation. In lieu of refining theory, focusing attention on the genetic and biochemical mechanisms that underlie chemical defense allocation is likely to provide greater insights into understanding patterns across taxa. In particular, generalizations derived from understanding such mechanisms in natural systems have immediate applications in altering patterns of human use of natural and synthetic chemicals for pest control. PMID:7816816

  18. Improving client and nurse satisfaction through the utilization of bedside report.

    PubMed

    Vines, Mary M; Dupler, Alice E; Van Son, Catherine R; Guido, Ginny W

    2014-01-01

    Bedside reporting improves client safety and trust and facilitates nursing teamwork and accountability; however, many nurses do not consider it best practice when caring for their clients. A literature review was conducted to determine whether bedside report is an essential shift handover process that promotes both client and nursing satisfaction. Implications for nurses in professional development are discussed, and strategies for developing and implementing bedside report using Lewin's theory of planned change are provided. PMID:25036080

  19. Men in nursing: their fields of employment, preferred fields of practice, and role strain.

    PubMed Central

    Egeland, J W; Brown, J S

    1989-01-01

    A survey of 367 randomly selected male registered nurses (RNs) revealed that (1) they considered certain fields of nursing (e.g., administration, emergency, or intensive care) to be more congruent with the male sex role than other fields (e.g., general medical, outpatient, or obstetrical nursing); (2) they generally preferred work in more congruent fields, except for administration; (3) over time, they were increasingly employed in more congruent fields; and (4) they did not experience significantly less role strain in the more congruent fields of nursing than in the less congruent fields. PMID:2584041

  20. Nursing students assess nursing education.

    PubMed

    Norman, Linda; Buerhaus, Peter I; Donelan, Karen; McCloskey, Barbara; Dittus, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This study assessed the characteristics of nursing students currently enrolled in nursing education programs, how students finance their nursing education, their plans for clinical practice and graduate education, and the rewards and difficulties of being a nursing student. Data are from a survey administered to a national sample of 496 nursing students. The students relied on financial aid and personal savings and earnings to finance their education. Parents, institutional scholarships, and government loans are also important sources, but less than 15% of the students took out bank loans. Nearly one quarter of the students, particularly younger and minority students, plan to enroll in graduate school immediately after graduation and most want to become advanced nursing practitioners. Most of the nursing students (88%) are satisfied with their nursing education and nearly all (95%) provided written answers to two open-ended questions. Comments collapsed into three major categories reflecting the rewards (helping others, status, and job security) and three categories reflecting the difficulties (problems with balancing demands, quality of nursing education, and the admissions process) of being a nursing student. Implications for public policymaking center on expanding the capacity of nursing education programs, whereas schools themselves should focus on addressing the financial needs of students, helping them strike a balance among their school, work, and personal/family responsibilities and modifying certain aspects of the curriculum. PMID:16021558

  1. A City-Campus Engagement Theory from, and for, Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyt, Lorlene

    2010-01-01

    This article tells a story of practice, a story of theory, and how each informs and transforms the other through a two-way flow of people and knowledge from a city to a campus and back again. By reflecting with fellow participants on the events and outcomes of a sustained city campus partnership, the author introduces a theory of engagement from…

  2. Theory and Practice in Communication Course Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szoke-Milinte, Eniko

    2013-01-01

    The textbook is an essential individual studying and learning tool which helps the student gain insight into the theoretical system as well as the practical issues of a particular field of study. It can also raise interest in and develop a commitment to a discipline with the aid of appropriate tasks and exercises. However, most importantly, the…

  3. Curriculum Theory and Practice: What's Your Style?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Donna L.

    2011-01-01

    Four common schools of thought in the curriculum arena are the linear, holistic, laissez faire, and critical theorist approaches. When teachers identify which approach they are most apt to use, they can consciously incorporate other styles into their practice. The author holds copyright to this article. Distributed by Phi Delta Kappa with…

  4. Contemporary Play Therapy: Theory, Research, and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaefer, Charles E., Ed.; Gerard Kaduson, Heidi, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    This highly practical book presents current developments in play therapy, including innovative applications for particular problems and populations. Contributors first discuss the latest ideas and techniques emerging from object-relations, experiential, dynamic, and narrative perspectives. Next, research evaluating the effectiveness of play…

  5. PUTTING THEORY INTO PRACTICE - CONCLUDING REMARKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The science of Landscape Ecology has a rich theoretical basis that continues to expand. While application of this science is clearly taking place, transfer of science into practice is lagging. Furthermore, examples of active management based on basic landscape ecological princi...

