Science.gov

Sample records for nutrients

  1. Ocean nutrients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Philip W.; Hurd, Catriona L.

    Nutrients provide the chemical life-support system for phytoplankton in the ocean. Together with the carbon fixed during photosynthesis, nutrients provide the other elements, such as N and P, needed to synthesize macromolecules to build cellular constituents such as ribosomes. The makeup of these various biochemicals, such as proteins, pigments, and nucleic acids, together determine the elemental stoichiometry of an individual phytoplankton cell. The stoichiometry of different phytoplankton species or groups will vary depending on the proportions of distinct cellular machinery, such as for growth or resource acquisition, they require for their life strategies. The uptake of nutrients by phytoplankton helps to set the primary productivity, and drives the biological pump, of the global ocean. In the case of nitrogen, the supply of nutrients is categorized as either new or regenerated. The supply of new nitrogen, such as nitrate upwelled from the ocean' interior or biological nitrogen fixation, is equal to the vertical export of particular organic matter from the upper ocean on a timescale of years. Nutrients such as silica can also play a structural role in some phytoplankton groups, such as diatoms, where they are used to synthesize a siliceous frustule that offers some mechanical protection from grazers. In this chapter, we also explore nutrient uptake kinetics, patterns in nutrient distributions in space and time, the biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen, the atmospheric supply of nutrients, departures from the Redfield ratio, and whether nutrient distributions and cycling will be altered in the future

  2. Nutrient Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrient management has been defined as “the science and art directed to link soil, crop, weather and hydrologic factors with cultural, irrigation and soil and water conservation practices to achieve the goals of optimizing nutrient use efficiency, yields, crop quality, and economic returns, while r...

  3. Nutrient management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrient management has been defined as “the science and art directed to link soil, crop, weather and hydrologic factors with cultural, irrigation and soil and water conservation practices to achieve the goals of optimizing nutrient use efficiency, yields, crop quality, and economic returns, while r...

  4. Nutrient cycling.

    PubMed

    Bormann, F H; Likens, G E

    1967-01-27

    The small-watershed approach to problems of nutrient cycling has these advantages. (i) The small watershed is a natural unit of suitable size for intensive study of nutrient cycling at the ecosystem level. (ii) It provides a means of reducing to a minimum, or virtually eliminating, the effect of the difficult-to-measure variables of geologic input and nutrient losses in deep seepage. Control of these variables makes possible accurate measurement of nutrient input and output (erosion) and therefore establishes the relationship of the smaller ecosystem to the larger biospheric cycles. (iii) The small-watershed approach provides a method whereby such important parameters as nutrient release from minerals (weathering) and annual nutrient budgets may be calculated. (iv) It provides a means of studying the interrelationships between the biota and the hydrologic cycle, various nutrient cycles, and energy flow in a single system. (v) Finally, with the small-watershed system we can test the effect of various land-management practices or environmental pollutants on nutrient cycling in natural systems. PMID:17737551

  5. Key Nutrients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Extension Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Lessons written to help trainer agents prepare aides for work with families in the Food and Nutrition Program are presented in this booklet. The key nutrients discussed in the 10 lessons are protein, carbohydrates, fat, calcium, iron, iodine, and Vitamins A, B, C, and D. the format of each lesson is as follows: Purpose, Presentation, Application…

  6. Root Nutrient Foraging1

    PubMed Central

    Giehl, Ricardo F.H.; von Wirén, Nicolaus

    2014-01-01

    During a plant's lifecycle, the availability of nutrients in the soil is mostly heterogeneous in space and time. Plants are able to adapt to nutrient shortage or localized nutrient availability by altering their root system architecture to efficiently explore soil zones containing the limited nutrient. It has been shown that the deficiency of different nutrients induces root architectural and morphological changes that are, at least to some extent, nutrient specific. Here, we highlight what is known about the importance of individual root system components for nutrient acquisition and how developmental and physiological responses can be coupled to increase nutrient foraging by roots. In addition, we review prominent molecular mechanisms involved in altering the root system in response to local nutrient availability or to the plant's nutritional status. PMID:25082891

  7. Nutrient Density Scores.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickinson, Annette; Thompson, William T.

    1979-01-01

    Announces a nutrient density food scoring system called the Index of Nutritional Quality (INQ). It expresses the ratio between the percent RDA of a nutrient and the percent daily allowance of calories in a food. (Author/SA)

  8. NATIONAL NUTRIENTS DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resource Purpose:The Nutrient Criteria Program has initiated development of a National relational database application that will be used to store and analyze nutrient data. The ultimate use of these data will be to derive ecoregion- and waterbody-specific numeric nutrient...

  9. Duodenal luminal nutrient sensing

    PubMed Central

    Rønnestad, Ivar; Akiba, Yasutada; Kaji, Izumi; Kaunitz, Jonathan D

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal mucosa is exposed to numerous chemical substances and microorganisms, including macronutrients, micronutrients, bacteria, endogenous ions, and proteins. The regulation of mucosal protection, digestion, absorption and motility is signaled in part by luminal solutes. Therefore, luminal chemosensing is an important mechanism enabling the mucosa to monitor luminal conditions, such as pH, ion concentrations, nutrient quantity, and microflora. The duodenal mucosa shares luminal nutrient receptors with lingual taste receptors in order to detect the five basic tastes, in addition to essential nutrients, and unwanted chemicals. The recent ‘de-orphanization’ of nutrient sensing G protein-coupled receptors provides an essential component of the mechanism by which the mucosa senses luminal nutrients. In this review, we will update the mechanisms of and underlying physiological and pathological roles in luminal nutrient sensing, with a main focus on the duodenal mucosa. PMID:25113991

  10. Mechanism of nutrient sensing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The term nutrient sensing has emerged to describe the molecular mechanisms by which nutrients and their metabolites interact with various cell surface receptors, intracellular signaling proteins, and nuclear receptors, and modulate the activity of a complex network of signaling pathways that regulat...

  11. Nutrient Control Design Manual

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Nutrient Control Design Manual will present an extensive state-of-the-technology review of the engineering design and operation of nitrogen and phosphorous control technologies and techniques applied at municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). This manual will present ...

  12. Nutrient Control Seminars

    EPA Science Inventory

    These Nutrient Control Seminars will present an extensive state-of-the-technology review of the engineering design and operation of nitrogen and phosphorous control technologies and techniques applied at municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). These seminars will present ...

  13. Nutrient Sensing Mechanisms Across Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Chantranupong, Lynne; Wolfson, Rachel L.; Sabatini, David M.

    2015-01-01

    For organisms to coordinate their growth and development with nutrient availability they must be able to sense nutrient levels in their environment. Here, we review select nutrient sensing mechanisms in a few diverse organisms. We discuss how these mechanisms reflect the nutrient requirements of specific species and how they have adapted to the emergence of multicellularity in eukaryotes. PMID:25815986

  14. Integrated Urban Nutrient Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nhapi, I.; Veenstra, S.; Siebel, M. A.; Gijzen, H. J.

