Sample records for nursing theory practice

  1. Orem's theory in practice. Hospice nursing care.

    PubMed

    Laferriere, R H

    1995-01-01

    The Orem Self-Care Deficit Theory offers a framework for hospice nursing care. In this article, the six core concepts of Orem's theory, self-care, self-care agency, and nursing system, are discussed as they relate to hospice care. These concepts of Orem's nursing theory are valuable to nurses in guiding palliative care. A case study is presented to illustrate clinical application of these concepts in hospice nursing practice. PMID:7591824

  2. Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Program: Theories for Extended Pediatric Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Margaret A.

    A description is provided of "Theories for Extended Pediatric Nursing Practice," a required course for pediatric and family nurse practitioner students in a California state university program. The course description presents information on the curricular placement of the course, prerequisites, in-class time allotments, and the focus of the course…

  3. Concept maps: linking nursing theory to clinical nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Daley, B J

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to offer a different methodology for teaching and learning in continuing nursing education and staff development. This article describes a qualitative research study that analyzed how linkages are made between theoretical material and clinical nursing practice. Findings indicate that nursing students did not link the elements of nursing process together, that clinical preparation was not linked to theoretical material, that the meaning students made of the information was different than the instructors' and that concepts from the basic sciences were not incorporated into student meaning structures. Implications for the use of concept maps as an educational strategy in continuing nursing education are drawn. PMID:8576492

  4. Linking theory and practice in teaching basic nursing skills.

    PubMed

    Smith, B E

    1992-01-01

    In an attempt to integrate theory and practice in baccalaureate nursing education, students were taught nursing skills with two cognitive strategies (Vee heuristics and concept maps) that consciously identify and reinforce connections between scientific theory and practice. The research showed that students using Vee heuristics and concept maps, rather than traditional modes, were significantly better able to identify scientific principles to describe why specific steps of a nursing skill were done. PMID:1312143

  5. Concept mapping for applying theory to nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Veo, Parrie

    2010-01-01

    Advocates of a return to theory-based practice believe that this will improve clinical outcomes and nurse satisfaction. The research question of whether concept mapping is an effective method of teaching nurses how to apply theory to their daily practice was tested during an action research project conducted at a community hospital. Registered nurses serving on a practice council were presented a review of nursing theory and given instruction on concept mapping. Symbols representing theoretical application were added to the usual concept map components of idea nodes and interconnecting relationship lines. Participants developed concept maps of familiar nursing tasks and were able to apply the theoretical symbols to those maps. Although the limitations of action research are evident in this study, observations of the members of the small participant group and their interview responses show a positive effect from the instructional intervention. The researcher suggests that review of nursing theory and the use of concept mapping to analyze its application should be considered for staff nurse development. PMID:20098169

  6. Theories in action and how nursing practice changed.

    PubMed

    Jasovsky, Deborah A; Morrow, Mary R; Clementi, Pamela S; Hindle, Paula A

    2010-01-01

    Rogers' theoretical framework of diffusion of innovation guided the successful infusion of the educational training and implementation of the Magis model of care at a 570 bed hospital in the Chicagoland area. The Magis model of care was derived from several nursing theories along with information from the Institute of Family-Centered Care. By incorporating the components that relate to the institution's values and Magnet theme, the stages of innovation were readily adopted and sustained over the first year of implementation. The model has spread beyond the original and sister units as demonstrated by another department creating the Magnet poster with the various elements that they have incorporated into daily care delivery. What is so invigorating to the nursing administration is hearing how nursing staff articulates the care they give to the various components of the model and the theory that supports this practice. PMID:20026725

  7. The Perceptions of Nurse Teachers, Student Nurses and Preceptors of the Theory-Practice Gap in Nurse Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corlett, Jo

    2000-01-01

    Group interviews with nursing teachers, students, and clinical preceptors identified concerns about the theory-practice gap: shortness of clinical placements, sequencing of theory and practice, lack of clinical-educational collaboration, and lack of clarity regarding teacher roles. Ways to minimize the gap were also identified. (SK)

  8. The use of theory-based nursing practice in the Department of Veterans' Affairs Medical Centers.

    PubMed

    Bonamy, C; Schultz, P; Graham, K; Hampton, M

    1995-01-01

    In this study, the authors surveyed the chief nurses of 152 Veterans' Health Administration Medical Centers to determine which medical centers based their nursing practice on one or more nursing theories or models. Of the 76 medical centers responding, 24 (35%) stated theory-based practice was in use in their institutions. The greatest number (16 of the 24) reported use of Orem's Self-Care Deficit theory or a combination of Orem with other theories. Most of the 24 chief nurses agreed that theory-based practice: 1) improves patient outcomes; 2) maximizes patient health; and 3) provides a consistent approach to care. However, they were less convinced that theory-based practice reduces nursing staff turnover or improves job satisfaction. They also stated that theory-based practice is more important to nursing administrators than to staff nurses. A similar survey of staff nurses is recommended. PMID:7869135

  9. Hildegard Peplau meets family systems nursing: innovation in theory-based practice.

    PubMed

    Forchuk, C; Dorsay, J P

    1995-01-01

    Nursing theories which have evolved from mental health--psychiatric nursing have focused on the individual nurse-client relationship. Other nursing theories generally focus on the individual as client. Therefore, nurses working with families may have difficulty in applying these frameworks to their practice. Nursing theories need to be expanded to include families, groups and communities more explicitly. The well established theory of Hildegard Peplau, which previous studies have found to be the theory most frequently used by psychiatric nurses, and the family systems nursing theory of Wright and Leahey share a complementary focus. Both theories form part of the interpersonal paradigm of nursing; both view nursing from an interactional perspective, rather than focusing on individuals. Use of a combined theoretical approach offers several advantages. The approach explicitly considers both the individual and the family. The combination provides grounding for family work in an articulated nursing theory. PMID:7897061

  10. Nursing agency: the link between practical nursing science and nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Banfield, Barbara E

    2011-01-01

    The relationship of nursing science and nursing practice has been the topic of numerous discussions over the past decades. According to Orem, nursing science is a practical science, meaning that knowledge is developed for the sake of nursing practice. Within Orem's self-care deficit nursing theory, the concept of nursing agency links nursing science and nursing practice. Nursing agency refers to the power or ability of the nurse to design and produce systems of care. The relationship of practical nursing science, nursing practice, and nursing agency is examined in this article. Suggestions for further work related to nursing agency are provided. PMID:21220575

  11. Toward Inclusionary Practices in the Education of Nurses: A Critique of Transcultural Nursing Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, Diana L.

    1999-01-01

    Describes ongoing research engaged in an antiracist critique of transcultural nursing theory (TCN). TCN's core theme of cultural sensitivity organizes and reproduces White racial identity as a dominant but invisible presence in nursing texts. The research will test an instrument that supports nursing faculty and students in examining…

  12. PHD IN NURSING SAMPLE FULL-TIME PROGRAM Student with an interest in Symptom Management in Adults; Theory & Practice Emphasis

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    PHD IN NURSING SAMPLE FULL-TIME PROGRAM Student with an interest in Symptom Management in Adults Practice Nursing Theory: Adults and Older Adults 3 N703 Health Care & Public Policy 3 N815 Knowledge Development in Nursing 3 N803 Advanced Quantitative Design & Methods 3 N816 Proseminar in Nursing Research 1

  13. Nursing theory and clinical practice: how three nursing models can be incorporated into the care of patients with end stage kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Graham, Janet

    2006-01-01

    Patients with end stage kidney disease require complex care regardless of where they are within the disease continuum. Although not often recognized by clinical nurses, the incorporation of nursing theory into the clinical care of patients with end stage kidney disease can enhance the overall care that is administered This paper will endeavour to demonstrate how the three nursing models/theories of Orem, Neuman and Peplau can assist renal nurses to articulate their practice and to incorporate these theories into the nursing practice required to care for patients with end stage kidney disease. PMID:17252898

  14. Applications of complex systems theory in nursing education, research, and practice.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Thomas R; Effken, Judith A; Pesut, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The clinical and administrative processes in today's healthcare environment are becoming increasingly complex. Multiple providers, new technology, competition, and the growing ubiquity of information all contribute to the notion of health care as a complex system. A complex system (CS) is characterized by a highly connected network of entities (e.g., physical objects, people or groups of people) from which higher order behavior emerges. Research in the transdisciplinary field of CS has focused on the use of computational modeling and simulation as a methodology for analyzing CS behavior. The creation of virtual worlds through computer simulation allows researchers to analyze multiple variables simultaneously and begin to understand behaviors that are common regardless of the discipline. The application of CS principles, mediated through computer simulation, informs nursing practice of the benefits and drawbacks of new procedures, protocols and practices before having to actually implement them. The inclusion of new computational tools and their applications in nursing education is also gaining attention. For example, education in CSs and applied computational applications has been endorsed by The Institute of Medicine, the American Organization of Nurse Executives and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing as essential training of nurse leaders. The purpose of this article is to review current research literature regarding CS science within the context of expert practice and implications for the education of nurse leadership roles. The article focuses on 3 broad areas: CS defined, literature review and exemplars from CS research and applications of CS theory in nursing leadership education. The article also highlights the key role nursing informaticists play in integrating emerging computational tools in the analysis of complex nursing systems. PMID:18922279

  15. Orem's nursing theory and positive mental health: practical considerations.

    PubMed

    Orem, D E; Vardiman, E M

    1995-01-01

    The impetus for the authors' development of this article was their growing awareness of the failure of some nurses to recognize positive mental health behaviors of patients. The authors also were aware of the absence of readily applicable criterion measures of positive mental health. This awareness led to the formulation and investigation of two questions: What human behaviors constitute adequate criterion measures of positive mental health of adults? Do adult persons in health care, including nursing situations, reveal evidence of positive mental health? PMID:8684725

  16. Health Occupations Curriculum. Skills and Theory for Practical Nurse. Units 16 and 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Education, Phoenix.

    Part of a health occupations program, these instructional units consist of materials for use by those who are studying to become practical nurses. Unit 16 deals with basic concepts in the nursing of the aged, in community health, and in the legal responsibilities of the practical nurse. Covered next are nursing care procedures for adults with the…

  17. Nursing Practice Instructors Faculty of Nursing

    E-print Network

    Habib, Ayman

    Nursing Practice Instructors Faculty of Nursing The University of Calgary Faculty of Nursing is seeking applications for limited term Nursing Practice Instructors. We are seeking applicants with broad campus. For detailed information on these exciting opportunities please follow the link at http://nursing

  18. Keeping vigil over the profession: a grounded theory of the context of nurse anaesthesia practice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Nurse anaesthetists in the US have faced continued, repeated challenges to their profession. Regardless, they have met these challenges and have established themselves as major anaesthesia care providers. In this paper we address the research question: How do certified registered nurse anaesthetists (CRNAs) manage the socio-political context in which they provide care for their patients? Methods Grounded theory was used to explore how nurse anaesthetists protect and promote their profession. Purposive, snowball, and theoretical sampling was used and data were collected through participant observation and interviews conducted at a conference of the professional association, an educational program, by telephone, email exchanges, and time spent in operating rooms and an outpatient surgical clinic. Analysis included coding at increasingly abstract levels and constant comparison. Results The basic social process identified was Keeping Vigil Over the Profession, which explains how nurse anaesthetists protect and promote their profession. It is comprised of three contextual categories: Establishing Public Credibility through regulatory and educational standards, Political Vigilance and taking action in governmental and policy arenas, and Tending the Flock through a continuous information loop between local and administrative/political levels. Conclusions From our study of the context of nurse anaesthesia practice, it is clear that CRNAs are dedicated to protecting their ability to provide high quality patient care by maintaining constant vigilance over their profession. PMID:20633286

  19. Postflood disaster management and the home health nurse: using theory to guide practice.

    PubMed

    Hunter Revell, Susan M; McCurry, Mary K

    2010-07-01

    Few frameworks exist to guide home health nurses during the response and recovery phases of disasters such as flooding. The Double ABCX Model of Family Adaptation is offered as an example of a guiding framework for nurses in postflood management. Phases of the model are linked to the nursing process, and management strategies are applied to individuals and families living in the community. Postcrisis decision-making is detailed through the discussion of nursing diagnoses, interventions, and evaluation. Implications highlight the value of using a theoretical framework to guide practice, develop knowledge, and clarify the home health nurse's role in postflood management. PMID:20694875

  20. Advanced practice in neonatal nursing.

    PubMed

    2003-06-01

    The advanced practice neonatal nurse's participation in newborn care continues to be accepted and supported by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Recognized categories of advanced practice neonatal nurse are the neonatal clinical nurse specialist and the neonatal nurse practitioner. Training and credentialing requirements have been updated recently and are endorsed in this revised statement. PMID:12777571

  1. Master of Nursing and Doctor of Nursing Practice Degrees in Advanced Practice Nursing & Health

    E-print Network

    Chapman, Michael S.

    Master of Nursing and Doctor of Nursing Practice Degrees in Advanced Practice Nursing & Health Systems and Organizational Leadership For the love of practice #12;An advanced practice registered nurse nurses is that a significant component of the education and practice focuses on direct care

  2. Health Practices of School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petch-Levine, Deborah; Cureton, Virginia Young; Canham, Daryl; Murray, Meg

    2003-01-01

    The health practices of school nurses affect our role as advocates and educators to promote the health of youth. This study describes the health practices of a convenience sample of 388 school nurses who attended the business meeting at an annual school nurse conference. A self-administered, 40-item questionnaire identified health practices of…

  3. Examination of the teaching styles of nursing professional development specialists, part I: best practices in adult learning theory, curriculum development, and knowledge transfer.

    PubMed

    Curran, Mary K

    2014-05-01

    The American Nurses Association advocates for nursing professional development (NPD) specialists to have an earned graduate degree, as well as educational and clinical expertise. However, many NPD specialists have limited exposure to adult learning theory. Limited exposure to adult learning theory may affect NPD educational practices, learning outcomes, organizational knowledge transfer, and subsequently, the professional development of the nurses they serve and quality of nursing care. An examination of current teaching practices may reveal opportunities for NPD specialists to enhance educational methods to promote learning, learning transfer, and organizational knowledge and excellence. This article, the first in a two-part series, examines best practices of adult learning theories, nursing professional development, curriculum design, and knowledge transfer. Part II details the results of a correlational study that examined the effects of four variables on the use of adult learning theory to guide curriculum development for NPD specialists in hospitals. PMID:24779716

  4. Dorthea Orem's self care theory as related to nursing practice in hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Laurie

    2009-01-01

    Dorthea Orem believed that people have a natural ability for self care, and nursing should focus on affecting that ability. Using a literature search of studies involving adults receiving hemodialysis for end stage renal disease (ESRD) in an outpatient dialysis setting and self-care/management publications in peer-reviewed journals and dissertations, this article explores the implementation of Dorthea Orem's Self Care Theory in the hemodialysis setting, considering the ways it relates to a population in which self-management is critical for patients' positive quality of life, nurses' ability to promote self care for this population, and potential health outcomes. In order to maximize the health of patients with ESRD, considerable lifestyle changes must be made. As healthcare professionals who provide direct care, nurses can assist with these changes by providing educational opportunities and strategies that increase self-care agency, thus making a positive impact on patient quality of life. PMID:19715109

  5. A critical analysis of the potential contribution of Orem's (2001) self-care deficit nursing theory to contemporary coronary care nursing practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fiona Timmins; Paul Horan

    2007-01-01

    BackgroundOver the last three decades, nurse theorists have strongly advocated the use of conceptual models of nursing to guide nursing practice. Within coronary care units, conceptual model-based care has had inconsistent application and is currently challenged by contemporary approaches such as pathways of care.

  6. LSUHSC School of Nursing Doctor of Nursing Practice

    E-print Network

    LSUHSC School of Nursing Doctor of Nursing Practice Fall 2012 The LSUHSC School of Nursing announces the Inaugural Class of the Doctor of Nursing Practice Students DNP Open House DNP Open House If you are a post-master's Family or Neonatal Nurse Practitioner, Nursing Administrator, CNS in Adult

  7. A Framework for Advanced Practice Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Sarah Jo

    1998-01-01

    Advanced practice nursing is defined as professional health care focused on clinical services, using a nursing orientation and based on competencies from graduate nursing education. AP nurses are involved in clinical practice, systems management, and health care discourse. (SK)

  8. Nursing students' responses to ethical dilemmas in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Dierckx de Casterlé, B; Grypdonck, M; Vuylsteke-Wauters, M; Janssen, P J

    1997-01-01

    In literature as well as in nursing practice a growing concern about nurses' ethical competence can be observed. Based on the cognitive theory of moral development by Kohlberg, this research examined nursing students' ethical behaviour in five nursing dilemmas. Ethical behaviour refers not only to the ethical reasoning of nursing students but also to the relationship between reasoning and behaviour. Kohlberg's definition of morality was refined by adding a care perspective. The results show that the majority of students can be located in the fourth moral stage according to Kohlberg's theory, that is, the conventional level of moral development. This finding implies that students are still guided by professional rules, norms and duties, and have not (yet) succeeded in making personal ethical decisions on the basis of their own principles and acting according to such decisions. PMID:9052178

  9. Nursing Theory across Curricula: A Status Report from Midwest Nursing Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Algase, Donna L.; Newton, Sarah E.; Higgins, Patricia A.

    2001-01-01

    An informal survey with 51 respondents from Midwest nursing schools found great consistency in teaching about nursing theory at the baccalaureate and doctoral levels. Only 34% of baccalaureate programs required nursing theory. Faculty with nursing doctorates tended to emphasize theory-practice linkages in undergraduate teaching. (Contains 27…

  10. Handbook of clinical nursing practice

    SciTech Connect

    Asheervath, J.; Blevins, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Written in outline format, this reference will help nurses further their understanding of advanced nursing procedures. Information is provided on the physiological, psychological, environmental, and safety considerations of nursing activities associated with diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Special consideration is given to the areas of pediatric nursing, nursing assessment, and selected radiologic and nuclear medicine procedures for each system. Contents: Clinical Introduction. Clinical Nursing Practice: Focus on Basics. Focus on Cardiovascular Function. Focus on Respiratory Function. Focus on Gastrointestinal Function. Focus on Renal and Genito-Urological Function. Focus on Neuro-Skeletal and Muscular Function. Appendices.

  11. Vocation in theology-based nursing theories.

    PubMed

    Lundmark, Mikael

    2007-11-01

    By using the concepts of intrinsicality/extrinsicality as analytic tools, the theology-based nursing theories of Ann Bradshaw and Katie Eriksson are analyzed regarding their explicit and/or implicit understanding of vocation as a motivational factor for nursing. The results show that both theories view intrinsic values as guarantees against reducing nursing practice to mechanistic applications of techniques and as being a way of reinforcing a high ethical standard. The theories explicitly (Bradshaw) or implicitly (Eriksson) advocate a vocational understanding of nursing as being essential for nursing theories. Eriksson's theory has a potential for conceptualizing an understanding of extrinsic and intrinsic motivational factors for nursing but one weakness in the theory could be the risk of slipping over to moral judgments where intrinsic factors are valued as being superior to extrinsic. Bradshaw's theory is more complex and explicit in understanding the concept of vocation and is theologically more plausible, although also more confessional. PMID:17901187

  12. Collaborations between home healthcare agencies and schools of nursing: bridging the theory-practice gap at home.

    PubMed

    Mager, Diana R; Bradley, Sharon

    2013-10-01

    Home healthcare (HHC) agencies and schools of nursing (SONs) share the mutual goal of using evidence-based knowledge to deliver care while fostering a professionally stimulating environment. As HHC agencies strive to deliver clinically effective, cost-efficient, patient-centered nursing care, SONs use scholarly methods to develop sound practitioners with investigative skills. Collaborations have long existed between these two entities, but few studies describe how theory and practice meld in the ever-growing HHC arena. The purpose of this article is to highlight the need for such future collaborations and to summarize some of the successful collaborative methods used by schools and agencies. Additionally, the collaboration between one nonprofit HHC agency and a university-based SON is described along with the challenges and benefits to both partners. PMID:24081130

  13. Occupational health nursing practice through the Human Caring lens.

    PubMed

    Noel, Dianne L

    2010-01-01

    Many health care and academic centers have adopted Watson's Theory of Human Caring as their guiding principle; the theory is also used in other disciplines, such as library science. Human caring theory offers occupational health nurses as structure that not only defines a focus for practice, but also provides a basis for moral and philosophical practice analyses. In particular, nurses may find this theory useful in confirming the definition of "caring" and reconsidering what nursing is all about. More importantly, consideration and application of this theory may lead to research on its applicability to the field of occupational health nursing. This article presents the science and philosophy of human caring, specifically Watson's Theory of Human Caring. Two case studies are presented that demonstrate how the theory could be used to evaluate occupational health nursing practice. To demonstrate its possible relevance as an occupational health nursing framework, an analysis of and comparison to existing occupational health nursing guidelines are detailed and discussed. PMID:20027992

  14. Nursing Home Work Practices and Nursing Assistants' Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Christine E.; Squillace, Marie R.; Meagher, Jennifer; Anderson, Wayne L.; Wiener, Joshua M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the impact of nursing home work practices, specifically compensation and working conditions, on job satisfaction of nursing assistants employed in nursing homes. Design and Methods: Data are from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey, responses by the nursing assistants' employers to the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey,…

  15. Using Nursing Languages in School Nursing Practice. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denehy, Janice

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this updated manual is to define and describe standardized nursing languages, highlight how nursing languages are a part of the nursing process, and illustrate through case examples how nursing languages are used in school nursing practice. This manual also summarizes the history and development of three nursing classifications, the…

  16. Hostility Patterns: Implications for Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Sofhauser, Cynthia D

    2015-07-01

    In order to present the state of the science of hostility among and across disciplines, a review of the literature was completed. The knowledge gained may influence nursing practice. Scholarly works from nursing, medical and basic sciences, psychology, sociology, education, philosophy, business, communication, and criminology were reviewed. Similar patterns in the use of the concept were discovered. The patterns revealed five themes: hostility as a health-risk factor, hostility as a factor in family relationships, hostility as a factor in perceived challenge, hostility as a factor in criminal behavior, and hostility as a factor in the workplace. Based on the knowledge gained about hostility, implications for nursing practice related to changing the hostile working environment for nurses were suggested using modeling and role-modeling nursing theory. PMID:26109695

  17. Postflood Disaster Management and the Home Health Nurse: Using Theory to Guide Practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan M. Hunter Revell; Mary K. McCurry

    2010-01-01

    Few frameworks exist to guide home health nurses during the response and recovery phases of disasters such as flooding. The Double ABCX Model of Family Adaptation is offered as an example of a guiding framework for nurses in postflood management. Phases of the model are linked to the nursing process, and management strategies are applied to individuals and families living

  18. Demonstrating Theory in Practice: Examples of the McGill Model of Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudine, Alice P.

    2001-01-01

    A workshop on the McGill Model of Nursing, which depicts nurses' role in developing and maintaining family health, was attended by 147 nurses. Increases in self-efficacy, behavior, and performance related to implementing the model were evident 6 months after the workshop. (SK)

  19. [Rediscovering practical knowledge in nursing].

    PubMed

    Medina Moya, José Luis

    2005-01-01

    The author demythologizes some arguments which blamed the victim and he works on the path to rediscover practical knowledge in nursing in the sense that a nurse becomes a "constructor" or a "maker" of knowledge and not a mere applicator of knowledge. PMID:16130684

  20. The rhetoric of nursing theory.

    PubMed

    Levine, M E

    1995-01-01

    Skeptics who question the validity and relevance of nursing theory in the nursing curriculum demonstrate the failure to persuade nurses of the importance of theory. Attempts to justify theory by forcing its use in contexts where it barely fits have contributed to the increasing disenchantment. But however misused and misunderstood, theory is nevertheless a lasting and essential part of nursing knowledge. Theory is the intellectual life of nursing. To further research, experiment, and insight in nursing as a discipline, theorizing must be encouraged--subject as all intellectual efforts must be--to honest critique and a healthy willingness to acknowledge success or failure. PMID:7721304

  1. Educating Advanced Practice Nurses for Practice Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamric, Ann B.; Hanson, Charlene M.

    2003-01-01

    Explains why content related to role acquisition and transition is critical in preparing advanced practice nurses. Recommends teaching strategies and timing and placement options for role content in graduate education. (Contains 26 references.) (SK)

  2. Doctor of Nursing Practice Ph.D. in Nursing Focus Nursing Practice Nursing Research

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Pei

    , and Advanced Specialty Practice Trajectories of Chronic Illness and Care Systems Core Courses Evidence Based with the tools and skills necessary to translate evidence gained through nursing research into practice, improve Focus Translation of evidence to practice, Transformation of health care, Health care leadership

  3. The advanced practice nurse in collaborative practice.

    PubMed

    Nugent, K E; Lambert, V A

    1996-01-01

    Establishing interdisciplinary collaborative practice models is vital to the success of health care reform. Paramount in this assumption is the need to change the roles and relationships between nurses and physicians. To facilitate this change, the authors have prepared a model of collaborative practice based on the concepts of common purpose, professional contributions of practitioners, collegiality, communication, and client-focused practice. PMID:8788631

  4. Communication in Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    Kourkouta, Lambrini; Papathanasiou, Ioanna V.

    2014-01-01

    Good communication between nurses and patients is essential for the successful outcome of individualized nursing care of each patient. To achieve this, however, nurses must understand and help their patients, demonstrating courtesy, kindness and sincerity. Also they should devote time to the patient to communicate with the necessary confidentiality, and must not forget that this communication includes persons who surround the sick person, which is why the language of communication should be understood by all those involved in it. Good communication also is not only based on the physical abilities of nurses, but also on education and experience. PMID:24757408

  5. Communication in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Kourkouta, Lambrini; Papathanasiou, Ioanna V

    2014-02-01

    Good communication between nurses and patients is essential for the successful outcome of individualized nursing care of each patient. To achieve this, however, nurses must understand and help their patients, demonstrating courtesy, kindness and sincerity. Also they should devote time to the patient to communicate with the necessary confidentiality, and must not forget that this communication includes persons who surround the sick person, which is why the language of communication should be understood by all those involved in it. Good communication also is not only based on the physical abilities of nurses, but also on education and experience. PMID:24757408

  6. Moral competence in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Jormsri, Pantip; Kunaviktikul, Wipada; Ketefian, Shaké; Chaowalit, Aranya

    2005-11-01

    This article presents the derivation of moral competence in nursing practice by identifying its attributes founded on Thai culture. In this process moral competence is formed and based on the Thai nursing value system, including personal, social and professional values. It is then defined and its three dimensions (moral perception, judgment and behavior) are also identified. Additionally, eight attributes as indicators of moral competence are identified and selected from three basic values. The eight attributes are loving kindness, compassion, sympathetic joy, equanimity, responsibility, discipline, honesty, and respect for human values, dignity and rights. All attributes are discussed by addressing the three moral dimensions in order to present how to deal with ethical issues in nursing practice. As a summary, a model of moral competence is presented to demonstrate moral competence in nursing practice in Thailand. PMID:16312087

  7. Nursing: Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurses

    MedlinePLUS

    ... LPNs) and licensed vocational nurses (LVNs) provide basic nursing care. They work under the direction of registered ... licensed vocational nurses work in many settings, including nursing homes and extended care facilities, hospitals, physicians' offices, ...

  8. Clinical concept maps in nursing education: An effective way to link theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Hicks-Moore, Sandee L

    2005-11-01

    Historically, nursing care plans have been utilized in nursing education to identify actual and potential health problems. The rigid structure of these plans often makes it challenging for students to assimilate data to identify and understand the many diverse patient problems. To promote critical thinking, improve problem-solving skills and foster understanding of the interrelationships among patient's health concerns, second year baccalaureate students developed and implemented concept maps using the nursing process in the clinical setting. An overview of what concept maps are, how the concept maps were developed and utilized in the clinical setting, implications for clinical teaching and outcomes of the experience are highlighted. PMID:19040844

  9. Awareness of self and expanding consciousness: using nursing theories to prepare nurse-therapists.

    PubMed

    Vandemark, Lisa M

    2006-07-01

    Psychotherapy is an accepted role of the advanced practice psychiatric nurse. Nursing theorists, notably Hildegard Peplau and Margaret Newman, offer guidance on the psychological and professional development of the nurse. This paper examines Newman's theory of health as expanding consciousness and the concept of awareness of self in Peplau's theory, and suggests that psychiatric advanced practice nursing programs consider the need for nurses to develop self-knowledge to facilitate the nurse-patient relationship and to improve outcomes of patient care in psychotherapy. PMID:16923732

  10. Doctoral education for WOC nurses considering advanced practice nursing.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Barbara; Colwell, Janice

    2012-01-01

    Advanced practice nursing education is at a crossroads. Societal changes, increased health care demands, and leadership nursing organizations have identified the need of a doctor of nursing practice (DNP) degree as the advanced practice degree. WOC nurses need to examine DNP programs when considering returning for an advanced practice degree. This article explores nursing education at the doctorate level and areas the WOC nurse should consider when making a decision about attending a program. The WOC nurse needs to understand the similarities and differences of the doctor of philosophy and the DNP, issues about each program and its completion, personal factors, and the application process. Although selecting a doctoral program is a daunting experience, the education will provide opportunities for the WOC nurse to excel as a scholar, thus influencing the profession and the practice. PMID:22572897

  11. Watson's theory of transpersonal caring: factors impacting nurses professional caring.

    PubMed

    Vandenhouten, Christine; Kubsch, Sylvia; Peterson, Margaret; Murdock, Jennifer; Lehrer, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    This study's purpose was to identify factors impacting nurses' perceived professional caring. The sample of 242 nurses completed a researcher-developed survey based on Watson's theory of transpersonal caring. Results showed that experienced, hospital-based nurses and those demonstrating greater familiarity with Watson's theory had higher caring scores. Implications for education, practice, and research are suggested. PMID:23075749

  12. Role modeling excellence in clinical nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Perry, R N Beth

    2009-01-01

    Role modeling excellence in clinical nursing practice is the focus of this paper. The phenomenological research study reported involved a group of 8 nurses identified by their colleagues as exemplary. The major theme revealed in this study was that these exemplary nurses were also excellent role models in the clinical setting. This paper details approaches used by these nurses that made them excellent role models. Specifically, the themes of attending to the little things, making connections, maintaining a light-hearted attitude, modeling, and affirming others are presented. These themes are discussed within the framework of Watson [Watson, J., 1989. Human caring and suffering: a subjective model for health services. In: Watson, J., Taylor, R. (Eds.), They Shall Not Hurt: Human Suffering and Human Caring. Colorado University, Boulder, CO] "transpersonal caring" and [Bandura, A., 1997. Social Learning Theory. Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ] "Social Learning Theory." Particular emphasis in the discussion is on how positive role modeling by exemplary practitioners can contribute to the education of clinical nurses in the practice setting. PMID:18590978

  13. Advanced practice nursing: a concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Maura; Beauchesne, Michelle; Farrelly, Frances; Murphy, Kathy

    2013-04-01

    A variety of terms are used to describe advanced practice nursing roles internationally. This has resulted in confusion in terminology around these roles. The aim of this concept analysis was to clarify what is meant by advanced practice nursing internationally, what attributes signify advanced practice nursing and what are its antecedents, consequences, references and related terms. Rodgers's evolutionary method of concept analysis was used. Data sources included Medline, CINAHL, Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts (ASSIA), Cochrane Library, Science Direct, SCOPUS, Web of Science, Dissertation Abstracts and DARE as well as relevant nursing texts and professional organization websites. The analysis reveals that there are many different articulations of the advanced practice nursing role outlined in the literature. This variety in terminology hinders developments in advanced practice nursing roles. Consensus on advanced practice nursing definitions, terminology, educational requirements and regulatory approaches is integral to the implementation of the advanced practice nursing role internationally. PMID:23577970

  14. Nursing knowledge, theory and method revisited.

    PubMed

    Booth, K; Kenrick, M; Woods, S

    1997-10-01

    With the approach of the 21st century, nursing is having to respond to diverse influences which are remoulding the professional landscape. Not least of these is the changing status of western economies which underpins a drive towards evidence-based practice and an increased emphasis on multidisciplinary approaches to health care delivery. Certainty in health care is now a thing of the past. Central to the way the nursing profession embraces the future is its underlying philosophy: that which articulates professional values and shapes practice, research, education and management. In a time of change it is therefore essential to revisit the philosophical framework which underpins nursing. The debate in nursing research and theory appears to have stressed the polarization of viewpoints. It may be the case that feminist writers, ethnographers, positivist researchers and nursing theorists, in defending their own points of view, diminish rather than enhance professional dialogue. This paper reviews the nature of this debate within nursing and considers the implications that a dichotomous position may have for knowledge, theory and research method within the current context of health care. It then suggests a philosophical framework which could be relevant and accessible across the whole spectrum of nursing activity. In so doing, the paper aims to contribute to the discussion around epistemology and method in a way which encompasses the diversity found within the broad church of nursing. PMID:9354995

  15. Transpersonal caring: a nursing practice guideline.

    PubMed

    Gallagher-Lepak, Susan; Kubsch, Sylvia

    2009-01-01

    Watson's carative factors offer general guidance to nurses but do not specify explicit nursing actions. On the basis of a qualitative analysis of clinical stories written by registered nurses, a transpersonal caring intervention guideline was developed. The protocol will assist nurses in using caring more intentionally and effectively in practice. PMID:19411996

  16. Development of Clinical Practice Standards for Nurses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joyce Waterman Taylor

    1991-01-01

    Nursing, with leadership from the American Nurses Association (ANA), has a long-standing com mitment to the development of standards. The first nursing practice standards were published in 1973. Since that time, both the ANA and specialty nursing organizations have developed standards. However, the proliferation of standards, reflecting a wide di vergence of intent, format, and scope, has limited their usefulness.

  17. Nurses' intention to apply clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Kogan, Ella; Tabak, Nili

    2012-12-01

    Using Ajzen and Madden's Theory of Planned Behavior, this study investigates factors which influence nurses' intention to apply clinical practice guidelines in their daily ward work. A convenience sample of 91 nurses in internal medicine wards in three Israeli hospitals answered four questionnaires. Data were processed by Pearson correlation coefficients and multivariate regression. The main findings were that burnout was negatively correlated with the intention to work according to guidelines and that professionalism (in the sense of a tendency to follow taught procedure rather than personal judgment) was positively correlated with it. Furthermore, nurses who perceive their behavioral control and subjective norms to be positive will be the most determined to work according to guidelines, provided they personally command the necessary resources to do so. PMID:23447906

  18. Does Faculty Incivility in Nursing Education Affect Emergency Nursing Practice?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, Pamela

    Incivility in nursing education is a complicated problem which causes disruptions in the learning process and negatively affects future nursing practice. This mixed method research study described incivility as well as incivility's effects through extensive literature review and application of a modified Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey. The INE included six demographic items, four quantitative sections, and five open-ended questions. The survey examined emergency nurses' perceptions of incivility and how the experience affected their personal nursing practice. The INE was initially tested in a 2004 pilot study by Dr. Cynthia Clark. For this research study, modifications were made to examine specifically emergency nurse's perceptions of incivility and the effects on their practice. The population was a group of nurses who were members of the emergency nurses association in a Midwestern state. In the quantitative component of the Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey, the Likert scale questions indicated that the majority of the participants reported witnessing or experiencing the uncivil behaviors. In the qualitative section of the INE survey, the participants reported that although they have not seen incivility within their own academic career, they had observed faculty incivility with nursing students when the participants were assigned as preceptors as part of their emergency nursing practice.

  19. Nursing Practice Environment and Registered Nurses' Job Satisfaction in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, JiSun; Flynn, Linda; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recruiting and retaining registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes is problematic, and little research is available to guide efforts to make nursing homes a more attractive practice environment for RNs. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between aspects of the nursing practice environment and job satisfaction among RNs…

  20. Remolding Child: Process of Nursing Practice for Sexually Abused Children

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sangtien Thamlikitkul; Jintana Yunibhand; Waraporn Chaiyawat

    Objective: To explore and understand the nursing practice processes of psychiatric nurses for school-aged sexually abused children admitted to psychiatric wards. Material and Method: Grounded theory approach. Twelve psychiatric nurses, aged between 35-59 years old, experienced with sexually abused child patients, participated in the present study. Data was collected by using in-depth interview that were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim, line

  1. HEALTH POLICY AND SYSTEMS Nurses' Practice Environments, Error Interception Practices,

    E-print Network

    Xie, Minge

    , & Leape, 2001; Rothschild et al., 2005). Yet, despite studies illuminating the critical role of nurses hospitals. Registered nurses (RNs) on the 82 units were surveyed, producing a sample of 686 staff nurses. Importantly, nurses' interception practices were inversely associated with medication error rates. Conclusions

  2. Nurse-perceived Patient Adverse Events and Nursing Practice Environment

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jeong-Hee; Kim, Chul-Woung; Lee, Sang-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the occurrence of patient adverse events in Korean hospitals as perceived by nurses and examine the correlation between patient adverse events with the nurse practice environment at nurse and hospital level. Methods: In total, 3096 nurses working in 60 general inpatient hospital units were included. A two-level logistic regression analysis was performed. Results: At the hospital level, patient adverse events included patient falls (60.5%), nosocomial infections (51.7%), pressure sores (42.6%) and medication errors (33.3%). Among the hospital-level explanatory variables associated with the nursing practice environment, ‘physician- nurse relationship’ correlated with medication errors while ‘education for improving quality of care’ affected patient falls. Conclusions: The doctor-nurse relationship and access to education that can improve the quality of care at the hospital level may help decrease the occurrence of patient adverse events. PMID:25284199

  3. The theory of bureaucratic caring for nursing practice in the organizational culture.

    PubMed

    Ray, M A

    1989-01-01

    Changes in the health care environment have raised many questions related to patient care. How are political, economic, legal, and technological caring decisions made? How is spiritual caring fostered? How can ethical caring be the grounds on which moral decisions are made? What new policies must be designed to enhance the human perspective in corporate policy, and how will these principles and policies guide actions? The impact of the Theory of Bureaucratic Caring on the corporate enterprise will necessitate a system shift from a narrow to a broad focus where management and caring views can exist side by side and realistically represent the transformation of health care organizations to benefit humankind. PMID:2922119

  4. The Graduate School Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Degree

    E-print Network

    Collins, Gary S.

    Specialty Track (Family Nurse Practitioner, Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner, or Advanced-baccalaureate DNP Specialty Track (Family Nurse Practitioner, Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner are adding a specialty in Advanced Population Health, Family Practice, or Psychiatric Mental Health Practice

  5. Evidence-Based Practice and School Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Susan; McCarthy, Ann Marie

    2005-01-01

    School nurses need to demonstrate that their practice is based on the best evidence available, which is usually data obtained from research. Evidence-based practice involves combining the best evidence available with nursing expertise and patient and family preferences to determine optimum care. Evidence-based practice guidelines are developed by…

  6. Assisted living nursing practice: the language of dementia: theories and interventions.

    PubMed

    Mitty, Ethel; Flores, Sandi

    2007-01-01

    The person with dementia uses behavior to communicate, but their behavior is altered by the combination of neurological damage and impairment, altered interpersonal relationships and reactions of others, and the individual's loss or weakening of their lifelong defenses or coping mechanisms. This article discusses the routes by which behavior can be understood and describes a constellation of needs of a person with dementia that has a unique fit with person-centered care. Three evidence-based models (theories) and interventions specific to dementia behaviors are discussed: the Need-Driven Dementia-Compromised Behavior Model, the Progressively Lowered Stress Threshold Model, and the utilization of self-identity roles. Montessori-based activities are another approach to person-centered dementia care that respect, as do the models, the dignity, worthiness and interests of the person afflicted with dementia. The models discussed in this article all seek to improve the quality of life of the person with dementia. Other than those at the profound end stage of dementia, most sufferers can communicate feelings. Subjective quality of life must be determined based on the self-report of the person suffering with dementia so that treatment interventions and effectiveness are grounded in that person's reality. PMID:17923285

  7. Factors Influencing Theoretical Knowledge and Practical Skill Acquisition in Student Nurses: An Empirical Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corlett, Jo; Palfreyman, J. W.; Staines, H. J.; Marr, H.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of the following on bridging the theory-practice gap in nursing education was examined: (1) theory taught by preceptors or nurse educators; (2) nurse educator/preceptor collaboration on content; and (3) immediate clinical placements following theory learning. Preceptors were more effective, collaboration was ineffective, and delay was…

  8. Nursing practice environment: A strategy for mental health nurse retention?

    PubMed

    Redknap, Robina; Twigg, Di; Rock, Daniel; Towell, Amanda

    2015-06-01

    Historically, mental health services have faced challenges in their ability to attract and retain a competent nursing workforce in the context of an overall nursing shortage. The current economic downturn has provided some respite; however, this is likely to be a temporary reprieve, with significant nursing shortages predicted for the future. Mental health services need to develop strategies to become more competitive if they are to attract and retain skilled nurses and avoid future shortages. Research demonstrates that creating and maintaining a positive nursing practice environment is one such strategy and an important area to consider when addressing nurse retention. This paper examines the impact the nursing practice environment has on nurse retention within the general and mental health settings. Findings indicate, that while there is a wealth of evidence to support the importance of a positive practice environment on nurse retention in the broader health system, there is little evidence specific to mental health. Further research of the mental health practice environment is required. PMID:25758289

  9. Reexamining fatigue: implications for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Graves, Krisanne; Simmons, Debora

    2009-01-01

    A growing body of scientific evidence demonstrates negative effects of fatigue on human performance. Nursing practice encompasses many tasks that require optimal performance. Fatigue can be the result of a multitude of contributing causes. Nurses and nursing leaders must be aware of the causes and effects of fatigue and ensure that its impact is considered where staffing and patient safety intersect. PMID:19300075

  10. State Regulations for School Nursing Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Praeger, Susan; Zimmerman, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present a state-by-state summary of rules and regulations governing school nursing practice in the United States. Official government and agency sites were reviewed to determine providers of services in schools, criteria for becoming a school nurse, protection of titling, mandates for school nursing, and the…

  11. Nursings students’ attitudes towards rural nursing practice 

    E-print Network

    Tao, Yuexian

    2014-07-01

    Background: Nursing shortage is a worldwide phenomenon; in rural areas, this shortage is exacerbated by geographical imbalances. Reducing the inequality of health outcomes between rural and urban areas requires improvement ...