  6. Analyzing Literacy Practice: Grounded Theory to Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell-Gates, Victoria; Perry, Kristen H.; Briseno, Adriana

    2011-01-01

    In this methodological and theoretical article, we address the need for more cross-case work on studies of literacy in use within different social and cultural contexts. The Cultural Practices of Literacy Study (CPLS) project has been working on a methodology for cross-case analyses that are principled in that the qualitative nature of each case,…

  7. Kindergarten Education: Theory, Research, and Practice, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Violet B., Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This document is comprised of the two 2000 issues of a biannually-published journal featuring research studies, theoretical essays, and classroom practice articles about the development and education of kindergarten children as well as occasional articles concerning preschool and the early primary grades. The spring 2000 issue contains the…

  8. Theology and Imagination: From Theory to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Michael Paul

    2006-01-01

    The theology of the late 20th century reflects a courageous retrieval of God as beauty, but integrating such perspectives into the practice of teaching theology is difficult. This field has suffered both from disproportionate academic focus on system thinking and from excessive emphasis on ministerial professionalism. How can we acknowledge the…

  9. Community transformation through culturally competent nursing leadership: application of theory of culture care diversity and universality and tri-dimensional leader effectiveness model.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Mina L; Miller, June; White, Kathleen

    2006-04-01

    Transcultural knowledge and competency have become a critical need for nurses to accommodate the global trends in cultural diversity and health care disparities. Today, nurses are increasingly taking on leadership roles in community settings. This article addresses the application of Leininger's culture care theory with the sunrise model and Hersey and Blanchard's tri-dimensional leader effectiveness model as potential collaborating theories for capacity building and community transformation from a global, transcultural nursing perspective. The two theories, used in collaboration, view the provision of competent leadership as the delivery of effective, culturally congruent nursing care in promoting health and health equity at the community level. PMID:16595398

  10. PHD IN NURSING SAMPLE PART-TIME PROGRAM Student with an interest in community mental health services; Policy & Leadership Emphasis

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    PHD IN NURSING SAMPLE PART-TIME PROGRAM Student with an interest in community mental health Advanced Practice Nursing Theory: Psych Mental Health 3 N703 Health Care & Public Policy 3 Intro815 Knowledge Development in Nursing 3 N803 Advanced Quantitative Design & Methods 3 N816 Proseminar

  11. Why Do Men Choose Nursing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boughn, Susan

    1994-01-01

    Using grounded theory, interviews with 12 males elicited themes for their choice of a nursing career: (1) desire to care for others; (2) practical motivations related to job security and salary; and (3) feelings of power and empowerment, related both to their being male in a female-dominated occupation and to critical care issues. (SK)

  12. Advanced practice nursing, health care teams, and perceptions of team effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Kelley; Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Ritchie, Judith A; Lamothe, Lise

    2014-01-01

    This article summarizes the results of an extensive review of the organizational and health care literature of advanced practice nursing (APN) roles, health care teams, and perceptions of team effectiveness. Teams have a long history in health care. Managers play an important role in mobilizing resources, guiding expectations of APN roles in teams and within organizations, and facilitating team process. Researchers have identified a number of advantages to the addition of APN roles in health care teams. The process within health care teams are dynamic and responsive to their surrounding environment. It appears that teams and perceptions of team effectiveness need to be understood in the broader context in which the teams are situated. Key team process are identified for team members to perceive their team as effective. The concepts of teamwork, perceptions of team effectiveness, and the introduction of APN roles in teams have been studied disparately. An exploration of the links between these concepts may further our understanding the health care team's perceptions of team effectiveness when APN roles are introduced. Such knowledge could contribute to the effective deployment of APN roles in health care teams and improve the delivery of health care services to patients and families. PMID:25397338

  13. Nurse Educator Pathway Project: a competency-based intersectoral curriculum.

    PubMed

    Young, Lynne; Frost, Linda J; Bigl, Julie; Clauson, Marion; McRae, Cora; Scarborough, Kathy S; Murphy, Sue; Jillings, Carol; Gillespie, Frank