    Most cities, especially from the developing countries, are facing serious problems with the management of nutrients, necessitating an urgent review of current waste management systems. Whilst highly efficient technologies are available, the inclusion of these in a well-thought out and systematic approach is necessary to contain the nutrient influxes and outfluxes from towns. Five intervention measures are proposed in this paper. The first is to manage the use and generation of nutrients by drastically minimising water consumption and employing other cleaner production approaches. The second deals with the optimal reuse of nutrients and water at the smallest possible level, like at the household and on-plot level. The second option is to covert the waste into something useful for reuse, and, where not possible, to something which is envi- ronmentally neutral. This involves treatment, but applying technologies that makes the best use of side products via reuse. Where the first three options will have failed, two least preferred options could be used. Waste can be dispersed or diluted to enhance self-purification capacities of downstream water bodies. The last option is to store the wastewater for some parts of the year when there is water shortage to allow for polishing during the standing period. The success of urban nutrient planning requires an integrated approach, proving specific solutions to specific situations. This, in turn, requires appropriate institutional responses.

  15. SPARROW REGIONAL NUTRIENT MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is the second year of funding for the New England SPARROW (Spatially Referenced Regressions on Watershed Attributes) model. Funds in the first year (along with funds allocated for projects supporting Nutrient-Criteria development) were used to analyze regional results ...

  16. Nutrient Criteria Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has developed methodologies for deriving nutrient criteria, default criteria for the variety of waters and eco-regions found in the U.S., and a strategy for implementing the criteria including guidance on the use and development of biocriteria. Whereas preliminary research ha...

  17. Nutrient Requirements in Adolescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKigney, John I,; Munro, Hamish N.

    It is important to understand the nutrient requirements and the significance of nutrition both in pubescence and adolescence. The pubescent growth spurt is characterized by an increase in body size and a change in proportion of different tissues. Both of these factors are of great nutritional importance, since there is reason to believe that the…

  18. Nutrient element interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The management of overall tree physiological processes for optimization of either orchard yield or profitability is an annual challenge facing orchard managers. Optimization of chemical nutrient element concentrations within this context is often far more challenging than first appears. Tree or or...

  19. Estimation of stream nutrient uptake from nutrient addition experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Payn, Robert

    2005-09-01

    Nutrient uptake in streams is often quantified by determining nutrient uptake length. However, current methods for measuring nutrient uptake length are often impractical, expensive, or demonstrably incorrect. We have developed a new method to estimate ambient nutrient uptake lengths using field experiments involving several levels of nutrient addition. Data analysis involves plotting nutrient addition uptake lengths versus added concentration and extrapolating to the negative ambient concentration. This method is relatively easy, inexpensive, and based on sound theoretical development. It is more accurate than the commonly used method involving a single nutrient addition. The utility of the method is supported by field studies directly comparing our new method with isotopic tracer methods for determining uptake lengths of phosphorus, ammonium, and nitrate. Our method also provides parameters for comparing potential nutrient limitation among streams.

  20. Nutrient profiling: the new environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA) recommends that individuals choose nutrient-dense foods to help meet nutrient needs without consuming excess calories, a concept that is supported by health professionals and nutrition organizations. With an increased emphasis on nutrient density, the ...

  1. Bone nutrients for vegetarians.

    PubMed

    Mangels, Ann Reed

    2014-07-01

    The process of bone mineralization and resorption is complex and is affected by numerous factors, including dietary constituents. Although some dietary factors involved in bone health, such as calcium and vitamin D, are typically associated with dairy products, plant-based sources of these nutrients also supply other key nutrients involved in bone maintenance. Some research suggests that vegetarian diets, especially vegan diets, are associated with lower bone mineral density (BMD), but this does not appear to be clinically significant. Vegan diets are not associated with an increased fracture risk if calcium intake is adequate. Dietary factors in plant-based diets that support the development and maintenance of bone mass include calcium, vitamin D, protein, potassium, and soy isoflavones. Other factors present in plant-based diets such as oxalic acid and phytic acid can potentially interfere with absorption and retention of calcium and thereby have a negative effect on BMD. Impaired vitamin B-12 status also negatively affects BMD. The role of protein in calcium balance is multifaceted. Overall, calcium and protein intakes in accord with Dietary Reference Intakes are recommended for vegetarians, including vegans. Fortified foods are often helpful in meeting recommendations for calcium and vitamin D. Plant-based diets can provide adequate amounts of key nutrients for bone health. PMID:24898231

  2. National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference - Find Nutrient Value of Common Foods by Nutrient

    MedlinePlus

    ... Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference Release 28 NDL Home Food ... Sort by: Measure by: * required field ​ National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference Release 28 slightly revised May, ...

  3. Nutrient dynamics: Chapter 3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Likens, Gene E.; LaBaugh, James W.; Buso, Donald C.; Bade, Darren

    2009-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the variability and trends in chemical concentrations and fluxes at Mirror Lake during the period 1981–2000. It examines the water and chemical budgets of Mirror Lake to identify and understand better long-term trends in the chemical characteristics of the lake. It also identifies the causes of changes in nutrient concentrations and examines the contribution of hydrologic pathways to the contamination of Mirror Lake by road salt. The role of groundwater and precipitation on water and chemical budgets of the lake are also examined.

  4. Nutrient Sensing Mechanisms and Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Efeyan, Alejo; Comb, William C.; Sabatini, David M.

    2015-01-01

    PREFACE The ability to sense and respond to fluctuations in environmental nutrient levels is a requisite for life. Nutrient scarcity is a selective pressure that has shaped the evolution of most cellular processes. Different pathways that detect intracellular and extracellular levels of sugars, amino acids and lipids, and surrogate metabolites, are then integrated and coordinated at the organismal level via hormonal signals. During food abundance, nutrient sensing pathways engage anabolism and storage, and scarcity triggers homeostatic mechanisms, like the mobilization of internal stores through mechanisms such as autophagy. Nutrient sensing pathways are commonly deregulated in human metabolic diseases. PMID:25592535

  5. Nutrients and neurodevelopment: lipids.

    PubMed

    González, Horacio F; Visentin, Silvana

    2016-10-01

    Nutrients, lipids in particular, make up the central nervous system structure and play major functional roles: they stimulate development, migration, and nerve cell differentiation. They are part of gray matter, white matter, nerve nuclei, and synaptogenesis. Breast milk contains lipids which are crucial for infant brain development. The lipid profile of breast milk was used as a guideline for the development of breast milk substitutes. However, to date, no substitute has matched it. Complementary feeding should include docosahexaenoic acid, arachidonic acid, other polyunsaturated fatty acids, saturated fatty acids, and complex lipids found in milk fat. The lipid composition of breast milk depends on maternal intake and nutritional status during pregnancy and breast-feeding. It has a great impact on development. Our goal is to review scientific literature regarding the role of lipids on infant brain development and the importance of breast milk lipid composition, maternal diet, and complementary feeding. PMID:27606648

  6. Nutrient Cycling Study

    SciTech Connect

    Peter A. Pryfogle

    2005-09-01

    The particular goal of this study is to develop measurement techniques for understanding how consortia of organisms from geothermal facilities utilize sulfur and iron for metabolic activity; and in turn, what role that activity plays in initiating or promoting the development of a biofilm on plant substrates. Sulfur cycling is of interest because sulfur is produced in the resource. Iron is found in some of the steel formulations used in plant components and is also added as chemical treatment for reducing sulfide emissions from the plants. This report describes the set-up and operation of a bioreactor for evaluating the response of colonies of geothermal organisms to changes in nutrient and environmental conditions. Data from initial experiments are presented and plans for future testing is discussed.