  12. Characterising M?ori nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Simon, Victoria

    2006-09-01

    This paper summarises research which addresses the question What might constitute M?ori nursing practice? The research design adopted was influenced by Kaupapa M?ori methodology and used a semi-structured, qualitative, in-depth interview process. It was found that by understanding the current experiences of M?ori registered nurses, their reflections on their preparation for practice, and their current practice, we are able to identify the present and future training and practice needs of M?ori nurses. M?ori nursing practice can be characterised as having five features: the promotion of cultural affirmation including cultural awareness and identity; the support of, and access to M?ori networks; the adoption of M?ori models of health; the enabling of visibility and pro-activity as M?ori nurses; and, the validation of M?ori nurses as effective health professionals. Three recommendations for promoting M?ori nursing practice are made in relation to staff in the workplace and in nurse education programmes. All nursing staff need to be alert to: 1. The impact of western scientific models on M?ori healthcare; 2. The (often passive) non-acceptance of M?ori within mainstream institutions; and 3. The benefits of valuing Indigenous nursing programmes. PMID:17026427

  13. Nursing older people in Thailand: Embryonic holistic rhetoric and the biomedical reality of practice.

    PubMed

    Choowattanapakorn, Tassana; Nay, Rhonda; Fetherstonhaugh, Deirdre

    2004-01-01

    Qualitative research, informed by grounded theory, was used to investigate gerontic nursing practices in Bangkok, Thailand. In-depth interviews with older persons, their families, and nurses were conducted and the data were analyzed using constant comparison. Five inter-related major themes in gerontic nursing practice were revealed: the reality of nursing practice, family caregiving, views of gerontic nursing, tension, and communication. It was concluded that, though nursing rhetoric supported holistic care, the reality of everyday practice is still biomedical in focus. PMID:14976499

  14. The Journal of Doctoral Nursing Practice

    E-print Network

    Columbia University

    ..................................................................................................................12 Courtney E. Reinisch and Jeffrey Kwong PRACTICE EVIDENCE Awareness of Heuristics in Clinical Knowledge: An Evidence-Based Change Project .............................................42 Marie A. CobbThe Journal of Doctoral Nursing Practice CSRClinical Scholars Review www

  15. Eliciting nursing knowledge from practice: the dualism of nursing.

    PubMed

    Ramprogus, Vince

    2002-01-01

    Nursing knowledge has traditionally been examined and developed through the main research approaches based on the positivist, interpretive or phenomenological philosophies. These approaches are used either from a single and individual stance or combined to address particular research questions. They all, however, retain a focus that deals primarily or exclusively with what can be measured, observed or expressed as a fundamental unit of analysis to reconstruct, interpret and explain nursing practice. In this paper, Vince Ramprogus challenges the traditional approach to how nursing knowledge is defined and the common understanding of the purpose of nursing research. It is argued that adhering to empirical rigour while investigating or measuring nursing practice interferes with the very act and experience of nursing. Indeed, it becomes an either/or situation. It is also argued that nursing is not an empirical subject, and, therefore, the purpose of researching nursing is not about seeking the truth but about improving practice to achieve better patient care. The arguments are intended to provoke discussion and debate rather than to present a set position. PMID:12405006

  16. Nurses' spiritual care practices: becoming less religious?

    PubMed

    Delgado, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    Research indicates that nurses do not consistently provide spiritual care, feel ill equipped to do so, and there is a lack of information as to the type of spiritual care practices nurses use. This exploratory descriptive study surveyed nurses (N = 123) about their spiritual care practices and perceptions of effectiveness, followed by qualitative interviews with volunteers (n = 5) from the surveyed group. The nurses favored spiritual interventions that are not overtly religious, but conveyed concern and support, such as listening and providing comforting touch. PMID:25898449

  17. Some considerations concerning practice and feedback in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, J

    1993-12-01

    Dominant approaches to reflective practice and experiential learning in Australia and the United Kingdom seem to reflect a limited view of the functions of practice and feedback in human learning. These functions will be described from a cognitive psychological perspective and the weaknesses of such approaches discussed. It will be argued that Schönian reflective practice and some experiential learning techniques can reinforce rather than eliminate inappropriate action tendencies and that this, in turn, could consolidate nursing's theory-practice gap. PMID:8132932

  18. Intuition in nursing practice: deep connections.

    PubMed

    Leners, D W

    1992-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the phenomenon of intuition in nursing culture. The aims of the study were to (a) identify and describe terminology used with intuition in nursing care practice, (b) describe examples of experiential knowledge of intuition, (c) describe actions taken on intuitive experiences, (d) describe feelings associated with intuitive experience, and (e) compare and contrast patterns and processes of nursing intuition. The design of the study was ethnography. Sampling involved 40 nurses from all levels of the hospital and home health care practice. Intuition was found to (a) facilitate the depth of nurse-client relationships; (b) lead to a deeper understanding and connection with client patterns; (c) be acknowledged as a professional risk; (d) emphasize the significant influence of autonomy, independence, and assertiveness in nursing practice; and (e) contribute to excellence in nursing care. Intuition was identified as a manifestation of transpersonal caring in the art of nursing practice and was deeply connected to caring as the moral ideal of the nursing profession. PMID:1301422

  19. Critical thinking, nurse education and universities: some thoughts on current issues and implications for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Morrall, Peter; Goodman, Benny

    2013-09-01

    When in the latter part of the 20th century nurse 'training' in the UK left the old schools of nursing (based within the health delivery system) and entered universities, the promise was not just a change of focus from training to education but an embracement of 'higher' education. Specifically, nurses were to be exposed to the demands of thinking rather than just doing - and critical thinking at that. However, despite a history of critical perspectives informing nursing theory, that promise may be turning sour. The insidious saturation of the university system in bureaucracy and managerialism has, we argue, undermined critical thinking. A major funding restructuring of higher education in the UK, coinciding with public concern about the state of nursing practice, is undermining further the viability of critical thinking in nursing and potentially the acceptability of university education for nurses. Nevertheless, while critical thinking in universities has decayed, there is no obvious educational alternative that can provide this core attribute, one that is even more necessary to understand health and promote competent nursing practice in an increasingly complex and globalising world. We propose that nurse academics and their colleagues from many other academic and professional disciplines engage in collegiate 'moral action' to re-establish critical thinking in UK universities. PMID:23218906

  20. Patient and nurse experiences of theory-based care.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Jane

    2009-04-01

    The pre-surgery nursing practice model derived from Newman's theory was developed to change the delivery of nursing care in a pre-surgical clinic. Guided by the theoretical knowledge of health as expanding consciousness, transpersonal caring, and reflective practice, key practice changes included a) incorporating Newman's praxis process, b) changing the physical space, and c) providing opportunities to reflect on practice. The purpose of this study was to utilize a phenomenological approach to evaluate a new model of care among 31 patients and 4 nurses. PMID:19342715

  1. Making decisions: nursing practices in critical care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Judy Currey; Linda Worrall-Carter

    2001-01-01

    This article reports the types and complexity level of decisions made in everyday clinical practice by critical care nurses. It also reports factors that influence the complexity of those decisions. A combination of methods were chosen for the two phase study. In the first phase, 12 qualified critical care nurses documented decisions (over a 2 hour period) on a clinical

  2. Practical Nursing, Volume I. Health Occupations Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Helen W.; And Others

    This curriculum guide provides teachers with up-to-date information and skill-related applications needed by the practical nurse. The volume contains three sections and 24 instructional units: Personal Vocational Relationships (6 units), Nutrition (3 units), and Basic Nursing Principles and Applied Skills (15 units covering such topics as…

  3. Concept maps and nursing theory: a pedagogical approach.

    PubMed

    Hunter Revell, Susan M

    2012-01-01

    Faculty seek to teach nursing students how to link clinical and theoretical knowledge with the intent of improving patient outcomes. The author discusses an innovative 9-week concept mapping activity as a pedagogical approach to teach nursing theory in a graduate theory course. Weekly concept map building increased student engagement and fostered theoretical thinking. Unexpectedly, this activity also benefited students through group work and its ability to enhance theory-practice knowledge. PMID:22513774

  4. Evidence-based practice in rehabilitation nursing.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Linda L

    2007-01-01

    How to use research is a learned skill. With this skill rehabilitation nurses can help ensure that their practice is based on the best evidence available. Evidence-based practice is a balance of using external research-based clinical evidence and clinical expertise. The purpose of this article is to show rehabilitation nurses how to build the skills for using evidence, rather than just doing research. This involves asking questions, finding and appraising relevant data, and putting that information into everyday practice. When evidence-based practice is merged into a clinician's daily routine, the result is a more analytical and, ultimately, effective clinical practice. PMID:17899991

  5. Teaching Research Synthesis to Advanced Practice Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Upchurch, Sandra; Brosnan, Christine A.; Grimes, Deanna E.

    2002-01-01

    A process for teaching research synthesis to advanced practice nurses includes two courses: a first research applications course in which students build bibliographic databases, practice statistical analysis, and develop search skills; and a second course in which they complete literature reviews or meta analyses of research on clinical practice

  6. Nursing students learning to utilize nursing research in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Mattila, Lea-Riitta; Eriksson, Elina

    2007-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the significance of a learning assignment in relation to research skills and learning of nursing students in clinical practice. The learning assignment included an oral presentation of a nursing research article, which the students gave to their fellow students and ward nurses. The students also chaired the discussion after the presentation. The target group for the study was nursing students of a Finnish polytechnic who had been studying for 2-2 1/2 years and had accomplished a minimum of 120 ECTS credits of the total of 210 ECTS credits. When participating in the study, the students were completing a six-week clinical practice of optional studies. The data were collected with a questionnaire designed for the study. It consisted of six open-ended questions. Three of the questions were related to learning of research skills. Two questions were concerned with learning during the ongoing clinical practice. The final question inquired the students' views on the development of the learning assignment. The students received the questionnaire before the commencement of their clinical practice, and they returned it to the other researcher after their clinical practice. The questionnaire was given to 80 students, of which 50 returned it; the response rate was 63%. The data were analysed by content analysis question by question. According to the results, the learning assignment advanced the understanding of research concepts for the majority of the students. In particular, the students reported that the oral presentation clarified the research concepts, and the structure of a scientific article was also elucidated. The students stated that the assignment generated ideas concerning the development of nursing care. In relation to the ongoing clinical practice, the assignment advanced patient encounters and interaction, and bearing responsibility the most. Proposals for the further development of the learning assignment were expressed by more than half of the nursing students. Half of them suggested ensuring the interest in the topic from the ward. PMID:17064819

  7. North Dakota Statewide Nursing Study, Phase II. Delineation of Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Neil; Smith, David

    Nursing practice in North Dakota was studied as part the development of a statewide nursing resource planning system. In addition to the current scope of nursing practice, the study investigated: (1) specific competencies currently targeted by nursing education; (2) differences in specific competencies endorsed by nurses with various education…

  8. Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP) Earn Your Doctorate & Advance the Profession of Nursing

    E-print Network

    Papautsky, Ian

    Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP) Earn Your Doctorate & Advance the Profession of Nursing degree in nursing is the perfect way to enhance your practice and advance the profession of nursing will help you achieve your career goals. Points of Pride The UC College of Nursing is dedicated

  9. Best Faculty Practice Plan Model for a Small College of Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrad, Sharyn Neiman

    2010-01-01

    Bridging the gap between theory and practice has been a priority with universities and colleges of nursing. A mechanism for bridging this gap has been the establishment of faculty practices. Faculty practices have provided nurse practitioner faculty opportunities to mentor students, augment income, implement evidence-based research, provide…

  10. Using advanced mobile devices in nursing practice--the views of nurses and nursing students.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Pauline; Petersson, Göran; Saveman, Britt-Inger; Nilsson, Gunilla

    2014-09-01

    Advanced mobile devices allow registered nurses and nursing students to keep up-to-date with expanding health-related knowledge but are rarely used in nursing in Sweden. This study aims at describing registered nurses' and nursing students' views regarding the use of advanced mobile devices in nursing practice. A cross-sectional study was completed in 2012; a total of 398 participants replied to a questionnaire, and descriptive statistics were applied. Results showed that the majority of the participants regarded an advanced mobile device to be useful, giving access to necessary information and also being useful in making notes, planning their work and saving time. Furthermore, the advanced mobile device was regarded to improve patient safety and the quality of care and to increase confidence. In order to continuously improve the safety and quality of health care, advanced mobile devices adjusted for nursing practice should be further developed, implemented and evaluated in research. PMID:25183609

  11. Evidence-Based Practice Guidelines and School Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Susan; McCarthy, Ann Marie

    2007-01-01

    The use of evidence-based practice (EBP) has become the standard of health care practice. Nurses are expected to use best evidence on a wide range of topics, yet most nurses have limited time, resources, and/or skills to access and evaluate the quality of research and evidence needed to practice evidence-based nursing. EBP guidelines allow nurses

  12. [Application of Parse's Theory in the nurse-person relation].

    PubMed

    de Souza, S N; Rossetto, E G; Sodré, T M

    2000-09-01

    This study has the purpose of telling experiences lived by the authors, using the foundations of Parse's theory, "Human Becoming". They observed the study of the theory and its application in nursing practice claim for changes in nurse's values and beliefs, transforming her vision about human being and health, giving a more humanistic care. This lived experience allowed personal and professional maturation for the authors and stimulated them to divulge the theory to contribute for the nursing growth and improve the person's quality of life. PMID:12033130

  13. Computer-Assisted Instruction in Practical Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Maureen

    1976-01-01

    Existing computer-assisted instructional programs for nursing students are studied and their application to the education of practical nurses is considered in the light of the recent history of nursing education. (Author)

  14. Advanced practice in pediatric nursing: blending roles.

    PubMed

    Sperhac, A M; Strodtbeck, F

    2001-04-01

    In the past, pediatric advanced practice nurse's roles were the Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) in the inpatient setting and the Nurse Practitioner (NP) in the outpatient setting. With health care system changes, such as the shifting and blurring boundaries between inpatient and outpatient care, changes were required in the graduate curricula to blend the CNS and NP roles into an advanced practice nurse (APN) role. This article describes the model at Rush University, the advantages of the CNS/NP blended role, the revised APN curriculum, and examples of blended-role APNs in action. The curriculum change to blend the CNS/NP roles addresses the need for the blended APN role in changing health care systems. PMID:11326400

  15. Practical strategies for nursing education program evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lewallen, Lynne Porter

    2015-01-01

    Self-evaluation is required for institutions of higher learning and the nursing programs within them. The literature provides information on evaluation models and instruments, and descriptions of how specific nursing education programs are evaluated. However, there are few discussions in the nursing education literature of the practical aspects of nursing education program evaluation: how to get started, how to keep track of data, who to involve in data collection, and how to manage challenging criteria. This article discusses the importance of program evaluation in the academic setting and provides information on practical ways to organize the evaluation process and aggregate data, and strategies for gathering data from students, graduates, alumni, and employers of graduates. PMID:25839953

  16. The Journal of Doctoral Nursing Practice

    E-print Network

    Qian, Ning

    College of Nursing Practice Evidence H. Michael Dreher, PhD, RN Associate Professor, Department .................................................................................6 Denise Davis, Vernell DeWitty, and Catherine Millett PRACTICE EVIDENCE Effects of Educating Women Roubion-Johnson and Donna L. Williams Evidence-Based Clinical Guidelines and Their Impact on Prevention

  17. 76 FR 14033 - National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ...National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice...address diversity in nurse education and practice...diversification of the nursing workforce; (2) summarize...National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice...bhpr.hrsa.gov/nursing/nacnep.htm....

  18. How reflective practice improves nurses' critical thinking ability.

    PubMed

    Cirocco, Maria

    2007-01-01

    Purposeful reflection is consistent with adult learning theory. It is known to lead to a deeper understanding of issues and to develop judgment and skill. Required by law to ensure members' competence in their professional practice, the College of Nurses of Ontario recommends and has developed a tool for evaluating reflective practice. The tool focuses on key attributes said to be demonstrated by competent practitioners, including critical thinking (CT) and job knowledge. This study aimed to determine whether nurses engage in reflective practice and whether they perceive that it enhances their CT ability. Surveys were sent to 60 gastroenterology nurses at a large teaching hospital; 34 surveys were anonymously returned. All respondents engaged in reflective practice, and 24 reported using the college's tool. Nineteen respondents strongly agreed that their nursing practice had improved as a result. Critical thinking is difficult to assess because of a lack of clear-cut performance criteria. Improvement of CT was difficult to evaluate from the responses, even though all respondents participated in reflective practice. Both CT and reflective practice need to be better defined in order to examine and explain their relationship. PMID:18156956

  19. Effective communication skills in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Bramhall, Elaine

    2014-12-01

    This article highlights the importance of effective communication skills for nurses. It focuses on core communication skills, their definitions and the positive outcomes that result when applied to practice. Effective communication is central to the provision of compassionate, high-quality nursing care. The article aims to refresh and develop existing knowledge and understanding of effective communication skills. Nurses reading this article will be encouraged to develop a more conscious style of communicating with patients and carers, with the aim of improving health outcomes and patient satisfaction. PMID:25467362

  20. A center of nursing excellence: supporting the professional practice environment.

    PubMed

    Schutzenhofer, K K

    1992-08-01

    The Center of Nursing Excellence is a unique, multifaceted program that promotes the professional practice environment. The Center provides programs and services in six areas: career planning and development, nursing practice review, research and grants support, scholarly affairs, nursing outreach, and nursing resources. The Center serves as a resource to nurses at St. Louis Children's Hospital and in the nursing community at large. PMID:1507058

  1. The University of Texas at Austin School of Nursing Professional and Technical Standards for Nursing Practice

    E-print Network

    Johnston, Daniel

    , with or without accommodation. Intellectual Requirements: Critical thinkingThe University of Texas at Austin School of Nursing Professional and Technical Standards for Nursing Practice Responsibilities and standards in nursing

  2. Do educational outcomes correspond with the requirements of nursing practice: educators' and managers' assessments of novice nurses' professional competence

    PubMed Central

    Numminen, Olivia; Laine, Tuija; Isoaho, Hannu; Hupli, Maija; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Meretoja, Riitta

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated weather educational outcomes of nurse education meet the requirements of nursing practice by exploring the correspondence between nurse educators' and nurse managers' assessments of novice nurses' professional competence. The purpose was to find competence areas contributing to the acknowledged practice–theory gap. Design A cross-sectional, comparative design using the Nurse Competence Scale was applied. Subjects The sample comprised nurse educators (n = 86) and nurse managers (n = 141). Methods Descriptive and inferential statistics were used in the data analysis. Main outcome measures Educators assessed novice nurses' competence to a significantly higher level than managers in all competence areas (p < 0.001). The biggest correspondence between educators' and mangers' assessments were in competencies related to immediate patient care, commitment to ethical values, maintaining professional skills and nurses' care of the self. The biggest differences were in competencies related to developmental and evaluation tasks, coaching activities, use of evidence-based knowledge and in activities which required mastering a comprehensive view of care situations. However, differences between educators' and managers' assessments were strongly associated with their age and work experience. Active and improved collaboration should be focused on areas in which the differences between educators' and managers' assessments greatly differ in ensuring novice nurses? fitness for practice. PMID:24512685

  3. Oncology Nursing as Ethical Practice.

    PubMed

    Barton-Burke, Margaret

    2015-05-01

    Many of us have patients we remember who left us with lasting memories. One such patient I cared for was a young man from Ghana. This young man had a wife, two children, and terminal cancer. He would not discuss the seriousness of his illness with his doctors, his nurses, his wife, or his community. However, from his hospital bed, he decided to go to Ghana to visit his mother. I was the clinical nurse specialist on the oncology unit at the time, and the nurses on the unit became upset with this man's plan because they knew that he would probably never return from Ghana. He would not die with his wife or his children surrounding his bedside, as in a U.S. healthcare setting. He would die with his mother in his country--in his own way. PMID:25901371

  4. Perinatal Safety: From Concept to Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Holly Powell

    2010-01-01

    Communication and teamwork problems are leading causes of documented preventable adverse outcomes in perinatal care. An essential component of perinatal safety is the organizational culture in which clinicians work. Clinicians’ individual and collective authority to question the plan of care and take action to change the direction of a clinical situation in the patient’s best interest can be viewed as their “agency for safety.” However, collective agency for safety and commitment to support nurses in their advocacy role is missing in many perinatal care settings. This paper draws from Organizational Accident Theory, High Reliability Theory, and Symbolic Interactionism to describe the nurse’s role in maintaining safety during labor and birth in acute care settings, and suggests actions for supporting the perinatal nurse at individual, group, and systems levels to achieve maximum safety in perinatal care. PMID:20147827

  5. Factors influencing evidence-based practice for community nurses.

    PubMed

    Baird, Lisa M Garland; Miller, Tess

    2015-05-01

    Factors influencing the development of evidence-based nursing practice (EBNP) were examined in Prince Edward Island, Canada. An adapted electronic questionnaire was distributed to practicing registered nurses and nurse practitioners (n=68). An analysis of variance revealed a significant difference between nurses' clinical practice setting and the EBNP scale. Significant differences were also found between age and education level when compared with the EBNP subscales where novice nurses were less likely to rely on experience and intuition, and expert nurses with a higher level of education reported being more skilful at synthesising and applying information from research findings into their nursing practice. PMID:25993372

  6. The Institute for Johns Hopkins Nursing: A Collaborative Model for Nursing Practice and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabatier, Kathleen Hartman

    2002-01-01

    The Institute for Johns Hopkins Nursing was developed collaboratively by the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing and the Johns Hopkins Hospital Department of Nursing. The institute prepares nurses for practice, keeps practitioners current, and provides nursing staff development programs. (Contains 11 references.) (JOW)

  7. Faculty practice and roles of staff nurses and clinical faculty in nursing student learning

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joanne C. Langan

    2003-01-01

    The perceptions of staff nurses and clinical nurse faculty on the roles they play in nursing student learning were examined. The study also sought to explore how faculty practice status affected these perceived roles. Nursing schools with generic baccalaureate nursing programs in the middle Atlantic region composed the study population. A convenience sample of two schools that expected their undergraduate

  8. When the mission is teaching: Does nursing faculty practice fit?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laurie N. Sherwen

    1998-01-01

    As nursing faculty practice becomes a part of academic life, nursing programs in liberal arts colleges, where the primary mission is teaching, must document not only that practice is scholarship but also that practice conforms to the teaching mission of the institution. Discussions of scholarly practice from the nursing literature, as well as from Schon and Boyer, serve to validate

  9. Identification of Desired Outcomes for School Nursing Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selekman, Janice; Guilday, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    The "Scope and Standards of Professional School Nursing Practice" states that school nurses should evaluate the quality and effectiveness of their practice. School nurses have not yet identified and adopted outcomes by which this effectiveness can be measured. This study used focus groups during a national meeting of school nurse leaders to…

  10. The National Nursing Model from the Nursing Practice Perspective – Results from a Finnish Evaluation Study

    PubMed Central

    Kuusisto, Anne; Kaipio, Johanna; Nykänen, Pirkko

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of the national nursing model in Finland. The feasibility evaluation was carried out with nurses using interviews and patient case scenarios in primary, specialized and private healthcare. The nursing process model showed to be feasible in nursing practice but the current national nursing classification (FinCC) was considered to be too detailed, multi-layered and difficult to understand and use. Overall, electronic nursing documentation improves the legal protection of patients and health professionals and makes nursing care transparent, but the nursing documentation systems do not support multi-professional care or information exchange. This study resulted in that the nursing model should conform better to nursing practices and support better nurses in their care interventions. An essential improvement for nursing practice would be specific templates that are easy to apply in specific situations with homogenous patient groups. PMID:24199092

  11. [The Peplau theory of interpersonal relations in nursing: analysis and development].

    PubMed

    Santos, S S; da Nóbrega, M M

    1996-01-01

    This is a bibliographic study where the authors tried to analyse the interpersonal relationships of nursing from Hildegard E. Peplau following the conceptual pattern of analysis and evolution proposed by Thibodeau. It describes the concepts of person, environment, health and nursing; the source and procedures used to this theory formation; and its generalization, use, acceptance and significance for nursing. It shows the importance of its application in nursing practice because the interpersonal process is a primary stage in nursing assistance. PMID:9052242

  12. Learning theories application in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Aliakbari, Fatemeh; Parvin, Neda; Heidari, Mohammad; Haghani, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    Learning theories are the main guide for educational systems planning in the classroom and clinical training included in nursing. The teachers by knowing the general principles of these theories can use their knowledge more effectively according to various learning situations. In this study, Eric, Medline, and Cochrane databases were used for articles in English and for the Persian literature, Magiran, Iran doc, Iran medex, and Sid databases were used with the help of keywords including social cognitive learning, learning theory, behavioral theory, cognitive theory, constructive theory, and nursing education. The search period was considered from 1990 to 2012. Some related books were also studied about each method, its original vision, the founders, practical application of the training theory, especially training of nursing and its strengths and weaknesses. Behaviorists believe that learning is a change in an observable behavior and it happens when the communication occurs between the two events, a stimulus and a response. Among the applications of this approach is the influence on the learner's emotional reactions. Among the theories of this approach, Thorndike and Skinner works are subject to review and critique. Cognitive psychologists unlike the behaviorists believe that learning is an internal process objective and they focus on thinking, understanding, organizing, and consciousness. Fundamentalists believe that learners should be equipped with the skills of inquiry and problem solving in order to learn by the discovery and process of information. Among this group, we will pay attention to analyze Wertheimer, Brunner, Ausubel theories, Ganyeh information processing model, in addition to its applications in nursing education. Humanists in learning pay attention to the feelings and experiences. Carl Rogers support the retention of learning-centered approach and he is believed to a semantic continuum. At the other end of the continuum, experiential learning is located with the meaning and meaningful. It applies the minds and feelings of the person. From this group, the main focus will be on the works of Rogers and Novels. Finally, it could be concluded that the usage of any of these theoriesin its place would be desired and useful. PMID:25767813

  13. Learning theories application in nursing education

    PubMed Central

    Aliakbari, Fatemeh; Parvin, Neda; Heidari, Mohammad; Haghani, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    Learning theories are the main guide for educational systems planning in the classroom and clinical training included in nursing. The teachers by knowing the general principles of these theories can use their knowledge more effectively according to various learning situations. In this study, Eric, Medline, and Cochrane databases were used for articles in English and for the Persian literature, Magiran, Iran doc, Iran medex, and Sid databases were used with the help of keywords including social cognitive learning, learning theory, behavioral theory, cognitive theory, constructive theory, and nursing education. The search period was considered from 1990 to 2012. Some related books were also studied about each method, its original vision, the founders, practical application of the training theory, especially training of nursing and its strengths and weaknesses. Behaviorists believe that learning is a change in an observable behavior and it happens when the communication occurs between the two events, a stimulus and a response. Among the applications of this approach is the influence on the learner's emotional reactions. Among the theories of this approach, Thorndike and Skinner works are subject to review and critique. Cognitive psychologists unlike the behaviorists believe that learning is an internal process objective and they focus on thinking, understanding, organizing, and consciousness. Fundamentalists believe that learners should be equipped with the skills of inquiry and problem solving in order to learn by the discovery and process of information. Among this group, we will pay attention to analyze Wertheimer, Brunner, Ausubel theories, Ganyeh information processing model, in addition to its applications in nursing education. Humanists in learning pay attention to the feelings and experiences. Carl Rogers support the retention of learning-centered approach and he is believed to a semantic continuum. At the other end of the continuum, experiential learning is located with the meaning and meaningful. It applies the minds and feelings of the person. From this group, the main focus will be on the works of Rogers and Novels. Finally, it could be concluded that the usage of any of these theoriesin its place would be desired and useful. PMID:25767813

  14. Why we do what we do: a theoretical evaluation of the integrated practice model for forensic nursing science.

    PubMed

    Valentine, Julie L

    2014-01-01

    An evaluation of the Integrated Practice Model for Forensic Nursing Science () is presented utilizing methods outlined by . A brief review of nursing theory basics and evaluation methods by Meleis is provided to enhance understanding of the ensuing theoretical evaluation and critique. The Integrated Practice Model for Forensic Nursing Science, created by forensic nursing pioneer Virginia Lynch, captures the theories, assumptions, concepts, and propositions inherent in forensic nursing practice and science. The historical background of the theory is explored as Lynch's model launched the role development of forensic nursing practice as both a nursing and forensic science specialty. It is derived from a combination of nursing, sociological, and philosophical theories to reflect the grounding of forensic nursing in the nursing, legal, psychological, and scientific communities. As Lynch's model is the first inception of forensic nursing theory, it is representative of a conceptual framework although the title implies a practice theory. The clarity and consistency displayed in the theory's structural components of assumptions, concepts, and propositions are analyzed. The model is described and evaluated. A summary of the strengths and limitations of the model is compiled followed by application to practice, education, and research with suggestions for ongoing theory development. PMID:25144581

  15. Clinical practice guideline use by oncology advanced practice nurses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Regina S. Cunningham

    2006-01-01

    Understanding how clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are utilized and the effects of their implementation on outcomes is an important goal. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if oncology advanced practice nurse (APN) interventions provided to men with prostate cancer were consistent with Agency for Healthcare Policy and Research CPGs regarding pain [U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

  16. 76 FR 64953 - National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-19

    ...National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice...National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice...delineate the contribution of nursing workforce development...key issues challenging nursing workforce development...National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and...

  17. 78 FR 22890 - National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-17

    ...National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice...National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice...the key issues facing nursing workforce development...key challenges facing nursing workforce development...National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and...

  18. 75 FR 64318 - National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-19

    ...address diversity in nurse education and practice...diversification of the nursing workforce; (2...diversity in the nursing workforce and health...presented on diversity in nurse education and practice...Advisory Council on Nurse Education and...

  19. 78 FR 2275 - National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-10

    ...National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice...National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice...key challenges facing nursing workforce development...key challenges facing nursing workforce development...National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and...

  20. 78 FR 65342 - National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ...National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice...National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice...the key issues facing nursing workforce development...key challenges facing nursing workforce development...National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and...

  1. Principles of nursing practice: development and implementation.

    PubMed

    Manley, Kim; Watts, Chris; Cunningham, Geraldine; Davies, Janet

    This article, the first in a nine-part series, describes the development of the recent Principles of Nursing Practice initiative. It provides an overview of the Principles, the objectives that informed them and the challenges experienced in their development. PMID:21473345

  2. The Palliative Care Advanced Practice Nurse

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kim K. Kuebler

    2003-01-01

    The emerging role of the advanced practice nurse (APN) as a palliative care provider is gain- ing increased recognition in the United States. The APN' s ability to perform comprehensive physical evaluations, order and interpret diagnostics, and prescribe appropriate medications while receiving reimbursement allow this provider to become a valuable and important dis- cipline in the patient' s plan of

  3. Practical Nursing. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for practical nursing. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that…

  4. Moral instability: the upsides for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Joan

    2010-04-01

    This article briefly outlines some of the key problems with the way in which the moral realm has traditionally been understood and analysed. I propose two alternative views of what is morally interesting and applicable to nursing practice and I indicate that instability has its upsides. I begin with a moral tale - a 'Good Samaritan' story - which raises fairly usual questions about the nature of morality but also the more philosophically fundamental question about the relationship between subjectivity and moral agency. I then consider this relationship from the perspectives of two twentieth century philosophers: Emmanuel Levinas and Michel Foucault. Levinas' basic point is that the experience of ethical subjectivity is made possible through others: the demand to respond to the existence of others is the basic social structure that precedes individual freedom. If Levinas posits intersubjectivity as a fundamental or primitive feature of the moral realm, Foucault poses an even more basic question: how have moral subjects and relations of obligation been constituted? The aim of ethical inquiry, for Foucault, is to describe the network of discourses, institutions, relations, and practices through which certain kinds of subjects are constituted and constitute themselves, e.g. as a kind of person who can act morally. Finally, I consider some recent research in philosophy of nursing which illustrates how Levinasian and/or Foucauldian perspectives can deepen understanding of nurses' moral practices, specifically, the work of Norwegian public health nurses, Canadian pediatric nurses, and Irish midwives. I suggest that in spite of the instability of morality in general and the particular ethical challenges that face nurses, there are grounds for hope and possible strategies for living in unstable times. PMID:20415964

  5. Exploring reflective thinking in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Teekman, B

    2000-05-01

    While it is claimed in the nursing literature that reflective thinking is the approach par excellence for learning and advancing the art and practice of nursing, few empirical studies have been undertaken in this area to date. Sense-Making, a qualitative research method, was utilized to obtain and analyse data from interviews with 10 registered nurses in order to study reflective thinking in actual nursing practice. Ten non-routine nursing situations were analysed for the presence of reflective thinking. Time-line interviews of the events resulted in a total of 59 micro-moments, each of which was explored in terms of the thinking processes utilized to make sense of the situation as well as the focus of their thought. 'Pre-perceptions' played an important part in how the respondents perceived their situation. Reflective thinking was extensively manifest, especially in moments of doubt and perplexity, and consisted of such cognitive activities as comparing and contrasting phenomena, recognizing patterns, categorizing perceptions, framing, and self-questioning in order to create meaning and understanding. Self-questioning was identified as a significant process within reflective thinking. By exploring and analysing the type of questions respondents were asking themselves, the study uncovered three hierarchical levels of reflective thinking. Respondents most often engaged in reflective thinking-for-action which centred on the here and now in order to act. Reflective thinking-for-evaluation focused on creating wholeness and contributed to the realization of multiple perceptions and multiple responses. Reflective thinking-for-critical-inquiry could not be demonstrated in the study sample. The findings of this study resulted in the development of a model of reflective thinking, which is discussed in terms of the implications for learning in nursing practice. PMID:10840246

  6. Constructing consensus: developing an advanced nursing practice role.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Jill

    2008-11-01

    Following the release of the Ministerial Taskforce on Nursing in August 1998 and the withdrawal of the New Zealand Nurses Organisation from the Taskforce membership, a 'decision-making' workshop was held to further advance nursing practice roles in New Zealand. Momentum about advanced nursing roles had been gathering spurred on by political reform and the research about established nursing practitioner and clinical nurse specialist roles overseas. This study uses a discourse analytical approach to trace the ongoing struggle between nursing groups for power to control the future of advanced nursing practice. The convergence of political discourses with those that were dominant in nursing during this period produced considerable tension, but eventually led to a consensus position concerning the location of a nurse practitioner role within the regulatory framework of the Nursing Council of New Zealand. PMID:19238824

  7. Documentation of Nursing Practice Using a Computerized Medical Information System

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Carol

    1981-01-01

    This paper discusses a definition of the content of the computerized nursing data base developed by the Nursing Department for the Clinical Center Medical Information System at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. The author describes the theoretical framework for the content and presents a model to describe the organization of the nursing data components in relation to the process of nursing care delivery. Nursing documentation requirements of Nurse Practice Acts, American Nurses Association Standards of Practice and the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals are also addressed as they relate to this data base. The advantages and disadvantages of such an approach to computerized documentation are discussed.

  8. Spirituality and self care: Expanding self-care deficit nursing theory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary Louise White

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to extend the theory of self-care deficit nursing by including specific constructs of religion, spirituality, and spiritual self-care practices within the structure suggested by Orem's self-care deficit nursing theory. Based on an extensive literature review, practice experience, and a discovery theory-building approach, a new mid-range theory called White's theory of spirituality and spiritual self-care

  9. Spirituality And Spiritual Self-Care: Expanding Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary Louise White

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to extend the theory of self-care deficit nursing by including specific constructs of religion, spirituality, and spiritual self-care practices within the structure suggested by Orem's self-care deficit nursing theory. Based on an extensive literature review, practice experience, and a discovery theory-building approach, a new mid-range theory called White's theory of spirituality and spiritual self-care

  10. FACT SHEET for Licensed Practical Nurses Entering NEPS

    E-print Network

    Saskatchewan, University of

    a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) interested in entering the Nursing Education Program of Saskatchewan (NEPS of Care · NEPS 222.3 Nursing Therapeutics I (Transfer credit granted if student passes the NEPS 222 222.3 & NEPS 223.3, Nursing Therapeutics I & II (transfer credit granted if student passes

  11. Better protection for nursing: reporting poor practice.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Richard

    The government has responded to criticism about a legal loophole in the protection of those who report poor practice in the interest of the public. The gap in protection, which limited any liability for the detrimental treatment of whistleblowers to their employers and excluded detriment caused by co-workers, threatened to derail plans for the introduction of a duty of candour on healthcare providers as recommended by the Francis Report. In this article, the author describes how changes to the law set out in the Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Act 2013 will improve protection for nurses who report poor practice and explains the role of Public Concern at Work in providing advice and support to nurses who wish to report poor practice. PMID:24260996

  12. The Quad Council practice competencies for public health nursing.

    PubMed

    Swider, Susan M; Krothe, Joyce; Reyes, David; Cravetz, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the most recent efforts by the Quad Council of Public Health Nursing organizations to review and revise the competencies for PHN practice, and highlights the implications of these competencies for practice, education, and research. The Quad Council is a coalition of four nursing organizations with a focus on public health nursing and includes the Association of Community Health Nursing Educators; the Association of Public Health Nursing (known prior to July 1, 2012 as the Association of State and Territorial Directors of Nursing); the Public Health Nursing section of the American Public Health Association; and the Council on Economics and Practice of the American Nurses' Association. The Quad Council competencies are based on the Council on Linkages competencies for public health professionals and were designed to ensure that public health nursing fits in the domain of public health science and practice. PMID:24579712

  13. Advanced practice nursing in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Clancy, G T; Maguire, D

    1995-03-01

    The advanced practice roles of clinical nurse specialist and neonatal nurse practitioner have enjoyed challenge and success in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). This article provides a historic perspective and role descriptions of advanced practice roles in the NICU, describes a theoretical framework for development of the graduate neonatal nurse practitioner, and uses this framework to describe the neonatal advanced practice nurse of the future. PMID:7766379

  14. The relationship between research and the nursing process in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Mason, G M; Attree, M

    1997-11-01

    The nursing process was originally adopted by the North American nursing profession from the general systems theory (GST) and quickly became a symbol of contemporary nursing as well as a professionalist nurse ideology. In contrast its initial introduction in the United Kingdom (UK) was not a complete success. This could be attributed to the mode of its implementation, which utilized a power-coercive change strategy, that is, comprising of imposition from above without sufficient time for education regarding its scientific and philosophical foundations. Consequently the nursing process was initially regarded as a professional and educational mandate rather than an organizational component of nursing care delivery. It has been maintained that the theoretical basis from which the nursing process was derived, together with the theoretical developments in diagnostic and intervention studies, has established the nursing process as a key element of the nurse's role in research, education and practice. This paper will briefly review the early theoretical developments and fate of the nursing process as a tool for clinical practice and research. It will then examine recent attempts to revitalize and modernize the theory for practice through research into nursing diagnosis. PMID:9372412

  15. Scholarly nursing practice from the perspectives of early-career nurses.

    PubMed

    Riley, Joan M; Beal, Judy A

    2013-01-01

    Although clinical scholarship is an espoused professional ideal, how nurses develop and maintain a scholarly approach to nursing practice throughout different stages of their careers is not well understood. This qualitative study describes early-career nurses' accounts of pursuing professional practice as a scholarly endeavor. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 18 early-career nurses purposively sampled from an ANCC Magnet-designated tertiary-care facility. The data were analyzed using content analysis. Findings center on four major themes. I Need Skills First and My Practice Evolves explain how early-career nurses conceptualized their practice in its initial stage. I Think I Know What It Looks Like and I Am Not There Yet reflect their assessment of how their current practice level in comparison with their understanding of scholarly nursing practice. Nursing needs requires a new scholarly practice development paradigm for a multistage career beginning with a concerted focus on the critical first stage of practice. PMID:23036689

  16. Theory into Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Sandra N.

    2012-01-01

    The importance of putting theory into practice can be addressed and advocated to educators and gifted students through the presentation of a Continuum of Practice. Articulating the sequence and phases of practice can underscore how practice can take place; it also can change the perspective and meaning of practice.

  17. 78 FR 39738 - National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice for Request for Nominations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ...Council on Nurse Education and Practice is in accordance with the...nursing education, and nursing practice improvement. The Advisory...nurse supply, education, and practice improvement. The Advisory...orientation, and cultural, religious, or socioeconomic...

  18. Evidence based practices are critical care nurses ready for it?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tracey Bucknall; Beverley Copnell; Kathleen Shannon; Dianne McKinley

    2001-01-01

    In the emergence of the evidence based practice movement, critical care nurses have struggled to identify scientific evidence on which to base their clinical practice. While the lack of critical care nursing research is a major concern, other important issues have significantly stalled the implementation of evidence even when it is available. A descriptive study of 274 critical care nurses

  19. The Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory as a curriculum conceptual framework in baccalaureate education.

    PubMed

    Berbiglia, Violeta A

    2011-04-01

    Although Dorothea Orem's Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory has been used for curricula framework for years, it was not until 2001 that Orem identified the nursing practice sciences and the foundational nursing sciences and specified the appropriate content for the two sciences. The broad purpose of this paper is to reinforce the importance of utilizing nursing theories as curricular conceptual frameworks. The specific purpose is to delineate the appropriate content for baccalaureate programs that adopt a Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory conceptual framework for their curriculum. PMID:21471038

  20. Reflective practice groups for nurses: a consultation liaison psychiatry nursing initiative: part 1--The model.

    PubMed

    Dawber, Chris

    2013-04-01

    In the present study, we outline the evolution of a process-focused reflective practice group (RPG) model for nurses working in clinical settings. The groups were initiated at Redcliffe and Caboolture hospitals by the consultation liaison psychiatry nurse and author. An associated article provides an evaluation of these RPG. The literature review identifies the key themes and theories on which the model is based, and the article outlines the process and practicalities of facilitating RPG in critical care, midwifery, and oncology specialties over a 3-year period. The model proposes that the effectiveness and sustainability of RPG arises from adequate preparation and engagement with prospective participants. Group rules, based on principles of confidentially, supportiveness, and diversity, were collaboratively developed for each group. Facilitation utilized a group-as-a-whole approach to manage process and stimulate reflection. While the purpose of RPG was a reflection on interpersonal aspects of nursing, contextual workplace issues were frequently raised in groups. Acknowledgement and containment of such issues were necessary to maintain clinical focus. The literature highlights facilitator credibility and style as crucial factors in the overall success of RPG, and it is proposed that reflective practice as a process-focused model for groups succeeds when nurse facilitators are trained in group process and receive concurrent supervision. PMID:23009276

  1. Obesity Prevention Practices of Elementary School Nurses in Minnesota: Findings from Interviews with Licensed School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison-Sandberg, Leslie F.; Kubik, Martha Y.; Johnson, Karen E.

    2011-01-01

    Elementary schools are an optimal setting to provide obesity prevention interventions, yet little is known about the obesity prevention practices of elementary school nurses. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into current obesity-related school nursing practice in elementary schools in Minnesota, opinions regarding school nurse-led…

  2. Telephone interventions for family caregivers of patients with dementia: what are best nursing practices?

    PubMed

    Mason, Bernadette J; Harrison, Barbara E

    2008-01-01

    Family caregivers of patients with dementia experience caregiver burden and need holistic nursing interventions, such as telephone support. This article reviews the literature on telephone support interventions for family caregivers of patients with dementia and describes evidence-based holistic nursing practices within Watson's theory of human caring, which focuses on transpersonal caring relationships. PMID:18981815

  3. EmpowEr your practicE mastEr of NursiNg

    E-print Network

    Manchak, John

    EmpowEr your practicE mastEr of NursiNg #12;mastEr of NursiNg (mN) The UniversiTy of WashingTon BoThell MasTer of nUrsing prograM prepares nurses for advanced leadership roles in health care practice and elective credits support a wide range of nursing interests that allow a custom fit to your individual goals

  4. Advanced practice nursing: unification through a common identity.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Jo-Ann; Herbert, Rosemary; Thibeault, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    Despite the wide variety of advanced practice roles in nursing and the well-documented differences among them [Hamric, A. (2000). A definition of advanced nursing practice. In A. Hamric, J. Spross, & C. Hanson (Eds.), Advanced nursing practice: An integrative approach (pp. 53-73). Philadelphia, PA: W. B. Saunders], the authors suggest that nurses in these roles should adopt a common identity, that of an "advanced practice nurse" (APN). The authors outline the development of advanced practice nursing in Canada and the United States, tracking historical influences and highlighting current issues facing APNs. The authors explore elements that constitute the definable and describable core of advanced practice nursing-knowledge, education, scope of practice, regulatory issues, and outcomes. They conclude that adoption of a common identity for all advanced practice nursing roles may clarify role confusion (which is currently experienced within and outside the profession), reinforce links between knowledge development and nursing practice, and ensure that advanced nursing practice is responsive to the needs of society. PMID:16759960

  5. The Vanderbilt Professional Nursing Practice Program: part 1: Growing and supporting professional nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Karen; Eck, Carol; Keck, Becky; Wells, Nancy

    2003-09-01

    Professional practice programs are designed to attract, retain, and reward nurses. This three-part series will describe Vanderbilt's performance-based career advancement system, the Vanderbilt Professional Nursing Practice Program (VPNPP). Part 1 outlines the overall program's foundation, philosophical background, and basic structure. The VPNPP is built upon Benner's work, distinguishing among four levels of practice: novice, competent, proficient, and expert. Work by many in the organization identified the expected behaviors for nurses at each level, which were then used to develop clear process evaluation criteria. Part 2 will examine the performance measurement and evaluation system created to support the program. The process of advancing within the program will be described in part 3. PMID:14501560

  6. “Negotiating, Navigating, and Networking”: Three Strategies Used by Nursing Leaders to Shape the Adoption and Incorporation of Simulation into Nursing Curricula—A Grounded Theory Study

    PubMed Central

    Jack, Susan M.; Martin, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Background. Implementing simulation requires a substantial commitment of human and financial resources. Despite this, little is known about the strategies used by academic nursing leaders to facilitate the implementation of a simulation program in nursing curricula. Methods. A constructivist grounded theory study was conducted within 13 nursing programs in Ontario, Canada. Perspectives of key stakeholders (n = 27) including nursing administrators (n = 6), simulation leaders (n = 9), and nursing faculty (n = 12) were analyzed using the constant comparison method. Results. Nursing leaders, specifically nursing administrators and simulation leaders who successfully led the adoption and incorporation of simulation into nursing curricula, worked together and utilized negotiating, navigating, and networking strategies that impacted the adoption and incorporation of simulation into nursing curricula. Conclusions. Strategies that were found to be useful when planning and executing the adoption and incorporation of an innovation, specifically simulation, into nursing curricula provide practical approaches that may be helpful to nurse leaders when embarking upon an organizational change. PMID:25093122

  7. "Negotiating, navigating, and networking": three strategies used by nursing leaders to shape the adoption and incorporation of simulation into nursing curricula-a grounded theory study.

