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Sample records for nursing theory practice

  1. Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Program: Theories for Extended Pediatric Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Margaret A.

    A description is provided of "Theories for Extended Pediatric Nursing Practice," a required course for pediatric and family nurse practitioner students in a California state university program. The course description presents information on the curricular placement of the course, prerequisites, in-class time allotments, and the focus of the courseÖ

  2. Critical theory as a framework for academic nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Swartz, Martha K

    2014-05-01

    In academic centers of nursing, faculty or academic practice has become more widespread and integrated into the expectations and criteria for appointment and promotion. Yet, the concept of academic practice is not fully embraced among all schools of nursing. Numerous models of academic nursing practice have evolved and vary widely according to the clinical site, the roles of the practitioners, and the systems for generating revenue. Although most models are related to the mission statements of the schools of nursing, few seem to be based on a distinct philosophy of practice. In this article, a consideration of critical theory that provides a framework for practice-based nursing education is presented. By applying the philosophical underpinnings and assumptions of practice that are guided by critical theory, educators may begin to better identify the values of academic nursing practice and incorporate this activity more fully into the educational environment. PMID:24708051

  3. Relating Theory to Practice in Nurse Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Mavis

    This paper studies the perceptions of clinically based registered nurses in England concerning the role of the nurse teacher in different clinical areas at two National Health Service Hospital Trusts served by a single College of Nursing and Midwifery. Survey questionnaires were completed by 33 registered nurses employed at the two hospital…

  4. Concept mapping for applying theory to nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Veo, Parrie

    2010-01-01

    Advocates of a return to theory-based practice believe that this will improve clinical outcomes and nurse satisfaction. The research question of whether concept mapping is an effective method of teaching nurses how to apply theory to their daily practice was tested during an action research project conducted at a community hospital. Registered nurses serving on a practice council were presented a review of nursing theory and given instruction on concept mapping. Symbols representing theoretical application were added to the usual concept map components of idea nodes and interconnecting relationship lines. Participants developed concept maps of familiar nursing tasks and were able to apply the theoretical symbols to those maps. Although the limitations of action research are evident in this study, observations of the members of the small participant group and their interview responses show a positive effect from the instructional intervention. The researcher suggests that review of nursing theory and the use of concept mapping to analyze its application should be considered for staff nurse development. PMID:20098169

  5. Empowerment in School Nursing Practice: A Grounded Theory Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broussard, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    Professional empowerment is vital to nurses' productivity and job satisfaction. A grounded theory study was conducted to describe the basic social process experienced by school nurses in relation to professional empowerment. Interviews with 10 school nurses led to the development of a situation-specific theory of school nurse empowerment, "Making…

  6. Theories in action and how nursing practice changed.

    PubMed

    Jasovsky, Deborah A; Morrow, Mary R; Clementi, Pamela S; Hindle, Paula A

    2010-01-01

    Rogers' theoretical framework of diffusion of innovation guided the successful infusion of the educational training and implementation of the Magis model of care at a 570 bed hospital in the Chicagoland area. The Magis model of care was derived from several nursing theories along with information from the Institute of Family-Centered Care. By incorporating the components that relate to the institution's values and Magnet theme, the stages of innovation were readily adopted and sustained over the first year of implementation. The model has spread beyond the original and sister units as demonstrated by another department creating the Magnet poster with the various elements that they have incorporated into daily care delivery. What is so invigorating to the nursing administration is hearing how nursing staff articulates the care they give to the various components of the model and the theory that supports this practice. PMID:20026725

  7. Practical ethical theory for nurses responding to complexity in care.

    PubMed

    Fairchild, Roseanne Moody

    2010-05-01

    In the context of health care system complexity, nurses need responsive leadership and organizational support to maintain intrinsic motivation, moral sensitivity and a caring stance in the delivery of patient care. The current complexity of nurses' work environment promotes decreases in work motivation and moral satisfaction, thus creating motivational and ethical dissonance in practice. These and other work-related factors increase emotional stress and burnout for nurses, prompting both new and seasoned nurse professionals to leave their current position, or even the profession. This article presents a theoretical conceptual model for professional nurses to review and make sense of the ethical reasoning skills needed to maintain a caring stance in relation to the competing values that must coexist among nurses, health care administrators, patients and families in the context of the complex health care work environments in which nurses are expected to practice. A model, Nurses' Ethical Reasoning Skills, is presented as a framework for nurses' thinking through and problem solving ethical issues in clinical practice in the context of complexity in health care. PMID:20444776

  8. Hearing the voice of nurses in caring theory-based practice.

    PubMed

    Dyess, Susan MacLeod; Boykin, Anne; Bulfin, Mary Jo

    2013-04-01

    The authors in this paper describe the process and findings of a participatory action research project between a college of nursing and a for-profit acute healthcare organization as practice environment transformation occurred, grounded in caring theory. The participatory action research process and findings emphasize the importance of the intention to know what matters and the required time, courage, and commitment necessary to actualize practice environments that support nursing. Implications show efforts to develop and sustain theory-based practice environments that enable the full expression of nursing and a way of being that honors and celebrates the uniqueness of nurses. PMID:23575494

  9. A classical view of the theory-practice gap in nursing.

    PubMed

    Allmark, P

    1995-07-01

    The perceived problem of the theory-practice gap is built upon the assumption that theory can and must be directly applied to nursing practice, otherwise it is irrelevant. Whilst the spirit in which this claim is made is healthy, the assumption is false. An examination of the Greek origins of theory and practice show that the ancient Greeks had different terms for the different types of knowledge contained within theory and within practice. The type of knowledge associated with practice could not be taught through theory, nor well represented in theoretical terms. The knowledge of the bicycle rider and the piano player illustrate this well. If this is correct then simplistic notions of 'applied theory' are nonsensical. The knowledge of the practitioner is not theory, but something else. However, there is a proper relationship between theory and practice, and there are clear examples of this in the way science informs nursing practice. The problem is that much of this is obscured by the false claim of theorists that nursing theory (such as normative models) is also science. In fact, what it represents is inadequate attempts by theory to represent knowledge which cannot be represented in that form. Nursing is practice, not theory. If so, then the term 'nursing theory' seems to be oxymoronic. PMID:7560527

  10. A practice theory approach to understanding the interdependency of nursing practice and the environment: implications for nurse-led care delivery models.

    PubMed

    Bender, Miriam; Feldman, Martha S

    2015-01-01

    Nursing has a rich knowledge base with which to develop care models that can transform the ways health is promoted and valued. However, theory linking the environment domain of the nursing metaparadigm with the real-world environments where nurses practice and patients experience their health care is tenuous. Practice theory is used to foreground the generative role of nursing practice in producing environments of care, providing the basis for a metaparadigm relational proposition explicitly linking nursing practice and environment metaparadigm domains. A theoretical and empirical focus on the significance of nursing practice dynamics in producing environments of care that promote health and healing will strengthen present and future nursing care models. PMID:25932817

  11. Clinical Nurse Leader Integration Into Practice: Developing Theory To Guide Best Practice.

    PubMed

    Bender, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Numerous policy bodies have identified the clinical nurse leader (CNL) as an innovative new role for meeting higher health care quality standards. Although there is growing evidence of improved care environment and patient safety and quality outcomes after redesigning care delivery microsystems to integrate CNL practice, significant variation in CNL implementation has been noted across reports, making it difficult to causally link CNL practice to reported outcomes. This variability reflects the overall absence in the literature of a well-defined CNL theoretical framework to help guide standardized application in practice. To address this knowledge gap, an interpretive synthesis with a grounded theory analysis of CNL narratives was conducted to develop a theoretical model for CNL practice. The model clarifies CNL practice domains and proposes mechanisms by which CNL-integrated care delivery microsystems improve health care quality. The model highlights the need for a systematic approach to CNL implementation including a well-thought out strategy for care delivery redesign; a consistent, competency-based CNL workflow; and sustained macro-to-micro system leadership support. CNL practice can be considered an effective approach to organizing nursing care that maximizes the scope of nursing to influence the ways care is delivered by all professions within a clinical microsystem. PMID:26802589

  12. A Holistic Framework for Nursing Time: Implications for Theory, Practice, and Research

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Terry L.

    2010-01-01

    Topic Nursing time has relevance for those who produce it, those who receive it and those who must pay for it. Though the term nursing time may be commonly used, a common understanding of the concept within the fields of nursing and healthcare administration is lacking. Purpose The purposes of this paper are to explore the concept of nursing time and to identify implications for theory development, clinical and administrative practice, and research. Discussion Both physical and psychological forms of time are viewed as fundamental to our experience of time as social beings. Nursing time has significant intrinsic and instrumental value in nursing and healthcare. A holistic approach incorporating the physical, psychological, and sociological aspects and dimensions of nursing time is advocated. Conclusions Multiple strategies to enhance the patient experience of nursing time are warranted and should address how much time nurses spend with patients as well as how they spend that time. Patterns of overlapping and competing time structures for nurses should be identified and evaluated for their effect on physical time available for patient care and the psychological experiences of time by nurses and patients. PMID:20690994

  13. Interactional nursing--a practice-theory in the dynamic field between the natural, human and social sciences.

    PubMed

    Scheel, Merry Elisabeth; Pedersen, Birthe D; Rosenkrands, Vibeke

    2008-12-01

    Nursing is often described from the point of view of either the natural or the human sciences. In contrast to this, the value foundation in Interactional nursing practice is understood from the point of view of the natural sciences as well as that of the human and social sciences. This article presents many-faceted practice-theory of nursing, which is situated in the dynamic field between these three sciences. The focus of the theory is on interaction and practice resulting in a caring practice. Here practice is based on Taylor's and MacIntyre's interpretation of this concept. Action in nursing is based on Habermas' three varied modes of action seen in the light of an understanding of the world as a system world and a life world. Nursing as an interactional practice-theory is presented with examples of interpretative nursing science, seen in the ethical action-oriented, socio-cultural framework of Taylor and Habermas. It is concluded that phenomenologic and socio-cultural research into caring practice as well as an in-depth, comprehensive interpretation of nursing practice are both highly suited to forming the fundamental theoretical framework in nursing, here seen as an interpretative nursing science. Finally, a comparison is drawn between Interactional nursing practice and Benner's theory of nursing practice. PMID:19068053

  14. Student Assessment System. Domain Referenced Tests. Allied Health Occupations/Practical Nursing. Volume II: Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Gene, Comp.; Simpson, Bruce, Comp.

    These written domain referenced tests (DRTs) for the area of allied health occupations/practical nursing test cognitive abilities or knowledge of theory. Introductory materials describe domain referenced testing and test development. Each multiple choice test includes a domain statement, describing the behavior and content of the domain, and a…

  15. Health Occupations Curriculum. Skills and Theory for Practical Nurse. Units 16 and 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Education, Phoenix.

    Part of a health occupations program, these instructional units consist of materials for use by those who are studying to become practical nurses. Unit 16 deals with basic concepts in the nursing of the aged, in community health, and in the legal responsibilities of the practical nurse. Covered next are nursing care procedures for adults with the…

  16. A qualitative study exploring the relationship between nursing and health promotion language, theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Piper, Stewart

    2008-02-01

    The definitions and meaning qualified nurses employed in an acute NHS hospital setting in the UK gave to health education and health promotion practice and how these fitted established language and theory were investigated qualitatively. These concepts, and the concomitant frameworks and models of practice, have been the subject of considerable debate in the literature. While unresolved both in general and in nursing, a degree of theoretical convergence was established in the 1990s [Bunton, R., Macdonald, G., 1992. Health promotion: disciplines and diversity. Routledge, London; Maben, J.M., Macleod Clark, J. 1995. Health promotion: a concept analysis. Journal of Advanced Nursing 22, 1158-165] helped by The Ottawa Charter [WHO, 1986. Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion. http://www.who.int/hpr/archive/docs/ottawa.html]. For many of the participants in this study however, the meanings given to these concepts and the predominant use of health education were inconsistent with much of the language of the wider debate and this has potential implications for nurse education. For, if the findings are considered transferable then there is a need to develop education strategies and curricula that articulate the ideological foundations of policy and practice and to use mainstream terminology to assist nurses both to understand and contribute to the contemporary health promotion debate. PMID:17512097

  17. Shared Decision-Making Models Acknowledging an Interprofessional Approach: A Theory Analysis to Inform Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Krystina B; Stacey, Dawn; Squires, Janet E; Carroll, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Patient engagement in collaboration with health professionals is essential to deliver quality health care. A shared decision-making (SDM) approach requires that patients are involved in decisions regarding their health. SDM is expanding from the patient-physician dyad to incorporate an interprofessional perspective. Conceptual models can be used to better understand theoretical underpinnings for application in clinical practice. The aim of this article was to conduct a theory analysis of conceptual models using an interprofessional approach to SDM and discuss each model's relevance to nursing practice. Walker and Avant's theory analysis approach was used. Three conceptual models were eligible. For all models, the decision-making process was considered iterative. The development process was described for 1 model. All models were logical, parsimonious, and generalizable. One was supported by empirical testing. No model described how partnerships are enacted to achieve interprofessional SDM. Also, there was limited articulation as to how nurses' roles and contributions differ from other team members. This theory analysis highlights the need for a model that explains how partnerships among interprofessional team members are enacted to better understand the operationalization of interprofessional SDM. Implications for nursing practice at all system levels are offered and supported by the 3 models. PMID:27024998

  18. Keeping vigil over the profession: a grounded theory of the context of nurse anaesthesia practice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Nurse anaesthetists in the US have faced continued, repeated challenges to their profession. Regardless, they have met these challenges and have established themselves as major anaesthesia care providers. In this paper we address the research question: How do certified registered nurse anaesthetists (CRNAs) manage the socio-political context in which they provide care for their patients? Methods Grounded theory was used to explore how nurse anaesthetists protect and promote their profession. Purposive, snowball, and theoretical sampling was used and data were collected through participant observation and interviews conducted at a conference of the professional association, an educational program, by telephone, email exchanges, and time spent in operating rooms and an outpatient surgical clinic. Analysis included coding at increasingly abstract levels and constant comparison. Results The basic social process identified was Keeping Vigil Over the Profession, which explains how nurse anaesthetists protect and promote their profession. It is comprised of three contextual categories: Establishing Public Credibility through regulatory and educational standards, Political Vigilance and taking action in governmental and policy arenas, and Tending the Flock through a continuous information loop between local and administrative/political levels. Conclusions From our study of the context of nurse anaesthesia practice, it is clear that CRNAs are dedicated to protecting their ability to provide high quality patient care by maintaining constant vigilance over their profession. PMID:20633286

  19. Using theory and evidence to drive measurement of patient, nurse and organizational outcomes of professional nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Jeffs, Lianne; Sidani, Souraya; Rose, Donald; Espin, Sherry; Smith, Orla; Martin, Kirsten; Byer, Charlie; Fu, Kaiyan; Ferris, Ella

    2013-04-01

    An evolving body of literature suggests that the implementation of evidence based clinical and professional guidelines and strategies can improve patient care. However, gaps exist in our understanding of the effect of implementation of guidelines on outcomes, particularly patient outcomes. To address this gap, a measurement framework was developed to assess the impact of an organization-wide implementation of two nursing-centric best-practice guidelines on patient, nurse and organizational level outcomes. From an implementation standpoint, we anticipate that our data will show improvements in the following: (i) patient satisfaction scores and safety outcomes; (ii) nurses ability to value and engage in evidence based practice; and (iii) organizational support for evidence-informed nursing care that results in quality patient outcomes. Our measurement framework and multifaceted methodological approach outlined in this paper might serve as a blueprint for other organizations in their efforts to evaluate the impacts associated with implementation of clinical and professional guidelines and best practices. PMID:23577971

  20. Breaking the boundaries between nursing and sociology: a critical realist ethnography of the theory-practice gap.

    PubMed

    Porter, S; Ryan, S

    1996-08-01

    This paper is a response to the challenges laid down by Hannah Cooke in a paper in the Journal of Advanced Nursing entitled "Boundary work in the nursing curriculum: the case of sociology' (Cooke 1993a). In her paper, Cooke noted that the outlook of nursing and sociology are inimicable because nursing's concentration on individuals is at variance with sociology's concern with wider social issues. We argue that it is possible for nursing research to give due attention to social structures without losing its focus on individuals. One methodology that could facilitate this broadening of nursing's epistemological boundaries is critical realist ethnography, which works under the assumption that the relationship between social structures and individual actors involves a two-way process, in that while the enablements and constraints imposed by structures influence individual actions, those actions in turn either maintain or transform social structures. To demonstrate how such a methodology could be applied in nursing research, we work through a case study concerning the theory-practice gap, arguing that the gap is neither the result of clinicians' ignorance of nor antipathy to theory, but is largely generated by the lack of resources enjoyed by nurses, which in turn is a reflection of the social structure of capitalism within which nurses operate. PMID:8858449

  1. Health Occupations Curriculum. Skills and Theory for Practical Nurse. Units 18, 19, and 20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Education, Phoenix.

    Part of a health occupations program, these instructional units consist of materials for use by those who are studying to become practical nurses. Covered in the units are the following: the nursing care of mothers and newborns (obstetrics, prenatal care and complications, patient needs, care of the newborn, prematurity, medications, and cultural…

  2. Health Occupations Curriculum. Skills and Theory for Practical Nurse. Units 14 and 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Education, Phoenix.

    Part of a health occupations program, these instructional units consist of materials for use by those who are studying to become practical nurses. The first unit deals with the various aspects of pediatric nursing, including the growth and development levels of children, diseases and conditions specific to children, and the application of health…

  3. [Applying the human dignity ideals of Confucianism and Kant to psychiatric nursing: from theory to practice].

    PubMed

    Lee, Mei-Hsiu; Lee, Shui-Chuen; Lee, Shu-Chen

    2012-04-01

    Literature articles and clinical observation suggest disease and environmental factors as primary causes of the low self-esteem and stigmatization that typify most psychiatric patients. These patients are at risk of injury when subjected to inappropriate physical restraint. Hospital staffs, including nurses, are in immediate and close contact with psychiatric patients. Mencius's and Kant's thoughts on human dignity can enhance reflections on clinical nursing practices. Mencius's belief that preserving life is not the most desirable thing and death is not the most hated thing can help nurses realize the human dignity of psychiatric patients by understanding that, as an unrighteous act is more detestable than death, the meaning and value of righteousness are greater than life itself. In light of Kant's views on human dignity, nurses should treat patients as goals rather than means. Exploring such ideas can raise nursing quality, restore a positive sense of humanity to psychiatric patients, and develop nursing values and meaning to a higher plane. PMID:22469899

  4. Theory before practice: implicit assumptions about clinical nursing education in Australia as revealed through a shared critical reflection.

    PubMed

    Grealish, Laurie; Smale, Lacey Anne

    2011-08-01

    The transfer of nursing education into the higher education sector occurred over a 10-year period in Australia (1985-1994). Australian nurse leaders settled on a single outcome measure to be applied for all nursing graduates in the form of national competency standards. While this move enabled diversity, the lack of consistency in curriculum design has subsequently led to increasing confusion for clinicians who support students' learning in clinical placements. Using a shared critical reflection method, the authors reviewed (1) the evaluation comments from nurses in one nursing unit of a hospital in one Australian jurisdiction and (2) an historical review of nursing literature at the time of the transfer of nursing education into the higher education sector. The reflection suggests that the aim of the transfer, to create critical thinking graduates, has been undermined by the implicit clinical education practices that have since emerged. In order to address the contemporary challenges for clinical staff working with students from multiple universities, as well as increased student numbers to address the nursing shortage, we recommend a new approach to curriculum design: a national clinical curriculum drawn from social, as well as cognitive, learning theory that at once informs clinicians of students' potential abilities and provides the scope to accommodate the increasingly difficult and critical learning requirements of tertiary-based nursing students. PMID:21955266

  5. Understanding advanced nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Rolfe, Gary

    Articles published in Nursing Times in 2012 presented the role of the advanced nurse practitioner as an extension into the territory of junior doctors in response to pressures in healthcare resources. This article traces the history of advanced practice and suggests that a more appropriate model, post Francis report, should focus on fundamental skills and core nursing values. Rather than attempting to plug a gap created by a shortage of doctors by developing medical skills, nurses should value and promote advanced nursing practice, which is driven by patients' needs for the care that doctors are unable and unskilled to provide. PMID:25095571

  6. Creating a holistic environment for practicing nurses.

    PubMed

    Weber, Janet

    2007-06-01

    Until nurse administrators and nurse educators focus on improving the nursing practice environments in which we lead and teach others, it is likely to be extremely difficult for nurses to succeed in providing holistic care to clients. To promote a holistic practice environment for nurses, we need to find creative ways to apply newer leadership theories in practice and education. A heightened self-awareness of our own emotions and how we influence others can promote more positive relationships, and thus a more nurturing practice environment, for nurses of all ages, cultures, and levels of experience. PMID:17544684

  7. Rethinking theory and practice: pre-registration student nurses experiences of simulation teaching and learning in the acquisition of clinical skills in preparation for practice.

    PubMed

    Hope, Angela; Garside, Joanne; Prescott, Stephen

    2011-10-01

    In the United Kingdom (UK) simulation learning has been recognised in the form of a regulatory agreement that may replace hours from clinical practice. This integration has become an embedded feature of the pre-registration nursing programme at a University in the North of England, along with strategic investment in staff and simulation suites developed to underpin this curriculum change albeit in the absence of sparse empirical evidence, hence the rationale for the study which was designed to explore the relationship between simulation, theory and practice. The study features a thematic analysis of evaluation questionnaires from pre-registration student nurses (n=>500) collected over a 2 year period which informed subsequent focus group interviews to explore the themes in more detail. Consistent data findings were the students' positive response to simulation as a learning approach facilitating the application of theory in a safe controlled environment. Students reported that they felt prepared for practice, recognising that simulated learning improved their humanistic and problem solving abilities as well as the development of psychomotor, technical skills, and overall confidence. The theory-practice gap is a recurring narrative in the nursing literature, the findings of this study recognises that simulation offers an opportunity to enact the integration of theory and practice illuminating this relationship in a controlled environment thus, reinforcing the theory-practice relationship for nursing students. PMID:21237536

  8. The theory-practice gap in nurse education: its causes and possible solutions. Findings from an action research study.

    PubMed

    McCaugherty, D

    1991-09-01

    Kurt Lewin, the originator of action research, proposed that it was valuable not only for innovating change, but also the process of change could lead to new insights into the nature of the problem that was being tackled. This action research project developed and evaluated a teaching model that aimed to help RGN (registered general nurse) students to bridge the theory-practice gap. During the course of this work, the possible reasons for a theory-practice gap started to become clear. This paper provides a discussion of these factors. The viewpoint for this discussion is that of the student nurse. The student is assumed to 'own' the problem and it is from her perspective that the theory-practice gap is analysed. The paper includes a critical examination of books, lectures, the school curriculum and ward nursing practice. Finally, possible solutions to the theory-practice problem are discussed and it is hoped that these will provide a rational basis for tackling the problem. PMID:1939918

  9. Development of Gerontological Nursing Theory. Applying the Man-Living-Health Theory of Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heine, Christine

    1991-01-01

    Describes Rosemary Rizzo Parse's Man-Living-Health theory that was used to describe how gerontological nursing knowledge could be developed through a nursing conceptual model that includes a defined practice and research methodology. (Author/JOW)

  10. Infusing Swanson's Theory of caring into an advanced practice nursing model for an infectious diseases anal dysplasia clinic.

    PubMed

    Ahern, Richard L; Corless, Inge B; Davis, Sheila M; Kwong, Jeffrey J

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of anal cancer is increasing among HIV-infected men and women. The process of screening for anal dysplasia and the management of abnormal findings are currently and most often based on a medical model. The needs of these patients, however, go well beyond medical care. A more comprehensive and holistic approach to health care is, therefore, required. Given the scope of practice of advanced practice nurses who are involved in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with anal dysplasia, it is appropriate for them to assume leadership roles in addressing the needs of these patients. This article describes the application of a theory of caring to create an advanced practice nursing model of care for HIV-infected men and women in infectious diseases anal dysplasia clinics. PMID:22035527

  11. What GUIDES Your NURSING PRACTICE?

    PubMed

    Hountras, Stacy C

    2015-01-01

    Nurses' personal belief systems or philosophies about nursing and people guides their nursing care, especially in difficult situations. Defining and articulating a personal philosophy helps the nurse better understand the motivation and reasoning behind his or her work. In this article, a nurse shares her philosophy of nursing, underlying beliefs, and discusses how this guides her practice. Questions to help nurses articulate their own personal philosophy of nursing are included. PMID:26211305

  12. Valuing the gap: a dialectic between theory and practice in graduate nursing education from a constructive educational approach.

    PubMed

    Moss, Cheryle; Grealish, Laurie; Lake, Sarah

    2010-05-01

    Within nursing education, graduate pedagogies are relatively unexplored, with research commonly focused upon undergraduate and continuing education. In order to address the increasingly complex organisational challenges in the workplace, mid-career nurses and midwives are turning to graduate education. In one graduate course on cultures of learning in the workplace, a constructivist approach to learning was adopted. Post-course analysis of data, from the feedback on the course from students, student choice of assignment topics, and reflections of the course facilitators, revealed three pedagogies unique to graduate education. The pedagogies were labelled 'keeping the space open', 'theoretical concepts as tools', and 'resonance and action as praxis'. The intended outcome of the course is revealed in a fourth theme, 'developing practice in the workplace'. This evaluation suggests that constructivist pedagogies used with graduate students may be different to those pedagogies used with undergraduate and continuing education students. We argue that graduate pedagogies move nursing education beyond strategies that seek integration of theory and practice, towards a dialectic between theory and practice. PMID:19969401

  13. Bandura's self-efficacy theory: a guide for cardiac rehabilitation nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Jeng, C; Braun, L T

    1994-12-01

    To help patients achieve the greatest benefit from cardiac rehabilitation programs, nurses must assist them to modify unhealthy behaviors. Many cardiac rehabilitation programs, however, lack a theoretical foundation; therefore, interventions are usually executed without accounting for the complexities of human behavior, and little consideration is given to the difficulties encountered in altering unhealthy behavior patterns. Bandura's self-efficacy theory is considered a suitable model for cardiac rehabilitation because it provides a systematic direction which allows one to interpret, modify, and predict patients' behaviors. This article describes the development of and conceptual framework for Bandura's theory, how it provides a basis for measurement of self-efficacy, and how it may be applied to the study of cardiac rehabilitation. Finally, some research issues, which are related to applications of self-efficacy theory in cardiac rehabilitation are discussed. PMID:7722281

  14. A non-theorist's perspective on nursing theory: issues of the 1990s.

    PubMed

    DeKeyser, F G; Medoff-Cooper, B

    2001-01-01

    The basis of all nursing endeavors, including practice and research, lies in theory. While nursing theorists are postulating and debating, practicing nurses are continuing with their daily routines and are often unaware that the world of nursing theory is changing. It is important, however, for all nurses to keep abreast of the latest developments in nursing theory. This article discusses some of the key developments within nursing theory based on a review of the nursing literature from 1990 through 1999. PMID:11885867

  15. Health Practices of School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petch-Levine, Deborah; Cureton, Virginia Young; Canham, Daryl; Murray, Meg

    2003-01-01

    The health practices of school nurses affect our role as advocates and educators to promote the health of youth. This study describes the health practices of a convenience sample of 388 school nurses who attended the business meeting at an annual school nurse conference. A self-administered, 40-item questionnaire identified health practices of…

  16. Popper and nursing theory.

    PubMed

    Allmark, Peter

    2003-04-01

    Science seems to develop by inducing new knowledge from observation. However, it is hard to find a rational justification for induction. Popper offers one attempt to resolve this problem. Nursing theorists have tended to ignore or reject Popper, often on the false belief that he is a logical positivist (and hence hostile to qualitative research). Logical positivism claims that meaningful sentences containing any empirical content should ultimately be reducible to simple, observation statements. Popper refutes positivism by showing that there are no such simple statements. He is not a positivist. For Popper, the scientist begins with problems and puts forward trial solutions. These are subjected to rigorous testing aimed at falsifying them. A new theoretical position is then reached in which the scientist knows either that the trial solutions are false or that they have not yet been falsified. Science is characterized by the fact that it tests its ideas through attempted falsification. Non-science tests its ideas through attempted refutation. Nursing theory is a mixture of science and non-science. Popper's method requires rigorous testing of theory in both realms. As such, some nursing theory should be discarded. Popper's view faces at least two important criticisms. One is that a scientist can always reject an apparent falsification by instead altering some auxiliary hypothesis (e.g. denying the accuracy of the falsifying observation). Popper can deal with this argument by saying that defence of a theory in this way will eventually break down if the theory is false. The second criticism is that Popper's method does ultimately draw upon induction. This criticism is true, but his method can be usefully adapted. An adapted from of Popper's philosophy of science provides a good basis for nursing theory. PMID:14498963

  17. Simulations in nursing practice: toward authentic leadership.

    PubMed

    Shapira-Lishchinsky, Orly

    2012-06-01

    shapira-lishchinsky o. (2012) Journal of Nursing Management Simulations in nursing practice: toward authentic leadership Aim‚Äā This study explores nurses' ethical decision-making in team simulations in order to identify the benefits of these simulations for authentic leadership. Background‚Äā While previous studies have indicated that team simulations may improve ethics in the workplace by reducing the number of errors, those studies focused mainly on clinical aspects and not on nurses' ethical experiences or on the benefits of authentic leadership. Methods‚Äā Fifty nurses from 10 health institutions in central Israel participated in the study. Data about nurses' ethical experiences were collected from 10 teams. Qualitative data analysis based on Grounded Theory was applied, using the atlas.ti 5.0 software package. Findings‚Äā Simulation findings suggest four main benefits that reflect the underlying components of authentic leadership: self-awareness, relational transparency, balanced information processing and internalized moral perspective. Conclusions‚Äā Team-based simulation as a training tool may lead to authentic leadership among nurses. Implications for nursing management‚Äā Nursing management should incorporate team simulations into nursing practice to help resolve power conflicts and to develop authentic leadership in nursing. Consequently, errors will decrease, patients' safety will increase and optimal treatment will be provided. PMID:23410036

  18. Occupational health nursing practice through the Human Caring lens.

    PubMed

    Noel, Dianne L

    2010-01-01

    Many health care and academic centers have adopted Watson's Theory of Human Caring as their guiding principle; the theory is also used in other disciplines, such as library science. Human caring theory offers occupational health nurses as structure that not only defines a focus for practice, but also provides a basis for moral and philosophical practice analyses. In particular, nurses may find this theory useful in confirming the definition of "caring" and reconsidering what nursing is all about. More importantly, consideration and application of this theory may lead to research on its applicability to the field of occupational health nursing. This article presents the science and philosophy of human caring, specifically Watson's Theory of Human Caring. Two case studies are presented that demonstrate how the theory could be used to evaluate occupational health nursing practice. To demonstrate its possible relevance as an occupational health nursing framework, an analysis of and comparison to existing occupational health nursing guidelines are detailed and discussed. PMID:20027992

  19. Handbook of clinical nursing practice

    SciTech Connect

    Asheervath, J.; Blevins, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Written in outline format, this reference will help nurses further their understanding of advanced nursing procedures. Information is provided on the physiological, psychological, environmental, and safety considerations of nursing activities associated with diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Special consideration is given to the areas of pediatric nursing, nursing assessment, and selected radiologic and nuclear medicine procedures for each system. Contents: Clinical Introduction. Clinical Nursing Practice: Focus on Basics. Focus on Cardiovascular Function. Focus on Respiratory Function. Focus on Gastrointestinal Function. Focus on Renal and Genito-Urological Function. Focus on Neuro-Skeletal and Muscular Function. Appendices.

  20. Empowering Nurses for Professional Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson-Catalano, Judy

    1992-01-01

    Empowering teaching strategies encourage leadership, critical thinking, problem solving, and collegiality and discourage passivity, isolation, and subordination. Empowerment prepares nurses for professional practice in hospitals. (SK)

  1. Mentoring practices benefiting pediatric nurses.

    PubMed

    Weese, Meghan M; Jakubik, Louise D; Eliades, Aris B; Huth, Jennifer J

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies examining predictors of pediatric nurse prot√©g√© mentoring benefits demonstrated that prot√©g√© perception of quality was the single best predictor of mentoring benefits. The ability to identify the mentoring practices that predict specific benefits for individual nurses provides a better understanding of how mentoring relationships can be leveraged within health care organizations promoting mutual mentoring benefits. This descriptive correlational, non-experimental study of nurses at a northeast Ohio, Magnet¬ģ recognized, free-standing pediatric hospital advances nursing science by demonstrating how mentoring practices benefit pediatric nurse prot√©g√©s. PMID:25128577

  2. Practice Write-ups: An Assessment Instrument that Contributes to Bridging the Differences between Theory and Practice for Student Nurses through the Development of Core Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gormley, Kevin J.

    1997-01-01

    Practice write-ups--descriptions of their clinical experiences--enable nursing students to demonstrate competence in core skills and to develop the ability to reflect on practice. As assessment instruments, they provide individualized and meaningful feedback. (SK)

  3. Watson's theory of transpersonal caring: factors impacting nurses professional caring.

    PubMed

    Vandenhouten, Christine; Kubsch, Sylvia; Peterson, Margaret; Murdock, Jennifer; Lehrer, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    This study's purpose was to identify factors impacting nurses' perceived professional caring. The sample of 242 nurses completed a researcher-developed survey based on Watson's theory of transpersonal caring. Results showed that experienced, hospital-based nurses and those demonstrating greater familiarity with Watson's theory had higher caring scores. Implications for education, practice, and research are suggested. PMID:23075749

  4. Reflection: nursing's practice and education panacea?

    PubMed

    Burton, A J

    2000-05-01

    Nurses are now directed to 'reflect effectively and practice reflectively'. When there is scant evidence to support the use of reflection, why does the United Kingdom Central Council, English National Board for Nursing Midwifery and Health Visiting and institutes of nurse education insist that nurses, at all levels of experience, reflect? Before developing the debate in relation to the robustness or otherwise of the concept of 'reflection' and its application to practice, a discussion as to what constitutes nursing knowledge, followed by an examination of the main theories related to adult learning, is presented. The paper develops to encompass a critical examination of both theoretical and applied perspectives on reflection. Conceptual issues and assumptions related to reflection are explored. Key areas considered are whether the practice of reflection facilitates the improvement of one's knowledge, helps to generate theory and results in one becoming a more critical practitioner with resulting benefits for patients. It will be argued that reflective theory and practice has not yet been adequately tested and that there is a pressing need for evidence to demonstrate irrefutably the effectiveness of reflection on nursing practice, particularly with respect to patient outcomes. PMID:10840233

  5. Primary Health Care Theory to Practice: Experience of First-Year Nursing Students in Hong Kong.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Peggy; Chan, Mun Che; Cheung, Lai Yin; Hui, Tze Shau; Li, Ka Ying; Tang, Hiu Tung; Tong, Hoi Ning; Wong, Sik Kwan; Wong, Po Ming

    2002-01-01

    Eight first-year nursing students in Hong Kong implemented a primary health care project involving health assessments of older adults. Clients improved health knowledge and were satisfied with assessments. Students demonstrated high competence in health assessment, needs assessment, evaluation strategies, and health promotion skills. (Contains 27…

  6. Using Nursing Languages in School Nursing Practice. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denehy, Janice

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this updated manual is to define and describe standardized nursing languages, highlight how nursing languages are a part of the nursing process, and illustrate through case examples how nursing languages are used in school nursing practice. This manual also summarizes the history and development of three nursing classifications, the…

  7. Nursing Home Work Practices and Nursing Assistants' Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Christine E.; Squillace, Marie R.; Meagher, Jennifer; Anderson, Wayne L.; Wiener, Joshua M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the impact of nursing home work practices, specifically compensation and working conditions, on job satisfaction of nursing assistants employed in nursing homes. Design and Methods: Data are from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey, responses by the nursing assistants' employers to the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey,…

  8. Nursing Home Work Practices and Nursing Assistants' Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Christine E.; Squillace, Marie R.; Meagher, Jennifer; Anderson, Wayne L.; Wiener, Joshua M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the impact of nursing home work practices, specifically compensation and working conditions, on job satisfaction of nursing assistants employed in nursing homes. Design and Methods: Data are from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey, responses by the nursing assistants' employers to the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey,Ö

  9. The theory-theory gap: the challenge for nurse teachers.

    PubMed

    Dale, A E

    1994-09-01

    The paper begins with a review of the nature of theory-based practice and how it is evidenced. This is then used to demonstrate that theory is based upon practice and that there is not a gap between theory and practice but rather there is a theory-theory gap which is evidenced by a lack of experiential knowledge. The paper continues by exploring ways in which theory can be integrated in practice to provide the student with experiential knowledge and the challenge this creates for nurse teachers. It finishes with a proposal for the way in which the nurse teacher might develop his/her clinical role to address the gap whilst securing their basis for the future in higher education. PMID:7963059

  10. Aggression prevention training for student nurses: differential responses to training and the interaction between theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Beech, Bernard

    2008-03-01

    Workplace violence is of great concern to all health care professionals. Nurses are major targets for incidents of violence, with student nurses being clearly recognised as a high-risk sub-group. Training is widely advocated as the appropriate organisational response but the effects and effectiveness of training are inadequately studied. A recently completed Ph.D study used a longitudinal research design to evaluate the effects of a three-day 'aggression prevention and management training programme' on various learning domains of three cohorts of UK student nurses destined for adult, child, mental health and learning disability specialities [N=243] in their first year of nurse training. A purpose-designed questionnaire was used to collect data on knowledge, attitudes, confidence, and self-assessed competence at four time points, two before and two following the educational input. This paper focuses on the differences detected in student nurses' responses to different sections of the questionnaire, at various time points, in relation to recorded demographic variables, namely, their age, gender, destined speciality, and previous relevant training experience. It also considers the 'interaction' between theoretical preparation and clinical practice. These finding may also have wider relevance to skills training and understanding of the reality of student nurse experience in clinical settings. PMID:18291326

  11. [Rediscovering practical knowledge in nursing].

    PubMed

    Medina Moya, José Luis

    2005-01-01

    The author demythologizes some arguments which blamed the victim and he works on the path to rediscover practical knowledge in nursing in the sense that a nurse becomes a "constructor" or a "maker" of knowledge and not a mere applicator of knowledge. PMID:16130684

  12. Formalizing nursing knowledge: from theories and models to ontologies.

    PubMed

    Peace, Jane; Brennan, Patricia Flatley

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge representation in nursing is poised to address the depth of nursing knowledge about the specific phenomena of importance to nursing. Nursing theories and models may provide a starting point for making this knowledge explicit in representations. We combined knowledge building methods from nursing and ontology design methods from biomedical informatics to create a nursing representation of family health history. Our experience provides an example of how knowledge representations may be created to facilitate electronic support for nursing practice and knowledge development. PMID:19592863

  13. Envisioning human dignity to enhance practice while journeying with Rwandan women: student nurses teaching-learning Parse's theory of humanbecoming.

    PubMed

    Oaks, Geneva; Drummond, Susan

    2009-07-01

    California Baptist University School of Nursing opened in September 2006 as the first baccalaureate nursing education program in Riverside, California. Under the direction of Dr. Constance Milton, the curriculum was cocreated using Parse's humanbecoming school of thought as a framework. In August 2008, nursing students traveled to Rwanda where they bore witness to the transformation after the 1994 genocide. Dimensions and processes of Parse's practice methodology-illuminating meaning by explicating what is with languaging, synchronizing rhythms while dwelling with ups and downs in the struggle of connecting-separating, and mobilizing transcendence as moving beyond with the not-yet while transforming- emerged in the students' journaling as lived all-at-once amid reverence that honored the dignity and worth of the Rwandan people. PMID:19567728

  14. A theory of healing in the aftermath of youth suicide. Implications for holistic nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Kalischuk, R G; Davies, B

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this family-focused, grounded-theory study was to develop a substantive theory that explains how individual family members heal in the aftermath of youth suicide. Individual healing following youth suicide is conceptualized as a process of "journeying toward wholeness." In response to youth suicide, survivors characteristically tap into their innate strengths and coping capabilities. Eventually, most survivors move toward healing. Precipitated by youth suicide, individual healing was found to be a contextually mediated, ongoing, dynamic, and recursive process. Most often initiated by a family survivor who was emotionally and spiritually close to the youth prior to suicide, healing emanated from the survivor's consciousness as an act of volition. This study brings to light the idea that bereaved family survivors of youth suicide have the potential to heal in response to the decisions they make and the healthy bonds they create and maintain between themselves and the deceased youth. PMID:11847837

  15. Nursing documentation and nursing practice: a discourse analysis.

    PubMed

    Heartfield, M

    1996-07-01

    Nursing documentation exists as a daily reality of nurses' work. It is interpreted by some as the evidence of nursing actions and dismissed by others as a misrepresentation of nursing care. This paper reports on a study of nursing documentation as nursing practice. The work of Foucault and discourse analysis provide a research design for examination of how written descriptions of patient events taken from patient case notes result from hegemonic influences that construct a knowledge and therefore a practice of nursing. Discourses as ways of understanding knowledge as language, social practices and power relations are used to identify how nursing documentation functions as a manifestation and ritual of power relations. A focus on body work and fragmented bodies provided details of nursing's participation in the discursive construction of the object patient and invisible nurse. It is through resistances to documentation that alternative knowledge of nursing exists. PMID:8807383

  16. Assisted living nursing practice: the language of dementia: theories and interventions.

    PubMed

    Mitty, Ethel; Flores, Sandi

    2007-01-01

    The person with dementia uses behavior to communicate, but their behavior is altered by the combination of neurological damage and impairment, altered interpersonal relationships and reactions of others, and the individual's loss or weakening of their lifelong defenses or coping mechanisms. This article discusses the routes by which behavior can be understood and describes a constellation of needs of a person with dementia that has a unique fit with person-centered care. Three evidence-based models (theories) and interventions specific to dementia behaviors are discussed: the Need-Driven Dementia-Compromised Behavior Model, the Progressively Lowered Stress Threshold Model, and the utilization of self-identity roles. Montessori-based activities are another approach to person-centered dementia care that respect, as do the models, the dignity, worthiness and interests of the person afflicted with dementia. The models discussed in this article all seek to improve the quality of life of the person with dementia. Other than those at the profound end stage of dementia, most sufferers can communicate feelings. Subjective quality of life must be determined based on the self-report of the person suffering with dementia so that treatment interventions and effectiveness are grounded in that person's reality. PMID:17923285

  17. Cultural negotiation: a constructivist-based model for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Engebretson, J; Littleton, L Y

    2001-01-01

    Combining abstract concepts from grand theories with the pragmatics of nursing practice presents a dilemma for nursing that is being addressed with the emphasis on middle-range theory. The philosophical perspective of constructivism is the foundation for a middle-range theory that links the nursing process to holism through the respective worlds and knowledge of the nurse and client. The nursing process is situated in the context of the cultural worlds of the nurse, client, and health care system and in the greater social context. This model allows the nursing process to be recast in new language that captures the interdependence of the client-nurse interaction. This model accommodates the social values and beliefs of both the health care system and the social context. PMID:11677516

  18. Mental health nurses: changing practice?

    PubMed

    Tingle, Alison

    2002-09-01

    Project 2000 envisaged that the nurse practitioner of the future should act as an "agent for change", using research evidence to address those aspects of practice deemed detrimental to patient care. A Department of Health funded study investigating the careers of nurse diplomates provides information on the extent to which newly qualified nurses were able to change aspects of practice, what factors inhibited changes and which personnel played a key role in facilitating change. Key factors which inhibited newly qualified nurses acting as change agents were lack of experience and confidence, as well as attitudes of other members of staff. Staff of a higher grade, immediate line managers and healthcare assistants all played a key role in facilitating change. PMID:12201893

  19. Training Advanced Practice Palliative Care Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Deborah Witt

    1999-01-01

    Describes the role and responsibilities of advanced-practice nurses in palliative care and nursing's initiative in promoting high-quality care through the educational preparation of these nurses. (JOW)

  20. Culturally Competent School Nurse Practice.

    PubMed

    Carr, Bette; Knutson, Stephanie

    2015-11-01

    School nurses are among the professional specialty disciplines in the school environment that have the unique opportunity of exploring and building upon effective practices when working and providing service to diverse populations. As such, school nurses must not only acquire the skills to survive in the culture of education; they must also develop cultural competence by engaging in self-identity and reflection, understanding cultural differences, being culturally responsive, identifying social injustices, and engaging in life-long learning experiences. PMID:26515571

  1. What constitutes a nursing practical skill?

    PubMed

    Bj√łrk, I T

    1999-02-01

    Practical nursing skills ensure patients' physical comfort, hygiene, and safe medical treatment. The learning, performance, or significance of nursing practical skills are seldom a theme in theoretical and philosophical debate or the topic of research within nursing. This might be due to a long-standing behavioristic tradition in nursing of viewing nursing practical skills in a simplistic way, only as correctly sequenced motor movement. The purpose of this article is to bring forth an argument for a broader understanding of the constitution of nursing practical skills. This argument is substantiated by a review of past and present conceptualizations of nursing practical skills as well as by philosophical reflections on the value of practical skills in the nursing profession. Nursing practical skills embrace dimensions of performance, intention, and nursing "disciplined" understanding. PMID:11512159

  2. A nursing diagnosis based model: guiding nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Krenz, M; Karlik, B; Kiniry, S

    1989-05-01

    Fiscal uncertainty, anxiety about nursing retention, and public scrutiny characterize the hospital milieu. During times such as these, introducing a conceptual model may appear inpractical and untimely. However, the conceptual model at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital has demonstrated many practical applications. It guides nursing practice and provides a framework for quality assurance, documentation of nursing care, and education of nurses in the hospital. Future plans include using the model as a basis for developing a computerized care planning system and a method for cost accounting for nursing. The authors describe how the model serves to unify, give direction, simplify, and improve nursing practice. PMID:2723785

  3. Role modeling excellence in clinical nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Perry, R N Beth

    2009-01-01

    Role modeling excellence in clinical nursing practice is the focus of this paper. The phenomenological research study reported involved a group of 8 nurses identified by their colleagues as exemplary. The major theme revealed in this study was that these exemplary nurses were also excellent role models in the clinical setting. This paper details approaches used by these nurses that made them excellent role models. Specifically, the themes of attending to the little things, making connections, maintaining a light-hearted attitude, modeling, and affirming others are presented. These themes are discussed within the framework of Watson [Watson, J., 1989. Human caring and suffering: a subjective model for health services. In: Watson, J., Taylor, R. (Eds.), They Shall Not Hurt: Human Suffering and Human Caring. Colorado University, Boulder, CO] "transpersonal caring" and [Bandura, A., 1997. Social Learning Theory. Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ] "Social Learning Theory." Particular emphasis in the discussion is on how positive role modeling by exemplary practitioners can contribute to the education of clinical nurses in the practice setting. PMID:18590978

  4. Philosophic analysis of a theory of clinical nursing.

    PubMed

    Schafer, P J

    1987-01-01

    Knowledge in nursing requires development of theories that address both the science and art of the professional practice discipline. "A Theory of Clinical Nursing" was analyzed to explicate the epistemologic dimensions within an historic perspective. Epistemologic dimensions defined by the philosophy of science--approaches to theory development, sources of knowledge, and methodology--were characterized from two perspectives, scientific inquiry and historicism. The major perspectives in the scientific mode, namely, mechanism, empiricism, logical positivism, and logical empiricism, were analyzed along the three dimensions of theory development, sources of knowledge, and methodology. Trends in theoretical developments in nursing were related to the scientific and historic perspectives and to the epistemologic dimensions. Juxtaposing the diversity of knowledge required for nursing science and practice, and the values systems of the practitioners, revealed the inadequacy of the scientific model. Nursing knowledge explication required several modes of inquiry to articulate the scientific basis of the discipline and the art of delivery of the practice. The historicist approach framed scientific work with the prevailing World View. The Rubin theory was located within the matrix of approaches to inquiry and perspectives in nursing science. Labeled by the theorist as both a nursing research and a nursing care model, "A Theory of Clinical Nursing" represented a transition model of nursing, undergirded by the major conceptualizations and methodologies of field, psychoanalytic, and social behaviorist traditions, but implicitly coalescing the art with the science of nursing. The theory addressed core concepts of person, situation, and nursing care, as well as major process themes of change and interaction. Nursing theories of a more narrow range, such as maternal role attainment and maternal identity, nested within the theory, while subsequent theoretical clarifications and expansions have been constructed by students of the theorist. In the hierarchy of knowledge conceptualizations, Rubin's theory represents a disciplinary matrix: ordering theories, methods, and exemplars; giving direction to the development of theories of nursing that address empirical problems of the discipline; and cohering to the metaparadigm of nursing. Philosophic analysis of theories of nursing can yield an articulated, clearly depicted framework of concepts and their relationships from which new understandings may emerge. PMID:3450983