  7. Nutrient loading alters the performance of key nutrient exchange mutualisms.

    PubMed

    Shantz, Andrew A; Lemoine, Nathan P; Burkepile, Deron E

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient exchange mutualisms between phototrophs and heterotrophs, such as plants and mycorrhizal fungi or symbiotic algae and corals, underpin the functioning of many ecosystems. These relationships structure communities, promote biodiversity and help maintain food security. Nutrient loading may destabilise these mutualisms by altering the costs and benefits each partner incurs from interacting. Using meta-analyses, we show a near ubiquitous decoupling in mutualism performance across terrestrial and marine environments in which phototrophs benefit from enrichment at the expense of their heterotrophic partners. Importantly, heterotroph identity, their dependence on phototroph-derived C and the type of nutrient enrichment (e.g. nitrogen vs. phosphorus) mediated the responses of different mutualisms to enrichment. Nutrient-driven changes in mutualism performance may alter community organisation and ecosystem processes and increase costs of food production. Consequently, the decoupling of nutrient exchange mutualisms via alterations of the world's nitrogen and phosphorus cycles may represent an emerging threat of global change. PMID:26549314

  8. Nutrient biofortification of food crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant-based foods offer an array of nutrients that are essential for human nutrition and promote good health. However, the major staple crops of the world are often deficient in some of these nutrients. Traditional agricultural approaches can marginally enhance the nutritional value of some foods, b...

  9. Nutrient Removal in Wastewater Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Kanti L.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the sources and effects of nutrients in wastewater, and the methods of their removal in wastewater treatment. In order to conserve water resources and eliminate the cost of nutrient removal, treated effluent should be used wherever possible for irrigation, since it contains all the ingredients for proper plant growth. (JR)

  10. Nutrient Needs of Young Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willenberg, Barbara; Hemmelgarn, Melinda

    1991-01-01

    Explains the nutritional requirements of children and adolescents, and the physiological roles of the major nutrients. Details the nutrient needs of young athletes, including pre- and postgame meals and fluid replacement. Discusses eating disorders and obesity. Advocates a diet rich in complex carbohydrates. (BC)

  11. Use of Select Nutrients to Foster Wellness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassel, Russell N.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses how to be healthy through one's diet. Lists 20 nutrients necessary for one's well being and explains role of each nutrient. Describes how nutrients complement one another and asserts that the right combination of nutrients can sometimes substitute for medication. Also lists 20 diagnostic categories of problems and suggests nutrients to…

  12. Energy and Nutrient Intake Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckey, T. D.; Venugopal, B.; Hutcheson, D. P.

    1975-01-01

    A passive system to determine the in-flight intake of nutrients is developed. Nonabsorbed markers placed in all foods in proportion to the nutrients selected for study are analyzed by neutron activation analysis. Fecal analysis for each market indicates how much of the nutrients were eaten and apparent digestibility. Results of feasibility tests in rats, mice, and monkeys indicate the diurnal variation of several markers, the transit time for markers in the alimentary tract, the recovery of several markers, and satisfactory use of selected markers to provide indirect measurement of apparent digestibility. Recommendations are provided for human feasibility studies.

  13. Nutrient-sensing mechanisms across evolution.

    PubMed

    Chantranupong, Lynne; Wolfson, Rachel L; Sabatini, David M

    2015-03-26

    For organisms to coordinate their growth and development with nutrient availability, they must be able to sense nutrient levels in their environment. Here, we review select nutrient-sensing mechanisms in a few diverse organisms. We discuss how these mechanisms reflect the nutrient requirements of specific species and how they have adapted to the emergence of multicellularity in eukaryotes. PMID:25815986

  14. Cycling and loss of nutrients in pastures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pastures are fundamentally different than croplands. When cropland is harvested, large amounts of plant nutrients are removed so relatively large rates of nutrients are often needed. In pasture, most of the nutrients harvested by livestock are returned. The proportion of nutrients returned by livest...

  15. Octopamine connects nutrient cues to lipid metabolism upon nutrient deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Jun; Ma, Yi-Cheng; Yang, Zhong-Shan; Zou, Cheng-Gang; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Starvation is probably the most common stressful situation in nature. In vertebrates, elevation of the biogenic amine norepinephrine levels is common during starvation. However, the precise role of norepinephrine in nutrient deprivation remains largely unknown. We report that in the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, up-regulation of the biosynthesis of octopamine, the invertebrate counterpart of norepinephrine, serves as a mechanism to adapt to starvation. During nutrient deprivation, the nuclear receptor DAF-12, known to sense nutritional cues, up-regulates the expression of tbh-1 that encodes tyramine β-hydroxylase, a key enzyme for octopamine biosynthesis, in the RIC neurons. Octopamine induces the expression of the lipase gene lips-6 via its receptor SER-3 in the intestine. LIPS-6, in turn, elicits lipid mobilization. Our findings reveal that octopamine acts as an endocrine regulator linking nutrient cues to lipolysis to maintain energy homeostasis, and suggest that such a mechanism may be evolutionally conserved in diverse organisms. PMID:27386520

  16. TOR Signaling and Nutrient Sensing.

    PubMed

    Dobrenel, Thomas; Caldana, Camila; Hanson, Johannes; Robaglia, Christophe; Vincentz, Michel; Veit, Bruce; Meyer, Christian

    2016-04-29

    All living organisms rely on nutrients to sustain cell metabolism and energy production, which in turn need to be adjusted based on available resources. The evolutionarily conserved target of rapamycin (TOR) protein kinase is a central regulatory hub that connects environmental information about the quantity and quality of nutrients to developmental and metabolic processes in order to maintain cellular homeostasis. TOR is activated by both nitrogen and carbon metabolites and promotes energy-consuming processes such as cell division, mRNA translation, and anabolism in times of abundance while repressing nutrient remobilization through autophagy. In animals and yeasts, TOR acts antagonistically to the starvation-induced AMP-activated kinase (AMPK)/sucrose nonfermenting 1 (Snf1) kinase, called Snf1-related kinase 1 (SnRK1) in plants. This review summarizes the immense knowledge on the relationship between TOR signaling and nutrients in nonphotosynthetic organisms and presents recent findings in plants that illuminate the crucial role of this pathway in conveying nutrient-derived signals and regulating many aspects of metabolism and growth. PMID:26905651

  17. Programming placental nutrient transport capacity

    PubMed Central

    Fowden, A L; Ward, J W; Wooding, F P B; Forhead, A J; Constancia, M

    2006-01-01

    Many animal studies and human epidemiological findings have shown that impaired growth in utero is associated with physiological abnormalities in later life and have linked this to tissue programming during suboptimal intrauterine conditions at critical periods of development. However, few of these studies have considered the contribution of the placenta to the ensuing adult phenotype. In mammals, the major determinant of intrauterine growth is the placental nutrient supply, which, in turn, depends on the size, morphology, blood supply and transporter abundance of the placenta and on synthesis and metabolism of nutrients and hormones by the uteroplacental tissues. This review examines the regulation of placental nutrient transfer capacity and the potential programming effects of nutrition and glucocorticoid over-exposure on placental phenotype with particular emphasis on the role of the Igf2 gene in these processes. PMID:16439433

  18. Hungry for Nutrient Data? Navigating the USDA Nutrient Database

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference (SR) is the major source of food composition data in the United States, providing the foundation for most food composition databases in the public and private sectors. Most nutrition professionals are familiar with the basics of the SR onlin...