    PubMed

    Taplay, Karyn; Jack, Susan M; Baxter, Pamela; Eva, Kevin; Martin, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Background. Implementing simulation requires a substantial commitment of human and financial resources. Despite this, little is known about the strategies used by academic nursing leaders to facilitate the implementation of a simulation program in nursing curricula. Methods. A constructivist grounded theory study was conducted within 13 nursing programs in Ontario, Canada. Perspectives of key stakeholders (n = 27) including nursing administrators (n = 6), simulation leaders (n = 9), and nursing faculty (n = 12) were analyzed using the constant comparison method. Results. Nursing leaders, specifically nursing administrators and simulation leaders who successfully led the adoption and incorporation of simulation into nursing curricula, worked together and utilized negotiating, navigating, and networking strategies that impacted the adoption and incorporation of simulation into nursing curricula. Conclusions. Strategies that were found to be useful when planning and executing the adoption and incorporation of an innovation, specifically simulation, into nursing curricula provide practical approaches that may be helpful to nurse leaders when embarking upon an organizational change. PMID:25093122

  8. The certification process. History and significance for addictions nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Nelson, N

    1989-03-01

    The addictions nursing certification process will become a reality for the nurse. Ideally, this process will provide a method of ensuring quality care while maintaining self-regulation by the profession. The literature supports certification based on standards of care as a measure of that quality of care and as a voluntary mechanism selected by the practicing nurse. Many professional issues lie ahead for specialty nursing practice in the 1990s. The addictions nursing certification established by the NNSA offers a quality basis for certification implementation. The addictions nursing practice certification credential can provide the acknowledgement that the nurse has mastered a body of knowledge and skills reflective of a specialty nursing area. PMID:2646609

  9. 77 FR 59931 - Single Source Program Expansion Supplement Award to Nurse Education, Practice, Quality and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ...Expansion Supplement Award to Nurse Education, Practice, Quality...Expansion Supplement Award to Nurse Education, Practice, Quality...Christi (TAMUCC), College of Nursing and Health Science (CONHS...Training into Academic Credit for Nursing Education Programs, and...

  10. [Advanced nursing practice: vision in Switzerland].

    PubMed

    Morin, Diane; Ramelet, Anne-Sylvie; Shaha, Maya

    2013-12-01

    To meet the challenges related to the development of health problems taking into account the development of knowledge, several innovations in care are being implemented. Among these, advanced nursing roles and increased interprofessional collaboration are considered as important features in Switzerland. Although the international literature provides benchmarks for advanced roles, it was considered essential to contextualize these in order to promote their application value in Switzerland. Thus, from 79 statements drawn from the literature, 172 participants involved in a two-sequential phases study only kept 29 statements because they considered they were relevant, important and applicable in daily practice. However, it is important to point out that statements which have not been selected at this stage to describe advanced practice cannot be considered irrelevant permanently. Indeed, given the emergence of advanced practice in western Switzerland, it is possible that a statement judged not so relevant at this moment of the development of advanced practice, will be considered as such later on. The master's program in nursing embedded at the University of Lausanne and the University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland was also examined in the light of these statements. It was concluded that all the objectives of the program are aligned with the competencies statements that were kept. PMID:24490453

  11. The Historical Evolution of Theories and Conceptual Models for Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Joellen W.

    The development of nursing models can be traced to the inception of nursing as a profession. Florence Nightingale laid the foundation for current nursing practice and differentiated nursing from medicine. The late 19th and early 20th centuries contributed a number of important nurse theorists, better known for other contributions to the neophyte…

  12. Family nursing practice and education: what is happening in Japan?

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Michiko

    2008-11-01

    Significant developments in family nursing in Japan are described and analyzed beginning with the political and health care legislation in the country that stimulated a need for family nursing and the early adoption of family nursing theories and models by visionary leaders in nursing education. In 1994, Japan was the first country in the world to establish a national family nursing association, the Japanese Association for Research in Family Nursing, that provided the necessary infrastructure and leadership for family nursing in Japan to flourish. The strengths and challenges of family nursing in Japan are identified and a call is made for innovations in nursing curricula as well as global networking of family nurses around the world. PMID:19139158

  13. Sintering Theory and Practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Randall M. German

    1996-01-01

    Although sintering is an essential process in the manufacture of ceramics and certain metals, as well as several other industrial operations, until now, no single book has treated both the background theory and the practical application of this complex and often delicate procedure. In Sintering Theory and Practice, leading researcher and materials engineer Randall M. German presents a comprehensive treatment

  14. Impact of evidence and health policy on nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Geurden, Bart; Adriaenssens, Jef; Franck, Erik

    2014-12-01

    The story of evidence-based practice in nursing is long, with many successes, contributors, leaders, scientists, and enthusiasts. Nurse educators have great advantages offered from a wide variety of educational resources for evidence-based practice. These resources offer students the opportunity to connect their emerging competencies with clinical needs for best practices in clinical and microsystem changes. PMID:25458138

  15. Clinical Experience in Advanced Practice Nursing: A Canadian Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnelly, Glenn

    2003-01-01

    The role of advanced practice (AP) nurses must be clearly articulated and defined and not overshadowed by medical functions. Consensus on their educational preparation and explication of the nature of expertise in advanced practice are needed if AP nurses are to realize the full scope of their practice. (Contains 35 references.) (SK)

  16. Implementing nursing best practice guidelines: Impact on patient referrals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nancy Edwards; Barbara Davies; Jenny Ploeg; Tazim Virani; Jennifer Skelly

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although referring patients to community services is important for optimum continuity of care, referrals between hospital and community sectors are often problematic. Nurses are well positioned to inform patients about referral resources. The objective of this study is to describe the impact of implementing six nursing best practice guidelines (BPGs) on nurses' familiarity with patient referral resources and referral

  17. The Competencies in Nutrition Essential for Comprehensive Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trooboff, Rebecca C.

    Faculty of nursing education programs within the Georgia university system were surveyed to ascertain their opinions about the nutrition competencies that they consider essential for comprehensive nursing practice and the level of nursing education program(s) to which these competencies are best suited. The survey instrument, 56 competency…

  18. The integration of HIV testing and counseling into nursing practice.

    PubMed

    McMahon, K M

    1988-12-01

    Historically, registered professional nurses have responded to the health care needs of the community in a variety of roles. Practitioner, educator, administrator, consultant, or researcher--health promotion and prevention have served as an integral part of nursing practice. With the emergence this decade of HIV infection, nurses are responding with much needed education, skill, expertise, and care. PMID:3057466

  19. Practical Nursing Education: Criteria and Procedures for Accreditation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Practical Nurse Education and Service, Inc., New York, NY.

    The third in a series of pamphlets on practical nursing education, this document contains information on accreditation standards governing nursing programs. Included are announcements of: (1) available accreditation and consultation services, (2) policies regulating accreditation eligibility, (3) standards of ethics by which nursing programs are…

  20. Factors affecting practical nursing student attrition.

    PubMed

    Stickney, Margaret Christine

    2008-09-01

    This study investigated factors that affect student attrition for 151 students in a practical nursing program. The academic variables studied were scores on preadmission tests and grades in required prerequisite courses. The demographic variables included age, gender, and race. The analysis of the data obtained from student records revealed a statistically significant difference between the retention and attrition student groups for the variables of race, preadmission test scores, and prerequisite course grades. Recommendations for a retention program to reduce attrition were made based on the findings of this study. PMID:18792710

  1. Strategies for innovative energy-based nursing practice: the Healing Touch program.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Mari

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to share professional knowledge, practice, and educational opportunities related to energy-based nursing in order to broaden and improve the delivery of health care services. The holistic, theory-based approach places a patient's perceived needs first, and cares for the human body as well as the spirit. Energy medicine is an intricate part of the patient's expectation for health care. Watson's transpersonal-caring-healing model is explored (Watson, 1999). This model expands the view of the person to one that embodies energy that is comprised of spirit, a universal mind, and consciousness. The North American Nurses Diagnosis Association (NANDA) recognizes energy therapy as an intervention representing a specific theory: human energy field theory (HEFT). This therapy is related to the approved nursing diagnosis of energy field disturbance 1.8 (NANDA, 1995/1996). Healing touch (HT) is an energy-based therapeutic approach to healing that emphasizes caring for the whole person based on the HEFT. It is used in the nursing profession to influence changes in the human energy system; HT affects physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual health. The nursing process is evident throughout the curriculum. Nurse researchers report positive patients outcomes. The holistic nursing concept of energetic healing returns nurse professionals to the essence of nursing. Spinal cord injury (SCI) nurses will benefit by increasing their knowledge and awareness of energy therapy to increase patient satisfaction and improve outcomes for persons with SCI. PMID:12510515

  2. MENTAL HEALTH AND PSYCHIATRIC NURSING IN PRACTICAL NURSE EDUCATION. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CRAWFORD, ANNIE L.

    THIRTY-ONE PROFESSIONAL NURSE EDUCATORS IN SCHOOLS OF PRACTICAL NURSING IN THE SOUTHEAST ATTENDED A TWO-WEEK CLINICAL WORKSHOP ON PSYCHIATRIC NURSING AT WESTERN STATE HOSPITAL, STAUNTON, VIRGINIA, IN AUGUST 1966. THEY RECONVENED FOR A THREE-DAY FOLLOW-UP CONFERENCE AT ATLANTA, GEORGIA, IN JANUARY 1967. THE PROJECT WAS UNDERTAKEN TO UPDATE THE…

  3. Upgrading Licensed Practical Nurse to Registered Nurse Program, September 1971 - June 1973. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holloway, Sally

    Twenty Licensed Practical Nurses (LPN) became Registered Nurses (RN) in a pilot program giving partial academic credit for their LPN training and building on their existing skills. The program revolved around three needs: (1) trained nurses; (2) eliminating the notion that jobs were dead-end; and (3) achieving upward mobility for hospital staff.…

  4. [Graduate nursing teaching at Unicamp: policies and practices].

    PubMed

    Nozawa, Márcia Regina; Kirschbaum, Débora Isane Ratner; da Silva, Mauro Antônio Pires Dias; Silva, Eliete Maria

    2003-01-01

    The authors analyse teaching at the graduate nursing program from Unicamp (SP), starting from the introduction of a new curriculum in 1997, in accordance to the curricular standards taken from Federal Law concerning education. In theory, the changes implemented subvert the established order. It has been a hard task to operate curricular reform in a public university that is experiencing a financial and management crisis--reflections of a neoliberal ideology in public education policies, which increasingly values scientific production to the detriment of initiatives toward quality teaching. The difficulties found demanded some considerations and the proposition of seven fundamental thesis in order to subsidize problem analysis and guide necessary interventions. Among them, the theme Policies and Practice in nursing teaching is focused in this text. PMID:15320623

  5. The revised scope of nurse anesthesia practice embodies the broad continuum of nurse anesthesia services.

    PubMed

    Neft, Michael; Okechukwu, Kymika; Grant, Patricia; Reede, Lynn

    2013-10-01

    The AANA determines the scope of nurse anesthesia practice. It is important for all members to understand the scope of practice that governs their work to better practice their profession and mentorship. In January 2013, the AANA Board of Directors charged the Practice Committee to revise the Scope of Nurse Anesthesia Practice. A systematic review of literature, focus groups, and a survey were conducted. Major focus group themes were identified, and survey results were analyzed to identify relationships between variables. The literature search resulted in 8,739 abstracts. Forty-six articles were reviewed. Full scope of advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) practice was a recurrent theme across the literature. Focus group themes include: (1) elements of nurse anesthesia practice; (2) future practice opportunities; (3) interprofessional collaboration; (4) full scope of practice; (5) autonomous practice; and (6) barriers to practice and recommendations. Of the 4,200 CRNA survey respondents, 44.6% are not permitted to practice to their full scope of practice. The revised Scope of Nurse Anesthesia Practice embodies the comprehensive span of nurse anesthesia practice. PMID:24354069

  6. Reflections on nursing practice science: the nature, the structure, and the foundation of nursing sciences.

    PubMed

    Orem, Dorothea E; Taylor, Susan G

    2011-01-01

    In preparation for the self-care deficit nursing theory conference to be held in Ulm, Germany in 2004, Dorothea Orem and I reflected on the development of nursing science. Orem drafted this paper which I edited. The International Orem Society is sharing this paper with Nursing Science Quarterly as presented to the conference as a memorial to Orem and her work. PMID:21220574

  7. Potentials Unlimited: Nursing Practice, Education and Administration. Nursing Research Conference Proceedings (1st, Fresno, California, April 8, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen-Webb, Marilyn-Lu, Ed.

    The purposes of this conference were: (1) to present research representing a variety of topics and study designs; (2) to disseminate findings of nursing research; and (3) to stimulate the use of research and theory as a basis for clinical, educational, and administrative practice. The keynote address and two invited presentations are presented in…

  8. Preparing nurses for the 21st century: reenvisioning nursing education and practice.

    PubMed

    Long, Kathleen Ann

    2004-01-01

    Significant advances in biomedical science and in the complexity of health care, coupled with a worsening nursing shortage and numerous reports of unsafe and inadequate patient care, have prompted concerns about both nursing education and nursing practice. Beginning in 2000, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) made a thorough study of nursing education, regulation, and practice issues. Input and consultation were sought from AACN members, nursing practice leaders, regulators, and other health professionals. Results of this work indicated the need for a new nursing professional, the clinical nurse leader, who could effectively coordinate, manage and evaluate care for groups of patients in complex health systems. Master's-degree education is proposed for piloting the preparation of clinical nurse leaders. Close coordination with nurse executives and administrators to develop the new education program and new models for care delivery is planned. Critical components of the pilot testing will be evaluation of the patient and nurse outcomes associated with the use of clinical nurse leaders and focused work to develop a new legal scope and credentials for them. PMID:15176009

  9. Predictors of Practice Patterns for Lymphedema Care Among Oncology Advanced Practice Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Joanne C.; Cleland, Charles M.; Fu, Mei R.

    2012-01-01

    Lymphedema, a debilitating and chronic condition, is considered to be one of the most distressing adverse effects of cancer treatment. The purpose of this study was to understand the practice patterns in lymphedema care and identify predictors influencing those patterns among oncology nurses, with a focus on advanced practice nurses. Random and purposive sampling was utilized to recruit 238 oncology nurses who completed the Web-based study. Participants included advanced practice nurses (nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists), nurse navigators/case managers, staff nurses, and directors/managers/coordinators. Data focused on perceived knowledge of and perceived competence in risk reduction, treatment, and self-management of lymphedema and practice patterns in lymphedema care. Actual knowledge of lymphedema care was evaluated. Descriptive, comparative, and regression analyses were performed. The study showed that perceived knowledge and perceived competence were highly correlated. Perceived competence was a predictor of practicing lymphedema care. Advanced practice nurses scored in the midrange for perceived knowledge and perceived competence in risk reduction and self-management, but obtained lower scores in perceived knowledge and perceived competence for treatment. The odds of advanced practice nurses delivering lymphedema care were less than those of staff nurses. This study identifies gaps and opportunities for advanced practice nurses to play an important role in providing lymphedema care, an essential aspect of cancer survivorship. PMID:25031960

  10. Obesity prevention practices of elementary school nurses in Minnesota: findings from interviews with licensed school nurses.

    PubMed

    Morrison-Sandberg, Leslie F; Kubik, Martha Y; Johnson, Karen E

    2011-02-01

    Elementary schools are an optimal setting to provide obesity prevention interventions, yet little is known about the obesity prevention practices of elementary school nurses. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into current obesity-related school nursing practice in elementary schools in Minnesota, opinions regarding school nurse-led obesity prevention programs, and school nurses' interest in implementing obesity prevention programs. Semistructured interviews were conducted with key informants from 21 Minnesota school districts (urban = 7; suburban = 8; and rural = 6), who were licensed school nurses (LSNs). Findings indicated that LSNs provided some primary and secondary obesity prevention services. Key informants felt school nurses, administrators, and parents would be supportive of school-based, LSN-led obesity prevention efforts. Interest in increasing efforts was limited by time constraints, staffing, and resources. School nurses are well positioned to provide prevention services that will contribute to reducing childhood obesity. PMID:20966488

  11. Practice nurse use of evidence in clinical practice: a descriptive survey.

    PubMed

    Prior, Patsy; Wilkinson, Jill; Neville, Stephen

    2010-08-01

    The role of practice nurses is a specific feature of the modernisation agenda of the New Zealand health service. Increasing importance is being placed on service improvement through effective decision making and enhanced clinical performance. To contribute to the development of primary health care it is crucial that nurses have the skills to appropriately implement research based and other evidence in practice. This study involved 55 West Auckland practice nurses working in the general practice setting. The aim of the study was to describe nurses' perceptions of their use of evidence-based practice, attitudes toward evidence-based practice and perceptions of their knowledge/skills associated with evidence-based practice. An additional aim was to determine the effect of educational preparation on practice, attitudes and knowledge/skills toward evidence-based practice. A descriptive survey design was selected for this study. The results demonstrated that nurses' attitudes toward evidence-based practice, knowledge and skills relevant to the implementation of evidence-based practice and the educational preparation of the nurses were important factors influencing the effective utilisation and application of research results in practice. Educational interventions are identified as an integral aspect of implementing evidence-based practice and enhancing practice nurses' knowledge and skill relevant to the use of evidence in practice. Further research is needed to assess the contextual factors which can inhibit or promote achievement of evidence-based practice by practice nurses. PMID:21032971

  12. Aseptic practice recommendations for circulating operating theatre nurses.

    PubMed

    Aholaakko, Teija-Kaisa; Metsälä, Eija

    2015-07-01

    Aseptic practices prevent exposure of a surgical wound to microbes, operating theatre environment and personnel. The circulating nurse assists the operating theatre personnel and supervises aseptic practices preventing surgical site infections. In the absence of analytical tools, few studies exist on intraoperative nursing-related aseptic practices. This study introduces recommendations to assess the role of the circulating nurse in aseptic practices. The authors used international recommendations and research findings to construct a 20-item self-report instrument with a demonstrated reliability across the scale. The authors structured the scale based on three phases: establishment; maintenance; and disestablishment of a sterile operating field. The tool was tested among operating theatre and day surgery nurses, and compared the differences in the mean acceptance rates of aseptic practice recommendations based on background characteristics. College-level nurses and nurses with 15 or more years' work experience accepted the recommendations at higher levels than bachelor-level nurses and nurses with less work experience. Continual assessment of the evidence base and comprehensive evaluation represent important components in further developing the tool. A reasonable number of items covering clinical practice are necessary for assessing the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of aseptic practices, and a larger response rate is needed to validate the tool in future. PMID:26153805

  13. Mentoring for nurses in general practice: an Australian study.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Terri; Heartfield, Marie

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a project conducted to recommend a national framework for mentoring for general practice nurses in Australia. The first phase identified challenges and key issues; the second and third phases (reported here) engaged practice nurses and general medical practitioners in discussion to advance thinking on the topic. Outcomes revolved around seven core areas: role confusion and diversity of practice nursing; lack of a defined career pathway for practice nurses; professional isolation of practice nurses; need for general practitioner support; expectations of mentoring; importance of resourcing and infrastructure; and roles, skills and qualities of mentors. Implications of these for the development of a systemic approach to supporting nurses in general practice are discussed, taking into account the inter-professional context and special working relationship between nurses and doctors. Findings revealed keen support for the idea of mentoring for nurses in general practice and indicate success will depend on appropriate resourcing and infrastructure through national, state and local coordination processes. PMID:15842080

  14. Mapping the future of environmental health and nursing: strategies for integrating national competencies into nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Laura S; Butterfield, Patricia

    2002-01-01

    :Nurses are increasingly the primary contact for clients concerned about health problems related to their environment. In response to the need for nursing expertise in the field of environmental health, the Institute of Medicine (IOM), Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), and National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) have designed core competencies for the nursing profession. The IOM competencies focus on four areas: (1) knowledge and concepts; (2) assessment and referral; advocacy, ethics, and risk communication; and (4) legislation and regulation. The competencies establish a baseline of knowledge and awareness in order for nurses to prevent and minimize health problems associated with exposure to environmental agents. To address the known difficulties of incorporating new priorities into established practice, nurses attending an environmental health short course participated in a nominal group process focusing on the question, "What specific actions can we take to bring environmental health into the mainstream of nursing practice?" This exercise was designed to bring the concepts of the national initiatives (IOM, NINR, ATSDR) to the awareness of individual nurses involved in the direct delivery of care. Results include 38 action items nurses identified as improving awareness and utilization of environmental health principles. The top five ideas were: (1) get environmental health listed as a requirement or competency in undergraduate nursing education; (2) improve working relationships with interdepartmental persons-a team approach; (3) strategically place students in essential organizations such as NIOSH, ATSDR, or CDC; (4) educate nurse educators; and (5) create environmental health awards in nursing. The 38 original ideas were also reorganized into a five-tiered conceptual model. The concepts of this model include: (1) developing partnerships; (2) strengthening publications; (3) enhancing continuing education; (4) updating nursing practice; and (5) strengthening schools of nursing. The model serves as a road map for action in building environmental health capacity within mainstream nursing. PMID:12071904

  15. Perceptions of Liberal Education of Two Types of Nursing Graduates: The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBrew, Jacqueline Kayler

    2010-01-01

    The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), which defines the expectations of a new baccalaureate-prepared nurse, includes a liberal education as a desired outcome for bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) graduates. A liberal education is thought to provide the professional nurse with the skills needed to practice nursing, including…

  16. Assertiveness in nursing practice: an action research and reflection project.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Beverley; Edwards, Paul; Holroyd, Beth; Unwin, Anna; Rowley, Joanne

    2005-12-01

    This article describes an action research project that highlighted reflective processes, so hospital nurses could work systematically through problem solving processes to uncover constraints against effective nursing care; and to improve the quality of their care in light of the identified constraints and possibilities. Four Registered Nurses (RNs) co-researched their practice with the facilitator and over the research period identified the thematic concern of the need for assertiveness in their work. The RNs planned, implemented and evaluated an action plan and, as a direct result of their reflections and collaborative action, they improved their nursing practice in relation to becoming more effective in assertiveness in work situations. PMID:16393105

  17. Knowledge, attitudes and competence in nursing practice of typhoon disaster relief work among Chinese nurses: a questionnaire survey.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lin; He, Hong-Gu; Zhou, Wen-Guang; Shi, Su-Hua; Yin, Ting-Ting; Kong, Yue

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the relationships among nurses' knowledge of, attitudes towards and level of competence in nursing practice, as well as factors influencing nurses' competence in nursing practice, in typhoon disaster relief work. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted using a self-developed questionnaire to obtain data from 607 nurses working in four tertiary hospitals and two secondary hospitals in Fujian, China, in November 2011. Our findings show that the nurses' average percentage scores on their responses to questions in the domains of knowledge, attitudes and practice were 66.33%, 68.87% and 67.60%, respectively. The findings demonstrated a significant positive relationship between nurses' attitudes and their practice. Nurses' working unit, prior training in typhoon disaster relief, current position of employment and attitudes were significant predictors of nurses' competence in practice. The results indicate that strategies need to be developed for nurses to improve their knowledge, attitudes and practice. PMID:24219840

  18. Nursing faculties’ knowledge and attitude on evidence-based practice

    PubMed Central

    Mehrdad, Neda; Joolaee, Soodabeh; Joulaee, Azadeh; Bahrani, Naser

    2012-01-01

    Background: Evidence-based practice (EBP) is one of the main professional competencies for health care professionals and a priority for medicine and nursing curriculum as well. EBP leads to improve effective and efficient care and patient outcomes. Nurse educators have responsibility to teach the future nurses, and an opportunity to promote patient outcomes. Therefore, the aim of this study was to describe nurse educators’ knowledge and attitude on EBP. Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive study conducted in nursing faculties of two major universities of medical sciences affiliated to Ministry of Health and Medical Sciences in Tehran, Iran. Data were gathered using a three-section questionnaire. Content and face validity was further enhanced by submitting it to nursing research and education experts. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS 11 software. Results: According the results, nursing faculties’ knowledge of EBP was mainly moderate (47.1%). Significant statistical relationship was found between the level of knowledge with education and teaching experience in different nursing programs. Nurses generally held positive attitudes toward EBP (88.6%) and there was no statistical significant relationship with demographic variables. Conclusion: Nursing educators are in a position to influence nursing research in clinical practice in the future. Therefore, it is critical to achieve implementation of EBP and be a change agent for a paradigm shift toward EBP. PMID:23922597

  19. Bridging nursing practice and education through a strategic global partnership.

    PubMed

    Stringer, Marilyn; Rajeswaran, Lakshmi; Dithole, Kefalotse; Hoke, Linda; Mampane, Patricia; Sebopelo, Sheila; Molefe, Margret; Muecke, Marjorie A; Rich, Victoria L; Polomano, Rosemary C

    2014-10-30

    To forge strong relationships among nurse scholars from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, PA (USA); University of Botswana School of Nursing, Gaborone, Botswana; the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; Princess Marina Hospital (PMH), Gaborone; and the Ministry of Health of Botswana, a strategic global partnership was created to bridge nursing practice and education. This partnership focused on changing practice at PMH through the translation of new knowledge and evidence-based practice. Guided by the National Institutes of Health team science field guide, the conceptual implementation of this highly successful practice change initiative is described in detail, highlighting our strategies, challenges and continued collaboration for nurses to be leaders in improving health in Botswana. PMID:25355182

  20. Spinal cord injury nursing and evidenced-based practice.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Lynn C

    2004-01-01

    The importance of the dissemination of current data-based research findings cannot be said enough! Nurse researchers have an obligation to report their findings and potentially improve nursing practice and patient care outcomes. Conclusions drawn from the "evidence," whether good, bad, or indifferent, benefit nursing practice. Nurses need to know "what works," "what doesn't work," and the pluses and minuses of every finding. Reporting the "evidence" at national and international platforms can reach many health care providers. To reach the largest possible audience, however, research findings must be published in refereed journals. SCI Nursing is a refereed journal that reaches across our national boundary to other countries and the entire world. Publishing scholarly works is a responsibility of professional nurses! PMID:15794417

  1. Comparing nurses' intent to leave or stay: differences of practice environment perceptions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shu-Yuan; Chiang, Hui-Ying; Chen, Ia-Ling

    2011-12-01

    Few existing studies have compared nurses' perceptions of the practice environment in relation to intent to leave or stay in employment and nursing concurrently. This study compared the differences between Taiwanese nurses' intent to leave or stay in employment and nursing, as related to their perceptions of the practice environment. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted at four hospitals in southern Taiwan. Questionnaires including the Chinese Nursing Practice Environment Scale, regarding intention in employment and nursing, were distributed to 535 nurses who provided direct patient care in Taiwan hospitals. Taiwanese nurses with intent to stay perceived the practice environment as better than nurses with intent to leave employment and nursing. The influences of the nursing practice environment on nurses' intent in employment and nursing were supported preliminarily. Targeting interventions to enhance participation in hospital affairs and adequacy of staffing and resources could be beneficial for a stable nursing workforce. PMID:22011072

  2. Incorporating political socialization theory into baccalaureate nursing education.

    PubMed

    Brown, S G

    1996-01-01

    Political socialization theory explains how an individual develops a political belief system. As the health care system undergoes dramatic changes, nursing faculty should use political socialization theory to enhance the education of student nurses. A political thread can be woven through the nursing curricula, and students can be socialized to the political role. The new generation of nurses must incorporate a political component into their professional role identity. Political socialization theory can guide nursing faculty as knowledge of the political system and political skills are incorporated into nursing curricula. PMID:8794452

  3. Community Nurses' View of General Practice Attachment

    PubMed Central

    Walker, J. H.; McClure, L. M.

    1969-01-01

    An analysis of 98 health visitors and district nurses attached and non-attached to general practitioners in three local authority areas showed that most of them were aged over 40 and that many had entered domiciliary work because of the convenient hours or because of its intangible attractions. Adequate preparation for attachment was considered important, particularly a clear definition of the roles of the attached staff and their relationships to other workers in the practice. Attached staff were found to be much more satisfied with the information given by the general practitioner about their patients than were unattached staff, and the former usually had access to the patients' medical records. The principal advantages of attachment were listed as access to family history; improved co-ordination within the practice and co-operation with the social services; favourable patient response; and increased mileage and work-load; the impossibility of crossing local authority boundaries; and having to deal with families registered with more than one doctor. PMID:5803696

  4. Ethical climate in nursing practice: the leader's role.

    PubMed

    Shirey, Maria R

    2005-01-01

    Clarity in an organization's mission, vision, and values is key to effective management in today's complex healthcare work environment. To clearly articulate mission, vision, and values, employees must experience consistency between what is espoused and what is lived. The purpose of this article is to discuss the nurse leader's role in ensuring congruence between caring missions and caring practices. Ethical principles are discussed as the foundation necessary for creating an ethical climate for nursing practice. Components of ethical climate are presented and strategies to create a positive ethical climate for nursing practice are provided. PMID:15937423

  5. Issues in nursing documentation and record-keeping practice.

    PubMed

    Prideaux, Antony

    Record keeping is an essential part of nursing practice with clinical and legal significance. Good quality record keeping is linked with improvements in patient care, while poor standards of documentation are regarded as contributing to poor quality nursing care. The quality of nursing documentation has consistently been found to be failing to meet recommended standards. This article will provide an overview of the literature on record-keeping practice and examine what makes good quality record keeping and the factors that prevent nurses from achieving good documentation standards. This article will also look at ways that documentation standards can be improved and the impact that accountability has on the record-keeping practices of nurses. PMID:22241496

  6. Crossmapping of Nursing Problem and Action Statements in Telephone Nursing Consultation Documentations with International Classification for Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Jung

    2010-01-01

    Objectives This study is to cross-map telephone nursing consultation documentations with International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP; ver. 1.0 concepts). Methods The narrative telephone nursing consultation documentations of 170 ophthalmology nursing unit patients were analyzed. The nursing statements were examined and cross-mapped with the Korean version of the ICNP ver. 1.0. If all the concepts of a statement were mapped to ICNP concepts, it was classified as 'completely mapped'. If any concept of a statement wasnot mapped, it was classified as 'partially mapped'. If none of the concepts were mapped, it was classified as 'not mapped'. Results A total of 738 statements wereused for documenting telephone nursing consultations. These statements were divided into 3 groups according to their content: 1) 294 nursing phenomena-related statements (72 unique statements), 2) 440 nursing actions-related statements (76 unique statements), and 3) 4 other statements (2 unique statements). In total, 189 unique nursing concepts extracted from 150 unique statements and 108 concepts (62.44%) were mapped onto ICNP concepts. Conclusions This study demonstrated the feasibility of computerizing narrative nursing documentations for electronic telephone triagein the ophthalmology nursing unit. PMID:21818446

  7. The practice of nurses caring for families of pediatric inpatients in light of Jean Watson.

    PubMed

    Santos, Maiara Rodrigues Dos; Bousso, Regina Szylit; Vendramim, Patrícia; Baliza, Michelle Freire; Misko, Maira Deguer; Silva, Lucía

    2014-08-01

    Objective To know the facilities and the difficulties of nurses in caring practice of hospitalized children's families in the light of Jean Watson's Theory of Human Caring. Method It was used the descriptive qualitative approach. The data collection was conducted in three stages: presentation of theoretical content; engagement with families in the light of Watson's theory; and semi-structured interview with 12 pediatric nurses. The interviews were analysed using inductive thematic analysis, being possible to form three themes: Recognizing a framework for care; Considering the institutional context; and Challenges in family's relationship. Results The theory favored reflections about self, about the institutions and about nurses' relationship with the family of the child, normalized by a consciousness toward caring attitudes. Conclusion In this process, it is imperative that nurses recognize the philosophical-theoretical foundations of care to attend the child's family in hospital. PMID:25517839

  8. Fostering Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rambur, Betty

    1999-01-01

    Evidence-based nursing practice is impeded by low numbers of baccalaureate nurses, lack of critical perspectives toward research, the volume of information, and conflicting worldviews. Teaching strategies to address the challenge include fostering the ability to question and initiating teacher/student dialog. (SK)

  9. Ethical dilemmas and moral distress in oncology nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jeryl S; Erickson, Jeanne M

    2006-12-01

    Although ethical values and principles guide oncology nursing practice, nurses often are challenged to fulfill every professional core duty and responsibility in their everyday practice. Nurses commonly encounter clinical situations that have ethical conflicts, and they often have difficulty recognizing and articulating them. Unresolved conflicts can cause feelings of frustration and powerlessness, which can lead to compromises in patient care, job dissatisfaction, disagreements among those in the healthcare team, and burnout. This article reviews the ethical principles and values individual nurses bring to their practice as well as those basic to the profession of nursing. This article also discusses ethical conflicts in oncology practice and describes how nurses, especially students and novice nurses, may react to such situations with moral uncertainty or distress. In addition, a process for analyzing and resolving ethical problems in clinical situations is outlined. Increasing awareness and dialogue about ethical issues is an important first step in the process. Additional resources in the clinical setting may encourage nurses to actively participate in ethical decision making and take deliberate action as moral agents. PMID:17193943

  10. Faculty Practice in Nursing Education Programs in Rural States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkram, Gelene Marie

    1998-01-01

    This descriptive study identified demographic, organizational, and satisfaction data of faculty in nursing education programs in rural states who do and do not engage in faculty practice. Out of a total of 509 surveys which were sent to faculty from 35 nursing schools located in twelve rural states, 366 surveys were returned for a 72% response…

  11. In all required nursing practice courses, students are evaluated by faculty via the Collaborative Nursing Practice Evaluation Instrument. This evaluation instrument is available to view at

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    In all required nursing practice courses, students are evaluated by faculty via the Collaborative Nursing Practice Evaluation Instrument. This evaluation instrument is available to view at http://nursing.fau.edu/newnursingsite/handbook/forms/practiceevaluation.html. The instrument describes in detail the competencies of caring that are the foundation for the nursing program

  12. Future of advanced practice public health nursing education.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Sonia A; McCullagh, Marjorie; Lee, Corinne

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to conduct an assessment of the need for advanced practice, master's-prepared public health nurses in Michigan. A cross-sectional design was used to conduct interviews with former students, community leaders, and faculty. Content was analyzed qualitatively for themes. Participants were enthusiastic about the practice environment, but funding was a major concern. Almost all participants thought jobs were available and that public health nursing was cost-effective, yet there was concern about the aging work force and the need for higher education. Other disciplines serving in public health roles and hospitals were identified as competition to the public health nurse. Epidemiology, prevention, community assessment/program planning, health policy/law/ethics, leadership, health services, informatics, research, and grant writing were noted as skills needed. The results of this study are favorable for the future of advanced practice public health nursing practice and education. PMID:25802903

  13. [Building up nursing knowledge by means of reflexive practice].

    PubMed

    Colina, J; Medina, J L

    1997-12-01

    After analyzing the prior questions which determine the nursing field contents, the authors propose "reflective practice" as the methodological and pedagogical philosophy of choice in the formation of nurses. According to the authors, the professor is responsible for developing the curriculum. As such, the professor makes decisions regarding course design, methodology, content development, and student evaluation in terms of aptitute, attitude and knowledge acquisition. Research studies seem to demonstrate that the knowledge which, in the end, aids in comprehending the context taught and which determines the decisions a professor takes, is that knowledge based on a reflective practice, a product of the professor's experiences, background, knowledge and active relationship with nursing practice. The contents in this article were presented as a conference in the Third Seminar of Professors of Nursing for General Practice and Surgery. PMID:9485855

  14. OPT: Transformation of Nursing Process for Contemporary Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pesut, Daniel J.; Herman, JoAnne

    1998-01-01

    The Outcome-Present State-Test reasoning model emphasizes reflection, outcome specification, and testing within clinical narratives. This clinical reasoning model is more relevant to contemporary nursing practice. (SK)

  15. 75 FR 12554 - National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-16

    ...advanced practice registered nurses; (3) describe factors...advanced practice registered nurses; (4) identify the...primary care delivered by nurses and recommended strategies...recommend community-based, nurse-directed models for...Experts from professional nursing, public and...

  16. Establishing a minor illness nurse in a busy general practice.

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, G. N.; Dawes, M. L.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To study the feasibility of a practice nurse caring for patients with minor illnesses. DESIGN--Nurse given training in dealing with patients with minor illnesses. Patients requesting a same day appointment were offered a nurse consultation. SETTING--Group practice in Stockton on Tees. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Number of consultations which required a doctor contact, treatment, and rate of reconsultation. RESULTS--Of 696 consultations in six months, 602 (86%) required no doctor contact. 549 (79%) patients did not reconsult about the episode of illness, and 343 (50%) patients were given advice on self care only. CONCLUSION--Trained nurses could diagnose and treat a large proportion of patients currently consulting general practitioners about minor illness provided that the nurse has immediate access to a doctor. PMID:7711584

  17. Clinical Protocol-Nursing Practice Manual Page 1 of 17 John Dempsey Hospital Department of Nursing

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROTOCOL / PROCEDURE FOR: Negative Pressure Wound abdominal wounds with exposed viscera' placed on the Renasys (Smith & Nephew) negative pressure machine Practice Manual (Abdominal Negative Pressure Therapy Vacuum Device). Indications for Use Contraindications

  18. Telenursing in the intensive care unit: transforming nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Williams, Lisa-Mae; Hubbard, Kenneth E; Daye, Olive; Barden, Connie

    2012-12-01

    In tele-intensive care units, informatics, telecommunication technology, telenursing, and telemedicine are merged to provide expert, evidence-based, and cutting-edge services to critically ill patients. Telenursing is an emerging subspecialty in critical care that is neither well documented in the extant literature nor well understood within the profession. Documentation and quantification of telenursing interventions help to clarify the impact of the telenurse's role on nursing practice, enhancement of patient care, patient safety, and outcomes. Tele-intensive care unit nursing will continue to transform how critical care nursing is practiced by enhancing/leveraging available resources through the use of technology. PMID:23203956

  19. Learning Support System Reproducing Finger Movements in Practicing Nursing Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Majima, Yukie; Maekawa, Yasuko; SOGA, Masato

    2012-01-01

    Heretofore, “skill proficiency” in nursing techniques has only been developed through experience. To pass that technical proficiency down to later generations, this study is intended to build a learning support system using virtual reality by reproducing finger movements used in practicing nursing techniques. For practicing blood drawing techniques, we earlier developed a prototype system that uses a finger motion capture system to acquire finger position data when a syringe is grasped. It uses the acquired data to reproduce the process of the techniques three-dimensionally. This paper outlines the prototype system and reports its effectiveness for learning after examining results of a demonstration experiment for nursing students. PMID:24199102

  20. Ethics in Nursing Practice and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benoliel, Jeanne Quint

    1983-01-01

    The fact that ethics has become important to nurses is a reflection of two types of developments: (1) rapid expansion and application of biomedical technology, and (2) the human rights movement. Therefore, nursing involves an increasing number of activities with both moral and technical implications. (SSH)

  1. Nursing Services Delivery Theory: an open system approach

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Raquel M; O’Brien-Pallas, Linda L

    2010-01-01

    meyer r.m. & o’brien-pallas l.l. (2010)Nursing services delivery theory: an open system approach. Journal of Advanced Nursing66(12), 2828–2838. Aim This paper is a discussion of the derivation of the Nursing Services Delivery Theory from the application of open system theory to large-scale organizations. Background The underlying mechanisms by which staffing indicators influence outcomes remain under-theorized and unmeasured, resulting in a ‘black box’ that masks the nature and organization of nursing work. Theory linking nursing work, staffing, work environments, and outcomes in different settings is urgently needed to inform management decisions about the allocation of nurse staffing resources in organizations. Data sources A search of CINAHL and Business Source Premier for the years 1980–2008 was conducted using the following terms: theory, models, organization, organizational structure, management, administration, nursing units, and nursing. Seminal works were included. Discussion The healthcare organization is conceptualized as an open system characterized by energy transformation, a dynamic steady state, negative entropy, event cycles, negative feedback, differentiation, integration and coordination, and equifinality. The Nursing Services Delivery Theory proposes that input, throughput, and output factors interact dynamically to influence the global work demands placed on nursing work groups at the point of care in production subsystems. Implications for nursing The Nursing Services Delivery Theory can be applied to varied settings, cultures, and countries and supports the study of multi-level phenomena and cross-level effects. Conclusion The Nursing Services Delivery Theory gives a relational structure for reconciling disparate streams of research related to nursing work, staffing, and work environments. The theory can guide future research and the management of nursing services in large-scale healthcare organizations. PMID:20831573

  2. Clinical Procedure Page 1 of 2 Clinical Manual Nursing Practice Manual

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    . Initiate transfusion. APPROVAL: Nursing Standards Committee Transfusion Committee Director of Transfusion Medicine #12;Clinical Procedure Page 2 of 2 Clinical Manual ­ Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital

  3. Practical Nursing for High Schools. Curriculum Bulletin 1973-74 Series No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Bureau of Curriculum Development.

    The bulletin, a revision of Practical Nursing for High Schools published in 1963, is a guide for the licensed teacher of nursing in educating the practical nurse student. The publication can be used as a resource for developing the program in individual schools of practical nursing or to develop the behavioral objectives for each procedure. Part…

  4. Connecting congregations: technology resources influence parish nurse practice.

    PubMed

    Zerull, Lisa M; Near, Kelly K; Ragon, Bart; Farrell, Sarah P

    2009-01-01

    This descriptive pilot study evaluated the influence of health resource information education and the use of Web-based communication technology on the professional practice of the parish nurse in the congregational setting. Five parish nurse participants from varied denominations in rural and nonrural Virginia received a laptop computer, printer, video projector, and webcam along with high-speed Internet access in each congregational setting. The nurses attended two group education sessions that incorporated computer applications and training in accessing and using quality health information resources and communication applications such as a group "chat" software and webcam to communicate with others through high-speed Internet access. Qualitative analysis from semistructured interviews of nurses confirmed that participants found the project to be beneficial in terms of awareness, education, and applicability of technology use in parish nurse practice. Quantitative data from preproject and postproject surveys found significant differences in nurses' abilities and confidence with technology use and application. Findings showed that the knowledge and experience gained from this study enhanced parish nurse practice and confidence in using technology for communication, health education, and counseling. PMID:19411943

  5. Exploring incentives for RNs to return to practice: a partial solution to the nursing shortage.

    PubMed

    Langan, Joanne C; Tadych, Rita A; Kao, Chia-Chan

    2007-01-01

    Although many have suggested strategies to resolve the nursing shortage, few have considered inactive RNs. This pilot study investigated reasons why nurses leave the practice, the type of work environment and resources necessary to entice RNs to return to practice, and the specific skills required to assist RNs in feeling confident and competent to return to practice. Herzberg's Two-Factor Theory was used to study motivation and hygiene factors enticing RNs to practice. A screening questionnaire was sent to 1,004 randomly selected RNs in Missouri to determine who were licensed but not practicing. Fifty-two full questionnaires were mailed and 33 (63%) were returned. Quantitative data were analyzed using SPSS, whereas qualitative data were coded and analyzed using manifest content analysis. The lack of motivators such as recognition of one's work and achievements was one reason why RNs left the practice. The hygiene factors of money, improved working conditions, refresher courses, and health insurance would motivate RNs to return to practice. Those wishing to entice inactive nurses to practice will need to offer sign-on bonuses or make the hourly wages and benefits package very competitive. This study indicates that nurses value flexible working hours, part-time opportunities, consideration of family lives, and positive relationships with administrators. PMID:17292129

  6. Nurses and independent fee-for-service practice: a critical view.

    PubMed

    Willis, E

    1993-12-01

    A contemporary development in nursing in Australia is the move to independent private practice. This move is made in support of autonomy for the individual nurse practitioner and in the interests of improved patient care. This paper examines this development using the literature as data and critical theory as the framework of analysis. Critical theory argues that much human knowledge is bound by 'ideological' interests in either the technical or interpretative. Emancipatory knowledge attempts to peel off the various ideological layers in search of truth. Using work to examine the 'technical interest' and professionalism to examine the 'interpretative interest', it is argued that in the contemporary Australian health care system the nurse's claim to autonomy through independent practice calls for continuing debate and reflection. PMID:8260787

  7. Israeli nurse practice environment characteristics, retention, and job satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is an international nursing shortage. Improving the practice environment has been shown to be a successful strategy against this phenomenon, as the practice environment is associated with retention and job satisfaction. The Israeli nurse practice environment has not been measured. The purpose of this study was to measure practice environment characteristics, retention and job satisfaction and to evaluate the association between these variables. Methods A demographic questionnaire, the Practice Environment Scale, and a Job Satisfaction Questionnaire were administered to Israeli acute and intensive care nurses working in 7 hospitals across the country. Retention was measured by intent to leave the organization and work experience. A convenience sample of registered nurses was obtained using a bi-phasic, stratified, cluster design. Data were collected based on the preferences of each unit, either distribution during various shifts or at staff meetings; or via staff mailboxes. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the sample and results of the questionnaires. Pearson Product Moment Correlations were used to determine significant associations among the variables. A multiple regression model was designed where the criterion variable was the practice environment. Analyses of variance determined differences between groups on nurse practice environment characteristics. Results 610 nurses reported moderate levels of practice environment characteristics, where the lowest scoring characteristic was ‘appropriate staffing and resources’. Approximately 9% of the sample reported their intention to leave and the level of job satisfaction was high. A statistically significant, negative, weak correlation was found between intention to leave and practice environment characteristics, with a moderate correlation between job satisfaction and practice environment characteristics. ‘Appropriate staffing and resources’ was the only characteristic found to be statistically different based on hospital size and geographic region. Conclusions This study supports the international nature of the vicious cycle that includes a poor quality practice environment, decreased job satisfaction and low nurse retention. Despite the extreme nursing shortage in Israel, perceptions of the practice environment were similar to other countries. Policy makers and hospital managers should address the practice environment, in order to improve job satisfaction and increase retention. PMID:24565045

  8. Sintering Theory and Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    German, Randall M.

    1996-01-01

    Although sintering is an essential process in the manufacture of ceramics and certain metals, as well as several other industrial operations, until now, no single book has treated both the background theory and the practical application of this complex and often delicate procedure. In Sintering Theory and Practice, leading researcher and materials engineer Randall M. German presents a comprehensive treatment of this subject that will be of great use to manufacturers and scientists alike. This practical guide to sintering considers the fact that while the bonding process improves strength and other engineering properties of the compacted material, inappropriate methods of control may lead to cracking, distortion, and other defects. It provides a working knowledge of sintering, and shows how to avoid problems while accounting for variables such as particle size, maximum temperature, time at that temperature, and other problems that may cause changes in processing. The book describes the fundamental atomic events that govern the transformation from particles to solid, covers all forms of the sintering process, and provides a summary of many actual production cycles. Building from the ground up, it begins with definitions and progresses to measurement techniques, easing the transition, especially for students, into advanced topics such as single-phase solid-state sintering, microstructure changes, the complications of mixed particles, and pressure-assisted sintering. German draws on some six thousand references to provide a coherent and lucid treatment of the subject, making scientific principles and practical applications accessible to both students and professionals. In the process, he also points out and avoids the pitfalls found in various competing theories, concepts, and mathematical disputes within the field. A unique opportunity to discover what sintering is all about--both in theory and in practice What is sintering? We see the end product of this thermal process all around us--in manufactured objects from metals, ceramics, polymers, and many compounds. From a vast professional literature, Sintering Theory and Practice emerges as the only comprehensive, systematic, and self-contained volume on the subject. Covering all aspects of sintering as a processing topic, including materials, processes, theories, and the overall state of the art, the book Offers numerous examples, illustrations, and tables that detail actual processing cycles, and that stress existing knowledge in the field Uses the specifics of various consolidation cycles to illustrate the basics Leads the reader from the fundamentals to advanced topics, without getting bogged down in various mathematical disputes over treatments and measurements Supports the discussion with critically selected references from thousands of sources Examines the sintering behavior of a wide variety of engineered materials--metals, alloys, oxide ceramics, composites, carbides, intermetallics, glasses, and polymers Guides the reader through the sintering processes for several important industrial materials and demonstrates how to control these processes effectively and improve present techniques Provides a helpful reference for specific information on materials, processing problems, and concepts For practitioners and researchers in ceramics, powder metallurgy, and other areas, and for students and faculty in materials science and engineering, this book provides the know-how and understanding crucial to many industrial operations, offers many ideas for further research, and suggests future applications of this important technology. This book offers an unprecedented opportunity to explore sintering in both practical and theoretical terms, whether at the lab or in real-world applications, and to acquire a broad, yet thorough, understanding of this important technology.