  5. Assisted living nursing practice: admission assessment.

    PubMed

    Mitty, Ethel; Flores, Sandi

    2007-01-01

    Admission assessment, generally conducted by a registered nurse, is autonomous, without opportunity for dialogue with colleagues and other health care professionals and bounded by the nurse's knowledge and skills, state regulations, facility practices, and marketing. The fact that some states permit admission and retention of nursing home level-of-care residents and provision of end-of-life care means that the assessment has to be able to predict the resident's likely trajectory of well-being as well as chronic illness exacerbation. The nurse must have a clear perspective on staff competencies and judge whether additional education or training will be necessary. This article reviews assessment standards of practice as put forth by the American Assisted Living Nurses Association as part of its application for recognition of assisted living nursing as specialty nursing practice by the American Nurses Association. The role of the Licensed Practical Nurse/Licensed Vocational Nurse in resident assessment is also discussed. PMID:17292794

  6. Remote nursing certified practice: viewing nursing and nurse practitioner practice through a social justice lens.

    PubMed

    Tarlier, Denise S; Browne, Annette J

    2011-06-01

    Remote Nursing Certified Practice (RNCP) was introduced in 2010 to regulate nursing practice in remote, largely First Nations communities in British Columbia, Canada. These are communities that often experience profound health and health-care inequities. Typically nurses are the main health-care providers. Using a critical social justice lens, the authors explore the clinical and ethical implications of RNCP in terms of access to equitable, high-quality primary health care.They examine the fit between the level and scope of health services provided by registered nurses working under RNCP and the health needs of remote First Nations communities. In doing so, they draw comparisons between nurse practitioners (NPs) and outpost nurses working in NP roles who historically were employed to provide health care in these communities.The authors conclude by calling for nursing regulations that support equitable, high-quality primary care for all British Columbians. PMID:21888005

  7. Starting a nursing consultation practice.

    PubMed

    Schulmeister, L

    1999-03-01

    Because the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) role has been changed or eliminated in many hospital organizations, many CNSs in career transition are considering establishing collaborative or independent nursing consultation practices. Opportunities for consultants exist in diverse practice settings and specialties. Before starting a consultation practice, the CNS should carefully examine goals, identify resources, and begin contacting potential referral sources. He or she must also decide what form of business organization to establish and write a business plan to solidify ideas and prepare for the unexpected. Most CNS consultants rely on personal savings to cover initial business and personal expenses, and many continue working as a CNS until the consultation practice is established. Fees can be set based on community standards, what the market will bear, desired projected income, or a third-party payor's fee schedule. The consultation practice can be marketed by word of mouth, inexpensive advertising techniques such as distributing flyers and business cards, direct mall, and media advertising. In today's healthcare marketplace, opportunities abound for the CNS risk-taker interested in starting a nursing consultation practice. PMID:10382408

  8. Nursing Home Registered Nurses' and Licensed Practical Nurses' Knowledge of Causes of Falls.

    PubMed

    Gray-Miceli, Deanna; de Cordova, Pamela B; Crane, Giles L; Quigley, Patricia; Ratcliffe, Sarah J

    2016-01-01

    Reducing falls in nursing homes requires a knowledgeable nursing workforce. To test knowledge, 8 validated vignettes representing multifactorial fall causes were administered to 47 nurses from 3 nursing homes. Although licensed practical nurses scored higher than registered nurses in individual categories of falls, when we computed the average score of all 8 categories between groups of registered nurses and licensed practical nurses, registered nurses scored higher (F = 4.106; P < .05) in identifying 8 causal reasons for older adults to fall. PMID:26421775

  9. Cultural characteristics of nursing practice in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, Mayuko; Ishigaki, Kazuko; Yamamoto-Mitani, Noriko; Fujita, Junko; Katakura, Naoko; Ogata, Yasuko; Mochizuki, Yuki; Okamoto, Yuko; Shinohara, Yuko

    2016-04-01

    The population of Japan has become multi-cultural, and there is more demand for culturally competent nursing care. The purpose of this study was to explore cultural characteristics of nursing practice in Japan focusing on behaviour. We interviewed 25 professionals with experience in or knowledge of nursing practice both in Japan and either the United States, the United Kingdom, Sweden, Thailand or South Korea. Qualitative content analysis has yielded three themes for cultural characteristics of nursing practice in Japan: practice expectations, communication and relationships with patients. Practice expectations for nurses in Japan involved various aspects; nurses conducted a wide range of basic nursing tasks, including bed baths and toileting. They often relied on non-verbal communication to deliver thoughtfulness and perceptiveness. They typically show deference to doctors and colleagues, emphasizing building and maintaining harmony with them. This emphasis on a multifaceted, non-verbal, and harmonious approach seemed characteristic of practice among Japanese nurses. PMID:27184703

  10. Nurse Career-Pattern Study. Part I: Practical Nursing Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tate, Barbara L.; Knopf, Lucille

    The overall nurse career-patterns study actually consists of four concurrent longitudinal studies relating to the four kinds of nursing programs in which, if possible, each subject will be followed from the time of entrance through a 15-year period after graduation. The practical nurse study seeks to determine whether certain biographical data or…

  11. Towards a strong virtue ethics for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Alan E

    2006-07-01

    Illness creates a range of negative emotions in patients including anxiety, fear, powerlessness, and vulnerability. There is much debate on the 'therapeutic' or 'helping' nurse-patient relationship. However, despite the current agenda regarding patient-centred care, the literature concerning the development of good interpersonal responses and the view that a satisfactory nursing ethics should focus on persons and character traits rather than actions, nursing ethics is dominated by the traditional obligation, act-centred theories such as consequentialism and deontology. I critically examine these theories and the role of duty-based notions in both general ethics and nursing practice. Because of well-established flaws, I conclude that obligation-based moral theories are incomplete and inadequate for nursing practice. I examine the work of Hursthouse on virtue ethics' action guidance and the v-rules. I argue that the moral virtues and a strong (action-guiding) version of virtue ethics provide a plausible and viable alternative for nursing practice. I develop an account of a virtue-based helping relationship and a virtue-based approach to nursing. The latter is characterized by three features: (1) exercising the moral virtues such as compassion; (2) using judgement; and (3) using moral wisdom, understood to include at least moral perception, moral sensitivity, and moral imagination. Merits and problems of the virtue-based approach are examined. I relate the work of MacIntyre to nursing and I conceive nursing as a practice: nurses who exercise the virtues and seek the internal goods help to sustain the practice of nursing and thus prevent the marginalization of the virtues. The strong practice-based version of virtue ethics proposed is context-dependent, particularist, and relational. Several areas for future philosophical inquiry and empirical nursing research are suggested to develop this account yet further. PMID:16774598

  12. Nurse managers describe their practice environments.

    PubMed

    Warshawsky, Nora E; Lake, Sharon W; Brandford, Arica

    2013-01-01

    Hospital work environments that support the professional practice of nurses are critical to patient safety. Nurse managers are responsible for creating these professional practice environments for staff nurses, yet little is known about the environments needed to support nurse managers. Domains of nurse managers' practice environment have recently been defined. This is a secondary analysis of 2 cross-sectional studies of organizational characteristics that influence nurse manager practice. Content analysis of the free text comments from 127 nurse managers was used to illustrate the 8 domains of nurse managers' practice environments. Nurse managers valued time spent with their staff; therefore, workloads must permit meaningful interaction. Directors demonstrated trust when they empowered nurse managers to make decisions. Administrative leaders should build patient safety cultures on the basis of shared accountability and mutual respect among the health care team. The expectations of nurse managers have greatly expanded in the volume and complexity of direct reports, patient care areas, and job functions. The nurse managers in this analysis reported characteristics of their practice environments that limit their role effectiveness and may negatively impact organizational performance. Further research is needed to understand the effects of nurse managers' practice environments on staff and patient outcomes. PMID:24022285

  13. Patient and nurse experiences of theory-based care.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Jane

    2009-04-01

    The pre-surgery nursing practice model derived from Newman's theory was developed to change the delivery of nursing care in a pre-surgical clinic. Guided by the theoretical knowledge of health as expanding consciousness, transpersonal caring, and reflective practice, key practice changes included a) incorporating Newman's praxis process, b) changing the physical space, and c) providing opportunities to reflect on practice. The purpose of this study was to utilize a phenomenological approach to evaluate a new model of care among 31 patients and 4 nurses. PMID:19342715

  14. [German hospital nurses' attitudes concerning evidence-based nursing practice].

    PubMed

    Köpke, Sascha; Koch, Frauke; Behncke, Anja; Balzer, Katrin

    2013-06-01

    The relevance of nurses' attitudes for establishing an evidence-based nursing practice (EBP) has been proven internationally. For German-speaking countries so far only few data are available. The present survey aims at assessing nurses' perceptions of relevant context factors for implementing an EBP. Therefore, 1384 nurses in 21 hospitals in Northern-Germany received a self-developed questionnaire based on established instruments in March and April 2012. 1023 (74 %) nurses responded. In principal, results show a positive attitude towards EBP. The majority of participants regards research as relevant for nursing practice. Support from superiors and colleagues is seen as important prerequisite. However, implementation remains a challenge. Nurses are not informed about recent research results. Original articles are hardly used. Only a minority is prepared to spend own money on congresses or to start academic nursing training in the near future. For the first time in German-speaking countries, the study provides meaningful data on nurses' attitudes towards EBP. Nurses confirm the value of research for their own practice. However, there is a lack of basic requirements to identify and implement relevant research findings as for example the use of recent scientific evidence. Nursing education in Germany should therefore focus more strongly on building competencies required for EBP, for example through properly designed academic nursing training. PMID:23732313

  15. Leadership redefined: educating the Doctorate of Nursing Practice nurse leader through innovation.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Kathryn Lothschuetz

    2011-01-01

    In today's society, health care systems are characterized by change, unpredictability, increasing speed of information and knowledge exchanges, redefined organizational boundaries and hierarchy, emphasis on value, teamwork, interdisciplinary collaboration, diversity, and interconnectedness. This new reality has forced nurse educators to redefine nursing leadership and prepare the Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP) leader through innovative courses offering experiential learning based on complex adaptive systems and quantum leadership theory. This article describes the experiential learning approach and integrated learning experience for DNP students. PMID:21654485

  16. Understanding the domestic rupture in forensic psychiatric nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Jean Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this article is to examine the tensions that exist between care and custody in correctional environments by presenting the (im)possibilities of psychiatric nursing practice within this context. The analysis will be guided by empirical data obtained from a qualitative research conducted in a correctional setting. Semistructured interviews with nurses were conducted and used as the primary source of data for analysis. This article will explore the contextual characteristics of psychiatric nursing practice in correctional settings, describe the alienating effects of this context on nursing practice, theorize nurses' experience using Festinger's theory on cognitive dissonance, and, finally, explore how some nurses engage in the reconstruction of their care to counter the effects of working in correctional settings. PMID:24272741

  17. Does Faculty Incivility in Nursing Education Affect Emergency Nursing Practice?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, Pamela

    Incivility in nursing education is a complicated problem which causes disruptions in the learning process and negatively affects future nursing practice. This mixed method research study described incivility as well as incivility's effects through extensive literature review and application of a modified Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey. The INE included six demographic items, four quantitative sections, and five open-ended questions. The survey examined emergency nurses' perceptions of incivility and how the experience affected their personal nursing practice. The INE was initially tested in a 2004 pilot study by Dr. Cynthia Clark. For this research study, modifications were made to examine specifically emergency nurse's perceptions of incivility and the effects on their practice. The population was a group of nurses who were members of the emergency nurses association in a Midwestern state. In the quantitative component of the Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey, the Likert scale questions indicated that the majority of the participants reported witnessing or experiencing the uncivil behaviors. In the qualitative section of the INE survey, the participants reported that although they have not seen incivility within their own academic career, they had observed faculty incivility with nursing students when the participants were assigned as preceptors as part of their emergency nursing practice.

  18. Nurse educators' perspectives on student development of reflection for psychiatric mental health nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Karpa, Jane V; Chernomas, Wanda M

    2013-01-01

    Psychiatric nursing, in various parts of the world, including regions of Canada, is recognized as a distinct nursing profession. In psychiatric mental health nursing practice, reflection is considered a foundational skill given the relational nature of nurses' therapeutic work. Communicating the significance of reflection for practice to students and teaching this intangible skill is challenging for educators. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore with psychiatric mental health nurse educators their views on how they develop reflective practitioners. Participants' perspectives and experiences in teaching reflective practice were captured in four themes: building the use of self as an agent of change, building skills of reflection/building the habit of reflection, building a bridge between theory and practice, and building a continuing reflective practice - from student to practitioner. Recommendations include a systematic incorporation of reflection into a curriculum and creating supportive learning environments that facilitate the development of reflective practitioners. PMID:23974046

  19. Reflections on the doctorate of nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Dracup, Kathleen; Cronenwett, Linda; Meleis, Afaf I; Benner, Patricia E

    2005-01-01

    A debate is currently raging in many academic nursing circles about a new degree, the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP). The degree is envisioned as the terminal degree in the discipline that focuses on clinical practice, and it is proposed to supplant the master's degree by 2015. There are a number of driving forces fueling the proposed change, including the hoped-for parity it will create with other health care disciplines and the potential for addressing the complexity of today's health care system. However, we believe that a substantive debate is required prior to a full-scale adoption of this new degree. In this article, we pose the potential unintended consequences of adopting a practice doctorate within our profession-the ones that might be negative for the nursing profession, for health care, and for society as a whole. We discuss these 3 dimensions and suggest that the DNP may erode the major progress nursing as a scientific discipline has made in universities over the past 3 decades. We suggest that the adoption of a DNP will threaten the generation of theory-based science in our discipline, either by decreasing the number of PhD-prepared nurses that will enter the field in the future or by lengthening the course of study to a PhD, thereby significantly shortening productive scientific careers. We question whether the creation of 2 doctoral tracks will further widen the chasm between nurse scientists and clinicians and result in many nurse clinicians feeling disenfranchised. We also pose questions about the impact of the DNP on health care and society. We are concerned that the number of nurses prepared at an advanced practice level will decrease and that the DNP will, thus, have negative impacts on quality, cost, and access to care. Finally, we question whether the DNP will create confusion among colleagues and consumers. We recommend that the adoption of the DNP only occur after thoughtful discussion both within and outside the profession. PMID:16115509

  20. Nursing Practice Environment and Registered Nurses' Job Satisfaction in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, JiSun; Flynn, Linda; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recruiting and retaining registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes is problematic, and little research is available to guide efforts to make nursing homes a more attractive practice environment for RNs. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between aspects of the nursing practice environment and job satisfaction among RNs…

  1. Nursing Practice Environment and Registered Nurses' Job Satisfaction in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, JiSun; Flynn, Linda; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recruiting and retaining registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes is problematic, and little research is available to guide efforts to make nursing homes a more attractive practice environment for RNs. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between aspects of the nursing practice environment and job satisfaction among RNsÖ

  2. New nurses' perceptions of nursing practice and quality patient care.

    PubMed

    Boswell, Suzanne; Lowry, Lois W; Wilhoit, Kathryn

    2004-01-01

    During this time of nursing shortages, hospitals that want to maintain the competitive edge must seek ways to recruit and retain a competent nursing staff. This study was conducted in a large hospital that strives to be the primary health care provider and employer of choice in its geographic region. The purpose of the study was to assess new nurses' perceptions of nursing practice and their expectations for meeting professional goals. Sixty-seven new nurses from 13 hospital departments were interviewed. Comprehensive orientation, continuing education, and mentoring were important values identified by this group of nurses. Communication with physicians and fear of causing accidental harm to patients were expressed concerns. Data from this survey will be used by the organization to change orientation policies to better meet the needs of the nursing staff and improve recruitment and retention of nurses. PMID:14717152

  3. Flight nursing expertise: towards a middle-range theory

    PubMed Central

    Reimer, Andrew P.; Moore, Shirley M.

    2010-01-01

    Aim This paper presents a middle-range Theory of Flight Nursing Expertise. Background Rotary-wing (helicopter) medical transport has grown rapidly in the USA since its introduction, particularly during the past 5 years. Patients once considered too sick to transport are now being transported more frequently and over longer distances. Many limitations are imposed by the air medical transport environment and these require nurses to alter their practice. Data sources A literature search was conducted using Pubmed, Medline, CINAHL, secondary referencing and an Internet search from 1960 to 2008 for studies related to the focal concepts in flight nursing. Discussion The middle-range Theory of Flight Nursing Expertise is composed of nine concepts (experience, training, transport environment of care, psychomotor skills, flight nursing knowledge, cue recognition, pattern recognition, decision-making and action) and their relationships. Five propositions describe the relationships between those concepts and how they apply to flight nursing expertise. Implications for nursing After empirical testing, this theory may be a useful tool to assist novice flight nurses to attain the skills necessary to provide safe and competent care more efficiently, and may aid in designing curricula and programmes of research. Conclusion Research is needed to determine the usefulness of this theory in both rotary and fixed-wing medical transport settings, and to examine the similarities and differences related to expertise needed for different flight nurse team compositions. Curriculum and training innovations can result from increased understanding of the concepts and relationships proposed in this theory. PMID:20337803

  4. Fostering civility in nursing education and practice: nurse leader perspectives.

    PubMed

    Clark, Cynthia M; Olender, Lynda; Cardoni, Cari; Kenski, Diane

    2011-01-01

    Incivility in healthcare can lead to unsafe working conditions, poor patient care, and increased medical costs. The authors discuss a study that examined factors that contribute to adverse working relationships between nursing education and practice, effective strategies to foster civility, essential skills to be taught in nursing education, and how education and practice can work together to foster civility in the profession. PMID:21799364

  5. Specialty practice entrepreneur: the advanced practice nurse.

    PubMed

    Kowal, N

    1998-01-01

    There are many opportunities in the health care arena to make a difference. The structured sense of change is "old school." New "surfers" of the system will be entrepreneurial in spirit, energy, and flexibility. There is no job description for the perfect person, only a sense of excitement and innovation that gives one the feeling energetic change is about to happen. In nursing, the risk takers are abundant in the APN role. It is the reason why they walk the line of provider/nurse. Making a difference to patients is important. Riding the waves of clinical care is the excitement. The final results are "the big waves" of life--a patient's life. A provider who defines the reality of practice creates a vision and skillfully bridges the road between the two. Design the surfboard--catch the wave. PMID:9987328

  6. Nursing theory and the delivery of compassionate care.

    PubMed

    Power, Louisa

    2016-02-10

    Compassionate care is a priority in current healthcare policy. However, its definition is amorphous, leading to difficulties standardising it in practice. This article discusses how nursing theory is central to the delivery of compassionate care. It emphasises the need to develop a theoretical framework that reflects the eclectic and pragmatic nature of nursing practice, and the importance of using patient feedback as an indicator of the quality of care and as a basis for adapting theoretical hypotheses. PMID:26860176

  7. Transformational leadership in nursing service. A test of theory.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, C; Wolf, G A

    1992-02-01

    What are the leadership dimensions that result in low turnover or work satisfaction? Intellectual stimulation, charisma, and individual consideration constitute aspects of transformational leadership that are suggested to enhance retention and staff satisfaction. In this study, the authors tested transformational leadership theory in one nursing department with an executive, 11 midlevel administrators, and 77 staff registered nurses. Findings support the predictions. Composed of teachable components, transformational factors are similar to leadership qualities described in magnet hospitals, offering positive implications for nursing administration and professional nursing practice. PMID:1735808

  8. Learning theories application in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Aliakbari, Fatemeh; Parvin, Neda; Heidari, Mohammad; Haghani, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    Learning theories are the main guide for educational systems planning in the classroom and clinical training included in nursing. The teachers by knowing the general principles of these theories can use their knowledge more effectively according to various learning situations. In this study, Eric, Medline, and Cochrane databases were used for articles in English and for the Persian literature, Magiran, Iran doc, Iran medex, and Sid databases were used with the help of keywords including social cognitive learning, learning theory, behavioral theory, cognitive theory, constructive theory, and nursing education. The search period was considered from 1990 to 2012. Some related books were also studied about each method, its original vision, the founders, practical application of the training theory, especially training of nursing and its strengths and weaknesses. Behaviorists believe that learning is a change in an observable behavior and it happens when the communication occurs between the two events, a stimulus and a response. Among the applications of this approach is the influence on the learner's emotional reactions. Among the theories of this approach, Thorndike and Skinner works are subject to review and critique. Cognitive psychologists unlike the behaviorists believe that learning is an internal process objective and they focus on thinking, understanding, organizing, and consciousness. Fundamentalists believe that learners should be equipped with the skills of inquiry and problem solving in order to learn by the discovery and process of information. Among this group, we will pay attention to analyze Wertheimer, Brunner, Ausubel theories, Ganyeh information processing model, in addition to its applications in nursing education. Humanists in learning pay attention to the feelings and experiences. Carl Rogers support the retention of learning-centered approach and he is believed to a semantic continuum. At the other end of the continuum, experiential learning is located with the meaning and meaningful. It applies the minds and feelings of the person. From this group, the main focus will be on the works of Rogers and Novels. Finally, it could be concluded that the usage of any of these theoriesin its place would be desired and useful. PMID:25767813

  9. Learning theories application in nursing education

    PubMed Central

    Aliakbari, Fatemeh; Parvin, Neda; Heidari, Mohammad; Haghani, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    Learning theories are the main guide for educational systems planning in the classroom and clinical training included in nursing. The teachers by knowing the general principles of these theories can use their knowledge more effectively according to various learning situations. In this study, Eric, Medline, and Cochrane databases were used for articles in English and for the Persian literature, Magiran, Iran doc, Iran medex, and Sid databases were used with the help of keywords including social cognitive learning, learning theory, behavioral theory, cognitive theory, constructive theory, and nursing education. The search period was considered from 1990 to 2012. Some related books were also studied about each method, its original vision, the founders, practical application of the training theory, especially training of nursing and its strengths and weaknesses. Behaviorists believe that learning is a change in an observable behavior and it happens when the communication occurs between the two events, a stimulus and a response. Among the applications of this approach is the influence on the learner's emotional reactions. Among the theories of this approach, Thorndike and Skinner works are subject to review and critique. Cognitive psychologists unlike the behaviorists believe that learning is an internal process objective and they focus on thinking, understanding, organizing, and consciousness. Fundamentalists believe that learners should be equipped with the skills of inquiry and problem solving in order to learn by the discovery and process of information. Among this group, we will pay attention to analyze Wertheimer, Brunner, Ausubel theories, Ganyeh information processing model, in addition to its applications in nursing education. Humanists in learning pay attention to the feelings and experiences. Carl Rogers support the retention of learning-centered approach and he is believed to a semantic continuum. At the other end of the continuum, experiential learning is located with the meaning and meaningful. It applies the minds and feelings of the person. From this group, the main focus will be on the works of Rogers and Novels. Finally, it could be concluded that the usage of any of these theoriesin its place would be desired and useful. PMID:25767813

  10. Medication Administration Practices of School Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Ann Marie; Kelly, Michael W.; Reed, David

    2000-01-01

    Assessed medication administration practices among school nurses, surveying members of the National Association of School Nurses. Respondents were extremely concerned about medication administration. Errors in administering medications were reported by 48.5 percent of respondents, with missed doses the most common error. Most nurses followed…

  11. Managing ethical distress in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Aysha

    In this monthly column, Aysha Mendes explores the many aspects of psychology interwoven into nursing practice. This month, she explores the causes of ethical distress in nursing, the effect it can have on nurses and what can be done to manage it. PMID:25492438

  12. State Regulations for School Nursing Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Praeger, Susan; Zimmerman, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present a state-by-state summary of rules and regulations governing school nursing practice in the United States. Official government and agency sites were reviewed to determine providers of services in schools, criteria for becoming a school nurse, protection of titling, mandates for school nursing, and the…

  13. Nursing conceptualizations of research and practice.

    PubMed

    Peace, Jane; Lutz, Kristin F

    2009-01-01

    Despite the fact that computer use in health care and nursing is burgeoning, nurses often find that they have inadequate tools with which to manage information about complex phenomena. Family is one such complex phenomenon of interest to nurses. Commonly-used computer tools for managing information about families may not be congruent with the ways that individuals define their families and may not be consistent with nursing conceptualization of families as dynamic groups not necessarily limited to biologically related individuals. Building nursing knowledge on incongruent conceptualizations will result in inaccurate knowledge. Communication and collaboration between nurse researchers, clinicians, and nursing informatics researchers are needed in order to produce tools that are consistent with nursing conceptualization and that will support nursing research and practice. PMID:19150266

  14. Nursing conceptualizations of research and practice

    PubMed Central

    Peace, Jane; Lutz, Kristin F.

    2009-01-01

    Despite the fact that computer use in health care and nursing is burgeoning, nurses often find that they have inadequate tools with which to manage information about complex phenomena. Family is one such complex phenomenon of interest to nurses. Commonly used computer tools for managing information about families may not be congruent with the ways that individuals define their families and may not be consistent with nursing conceptualization of families as dynamic groups not necessarily limited to biologically related individuals. Building nursing knowledge on incongruent conceptualizations will result in inaccurate knowledge. Communication and collaboration between nurse researchers, clinicians, and nursing informatics researchers are needed in order to produce tools that are consistent with nursing conceptualization and that will support nursing research and practice. PMID:19150266

  15. Public Health Interventions for School Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Marjorie A; Anderson, Linda J W; Rising, Shannon

    2016-06-01

    School nurses (SNs) use public health nursing knowledge and skills to provide nursing services to school populations. The Public Health Intervention Wheel is a practice framework that can be used to explain and guide public health nursing interventions. SNs who were also members of the National Association of School Nurses completed an electronic survey on their use of public health interventions as defined by the wheel. Although 67% of the participants were not familiar with the Public Health Intervention Wheel, respondents reported conducting activities that were consistent with the Wheel interventions. Screening, referral and follow-up, case management, and health teaching were the most frequently performed interventions. Intervention use varied by educational level, age of nurse, years of practice, and student population. The Public Health Intervention Wheel is a relevant and useful framework that provides a language to explain population-based school nursing practice. PMID:26404552

  16. Cultural Congruence and Infusion Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Abitz, Tracey L

    2016-01-01

    The importance of cultural competence in every nursing practice setting in today's world cannot be understated. Unconscious bias can have detrimental effects on therapeutic relationships and health outcomes. Nursing models of cultural competence by Purnell, Leininger, and Campinha-Bacote are reviewed. The Kleinman Model and LEARN Model offer questions and guidelines to facilitate assessment of patients' understanding of illness and treatment. The Infusion Nursing Standards of Practice contains elements of diversity and cultural competence throughout. Self-reflection of one's own values, beliefs, biases, and practice as an infusion nurse will promote the development of cultural competence. PMID:26934161

  17. Hand Hygiene Practices Reported by Nurse Aides in Nursing Homes.

    PubMed

    Castle, Nicholas; Handler, Steven; Wagner, Laura

    2016-03-01

    Information from nurse aides describing their opinions of hand hygiene practices in nursing homes including perceived barriers to hand hygiene is presented. The information comes from a questionnaire developed for this investigation, with items addressing compliance, facility guidelines and protocols, training, hand washing facilities and materials, and hand washing barriers. Information from 4,211 nurse aides (response rate of 56%) working in a nationally representative sample of 767 nursing homes (participation rate = 51%) is used. We find that 57.4% of nurse aides comply with hand washing when caring for residents most of the time, while 21.7% always comply. With facilities, 43.3% sometimes check that hand washing is performed. In summary, self-reported compliance was poor, and facilities and materials were often lacking. These findings are useful in identifying issues and interventions, including the need for further initiatives to address hand hygiene practices. PMID:24652917

  18. School Nursing: A Framework for Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wold, Susan J.; Dagg, Nancy V.

    2001-01-01

    This 1978 paper provides school nurses with a conceptual framework for structuring their practice. In discussing each of the five concepts, the paper presents a definition, a rationale for its inclusion, and examples illustrating its applicability to school nursing practice. The five concepts are: public health, adaptation, helping relationships,Ö

  19. Lessons learned from advanced practice nursing payment.

    PubMed

    Sullivan-Marx, Eileen M

    2008-05-01

    For more than 25 years, advanced practice nurses have been incrementally included as a part of the health care financing structure. Following physician payment revisions at the federal level, advanced practice nurses were overtly recognized as Medicare providers and have participated in the establishment of current procedural terminology codes and the subsequent relative work values associated with payment. Success in this regard has been the result of business, political, and policy savvy that has important lessons for moving forward in any health care restructuring for both nurses and advanced practice nurses. Principles of valuing nurse work, time, and intensity in the Resource-Based Relative Value Scale are discussed with implications for future opportunities of measuring nursing work and any potential relationship to quality outcomes of care. PMID:18650417

  20. Religion, bioethics and nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Marsha D

    2009-07-01

    This article calls nursing to engage in the study of religions and identifies six considerations that arise in religious studies and the ways in which religious faith is expressed. It argues that whole-person care cannot be realized, neither can there be a complete understanding of bioethics theory and decision making, without a rigorous understanding of religious-ethical systems. Because religious traditions differ in their cosmology, ontology, epistemology, aesthetic, and ethical methods, and because religious subtraditions interact with specific cultures, each religion and subtradition has something distinctive to offer to ethical discourse. A brief example is drawn from Native American religions, specifically their view of ;speech' and ;words'. Although the example is particular to an American context, it is intended to demonstrate a more general principle that an understanding of religion per se can yield new insights for bioethics. PMID:19528097

  1. Magnet hospital nurses describe control over nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Marlene; Schmalenberg, Claudia E

    2003-06-01

    Staff nurses describe control over nursing practice (C/NP) as a professional nursing function made up of a variety of activities and outcomes. Greater acclaim, status, and prestige for nursing in the organization are viewed as a result, not a precursor, of C/NP. Interviews with 279 staff nurses working in 14 magnet hospitals indicated that effective C/NP requires some kind of empowered, formal organizational structure, extends beyond clinical decision making at the patient care interface, and is the same as or highly similar to what the literature describes as professional autonomy. From constant comparative analysis of nurses' descriptions of C/NP activities, five ranked categories of this real-life event emerged. The basis for the categories and ranking was "who owned the problem, issue, and solution" and the "degree of effectiveness of control" as reflected in visibility, viability, and recognition of a formal structure allowing and encouraging nurses' control over practice. Hospital mergers and structural reorganization were reported to negatively affect the structure needed for effective C/NP. Almost 60% of these magnet hospital staff nurses stated and/or described little or no C/NP. PMID:12790058

  2. Theory into Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Sandra N.

    2012-01-01

    The importance of putting theory into practice can be addressed and advocated to educators and gifted students through the presentation of a Continuum of Practice. Articulating the sequence and phases of practice can underscore how practice can take place; it also can change the perspective and meaning of practice.

  3. A scheme to increase practice nurse numbers.

    PubMed

    Lane, Peter

    A shortage of practice nurses is adding to the workforce crisis in general practice. This crisis has been caused by there being problems recruiting and retaining enough GPs to cope with rising demand for health services. Health Education Yorkshire and the Humber set up the Advanced Training Practice Scheme to ease workforce pressure. The scheme focuses on creating high-quality, undergraduate nurse placements in GP practices to promote the recruitment of practice nurses. In just over six years, it has created capacity for 350 student placements in more than 130 practices in the region. From November 2012 until March 2014 the number of student nurses considering general practice as a first career rose from 31% to 73%. PMID:26182573

  4. Practical guidelines for feminist research in nursing.

    PubMed

    Im, Eun-Ok

    2013-01-01

    With increasing interests in oppressed groups, the number of feminist studies in nursing has steadily increased. Despite the increasing number of feminist studies, very few articles have been written to provide practical guidelines for feminist research in nursing. In this article, guidelines for feminist research in nursing are proposed on the basis of 3 previous feminist studies. First, characteristics of feminist research are concisely described. Then, the 3 studies that are the basis for the guidelines are described. Finally, practical guidelines for feminist nursing research are proposed on the basis of 10 idea categories related to issues/concerns from the 3 studies. PMID:23644265

  5. Nurses' spiritual care practices: becoming less religious?

    PubMed

    Delgado, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    Research indicates that nurses do not consistently provide spiritual care, feel ill equipped to do so, and there is a lack of information as to the type of spiritual care practices nurses use. This exploratory descriptive study surveyed nurses (N = 123) about their spiritual care practices and perceptions of effectiveness, followed by qualitative interviews with volunteers (n = 5) from the surveyed group. The nurses favored spiritual interventions that are not overtly religious, but conveyed concern and support, such as listening and providing comforting touch. PMID:25898449

  6. Humanistic nursing, interpersonal relations theory, and the empathy-altruism hypothesis.

    PubMed

    McCamant, Karen L

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to illuminate the relevance and applicability of theory for nursing research and practice. Following a brief explanation of the four levels of theoretical abstraction recognized by nursing, Paterson and Zderad's humanistic nursing theory and Peplau's theory of interpersonal relations are described. In addition, one social psychology theory, the empathy-altruism hypothesis, is also explained. The value and implications of the three theories for nursing research and practice are discussed, and several research questions are proposed. PMID:16982721

  7. A new vision for advanced nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Rolfe, Gary

    Part one of this series suggests that the post-Francis era requires a perspective on advanced nursing practice that emphasises, celebrates and rewards the development of core nursing skills, values and attitudes rather than extending the role of the nurse into medical territory. This article offers some thoughts and ideas that attempt to move the focus away from the notion of advanced practice as the development of a particular role towards the idea of advancing practice as a team of like-minded professionals working together in practice innovation units for the benefit and wellbeing of patients. PMID:25087441

  8. Advanced Practice Nursing Education: Challenges and Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Cynthia; Kantrowitz-Gordon, Ira; Katz, Janet; Hirsch, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Nursing education programs may face significant difficulty as they struggle to prepare sufficient numbers of advanced practice registered nurses to fulfill the vision of helping to design an improved US healthcare system as described in the Institute of Medicine's ‚ÄúFuture of nursing‚ÄĚ report. This paper describes specific challenges and provides strategies to improve advanced practice nursing clinical education in order to ensure that a sufficient number of APRNs are available to work in educational, practice, and research settings. Best practices are identified through a review of classic and current nursing literature. Strategies include intensive interprofessional collaborations and radical curriculum revisions such as increased use of simulation and domestic and international service work. Nurse educators must work with all stakeholders to create effective and lasting change. PMID:22220273

  9. Intuition in nursing practice: deep connections.

    PubMed

    Leners, D W

    1992-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the phenomenon of intuition in nursing culture. The aims of the study were to (a) identify and describe terminology used with intuition in nursing care practice, (b) describe examples of experiential knowledge of intuition, (c) describe actions taken on intuitive experiences, (d) describe feelings associated with intuitive experience, and (e) compare and contrast patterns and processes of nursing intuition. The design of the study was ethnography. Sampling involved 40 nurses from all levels of the hospital and home health care practice. Intuition was found to (a) facilitate the depth of nurse-client relationships; (b) lead to a deeper understanding and connection with client patterns; (c) be acknowledged as a professional risk; (d) emphasize the significant influence of autonomy, independence, and assertiveness in nursing practice; and (e) contribute to excellence in nursing care. Intuition was identified as a manifestation of transpersonal caring in the art of nursing practice and was deeply connected to caring as the moral ideal of the nursing profession. PMID:1301422

  10. Evidence-based practice: how nurse leaders can facilitate innovation.

    PubMed

    Shirey, Maria R

    2006-01-01

    Evidence-based nursing practice (EBNP) is the wave of the future. Increasingly, EBNP is being identified as a key to quality and excellence in nursing services. Incorporating evidence into practice is necessary to deliver scientifically sound patient care. In addition, understanding the importance of evidence is crucial for meeting the excellence requirements of Magnet designation. Despite the growing popularity of EBNP and its documented significant benefits, the literature demonstrates that only 15% of the nursing workforce consistently practices within an EBNP framework. If EBNP adoption is to increase in the profession, it will require the active efforts of nurse leaders to pursue an aggressive innovation diffusion strategy. The purpose of this article is to discuss the nurse leader's role in facilitating EBNP in nursing using a theoretical framework grounded in innovation diffusion theory. The article develops 4 areas of focus. First, the components of innovation diffusion theory are discussed. Second, a pertinent empirical review of the EBNP adoption literature is presented. Third, strategies for applying innovation diffusion theory to facilitate EBNP adoption are proposed. Lastly, the article ends with a leadership call to action. PMID:16878011

  11. When practice precedes theory - A mixed methods evaluation of students' learning experiences in an undergraduate study program in nursing.

    PubMed

    Falk, Kristin; Falk, Hanna; Jakobsson Ung, Eva

    2016-01-01

    A key area for consideration is determining how optimal conditions for learning can be created. Higher education in nursing aims to prepare students to develop their capabilities to become independent professionals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of sequencing clinical practice prior to theoretical studies on student's experiences of self-directed learning readiness and students' approach to learning in the second year of a three-year undergraduate study program in nursing. 123 nursing students was included in the study and divided in two groups. In group A (n = 60) clinical practice preceded theoretical studies. In group (n = 63) theoretical studies preceded clinical practice. Learning readiness was measured using the Directed Learning Readiness Scale for Nursing Education (SDLRSNE), and learning process was measured using the revised two-factor version of the Study Process Questionnaire (R-SPQ-2F). Students were also asked to write down their personal reflections throughout the course. By using a mixed method design, the qualitative component focused on the students' personal experiences in relation to the sequencing of theoretical studies and clinical practice. The quantitative component provided information about learning readiness before and after the intervention. Our findings confirm that students are sensitive and adaptable to their learning contexts, and that the sequencing of courses is subordinate to a pedagogical style enhancing students' deep learning approaches, which needs to be incorporated in the development of undergraduate nursing programs. PMID:26070493

  12. [Domains in the clinical practice of Clinical Nursing Experts in Germany and their correspondence with the internationally described "Advanced Nursing Practice"].

    PubMed

    Mendel, Simon; Feuchtinger, Johanna

    2009-06-01

    In spite of a growing trend toward academic education and increasing numbers of "nursing experts" functioning as change agents in Germany, actual nursing experts as in the internationally described Advanced Nursing Practice (ANP) are scarce. Drawing from a ten-year experience in implementing the international concept, the University Hospital Freiburg (UKF), Germany, constitutes a notable exception, as it presently employs ten clinically practicing nursing experts. Based on this background of educating nursing experts, this presentation aims at describing the implementation of the nursing expert's role and its fit and conformance with the international ANP. A 3-stage Delphi design was used for interviewing all the nursing experts at the hospital (n = 10) about their expert opinions; in addition, all nursing managers (n = 7) as well as unit and team leaders (n = 49) were asked about their opinion to relevant functions and domains of nursing experts. The following clinical practice domains of nursing experts were identified: Direct patient care, patient education, support and supervision of nurses, maintenance and expansion of professional skills and knowledge of the nursing staff, counselling of managers, quality assurance and organizational development, theory to practice transfer, nursing research, maintenance of own professional skills and knowledge and continuing education, and publicity work. Additionally, a three-year nursing education, a longer lasting professional experience, a degree in nursing science or nursing education, and specialist skills in the respective area of expertise were identified as credentials for nursing expert practice. The nursing expert concept at UKF shows elements of the international ANP with similarities to the role of a Clinical Nurse Specialist. PMID:19496033

  13. Practical Nursing, Volume I. Health Occupations Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Helen W.; And Others

    This curriculum guide provides teachers with up-to-date information and skill-related applications needed by the practical nurse. The volume contains three sections and 24 instructional units: Personal Vocational Relationships (6 units), Nutrition (3 units), and Basic Nursing Principles and Applied Skills (15 units covering such topics asÖ

  14. Practical Nursing, Volume I. Health Occupations Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Helen W.; And Others

    This curriculum guide provides teachers with up-to-date information and skill-related applications needed by the practical nurse. The volume contains three sections and 24 instructional units: Personal Vocational Relationships (6 units), Nutrition (3 units), and Basic Nursing Principles and Applied Skills (15 units covering such topics as…

  15. Public Health Nursing Legacy: Historical Practical Wisdom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zerwekh, Joyce V.

    1992-01-01

    Conveys the practical knowledge shown by public health nurses since the days of Lillian Wald in the 1890s. Public health nurses have had to work with high-risk families--work that often requires a common sense approach. (JOW)

  16. [Nursing practice in a specialized care center].

    PubMed

    Leplongeon, Marie-Fran√ßoise; Naslin, Le√Įla

    2013-12-01

    Nursing practice in a specialised care centre comprises technical and relational care, which must be adapted to each patient and each situation. The nurse must be both very organised and flexible to provide the best possible care to these patients with multiple pathologies. Multi-disciplinary teamwork is essential. PMID:24427913

  17. Ethical dilemmas in perioperative nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Reeder, J M

    1989-12-01

    Ethical dilemmas in perioperative nursing practice occur during all phases and in every practice setting. Awareness of commonly experienced dilemmas and understanding of a model available to analyze and resolve these dilemmas can benefit patients and perioperative nurses. Patients will benefit from nurse advocates who recognize and act to resolve actual and potential ethical dilemmas. Nurses will benefit when they are empowered with the knowledge and ethical skills to enhance patient autonomy, to protect dignity and confidentiality, and human rights. Perioperative nurses should reflect on previous dilemmas and use them to assist with resolution of similar dilemmas. They should be knowledgeable of personal, departmental, institutional, and professional resources available when faced with ethical dilemmas. The ANA code for Nurses and the AORN Statements of Competency in Perioperative Nursing are two resources available to perioperative nurses. In the increasingly complex, technologically laden surgical environment, patients who are sicker and living longer will require services of highly skilled and educated professionals. They are vulnerable in the surgical setting and need surgical teams to act on their behalf. Perioperative nurses with ethical skill are an asset to patients and other members of the surgical team when they seek to resolve ethical dilemmas in knowledgeable and systematic ways. PMID:2685781

  18. Returning to nursing practice: a learning journey.

    PubMed

    Elwin, Carolyn

    2007-04-01

    In response to the current shortage in the Australian nursing workforce, educational strategies that support organisational investment in nurses returning to the workforce are described. For many of these nurses, contemporary roles and responsibilities present a dramatic departure from their previous experiences. This hospital-based Return to Practice Programme described in this paper is pivotal to the integration of formal learning with current clinical practice. The programme moves away from a need to fill vacant positions to a framework that overtly values the diversity of experience and knowledge that participants bring to the workplace, focusing on a person-environment fit with opportunities for clinical practice. The programme supports nurses who are returning to practice to identify their learning needs, to refresh their theoretical knowledge for contemporary nursing care delivery and provides structured, supported practice in the clinical setting. This paper describes programme participants' learning journeys which emerged through analysis of data using interpretive phenomenology, an approach that focuses on the meaning of an experience for the individual in relation to the context in which it occurred. From the exemplars used to illustrate some of these learning experiences, educators and practioners alike may better anticipate participants' learning and support requirements thus optimising their clinical learning opportunities while maximising the number of nurses that are recruited back into the nursing workforce. PMID:17563329

  19. [Innovative thinking in nursing practice].

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Ling; Wang, Ya-Ni; Tsai, Hsiu-Min

    2013-04-01

    The nursing profession is patient-centered and responsible to meet the disparate health needs of a wide range of client "groups". Ensuring continued innovation and change to further improve care quality in an evolving health care system is an important issue. A focus on resolving minor points rather than on achieving major change may be the best approach to realizing continuous innovation in nursing. The advantages include not only promoting nursing quality and decreasing costs and manpower, but also giving satisfaction and self-fulfillment to the innovator. Successful innovation is affected by environmental structural support as well as the characteristics of the innovation and innovator. A successful innovator is sensitive to each opportunity, but is not a risk creator. This article describes innovator characteristics and innovation execution, and investigates the content and process of nursing innovation from various points of view in order to create new ideas and values related to the traditional nursing role. PMID:23588694

  20. The lost path to emancipatory practice: towards a history of reflective practice in nursing.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Sioban

    2012-07-01

    This paper historicizes the taken-for-granted acceptance of reflection as a fundamental professional practice in nursing. It draws attention to the broad application of reflective practice, from pedagogy to practice to regulation, and explores the epistemological basis upon which the authority of reflective discourse rests. Previous work has provided a series of critiques of the logic and suitability of reflective practice across all domains of nursing. The goal of this paper is to commence a history of nursing's reflective identity. The paper begins with a discussion of Dewey and Schön then focuses on Habermas's Theory of Communicative Action as the epistemological basis of reflective practice's standing as a authoritative discourse in nursing. PMID:22672679

  1. Best Faculty Practice Plan Model for a Small College of Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrad, Sharyn Neiman

    2010-01-01

    Bridging the gap between theory and practice has been a priority with universities and colleges of nursing. A mechanism for bridging this gap has been the establishment of faculty practices. Faculty practices have provided nurse practitioner faculty opportunities to mentor students, augment income, implement evidence-based research, provide…

  2. Tobacco cessation education for advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Diane; Zucker, Steven B; Stone, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    The predicted shortfall of primary care physicians and the millions of newly insured beginning in 2014 call for an increase in the number of advanced practice nurses (APRNs). Advanced practice nurses can significantly improve their clients' quality of life and increase their life expectancy through tobacco cessation education. The purpose of this study was to educate APRN students on smoking information and techniques to assist clients with quitting smoking in the primary care setting. PMID:24867074

  3. Beyond the sick role: situating community health nursing practice.

    PubMed

    St John, W

    1999-01-01

    This grounded theory research into the role of the community health nurse in Australia identified that moving from the comfort and structure of an institutional setting to the client's turf results in profound changes to the purpose of nursing practice. Data were collected from 17 'excellent' community health nurses practising in a range of community health settings in three states of Australia. Data included transcripts from in-depth interviews, questionnaires, group discussions with participants, job descriptions, agency documentation, professional organisation documentation and focus groups. Data were analysed using constant comparative techniques. In community health nursing practice, the client's role changes from a sick role to a well role and there is a shift in responsibility for outcomes from the nurse to the client. The central purpose of the community health nursing role is to facilitate Situated Health Competence, which the client achieves within the context of going about their everyday life, including work, recreation, relationships and role responsibilities. Situated Health Competence requires families, groups and communities to address their own illnesses, health problems, health issues and health behaviours; have enough knowledge and power to make their own decisions; question matters that impact on their health; and seek out and access appropriate health resources on an ongoing basis. The findings of this study make the intangible motivations of the community health nurse more explicit. The aim of facilitating Situated Health Competence results in an expanded view of the boundaries of nursing practice. The traditional foci of nursing practice are still present, but are incorporated within a broader 'situated' role. PMID:10401284

  4. North Dakota Statewide Nursing Study, Phase II. Delineation of Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Neil; Smith, David

    Nursing practice in North Dakota was studied as part the development of a statewide nursing resource planning system. In addition to the current scope of nursing practice, the study investigated: (1) specific competencies currently targeted by nursing education; (2) differences in specific competencies endorsed by nurses with various educationÖ

  5. Academic nursing practice in rural West Virginia.

    PubMed

    Persily, Cynthia Armstrong

    2004-02-01

    This exemplar highlights how a rural academic nursing practice has been effective in facilitating the integration of the tripartite academic role of education, research, and service for one university faculty member. The integration of students into the practice is described. The experience provided them with critical insights into rural academic practice during their delivery of prenatal care services to a vulnerable population of women in rural Appalachia. This exemplar also describes the use of the academic nursing practice as a laboratory both for studying the specific problems of this vulnerable population of women and their families, and testing interventions tailored to the needs of the community. Finally, the other ways the academic nursing practice benefits faculty and students, including integration of educational technology into the practice setting and opportunities for faculty leadership in rural community development, are discussed. PMID:14974514

  6. Fostering nurses' political knowledges and practices: education and political activation in relation to lesbian health.