  19. REGIONAL CHARACTERISTICS OF NUTRIENT CONCENTRATIONS IN STREAMS AND THEIR APPLICATION TO NUTRIENT CRITERIA DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to establish meaningful nutrient criteria, consideration must be given to the spatial variations in geographic phenomena that cause or reflect differences in nutrient concentrations in streams. Regional differences in stream nutrient concentrations were illustrated usin...

  20. Stillage processing for nutrient recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeten, J.M.; Coble, C.G.; Egg, R.P.; Lawhon, J.T.; McBee, G.G.; Schelling, G.T.

    1983-06-01

    Stillage from fermentation of grain sorghum and sweet potatoes was processed for dry matter and nutrient recovery by combinations of screw press, vibrating screen, centrifugation, ultrafiltration, and reverse osmosis, yielding up to 98% dry matter removal. For most processes, protein removal equaled or exceeded dry matter removal.

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF NUMERICAL NUTRIENT CRITERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A major goal of the numeric nutrient criteria program is to develop waterbody-type technical guidance manuals for assessing trophic state. EPA has published guidance for lakes and for rivers. EPA Region 1 is publishing New England-specific guidance in 2001 for lakes, ponds and ...

  2. Regulating nutrient allocation in plants

    DOEpatents

    Udvardi, Michael; Yang, Jiading; Worley, Eric

    2014-12-09

    The invention provides coding and promoter sequences for a VS-1 and AP-2 gene, which affects the developmental process of senescence in plants. Vectors, transgenic plants, seeds, and host cells comprising heterologous VS-1 and AP-2 genes are also provided. Additionally provided are methods of altering nutrient allocation and composition in a plant using the VS-1 and AP-2 genes.

  3. Rhizosphere priming: a nutrient perspective

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizosphere priming is the change in decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) caused by root activity. Rhizosphere priming plays a crucial role in soil carbon (C) dynamics and their response to global climate change. Rhizosphere priming may be affected by soil nutrient availability, but rhizospher...

  4. Nutrient enrichment and nutrient regeneration stimulate bacterioplankton growth.

    PubMed

    Chrzanowski, T H; Sterner, R W; Elser, J J

    1995-05-01

    Bacterial abundance results from predatory losses of individuals and replacement of losses through growth. Growth depends on sustained input of organic substrates and mineral nutrients. In this work we tested the hypothesis that bacterial growth in two oligotrophic Canadian shield lakes was limited by nitrogen (N) or phosphorus (P). We also determined whether consumer-regenerated resources contributed substantially to net bacterial growth. Two types of dilution assays were conducted to determine the response of bacteria to nutrient enrichment: diluted whole water (DWW, 1:9 whole/filtered with 0.2 μm of filtered lake water) and diluted fractionated water (DFW, 1.0 μm prefiltered then diluted as above). Replicate bottles in each dilution assay received either N (50 μM), P (10 μM), or both N and P enrichments. Controls received no nutrients. Resource-saturated growth rates and grazing rates were estimated from a standard dilution-growth approach. Bacterial growth was stimulated by addition of P alone and in combination with N. Consumers regenerated sufficient resources to support up to half the bacterial growth rate, but the benefit derived from consumers was minor when compared to mortality. PMID:24185342

  5. Nutrient quality of fast food kids meals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exposure of children to kids’ meals at fast food restaurants is high; however, the nutrient quality of such meals has not been systematically assessed. We assessed the nutrient quality of fast food meals marketed to young children, i.e., "kids meals". The nutrient quality of kids’ meals was assessed...

  6. NUTRIENT CRITERIA DEVELOPMENT FOR R10 ECOREGIONS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excess nutrients in waters of the northwest are one of the top contributors to water quality impairment. EPA, states and Tribes lack quantifiable targets for nutrients in the water quality standards. Water quality standards for nutrients usually use narrative language, such as ...

  7. Nutrient Data Bases--Considerations for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Loretta W.; Pelican, Suzanne

    1984-01-01

    Examines sources and limitations of nutrient data and databases, and discusses some educational issues surrounding their selection and use in nutrient analysis programs. Tables illustrating the state of development of methods for nutrients in food, and selected United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) databases. (JN)

  8. Nutrient Management Behavior on Wisconsin Dairy Farms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrient management plans for livestock operations should account for rates and timing of manure application to cropland, as well as how manure is integrated with other nutrient sources. Little is known, however, about actual farmer nutrient management practices and what changes may be needed for fa...

  9. Silage and whole-farm nutrient management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The management of forage-based livestock farms is complex. A selected silage system can affect nutrient management by influencing the type, amount, and nutrient content of feeds fed. Manure handling procedures used on a farm can also affect the yield and nutrient contents of the forages produced. So...

  10. Automated nutrient analyses in seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Whitledge, T.E.; Malloy, S.C.; Patton, C.J.; Wirick, C.D.

    1981-02-01

    This manual was assembled for use as a guide for analyzing the nutrient content of seawater samples collected in the marine coastal zone of the Northeast United States and the Bering Sea. Some modifications (changes in dilution or sample pump tube sizes) may be necessary to achieve optimum measurements in very pronounced oligotrophic, eutrophic or brackish areas. Information is presented under the following section headings: theory and mechanics of automated analysis; continuous flow system description; operation of autoanalyzer system; cookbook of current nutrient methods; automated analyzer and data analysis software; computer interfacing and hardware modifications; and trouble shooting. The three appendixes are entitled: references and additional reading; manifold components and chemicals; and software listings. (JGB)

  11. Spectral Quantitation Of Hydroponic Nutrients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlager, Kenneth J.; Kahle, Scott J.; Wilson, Monica A.; Boehlen, Michelle

    1996-01-01

    Instrument continuously monitors hydroponic solution by use of absorption and emission spectrometry to determine concentrations of principal nutrients, including nitrate, iron, potassium, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, sodium, and others. Does not depend on extraction and processing of samples, use of such surrograte parameters as pH or electrical conductivity for control, or addition of analytical reagents to solution. Solution not chemically altered by analysis and can be returned to hydroponic process stream after analysis.

  12. Rhizosphere priming: a nutrient perspective

    PubMed Central

    Dijkstra, Feike A.; Carrillo, Yolima; Pendall, Elise; Morgan, Jack A.