  9. The Development of a Regional Nursing History Collection: Its Relevance to Practice, Education, and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hezel, Linda F.; Linebach, Laura M.

    1991-01-01

    The Nursing History Collection at the University of Missouri-Kansas City preserves artifacts and memorabilia of regional nursing history. Such collections are essential to practice, education, and research in nursing. (SK)

  10. [The psychodynamic nursing theory by Hildegard E. Peplau].

    PubMed

    Vellone, E; Piras, G

    1997-01-01

    Peplau's theory is one of the early Nursing theories, published in 1952. The nurse-patient relationship consists of four steps (orientation, identification, development and conclusion). In these steps nurse could have the role of foreign, reliable person, teacher, guide in nursing care, substitute and consultant. Nurse-patient relationship is influenced by psychobiological experiences (needs, frustrations, conflicts and anxiety) which need dynamism. Peplau thinks that Nursing care is an important opportunity for nurse because she can help patient to complete the infancy psychological tasks (learning to rely on other people, learning to show satisfaction, self-identifying, and developing ability in sharing) if these are not completed. For these reasons Nursing, by Peplau, is a maturation strength of civilization. PMID:10474451

  11. Postgraduate nurse practitioner residency programs: supporting transition to practice.

    PubMed

    Wiltse Nicely, Kelly L; Fairman, Julie

    2015-06-01

    The 2010 Institute of Medicine report The Future of Nursing recommended residency programs for nurses. The number of such postgraduate residencies for nurse practitioners (NPs) is increasing in community settings; still, the Institute of Medicine's recommendation departs from the tradition of direct entry into practice after the completion of a formal nursing program. Research shows that residencies support NPs' transition to practice, but very few data support their impact on patient care. Postgraduate residencies are controversial, and the authors of this Commentary discuss the naming, funding mechanisms, and possible mandating of these programs.The authors believe that residencies should not be mandated but encouraged for new NPs and for those moving to new clinical settings. Team-based residencies provide both an opportunity to improve collaboration and a model of patient-centered care. PMID:25551860

  12. Compassion fatigue within nursing practice: a concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Coetzee, Siedine Knobloch; Klopper, Hester C

    2010-06-01

    "Compassion fatigue" was first introduced in relation to the study of burnout among nurses, but it was never defined within this context; it has since been adopted as a synonym for secondary traumatic stress disorder, which is far removed from the original meaning of the term. The aim of the study was to define compassion fatigue within nursing practice. The method that was used in this article was concept analysis. The findings revealed several categories of compassion fatigue: risk factors, causes, process, and manifestations. The characteristics of each of these categories are specified and a connotative (theoretical) definition, model case, additional cases, empirical indicators, and a denotative (operational) definition are provided. Compassion fatigue progresses from a state of compassion discomfort to compassion stress and, finally, to compassion fatigue, which if not effaced in its early stages of compassion discomfort or compassion stress, can permanently alter the compassionate ability of the nurse. Recommendations for nursing practice, education, and research are discussed. PMID:20602697

  13. Tanzanian Nurses Understanding and Practice of Spiritual Care

    PubMed Central

    Dhamani, Khairunnisa Aziz; Paul, Pauline; Olson, Joanne Kaye

    2011-01-01

    Spirituality, as a basic characteristic of humans and a contributor to human health, is regarded as part of nursing practice. The purpose of this study was to examine how Tanzanian nurses understand spirituality and spiritual care. Using the qualitative method of interpretive description, fifteen registered nurses engaged in clinical practice in a Tanzanian hospital were recruited to participate in this study. In-depth interviews using open-ended questions were carried out, tape-recorded, and transcribed verbatim. Data collection and inductive analysis occurred concurrently. In this paper, key findings are grouped under the following headings: meaning of spiritual care, recognition of spiritual needs, and interventions to respond to spiritual needs. Although there were some differences, overall participants' understanding of spirituality and spiritual care was similar to what is found in the literature about nurses in other countries. The provision of spiritual care also included some unique elements that may reflect the African context. PMID:22007322

  14. Constructing mentally ill inmates: nurses' discursive practices in corrections.

    PubMed

    Perron, Amélie; Holmes, Dave

    2011-09-01

    The concepts of discourse, subjectivity and power allow for innovative explorations in nursing research. Discourse take many different forms and may be maintained, transmitted, even imposed, in various ways. Nursing practice makes possible many discursive spaces where discourses intersect. Using a Foucauldian perspective, were explored the ways in which forensic psychiatric nurses construct the subjectivity of mentally ill inmates. Progress notes and individual interviews constitute discursive spaces within which nurses construct patients' subjectivities. Progress notes provide a written (and permanent) form of discourse, while interviews set the space for a more fluid and contextual form of discourse. We identified five types of subjectivities - the (in)visible patient, the patient as risk, the deviant patient, the disturbed patient and the disciplined patient. These subjectivities were rooted in various types of discourses circulating in the selected setting. Despite the multiple discursive dimensions of forensic psychiatric nursing, progress notes remain the main formal source of information regarding nursing care even though it is not representative of the care provided nor is it representative of nurses' complex discursive practices in corrections. PMID:21790870

  15. Practical implications of pre-employment nurse assessments.

    PubMed

    Kuthy, James E; Ramon, Cheree; Gonzalez, Ronald; Biddle, Dan A

    2013-01-01

    Hiring nurses is a difficult task that can have serious repercussions for medical facilities. If nurses without proper skills are hired, patients can suffer from insufficient quality of care and potentially life-threatening conditions. Nurse applicants' technical knowledge is extremely important to avoid negative outcomes; however, there are soft skills that factor into their success, such as bedside manner, personality, communication, and decision making. In order for medical facilities to select and maintain high-performing nurse staff, hiring managers must incorporate evaluations for these types of skills in their hiring process. The current study focused on using content/criterion-related validation design to create assessments by which nurse applicants can be evaluated for both technical knowledge/skills and soft skills. The study included participation of more than 876 nursing staff members. To rank applicants on divergent skills, 3 assessment types were investigated, resulting in the creation of an assessment with 3 components. The clinical, situational, and behavioral components that were created measure applicants' job knowledge, interpersonal competency in medical facility-related situations, and aspects of personality and behavior, respectively. Results indicate that using the assessment can predict 45% of a nurse applicant's future job performance. Practical implications include hiring and maintaining a higher quality of nurses and decreased hiring costs. PMID:23629042

  16. Reflections by clinical nurse specialists on changing ward practice.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Catherine; Ramcharan, Angie

    In September 2010, palliative care clinical nurse specialists at North Middlesex University Hospital Trust introduced competencies for all nurses in setting up and using syringe drivers. This was done after the trust identified a high level of clinical incidents involving syringe drivers. This article discusses how the competencies were implemented and assessed, explores the importance of understanding change management to achieve change, and how different leadership styles affect changes to practice. PMID:21957520

  17. Fever management practices of neuroscience nurses: what has changed?

    PubMed

    Rockett, Hannah; Thompson, Hilaire J; Blissitt, Patricia A

    2015-04-01

    Current evidence shows that fever and hyperthermia are especially detrimental to patients with neurologic injury, leading to higher rates of mortality, greater disability, and longer lengths of stay. Although clinical practice guidelines exist for ischemic stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and traumatic brain injury, they lack specificity in their recommendations for fever management, making it difficult to formulate appropriate protocols for care. Using survey methods, the aims of this study were to (a) describe how nursing practices for fever management in this population have changed over the last several years, (b) assess if institutional protocols and nursing judgment follow published national guidelines for fever management in neuroscience patients, and (c) explore whether nurse or institutional characteristics influence decision making. Compared with the previous survey administered in 2007, there was a small increase (8%) in respondents reporting having an institutional fever protocol specific to neurologic patients. Temperatures to initiate treatment either based on protocols or nurse determination did not change from the previous survey. However, nurses with specialty certification and/or working in settings with institutional awards (e.g., Magnet status or Stroke Center Designation) initiated therapy at a lower temperature. Oral acetaminophen continues to be the primary choice for fever management, followed by ice packs and fans. This study encourages the development of a stepwise approach to neuro-specific protocols for fever management. Furthermore, it shows the continuing need to promote further education and specialty training among nurses and encourage collaboration with physicians to establish best practices. PMID:25634653

  18. [Evidence-based nursing, a driver for change in nursing practice].

    PubMed

    Codeluppi, Caroline; Silva, José; Perrenoud, Béatrice

    2012-12-01

    A urology nursing team examined its perioperative practices in the light of scientific data and implemented updated care practices adapted to this context.This experience favours the development of skills essential for interdisciplinary collaboration drawing on the resources of each profession, to work towards a common goal for the benefit of the patient. PMID:23362576

  19. Compass and Prerequisite Course Scores as Predictors of Success in Practical Nursing School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, Toni L. Early

    2010-01-01

    The nursing shortage is compounded by nursing student attrition. Schools of nursing have limited enrollment, making the admission process an important factor in resolving the ongoing nursing shortage. The purpose of this study was to identify preadmission criteria that accurately identify applicants to practical/vocational nursing (P/VN) schools…

  20. Humility and its practice in nursing.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Kay

    2004-11-01

    Following a personal experience of transformation as a result of washing the feet of a terminally ill patient, an exploratory study was undertaken to investigate nurses' experience of washing patients' feet. Seven postregistration student nurses participated in the study by washing the feet of as many patients as they could over a defined period of time. They were then interviewed about the experience. The transcribed interviews were analysed using the heuristic enquiry approach. Symbolically, washing feet is an act of humility. In washing feet in the manner required for this study I suggest that the nurses were practising beyond role definition of duty of care. As a result of this they experienced interconnectedness and changes in their relationship with the patients whose feet they had washed that could be interpreted as a response to humility. PMID:15597938

  1. The evolution of an intervention--the use of Peplau's process of practice-based theory development.

    PubMed

    Peden, A R

    1998-06-01

    In 1969, at the first Nursing Theory Conference, Hildegard Peplau proposed a research methodology that would guide the development of nursing knowledge. To direct nurses in the development of practice-based theory, Peplau proposed a three-step process that would assist in this pursuit. The purpose of this paper is to describe the use of Peplau's process of practice-based theory development as it has directed a program of research in the area of depression. Peplau's ideas related to practice-based theory development came at a time in nursing when grand theories were being developed and theoretical nursing was highly valued. Peplau, ahead of her time, proposed an approach that valued the development of nursing knowledge in practice, while also combining both qualitative and quantitative methods. This research methodology deserves recognition today, as one that can guide knowledge development in psychiatric nursing. PMID:9807345

  2. A reply to Kevin Gournay's 'Schizophrenia: a review of the contemporary literature and implications for mental health nursing theory, practice and education'.

    PubMed

    Dawson, P J

    1997-02-01

    Mental health nurses are being increasingly encouraged to move to a more biologically oriented approach. Authors such as Professor Gournay promulgate the myth that biological psychiatry will soon be able to provide an unambiguous model of the nature of mental disorder. A closer examination of some of the biological research identified by Gournay as moving us closer to this ideal reveals, however, the confused and unconvincing nature of the results so far achieved. In the light of this it seems premature to be advocating wholesale acceptance of the biological model by nursing. Nurses should be made aware of the investigations of the biologists, but, unless they are equipped with the necessary intellectual tools to place such investigations in context, they will continue to be susceptible to the rhetoric of proselytisers such as Gournay. PMID:9171569

  3. Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders – a model for optimising the geriatric nursing practice environment

    PubMed Central

    Capezuti, Elizabeth; Boltz, Marie; Cline, Daniel; Dickson, Victoria Vaughn; Rosenberg, Marie-Claire; Wagner, Laura; Shuluk, Joseph; Nigolian, Cindy

    2012-01-01

    Aims and objectives To explain the relationship between a positive nurse practice environment (NPE) and implementation of evidence-based practices. To describe the components of NICHE (Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders) programmes that contribute to a positive geriatric nursing practice environment. Background The NPE is a system-level intervention for promoting quality and patient safety; however, there are population-specific factors that influence the nurses’ perception of their practice and its’ relationship with patient outcomes. Favourable perceptions of the geriatric-specific NPE are associated with better perceptions of geriatric care quality. Designs Discursive paper. Method In this selective critical analysis of the descriptive and empirical literature, we present the implementation of geriatric models in relation to the NPE and components of the NICHE programme that support hospitals’ systemic capacity to effectively integrate and sustain evidence-based geriatric knowledge into practice. Results Although there are several geriatric models and chronic care models available, NICHE has been the most successful in recruiting hospital membership as well as contributing to the depth of geriatric hospital programming. Conclusions Although all geriatric care models require significant nursing input, only NICHE focuses on the nursing staff’s perception of the care environment for geriatric practice. Studies in NICHE hospitals demonstrate that quality geriatric care requires a NPE in which the structure and processes of hospital services focus on specific patient care needs. Relevance to clinical practice The implementation of evidence-based models addressing the unique needs of hospitalised older adults requires programmes such as NICHE that serve as technical resources centre and a catalyst for networking among facilities committed to quality geriatric care. Unprecedented international growth in the ageing population compels us to examine how to adapt the successful components of NICHE to the distinctive needs of health systems throughout the world that serve older adults. PMID:23083387

  4. Practice nurse involvement in general practice clinical care: policy and funding issues need resolution.

    PubMed

    Afzali, Hossein Haji Ali; Karnon, Jonathan; Beilby, Justin; Gray, Jodi; Holton, Christine; Banham, David

    2014-06-01

    In Australia, primary care-based funding initiatives have been implemented to encourage general practices to employ practice nurses. The aim of this paper is to discuss limitations of the current funding and policy arrangements in enhancing the clinical role of practice nurses in the management of chronic conditions. This paper draws on the results of a real-world economic evaluation, the Primary Care Services Improvement Project (PCSIP). The PCSIP linked routinely collected clinical and resource use data to undertake a risk-adjusted cost-effectiveness analysis of increased practice nurse involvement in clinical-based activities for the management of diabetes and obesity. The findings of the PCSIP suggested that the active involvement of practice nurses in collaborative clinical-based activities is cost-effective, as well as addressing general practice workforce issues. Although primary healthcare organisations (e.g. Medicare Locals) can play a key role in supporting enhanced practice nurse roles, improvements to practice nurse funding models could further encourage more efficient use of an important resource. PMID:24870661

  5. The recovery alliance theory of mental health nursing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. SHANLEY; M. JUBB-SHANLEY

    2007-01-01

    The recovery alliance theory (RAT) is a mid-range theory of mental health nursing based on humanistic philosophy. The conception of the RAT was the outcome of collaboration among service users, practising mental health nurses, educationalists and managers and was developed in the context of a number of political and social changes as well as changes in the mental health field.

  6. The Theory of Critical Thinking of Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Cheryl

    2002-01-01

    Nursing students (n=47), entry-level nurses (n=48), and expert nurses (n=54) viewed and analyzed simulated nursing incidents. Findings determined that critical thinking and decision making increased with the level of clinical expertise. Grade point average was also correlated with critical thinking and decision making. (Contains 22 references.)…

  7. Oral care practices of intensive care nurses: a descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Türk, Gülengün; Kocaçal Güler, Elem; E?er, Ismet; Khorshid, Leyla

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate intensive care unit (ICU) nurses' views and practices on oral care and to define the factors related to oral care measures. A study was carried out in eight ICUs of a teaching hospital in 2008. One hundred one nurses constituted the study sample. The data were collected using 'Oral Care Practices Survey' which included demographic characteristics (5 items) and current oral care practices (13 items). Oral care was given the highest priority by nearly 60% of the nurses. The most commonly used solution was sodium bicarbonate (79.2%), and the most frequently used equipment was foam swab (82.2%). Oral care was carried out less than every 4 h per day by 44.5% of the nurses. The oral care products and solutions were reported to be different in almost every unit. The relationship between the use of toothpaste and the place of employment was statistically significant (x(2) = 24.566, d.f. = 6, P = 0.000). There was a statistical significance between the clinics and frequency of oral care (x(2) = 81.486, d.f. = 42, P = 0.000). This study suggests that there is a wide variety of type and frequency of oral care measures among ICU nurses. Optimal oral care supported by evidence is an effective prevention method for eliminating oral complications. PMID:22845634

  8. Reflecting on nurses' views on using research in practice.

    PubMed

    Heaslip, Vanessa; Hewitt-Taylor, Jaqui; Rowe, Nicholas E

    This paper follows a previous paper (Hewitt-Taylor et al, 2012) in which the authors summarised their reflections on the literature relating to the application of research in practice. This paper builds on these reflections and reports on the findings from one aspect of a study that explored nurses' views on using research in practice. Quantitative methods of data collection and analysis were used and data were gathered using questionnaires. The findings suggest that nurses generally value research, but this does not necessarily mean that they base individual decisions on particular research findings, or that research is considered the most important form of evidence in direct practice. In addition, the resources that enable nurses to find, appraise and make decisions about using research, are not always readily available in practice settings. From this part of the study, it can be concluded that for research utilisation to increase, time, resources, role models and environments that support this ethos are needed, and that an emphasis on research should not eclipse other key forms of nursing knowledge such as patient views and experiences, and professional expertise in the promotion of evidence-based practice. PMID:23249802

  9. Screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) as an integral part of nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Finnell, Deborah S; Nowzari, Shahrzad; Reimann, Brie; Fischer, Leigh; Pace, Elizabeth; Goplerud, Eric

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT. Substance use screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) should be an integral part of the scope of nursing practice. This commentary is an appeal for nurses to advance their knowledge and competencies related to SBIRT. The question of how to move SBIRT into the mainstream of nursing practice was posed to several leaders of federal agencies, health care and nursing organizations, nurse educators, and nurse leaders. The authors provide recommendations for moving this set of clinical strategies (i.e., SBIRT) into day-to-day nursing practice. PMID:24580067

  10. Telephone triage of acute illness by a practice nurse in general practice: outcomes of care.

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, M; Huddart, T; Henderson, B

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Telephone working is an increasingly important way of managing general practice workload, particularly out of hours. The role of telephone triage, however, in managing acute consultations during the day has not been adequately researched. AIM: To determine the impact of telephone triage, conducted by a practice nurse, on the management of same day consultations in a general practice. METHOD: A general practice of 11,300 patients in South Tyneside collected prospective telephone and surgery consultation data over three months. Patient satisfaction, for those who had received only telephone advice, was measured using a postal questionnaire. Four outcomes were measured: changes in doctor and nurse workload; repeat consultations with the same problem; prescriptions issued; and patient satisfaction with the service. RESULTS: In three months, 1263 consultations were recorded. Doctor workload fell by 54%, from 1522 to 664 consultations, compared with the previous three months. A total of 325 (26%) telephone requests to see the doctor were managed by the nurse on the telephone without them visiting the surgery. Also, 273 (21%) patients saw the nurse in the surgery, 565 (45%) saw the doctor in the surgery, and 99 (8%) saw the doctor and the nurse in the surgery. The response rate to the postal questionnaire was 192/271 (71%); 154 (88%) were satisfied with nurse telephone advice. CONCLUSIONS: Telephone triage, by a practice nurse, of patients who wish to see the doctor on the same day, reduced doctor workload. This was a service that patients liked. PMID:9667088

  11. Use of Evidence-Based Practice in School Nursing: Survey of School Nurses at a National Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Primary and acute care settings are the focus of a concerted effort to implement evidence-based practice (EBP) in health care; yet, little attention has been given to use of EBP among school nurses. The aims of this study were to (a) describe current use of EBP among school nurses attending a national school nurse conference, (b) describe…

  12. Promising practices for faculty in accelerated nursing programs.

    PubMed

    Rico, Janet Sweeney; Beal, Judy; Davies, Terry

    2010-03-01

    Accelerated nursing programs for college graduates have been graduating RNs since 1971. The question of how best to educate this cohort is a concern and even more of a priority because these students have different learning needs. Anecdotally, faculty know accelerated students tend to be challenging to teach. Administrators of nursing programs also are aware that some faculty prefers teaching this cohort and other faculty does not. This descriptive qualitative study collected data during focus groups using an open-ended interview guide. The focus groups consisted of accelerated second-degree nursing students. Participants identified six themes as best faculty practices: appreciate accelerated students as adult learners, communicate passion for the profession, challenge and motivate, practice while teaching and share their experiences, support accelerated students, and use varied teaching styles. PMID:20143760

  13. Caring as emancipatory nursing praxis: the theory of relational caring complexity.

    PubMed

    Ray, Marilyn A; Turkel, Marian C

    2014-01-01

    In the culture of health care, nurses are challenged to understand their values and beliefs as humanistic within complex technical and economically driven bureaucratic systems. This article outlines the language of social justice and human rights and the advance of a Theory of Relational Caring Complexity, which offers insights into caring as emancipatory nursing praxis. Recommendations provide knowledge of the struggle to balance economics, technology, and caring. As nurses practice from a value-driven, philosophical, and ethical social justice framework, they will find "their voice" and realize the full potential that the power of caring has on patient and organizational outcomes. PMID:24786202

  14. Toward a Theory of Intuitive Decision-Making in Nursing.

    PubMed

    Payne, Lesle Karns

    2015-07-01

    The author in this article presents a theory of decision-making in nursing, specifically a middle-range theory of intuitive decision-making in nursing created through the synthesis of Patricia Benner's model of skill acquisition in nursing and Damasio's somatic marker hypothesis. The author proposes that Damasio's somatic state is equivalent to what Benner has identified as intuition. When a nurse is faced with a decision, intuition, if developed, is a somatic state that creates a measurable physiological biasing signal (skin conductive response) that helps in making an advantageous decision. Research, educational, clinical and theoretical implications are discussed. PMID:26109700

  15. From anxiety to enthusiasm: facilitating graduate nursing students' knowledge development in science and theory.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Diana E; Bell, Sandy; Benson, Ember E; Mandzuk, Lynda L; Matias, Debra M; McIvor, Marilyn J; Robertson, Judy E; Wilkins, Krista L

    2007-02-01

    Knowledge development of theory can be challenging for graduate nursing students when they experience deficits related to theoretical foundations, evaluation, or application. This article recounts the experiences of the students and course facilitator with a graduate-level nursing science and theory course, which required critical analysis of a concept, theory critique, and poster presentation. The idea for this article was generated when the students realized the profound importance of nursing theories and their applicability to practice and research. Students' anxiety gave way to enthusiasm with the implementation of teaching and learning strategies based on adult learning theory. Knowles' four characteristics of adult learners are discussed in relation to the experiences of the students and course facilitator. These characteristics include learners' wish to be self-directed, need to bring life experiences to their learning, recognition of their social and occupational role competencies, and need to take a more immediate, problem-solving approach to their learning. PMID:17315569

  16. Practical Nursing. Volume II. Health Occupations Education. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Helen V.; Reid-Sloan, Jamee

    This curriculum guide, revised from a 1975 edition, provides teachers with up-to-date information and skill-related applications needed by practical nurses. It includes 4 sections and 24 instructional units. Each unit of instruction consists of eight basic components: performance objectives, teacher activities, information sheets, assignment…

  17. Mobile Learning in Nursing Practice Education: Applying Koole's FRAME Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, Richard F.; Van Neste-Kenny, Jocelyne M. C.; Park, Caroline L.; Burton, Pamela A.; Meiers, Jan

    2009-01-01

    We report here on an exploratory formative evaluation of a project to integrate mobile learning into a Western Canadian college nursing program. Third-year students used Hewlett Packard iPAQ mobile devices for five weeks in a practice education course in April-May, 2007. Koole's (2009) "Framework for the Rational Analysis of Mobile Education"…

  18. Exploring nursing students’ experience of peer learning in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Ravanipour, Maryam; Bahreini, Masoud; Ravanipour, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Peer learning is an educational process wherein someone of the same age or level of experience level interacts with other students interested in the same topic. There is limited evidence specifically focusing on the practical use of peer learning in Iran. The aim of this study was to explore nursing students’ experiences of peer learning in clinical practice. Materials and Methods: A qualitative content analysis was conducted. Focus groups were used to find the students’ experiences about peerlearning. Twenty-eight baccalaureate nursing students at Bushehr University of Medical Sciences were selected purposively, and were arranged in four groups of seven students each. The focus group interviews were conducted using a semi-structured interview schedule. All interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using conventional content analysis method. Results: The analysis identified four themes: Paradoxical dualism, peer exploitation, first learning efficacy, and socialization practice. Gained advantages and perceived disadvantages created paradoxical dualism, and peer exploitation resulted from peer selection and peer training. Conclusion: Nursing students reported general satisfaction concerning peer learning due to much more in-depth learning with little stress than conventional learning methods. Peer learning is a useful method for nursing students for practicing educational leadership and learning the clinical skills before they get a job. PMID:26097860

  19. Administrative Protocol Page 1 of 3 Nursing Practice Manual

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    and respiratory depression associated with patient controlled analgesia (PCA), continuous narcotic infusionPRO and Contract) Personnel POLICY: Routine Staffing 1. Assignment of nursing care is consistent with patient to: a. level of care required for an equal distribution of workload b. infection control practices

  20. Addressing Sexuality-Related Needs in Practice: Perspectives of Maternal/Child and Women's Health Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Propst, Maureen G.; Phillips, Billie Rhea; Andrew, Michael E.

    2001-01-01

    A survey of sexuality-related nursing practices was completed by 130 maternal/child and women's health nurses. A disparity was found between their agreement on nurses' role in sexuality-related practices and their actual practice; 46.5% felt only somewhat knowledgeable about sexuality. (SK)

  1. Knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding emergency contraception among nurses and nursing students in two hospitals in Nairobi, Kenya

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter B Gichangi; Joseph G Karanja; Christine S Kigondu; Karoline Fonck; Marleen Temmerman

    1999-01-01

    A cross-sectional descriptive study on knowledge, attitudes, and practice about emergency contraception (EC) was conducted among nurses and nursing students using a self-administered questionnaire. One-hundred-sixty-seven qualified nurses and 63 nursing students completed the questionnaire. Over 95% listed at least one regular contraceptive method but only 2.6% spontaneously listed EC as a contraceptive method, whereas 48% of the respondents had heard

  2. Addressing sexuality-related needs in practice: perspectives of maternal/child and women's health nurses.

    PubMed

    Propst, M G; Phillips, B R; Andrew, M E

    2001-01-01

    A quantitative, descriptive survey was conducted using Waterhouse's instrument, Survey of Sexuality-Related Nursing Practice. The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which maternal/child and women's health nurses address sexuality in their practice and to assess the influence of select variables on that practice. A sample of maternal/child and women's health registered nurses (n = 130) was systematically selected from the 1995 Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses' (AWHONN) District VII mailing list. Findings reveal incongruities in maternal/child and women's health nurses' perspectives and the incorporation of sexuality-related nursing interventions into practice. PMID:11868958

  3. Effectiveness of a critical care nursing course: preparing students for practice in critical care.

    PubMed

    Oermann, M H

    1991-05-01

    Experiences in critical care in an undergraduate program provide an opportunity for students to develop beginning knowledge and skills for practice in this setting, gain exposure to the role of the nurse in critical care, and acquire competencies essential for care of any acutely ill patient regardless of health problem and setting. The purposes of this study were to (1) examine the acquisition of basic critical care nursing knowledge after completion of an undergraduate course in critical care, (2) compare the differences in learning between students who completed only the theory component of the course and those who completed both theory and clinical practice in critical care, (3) examine learner perceptions toward critical care nursing, and (4) examine the impact of the course on selection by new graduates of critical care as their practice specialty. A quasi-experimental pretest-posttest design was used with two experimental groups: lecture only and lecture and clinical practice, and a randomized control group. Subjects were 85 senior nursing students in a baccalaureate program in a large metropolitan area in the Midwest. Data were collected by using a demographic data sheet, the Basic Knowledge Assessment Tool (BKAT), the Perceptions of Critical Care Nursing Questionnaire (PCCNQ), and follow-up interviews of graduates who completed the course. Both experimental groups demonstrated a statistically significant increase in learning from pretest and posttest, as measured by the BKAT. There were no significant differences in BKAT scores between the lecture and lecture-clinical practice groups. Mean scores on the BKAT at posttest for the experimental groups, who participated in the course, were significantly higher than the control.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1903370

  4. Influence of the Nursing Practice Environment on Job Satisfaction and Turnover Intention

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Yi; Kim, Chul-Woung; Kang, Jeong-Hee; Yoon, Tae-Ho; Kim, Cheoul Sin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To examine whether the nursing practice environment at the hospital-level affects the job satisfaction and turnover intention of hospital nurses. Methods: Among the 11 731 nurses who participated in the Korea Health and Medical Workers’ Union’s educational program, 5654 responded to our survey. Data from 3096 nurses working in 185 general inpatient wards at 60 hospitals were analyzed using multilevel logistic regression modeling. Results: Having a standardized nursing process (odds ratio [OR], 4.21; p<0.001), adequate nurse staffing (OR, 4.21; p<0.01), and good doctor-nurse relationship (OR, 4.15; p<0.01), which are hospital-level variables based on the Korean General Inpatients Unit Nursing Work Index (KGU-NWI), were significantly related to nurses’ job satisfaction. However, no hospital-level variable from the KGU-NWI was significantly related to nurses’ turnover intention. Conclusions: Favorable nursing practice environments are associated with job satisfaction among nurses. In particular, having a standardized nursing process, adequate nurse staffing, and good doctor-nurse relationship were found to positively influence nurses’ job satisfaction. However, the nursing practice environment was not related to nurses’ turnover intention. PMID:25284197

  5. Knowledge for the good of the individual and society: linking philosophy, disciplinary goals, theory, and practice.

    PubMed

    McCurry, Mary K; Revell, Susan M Hunter; Roy, Sr Callista

    2010-01-01

    Nursing as a profession has a social mandate to contribute to the good of society through knowledge-based practice. Knowledge is built upon theories, and theories, together with their philosophical bases and disciplinary goals, are the guiding frameworks for practice. This article explores a philosophical perspective of nursing's social mandate, the disciplinary goals for the good of the individual and society, and one approach for translating knowledge into practice through the use of a middle-range theory. It is anticipated that the integration of the philosophical perspective and model into nursing practice will strengthen the philosophy, disciplinary goal, theory, and practice links and expand knowledge within the discipline. With the focus on humanization, we propose that nursing knowledge for social good will embrace a synthesis of the individual and the common good. This approach converges vital and agency needs described by Hamilton and the primacy of maintaining the heritage of the good within the human species as outlined by Maritain. Further, by embedding knowledge development in a changing social and health care context, nursing focuses on the goals of clinical reasoning and action. McCubbin and Patterson's Double ABCX Model of Family Adaptation was used as an example of a theory that can guide practice at the community and global level. Using the theory-practice link as a foundation, the Double ABCX model provides practising nurses with one approach to meet the needs of individuals and society. The integration of theory into nursing practice provides a guide to achieve nursing's disciplinary goals of promoting health and preventing illness across the globe. When nursing goals are directed at the synthesis of the good of the individual and society, nursing's social and moral mandate may be achieved. PMID:20017882

  6. Developing best practice in critical care nursing: knowledge, evidence and practice.

    PubMed

    Fulbrook, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Because the current drive towards evidence-based critical care nursing practice is based firmly within the positivist paradigm, experimentally derived research tends to be regarded as 'high level' evidence, whereas other forms of evidence, for example qualitative research or personal knowing, carry less weight. This poses something of a problem for nursing, as the type of knowledge nurses use most in their practice is often at the so-called 'soft' end of science. Thus, the 'Catch 22' situation is that the evidence base for nursing practice is considered to be weak. Furthermore, it is argued in this paper that there are several forms of nursing knowledge, which critical care nurses employ, that are difficult to articulate. The way forward requires a pragmatic approach to evidence, in which all forms of knowledge are considered equal in abstract but are assigned value according to the context of a particular situation. It is proposed that this can be achieved by adopting an approach to nursing in which practice development is the driving force for change. PMID:12859079

  7. Understanding partnership practice in child and family nursing through the concept of practice architectures.

    PubMed

    Hopwood, Nick; Fowler, Cathrine; Lee, Alison; Rossiter, Chris; Bigsby, Marg

    2013-09-01

    A significant international development agenda in the practice of nurses supporting families with young children focuses on establishing partnerships between professionals and service users. Qualitative data were generated through interviews and focus groups with 22 nurses from three child and family health service organisations, two in Australia and one in New Zealand. The aim was to explore what is needed in order to sustain partnership in practice, and to investigate how the concept of practice architectures can help understand attempts to enhance partnerships between nurses and families. Implementation of the Family Partnership Model (FPM) is taken as a specific point of reference. Analysis highlights a number of tensions between the goals of FPM and practice architectures relating to opportunities for ongoing learning; the role of individual nurses in shaping the practice; relationships with peers and managers; organisational features; and extra-organisational factors. The concept of practice architectures shows how changing practice requires more than developing individual knowledge and skills, and avoids treating individuals and context separately. The value of this framework for understanding change with reference to context rather than just individual's knowledge and skills is demonstrated, particularly with respect to approaches to practice development focused on providing additional training to nurses. PMID:23336287

  8. Safer handling practice for nurses: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wilson, C B

    The lifting and handling of people is an integral part of nursing care and has been blamed for a high incidence of back injuries to nurses. Changes to nursing practice have been dictated by this level of injury following the passing of health and safety legislation in 1992. This review seeks to evaluate the growing body of research from a range of disciplines in order to establish an evidence base for the moving and handling of patients. It identifies that studies considering the impact of changes in practice on patient outcomes are lacking. The term 'safer handling practice' has been used by the author to indicate a new way of thinking in relation to moving and handling people in health and care settings. A definition of safer handling practice has been derived from the literature with concomitant implications for training. Using this body of knowledge alongside studies investigating mobility of older people, the literature was used deductively to ascertain that safer handling practice has the potential to influence positively the mobility of older people. The author suggests further research to be conducted in the field of safer handling practice. PMID:12170493

  9. Intentionality and caring-healing consciousness: a practice of transpersonal nursing.

    PubMed

    Watson, Jean

    2002-07-01

    This article explicates some theoretical and scientific dimensions of intentionality and consciousness as a framework for transpersonal nursing. New connections are made between noetic sciences and transpersonal caring theory, both of which cultivate intentionality as a form of focused consciousness as a formal field of study. What emerges is Intentional Transpersonal Caring, whereby intentionality, consciousness, and universal energy-field are posited as the foundation of a caring moment, potentiating healing for both practitioner and patient. The theoretical and scientific are translated into the practical by a series of practice guidelines that activate intentionality into a living theory of transpersonal caring-healing praxis. PMID:12060941

  10. [Recontextualization of nursing clinical simulation based on Basil Bernstein: semiology of pedagogical practice].

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Mateus Casanova; Leite, Maria Cecília Lorea; Heck, Rita Maria

    2010-12-01

    This is an investigative case study with descriptive and participative character, based on an educational experience with the Simulation in Nursing learning trigger. It was carried out during the second semester of the first cycle of Faculdade de Enfermagem (FEN), Universidade Federal de Pelotas (UFPel). The aim is to study the recontextualization of pedagogic practice of simulation-based theories developed by Basil Bernstein, an education sociologist, and to contribute with the improvement process of education planning, and especially the evaluation of learning trigger. The research shows that Bernstein's theory is a powerful tool semiotic pedagogical of practices which contributes to the planning and analysis of curricular educational device. PMID:21805886

  11. Doctor of Nursing Practice Program DNP INTENSIVE

    E-print Network

    Bordenstein, Seth

    Application of Evidence-Based Practice I Rene Love, DNP, PMHNP-BC Donna McArthur, PhD, FNP-BC, FAANP Patti:00-5:00 Nancy Wells, DNSc, RN, FAAN N450: Integrative Application of Evidence- Based Practice IV Susie Adams, Ph/Session Event/Session 8:00-10:00 a.m. 1st Year: 140FH 2nd Year: 144FH N422: Evidence-Based Practice II

  12. Curriculum: From Theory to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Null, Wesley

    2011-01-01

    "Curriculum: From Theory to Practice" introduces readers to curriculum theory and how it relates to classroom practice. Wesley Null provides a unique organization of the curriculum field into five traditions: systematic, existential, radical, pragmatic, and deliberative. He discusses the philosophical foundations of curriculum as well as…

  13. Staff nurses creating safe passage with evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Dora; Dixon, John F

    2009-03-01

    Patient safety is one of the most critical issues for health care today. The escalating need to decrease preventable complications serves as a significant catalyst to identify and use evidence-based practice (EBP) at the bedside. Decreasing preventable complications requires a synergistic relationship between the nurses at the bedside and nursing leadership. This article presents an overview of the concepts and the specific structures and processes used at Baylor Health Care System to increase the use of EBP and improve patient safety. PMID:19167550

  14. The role of the clinical nurse specialist/neonatal nurse practitioner in a breastfeeding clinic: a model of advanced practice.