    PubMed

    MacDonnell, Judith A

    2009-01-01

    This article describes findings from a qualitative policy study focused on female nurses' activism in relation to lesbian health. Critical feminist analysis and comparative life history methodology were applied to career histories obtained from 10 diversely situated female nurses across Ontario, Canada. The findings show that nursing activist practices are informed by advocacy experiences that foster inclusive professional and community education plus formal education processes that shape their political socialization. Implications for nursing theory include the development of political knowledges and practices that support caring science, sociopolitical knowing, and primary healthcare nursing practice in a community context. PMID:19461232

  7. Protection: clarifying the concept for use in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Susan G

    2007-01-01

    The protection of patients is integral in any healthcare setting. Healthcare organizations are increasingly held accountable for preventable medical errors, the attitudes toward safety, and communication among all levels of providers, collaborative practices, and recognition of risks. The concept of protection is inherent in nursing practice. It provides a framework, that further defines healthcare provider's roles in meeting these imperatives. The scope of protection is considered both globally and individually prominent. Nurses protect patients from environmental hazards, themselves, and any perceived threat. In this analysis of the phenomenon, the concept is clarified, and an evidence-based approach to protection is utilized for theory development and concept measurement. PMID:17471049

  8. Humpty Dumpty: reflection and reflective nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Richardson, R

    1995-06-01

    The recent increase in the amount of published work relating reflection and reflective practice to nurses and nursing practice suggests that nurses value the opportunities which this approach is believed to provide. There also appears to be an underlying assumption that we all share the same concepts, hence the association with Humpty Dumpty. Indications of attempts to mechanize the processes and to endow the perceived skills with an élitism are becoming evident. In contrast, there are other attempts to foster the notion of accepting uncertainty, unpredictability and the opportunity for increased understanding to emerge. In this paper, the roots of some of these concepts are traced. The appropriateness of traditional values and assumptions, based on natural science perspectives, in relation to reflective processes and the practice of nursing is questioned. The development of a multi-faceted approach which takes account of differing contexts and the factors which influence them is suggested. PMID:7665766

  9. Perinatal Safety: From Concept to Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Holly Powell

    2010-01-01

    Communication and teamwork problems are leading causes of documented preventable adverse outcomes in perinatal care. An essential component of perinatal safety is the organizational culture in which clinicians work. Cliniciansí individual and collective authority to question the plan of care and take action to change the direction of a clinical situation in the patientís best interest can be viewed as their ďagency for safety.Ē However, collective agency for safety and commitment to support nurses in their advocacy role is missing in many perinatal care settings. This paper draws from Organizational Accident Theory, High Reliability Theory, and Symbolic Interactionism to describe the nurseís role in maintaining safety during labor and birth in acute care settings, and suggests actions for supporting the perinatal nurse at individual, group, and systems levels to achieve maximum safety in perinatal care. PMID:20147827

  10. Combining Theory With Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houa, Souen

    1975-01-01

    Using specific examples, the author discusses how the Chinese educators link theory with practice in order to associate education with the three great revolutionary motive forces--the class struggle, the drive towards productivity, and scientific experimentation. (Author/RM)

  11. Frontiers of nursing in the 21st century: development of models and theories on the concept of nursing.

    PubMed

    Adam, E

    1983-01-01

    In the past nursing has used a medically oriented perspective; consciously or not, nursing practice, education and research have been guided by the same conceptual frame of reference as has medicine. For nursing to justify its claim to being an independent health profession offering a particular service to society, it must adopt its own conceptual base, one that indicates those phenomena that are of concern to nursing and those health problems that nursing must try to solve. Many nurses have already chosen to base their teaching, research and nursing care on one of the existing conceptual models for nursing. The challenge for the 21st century is that all nurses adopt an explicit conceptual base. Broader than a theory, a conceptual model specifies nursing's focus of inquiry and may thus lead to the development of theories which will prove useful not only to nurses but to other health professionals as well. Since nursing exists to provide a necessary service to mankind, its conceptual base must be evaluated by using specific social criteria. PMID:6550062

  12. Measuring nursing informatics competencies of practicing nurses in Korea: Nursing Informatics Competencies Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Chung, Seon Yoon; Staggers, Nancy

    2014-12-01

    Informatics competencies are a necessity for contemporary nurses. However, few researchers have investigated informatics competencies for practicing nurses. A full set of Informatics competencies, an instrument to measure these competencies, and potential influencing factors have yet to be identified for practicing nurses. The Nursing Informatics Competencies Questionnaire was designed, tested for psychometrics, and used to measure beginning and experienced levels of practice. A pilot study using 54 nurses ensured item comprehension and clarity. Internal consistency and face and content validity were established. A cross-sectional survey was then conducted on 230 nurses in Seoul, Korea, to determine construct validity, describe a complete set of informatics competencies, and explore possible influencing factors on existing informatics competencies. Principal components analysis, descriptive statistics, and multiple regression were used for data analysis. Principal components analysis gives support for the Nursing Informatics Competencies Questionnaire construct validity. Survey results indicate that involvement in a managerial position and self-directed informatics-related education may be more influential for improving informatics competencies, whereas general clinical experience and workplace settings are not. This study provides a foundation for understanding how informatics competencies might be integrated throughout nurses' work lives and how to develop appropriate strategies to support nurses in their informatics practice in clinical settings. PMID:25393832

  13. Toward a North-South dialogue: revisiting nursing theory (from the South).

    PubMed

    Santos Salas, Anna

    2005-01-01

    In nursing, the current world situation calls us to revisit our knowledge schemes and revise the extent to which they assist us in improving the health of the world peoples. In this discussion, I offer a Latin American nursing perspective to knowledge development in our discipline. I suggest that a persistent concern to develop elaborate conceptualizations has distracted our attention from the realities practicing nurses face throughout the world. In their abstractness, (North) American nursing theories have conveyed a view that presumingly universal imposes itself as hegemonic in the international nursing community. Yet the exportation of these theories to other countries introduces a view that is foreign to practicing nurses. The world situation as well as the disparate and concurrent human paths that we witness and experience calls for approaches that are more in tune with the local realities of nursing practices. PMID:15718935

  14. [Breastfeeding: nurses' practice under the perspective of the International Classification of Collective Health Nursing Practices].

    PubMed

    Chaves, Maria Marta Nolasco; de Senna Ńvila Farias, Fabiana Costa; Apostůlico, MaŪra Rosa; Cubas, Marcia Regina; Egry, Emiko Yoshikawa

    2011-03-01

    This descriptive and exploratory study aimed to describe nursing diagnoses and interventions under the International Nursing Practice Classification in Collective Health--CIPESCģ--in Women's Health Care, sub-theme Pre-Natal and Puerperium, correlating them to nurses' competences at Curitiba's Mother Program. Data used were diagnoses and interventions during nursing consultation from April to July/ 2005. Basic Statistics was used for data treatment. Proper Breastfeeding was the most frequent diagnosis and most interventions are related to strengthening the user to face the health-disease process (68.9%). In spite of nurses' practice during puerperium, such a competence is not part of the Program Protocol. In conclusion, minor adjustments are necessary in the analyzed diagnoses and the Protocol should be reviewed to entail nurses' competences that are developed in their practice in health services according to CIPESC' s registers. PMID:21445509

  15. Put Theory into Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaeger, Audrey J.; Dunstan, Stephany; Thornton, Courtney; Rockenbach, Alyssa B.; Gayles, Joy G.; Haley, Karen J.

    2013-01-01

    When making decisions that impact student learning, college educators often consider previous experiences, precedent, common sense, and advice from colleagues. But how often do they consider theory? At a recent state-level educators' meeting, the authors of this article asked 50 student affairs educators about the use of theory in their practice.…

  16. New strategy planned to boost nurse numbers in general practice.

    PubMed

    Wynton, Linsey

    2016-04-20

    A new practice nursing strategy is to be developed. NHS England has confirmed it will look at the recruitment and retention challenges facing primary care nursing, including ways to make the sector more attractive to newly qualified nurses. PMID:27097167

  17. Oncology Nursing as Ethical Practice.

    PubMed

    Barton-Burke, Margaret

    2015-05-01

    Many of us have patients we remember who left us with lasting memories. One such patient I cared for was a young man from Ghana. This young man had a wife, two children, and terminal cancer. He would not discuss the seriousness of his illness with his doctors, his nurses, his wife, or his community. However, from his hospital bed, he decided to go to Ghana to visit his mother. I was the clinical nurse specialist on the oncology unit at the time, and the nurses on the unit became upset with this man's plan because they knew that he would probably never return from Ghana. He would not die with his wife or his children surrounding his bedside, as in a U.S. healthcare setting. He would die with his mother in his country--in his own way. PMID:25901371

  18. Nursing Education Leaders' Perceived Leadership Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLong, Dianne

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the leadership practices perceived by nursing education leaders as measured by the Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI). The framework used was a contemporary transformational leadership model described in "The Leadership Challenge" ("4th ed.") by Dr. James Kouzes and Dr. Barry Posner, which identifies the…

  19. Teaching Research Synthesis to Advanced Practice Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Upchurch, Sandra; Brosnan, Christine A.; Grimes, Deanna E.

    2002-01-01

    A process for teaching research synthesis to advanced practice nurses includes two courses: a first research applications course in which students build bibliographic databases, practice statistical analysis, and develop search skills; and a second course in which they complete literature reviews or meta analyses of research on clinical practice…

  20. [Different perspectives on nursing practice in prisons].

    PubMed

    Warnet, Sylvie

    2013-02-01

    Different perspectives on nursing practice in prisons. The prison population accumulates health risk factors with, in most cases, low access to care before entering prison and a background of social deprivation. The loss of freedom increases the potential for manifestations of anxiety, violence, addictive behaviour and other illnesses. This article contains some caregivers' personal accounts of their practice. PMID:23477087

  1. Qualitative Distinctions and Similarities in the Practice of Clinical Nurse Specialists and Nurse Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenton, Mary V.; Brykczynski, Karen A.

    1993-01-01

    A comparison of results of two studies regarding the actual practice of clinical nurse specialists and nurse practitioners revealed a shared core of advanced practice competencies as well as distinct differences between practice roles. (JOW)

  2. The Historical Evolution of Theories and Conceptual Models for Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Joellen W.

    The development of nursing models can be traced to the inception of nursing as a profession. Florence Nightingale laid the foundation for current nursing practice and differentiated nursing from medicine. The late 19th and early 20th centuries contributed a number of important nurse theorists, better known for other contributions to the neophyteÖ

  3. A Trial of Nursing Cost Accounting using Nursing Practice Data on a Hospital Information System.

    PubMed

    Miyahira, Akiko; Tada, Kazuko; Ishima, Masatoshi; Nagao, Hidenori; Miyamoto, Tadashi; Nakagawa, Yoshiaki; Takemura, Tadamasa

    2015-01-01

    Hospital administration is very important and many hospitals carry out activity-based costing under comprehensive medicine. However, nursing cost is unclear, because nursing practice is expanding both quantitatively and qualitatively and it is difficult to grasp all nursing practices, and nursing cost is calculated in many cases comprehensively. On the other hand, a nursing information system (NIS) is implemented in many hospitals in Japan and we are beginning to get nursing practical data. In this paper, we propose a nursing cost accounting model and we simulate a cost by nursing contribution using NIS data. PMID:26262246

  4. Healthy buildings: impact on nurses and nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Robin; Hall, Anna Gilmore

    2007-05-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that buildings can be a significant cause of human illness and environmental degradation. According to the United States (US) Environmental Protection Agency, indoor air pollution is one of the top five environmental risks to public health in the US. This may be related, to a large extent, to the fact that US citizens spend as much as 95% of their time indoors. Health care leaders, designers, and architects, recognizing the connection between health and the buildings in which much time is spent, are engaging in sustainable design and construction for healthy, 'green' buildings. The purpose of this article is to assist nurses in understanding the impact that unhealthy buildings can have on nurses and nursing practice and to provide tools and resources to assist nurses in transforming the health care industry with the goal of creating healing environments and reducing the negative environmental impact of the health care industry. First definitions, current initiatives, and motivations related to sustainable designs will be presented. Next sustainable health care design strategies, such as site planning, clean transportation, water conservation, healthy materials selection, indoor environmental quality, and also the benefits of sustainable design will be discussed. The article will conclude by sharing a variety of resources nurses can use to create healing environments in health care settings. PMID:21848349

  5. Implementing a Gerontological Clinical Nursing Practice with an Interdisciplinary Focus: Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahlke, Sherry; Fehr, Cindy

    2010-01-01

    A gerontological clinical nursing practice with an interdisciplinary focus was developed to provide opportunities for student nurses to expand their knowledge about aging, hone assessment skills, and critically examine beliefs about older adults. The practice included theory about older adults and a rotation through a variety of clinical settings…

  6. Identification of Desired Outcomes for School Nursing Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selekman, Janice; Guilday, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    The "Scope and Standards of Professional School Nursing Practice" states that school nurses should evaluate the quality and effectiveness of their practice. School nurses have not yet identified and adopted outcomes by which this effectiveness can be measured. This study used focus groups during a national meeting of school nurse leaders to…

  7. ‚ÄúNegotiating, Navigating, and Networking‚ÄĚ: Three Strategies Used by Nursing Leaders to Shape the Adoption and Incorporation of Simulation into Nursing Curricula‚ÄĒA Grounded Theory Study

    PubMed Central

    Jack, Susan M.; Martin, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Background. Implementing simulation requires a substantial commitment of human and financial resources. Despite this, little is known about the strategies used by academic nursing leaders to facilitate the implementation of a simulation program in nursing curricula. Methods. A constructivist grounded theory study was conducted within 13 nursing programs in Ontario, Canada. Perspectives of key stakeholders (n = 27) including nursing administrators (n = 6), simulation leaders (n = 9), and nursing faculty (n = 12) were analyzed using the constant comparison method. Results. Nursing leaders, specifically nursing administrators and simulation leaders who successfully led the adoption and incorporation of simulation into nursing curricula, worked together and utilized negotiating, navigating, and networking strategies that impacted the adoption and incorporation of simulation into nursing curricula. Conclusions. Strategies that were found to be useful when planning and executing the adoption and incorporation of an innovation, specifically simulation, into nursing curricula provide practical approaches that may be helpful to nurse leaders when embarking upon an organizational change. PMID:25093122

  8. Structures and practices enabling staff nurses to control their practice.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Marlene; Schmalenberg, Claudia; Maguire, Patricia; Brewer, Barbara B; Burke, Rebecca; Chmielewski, Linda; Cox, Karen; Kishner, Janice; Krugman, Mary; Meeks-Sjostrom, Diana; Waldo, Mary

    2008-08-01

    This mixed-methods study uses interviews, participant observations, and the CWEQII empowerment tool to identify structures and attributes of structures that promote control over nursing practice (CNP). Nearly 3,000 staff nurses completed the Essentials of Magnetism (EOM), an instrument that measures CNP, one of the eight staff nurse-identified essential attributes of a productive work environment. Strategic sampling is used to identify 101 high CNP-scoring clinical units in 8 high-EOM scoring magnet hospitals. In addition to 446 staff nurses, managers, and physicians on these high-scoring units, chief nursing officers, chief operating officers, and representatives from other professional departments are interviewed; participant observations are made of all unit/departmental/hospital council and interdisciplinary meetings held during a 4 to 6 day site visit. Structures and components of viable shared governance structures that enabled CNP are identified through constant comparative analysis of interviews and observations, and through analysis of quantitative measures. PMID:18195080

  9. Eliciting reflections on caring theory in elderly caring practice

    PubMed Central

    Elisabeth Ranheim, Albertine; Kärner, Anita; Berterö, Carina

    2011-01-01

    Caring theories are the description and conceptualization of the care that is given in caring practise by nurses and other professional caregivers with the aim of verbalizing and communicating caring phenomena. Intermittently, a theory ‚Äďpractice gap is given expression- that theory does not go along with clinical practice in caring. The aim of this study was an investigation into the possible disparity between theory and practice in caring by analysing nurses‚Äô lived experience of the understanding of caring theory in practice in the context of municipal elderly care. Hermeneutical phenomenology was the research approach used to explore the lived experience of caring science theories in caring practice from the perspective of 12 nurses working in municipal care for elderly. The findings shows that the nurses Impulsively described their experience of detachment to caring theory, but when describing their caring intentions, the relationship to theory became apparent, and even confirmed their practice. As such, a seedbed exists for caring theory to be reflected on and cultivated in caring praxis. However, as the nurses describe, the caring theory must be sensitive enough for the nursing practitioners to accept. The gap revealed itself on an organisational level, as the nurses‚Äô commission in municipal care did not correspond with their caring intention. We believe it is important to seriously consider what we want to achieve as a caring profession. We have to reflect on our responsibility as culture carriers and knowledge developers. We must make the disparate forces of intention and organisation become one intertwining force. PMID:21866232

  10. Thinking creatively: from nursing education to practice.

    PubMed

    Kalischuk, Ruth Grant; Thorpe, Karran

    2002-01-01

    Creative thinking is a critical link in the teaching-learning process, one that enhances problem solving in nursing practice. This article describes a conceptualization of creativity based on focus groups with 12 post-RN students and two nurse educators. Inherent within the major theme, striving for balance, were three subthemes-enhancing self-esteem, working within structure, and making time for reflection (i.e., process). When participants achieved balance, both personally and professionally, they experienced increased creative energy that resulted in creative expression, subsequently displayed in educational endeavors and clinical practice (i.e., product). Strategies for fostering creativity and criteria for evaluating creativity are offered, and implications for nurse educators, managers, and practitioners are examined. PMID:12180769

  11. Excellence in nursing: a model for implementing Family Systems Nursing in nursing practice at an institutional level in Iceland.

    PubMed

    Svavarsdottir, Erla Kolbrun; Svavardottir, Erla Kolbrun

    2008-11-01

    An innovative opportunity is being created by nursing leaders from practice and education in Iceland to implement Family Systems Nursing at an institutional level on all units and divisions with the Landspitali University Hospital. This article describes the phases of the implementation model for knowledge translation that will be operationalized over four years. The goals of implementing Family Systems Nursing at the Landspitali University Hospital are to (a) educate all practicing nurses in Family Systems Nursing and, in particular, the Calgary family assessment and intervention models; (b) strengthen practicing nurses' clinical skills for intervening with families by offering specific clinical training courses to all nurses using family skills labs; and (c) explore and assess the difference that the theoretical and clinical programs make for the nurses, the patients and their families, and the nurses' practice (the family-nurse relationship). PMID:19139159

  12. Practical Nursing. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for practical nursing. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that…

  13. Practice Management Skills for the Nurse Practitioner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sportsman, Susan; Hawley, Linda J.; Pollock, Susan; Varnell, Gayle

    2001-01-01

    An expert panel identified 20 business concepts important for a family nurse practitioner curriculum. A focus group of practitioners verified the concepts and clarified relevant information to be taught. The business concepts center on management and operations of a clinical practice. (SK)

  14. The advanced practice nurse in gastroenterology. Identifying and comparing care interactions of nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists.

    PubMed

    Hillier, A

    2001-01-01

    Collaborative practice models using advanced practice nurses have been developed to provide high-quality healthcare in a cost-effective manner. Studies in gastroenterology nursing evaluating effectiveness of advanced practice nurses have been limited to performance of procedures, such as screening flexible sigmoidoscopies, and assisting with percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube placement. Research and literature discussing the potential benefits of using advanced practice nurses as providers of care in a gastroenterology setting is limited. This cross-sectional descriptive study (N = 32) compares the nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialist roles in gastroenterology. PMID:11847995

  15. Do educational outcomes correspond with the requirements of nursing practice: educators' and managers' assessments of novice nurses' professional competence

    PubMed Central

    Numminen, Olivia; Laine, Tuija; Isoaho, Hannu; Hupli, Maija; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Meretoja, Riitta

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated weather educational outcomes of nurse education meet the requirements of nursing practice by exploring the correspondence between nurse educators' and nurse managers' assessments of novice nurses' professional competence. The purpose was to find competence areas contributing to the acknowledged practice‚Äďtheory gap. Design A cross-sectional, comparative design using the Nurse Competence Scale was applied. Subjects The sample comprised nurse educators (n¬†=¬†86) and nurse managers (n¬†=¬†141). Methods Descriptive and inferential statistics were used in the data analysis. Main outcome measures Educators assessed novice nurses' competence to a significantly higher level than managers in all competence areas (p¬†<¬†0.001). The biggest correspondence between educators' and mangers' assessments were in competencies related to immediate patient care, commitment to ethical values, maintaining professional skills and nurses' care of the self. The biggest differences were in competencies related to developmental and evaluation tasks, coaching activities, use of evidence-based knowledge and in activities which required mastering a comprehensive view of care situations. However, differences between educators' and managers' assessments were strongly associated with their age and work experience. Active and improved collaboration should be focused on areas in which the differences between educators' and managers' assessments greatly differ in ensuring novice nurses‚Ä≤ fitness for practice. PMID:24512685

  16. Moral instability: the upsides for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Joan

    2010-04-01

    This article briefly outlines some of the key problems with the way in which the moral realm has traditionally been understood and analysed. I propose two alternative views of what is morally interesting and applicable to nursing practice and I indicate that instability has its upsides. I begin with a moral tale - a 'Good Samaritan' story - which raises fairly usual questions about the nature of morality but also the more philosophically fundamental question about the relationship between subjectivity and moral agency. I then consider this relationship from the perspectives of two twentieth century philosophers: Emmanuel Levinas and Michel Foucault. Levinas' basic point is that the experience of ethical subjectivity is made possible through others: the demand to respond to the existence of others is the basic social structure that precedes individual freedom. If Levinas posits intersubjectivity as a fundamental or primitive feature of the moral realm, Foucault poses an even more basic question: how have moral subjects and relations of obligation been constituted? The aim of ethical inquiry, for Foucault, is to describe the network of discourses, institutions, relations, and practices through which certain kinds of subjects are constituted and constitute themselves, e.g. as a kind of person who can act morally. Finally, I consider some recent research in philosophy of nursing which illustrates how Levinasian and/or Foucauldian perspectives can deepen understanding of nurses' moral practices, specifically, the work of Norwegian public health nurses, Canadian pediatric nurses, and Irish midwives. I suggest that in spite of the instability of morality in general and the particular ethical challenges that face nurses, there are grounds for hope and possible strategies for living in unstable times. PMID:20415964

  17. Action research: changing nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Hegney, Desley Gail; Francis, Karen

    2015-06-01

    This article describes action research as a methodology and gives two examples of its application to nursing and health services research. Action research is cyclical in nature and involves the development, evaluation and redefining of an action plan using four basic steps: planning, action, observation and reflection. These cycles of action continue until the research group is satisfied that its objectives have been met. Data generation and analysis are iterative processes that occur continuously throughout the project, which is usually time-limited. Factors that should be taken into account to ensure success include: engaging the community, consideration of 'insider' versus 'outsider' perspectives, competing agendas, expectations not being met and the integrity of the research methodology. PMID:26036404

  18. Nursing Students' Experiences of Learning Numeracy for Professional Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Rachel; Hodgen, Jeremy; Coben, Diana; Bretscher, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines nursing students' experiences of the teaching and assessment of numeracy for nursing. Data from interviews with eight student nurses at a large school of nursing in the United Kingdom are analysed using a constructivist grounded theory approach to explore their perceptions of any disjunctures between the ways in which numeracy…

  19. The relationship between research and the nursing process in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Mason, G M; Attree, M

    1997-11-01

    The nursing process was originally adopted by the North American nursing profession from the general systems theory (GST) and quickly became a symbol of contemporary nursing as well as a professionalist nurse ideology. In contrast its initial introduction in the United Kingdom (UK) was not a complete success. This could be attributed to the mode of its implementation, which utilized a power-coercive change strategy, that is, comprising of imposition from above without sufficient time for education regarding its scientific and philosophical foundations. Consequently the nursing process was initially regarded as a professional and educational mandate rather than an organizational component of nursing care delivery. It has been maintained that the theoretical basis from which the nursing process was derived, together with the theoretical developments in diagnostic and intervention studies, has established the nursing process as a key element of the nurse's role in research, education and practice. This paper will briefly review the early theoretical developments and fate of the nursing process as a tool for clinical practice and research. It will then examine recent attempts to revitalize and modernize the theory for practice through research into nursing diagnosis. PMID:9372412

  20. Factors impacting on nurses' transference of theoretical knowledge of holistic care into clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Saras

    2002-12-01

    Since nurse education moved to universities, a reoccurring concern of health consumers, health administrators, and some practising nurses is that nurses are not able to transfer the theoretical knowledge of holistic care into practice. Much has been written about this concern usually under the heading of the theory-practice gap. A common reason that has been highlighted as the cause of this gap is that the theoretical knowledge that nurses learn in academia is predicated on concepts such as humanism and holistic caring. In contrast, the bureaucratic organisation where nurses provide care tends to be based on management concepts where cost containment and outcome measures are more acceptable. Hence nurses' learned values of holistic caring are pitted against the reality of the practice setting. So what is this practice reality? This paper attempts to provide an insider view of why the theoretical knowledge of holistic care may be difficult to enact in the clinical setting. In-depth taped interviews with nurses and participant observation were conducted in acute care hospitals in Western Australia. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using the constant comparative method. The findings indicated that utilitarian nursing and role models had impacted on the transference of theoretical knowledge of holistic care into practice. The paper outlines some measures that nurses themselves can undertake to ensure the narrowing of the theory-practice gap in this area. PMID:19036306

  1. Humanitarian nursing challenges: a grounded theory study.

    PubMed

    Almonte, Angelica L C

    2009-05-01

    In response to the 2004 tsunami disaster in the Indian Ocean, the U.S. Navy deployed teams aboard the USNS Mercy to provide aid during Operation Unified Assistance (OUA). To date, few research studies have examined how Navy nurses prepared for and clinically performed during this relief operation. The current article describes the challenges faced by Navy nurses throughout OUA. A purposive convenience sample was recruited; 11 participated. Data were collected from interviews, observations, field notes, memos, and a demographic tool. Information was categorized, coded, compared to incoming data, then analyzed using Strauss and Corbin's open coding, axial coding, and selective coding methods. A theoretical model was developed to illustrate how participants experienced the mission. Key lessons learned were that most were unprepared for providing pediatric care, and saying "No" in delivering care. Recommendations include: deployment of advanced-practice nurses (specialists in pediatrics and well-mental health) and predeployment training on moral distress. PMID:20731277

  2. The Future of Neonatal Advanced Practice Registered Nurse Practice: White Paper.

    PubMed

    Staebler, Suzanne; Meier, Susan R; Bagwell, Gail; Conway-Orgel, Margaret

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, the National Association of Neonatal Nurses and the National Association of Neonatal Nurse Practitioners have been monitoring aspects of neonatal advanced practice nursing and providing leadership and advocacy to address concerns related to workforce, education, competency, fatigue, safety, and scope of practice. This white paper discusses current barriers within neonatal advanced practice registered nurse practice as well as strategies to promote the longevity of the neonatal advanced practice registered nurse roles. PMID:26742097

  3. A synthesis of Vroom's model with other social theories: an application to nursing education.

    PubMed

    Gyurko, Charlene C

    2011-07-01

    In 2009, the National League for Nursing reported that there are over 3.4 million persons in the United States employed in nursing in the roles of Registered Nurses (RNs) and Advanced Practice Nurses (APRNs). In 2007, the Bureau of Labor Statistics also reported that in 2006, there were over 749,000 Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs) working in the United States with a projected increase of 14% by 2016. Buerhaus et al, in 2009, stated that between 2016 and 2025, it is estimated that the U.S. will need over 260,000 registered nurses (RNs) Using the conceptual framework of Vroom's expectancy theory on motivation as well as theories addressing student and career development, this paper demonstrates a synthesis of Vroom's model with other educational theories and its application to nursing education, specifically the prediction of motivation to advance one's nursing education. By putting Vroom's theory into a context, Vroom's fairly simple model could help nurse educators predict the factors that make for success in midcareer educational advancement--and even possibly manipulate those factors to increase that success. In today's economy, that practical part seems too good to lose. PMID:20832146

  4. Governance of professional nursing practice in a hospital setting: a mixed methods study1

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, José Luís Guedes; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to elaborate an interpretative model for the governance of professional nursing practice in a hospital setting. Method: a mixed methods study with concurrent triangulation strategy, using data from a cross-sectional study with 106 nurses and a Grounded Theory study with 63 participants. The quantitative data were collected through the Brazilian Nursing Work Index - Revised and underwent descriptive statistical analysis. Qualitative data were obtained from interviews and analyzed through initial, selective and focused coding. Results: based on the results obtained with the Brazilian Nursing Work Index - Revised, it is possible to state that nurses perceived that they had autonomy, control over the environment, good relationships with physicians and organizational support for nursing governance. The governance of the professional nursing practice is based on the management of nursing care and services carried out by the nurses. To perform these tasks, nurses aim to get around the constraints of the organizational support and develop management knowledge and skills. Conclusion: it is important to reorganize the structures and processes of nursing governance, especially the support provided by the organization for the management practices of nurses. PMID:26625992

  5. Identifying and transforming dysfunctional nurse-nurse relationships through reflective practice and action research.

    PubMed

    Taylor, B

    2001-12-01

    This project facilitated reflective practice processes in experienced Registered Nurses (RNs) in order to raise critical awareness of practice problems, work systematically through problem-solving processes to uncover constraints, and improve the quality of care given by nurses in light of the identified constraints and possibilities. Twelve experienced female RNs working in a large Australian rural hospital shared their experiences of nursing during three action research cycles. A thematic concern of dysfunctional nurse-nurse relationships was identified, as evidenced by bullying and horizontal violence. The negotiated action plan was put into place and participants reported varying degrees of success in attempting to improve nurse-nurse relationships. PMID:11785443

  6. Impact of human resource management practices on nursing home performance.

    PubMed

    Rondeau, K V; Wagar, T H

    2001-08-01

    Management scholars and practitioners alike have become increasingly interested in learning more about the ability of certain 'progressive' or 'high-performance' human resource management (HRM) practices to enhance organizational effectiveness. There is growing evidence to suggest that the contribution of various HRM practices to impact firm performance may be synergistic in effect yet contingent on a number of contextual factors, including workplace climate. A contingency theory perspective suggests that in order to be effective, HMR policies and practices must be consistent with other aspects of the organization, including its environment. This paper reports on empirical findings from research that examines the relationship between HRM practices, workplace climate and perceptions of organizational performance, in a large sample of Canadian nursing homes. Data from 283 nursing homes were collected by means of a mail survey that included questions on HRM practices, programmes, and policies, on human resource aspects of workplace climate, as well as a variety of indicators that include employee, customer/resident and facility measures of organizational performance. Results derived from ordered probit analysis suggest that nursing homes in our sample which had implemented more 'progressive' HRM practices and which reported a workplace climate that strongly values employee participation, empowerment and accountability tended to be perceived to generally perform better on a number of valued organizational outcomes. Nursing homes in our sample that performed best overall were found to be more likely to not only have implemented more of these HRM practices, but also to report having a workplace climate that reflects the seminal value that it places on its human resources. This finding is consistent with the conclusion that simply introducing HRM practices or programmes, in the absence of an appropriately supportive workplace climate, will be insufficient to attain optimal organizational performance. PMID:11507813

  7. Future trends in nursing practice and technology.

    PubMed

    Fuszard, B

    1991-01-01

    Rural hospitals will be affected by changes in nursing anticipated in the future. Welcome changes will be the maturity and life experiences new graduates will bring to the work setting, knowledge of computers, and a broadening database. New graduates will also know various methods of care delivery, including case management, and will be able to select the delivery system that best meets the needs of the patients and institution. They will be more autonomous and possess leadership and management skills. With their knowledge of community as well as institutional nursing, they will be able to draw upon the skills of both groups to bring the two areas of nursing into continuity of care for patients. A difficulty ahead for rural hospitals is recruitment of new graduates, the majority of whom will have established families and lives elsewhere. And the practice of developing their own employees for higher levels of nursing will be compounded by the doubling of time necessary to complete nursing programs in the future. PMID:10116031

  8. [Construction of terminology subsets: contributions to clinical nursing practice].

    PubMed

    Clares, Jorge Wilker Bezerra; de Freitas, Maria Cťlia; Guedes, Maria VilanŪ Cavalcante; da Nůbrega, Maria Miriam Lima

    2013-08-01

    The International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNPģ) is a classification system that unifies the elements of nursing practice (diagnoses, interventions and outcomes), enabling elucidation of elements of a specific nursing language through the construction of terminology subsets. In this reflective essay, aspects relevant to the construction of ICNPģ terminology subsets are highlighted, as well as their contributions to clinical nursing practice. The development of subsets as a tool that contributes to making nursing language universal, facilitates the communication process, as well as the scientific and technological advancement of the profession, is discussed. Therefore, its use by nurses worldwide is encouraged. PMID:24310697

  9. Reflective practice groups for nurses: a consultation liaison psychiatry nursing initiative: part 1--The model.

    PubMed

    Dawber, Chris

    2013-04-01

    In the present study, we outline the evolution of a process-focused reflective practice group (RPG) model for nurses working in clinical settings. The groups were initiated at Redcliffe and Caboolture hospitals by the consultation liaison psychiatry nurse and author. An associated article provides an evaluation of these RPG. The literature review identifies the key themes and theories on which the model is based, and the article outlines the process and practicalities of facilitating RPG in critical care, midwifery, and oncology specialties over a 3-year period. The model proposes that the effectiveness and sustainability of RPG arises from adequate preparation and engagement with prospective participants. Group rules, based on principles of confidentially, supportiveness, and diversity, were collaboratively developed for each group. Facilitation utilized a group-as-a-whole approach to manage process and stimulate reflection. While the purpose of RPG was a reflection on interpersonal aspects of nursing, contextual workplace issues were frequently raised in groups. Acknowledgement and containment of such issues were necessary to maintain clinical focus. The literature highlights facilitator credibility and style as crucial factors in the overall success of RPG, and it is proposed that reflective practice as a process-focused model for groups succeeds when nurse facilitators are trained in group process and receive concurrent supervision. PMID:23009276

  10. [Systems theory and nursing--a theoretical discussion].

    PubMed

    Andersson-Segesten, K

    1989-01-01

    Every nurse interested in nursing process models and nursing theory will sooner or later meet the general systems theory (GST). In this article the background of GST is briefly described. Further the key concepts of GST are defined; components, attributes, relations, borders, input, output, filtering, process, open system, closed system, subsystem, suprasystem, feedback and steady state. As examples of GST in nursing the Newman Health Care Systems Model, the Johnson Open System Model and Yura and Walsh way of using the theory are described in brief. Finally some advantages and disadvantages of using general systems theory in nursing are noticed. PMID:2487988

  11. Telephone interventions for family caregivers of patients with dementia: what are best nursing practices?

    PubMed

    Mason, Bernadette J; Harrison, Barbara E

    2008-01-01

    Family caregivers of patients with dementia experience caregiver burden and need holistic nursing interventions, such as telephone support. This article reviews the literature on telephone support interventions for family caregivers of patients with dementia and describes evidence-based holistic nursing practices within Watson's theory of human caring, which focuses on transpersonal caring relationships. PMID:18981815

  12. The case for concordance: value and application in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    McKinnon, John

    This is the first of two articles exploring the concept of concordance in practice. This first paper draws on psychology, research in clinical practice and social participation theory to argue for a concordant approach to nursing care. Where most writers have confined discussions on concordance to medicines management, the author seeks to widen the debate to explore the value of the principle across the whole spectrum of nursing practice. Studies describing patient involvement are mapped against Arnstein's model of citizen participation to determine true levels of patient-practitioner working. The outcomes of care delivered in a paternalistic way are compared with those arising from patient-practitioner partnership working across a range of healthcare settings. The values underpinning concordance and the relationships and skills necessary to achieve and sustain it are considered. A recommendation for practice is that concordance needs to be taught as a central part of the healthcare process rather than merely an ethical principle in healthcare education. The power of the nurse-patient relationship on which concordance is built needs to be recognised and valued. The principle of concordance will be more feasible in practice when accompanied by other initiatives that promote public participation in education review commissioning and standard setting. PMID:24261092

  13. A comprehensive theory of the human person from philosophy and nursing.

    PubMed

    Green, Catherine

    2009-10-01

    This article explores a problem of the articulation of an adequate account of the human person in both philosophical and nursing theory. It follows the lead of philosopher Norris Clarke in suggesting that there has been a significant division in the way philosophers have looked at the human person and goes on to suggest that this division is paralleled in prominent nursing theories. The paper reviews and argues for the synthesis of two contemporary philosophic theories of the person that arise from the traditional philosophical division, and uses Clarke's account to show the ontological need for such a synthesis if we are to have a more adequate account of the human person. Next, accounts of the person identified in a number of the prominent theories of nursing are briefly reviewed revealing the vast complexity of the person encountered in nursing practice. It is suggested that each new theory of nursing is founded, at least in part, on the need to account for attributes of the person missing from prior nursing theories. It will be seen that the synthesized account of the person argued for here more adequately accounts for the various attributes identified in these nursing accounts and it is hoped that this synthesized account will serve as a somewhat more complete basis for a continued exploration of the persons encountered in nursing practice in its many and varied manifestations. PMID:19743970

  14. The practice doctorate in nursing: approaches to transform nurse practitioner education and practice.

    PubMed

    Draye, Mary Ann; Acker, Michele; Zimmer, Phyllis Arn

    2006-01-01

    Ongoing challenges caused by increased complexity of care, changing patient demographics, and shifting health care delivery systems are necessitating a transformation of advanced practice. The practice doctorate has the potential to prepare graduates to meet these challenges now and in the future. This article conceptualizes the practice doctorate curriculum for nurse practitioners (NPs), with particular focus on how it will prepare NPs as expert clinicians with enhanced leadership and research skills. Nurse practitioner doctoral education and practice is articulated and differentiated from current NP education and practice, with distinguishing features clearly identified. A compelling argument is made for how this educational preparation will facilitate NPs in meeting future societal needs. The purpose of this article is to provide guidance for all advanced practice educational programs considering adoption of a practice doctorate, and to contribute to the advancement of thinking about the practice doctorate for clinicians as well as educators. PMID:16759936

  15. Sintering Theory and Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    German, Randall M.

    1996-01-01

    Although sintering is an essential process in the manufacture of ceramics and certain metals, as well as several other industrial operations, until now, no single book has treated both the background theory and the practical application of this complex and often delicate procedure. In Sintering Theory and Practice, leading researcher and materials engineer Randall M. German presents a comprehensive treatment of this subject that will be of great use to manufacturers and scientists alike. This practical guide to sintering considers the fact that while the bonding process improves strength and other engineering properties of the compacted material, inappropriate methods of control may lead to cracking, distortion, and other defects. It provides a working knowledge of sintering, and shows how to avoid problems while accounting for variables such as particle size, maximum temperature, time at that temperature, and other problems that may cause changes in processing. The book describes the fundamental atomic events that govern the transformation from particles to solid, covers all forms of the sintering process, and provides a summary of many actual production cycles. Building from the ground up, it begins with definitions and progresses to measurement techniques, easing the transition, especially for students, into advanced topics such as single-phase solid-state sintering, microstructure changes, the complications of mixed particles, and pressure-assisted sintering. German draws on some six thousand references to provide a coherent and lucid treatment of the subject, making scientific principles and practical applications accessible to both students and professionals. In the process, he also points out and avoids the pitfalls found in various competing theories, concepts, and mathematical disputes within the field. A unique opportunity to discover what sintering is all about--both in theory and in practice What is sintering? We see the end product of this thermal process all around us--in manufactured objects from metals, ceramics, polymers, and many compounds. From a vast professional literature, Sintering Theory and Practice emerges as the only comprehensive, systematic, and self-contained volume on the subject. Covering all aspects of sintering as a processing topic, including materials, processes, theories, and the overall state of the art, the book Offers numerous examples, illustrations, and tables that detail actual processing cycles, and that stress existing knowledge in the field Uses the specifics of various consolidation cycles to illustrate the basics Leads the reader from the fundamentals to advanced topics, without getting bogged down in various mathematical disputes over treatments and measurements Supports the discussion with critically selected references from thousands of sources Examines the sintering behavior of a wide variety of engineered materials--metals, alloys, oxide ceramics, composites, carbides, intermetallics, glasses, and polymers Guides the reader through the sintering processes for several important industrial materials and demonstrates how to control these processes effectively and improve present techniques Provides a helpful reference for specific information on materials, processing problems, and concepts For practitioners and researchers in ceramics, powder metallurgy, and other areas, and for students and faculty in materials science and engineering, this book provides the know-how and understanding crucial to many industrial operations, offers many ideas for further research, and suggests future applications of this important technology. This book offers an unprecedented opportunity to explore sintering in both practical and theoretical terms, whether at the lab or in real-world applications, and to acquire a broad, yet thorough, understanding of this important technology.

  16. Educational Progression of Licensed Practical Nurses to Registered Nursing Programs. Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosch, India, Comp.

    A project was conducted to develop a structural mechanism for articulation between colleges and vocational schools in West Virginia. Such articulation would permit licensed practical nurses (LPNs) desiring to become registered nurses to transfer credits for their licensed practical nursing courses and thereby eliminate unnecessary repetition of…

  17. Obesity Prevention Practices of Elementary School Nurses in Minnesota: Findings from Interviews with Licensed School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison-Sandberg, Leslie F.; Kubik, Martha Y.; Johnson, Karen E.

    2011-01-01

    Elementary schools are an optimal setting to provide obesity prevention interventions, yet little is known about the obesity prevention practices of elementary school nurses. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into current obesity-related school nursing practice in elementary schools in Minnesota, opinions regarding school nurse-ledÖ

  18. Obesity Prevention Practices of Elementary School Nurses in Minnesota: Findings from Interviews with Licensed School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison-Sandberg, Leslie F.; Kubik, Martha Y.; Johnson, Karen E.

    2011-01-01

    Elementary schools are an optimal setting to provide obesity prevention interventions, yet little is known about the obesity prevention practices of elementary school nurses. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into current obesity-related school nursing practice in elementary schools in Minnesota, opinions regarding school nurse-led…

  19. Theory and Practice in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dearden, R. F.

    1980-01-01

    Examines the nature of educational theory and its relationship to practice. Discusses barriers in translating theory into practice and concludes that the educational theorist is subject to severe role conflict. (Author/KC)

  20. Building knowledge for safer care: nursing research advancing practice.

    PubMed

    Jeffs, Lianne; M Smith, Orla; Wilson, Gail; Kohn, Melanie; Campbell, Heather; Maione, Maria; Tregunno, Deborah; Ferris, Ella

    2009-01-01

    Organizational and professional efforts to support nurses engaging in research projects that advance patient safety practices are needed. In this context, the purpose of this article is to provide a description of the design, implementation, and evaluation of a research capacity strategy designed for clinical nurses and the lessons learned. Participating nurses evolved from research novices to key champions in advancing nursing practice, patient safety, and quality improvement. PMID:19525767

  1. Nursing practice: compassionate deception and the Good Samaritan.

    PubMed

    Tuckett, A

    1999-09-01

    This article reviews the literature on deception to illuminate the phenomenon as a background for an appraisal within nursing. It then describes nursing as a practice of caring. The character of the Good Samaritan is recommended as indicative of the virtue of compassion that ought to underpin caring in nursing practice. Finally, the article concludes that a caring nurse, responding virtuously, acts by being compassionate, for a time recognizing the prima facie nature of the rules or principles of truth telling. PMID:10696185

  2. Family nursing practice and education: what is happening in Japan?

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Michiko

    2008-11-01

    Significant developments in family nursing in Japan are described and analyzed beginning with the political and health care legislation in the country that stimulated a need for family nursing and the early adoption of family nursing theories and models by visionary leaders in nursing education. In 1994, Japan was the first country in the world to establish a national family nursing association, the Japanese Association for Research in Family Nursing, that provided the necessary infrastructure and leadership for family nursing in Japan to flourish. The strengths and challenges of family nursing in Japan are identified and a call is made for innovations in nursing curricula as well as global networking of family nurses around the world. PMID:19139158

  3. The Vanderbilt Professional Nursing Practice Program: part 1: Growing and supporting professional nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Karen; Eck, Carol; Keck, Becky; Wells, Nancy

    2003-09-01

    Professional practice programs are designed to attract, retain, and reward nurses. This three-part series will describe Vanderbilt's performance-based career advancement system, the Vanderbilt Professional Nursing Practice Program (VPNPP). Part 1 outlines the overall program's foundation, philosophical background, and basic structure. The VPNPP is built upon Benner's work, distinguishing among four levels of practice: novice, competent, proficient, and expert. Work by many in the organization identified the expected behaviors for nurses at each level, which were then used to develop clear process evaluation criteria. Part 2 will examine the performance measurement and evaluation system created to support the program. The process of advancing within the program will be described in part 3. PMID:14501560

  4. Nurses' views about returning to practice after a career break.

    PubMed

    Durand, Mary Alison; Randhawa, Gurch

    Shortages in nursing staff have led to recruitment campaigns targeting nurses who have left the profession. The present study explored reasons why career-break nurses decide for or against a return to practice, as well as perceptions of nursing following return. Semistructured interview were conducted with 24 nurses who had returned recently to the profession and 28 nurses on a "career break". Findings revealed that those who returned did so when their personal circumstances allowed, and half returned as bank nurses in order to work flexible, family-friendly hours. Some non-returners reported that they could not afford to return because of childcare costs. Although still a caring one, the nurse's role is seen by returners as becoming increasingly technologically and administratively demanding. Flexibility with regard to working practices, increased salaries and demonstrating that it values its staff, were highlighted by interviewees generally as priority issues for the NHS if it wishes to recruit career-break nurses. PMID:11984462

  5. A renal nursing professional practice model: the next generation.

    PubMed

    Harwood, Lori; Downing, Linda; Ridley, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Professional practice models provide a structure for excellence in nursing practice. Our centre has had a long tradition of working with a professional practice model with proven nursing outcomes such as job satisfaction, empowerment and perceptions of improved patient care. Our model, in place since 1999, has provided an opportunity to discuss and articulate a vision for nursing practice based on the values of accountability, evidence-informed care and empowerment. In order for the model to effectively guide nursing practice, a revision was necessary to keep pace with the changes in the renal program and the health care environment. The revised model needed to address the enhancements in nursing roles, practice environment, corporate requirements and patient care needs. This paper describes a revised professional practice model unique to nephrology nursing. PMID:24344518

  6. Factors Associated With the Perception of Family Nursing Practice Among Mental Health Nurses in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Chiu-Yueh; Tsai, Yun-Fang

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine factors that influenced the perceptions of mental health nurses about involving families in their nursing practice. A sample of 175 Taiwanese mental health nurses who are employed in both inpatient and community settings completed structured questionnaires designed to measure empathy, attitudes about involving families in care, and perceptions of family nursing practice. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Pearson's product-moment correlation, t test, one-way ANOVA, and a hierarchical multiple regression analysis. Positive perceptions of family nursing practice were correlated with more years of clinical experience in mental health, empathy, supportive attitudes toward the importance of family nursing care, and personal experiences with family members with serious illness in need of professional care. These findings may assist in the development of effective educational programs designed to help nurses integrate family nursing knowledge and skills in the care of patients and families experiencing mental illness. PMID:26410853

  7. The experiences of student nurses on placements with practice nurses: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Gale, Julia; Ooms, Ann; Sharples, Kath; Marks-Maran, Di

    2016-01-01

    To prepare the registered nurse of tomorrow in the United Kingdom (UK) to care for patients in general practice (GP)-led services, today's student nurses need to have the opportunity to experience placements with practice nurses to enable them to make positive career choices to become practice nurses in the future. The role of the practice nurse is described in the article. As a pilot project, seventeen students undertook placements with practice nurses in one of seven GP practices selected by the London GP Deanery and the university as having fulfilled the criteria to support student nurses in placements. A mentorship preparation programme was provided to prepare practice nurses for mentoring these students. An evaluation study was undertaken of this pilot project. Findings showed that students were highly positive about the experience; the majority rated this placement as being as good as or better than previous placement experiences. The evaluation also explored the impact on student learning and the value that the placement had. There was a positive impact on students' knowledge and skills in certain clinical areas especially related to health promotion. Students also indicated that they would like to have additional placements with practice nurses and would consider a career as a practice nurse in the future. PMID:26321359

  8. Nursing practice environment, quality of care, and morale of hospital nurses in Japan.

    PubMed

    Anzai, Eriko; Douglas, Clint; Bonner, Ann

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe Japanese hospital nurses' perceptions of the nursing practice environment and examine its association with nurse-reported ability to provide quality nursing care, quality of patient care, and ward morale. A cross-sectional survey design was used including 223 nurses working in 12 acute inpatient wards in a large Japanese teaching hospital. Nurses rated their work environment favorably overall using the Japanese version of the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index. Subscale scores indicated high perceptions of physician relations and quality of nursing management, but lower scores for staffing and resources. Ward nurse managers generally rated the practice environment more positively than staff nurses except for staffing and resources. Regression analyses found the practice environment was a significant predictor of quality of patient care and ward morale, whereas perceived ability to provide quality nursing care was most strongly associated with years of clinical experience. These findings support interventions to improve the nursing practice environment, particularly staffing and resource adequacy, to enhance quality of care and ward morale in Japan. PMID:23855754

  9. Learning Theory Support of Simulation to Improve Nurses' Care of Critically Ill Patients.

    PubMed

    Walker, Mandi; Stevenson, Gina

    2016-01-01

    Simulation, as a conduit to apply both adult and constructivist learning theory, is an important educational modality in nursing professional development. The use of simulation is well studied in the academic setting, but evidence supporting its use in the practice environment is lacking. This educational quality improvement project provides a road map for designing and implementing simulation to meet the educational needs of practicing nurses. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2016;47(1):27-31. PMID:26790494

  10. Domains of practice and Advanced Practice Nursing in Australia.

    PubMed

    Roche, Michael; Duffield, Christine; Wise, Sarah; Baldwin, Richard; Fry, Margaret; Solman, Annette

    2013-12-01

    A key component of workforce reform is the international growth in Advanced Practice Nursing (APN) roles. This study evaluated one APN role in Australia, the Clinical Nurse Consultant (CNC). All 56 CNCs employed in a tertiary hospital in New South Wales took part in the study. Demographic and work activity data were collected by an online questionnaire. Face-to-face interviews included the administration of a 50-point tool to score the level of practice of each CNC against five domains. The domains of practice did not appear to have played a central role in the design of these CNC roles despite being defined in the industrial legislation and linked to a pay structure. There was widespread variability in the level of practice both within and between the CNC grades as well as significant differences in job content. Few CNCs managed to achieve a moderate level of practice across all five domains. The findings suggest that the distinctive features of the CNC roles as articulated in the domains of practice are often not realized in practice. PMID:23692175

  11. Utilizing Rogers' Theory of Self-Concept in mental health nursing.

    PubMed

    Hosking, P

    1993-06-01

    The work of mental health nurse is interactive in nature, the priority of which is the effective development and maintenance of a therapeutic relationship with clients. This field of nursing bases its practice on theories from many schools of thought in order to provide clients with the highest quality of care. One such theory is that of Carl Rogers whose practice as a psychotherapist was based on his Theory of Self-Concept. This paper examines the development of the Theory of Self-Concept from the works of Cooley, Mead, Allport and Rogers and relates to the therapeutic alliance between a primary nurse and a client who has been medically diagnosed as being 'depressed'. The implications for practice are considered and some of the difficulties of utilizing Rogers' theory on an in-patient unit are explored. The paper emphasizes the need for nurses to be aware of the use of such theories in order to enrich the care that clients receive. It also highlights the need for nurses to be aware of their own 'self' when working with clients, a state that can only be achieved if the nurses themselves have adequate clinical supervision and an environment which is supportive of such work. PMID:8320395

  12. Informatics in the Doctor of Nursing Practice Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Melinda; Wilson, Marisa; Ozbolt, Judy

    2007-01-01

    In 2006, The American Association of Colleges of Nursing approved a new doctoral degree for clinical leaders, the Doctor of Nursing Practice. These new advanced practice leaders will need sophisticated skills in informatics to acquire and use data, information, and knowledge in their roles. This paper proposes a foundational course for all Doctor of Nursing Practice students and some strategies for integrating informatics throughout the curriculum. PMID:18693859

  13. Moving toward a Model for Nursing Education and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lusk, Marilyn; Decker, Ilene

    2001-01-01

    One baccalaureate nursing program and five community college programs collaboratively developed a shared philosophy, curriculum design, and model for nursing education and practice. The model takes a holistic view of the client/patient's mind, body, and spirit engaged in life-changing transitions and depicts the role of nursing care. (SK)

  14. A Phenomenographic Study Exploring Nursing Education and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Degen, Greta M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to illuminate the qualitatively different ways in which three nurses with an associate degree (ADN) and three nurses with a baccalaureate degree (BSN) experience, conceptualize, perceive, and understand their own nursing practice within the context of their educational background. Using a phenomenographic methodology…

  15. [Assessing the experience of practice placement nurse tutors].