    2013-01-01

    Rhizosphere priming is the change in decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) caused by root activity. Rhizosphere priming plays a crucial role in soil carbon (C) dynamics and their response to global climate change. Rhizosphere priming may be affected by soil nutrient availability, but rhizosphere priming itself can also affect nutrient supply to plants. These interactive effects may be of particular relevance in understanding the sustained increase in plant growth and nutrient supply in response to a rise in atmospheric CO2 concentration. We examined how these interactions were affected by elevated CO2 in two similar semiarid grassland field studies. We found that an increase in rhizosphere priming enhanced the release of nitrogen (N) through decomposition of a larger fraction of SOM in one study, but not in the other. We postulate that rhizosphere priming may enhance N supply to plants in systems that are N limited, but that rhizosphere priming may not occur in systems that are phosphorus (P) limited. Under P limitation, rhizodeposition may be used for mobilization of P, rather than for decomposition of SOM. Therefore, with increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations, rhizosphere priming may play a larger role in affecting C sequestration in N poor than in P poor soils. PMID:23908649

  13. Nutrient Cycling in Piermont Marsh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, K.; Reyes, N.; Gribbin, S.; Newton, R.; Laporte, N.; Trivino, G.; Ortega, J.; McKee, K.; Sambrotto, R.

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the cycling of nutrients through a brackish tidal wetland about 40 km north of Manhattan in the Hudson River estuary. As part of a long-term ecological study of Piermont Marsh, a NOAA reference wetland managed by the NY State DEC, we are measuring dissolved inorganic nutrients on the Marsh surface and its drainage channels. The marsh occupies 400 acres along the southwest corner of Haverstraw Bay with approximately 2 km frontage to the estuary. It is supplied with nutrient-rich water and drained primarily along several tidal creeks and the hundreds of rivulets that feed them. During most tidal cycles the silty berm bounding the marsh is not topped. Human influence in the marsh's surrounding area has had profound effects, one of the most fundamental of which has been the shift from native grass species, predominantly Spartina alterniflora, to an invasive genotype of common reed, Phragmites australis. Along with this shift there have been changes in the root bed, the effective marsh interior and berm heights, the hydroperiod and, as a result, the ability of the marsh to be utilized by various types of Hudson estuary fish. The vegetative shift is believed to be anthropogenic, but the connection is not well understood, and it is not known what role biogeochemical perturbations are playing. We present two field seasons of nitrate, phosphate and silicate measurements from Sparkill Creek, a freshwater stream draining the surrounding highlands constitutes the northern boundary, two tidally driven creeks transect the Marsh from West to East: the Crumkill and an unnamed creek we have dubbed the "Tidal", Ludlow Ditch, a no-longer-maintained drainage channel grading gently from the northern part of the marsh to the South terminates in a wide tidal outlet that is its southern boundary. Net tidal cycle fluxes and fluxes resulting from runoff events are presented. Deviations from Redfield ratios and limiting nutrients are analyzed. Piermont Marsh data is compared

  14. Inorganic nutrients, bacteria, and the microbial loop.

    PubMed

    Caron, D A

    1994-09-01

    The realization that natural assemblages of planktonic bacteria may acquire a significant fraction of their nitrogen and phosphorus via the uptake of dissolved inorganic nutrients has modified our traditional view of these microorganisms as nutrient remineralizers in plankton communities. Bacterial uptake of inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus may place bacteria and phytoplankton in competition for growth-limiting nutrients, rather than in their traditional roles as the respective "source" and "sink" for these nutrients in the plankton. Bacterial nutrient uptake also implies that bacterivorous protozoa may play a pivotal role in the remineralization of these elements in the microbial loop. The overall contribution of bacterial utilization of inorganic nutrients to total nutrient uptake in the ocean is still poorly understood, but some generalizations are emerging with respect to the geographical areas and community physiological conditions that might elicit this behavior. PMID:24186457

  15. Nutrient Management in Recirculating Hydroponic Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugbee, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    There is an increasing need to recirculate and reuse nutrient solutions in order to reduce environmental and economic costs. However, one of the weakest points in hydroponics is the lack of information on managing the nutrient solution. Many growers and research scientists dump out nutrient solutions and refill at weekly intervals. Other authors have recommended measuring the concentrations of individual nutrients in solution as a key to nutrient control and maintenance. Dumping and replacing solution is unnecessary. Monitoring ions in solution is not always necessary; in fact the rapid depletion of some nutrients often causes people to add toxic amounts of nutrients to the solution. Monitoring ions in solution is interesting, but it is not the key to effective maintenance.

  16. Generalized Nutrient Taxes Can Increase Consumer Welfare.

    PubMed

    Bishai, David

    2015-11-01

    Certain nutrients can stimulate appetite making them fattening in a way that is not fully conveyed by the calorie content on the label. For rational eaters, this information gap could be corrected by more labeling. As an alternative, this paper proposes a set of positive and negative taxes on the fattening and slimming nutrients in food rather than on the food itself. There are conditions under which this tax plus subsidy system could increase welfare by stopping unwanted weight gain while leaving the final retail price of food unchanged. A nutrient tax system could improve welfare if fattening nutrients, net of their effect on weight, are inferior goods and the fiscal cost of administering the tax is sufficiently low. More data on the price elasticity of demand for nutrients as well as data on how specific nutrients affect satiety and how total calorie intake would be necessary before one could be sure a nutrient tax would work in practice. PMID:25241653

  17. Insects, infestations and nutrient fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalzik, B.

    2012-04-01

    Forest ecosystems are characterized by a high temporal and spatial variability in the vertical transfer of energy and matter within the canopy and the soil compartment. The mechanisms and controlling factors behind canopy processes and system-internal transfer dynamics are imperfectly understood at the moment. Seasonal flux diversities and inhomogeneities in throughfall composition have been reported from coniferous and deciduous forests, and in most cases leaf leaching has been considered as principle driver for differences in the amount and quality of nutrients and organic compounds (Tukey and Morgan 1963). Since herbivorous insects and the processes they initiate received less attention in past times, ecologists now emphasize the need for linking biological processes occurring in different ecosystem strata to explain rates and variability of nutrient cycling (Bardgett et al. 1998, Wardle et al. 2004). Consequently, herbivore insects in the canopies of forests are increasingly identified to play an important role for the (re)cycling and availability of nutrients, or, more generally, for the functioning of ecosystems not only in outbreak situations but also at endemic (non-outbreak) density levels (Stadler et al. 2001, Hunter et al. 2003). Before, little attention was paid to insect herbivores when quantifying element and energy fluxes through ecosystems, although the numerous and different functions insects fulfill in ecosystems (e.g. as pollinators, herbivores or detritivores) were unanimously recognized (Schowalter 2000). Amongst the reasons for this restraint was the argument that the total biomass of insects tends to be relatively low compared to the biomass of trees or the pool of soil organic matter (Ohmart et al. 1983). A second argument which was put forward to justify the inferior role of insects in nutrient cycling were the supposed low defoliation losses between 5-10% of the annual leaf biomass, or net primary production, due to insect herbivory under