    PubMed

    Gibbins, S A; Green, P E; Scott, P A; MacDonell, J W

    2000-03-01

    A commitment to quality health care requires the development of innovative models of care. An example of such a model is the Clinical Nurse Specialist/Neonatal Nurse Practitioner in the role as consultant to Lactation Consultants in a large breastfeeding clinic. The role of the Clinical Nurse Specialist/Neonatal Nurse Practitioner in this ambulatory setting encompasses all the dimensions of the advanced practice model including research, leadership, education, and clinical practice. The evolution of this model of care is described. A conceptual framework of this advanced practice model is presented, supported by examples of the role in the clinic. PMID:11188448

  15. Virtual reality or real virtuality: the space of flows and nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Lynne; Rudge, Trudy

    2005-12-01

    The use of virtual environments for the provision of health-care is on the increase, and with each new development brings debates about their impact on care, nursing and nursing practice. Such environments offer opportunities for extending care and improvements in communication. Others believe these developments threaten aspects of nursing they hold sacrosanct. This paper explores the development of an assemblage of computer networks, databases, information systems, software programs and management systems that together work to manage health-care in Australia, namely casemix. We contend that spatial theories on network society show how this assemblage co-ordinates and operates to manage care. We discuss how this assemblage affects care and suggest that changes in organisation may be a part of the shift in how bodily organisation occurs more generally, but more specifically in health-care. We also suggest how nurses are enrolled in and by such networks, leading to transformation in nurses' practices. Finally, we argue that using spatial forms of analysis allows an interpretation of such assemblages that may account for their strengths and their shortcomings. PMID:16359457

  16. Thinking Like a Nurse and Perceived Readiness for Professional Practice: A Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowdoin, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Thinking like a nurse (TLN) has been identified as a core competency of professional nursing practice. The term embraces the full context of the daily metacognitive process nurses use to provide competent nursing care and was theorized in this study to have four attributes: critical thinking, clinical judgment, moral reasoning, and professional…

  17. Do calculation errors by nurses cause medication errors in clinical practice? A literature review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kerri Wright

    2010-01-01

    This review aims to examine the literature available to ascertain whether medication errors in clinical practice are the result of nurses’ miscalculating drug dosages. The research studies highlighting poor calculation skills of nurses and student nurses have been tested using written drug calculation tests in formal classroom settings [Kapborg, I., 1994. Calculation and administration of drug dosage by Swedish nurses,

  18. Including sexuality in your nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Shell, Judith A

    2007-12-01

    One would think that today's exposure of the topic of sexuality in the electronic and print media would elevate the medical professional's comfort level with communication regarding sexuality issues. However, writers continue to comment on clinician discomfort or lack of discussion with their patients about sexual concerns and anxieties. Many patients want to learn about the implications of their treatment and medications on their sexuality. Nurses who care for chronically ill patients may help foster a more positive self-esteem for the patient, and may influence patient-partner attitudes about worthiness, self-concept, and body image, by providing opportunities to talk about feelings and fears about how treatment may affect their sexuality. PMID:17996764

  19. How Do Dyslexic Nursing Students Cope with Clinical Practice Placements? The Impact of the Dyslexic Profile on the Clinical Practice of Dyslexic Nursing Students: Pedagogical Issues and Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Geraldine A.; Gale, Anne

    2006-01-01

    The safety of dyslexic nurses, and whether they are a danger to their patients, has been widely discussed. This empirical study sought to discover the impact of the dyslexic profile on clinical practice for nursing students. Two focus groups of third-year nursing students in higher education were set up: a control group and a dyslexic group. The…

  20. Constructing nurses' professional identity through social identity theory.

    PubMed

    Willetts, Georgina; Clarke, David

    2014-04-01

    The profession of nursing continues to struggle with defining and clarifying its professional identity. The definitive recognition of nursing as a profession was the moving of training from the hospital apprentice model to the tertiary sector. However, this is only part of the story of professional identity in nursing. Once training finishes and enculturation into the workplace commences, professional identity becomes a complicated social activity. This paper proposes social identity theory as a valuable research framework to assist with clarifying and describing the professional identity of nurses. The paper outlines the key elements of a profession and then goes on to describe the main concepts of social identity theory. Lastly, a connection is made between the usefulness of using social identity theory in researching professional identity in nursing, recognizing the contextual nature of the social activity of the profession within its workplace environment. PMID:24713013

  1. Welfare advice in general practice: a resource for community nurses.

    PubMed

    Greasley, Peter

    2005-08-01

    Recent policy guidance has recommended that community nurses address public health issues, suggesting that they play a role in assessing and addressing poverty, and ensuring patients claim the welfare benefits to which they are entitled. This article reports an evaluation of a welfare advice service catering for 30 general practices in inner-city Bradford. Community nurses, along with other members of the primary care team, were able to refer patients for advice about welfare issues, including benefits, housing, debt etc. A retrospective study was conducted of all patients referred for advice during 24 months of the project. The advice workers saw 2484 patients, dealt with over 4000 welfare advice issues, and raised over pounds 2 million in welfare benefit claims for patients, primarily through disability-related benefits. The contribution of community nurses is examined in terms of referrals and outcomes for patients. PMID:16116396

  2. Accessing best practice resources using mobile technology in an undergraduate nursing program: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Mann, Elizabeth G; Medves, Jennifer; Vandenkerkhof, Elizabeth G

    2015-03-01

    Mobile technology presents new opportunities for nursing education and ultimately the provision of nursing care. The aim of this study was to explore the utility of mobile technology in undergraduate nursing education. In this evaluation study, undergraduate nursing students were provided with iPod Touch devices containing best practice guidelines. Computer self-efficacy was assessed, and the Theory of Planned Behavior was used to identify potential predictors of the use of mobile technology. Questionnaires were completed at baseline (n = 33) and postimplementation (n = 23). Feedback on feasibility issues was recorded throughout the study period. Students generally found the devices useful, and few technical problems were identified; however, lack of skill in using the devices and lack of support from staff in the clinical setting were commonly identified issues. Self-efficacy scores were high throughout the study. Attitudes, perceptions of the desirability of use, perceived personal control over use, and intentions of using the device were lower postimplementation than at baseline. Attitude toward the technology predicted intention to use the device after graduation. Mobile technology may promote evidence-informed practice; however, supporting students' acquisition of related skills may optimize use. Successful integration of mobile technology into practice requires attention to factors that affect student attitudes. PMID:25636042

  3. A better way to do this? Views of mental health nursing directors about preparation for mental health nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Happell, Brenda

    2015-04-01

    Objective Nursing directors in mental health services hold important leadership positions that include responsibility for the nursing workforce. The comprehensive or generalist approach to undergraduate nursing education consistently poses significant recruitment problems. Specialisation in mental health within Bachelor of Nursing programs has been suggested as a potential solution. This paper presents the views and opinions of mental health nursing directors regarding undergraduate specialisation. Methods A qualitative exploratory study was undertaken. Thirteen nursing directors from Queensland Mental Health Services participated in an in-depth telephone interview. The data were analysed thematically. Results Nursing directors were very supportive of specialisation in mental health at the undergraduate level. Thematic analysis revealed four main themes: perceived advantages of the specialist stream; knowledge and experience; increased recruitment; and commitment. Conclusions Nursing directors are important stakeholders in educational preparation for practice in mental health settings. The research participants described many potential benefits to undergraduate specialisation. Their voice provides an important contribution to this issue. What is known about the topic? The current model of nurse education in Australia aims to prepare graduates for practice in a broad range of healthcare settings with specialisation occurring at the postgraduate level. Mental health nursing is identified as one of the least popular career options for nursing graduates, and mental health services struggle to recruit sufficient graduates for their nursing workforce; this is attributed, at least in part, to the current model of education. What does this paper add? This paper gives voice to the perspectives of nursing directors from the mental health service delivery sector about the educational preparation for nursing practice in mental health. Nursing directors support the introduction of specialist preparation in mental health nursing at the undergraduate level. A more skilled and committed workforce is seen as contributing to addressing current recruitment problems. What are the implications for practitioners? The educational preparation for nursing graduates for mental health practice impacts significantly on nursing leaders, and their perspective is essential in addressing the debate. Mental health nursing directors need to be formally recognised as key stakeholders in the preparation of nursing graduates. PMID:25514568

  4. Supporting student nurses in practice with additional online communication tools.

    PubMed

    Morley, Dawn A

    2014-01-01

    Student nurses' potential isolation and difficulties of learning on placement have been well documented and, despite attempts to make placement learning more effective, evidence indicates the continuing schism between formal learning at university and situated learning on placement. First year student nurses, entering placement for the first time, are particularly vulnerable to the vagaries of practice. During 2012 two first year student nurse seminar groups (52 students) were voluntarily recruited for a mixed method study to determine the usage of additional online communication support mechanisms (Facebook, wiki, an email group and traditional methods of support using individual email or phone) while undertaking their first five week clinical placement. The study explores the possibility of strengthening clinical learning and support by promoting the use of Web 2.0 support groups for student nurses. Results indicate a high level of interactivity in both peer and academic support in the use of Facebook and a high level of interactivity in one wiki group. Students' qualitative comments voice an appreciation of being able to access university and peer support whilst working individually on placement. Recommendations from the study challenge universities to use online communication tools already familiar to students to complement the support mechanisms that exist for practice learning. This is tempered by recognition of the responsibility of academics to ensure their students are aware of safe and effective online communication. PMID:23871299

  5. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Emergency Contraception on Nursing Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Shanthini N, Fatima

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Emergency Contraception is a grossly underu–tilized option of prevention of pregnancy. It is a safe and effective method which can prevent unintended pregnancies, unsafe abortions and unwanted childbirth. Knowledge and attitude of Nursing personnel who are both service providers and health educators to the community can influence the contraceptive behavior of the people exposed to them. A few studies done in our country indicate that their awareness regarding EC is low. Aim: To explore the knowledge, attitude and practice of EC amongst Nursing Personnel in a medical college hospital. Materials and Methods: In this study, 185 nursing personnel participated. A predesigned, pretested questionnaire was used to collect their responses regarding knowledge, attitude and practice of EC. Descriptive analysis of data was done. Results : Out of the total, 52.43% of the participants had good knowledge regarding the general information of EC, 51.35% had positive attitude towards EC, 47.56% had expressed willingness to use EC if indicated whereas only 22.7% had ever used EC. 72.97% had expressed willingness to attend awareness programmes on EC. Conclusion :Even though knowledge and attitude towards EC among the participants was marginally good they had many misconceptions regarding specific aspects like mode of action, indications and timing of administration. More awareness programmes would definitely clear their misconceptions and apprehensions and encourage Nursing Personnel to personally use and promote EC to others. PMID:25386489

  6. Using career nurse mentors to support minority nursing students and facilitate their transition to practice.

    PubMed

    Banister, Gaurdia; Bowen-Brady, Helene M; Winfrey, Marion E

    2014-01-01

    The Clinical Leadership Collaborative for Diversity in Nursing was developed through an academe-service partnership focused on supporting minority nursing students and facilitating transition to practice. A key program element is mentoring. Students are paired with an experienced, minority clinical nurse or nurse leader from one of the partnering agencies, who helps guide the student throughout the junior and senior year of school and first year of employment. The mentoring component was evaluated through surveys in which mentors and mentees rated one another and offered open-ended comments on the program's impact. Aspects of mentees rated highest by mentors include manner (courteous and professional), ability to communicate and get along with others, preparation for meetings, and fully utilizing their time with mentors. Aspects of mentors rated highest by mentees include warmth, encouragement, and willingness to listen; enthusiasm for nursing and how they sparked the mentee's interest; and clarity regarding expectations for mentees and how they pushed mentees to achieve high standards. In the open-ended comments, mentees consistently identified mentoring as the program's strongest component. Sixty-four minority students have participated to date with a zero rate of attrition and very low job turnover among graduates. PMID:25150417

  7. A nursing brief: emerging best practice in Department of Children and Families nursing.

    PubMed

    Kiwanuka, Anne; Boyar, Valerie; Jensen, Monica

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, more than 400,000 children in the United States were in the child welfare system because of abuse or neglect. These children are uniquely vulnerable and present multiple health challenges to child welfare and health professionals. According to the most recent Child and Family Services Reviews (CFSR) from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Administration for Children and Families' Children's Bureau (2010), none of the 50 states, Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia were "in substantial conformity" in meeting the well-being outcome for the physical and mental health needs of the children in their care. To address this deficiency, Connecticut nurses caring for children involved with Department of Children and Families (DCF) collaborated to establish nursing standards of practice leading to improved health services for children in care and a mechanism to readily transfer health information. Post-implementation evaluation revealed improved quality of care and the availability of enhanced health information. These endeavors have led to the recognition that nurses working in DCF venues are members of an emerging professional nursing specialty: "nursing in child welfare." PMID:23540103

  8. Nursing Faculty Decision Making about Best Practices in Test Construction, Item Analysis, and Revision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killingsworth, Erin Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    With the widespread use of classroom exams in nursing education there is a great need for research on current practices in nursing education regarding this form of assessment. The purpose of this study was to explore how nursing faculty members make decisions about using best practices in classroom test construction, item analysis, and revision in…

  9. Career Mobility: Implementing the Ladder Concept in Associate Degree and Practical Nursing Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Story, Donna Ketchum

    Designing a career ladder curriculum is not simply taking an existing practical nurse curriculum and an associate degree nursing curriculum and placing one after the other. The curriculum is designed to produce students who are competent practitioners as practical nurses at the end of the first level and then allow them to continue for an…

  10. Incorporating Political Socialization Theory into Baccalaureate Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Sandra Godman

    1996-01-01

    Nurses must incorporate a political component into their professional role identity to meet the future challenges of the health care system. Political socialization theory can assist faculty in adding a political thread to the curriculum. (SK)

  11. Assertiveness process of Iranian nurse leaders: a grounded theory study.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudirad, Gholamhossein; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Vanaki, Zohreh; Hajizadeh, Ebrahim

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the assertiveness process in Iranian nursing leaders. A qualitative design based on the grounded theory approach was used to collect and analyze the assertiveness experiences of 12 nurse managers working in four hospitals in Iran. Purposeful and theoretical sampling methods were employed for the data collection and selection of the participants, and semistructured interviews were held. During the data analysis, 17 categories emerged and these were categorized into three themes: "task generation", "assertiveness behavior", and "executive agents". From the participants' experiences, assertiveness theory emerged as being fundamental to the development of a schematic model describing nursing leadership behaviors. From another aspect, religious beliefs also played a fundamental role in Iranian nursing leadership assertiveness. It was concluded that bringing a change in the current support from top managers and improving self-learning are required in order to enhance the assertiveness of the nursing leaders in Iran. PMID:19519697

  12. Writing an employer-focused resume for advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Welton, Robert H

    2013-01-01

    The most important new trend in resumes is the employer-focused resume. Writing one is not difficult, but it requires a change in focus. The focus of this type of resume is on the needs of prospective employers. This new resume format allows applicants to describe to prospective employers what they can provide related to the employer's needs as opposed to a simple listing of their academic and work experiences without relation to the prospective new job. This article provides advanced practice nurses with sources to guide construction of informative text about their advanced practice nursing skills and competencies using language familiar to employers. Resumes and curriculum vitae formats are compared, and advice is provided on developing content for either format. Guidelines are provided about listing credentials, identifying clinical proficiencies from student clinical practicum, using qualification summaries rather than an objective statement, choosing references, and including essential components in a cover letter. PMID:23615018

  13. National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice Report to the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services on the Basic Registered Nurse Workforce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice, Rockville, MD.

    The National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice (NACNEP) initiated an examination of basic registered nurse workforce issues in December 1994. NACNEP took into account the environment in which registered nurses (RNs) would practice, the appropriate educational qualifications needed, and the status of the registered nurse population…

  14. Negotiation Theory & Practice Michael Alvarez

    E-print Network

    Puglisi, Joseph

    · Communication Key!! (95%) non-verbal, temporal, thoughtful, attentive listening · Commitment (giveNegotiation Theory & Practice Michael Alvarez Stanford School of Medicine Career Center Julie reserved February 16, 2006 #12;Definition American Heritage Dictionary · Negotiation (v.) To confer

  15. Clinical Protocol Page 1 of 3 Clinical Manual Nursing Practice Manual

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Clinical Protocol Page 1 of 3 Clinical Manual ­ Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROTOCOL FOR: Delirium ­ Care, aneurysm, dementia) h. Acute psychiatric disorders, particularly depression, and other affective disorders

  16. Development of the Massachusetts School Nurse Research Network (MASNRN): A Practice-Based Research Network to Improve the Quality of School Nursing Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vessey, Judith A.

    2007-01-01

    When school nurses embrace evidence-based practice (EBP), higher-quality care is provided to students, their families, and the larger community. Despite this, school nursing has been slow to embrace EBP. Practice-Based Research Networks (PBRNs), which capitalize on the combined strengths of clinicians and researchers to study clinical questions,…

  17. MOTHER AND INFANT CARE, PRACTICAL NURSE TRAINING PROGRAM, LESSON PLANS, PREPARED BY PRACTICAL NURSING INSTRUCTORS DURING CONFERENCE (UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE, AUGUST 14-18, 1961).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee State Board for Vocational Education, Murfreesboro. Vocational Curriculum Lab.

    PRACTICAL NURSE INSTRUCTORS, IN CONFERENCE, COMPILED THIS INDIVIDUALLY PLANNED AND TESTED MATERIAL TO BE USED IN PRACTICAL NURSE EDUCATION. THIRTY-TWO LESSON PLANS ON THE SUBJECT OF MOTHER AND INFANT CARE COVER TOPICS RANGING FROM THE REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEM TO COMPLICATIONS INVOLVING THE NEWBORN. EACH PLAN INCLUDES AIM, REFERENCES, MATERIALS,…

  18. Best Practice at Your Fingertips: The WISHeS School Nurse Procedure Website.

    PubMed

    DuChateau, Teresa A; Beversdorf, Sarah; Wolff, Marie

    2015-05-01

    School nurses are responsible for providing and supervising school nursing services for children with complex health concerns. Given that school nurses frequently practice in isolation and may have limited access to clinical practice changes, they can benefit from up-to-date, evidence-based resources. Additionally, the resources must account for the fact that the nursing procedures will be performed in the unique setting of a school building and, in many cases, will be performed by school personnel who have limited formal education in health care. This article provides an overview of a newly developed, easy to use, online school nursing procedures website for school nurses and other school personnel. PMID:25816427

  19. A study of quality management practices in nursing in universities in Australia.

    PubMed

    Cruickshank, Mary

    2003-01-01

    In Australia, the traditional Quality Assurance approach used in the hospital setting has played an important role in nursing practice. During the past decade, nurses have begun making a paradigm shift from Quality Assurance to Total Quality Management but scant attention has been paid to quality management practices in nursing in the higher education sector. This paper reports on a quantitative study examining the perceptions of nurse academics to the applicability of TQM to nursing in universities. The findings identified how TQM could be applied to suit the nursing culture in the higher education sector. PMID:15485391

  20. Unlocking reflective practice for nurses: innovations in working with master of nursing students in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Joyce-McCoach, Joanne T; Parrish, Dominique R; Andersen, Patrea R; Wall, Natalie

    2013-09-01

    Being reflective is well established as an important conduit of practice development, a desirable tertiary graduate quality and a core competency of health professional membership. By assisting students to be more effective in their ability to reflect, they are better able to formulate strategies to manage issues experienced within a professional context, which ultimately assists them to be better service providers. However, some students are challenged by the practice of reflection and these challenges are even more notable for international students. This paper presents a teaching initiative that focused specifically on enhancing the capacity of an international cohort of nursing students, to engage in reflective practice. The initiative centered on an evaluation of a reflective practice core subject, which was taught in a Master of Nursing programme delivered in Hong Kong. A learning-centered framework was used to evaluate the subject and identify innovative strategies that would better assist international students to develop reflective practices. The outcomes of curriculum and teaching analysis and proposed changes and innovations in teaching practice to support international students are presented and discussed. PMID:23232086

  1. Simulation Methodology in Nursing Education and Adult Learning Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutherford-Hemming, Tonya

    2012-01-01

    Simulation is often used in nursing education as a teaching methodology. Simulation is rooted in adult learning theory. Three learning theories, cognitive, social, and constructivist, explain how learners gain knowledge with simulation experiences. This article takes an in-depth look at each of these three theories as each relates to simulation.…

  2. Implementing evidence-based nursing practice: a tale of two intrapartum nursing units.

    PubMed

    Angus, Jan; Hodnett, Ellen; O'Brien-Pallas, Linda

    2003-12-01

    Despite concerns that the rise of evidence-based practice threatens to transform nursing practice into a performative exercise disciplined by scientific knowledge, others have found that scientific knowledge is by no means the preeminent source of knowledge within the dynamic settings of health-care. We argue that the contexts within which evidence-based innovations are implemented are as influential in the outcomes as the individual practitioners who attempt these changes. A focused ethnography was done in follow-up to an earlier trial that evaluated the effectiveness of a marketing strategy to encourage the adoption of evidence-based intrapartum nursing practice. Bourdieu's (1990, 1991) concepts of habitus, capital and social field were used in our refinement of the analysis of the ethnographic findings. Nursing leadership, interprofessional struggle with physicians, the characteristics of the community and the physical environment were prominent issues at all of the sites. Detailed descriptions of the sociohistorical context and of the experiences at two sites are presented to illustrate the complexities encountered when implementing innovations. PMID:14622368

  3. NETWORK SCIENCE Theory and Practice

    E-print Network

    Chen, Guanrong "Ron"

    NETWORK SCIENCE Theory and Practice TED G. LEWIS Professor of Computer Science Naval Postgraduate of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data: Lewis, T. G. (Theodore Gyle), 1941- Network science : theory Bristor, Ryan "Buying networks" ¼ application of network science to model economic system 1990 Guare

  4. Assessment of advanced practice palliative care nursing competencies in nurse practitioner students: implications for the integration of ELNEC curricular modules

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joyce Shea; Sheila Grossman; Meredith Wallace Kazer; Jean Lange

    2010-01-01

    Advanced practice nurses (APRNs) have key roles in the care of patients who are nearing death and those living with a disabling chronic disease. This article describes a mixed-method formative assessment of 36 graduate nursing students' knowledge about and attitudes toward palliative care preliminary to curricular integration of the End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC) graduate core modules. Students' knowledge about

  5. Perioperative Nursing Leaders Implement Clinical Practice Guidelines Using the Iowa Model of Evidence-Based Practice.

    PubMed

    White, Shawna; Spruce, Lisa

    2015-07-01

    Many health care organizations, nursing leaders, and individual clinicians are not providing care consistently based on evidence and many are not aware of the evidence that is available. Preventable complications have an adverse effect on hospital reimbursement and the burden is placed on hospital personnel and nursing leaders to use current evidence to improve care and prevent complications, such as surgical site infections. Using AORN resources, leadership involvement and ownership, and implementing a theoretical model will contribute to implementing daily evidence-based practice and help to decrease the chasm between research and practice. PMID:26119609

  6. Influences on and outcomes of enacted scope of nursing practice: a new model.

    PubMed

    Déry, Johanne; D?Amour, Danielle; Blais, Régis; Clarke, Sean P

    2015-01-01

    Enacted scope of practice is a major issue for nursing administrators, given the potentially negative effect on accessibility, continuity, safety and quality of care, job satisfaction, and organizational costs of nurses working at reduced scope. Optimal deployment of nurses to a fuller enacted scope of nursing practice holds much promise for addressing all of these larger challenges. In this sense, new model of the Enacted Scope of Nursing Practice presented in this article provides a number of directions for interventions that could improve health system functioning. PMID:25932820

  7. A Case Study of Factors Leading to Student Success in an Accelerated Licensed Practical Nurse to Associate Degree Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sherry T.

    2012-01-01

    This case study attempted to discover and comprehend the relationship of students and contributing factors of success, of one Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) to Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) program, to formulate an understanding of which contributing factors are most beneficial to enable students to persist to graduation and/or successfully…

  8. [Education and health regarding citizenship: a nurses' group practice].

    PubMed

    de Lima, C B; Baptista, S de S

    1997-01-01

    This study was run in a community committee of Nossa Senhora da Aparecida, a surrounding city of Joao Pessoa, Paraiba. It aimed at characterizing nursing practice there and discussing its occurrence. The analysis was run based on eight inhabitants and four nurses speeches through semistructured interviews whose data were collected qualitatively. It focused on the discussion which evolved from questions regarding to education and health from the perspective of exercising citizenship. In the participants of the study representations, education seemed dynamic and implied awareness ... a question of life. Health is comprehended under 3 points of view: the one of welfare, the one of suffering and the one of biological balance. The perspective of citizenship exercise reveals itself sometimes as conformism, through silence or resignation and sometimes as resistance, through the ideal manifestation and courage for fighting for better life condition. PMID:10765333

  9. Coaching to promote professional development in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Narayanasamy, Aru; Penney, Vivian

    This article presents coaching, which facilitates the highest form of learning, as a potential strategy for promoting professional development in nursing. In doing so, it sets out what coaching is and highlights its benefits in terms of team building, adaptation to changes, career planning and professional development. Having established the rudiments of coaching and identifying its qualities, the article then sets out strategies of coaching using three models: the 3-D Technique Model, The Practice Spiral Model and The Grow Model. Three case histories are presented to explain how these models could be used to implement coaching and personal learning plans (PLP). Directions are provided where training for coaching is available. It is concluded that coaching can be a powerful tool in enhancing nurses' and other health professionals' ability to contribute to the success of healthcare organisations. PMID:24933546

  10. Prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms in hospital nurse technicians and licensed practical nurses: associations with demographic factors

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Roberta F. C.; Sato, Tatiana O.; Foltran, Fabiana A.; Silva, Luciana C. C. B.; Coury, Helenice J. C. G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective : This cross-sectional study aimed at analyzing: 1. the main musculoskeletal symptoms (MSS) presented by hospital nursing workers and; 2. personal, occupational, and health factors related to MSS among them. Method : Two questionnaires were filled in by 245 nurse technicians (NTs) and licensed practical nurses (LPNs) (response rate 95%) associated with direct patient care sectors from a hospital. These questionnaires were: the standardized version of the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) and one including questions on 15 demographic independent variables potentially related to outcomes from the NMQ. Univariate analyses and binary logistic regression analyses were performed to identify which variables would explain the occurrence of MSS in different body regions. Results: The low back (57%), shoulder (52%), and neck (48%) were identified as the most affected regions. The logistic regression analysis showed that low back symptoms in the last 12 months were significantly associated with LPN activities (OR=2.36; CI=1.24-4.5) and previous sick leave due to MSS (OR=5.97; CI=1.2-29.1). Smoking was significantly associated with symptoms in the low back (OR=2.77; CI=1.13-6.8) and thoracic spine (OR=2.37; CI=1.04-5.40). Physical exercise showed a protective effect on the cervical spine (OR=0.42; CI=0.23-0.77). Previous sick leave was significantly associated with pain in the knees (OR=4.24; CI=1.33-13.5) and in the upper limbs (OR=5.36; CI=1.07-26.7). Conclusions: The nursing workers who were evaluated presented a high prevalence of MSS. Previous history of sick leave was strongly associated with the presence of symptoms in various body regions. These results indicate the need for preventive programs in the hospital environment in order to control more severe MSS in nursing professionals. PMID:25054385

  11. The Theory Into Practice Database

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Theory Into Practice (TIP) database contains summarized descriptions of 50 educational theories related to human learning and instruction. It was compiled by Dr. Greg Kearsley, and independent consultant specializing in online education who has a PhD in educational psychology. For each instructional theory, Kearsley provides a brief overview, explains its scope and application, outlines its principles, offers a theoretical example, and lists references. In addition, some of the overviews include Quicktime video clips of Dr. Kearsley or others lecturing on specific theories. The TIP database is accessible via three indices: an alphabetic index, a learning domain index, and a learning concepts index.

  12. The seven principles of good practice: applications for online education in nursing.

    PubMed

    Koeckeritz, Jane; Malkiewicz, Judy; Henderson, Ann

    2002-01-01

    Traditional education has been studied over time for the purpose of documenting what constitutes good practice in teaching. Online education in nursing is still relatively new and has not endured the same scrutiny as classroom education. The authors discuss how Chickering and Gamson's Seven Principles of Good Practice for Undergraduate Education apply to online nursing education and provide practical examples of how the principles can be implemented in Web-based nursing courses. PMID:12464770

  13. The motivation to care : Application and extension of motivation theory to professional nursing work

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roseanne C. Moody; Daniel J. Pesut

    2006-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this research is to describe a model of nurses' work motivation relevant to the human caring stance of professional nursing work. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The model was derived from selected theories of behavioral motivation and work motivation. Evidence-based theory addressing nurses' work motivation and nurses' motivational states and traits in relation to characteristics of organizational culture

  14. [Centennial retrospective on the evolution and development of the nursing practice environment in Taiwan].

    PubMed

    Lin, Shou-Ju; Huang, Lain-Hua

    2014-08-01

    The practice environment for nurses has seen tremendous change over the past century due to the dedication and trailblazing work of nursing pioneers. This article describes how the nursing practice environment in Taiwan has evolved over this period. References used include nursing narratives, hospital accreditation standards, standard operating procedures, workplace safety standards, and worksite-related values and expectations. The efforts of the professional nursing community to realize a positive practice environment are further discussed. Over this century of change, the only thing that has remained unchanged is the commitment of nurses to "treat patients as one's own family". In the current as well as the previous periods of manpower shortages in nursing, the nursing community has managed to turn crisis into opportunity by using the situation to enhance pay and benefits. Nursing professionalism is widely respected and recognized throughout Taiwan society. The rapidly changing needs of the 21st century in aspects such as the advancement of high technology, the rapid growth of the elderly population, and the fast rate of social change seriously impact the development of the nursing profession. How to effectively apply high technology, simplify workflows, provide high quality and humanistic nursing care, build safe and quality workplaces, attract bright nursing students, and provide healthcare for the entire population will remain the responsibilities of nursing for generations to come. PMID:25125157

  15. Providing Assistance to the Victims of Adolescent Dating Violence: A National Assessment of School Nurses' Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khubchandani, Jagdish; Telljohann, Susan K.; Price, James H.; Dake, Joseph A.; Hendershot, Candace

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study assessed the perceptions and practices of school nurses regarding adolescent dating violence (ADV). Methods: The membership list of the National Association of School Nurses was used to identify a national random cross-sectional sample of high school nurses in the United States (N?=?750). A valid and reliable survey…

  16. The therapeutic role of the mental health nurse: implications for the practice of psychological therapies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jacklin Elisabet Monica Fisher

    2011-01-01

    This research project identifies therapeutic roles that nurses and consumers believe are most helpful in the nursing care of people with serious and ongoing mental illness, including identifying the knowledge concerning, attitudes towards and usage of evidence-based psychological therapies in mental health nursing practice. A critical realist perspective utilising a mixed-methods‘ approach was chosen in this study. Two Delphi studies

  17. Addressing Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome in Advanced Practice Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nokes, Kathleen M.; Stein, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    A survey of 23 advanced practice nursing programs showed only 3 had HIV-specific graduate-level nursing courses. Recommendations were made for HIV-specific courses, integration of HIV content into other courses, use of Centers for Disease Control and Occupational Safety and Health Administration guidelines, and subspecialties in HIV nursing. (SK)

  18. Public Health Nurses' Primary Health Care Practice: Strategies for Fostering Citizen Participation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Megan Aston; Donna Meagher-Stewart; Nancy Edwards; Linda M. Young

    2009-01-01

    Citizen participation is heralded as a critical element of community health programs that emphasize empowerment and health promotion strategies. Although there is a growing body of research on public health nurses' primary health care practice, few studies have described how public health nurses foster citizen participation. This article presents findings from an interpretive qualitative study of public health nurses' perceptions

  19. Most Likely to Achieve: Predicting Early Success of the Practical Nurse Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cline, April P.

    2013-01-01

    It is important that practical nurse (PN) educators be able to identify which students are likely to be successful in their programs. However, the majority of literature related to predicting success of nursing students has been done on baccalaureate nursing students in the university setting. This study sought to determine whether the same…

  20. Succession planning for the future through an academic-practice partnership: a nursing administration master's program for emerging nurse leaders.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Rose; Dyess, Susan; Hannah, Ed; Prestia, Angela

    2013-01-01

    A global nursing leadership shortage is projected by the end of this decade. There is an urgent need to begin developing emerging nurse leaders now. This article describes the work of an academic-practice partnership collaborative of nurse leaders. The goal of the partnership is to develop and promote an innovative enhanced nursing administration master's program targeted to young emerging nurse leaders, who have not yet moved into formal leadership roles. An action research design is being used in program development and evaluation. Qualities needed by emerging leaders identified through research included a need to be politically astute, competency with business skills required of nurse leaders today, comfort with ambiguity, use of a caring approach, and leadership from a posture of innovation. The current curriculum was revised to include clinical immersion with a nurse leader from the first semester in the program, a change from all online to online/hybrid courses, innovative assignments, and a strong mentorship component. Eighteen young emerging nurse leaders began the program in January 2012. Early outcomes are positive. The emerging nurse leaders may be uniquely positioned, given the right skills sets, to be nurse leaders in the new age. PMID:23222750

  1. Tidewater Regional Model for Articulation and Coordination of Nursing Education. Task Analyses Guides for Licensed Practical Nurses Pursuing an Associate Degree in Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norfolk Public Schools, VA.

    This instructional guide includes the curriculum for two complete and separate courses to be taught at the associate degree level. The first six units of the guide are the course content for a 2-3 semester hour course, "Transition from Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) to Associate Degree Nursing (ADN)." The entire content of the guide, 19 units in…

  2. Australian Nurse Practitioner Practice: Value Adding through Clinical Reflexivity

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Michelle; Murfet, Giuliana

    2015-01-01

    The role of the Australian Nurse Practitioner (NP) is in its infancy and at a crossroads where extensive research demonstrates effective quality care and yet the role remains underrecognised and underutilised. The translation of practice into “value” is critical for the sustainability of NP roles and requires the practitioner to adopt a systematic method of inquiry. Kim's (1999) “Critical Reflective Inquiry” (CRI) method was adapted by two Australian NPs who specialise in diabetes and chronic disease management. Kim highlights the intent of CRI as understanding the meaning of practice, delivering improvements to practice through self-reflection, and the critique of practice that can lead to practice changes and development of new models of care translated to “products” of value. Based on the thematically analysis of 3 years of CRI application, the authors formed 5 headings that represented the NP's practice as Specialised Care Access, Complications and Diagnostics Interventions, Pharmaceutical Treatment, Vulnerable Populations, and Leadership. The utility of CRI demonstrates how NP practice is integral to a continuous cycle of addressing health care services gaps, and the conversion of “products” into “value” and positions the NP to assimilate the role of the practitioner-researcher. PMID:25705517

  3. Australian Nurse Practitioner Practice: Value Adding through Clinical Reflexivity.

    PubMed

    Woods, Michelle; Murfet, Giuliana

    2015-01-01

    The role of the Australian Nurse Practitioner (NP) is in its infancy and at a crossroads where extensive research demonstrates effective quality care and yet the role remains underrecognised and underutilised. The translation of practice into "value" is critical for the sustainability of NP roles and requires the practitioner to adopt a systematic method of inquiry. Kim's (1999) "Critical Reflective Inquiry" (CRI) method was adapted by two Australian NPs who specialise in diabetes and chronic disease management. Kim highlights the intent of CRI as understanding the meaning of practice, delivering improvements to practice through self-reflection, and the critique of practice that can lead to practice changes and development of new models of care translated to "products" of value. Based on the thematically analysis of 3 years of CRI application, the authors formed 5 headings that represented the NP's practice as Specialised Care Access, Complications and Diagnostics Interventions, Pharmaceutical Treatment, Vulnerable Populations, and Leadership. The utility of CRI demonstrates how NP practice is integral to a continuous cycle of addressing health care services gaps, and the conversion of "products" into "value" and positions the NP to assimilate the role of the practitioner-researcher. PMID:25705517

  4. Transcending life: the practice wisdom of nursing hospice experts.

    PubMed

    Zerwekh, J

    1993-01-01

    In philosophy and theology, to transcend is to go beyond the limits of lived human experience. Hospice workers accompany people who are traveling beyond the limits. "Whoever would be a companion to the dying, therefore, must enter into their darkness, go with them at least part way along their lonely and frightening road." This paper explores the requisite hospice practice competencies of caring spiritually and guiding letting go, as identified in a qualitative analysis of the practice stories of 32 hospice nurse experts working with people nearing death. Spirituality has been described as the essence of personhood, the longing for meaning in existence, experience of God, experience of ultimate values, and trust in the transcendent. Its ultimate end is union or connection with a reality more enduring than the individual self. In contrast, spiritual distress is manifested as alienation and disconnection. The reality of the dying process involves a progressive series of disconnections from life, which requires the process of letting go. Thus, transcending life involves both the need to detach and separate from life as it has been lived. One home visiting hospice nurse has described dying as a spiritual process of both reflecting and detaching. Nagai-Jacobsen and Burkhardt identify three goals of caring spiritually: Fostering personal integrity; Promoting interpersonal connection; Supporting personal search for meaning. O'Connor describes hospice spiritual care promoted through the practice of presence, compassion, hopefulness, and the affirmation of life as fruitful. Stiles has completed the only published qualitative description of hospice nursing as spiritual care.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8398473

  5. Growing practice specialists in mental health: addressing stigma and recruitment with a nursing residency program.

    PubMed

    Ng, San; Kessler, Linda; Srivastava, Rani; Dusek, Janice; Duncan, Deborah; Tansey, Margaret; Jeffs, Lianne

    2010-05-01

    Despite the growing prevalence and healthcare needs of people living with mental illness, the stigma associated with mental health nursing continues to present challenges to recruiting new nurses to this sector. As a key recruitment strategy, five mental health hospitals and three educational institutions collaborated to develop and pilot an innovative nursing residency program. The purpose of the Mental Health Nursing Residency Program was to dispel myths associated with practising in the sector by promoting mental health as a vibrant specialty and offering a unique opportunity to gain specialized competencies. The program curriculum combines protected clinical time, collaborative learning and mentored clinical practice. Evaluation results show significant benefits to clinical practice and an improved ability to recruit and retain nurses. Nursing leadership was crucial at multiple levels for success. In this paper, we describe our journey in designing and implementing a nursing residency program for other nurse leaders interested in providing a similar program to build on our experience. PMID:20463449

  6. Managed care challenges and opportunities for cardiovascular advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Urban, N

    1997-02-01

    The aggressive changes in the health-care system are mandating revolutionary new approaches in patient-care delivery. Cardiovascular care, in particular, is under scrutiny due to its high cost and wide variation in outcome. The need to comprehensively coordinate cardiac surgical care and aggressively manage complex cases has resulted in growing interest in using cardiovascular advanced practice nurses (APNs) to ensure high-quality, yet cost-effective patient care. The unique skills of the cardiovascular APN as practitioner, consultant, educator, researcher, and change agent ensure optimal outcomes for patients and their families as well the staff, physicians, and the hospital's bottom line. PMID:9086921

  7. Policy implications for optimizing advanced practice registered nurse use nationally.

    PubMed

    Newhouse, Robin P; Weiner, Jonathan P; Stanik-Hutt, Julie; White, Kathleen M; Johantgen, Meg; Steinwachs, Don; Zangaro, George; Aldebron, Jillian; Bass, Eric B

    2012-05-01

    This article examines the potential benefits of enhanced use of advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) given health care workforce projections that predict an inadequate supply of certain types of providers. The conclusions of a systematic review comparing the effectiveness of care provided by APRNs with that of physicians alone or teams without APRNs indicate the viability of this approach. Allowing APRNs to assume roles that take full advantage of their educational preparation could mitigate the shortage of primary care physicians and improve care processes. The development of health care policy should be guided by patient-centric evidence rather than how care has been delivered in the past. PMID:22941772

  8. Predictability of a Professional Practice Model to Affect Nurse and Patient Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Stallings-Welden, Lois M; Shirey, Maria R

    2015-01-01

    Thousands of patients experience needless deaths and injuries as a result of errors while hospitalized for an unrelated problem. The lack of an established professional practice model (PPM) of nursing may be a contributing factor to patient care quality and safety breaches. The PPM of nursing was tested for its ability to affect nurse and patient outcomes. Using a retrospective/prospective research design, secondary data were collected from 2395 staff nurses on 15 inpatient-nursing units covering a 6-year timeframe. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and the Pearson correlation. Nurse and patient outcomes on 2 hospital campuses reached statistical significance. Positive correlations were seen between the initiation of a PPM and subsequent nurses' perception of quality of care, nurse interactions, decision making, autonomy, job enjoyment, and patient satisfaction. This study provides empirical evidence that a uniquely designed PPM in alignment with organizational context can indeed impact nurse and patient outcomes in a community health system. PMID:26049597

  9. Enhancing Trifocal Leadership Practices Using Simulation in a Pediatric Charge Nurse Orientation Program.

    PubMed

    Clark, Teresa J; Yoder-Wise, Patricia S

    2015-07-01

    A well-established charge nurse orientation program was enhanced with the addition of a simulation, addressing three primary populations (the trifocus) with whom charge nurses interact: patients, patients' parents, and other staff members. In this pilot quality improvement project, 20 staff nurses enrolled in the orientation program and were assigned a mentor. Only one participant used the mentorship opportunity; therefore, it is not discussed here. Twelve nurses completed all charge nurse classes and a simulation scenario of caring for a deteriorating infant. The nurses were given an opportunity to reflect on leadership practices after the simulation. Thematic analysis from qualitative, reflective data supported the enhanced understanding of managing complex patients, a code situation, and teams; guiding a team's novice nurse; leading as a charge nurse; and using clinical and critical thinking skills. All nurses reported that the simulation as experiential learning helped them to meet their leadership goals. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2015;46(7):311-317. PMID:26154673

  10. Primary and Community Health Nurses' perception of evidence needed to demonstrate that their clinical practice meets the ANMC competencies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sandra Walker; Shirley Godfrey

    In Australia all registered nurses are required to meet the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Council (ANMC) Competencies. These are the base level that all registered nurses must meet when delivering care to clients. This study explored generalist primary and community health nurses' perception of the evidence they believe necessary to demonstrate that their nursing practice meets the ANMC competencies. Eleven

  11. Graduate education for advanced practice public health nursing: at the crossroads.

    PubMed

    Levin, Pamela F; Cary, Ann H; Kulbok, Pamela; Leffers, Jeanne; Molle, Mary; Polivka, Barbara J

    2008-01-01

    The complexity of public health problems and advancement of science framing public health demand an expansion of traditional educational approaches and curriculum to prepare a futuristic advanced practice public health nursing (APPHN) workforce. This position paper sponsored by the Association of Community Health Nursing Educators challenges nurse educators to apply innovative strategies in preparing public health nursing (PHN) professionals and to expand curriculum paradigms to promote PHN's ecological approach to solving problems. To meet the challenges of ensuring public health in the 21st century, advanced practice public health nurses must have greater foundational knowledge in critical content areas discussed in this document. Competence in these areas will enable advanced practice public health nurses to address future health care challenges such as rapidly changing social structures, escalating knowledge explosion, globalization, and growth of new technologies. This education will prepare nurses to forge new knowledge and establish health care teams to create effective solutions. PMID:18294186

  12. A descriptive study of current neonatal nurse practitioner practice.

    PubMed

    Ruth-Sanchez, V; Lee, K A; Bosque, E M

    1996-08-01

    This study describes the role of the neonatal nurse practitioner (NNP) in current practice and identifies facilitators and constraints to practice perceived by individuals currently practicing as NNPs. The 7-point scale used in this study allowed respondents to identify specific conditions of NNP practice, from highly facilitating (+3) to very constraining (-3). Each item was followed by a clarification section. The questionnaire was mailed to 1,521 individuals holding current NNP certification in the U.S. Data were analyzed using a total facilitation score. The possible range for this score (+225 - (-)225) is based on the numerical range of the scale (+3 - (-)3) multiplied by the 75 items in the facilitation section of the questionnaire. Actual scores ranged from +195 to -114, indicating that NNPs are more facilitated than constrained in their practice. Empirical data generated by this study will help in developing a theoretical model for NNP practice and provide important information for shaping the future role of the NNP. PMID:8868694

  13. A novel theory for nursing education: holistic comfort.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Miki; Sener, India; Steiner, Susan H

    2007-12-01

    This article discusses how aspects of a holistic comfort theory were adapted to create a taxonomic structure to apply its concepts to a fast-track nursing education program. The principles of learner-centered education were combined with comfort theory to develop strategies that appear to have produced positive influences on the attributes and contexts of comfort within the learning community. With emphasis on balanced academic exposure to the art of comfort as well as the rigorous science of nursing, students and teachers developed a mutually rewarding learning partnership. The resulting grid, adapted from Kolcaba's taxonomic structure, exposes educators and students to the application of holistic comfort theory. It is anticipated that this adaptation may assist students to transform into professional nurses who are comfortable and comforting in their roles and who are committed to the goal of lifelong learning. PMID:18029969

  14. Optimizing Java Theory and Practice

    E-print Network

    Budimliæ, Zoran

    Optimizing Java Theory and Practice Zoran Budimlic Ken Kennedy Rice University Computer Science popularity of the Internet has made an instant star of the Java programming language. Java's portability Java implementation, even with just­in­time compilation technology, is far behind the most popular

  15. Narrative Inquiry: Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savin-Baden, Maggi; Van Niekerk, Lana

    2007-01-01

    This article offers an overview of the method of narrative inquiry and explores competing trends in the use of the approach. It not only examines the theories relating to the method but also offers practical guidance on using narrative inquiry, including an exploration of what might count as a narrative and ways of analysing narrative data. The…

  16. Minority nursing student success: A grounded theory case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mister, Brenda J.

    There has been a dramatic increase in the nation's racial and ethnic minority populations over recent years. This increase is placing a higher demand on the health care industry to provide culturally competent care to these diverse populations. This challenge is met with yet another problem as the nation faces a critical shortage of nurses, particularly minority nurses. This shortage is only expected to worsen over the next several years. As schools of nursing across the country are being asked to increase the number of nursing program graduates, specifically minorities, they are confronted with a double edged sword as retention rates are decreasing, and attrition rates are increasing. This is particularly troublesome when many racial and ethnic minority nursing students do not graduate. This qualitative study was implemented to assess and understand the perceived educational experiences of racial and ethnic minority nursing students enrolled in a rural community college nursing program on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. Eight voluntary nursing students who identified themselves as either a racial or ethnic minority participated in the study. Data were collected by: individual audio-taped interview sessions; audio-taped focus group sessions; and documentation of field notes. Participants also provided demographic information and were asked to provide a brief written response to a scenario regarding increasing the recruitment and retention rates of minority nursing students. All data were analyzed utilizing the constant comparative method. Results of the study revealed six different themes: personal support systems and peer relationships; college services and academic resources; faculty support; cultural understanding versus cultural insensitivity; personal attributes of self-efficacy/advice for future nursing students; and suggestions for college and nursing program improvement. After the major themes were examined one central theme, a grounded theory, was born. The theory proposes that when the minority nursing student bridges his or her personal attributes of self-efficacy with some or all identified support systems, this may be a conduit to fostering success in obtaining their educational goals as long as the resources are available, and a caring environment is present.

  17. Job satisfaction of nurse practitioners: an analysis using Herzberg's theory.

    PubMed

    Koelbel, P W; Fuller, S G; Misener, T R

    1991-04-01

    The current sociopolitical and economic forces affecting health care may lead to job dissatisfaction among nurse practitioners, according to results of a South Carolina study. A mailed survey that consisted of the Index of Job Satisfaction and the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire--Short Form was used to test Herzberg's dual-factor theory of job satisfaction. A response rate of 90 percent was attained, with a final sample of 132 nurse practitioners and midwives. Consistent with the predictions of Herzberg's model, intrinsic factors served as sources of job satisfaction, while extrinsic factors were the primary sources of job dissatisfaction. Nurse practitioners in the sample reported a moderate amount of satisfaction with their "overall jobs." Suggestions are provided for ways both nurse practitioners and health administrators can enhance job satisfaction. PMID:2062471

  18. [Attempts at innovations in the practice of teaching and practicing psychiatric nursing].