    PubMed

    Carrey, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Focused for many years on the quality of the supervision of student nurses during their practice placements, the teams of the American Hospital of Paris carried out an original survey around the new nurse training reference framework, questioning nurse tutors and young frontline professionals. PMID:26365646

  16. Hand decontamination: nurses' opinions and practices.

    PubMed

    Gould, D

    Infection is spread in hospital mainly by hands, making hand decontamination the most important means of preventing dissemination. There is some evidence to suggest that when access to hand-decontaminating agents is poor or the agents available are disliked, hands are washed too seldom, increasing risks of cross-infection. However, little attention has been paid to the use of towels and factors which promote their use, although it is known that damp hands transfer bacteria more readily than dry ones and that hands which become sore through poor drying have higher bacterial counts, contributing to the risk of cross-infection. This paper reports the results of the Nursing Times Hand Drying survey designed to assess nurses' access to hand decontamination agents and towels. The results suggest that the 112 nurses who participated were aware of the need for attention to hand hygiene but that access to both hand-decontaminating agents and paper towels was variable. Forty-one per cent complained of a shortage of soap and although nearly all used paper towels, these were in many cases of poor quality. Such towels were perceived as damaging to hands, leaving them feeling damp and sore. Good-quality, soft, paper towels were much appreciated by respondents in this sample. It is concluded that the quality of paper towels contributes to good infection control practice. PMID:7753663

  17. Potentials Unlimited: Nursing Practice, Education and Administration. Nursing Research Conference Proceedings (1st, Fresno, California, April 8, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen-Webb, Marilyn-Lu, Ed.

    The purposes of this conference were: (1) to present research representing a variety of topics and study designs; (2) to disseminate findings of nursing research; and (3) to stimulate the use of research and theory as a basis for clinical, educational, and administrative practice. The keynote address and two invited presentations are presented in…

  18. Articulation Matrix for Home Health Aide, Nursing Assistant, Patient Care Assistant, Practical Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Instructional Development and Services.

    This document demonstrates the relationships among four Florida nursing education programs (home health aide, nursing assistant, patient care assistant, and practical nursing) by listing student performance standards and indicating which ones are required in each program. The 268 student performance standards are arranged in 23 areas of…

  19. Pain Management: Knowledge and Attitudes of Senior Nursing Students and Practicing Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messmer, Sherry

    2009-01-01

    Despite scientific advances in pain management, inadequate pain relief in hospitalized patients continues to be an on-going phenomenon. Although nurses do not prescribe medication for pain, the decision to administer pharmacological or other interventions for pain relief is part of nursing practice. Nurses play a critical role in the relief ofÖ

  20. Pain Management: Knowledge and Attitudes of Senior Nursing Students and Practicing Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messmer, Sherry

    2009-01-01

    Despite scientific advances in pain management, inadequate pain relief in hospitalized patients continues to be an on-going phenomenon. Although nurses do not prescribe medication for pain, the decision to administer pharmacological or other interventions for pain relief is part of nursing practice. Nurses play a critical role in the relief of…

  1. Assuring Quality and Access in Advanced Practice Nursing: A Challenge to Nurse Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mundinger, Mary O.; Cook, Sarah Sheets; Lenz, Elizabeth R.; Piacentini, Karen; Auerhahn, Carolyn; Smith, Jennifer

    2000-01-01

    Advanced practice nurses are assuming increasingly accountable roles in primary health care. A doctor of nursing practice degree would signify the high level of competency they achieve. Columbia University's training model is an example of the preparation needed for this level of professional practice. (SK)

  2. Satisfaction and comfort with nursing in Australian general practice.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    The practice nursing workforce has grown exponentially in recent years. Whilst evidence has shown the important contributions of nurses to general practice service delivery, the consumer perspective of nursing in general practice has received limited attention. Given that acceptability of nurses is influenced by patient satisfaction which can in turn improve both treatment adherence and clinical outcomes, this is an important area for investigation. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate consumer satisfaction with chronic disease management by nurses in general practice (NiGP) and comfort with the tasks undertaken by nurses in general practice. Consumers receiving chronic disease services from nurses in general practice participating in a larger study were recruited to complete a survey. The survey comprised of demographic information, and items related to satisfaction with the nurse encounter (SPN-9) and consumer comfort with nurse roles in general practice (CPN-18). Eighty-one consumers participated in the study. Cronbach's alpha values of the SPN-9 and the CPN-18 were 0.95 and 0.97 respectively. SPN-9 results demonstrated high levels of satisfaction with PN consultations. Bivariate analysis did not show any significant differences within the consumer group relating to satisfaction. However, those who presented for diabetes-related reasons were more likely to report high comfort levels with the nurse encounter compare to those who presented to general practice for other chronic disease conditions (38% versus 14%, p = 0.016). The results of this study demonstrate that consumers are generally satisfied with nursing consultations in general practice related to chronic disease. However, further research evaluating consumer confidence, comfort and satisfaction with nursing care is needed to ensure that nursing services meet consumer needs. PMID:26281408

  3. Exploring use of a clinical data repository containing international classification for nursing practice-based nursing practice data.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyeoun-Ae; Cho, Insook; Chung, Eunja

    2011-07-01

    To determine the usefulness of a clinical data repository for nursing, we conducted two studies (1) investigating the gaps between required nursing care time based on patient classification and actual nursing care time based on nurse staffing level and (2) exploring the practice variations of nurses by comparing nursing interventions documented to prevent and treat pressure ulcers. We reviewed the nursing records of 124,416 patients discharged from 2005 to 2007 to identify the gaps in nursing care time. We also reviewed records of 41,891 patients discharged in 2007 to identify those who had pressure ulcers or were at risk of pressure ulcers and analyzed the nursing interventions documented to prevent and treat pressure ulcers. The pediatric and geriatric units showed relatively high staffing needs and the trends of understaffing over time. For pressure ulcer care, nursing interventions vary by nursing unit. Position change was the most common nursing intervention documented except in the maternity unit, followed by ulcer wound care, use of devices, and nutritional assessment. This study showed that data in a clinical data repository can provide nurse managers and nurses with valuable information about nurse staffing and patient care. PMID:20978438

  4. New Brunswick nurses' views on nursing research, and factors influencing their research activities in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Robichaud-Ekstrand, Sylvie

    2016-06-01

    New Brunswick became the first province in Canada to require a baccalaureate degree in nursing as the entry to practice, yet nursing research in hospital settings remains quite low. This study examined clinical nurses' views on nursing research, and identified some contributing factors to the research-practice gap. This descriptive, cross-sectional multicenter study involved 1081 nurses working in the Francophone Regional Health Authority in New Brunswick, Canada. Nurses were eager to identify nursing-care problems to improve patient care (92.9%), and to be involved in collecting data for nursing research studies (95.2%). However, without research supervision, few had engaged in basic research activities, such as formulating or refining research questions (24.5%), presenting at research conferences (6.9%), or changing their practice based on research findings (27.2%). Younger, more educated nurses, nurse managers, and educators participated more readily in research. Sharing research and clinical expertise, as well as infrastructures between academic and clinical institutions is the key to enduring successful patient-centered nursing research in clinical settings. Concrete actions are proposed to build clinical nursing research. PMID:26822438

  5. CE: Incorporating Acupressure into Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Judy

    2015-12-01

    Rooted in traditional Chinese medicine, the use of acupressure to alleviate symptoms, support the healing process, promote relaxation, and improve overall health has grown considerably in the West. The effects of acupressure--like those of acupuncture, with which it shares a theoretical framework--cannot always be explained in terms of Western anatomical and physiologic concepts, but this noninvasive practice involves minimal risk, can be easily integrated into nursing practice, and has been shown to be effective in treating nausea as well as low back, neck, labor, and menstrual pain. The author discusses potential clinical indications for the use of acupressure, describes the technique, explains how to evaluate patient outcomes, and suggests how future research into this integrative intervention might be improved. PMID:26559160

  6. Working Together Toward a Common Goal: A Grounded Theory of Nurse-Physician Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Fewster-Thuente, Lori

    2015-01-01

    Working together toward a common goal is an empirically derived theory that can guide education and practice to improve patient outcomes while saving money and lives. Grounded theory was used to explore nurses' and physicians' experiences with collaboration in order to understand the process intrinsically. PMID:26665873

  7. The path to development of the Hózhó Resilience Model for nursing research and practice.

    PubMed

    Kahn-John, Michelle

    2016-02-01

    This article describes how the Diné (Navajo) Hózhó wellness philosophy, along with nursing research and theory, informed the development of a theoretical nursing model, the Hózhó Resilience Model that can be used to generate patient-centered nursing knowledge through connections among our theories, research, and practice. The Hózhó Resilience Model is a model that can be used to understand American Indian worldviews in relation to health, and may also be used to guide future research and nursing practice with the American Indian population. PMID:26856506

  8. Seminar: Legal Perspectives of Nursing Practice. Nursing 89.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Odette P.

    This course outline provides information to be used by students in conjunction with Nursing 89, a seminar on the legal aspects of nursing to be offered starting in Spring 1982 at Diablo University (California). General information is provided first, including a class calendar, a statement defining the purpose of the course, an outline of…

  9. Impact of empowerment on professional practice environments and organizational commitment among nurses: a structural equation approach.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinhua; Liu, Yanhui; Huang, Chunping; Zhu, Lefeng

    2013-02-01

    A higher turnover rate was identified in Chinese staff nurses and it was highly correlated with lower commitment. Empowering work environments that support professional practice have been positively related to nurse outcomes. This study was to integrate structural empowerment theory with magnet hospital characteristics and provide empirical evidence on the relationships between structural empowerment, professional practice environments and organizational commitment. A cross-sectional design was used to examine the relationships in a sample of 750 full-time nurses employed in five Chinese hospitals in 2011. Structural equation modeling was used to test the proposed hypotheses. The results support the hypothesized model. Professional practice environments partially mediated the relationship between empowerment and organizational commitment. Our findings suggest that higher empowerment facilitates the professional practice environments and commitment of these nurses. PMID:23425379

  10. The scope of private practice nursing in an Australian sample.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Anne; Averis, Andrea; Walsh, Ken

    2004-01-01

    The changing Australian health care system is creating new opportunities for nurses who work directly with clients in private practice settings. This study examines the scope of practice of a cohort of nurses in private practice. In a questionnaire sent to 106 self-employed nurse entrepreneurs, questions were asked pertaining to the participants' scope of practice, their clients, the types of services offered, and their fee structures. Questions about scope of practice were divided into domains of clinical practice, business consultancy, education, and research. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected for a final sample 54 eligible responses. Participants had been in private practice for an average of 7.6 years (range: 1-20) and reported a mean of 21 years of nursing experience (range: 4-42) before entering private practice. Over half held diplomas in specialty areas. Most participants reported clinical practice, consultancy, or education as the primary work domain; research was much less important as a work activity. Nurses reported difficulties with building client base and receiving adequate fees for service, particularly in clinical practice. Increasing awareness within the nursing profession and health sector about various aspects of private practice nursing could improve service quality for their clients. PMID:15363028

  11. Financial literacy as an essential element in nursing management practice.

    PubMed

    Talley, Linda B; Thorgrimson, Diane H; Robinson, Nellie C

    2013-01-01

    Grooming nurses at all levels of the organization to master health care executive skills is critical to the organization's success and the individual's growth. Selecting and executing next steps for nursing leadership team development is critical to success. Leaders must make it their responsibility to provide nurses with increased exposure to quality, safety, and financial data, thereby allowing nurses to translate data while achieving and sustaining successful outcomes. The work of the CNO Dashboard to measure, report, trend, and translate clinical and non-clinical outcomes must be integrated throughout all levels of nursing staff so that nursing practice is positioned to continually strive for best practice. The education and evolution of nurses as business managers is critical to building a strong RN workforce. PMID:23691748

  12. Respiratory nursing diagnoses: practicing nurses' selection of defining characteristics.

    PubMed

    Capuano, T A; Hitchings, K S; Johnson, S

    1990-01-01

    One-hundred medical/surgical nurses from two hospitals participated in a study designed to determine which defining characteristics professional nurses working in acute-care settings associated with each of the three respiratory nursing diagnoses identified by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA). All NANDA defining characteristics for impaired gas exchange and ineffective airway clearance were selected by at least 63% and 67% of the study participants, respectively. Thirteen of the 15 NANDA defining characteristics for ineffective breathing pattern were selected by at least 68% of the study participants. Two characteristics of ineffective breathing pattern identified by NANDA, cough and fremitus, were selected by only 47% and 45% of respondents. This study was the first in a series of studies intended to validate the respiratory nursing diagnoses. PMID:2291860

  13. [Nursing and power--use of the so-called poststructuralism theory for the analysis of the power-relationships in the "female" nursing professional].

    PubMed

    Arnold, D

    1996-03-01

    Nursing and power. Poststructuralism and its application to the power-relationships in the "female" occupation of nursing The theory of Foucault is used to outline a "genealogy" of nursing, historically a female occupation, subordinate to medicine. Foucault's ideas about power, discourse and panopticon are analysed in relation to nursing. The concept of discourse enables the writer to see the "feminine ideology" of society as the effect of power on the identity, behaviour and expression of emotion of women in nursing. The hospital and the "Mutterhaus" can be understood as panoptical institutions. Hospital nurses are in a position in which they have powers of disciplining patients and at the same time are themselves subject to surveillance and normalisation. As a concrete example, the techniques of using power, which originate from monasteries, form "norm-traps" when applied to nursing. Finally, not only the question of power, but also that of resistance to power, is addressed. Professionalisation and the move towards science-based nursing can be seen as "counter discourse". This is meant to set up the nurses' own knowledge base, their understanding of the nurse-patient relationship and of nursing practice, against the view of nursing as a profession subordinate to medicine. Foucault's view of power and resistance leads the writer to align herself with "the other side", in this case professionalisation in nursing. But at the same time one is invited to take the offensive in the debate of old and new contradictions. PMID:8715575

  14. Making "cents" of the business side of nurse practitioner practice.

    PubMed

    Luster-Tucker, AtNena

    2016-03-15

    Nurse practitioners produce excellent patient outcomes and should be allowed to practice to the full extent of their education and training. In addition to clinical skills, nurse practitioners need to understand the business side of practice in order to ensure fair and equitable compensation. PMID:26886267

  15. [Foundations and construction of the ethical approach in nursing practice].

    PubMed

    Moutel, Grégoire

    2015-12-01

    The evolution of science and our society raises ethical questions in medical and nursing practice. These give rise to the requirement for individual and collective reflection in order to consider the consequences of decisions and to judge on sometimes complex choices. This reflection concerns both nursing practices and the organisation of the health system. PMID:26675100

  16. Obesity prevention practices of elementary school nurses in Minnesota: findings from interviews with licensed school nurses.

    PubMed

    Morrison-Sandberg, Leslie F; Kubik, Martha Y; Johnson, Karen E

    2011-02-01

    Elementary schools are an optimal setting to provide obesity prevention interventions, yet little is known about the obesity prevention practices of elementary school nurses. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into current obesity-related school nursing practice in elementary schools in Minnesota, opinions regarding school nurse-led obesity prevention programs, and school nurses' interest in implementing obesity prevention programs. Semistructured interviews were conducted with key informants from 21 Minnesota school districts (urban = 7; suburban = 8; and rural = 6), who were licensed school nurses (LSNs). Findings indicated that LSNs provided some primary and secondary obesity prevention services. Key informants felt school nurses, administrators, and parents would be supportive of school-based, LSN-led obesity prevention efforts. Interest in increasing efforts was limited by time constraints, staffing, and resources. School nurses are well positioned to provide prevention services that will contribute to reducing childhood obesity. PMID:20966488

  17. Factors influencing evidence-based nursing utilization intention in Korean practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Park, Jee-Won; Ahn, Jeong-Ah; Park, Mi-Mi

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe Korean nurses' perceptions, attitudes and utilization intention for evidence-based nursing (EBN), and to explore what factors influence utilization intention. We conducted a cross-sectional survey in 2012. Registered nurses directly involved in clinical practice were recruited at a medical centre in Korea. A total of 420 nurses completed a self-report questionnaire. Results showed that participants reported moderate scores regarding their perceptions and attitudes towards EBN, and rated themselves as higher than the median for utilization intention. Furthermore, this study revealed that perceptions of and attitudes towards EBN, occupational view and previous EBN education were significant factors affecting utilization intention. Nurse educators and managers should encourage nurses to have better attitudes towards EBN, help them be more satisfied with their work and provide them with appropriate education for EBN to establish evidence-based practice as a part of daily nursing care. PMID:24689706

  18. Reframing the Australian nurse teacher competencies: do they reflect the 'REAL' world of nurse teacher practice?

    PubMed

    Guy, Jacqui; Taylor, Christine; Roden, Janet; Blundell, Jennifer; Tolhurst, Gerda

    2011-04-01

    The Australian nurse teacher competencies were introduced in 1996; however, the researchers perceived that changes to the health care system and a nursing workforce shortage may have affected nurse teacher roles over the past decade. This study aimed to explore perceptions of nurse teachers on the applicability of the current Australian nurse teacher competencies to practice, and modify the nurse teacher competencies to better reflect current practice. Methodology utilized mixed methods, and data collection was via focus groups, telephone interviews, and survey data. Results revealed that participants were mostly positive about the original competency statements, although there were some variations between items. Themes that emerged from the qualitative data were: changing trends in health care; preparation for teaching; understanding of the competencies, contextual influences on education role; nurse teachers as change agents, and resource management. Conclusions were that the Australian nurse teacher competencies (1996) were reflective of the current generic roles of nurse teachers however some of the competencies needed reframing to meet the current needs of nurse teachers. However, changes needed to be made in areas such as reducing complex language, inclusion of technology, and cultural competencies. Nurse teachers were supportive of the research because they valued the teacher competencies for reflection on their practice and the development of portfolios, job descriptions and performance appraisals. PMID:21093124

  19. Knowledge translation in everyday nursing: from evidence-based to inquiry-based practice.

    PubMed

    Doane, Gweneth Hartrick; Varcoe, Colleen

    2008-01-01

    The interconnection of theory, evidence, and practice is most often conceptualized as an epistemological enterprise. In this article, we shift the discussion from one that is solely concerned with epistemology to one that considers the significance of ontology and the way in which epistemology and ontology are intricately intertwined in every nursing action. Drawing on deconstructive hermeneutics, we contend that to understand and affect the interconnection of theory, evidence, and practice, an ontological inquiry at the action level is required. Using a nursing practice example, we illustrate the complexities of knowledge translation and how effective integration of knowledge into practice involves an embodied process of ontological inquiry and action. This inquiry process draws on theory and evidence to enlarge and imagine possibilities for action in particular moments, situations, and contexts and rests in a way-of-being in which the interconnection of theory, evidence, and practice is embodied. PMID:19033744

  20. Practicing nurses perspectives of clinical scholarship: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a scarcity of research published on clinical scholarship. Much of the conceptualisation has been conducted in the academy. Nurse academics espouse that the practice of nursing must be built within a framework of clinical scholarship. A key concept of clinical scholarship emerging from discussions in the literature is that it is an essential component of enabling evidence‚Äďbased nursing and the development of best practice standards to provide for the needs of patients/clients. However, there is no comprehensive definition of clinical scholarship from the practicing nurses. The aim of this study was to contribute to this definitional discussion on the nature of clinical scholarship in nursing. Methods Naturalistic inquiry informed the method. Using an interpretative approach 18 practicing nurses from Australia, Canada and England were interviewed using a semi-structured format. The audio-taped interviews were transcribed and the text coded for emerging themes. The themes were sorted into categories and the components of clinical scholarship described by the participants compared to the scholarship framework of Boyer [JHEOE 7:5-18, 2010]. Results Clinical scholarship is difficult to conceptualise. Two of the essential elements of clinical scholarship are vision and passion. The other components of clinical scholarship were building and disseminating nursing knowledge, sharing knowledge, linking academic research to practice and doing practice-based research. Conclusion Academic scholarship dominated the discourse in nursing. However, in order for nursing to develop and to impact on health care, clinical scholarship needs to be explored and theorised. Nurse educators, hospital-based researchers and health organisations need to work together with academics to achieve this goal. Frameworks of scholarship conceptualised by nurse academics are reflected in the findings of this study with their emphasis on reading and doing research and translating it into nursing practice. This needs to be done in a nonthreatening environment. PMID:24066801

  1. Framework for 21st Century School Nursing Practice: National Association of School Nurses.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The National Association of School Nurses (NASN) developed the Framework for 21st Century School Nursing Practice to reflect current school nurse practice. The Framework of practice was introduced in June 2015, and feedback was requested and obtained from practicing school nurses in a variety of ways. The final version of the Framework is introduced in this article. This article updates (and replaces) the articles in the July 2015 NASN School Nurse related to the Framework. Central to the Framework is student-centered nursing care that occurs within the context of the students' family and school community. Surrounding the student, family, and school community are the nonhierarchical, overlapping key principles of Care Coordination, Leadership, Quality Improvement, and Community/Public Health.These principles are surrounded by the fifth principle, Standards of Practice, which is foundational for evidence-based and clinically competent quality care. Each of these principles is further defined by practice components. Suggestions are provided regarding how the Framework can be used in a variety of settings to articulate and prioritize school nursing practice. The ultimate goal is to provide a resource to guide school nurses in their practice to help students be healthy, safe, and ready to learn. PMID:26739934

  2. Mapping the Future of Environmental Health and Nursing: Strategies for Integrating National Competencies into Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Laura S.; Butterfield, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Nurses are increasingly the primary contact for clients concerned about health problems related to their environment. In response to the need for nursing expertise in the field of environmental health, the Institute of Medicine (IOM), Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), and National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) have designed core competencies for the nursing profession. The IOM competencies focus on four areas: (1) knowledge and concepts; (2) assessment and referral; advocacy, ethics, and risk communication; and (4) legislation and regulation. The competencies establish a baseline of knowledge and awareness in order for nurses to prevent and minimize health problems associated with exposure to environmental agents. To address the known difficulties of incorporating new priorities into established practice, nurses attending an environmental health short course participated in a nominal group process focusing on the question, ‚ÄúWhat specific actions can we take to bring environmental health into the mainstream of nursing practice?‚ÄĚ This exercise was designed to bring the concepts of the national initiatives (IOM, NINR, ATSDR) to the awareness of individual nurses involved in the direct delivery of care. Results include 38 action items nurses identified as improving awareness and utilization of environmental health principles. The top five ideas were: (1) get environmental health listed as a requirement or competency in undergraduate nursing education; (2) improve working relationships with interdepartmental persons‚ÄĒa team approach; (3) strategically place students in essential organizations such as NIOSH, ATSDR, or CDC; (4) educate nurse educators; and (5) create environmental health awards in nursing. The 38 original ideas were also reorganized into a five-tiered conceptual model. The concepts of this model include: (1) developing partnerships; (2) strengthening publications; (3) enhancing continuing education; (4) updating nursing practice; and (5) strengthening schools of nursing. The model serves as a road map for action in building environmental health capacity within mainstream nursing. PMID:12071904

  3. Curriculum: From Theory to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Null, Wesley

    2011-01-01

    "Curriculum: From Theory to Practice" introduces readers to curriculum theory and how it relates to classroom practice. Wesley Null provides a unique organization of the curriculum field into five traditions: systematic, existential, radical, pragmatic, and deliberative. He discusses the philosophical foundations of curriculum as well asÖ

  4. Applying Theory to Practice--The Use of "Ripple Effect" Plans in Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Robyn; Donald, Anne; Mousseau-Gershman, Yolande; Powell, Terry

    1998-01-01

    A nursing management course used Ripple Effect Plans to demonstrate the application of theory to practice. These plans are individual learning contracts that involve solving of problems taken from practice. (SK)

  5. Aseptic practice recommendations for circulating operating theatre nurses.

    PubMed

    Aholaakko, Teija-Kaisa; Metsälä, Eija

    Aseptic practices prevent exposure of a surgical wound to microbes, operating theatre environment and personnel. The circulating nurse assists the operating theatre personnel and supervises aseptic practices preventing surgical site infections. In the absence of analytical tools, few studies exist on intraoperative nursing-related aseptic practices. This study introduces recommendations to assess the role of the circulating nurse in aseptic practices. The authors used international recommendations and research findings to construct a 20-item self-report instrument with a demonstrated reliability across the scale. The authors structured the scale based on three phases: establishment; maintenance; and disestablishment of a sterile operating field. The tool was tested among operating theatre and day surgery nurses, and compared the differences in the mean acceptance rates of aseptic practice recommendations based on background characteristics. College-level nurses and nurses with 15 or more years' work experience accepted the recommendations at higher levels than bachelor-level nurses and nurses with less work experience. Continual assessment of the evidence base and comprehensive evaluation represent important components in further developing the tool. A reasonable number of items covering clinical practice are necessary for assessing the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of aseptic practices, and a larger response rate is needed to validate the tool in future. PMID:26153805

  6. Authentic leaders creating healthy work environments for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Shirey, Maria R

    2006-05-01

    Implementation of authentic leadership can affect not only the nursing workforce and the profession but the healthcare delivery system and society as a whole. Creating a healthy work environment for nursing practice is crucial to maintain an adequate nursing workforce; the stressful nature of the profession often leads to burnout, disability, and high absenteeism and ultimately contributes to the escalating shortage of nurses. Leaders play a pivotal role in retention of nurses by shaping the healthcare practice environment to produce quality outcomes for staff nurses and patients. Few guidelines are available, however, for creating and sustaining the critical elements of a healthy work environment. In 2005, the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses released a landmark publication specifying 6 standards (skilled communication, true collaboration, effective decision making, appropriate staffing, meaningful recognition, and authentic leadership) necessary to establish and sustain healthy work environments in healthcare. Authentic leadership was described as the "glue" needed to hold together a healthy work environment. Now, the roles and relationships of authentic leaders in the healthy work environment are clarified as follows: An expanded definition of authentic leadership and its attributes (eg, genuineness, trustworthiness, reliability, compassion, and believability) is presented. Mechanisms by which authentic leaders can create healthy work environments for practice (eg, engaging employees in the work environment to promote positive behaviors) are described. A practical guide on how to become an authentic leader is advanced. A research agenda to advance the study of authentic leadership in nursing practice through collaboration between nursing and business is proposed. PMID:16632768

  7. Perceptions of Liberal Education of Two Types of Nursing Graduates: The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBrew, Jacqueline Kayler

    2010-01-01

    The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), which defines the expectations of a new baccalaureate-prepared nurse, includes a liberal education as a desired outcome for bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) graduates. A liberal education is thought to provide the professional nurse with the skills needed to practice nursing, including…

  8. Practical Nursing in Iowa: A Profile. A Study of the Developments, Trends and Current Status of Practical Nursing in Iowa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Elizabeth E.; And Others

    This sub-study of a 39-month longitudinal study conducted by the University of Illinois in cooperation with the University of Iowa, undertook to discern the trends in practical nursing in Iowa and to record a history of its development. The 435 member 10 percent random sample of practical nurses licensed in Iowa through December 1965, which was…

  9. Implementation of a State Legislative Fellowship for Doctor of Nursing Practice Students.

    PubMed

    Crowder, Sharron J; Ironside, Pamela M; Cangany, Martha; Roddy, Wanda Spann

    2016-01-01

    Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) students need to be effective health policy leaders and contribute their expertise to legislative discussions. Nursing faculty have unique opportunities to prepare future DNP health policy leaders through legislative experiential learning opportunities. Yet, the creation of legislative fellowships can seem challenging. This article describes a state legislative fellowship based on Kolb's experiential learning theory and explores ways faculty can support DNP student preparation. PMID:26771941

  10. [Nursing development at the Solothurn hospitals. Towards clinically oriented nursing expertise and practice development].

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Ursi Barandun; Hirsbrunner, Therese; Jäger, Susanne; Näf, Ernst; Römmich, Sabine; Horlacher, Kathrin

    2011-02-01

    At the Solothurn Hospitals (soH), 13 academically educated nurses are responsible for the development of nursing care with the goal to improve patient-oriented, effective, appropriate, and economic care. The strategy contains three priorities: a) expert care of single patients in demanding situations, b) sustained application of organisational methods such as primary nursing, nursing process, and skill/grade mix, and c) design and management of practice development projects related to specific patient groups. A first evaluation with qualitative and quantitative methods showed that the exemplary care of single patients by expert nurses was evaluated as positive for the patients as well as for the teams on two wards by nurses who were interviewed. After the introduction of primary nursing, the application rate was 81 to 90 % and the introduction of fall prevention methods in geriatric rehabilitation decreased the fall rate from 8.2 to 5.5 per 1000 patient days. A comparision with the literature shows that the expert nurses of soH perform both, working at the bedside and being responsible for practice development projects, as specialised Advanced Practice Nurses (APNs). APNs at the Solothurn Hospitals work also as generalists when organisational methods need to be consolidated. Their successes depend from their integration into the hierarchy and both, into the nursing as well as into the interprofessional teams. Competencies in Transformational Leadership also are essential at all management levels. PMID:21274841

  11. Woman-Centered Maternity Nursing Education and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Giarratano, Gloria

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this Heideggerian phenomenological study was to uncover the meanings of the clinical experiences of registered nurses working in maternity settings after they studied maternity nursing from a woman-centered, feminist perspective in a generic baccalaureate nursing program. Purposeful sampling was conducted to locate and recruit nurses who had graduated from this nursing program between the December 1996 and December 1998 semesters and were currently working in a maternal-newborn clinical setting. Each participant had taken the required woman-centered, maternity-nursing course during her/his undergraduate education. Data collection included an individual, open-ended interview that focused on the nurses' descriptions of their everyday practices as maternity nurses. Nineteen maternal-newborn nurses between the ages of 23 and 43 years who had been in practice from six months to three years were interviewed. The constitutive patterns identified from the interviews were: ‚ÄúOtherness,‚ÄĚ ‚ÄúBeing and Becoming Woman-Centered,‚ÄĚ and ‚ÄúTensions in Practicing Woman-Centered Care.‚ÄĚ Findings revealed that the nurses had a raised awareness of oppressive maternity care practices and applied ideology of woman-centeredness as a framework for providing more humanistic care. Creating woman-centered maternity care meant negotiating tensions and barriers in medically focused maternity settings and looking for opportunities for advocacy and woman-empowerment. The barriers the nurses faced in implementing woman-centered care exposed limitations to childbearing choices and nursing practices that remain problematic in maternity care. PMID:17273327

  12. Bridging nursing practice and education through a strategic global partnership.

    PubMed

    Stringer, Marilyn; Rajeswaran, Lakshmi; Dithole, Kefalotse; Hoke, Linda; Mampane, Patricia; Sebopelo, Sheila; Molefe, Margret; Muecke, Marjorie A; Rich, Victoria L; Polomano, Rosemary C

    2016-02-01

    To forge strong relationships among nurse scholars from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, PA (USA); University of Botswana School of Nursing, Gaborone, Botswana; the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; Princess Marina Hospital (PMH), Gaborone; and the Ministry of Health of Botswana, a strategic global partnership was created to bridge nursing practice and education. This partnership focused on changing practice at PMH through the translation of new knowledge and evidence-based practice. Guided by the National Institutes of Health team science field guide, the conceptual implementation of this highly successful practice change initiative is described in detail, highlighting our strategies, challenges and continued collaboration for nurses to be leaders in improving health in Botswana. PMID:25355182

  13. Toward clarification of the doctor of nursing practice degree.

    PubMed

    Chism, Lisa Astalos

    2009-01-01

    The doctor of nursing practice (DNP) degree has been recommended by the American Association of College of Nursing (AACN) as the terminal degree in nursing practice by 2015 (AACN, 2004). However, confusion regarding this degree still exists. To promote understanding of this degree, the pertinent history of doctoral education in nursing is reviewed. In addition, a clear definition of the degree, including the competencies of the DNP degree, is provided. A comparison of the PhD in nursing and the DNP degree is also reviewed to provide further clarification. DNP graduates may engage in various roles such as leadership, health policy advocate, and scholarship. These roles will be reviewed as well as the relevant issues associated with this degree such as use of the title "Dr.," educating others about the degree, faculty shortages, and program enrollment. Finally, the implications for emergency nursing regarding the DNP degree are discussed. PMID:20118882

  14. Crossmapping of Nursing Problem and Action Statements in Telephone Nursing Consultation Documentations with International Classification for Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Jung

    2010-01-01

    Objectives This study is to cross-map telephone nursing consultation documentations with International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP; ver. 1.0 concepts). Methods The narrative telephone nursing consultation documentations of 170 ophthalmology nursing unit patients were analyzed. The nursing statements were examined and cross-mapped with the Korean version of the ICNP ver. 1.0. If all the concepts of a statement were mapped to ICNP concepts, it was classified as 'completely mapped'. If any concept of a statement wasnot mapped, it was classified as 'partially mapped'. If none of the concepts were mapped, it was classified as 'not mapped'. Results A total of 738 statements wereused for documenting telephone nursing consultations. These statements were divided into 3 groups according to their content: 1) 294 nursing phenomena-related statements (72 unique statements), 2) 440 nursing actions-related statements (76 unique statements), and 3) 4 other statements (2 unique statements). In total, 189 unique nursing concepts extracted from 150 unique statements and 108 concepts (62.44%) were mapped onto ICNP concepts. Conclusions This study demonstrated the feasibility of computerizing narrative nursing documentations for electronic telephone triagein the ophthalmology nursing unit. PMID:21818446

  15. Narrative pedagogy with evolving case study--A transformative approach to gerontic nursing practice for undergraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Laver, Shaorn; Croxon, Lyn

    2015-09-01

    Engaging nursing students in the complexities of care across community, acute, rehabilitation and residential aged care settings is challenging. Equally challenging is conceptualising and promoting diverse and comprehensive health assessments across care settings that reflect clinical reality, inform clinical decision making, traverse theory and practice, and transform clinical practice knowledge. This article describes the use of narrative and evolving case study as a teaching-learning tool utilised by the authors in a third year undergraduate gerontic nursing subject in a pre-service nursing degree at a rural university. Principles of transformative learning and strengths based nursing were drawn upon in the development of the case study. The aim of the approach was to draw on embedded knowledge and the experiences of students and academics from assorted practice settings to facilitate understanding of the lived experiences of an older community dwelling couple. Using social learning strategies students were encouraged to analyse and think critically and creatively about the situations they were presented with. They identified possible solutions that would be acceptable to the couple. Building on the older couple's strengths, achievements and personal social capital, the aim was to develop a positive paradigm for health and the way older people are viewed by nursing students. PMID:25960064

  16. PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING IN MISSISSIPPI: CHANGES IN CONTEXT AND PRACTICE

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Betty L.; Zahner, Susan J.; Simani, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Current standards and competencies guiding public health nursing (PHN) practice promote population-focused practice, but few studies have examined the extent to which change toward this type of practice has occurred. A cross-sectional, mail-back survey was conducted among public health nurses in Mississippi to examine recent changes in their practice, contextual factors related to population-focused practice, and recommendations for improving practice and educational preparation for practice. The survey response rate was 54% (n=150 [of 277]). Participants were predominantly female (95%), White (85%), 46 years or older (62%) and held an associate degree in nursing (69%). Most experienced nurses (n=106, 70%) reported perceived practice changes compared to five years prior, but did not consistently report changes toward greater population-focused practice. Participants reported funding decreases and negative effects on practice stemming from the nursing shortage. Recommendations for improving practice conditions included increasing resources, improving workplace environment and management practices, changing the focus of services, and promoting awareness of public health and PHN. Recommendations for improving education included providing more clinical experiences in public health settings and increasing financial supports and distance learning options. Additional research is needed to determine the nature and characteristics of population-focused PHN as practiced in Mississippi and elsewhere. PMID:21243042

  17. Transitioning from clinical practice to nursing faculty: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Paula Jo

    2010-03-01

    Entering into academia as a nurse educator requires a major transition from the practice arena to the educational world. The nurse, often an expert clinician, enters as a novice educator. Lessons learned from personal experience and a literature review were integrated. These lessons are organized into three categories: knowledge deficit, culture and support, and salary and workload. Findings are shared with new nursing faculty to ease the transition. PMID:19877571

  18. Nursing Students' Empowerment in Distance Education: Testing Kanter's Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledwell, Elizabeth; Andrusyszyn, Mary-Anne; Iwasiw, Carroll

    2006-01-01

    This qualitative, explanatory study examined Post-RN baccalaureate nursing students' experiences of empowerment with distance education and computer conferencing (CC) for fit with the constructs of Kanter's (1977, 1993) Theory of Structural Power in Organizations. Seven post-RNs from Canadian distance education nursing programs were interviewed.…

  19. Caring as emancipatory nursing praxis: the theory of relational caring complexity.

    PubMed

    Ray, Marilyn A; Turkel, Marian C

    2014-01-01

    In the culture of health care, nurses are challenged to understand their values and beliefs as humanistic within complex technical and economically driven bureaucratic systems. This article outlines the language of social justice and human rights and the advance of a Theory of Relational Caring Complexity, which offers insights into caring as emancipatory nursing praxis. Recommendations provide knowledge of the struggle to balance economics, technology, and caring. As nurses practice from a value-driven, philosophical, and ethical social justice framework, they will find "their voice" and realize the full potential that the power of caring has on patient and organizational outcomes. PMID:24786202

  20. Nurse work engagement impacts job outcome and nurse-assessed quality of care: model testing with nurse practice environment and nurse work characteristics as predictors

    PubMed Central

    Van Bogaert, Peter; van Heusden, Danny; Timmermans, Olaf; Franck, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To explore the mechanisms through which nurse practice environment dimensions, such as nurse‚Äďphysician relationship, nurse management at the unit level and hospital management and organizational support, are associated with job outcomes and nurse-assessed quality of care. Mediating variables included nurse work characteristics of workload, social capital, decision latitude, as well as work engagement dimensions of vigor, dedication and absorption. Background: Understanding how to support and guide nurse practice communities in their daily effort to answer complex care most accurate, alongside with the demand of a stable and healthy nurse workforce, is challenging. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Method: Based on earlier empirical findings, a structural equation model, designed with valid measurement instruments, was tested. The study population included registered acute care hospital nurses (N = 1201) in eight hospitals across Belgium. Results: Nurse practice environment dimensions predicted nurses‚Äô ratings of job outcome variables as well as quality of care. Features of nurses‚Äô work characteristics, e.g., perceived workload, decision latitude, social capital, and the three dimension of work engagement, played mediating roles between nurse practice environment and outcomes. A revised model, using various fit measures, explained 60% of job outcomes and 47% of nurse-assessed quality of care. Conclusion: The findings in this study show that nurse work characteristics as workload, decision latitude, and social capital, alongside with nurse work engagement (e.g., vigor, dedication, and absorption) influence nurses‚Äô perspective of their nurse practice environment, job outcomes, and quality of care. The results underline aspects to considerate for various stakeholders, such as executives, nurse managers, physicians, and staff nurses, in setting up and organizing health care services. PMID:25431563

  1. Continuing Education: A National Imperative for School Nursing Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vought-O'Sullivan, Victoria; Meehan, Nancy K.; Havice, Pamela A.; Pruitt, Rosanne H.

    2006-01-01

    Competency-based continuing education is critical to the professional development of school nurses to ensure the application of timely, age-appropriate clinical knowledge and leadership skills in the school setting. School nurses are responsible for a large number of students with a variety of complex and diverse health care needs. Benner's theoryÖ

  2. Development of the role of director of advanced practice nursing.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Catherine A; Fusilero, Jane; Williams, Christine M

    2010-01-01

    Advanced practice nurses (APNs) are integral to cost-effective delivery of health care in large health care organizations. Development of the leadership position of director of advanced practice nurses in a large teaching institution provides leadership to APNs in various settings, contributes to staff satisfaction, facilitates increased professional growth, and provides improved quality and fiscal outcomes. Job satisfaction, productivity, accountability, and communication may be enhanced through implementation of the role of director of advanced practice nursing and a committee structure of APNs, as was found in this academic health system. PMID:20306882

  3. Ethical climate in nursing practice: the leader's role.

    PubMed

    Shirey, Maria R

    2005-01-01

    Clarity in an organization's mission, vision, and values is key to effective management in today's complex healthcare work environment. To clearly articulate mission, vision, and values, employees must experience consistency between what is espoused and what is lived. The purpose of this article is to discuss the nurse leader's role in ensuring congruence between caring missions and caring practices. Ethical principles are discussed as the foundation necessary for creating an ethical climate for nursing practice. Components of ethical climate are presented and strategies to create a positive ethical climate for nursing practice are provided. PMID:15937423

  4. Strengthening Practice With Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casazza, Martha E.

    1998-01-01

    Uses case studies of students to outline the theories related to cognitive development and different ways of understanding what knowledge is. Organizes four sets of concepts: (1) the construct of intelligence; (2) different ways of knowing; (3) the nature of constructivism; and (4) the active, strategic process of learning. Contains 19 references.…

  5. Australian Nurse Educators Identify Gaps in Expert Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelletier, Dianne; Duffield, Christine; Adams, Anne; Nagy, Sue; Crisp, Jackie; Mitten-Lewis, Suzanne

    2000-01-01

    A Delphi panel of 28 Australian nurse educators and 42 clinicians identified 58 practice items in which reality was far from ideal. In particular, for 16 items related to patient empowerment, nursing research, and technology policy, clinical behavior was rated below the median. (SK)

  6. Psychiatric Nursing Faculty Practice: Care within the Community Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richie, Mary Fern; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Psychiatric nursing faculty practice offers the academic nurse opportunity to generate salary support and integrate students into the real world of mental health care. It promotes scholarship and knowledge-building and has a direct impact on the lives of patients. (Author/JOW)

  7. Incorporating Political Socialization Theory into Baccalaureate Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Sandra Godman

    1996-01-01

    Nurses must incorporate a political component into their professional role identity to meet the future challenges of the health care system. Political socialization theory can assist faculty in adding a political thread to the curriculum. (SK)

  8. Traditional Chinese medicine in rehabilitation nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Sherwin, D C

    1992-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) employs methods of treatment such as acupuncture, acupressure, and Qi Gong (treatment based on meditation). The nurse using TCM can affect rehabilitation patient outcomes positively. With TCM training, nurses have an opportunity to learn the nuances of the Oriental environment and integrate them into their skills to nurse the spirit, mind, and body of patients in a holistic manner. PMID:1448606

  9. The transforming effect of handheld computers on nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Brent W

    2005-01-01

    Handheld computers have the power to transform nursing care. The roots of this power are the shift to decentralization of communication, electronic health records, and nurses' greater need for information at the point of care. This article discusses the effects of handheld resources, calculators, databases, electronic health records, and communication devices on nursing practice. The US government has articulated the necessity of implementing the use of handheld computers in healthcare. Nurse administrators need to encourage and promote the diffusion of this technology, which can reduce costs and improve care. PMID:16260994

  10. Impact of the RCT proposal on specialty nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, S M

    1989-01-01

    The nursing shortage is clearly the major human resource challenge facing our practice today. According to the American Medical Association (AMA), the RCT plan is intended to be an innovative solution to the shortage of bedside personnel and will prove to be timely, cost-effective and efficient. The impact of this proposal and others involving the use of clinically assistive personnel in health care facilities today is a concern for all nurses. The author addresses the latest solutions to the nursing shortage and the effect of such programs on the specialty of intravenous nursing. PMID:2754519

  11. Simulation Methodology in Nursing Education and Adult Learning Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutherford-Hemming, Tonya

    2012-01-01

    Simulation is often used in nursing education as a teaching methodology. Simulation is rooted in adult learning theory. Three learning theories, cognitive, social, and constructivist, explain how learners gain knowledge with simulation experiences. This article takes an in-depth look at each of these three theories as each relates to simulation.Ö

  12. Simulation Methodology in Nursing Education and Adult Learning Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutherford-Hemming, Tonya

    2012-01-01

    Simulation is often used in nursing education as a teaching methodology. Simulation is rooted in adult learning theory. Three learning theories, cognitive, social, and constructivist, explain how learners gain knowledge with simulation experiences. This article takes an in-depth look at each of these three theories as each relates to simulation.…

  13. Incorporating the Principles of Nursing Practice and the 6Cs.

    PubMed

    Foulds, Louise; Timms, Katy; Barwell, Julie; Gunning, Amanda

    This article will demonstrate how the Royal College of Nursing's (RCN's) Principles of Nursing Practice (2010) and the 6Cs (Cummings and Bennett, 2012a ; 2012b) can be applied to stoma care nursing. The multidimensional role of the stoma care nurse means that he or she is well placed to improve quality and standards in stoma nursing care. Stoma care nurses provide direct patient care and can play a vital part in helping patients with a stoma, a long-term condition, ensuring that their patients get the best possible care (RCN, 2010). The poster contained within this article was displayed at the Association of Stoma Care Nurses (ASCN) national conference in Harrogate in October 2014 and was voted the overall winner. The authors of the article and the poster are stoma care nurses working in the acute and community settings and, between 2013 and 2014, they completed the RCN's Clinical Leadership Programme (RCN, 2005). The NHS Plan (Department of Health, 2000) identified the importance of leadership and the necessity of remodelling the NHS around the needs of service users. With this in mind, using the Principles of Nursing Practice and the 6Cs within stoma care demonstrates development with a consistent focus on patient care. PMID:25757740

  14. 78 FR 39738 - National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice for Request for Nominations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ... nursing (i.e. both undergraduate and graduate); from the general public; from practicing professional nurses; from among the leading authorities in the various fields of nursing, higher secondary education... including the range of issues relating to the nurse workforce, nursing education, and nursing...