  18. Plant and pathogen nutrient acquisition strategies

    PubMed Central

    Fatima, Urooj; Senthil-Kumar, Muthappa

    2015-01-01

    Nutrients are indispensable elements required for the growth of all living organisms including plants and pathogens. Phyllosphere, rhizosphere, apoplast, phloem, xylem, and cell organelles are the nutrient niches in plants that are the target of bacterial pathogens. Depending upon nutrients availability, the pathogen adapts various acquisition strategies and inhabits the specific niche. In this review, we discuss the nutrient composition of different niches in plants, the mechanisms involved in the recognition of nutrient niche and the sophisticated strategies used by the bacterial pathogens for acquiring nutrients. We provide insight into various nutrient acquisition strategies used by necrotrophic, biotrophic, and hemibiotrophic bacteria. Specifically we discuss both modulation of bacterial machinery and manipulation of host machinery. In addition, we highlight the current status of our understanding about the nutrient acquisition strategies used by bacterial pathogens, namely targeting the sugar transporters that are dedicated for the plant’s growth and development. Bacterial strategies for altering the plant cell membrane permeability to enhance the release of nutrients are also enumerated along with in-depth analysis of molecular mechanisms behind these strategies. The information presented in this review will be useful to understand the plant–pathogen interaction in nutrient perspective. PMID:26442063

  19. Global nutrient limitation in terrestrial vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Joshua B.; Badgley, Grayson; Blyth, Eleanor

    2012-09-01

    Most vegetation is limited in productivity by nutrient availability, but the magnitude of limitation globally is not known. Nutrient limitation is directly relevant not only to ecology and agriculture, but also to the global carbon cycle by regulating how much atmospheric CO2the terrestrial biosphere can sequester. We attempt to identify total nutrient limitation in terrestrial plant productivity globally using ecophysiological theory and new developments in remote sensing for evapotranspiration and plant productivity. Our map of nutrient limitation qualitatively reproduces known regional nutrient gradients (e.g., across Amazonia), highlights differences in nutrient addition to croplands (e.g., between "developed" and "developing" countries), identifies the role of nutrients on the distribution of major biomes (e.g., tree line migration in boreal North America), and compares similarly to a ground-based test along the Long Substrate Age Gradient in Hawaii, U.S.A. (e.g., foliar and soil nutrients, litter decomposition). Nonetheless, challenges in representing light and water use efficiencies, disturbance, and comparison to ground data with multiple interacting nutrients provide avenues for further progress on refining such a global map. Global average reduction in terrestrial plant productivity was within 16-28%, depending on treatment of disturbance; these values can be compared to global carbon cycle model estimates of carbon uptake reduction with nutrient cycle inclusion.

  20. [Nutrient supplements - possibilities and limitations].

    PubMed

    Ströhle, Alexander; Hahn, Andreas

    2013-05-01

    The consumption of micronutrient-supplements by the general public has become widespread; between 25 and more than 40% of individuals questioned in western developed nations confirm to regularly consume such products. In principle, there are two product categories for micronutrient-supplements - medicinal products (drugs) and foodstuffs. The latter are marketed as food supplements (FS) and dietary foodstuffs for particular nutritional uses including foods for special medical purposes (FSMP). FS serve the general supplementation of any consumer whilst foodstuffs for particular nutritional uses are directed at consumers with special dietary requirements; FSMP are intended for the dietary management of patients. There are clearly defined legal frameworks for those product categories. Independently of their legal product status, six areas of application can be characterised for micronutrient-supplements: general and special supplementation, primary prevention, compensation of disease-related deficits, therapeutic function and containment of diseases or avoidance of subsequent damages (secondary and tertiary function). Gauged with the mean-intake, micro nutrient supply in Germany is sufficient (exception: folic acid and vitamin D; partially also iodine). However, the intake of vitamins E, C, B1 and B2 as well as the minerals calcium, magnesium, zinc and iodine could be improved in 20-50% of the general public. Micro nutrient preparations in physiological dose could contribute to closing this gap in supply. PMID:23758028

  1. Protein: A nutrient in focus.

    PubMed

    Arentson-Lantz, Emily; Clairmont, Stephanie; Paddon-Jones, Douglas; Tremblay, Angelo; Elango, Rajavel

    2015-08-01

    Protein is an essential component of a healthy diet and is a focus of research programs seeking to optimize health at all stages of life. The focus on protein as a nutrient often centers on its thermogenic and satiating effect, and when included as part of a healthy diet, its potential to preserve lean body mass. A growing body of literature, including stable isotope based studies and longer term dietary interventions, suggests that current dietary protein recommendations may not be sufficient to promote optimal muscle health in all populations. A protein intake moderately higher than current recommendations has been widely endorsed by many experts and working groups and may provide health benefits for aging populations. Further, consuming moderate amounts of high-quality protein at each meal may optimally stimulate 24-h muscle protein synthesis and may provide a dietary platform that favors the maintenance of muscle mass and function while promoting successful weight management in overweight and obese individuals. Dietary protein has the potential to serve as a key nutrient for many health outcomes and benefits might be increased when combined with adequate physical activity. Future studies should focus on confirming these health benefits from dietary protein with long-term randomized controlled studies. PMID:26197807

  2. Adaptability of growth and nutrient uptake potential of Chlorella sorokiniana with variable nutrient loading.

    PubMed

    Shriwastav, Amritanshu; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Ansari, Faiz Ahmad; Rawat, Ismail; Bux, Faizal

    2014-12-01

    Chlorella sorokiniana can sustain growth in conditions hostile to other species, and possesses good nutrient removal and lipid accumulation potentials. However, the effects of variable nutrient levels (N and P) in wastewaters on growth, productivity, and nutrient uptake by C. sorokiniana have not been studied in detail. This study demonstrates the ability of this alga to sustain uniform growth and productivity, while regulating the relative nutrient uptake in accordance to their availability in the bulk medium. These results highlight the potential of C. sorokiniana as a suitable candidate for fulfilling the coupled objectives of nutrient removal and biomass production for bio-fuel with wastewaters having great variability in nutrient levels. PMID:25463782

  3. Nutrient availability moderates transpiration in Ehrharta calycina.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Michael D; Hoffmann, Vera; Verboom, G Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Transpiration-driven 'mass-flow' of soil-water can increase nutrient flow to the root surface. Here it was investigated whether transpiration could be partially regulated by nutrient status. Seeds of Ehrharta calycina from nine sites across a rainfall gradient were supplied with slow-release fertilizer dibbled into the sand surrounding the roots and directly available through interception, mass-flow and diffusion (dubbed 'interception'), or sequestered behind a 40-microm mesh and not directly accessible by the roots, but from which nutrients could move by diffusion or mass-flow (dubbed 'mass-flow'). Although mass-flow plants were significantly smaller than interception plants as a consequence of nutrient limitation, they transpired 60% faster, had 90% higher photosynthesis relative to transpiration (A/E), and 40% higher tissue P, Ca and Na concentrations than plants allowed to intercept nutrients directly. Tissue N and K concentrations were similar for interception and mass-flow plants. Transpiration was thus higher in the nutrient-constrained 'mass-flow' plants, increasing the transport of nutrients to the roots by mass-flow. Transpiration may have been regulated by N availability, resulting in similar tissue concentration between treatments. It is concluded that, although transpiration is a necessary consequence of photosynthetic CO(2) uptake in C(3) plants, plants can respond to nutrient limitation by varying transpiration-driven mass-flow of nutrients. PMID:18537891

  4. Nutrient-Specific Foraging in Invertebrate Predators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayntz, David; Raubenheimer, David; Salomon, Mor; Toft, Søren; Simpson, Stephen J.