    PubMed

    Barros, S; Aranha e Silva, A L; Lopérgolo, A C; Pitta, A M

    1999-06-01

    In the context of recent changes that are taking place in the field of mental health care in Brazil, the University has the responsibility to redimensioning human resources qualification of mental health workers. At the Mental Health Care and Educational Program of the University of São Paulo and São Paulo Health Office (São Paulo/Brazil), an experience still in course, the nursing students attending to psychiatric nurse training evaluated that theoretical-practical education dealing with health care issue in the field of Psychosocial Rehabilitation purpose, at the same time that directly interferes in the qualification of practices, simultaneously develops the students attitudes and knowledge that qualify them to perform coherent practices in accordance with rehabilitation models of care. PMID:10847108

  19. Improving the Nurse–Family Partnership in Community Practice

    PubMed Central

    Donelan-McCall, Nancy; O’Brien, Ruth; MacMillan, Harriet; Jack, Susan; Jenkins, Thomas; Dunlap, Wallace P.; O’Fallon, Molly; Yost, Elly; Thorland, Bill; Pinto, Francesca; Gasbarro, Mariarosa; Baca, Pilar; Melnick, Alan; Beeber, Linda

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence-based preventive interventions are rarely final products. They have reached a stage of development that warrant public investment but require additional research and development to strengthen their effects. The Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP), a program of nurse home visiting, is grounded in findings from replicated randomized controlled trials. OBJECTIVE: Evidence-based programs require replication in accordance with the models tested in the original randomized controlled trials in order to achieve impacts comparable to those found in those trials, and yet they must be changed in order to improve their impacts, given that interventions require continuous improvement. This article provides a framework and illustrations of work our team members have developed to address this tension. METHODS: Because the NFP is delivered in communities outside of research contexts, we used quantitative and qualitative research to identify challenges with the NFP program model and its implementation, as well as promising approaches for addressing them. RESULTS: We describe a framework used to address these issues and illustrate its use in improving nurses’ skills in retaining participants, reducing closely spaced subsequent pregnancies, responding to intimate partner violence, observing and promoting caregivers’ care of their children, addressing parents’ mental health problems, classifying families’ risks and strengths as a guide for program implementation, and collaborating with indigenous health organizations to adapt and evaluate the program for their populations. We identify common challenges encountered in conducting research in practice settings and translating findings from these studies into ongoing program implementation. CONCLUSIONS: The conduct of research focused on quality improvement, model improvement, and implementation in NFP practice settings is challenging, but feasible, and holds promise for improving the impact of the NFP. PMID:24187112

  20. Advanced practice nurses: roles in the hemodialysis unit.

    PubMed

    Headley, C M; Wall, B

    2000-04-01

    Newly diagnosed cases of end stage renal disease (ESRD) have increased by 9% each year since 1970. It has been estimated that there will need to be a significant increase in the number of nephrologists to care for the ESRD population by the year 2010. Recent reports have advocated the use of advanced practice nurses (APN) to collaborate with nephrologists to meet increasing patient care demands. Clinical evidence has supported the financial and clinical advantages of APN utilization in nephrology. The renal community has stressed an outcome-based practice with a provision of guidelines to improve morbidity and mortality in ESRD. Reimbursement and mortality have been linked to identification of quality care delivery. APNs can be instrumental in assuring that quality patient care is delivered across the ESRD continuum through several different roles: clinician, educator, consultant, researcher, administrator, and case manager. PMID:11111544

  1. Nurses' perceptions of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: Impacts on practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. R. Lugg; H. A. Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    Aim and objectives: The main aim of this study is to explore the perceptions and understanding of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections among adults' and children's nurses. Specifically the objectives are:? to assess and compare adults' and children's nurses' self-reported practices? to examine the correlation between knowledge and self-reported practices among nursing staff members? to investigate the factors that influence

  2. Orem's self-care deficit nursing theory: its philosophic foundation and the state of the science.

    PubMed

    Taylor, S G; Geden, E; Isaramalai, S; Wongvatunyu, S

    2000-04-01

    There is a preponderance of descriptive studies, ranging from those using a simple descriptive correlational approach to multivariate approaches. Only one study is clearly identified as an experimental study (Moore, 1987) and two clearly identified as replication studies (Lenatsch, 1999; Schott-Baer, Fisher, & Gregory, 1995). Fewer than half make clear links between the variables being examined and situations of nursing practice; that is, they examine elements of the theory of self-care without making the link to nursing practice an explicit part of the study. While this work is increasing our knowledge about self-care (Stage II), further work needs to be done to put the results of these in the context of nursing practice as in Stages III, IV, or V. Most of the studies reviewed are Stage II and provide an enhanced or broader description of an element or component of the theory, empirically describing the relationships between or among age, gender, self-care actions, disease, and so forth. These studies add to our understanding of existing and known or proposed relationships within the extant theory. The majority of studies examine self-care and/or self-care deficits. There are many studies but little evidence that sustained research programs are developing and expanding the theory. The bricks are piling up around the framework, but only a few scholars are working on building the walls. These programs of research are occurring in universities where a critical mass of interested scholars and students can be found. The use of theoretical language is sometimes imprecise and at other times inaccurate. Valid new terms are introduced but the relationship to existing theoretical constructs is not always explicit. There is little critical review of research in the literature. Ongoing dialog among scholars is minimal. There is a need for nurse scholars to come together and to engage in such a dialogue to enhance the work. Given the relatively short history of nursing research and, more importantly, the conduct of nursing theory-based research, the number and quality of the work being conducted is quite remarkable. There has been a substantial amount of work produced and the quality of it has improved over time. Orem has provided nurse researchers with a theoretical system comprising an ontological structure, related epistemology, and numerous models that give direction to scholarly efforts. Scholars using this theoretical system would be well-advised to use these in conceptualizing and interpreting their work. PMID:11847693

  3. Evidence-based practice for pain identification in cognitively impaired nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Sacoco, Christina; Ishikawa, Sally

    2014-09-01

    Pain identification of cognitively impaired elderly is very challenging. This project aimed to identify best practices for pain assessment in nursing home residents with cognitive impairment and to establish a standardized pain assessment guide to optimize nursing practice and resident outcomes. The Iowa Model of Evidence-Based Practice to Promote Quality of Care guided the project's process. Phase I of the project analyzed data gained from chart reviews on current practices of pain assessment, and Phase II used the results of Phase I to develop, implement, and evaluate an evidence-based practice standard for nursing assessment of pain for cognitively impaired residents. PMID:25155534

  4. Administrative Protocol Page 1 of 3 Nursing Practice Manual

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    and Annual: Completion for Department of Nursing Staff POLICY: 1. The competency of Department of Nursing employees will be validated during orientation (General Nursing Orientation, and Unit, Department and role which is attached to the annual performance review. 3. Department of Nursing staff will complete

  5. Nurses joining family doctors in primary care practices: perceptions of patients with multimorbidity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin Fortin; Catherine Hudon; Frances Gallagher; Antoine L Ntetu; Danielle Maltais; Hassan Soubhi

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Among the strategies used to reform primary care, the participation of nurses in primary care practices appears to offer a promising avenue to better meet the needs of vulnerable patients. The present study explores the perceptions and expectations of patients with multimorbidity regarding nurses' presence in primary care practices. METHODS: 18 primary (health) care patients with multimorbidity participated in

  6. Pain management knowledge, attitudes and clinical practice: The impact of nurses' characteristics and education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ellen B. Clarke; Brian French; Mary Liz Bilodeau; Virginia C. Capasso; Annabel Edwards; Joanne Empoliti

    1996-01-01

    This study examined the knowattitudes, and clinical practice of registered nurses (N = 120) regarding paint management Data were collected from nine varied clinical units in a large, univasity-effiliaated teaching hospital to an urban area of the Northeast. Demogrohic information was also collected to explore the relationship between nurses' characteristics, including previous pain education, clinical experience, area of clinical practice,

  7. An Investigation of NCLEX-PN Performance and Student Perceptions among Practical Nursing Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abston-Coleman, Sharon L.; Levy, Dessie R.

    2010-01-01

    Students in practical nursing programs require 32 weeks of coursework (1 academic year) and completion of a national licensing exam (NCLEX-PN) to secure employment. The purpose of this study was to identify selected academic variables that were related to NCLEX-PN performance for first-time test takers of two types of practical nursing programs at…

  8. The role of the nurse lecturer in clinical practice in the Republic of Ireland.

    PubMed

    McSharry, Edel; McGloin, Helen; Frizzell, Anne Marie; Winters-O'Donnell, Lisa

    2010-07-01

    Undergraduate nurse education in Ireland transferred into the third level sector in 2002. As a result nurse lecturers are expected to develop a model of clinical practice that enables them to be involved in practice and its development while maintaining their own nursing expertise and credibility [An Bord Altranais, 2005. Requirements and Standards for Nurse Registration Education Programmes, third ed. An Bord Altranais, Dublin]. In light of this the researchers set out to explore the perceptions of the nurse lecturers' role in clinical practice among nurse lecturers, preceptors, clinical nurse managers, clinical placement co-ordinators and students. A qualitative research design using focus groups was chosen. A purposive sampling strategy generated the sample for 5 in-depth focus group interviews with the aforementioned key stakeholders and the data was thematically analysed. Five themes emerged which centred on the maintenance of lecturers' clinical credibility, the lecturers' role as a resource to clinical staff, teaching and assessing students in practice, the value of fostering relationships in practice and role duplication. The findings from this study supports the anecdotal evidence that confusion exists around the role but more importantly it gives the nurse lecturer population guidance on how to develop the role in partnership with the various stakeholders in a way that supports the nursing students and clinical staff in practice in an effective manner. PMID:19850523

  9. Development of the practice environment scale of the Nursing Work Index.

    PubMed

    Lake, Eileen T

    2002-06-01

    Five subscales were derived from the Nursing Work Index (NWI) to measure the hospital nursing practice environment, using 1985-1986 nurse data from 16 magnet hospitals. The NWI comprises organizational characteristics of the original magnet hospitals. The psychometric properties of the subscales and a composite measure were established. All measures were highly reliable at the nurse and hospital levels. Construct validity was supported by higher scores of nurses in magnet versus nonmagnet hospitals. Confirmatory analyses of contemporary data from 11,636 Pennsylvania nurses supported the subscales. The soundness of the new measures is supported by their theoretical and empirical foundations, conceptual integrity, psychometric strength, and generalizability. The measures could be used to study how the practice environment influences nurse and patient outcomes. PMID:12015780

  10. Nursing diagnoses, interventions and outcomes - application and impact on nursing practice: systematic review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maria Müller-Staub; Mary Ann Lavin; Ian Needham; Theo van Achterberg

    2006-01-01

    AIM: This paper reports a systematic review on the outcomes of nursing diagnostics. Specifically, it examines effects on documentation of assessment quality; frequency, accuracy and completeness of nursing diagnoses; and on coherence between nursing diagnoses, interventions and outcomes. BACKGROUND: Escalating healthcare costs demand the measurement of nursing's contribution to care. Use of standardized terminologies facilitates this measurement. Although several studies

  11. School Nursing Documentation: Knowledge, Attitude, and Barriers to Using Standardized Nursing Languages and Current Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yearous, Sharon Kay Guthrie

    2011-01-01

    The independent, complex role of a school nurse requires accurate documentation of assessments, interventions, and outcomes. Consistent documentation by all school nurses is crucial to study the impact of nursing interventions on children's health and success in school. While standardized nursing languages are available, the actual use of…

  12. Investing in nursing research in practice settings: a blueprint for building capacity.

    PubMed

    Jeffs, Lianne; Smith, Orla; Beswick, Susan; Maoine, Maria; Ferris, Ella

    2013-12-01

    Engaging clinical nurses in practice-based research is a cornerstone of professional nursing practice and a critical element in the delivery of high-quality patient care. Practising staff nurses are well suited to identify the phenomena and issues that are clinically relevant and appropriate for research. In response to the need to invest in and build capacity in nursing research, hospitals have developed creative approaches to spark interest in nursing research and to equip clinical nurses with research competencies. This paper outlines a Canadian hospital's efforts to build research capacity as a key strategy to foster efficacious, safe and cost-effective patient care practices. Within a multi-pronged framework, several strategies are described that collectively resulted in enhanced research and knowledge translation productivity aimed at improving the delivery of safe and high-quality patient care. PMID:24377848

  13. Registered nurses' ideas of physical science concepts relevant to their clinical practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, Lesley M.; Batts, Judith E.

    1996-09-01

    Experience in teaching science to nurses has raised the question of whether nurses' expressions of their understanding of concepts in physical science are adequate for professional practice. Nurses' descriptions of physical science concepts relevant to their practice must be explicated before educators can develop strategies to enhance nurses' learning of science. A cross-sectional study was undertaken to establish registered nurses' conceptions of physical science in their clinical practice. Data were collected using a multiple choice question survey, field work and focused interviews. Six categories of conceptions emerged from data analysis. Of the three which related to complexity of understanding “association” and “definition” were predominant and related in the main, to two of the three contextual categories “instrumentation/equipment” and “procedure.” There were few examples of the other two categories of “elaboration” and “body processes.” We argue that the conceptions held by the nurses were not adequate to allow them to fulfil their roles as professional practitioners in health care.

  14. Digital Imaging: theory joins practice

    E-print Network

    Patzke, Karin; Thiel, Sarah Goodwin

    2009-07-01

    Digital Imaging: theory joins practice. • Karin Patzke, Rapid Imaging Project Coordinator, Art Institute of Chicago (AIC) • Sarah Goodwin Thiel, Digital Services Librarian, University of Kansas Libraries and Chair, 2007/2008 Digital... the Canon Mark Series have allowed the capture large image files (approximately 25 megabytes) and the purchase of copy stands, tables, computers have created stations that are relatively mobile and simple to use (Figure 1 illustrates the Asian and...

  15. Assisting nurses to facilitate student and new graduate learning in practice settings: what 'support' do nurses at the bedside need?

    PubMed

    Henderson, Amanda; Eaton, Emma

    2013-05-01

    The behaviours of nurses in the community of practice that new graduates and students participate directly contribute to learning. These behaviours are becoming more important with increasing numbers of students and graduates learning in health care contexts. Nurses, whether they assume the role of preceptor, buddy or mentor are pivotal in identifying appropriate learning opportunities for students and graduates, and assimilating these learners into the team. As nurses at the bedside have a designated caseload they need to be supported to perform this important role while delivering health care. The literature reports a number of constraints for nurses when facilitating the learning of others, namely, inadequate preparation about how to foster learning in this context, poor planning at the ward level, lack of reward or recognition for the role, lack of understanding about the specific learning needs of students and new graduates. This discussion paper provides direction for leadership and management teams to effectively support nurses who assume the role of preceptor, buddy or mentor to assist others' learning in the workplace. The recommendations suggest management teams provide for adequate preparation of nurses, effective planning of workload and organisation of work in the clinical area, and mechanisms for timely and specific feedback to maintain nurses interest and motivation in performing the role. Furthermore, senior leadership personnel need to establish a culture where the value of teaching and learning in practice is recognised and fostered by the entire team. PMID:23142237

  16. The answer is questions: accelerated-nursing students report practice questions are fundamental to first-time NCLEX-RN success.

    PubMed

    Blozen, Barbara B

    2014-01-01

    There are a number of anecdotal reports on demographic characteristics and academic success of accelerated-nursing students; yet few empirical studies have examined accelerated-nursing students NCLEX-RN success. Applying Knowles' adult learning theory as a guiding framework, the purpose of this qualitative study was to explore, from the accelerated-nursing students' perspective, the factors reported as contributing to their success on the NCLEX-RN. The research questions aimed to elicit participants' descriptions of their experiences and factors contributing to their success via individual interviews. The most significant finding the participants identified as the factor that contributed to their success was the practicing of NCLEX-RN questions. The findings of this study have several implications for educational policy and practice for universities and schools of nursing as the information gained from this study applies to recruitment and retention as well as curriculum and educational strategies in an accelerated-nursing program. PMID:26021133

  17. The use of handheld technology in nursing research and practice.

    PubMed

    Hardwick, Mary E; Pulido, Pamela A; Adelson, Wendy S

    2007-01-01

    Use of handheld devices with electronic patient diaries (EPDs) can improve the quality of patient-reported information collected in clinical and research settings. EPDs have advantages compared with traditional paper-based instruments that include decreased data entry error and decreased time spent on data management. Orthopaedic pain management, which is often dependent on patient-reported pain levels, can benefit from the use of EPDs. A pilot survey was conducted to compare two self-report pain diary methods in shoulder surgery patients: (a) EPD or (b) paper entry. Compliance was lower in the EPD group, which was attributed to insufficient ease of use. Handheld technology can be used by nurses to improve and streamline patient care by capturing clinical data, by organizing and reporting home health services, and by providing references for evidence-based practice. Handheld technology can facilitate the transformation of clinical documentation of assessments, interventions, and outcomes into evidence-based decision making in orthopaedic nursing. PMID:17882103

  18. Implications of evidence-based practice for mental health nursing.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Jacklin E; Happell, Brenda

    2009-06-01

    The introduction of evidence-based practice (EBP) and the hierarchical approach to evidence it engenders within research and evaluation has aroused controversy in the mental health professions. The aim of this paper is to present a critique of EBP with a specific relationship to mental health nursing. It will be argued that in its current form, EBP presents a potential impediment to the facilitation of consumer participation in mental health services and to the recovery model. The need for the consumer voice and the importance of the lived experience of mental illness are not readily reconciled with a strong scientific paradigm that promotes detachment and objectivity. The importance of evidence in contemporary mental health care will also be acknowledged and discussed in light of the current climate of increased consumer knowledge, fiscal constraint, and extensive social criticism of mental health-care services. The current approach to EBP requires reconstruction to support the consumer-focused nature of mental health nursing, and to facilitate the implementation of a recovery model for mental health care. PMID:19490228

  19. Spanning the Gap between Theory and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Richard E.

    1982-01-01

    Suggests that new developments in prescriptive theory offer an opportunity for instructional designers to combine research and practice in developing instruction. Ways in which instructional theories can facilitate practical applications are suggested. (MER)

  20. Promoting nurses' knowledge in evidence-based practice: do educational methods matter?

    PubMed

    Toole, Belinda M; Stichler, Jaynelle F; Ecoff, Laurie; Kath, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a mandate for nursing practice. Education on EBP has occurred in academic settings, but not all nurses have received this training. The authors describe a randomized controlled pretest/posttest design testing the differences in effectiveness of two educational methods to improve nurses' knowledge, attitudes, and practice of EBP. Results indicated both methods improved self-reported practice. On the basis of the study findings, staff development educators can select the teaching method that best complements their organizational environment. PMID:23877287

  1. Renewing the spirit of nursing: Embracing evidence-based practice in a rural state.

    PubMed

    Sossong, Ann E; Cullen, Sue; Theriault, Paula; Stetson, Alanna; Higgins, Barbara; Roche, Sarina; Ellis-Hermansen, Sue; Patillo, Dorrin

    2009-03-01

    A group of nursing leaders from several organizations in the central and northern regions of the state established the Maine Nursing Practice Consortium (MNPC). The MNPC has created educational opportunities through workshops that assist nurses with the development and implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) in rural Maine. Through collaboration and consultation with EBP leaders, members have ignited a spirit of inquiry and gained the support of nurses from varied backgrounds to engage actively in EBP initiatives. This article briefly summarizes the process of establishing these collaborative partnerships, describes some of the outcomes from the workshops, and describes the organizational and individual commitment that was essential to the work. PMID:19167547

  2. Nursing and the next millennium.

    PubMed

    Huch, M H

    1995-01-01

    On March 19, 1993, in Toronto, Canada, at Discovery International, Inc.'s, Biennnial Nurse Theorist Conference, five theorists participated in a panel discussion on: caring as an essence of nursing; the value of continuing to develop nursing theory; what constitutes nursing research; the role of advanced practice nurses. The theorists were Imogene M. King, Madeleine M. Leininger, Rosemarie Rizzo Parse, Hildegard E. Peplau, and Martha E. Rogers. Marlaine C. Smith was the moderator and presented the questions to the panel. PMID:7877782

  3. Postcolonial theory, nursing knowledge, and the development of emancipatory knowing.

    PubMed

    Bickford, Deanna

    2014-01-01

    Nurses must assume a leadership role in confronting inequitable access to health care. This imperative is realizable through contributions to the knowledge of the discipline, reflecting on the profession's mandate for social justice and elimination of health inequities, as well as embracing the diversity of nursing's fundamental patterns of knowing. Emancipatory knowing involves critically examining social, political, and institutional structures to uncover social injustices and inequities and disrupt the status quo, as well as asking critical questions. Postcolonial theory, aligned with these foundational principles, can be used to answer such critical questions, thus contributing to the advancement of disciplinary knowledge. PMID:25102212

  4. Integrating the illness beliefs model in clinical practice: a family systems nursing knowledge utilization model.

    PubMed

    Duhamel, Fabie; Dupuis, France; Turcotte, Annie; Martinez, Anne-Marie; Goudreau, Johanne

    2015-05-01

    To promote the integration of Family Systems Nursing (FSN) in clinical practice, we need to better understand how nurses overcome the challenges of FSN knowledge utilization. A qualitative exploratory study was conducted with 32 practicing female nurses from hospital and community settings who had received FSN intervention training and skill development based on the Illness Beliefs Model and the Calgary Family Assessment and Intervention Models. The participants were interviewed about how they utilized FSN knowledge in their nursing practice. From the data analysis, a FSN Knowledge Utilization Model emerged that involves three major components: (a) nurses' beliefs in FSN and in their FSN skills, (b) nurses' knowledge utilization strategies to address the challenges of FSN practice, and (c) FSN positive outcomes. The FSN Knowledge Utilization Model describes a circular, incremental, and iterative process used by nurses to integrate FSN in daily nursing practice. Findings point to a need for re-evaluation of educational and management strategies in clinical settings for advancing the practice of FSN. PMID:25838467

  5. Spiritual perception, attitudes about spiritual care, and spiritual care practices among nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Stranahan, S

    2001-02-01

    The purpose of the nonexperimental study was to examine the relationships among spiritual perception, attitudes about spiritual care, and spiritual care practices in nurse practitioners. Attitudes about providing spiritual care and spiritual care practices have been studied among nurse generalists, but little research has been conducted on nurses in advanced practice. All nurse practitioners registered by the state of Indiana were sent Reed's Spiritual Perspective Scale (SPS) and a modified version of the Nurses' Spiritual Care Perspectives Scale developed by Taylor, Highfield, and Amenta. Pearson correlation techniques were used to test for significant relationships. Statistically positive relationships were between perception of personal spirituality and 9 of the 12 spiritual care practices. Eight of the 13 items describing attitude toward providing spiritual care were statistically significant with the SPS. Implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:11216028

  6. Practice Theory: Viewing Leadership as Leading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Jane; Kemmis, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by Theodore Schatzki's "societist" approach--in which he advocates a notion of "site ontologies"--in this article, we outline our theory of practice architectures (a theory about what practices are composed of) and ecologies of practices (how practices relate to one another). Drawing on case studies of four Australian…

  7. Practices of Japanese nurses for the preparation of N95 respirators.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kemal; Kotake, Kyuhei

    2014-09-01

    A delay in the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) is a public health problem in Japan. This delay may increase the chance of a TB patient visiting in a medical institution without a TB ward. We evaluated the practices of nurses for fit testing and seal checking their N95 respirator masks at hospitals without tuberculosis wards in Kanagawa, Japan. Of 36 nurses who participated in a medical course on infection control and medical safety in June 2010, 33 (91.7%) answered a questionnaire. Seven (22.6%) and 8 (26.7%) nurses had practical experience of fit testing and seal checking N95 masks, respectively. Nurses affiliated with hospitals having sanatorium wards were more likely to be acquainted with fit testing and seal checking than nurses from hospitals with only general wards [6 (39.9%) vs. 0 (0%) and 7 (46.7%) vs. 0 (0%), respectively]. Fewer than 30% of nurses exposed to TB patients had no experience with fit testing and scale checking N95 masks. Only one nurse had practical experience fitting testing at the hospital where she worked. Although the sample size in this study was small, these results showed inadequate experience in handling N95 respirator marks among Japanese nurses at hospitals without tuberculosis wards, which suggests the need to educate nurses practically in fit testing and seal checking N95 respirator masks. PMID:25507254

  8. Practices of Japanese nurses for the preparation of N95 respirators.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kemal; Kotake, Kyuhei

    2014-09-01

    A delay in the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) is a public health problem in Japan. This delay may increase the chance of a TB patient visiting in a medical institution without a TB ward. We evaluated the practices of nurses for fit testing and seal checking their N95 respirator masks at hospitals without tuberculosis wards in Kanagawa, Japan. Of 36 nurses who participated in a medical course on infection control and medical safety in June 2010, 33 (91.7%) answered a questionnaire. Seven (22.6%) and 8 (26.7%) nurses had practical experience of fit testing and seal checking N95 masks, respectively. Nurses affiliated with hospitals having sanatorium wards were more likely to be acquainted with fit testing and seal checking than nurses from hospitals with only general wards [6 (39.9%) vs. 0 (0%) and 7 (46.7%) vs. 0 (0%), respectively]. Fewer than 30% of nurses exposed to TB patients had no experience with fit testing and scale checking N95 masks. Only one nurse had practical experience fitting testing at the hospital where she worked. Although the sample size in this study was small, these results showed inadequate experience in handling N95 respirator marks among Japanese nurses at hospitals without tuberculosis wards, which suggests the need to educate nurses practically in fit testing and seal checking N95 respirator masks. PMID:25417526

  9. Health promotion self-care within Orem's general theory of nursing.

    PubMed

    Hartweg, D L

    1990-01-01

    The growing emphasis on health promotion by society and the increasing utilization of Orem's general theory of nursing to guide practice, education and research create a need to clarify health promotion activity within the model. The concept of health promotion self-care is developed after an analysis of statements by Pender and Orem for their logical congruence. Further in-depth analysis of Orem's model facilitates the placement of the new concept within its current structure. The potential strength of the model for guiding health promotion practice is discussed, as well as areas for needed development. PMID:2406315

  10. Learning and applying biosciences to clinical practice in nursing.

    PubMed

    Smales, K

    The study of biosciences by nursing students, while perceived by most as relevant, presents particular challenges for many during pre- registration programmes. This article describes a literature review of the teaching and learning of biosciences in nursing curricula. Four areas are explored: the relevance of bioscience in pre-registration nursing; difficulties experienced by nursing students learning biosciences; lecturer attributes in facilitating learning; and teaching and assessment methods. PMID:20461922

  11. [Quality needs competence and responsibility - challenges and perspectives of Advanced Nursing Practice for the health care system from a nursing science perspective].

    PubMed

    Gaidys, Uta

    2011-02-01

    Advanced Nursing Practice seems to be an answer to the complex challenges of the health system. However, the quality of Advanced Nursing Practice is researched by comparison to medical care. These attempts to legitimise Advanced Nursing Practice decrease the potentials of nursing care. In contrast to this, a prospect for Advanced Nursing Practice should be derived from the core of nursing, namely the relation to the life-world of the clients, the closeness to the clients and their families, and the opportunity for consistency in health care. This vision has to be realised by means of autonomy and responsibility in nursing care. The competence to autonomous and responsible decision-making is based on an educational process, where the ability to perceive the situation of client as changeable is developed. PMID:21274842

  12. Doctor of NursiNg Practice scholarly Projects ~ 2011

    E-print Network

    Bordenstein, Seth

    #12;FroM THe direCTor "Nurses should be full partners with physicians and other health care professionals in redesigning health care in the United States" (ioM, Future of Nursing¸2010). indeedCUlTY & PrograM direCTorS Susan adams, Phd, rN, PMHNP-BC, FaaNP Professor of Nursing, Director Psychiatric

  13. Principles in Practice: An Australian Initiative in Nursing Curriculum Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAllister, Margaret

    2001-01-01

    The philosophical basis of a nursing education curriculum in Australia is the human dimension of nursing. The curriculum acknowledges the importance of the learning climate, diverse learning styles, diversity, and the active role of teachers in developing nurses who are competent and critical thinkers. (SK)

  14. Measuring the essence of nursing: A guide for future practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Donna Ambler Peters; Beverly J. Hays

    1995-01-01

    Today's changing health care environment presents nursing with the opportunity to expand its role in the health care system. With this opportunity, issues of appropriate education, delegation of supplemental activities to nonprofessionals, and cost of nursing services become significant. Satisfactory resolution of these issues will require a clearly articulated language for what nursing does so that services can be well

  15. Infusing Theory into Practice, Practice into Theory: Small Wins and Big Gains for Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rog, Debra J.

    2015-01-01

    This article illustrates the synergistic role between practice and theory in evaluation. Using reflective practice, the author reviews her own work as well as the work of other evaluators to illustrate how theory can influence practice and, in turn, how evaluation practice can inform and grow theory, especially evaluation theory. The following…

  16. A Culture of Safety: Nursing Rounds As Falls Prevention Best Practice Dr. Judith Moran-Peters, RN, DNSc, CNA, BC

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Diane Peyser; Angela Neglia

    The purpose is to describe the effect of hourly nursing rounds on prevention of falls in hospitalized patients. Implication for practice: The information presented will increase nurses' knowledge regarding the effectiveness of fall prevention nursing activities. Recommendation: direct care nurses making hourly point-of-care rounds on their clinical units will experience positive outcomes in preventing patient falls. Problem: National Patient Safety

  17. Matriculation Plan Summary and Worksheet Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Program

    E-print Network

    Dolbow, John

    . Evidence-Based Practice I N651. Evidence-Based Practice II N652. Transforming the Nation's Health N653 Evidence-Based Practice II: Implementation and Evaluation N650 N655 Health Systems Transformation N402 #12Matriculation Plan Summary and Worksheet Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Program This document

  18. An evaluation of the management of patients with sore throats by practice nurses and GPs.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, C; Jones, M

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Practice nurses are increasingly involved in the management of minor illnesses in primary care. However, there has been little work published that evaluates the quality of the service they offer to patients. In our practice (semi-rural, 14,000 patients) a nursing triage system for minor illnesses has been established since 1992. AIM: To compare the quality of management of sore throats by practice nurses and general practitioners (GPs) in a routine nursing triage system. METHOD: An observational study assessing all patients over the age of two years presenting over a six-month period (February-August 1997) to either the practice nurse or GP with a sore throat as the chief presenting complaint. Patients were followed up at five to seven days by a researcher and recovery rates, analgesic requirements, reconsultation rates, and satisfaction rates were recorded. Patients who were still symptomatic at five to seven days were followed up again at 28 days and outcomes recorded. RESULTS: A total of 44% of patients consulted the practice nurse and 56% consulted the GP. Severity of presenting illness was similar in the two groups. The number of patients whose sore throats had settled, reconsultation rates, antibiotic prescription, and dissatisfaction rates were the same for both groups. However, the patients consulting the nurse had a more favourable outcome on indices such as patients' perception of being back to normal health (64% versus 53%) and median number of days for the sore throat to settle (four versus five). Nurses tended to see younger patients (mean age = 22.5 years versus 28.3 years) and more patients seeing the practice nurse recalled receiving advice about home remedies (76% versus 54%). CONCLUSION: Practice nurses can establish a safe and effective service for treatment of sore throats in a time-restricted triage system. PMID:11141872

  19. Preparing new nurse graduates for practice in multiple settings: a community-based academic-practice partnership model.

    PubMed

    West, Nikki; Berman, Audrey; Karshmer, Judith; Prion, Susan; Van, Paulina; Wallace, Jonalyn

    2014-06-01

    Responding to local and national concerns about the nursing workforce, the California Institute for Nursing and Health Care worked with private and public funders and community health care partners to establish community-based transition-to-practice programs for new RN graduates unable to secure nursing positions in the San Francisco Bay Area. The goals were to retain new RN graduates in nursing and further develop their skills and competencies to increase their employability. Leaders from academic and inpatient, ambulatory, and community-based practice settings, as well as additional community partners, collaboratively provided four 12- to 16-week pilot transition programs in 2010-2011. A total of 345 unemployed new nurse graduates enrolled. Eighty-four percent of 188 respondents to a post-program survey were employed in inpatient and community settings 3 months after completion. Participants and clinical preceptors also reported increases in confidence and competence. PMID:24779715

  20. Beyond google: finding and evaluating web-based information for community-based nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Miller, Louise C; Graves, Rebecca S; Jones, Barbara B; Sievert, Maryellen C

    2010-01-01

    Nurses are challenged to find and use reliable, credible information to support clinical decision-making and to meet expectations for evidence-based nursing practice. This project targeted practicing public health and school nurses, teaching them how to access and critically evaluate web-based information resources for frontline practice. Health sciences librarians partnered with nursing faculty to develop two participatory workshops to teach skills in searching for and evaluating web-based consumer and professional practice resources. The first workshop reviewed reliable, credible consumer web-resources appropriate to use with clients, using published criteria to evaluate website credibility. In the second workshop, nurses were taught how to retrieve and evaluate health-related research from professional databases to support evidence-based nursing practice. Evaluation data indicated nurses most valued knowing about the array of reliable, credible web-based health information resources, learning how to evaluate website credibility, and understanding how to find and apply professional research literature to their own practice. PMID:20812913

  1. Developing leadership practices in hospital-based nurse educators in an online learning community.

    PubMed

    Stutsky, Brenda J; Spence Laschinger, Heather K

    2014-01-01

    Hospital-based nurse educators are in a prime position to mentor future nurse leaders; however, they need to first develop their own leadership practices. The goal was to establish a learning community where hospital-based nurse educators could develop their own nursing leadership practices within an online environment that included teaching, cognitive, and social presence. Using a pretest/posttest-only nonexperimental design, 35 nurse educators from three Canadian provinces engaged in a 12-week online learning community via a wiki where they learned about exemplary leadership practices and then shared stories about their own leadership practices. Nurse educators significantly increased their own perceived leadership practices after participation in the online community, and teaching, cognitive, and social presence was determined to be present in the online community. It was concluded that leadership development can be enhanced in an online learning community using a structured curriculum, multimedia presentations, and the sharing and analysis of leadership stories. Educators who participated should now be better equipped to role model exemplary leadership practices and mentor our nurse leaders of the future. PMID:24256766

  2. Practice Environments of Nurses in Ambulatory Oncology Settings: A Thematic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Akiko; Schneider, Karin; Lee, Cheryl S.; Crawford, Scott D.; Friese, Christopher R.

    2010-01-01

    Background The practice environments of nurses have been studied extensively in inpatient settings, but rarely in the ambulatory context. As the majority of cancer care is delivered in ambulatory settings, a better understanding of the nursing practice environment may contribute to quality improvement efforts. Objective We sought to examine the features of nursing practice environments that contribute to quality patient care and nursing job satisfaction. Interventions/Methods In 2009-2010, we conducted focus groups with nurses who cared for adults with cancer outside of inpatient units. A semi-structured moderator guide explored practice environment features that promoted safe, high-quality care, and high job satisfaction. We also asked nurses to identify practice environment features that hindered quality care and reduced job satisfaction. We conducted thematic analysis to report themes, and to construct a conceptual framework. Results From two focus groups, comprised of 13 participants, nurses reported that variability in workloads, support from managers and medical assistants, and the practice's physical resources could facilitate or hinder high-quality care and job satisfaction. High-quality communication across team members improved patient safety and satisfaction. Conclusions Consistent with research findings from inpatient settings, nurses identified staffing and resource adequacy, management support, and collegiality as important inputs to high-quality care. Implications for Practice These findings can inform quality improvement initiatives in ambulatory oncology practices. Strengthening nurse-medical assistant relationships, smoothing patient workload variability, and implementing strategies to strengthen communication, may contribute to quality cancer care. Studies to test our proposed conceptual framework would bridge existing knowledge gaps in ambulatory settings. PMID:21372702

  3. Clinical Procedure Page 1 of 2 Clinical Manual/Nursing Practice Manual

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Clinical Procedure Page 1 of 2 Clinical Manual/Nursing Practice Manual John Dempsey Hospital ­ Background ­ Assessment ­ Recommendation. It is an evidence based communication model that assists patient care is "handed-off" from one provider to another (i.e., nursing staff shift report) or from one

  4. Putting Discourse to Work: Information Practices and the Professional Project of Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johannisson, Jenny; Sundin, Olof

    2007-01-01

    This article contributes to discourse-oriented, information-seeking research by showing how discourses, from a neopragmatist perspective, can be explored as tools that people employ when they actively engage in information practices in varied social contexts. A study of nurses and the nursing profession in Sweden is used as an empirical example of…

  5. Daily Practice Teams in Nursing Homes: Evidence From New York State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temkin-Greener, Helena; Cai, Shubing; Katz, Paul; Zhao, Hongwei; Mukamel, Dana B.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Most health care organizations, including nursing homes, report having teams. However, little is known about everyday practice teams among staff providing direct resident care. We assess the prevalence of such teams in nursing homes as reported by direct care staff and administrators, and examine characteristics of facilities that foster…

  6. Readiness for Evidence-Based Practice: Information Literacy Needs of Nurses in the United States

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Annelle Tanner; Susan Pierce; Diane Pravikoff

    In this paper U.S. nurses' readiness to provide Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) as measured by their information literacy knowl- edge and skills is described. The Institute of Medicine directed health care providers to use EBP as a means to improve patient safety, efficiency and effectiveness of health care services. Infor- mation literacy has been identified as a nursing informatics competency for

  7. Influence of Perceptions on School Nurse Practices to Prevent Childhood Obesity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quelly, Susan B.

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive childhood obesity prevention (COP) strategies should include increasing school nurse involvement. This study was conducted to determine the influence of key school nurse perceptions (self-efficacy, perceived benefits, and perceived barriers) on participation in COP practices at the individual child and school level. Florida…

  8. The habilitation nursing of children with developmental disabilities—Beyond traditional nursing practices and principles?

    PubMed Central

    Olli, Johanna; Vehkakoski, Tanja

    2014-01-01

    Research-based descriptions of the contents of the habilitation nursing of children with developmental disabilities are lacking. The objective of this qualitative study was to describe the habilitation nursing of children with developmental disabilities in a Finnish children's neurological ward. In addition, the purpose was to outline the principles that directed the nursing functions (which consisted of various nursing interventions). The data collection included observation, a retrospective think-aloud method with video-taped nursing situations, the nursing records, and an open-ended questionnaire. The data were analysed with a qualitative content analysis of the manifest and latent content. The findings show that habilitation nursing in a children's neurological ward consists of assessing the child's skills, supporting the child's development, and collaborating with the child's immediate adults. When implementing those functions with nursing interventions, the nurses demonstrated four principles: client-originated and professional-originated principles, and individual-centred and community-centred principles. Becoming conscious of these principles and the theoretical frameworks behind them enables the development of a nursing science–based model for habilitation nursing. PMID:24656260

  9. Portfolio use as a tool to demonstrate professional development in advanced nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Hespenheide, Molly; Cottingham, Talisha; Mueller, Gail

    2011-01-01

    A concrete way of recognizing and rewarding clinical leadership, excellence in practice, and personal and professional development of the advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) is lacking in the literature and healthcare institutions in the United States. This article presents the process of developing and evaluating a professional development program designed to address this gap. The program uses APRN Professional Performance Standards, Relationship-Based Care, and the Magnet Forces as a guide and theoretical base. A key tenet of the program is the creation of a professional portfolio. Narrative reflections are included that illustrate the convergence of theories. A crosswalk supports this structure, guides portfolio development, and operationalizes the convergence of theories as they specifically relate to professional development in advanced practice. Implementation of the program has proven to be challenging and rewarding. Feedback from APRNs involved in the program supports program participation as a meaningful method to recognize excellence in advanced practice and a clear means to foster ongoing professional growth and development. PMID:22016019

  10. Knowledge, attitudes and practice toward cervical cancer screening among Sikkimese nursing staff in India

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Hafizur; Kar, Sumit

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess baseline knowledge of cancer cervix, screening and practice of Pap smear screening among Sikkimese staff nurses in India. Materials and Methods: Between April 2012 and February 2013, a predesigned, pretested, self -administered multiple responses questionnaire survey was conducted among staff nurses’ working in various hospitals of Sikkim. Questionnaire contained information about their demographics, knowledge of cervical cancer, its risk factors, screening methods, attitudes toward cervical cancer screening and practice of Pap smear amongst themselves. Results: Overall, 90.4% nurses responded that they were aware of cancer cervix. Three quarter of the staff nurses were not aware of commonest site being cancer cervix in women. Of the 320 participants, who had heard of cancer cervix, 253 (79.1%) were aware of cancer cervix screening. Pap smear screening should start at 21 years or 3 years after sexual debut was known to only one-third of the nursing staff. Age was found to be a significant predictor of awareness of Pap smear screening among nursing staff. Awareness was significantly more prevalent among older staff (P < 0.007). Married nursing staffs were significantly more likely to be aware of screening methods, and nursing staff of Christian and Buddhist religion were 1.25 times and 2.03 times more likely to aware of screening methods than Hindu religion respectively. Only 16.6% nurses, who were aware of a Pap smear (11.9% of the total sample), had ever undergone a Pap smear test. Most common reason offered for not undergoing Pap smear test were, they felt they were not at risk (41%), uncomfortable pelvic examination (25%) and fear of a bad result (16.6%). Conclusion: Knowledge of cancer cervix, screening and practice of Pap smear was low among Sikkimese nursing staff in India. There is an urgent need for re-orientation course for working nurses and integration of cervical cancer prevention issues in the nurses’ existing curriculum in India and other developing countries.

  11. Making connections: Linking generalist and specialist essentials in baccalaureate community\\/public health nursing education and practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Katherine Laux Kaiser; Kimberly Ferren Carter; Patricia A. O'Hare; Lynn Clark Callister

    2002-01-01

    Nurse educators and potential employers of baccalaureate nursing graduates are challenged by the constant change in health care today. This change mandates competencies for professional nursing practice that preserves the relevant and useful skills and knowledge of the past, yet incorporates skills and knowledge for practice today and in the future. As in previous eras of health system change, identifying

  12. Social theory and system dynamics practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1999-01-01

    This paper explores the social theories implicit in system dynamics (SD) practice. Groupings of SD practice are observed in different parts of a framework for studying social theories. Most are seen to be located within `functionalist sociology'. To account for the remainder, two new forms of practice are discussed, each related to a different paradigm. Three competing conclusions are then

  13. The influence of knowledge, perceptions, and beliefs, on hand hygiene practices in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Aiello, Allison E; Malinis, Maricar; Knapp, Jennifer K; Mody, Lona

    2009-03-01

    There are few studies that have assessed factors influencing infection control practices among health care workers (HCW) in nursing homes. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of HCWs (N = 392) in 4 nursing homes to assess whether knowledge, beliefs, and perceptions influence reported hand hygiene habits. Positive perceptions and beliefs regarding effectiveness of infection control in nursing homes were associated with reported appropriate glove use and fingernail characteristics, respectively, among HCWs. Further research on hand hygiene interventions, including targeted educational in-services should be conducted in the nursing home setting. PMID:18945512

  14. Anti-Oppressive Practice and Reflexive Lifeworld-Led Approaches to Care: A Framework for Teaching Nurses about Social Justice

    PubMed Central

    Hutchison, Jacqueline Sarah

    2015-01-01

    This paper was initially written for a European Academy of Caring Science workshop and aimed to provide clarity and direction about Caring Science by offering some ideas emerging from the philosophy, themes, and projects of EACS. An underpinning concept for the work of the Academy is the lifeworld. The focus of the workshop was to explore the lifeworld of the patient, student, and carer. The intention was to promote discussion around the need to provide alternative ways to conceptualise caring relevant knowledge, naming phenomena and practices central to caring sciences, and the educational curriculum and its adequacy for caring science. This paper seeks to identify concepts and approaches to understanding oppression, power, and justice which enable nurses to challenge the structures in health care environments which discriminate or disempower clients. Anti-oppressive practice theory and reflexive lifeworld-led approaches to care enable nurses to be critical of their practice. A framework for teaching social justice in health care is offered to augment teaching students to challenge oppressive practice and to assist nurses to reflect and develop conceptual models to guide practices which are central to promoting caring interactions. PMID:25838944

  15. Nurses’ self-efficacy and practices relating to weight management of adult patients: a path analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Health professionals play a key role in the prevention and treatment of excess weight and obesity, but many have expressed a lack of confidence in their ability to manage obese patients with their delivery of weight-management care remaining limited. The specific mechanism underlying inadequate practices in professional weight management remains unclear. The primary purpose of this study was to examine a self-efficacy theory-based model in understanding Registered Nurses’ (RNs) professional performance relating to weight management. Methods A self-report questionnaire was developed based upon the hypothesized model and administered to a convenience sample of 588 RNs. Data were collected regarding socio-demographic variables, psychosocial variables (attitudes towards obese people, professional role identity, teamwork beliefs, perceived skills, perceived barriers and self-efficacy) and professional weight management practices. Structural equation modeling was conducted to identify correlations between the above variables and to test the goodness of fit of the proposed model. Results The survey response rate was 71.4% (n?=?420). The respondents reported a moderate level of weight management practices. Self-efficacy directly and positively predicted the weight management practices of the RNs (??=?0.36, p?practices. The final model constructed in this study demonstrated a good fit to the data [?2 (14) =13.90, p?=?0.46; GFI?=?0.99; AGFI?=?0.98; NNFI?=?1.00; CFI?=?1.00; RMSEA?=?0.00; AIC?=?57.90], accounting for 38.4% and 43.2% of the variance in weight management practices and self-efficacy, respectively. Conclusions Self-efficacy theory appears to be useful in understanding the weight management practices of RNs. Interventions targeting the enhancement of self-efficacy may be effective in promoting RNs’ professional performance in managing overweight and obese patients. PMID:24304903

  16. A school of nursing-wellness center partnership: creating collaborative practice experiences for undergraduate US senior nursing students.