  15. e-Learning competency for practice nurses: an evaluation report.

    PubMed

    Heartfield, Marie; Morello, Andrea; Harris, Melanie; Lawn, Sharon; Pols, Vincenza; Stapleton, Carolyn; Battersby, Malcolm

    2013-01-01

    Practice nurses in Australia are now funded to facilitate chronic condition management, including self-management support. Chronic disease management requires an established rapport, support and proactivity between general practitioners, patients and the practice nurses. To achieve this, training in shared decision making is needed. e-Learning supports delivery and achievement of such policy outcomes, service improvements and skill development. However, e-learning effectiveness for health care professionals' is determined by several organisational, economic, pedagogical and individual factors, with positive e-learning experience linked closely to various supports. This paper reinforces previous studies showing nurses' expanding role across general practice teams and reports on some of the challenges of e-learning. Merely providing practice nurses with necessary information via web-based learning systems does not ensure successful learning or progress toward improving health outcomes for patients. PMID:24134876

  16. OPT: Transformation of Nursing Process for Contemporary Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pesut, Daniel J.; Herman, JoAnne

    1998-01-01

    The Outcome-Present State-Test reasoning model emphasizes reflection, outcome specification, and testing within clinical narratives. This clinical reasoning model is more relevant to contemporary nursing practice. (SK)

  17. Occupational health nursing practice, education, and research in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yun-Ping; Hong, OiSaeng; Yeh, Mei Chang

    2008-04-01

    This article describes occupational health nursing practice, education, research, and future perspectives in Taiwan. It also provides a brief overview of major occupational health and safety problems, laws and regulations, and organizations in Taiwan. PMID:18444403

  18. [Building up nursing knowledge by means of reflexive practice].

    PubMed

    Colina, J; Medina, J L

    1997-12-01

    After analyzing the prior questions which determine the nursing field contents, the authors propose "reflective practice" as the methodological and pedagogical philosophy of choice in the formation of nurses. According to the authors, the professor is responsible for developing the curriculum. As such, the professor makes decisions regarding course design, methodology, content development, and student evaluation in terms of aptitute, attitude and knowledge acquisition. Research studies seem to demonstrate that the knowledge which, in the end, aids in comprehending the context taught and which determines the decisions a professor takes, is that knowledge based on a reflective practice, a product of the professor's experiences, background, knowledge and active relationship with nursing practice. The contents in this article were presented as a conference in the Third Seminar of Professors of Nursing for General Practice and Surgery. PMID:9485855

  19. Future of advanced practice public health nursing education.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Sonia A; McCullagh, Marjorie; Lee, Corinne

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to conduct an assessment of the need for advanced practice, master's-prepared public health nurses in Michigan. A cross-sectional design was used to conduct interviews with former students, community leaders, and faculty. Content was analyzed qualitatively for themes. Participants were enthusiastic about the practice environment, but funding was a major concern. Almost all participants thought jobs were available and that public health nursing was cost-effective, yet there was concern about the aging work force and the need for higher education. Other disciplines serving in public health roles and hospitals were identified as competition to the public health nurse. Epidemiology, prevention, community assessment/program planning, health policy/law/ethics, leadership, health services, informatics, research, and grant writing were noted as skills needed. The results of this study are favorable for the future of advanced practice public health nursing practice and education. PMID:25802903

  20. Work engagement in nursing practice: a relational ethics perspective.

    PubMed

    Keyko, Kacey

    2014-12-01

    The concept of work engagement has existed in business and psychology literature for some time. There is a significant body of research that positively correlates work engagement with organizational outcomes. To date, the interest in the work engagement of nurses has primarily been related to these organizational outcomes. However, the value of work engagement in nursing practice is not only an issue of organizational interest, but of ethical interest. The dialogue on work engagement in nursing must expand to include the ethical importance of engagement. The relational nature of work engagement and the multiple levels of influence on nurses' work engagement make a relational ethics approach to work engagement in nursing appropriate and necessary. Within a relational ethics perspective, it is evident that work engagement enables nurses to have meaningful relationships in their work and subsequently deliver ethical care. In this article, I argue that work engagement is essential for ethical nursing practice. If engagement is essential for ethical nursing practice, the environmental and organizational factors that influence work engagement must be closely examined to pursue the creation of moral communities within healthcare environments. PMID:24714045

  1. Perceptions of the Role of the Doctor of Nursing Practice-Prepared Nurse: Clarity or Confusion.

    PubMed

    Udlis, Kimberly A; Mancuso, Josephine M

    2015-01-01

    Confusion and disagreement about the DNP degree and its implications continues despite the rapid and steady growth of DNP programs. There is a paucity of literature that examines nurses' perceptions of the role of the DNP-prepared nurse. The purpose of this study was to explore how nurses perceive the role of the DNP-prepared nurse and identify areas of ambiguity in understanding the roles that DNP-prepared nurses fulfill. A descriptive, cross-sectional design, using self-administered questionnaires, explored the perceptions of n = 340 nurses with various educational levels and backgrounds. Descriptives of the sample and instruments were conducted as well as chi-square analyses to detect differences in perceptions across levels of education. Results indicated that nurses clearly supported the DNP degree with a focus on the improvement of health care outcomes through the roles of leadership in health organizations, policy, interprofessionalism, and translation of evidence into practice. Multiple areas of confusion concerning the role of DNP-prepared nurse existed in academia, academia leadership, and scholarship. In order to reduce role ambiguity, the distinctive contributions of the DNP-prepared nurse must be embraced, valued, and operationalized. Otherwise, the role of the DNP-prepared nurse will continue to be discussed, debated, and challenged. PMID:26194957

  2. Important interactional strategies for everyday public health nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Porr, Caroline J

    2015-01-01

    This Clinical Concepts article concerns the relational tools required by public health nurses to establish relationships with single mothers living on public assistance, mothers who are vulnerable and often stigmatized. The implications of stigmatization for relationship building are highlighted based on previous research investigating how public health nurses working in Canadian jurisdictions establish professional caring relationships with this cohort of mothers. Public health nurses employed interactional strategies including engaging in a positive manner and offering verbal commendations which served as effective relational tools to break through mothers' walls of defensiveness and to resume the dynamic process of relationship building. Building Relationship is a key practice standard for public health nurses and is instrumental to their work at both individual and community levels to improve social determinants of health. The author concludes with recommendations to facilitate building relationships during everyday public health nursing practice. PMID:24320117

  3. A model to develop nurse leaders for rural practice.

    PubMed

    Hauenstein, Emily J; Glick, Doris F; Kane, Catherine; Kulbok, Pamela; Barbero, Edie; Cox, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    Rural health disparities are due in part to access barriers to health care providers. Nursing education has been extended into rural areas, yet a limited rural research and practice literature informs the content and delivery of these educational programs. The University Of Virginia School of Nursing through a grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration developed the Nursing Leadership in Rural Health Care (NLRHC) Program. The transformational nursing leadership in rural health care (TNLRHC) model guided the development of NLRHC program content and teaching methods. This article describes the TNLRHC model and how it has steered the integration of rural content into advanced practice nursing (APN) education. The capacity of the TNLRHC model for promoting innovation in APN education is described. Recommendations regarding the future development of APN education are presented. PMID:25455327

  4. Supporting Graduate Nurse Transition: Collaboration Between Practice and University.

    PubMed

    Bull, Rosalind; Shearer, Toniele; Phillips, Michelle; Fallon, Anne

    2015-09-01

    Making the transition from student to RN is challenging and demanding. In Australia, where nurses commonly graduate after 3 years in a Bachelor of Nursing program, graduate transition programs have been established in the workplace to support and socialize new graduates to nursing practice. These programs vary in content, rigor, and available support mechanisms, and no nationally agreed upon standards of expected graduate performance exist. Providing a structured, evidence-based, and clinically focused education and support program specific to the needs of graduate nurses contributes to quality care and patient safety and has significant benefits for the individual graduate, the employing organizations, and health care. This article presents the development and implementation of the Bachelor of Nursing With Clinical Honors (Transition to Practice) program offered by the University of Tasmania, in collaboration with St. Vincent's Private Hospital, Sydney, Australia. PMID:26352044

  5. Advanced or advancing nursing practice: what is the future direction for nursing?

    PubMed

    Gray, Alastair

    2016-01-14

    Advanced nursing practice roles have emerged over the last 25 years in response to two major challenges: first, the significant reduction in available doctors; and, second, the rise in numbers of patients with complex health needs. It is suggested that, with a major drive to respond to the first problem, with its emphasis on the development of medical skills, the development of advanced nursing practice (which has the potential to have a significant impact on the second challenge of the rise in long-term conditions) has very much taken second place. Moreover, advanced nursing practice roles have become so medically focused that not only is advanced nursing practice not evident, but neither are the recognised sub-roles that are fundamental to advancing practice. These include innovation, education, research and clinical leadership. This article argues that in the current climate it is essential that advanced nurse practitioners not only demonstrate advanced practice, but also actively embrace the concept of 'advancing' nursing practice as the dominant feature of new roles. PMID:26768039

  6. Influencing health policy: strategies for nursing education to partner with nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Short, Nancy M

    2008-01-01

    Cost, access, and quality have dominated health policy for more than 30 years. During that time, the number of health policy analysts and health services researchers has grown exponentially; however, health care policy remains a mysterious topic for most registered nurses. The foundations for a professional understanding of health care policy and policymaking should be well laid in formal education and synthesized with practice and work environments. Without time to promote synthesis of policy concepts related to the practice environment, nurses have no basis for further exploration and may remain naive to the influences of policy throughout their career. Practicing nurses, as eyewitnesses to the shortcomings of the U.S. health care system, are best suited to inform policymakers of needs, unintended consequences, and success stories. This article summarizes strategies to promote a partnership between the academy and nursing practice. PMID:18804078

  7. Future practitioners.... advancing nursing practice in the perioperative setting.

    PubMed

    Mehigan, S

    2000-03-01

    The aim of this article is to consider how perioperative nursing practice may be advanced in the future. Imagine a new operating department, in a brand new hospital, where you have been given the task of finding and developing a team of perioperative nurses. Where will they come from, and how will they be developed? It is hoped that the remainder of this article may give some answers to these questions before providing some food for thought as to how nursing practice may advance. PMID:11075041

  8. Transfer-of-Care Communication: Nursing Best Practices.

    PubMed

    Chard, Robin; Makary, Martin A

    2015-10-01

    The successful and safe transfer of the patient from one phase of care to another is contingent on optimal communication by all team members. Nurses are often in a natural leadership position to improve safe practices during hand overs. A holistic understanding of the patient allows the perioperative nurse the opportunity to identify issues and choose a nursing diagnosis based on key elements of a patient's needs and goals--information that should be relayed during patient transfers. This article reviews best practices in transfer-of-care communication to enable perioperative RNs to take an active, leading role in hand-over processes. PMID:26411818

  9. Nurse Manager Safety Practices in Outpatient Hemodialysis Units.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Hawkins, Charlotte; Flynn, Linda; Lindgren, Teri G; Weaver, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Little is known regarding the specific managerial activities or best practices that nurse managers in outpatient hemodialysis settings use to achieve positive safety outcomes. The purpose of this study was to identify and describe specific managerial practices used by nurse managers in outpatient hemodialysis units to enhance patient safety and quality of care. A descriptive qualitative design was used. Seventeen nurse managers in outpatient hemodialysis units comprised the study sample. Telephone interviews were conducted, and qualitative content analysis was used to encode the data. Nurse managers identified patients, staff, the dialysis unit environment, and the dialysis organization as sources of safety risks. Nurse manager safety practices illuminated from the data were complex and multifaceted, and were aimed at reducing patient, staff environmental, and organization risks. The findings from this study offer a description and a better understanding of the practices in which nurse managers in outpatient hemodialysis units engage to keep patients safe in their units, and they underscore the critical role of nurse managers in creating and maintaining patient safety within outpatient hemodialysis settings. PMID:26207274

  10. The Coppin State University Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Program.

    PubMed

    Tilghman, Joan S

    2015-01-01

    The Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program development was identified as a pivotal part of the Coppin State University (CSU) Helene Fuld School of Nursing's' Strategic Plan. The program was launched as early as 2009 with plans to be implemented before 2015. The program was developed in response to the October 2004 endorsement of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) position statement which recognizes the DNP as the appropriate credential for all advanced nursing practice roles by 2015. The Helene Fuld School of Nursing began its inaugural doctoral program in May 2015. The CSU DNP program will prepare graduates to address current and future practice issues. This program will prepare post baccalaureate graduates of nursing programs and post Master's advanced practice nurses to earn the DNP degree. The curriculum balances didactics, and clinical application in actual patient care facilities and health agencies relevant to course content. The DNP program fulfills CSU's goal to prepare graduates who distinguish themselves as leaders and service providers in critical and essential professions that offer life-long diverse employment, professional growth, and service opportunities. PMID:26665500

  11. Promoting a Strategic Approach to Clinical Nurse Leader Practice Integration.

    PubMed

    Williams, Marjory; Avolio, Alice E; Ott, Karen M; Miltner, Rebecca S

    2016-01-01

    The Office of Nursing Services of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) piloted implementation of the clinical nurse leader (CNL) into the care delivery model and established a strategic goal in 2011 to implement the CNL role across the VA health care system. The VA Office of Nursing Services CNL Implementation and Evaluation (CNL I&E) Service was created as one mechanism to facilitate that goal in response to a need identified by facility nurse executives for consultative support for CNL practice integration. This article discusses strategies employed by the CNL I&E consultative team to help facility-level nursing leadership integrate CNLs into practice. Measures of success include steady growth in CNL practice capacity as well as positive feedback from nurse executives about the value of consultative engagement. Future steps to better integrate CNL practice into the VA include consolidation of lessons learned, collaboration to strengthen the evidence base for CNL practice, and further exploration of the transformational potential of CNL practice across the care continuum. PMID:26636231

  12. The role of the nurse executive in fostering and empowering the advanced practice registered nurse.

    PubMed

    Talbert, Tukea L

    2012-06-01

    The nurse executive plays a critical role in the design, oversight, and outcomes of the delivery of care and a key role in the success of the integration of advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) into an organization. The critical areas that nurse executives must consider to foster and empower APRNs are: (1) knowledge and self preparation, especially of political initiatives that affect the role, (2) visionary leadership and development of clear role expectations and appropriate credentialing, (3) strategies to reduce disconnection between the APRN and their practice setting, and (4) appropriate education and marketing of the role to stakeholders. PMID:22579061

  13. Factors enabling advanced practice nursing role integration in Canada.

    PubMed

    DiCenso, Alba; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Donald, Faith; Abelson, Julia; Bourgeault, Ivy; Kilpatrick, Kelley; Carter, Nancy; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Harbman, Patricia

    2010-12-01

    Although advanced practice nurses (APNs) have existed in Canada for over 40 years and there is abundant evidence of their safety and effectiveness, their full integration into our healthcare system has not been fully realized. For this paper, we drew on pertinent sections of a scoping review of the Canadian literature from 1990 onward and interviews or focus groups with 81 key informants conducted for a decision support synthesis on advanced practice nursing to identify the factors that enable role development and implementation across the three types of APNs: clinical nurse specialists, primary healthcare nurse practitioners and acute care nurse practitioners. For development of advanced practice nursing roles, many of the enabling factors occur at the federal/provincial/territorial (F/P/T) level. They include utilization of a pan-Canadian approach, provision of high-quality education, and development of appropriate legislative and regulatory mechanisms. Systematic planning to guide role development is needed at both the F/P/T and organizational levels. For implementation of advanced practice nursing roles, some of the enabling factors require action at the F/P/T level. They include recruitment and retention, role funding, intra-professional relations between clinical nurse specialists and nurse practitioners, public awareness, national leadership support and role evaluation. Factors requiring action at the level of the organization include role clarity, healthcare setting support, implementation of all role components and continuing education. Finally, inter-professional relations require action at both the F/P/T and organizational levels. A multidisciplinary roundtable formulated policy and practice recommendations based on the synthesis findings, and these are summarized in this paper. PMID:21478695

  14. Leaving from and returning to nursing practice: contributing factors.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, Isabel; Taua, Chris

    2009-07-01

    Many nurses leave nursing and never return. Others return after a period of time. Given the global shortage of nurses a better understanding of these movements is needed. The present study focused on nurses who had been out of nursing for more than five years, and explored factors that influenced their leaving and return to practice. All the nurses who had undertaken a Competency Assessment Programme at a given New Zealand tertiary institution during 2005 were invited to participate. Of the 70 questionnaires mailed out 32 (44.5%) were completed and returned. Quantitative data were analysed using Microsoft Excel, and the qualitative data were coded and analysed by means of content analysis. For each, leaving and returning, three key issues emerged. Nurses left for personal reasons, to seek a career change, or because of poor working conditions. They returned when they had the personal freedom to do so, for fiscal reasons, or because they were motivated by some sense of unfinished business. These findings indicate that it is important for educators involved with Competency Assessment Programmes to collaborate with employers in ensuring that there are opportunities for re-entry to positive work environments, with a degree of flexibility that suits the demographic characteristics of those nurses returning to practice. PMID:19928648

  15. Future realities in nursing: partnerships, practice, and economics.

    PubMed

    Bechtel, G A; Davidhizar, R; Tiller, C M; Quinn, M E

    1999-01-01

    Health care reform, innovations in technology, and the need to make health care cost-effective have affected all aspects of health care practice and education. Critical thinking skills, interpersonal and communication skills, leadership and motivation skills, computer literacy, and cultural sensitivity are all capabilities nursing graduates must now possess if they are to practice effectively in the complex and competitive contexts that today define the health care marketplace. Partnerships with community agencies are essential if faculty are to prepare a new generation of nurses who will be proficient in the skills that 21st-century nursing practice will demand. Although academic institutions have made some changes to meet marketplace demands, nursing educators, practitioners, and researchers must thoroughly reconceptualize their philosophies and retool their curricula in response to these changes. PMID:10401398

  16. [Anticoagulant therapy clinic: moving towards Advanced Nursing Practice].

    PubMed

    Romero Ruiz, Adolfo; Parrado Borrego, Gema; Rodríguez González, José; Caparrós Miranda, Isabel S; Vargas Lirio, M Isabel; Ortiz Fernández, Primitiva

    2014-01-01

    There is currently around one million people receiving oral anticoagulants in Spain. The drug most used is acenocoumarol, which requires coagulation monitoring to ensure that the patient is within its normal therapeutic range. Patients usually start this treatment in a hospital clinic and, when they are stabilised, they are referred to primary care, where they are followed-up by their community nurses. The usual practice is that nurses are responsible for changes in the dose when the patients are outside the range. This practice is not performed by hospital nurses, despite having sufficient experience and knowledge to adequately manage these types of patients. An Advanced Nursing Practice model has been introduced into the Haematology management unit of the Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Victoria, M√°laga. This involves various aspects of attention and care of patients on anticoagulant therapy, and includes adjusting the doses of their treatment following a catalogue of therapeutic and diagnostic ranges. PMID:24746343

  17. Transformation of admission interview to documentation for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    H√łjskov, Ida E; Glasdam, Stinne

    2014-09-01

    The admission interview is usually the first structured meeting between patient and nurse. The interview serves as the basis for personalised nursing and care planning and is the starting point for the clinic's documentation of the patient and his course of treatment. In this way, admission interviews constitute a basis for reporting by each nurse on the patient to nursing colleagues. This study examined how, by means of the admission interview, nurses constructed written documentation of the patient and his course of treatment for use by fellow nurses. A qualitative case study inspired by Ricoeur was conducted and consisted of five taped admission interviews, along with the written patient documentation subsequently worked out by the nurse. The findings were presented in four constructed themes: Admission interviews are the nurse's room rather than the patient's; Information on a surgical object; The insignificant but necessary contact; and Abnormalities must be medicated. It is shown how the nurse's documentation was based on the admission interview, the medical record details on the patient (facts that are essential to know in relation to disease and treatment), as well as the nurse's preconception of how to live a good life, with or without disease. Often, the patient tended to become an object in the nurse's report. It is concluded that in practice, the applied documentation system, VIPS, comes to act as the framework for what is important to the nurse to document rather than a tool that enables her to document what is important to the individual patient and his special circumstances and encounter with the health system. PMID:24033872

  18. Let's empower practice nurses to improve care.

    PubMed

    2016-04-20

    How many times have we read a report or piece of research that suggests nurses could be taking on more of the work currently performed by doctors? It is invariably accompanied by figures suggesting that the NHS would save squillions of pounds every year if only consultants and GPs let nurses take on more responsibilities. Not only that, but access to services would improve and outcomes would be unaffected or might even be enhanced. PMID:27097166

  19. Moral distress in clinical practice: implications for the nurse administrator.

    PubMed

    Fenton, M

    1988-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the experience and effect of moral distress in clinical practice and to present the implications of this phenomena for nurse administrators. Findings from three recent investigations provide the descriptive data for this paper. Nurses in clinical practice are frequently confronted with situations which challenge personal moral beliefs. Life and death events, sudden unexpected emergencies and professional role conflict have been identified as some examples of the kinds of situations that are most difficult to cope with. Feelings of emotional distress may occur as a result of participation in a patient care situation which involves an ethical issue. Personal and professional wholeness may be significantly compromised by the ineffective resolution of such issues. Moral distress may affect the nurse's ability to care for the patient and may require a significant period of resolution. Moral distress has been identified as one reason that nurses choose to leave their jobs and occasionally to leave the profession. Implications for the nurse administrator include a responsibility to be aware and supportive of the nurse in this situation. Commitment to developing effective strategies to assist nurses to cope successfully with the ethical dimension of clinical practice is an important management concern. PMID:3154037

  20. Connecting congregations: technology resources influence parish nurse practice.

    PubMed

    Zerull, Lisa M; Near, Kelly K; Ragon, Bart; Farrell, Sarah P

    2009-01-01

    This descriptive pilot study evaluated the influence of health resource information education and the use of Web-based communication technology on the professional practice of the parish nurse in the congregational setting. Five parish nurse participants from varied denominations in rural and nonrural Virginia received a laptop computer, printer, video projector, and webcam along with high-speed Internet access in each congregational setting. The nurses attended two group education sessions that incorporated computer applications and training in accessing and using quality health information resources and communication applications such as a group "chat" software and webcam to communicate with others through high-speed Internet access. Qualitative analysis from semistructured interviews of nurses confirmed that participants found the project to be beneficial in terms of awareness, education, and applicability of technology use in parish nurse practice. Quantitative data from preproject and postproject surveys found significant differences in nurses' abilities and confidence with technology use and application. Findings showed that the knowledge and experience gained from this study enhanced parish nurse practice and confidence in using technology for communication, health education, and counseling. PMID:19411943

  1. Development of the Nurse Practitioner Standards for Practice Australia

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Thomas; Donoghue, Judith; Heartfield, Marie; Bryce, Julianne; Cox, Darlene; Waters, Donna; Gosby, Helen; Kelly, John; Dunn, Sandra V.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the context and development of the new Nurse Practitioner Standards for Practice in Australia, which went into effect in January 2014. The researchers used a mixed-methods design to engage a broad range of stakeholders who brought both political and practice knowledge to the development of the new standards. Methods included interviews, focus groups, surveys, and work-based observation of nurse practitioner practice. Stakeholders varied in terms of their need for detail in the standards. Nonetheless, they invariably agreed that the standards should be clinically focussed attributes. The pillars common in many advanced practice nursing standards, such as practice, research, education, and leadership, were combined and expressed in a new and unique clinical attribute. PMID:26162455

  2. Development of the Nurse Practitioner Standards for Practice Australia.

    PubMed

    Cashin, Andrew; Buckley, Thomas; Donoghue, Judith; Heartfield, Marie; Bryce, Julianne; Cox, Darlene; Waters, Donna; Gosby, Helen; Kelly, John; Dunn, Sandra V

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the context and development of the new Nurse Practitioner Standards for Practice in Australia, which went into effect in January 2014. The researchers used a mixed-methods design to engage a broad range of stakeholders who brought both political and practice knowledge to the development of the new standards. Methods included interviews, focus groups, surveys, and work-based observation of nurse practitioner practice. Stakeholders varied in terms of their need for detail in the standards. Nonetheless, they invariably agreed that the standards should be clinically focussed attributes. The pillars common in many advanced practice nursing standards, such as practice, research, education, and leadership, were combined and expressed in a new and unique clinical attribute. PMID:26162455

  3. Exploring incentives for RNs to return to practice: a partial solution to the nursing shortage.

    PubMed

    Langan, Joanne C; Tadych, Rita A; Kao, Chia-Chan

    2007-01-01

    Although many have suggested strategies to resolve the nursing shortage, few have considered inactive RNs. This pilot study investigated reasons why nurses leave the practice, the type of work environment and resources necessary to entice RNs to return to practice, and the specific skills required to assist RNs in feeling confident and competent to return to practice. Herzberg's Two-Factor Theory was used to study motivation and hygiene factors enticing RNs to practice. A screening questionnaire was sent to 1,004 randomly selected RNs in Missouri to determine who were licensed but not practicing. Fifty-two full questionnaires were mailed and 33 (63%) were returned. Quantitative data were analyzed using SPSS, whereas qualitative data were coded and analyzed using manifest content analysis. The lack of motivators such as recognition of one's work and achievements was one reason why RNs left the practice. The hygiene factors of money, improved working conditions, refresher courses, and health insurance would motivate RNs to return to practice. Those wishing to entice inactive nurses to practice will need to offer sign-on bonuses or make the hourly wages and benefits package very competitive. This study indicates that nurses value flexible working hours, part-time opportunities, consideration of family lives, and positive relationships with administrators. PMID:17292129

  4. The creative élan of nursing theory: indispensable to leadership.

    PubMed

    Donohue-Porter, Patricia

    2014-10-01

    The author discusses how nursing theoretical knowledge contributes to nursing leadership and how the use of nursing theory can build confidence in nurse leaders in all settings, drawing on examples from selected theorists' work. It is suggested that when nursing theory is not fully valued by the profession, not only knowledge is lost but also the language that helps nurses to lead. However, the vision and the voice of nursing theory will allow nurses to lead with creativity and to tap into innovation that facilitates contributions to healthcare. To be firmly, intellectually, and enthusiastically grounded in one's disciplinary knowledge sets the stage to being able to lead effectively. Four aspects of leadership are addressed: clinical, interdisciplinary, nursing education, and interpersonal nursing. Our accumulated nursing theories can help nurse leaders to meet contemporary healthcare challenges by providing answers that help to focus on improvement, patient-centered care, critical reflection, and caring. PMID:25248779

  5. Vaccination learning experiences of nursing students: a grounded theory study

    PubMed Central

    Ildarabadi, Eshagh; Moonaghi, Hossein Karimi; Heydari, Abbas; Taghipour, Ali; Abdollahimohammad, Abdolghani

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to explore the experiences of nursing students being trained to perform vaccinations. Methods: The grounded theory method was applied to gather information through semi-structured interviews. The participants included 14 undergraduate nursing students in their fifth and eighth semesters of study in a nursing school in Iran. The information was analyzed according to Strauss and Corbin’s method of grounded theory. Results: A core category of experiential learning was identified, and the following eight subcategories were extracted: students’ enthusiasm, vaccination sensitivity, stress, proper educational environment, absence of prerequisites, students’ responsibility for learning, providing services, and learning outcomes. Conclusion: The vaccination training of nursing students was found to be in an acceptable state. However, some barriers to effective learning were identified. As such, the results of this study may provide empirical support for attempts to reform vaccination education by removing these barriers. PMID:26084680

  6. Practical Nursing for High Schools. Curriculum Bulletin 1973-74 Series No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Bureau of Curriculum Development.

    The bulletin, a revision of Practical Nursing for High Schools published in 1963, is a guide for the licensed teacher of nursing in educating the practical nurse student. The publication can be used as a resource for developing the program in individual schools of practical nursing or to develop the behavioral objectives for each procedure. Part…

  7. Academic learning for specialist nurses: a grounded theory study.

    PubMed

    Millberg, Lena German; Berg, Linda; Bršmberg, Elisabeth BjŲrk; NordstrŲm, Gun; Ohlťn, Joakim

    2014-11-01

    The aim was to explore the major concerns of specialist nurses pertaining to academic learning during their education and initial professional career. Specialist nursing education changed in tandem with the European educational reform in 2007. At the same time, greater demands were made on the healthcare services to provide evidence-based and safe patient-care. These changes have influenced specialist nursing programmes and consequently the profession. Grounded Theory guided the study. Data were collected by means of a questionnaire with open-ended questions distributed at the end of specialist nursing programmes in 2009 and 2010. Five universities were included. Further, individual, pair and group interviews were used to collect data from 12 specialist nurses, 5-14 months after graduation. A major concern for specialist nurses was that academic learning should be "meaningful" for their professional future. The specialist nurses' "meaningful academic learning process" was characterised by an ambivalence of partly believing in and partly being hesitant about the significance of academic learning and partly receiving but also lacking support. Specialist nurses were influenced by factors in two areas: curriculum and healthcare context. They felt that the outcome of contribution to professional confidence was critical in making academic learning meaningful. PMID:25240945

  8. Nurses' roles in health promotion practice: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Kemppainen, Virpi; Tossavainen, Kerttu; Turunen, Hannele

    2013-12-01

    Nurses play an important role in promoting public health. Traditionally, the focus of health promotion by nurses has been on disease prevention and changing the behaviour of individuals with respect to their health. However, their role as promoters of health is more complex, since they have multi-disciplinary knowledge and experience of health promotion in their nursing practice. This paper presents an integrative review aimed at examining the findings of existing research studies (1998-2011) of health promotion practice by nurses. Systematic computer searches were conducted of the Cochrane databases, Cinahl, PubMed, Web of Science, PsycINFO and Scopus databases, covering the period January 1998 to December 2011. Data were analysed and the results are presented using the concept map method of Novak and Gowin. The review found information on the theoretical basis of health promotion practice by nurses, the range of their expertise, health promotion competencies and the organizational culture associated with health promotion practice. Nurses consider health promotion important but a number of obstacles associated with organizational culture prevent effective delivery. PMID:22888155

  9. Inquiry in baccalaureate nursing education: fostering evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Callister, Lynn Clark; Matsumura, Gerry; Lookinland, Sandra; Mangum, Sandra; Loucks, Carol

    2005-02-01

    With the increasing emphasis on evidence-based nursing practice, nurse educators need to more fully implement teaching strategies that help students gain critical thinking skills related to inquiry and understand the importance of evidence-based nursing practice. Research and scholarship emphases in one baccalaureate nursing program, student-identified benefits, and challenges associated with incorporating inquiry across the curriculum are described in this article. In clinical journal entries, students described the following benefits associated with curricular emphasis on inquiry: increased interest in evidence-based nursing practice and participating in the generation of research; enhanced critical thinking skills through the development of knowledge, experience, and competencies; increased motivation to continue professional growth and development by participating in lifelong learning; the desire to become better consumers of research findings; better understanding of the "real world" of clinical research; and increased desire to pursue graduate studies in nursing. The challenge to promote student growth toward competence in the application of evidence-based principles in clinical practice is ongoing. PMID:15719712

  10. Scope of practice for Australian enrolled nurses: evolution and practice issues.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Elisabeth Ruth; Barnett, Anthony; Sellick, Kenneth; McKenna, Lisa

    2013-10-01

    Significant changes to the scope of practice for enrolled nurses have occurred in Australia over the past decade. These changes, which are largely a consequence of staff shortages and economic pressure, have resulted in increased role confusion and overlap between enrolled and registered nurses in Australia. This paper presents a brief history of the enrolled nurse in Australia followed by an overview of the current situation and emerging trends in the education and employment of these nurses. Definitions and approaches to scope of practice are described and emerging issues within Australia raised and discussed. A review of the literature found the number of enrolled nurses and the roles they perform have changed significantly in Australia following the introduction of the enhanced scope of practice. Further research is required to better define and delineate between the different nursing roles and to explore broader frameworks to analyze, describe and define these roles. PMID:24299243

  11. Israeli nurse practice environment characteristics, retention, and job satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is an international nursing shortage. Improving the practice environment has been shown to be a successful strategy against this phenomenon, as the practice environment is associated with retention and job satisfaction. The Israeli nurse practice environment has not been measured. The purpose of this study was to measure practice environment characteristics, retention and job satisfaction and to evaluate the association between these variables. Methods A demographic questionnaire, the Practice Environment Scale, and a Job Satisfaction Questionnaire were administered to Israeli acute and intensive care nurses working in 7 hospitals across the country. Retention was measured by intent to leave the organization and work experience. A convenience sample of registered nurses was obtained using a bi-phasic, stratified, cluster design. Data were collected based on the preferences of each unit, either distribution during various shifts or at staff meetings; or via staff mailboxes. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the sample and results of the questionnaires. Pearson Product Moment Correlations were used to determine significant associations among the variables. A multiple regression model was designed where the criterion variable was the practice environment. Analyses of variance determined differences between groups on nurse practice environment characteristics. Results 610 nurses reported moderate levels of practice environment characteristics, where the lowest scoring characteristic was ‚Äėappropriate staffing and resources‚Äô. Approximately 9% of the sample reported their intention to leave and the level of job satisfaction was high. A statistically significant, negative, weak correlation was found between intention to leave and practice environment characteristics, with a moderate correlation between job satisfaction and practice environment characteristics. ‚ÄėAppropriate staffing and resources‚Äô was the only characteristic found to be statistically different based on hospital size and geographic region. Conclusions This study supports the international nature of the vicious cycle that includes a poor quality practice environment, decreased job satisfaction and low nurse retention. Despite the extreme nursing shortage in Israel, perceptions of the practice environment were similar to other countries. Policy makers and hospital managers should address the practice environment, in order to improve job satisfaction and increase retention. PMID:24565045

  12. 'Implementation deficit' and 'street-level bureaucracy': policy, practice and change in the development of community nursing issues.

    PubMed

    Bergen, Ann; While, Alison

    2005-01-01

    The present paper examines the mechanisms by which health and social care policies put forward by the Government may be translated into community nursing practice. Data from a research project on community nurse case managers were re-examined in the light of two classic theories often cited by policy analysts (i.e. implementation theory and 'street-level bureaucracy'). It was found that the extent to which nurses adopted the case management role, and the model of choice, depended on four major interrelated variables, namely: (1) the clarity of policy guidance; (2) the extent to which it coincided with professional (nursing) values; (3) local practices and policies; and (4) the personal vision of the community nurse. It is argued that this framework may have wider relevance, and this was tested out in two ways. First, major change in one of these variables (Government policy) over time was analysed for its effect on case management practice via the remaining variables. Secondly, an unrelated, but policy-initiated, nursing issue (nurse prescribing) was briefly examined in the light of the framework. It is suggested that this framework may be of some use when considering the likely practice response to policy-related changes in community nursing. PMID:15717901

  13. Are pedagogies used in nurse education research evident in practice?

    PubMed

    Allan, H T; Smith, P

    2010-07-01

    This paper considers two questions: what pedagogies for teaching nursing are used in nurse education research? Are these pedagogies transferred to learning in the workplace? We argue that there are underpinning pedagogies identified in nurse education research in the area of workplace and work based learning which are broadly qualitative, action orientated and focused on knowledge generation. Such pedagogies are rooted in a philosophy of teaching and learning where learning is seen as active, reflective and socially constructed. We consider possible answers to these questions through an exploration of empirical work by Evans et al. (2009) which has focused on knowledge transfer in the workplace. Their work offers insights into how pedagogies can be applied to nurse education research which in turn may be transferred into the workplace. In particular, they argue that the concept of knowledge transfer is outdated and we should focus instead on how knowledge learnt in one context (the academy) is re-contextualised in another (the workplace). We also draw on Aranda and Law's (2007) paper on the debates concerning the use of sociology in nurse education to explore competing narratives. We conclude that the pedagogies identified in educational research are not transferred to nurse education and practice yet offer an alternative view of knowledge transfer as illustrated by Evans et al.'s work which explores how learning in the workplace may be facilitated more effectively. We conclude that the lack of transfer of nurse education research pedagogies to practice learning undermines the position of nurse teachers within the academy as nurse education becomes a practice or professional discipline without a discrete disciplinary base. PMID:19926366

  14. Theory into Practice Goes Exactly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Jonny

    2007-01-01

    "Dimensions of possible variation" is a phrase that now occupies a safe place in the literature describing the application of education theory to education practice: "asking yourself what could be changed [in the task], while using the same approach or technique, opens up dimensions of possible variation. A set of exercises forming a sequence ofÖ

  15. Linking HRD Theory and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This document contains four symposium papers on linking human resource development (HRD) theory and practice. "Reorienting the Theoretical Foundations of Human Resource Development: Building a Sustainable Profession and Society" (Tim Hatcher) examines the theoretical disciplines of economics, general systems, sociology, psychology, and ethics in…

  16. Teaching Rhetorica: Theory, Pedagogy, Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronald, Kate, Ed.; Ritchie, Joy, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    In their breakthrough anthology of women's rhetoric, "Available Means," Kate Ronald and Joy Ritchie presented the first comprehensive collection of women's rhetorical theory and practice from the third century B.C. to 2001. With that expansive gathering of women's rhetoric, they raised questions about gender, difference, and the rhetorical canon,…

  17. Practice Theory in Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Richard F.; Astarita, Alice C.

    2013-01-01

    Ortega (2011) has argued that second language acquisition is stronger and better after the social turn. Of the post-cognitive approaches she reviews, several focus on the social context of language learning rather than on language as the central phenomenon. In this article, we present Practice Theory not as yet another approach to language…

  18. Practice Theory in Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Richard F.; Astarita, Alice C.

    2013-01-01

    Ortega (2011) has argued that second language acquisition is stronger and better after the social turn. Of the post-cognitive approaches she reviews, several focus on the social context of language learning rather than on language as the central phenomenon. In this article, we present Practice Theory not as yet another approach to languageÖ

  19. Psychomotor Education - Theory and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naville, Suzanne; Blom, Gaston E.

    This presentation introduced the theory and practice of psychomotor education as developed by de Ajuriaguerra and Naville at the University of Geneva. Some overlap of their concepts and principles with perceptual motor training methods occurred in the United States, according to the authors. The focus of the theoretical discussion integrated…

  20. Theory into Practice Goes Exactly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Jonny

    2007-01-01

    "Dimensions of possible variation" is a phrase that now occupies a safe place in the literature describing the application of education theory to education practice: "asking yourself what could be changed [in the task], while using the same approach or technique, opens up dimensions of possible variation. A set of exercises forming a sequence of…

  1. Preparing emotionally intelligent doctor of nursing practice leaders.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Michelle T; Rutledge, Carolyn; Shepherd, Laurel

    2012-08-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) identified the need for interdisciplinary teams that collaborate, communicate, and integrate care across settings to improve health care delivery. Focusing on innovative strategies that address leadership skills in graduate nursing education could have an effect on interdisciplinary partnerships, transformation of patient care, and new styles of leadership to change current practice models. In response to the IOM guidelines, we incorporated emotional intelligence as a component in our Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) leadership curriculum. This article describes a new action-oriented leadership model that prepares the DNP graduate for leadership roles to serve the public and the nursing discipline during a time of radical changes in health care. Behavioral profile, nontraditional readings, and online discussions form the basis of the model. The principles and strategies in this article can be applied to nursing education in multiple arenas, at both the undergraduate and graduate settings. PMID:22624564

  2. Compassion fatigue within nursing practice: a concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Coetzee, Siedine Knobloch; Klopper, Hester C

    2010-06-01

    "Compassion fatigue" was first introduced in relation to the study of burnout among nurses, but it was never defined within this context; it has since been adopted as a synonym for secondary traumatic stress disorder, which is far removed from the original meaning of the term. The aim of the study was to define compassion fatigue within nursing practice. The method that was used in this article was concept analysis. The findings revealed several categories of compassion fatigue: risk factors, causes, process, and manifestations. The characteristics of each of these categories are specified and a connotative (theoretical) definition, model case, additional cases, empirical indicators, and a denotative (operational) definition are provided. Compassion fatigue progresses from a state of compassion discomfort to compassion stress and, finally, to compassion fatigue, which if not effaced in its early stages of compassion discomfort or compassion stress, can permanently alter the compassionate ability of the nurse. Recommendations for nursing practice, education, and research are discussed. PMID:20602697

  3. Current Continuing Professional Education Practice among Malaysian Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Mei Chan; Francis, Karen; Cooper, Simon; Abdullah, Khatijah Lim

    2014-01-01

    Nurses need to participate in CPE to update their knowledge and increase their competencies. This research was carried out to explore their current practice and the future general needs for CPE. This cross-sectional descriptive study involved registered nurses from government hospitals and health clinics from Peninsular Malaysia. Multistage cluster sampling was used to recruit 1000 nurses from four states of Malaysia. Self-explanatory questionnaires were used to collect the data, which were analyzed using SPSS version 16. Seven hundred and ninety-two nurses participated in this survey. Only 80% (562) of the nurses had engaged in CPE activities during the past 12 months. All attendance for the various activities was below 50%. Workshops were the most popular CPE activity (345, 43.6%) and tertiary education was the most unpopular activity (10, 1.3%). The respondents did perceive the importance of future CPE activities for career development. Mandatory continuing professional education (MCPE) is a key measure to ensure that nurses upgrade their knowledge and skills; however, it is recommended that policy makers and nurse leaders in the continuing professional development unit of health service facilities plan CPE activities to meet registered nurses' (RNs) needs and not simply organizational requirements. PMID:24523961

  4. OPT: transformation of nursing process for contemporary practice.

    PubMed

    Pesut, D J; Herman, J

    1998-01-01

    Over time, clinical, educational, and social forces have influenced the development of three generations of traditional nursing process. The first generation was concerned with problems and process. Analysis of second-generation models revealed interest in understanding the nature of diagnosis and diagnostic reasoning. We have proposed a third generation model that underscores the importance of critical, metacognitive, and thinking skills that support outcome specification and testing in clinical reasoning. Clinicians, educators, managers, and administrators are invited to consider the OPT model as an alternative to traditional nursing process. The OPT model may be one of many transitional reasoning models needed for contemporary nursing practice. PMID:9513228

  5. Developing good practice for clinical research nurses.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Shona; Hathaway, Kornelia; Saunders, Caroline

    This article outlines the role of clinical research in the UK government's strategy for economic growth and the role of clinical research nurses in that research. The diverse skills and knowledge required by clinical research nurses to support a range of research studies in a number of research environments are described. The development and aim of the UK Clinical Research Facility Network is discussed, with particular focus on the role of the UK Clinical Research Facility Network Education Group in supporting clinical research nurses and research teams to acquire and maintain relevant research skills. The outcomes delivered by the UK Clinical Research Facility Network Education Group are outlined along with ongoing and future work. Recommendations to ensure that the workforce will be skilled appropriately to support future clinical research are provided. PMID:24568424

  6. Translating social justice into clinical nurse specialist practice.

    PubMed

    Bell, Sue Ellen; Hulbert, James R

    2008-01-01

    Translating social justice into clinical nurse specialist (CNS) practice involves not only facilitating equitable access to healthcare resources but also changing the definition of health from individual centric to population based. Clinical nurse specialists working within hospitals or healthcare systems generally have not explored the ethical conflicts between demand and available healthcare resources. Application of social justice to CNS practice requires microallocation decisions in direct patient care and macroallocation decisions in the distribution of all societal goods that alleviate health disparities. This article reviews the meaning, history, and current basis for the application of the principle of social justice to CNS practice. PMID:18955847

  7. Reflections by clinical nurse specialists on changing ward practice.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Catherine; Ramcharan, Angie

    In September 2010, palliative care clinical nurse specialists at North Middlesex University Hospital Trust introduced competencies for all nurses in setting up and using syringe drivers. This was done after the trust identified a high level of clinical incidents involving syringe drivers. This article discusses how the competencies were implemented and assessed, explores the importance of understanding change management to achieve change, and how different leadership styles affect changes to practice. PMID:21957520

  8. [ICNP- International Classification of Nursing Practice: origin, structure and development].

    PubMed

    Marucci, Anna Rita; De Caro, Walter; Petrucci, Cristina; Lancia, Loreto; Sansoni, Julita

    2015-01-01

    ICNP is a standardized nursing terminology included within acknowledged terminologies by WHO, it is a relevant aspect of ICN programs and strategies. This paper aims to describe structure and characteristics of ICNP terminology as well as to highlight how this tool can be useful both in practice and in terms of nursing professional development. This version looks like a pyramid with seven axes describing different areas of nursing and related interventions, enriched by two special axes related to pre-coordinated Diagnosis / Outcomes (DC) and Operations (IC) which facilitate daily use in practice. In order to clarify how this tool can be actually be used in daily nursing practice some examples are provided, clarifying how adopting the current version of ICNP terminology (2015 release) Diagnosis/Outcomes and Interventions can be built. The ICNP Italian Centre is committed to introduce it to Italian nurses as a tool for sharing and disseminating terminology in our Country, having as main final aim to achieve even in Italy, professional visibility objectives promoted in different ways by the International Council of Nurses. PMID:26402233

  9. Everyday Excellence: A Framework for Professional Nursing Practice in Long-Term Care

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Stacie Salsbury; Specht, Janet Pringle; Karlman, Susan E.

    2009-01-01

    Registered nurses make measurable contributions to the health and wellness of persons living in nursing homes. However, most nursing homes do not employ adequate numbers of professional nurses with specialized training in the nursing care of older adults to positively impact resident outcomes. As a result, many people never receive excellent geriatric nursing while living in a long-term care facility. Nurses have introduced various professional practice models into health care institutions as tools for leading nursing practice, improving client outcomes, and achieving organizational goals. Problematically, few professional practice models have been implemented in nursing homes. This article introduces an evidence-based framework for professional nursing practice in long-term care. The Everyday Excellence framework is based upon eight guiding principles: Valuing, Envisioning, Peopling, Securing, Learning, Empowering, Leading, and Advancing Excellence. Future research will evaluate the usefulness of this framework for professional nursing practice. PMID:20077966

  10. Nurse Education and Communities of Practice. Researching Professional Education Research Reports Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkitt, Ian; Husband, Charles; Mackenzie, Jennifer; Torn, Alison

    The processes whereby nurses develop the skills and knowledge required to deliver individualized and holistic care were examined in a 2-year study of nurses in a range of clinical settings and a university department of nursing in England. Members of two research teams of qualified nurses joined various communities of nursing practice as…

  11. Nurse Responses to Re-tooling Practice, Education, and Management Roles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kjervik, Diane K.; Leonard, Dianne J.

    2001-01-01

    Responses from 409 registered nurses, 105 nurse managers, 144 nurse educators, and 31 licensed practical nurses indicated that 92% were willing to retool, defined as prepare for evolving nursing roles. They were less likely to be aware of employer expectations or supports for retooling. Areas needing development included critical thinking,…

  12. Compass and Prerequisite Course Scores as Predictors of Success in Practical Nursing School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, Toni L. Early

    2010-01-01

    The nursing shortage is compounded by nursing student attrition. Schools of nursing have limited enrollment, making the admission process an important factor in resolving the ongoing nursing shortage. The purpose of this study was to identify preadmission criteria that accurately identify applicants to practical/vocational nursing (P/VN) schools…

  13. An overview of hospice and palliative care nursing models and theories.

    PubMed

    Dobrina, Raffaella; Tenze, Maja; Palese, Alvisa

    2014-02-01

    Current literature reports that nurses are the members of the health-care team who have the most contact with patients facing a life-threatening illness. The multidisciplinary palliative care approach means that hospice and palliative care nurses require a consistent theoretical foundation in order to be confident of and able to explain their role. The aim of this paper is to describe existing palliative care and hospice nursing models and theories and to identify their core concepts. Literature published between 2002 and 2012 on such models was reviewed and subjected to content analysis. Ten core concepts were identified that fell into three categories: patient, nurse, and therapeutic relationship. The themes and values identified in the end-of-life nursing models and theories are congruent with palliative care best practices based on a patient-centred and an interdisciplinary teamwork approach. In developing a therapeutic relationship with patients, nurses have a 'privileged' experience that may lead to existential growth and job satisfaction. PMID:24577213

  14. Practice and education of nurse anaesthetists.

    PubMed Central

    Henry, B.; McAuliffe, M.