    2005-01-01

    Many herbivores and omnivores adjust their food selection behavior to regulate the intake of multiple nutrients. Carnivores, however, are generally assumed to optimize the rate of prey capture rather than select prey according to nutrient composition. We showed experimentally that invertebrate predators can forage selectively for protein and lipids to redress specific nutritional imbalances. This selection can take place at different stages of prey handling: The predator may select among foods of different nutritional composition, eat more of a prey if it is rich in nutrients that the predator is deficient in, or extract specific nutrients from a single prey item.

  5. Variable primary producer responses to nutrient and temperature manipulations in mesocosms: temperature usually trumps nutrient effects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mesocosm experiments have been used to evaluate the impacts of nutrient loading on estuarine plant communities in order to develop nutrient response relationships. Mesocosm eutrophication studies tend to focus on long residence time systems. In the Pacific Northwest, many estuari...

  6. NUTRIENT UPTAKE: A Microcomputer Program to Predict Nutrient Absorption from Soil by Roots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oates, Kenneth; Barber, S. A.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the use of a computer program designed to solve the mathematical model associated with soil nutrient uptake by plant roots and to predict the nutrient uptake. Describes a user-friendly personal computer version of this program. (TW)

  7. Nutrient balance and body composition.

    PubMed

    Rolland-Cachera, M F; Deheeger, M; Bellisle, F

    1997-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity in industrialized countries is increasing in spite of decreased energy and fat intakes. This trend might be mainly a consequence of a decline in energy expenditure. It is suggested here that it might also be accounted for by the increasing proportion of protein in the diet, affecting the hormonal status. The nutrient imbalance is particularly apparent in early childhood, when a low fat and high protein diet is not justified because of high energy needs for growth and because it is the period of high rate of myelinization of the nervous system. At later ages, the proportion of fat exceeds the recommended level, and the protein intake remains high. A diet containing less animal and more vegetable products would reduce both protein and saturated fat excesses and could help decrease metabolic risk factors. PMID:9477439

  8. Nutrient Models Developments Using Runoff-Nutrient Relationships in an Agricultural Prairie Basin, Manitoba.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, T. H.; Pomeroy, J. W.; Wheater, H. S.; Elliott, J. A.; Baulch, H. M.; Lindenschmidt, K. E.

    2015-12-01

    Nutrient export to streams and lakes from agricultural activities can result in significant deterioration of water quality and aquatic ecosystem health. In Western Canada, particular concerns arise for prairie agricultural systems, which are dominated by the effects of a cold climate. Insufficient attention has been given to understand the links between cold region watershed responses and nutrient concentration and a robust watershed-scale modeling framework is needed to simulate nutrient concentration and loads. Long-term, field observations of nutrient concentration-runoff relationships were used to develop nutrient concentration models for the Tobacco Creek Model Watershed (TCMW) which drains into the Red River basin. Field observations include streamflow concentrations of N and P at multiple scales from two headwater basins. Distinct nutrient concentration-runoff models for snowmelt, rain on snow (ROS) and rainfall runoff processes were developed from observed runoff-nutrient concentration relationships. Snowmelt runoff had a moderately positive correlation with particulate nutrient concentrations but no correlation with that of dissolved nutrients. ROS runoff had a weak relationship with both particulate and dissolved nutrient concentrations. Rainfall runoff had the strongest positive correlation with particulate nutrient concentrations but no association with that of dissolved nutrients. The modeling approach also identified a clear hysteretic behavior in the relationship between runoff and particulate nutrient concentration during the 2013 snowmelt runoff event at the basin outlet gauge. The models provide insight into the hydrological controls on nutrient export from cold regions watersheds and the strong effects of inter-annual climatic variability. Snowmelt runoff is a reliable exporter of large nutrient loads while nutrient export by rainfall runoff exceeded snowmelt runoff during hydrologically wet summers such as 2002, 2005, 2011 and 2013.

  9. Comparison of nutrient density and nutrient-to-cost between cooked and canned beans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumption of nutrient rich foods such as beans and peas is recommended because these foods provide key nutrients and relatively little energy. Many consumers are unfamiliar with dried beans or do not have the time to prepare them. The purpose of this study was to compare nutrient density and nutri...

  10. Practice Paper of the American Dietetic Association: Nutrient Density: Meeting Nutrient Goals within Calorie Needs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although nutrient density is a core nutrition concept of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005, there is currently no scientifically valid definition for either nutrient density or nutrient-dense food. The purposes of this American Dietetic Association Practice Paper are to summarize the current...

  11. Enhanced Plant Nutrient use Efficiency with PGPR and AMF in an Integrated Nutrient Management System

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A three-year field study was conducted with field corn from 2005 to 2007 to test the hypothesis that microbial inoculants that increase plant growth and yield will enhance nutrient uptake, and thereby remove more nutrients, especially N, P, and K from the field as part of an integrated nutrient mana...

  12. UNDERSTANDING NUTRIENT VARIABILITY: IMPACT ON PUBLIC HEALTH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: Information on the sources and magnitude of nutrient variability in U.S. foods is often lacking and may include differences due to cultivars, brands, growing or processing conditions, cooking practices, fortification, nutrient stability, and analytical methods. Accurate analytical determi...

  13. SSMILes: Measuring the Nutrient Tolerance of Algae.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedgepeth, David J.

    1995-01-01

    Presents an activity integrating mathematics and science intended to introduce students to the use of metric measurement of mass as a way to increase the meaningfulness of observations about variables in life sciences. Involves measuring the nutrient tolerance of algae. Contains a reproducible algae nutrient graph. (Author/MKR)

  14. Nutrient Density: Making the Pyramid Come Alive

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA’s) and MyPyramid, which accompanies it, emphasize nutrient density as a way to choose foods within food groups. Yet, nutrient density is a difficult concept for consumers to apply to individual foods. In addition, consensus is lacking on how to measur...

  15. 21 CFR 107.10 - Nutrient information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nutrient information. 107.10 Section 107.10 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA Labeling § 107.10 Nutrient information. (a) The labeling of infant... order given, in the units specified, and in tabular format, the following information regarding...

  16. INCORPORATING NUTRIENT SENSING TECHNOLOGY IN PRODUCTION AGRICULTURE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The greatest impediment to using manual soil sampling followed by laboratory measurement for crop nutrient management is the time and expense associated with sampling, transportation, and analysis of the sample. While improvements in fertilizer nutrient use efficiency have been made relying on these...

  17. Seasonal sediment and nutrients transport patterns

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is essential to understand sediment and nutrient sources and their spatial and temporal patterns in order to design effective mitigation strategies. However, long-term data sets to determine sediment and nutrient loadings are scarce and expensive to collect. The goal of this study was to determin...

  18. Nutrient Management: Water Quality/Use

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrient management programs must have a positive impact on water quality. The challenge for producers is to understand the nutrient balance in the soil and to reduce the risk of surface runoff of manure. The challenge for science is to increase our understanding of the value of manure in the soil a...

  19. Nutrient use efficiency in plants: an overview

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In modern agriculture use of essential plant nutrients in crop production is very important to increase productivity and maintain sustainability of the cropping system. Use of nutrients in crop production is influenced by climatic, soil, plant and social-economical condition of the farmers. Overall,...

  20. A Method for Developing a Nutrient Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Ardyth H.; Roderuck, Charlotte E.