    PubMed

    Aponte, Judith; Egues, Aida L

    2010-01-01

    As there is a global drive for schools of nursing (SONs) to increase enrollments and as there is a strain in the number of placement sites available to nursing students, SONs need to think innovatively about creating new collaborative partnerships that can serve as placement sites. A collaborative US intrainstitutional partnership was developed between an urban college wellness center (WC) and a SON that met the following needs: (1) it provided a community/public health nursing clinical practice site for undergraduate, senior-year baccalaureate SON students and (2) it enhanced and expanded WC services for the college community. During 7-week clinical sessions, nursing students provided holistic nursing care through screenings, health promotion activities, and educational meetings. Having the WC as a clinical site allowed the students to assess, integrate, and synthesize didactic knowledge and critical thinking skills into the clinical setting while providing critically needed holistic nursing services to their college community. Further, the collaboration created an ongoing partnership that bridged the service and academic needs of both entities. PMID:20421756

  17. Doctor of NursiNg Practice scholarly Projects ~ 2010

    E-print Network

    Bordenstein, Seth

    of Nursing #12;FroM THe direCTor "i believe it the rarest, tho' by no means the highest talent, to be able of Nursing #12;FaCULTY & PrograM direCTorS Susan adams, Phd, rN, PMHNP-BC, FaaNP Associate Professor Lorraine Mion, Phd, rN, FaaN Independence Foundation Professor of Nursing elizabeth (Bette) Moore, Phd, r

  18. The perinatal nurse practitioner: an innovative model of advanced practice.

    PubMed

    McGee, D C

    1995-09-01

    When a major urban hospital received notice it would no longer have resident physicians to serve its perinatal population, nurses and physicians joined forces with a private university to develop a curriculum for advanced level caregivers. This willingness to rise to a challenge helped to create the Perinatal Nurse Practitioner Program and has paved the way for other needed inpatient nurse practitioner roles. PMID:7500190

  19. Infusing evidence-based instructional strategies to prepare today's military practical nurses for tomorrow's practice.

    PubMed

    Neilson, Richard A; Hopkins-Chadwick, Denise L

    2014-01-01

    Is there one best method to provide instruction to today's nursing students? The evidence found in the current literature clearly states the answer is no. The student of today is technology oriented. But for them, it's not about technology, it's about the learning that technology provides. With this understanding, this article provides a review of the efforts by the staff of the US Army Practical Nurse Course (68WM6) to infuse evidence-based instructional strategies into curriculum. Five strategies that were integrated into the curriculum are presented: computer assisted learning, gaming software, classroom response system, human patient simulators, and video recordings. All of the initiatives discussed in this article were implemented into the program of instruction over a 6-year period in an attempt to incorporate the use of appropriate technology in the learning process. The results are a testimony to the necessity of using a combination of strategies for teaching today's nursing students. In doing so, the organization not only improved the learning process, but found significant financial savings. PMID:24488873

  20. Examining Harasim's Online Collaborative Learning Theory for Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breen, Henny

    2013-01-01

    Online nursing education has been evolving at a rapid pace as it is recognized as offering the flexibility needed for practicing associate degree (ADN) and diploma prepared Registered Nurses to return to school to earn their BSN. At the same time, there is a paradigm shift in how nursing education is delivered. The focus has shifted from content…

  1. Physician Assistant and Advance Practice Nurse Care in Hospital Outpatient Departments: United States, 2008-2009

    MedlinePLUS

    ... November 2011 Physician Assistant and Advance Practice Nurse Care in Hospital Outpatient Departments: United States, 2008–2009 ... department visits Are PAs and APNs providing more care at visits to hospital OPDs? Between 2000–2001 ...

  2. Research to support evidence-based practice in COPD community nursing.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Pamela; Wilson, Ethel; Wimpenny, Peter

    2012-10-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a requirement of nurses through the generation of evidence to implementing it, in a bid to to improve clinical practice. However, EBP is difficult to achieve. This paper highlights an approach to generating evidence for enhancing community nursing services for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) through a collaborative partnership. A district nurse and two nursing lecturers formed a partnership to devise a systematic review protocol and perform a systematic review to enhance COPD practice. This paper illustrates the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) systematic review process, the review outcomes and the practitioner learning. Collaborative partnerships between academics, researchers and clinicians are a potentially useful model to facilitate enhanced outcomes in evidence-based practice and evidence application. PMID:23124376

  3. Knowing, caring, and telehealth technology: "going the distance" in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Daniel A; Pomerleau, Sophie G; Penner, Jamie L

    2013-06-01

    The use of technology in delivery of health care services is rapidly increasing, and more nurses are using telehealth to provide care by distance to persons with complex health challenges. The rapid uptake of telehealth modalities and dynamic evolution of technologies has outpaced the generation of empirical knowledge to support nursing practice in this emerging field, specifically in relation to how nurses come to know the person and engage in holistic care in a virtual environment. Knowing the person and nursing care have historically been associated with physical presence and close proximity in the nurse-client relationship, and the use of telehealth can limit the ways in which a nurse can observe the person, potentiate perceptions of distance, and lead to a reductionist perspective in care. The purpose of this article is to illuminate the dynamic and evolving nature of nursing practice in relation to the use of telehealth and to highlight gaps in nursing knowledge specific to knowing the person in a virtual environment. Such an understanding is necessary to inform future research and generate empirical evidence to support nurses in providing ethical, safe, effective, and holistic care by distance to persons through telehealth technology. PMID:23175170

  4. Registered nurses' constructed meaning of concepts of solution and their use in clinical practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, Lesley M.; Batts, Judith E.

    1991-12-01

    Since the introduction of nursing into tertiary institutions in Australia in 1975, there has been increasing interest in the teaching of physical science to nurses. Various courses in physical science for nurse students have been developed. They vary in length and content but there is agreement that concepts taught should be closely related to nursing applications. The choice of relevant concepts tends to be made by individual curriculum developers. This paper reports an examination of the use of physical science concepts and their relevance from the perspective of registered nurses practising in general ward areas. Inherent in this study is the premise that for registered nurses to have ideas of the physical science underlying their practice they must have constructed meaning first for these concepts. Specific chemical concepts related to solutions are discussed in these terms.

  5. Setting a new course for advanced practice community\\/public health nursing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Katherine Laux Kaiser; Kathleen L Barr; Bevely J Hays

    2003-01-01

    In recent years the changes in the organization and delivery of health care have created an environment that places great demands on nursing education at all levels. Determining a sound, responsive course of study in advanced practice community\\/public health nursing (C\\/PHN) is dependent on clear educational outcomes and competencies. Outcomes and competencies for C\\/PHN practice need to continue to be

  6. To what extent do nurses use research in clinical practice? A systematic review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Janet E Squires; Alison M Hutchinson; Anne-Marie Boström; Hannah M O’Rourke; Sandra J Cobban; Carole A Estabrooks

    2011-01-01

    Background  In the past forty years, many gains have been made in our understanding of the concept of research utilization. While numerous\\u000a studies exist on professional nurses' use of research in practice, no attempt has been made to systematically evaluate and\\u000a synthesize this body of literature with respect to the extent to which nurses use research in their clinical practice. The

  7. A review of intensive care nurse staffing practices overseas: what lessons for Australia ?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Therese Clarke; Elizabeth Mackinnon; Kerry England; Gayle Burr; Sue Fowler; Lynette Fairservice

    1999-01-01

    In view of market-driven health-care policies and the move to greater efficiencies within the health-care system, the cost of nursing care is being increasingly scrutinised. Different overseas practices are commonly cited as justification for changing practices within Australia. This study is based on a review of the literature on intensive care nurse staffing requirements in Australasia; specifically, New South Wales,

  8. A review of intensive care nurse staffing practices overseas: what lessons for Australia?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Therese Clarke; Elizabeth Mackinnon; Kerry England; Gayle Burr; Sue Fowler; Lynette Fairservice

    2000-01-01

    In view of market-driven health-care policies and the move to greater efficiencies within the health-care system, the cost of nursing care is being increasingly scrutinised. Different overseas practices are commonly cited as justification for changing practices within Australia. This study is based on a review of the literature on intensive care nurse staffing requirements in Australasia; specifically, New South Wales,

  9. Differences in preferences for rural job postings between nursing students and practicing nurses: evidence from a discrete choice experiment in Lao People’s Democratic Republic

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A discrete choice experiment was conducted to investigate preferences for job characteristics among nursing students and practicing nurses to determine how these groups vary in their respective preferences and to understand whether differing policies may be appropriate for each group. Methods Participating students and workers were administered a discrete choice experiment that elicited preferences for attributes of potential job postings. Job attributes included salary, duration of service until promotion to permanent staff, duration of service until qualified for further study and scholarship, housing provision, transportation provision, and performance-based financial rewards. Mixed logit models were fit to the data to estimate stated preferences and willingness to pay for attributes. Finally, an interaction model was fit to formally investigate differences in preferences between nursing students and practicing nurses. Results Data were collected from 256 nursing students and 249 practicing nurses. For both groups, choice of job posting was strongly influenced by salary and direct promotion to permanent staff. As compared to nursing students, practicing nurses had significantly lower preference for housing allowance and housing provision as well as lower preference for provision of transportation for work and personal use. Conclusions In the Lao People’s Democratic Republic, nursing students and practicing nurses demonstrated important differences in their respective preferences for rural job posting attributes. This finding suggests that it may be important to differentiate between recruitment and retention policies when addressing human resources for health challenges in developing countries, such as Laos. PMID:23705805

  10. A new mindset for quality and safety: the QSEN competencies redefine nurses' roles in practice.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Gwen; Zomorodi, Meg

    2014-10-01

    Preventable errors are a major issue in health care. The complexity of health care requires interactions among numerous providers for any patient multiple times a day. Nurses are the constant presence with patients and have an important role in coordinating the contributions of the myriad of caregivers. Nurses are also the last line of defense. Increasingly, it is recognized that nurses need to be better prepared with quality and safety competencies to have a leading role in making our healthcare system safer.This article presents evidence related to quality and safety, describes the six core competencies from the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) project for integration in nursing practice, describes a practice based on inquiry and engagement, and presents a toolkit for developing a new mindset based on new quality and safety science. PMID:25279507

  11. Training for Teachers of Nursing: A Contribution towards an Assessment of Training Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliveira, Maria de Lourdes Magalhaes

    2004-01-01

    We present an exploratory study that seeks to assess training practices and to link the training of teachers of nursing to changes in these practices. This is relevant because of the need to discover how training leads to changes in teaching practice. The objectives of the present study were to rate the importance attributed to training by…

  12. Teaching Evidence-Based Practice to Undergraduate Nursing Students: Overcoming Obstacles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Sharon D.

    2007-01-01

    Evidence-based practice is highly valued in health care literature at this time. But research suggests that U.S. RNs face many obstacles when implementing evidence-based practice including a lack of value for research in practice (Pravikoff et al, 2005). Additional obstacles may exist for traditional U.S. BSN nursing students who may not value the…

  13. POST MASTERS DOCTOR OF NURSING PRACTICE (DNP) Thursday, July 25th

    E-print Network

    Biostatisticsal Methods II Evidence Based Practice Health Policy & Politics Health Outcomes: Information Systems? This program will prepare advanced practice nurses to translate academic research, promote evidence based practice, and develop systems of care based on research utilization. Does the DNP have a place

  14. Educational role of nurse practitioners in a family practice centre

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Allyn; Moore, Ainsley; Barber, Anne; Opsteen, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine the role of nurse practitioners (NPs) as educators of family medicine residents in order to better understand the interprofessional educational dynamics in a clinical teaching setting. Design A qualitative descriptive approach, using purposive sampling. Setting A family practice centre that is associated with an academic department of family medicine and is based in an urban area in southern Ontario. Participants First-year (8 of 9) and second-year (9 of 10) family medicine residents whose training program was based at the family practice centre, and all NPs (4 of 4) who worked at the centre. Methods Semistructured interviews were conducted, which were audiotaped and transcribed. An iterative approach was used for coding and analysis. Data management software guided organization and analysis of the data. Main findings Four interconnected themes were identified: role clarification, professional identity formation, factors that enhance the educational role of NPs, and factors that limit the educational role of NPs. Although residents recognized NPs’ value in team functioning and areas of specialized knowledge, they were unclear about NPs’ scope of practice. Depending on residents’ level of training, residents tended to respond differently to teaching by NPs. More of the senior residents believed they needed to think like physicians and preferred clinical teaching from physician teachers. Junior residents valued the step-by-step instructional approach used by NPs, and they had a decreased sense of vulnerability when being taught by NPs. Training in teaching skills was helpful for NPs. Barriers to providing optimal education included opportunity, time, and physician attitudes. Conclusion The lack of an intentional orientation of family medicine residents to NPs’ scope of practice and educational role can lead to difficulties in interprofessional education. More explicit recognition of the evolving professional identity of family medicine residents might decrease resistance to teaching by NPs and ensure that interprofessional teaching and learning strategies are effective. Faculty development opportunities for all educators are required to manage these issues, both to ensure teaching competencies and to reinforce positive interprofessional collaboration. PMID:24925966

  15. Student nurses' experiences of community-based practice placement learning: a qualitative exploration.

    PubMed

    Baglin, M R; Rugg, Sue

    2010-05-01

    United Kingdom (UK) health policy has adopted an increasing community and primary care focus over recent years (Department of Health, 1997; Department of Health, 1999. Making a Difference: Strengthening the Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visitor Contribution to Health and Health Care. Department of Health, London; Department of Health, 2004. The NHS Knowledge and Skills Framework (NHS KSF). Department of Health, London). Nursing practice, education and workforce planning are called upon to adapt accordingly (Department of Health, 2004. The NHS Knowledge and Skills Framework (NHS KSF). Department of Health, London; Kenyon, V., Smith, E., Hefty, L., Bell, M., Martaus, T., 1990. Clinical competencies for community health nursing. Public Health Nursing 7(1), 33-39; United Kingdom Central Council for Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting, 1986. Project 2000: A New Preparation for Practice. UKCC, London). Such changes have major implications for pre-registration nursing education, including its practice placement element. From an educational perspective, the need for increased community nursing capacity must be balanced with adequate support for student nurses' learning needs during community-based placements. This qualitative study explored six second year student nurses' experiences of 12 week community-based practice placements and the extent to which these placements were seen to meet their perceived learning needs. The data came from contemporaneous reflective diaries, completed by participants to reflect their 'lived experience' during their practice placements (Landeen, J., Byrne, Brown, B., 1995. Exploring the lived experiences of psychiatric nursing students through self-reflective journals. Journal of Advanced Nursing 21(5), 878-885; Kok, J., Chabeli, M.M., 2002. Reflective journal writing: how it promotes reflective thinking in clinical nursing education: a students' perspective. Curationis 25(3), 35-42; Löfmark, A., Wikblad, K., 2001. Facilitating and obstructing factors for development of learning in clinical practice: a student perspective. Issues and innovations in Nursing Education. Journal of Advanced Nursing 34(1), 43-50; Priest, H., 2004. Phenomenology. Nurse Researcher 11(4), 4-6; Stockhausen, L., 2005. Learning to become a nurse: student nurses' reflections on their clinical experiences. Australian Journal of Nursing 22(3), 8-14). The data were analysed using content analysis techniques, exploring their contextual meaning through the development of emergent themes (Neuendorf, K.A., 2002. The Content Analysis Guidebook. Sage Publications, London). The identified themes related to elements of students' basic skill acquisition, the development of their working relationships with mentors, patients and others, the learning opportunities offered by community practice placements and the effects that such placements had on their confidence to practice. These themes are discussed with regard to the published literature, to arrive at conclusions and implications for future nursing education, practice and research. PMID:19570716

  16. Identification of Data Element Categories for Clinical Nursing Information Systems via Information Analysis of Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Judith R.; Corcoran, Sheila

    1988-01-01

    In order to empirically identify data elements for content of a Clinical Nursing Information System serving cardiovascular nurses, the question “What supplemental information (or data, or knowledge) do nurses seek in order to make decisions about patient care?” was asked. Data was collected from nurses working all shifts in three different agencies: a community hospital, a large private teaching hospital, and a large public teaching hospital. For each instance of supplemental information-seeking (N=178), the information needed and the reason for seeking it were noted. Four main categories of supplemental information sought were identified: Patient-related information, Institution-related information, Protocol information, and Domain Knowledge.

  17. Irish psychiatric nurses' self-reported sources of knowledge for practice.

    PubMed

    Yadav, B L; Fealy, G M

    2012-02-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is an approach to health care in which health professionals use the best evidence available to guide their clinical decisions and practice. Evidence is drawn from a range of sources, including published research, educational content and practical experience. This paper reports the findings of a study that investigated the sources of knowledge or evidence for practice used by psychiatric nurses in Ireland. The paper is part of a larger study, which also investigated barriers, facilitators and level of skills in achieving EBP among Irish psychiatric nurses. Data were collected in a postal survey of a random sample of Irish psychiatric nurses using the Development of Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire. The findings revealed that the majority of survey respondents based their practice on information which was derived from interactions with patients, from their personal experience and from information shared by colleagues and members of the multidisciplinary team, in preference to published sources of empirically derived evidence. These findings are consistent with those of the previous similar studies among general nurses and suggest that Irish psychiatric nurses face similar challenges to their general nursing counterparts in attaining of EBP. PMID:22070347

  18. Advanced practice nursing students in the patient-centered medical home: preparing for a new reality.

    PubMed

    Swartwout, Kathryn; Murphy, Marcia Pencak; Dreher, Melanie C; Behal, Raj; Haines, Alison; Ryan, Mary; Ryan, Norman; Saba, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Driven by reimbursement incentives for increased access, improved quality and reduced cost, the patient-centered medical home model of health care delivery is being adopted in primary care practices across the nation. The transition from traditional primary care models to patient-centered medical homes presents many challenges, including the assembly of a well-prepared, interprofessional provider team to achieve effective, well-coordinated care. In turn, advanced practice nursing education programs are challenged to prepare graduates who are qualified for practice in the new reality of health care reform. This article reviews the patient-centered medical home model and describes how one college of nursing joined 7 primary care physician practices to prepare advanced practice nursing students for the new realities of health care reform while supporting each practice in its transition to the patient-centered medical home. PMID:24720942

  19. Implications for nursing managers from a systematic review of practice development.

    PubMed

    Dewing, Jan

    2008-03-01

    This paper considers some of the implications for Nursing Managers arising from a recent systematic review of practice development carried out in the UK by McCormack et al. (2007a, b). The paper begins by offering some background to practice development (PD). It then summarizes the methodology and method of the systematic review before moving on to discuss, what it is suggested, are the main implications Nursing Managers need to focus on. Finally, 10 points or key messages from the review, relevant for Nursing Managers, are offered. This paper is relevant not only to managers in older people's services but to all services. PMID:18269543

  20. Use of knowledge discovery techniques to understand nurse practitioner practice patterns and their integration into a healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Sangster-Gormley, Esther; Kuo, Mu-Hsing; Borycki, Elizabeth M; Schreiber, Rita

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the feasibility of applying knowledge discovery techniques to identifying nurse practitioner practice patterns and enacted scope of practice. For the research, we plan to use data extracted from a Ministry of Health database. The data items are focused around: nurse practitioner demographics, health authorities, and encounter types. This analysis produces patterns that indicate relationships between the demographics, scope of practice and practice settings of nurse practitioners working in British Columbia. PMID:23388266

  1. Faculty Practice in Joint Appointments: Implications for Nursing Staff Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beitz, Janice M.; Heinzer, Marjorie M.

    2000-01-01

    Nursing faculty's joint appointments may involve clinical, research, or administrative roles. These dual responsibilities have many benefits but pose challenges in prioritizing work and dealing with workload increases and fatigue. Joint appointments give faculty the opportunity to provide staff development to clinical nurses. (SK)

  2. Clinical Procedure Page 1 of 2 Nursing Practice Manual

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROCEDURE FOR: Skin Tests: Administration of POLICY: 1 ­ Department of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROCEDURE FOR: Skin Tests: Administration. Physician/LIP orders must state type and strength of skin test. 2. An RN or LPN will administer ordered skin

  3. Informatics Competencies for Nurses at Four Levels of Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staggers, Nancy; Gassert, Carole A.; Curran, Christine

    2001-01-01

    A database of nursing informatics competencies was modified and validated by a panel of experts and sorted by skill levels: beginner, experienced, specialist, and innovator. The competencies encompass computer-related skills as well as knowledge and attitudes needed by nurses. (Contains 30 references.) (SK)

  4. [Application of the nursing process based on Orem's theory: a case study with a pregnant adolescent].

    PubMed

    Torres, G de V; Davim, R M; da Nóbrega, M M

    1999-04-01

    This is a descriptive study with a qualitative approach that aimed at applying the nursing process based in Orem Self-Care Theory, through a case study with a pregnant adolescent in order to identify the nursing diagnosis in the above mentioned clients, based on NANDA'S nursing diagnoses. Results obtained identified three nursing diagnoses: prejudiced adaptation, sleep disturb and familiar change process. The application of the nursing process based in Orem and the importance of the diagnosis identified for clients nursing care were evidenced. PMID:10734950

  5. Web-Based Virtual Patients in Nursing Education: Development and Validation of Theory-Anchored Design and Activity Models

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Research has shown that nursing students find it difficult to translate and apply their theoretical knowledge in a clinical context. Virtual patients (VPs) have been proposed as a learning activity that can support nursing students in their learning of scientific knowledge and help them integrate theory and practice. Although VPs are increasingly used in health care education, they still lack a systematic consistency that would allow their reuse outside of their original context. There is therefore a need to develop a model for the development and implementation of VPs in nursing education. Objective The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a virtual patient model optimized to the learning and assessment needs in nursing education. Methods The process of modeling started by reviewing theoretical frameworks reported in the literature and used by practitioners when designing learning and assessment activities. The Outcome-Present State Test (OPT) model was chosen as the theoretical framework. The model was then, in an iterative manner, developed and optimized to the affordances of virtual patients. Content validation was performed with faculty both in terms of the relevance of the chosen theories but also its applicability in nursing education. The virtual patient nursing model was then instantiated in two VPs. The students’ perceived usefulness of the VPs was investigated using a questionnaire. The result was analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results A virtual patient Nursing Design Model (vpNDM) composed of three layers was developed. Layer 1 contains the patient story and ways of interacting with the data, Layer 2 includes aspects of the iterative process of clinical reasoning, and finally Layer 3 includes measurable outcomes. A virtual patient Nursing Activity Model (vpNAM) was also developed as a guide when creating VP-centric learning activities. The students perceived the global linear VPs as a relevant learning activity for the integration of theory and practice. Conclusions Virtual patients that are adapted to the nursing paradigm can support nursing students’ development of clinical reasoning skills. The proposed virtual patient nursing design and activity models will allow the systematic development of different types of virtual patients from a common model and thereby create opportunities for sharing pedagogical designs across technical solutions. PMID:24727709

  6. Analysis of the UCSF Symptom Management Theory: Implications for Pediatric Oncology Nursing

    PubMed Central

    Linder, Lauri

    2015-01-01

    Symptom management research is a priority for both children and adults with cancer. The UCSF Symptom Management Theory (SMT) is a middle range theory depicting symptom management as a multidimensional process. A theory analysis using the process described by Walker and Avant evaluated the SMT with attention to application in research involving children with cancer. Application of the SMT in studies involving children has been limited to descriptive studies testing only portions of the theory. Findings of these studies have provided empiric support for the relationships proposed within the SMT. Considerations for future research involving children include attention to measurement of symptoms and clarity regarding the location of the parents and family within the model. With additional testing and refinement, the SMT has the potential to guide nursing research and practice to improve symptoms for children with cancer. PMID:20639345

  7. Nurses Practice Beyond Simple Advocacy to Engage in Relational Narratives: Expanding Opportunities for Persons to Influence the Public Space

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, N; Aquino-Russell, C

    2008-01-01

    In practicing existential and human advocacy, or engaging in a relational narrative, nurses may assist persons who experience health inequalities to clarify their values, and, in becoming more fully their authentic selves, community members who ordinarily feel powerless in the public space may act with confidence in influencing the distribution of health-care resources. In this paper, the writers describe research characterizing nurses’ advocacy practices and review the concepts of respect and self-interpretation as a foundation for arguing that nurses who engage in relational narratives with the persons they serve may encourage continuing acts of self-understanding. Investigators indicated that nurses characterized their practices as a therapeutic endeavor, and that their practices were grounded in respect. Practicing nurses may need self-awareness to habitually convey respect for human dignity, in addition, nurse educators ought to attend to the professional development of student nurses, providing opportunities for the formation of character traits or qualities. PMID:19319219

  8. Practice nursing in Australia: A review of education and career pathways

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Rhian M; Keleher, Helen M; Francis, Karen; Abdulwadud, Omar

    2009-01-01

    Background Nurses in Australia are often not educated in their pre registration years to meet the needs of primary care. Careers in primary care may not be as attractive to nursing graduates as high-tech settings such as intensive or acute care. Yet, it is in primary care that increasingly complex health problems are managed. The Australian government has invested in incentives for general practices to employ practice nurses. However, no policy framework has been developed for practice nursing to support career development and post-registration education and training programs are developed in an ad hoc manner and are not underpinned by core professional competencies. This paper reports on a systematic review undertaken to establish the available evidence on education models and career pathways with a view to enhancing recruitment and retention of practice nurses in primary care in Australia. Methods Search terms describing education models, career pathways and policy associated with primary care (practice) nursing were established. These search terms were used to search electronic databases. The search strategy identified 1394 citations of which 408 addressed one or more of the key search terms on policy, education and career pathways. Grey literature from the UK and New Zealand internet sites were sourced and examined. The UK and New Zealand Internet sites were selected because they have well established and advanced developments in education and career pathways for practice nurses. Two reviewers examined titles, abstracts and studies, based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. Disagreement between the reviewers was resolved by consensus or by a third reviewer. Results Significant advances have been made in New Zealand and the UK towards strengthening frameworks for primary care nursing education and career pathways. However, in Australia there is no policy at national level prepare nurses to work in primary care sector and no framework for education or career pathways for nurses working in that sector. Conclusion There is a need for national training standards and a process of accreditation for practice nursing in Australia to support the development of a responsive and sustainable nursing workforce in primary care and to provide quality education and career pathways. PMID:19473493

  9. Issues and innovations in nursing practice: Palliative care for patients with cancer: district nurses' experiences

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K Dunne; K A Sullivan; G Kernohan

    2005-01-01

    Aim. This paper reports a study exploring district nurses' experiences of providing palliative care for patients with cancer and their families. Background. There is an increasing demand for palliative care in the community, as many patients wish to die at home. District nurses are central to providing palliative care in the community, but there is a dearth of literature on

  10. Introducing advanced practice nurses \\/ nurse practitioners in health care systems: a framework for reflection and analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sabina De Geest; Philip Moons; Betty Callens; Chris Gut; Lyn Lindpaintner; Rebecca Spirig

    An increasing number of countries are ex- ploring the option of introducing Advanced Prac- tice Nurses (APN), such as Nurse Practitioners (NP), as part of the health care workforce. This is particular relevant in light of the increase of the elderly and chronically ill. It is crucial that this in- troduction is preceded by an in depth understand- ing of

  11. Educating advanced practice nurses in using social media in rural health care.

    PubMed

    Rutledge, Carolyn M; Renaud, Michelle; Shepherd, Laurel; Bordelon, Michele; Haney, Tina; Gregory, Donna; Ayers, Paula

    2011-01-01

    Health care in the United States is facing a crisis in providing access to quality care for those in underserved and rural regions. Advanced practice nurses are at the forefront of addressing such issues, through modalities such as health care technology. Many nursing education programs are seeking strategies for better educating students on technology utilization. Health care technology includes electronic health records, telemedicine, and clinical decision support systems. However, little focus has been placed on the role of social media in health care. This paper describes an educational workshop using standardized patients and hands-on experiences to introduce advanced practice nurses in a Doctor of Nursing Practice program to the role of social media in addressing issues inherent in the delivery of rural health care. The students explore innovative approaches for utilizing social media for patient and caregiver support as well as identify online resources that assist providers in a rural setting. PMID:22718665

  12. Nurse Practitioners' Knowledge, Experience, and Intention to Use Health Literacy Strategies in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Cafiero, Madeline

    2013-01-01

    Nurse practitioners' (NPs) knowledge, experience, and intention to use health literacy strategies in practice were investigated using the Theory of Planned Behavior as the theoretical framework. NPs who work in outpatient settings were recruited at a national NP conference. Participants were administered 3 self-report instruments: Health Literacy Knowledge and Experience Survey, Parts I and II; and the Health Literacy Strategies Behavioral Intention Questionnaire. Overall knowledge of health literacy and health literacy strategies was found to be low. Screening patients for low health literacy and evaluating patient education materials were found to be areas of knowledge deficit. Most NP participants used written patient education materials with alternate formats for patient education, such as audiotapes, videotapes, or computer software rarely used. Statistically significant differences were found in mean experience scores between NP level of educational preparation and NP practice settings. The intention to use health literacy strategies in practice was found to be strong. The findings of this investigation offer implications for enhancing NP curriculum and for continuing education opportunities. Increasing NPs' knowledge of health literacy and facilitating the use of health literacy strategies has the potential to change clinical practice and support improved patient outcomes. PMID:24093347

  13. Deweyan Inquiry: From Education Theory to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, James Scott

    2009-01-01

    This book presents John Dewey's theory of inquiry and applies it to various areas of the primary, middle, and secondary school curricula. "Deweyan Inquiry" brings Dewey's theory of inquiry together with educational theory and practice. James Scott Johnston uses Dewey's late masterpiece "Logic: The Theory of Inquiry" as a guide and looks at inquiry…

  14. The Influence of a Wound Care Teleassistance Service on Nursing Practice: A Case Study in Quebec

    PubMed Central

    Breton, Erik; Courcy, François; Quirion, Sonia; Côté, José; Paré, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Although telehealth is a promising solution for healthcare professionals who work in remote and rural regions, the influence of specific telehealth applications on the nursing workforce remains unknown. This case study aimed to explore the potential influence of a teleassistance service in wound care (the acronym in French is TASP) on nursing practices and on nurse retention in peripheral areas. Materials and Methods: We carried out an exploratory single case study based on 16 semistructured interviews with two promoters of TASP, five nursing managers, and nine nurses from three levels of expertise associated with this service. Results: According to participants, the main positive influences of TASP were observed in quality of care, professional autonomy, professional development, and decrease of professional isolation. Participants mentioned increased workload associated with global patient data collection at first consultation as a negative effect of TASP. Finally, three possible effects of TASP on nurse retention were identified: none or minimal, imprecise, or mostly positive. Conclusions: This case study highlights the positive influence of TASP on several dimensions of nursing practice, in addition to its essential role in improving the quality of care. However, it is important to consider that the service cannot be considered as a solution to or replacement for the shortage of nurses. PMID:24694008

  15. Impact of a nursing information system on practice patterns in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ting-Ting; Mills, Mary Etta; Lu, Ming-Huei

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure changes in nursing practice patterns between the beginning stage and a later phase of implementing the nursing information systems. The study was a two-stage data comparison analysis. The data were collected during the first 2 weeks and 1 year after installing the nursing information system. Nursing activities were checked from a list with 83 items. Data were collected by a work sampling strategy during two 2-week periods in November 2004 and November 2005. For both stages, nurses spent about 20% of their time on direct care, 25% on indirect care, 9% on unit-related activities, 30% on documentation, and 15% on personal time. After 1 year of using the nursing information system, nurses spent more time on documentation but less on indirect care and unit-related activities. When unit patient census was high, nurses spent more time on direct care. Issues regarding evaluating the impact of information systems on practice patterns were explored. PMID:18600128

  16. [Changes in nurse-midwifery practices in Taiwan].

    PubMed

    Kuo, Su-Chen

    2009-04-01

    Nurse-midwifery professionals play an important role for pregnant women in the healthcare system, providing assistance to both expectant women and their newborn children. In Taiwan, midwifery professionals have contributed significantly to women and infant health. Before 1960s, nurse-midwives were the main nursing caregivers for women and babies. However, this changed for a variety of reasons. In the past, the education of much of the population was limited to vocational high schools and five-year junior colleges. In 1999, midwifery education was extended to the college and graduate school levels. Nurse-midwives hold that pregnancy, childbirth, and breastfeeding represent natural processes. Traditionally speaking, women have been in control of pregnancy and childbirth. Healthcare offered includes the following items: proper medical consultation, collaboration with obstetricians on case management, referral of cases to other institutions, participation in women's health promotion and illness prevention. In Taiwan, in an attempt to realize the great potential of the nurse-midwifery profession, we hope to emphasize the three stages of teaching, examination, and employment. In the future, we hope that nurse-midwifery policies will be directed to promote the image of nurse-midwives and confirm their status as healthcare professionals. PMID:19319807

  17. [Nursing practice in the context of geographic isolation: implications for training].

    PubMed

    Berteloot, G; Gagnayre, R; d'Ivernois, J F

    2004-06-01

    A survey on the characteristics of the unique working context of nursing practice in remote areas of French Polynesia and semi-remote areas of northern Quebec demonstrates the importance of a specific training to best prepare the professionals who find themselves in this type of setting. Twenty professionals were interviewed: six nurses practicing in isolated stations in French Polynesia (Tuamotu Archipelago, Marquesas Islands and Austral Islands), six nurses practicing in semi-remote areas within northern Quebec (namely among the Algonquins, the Crees and the Attikameks), four officials of the French Polynesian Health Directorate and four training programme designers from Quebec who were encountered during an expedition to Montreal, Mistissini and Trois-Rivieres. The authors identified ten characteristics which were then regrouped into two categories for both of the practice contexts: first, those inherently linked to professional practice in an isolated context (including the characteristics of nursing practice, the working conditions, the community's health problems, their forms of socio-professional relations, their way of life, and their perception and responses to isolation); and second, those pertaining to the social and natural environment, the economic conditions and the community's cultural specificities. All of the results strongly demonstrate that the specificities of the skills utilised by these nurses are indeed very different than those which they received in their initial preparatory training. If a training programme specific to nursing practice in isolated settings seems essential for these nurses, their individual predisposition to practice in such a complex environment and the acknowledgement of their professional competencies are equally to be considered within the perspective of human resources management. PMID:15360177

  18. Recording skills practice on videotape can enhance learning - a comparative study between nurse lecturers and nursing students.

    PubMed

    Minardi, H A; Ritter, S

    1999-06-01

    Video recording techniques have been used in educational settings for a number of years. They have included viewing video taped lessons, using whole videos or clips of tapes as a trigger for discussion, viewing video recordings to observe role models for practice, and being video recorded in order to receive feedback on performance from peers and tutors. Although this last application has been in use since the 1960s, it has only been evaluated as a teaching method with health care professionals in the past 10 years and mostly in the areas of medical and counsellor education. In nurse education, however, use of video recording techniques has been advocated without any empirical evidence on its efficacy. This study has used nursing degree students and nurse educationalists to categorize statements from four cohorts of students who took part in a 12-day clinical supervision course during which their interpersonal skills were recorded on videotape. There were two categories: positive and negative/neutral. Analysis of the data showed that between 61% and 72% of the subjects gave an overall positive categorization to the statements in the questionnaire. Chi-square tests were significant for all groups in both categories. This suggests that both nursing students and nurse lecturers thought that course participants' statements expressed a positive belief that video tape recording is useful in enhancing students' ability to learn effective interpersonal skills in clinical supervision. PMID:10354225

  19. Primary health care as a philosophical and practical framework for nursing education: rhetoric or reality?

    PubMed

    Mackey, Sandra; Hatcher, Deborah; Happell, Brenda; Cleary, Michelle

    2013-08-01

    At least three decades after primary health care (PHC) took nursing by storm it is time to re-examine the philosophical shift to a PHC framework in pre-registration nursing curricula and overview factors which may hinder or promote full integration of PHC as a course philosophy and a contemporary approach to professional practice. Whilst nurse education has traditionally focused on preparing graduates for practice in the acute care setting, there is continuing emphasis on preparing nurses for community based primary health roles, with a focus on illness prevention and health promotion. This is driven by growing evidence that health systems are not responding adequately to the needs and challenges of diverse populations, as well as economic imperatives to reduce the burden of disease associated with the growth of chronic and complex diseases and to reduce the costs associated with the provision of health care. Nursing pre-registration programs in Australia and internationally have philosophically adopted PHC as a curriculum model for preparing graduates with the necessary competencies to function effectively across a range of settings. Anecdotal evidence, however, suggests that when adopted as a program philosophy PHC is not always well integrated across the curriculum. In order to develop a strong and resilient contemporary nursing workforce prepared for practice in both acute and community settings, pre-registration nursing programs need to comprehensively consider and address the factors impacting on the curricula integration of PHC philosophy. PMID:24099228

  20. Barriers to evidence-based practice utilization in psychiatric/mental health nursing.

    PubMed

    Alzayyat, Abdulkarim Subhi

    2014-02-01

    Many psychiatric/mental health nursing (PMHN) practices have been affected by old traditions and haphazard trial and error instead of by established scientific evidence. The purpose of this article is to explore and analyze the barriers surrounding evidence-based practice (EBP) in PMHN. I identify some strategies to overcome these barriers in an attempt to incorporate EBP within the framework of PMHN services. Barriers explain the lack of EBP in today's PMHN environment. The barriers identified in this research are: the nature of the evidence, the contribution of the psychiatric nursing researchers to EBP, the personal characteristics of psychiatric nurses, and organizational factors. While the barriers to EBP for PMHN practice are clearly apparent, the challenge, now, is to build up creative strategies through which psychiatric nurses are better able to provide EBP care as part of their everyday performance. Adaptation of a more dynamic form of EBP, increasing the number of PMHN researchers, conducting clinical research projects, choosing suitable journals for publication, training the psychiatric nurses about computer skills, integrating the EBP principles into nursing curricula, developing journal clubs, and offering organizational facilitators are essential prerequisites for the achievement of EBP in the PMHN field. It is no longer justifiable for psychiatric nurses to be deficient in knowledge and skill since the advantages of EBP for patients are well-documented. PMID:24502472

  1. [The help relationship: contexts and practices in nursing].

    PubMed

    de Melo, Rosa Cândida Carvalho Pereira

    2008-01-01

    The healing relationship emerges lately as a source of nursing care more valued by the sick people, but, given its subjectivity, has been somewhat misunderstood in both its fundamental principles, as in the identification of its importance. Thus, for better understanding of the concepts that underlie the healing relationship, we want with this article to reflect on the concept of healing relationship in nursing care, the emergence of the healing relationships in the context of nursing and its legal and ethical framework in the profession as a therapeutic element. PMID:19066162

  2. [Pain in the newborn: a challenge for nursing practice].

    PubMed

    Seixas Silva, Ana Maria

    2013-01-01

    Literature review with the objective of searching nurses' articles concerning non-pharmacological strategies for pain relief in Newborns. Being a pain relief a right of Newborn and nurses' responsibility, it's necessary to know how to do it, like the following forms: non-nutritive sucking as administration of glucose, massages, the reduction of stimuli, among others. The research was done in January of 2013 with the following keywords: "pain", "newborn", "non-pharmacological strategies", "nursing". All of the selected studies are unanimous in affirming the efficacy of glucose in pain control. We suggest the development of protocols to assist in the decision of the pain's process of the newborn. PMID:23888598

  3. Study of 23 advanced-practice nurses suggest that their ability to facilitate evidence-based practice among frontline nurses is influenced by their personal attributes, relationships with stakeholders, responsibility and workload and organisational context.

    PubMed

    van Soeren, Mary

    2013-04-01

    Implications for practice and research: Role development of advance practice nurses (APNs) and organisational culture are important contributing factors for the adoption of evidence-based practice (EBP) by nurses. Nursing and APN workload were factors limiting adoption of EBPs. Education on EBP, leadership and facilitation should be part of all APN education. Further research across a range of settings is needed to determine additional factors that may influence adoption of EBP. PMID:23125275

  4. Theory Loves Practice: A Teacher Researcher Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hochtritt, Lisa; Thulson, Anne; Delaney, Rachael; Dornbush, Talya; Shay, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Once a month, art educators from the Denver metro area have been gathering together in the spirit of inquiry to explore issues of the perceived theory and daily practice divide. The Theory Loves Practice (TLP) group was started in 2010 by Professors Rachael Delaney and Anne Thulson from Metropolitan State University of Denver (MSU) and now has 40…

  5. Protocol Page 1 of 1 Nursing Practice Manual

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    massaging extremity. 3. Monitor neurovascular checks every 8 hours and per practitioner order. 4. Monitor in neurovascular checks. APPROVAL: Nursing Standards Committee EFFECTIVE DATE: 1/94 REVISION DATES: 12/97, 5/03, 9

  6. Clinical practice in nursing homes as a key for progress

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. E. Morley

    2010-01-01

    With the aging of the world’s population there has become a major need for the development of nursing homes throughout the\\u000a world. While some countries provide high quality care for the disabled elderly, in others this is not the case. Education\\u000a of a medical director has been shown to improve the quality of the nursing home. Physicians need to have

  7. Japanese development and testing of the network establishment practices scale for community and public health nurses.

    PubMed

    Koshida, Mihoko; Morita, Takae

    2013-03-01

    The practices required by community and public health nurses to establish community networks mainly involve communicative competencies. Assessment through development and testing of such competencies is necessary for community and public health nurse educators and practitioners around the world to create and maintain a mutual support network. The purpose of this study was to develop and test a scale for community and public health nurse practices to establish and maintain community networks, and to then determine construct validity in a factorial structure model. The participants were 3970 community and public health nurses in Japan. A 43-item list was developed from a literature review, individual interviews, and repeated examinations. The secondary structural model consisted of four factors with 21 items. The internal consistency of the 21 items was highly reliable (Cronbach's ??=?0.915). Confirmatory factor analysis by structural equation modeling showed the fit criteria to be statistically significant. Attributes of the community and public health nurses (age, years of experience, work municipalities, work positions, and educational institutions) showed significant relationships with the scale scores. The findings validated the efficacy of the Network Establishment Practices Scale to assess community and public health nurse practices to establish community networks. PMID:23205766

  8. Neurodevelopmental treatment stroke rehabilitation: a critique and extension for neuroscience nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Seneviratne, Cydnee; Reimer, Marlene

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this article is to review neurodevelopmental treatment (NDT) literature and existing stroke NDT nursing research, as well as explore issues related to professional collaboration in stroke rehabilitation and implications for neuroscience nursing practice. NDT or the Bobath approach is used to encourage stroke patients to use the affected side of their body in order to promote and relearn normal movement and to reduce muscle spasticity. Neuroscience nurses have an important role in facilitating stroke patients to practise transferring out of bed and performing activities of daily living outside of physiotherapy and occupational therapy sessions. Neuroscience nurses also care for stroke patients over a 24-hour perio. Therefore, it is important that nurses understand physiotherapy and occupational therapy strategies in stroke rehabilitation. PMID:15663315

  9. Teaching Evidence-Based Practice To Undergraduate Nursing Students: Overcoming Obstacles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sharon D. Martin

    Evidence-based practice is highly valued in health care literature at this time. But research suggests that U.S. RNs face many obstacles when implementing evidence-based practice including a lack of value for research in practice (Pravikoff et al, 2005). Additional obstacles may exist for traditional U.S. BSN nursing students who may not value the importance of learning about evidence-based practice principles

  10. Lessons from the Past: Confronting Past Discriminatory Practices To Alleviate the Nursing Shortage through Increased Professional Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Diane Randall

    2003-01-01

    Reviews the history of discriminatory practices in nursing, resulting in African Americans comprising only 4.9% of practicing nurses. Urges recognition of past injustices and suggests strategies to increase participation through recruitment, retention, and practice support. (Contains 21 references.) (SK)

  11. Faculty of Nursing Nursing BScN

    E-print Network

    Faculty of Nursing Nursing BScN Nursing is the science of applying nursing knowledge, the technical aspects of practice and the art of establishing a caring relationship. As a nurse, your role may in all areas of health care. Nursing is a vibrant and dynamic profession. Nurses make a difference! www.uwindsor.ca/nursing

  12. Is there a place for reflective practice in the nursing curriculum?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Carroll; L. Curtis; A. Higgins; H. Nicholl; R. Redmond; F. Timmins

    2002-01-01

    Within this paper a review of the literature on the area of reflection and reflective practice is presented. Lecturers at Trinity College Dublin currently face a dilemma with regard to including these concepts in the nursing curricula. They are faced on the one hand with national recommendations for the use of reflection and reflective practice, and on the other with

  13. Are parish nurses prepared to incorporate the spiritual dimension into practice?

    PubMed

    Newbanks, Shirlene; Rieg, Linda S

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study assessed if parish nurses (PNs) perceive the basic preparation course they attended prepared them to incorporate the spiritual dimension into their practice. It was unclear if the course was a major variable or if previous spiritual training and experience are the critical dimensions related to whether or not PNs feel prepared to incorporate the spiritual dimension into their practice. PMID:21853715

  14. Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) 4 Yr Program of Study (DNP Psych/Mental Health)

    E-print Network

    Dyer, Bill

    1 Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) 4 Yr Program of Study (DNP Psych/Mental Health) Year 1 Fall Ethics, Law and Policy 3 9 credits Summer (Semester 6) 631 Advanced Clinical I (Psych/Mental Health) 6 (3 Practice 3 632 Advanced Clinical II (Psych/Mental Health) 6 (3 lec; 3 clinical lab) 674 DNP Scholarly

  15. Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) 4 Yr Program of Study (NP Psych/Mental Health)

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) 4 Yr Program of Study (NP Psych/Mental Health) Year 1 Fall 613 Finance and Budget 2 8 credits Summer (Semester 6) 631 Advanced Clinical I (Psych/Mental Health) 6 Practice 3 632 Advanced Clinical II (Psych/Mental Health) 6 (3 lec; 3 clinical lab) 674 DNP Scholarly

  16. Multicultural Ethics in Nursing Education: A Potential Threat to Responsible Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kikuchi, June F.