    1999-01-01

    A survey was conducted of the anaesthesia services provided by nurses and the education available to them in this field in 107 countries. Among the procedures carried out were general anaesthesia, spinal blocks and tracheal intubation. The implications of the findings for health planning and policy-making are discussed with particular reference to workforce structure and women's involvement in it. PMID:10212519

  15. Impact of the 2004 GMS contract on practice nurses:

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Wendy; Jabareen, Hussein; O'Donnell, Catherine A; Mercer, Stewart W; Watt, Graham CM

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background The new GMS contract has led to practice nurses playing an important role in the delivery of the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF). Aim This study investigated how practice nurses perceive the changes in their work since the contract's inception. Design of study A qualitative approach, sampling practice nurses from practices in areas of high and low deprivation, with a range of QOF scores. Setting Glasgow, UK. Method Individual interviews were conducted, audiotaped, transcribed, and analysed using a thematic approach. Results Three themes emerged: roles and incentives, workload, and patient care. Practice nurses were positive about the development of their professional role since the introduction of the new GMS contract but had mixed views about whether their status had changed. Views on incentives (largely related to financial rewards) also varied, but most felt under-rewarded, irrespective of practice QOF achievement. All reported a substantial increase in workload, related to incentivised QOF domains with greater ‚Äėbox ticking‚Äô and data entry, and less time to spend with patients. Although the structure created by the new contract was generally welcomed, many were unconvinced that it improved patient care and felt other important areas of care were neglected. Concern was also expressed about a negative effect of the QOF on holistic care, including ethical concerns and detrimental effects on the patient‚Äďnurse relationship, which were regarded as a core value. Conclusions The new GMS contract has given practice nurses increased responsibility. However, discontent about how financial gains are distributed and negative impacts on core values may lead to detrimental long-term effects on motivation and morale. PMID:18826783

  16. Minority nursing student success: A grounded theory case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mister, Brenda J.

    There has been a dramatic increase in the nation's racial and ethnic minority populations over recent years. This increase is placing a higher demand on the health care industry to provide culturally competent care to these diverse populations. This challenge is met with yet another problem as the nation faces a critical shortage of nurses, particularly minority nurses. This shortage is only expected to worsen over the next several years. As schools of nursing across the country are being asked to increase the number of nursing program graduates, specifically minorities, they are confronted with a double edged sword as retention rates are decreasing, and attrition rates are increasing. This is particularly troublesome when many racial and ethnic minority nursing students do not graduate. This qualitative study was implemented to assess and understand the perceived educational experiences of racial and ethnic minority nursing students enrolled in a rural community college nursing program on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. Eight voluntary nursing students who identified themselves as either a racial or ethnic minority participated in the study. Data were collected by: individual audio-taped interview sessions; audio-taped focus group sessions; and documentation of field notes. Participants also provided demographic information and were asked to provide a brief written response to a scenario regarding increasing the recruitment and retention rates of minority nursing students. All data were analyzed utilizing the constant comparative method. Results of the study revealed six different themes: personal support systems and peer relationships; college services and academic resources; faculty support; cultural understanding versus cultural insensitivity; personal attributes of self-efficacy/advice for future nursing students; and suggestions for college and nursing program improvement. After the major themes were examined one central theme, a grounded theory, was born. The theory proposes that when the minority nursing student bridges his or her personal attributes of self-efficacy with some or all identified support systems, this may be a conduit to fostering success in obtaining their educational goals as long as the resources are available, and a caring environment is present.

  17. Nurse education regarding agitated patients and its effects on clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Leyla; Karabulut, Erdem

    This study identified the impact of an education program on nurses' practices for agitated patients and documented the changes in practice after completion of the training. Eighteen cardiac intensive care nurses were included to the study. Prior to nurses' participation in an education program, a pre-test indicating nurses' current practices for 40 agitated patients was evaluated with the 'Nurse Practice Form'. After the pre-test data collection period was completed, the 2-day training program on caring for agitated patients was conducted. The last step of the study was evaluation of post-test nurses' practices for 40 agitated patients using the 'Nurse Practice Form'. The findings indicated that instead of pre-test nurses' use of physical restraints for controlling agitated patients without a physician order, none of post-test nurses applied them. The training program provided nurses the knowledge and skills needed to evaluate and to manage the causes of agitation. PMID:20230178

  18. The Personal Narrative of a Nurse: A Journey Through Practice.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Sharon L

    2016-06-01

    This article examines my phases of holistic learning concerning how I became a nurse, using story presented in a personal narrative style. I have incorporated my own stories to elaborate my journey. First, my early life in the East End of London and how this influenced my becoming a nurse. Second, I give an account of my journey through practice, where I examine how I developed my own learning from professional practice, drawing on some personal illustrations presented as stories. I have set out to explore how my stories of practice have influenced my progress, and I present a personal account of such learning in general from the lens of a nurse educator. PMID:26025093

  19. Evaluation of Evidence-based Nursing Pain Management Practice.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenjia; Eaton, Linda H; Gordon, Debra B; Hoyle, Christine; Doorenbos, Ardith Z

    2015-08-01

    It is important to ensure that cancer pain management is based on the best evidence. Nursing evidence-based pain management can be examined through an evaluation of pain documentation. The aim of this study was to modify and test an evaluation tool for nursing cancer pain documentation, and describe the frequency and quality of nursing pain documentation in one oncology unit via the electronic medical system. A descriptive cross-sectional design was used for this study at an oncology unit of an academic medical center in the Pacific Northwest. Medical records were examined for 37 adults hospitalized during April and May 2013. Nursing pain documentations (N = 230) were reviewed using an evaluation tool modified from the Cancer Pain Practice Index to consist of 13 evidence-based pain management indicators, including pain assessment, care plan, pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions, monitoring and treatment of analgesic side effects, communication with physicians, and patient education. Individual nursing documentation was assigned a score ranging from 0 (worst possible) to 13 (best possible), to reflect the delivery of evidence-based pain management. The participating nurses documented 90% of the recommended evidence-based pain management indicators. Documentation was suboptimal for pain reassessment, pharmacologic interventions, and bowel regimen. The study results provide implications for enhancing electronic medical record design and highlight a need for future research to understand the reasons for suboptimal nursing documentation of cancer pain management. For the future use of the data evaluation tool, we recommend additional modifications according to study settings. PMID:26256215

  20. Advancing practice inquiry: research foundations of the practice doctorate in nursing.

    PubMed

    Magyary, Diane; Whitney, Joanne D; Brown, Marie Annette

    2006-01-01

    The University of Washington Doctor of Nursing Practice program entails 3 curricular dimensions: advanced practice, leadership, and practice inquiry. In this article, the practice inquiry dimension is discussed and defined as a type of clinical investigation that closely aligns with the realities and complexities of everyday practice by advanced practice nurses (APNs). The advancement of APNs' practice inquiry competencies is timely for its interfaces with the national scientific agenda's emphasis on translating science to clinical practice, health care delivery systems and policy. A framework for conceptualizing a practice inquiry curriculum and competencies is proposed. In addition, the divergent and convergent comparisons with Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) nursing programs are discussed, with emphasis placed on potential collaborative clinical research endeavors. PMID:16759938

  1. Critical theory and its contribution to the nursing discipline.

    PubMed

    Mosqueda-Díaz, Angélica; Vílchez-Barboza, Vivian; Valenzuela-Suazo, Sandra; Sanhueza-Alvarado, Olivia

    2014-01-01

    This article reflects on the Critical theory, stemming from the most important philosophical concepts and the modifications it has endured over time. Thereafter, we expose the contribution of the Critical theory to Nursing. This emphasizes on the contextual analysis of the phenomena and it is a self-critique to prevent dogmatisms and totalitarianisms. It postulates that in order to establish a truth, we must consider the historical conditions within which said truth emerges. J√ľrgen Habermas, with his Theory of Communicative Action, reorients the original postulates of the Critical theory, making it more coherent from the social point of view, through the Guiding Interests of Knowledge. Nursing professionals who follow the Critical theory highlight the need to improve the description of the construction of knowledge with an emancipating and liberating purpose, which permits Nursing to provide responses to approach reality through a global and dialectic vision and from a democratic position of knowledge, construct research from the social situational reality that is part of its daily experience; everything that can be unified as a "Philosophy of Nursing Care", which should be incorporated onto the professional formation of the discipline and onto the research area. PMID:25230045

  2. E-Mentoring: Confidence Intervention for Senior Nursing Students Preparing for Readiness to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaRose, Patrick S., Sr.

    2013-01-01

    The role of the registered nurse has evolved over the years as technology has changed and the practice of nursing has advanced. There are many factors that influence how a new nurse enters practice; however, confidence appears to play a large role in the way nursing students see themselves and how this self perception regulates transition to…

  3. Transforming nursing home culture: evidence for practice and policy.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Sheryl; Shier, Victoria; Saliba, Debra

    2014-02-01

    The nursing home culture change movement aims to improve resident quality of life and quality of care by emphasizing the deinstitutionalization of nursing home culture and focusing on person-centered care. This article briefly reviews the history of culture change, discusses some of the challenges related to culture change in nursing homes, and overviews the conceptualization and select models of culture change. Building from this background, it critiques current understanding, identifies critical research questions, and notes key issues arising during a workshop that addressed existing and emerging evidence in the field. This review and analysis provide a context for how 9 accompanying papers in this supplemental issue of The Gerontologist fill identified evidence gaps and provide evidence for future practice and policies that aim to transform nursing home culture. PMID:24443601

  4. Teaching pharmacology to advanced practice nursing students: issues and strategies.

    PubMed

    Schwertz, D W; Piano, M R; Kleinpell, R; Johnson, J

    1997-02-01

    A pharmacology course should prepare the advanced practice nursing student to understand the cellular mechanisms of drug action and physiologic outcomes (pharmacodynamics); mechanisms of absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of drugs (pharmacokinetics); and the clinical use of drugs in the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of disease (pharmacotherapeutics). The goal of a pharmacology course for advance nursing practice is to provide practitioners with knowledge that provides a rational basis for pharmacologic management of patients with complex health problems. A pharmacology course should teach the student the principles of pharmacology along with the process of pharmacologic reasoning. PMID:9086927

  5. Reflective practice groups for nurses: a consultation liaison psychiatry nursing initiative: part 2--the evaluation.

    PubMed

    Dawber, Chris

    2013-06-01

    This paper outlines an evaluation of reflective practice groups (RPG) involving nurses and midwives from three clinical nursing specialties at Redcliffe and Caboolture Hospitals, Queensland, Australia. The groups were facilitated by the consultation liaison psychiatry nurse and author using a process-focused, whole-of-group approach to explore clinical narrative in a supportive group setting. This was a preliminary evaluation utilizing a recently-developed tool, the Clinical Supervision Evaluation Questionnaire, along with externally-facilitated focus groups. Nurses and midwives responded favourably to RPG, reporting a positive impact on clinical practice, self-awareness, and resilience. The majority of participants considered RPG had positive implications for team functioning. The focus groups identified the importance of facilitation style and the need to address aspects of workplace culture to enable group development and enhance the capacity for reflection. Evaluation of the data indicates this style of RPG can improve reflective thinking, promote team cohesion, and provide support for nurses and midwives working in clinical settings. Following on from this study, a second phase of research has commenced, providing more detailed, longitudinal evaluation across a larger, more diverse group of nurses. PMID:23020828

  6. Transformation of a nursing culture through actualization of a nursing professional practice model.

    PubMed

    Jost, Sandra G; Rich, Victoria L

    2010-01-01

    Leading and effecting meaningful change in a nursing division culture, such as the type required to achieve Magnet designation, entails senior nurse executives to be well-acquainted not only with the facts and figures of their business but also with the nuances, myths, and cultures that either enable or block a change from occurring. Expert nurse leaders embrace the story being told by data on dashboards and the quality outcomes achieved and look beyond those points of information out to the edges of their division. These nurse executives also seek to understand the pivotal, perhaps seemingly inconsequential things (notions, beliefs, cultural beliefs, and stories) that will block or tip a culture to change and achieve success. At the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (HUP), a Magnet-designated organization, the road to Magnet was not straightforward. Instead, the path was a winding, learning journey. Through authentic leadership and the conception and actualization of a professional practice model, the HUP Nursing Excellence in Professional Practice (HUP NEPP) model, Magnet designation was achieved and a nursing culture was transformed. PMID:20023559

  7. Sharing best practice in stoma care nursing.

    PubMed

    Willams, Julia

    A problem shared is a problem halved; a very poignant proverb that forms the essence of this year's World Council of Enterostomal Therapists (WCET) UK conference in Coventry. Sharing experiences from practice is invalid if clinical practice is to grow and develop. It raises awareness, offering the opportunity to question and review practice. Sharing practice offers opportunities to enquiring minds. PMID:19797996

  8. Finding common ground in public health nursing education and practice.

    PubMed

    Keller, Linda O; Schaffer, Marjorie A; Schoon, Patricia M; Brueshoff, Bonnie; Jost, Rose

    2011-01-01

    Preparation of the public health nursing (PHN) workforce requires public health nurses from academia and practice to collaborate. However, a shortage of PHN clinical sites may lead to competition between schools of nursing for student placements. The Henry Street Consortium, a group of 5 baccalaureate schools of nursing and 13 local health departments in the state of Minnesota, developed a model for collaboration between PHN education and practice. This paper describes the development process--the forming, storming, norming, and performing stages--experienced by the Henry Street Consortium members. The consortium developed a set of entry-level core PHN competencies that are utilized by both education and practice. It developed menus of learning opportunities that were used to design population-based PHN clinical experiences. In addition, the consortium created a model for training and sustaining a preceptor network. The members of the Henry Street Consortium collaborated rather than competed, used consensus for decision making, and respected and accepted different points of view. This collaboration significantly impacted how schools of nursing and local health departments work together. The consortium's ability to retain its relevance, energy, and momentum for both academic and agency partners sustains the collaboration. PMID:21535112

  9. Changes Resulting from Reflection Dialogues on Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Reiko; Fukada, Mika

    2014-01-01

    Background Reflection is defined here as a process by which, through self-conversation, one‚Äôs self and one‚Äôs behavior acquire meaning. However, people have limitations in terms of what they can express and be aware of during reflection. This finding points to the importance of facilitators. The purpose of this study was to determine what changes can be brought about through reflection dialogues on nursing practice. Methods The Participants were 9 nurses who worked at three institutions in City A, each with about 200 beds. Workplace topics were examined through self-reflections and reflection dialogues. The depth of reflection was assessed using the three levels of reflection described by Mezirow‚ÄĒ{reflecting on the content}, {reflecting on the process} and {reflecting on the assumptions}. Results In reflecting on nursing practice, the participants were also divided into those who had already reached the highest level, {reflecting on assumptions}, via self-reflection, and those who remained at the level of {reflecting on processes}, despite the use of reflection dialogues. Conclusion The development of reflective thinking on nursing practice was connected not only to the participants‚Äô desire to explore ways of accepting their individual experiences, but may also be connected to whether or not they are able to question themselves about their thoughts and preconceptions about nursing work. PMID:25067874

  10. Nurses' perceived barriers to the implementation of a Fall Prevention Clinical Practice Guideline in Singapore hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Serena SL; Manias, Elizabeth; Hutchinson, Alison M; Donath, Susan; Johnston, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Background Theories of behavior change indicate that an analysis of barriers to change is helpful when trying to influence professional practice. The aim of this study was to assess the perceived barriers to practice change by eliciting nurses' opinions with regard to barriers to, and facilitators of, implementation of a Fall Prevention clinical practice guideline in five acute care hospitals in Singapore. Methods Nurses were surveyed to identify their perceptions regarding barriers to implementation of clinical practice guidelines in their practice setting. The validated questionnaire, 'Barriers and facilitators assessment instrument', was administered to nurses (n = 1830) working in the medical, surgical, geriatric units, at five acute care hospitals in Singapore. Results An 80.2% response rate was achieved. The greatest barriers to implementation of clinical practice guidelines reported included: knowledge and motivation, availability of support staff, access to facilities, health status of patients, and, education of staff and patients. Conclusion Numerous barriers to the use of the Fall Prevention Clinical Practice Guideline have been identified. This study has laid the foundation for further research into implementation of clinical practice guidelines in Singapore by identifying barriers to change in acute care settings. PMID:18485235

  11. Use of Evidence-Based Practice in School Nursing: Survey of School Nurses at a National Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Primary and acute care settings are the focus of a concerted effort to implement evidence-based practice (EBP) in health care; yet, little attention has been given to use of EBP among school nurses. The aims of this study were to (a) describe current use of EBP among school nurses attending a national school nurse conference, (b) describe…

  12. [Chronic diseases and complexity: new roles in nursing. Advanced practice nurses and chronic patient].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martín, C Inmaculada

    2014-01-01

    The increase in chronic diseases and the progressive ageing of the population is a source of concern for the different agencies with responsibility for health care. This has led to the creation of many documents focused on the analysis of the current situation and care of chronic diseases, including the WHO recommendations intended to assist countries and health services design and implement strategies that will address the existing demand, control and prevention of chronic diseases. In addition, there is a need to respond to the demand generated by chronic diseases in every sense, and from the different systems it is becoming more difficult to get enough support from multidisciplinary teams where the nurse has a central importance. While chronic diseases are becoming a threat due to the costs they generate, it is also an opportunity for nursing to be at the forefront for advanced care requirements, performed by professionals with recognized advanced clinical skills and ability for case management while monitoring and controlling complex chronic patients. The different services of the National Health System have introduced nurses that play different roles (cases managers, liaison nurses, advanced practice nurses and so on). However, it could be argued that they are not being trained to a desirable development level. It is therefore time for health care authorities to determine the role of the advanced practice nurse in relation to functional positions, and allow them to make an advance in the development of unified skills for the whole National Health System. From our experience we have learned that the advanced practice nurse is a resource that helps in the sustainability of services, thanks to the efficiency shown in the results obtained from the care given to both chronic and complex chronic patients. PMID:24468495

  13. The Doctor of Nursing Practice: defining the next steps.

    PubMed

    Grey, Margaret

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to summarize the previous articles in this special issue of the Journal of Nursing Education that are based on the Committee on Institutional Cooperation's Dean's Conference on the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) and to identify areas of consensus, as well as areas of controversy. Areas of consensus include the high level of interest in DNP programs and the intent to expand the role of the advanced practice nurse to population health, policy, and leadership. Areas of controversy include the nature of the DNP product, the definition of clinical experiences, the nature of the capstone project, the outcomes of these new practitioners, and the impact on schools. Suggestions for achieving higher levels of consensus, including the need for respective, inclusive dialogue, are provided. PMID:23875725

  14. Preparing African American nurses for graduate school: practical tips.

    PubMed

    Jones, Diana P

    2009-01-01

    Returning to school for an advanced degree in nursing is a major lifetime decision and a new phase in life, whether you set an academic, career or professional goal. As in any new experience some degree of anxiety is to be expected and could result in frustration and uncertainty. For some African American students navigating the application process can be a challenging experience. However by following a few practical tips and using a variety of resources, your experience can be an exhilarating and a successful accomplishment. The primary aim of this article is to delineate strategies for academic success with a focus on African American students who are considering graduate education in nursing. This article offers practical help on how to get started in selecting a graduate nursing program, details on navigating the application process, and suggested approaches for surviving in graduate school. PMID:19715227

  15. Practice of preventive dentistry for nursing staff in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Acu√Īa-Reyes, Raquel; Cigarroa-Mart√≠nez, Didier; Ure√Īa-Bogar√≠n, Enrique; Orgaz-Fern√°ndez, Jose David

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Determine the domain of preventive dentistry in nursing personnel assigned to a primary care unit. Methods: Prospective descriptive study, questionnaire validation, and prevalence study. In the first stage, the questionnaire for the practice of preventive dentistry (CPEP, for the term in Spanish) was validated; consistency and reliability were measured by Cronbach's alpha, Pearson's correlation, factor analysis with intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). In the second stage, the domain in preventive dental nurses was explored. Results: The overall internal consistency of CPEP is őĪ= 0.66, ICC= 0.64, CI95%: 0.29-0.87 (p >0.01). Twenty-one subjects in the study, average age 43, 81.0% female, average seniority of 12.5 were included. A total of 71.5% showed weak domain, 28.5% regular domain, and there was no questionnaire with good domain result. The older the subjects were, the smaller the domain; female nurses showed greater mastery of preventive dentistry (29%, CI95%: 0.1-15.1) than male nurses. Public health nurses showed greater mastery with respect to other categories (50%, CI95%: 0.56-2.8). Conclusions: The CDEP has enough consistency to explore the domain of preventive dentistry in health-care staff. The domain of preventive dentistry in primary care nursing is poor, required to strengthen to provide education in preventive dentistry to the insured population. PMID:25386037

  16. [The ethical concerns of the private practice nurse].

    PubMed

    Pivot, Annie

    2015-12-01

    Ethics, by its definition, is a philosophical discipline which enables human beings to behave, to act and to be, in the best way possible, between themselves and towards their environment. In private nursing practice, the ethical dimension is based on personal reflection which enables each individual to adapt their attitude in order to act for the best. PMID:26675108

  17. Exploring nursing students’ experience of peer learning in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Ravanipour, Maryam; Bahreini, Masoud; Ravanipour, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Peer learning is an educational process wherein someone of the same age or level of experience level interacts with other students interested in the same topic. There is limited evidence specifically focusing on the practical use of peer learning in Iran. The aim of this study was to explore nursing students’ experiences of peer learning in clinical practice. Materials and Methods: A qualitative content analysis was conducted. Focus groups were used to find the students’ experiences about peerlearning. Twenty-eight baccalaureate nursing students at Bushehr University of Medical Sciences were selected purposively, and were arranged in four groups of seven students each. The focus group interviews were conducted using a semi-structured interview schedule. All interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using conventional content analysis method. Results: The analysis identified four themes: Paradoxical dualism, peer exploitation, first learning efficacy, and socialization practice. Gained advantages and perceived disadvantages created paradoxical dualism, and peer exploitation resulted from peer selection and peer training. Conclusion: Nursing students reported general satisfaction concerning peer learning due to much more in-depth learning with little stress than conventional learning methods. Peer learning is a useful method for nursing students for practicing educational leadership and learning the clinical skills before they get a job. PMID:26097860

  18. Competency Based Curriculum Guide for Practical Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey State Dept. of Education, Trenton. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This document contains entry-level practical nursing competencies arranged in eight categories. Each competency appears on a separate sheet on which is included a list of points of knowledge the student should possess in order to meet the competency and a statement regarding evaluative criteria for the competency. Competencies in the following…

  19. Genetic Association Studies in Nursing Practice and Scholarship

    PubMed Central

    Underwood, Patricia C.; Read, Catherine Y.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the role of genetic association studies in risk assessment for common complex diseases. Organizing Framework: An introduction to the types of genetic association studies is followed by a discussion of their potential use in risk assessment for age-related macular degeneration and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The benefits and limitations of this burgeoning technology are explored and related to nursing practice and scholarship. Conclusions: Nurses in practice must be prepared to assist clients with decisions about seeking and interpreting results from genetic association studies and nurse researchers must apply current guidelines for conducting robust studies and applying the results of such studies in clinical practice. Clinical Relevance: Data collected from genetic association studies will increasingly be used to identify novel prevention and treatment strategies for many complex diseases. An understanding of the principles that underlie this new science is essential for nurses in all areas of clinical practice as they design, test, and implement appropriate intervention and prevention strategies based on genetic association studies. PMID:18840203

  20. Nurses in Practice: A Perspective on Work Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Marcella Z., Ed.; And Others

    A major portion of the collection of 20 readings authored by practicing professionals consists of field observations presented both as raw data (field notes) and as analyzed and organized data. About the work of nurses in a variety of settings, a recurrent theme is that work behavior is greatly influenced by organizational and structural elements…

  1. Competency Based Curriculum Guide for Practical Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey State Dept. of Education, Trenton. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This document contains entry-level practical nursing competencies arranged in eight categories. Each competency appears on a separate sheet on which is included a list of points of knowledge the student should possess in order to meet the competency and a statement regarding evaluative criteria for the competency. Competencies in the followingÖ

  2. Missouri Responses to the Advanced Practice Nurse Role.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armer, Jane M.

    1997-01-01

    A randomly drawn statewide sample of 891 Missouri consumers revealed overall support for the advance practice nurse role to be greater than 75%. Seeking health care consumers' reactions to proposed alternatives is a crucial step in planning and implementing a program of health care reform that will meet current and future health needs. (Author)

  3. Mobile Learning in Nursing Practice Education: Applying Koole's FRAME Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, Richard F.; Van Neste-Kenny, Jocelyne M. C.; Park, Caroline L.; Burton, Pamela A.; Meiers, Jan

    2009-01-01

    We report here on an exploratory formative evaluation of a project to integrate mobile learning into a Western Canadian college nursing program. Third-year students used Hewlett Packard iPAQ mobile devices for five weeks in a practice education course in April-May, 2007. Koole's (2009) "Framework for the Rational Analysis of Mobile Education"…

  4. [Nurses and the Mercosul regulations and control of professional practice].

    PubMed

    Vieira, A L

    1998-01-01

    A study comparing the regulation and control of the professional practice of nurses in Brasil, Argentina, Uruguay and Paraguay, delineating their particularities, differences and similarities in the perspective of the implementation of the Cone Sul Common Market, which presupposes the free circulation of workers in the workplaces of the member-countries of the Ascnsion Treaty. PMID:10776275

  5. Advancing nursing practice through social media: a global perspective.

    PubMed

    Barry, Jean; Hardiker, Nicholas R

    2012-09-01

    Social media has been used globally as a key vehicle for communication. As members of an innovative profession, many nurses have embraced social media and are actively utilizing its potential to enhance practice and improve health. The ubiquity of the Internet provides social media with the potential to improve both access to health information and services and equity in health care. Thus there are a number of successful nurse-led initiatives. However, the open and democratising nature of social media creates a number of potential risks, both individual and organisational. This article considers the use of social media within nursing from a global perspective, including discussion of policy and guidance documents. The impact of social media on both healthcare consumers and nurses is reviewed, followed by discussion of selected risks associated with social media. To help nurses make the most of social media tools and avoid potential pitfalls, the article conclusion suggests implications appropriate for global level practice based on available published guidance. PMID:23036062

  6. Postcolonial theory, nursing knowledge, and the development of emancipatory knowing.

    PubMed

    Bickford, Deanna

    2014-01-01

    Nurses must assume a leadership role in confronting inequitable access to health care. This imperative is realizable through contributions to the knowledge of the discipline, reflecting on the profession's mandate for social justice and elimination of health inequities, as well as embracing the diversity of nursing's fundamental patterns of knowing. Emancipatory knowing involves critically examining social, political, and institutional structures to uncover social injustices and inequities and disrupt the status quo, as well as asking critical questions. Postcolonial theory, aligned with these foundational principles, can be used to answer such critical questions, thus contributing to the advancement of disciplinary knowledge. PMID:25102212

  7. Vermont Nurse Internship Project. A Collaborative Enterprise Developed by Nurse Leaders from Education, Practice, and Regulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Susan A.

    2002-01-01

    Two pilot studies tested a postgraduate internship model to prepare entry-level nurses with the support of clinical preceptors. Elements included preceptor training and a core competence assessment tool. The second pilot resulted in improvements in transition to practice and satisfaction with preceptors. (Contains 15 references.) (SK)

  8. The impact of evidence-based practice in nursing and the next big ideas.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Kathleen R

    2013-01-01

    The impact of evidence-based practice (EBP) has echoed across nursing practice, education, and science. The call for evidence-based quality improvement and healthcare transformation underscores the need for redesigning care that is effective, safe, and efficient. In line with multiple direction-setting recommendations from national experts, nurses have responded to launch initiatives that maximize the valuable contributions that nurses have made, can make, and will make, to fully deliver on the promise of EBP. Such initiatives include practice adoption; education and curricular realignment; model and theory development; scientific engagement in the new fields of research; and development of a national research network to study improvement. This article briefly describes the EBP movement and considers some of the impact of EBP on nursing practice, models and frameworks, education, and research. The article concludes with discussion of the next big ideas in EBP, based on two federal initiatives, and considers opportunities and challenges as EBP continues to support other exciting new thinking in healthcare. PMID:23758422

  9. Reflection and moral maturity in a nurse's caring practice: a critical perspective.

    PubMed

    Sumner, Jane

    2010-07-01

    The likelihood of nurse reflection is examined from the theoretical perspectives of Habermas' Theory of Communicative Action and Moral Action and Sumner's Moral Construct of Caring in Nursing as Communicative Action, through a critical social theory lens. The argument is made that until the nurse reaches the developmental level of post-conventional moral maturity and/or Benner's Stage 5: expert, he or she is not capable of being inwardly directed reflective on self. The three developmental levels of moral maturity and Benner's stages are presented with discussion on whether or not there can be self-reflection because of an innate vulnerability that leads to self-protective behaviours. It is only when the confidence from mastery of practice has been achieved can the nurse be comfortable with reflection that enables him or her to become enlightened, emancipated, and empowered. The influences and constraints of the knowledge power between nurse and patient are acknowledged. The power hierarchy of the institution is recognized as constraining. PMID:20536765

  10. The Affordable Care Act: Primary Care and the Doctor of Nursing Practice Nurse.

    PubMed

    Lathrop, Breanna; Hodnicki, Donna R

    2014-01-01

    The passage of the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) initiated the transformation of the United States healthcare system. The ACA fosters a preventive healthcare model that emphasizes primary care, funds community health initiatives, and promotes quality care. These changes increase the need for well-prepared healthcare professionals. Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs) who hold the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree are prepared to meet this increased need by providing leadership in community health centers, serving on interdisciplinary teams, and advocating for and directing future policy initiates. In this article, the authors consider how the ACA will serve as a prevention model, describe the role of DNP nurses as primary care providers, explain how preventive healthcare can be enhanced through the use of a primary care model, and address associated challenges related to increasing preventive care in our healthcare system. They also discuss DNP nurse leadership opportunities related to community-based programs and policy strategies to strengthen primary care delivery. The authors conclude by noting the professional and legal barriers that need to be removed before DNP nurses will be able to provide the care they have been prepared to offer. PMID:26824838

  11. Grounded theory in medical laboratory science expert practice development.

    PubMed

    Leibach, Elizabeth Kenimer

    2011-01-01

    Grounded theory and methods related to expert practice development in medical laboratory science were described using data from a large national survey of medical laboratory scientists (MLS) overlaid on findings from analysis of expert practice domains reported in nursing literature. An extensive focus group/expert review iterative process followed by a survey of MLS practitioners produced 25 critical thinking (CT) behaviors important in expert practice. Factor analysis was applied to discern common threads or themes linking the CT behaviors. The 25 important CT behaviors were reduced to a 7-factor structure representing constructs underlying the individual, observable CT behaviors. This 7-factor structure in MLS was compared to the 7 practice domains identified in expert nursing practice. The comparison yielded commonality between MLS and nursing in CT behaviors observed in the 7 expert practice domains of both professions: professional techniques, caring communication, growing professionally, setting priorities, practicing with judgment, anticipating/revising, and creating unique meaning. Emergent grounded theory is that (1) critical thinking is a metaprocess that facilitates learning by interlinking the more basic processes associated with different learning orientations: cognitivist, behaviorist, humanist (affective), and situated/contextual learning, (2) CT behaviors are observable events following from the CT metaprocess, and (3) observations of CT behaviors increase as practice advances from novice to expert. Identification and definition of CT behaviors, i.e., practice competencies, along the continuum of novice to expert can serve as the foundation for MLS curriculum and instructional design as well as measurement and evaluation in both formal and continuing education settings. PMID:22420229

  12. The University of Iowa Nursing Collaboratory: A Partnership for Creative Education and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dreher, Melanie; Everett, Linda; Hartwig, Sally Mathis

    2001-01-01

    A nursing college and its clinical partners created the Nursing Collaboratory to generate, disseminate, and apply knowledge to practice through four domains: education, research, practice, and informatics. It serves as an incubator for innovative products and services that enhance nursing education and practice. (SK)

  13. Practical Nursing Curriculum Advisory Committee Report Including Suggested Philosophy, Suggested Competencies, Geriatric Care Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Univ., Iowa City. Coll. of Education.

    A study was made of the current and future role of practical nurses and the curricula used to prepare these nurses in the 16 programs in Iowa. A statewide committee of 14 persons involved in hiring, employing, and controlling practical nurse practice was formed. Between Fall 1987 and Spring 1989, the committee gathered and analyzed information and…

  14. Structurational divergence theory as explanation for troublesome outcomes in nursing communication.

    PubMed

    Nicotera, Anne M; Zhao, Xiaoquan; Mahon, Margaret M; Peterson, Emily B; Kim, Wonsun; Conway-Morana, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Structurational divergence (SD) theory captures negative communication cycles resulting from interpenetration of incompatible meaning structures. It is estimated that 12-15% of practicing nurses suffer from a problematic level of SD. With a sample of 713 nurses (57 departments) in a large hospital, this study tests a model positing SD as a root explanation of nursing job satisfaction and turnover. A number of variables long presumed to be explanations for job satisfaction and turnover were hypothesized as mediators between SD and those outcomes. Path analysis showed support for burnout, role conflict, bullying, and organizational identification as useful mediators, explaining 68% of the variance in job satisfaction, and 45% in intentions to leave. The study also explores relationships between SD and hospital quality indicators. SD is a concern because it powerfully explains a number of poor outcomes and provides an underlying explanation for a number of factors that predict job satisfaction and turnover. PMID:24926968

  15. Measuring the impact of an interprofessional multimedia learning resource on Japanese nurses and nursing students using the Theory of Planned Behavior Medication Safety Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Omura, Mieko; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Stone, Teresa Elizabeth; Maguire, Jane; Lapkin, Samuel

    2015-12-01

    Interprofessional communication and teamwork are essential for medication safety; however, limited educational opportunities for health professionals and students to develop these skills exist in Japan. This study evaluated the impact of an interprofessional multimedia learning resource on registered nurses' and nursing students' intention to practice in a manner promoting medication safety. Using a quasi-experimental design, Japanese registered nurses and nursing students (n‚ÄČ=‚ÄČ203) were allocated to an experimental (n‚ÄČ=‚ÄČ109) or control group (n‚ÄČ=‚ÄČ94). Behavioral intentions of medication safety and the predictor variables of attitudes, perceived behavioral control, and subjective norms were measured using a Japanese version of the Theory of Planned Behavior Medication Safety Questionnaire. Registered nurses in the experimental group demonstrated a greater intention to collaborate and practice in a manner that enhanced medication safety, evidenced by higher scores than the control group on all predictor variables. The results demonstrate the potential for interprofessional multimedia learning resources to positively impact the behaviors of Japanese registered nurses in relation to safe medication practices. Further research in other contexts and with other cohorts is warranted. PMID:26138636

  16. On the night shift: advanced nurse practice in emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Jennifer

    2016-05-01

    Advanced nurse practitioners in the author's emergency department (ED) work autonomously and as part of a team to assess, diagnose and treat patients with unexplained and undiagnosed illnesses and injuries over a 24-hour cycle of care. The complexity of the role in EDs is often not fully understood, and expectations can vary between trusts and between different clinical areas within trusts. This article describes one night shift in the author's ED to explain the complexity of advanced nurse practitioners' roles in this environment. The article focuses on autonomous decision-making skills and the use of advanced clinical skills in the context of evidence-based practice. PMID:27165394

  17. Nurse residency program: best practices for optimizing organizational success.

    PubMed

    Meyer Bratt, Marilyn

    2013-01-01

    A nurse residency program's best practice recommendations are presented within this article and are organized around three processes: establishing the program infrastructure, creating a multistaged evidence-based program, and sustaining the program through appropriate evaluation and dissemination of results. These recommendations represent lessons learned and key findings derived from a team of academic and nursing professional development educators after 7 years of residency program implementation at multiple rural and urban hospital sites. Organizations, regardless of size and resources, can use these recommendations to increase the likelihood of building a successful residency program. PMID:23703268

  18. Cultural Diversity Training: The Necessity of Cultural Competence for Health Care Providers and in Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Young, Susan; Guo, Kristina L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the need to provide culturally sensitive care to the growing number of diverse health care consumers. A literature review of national standards and research on cultural competency was conducted and specifically focused on the field of nursing. This study supports the theory that cultural competence is learned over time and is a process of inner reflection and awareness. The domains of awareness, skill, and knowledge are essential competencies that must be gained by health care providers and especially for nurses. Although barriers to providing culturally sensitive care exist, gaining a better understanding of cultural competence is essential to developing realistic education and training techniques, which will lead to quality professional nursing practice for increasingly diverse populations. PMID:27111680

  19. Practice Theory: Viewing Leadership as Leading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Jane; Kemmis, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by Theodore Schatzki's "societist" approach--in which he advocates a notion of "site ontologies"--in this article, we outline our theory of practice architectures (a theory about what practices are composed of) and ecologies of practices (how practices relate to one another). Drawing on case studies of four Australian…

  20. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Practical Nursing Programs CIP: 51.1613--Practical Nurse (L.P.N. Training). Postsecondary Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the practical nursing program. Presented in the introductory section are a description of the program and suggested course sequence. Section I lists baseline competencies, and section II…

  1. Understanding partnership practice in child and family nursing through the concept of practice architectures.

    PubMed

    Hopwood, Nick; Fowler, Cathrine; Lee, Alison; Rossiter, Chris; Bigsby, Marg

    2013-09-01

    A significant international development agenda in the practice of nurses supporting families with young children focuses on establishing partnerships between professionals and service users. Qualitative data were generated through interviews and focus groups with 22 nurses from three child and family health service organisations, two in Australia and one in New Zealand. The aim was to explore what is needed in order to sustain partnership in practice, and to investigate how the concept of practice architectures can help understand attempts to enhance partnerships between nurses and families. Implementation of the Family Partnership Model (FPM) is taken as a specific point of reference. Analysis highlights a number of tensions between the goals of FPM and practice architectures relating to opportunities for ongoing learning; the role of individual nurses in shaping the practice; relationships with peers and managers; organisational features; and extra-organisational factors. The concept of practice architectures shows how changing practice requires more than developing individual knowledge and skills, and avoids treating individuals and context separately. The value of this framework for understanding change with reference to context rather than just individual's knowledge and skills is demonstrated, particularly with respect to approaches to practice development focused on providing additional training to nurses. PMID:23336287

  2. Thinking Like a Nurse and Perceived Readiness for Professional Practice: A Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowdoin, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Thinking like a nurse (TLN) has been identified as a core competency of professional nursing practice. The term embraces the full context of the daily metacognitive process nurses use to provide competent nursing care and was theorized in this study to have four attributes: critical thinking, clinical judgment, moral reasoning, and professionalÖ

  3. Communication, Coordination and Knowledge Sharing in the Implementation of CPOE: Impact on Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Tip; Norton, Michele; Skiba, 2 Diane

    2006-01-01

    The implementation of CPOE has transformed the delivery of healthcare. It has also significantly impacted nursing practice by refocusing the role of nurses in direct patient care. These changes have highlighted the vital role that nurses play in communication, coordination and knowledge sharing. CPOE has the potential to maximize productivity and contribute to improved patient safety and improved work environment for nurses. PMID:17238547

  4. Communication, coordination and knowledge sharing in the implementation of CPOE: impact on nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Tip; Norton, Michele; Skiba, Diane

    2006-01-01

    The implementation of CPOE has transformed the delivery of healthcare. It has also significantly impacted nursing practice by refocusing the role of nurses in direct patient care. These changes have highlighted the vital role that nurses play in communication, coordination and knowledge sharing. CPOE has the potential to maximize productivity and contribute to improved patient safety and improved work environment for nurses. PMID:17238547

  5. Thinking Like a Nurse and Perceived Readiness for Professional Practice: A Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowdoin, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Thinking like a nurse (TLN) has been identified as a core competency of professional nursing practice. The term embraces the full context of the daily metacognitive process nurses use to provide competent nursing care and was theorized in this study to have four attributes: critical thinking, clinical judgment, moral reasoning, and professional…

  6. Transfusion-associated necrotizing enterocolitis: translating knowledge into nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Luton, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a leading cause of prolonged hospitalizations for premature infants in the United States. In a recent large retrospective study, a significant proportion of NEC cases were shown to occur within 48 hours of packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusion, especially in growing preterm neonates of older postnatal age. A small body of evidence consistently demonstrates that 25-35 percent of NEC cases are temporally associated with PRBC transfusion and that cases of NEC associated with transfusion are generally more severe with a higher rate of surgical intervention and mortality. Awareness of this association is vital for potential prevention and early recognition of NEC. The neonatal nurse has a primary role in care strategies that may affect NEC. This review of literature was compiled to educate neonatal nurses about the existence of transfusion-associated necrotizing enterocolitis and guide the translation of knowledge into nursing practice at the bedside. PMID:23666186

  7. Infusing Theory into Practice, Practice into Theory: Small Wins and Big Gains for Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rog, Debra J.

    2015-01-01

    This article illustrates the synergistic role between practice and theory in evaluation. Using reflective practice, the author reviews her own work as well as the work of other evaluators to illustrate how theory can influence practice and, in turn, how evaluation practice can inform and grow theory, especially evaluation theory. The following…

  8. Infusing Theory into Practice, Practice into Theory: Small Wins and Big Gains for Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rog, Debra J.

    2015-01-01

    This article illustrates the synergistic role between practice and theory in evaluation. Using reflective practice, the author reviews her own work as well as the work of other evaluators to illustrate how theory can influence practice and, in turn, how evaluation practice can inform and grow theory, especially evaluation theory. The followingÖ

  9. How Do Dyslexic Nursing Students Cope with Clinical Practice Placements? The Impact of the Dyslexic Profile on the Clinical Practice of Dyslexic Nursing Students: Pedagogical Issues and Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Geraldine A.; Gale, Anne

    2006-01-01

    The safety of dyslexic nurses, and whether they are a danger to their patients, has been widely discussed. This empirical study sought to discover the impact of the dyslexic profile on clinical practice for nursing students. Two focus groups of third-year nursing students in higher education were set up: a control group and a dyslexic group. The…

  10. Creativity and connections: the future of nursing education and practice: the Massachusetts Initiative.

    PubMed

    Sroczynski, Maureen; Gravlin, Gayle; Route, Paulette Seymour; Hoffart, Nancy; Creelman, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Education and practice partnerships are key to effective academic program design and implementation in a time of decreasing supply and increasing demands on the nursing profession. An integrated education/practice competency model can positively impact patient safety, improve patient care, increase retention, and ensure a sufficient and competent nursing workforce, which is paramount to survival of the health care system. Through the contributions of nursing leaders from the broad spectrum of nursing and industry organizations within the state, the Massachusetts Nurse of the Future project developed a competency-based framework for the future design of nursing educational programs to meet current and future practice needs. The Massachusetts Nurse of the Future Nursing Core Competencies(©) expand on the Institute of Medicine's core competencies for all health care professionals and the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses competencies for quality and safety to define the expectations for all professional nurses of the future. The Massachusetts Nurse of the Future Nursing Core Competencies define the knowledge, attitude, and skills required as the minimal expectations for initial nursing practice following completion of a prelicensure professional nursing education program. These competencies are now being integrated into new models for seamless, coordinated nursing curriculum and transition into practice within the state and beyond. PMID:22142929

  11. Moral Exemplars in Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zagzebski, Linda

    2013-01-01

    In this article I outline an original form of ethical theory that I call exemplarist virtue theory. The theory is intended to serve the philosophical purposes of a comprehensive moral theory, but it is also intended to serve the practical purpose of moral education by structuring the theory around a motivating emotion--the emotion of admiration.…

  12. Improving the adoption of evidence-based practice among nurses in Army outpatient medical treatment facilities.

    PubMed

    Yackel, Edward E; Short, Nancy M; Lewis, Paul C; Breckenridge-Sproat, Sara T; Turner, Barbara S

    2013-09-01

    This quality improvement project implemented and evaluated an evidence-based practice (EBP) program at two Army outpatient health care facilities. The EBP program consisted of five implementation strategies that aimed to inculcate EBP into organizational culture as well as nursing practice and culture. A conceptual model of the "Diffusion of Innovations" theory was adapted to explain the application of the program. The Institutional Review Boards at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center and Duke University School of Medicine reviewed and exempted this quality improvement project. A pretest-posttest design was used with four instruments at each facility. The EBP program was successful in enhancing organizational culture and readiness for EBP (p < 0.01) and nursing staff's belief about the value of EBP and their ability to implement it (p < 0.05). Another indicator that the EBP program achieved its goals was the significant difference (p = 0.002) in the movement of the outpatient health care facilities toward an EBP culture. These results suggest that this EBP program may be an effective method for empowering outpatient nursing staff with the knowledge and tools necessary to use evidence-based nursing practice. PMID:24005550

  13. Development and reliability testing of a survey: measuring trusting and deference behaviors in microethical nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Krautscheid, Lorretta C; Britton, Justin; Craig, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Novice post-licensure nurses are frequently exposed to microethical nursing practice problems during their first 24 months of formative practice. Often, novice nurses trust the advice of experienced nurse coworkers, deferring to such advice even when they know the advice contradicts evidence-based practice. This study revealed the prevalence of deference behaviors and associated rationale. Study findings emphasize the importance of incorporating conflict management, effective communication techniques, ethical frameworks, and EBP standards within pre- and post-licensure education. PMID:25790362

  14. Differences Between Irish and Australian Psychiatric Nurses' Family-Focused Practice in Adult Mental Health Services.

    PubMed

    Grant, Anne; Goodyear, Melinda; Maybery, Darryl; Reupert, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Psychiatric nurses' practice with parents who have mental illness, their children and families is an important issue internationally. This study provides a comparison of Irish and Australian psychiatric nurses' family-focused practices in adult mental health services. Three hundred and forty three nurses across Ireland and 155 from Australia completed the Family Focused Mental Health Practice Questionnaire. Cross-country comparisons revealed significant differences, in terms of family-focused skill, knowledge, confidence and practice. Australian psychiatric nurses engaged in higher family-focused practice compared to Irish nurses. The comparative differences between countries may be attributable to differences in training, workplace support and policy. PMID:26992860

  15. Implementing differentiated practice: personal values and work satisfaction among hospital staff nurses.

    PubMed

    Prothero, M M; Marshall, E S; Fosbinder, D M

    1999-01-01

    This project was part of a collaborative model for nursing staff development and student education. Personal values and work satisfaction of 49 staff nurses working on three hospital units were compared. One of the units employed differentiated practice. Results revealed high similarity in personal values among all nurses. Work satisfaction was significantly higher among nurses working on the unit employing differentiated practice. The importance of assessing personal values of nurses emerged as an important aspect of staff development, and differentiated practice appeared to be related to staff nurse satisfaction. PMID:10776131

  16. Discovering the nature of advanced nursing practice in high dependency care: a critical care nurse consultant's experience.