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we begin by providing an overview of the Educator Pathway Project (EPP), an education infrastructure that was developed in response to emerging critical nursing workplace issues, and the related demand for enhanced workplace education. We then describe the EPP competency-based curriculum designed to prepare nurses as preceptors, mentors, and educators to lead learning with diverse learner groups. This competency-based curriculum was developed through a collaboration of nurse leaders across practice, academic, and union sectors and drew from a widely embraced curriculum development model (Iwasiw, Goldenberg, & Andrusyzyn, 2005). The goal of the curriculum was to prepare nurses through a four-level career pathway model that contextualized practice and education theory to various education-related roles and levels of experience within the practice setting. Over 1,100 nurses participated in this innovative intersectoral nursing initiative. PMID:21126229

  14. Conceptions and Practice of Information Literacy in Academic Libraries: Espoused Theories and Theories-in-Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Paulette A.

    2010-01-01

    This research was conducted to investigate the relationships between conceptions and practice of information literacy in academic libraries. To create a structure for the investigation, the research adopted the framework of Argyris and Schon (1974) in which professional practice is examined via theories of action, namely espoused theories and…

  15. Practice to Pedagogy: A Study of the Lived Experiences of Part-Time Nursing Faculty Transitioning from Expert Nurse to Novice Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Testut, Tammy A.

    2013-01-01

    Part-time faculty in nursing programs are increasingly being hired as a supplement to the deteriorating pool of full-time nursing faculty. There is a growing need to fill the many vacant slots in nursing academe at the same time that there is substantial growth in prospective students inspiring to become nurses. While these "expert"…

  16. Leadership Theories--Managing Practices, Challenges, Suggestions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Cheryl

    2009-01-01

    A shortage of community college executives due to the number of retirements occurring among current leaders is predicted. An examination of three leadership theories--servant-leadership, business leadership and transformational leadership--suggests techniques for potential community college leaders. Servant-leaders focus on the needs of their…

  17. The Expectant Reader in Theory and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Lois Josephs; McCormick, Kathleen

    1986-01-01

    Offers a method of using reader response theory that emphasizes the expectations about a text and how those expectations are fulfilled or deflated. Specifically, students read traditional fables, fairy tales, and parables, and compare them to contemporary works such as Kafka's "Metamorphosis" and Marquez's "The Very Old Man With Enormous Wings."…

  18. Partial Fractions, Theory and Practice with Mathematica.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, John H.

    1990-01-01

    Illustrated is the use of computer algebra software to assist in both a computational and theoretical way to develop the underlying theory of polynomials and the partial fraction decomposition of a rational function. Background information and a discussion of theoretical considerations are provided. (KR)

  19. The Practices of Critical Thinking Component and Its Impact in Malaysian Nurses Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdullah, Abdul Ghani Kanesan; Alzaidiyeen, Naser Jamil; Yee, Ng Mooi

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to study the impact of the critical thinking component in the health education curriculum of nurses for patients with different health needs. Data for this research was gathered from mixed approaches, quantitative and qualitative approaches. For the quantitative approach 84 student nurses were selected randomly to…

  20. Hospital-based nurse practitioner roles and interprofessional practice: a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Hurlock-Chorostecki, Christina; Forchuk, Cheryl; Orchard, Carole; van Soeren, Mary; Reeves, Scott

    2014-09-01

    This scoping review provides current global understanding of the rapidly evolving nurse practitioner role within hospital settings, and considers the level of understanding of its enactment within interprofessional teamwork. Arksey and O'Malley's framework was used to explore recent primary research, reviews, and gray literature in two ways. First, hospital-based nurse practitioner literature was mapped to country of origin, and thematically summarized. Second, clearly developed and consistently defined key interprofessional concepts were identified in the interprofessional literature then conceptually mapped to the nurse practitioner studies by their operationalization. The nurse practitioner review located 103 abstracts. Twenty-nine, originating from four countries, met the inclusion criteria. The interprofessional concept review identified a total of 137 relevant abstracts, however, only ten met the inclusion criteria. Understanding the nurse practitioner role within hospital teams remains limited due to a small number of countries producing evidence, the lack of nurse practitioner role title standardization hindering consistent knowledgebase development, and limited application and inconsistent operationalization of concepts within nurse practitioner research. Research focused on role enactment is needed to understand the uniqueness of the hospital-based nurse practitioner role. PMID:24330003