    1996-01-01

    Responsible nursing practice cannot be realized under multicultural, relativist ethics. An alternate ethical basis for practice that is grounded in moderate realism is transcultural ethics, which argues that natural human needs, inherent in common human nature, can be determined empirically and what constitutes a good can be derived therefrom.…

  17. From outside the walls: a qualitative study of nurses who recently changed from hospital-based practice to home health care nursing.

    PubMed

    Murray, T A

    1998-01-01

    Acute care facilities are no longer viewed as the center of the health care network. Efforts to reduce hospital length of stay will continue to spur the growth of care delivered in homes. With the downsizing of many hospitals, the need for nurses in acute care settings will decline. Many acute care nurses are finding themselves seeking employment opportunities in home health care settings. The purpose of this study was to examine nurses' experiences when they change from hospital-based practice to home health care nursing. The qualitative mode of inquiry was used to conduct taped-recorded interviews of 25 baccalaureate-prepared nurses in a large metropolitan area. Stressors experienced by the nurses were identified as well as adaptations required to minimize role stress. Continuing education programs can provide information and skills needed to improve nurses' competencies to function in a health care system projected to be more community-based, which includes home health care. PMID:9582772

  18. Swearing: its prevalence in healthcare settings and impact on nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Stone, T E; McMillan, M; Hazelton, M

    2010-08-01

    Despite its prevalence there has been little academic research into swearing, and certainly none on its impact on nurses and nursing practice. Nurses are, of all health workers, most likely to be targets of verbal aggression, and up to 100% of nurses in mental health settings report verbal abuse. The literature contains no reference to the effects on nurses of exposure to swearing. This paper reports the findings of a questionnaire study of 107 nurses working in three clinical settings, which used a mixed methods approach. Participants reported high levels of swearing by patients, 32% citing its occurrence from one to five times per week and 7% 'continuously'; a similar incidence arose across the nursing teams at all sites, but being sworn at in anger by another staff member happened rarely. The study failed to show significant differences in the frequency of swearing between mental health and paediatric settings, but did find gender-based differences in both frequency of use and offendedness. High degrees of distress among nurses subjected to swearing were evident; moreover, respondents appeared to have only a limited range of interventions to draw upon in dealing with exposure to such treatment. PMID:20633080

  19. Care Coordination for Children with Complex Special Health Care Needs: The Value of the Advanced Practice Nurse’s Enhanced Scope of Knowledge and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Looman, Wendy S.; Presler, Elizabeth; Erickson, Mary M.; Garwick, Ann E.; Cady, Rhonda G.; Kelly, Anne M.; Finkelstein, Stanley M.

    2012-01-01

    Efficiency and effectiveness of care coordination depends on a match between the needs of the population and the skills, scope of practice, and intensity of services provided by the care coordinator. There is limited existing literature that addresses the relevance of the APN role as a fit for coordination of care for children with SHCN. The objective of this paper is to describe the value of the advanced practice nurse’s (APN’s) enhanced scope of knowledge and practice for relationship-based care coordination in healthcare homes that serve children with complex special health care needs (SHCN). The TeleFamilies project is provided as an example of the integration of an APN care coordinator in a healthcare home for children with SHCN. PMID:22560803

  20. Following the funding trail: Financing, nurses and teamwork in Australian general practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher Pearce; Christine Phillips; Sally Hall; Bonnie Sibbald; Julie Porritt; Rachael Yates; Kathryn Dwan; Marjan Kljakovic

    2011-01-01

    Background  Across the globe the emphasis on roles and responsibilities of primary care teams is under scrutiny. This paper begins with\\u000a a review of general practice financing in Australia, and how nurses are currently funded. We then examine the influence on\\u000a funding structures on the role of the nurse. We set out three dilemmas for policy-makers in this area: lack of

  1. Making the invisible visible - operating theatre nurses' perceptions of caring in perioperative practice.

    PubMed

    Blomberg, Ann-Catrin; Bisholt, Birgitta; Nilsson, Jan; Lindwall, Lillemor

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to describe operating theatre nurses' (OTNs') perceptions of caring in perioperative practice. A qualitative descriptive design was performed. Data were collected with interviews were carried out with fifteen strategically selected operating theatre nurses from different operating theatres in the middle of Sweden. A phenomenographic analysis was used to analyse the interviews. The findings show that operating theatre nurses' perceptions of caring in perioperative practice can be summarised in one main category: To follow the patient all the way. Two descriptive categories emerged: To ensure continuity of patient care and keeping a watchful eye. The operating theatre nurses got to know the patient and as a result became responsible for the patient. They protected the patient's body and preserved patient dignity in perioperative practice. The findings show different aspects of caring in perioperative practice. OTNs wanted to be more involved in patient care and follow the patient throughout the perioperative nursing process. Although OTNs have the ambition to make the care in perioperative practice visible, there is today a medical technical approach which promotes OTNs continuing to offer care in secret. PMID:25250842

  2. Collaboration to change the landscape of nursing: a journey between urban and remote practice settings.

    PubMed

    Ferguson-Paré, Mary; Mallette, Claire; Zarins, Baiba; McLeod, Susan; Reuben, Kelly

    2010-05-01

    University Health Network (UHN) became a demonstration site to test a health human resource planning model to foster inter-organizational collaboration, knowledge transfer and exchange of nurses between an urban academic health science centre and a remote region in northern Ontario. Funding support was provided by the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. The partnership between UHN, Weeneebayko Health Ahtuskaywin (WHA) and James Bay General Hospital (JBGH) addressed retention, recruitment, professional practice development, planning and succession planning objectives. The primary goal of this partnership was to supply the staffing needs of WHA/JBGH with UHN nurses at a decreased cost for four- to six-week placement periods. This resulted in a marked decrease in agency use by approximately 40% in the WHA site during the months UHN nurses were practicing in the north, with an overall agency cost savings of $165,000 reported in the pilot year. The project also served as a recruitment and retention strategy for all organizations. It provided an opportunity to practice in new clinical settings and to engage in knowledge transfer experiences and professional development initiatives between remote and urban practice environments. In the pilot year, 37 nurses (30 from UHN and 7 from WHA) participated. They returned to their respective organizations re-energized by the different "landscape" of practice experience and toward the nursing profession itself. PMID:20463448

  3. Investigating the exercise-prescription practices of nurses working in inpatient mental health settings.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Robert; Happell, Brenda; Reaburn, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Nurses working in mental health are well positioned to prescribe exercise to people with mental illness. However, little is known regarding their exercise-prescription practices. We examined the self-reported physical activity and exercise-prescription practices of nurses working in inpatient mental health facilities. Thirty-four nurses completed the Exercise in Mental Illness Questionnaire - Health Practitioner Version. Non-parametric bivariate statistics revealed no relationship between nurses' self-reported physical activity participation and the frequency of exercise prescription for people with mental illness. Exercise-prescription parameters used by nurses are consistent with those recommended for both the general population and for people with mental illness. A substantial number of barriers to effective exercise prescription, including lack of training, systemic issues (such as prioritization and lack of time), and lack of consumer motivation, impact on the prescription of exercise for people with mental illness. Addressing the barriers to exercise prescription could improve the proportion of nurses who routinely prescribe exercise. Collaboration with exercise professionals, such as accredited exercise physiologists or physiotherapists, might improve knowledge of evidence-based exercise-prescription practices for people with mental illness, thereby improving both physical and mental health outcomes for this vulnerable population. PMID:25639383

  4. A Theory-Driven Integrative Process/Outcome Evaluation of a Concept-Based Nursing Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fromer, Rosemary F.

    2013-01-01

    The current trend in curriculum revision in nursing education is concept-based learning, but little research has been done on concept-based curricula in nursing education. The study used a theory-driven integrative process/outcome evaluation. Embedded in this theory-driven integrative process/outcome evaluation was a causal comparative…

  5. Domestic abuse as a transgressive practice: understanding nurses' responses through the lens of abjection.

    PubMed

    Bradbury-Jones, Caroline; Taylor, Julie

    2013-10-01

    Domestic abuse is a worldwide public health issue with long-term health and social consequences. Nurses play a key role in recognizing and responding to domestic abuse. Yet there is considerable evidence that their responses are often inappropriate and unhelpful, such as trivializing or ignoring the abuse. Empirical studies have identified several reasons why nurses' responses are sometimes wanting. These include organizational constraints, e.g. lack of time and privacy; and interpersonal factors such as fear of offending women and lack of confidence. We propose, however, that these factors present only a partial explanation. Drawing on the work of Julia Kristeva, we suggest that alternative understandings may be derived through applying the concept of abjection. Abjection is a psychological defence against any threat (the abject) to the clean and proper self that results in rejection of the abject. Using examples from our own domestic abuse research, we contend that exposure of nurses to the horror of domestic abuse evokes a state of abjection. Domestic abuse (the abject) transgresses established social boundaries of clean and proper. Thus when exposed to patients' and clients' experiences of it, some nurses subconsciously reject domestic abuse as a possibility (abjection). They do this to protect themselves from the horror of the act, but in so doing, render themselves unable to formulate appropriate responses. Rather than understanding the practice of some nurses as wilfully neglectful or ignorant, we argue that through a state of abjection, they are powerless to act. This does not refute existing evidence about nurses' responses to domestic abuse. Rather, as a relatively unknown concept in nursing, abjection provides an additional explanatory layer that accounts for why some nurses respond the way they do. Crucially, it elucidates the need for nurses to be supported emotionally when faced with the transgressive practice of abuse. PMID:24034160

  6. Practical knowledge of experienced nurses in critical care: a qualitative study of their narratives

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Scholars of nursing practices have claimed practical knowledge is source of knowledge in its own right, nevertheless we know little about this knowledge associated with day-to-day practice. The purpose of this study is to describe knowledge that the more experienced nurses the in ICU make use of and discover the components of care it includes. Understanding this knowledge can contribute to improving the working practices of nurses with less experience. Methods We used a phenomenologic and hermeneutic approach to conduct a qualitative study. Open in-depth dialogue interviews were conducted with 13 experienced ICU nurses selected by intentional sampling. Data was compiled on significant stories of their practice. The data analysis enabled units of meaning to be categorised and grouped into topics regarding everyday practical knowledge. Results Knowledge related to everyday practice was evaluated and grouped into seven topics corresponding to how the ICU nurses understand their patient care: 1) Connecting with, calming and situating patients who cannot communicate; 2) Situating and providing relief to patients in transitions of mechanical respiration and non-invasive ventilation; 3) Providing reassurance and guaranteeing the safety of immobilised patients; 4) The “connection” with patients in comas; 5) Taking care of the body; 6) The transition from saving life to palliative care; and 7) How to protect and defend the patient from errors. The components of caretaking that guarantee success include: the calm, care and affection with which they do things; the time devoted to understanding, situating and comforting patients and families; and the commitment they take on with new staff and doctors for the benefit of the patient. Conclusions These results show that stories of experiences describe a contextual practical knowledge that the more experienced nurses develop as a natural and spontaneous response. In critical patients the application of everyday practical knowledge greatly influences their well-being. In those cases in which the nurses describe how they have protected the patients from error, this practical knowledge can mean the difference between life and death. The study highlights the need to manage practical knowledge and undertake further research. The study is useful in keeping clinical practice up-to-date. PMID:25132455

  7. Nursing Practice Should Be Informed by the Best Available Evidence, but Should All First-Level Nurses Be Competent at Research Appraisal and Utilization?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Robert; Taylor, Shirley

    2002-01-01

    The British model of nurses as finders, appraisers, and users of research in practice is unattainable, given the technical complexity of research and the skills and time required. Clinical governance mechanisms and accountability demands further undermine the approach. An alternative is development of nursing research specialists and…

  8. Nurse as Educator: Principles of Teaching and Learning for Nursing Practice

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Nursing as a profession continues to attract the best and the brightest students. With all of this interest, students may find themselves looking for high quality resources to supplement their classroom instruction. This site was designed to accompany the Nurse as Educator textbook but can be used without the accompanying volume, if so desired. A great place to start is the Student Resources area, which contains links to flashcards, interactive glossaries, crossword puzzles, and small group discussion questions. Teachers will definitely appreciate the Case Studies area as it presents a solid set of case studies related to real world nursing encounters. The site is rounded out by the Web Links area which includes germane resources related to each chapter from the book.

  9. Evidence-based strategies for teaching dysrhythmia monitoring practices to staff nurses.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Susan Jane

    2011-07-01

    Standards for dysrhythmia monitoring were established by the American Heart Association in 2004, but they have not been fully implemented in everyday nursing practice. Nurses working on units with cardiac monitoring must be able to prepare the skin and place electrodes correctly, monitor in the appropriate lead, and identify potentially lethal dysrhythmias. This article presents a literature review of evidence-based strategies for educating staff nurses on dysrhythmia monitoring practices. Based on the findings of this literature review, there is evidence to support the use of an interactive web-based learning format combined with unit-based collaborative activities and competency validation. The program should incorporate Chickering and Gamson's seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education. More research is needed with randomized controlled studies to determine the most effective strategies. PMID:21485981

  10. Enhancing nurses' capacity to facilitate learning in nursing students: effective dissemination and uptake of best practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Emma; Henderson, Amanda; Winch, Sarah

    2007-10-01

    The preparation of nursing students for the real world of practice is a significant contemporary issue for health care and education institutions globally. Positive learning experiences are enabled through positive role models and attitudes which impact on ward culture. Although these best practices have been described, they have not been assimilated into the health-care system as the uptake of evidence is fraught with difficulties. Using the problem-solving approach of fitting evidence into practice--Read, Think, Do, this paper describes practical activities throughout the process to assimilate evidence. In particular, it details effective strategies that take into account the clinical context, such as displaying posters, demonstration of problem resolution in small group sessions and role modelling, and a presence in the clinical area. All of these contribute to the uptake of the guidelines to improve student experiences within the clinical setting. PMID:17883719

  11. Why 4 years when 3 will do? Enhanced knowledge for rural nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Amanda; Carter, Leah; Martin, Sonia; Williams, Sari

    2004-06-01

    In Australia, debates over the appropriate length of undergraduate nursing programs have a long history. Submissions from both universities and industry to key government reports have consistently argued that the current minimum entry level of practice, a three-year program, is too short to enable students to gain the knowledge and skills necessary for the contemporary nursing role. Despite these submissions, the established entry level for nursing practice in Australia remains a three-year undergraduate bachelor degree. However, there is a small group of high-achieving students who will begin practice at the end of a four-year program. Little is known about these programs, or the students who are currently enrolled in them. Designed as a collaborative endeavour, based on co-operative inquiry, the study discussed in this article aimed to provide an insight into aspects of a four-year undergraduate nursing program. Potentially, the broader theoretical and clinical preparation that is possible in a four-year program provides students with enhanced learning opportunities that will enable them to graduate with more confidence and greater ability. In this study a four-year program provided an opportunity for a regional university to prepare students for the demanding realities of a complex area of practice, rural nursing. PMID:15154890

  12. Doctor of NursiNg Practice scholarly Projects ~ 2011

    E-print Network

    Bordenstein, Seth

    for Cultural Diversity Kathryn lindstrom, Phd, FNP-BC, aCHPN Assistant Professor of Nursing Palliative Care the competencies necessary for planning and initiating change within health care systems as members and leaders of interprofessional teams, recognizing the current state of evidence and societal needs Colleen Conway-welch, Phd, CNM

  13. Administrative Procedure Page 1 of 2 Nursing Practice Manual

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    (APRN) or Physician Assistant (PA) who is medically responsible for the care of the patient; b. Senior changes or significant deterioration in the patient's condition and for assuring that there is physician. 2. The nurse notifies the responsible physician utilizing appropriate channels and chain of command

  14. Pain Management: A Practical Approach to Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wacker, Margaret S.; Pawasauskas, Joyce

    2002-01-01

    Nine brief onsite educational sessions of 10-20 minutes each trained nurses in pain management techniques. Participants recognized the value of brief presentations, but wanted more time to learn the material. The content was made available on disk for further study. (SK)

  15. Procedure Page 1 of 2 Clinical Manual / Nursing Practice Manual

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    labeled cord blood specimen will be acceptable as the ABO/Rh confirmation specimen only for newborn of Nursing The University of Connecticut Health Center PROCEDURE FOR: Blood Components: Type and Screen / ABO of specimens is as critical as checking blood components prior to administration. 2. Type and Screen specimens

  16. Protocol Page 1 of 3 Nursing Practice Manual

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    The University of Connecticut Health Center PROTOCOL FOR: Ostomy Care POLICY: 1. The Wound-Ostomy nurse will be discharged with appropriate prescriptions for ostomy supplies. DESIRED PATIENT OUTCOMES: 1. Patient will experience minimal/no complications related to bladder or bowel diversion. 2. Peristomal skin integrity

  17. Integrating Social Theory Into Public Health Practice

    PubMed Central

    Potvin, Louise; Gendron, Sylvie; Bilodeau, Angèle; Chabot, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    The innovative practice that resulted from the Ottawa Charter challenges public health knowledge about programming and evaluation. Specifically, there is a need to formulate program theory that embraces social determinants of health and local actors’ mobilization for social change. Likewise, it is imperative to develop a theory of evaluation that fosters reflexive understanding of public health programs engaged in social change. We believe advances in contemporary social theory that are founded on a critique of modernity and that articulate a coherent theory of practice should be considered when addressing these critical challenges. PMID:15798114

  18. Assessment of advanced practice palliative care nursing competencies in nurse practitioner students: implications for the integration of ELNEC curricular modules.

    PubMed

    Shea, Joyce; Grossman, Sheila; Wallace, Meredith; Lange, Jean

    2010-04-01

    Advanced practice nurses (APRNs) have key roles in the care of patients who are nearing death and those living with a disabling chronic disease. This article describes a mixed-method formative assessment of 36 graduate nursing students' knowledge about and attitudes toward palliative care preliminary to curricular integration of the End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC) graduate core modules. Students' knowledge about palliative care was assessed using the 106-item ELNEC examination. In addition, qualitative data were gathered regarding students' definitions of palliative care, the role of the APRN in palliative care, and their definitions of a "good" and "bad" death. Results revealed students' limited knowledge about palliative care. Qualitative findings indicated that most students exclusively linked palliative care with end-of-life care and believed that the treatment they provide should have the goal of prolonging life over maintaining quality of life. Implications for curriculum design, advanced practice role development, and collaboration with community health partners are discussed. PMID:19954137

  19. Computational geometry From theory to practice,

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ­ Computational geometry ­ From theory to practice, From linear objects to curved objects. Monique of computational geometry is often tempted to plunge into essentially theoretical research, in particular . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 1.6 Towards Other Geometries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 1.6.1 Space

  20. Quantum Cryptography: from Theory to Practice

    E-print Network

    Hoi-Kwong Lo; Norbert Lütkenhaus

    2007-03-13

    Quantum cryptography can, in principle, provide unconditional security guaranteed by the law of physics only. Here, we survey the theory and practice of the subject and highlight some recent developments.

  1. [One year Advanced Nursing Practice in pediatric cardiology - a first review].

    PubMed

    Spitz-Köberich, Christine; Steinle-Feser, Bettina

    2010-12-01

    In 2008, the patient-oriented concept of Advanced Nursing Practice (ANP) was introduced to the Pediatric Cardiology Division at the University Medical Center Freiburg (Germany) in order to meet the needs of the in majority chronically ill patients. The goal of ANP was to offer an extended and in-depth support and care to the patients. The Advanced Practice Nurse (APN), a nurse with a master degree in nursing science, offers direct care to patients, parents and families. In the first months, the APN conducted focus group discussions to explore potential interventions. Out of these focused discussions, the APN established training and counseling programs such as a medication management prior to hospital discharge and a training for parents in the recognition of heart failure signs. The goal of these programs was to increase parents' confidence and to support their effective caring for their child. Until today, the feedback of patients, parents and staff is positive but an evaluation is still missing. It was obvious that the successful implementation of such a new concept requires time and the involvement of the entire nursing team. To implement the concept in this environment, the APN also had to focus on the professional development of the nursing staff especially during the first month. PMID:21154252

  2. Nursing interventions in the clinical practice of an intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    de Fátima Lucena, Amália; de Gutiérrez, Maria Gaby Rivero; Echer, Isabel Cristina; de Barros, Alba Lucia Bottura Leite

    2010-01-01

    This cross-sectional study was carried out at a university hospital to describe the nursing interventions most frequently performed in the clinical practice of an intensive care unit, based on nursing care prescriptions, and to investigate their similarity to the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC). The sample consisted of 991 hospitalizations of patients. Data were retrospectively collected from the computer database and analyzed through descriptive statistics and cross-mapping. A total of 57 different NIC interventions frequently used in the unit were identified; most of them in the complex (42%) and basic physiological (37%) domains, in the classes 'respiratory management' and 'self-care facilitation'. Similarity between the nursing care prescribed and nursing interventions/NIC was found in 97.2% of the cases. The conclusion is that the interventions/NIC used in the clinical practice of this intensive care unit reflects the level of complexity of nursing care, which is mainly directed at the regulation of the body's physical and homeostatic functioning. PMID:21120405

  3. Increasing the practice of questioning among pediatric nurses: "The Growing Culture of Clinical Inquiry" project.

    PubMed

    Laibhen-Parkes, Natasha

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an innovative methodology implemented in an acute care pediatric setting to build nurses' confidence and competence in questioning practice. The Growing Culture of Clinical Inquiry (GCCI) project was composed of several evidence-based strategies to attain and maintain a spirit of clinical inquiry. These strategies included PowerPoint presentations, evidence-based practice (EBP) unit champions, patient-intervention-comparison-outcome (PICO) boxes, Clinical Inquiry Posters, summaries of evidence (SOE), layman's SOE, medical librarian in-services, and journal clubs. After 1 year of implementation, the GCCI project was evaluated and found to be a promising methodology for fostering a culture of inquiry among pediatric nurses. PMID:24188785

  4. Nursing Practice Manual Page 1 of 3 John Dempsey Hospital-Department of Nursing

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    The University of Connecticut Health Center PROTOCOL FOR: Post-Operative Care: General Care of the Post: Assessment: Scope of Nursing Physical Assessment: Adult Inpatient. CLINICAL ASSESSMENT AND CARE and reapply stockings for skin assessments. 4. Progressive activity per order. 5. Cardiac monitoring

  5. Using simulation technology to identify gaps between education and practice among new graduate nurses.

    PubMed

    Everett-Thomas, Ruth; Valdes, Beatriz; Valdes, Guillermo R; Shekhter, Ilya; Fitzpatrick, Maureen; Rosen, Lisa F; Arheart, Kristopher L; Birnbach, David J

    2015-01-01

    Applied knowledge was observed among nurse groups from a medical-surgical residency program to measure clinical performance during simulation training. Twenty groups of new graduate nurses were observed during five simulated clinical scenarios, and their performances were scored on a 24-item checklist. Nurse groups showed significant improvement (p < 0.001) in applied knowledge in four clinical domains from week 1 to week 5, and the results provided valuable information of the groups' overall performances. In two of the five scenarios, poor decisions and prioritization of competing tasks were factors associated with lower performance group scores. Complex patient conditions may pose a challenge for new graduate nurses, and standardized training during the residency program may help instructors recognize specific factors to address during the transition from education to practice. PMID:25406636

  6. Evidence-based Nursing Practice: To Infinity and Beyond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pape, Tess M.

    2003-01-01

    Provides an historical background for evidence-based practice and methods for assimilating research into practice. Information searching, systematic reviews, and other decision-making models are discussed using specific questions for establishing policy guidelines. Stresses the need for evidence-based practice implementing the best-known practices

  7. Authenticated Encryption in Theory and in Practice

    E-print Network

    Paterson, Kenny

    Authenticated Encryption in Theory and in Practice Jean Paul Degabriele Thesis submitted;Abstract Authenticated encryption refers to a class of cryptographic schemes that simulta- neously provide authenticated encryption as used in practice, and authenticated encryption as studied in the framework of theo

  8. Common Intra-Cluster Competencies Needed in Selected Occupational Clusters. Final Report. Supplemental Volume VII: Licensed Practical Nurse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClurg, Ronald B.

    An analysis of survey responses from a sample of licensed practical nurses on competency characteristics for their occupation is presented in this document. (Licensed practical nurse is one of seventeen occupation groups included in this research.) The competencies are reported in five categories: (1) those competencies selected by the respondents…

  9. Evidence-based practice and related information literacy skills of nurses in Singapore: An exploratory case study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Intan Azura Mokhtar; Shaheen Majid; Schubert Foo; Xue Zhang; Yin-Leng Theng; Yun-Ke Chang; Brendan Luyt

    2012-01-01

    Increased demand for medical or healthcare services has meant that nurses are to take on a more proactive and independent role intending to patients, providing basic treatment and deciding relevant clinical practice. This, in turn, translates into the need for nurses to be able to translate research and evidence into their practice more efficiently and effectively. Hence, competencies in looking

  10. Managing Challenging Situations in Practice: a new program developed to meet the specific needs of nursing students.

    PubMed

    Lyng, Colette; Cocoman, Angela; Ward, Emer; McGrath, Mary

    2012-11-01

    Health care workers, nurses, and nursing students face a high risk of workplace aggression and violence. Potential adverse consequences oblige health care providers and educators to protect the safety of everyone in the health care setting. It is broadly agreed that health care personnel should receive education and training in the management of work-related aggression and violence. However, there are no training programs designed to meet the specific needs of nursing students. In the absence of Irish or international policies or guidelines, an evidence-based training program for first-year undergraduate nursing students was developed. Its focus was to enable nursing students to recognize potential problems and develop the skills necessary to appropriately handle situations that may arise during their clinical nursing practice. This article outlines the development and delivery of a training program for first-year nursing students, entitled Managing Challenging Situations in Practice. PMID:23061522

  11. Challenges of Applying Continuing Education in Tehran Hospital Practice as Viewed By Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, Laleh; Dehghan Nayeri, Nahid; Salehi, Tahmineh; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan

    2015-01-01

    Background Although many planners of professional continuing education programs believe that this type of education positively affects the nurses’ performance, the results obtained by conducted research do not confirm such a perspective. In fact, inadequate application of these trainings in clinical practice is among the most challenging areas in nursing practices. Hence, this study was conducted to describe the challenges nurses encounter in order to apply what they have learned during continuing education programs in clinical settings of TUMS hospitals. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on 400 medical-surgical nurses who worked in the hospitals of Tehran University of Medical sciences. For sampling, after listing all the general hospitals, their wards were selected in proportion to hospital. Nurses filled out a questionnaire about factors affecting the application of continuing education. The questionnaire contained 43 items and the dimensions were supportive-organizational, individual, professional, and educational program design factors. The analysis was carried out using parametric and non-parametric method using SPSS 16 package. Results The results showed while 48.5% and 53.8% of nurses mentioned organizational and professional factors, respectively as the most inhibiting factors; only 2.25% of the nurses believed that organizational factors are facilitating. Conclusion The results obtained in this study are important regarding the fact that organizational and professional factors have a key role in applying or lack of application of learned materials. Thus, hospital authorities as well as nursing managers can provide the necessary condition in application of continuing education through promotion of facilitating factors and eliminating the hindering ones.  PMID:26005692

  12. A nursing partnership: the forces of magnetism guiding evidence-based practice in the Republic of Armenia.

    PubMed

    Bentson, Joanne; Latayan, Monica B; Olander, Linda; Rocco, Joanne

    2005-01-01

    A team of nurses at North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset, New York, has been participating in a global collaboration with nurses at Erebouni Medical Center in Yerevan, Armenia. During this collaboration, they have built on work initiated by representatives of the American International Health Alliance and the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) to develop application of evidence-based practice in the Armenian nurse's work environment. Their collective efforts have resulted in initiating nursing assessments and plans of care, position descriptions and performance appraisals, competency assessment tools, and performance improvement tools. Overall, the respect for nurses at Erebouni Medical Center has significantly improved. In October 2004, nurses at Erebouni Medical Center were recognized by the ANCC with the Journey to Nursing Excellence Award. PMID:16121496

  13. A Standardized Shift Handover Protocol: Improving Nurses’ Safe Practice in Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Malekzadeh, Javad; Mazluom, Seyed Reza; Etezadi, Toktam; Tasseri, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: For maintaining the continuity of care and improving the quality of care, effective inter-shift information communication is necessary. Any handover error can endanger patient safety. Despite the importance of shift handover, there is no standard handover protocol in our healthcare settings. Methods: In this one-group pretest-posttest quasi-experimental study conducted in spring and summer of 2011, we recruited a convenience sample of 56 ICU nurses. The Nurses’ Safe Practice Evaluation Checklist was used for data collection. The Content Validity Index and the inter-rater correlation coefficient of the checklist was 0.92 and 89, respectively. We employed the SPSS 11.5 software and the Mc Nemar and paired-samples t test for data analysis. Results: Study findings revealed that nurses’ mean score on the Safe Practice Evaluation Checklist increased significantly from 11.6 (2.7) to 17.0 (1.8) (P < 0.001). Conclusion: using a standard handover protocol for communicating patient’s needs and information improves nurses’ safe practice in the area of basic nursing care. PMID:25276725

  14. Readiness of U.S. nurses for evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Pravikoff, Diane S; Tanner, Annelle B; Pierce, Susan T

    2005-09-01

    Evidence-based practice is a systematic approach to problem solving for health care providers, including RNs, characterized by the use of the best evidence currently available for clinical decision making, in order to provide the most consistent and best possible care to patients. Are RNs in the United States prepared to engage in this process? This study examines nurses' perceptions of their access to tools with which to obtain evidence and whether they have the skills to do so. Using a stratified random sample of 3,000 RNs across the United States, 1,097 nurses (37%) responded to the 93-item questionnaire. Seven hundred sixty respondents (77% of those who were employed at the time of the survey) worked in clinical settings and are the focus of this article. Although these nurses acknowledge that they frequently need information for practice, they feel much more confident asking colleagues or peers and searching the Internet and World Wide Web than they do using bibliographic databases such as PubMed or CINAHL to find specific information. They don't understand or value research and have received little or no training in the use of tools that would help them find evidence on which to base their practice. Implications for nursing and nursing education are discussed. PMID:16138038

  15. Term base for nursing practices with elderly women with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Márcia Cristina de Figueiredo; Bittencourt, Greicy Kelly Gouveia Dias; Nóbrega, Maria Miriam Lima da; Nogueira, Jordana de Almeida; Silva, Antonia Oliveira

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to create a term base for nursing practices with elderly women with HIV/AIDS. This documental descriptive research was conducted at the Universidade Federal de Paraíba, from August 2012 to July 2013, based on a list of terms from the Integrated Plan to Combat the Feminization of AIDS and other STDs. These terms were cross-mapped with those of the International Classification for Nursing Practices 2011 (CIPE(r) 2011) and use of these terms in nursing practices was confirmed with the help of 15 participants. The base comprised 106 constant terms and 69 non-constant terms in the CIPE(r) 2011. Results revealed the need to reconsider nursing care for elderly women with HIV/AIDS in light of epidemiological changes in relation to aging and feminization of the disease. The term base will support the construction of more appropriate wording for nursing diagnoses, results and interventions for elderly women with HIV/AIDS. PMID:26098799

  16. Theory into Practice: A Bridge Too Far?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defazio, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    This article proposes a research agenda that addresses the gap between theory and practice in the area of instructional theory. It reflects the beliefs of this writer and attempts to address current issues in the field of instructional technology. Citing the limited literature that currently exists, the purpose of this article is to bring to the…

  17. Self-Directed Learning: Emerging Theory & Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Huey B.; And Others

    This book contains the following collection of papers: "Self-Directed Learning: Emerging Theory and Practice" (Long); "Self-Directed Orientation toward Learning: A Learning Style" (Bonham); "Self-Direction and Problem Solving: Theory and Method" (Peters); "Facilitating Self-Directed Learning: Not a Contradiction in Terms" (Garrison); "Development…

  18. Perspectives on Writing: Research, Theory, and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indrisano, Roselmina, Ed.; Squire, James R., Ed.

    Providing a foundation in which researchers may build future research and theory and in which teachers may design more effective classroom practice, this book presents 12 essays that bring together the contributions of researchers and teacher-scholars to present the significant theory and research related to the writing process. The book is…

  19. Statement on nursing: a personal perspective.

    PubMed

    McCutcheon, Tonna

    2004-01-01

    Contemporary nursing is based on a conglomerate of theoretical nursing models. These models each incorporate four central concepts: person, health, environment, and nursing. By defining these concepts, nurses develop an individual framework from which they base their nursing practice. As an aspiring nurse practitioner in the gastroenterology field, I have retrospectively assessed my personal definitions of person, health, environment, and nursing. From these definitions, I am able to incorporate specific theoretical frameworks into my personal belief system, thus formulating a basis for my nursing practice. This foundation is comprised of the influence of nursing theorists Jean Watson, Sister Callista Roy, Kolcaba, Florence Nightingale, and Ida J. Orlando; the Perioperative Patient-Focused Model; Watson's Theory of Human Caring; theories regarding transpersonal human caring and healing; and feminist theories. Therefore, this article describes self-examination of nursing care by defining central nursing concepts, acknowledging the influence of nursing theorists and theories, and developing a personal framework from which I base my nursing practice. PMID:15502517

  20. Student nurses as peer-mentors: collegiality in practice.

    PubMed

    Gilmour, Jean A; Kopeikin, Anna; Douché, Jeanie

    2007-01-01

    Mentoring is promoted as a key strategy for supporting nursing students and new practitioners in clinical settings. However, mentoring is also a complex process, requiring the development of bounded and purposeful relationships underpinned by knowledge, experience and opportunities for reflection. This paper reports the findings of an evaluation by second-year nursing student mentors and first-year mentee students of a short peer-mentoring programme. The main objective of the programme was to support students making the transition to the university and nursing. At a more focused professional level, the programme also provided the opportunity for students to be a mentor or to be mentored, as a learning precursor to being mentored in the clinical setting. The programme provided rich learning opportunities for the development of the qualities and skills required for mentoring roles and was a vehicle for encouraging collegial interaction and learning. The students' evaluation of the programme also demonstrated that formal mentoring programmes require considerable organisational investment and ongoing commitment in educational and clinical settings. Mentors and mentees require time for face-to-face meetings and discussion, effective and on-going communication channels, and adequate role preparation. PMID:17689422

  1. Research in Nursing Practice, Education, and Administration: Collaborative, Methodological, and Ethical Implications. Proceedings of the Research Conference of the Southern Council on Collegiate Education for Nursing (3rd, Baltimore, Maryland, December 2-3, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strickland, Ora L., Ed.; Damrosch, Shirley P., Ed.

    Collaborative research in nursing is discussed in five papers from the 1983 conference of the Southern Council on Collegiate Education for Nursing. Also included are 32 abstracts of nursing research, focusing on clinical practice, as well as nursing education and research models. Paper titles and authors are as follows: "Building a Climate for…

  2. Intelligent Agents: Theory and Practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Wooldridge; Nicholas R. Jennings

    1995-01-01

    The concept of an agent has become important in both Artificial Intelligence (AI) and mainstream computer science. Our aim in this paper is to point the reader at what we perceive to be the most important theoretical and practical issues associated with the design and construction of intelligent agents. For convenience, we divide these issues into three areas (though as

  3. Educational Management: Theory and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Tony

    This document is a chapter in "The Principles and Practice of Educational Management," which aims to provide a systematic and analytical introduction to the study of educational management. The structure of the book reflects the main substantive areas of educational leadership and management, and most of the major themes are covered in the…

  4. The Nurse as Advocate: A Grounded Theory Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sessler Branden, Pennie

    2012-01-01

    The nursing profession is entering an exciting time of new professional opportunities. As the United States of America (USA) deals with its health care crisis, nursing is positioned to determine the trajectory of health care and health policy. However, nurses are underrepresented in major forums where they could be change agents on this new path.…

  5. School of Nursing BULLETIN OF YALE UNIVERSITY

    E-print Network

    Management, Policy, and Leadership Specialty Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Specialty Psychiatric­Mental Health Pediatric Nurse Practitioner 48 Psychiatric­Mental Health Nurse Practitioner 48 Doctor of Nursing Practice Family Nurse Practitioner Specialty Midwifery/Women's Health Nurse Practitioner Specialty Nursing

  6. Evidence-based psychiatric nursing practice: Rhetoric or reality

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gail W. Stuart

    2001-01-01

    The most desirable basis to substantiate clinical practice is the evidence of well-established research findings. Developing evidence-based care involves defining the clinical question, finding the evidence, analyzing the evidence, using the evidence, and evaluating the outcome. Practice guidelines and clinical algorithms are useful tools for applying research findings in a practical way. Other mental health professionals are actively incorporating an

  7. Art Therapy in Theory & Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulman, Elinor, Ed.; Dachinger, Penny, Ed.

    The essays in this collection are grounded in theoretical underpinnings which range from Freud to Montessori. The focus encompasses educational and psychiatric concerns. Essays are organized in 4 parts. Part 1, "Theory of Art Therapy," includes: (1) "Art Therapy: Problems of Definition" (Elinor Ulman); (2) "Therapy is Not Enough: The Contribution…

  8. Constructivism. Theory, Perspectives, and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fosnot, Catherine Twomey, Ed.

    The 13 essays in this book examine the theory of constructivism in relation to teaching and learning. The first section provides an account of the epistemological, psychological, and sociocultural research that serves as the theoretical basis of constructivism, and includes the following chapters: "Introduction: Aspects of Constructivism" (Ernst…

  9. Intelligent agents: theory and practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Woolridge; N. Jennings

    1995-01-01

    Abstract The concept of an agent has become,important in both Artificial Intelligence (AI) and mainstream,computer,science. Our aim in this paper is to point the reader at what we perceive to be the most important theoretical and practical issues as sociated with the design and construction of intelligent agents. For convenience, we divide these issues into three areas (though as the

  10. Critical Friends: An Investigation of Shared Narrative Practice between Education and Nursing Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baguley, Margaret; Brown, Andy

    2009-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a pilot research project that investigated the perceived educational value of sharing narrative practice amongst graduate students from the School of Education and the School of Nursing and Midwifery at the University of Tasmania. During a semester the graduate students reflected upon and wrote about a…

  11. Practice in Computer-Based Testing and Performance on the National Certification Examination for Nurse Anesthetists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dosch, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    The general aim of the present retrospective study was to examine the test mode effect, that is, the difference in performance when tests are taken on computer (CBT), or by paper and pencil (PnP). The specific purpose was to examine the degree to which extensive practice in CBT in graduate students in nurse anesthesia would raise scores on a…

  12. Translating Research into Practice in Nursing Homes: Can We Close the Gap?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahman, Anna N.; Applebaum, Robert A.; Schnelle, John F.; Simmons, Sandra F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: A gap between research and practice in many nursing home (NH) care areas persists despite efforts by researchers, policy makers, advocacy groups, and NHs themselves to close it. The reasons are many, but two factors that have received scant attention are the dissemination process itself and the work of the disseminators or change agents.…

  13. The role of the advanced practice nurse in post-stroke care management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Wright; S. Hazelett; J. Weinhardt; D. Jarjoura; K. Hua; M. Gareri; S. Sikora; K. Allen

    2003-01-01

    Background: There is a lack of literature describing the role of the advanced practice nurse (APN) in care management (CM) of stroke victims. The purpose of this study is to describe a comprehensive post-stroke CM intervention coordinated by an APN in collaboration with an interdisciplinary team and the patient’s PCP. Methods: Subjects were part of a randomized pilot study of

  14. A Bridge between Two Cultures: Uncovering the Chemistry Concepts Relevant to the Nursing Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Corina E.; Henry, Melissa L. M.; Barbera, Jack; Hyslop, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on the undergraduate course that covers basic topics in general, organic, and biological (GOB) chemistry at a mid-sized state university in the western United States. The central objective of the research was to identify the main topics of GOB chemistry relevant to the clinical practice of nursing. The collection of data was…

  15. Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Degree 3 Yr Program of Study (NP, Psych/Mental Health)

    E-print Network

    Dyer, Bill

    Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Degree 3 Yr Program of Study (NP, Psych/Mental Health) Fall Clinical I (Psych/Mental Health) 6 (3 lec; 3 clinical lab) 11 credits Fall (Semester 4) 610 Health Care Informatics 3 632 Advanced Clinical II (Psych/Mental Health) 6 (3 lec; 3 clinical lab) 674 DNP Scholarly

  16. Student Assessment System. Domain Referenced Tests. Allied Health Occupations/Practical Nursing. Volume 1: Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Bruce; And Others

    These performance tests for the area of allied health occupations/practical nursing consist of a sampling technique (domain referenced tests) which covers all the possible performance situations. When used in total, they may also serve as a comprehensive test. Introductory materials discuss domain referenced testing, determining the domains, and…

  17. Telehealth: preparing advanced practice nurses to address healthcare needs in rural and underserved populations.

    PubMed

    Rutledge, Carolyn M; Haney, Tina; Bordelon, Michele; Renaud, Michelle; Fowler, Christianne

    2014-01-01

    Healthcare is being confronted with questions on how to deliver quality, affordable, and timely care to patients, especially those in rural areas, in systems already burdened by the lack of providers. Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs) have been challenged to lead this movement in providing care to these populations through the use of technologies, specifically telehealth. Unfortunately, APRNs have limited exposure to telehealth during their educational experience, thereby limiting their understanding and comfort with telehealth. To address this problem, a telehealth program was developed at a large university that prepares Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) APRN students. The telehealth program, embedded into the DNP curriculum, consisted of a simulation workshop, practice immersion, and written project. This program was well received by students, making them aware of the benefits and barriers to the implementation of telehealth as a care delivery modality. Telehealth was embraced as students implemented the program in their own practices. PMID:24423469

  18. Conceptualising the functional role of mental health consultation-liaison nurse in multi-morbidity, using Peplau's nursing theory.

    PubMed

    Merritt, Michael K; Procter, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the mental health consultation-liaison nursing (MHCLN) role and links this to the interpersonal relations theory of nurse theorist Hildegard Peplau. The paper argues that, as mental health nursing care around the world is increasingly focused upon meaningful therapeutic engagement, the role of the MHCLN is important in helping to reduce distressing symptoms, reduce the stigma for seeking help for mental health problems and enhancing mental health literacy among generalist nurses. The paper presents a small case exemplar to demonstrate interpersonal relations theory as an engagement process, providing patients with methodologies which allow them to work through the internal dissonance that exists in relation to their adjustment to changes in life roles precipitated by physical illness. This dissonance can be seen in the emergence of anxiety, depression and abnormal/psychogenic illness behaviours. This paper concludes arguing for considerable effort being given to the nurse-patient relationship that allows for the patient having freedom to use strategies that may help resolve the dissonance that exists. PMID:20509800

  19. Changing demographics in New York State: implications for nursing education and practice.

    PubMed

    Johnston, J G

    1989-06-01

    In the past, most women and men entering nursing in New York State were the children of European immigrants. In recent years, with changes in federal immigration laws, the ethnic composition of high-school and college age students has become more diverse. Demographic changes, combined with the fact that more career opportunities are available to women, have resulted in an increasingly heterogeneous population in nursing schools statewide. One effect of this diversity has been that many schools of nursing now have varying percentages of students who are non-primary speakers of English. The findings of a study conducted in one such baccalaureate school of nursing with an extremely ethnically and linguistically diverse student population indicated that language was the major variable predictive of success on the NCLEX-RN, exerting a greater effect than the academic parameters of grades and scores on standardized tests. The effects of the demographic changes on the recruitment and retention of nursing students able both to complete a program and to achieve success on the NCLEX-RN has implications for nursing education and practice in New York State. PMID:2732814

  20. Effect of reflective practice education on self-reflection, insight, and reflective thinking among experienced nurses: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Asselin, Marilyn E; Fain, James A

    2013-01-01

    A mixed-method study was conducted to determine whether nurses' participation in a reflective practice continuing education program using a structured reflection model makes a difference in nurses' self-reflection, insight, and reflective thinking about clinical practice situations. Findings suggested that use of structured reflection using question cues, written narratives, and peer-facilitated reflection increased nurses' engagement in self-reflection and enhanced reflective thinking in practice. Including reflective practice education in novice orientation and preceptor training may be beneficial. PMID:23703269