    PubMed

    Fairley, Debra

    2005-06-01

    This paper describes how a critical care nurse consultant's clinical role has evolved within a surgical high dependency unit (SHDU) in a large teaching hospitals trust. In order to provide some background to role development, an overview of the research exploring the nature of advanced nursing practice in the context of critical care will be presented. From the outset, advanced nursing practice was not perceived as the acquisition and application of technical procedures usually undertaken by doctors, but possibly an integration of medicine and nursing where holistic nursing assessment is combined with symptom-focused physical examination. A reflective account of practical problems encountered relating to role integration, professional autonomy, legal and consent issues, non-medical prescribing, and role evaluation will be presented. A model of working that can be applied to high dependency units, integrating the role of the advanced nurse practitioner within the clinical team, will be described. PMID:15907666

  17. Supporting student nurses in practice with additional online communication tools.

    PubMed

    Morley, Dawn A

    2014-01-01

    Student nurses' potential isolation and difficulties of learning on placement have been well documented and, despite attempts to make placement learning more effective, evidence indicates the continuing schism between formal learning at university and situated learning on placement. First year student nurses, entering placement for the first time, are particularly vulnerable to the vagaries of practice. During 2012 two first year student nurse seminar groups (52 students) were voluntarily recruited for a mixed method study to determine the usage of additional online communication support mechanisms (Facebook, wiki, an email group and traditional methods of support using individual email or phone) while undertaking their first five week clinical placement. The study explores the possibility of strengthening clinical learning and support by promoting the use of Web 2.0 support groups for student nurses. Results indicate a high level of interactivity in both peer and academic support in the use of Facebook and a high level of interactivity in one wiki group. Students' qualitative comments voice an appreciation of being able to access university and peer support whilst working individually on placement. Recommendations from the study challenge universities to use online communication tools already familiar to students to complement the support mechanisms that exist for practice learning. This is tempered by recognition of the responsibility of academics to ensure their students are aware of safe and effective online communication. PMID:23871299

  18. Doctor of nursing practice program development: reengineering health care.

    PubMed

    Wall, Barbra M; Novak, Julie C; Wilkerson, Sharon A

    2005-09-01

    In this article, we describe the developmental process of a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program that uses interdisciplinary resources to create unique DNP curriculum opportunities. Other schools may benefit from this experience in the development of their own DNP programs. The program delivers an innovative curriculum from post-baccalaureate to doctorate, emphasizing health care engineering and interdisciplinary collaboration among faculty, hospitals, community leaders, and policymakers. This DNP program is uniquely situated to provide leadership in solving complex clinical problems through its partnership with the Regenstrief Center for Healthcare Engineering, the School of Pharmacy, the Homeland Security Institute, and the Center on Aging and the Life Course. Doctoral coursework, interdisciplinary collaboration, health care engineering/systems approaches, and new knowledge result in uniquely qualified providers. Post-baccalaureate students complete the university's Adult Nurse Practitioner program or its developing Pediatric Nurse Practitioner program during the first 2 years of the 4-year curriculum. A total of 83 post-baccalaureate credit hours include 1,526 hours of supervised clinical practice, a health policy residency, and cognate residencies in an area of specialization. The seven core competencies recommended by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing are incorporated into the curriculum. PMID:16220646

  19. Female genital mutilation: knowledge, attitude and practice among nurses.

    PubMed Central

    Onuh, Sunday O.; Igberase, Gabriel O.; Umeora, Joaness O. U.; Okogbenin, Sylvanus A.; Otoide, Valentine O.; Gharoro, Etedafe P.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Female genital mutilation (FGM) and cutting is a subject of global interest, with many countries of the world still practicing it despite efforts by the WHO and other agencies to discourage the practice. The highest known prevalence is in Africa. OBJECTIVES: To determine the knowledge, attitude and practice of FGM among nurses in the ancient metropolis of Benin in a Nigerian state where FGM is illegal. RESULTS: One-hundred-ninety-three nurses in the study hospital were recruited in the study out of which 182 (94.3%) appropriately filled and returned the questionnaires. The average age of respondents was 37 years, and the average duration of postgraduation experience was 14.5 years. Most respondents are of Bini (36.8%) and Esan (34.1%) ethnic origin. All respondents identified at least one form of FGM, but only 12 respondents (6.6%) could correctly identify the four types of FGM. The harmful effects of FGM identified by the majority of respondents include hemorrhage, difficult labor/childbirth, genital tears, infections and scar/keloid formation. Forty-four (24.2%) of respondents were of the opinion that some forms of FGM are harmless. Eighty nurses admitted to having undergone FGM, for a prevalence of 44%. Five respondents (2.8%) view FGM as a good practice and will encourage the practice. Twelve respondents (6.6%) routinely perform FGM out of which seven (58.3%) viewed FGM as a bad practice. Nurses performing FGM routinely were those who had spent >20 years (59%) and 11-20 years (41%) in the profession. Another 26 (14.3%) had performed FGM before, though not on a routine basis. Of this latter group, 15 will perform FGM in the future when faced with certain circumstances. Reasons for FGM practice were mainly cultural. Eight of the respondents would have their daughters circumcised. CONCLUSION: Nurses perceive FGM in Benin as cultural. Almost half have had FGM themselves, and a small percentage recommend it to their daughters. Discouraging FGM practice will require culturally sensitive education of the healthcare providers and the population at large on the ill effects of FGM, including the risk to health and violations of human rights. PMID:16573307

  20. Establishing Policy Foundations and Regulatory Systems to Enhance Nursing Practice in the United Arab Emirates

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Lyndal H.; Aqtash, Salah; Day, Gary E.

    2015-01-01

    In 2009, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) established a Nursing and Midwifery Council with a mandate to develop standards for the registration and regulation of nursing and midwifery and to strengthen the nursing and midwifery workforce. Priorities included workforce Emiratization and the development of regulatory standards to support advanced and speciality nursing practice and new models of care‚ÄĒparticularly for the management of noncommunicable diseases. This article provides background, context for, and best practice inputs to the effort to provide one unified framework of nursing regulation and licensure across the whole of the UAE. This article is intended for nurse leaders, policy makers, and regulators who are reviewing or developing nursing regulatory processes and advancing nursing workforce capacity building activities; and nurse educators and nurses wishing to work in the UAE. PMID:25944674

  1. Career Mobility: Implementing the Ladder Concept in Associate Degree and Practical Nursing Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Story, Donna Ketchum

    Designing a career ladder curriculum is not simply taking an existing practical nurse curriculum and an associate degree nursing curriculum and placing one after the other. The curriculum is designed to produce students who are competent practitioners as practical nurses at the end of the first level and then allow them to continue for an…

  2. Nursing Faculty Decision Making about Best Practices in Test Construction, Item Analysis, and Revision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killingsworth, Erin Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    With the widespread use of classroom exams in nursing education there is a great need for research on current practices in nursing education regarding this form of assessment. The purpose of this study was to explore how nursing faculty members make decisions about using best practices in classroom test construction, item analysis, and revision in…

  3. Humanist ideology and nurse education. I. Humanist educational theory.

    PubMed

    Purdy, M

    1997-06-01

    Nurse education is dominated by the humanist perspective and the educational theory that it generates. Following a brief description of the perspective's phenomenological foundations and definition of humanist ideology, humanist educational theory is illustrated in an outline of the key contributions of John Dewey, Carl Rogers, Malcolm Knowles and Paulo Freire. The article concludes by noting Freire's sociological challenge to the individualism of the humanist perspective. This challenge recognizes the ideological and social control role of education in securing the reproduction of power relations and leads to questioning the function of individualism and the interests that humanist ideology may serve. PMID:9277158

  4. Pain management: a practical approach to nursing education.

    PubMed

    Wacker, Margaret S; Pawasauskas, Jayne

    2002-01-01

    This article describes a program that provides a practical approach to educating staff nurses in pain management. The content is appropriate for adult patients across all clinical specialties. Pain assessment and commonly used analgesic and adjuvant medications are provided in nine educational sessions lasting 10 to 20 minute. Each presentation topic is prepared in Microsoft Power Point in three versions: slides, notes, and handouts. PMID:12180774

  5. Care erosion in hospitals: Problems in reflective nursing practice and the role of cognitive dissonance.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Jan; Timmins, Fiona

    2016-03-01

    Care erosion - gradual decline in care level - is an important problem in health care today. Unfortunately, the mechanism whereby it occurs is complex and poorly understood. This paper seeks to address this by emphasising problems in reflective nursing practice. Critical reflection on quality of care which should drive good care instead spawns justifications, denial, and trivialisation of deficient care. This perpetuates increasingly poor care levels. We argue that cognitive dissonance theory provides a highly effective understanding of this process and suggest for this approach to be incorporated in all efforts to address care erosion. The paper includes a detailed discussion of examples and implications for practice, in particular the need to restore critical reflection in nursing, the importance of embracing strong values and standards, and the need for increased awareness of signs of care erosion. PMID:26733428

  6. A new window into nurse manager development: teaching for the practice.

    PubMed

    Cathcart, Eloise Balasco; Greenspan, Miriam

    2012-12-01

    An important domain that emerged from the interpretation of 91 nurse manager (NM) narratives was achieving the right relationship between a NM and a recalcitrant staff member. This article depicts the qualitative distinctions in 2 stages of NM practice to show the importance of reflection on experiential learning in the development of expertise. This work confirms that NM development is more complex than teaching a curriculum of business and management theory and should include teaching for mastery of the skilled know-how of clinical leadership practice and formation of the person as manager. PMID:23151927

  7. Nursing home practices following resident death: the experience of Certified Nursing Assistants.

    PubMed

    Barooah, Adrita; Boerner, Kathrin; van Riesenbeck, Isabelle; Burack, Orah R

    2015-01-01

    This study examined certified nursing assistants' (CNAs) experiences of nursing home practices following resident death. Participants were 140 CNAs who had experienced recent resident death. In semi-structured, in-person interviews, CNAs were asked about their experiences with the removal of the resident's body, filling the bed with a new resident, and how they were notified about the death. The facilities' practice of filling the bed quickly was most often experienced as negative. Responses to body removal and staff notification varied, but negative experiences were reported by a substantial minority. Being notified prior to returning to work was associated with a more positive experience. Learning about the death by walking into a room to find the bed empty or already filled was the most negative experience. Study findings suggest that more mindful approaches to the transitions related to resident deaths would be valued by CNAs and could improve their work experience. PMID:25554351

  8. [Breast Care Nurses - nursing experts for breast cancer care. A path to "Advanced Nursing Practice" in Germany?].

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Anja; Wiedemann, Regina

    2010-12-01

    The role of Breast Care Nurses (BCNs) has been discussed since Breast Centres have been opened in Germany. This article introduces the concept of the Breast Care Nurses on a national and an international level in the context of Advanced Nursing Practice (ANP). Within a descriptive study, graduates of a German BCN-education programme were interrogated regarding their current work, their main activities as a BCN, about general conditions in their work environment, experienced barriers, and supporting factors. 122 questionnaires were evaluated. The return rate was 71 % (n = 171). Results showed that 58.1 % (n = 71) of the graduates were employed as a Breast Care Nurse, however only 28.1 % (n = 20) in a full-time and 35.2 % (n = 25) in a part-time position. This first German study about BCN-services showed a lack of basic work conditions, for example regarding a consultation room, access to literature, or templates for documentation. In the discussion part, the situation of the BCNs is reviewed in the German context and in relation to ANP concepts as well as regarding future demands for the position of a BCN. PMID:21154250

  9. Strategies used by experienced versus novice practice teachers to enact their role with community nurse students.

    PubMed

    Sayer, Lynn

    2011-08-01

    This study offers an original analysis of how community nurse practice teachers learn to enact their role. A constructivist grounded theory approach was applied to a study of thirty community nurse practice teachers. Practice teachers were interviewed using a lightly structured interview approach following ethical approval. The study found that practice teachers considered relationships and nurturance to be of central importance. This led to emphasis being placed on providing experience for students and formative assessment. A number of key differences between the way novice and experienced practice teachers saw themselves functioning were discovered. These differences were theorised to explain the finding that novice practice teachers were much more likely to identify students as experiencing major difficulties than experienced practice teachers. It was discovered that practice teachers learn to enact their role within a socio-cultural context drawing upon a transformation approach to learning. This approach becomes firmly established over a period of approximately three years and is at odds with the current emphasis on competency based transmission models of learning. PMID:21095045

  10. Factors influencing the intention of perinatal nurses to adopt the baby-friendly hospital initiative in southeastern quebec, Canada: implications for practice.

    PubMed

    Chabot, Guylaine; Lacombe, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Nurses play a major role in promoting the baby-friendly hospital initiative (BFHI), yet the adoption of this initiative by nurses remains a challenge in many countries, despite evidences of its positive impacts on breastfeeding outcomes. The aim of this study was to identify the factors influencing perinatal nurses to adopt the BFHI in their practice. Methods. A sample of 159 perinatal nurses from six hospital-based maternity centers completed a survey based on the theory of planned behavior. Hierarchical multiple linear regression analyses were performed to assess the relationship between key independent variables and nurses' intention to adopt the BFHI in their practice. A discriminant analysis of nurses' beliefs helped identify the targets of actions to foster the adoption the BFHI among nurses. Results. The participants are mainly influenced by factors pertaining to their perceived capacity to overcome the strict criteria of the BFHI, the mothers' approval of a nursing practice based on the BFHI, and the antenatal preparation of the mothers. Conclusions. This study provides theory-based evidence for the development of effective interventions aimed at promoting the adoption of the BFHI in nurses' practice. PMID:25101173

  11. Factors Influencing the Intention of Perinatal Nurses to Adopt the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative in Southeastern Quebec, Canada: Implications for Practice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Nurses play a major role in promoting the baby-friendly hospital initiative (BFHI), yet the adoption of this initiative by nurses remains a challenge in many countries, despite evidences of its positive impacts on breastfeeding outcomes. The aim of this study was to identify the factors influencing perinatal nurses to adopt the BFHI in their practice. Methods. A sample of 159 perinatal nurses from six hospital-based maternity centers completed a survey based on the theory of planned behavior. Hierarchical multiple linear regression analyses were performed to assess the relationship between key independent variables and nurses' intention to adopt the BFHI in their practice. A discriminant analysis of nurses' beliefs helped identify the targets of actions to foster the adoption the BFHI among nurses. Results. The participants are mainly influenced by factors pertaining to their perceived capacity to overcome the strict criteria of the BFHI, the mothers' approval of a nursing practice based on the BFHI, and the antenatal preparation of the mothers. Conclusions. This study provides theory-based evidence for the development of effective interventions aimed at promoting the adoption of the BFHI in nurses' practice. PMID:25101173

  12. Factors associated with the use of primary care services: the role of practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Vallejo-Torres, Laura; Morris, Stephen

    2011-08-01

    Rising demand for and costs of health care have led to an increasing role of practice nurses in primary care in many countries, including the United Kingdom. Previous research has explored how practice nurse care differs from that provided by general practitioners (GPs) in terms of costs and health outcomes, and has highlighted the importance of matching skills and experience with roles and responsibilities. However, there has been little research to compare the characteristics of patients seen by GPs and practice nurses in primary care. We aim to investigate the factors associated with the use of practice nurse visits, and to compare these with the factors associated with GP use. We jointly model the use of practice nurse and GP visits using a bivariate probit regression model with a large set of covariates taken from two rounds of the Health Survey for England (2001, 2002). We find that practice nurse use is associated with age and gender, health, socioeconomic and supply variables. There are differences in the factors associated with practice nurse and GP use. Chronically ill patients are more likely to see a practice nurse, while acute ill health has a stronger association with the probability of seeing the GP. Practice nurse use is also correlated with a narrower range of health conditions compared with GP use. We also found differences between practice nurse and GP visits with respect to the association with economic activity, ethnic group, number of children, degree of urbanisation, and distance to practice. PMID:20496159

  13. Best Practice at Your Fingertips: The WISHeS School Nurse Procedure Website.

    PubMed

    DuChateau, Teresa A; Beversdorf, Sarah; Wolff, Marie

    2015-05-01

    School nurses are responsible for providing and supervising school nursing services for children with complex health concerns. Given that school nurses frequently practice in isolation and may have limited access to clinical practice changes, they can benefit from up-to-date, evidence-based resources. Additionally, the resources must account for the fact that the nursing procedures will be performed in the unique setting of a school building and, in many cases, will be performed by school personnel who have limited formal education in health care. This article provides an overview of a newly developed, easy to use, online school nursing procedures website for school nurses and other school personnel. PMID:25816427

  14. Best Practice at Your Fingertips: The WISHeS School Nurse Procedure Website

    PubMed Central

    DuChateau, Teresa A.; Beversdorf, Sarah; Wolff, Marie

    2015-01-01

    School nurses are responsible for providing and supervising school nursing services for children with complex health concerns. Given school nurses frequently practice in isolation and may have limited access to clinical practice changes, they can benefit from up-to-date, evidence-based resources. Additionally, the resources must account for the fact that the nursing procedures will be performed in the unique setting of a school building and in many cases, will be performed by school personnel who have limited formal education in health care. This article provides an overview of a newly developed, easy to use, online school nursing procedures website for school nurses and other school personnel. PMID:25816427

  15. MOTHER AND INFANT CARE, PRACTICAL NURSE TRAINING PROGRAM, LESSON PLANS, PREPARED BY PRACTICAL NURSING INSTRUCTORS DURING CONFERENCE (UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE, AUGUST 14-18, 1961).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee State Board for Vocational Education, Murfreesboro. Vocational Curriculum Lab.

    PRACTICAL NURSE INSTRUCTORS, IN CONFERENCE, COMPILED THIS INDIVIDUALLY PLANNED AND TESTED MATERIAL TO BE USED IN PRACTICAL NURSE EDUCATION. THIRTY-TWO LESSON PLANS ON THE SUBJECT OF MOTHER AND INFANT CARE COVER TOPICS RANGING FROM THE REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEM TO COMPLICATIONS INVOLVING THE NEWBORN. EACH PLAN INCLUDES AIM, REFERENCES, MATERIALS,…

  16. Transition into practice: a comparison of outcomes between associate- and baccalaureate-prepared nurses participating in a nurse residency program.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Stacy

    2011-01-01

    This study compared the survey scores between associate- and baccalaureate-prepared new graduate nurses participating in a 1-year nurse residency program. The results revealed differences in some areas between the two groups. Within the staff development arena, the educational degree of the novice nurse may deserve greater consideration in the development of orientation or other support programs during the first year of practice. PMID:22108064

  17. Perspectives of Australian nursing directors regarding educational preparation for mental health nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Happell, Brenda; McAllister, Margaret

    2014-11-01

    There is an ongoing global shortage of mental health nurses. Within Australia, the principal strategy of offering a postgraduate education programme with various incentives to encourage nurses back to study has not been successful. This has led to the consideration of radical alternatives, including the return to pre-registration specialisation in mental health. The successful introduction of this strategy would require the full support of industry partners. To date, the voice of industry has not been heard in relation to this issue. The aim of this paper is to present the views of an Australian sample of mental health nursing directors regarding the resources and other factors required, should undergraduate specialist programmes in mental health be developed, to ensure they are relevant and likely to be successful. A qualitative exploratory research project was undertaken to explore the perspectives and opinions of industry partners. In-depth interviews were conducted with nursing directors (n = 12) in Queensland Australia. Five main themes were identified: relationships with universities; clinical placement preparation and support; workplace culture; facilitators and preceptors; and practical student learning. Genuine collaboration between the two organisations was considered crucial for delivering a quality programme and providing the required support for students. Transformative leadership could inform this collaboration by promoting acknowledgement of and respect for differences. PMID:25353302

  18. Acupuncture: theory, efficacy, and practice.

    PubMed

    Kaptchuk, Ted J

    2002-03-01

    Traditionally, acupuncture is embedded in naturalistic theories that are compatible with Confucianism and Taoism. Such ideas as yin-yang, qi, dampness, and wind represent East Asian conceptual frameworks that emphasize the reliability of ordinary, human sensory awareness. Many physicians who practice acupuncture reject such prescientific notions. Numerous randomized, controlled trials and more than 25 systematic reviews and meta-analyses have evaluated the clinical efficacy of acupuncture. Evidence from these trials indicates that acupuncture is effective for emesis developing after surgery or chemotherapy in adults and for nausea associated with pregnancy. Good evidence exists that acupuncture is also effective for relieving dental pain. For such conditions as chronic pain, back pain, and headache, the data are equivocal or contradictory. Clinical research on acupuncture poses unique methodologic challenges. Properly performed acupuncture seems to be a safe procedure. Basic-science research provides evidence that begins to offer plausible mechanisms for the presumed physiologic effects of acupuncture. Multiple research approaches have shown that acupuncture activates endogenous opioid mechanisms. Recent data, obtained by using functional magnetic resonance imaging, suggest that acupuncture has regionally specific, quantifiable effects on relevant brain structures. Acupuncture may stimulate gene expression of neuropeptides. The training and provision of acupuncture care in the United States are rapidly expanding. PMID:11874310

  19. Understanding Jordanian Psychiatric Nurses' Smoking Behaviors: A Grounded Theory Study

    PubMed Central

    Aldiabat, Khaldoun M.; Clinton, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Smoking is prevalent in psychiatric facilities among staff and patients. However, there have been few studies of how contextual factors in specific cultures influence rates of smoking and the health promotion role of psychiatric nurses. This paper reports the findings of a classical grounded theory study conducted to understand how contextual factors in the workplace influences the smoking behaviors of Jordanian psychiatric nurses (JPNs). Method. Semi-structured individual interviews were conducted with a sample of eight male JPNs smokers at a psychiatric facility in Amman, Jordan. Findings. Constant comparative analysis identified becoming a heavy smoker as a psychosocial process characterized by four sub-categories: normalization of smoking; living in ambiguity; experiencing workplace conflict; and, facing up to workplace stressors. Conclusion. Specific contextual workplace factors require targeted smoking cessation interventions if JPNs are to receive the help they need to reduce health risks associated with heavy smoking. PMID:23844286

  20. Current marketing practices in the nursing home sector.

    PubMed

    Calhoun, Judith G; Banaszak-Holl, Jane; Hearld, Larry R

    2006-01-01

    Marketing is widely recognized as an essential business function across all industries, including healthcare. While many long-term care facilities adopted basic healthcare marketing practices and hired marketing staff by the early 1990s, a paucity of research on nursing home marketing exists in the literature. This study examines the extent to which nursing homes have developed more formulated marketing and related communication and promotional strategies as market competition has increased in this sector during the past two decades. In addition, we explored managers' perceptions of their control over marketing decision making, the impact of competition on the use of marketing practices, and areas for enhanced competitive positioning. Administrators from 230 nursing homes in 18 Southeastern Michigan counties were surveyed regarding (1) the adoption level of approximately 40 literature-based, best-practice marketing strategies; (2) the types of staff involved with the marketing function; and (3) their perception of their level of control over marketing functions and of local competition. Results from 101 (44 percent) survey participants revealed that although respondents viewed their markets as highly competitive, their marketing practices remained focused on traditional and relatively constrained practices. In relation to the importance of customer relationship management, the majority of the administrators reported intensive efforts being focused on residents and their families, referrers, and staff, with minimal efforts being extended to insurers and other types of payers. A significant positive relation was found between the intensity of marketing initiatives and the size of the facility (number of beds), whereas significant negative correlations were revealed in relation to occupancy and the perceived level of control over the function. PMID:16770906

  1. Pain Management Practices by Nurses: An Application of the Knowledge, Attitude and Practices (KAP) Model.

    PubMed

    Alzghoul, Bashar I; Abdullah, Nor Azimah Chew

    2015-01-01

    Pain is one of the most common reasons that drive people to go to hospitals. It has been found that several factors affect the practices of pain management. In this regard, this study aimed at investigating the underlying determinants in terms of pain management practices. Based on reviewing the previous studies and the suggestions of the KAP model, it was hypothesized that the main elements of the KAP model (attitudes and knowledge) significantly predict the variation in the practices of nurses regarding pain management. A questionnaire comprising the KAP model' s constructs, i.e. knowledge and attitude towards pain management, as well as pain management practices, was used to collect data from 266 registered nurses (n=266) who are deemed competent in the management of patients' pain in the Jordanian public hospitals. The two constructs, attitude and knowledge, which are the main determinants of the KAP model were found to independently predict nurses' practices of managing patients' pain. Knowledge of pain management was found to be the strongest predictor. Additionally, it was found that about 69% of the variance in pain management could be explained by the constructs of the KAP model. Therefore, it is recommended that the Jordanian hospitals and universities focus on nurses' knowledge and attitude towards pain management in order to enhance their practices in the field of pain management. PMID:26755474

  2. Promoting professional nursing practice: linking a professional practice model to performance expectations.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Marcia; Hinch, Barbara; Llewellyn, Jane; Dillon, Paula J; Carlson, Elizabeth

    2011-03-01

    Professional practice models (PPMs) provide the conceptual framework for establishing professional nursing practice. Integrating a PPM requires complex organizational change. One strategy for integrating a PPM is to directly link the PPM with performance expectations to ensure that underlying beliefs are integrated into everyday practice. This article describes the development, implementation, and successful outcomes of a clinical advancement system that was aligned with a PPM. PMID:21320662

  3. Exploring the experiences of general practice nurse peer appraisers.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Julie; Kennedy, Susan

    2014-09-01

    Appraisals linked to personal development plans (PDPs) are a requirement for NHS organisations to carry out with all staff. NHS policy documents emphasise the importance of appraisal, professional development plans, lifelong learning and clinical supervision for nurses. However, there is limited research regarding appraisal for general practice nurses (GPNs). The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions and experiences of trained GPN appraisers when appraising nurse colleagues, with a particular focus on identifying the barriers and facilitators associated with the implementation of the appraisal process. Appraisals were undertaken using volunteer GPN peer appraisers (n=10) following a NES-approved appraiser course. Forty appraisals were carried out (3-5/appraiser). Following the appraisals, the appraisers were invited to participate in one of two focus groups. The focus groups were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Analysis of the data identified three main themes: role issues, reflection and appraisal interview practicalities. The findings highlighted that effective appraisal can be provided by GPNs and was highly valued by both appraisee and appraiser. The findings identified a number of barriers and facilitators to implementing peer appraisal. Given the unique and varied role GPNs undertake, this study has highlighted the importance of offering high-quality peer appraisal that encourages both reflection and the facilitation of more person-centred PDPs. PMID:25625834

  4. Background and managerial practice of nurses: paths for transforming praxis.

    PubMed

    Resck, Zťlia Marilda Rodrigues; Gomes, Elizabeth Laus Ribas

    2008-01-01

    Qualitative research using a dialectics view; the objective is to analyze the demands and the expectations from the setting of managerial practices in view of the Pedagogical Project and the strategies which may or may not favor the transforming praxis. It involves 11 students, 12 professors, and 12 service nurses who are the participants in the teaching-learning process of managerial knowledge, in the interceding space, in the fields of practice and in the curricular training programs, both in the hospital environment and in the basic health services and of the Nursing graduation course from a Federal University, from the city of Alfenas-MG. It uses the collecting technique by focal group and the analysis of the contents is subsided by two great discussions: background and work. The results point that the nurse's background and praxis must go through the work processes in the caring, managerial and educative dimensions as well as in the scientific investigation, building paths for the development of competences, in the teaching and service interaction, following the current National Curriculum Guidelines. PMID:18392534

  5. Influence of the Nursing Practice Environment on Job Satisfaction and Turnover Intention

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Yi; Kim, Chul-Woung; Kang, Jeong-Hee; Yoon, Tae-Ho; Kim, Cheoul Sin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To examine whether the nursing practice environment at the hospital-level affects the job satisfaction and turnover intention of hospital nurses. Methods: Among the 11 731 nurses who participated in the Korea Health and Medical Workers’ Union’s educational program, 5654 responded to our survey. Data from 3096 nurses working in 185 general inpatient wards at 60 hospitals were analyzed using multilevel logistic regression modeling. Results: Having a standardized nursing process (odds ratio [OR], 4.21; p<0.001), adequate nurse staffing (OR, 4.21; p<0.01), and good doctor-nurse relationship (OR, 4.15; p<0.01), which are hospital-level variables based on the Korean General Inpatients Unit Nursing Work Index (KGU-NWI), were significantly related to nurses’ job satisfaction. However, no hospital-level variable from the KGU-NWI was significantly related to nurses’ turnover intention. Conclusions: Favorable nursing practice environments are associated with job satisfaction among nurses. In particular, having a standardized nursing process, adequate nurse staffing, and good doctor-nurse relationship were found to positively influence nurses’ job satisfaction. However, the nursing practice environment was not related to nurses’ turnover intention. PMID:25284197

  6. A Case Study of Factors Leading to Student Success in an Accelerated Licensed Practical Nurse to Associate Degree Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sherry T.

    2012-01-01

    This case study attempted to discover and comprehend the relationship of students and contributing factors of success, of one Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) to Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) program, to formulate an understanding of which contributing factors are most beneficial to enable students to persist to graduation and/or successfully…

  7. The challenges of communicating research evidence in practice: perspectives from UK health visitors and practice nurses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Health practitioners play a pivotal role in providing patients with up-to-date evidence and health information. Evidence-based practice and patient-centred care are transforming the delivery of healthcare in the UK. Health practitioners are increasingly balancing the need to provide evidence-based information against that of facilitating patient choice, which may not always concur with the evidence base. There is limited research exploring how health practitioners working in the UK, and particularly those more autonomous practitioners such as health visitors and practice nurses working in community practice settings, negotiate this challenge. This research provides a descriptive account of how health visitors and practice nurses negotiate the challenges of communicating health information and research evidence in practice. Methods A total of eighteen in-depth telephone interviews were conducted in the UK between September 2008 and May 2009. The participants comprised nine health visitors and nine practice nurses, recruited via adverts on a nursing website, posters at a practitioner conference and through recommendation. Thematic analysis, with a focus on constant comparative method, was used to analyse the data. Results The data were grouped into three main themes: communicating evidence to the critically-minded patient; confidence in communicating evidence; and maintaining the integrity of the patient-practitioner relationship. These findings highlight some of the daily challenges that health visitors and practice nurses face with regard to the complex and dynamic nature of evidence and the changing attitudes and expectations of patients. The findings also highlight the tensions that exist between differing philosophies of evidence-based practice and patient-centred care, which can make communicating about evidence a daunting task. Conclusions If health practitioners are to be effective at communicating research evidence, we suggest that more research and resources need to be focused on contextual factors, such as how research evidence is negotiated, appraised and communicated within the dynamic patient-practitioner relationship. PMID:23835038

  8. Coaching to promote professional development in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Narayanasamy, Aru; Penney, Vivian

    This article presents coaching, which facilitates the highest form of learning, as a potential strategy for promoting professional development in nursing. In doing so, it sets out what coaching is and highlights its benefits in terms of team building, adaptation to changes, career planning and professional development. Having established the rudiments of coaching and identifying its qualities, the article then sets out strategies of coaching using three models: the 3-D Technique Model, The Practice Spiral Model and The Grow Model. Three case histories are presented to explain how these models could be used to implement coaching and personal learning plans (PLP). Directions are provided where training for coaching is available. It is concluded that coaching can be a powerful tool in enhancing nurses' and other health professionals' ability to contribute to the success of healthcare organisations. PMID:24933546

  9. Effective methods for disseminating research findings to nurses in practice.

    PubMed

    Cronenwett, L R

    1995-09-01

    Professionals in all disciplines are challenged by the proliferation of new knowledge. Nurses, too, must find cost-effective ways of ensuring that their patients are benefiting from the most current knowledge about health and illness. The methods of research dissemination to clinicians described in this article are presumed to be effective because of anecdotal reports, conference evaluations, or clinician surveys. The profession needs more sophisticated evaluations of the effectiveness of various dissemination methods. In the meantime, whether you are a researcher, an administrator, an educator, or a clinician, you have a role to play in improving research dissemination. Implement just one strategy from this article and evaluate the results. Each contribution moves nursing toward research-based practice. PMID:7567569

  10. [Education and health regarding citizenship: a nurses' group practice].

    PubMed

    de Lima, C B; Baptista, S de S

    1997-01-01

    This study was run in a community committee of Nossa Senhora da Aparecida, a surrounding city of Joao Pessoa, Paraiba. It aimed at characterizing nursing practice there and discussing its occurrence. The analysis was run based on eight inhabitants and four nurses speeches through semistructured interviews whose data were collected qualitatively. It focused on the discussion which evolved from questions regarding to education and health from the perspective of exercising citizenship. In the participants of the study representations, education seemed dynamic and implied awareness ... a question of life. Health is comprehended under 3 points of view: the one of welfare, the one of suffering and the one of biological balance. The perspective of citizenship exercise reveals itself sometimes as conformism, through silence or resignation and sometimes as resistance, through the ideal manifestation and courage for fighting for better life condition. PMID:10765333

  11. Prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms in hospital nurse technicians and licensed practical nurses: associations with demographic factors

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Roberta F. C.; Sato, Tatiana O.; Foltran, Fabiana A.; Silva, Luciana C. C. B.; Coury, Helenice J. C. G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective : This cross-sectional study aimed at analyzing: 1. the main musculoskeletal symptoms (MSS) presented by hospital nursing workers and; 2. personal, occupational, and health factors related to MSS among them. Method : Two questionnaires were filled in by 245 nurse technicians (NTs) and licensed practical nurses (LPNs) (response rate 95%) associated with direct patient care sectors from a hospital. These questionnaires were: the standardized version of the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) and one including questions on 15 demographic independent variables potentially related to outcomes from the NMQ. Univariate analyses and binary logistic regression analyses were performed to identify which variables would explain the occurrence of MSS in different body regions. Results: The low back (57%), shoulder (52%), and neck (48%) were identified as the most affected regions. The logistic regression analysis showed that low back symptoms in the last 12 months were significantly associated with LPN activities (OR=2.36; CI=1.24-4.5) and previous sick leave due to MSS (OR=5.97; CI=1.2-29.1). Smoking was significantly associated with symptoms in the low back (OR=2.77; CI=1.13-6.8) and thoracic spine (OR=2.37; CI=1.04-5.40). Physical exercise showed a protective effect on the cervical spine (OR=0.42; CI=0.23-0.77). Previous sick leave was significantly associated with pain in the knees (OR=4.24; CI=1.33-13.5) and in the upper limbs (OR=5.36; CI=1.07-26.7). Conclusions: The nursing workers who were evaluated presented a high prevalence of MSS. Previous history of sick leave was strongly associated with the presence of symptoms in various body regions. These results indicate the need for preventive programs in the hospital environment in order to control more severe MSS in nursing professionals. PMID:25054385

  12. Integrating Practice-to-Theory and Theory-to-Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, R. Burke; Stefurak, Tres

    2012-01-01

    In "Towards a systemic theory of gifted education", Ziegler and Phillipson offer a useful critique of current research and the current paradigm in gifted education. They provide an interesting and useful merging of systems theory with their actiotope model, and using this paradigm they suggest many fruitful areas for future research. However, the…

  13. Integrating Practice-to-Theory and Theory-to-Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, R. Burke; Stefurak, Tres

    2012-01-01

    In "Towards a systemic theory of gifted education", Ziegler and Phillipson offer a useful critique of current research and the current paradigm in gifted education. They provide an interesting and useful merging of systems theory with their actiotope model, and using this paradigm they suggest many fruitful areas for future research. However, theÖ

  14. Critical Theory: Implications for School Leadership Theory and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peca, Kathy

    The school leader's behaviors are inspired by theories, and theories are intrinsic to practice. This paper provides an overview of an emerging perspective in educational administration, critical theory. The paper first highlights the philosophies of Immanuel Kant, Fichte, Hegel, Marx, and the Frankfurt School. It then discusses critical theory…

  15. Patient Safety and Patient Safety Culture in Nephrology Nurse Practice Settings: Issues, Solutions, and Best Practices.

    PubMed

    Kear, Tamara; Ulrich, Beth

    2015-01-01

    In order to assure patient safety, it is necessary to create positive patient safety cultures. This article presents the initial qualitative results from a national study, "Patient Safety Culture in Nephrology Nurse Practice Settings." Based on the responses of participants, themes were identified for both issues and potential solutions and best practices. Issue themes included underreporting of events and near misses, poor staffing ratios, long work hours, communication lapses, and training, infection control, and compliance. Potential solutions and best practice themes included non-punitive and transparent event reporting, fall reduction strategies, improved medication administration practices, and scheduled safety huddles and safety meetings. The results of this landmark study can be used to start conversations and spark education programs to improve patient safety culture in nephrology nurse practice settings. PMID:26207273

  16. Spirituality of staff nurses: application of modeling and role modeling theory.

    PubMed

    Koren, Mary Elaine; Papadimitriou, Christina; Papamiditriou, Christina

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study examines the spiritual needs of staff nurses. Focus group participants discussed "care of the patient" and "care of self." We use theory to argue that self-care is essential for the care of both nurses and patients, and spirituality is the foundation of nurses' work. PMID:23211387

  17. Theory Loves Practice: A Teacher Researcher Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hochtritt, Lisa; Thulson, Anne; Delaney, Rachael; Dornbush, Talya; Shay, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Once a month, art educators from the Denver metro area have been gathering together in the spirit of inquiry to explore issues of the perceived theory and daily practice divide. The Theory Loves Practice (TLP) group was started in 2010 by Professors Rachael Delaney and Anne Thulson from Metropolitan State University of Denver (MSU) and now has 40Ö

  18. Theory Loves Practice: A Teacher Researcher Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hochtritt, Lisa; Thulson, Anne; Delaney, Rachael; Dornbush, Talya; Shay, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Once a month, art educators from the Denver metro area have been gathering together in the spirit of inquiry to explore issues of the perceived theory and daily practice divide. The Theory Loves Practice (TLP) group was started in 2010 by Professors Rachael Delaney and Anne Thulson from Metropolitan State University of Denver (MSU) and now has 40…

  19. Advanced practice nursing for enduring health needs management: a global perspective.

    PubMed

    Koskinen, Liisa; Mikkonen, Irma; Graham, Iain; Norman, Linda D; Richardson, Jim; Savage, Eileen; Schorn, Mavis

    2012-07-01

    Advanced practice nursing expertise has been acknowledged worldwide as one response to the challenges arising from changes in society and health care. The roots of advanced practice nursing education are at the University of Colorado where the first known programme started in 1965. In many countries advanced practice nurses (APNs) have taken responsibility for routine patient care formerly carried out by physicians in order to reduce their workload. However, more and more, APNs have taken responsibility for new service areas and quality programmes not previously provided. Chronic disease management is one of these new service areas because long-term diseases are increasingly challenging service systems globally. This article is based on an international APN partnership. The aim of the article is to describe how the partnership will design a 15 ECTS credit course on Enduring Health Need Management as a cross-cultural collaborative endeavour. The adaptation of an inquiry based learning framework will be described drawing on four main principles of the theory: authentic learning communities; student encouragement in analysing gradually more complicated problems; networking in knowledge creation and; student engagement and activity. The cross-cultural online course aims to increase APNs' intercultural competence as well as their global and international work orientation. PMID:21839552

  20. Review: Pediatric nursing status and its application analysis based on high quality nursing theory.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junling; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Yufang; Shang, Xin'ai; Shi, Zhen; Ma, Xiang'an

    2015-03-01

    children's health concerns the revitalization and future of countries and nations. Pediatric nursing management is always the research hotspot of the international nursing field, and also the weak step in nursing management of China. China is now in a severe situation, i.e., shortage and loss of pediatric nursing staffs. In addition, a huge gap lies in the subject development between China and developed countries. This paper discussed the problems existing in the development of pediatric nursing as well as the application effect of high quality nursing in pediatric nursing, in order to promote the development of pediatric nursing and provide reference for nursing managers. PMID:25796166

  1. Professional development in rural nursing: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Cindy

    2009-03-01

    Nurses working in rural settings face challenges not found in urban and suburban areas. These challenges affect nursing care, the nursing profession, and the professional development of the individual nurse. To understand rural nursing, a clear definition of rural nursing and of rural nursing theory is essential. There are many challenges in the rural setting for nursing, particularly regarding enhancement of nurses' professional development. With a clear understanding of rural nursing practice, nurse leaders and educators can work to meet the challenges and embrace the opportunities afforded by nursing in the rural setting. PMID:19326820

  2. ["And it is always recommended"--educational concepts and expertise in nursing practice].

    PubMed

    Darmann-Finck, Ingrid

    2006-06-01

    This article presents the results of a qualitative empirical study of interaction between teachers and students during lessons in nursing training, focussing in particular on the perspectives of nursing didactics. It examines whether the classes warrant appropriate preparation for beginners with regard to the complex demands of professional practice. The presentation focuses on a widespread educational concept named "rule-orientation". This category summarises those communication patterns of teachers which create rules for operating in typical nursing situations and which are presented as benchmarks for professional practice. Limitations associated with this concept are (1) lacking science-based justification of those operation rules, (2) the communication of standards and recipes instead of clinical judgement, and (3) the partial resolution of intrinsically contradictious demands in nursing practice. Three nursing didactical target dimensions for nursing education are being concretised as a referential framework for class-related decisions that can contribute to better qualify nursing students for professional practice. PMID:16821327

  3. A multilevel analysis of the effects of the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index on nurse outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Allison S; Erickson, Rebecca J; Moran, Christina M; Diefendorff, James M; Bromley, Gail E

    2013-12-01

    Few researchers have examined how the components of the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index (PES-NWI) relate to nurses' well-being at multiple organizational levels. The objective of the study was to perform a multilevel assessment of the relationships of the PES-NWI subscales with three nurse outcomes: job satisfaction, emotional exhaustion, and turnover intentions. Additionally, we tested the multilevel factor structure of the PES-NWI. In a sample of 699 full-time registered nurses in 79 units and 9 branches of a hospital system, relationships of the NWI with nurse outcomes were fairly consistent across levels of analysis. However, subscales contributed differently to the three outcomes, demonstrating the complexity of environmental influences on nurses' work experience. PMID:24122833

  4. Voices that care: licensed practical nurses and the emotional labour underpinning their collaborative interactions with registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Truc; Alderson, Marie; Nadon, Michelle; Kershaw-Rousseau, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    Recognizing the emotional labour underlying interprofessional collaborations (IPCs) could be considered a crucial step towards building a cohesive nursing team. Although IPCs between registered nurses (RNs) and licensed practical nurses (LPNs) have been linked to quality nursing care, little is known about the emotions experienced by LPNs during their interactions with RNs or those factors that influence IPCs. A questionnaire administered to 309‚ÄČLPNs found that (1) the professional identity of LPNs has evolved into a that of a unique social group; (2) LPNs define IPC as an interpersonal process of exploring similar or dissimilar assessments of a patient's status with RNs and, together, establishing a course of nursing actions; (3) the primary organizational factor facilitating IPCs is inclusive nursing leadership; (4) the interpersonal factor promoting IPCs is the level of trust RNs extend to LPNs; and (5) an LPN's emotional labour (i.e., internal emotional regulation) is most tangible during uncollaborative interactions with RNs. PMID:22135732

  5. Voices That Care: Licensed Practical Nurses and the Emotional Labour Underpinning Their Collaborative Interactions with Registered Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Truc; Alderson, Marie; Nadon, Michelle; Kershaw-Rousseau, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    Recognizing the emotional labour underlying interprofessional collaborations (IPCs) could be considered a crucial step towards building a cohesive nursing team. Although IPCs between registered nurses (RNs) and licensed practical nurses (LPNs) have been linked to quality nursing care, little is known about the emotions experienced by LPNs during their interactions with RNs or those factors that influence IPCs. A questionnaire administered to 309‚ÄČLPNs found that (1) the professional identity of LPNs has evolved into a that of a unique social group; (2) LPNs define IPC as an interpersonal process of exploring similar or dissimilar assessments of a patient's status with RNs and, together, establishing a course of nursing actions; (3) the primary organizational factor facilitating IPCs is inclusive nursing leadership; (4) the interpersonal factor promoting IPCs is the level of trust RNs extend to LPNs; and (5) an LPN's emotional labour (i.e., internal emotional regulation) is most tangible during uncollaborative interactions with RNs. PMID:22135732

  6. Putting Theory to Practice and Practice to Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baskett, H. K. Morris; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Continuing educators have several options for practice: (1) being clear about the nature of their business; (2) adopting a holistic approach; (3) building better preprofessional programs; (4) moving to where learning occurs; (5) legitimizing practical knowledge; and (6) addressing contextual influences. (SK)

  7. Succession planning for the future through an academic-practice partnership: a nursing administration master's program for emerging nurse leaders.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Rose; Dyess, Susan; Hannah, Ed; Prestia, Angela

    2013-01-01

    A global nursing leadership shortage is projected by the end of this decade. There is an urgent need to begin developing emerging nurse leaders now. This article describes the work of an academic-practice partnership collaborative of nurse leaders. The goal of the partnership is to develop and promote an innovative enhanced nursing administration master's program targeted to young emerging nurse leaders, who have not yet moved into formal leadership roles. An action research design is being used in program development and evaluation. Qualities needed by emerging leaders identified through research included a need to be politically astute, competency with business skills required of nurse leaders today, comfort with ambiguity, use of a caring approach, and leadership from a posture of innovation. The current curriculum was revised to include clinical immersion with a nurse leader from the first semester in the program, a change from all online to online/hybrid courses, innovative assignments, and a strong mentorship component. Eighteen young emerging nurse leaders began the program in January 2012. Early outcomes are positive. The emerging nurse leaders may be uniquely positioned, given the right skills sets, to be nurse leaders in the new age. PMID:23222750

  8. Advancing HIV Nursing Practice: The Doctor of Nursing Practice HIV Specialty at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Willard, Suzanne; Nelson, John; Reyes, Darcel; Linn, Annńď

    2016-01-01

    The move to integrate HIV treatment and care into primary care is a major obstacle for the current U.S. health care workforce. Many HIV specialty providers will soon retire, while few primary care clinicians have been adequately trained in the diagnosis, care, and treatment of people living with HIV. The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) has supported the development of a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program with an HIV specialty at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, to assure successful transition to an HIV primary care workforce. The Rutgers School of Nursing has been at the forefront of the DNP education movement and is among the first to develop an HIV-focused DNP program. Thirty-seven students have enrolled in the 3-year program, and two have graduated from the first cohort. Here we discuss the planning, implementation, successes, and recommendations of the new program. PMID:27086187

  9. Tidewater Regional Model for Articulation and Coordination of Nursing Education. Task Analyses Guides for Licensed Practical Nurses Pursuing an Associate Degree in Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norfolk Public Schools, VA.

    This instructional guide includes the curriculum for two complete and separate courses to be taught at the associate degree level. The first six units of the guide are the course content for a 2-3 semester hour course, "Transition from Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) to Associate Degree Nursing (ADN)." The entire content of the guide, 19 units inÖ

  10. Tidewater Regional Model for Articulation and Coordination of Nursing Education. Task Analyses Guides for Licensed Practical Nurses Pursuing an Associate Degree in Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norfolk Public Schools, VA.

    This instructional guide includes the curriculum for two complete and separate courses to be taught at the associate degree level. The first six units of the guide are the course content for a 2-3 semester hour course, "Transition from Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) to Associate Degree Nursing (ADN)." The entire content of the guide, 19 units in…

  11. Successful aging in the United States and China: a theoretical basis to guide nursing research, practice, and policy.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong; Ling, Jiying; McCarthy, Valerie Lander

    2015-03-01

    Successful aging is gaining increasing attention given the growth in the older adult population. Criteria and definitions within multiple disciplines vary greatly in Western literature, with no consensus on its meaning. Sociocultural, economic, and political differences between the Western view of successful aging and its view in China add to the confusion. Similarities and differences in the meaning of successful aging in the United States and China are examined, and potential for a common definition useful to nursing in both countries is explored. Using concept analysis, shared criteria for successful aging were the following: decreased incidence of disease and disability, life satisfaction, meaning and purpose in life, and ability to cope effectively to achieve goals based on personal values and priorities. A comprehensive, multidimensional definition of successful aging for nursing and a midrange nursing theory of successful aging were identified that may be useful to guide nursing research, practice, and policy. PMID:24841471

  12. Examining Harasim's Online Collaborative Learning Theory for Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breen, Henny

    2013-01-01

    Online nursing education has been evolving at a rapid pace as it is recognized as offering the flexibility needed for practicing associate degree (ADN) and diploma prepared Registered Nurses to return to school to earn their BSN. At the same time, there is a paradigm shift in how nursing education is delivered. The focus has shifted from content…

  13. [Evidence-based practice in nursing curricula: the experience of nursing degree course of Reggio Emilia. A pilot study].

    PubMed

    Finotto, Stefano; Chiesi, Ivens; Mecugni, Daniela; Casali, Patrizia; Doro, Lucia Maria Grazia; Lusetti, Simona

    2010-01-01

    Given the lack of evidence in literature concerning the presence of Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) in nursing curricula, but considering its importance in order to educate future nurses to use critical thinking and to base their practice on scientific evidence, tutors and nursing teachers of the Nursing Degree Course of Reggio Emilia (Università degli Studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia), have decided to introduce a three-year laboratory of EBP. The purposes of this project are: to describe the three-year EBP laboratory of Nursing Degree, its objectives, its structure, its integration with practical training and nursing subjects and its students evaluation strategies; to get students verify the perception of the usefulness of the three-year EBP laboratory regarding the elaboration of the graduation thesis, the search for appropriatem answers for patients met during clinical trainings and the usefulness of the EBP process in view of the development of their professional career. The design of research of this pilot study is correlation-descriptive. It has been selected a sample of convenience consisting of 56 nurses graduated in the autumn session of the academic year 2007-2008. For data collection we have used an electronic questionnaire (Microsoft Word with closed fields) structured for the purpose. The laboratory has been effective in learning to use the database to search for evidences and to use the database to search for evidences related to nursing problems met in training placements. Finally, graduated nurses consider the EBP process an essential element of professional nursing luggage. Although the sample is restricted the results indicates the good educational choice made by our Nursing Degree Course of integrating the EBP Laboratory in the curriculum. PMID:21167112

  14. How a better understanding of transformational leadership can help improve your practice as a nurse administrator.

    PubMed

    Skelton-Green, J M

    1995-01-01

    Nursing administrators of today find themselves practising in an environment of permanent whitewater--an environment of chaotic change. Not only is the environment changing, so too are our employees: their needs, motives and priorities are vastly different than those we knew 20 years ago. The challenges of permanent whitewater cannot be overcome without effective leadership. Theorists agree that most North American organizations are currently overmanaged and underled. Certainly the leadership record of Canadian health care institutions has not been impressive. This paper will examine a selected set of concepts which the author believes are essential for nursing administrators who wish to provide real leadership to their departments and organizations: transformational (as compared to transactional) leadership; feminine (as compared to masculine) leadership; and empowerment. The literature review draws out both theory and practical applications. PMID:8603066

  15. Most Likely to Achieve: Predicting Early Success of the Practical Nurse Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cline, April P.

    2013-01-01

    It is important that practical nurse (PN) educators be able to identify which students are likely to be successful in their programs. However, the majority of literature related to predicting success of nursing students has been done on baccalaureate nursing students in the university setting. This study sought to determine whether the same…

  16. Knowledge and Practice of Nursing Staff towards Infection Control Measures in the Palestinian Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fashafsheh, Imad; Ayed, Ahmad; Eqtait, Faeda; Harazneh, Lubna

    2015-01-01

    Health care professionals are constantly exposed to microorganisms. Many of which can cause serious or even lethal infections. Nurses in particular are often exposed to various infections during the course of carrying out their nursing activities. Therefore nurses should have sound knowledge and strict adherence to infection control practice. Aim…

  17. Addressing Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome in Advanced Practice Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nokes, Kathleen M.; Stein, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    A survey of 23 advanced practice nursing programs showed only 3 had HIV-specific graduate-level nursing courses. Recommendations were made for HIV-specific courses, integration of HIV content into other courses, use of Centers for Disease Control and Occupational Safety and Health Administration guidelines, and subspecialties in HIV nursing. (SK)

  18. Providing Assistance to the Victims of Adolescent Dating Violence: A National Assessment of School Nurses' Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khubchandani, Jagdish; Telljohann, Susan K.; Price, James H.; Dake, Joseph A.; Hendershot, Candace

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study assessed the perceptions and practices of school nurses regarding adolescent dating violence (ADV). Methods: The membership list of the National Association of School Nurses was used to identify a national random cross-sectional sample of high school nurses in the United States (N?=?750). A valid and reliable survey…

  19. Most Likely to Achieve: Predicting Early Success of the Practical Nurse Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cline, April P.

    2013-01-01

    It is important that practical nurse (PN) educators be able to identify which students are likely to be successful in their programs. However, the majority of literature related to predicting success of nursing students has been done on baccalaureate nursing students in the university setting. This study sought to determine whether the sameÖ

  20. The process of becoming: from specialty practice to community-based nursing.

    PubMed

    Furlong, Beth; Andrews, Aris

    2004-01-01

    This article reports on the experience of the School of Nursing at Creighton University in cross-educating faculty to community-based nursing. In the late 1990's the Helene Fuld Health Trust recognized the importance of preparing nursing faculty for community-based nursing because of changing trends in the health care system. Placed in the historical context of the early beginnings of nursing practice in the community, this renewed emphasis led to seeking grant support from the Trust to strengthen the place of community-based nursing for faculty and students alike to be responsive to future changes in health care. PMID:15495762

  1. Emotion work in paramedic practice: the implications for nurse educators.

    PubMed

    Williams, Angela

    2012-05-01

    Contemporary paramedic practice involves the emergency assessment, management, treatment and transport of the public with minor and major; potentially life threatening conditions (Caroline, 2008). Paramedics are exposed to a myriad of human emotions related to suffering, pain, devastating trauma and death. Managing their own and others emotions appears to be a crucial component of their work, however there is a paucity of evidence relating to this aspect of the role. The movement of preregistration paramedic education into higher education has impacted on nurse educators in some settings, who are undertaking key administrative, managerial, teaching and personal tutoring roles. This is a valuable opportunity for nurse educators to contribute to the education of student paramedics in the crucial area of emotion work as part of interprofessional health care education. This paper examines emotional labour in health care, historical influences on paramedic education, the limited empirical research and the impact of gender, which provide insights into this profession crucial for nurse educators. The implications of emotion work for the educational curriculum and the support of student paramedics are discussed and strategies such as counselling, reflection and personal tutoring are suggested. Mentorship selection and preparation are highlighted and the need for a cultural change in attitude towards emotion work. PMID:21640449

  2. 76 FR 14033 - National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... and Practice; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee... Council on Nurse Education and Practice (NACNEP). Dates and Times: April 11, 2011, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. April.... Purpose: The purpose of this meeting is to address diversity in nurse education and practice....

  3. Changing Nephrology Nurses' Beliefs about the Value of Evidence-Based Practice and Their Ability to Implement in Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Hain, Debra; Haras, Mary S

    2015-01-01

    A rapidly evolving healthcare environment demands sound research evidence to inform clinical practice and improve patient outcomes. Over the past several decades, nurses have generated new knowledge by conducting research studies, but it takes time for this evidence to be implemented in practice. As nurses strive to be leaders and active participants in healthcare redesign, it is essential that they possess the requisite knowledge and skills to engage in evidence-based practice (EBP). Professional nursing organizations can make substantial contributions to the move healthcare quality forward by providing EBP workshops similar to those conducted by the American Nephrology Nurses'Association. PMID:26875231

  4. Growing practice specialists in mental health: addressing stigma and recruitment with a nursing residency program.

    PubMed

    Ng, San; Kessler, Linda; Srivastava, Rani; Dusek, Janice; Duncan, Deborah; Tansey, Margaret; Jeffs, Lianne

    2010-05-01

    Despite the growing prevalence and healthcare needs of people living with mental illness, the stigma associated with mental health nursing continues to present challenges to recruiting new nurses to this sector. As a key recruitment strategy, five mental health hospitals and three educational institutions collaborated to develop and pilot an innovative nursing residency program. The purpose of the Mental Health Nursing Residency Program was to dispel myths associated with practising in the sector by promoting mental health as a vibrant specialty and offering a unique opportunity to gain specialized competencies. The program curriculum combines protected clinical time, collaborative learning and mentored clinical practice. Evaluation results show significant benefits to clinical practice and an improved ability to recruit and retain nurses. Nursing leadership was crucial at multiple levels for success. In this paper, we describe our journey in designing and implementing a nursing residency program for other nurse leaders interested in providing a similar program to build on our experience. PMID:20463449

  5. [Strategy for promoting evidence-based nursing practice in hospital].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Tang, Lee-Chun; Chou, Shin-Shang

    2013-10-01

    Evidence-based practice has been demonstrated to improve quality of care, increase patients' satisfaction, and reduce the costs of medical care. Therefore, evidence-based practice is now central to the clinical decision-making process and to achieving better quality of care. Today, it is one of the important indicators of core competences for healthcare providers and accreditation for healthcare and educational systems. Further, evidence-based practice encourages in-school and continuous education programs to integrate evidence-based elements and concepts into curricula. Healthcare facilities and professional organizations proactively host campaigns and encourage healthcare providers to participate in evidence-based related training courses. However, the clinical evidence-based practice progress is slow. The general lack of a model for organizational follow-up may be a key factor associated with the slow adoption phenomenon. The authors provide a brief introduction to the evidence-based practice model, then described how it may be successfully translated through a staged process into the evidence-based practices of organizational cultures. This article may be used as a reference by healthcare facilities to promote evidence-based nursing practice. PMID:24096462

  6. Australian Nurse Practitioner Practice: Value Adding through Clinical Reflexivity

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Michelle; Murfet, Giuliana

    2015-01-01

    The role of the Australian Nurse Practitioner (NP) is in its infancy and at a crossroads where extensive research demonstrates effective quality care and yet the role remains underrecognised and underutilised. The translation of practice into ‚Äúvalue‚ÄĚ is critical for the sustainability of NP roles and requires the practitioner to adopt a systematic method of inquiry. Kim's (1999) ‚ÄúCritical Reflective Inquiry‚ÄĚ (CRI) method was adapted by two Australian NPs who specialise in diabetes and chronic disease management. Kim highlights the intent of CRI as understanding the meaning of practice, delivering improvements to practice through self-reflection, and the critique of practice that can lead to practice changes and development of new models of care translated to ‚Äúproducts‚ÄĚ of value. Based on the thematically analysis of 3 years of CRI application, the authors formed 5 headings that represented the NP's practice as Specialised Care Access, Complications and Diagnostics Interventions, Pharmaceutical Treatment, Vulnerable Populations, and Leadership. The utility of CRI demonstrates how NP practice is integral to a continuous cycle of addressing health care services gaps, and the conversion of ‚Äúproducts‚ÄĚ into ‚Äúvalue‚ÄĚ and positions the NP to assimilate the role of the practitioner-researcher. PMID:25705517

  7. Enhancing Trifocal Leadership Practices Using Simulation in a Pediatric Charge Nurse Orientation Program.

    PubMed

    Clark, Teresa J; Yoder-Wise, Patricia S

    2015-07-01

    A well-established charge nurse orientation program was enhanced with the addition of a simulation, addressing three primary populations (the trifocus) with whom charge nurses interact: patients, patients' parents, and other staff members. In this pilot quality improvement project, 20 staff nurses enrolled in the orientation program and were assigned a mentor. Only one participant used the mentorship opportunity; therefore, it is not discussed here. Twelve nurses completed all charge nurse classes and a simulation scenario of caring for a deteriorating infant. The nurses were given an opportunity to reflect on leadership practices after the simulation. Thematic analysis from qualitative, reflective data supported the enhanced understanding of managing complex patients, a code situation, and teams; guiding a team's novice nurse; leading as a charge nurse; and using clinical and critical thinking skills. All nurses reported that the simulation as experiential learning helped them to meet their leadership goals. PMID:26154673

  8. The effect of state laws on the supply of advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Kalist, David E; Spurr, Stephen J

    2004-12-01

    This paper considers how the decision to enter advanced practice nursing (e.g., the occupations of nurse practitioner, certified nurse-midwife, nurse anesthetist, and clinical nurse specialist) is affected by State laws on the scope of practice of APNs. We find that enrollments in APN programs are 30 percent higher in States where APNs have a high level of professional independence. Our work differs from previous studies by estimating a fixed effects model on cross-sectional and time series data, to avoid problems of endogeneity of State laws. PMID:15467405

  9. Political dreams, practical boundaries: the case of the Nursing Minimum Data Set, 1983-1990.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    The initial development of the Nursing Minimum Data Set (NMDS) was analyzed based on archival material from Harriet Werley and Norma Lang, two nurses involved with the project, and American Nurses Association materials. The process of identifying information to be included in the NMDS was contentious. Individual nurses argued on behalf of particular data because of a strong belief in how nursing practice (through information collection) should be structured. Little attention was paid to existing practice conditions that would ultimately determine whether the NMDS would be used. PMID:21329148

  10. Web-Based Virtual Patients in Nursing Education: Development and Validation of Theory-Anchored Design and Activity Models

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Research has shown that nursing students find it difficult to translate and apply their theoretical knowledge in a clinical context. Virtual patients (VPs) have been proposed as a learning activity that can support nursing students in their learning of scientific knowledge and help them integrate theory and practice. Although VPs are increasingly used in health care education, they still lack a systematic consistency that would allow their reuse outside of their original context. There is therefore a need to develop a model for the development and implementation of VPs in nursing education. Objective The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a virtual patient model optimized to the learning and assessment needs in nursing education. Methods The process of modeling started by reviewing theoretical frameworks reported in the literature and used by practitioners when designing learning and assessment activities. The Outcome-Present State Test (OPT) model was chosen as the theoretical framework. The model was then, in an iterative manner, developed and optimized to the affordances of virtual patients. Content validation was performed with faculty both in terms of the relevance of the chosen theories but also its applicability in nursing education. The virtual patient nursing model was then instantiated in two VPs. The studentsí perceived usefulness of the VPs was investigated using a questionnaire. The result was analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results A virtual patient Nursing Design Model (vpNDM) composed of three layers was developed. Layer 1 contains the patient story and ways of interacting with the data, Layer 2 includes aspects of the iterative process of clinical reasoning, and finally Layer 3 includes measurable outcomes. A virtual patient Nursing Activity Model (vpNAM) was also developed as a guide when creating VP-centric learning activities. The students perceived the global linear VPs as a relevant learning activity for the integration of theory and practice. Conclusions Virtual patients that are adapted to the nursing paradigm can support nursing studentsí development of clinical reasoning skills. The proposed virtual patient nursing design and activity models will allow the systematic development of different types of virtual patients from a common model and thereby create opportunities for sharing pedagogical designs across technical solutions. PMID:24727709

  11. Theory vs. Practice: Student Preferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, John Jr.; Hernon, Peter

    1981-01-01

    Contrasts the theoretical and practical aspects of professional library educational curriculums from the students' perspective, and examines the students' theoretical or practical orientation toward a variety of variables. This includes influences of sex, term in school, undergraduate or graduate degree, preprofessional work experience, andÖ

  12. Utilizing constructivism learning theory in collaborative testing as a creative strategy to promote essential nursing skills.

    PubMed

    Duane, Barbara T; Satre, Maria E

    2014-01-01

    In nursing education, students participate in individual learner testing. This process follows the instructionist learning theory of a system model. However, in the practice of nursing, success depends upon collaboration with numerous people in different capacities, critical thinking, clinical reasoning, and the ability to communicate with others. Research has shown that collaborative testing, a constructivism learning activity and a form of collaborative learning, enhances students' abilities to master these areas. Collaborative testing is a clear, creative strategy which constructivists would say supports the socio-linguistic base of their learning theory. The test becomes an active implementation of peer-mediated learning where individual knowledge is enhanced through problem solving or defense of an individual position with the collaborative method. There is criticism for the testing method's potential of grade inflation and for students to receive grade benefits with little effort. After a review of various collaborative testing methods, this nursing faculty implemented a collaborative testing format that addresses both the positive and negative aspects of the process. PMID:23608232

  13. A recommendation to use the diffusion of innovations theory to understand school nurses' role in HPV vaccine uptake.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Brittany; Goodson, Patricia

    Vaccinations represent one of the greatest public health achievements of the past century, but their success largely depends on populations' uptake. Seven years after its approval in 2006 for females, the HPV vaccination rates remain relatively low. Previous literature provides information about research examining U.S. physicians, pediatricians, and other healthcare providers' knowledge, attitudes, and professional practice toward the HPV vaccine. No research has yet investigated U.S. school nurses' role in educating the school community about the vaccine's benefits. Diffusion of Innovations theory is an appropriate perspective for examining school nurses as opinion leaders who can influence the uptake of the HPV vaccine for youth. This theory explains how innovations diffuse throughout a social system, and highlights the construct of opinion leadership. School nurses exhibit the characteristics of opinion leaders; therefore, Diffusion of Innovations can be a useful lens for assessing their role in efforts to promote HPV vaccination for youth. PMID:24366021

  14. Following the funding trail: Financing, nurses and teamwork in Australian general practice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Across the globe the emphasis on roles and responsibilities of primary care teams is under scrutiny. This paper begins with a review of general practice financing in Australia, and how nurses are currently funded. We then examine the influence on funding structures on the role of the nurse. We set out three dilemmas for policy-makers in this area: lack of an evidence base for incentives, possible untoward impacts on interdisciplinary functioning, and the substitution/enhancement debate. Methods This three year, multimethod study undertook rapid appraisal of 25 general practices and year-long studies in seven practices where a change was introduced to the role of the nurse. Data collected included interviews with nurses (n = 36), doctors (n = 24), and managers (n = 22), structured observation of the practice nurse (51 hours of observation), and detailed case studies of the change process in the seven year-long studies. Results Despite specific fee-for-service funding being available, only 6% of nurse activities generated such a fee. Yet the influence of the funding was to focus nurse activity on areas that they perceived were peripheral to their roles within the practice. Conclusions Interprofessional relationships and organisational climate in general practices are highly influential in terms of nursing role and the ability of practices to respond to and utilise funding mechanisms. These factors need to be considered, and the development of optimal teamwork supported in the design and implementation of further initiatives that financially support nursing in general practice. PMID:21329506

  15. Nurses' use of palliative care practices in the acute care setting.

    PubMed

    Bradley, E H; Cherlin, E; McCorkle, R; Fried, T R; Kasl, S V; Cicchetti, D V; Johnson-Hurzeler, R; Horwitz, S M

    2001-01-01

    This study examines the reported use of palliative care practices by nurses caring for terminally ill patients in the acute care setting. Randomly selected nurses (n = 180) from six randomly selected hospitals in Connecticut completed a self-administered questionnaire. Factors associated with use of palliative care practices were examined by using bivariate and multivariate analyses. Most nurses surveyed (88.5%) reported using palliative care practices when caring for their terminally ill patients. Factors associated with greater use included greater knowledge about hospice, having practiced nursing for less than 10 years, and having had hospice training in the past 5 years. A substantial proportion of nurses reported that they never discuss hospice (51.7 per cent of nurses) and prognosis (26.6 per cent of nurses) with their terminally ill patients. Educational preparation (bachelor's degree versus less education) was not associated with greater use of palliative care practices. Palliative care practices are commonly used by nurses in the acute care setting. However, many report having limited training and substantial gaps in knowledge about hospice among this group of nurses, suggesting greater attention to palliative care and hospice may be warranted in nursing educational programs. PMID:11211378

  16. Development of a nursing practice based competency model for the Flemish master of nursing and obstetrics degree.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Gerlinde; Goelen, Guido; Danschutter, Dirk; Vermeulen, Joeri; Huyghens, Luc

    2011-01-01

    The aim was to identify a set of competences for the Flemish academic Master of Nursing and Obstetrics degree that answer perceived needs in health care. The competency model was to demonstrate a degree of consensus among key nurses. The study was conducted in all Flemish hospitals registered to have 400 beds or more. Head nurses of surgery, geriatrics and intensive care units were eligible to participate, as well as one nurse from administration per hospital. A two round Delphi process allowed participants to comment on items identified in an analysis of existing international competency profiles of master level nurses and adapted to the Flemish context. Competences agreed to by 90% of the respondents were considered to have consensus. Fifteen out of 19 eligible hospitals were recruited in the study, 45 nurses participated in the Delphi panel. Consensus was reached on 31 competences that can be assigned to 5 nurse's roles: nursing expert, innovator, researcher, educator and manager. The resulting competency profile is in accordance with published profiles for similar programs. The reported study demonstrates a practical method to develop a consensus competency model for an academic master program based on the input of key individuals in mainstream nursing. PMID:20399547

  17. Spiritual care competence for contemporary nursing practice: A quantitative exploration of the guidance provided by fundamental nursing textbooks.

    PubMed

    Timmins, Fiona; Neill, Freda; Murphy, Maryanne; Begley, Thelma; Sheaf, Greg

    2015-11-01

    Spirituality is receiving unprecedented attention in the nursing literature. Both the volume and scope of literature on the topic is expanding, and it is clear that this topic is of interest to nurses. There is consensus that the spiritual required by clients receiving health ought to be an integrated effort across the health care team. Although undergraduate nurses receive some education on the topic, this is ad hoc and inconsistent across universities. Textbooks are clearly a key resource in this area however the extent to which they form a comprehensive guide for nursing students and nurses is unclear. This study provides a hitherto unperformed analysis of core nursing textbooks to ascertain spirituality related content. 543 books were examined and this provides a range of useful information about inclusions and omissions in this field. Findings revealed that spirituality is not strongly portrayed as a component of holistic care and specific direction for the provision of spiritual care is lacking. Fundamental textbooks used by nurses and nursing students ought to inform and guide integrated spiritual care and reflect a more holistic approach to nursing care. The religious and/or spiritual needs of an increasingly diverse community need to be taken seriously within scholarly texts so that this commitment to individual clients' needs can be mirrored in practice. PMID:25819014

  18. Do calculation errors by nurses cause medication errors in clinical practice? A literature review.

    PubMed

    Wright, Kerri

    2010-01-01

    This review aims to examine the literature available to ascertain whether medication errors in clinical practice are the result of nurses' miscalculating drug dosages. The research studies highlighting poor calculation skills of nurses and student nurses have been tested using written drug calculation tests in formal classroom settings [Kapborg, I., 1994. Calculation and administration of drug dosage by Swedish nurses, student nurses and physicians. International Journal for Quality in Health Care 6(4): 389 -395; Hutton, M., 1998. Nursing Mathematics: the importance of application Nursing Standard 13(11): 35-38; Weeks, K., Lynne, P., Torrance, C., 2000. Written drug dosage errors made by students: the threat to clinical effectiveness and the need for a new approach. Clinical Effectiveness in Nursing 4, 20-29]; Wright, K., 2004. Investigation to find strategies to improve student nurses' maths skills. British Journal Nursing 13(21) 1280-1287; Wright, K., 2005. An exploration into the most effective way to teach drug calculation skills to nursing students. Nurse Education Today 25, 430-436], but there have been no reviews of the literature on medication errors in practice that specifically look to see whether the medication errors are caused by nurses' poor calculation skills. The databases Medline, CINAHL, British Nursing Index (BNI), Journal of American Medical Association (JAMA) and Archives and Cochrane reviews were searched for research studies or systematic reviews which reported on the incidence or causes of drug errors in clinical practice. In total 33 articles met the criteria for this review. There were no studies that examined nurses' drug calculation errors in practice. As a result studies and systematic reviews that investigated the types and causes of drug errors were examined to establish whether miscalculations by nurses were the causes of errors. The review found insufficient evidence to suggest that medication errors are caused by nurses' poor calculation skills. Of the 33 studies reviewed only five articles specifically recorded information relating to calculation errors and only two of these detected errors using the direct observational approach. The literature suggests that there are other more pressing aspects of nurses' preparation and administration of medications which are contributing to medication errors in practice that require more urgent attention and calls into question the current focus on calculation and numeracy skills of pre registration and qualified nurses (NMC 2008). However, more research is required into the calculation errors in practice. In particular there is a need for a direct observational study on paediatric nurses as there are presently none examining this area of practice. PMID:19666199

  19. What Kind of Nurse Are You?

    PubMed

    Karnick, Paula M

    2014-06-19

    Once again the importance of nursing theory in practice comes to the forefront. By examining one's personal and professional beliefs in how one cares for people, it becomes apparent that nursing theory does guide nursing practice. The moral and ethical judgments one makes before or while caring for a person may reveal that personal bias can detract from the quality of care. PMID:24951521

  20. Occupational factors contributing to low self-esteem in registered nurses and licensed practical nurses: a multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Imai, K

    2001-03-01

    The present study examines job-related factors leading to low self-esteem in nurses. The lowering of self-esteem suggests that such nurses had difficulty in fully accepting themselves and their circumstances. Subjects were registered nurses (RN) and licensed practical nurses (LPN) at hospitals, and unemployed registered nurses (UEN) seeking employment. Questionnaires were provided at 53 hospitals and a Nurse Bank in Kanagawa Prefecture. The responses of 552 RN, 146 LPN and 433 UEN were analyzed. Questions were asked about personal life, past or present nursing experience, working conditions, nursing skills, satisfaction with work performance and self-esteem. Factors giving rise to low self-esteem were determined using logistic regression analysis and logistic discriminant analysis. Employment status and qualifications were determined to be the most important factors determining the self-esteem of nurses. The next most important factors were 'a limited number of years of experience (less than five years)' and 'dissatisfaction with discretion and responsibility as a nurse' (P < 0.01). Adjusted odds ratio for a reduction in self-esteem for LPN was 4.07 times higher than for UEN, and 2.2 times higher than for RN by logistic regression analysis. LPN are treated as unskilled workers, and thus significant differences were apparent in their performance of certain job tasks. These differences were analyzed using discriminant analysis, and were referred to as follows, 1: Advanced assessment skills, 2: Advanced technical skills, 3: Advanced communication skills, and 4: Nursing plan and documentation (positive discrimination rate was 70.8%). Job dissatisfaction is closely associated with the level of professional training. Continuous education and a feedback system for various levels of nurses are needed. PMID:11279837

  1. Integrating Social Theory Into Public Health Practice

    PubMed Central

    Potvin, Louise; Gendron, Sylvie; Bilodeau, Angèle; Chabot, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    The innovative practice that resulted from the Ottawa Charter challenges public health knowledge about programming and evaluation. Specifically, there is a need to formulate program theory that embraces social determinants of health and local actors’ mobilization for social change. Likewise, it is imperative to develop a theory of evaluation that fosters reflexive understanding of public health programs engaged in social change. We believe advances in contemporary social theory that are founded on a critique of modernity and that articulate a coherent theory of practice should be considered when addressing these critical challenges. PMID:15798114

  2. A qualitative evaluation of New Zealand consumers perceptions of general practice nurses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background An important consideration in health service delivery is ensuring that services meet consumer needs and that consumers are satisfied with service delivery. Patient satisfaction can impact on compliance with suggested treatments and therefore impact on health outcomes. Comparatively few studies have explored consumer satisfaction with nurses in general practice. Methods A sub-group of 18 consumers from a larger quantitative evaluation of consumer satisfaction with New Zealand general practice nurses participated in semi-structured telephone interviews. Interview data was analysed using thematic analysis. Results Four major themes emerged from the data. These themes highlighted that, despite confusion experienced by some consumers regarding the practice nurse role, consumers were happy with the level of care provided by them. Consumers felt valued by Practice Nurses and considered them competent and highly knowledgeable. Findings also convey that consumers appreciate the accessibility and financial benefits of utilising the services of practice nurses. Conclusions Consumers are highly satisfied with practice nurse service delivery and value their relationships with these health professionals. Consumers revealed that greater clarity around the practice nurse role and their scope of practice may enhance their utilisation. Spreading the message of practice nurses being the right person to deliver care, within their scope of practice, at the right time may have the potential to provide more timely care within the primary care setting. PMID:23433311

  3. The usefulness of the community nursing practice model in grounding practice and research: narratives from the United States and Africa.

    PubMed

    Barry, Charlotte D; Gordon, Shirley C; Lange, Bernadette

    2007-01-01

    A community nursing practice (CNP) model is presented as the synthesis of a decade of experience of caring for persons and communities. Values form the basis of the model and provide the grounding for practice. Transcendent values of respect, caring, and wholeness are explicated in the actualizing values of primary health care: access, essentiality, empowerment, intersectoral collaboration, and community participation. Usefulness of the CNPM in providing a framework for community nursing practice at school-based community wellness centers in both the United States and Africa is described. Narratives of practice and research presented in the unique voice of three faculty members illuminate the model's values and paradigmatic view of person, nursing, community, and environment. These narratives provide insight into how the CNPM has served as a heuristic in the design of creative responses to calls for nursing in community nursing practice, education, and research. PMID:17849650

  4. Behavior Modification: Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Presland, John

    1978-01-01

    Attempts to give some idea of how reinforcement and other learning principles work in practice with students in ordinary schools by using as reference three workshops for teachers run by educational psychologists in Birmingham in 1975. (Author/RK)

  5. The clinical nurse specialist's role as coach in a clinical practice development model.

    PubMed

    Lewis, C K

    1996-06-01

    Over the past 5 years, nursing leadership at St. Luke's Medical Center in Milwaukee has been considering various mechanisms in response to recurrent comments from nursing staff regarding our career ladder. A lack of satisfaction with our career ladder led to the adoption of a new model for nursing. This shift from a career ladder to a clinical ladder has taken place over many years. In April 1994 all staff nurses were staged and transitioned to a clinical practice development model (CPDM). The CPDM is based solely on nursing practice. Our new model was developed from more than 100 narratives of clinical practice submitted by nurses at St. Luke's. Narratives are first-person accounts of an actual clinical experience. The model is based on research conducted by Patricia Benner, PhD, RN, which focused on how nurses acquired their clinical skills and what characteristics are embedded in nurses' practice. This article describes the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) role as a "coach" in facilitating nursing staff transition from a career ladder to a CPDM. The CNS is in a unique position to contribute directly to quality patient care, and also indirectly by fostering professional growth and development of staff nurses. CPDM supports staff development along a continuum. The challenge for the CNS role is to further develop the coaching role to move staff along the continuum. PMID:8900771

  6. Mentors' perceptions and experiences of supporting student nurses in practice.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Annette; Gidman, Janice; Smith, Debra

    2014-08-01

    This paper reports on a funded project that explored the perceptions and experiences of mentors regarding student nurse support in practice. The study employed a mixed-method approach, using questionnaires and focus groups with mentors from one acute Trust and one community Trust. The findings highlighted the multifaceted nature of student learning in practice, with mentors reporting that clinical skills, adjustment to the placement and integrating into the team were the aspects students needed most support with. Mentors were aware of their roles and responsibilities in supporting students and recognized the importance of their own personal attributes. The participants reported a number of challenges, particularly time, competing demands and paperwork, and suggested that a team approach and support groups could help to overcome these. The support for students provided by peers and health-care assistants was recognized, as was the need to ensure that students are prepared to take responsibility for their learning. PMID:25157940

  7. Tips for starting your own nurse practitioner practice.

    PubMed

    Calmelat, A

    1993-04-01

    The decision to open a nurse practitioner practice is often difficult to make. Success depends on the possession of specific resources, such as adequate skills, finances, emotional support and the desire to be one's own boss. These skills will be critical as the NP develops a business plan and a budget, and makes important decisions, such as the form the business will take: sole proprietorship, partnership or corporation. Using external resources such as attorneys and accountants is also useful, especially when tackling issues of licenses, taxes and insurance. Start-up costs can be kept to a minimum with creativity and used equipment. In-house laboratories and reference laboratories must conform to strict regulations. A practice without established patients will need to market services aggressively through a successful mix of product, price, place and promotion. Patients' acceptance of the NP office will be enhanced by smooth patient flow, adequate space and cleanliness. PMID:8292127

  8. Imagery for Self-Healing and Integrative Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Kubes, Laurie F

    2015-11-01

    Imagery has been used as a healing practice since ancient times. Its reemergence in modern medicine began in the second half of the 20th century, when research suggested that imagery could help reduce patients' pain and anxiety and improve their quality of life and outlook on their illness. While current evidence is insufficient to support claims that imagery affects disease progression, research suggests that this method of inducing relaxation encourages patients' healing process and gives them a greater sense of autonomy in relation to disease and its management. Because imagery is noninvasive, the risks associated with its use are minimal and it is now widely used in integrative nursing. The author discusses imagery's uses and benefits, as well as the potential pitfalls in its use, and describes an imagery technique she has found effective in practice, providing a sample script and explaining how the technique might be used to help patients in various settings. PMID:26473442

  9. A Theory-Driven Integrative Process/Outcome Evaluation of a Concept-Based Nursing Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fromer, Rosemary F.

    2013-01-01

    The current trend in curriculum revision in nursing education is concept-based learning, but little research has been done on concept-based curricula in nursing education. The study used a theory-driven integrative process/outcome evaluation. Embedded in this theory-driven integrative process/outcome evaluation was a causal comparative…

  10. Organizational dimensions of hospital nursing practice: longitudinal results.

    PubMed

    Martin, Patricia A; Gustin, Tammy J; Uddin, David E; Risner, Phyllis

    2004-12-01

    Assessment of nurses' perceptions regarding key aspects of their work environment informs nurse administrators and helps keep a finger on the organizational pulse so that they can plan effectively for staffing needs and quality care. Longitudinal assessment of nurses' perceptions of the realities of the work environment is even more critical to inform nurse administrators for decision making and planning, especially during turbulent times. The authors report on a hospital's experience in selecting, evaluating, and, at times, discarding instruments to attain the best information on their nurses' perceptions regarding their work environment. These longitudinal findings can help nurse administrators design a more positive work environment for their nurses. PMID:15632751

  11. Sexuality in early childhood: pediatric nurses' attitudes, knowledge, and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Popovich, D M

    2000-01-01

    This exploratory study assessed pediatric nurses' attitudes, knowledge, and patient care practices related to the sexuality of hospitalized preschool and early school-age children. Sexuality was defined as the sum of the physical, emotional, and psychologic attributes that are expressed in gender identity and behavior. For this study, a questionnaire containing 24 attitude, 20 knowledge, and 29 nursing practice Likert-scale items was used to survey 45 pediatric nurses in a southeastern tertiary care teaching hospital. Results indicated that, in general, the nurses surveyed had positive attitudes, sound knowledge, and appropriate practice with regard to the sexuality-related needs of their patients. However, there appeared to be some attitudinal biases and knowledge gaps that could adversely affect nursing practice. These findings were used to alter the content in pediatric nursing education at the study institution. PMID:12026337

  12. Implementation of a nursing professional practice model of care in a pediatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Jodi E; Asher, Lucinda M

    2007-01-01

    Professional nursing practice models provide a theoretical and conceptual framework that nurses can use as a foundation for practice. The utilization of a practice model helps establish professional identity and improves quality outcomes. A freestanding children's hospital sought to identify and adopt a professional practice model to optimize outcomes for patients and families, the nursing staff, and the organization. Once a model was selected, two subgroups formed and focused on revising job descriptions and educating the nursing staff. Various strategies were used to implement the model and sustain the culture change. Examples include providing periodic education, incorporating the model into nursing procedures, and assisting nurses in using the model at the bedside. The model of care has been successfully implemented in both the inpatient and outpatient areas of this pediatric hospital. PMID:18196713

  13. School Nursing Documentation: Knowledge, Attitude, and Barriers to Using Standardized Nursing Languages and Current Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yearous, Sharon Kay Guthrie

    2011-01-01

    The independent, complex role of a school nurse requires accurate documentation of assessments, interventions, and outcomes. Consistent documentation by all school nurses is crucial to study the impact of nursing interventions on children's health and success in school. While standardized nursing languages are available, the actual use ofÖ

  14. Clinical Nursing Instructor Perception of the Influence of Engagement in Bedside Nursing Practice on Clinical Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berndt, Jodi L.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical experiences are an integral component of nursing education. Because the amount of time that a student spends in clinical experiences can be as many as twelve to sixteen hours per week, the clinical instructor plays a significant role in the nursing student's development of nursing knowledge. Many nurse educators attempt to balance dualÖ

  15. School Nursing Documentation: Knowledge, Attitude, and Barriers to Using Standardized Nursing Languages and Current Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yearous, Sharon Kay Guthrie

    2011-01-01

    The independent, complex role of a school nurse requires accurate documentation of assessments, interventions, and outcomes. Consistent documentation by all school nurses is crucial to study the impact of nursing interventions on children's health and success in school. While standardized nursing languages are available, the actual use of…

  16. Nursing Minimum Data Set for School Nursing Practice. Position Statement. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denehy, Janice

    2012-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) to support the collection of essential nursing data as listed in the Nursing Minimum Data Set (NMDS). The NMDS provides a basic structure to identify the data needed to delineate nursing care delivered to clients as well as relevant characteristics of those clients. Structure…

  17. Clinical Nursing Instructor Perception of the Influence of Engagement in Bedside Nursing Practice on Clinical Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berndt, Jodi L.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical experiences are an integral component of nursing education. Because the amount of time that a student spends in clinical experiences can be as many as twelve to sixteen hours per week, the clinical instructor plays a significant role in the nursing student's development of nursing knowledge. Many nurse educators attempt to balance dual…

  18. Socioscientific Issues: Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeidler, Dana L.; Nichols, Bryan H.

    2009-01-01

    Drawing upon recent research, this article reviews the theory underlying the use of socioscientific issues (SSI) in science education. We begin with a definition and rationale for SSI and note the importance of SSI for advancing functional scientific literacy. We then examine the various roles of context, teachers, and students in SSI lessons as…

  19. Work Motivation: Theory and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katzell, Raymond A.; Thompson, Donna E.

    1990-01-01

    Presents theories of motivation classified as those dealing either with exogenous causes or with endogenous processes. The following strategies for improving work motivation are discussed: (1) personal motives; (2) incentives and rewards; (3) reinforcement; (4) goal-setting techniques; (5) personal and material resources; (6) social and group…

  20. Constructivism. Theory, Perspectives, and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fosnot, Catherine Twomey, Ed.

    The 13 essays in this book examine the theory of constructivism in relation to teaching and learning. The first section provides an account of the epistemological, psychological, and sociocultural research that serves as the theoretical basis of constructivism, and includes the following chapters: "Introduction: Aspects of Constructivism" (Ernst…

  1. Work Motivation: Theory and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katzell, Raymond A.; Thompson, Donna E.

    1990-01-01

    Presents theories of motivation classified as those dealing either with exogenous causes or with endogenous processes. The following strategies for improving work motivation are discussed: (1) personal motives; (2) incentives and rewards; (3) reinforcement; (4) goal-setting techniques; (5) personal and material resources; (6) social and groupÖ

  2. Assessing Nursing Students' Knowledge of Genomic Concepts and Readiness for Use in Practice.

    PubMed

    Munroe, Theresa; Loerzel, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Nurses are expected to apply genomic concepts in clinical practice. This study evaluated undergraduate nursing students' genomic knowledge and attitudes about using this knowledge in practice. Using a pretest-posttest design, findings indicated that students' knowledge was poor, but improved over a semester with genomics content. Most students did not feel ready to use this knowledge in the clinical setting. These findings suggest the need for more genomic education in nursing curriculum. PMID:26312820

  3. Educational Management: Theory and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Tony

    This document is a chapter in "The Principles and Practice of Educational Management," which aims to provide a systematic and analytical introduction to the study of educational management. The structure of the book reflects the main substantive areas of educational leadership and management, and most of the major themes are covered in the…

  4. Spirituality in pre-registration nurse education and practice: A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lewinson, Lesline P; McSherry, Wilfred; Kevern, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Spirituality is known to be an integral part of holistic care, yet research shows that it is not well valued or represented in nurse education and practice. However, the nursing profession continues to make efforts to redress the balance by issuing statements and guidance for the inclusion of spirituality by nurses in their practice. A systematic literature review was undertaken and confirms that nurses are aware of their lack of knowledge, understanding and skills in the area of spirituality and spiritual care, and desire to be better informed and skilled in this area. Consequently, in order for nurses to support the spiritual dimension of their role, nurse education has a vital part to play in raising spiritual awareness and facilitating competence and confidence in this domain. The literature review also reveals that studies involving pre-registration are few, but those available do provide examples of innovation and various teaching methods to deliver this topic in nursing curricular. PMID:25707759

  5. Perspectives on Writing: Research, Theory, and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indrisano, Roselmina, Ed.; Squire, James R., Ed.

    Providing a foundation in which researchers may build future research and theory and in which teachers may design more effective classroom practice, this book presents 12 essays that bring together the contributions of researchers and teacher-scholars to present the significant theory and research related to the writing process. The book isÖ

  6. Learning to work collaboratively: nurses' views of their pre-registration interprofessional education and its impact on practice.

    PubMed

    Derbyshire, Julie A; Machin, Alison I

    2011-07-01

    One of the challenges of contemporary health care is the need for health and social care professionals to work differently to meet the complex needs of patients/clients. However it cannot be assumed that these professionals have been prepared with the skills and confidence to collaborate effectively, outside of traditional professional boundaries. Interprofessional education (IPE) is well established as an effective learning and teaching approach to prepare practitioners for collaborative practice at the point of qualification (DOH 2001; Hale 2003; Morison et†al., 2003; Department of Health 2006; Hammick et†al., 2007). The phenomenological study reported in this paper sought to follow up a group of newly qualified adult nurses at six months post-qualification. These nurses had undertaken a pre-registration curriculum in which classroom-based interprofessional learning was well embedded and formally assessed within their three year programme. Data from eight in depth interviews were analysed and five key themes were emerged: common understanding of IPE; teaching and learning; understanding of professional roles; stereotypes; influence of the practice environment. The outcome of the study suggested IPE should be as practice focused as possible to improve its relevance to nursing practice. This study contributed to the development of an innovative curriculum which provides the opportunity for nurses to integrate IPE theory within their collaborative working practice. PMID:21185233

  7. Nurses joining family doctors in primary care practices: perceptions of patients with multimorbidity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Among the strategies used to reform primary care, the participation of nurses in primary care practices appears to offer a promising avenue to better meet the needs of vulnerable patients. The present study explores the perceptions and expectations of patients with multimorbidity regarding nurses' presence in primary care practices. Methods 18 primary (health) care patients with multimorbidity participated in semi-directed interviews, in order to explore their perceptions and expectations in regard to the involvement of nurses in primary care practices. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. After reviewing the transcripts, the principal investigator and research assistants performed thematic analysis independently and reached consensus on the retained themes. Results Patients with multimorbidity were open to the participation of nurses in primary care practices. They expected greater accessibility, for both themselves and for new patients. However, the issue of shared roles between nurses and doctors was a source of concern. Many patients held the traditional view of the nurse's role as an assistant to the doctor in his or her various duties. In general, participants said they were confident about nurses' competency but expressed concern about nurses performing certain acts that their doctor used to, notwithstanding a close collaboration between the two professionals. Conclusion Patients with multimorbidity are open to the involvement of nurses in primary care practices. However, they expect this participation to be established using clear definitions of professional roles and fields of practice. PMID:21050443

  8. 75 FR 75689 - National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice for Request for Nominations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration National Advisory Council on Nurse Education... Education and Practice (NACNEP). Authority: 42 U.S.C. 297t, section 851 of the Public Health Service (PHS... contact, Lakisha Smith, Executive Secretary, National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice,...

  9. Cost-effectiveness of a WOC Advanced Practice Nurse in the Acute Care and Outpatient Setting

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Increasing numbers of advanced practice nurses who practice within the WOC specialty are challenged by the need to justify their role by demonstrating clinical and fiscal benefits to the employing agency. This View From Here column describes the steps I took while completing such an analysis for a position for a nurse practitioner with WOC certification in upstate New York. PMID:24918767

  10. Cost-effectiveness of a WOC advanced practice nurse in the acute care and outpatient setting.

    PubMed

    Medley, Jenny A

    2014-01-01

    Increasing numbers of advanced practice nurses who practice within the WOC specialty are challenged by the need to justify their role by demonstrating clinical and fiscal benefits to the employing agency. This View From Here column describes the steps I took while completing such an analysis for a position for a nurse practitioner with WOC certification in upstate New York. PMID:24918767

  11. An Investigation of NCLEX-PN Performance and Student Perceptions among Practical Nursing Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abston-Coleman, Sharon L.; Levy, Dessie R.

    2010-01-01

    Students in practical nursing programs require 32 weeks of coursework (1 academic year) and completion of a national licensing exam (NCLEX-PN) to secure employment. The purpose of this study was to identify selected academic variables that were related to NCLEX-PN performance for first-time test takers of two types of practical nursing programs at…

  12. Nursing on the medical ward.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Parker JM

    2004-12-01

    This paper considers some issues confronting contemporary medical nursing and draws upon psychoanalytic theories to investigate some seemingly straightforward and taken-for-granted areas of medical nursing work. I am arguing that the everyday work of medical nurses in caring for patients is concerned with bringing order to and placing boundaries around inherently unsettled and destabilized circumstances. I am also arguing that how nurses manage and organize their work in this regard stems from traditional practices that tend to be taken for granted and not explicitly thought about. It is therefore difficult for nurses to consider changing these practices that often have negative consequences for the nurses. I want to examine the impact upon nurses of the consequences of three taken-for-granted nursing practices: (i) the tendency of nurses to confine their reactions to what is going on so as to present a caring self; (ii) the tendency of nurses in their everyday talk to patients to confine, limit and minimize meaning; and (iii) the tensions and ambiguities that emerge for nurses in the policing function they perform in confining patients to the bed or the ward. Negative consequences on nurses of these practices potentially include stress and confusion regarding their ability to care for patients; an undervaluing of nursing skills; and a deterioration in the nurse-patient relationship. Clinical supervision for medical nurses is proposed as a means of facilitating greater understanding of the nature of nurses' relationships with patients and the complex dimensions of their medical nursing role.

  13. Approaches to Evaluation of Training: Theory & Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eseryel, Deniz

    2002-01-01

    Reviews current approaches to evaluation of training both in theory and in practice. Highlights include complexities associated with evaluation practice; possible means of expediting the performance of evaluations; expanding the range and precision of data collection using automated systems; and recommendations for further research. (Author/LRW)

  14. Theory, Practice and the Student of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Douglas A.

    1985-01-01

    Examines the two major clusters of intellectual tasks facing education students, setting forth a theory/practice schema. Education students' tasks include learning a different reason for learning, learning what causes educational events to happen, and learning to base decisions on both theoretical and practical knowledge. (DMM)

  15. Shortening the Path Between Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathis, Janelle

    2006-01-01

    The three books reviewed in this article represent the continuous effort to make visible the significant bridge between theory and practice in the fields of literacy and children's literature. While the authors maintain distinct purposes for their creations, the texts each speak to a strong theoretical support for the practices they describe. TheÖ

  16. Comparing the effects of stress and relationship style on student and practicing nurse anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Kendrick, P

    2000-04-01

    Stress in the workplace can be extremely detrimental. It has been estimated that stress-related outcomes cost organizations $50 billion to $75 billion per year. These costs are realized in the form of decreased productivity, increased absenteeism, and increased job turnover. Excessive stress in the healthcare professional can lead to burnout. A purpose of the present study was to compare and contrast stress levels between practicing nurse anesthetists and those in training. The study also sought to determine if communication was adversely affected by stress and by the style nurse anesthetists chose in relating to others. Style can be defined as any identifiable pattern of relating to others one follows to reach one's goals. Sixty-six student nurse anesthetists and 15 practicing nurse anesthetists participated in the study for a total of 81 participants. All participants were administered the Occupational Stress Inventory, the Strength Deployment Inventory, and the Interpersonal Communication Inventory. Significant findings included: (1) second-year students experienced the greatest amount of stress, (2) practicing nurse anesthetists have more coping resources than student nurse anesthetists, (3) of the 4 relationship styles available, the altruistic/nurturing and the analytic/autonomizing are the styles of relating to others used most often by student and practicing nurse anesthetists, (4) nurse anesthetists with high stress levels communicated less effectively than nurse anesthetists with low stress levels, and (5) nurse anesthetists communicated less effectively when using the altruistic/nurturing style compared with the analytic/autonomizing style. PMID:10876458

  17. Clinical liaison nurse model in a community hospital: a unique academic-practice partnership that strengthens clinical nursing education.

    PubMed

    Lovecchio, Catherine P; DiMattio, Mary Jane K; Hudacek, Sharon

    2012-11-01

    The necessity to help baccalaureate nursing students transition to clinical practice in a health care environment governed by change has compelled nurse educators to investigate alternative clinical instruction models that nurture academic-practice partnerships and facilitate student clinical learning. This article describes an academic-practice partnership in a community hospital using the Clinical Liaison Nurse (CLN) model as a link between students and clinical faculty and reports results of a quasi-experimental study that compared perceptions of the clinical learning environment between students participating in the CLN model (experimental group) and those in a traditional, instructor-led clinical model (control group). Students assigned to the CLN model had statistically significantly higher individualization, satisfaction, and task orientation scores on the Clinical Learning Environment Inventory. The findings provide evidence that academic-practice partnerships can be successful in community hospital settings and enhance students' perceptions in the clinical learning environment. PMID:23061523

  18. Intuition in nursing practice: sharing graduate students' exemplars with undergraduate students.

    PubMed

    Tatano Beck, C

    1998-04-01

    Failure to acknowledge ways of knowing in nursing education curricula other than linear reasoning hinders the development of the full extent of mental abilities brought to learning situations by nursing students. Nurse educators are challenged to develop creative methods to facilitate nursing students' intuitive thinking. In this article, a teaching strategy is described in which graduate students' exemplars of intuition in clinical practice are shared with undergraduate nursing students. Implications of using this teaching approach to demystify the intuitive process and address its legitimacy are discussed. PMID:9570416

  19. Strategic Planning and Doctor Of Nursing Practice Education: Developing Today's and Tomorrow's Leaders.

    PubMed

    Falk, Nancy L; Garrison, Kenneth F; Brown, Mary-Michael; Pintz, Christine; Bocchino, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Strategic planning and thinking skills are essential for today's nurse leaders. Doctor of nursing practice (DNP) programs provide an opportunity for developing effective nurse strategists. A well-designed strategy course can stimulate intellectual growth at all levels of Bloom's Taxonomy. Discussion forums in online education provide new opportunities for rich interaction among peers en route to development of well-informed strategic plans. An interprofessional perspective adds a rich and vital aspect to doctoral nursing education and it serves to inform strategic plan development. A roadmap for teaching strategic planning to current and future nursing leaders will guide the integration of essential content into DNP programs. PMID:26625577

  20. A Clinical Workshop in Mental Health and Psychiatric Nursing for Instructors in Schools of Practical Nursing. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamar, Carl F.; And Others

    Twenty directors and instructors in schools of practical nursing in Kentucky and a total of nine directors and instructors from six other states and the District of Columbia attended a 2-week workshop at the University of Kentucky in July 1967. The purpose was to assist participants to integrate mental health concepts into the practical nurse…