    1982-01-01

    This paper proposes a new approach to developing a tool for teaching nutrition and food selection. It allows adjustments as new information becomes available and takes into account both dietary recommendations and food composition. Steps involve nutrient composition; nutrient density; and ratings for fat, cholesterol, and sodium. (Author/CT)

  1. Dairy Manure Nutrients: Variable, But Valuable

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowing the nutrient content of manure is essential for doing nutrient management planning for dairy farms. Summaries of over 14,000 dairy manure samples from Wisconsin and 2,300 from Vermont over a 10 to 15-year period showed average values that were consistent with UW-Extension book values but dif...

  2. Grassland productivity limited by multiple nutrients.

    PubMed

    Fay, Philip A; Prober, Suzanne M; Harpole, W Stanley; Knops, Johannes M H; Bakker, Jonathan D; Borer, Elizabeth T; Lind, Eric M; MacDougall, Andrew S; Seabloom, Eric W; Wragg, Peter D; Adler, Peter B; Blumenthal, Dana M; Buckley, Yvonne M; Chu, Chengjin; Cleland, Elsa E; Collins, Scott L; Davies, Kendi F; Du, Guozhen; Feng, Xiaohui; Firn, Jennifer; Gruner, Daniel S; Hagenah, Nicole; Hautier, Yann; Heckman, Robert W; Jin, Virginia L; Kirkman, Kevin P; Klein, Julia; Ladwig, Laura M; Li, Qi; McCulley, Rebecca L; Melbourne, Brett A; Mitchell, Charles E; Moore, Joslin L; Morgan, John W; Risch, Anita C; Schütz, Martin; Stevens, Carly J; Wedin, David A; Yang, Louie H

    2015-01-01

    Terrestrial ecosystem productivity is widely accepted to be nutrient limited(1). Although nitrogen (N) is deemed a key determinant of aboveground net primary production (ANPP)(2,3), the prevalence of co-limitation by N and phosphorus (P) is increasingly recognized(4-8). However, the extent to which terrestrial productivity is co-limited by nutrients other than N and P has remained unclear. Here, we report results from a standardized factorial nutrient addition experiment, in which we added N, P and potassium (K) combined with a selection of micronutrients (K+μ), alone or in concert, to 42 grassland sites spanning five continents, and monitored ANPP. Nutrient availability limited productivity at 31 of the 42 grassland sites. And pairwise combinations of N, P, and K+μ co-limited ANPP at 29 of the sites. Nitrogen limitation peaked in cool, high latitude sites. Our findings highlight the importance of less studied nutrients, such as K and micronutrients, for grassland productivity, and point to significant variations in the type and degree of nutrient limitation. We suggest that multiple-nutrient constraints must be considered when assessing the ecosystem-scale consequences of nutrient enrichment. PMID:27250253

  3. Crop nutrient recovery from applied fish coproducts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Alaska fishing industry produces over 1,000,000 metric tons of fish byproducts annually, and most of them are not used. Most food in Alaska is imported. Fish byproducts are rich in plant essential nutrients and can be used as nutrient sources for crop production. The objective of the study was t...

  4. 21 CFR 107.10 - Nutrient information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nutrient information. 107.10 Section 107.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA Labeling § 107.10 Nutrient information. (a) The labeling of infant formulas, as defined in section 201(aa) of...

  5. Nutrient Content of Lettuce and its Improvement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lettuce is a popular leafy vegetable and plays an important role in American diet and nutrition. Crisphead lettuce has much lower nutrient content than leaf and romaine types. As the synthesis or absorption of many nutrients is light dependent, the lower nutritional value of crisphead lettuce is due...

  6. 21 CFR 107.10 - Nutrient information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nutrient information. 107.10 Section 107.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA Labeling § 107.10 Nutrient information. (a) The labeling of infant formulas, as defined in section 201(aa) of...

  7. NUTRIENTS IN WATERSHEDS; DEVELOPING ENHANCED MODELING TOOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nutrient enrichment is one of the most detrimental stressors causing water-resource impairment. Of systems surveyed and reported as impaired, 40% of rivers, 51% of lakes, and 57% of estuaries listed nutrients as a primary cause of impairment (USEPA, 1996). In many cases, these ...

  8. Closed-Cycle Nutrient Supply For Hydroponics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartzkopf, Steven H.

    1991-01-01

    Hydroponic system controls composition and feed rate of nutrient solution and recovers and recycles excess solution. Uses air pressure on bladders to transfer aqueous nutrient solution. Measures and adjusts composition of solution before it goes to hydroponic chamber. Eventually returns excess solution to one of tanks. Designed to operate in microgravity, also adaptable to hydroponic plant-growing systems on Earth.

  9. WASTEWATER TREATMENT WITH PLANTS IN NUTRIENT FILMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nutrient film technique (NFT) is a unique modification of a hydroponic plant growth system which utilizes plants growing on an impermeable surface. A thin film of water flowing through the extensive root system provides nutrients for plants and associated microbial growth. Ro...

  10. Processes and patterns of oceanic nutrient limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. M.; Mills, M. M.; Arrigo, K. R.; Berman-Frank, I.; Bopp, L.; Boyd, P. W.; Galbraith, E. D.; Geider, R. J.; Guieu, C.; Jaccard, S. L.; Jickells, T. D.; La Roche, J.; Lenton, T. M.; Mahowald, N. M.; Marañón, E.; Marinov, I.; Moore, J. K.; Nakatsuka, T.; Oschlies, A.; Saito, M. A.; Thingstad, T. F.; Tsuda, A.; Ulloa, O.

    2013-09-01

    Microbial activity is a fundamental component of oceanic nutrient cycles. Photosynthetic microbes, collectively termed phytoplankton, are responsible for the vast majority of primary production in marine waters. The availability of nutrients in the upper ocean frequently limits the activity and abundance of these organisms. Experimental data have revealed two broad regimes of phytoplankton nutrient limitation in the modern upper ocean. Nitrogen availability tends to limit productivity throughout much of the surface low-latitude ocean, where the supply of nutrients from the subsurface is relatively slow. In contrast, iron often limits productivity where subsurface nutrient supply is enhanced, including within the main oceanic upwelling regions of the Southern Ocean and the eastern equatorial Pacific. Phosphorus, vitamins and micronutrients other than iron may also (co-)limit marine phytoplankton. The spatial patterns and importance of co-limitation, however, remain unclear. Variability in the stoichiometries of nutrient supply and biological demand are key determinants of oceanic nutrient limitation. Deciphering the mechanisms that underpin this variability, and the consequences for marine microbes, will be a challenge. But such knowledge will be crucial for accurately predicting the consequences of ongoing anthropogenic perturbations to oceanic nutrient biogeochemistry.

  11. Variation in nutrient resorption by desert shrubs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant nutrient resorption prior to leaf senescence is an important nutrient conservation mechanism for aridland plant species. However, little is known regarding the phylogenetic and environmental factors influencing this trait. Our objective was to compare nitrogen and phosphorus resorption in a ...

  12. NUTRIENT-UPTAKE MODEL IN MARSH ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mechanistic models of nutrient dynamics in natural wetlands were developed and applied in a study of Kissimmee River (Florida) flood-plain marshes. The models describe hydrodynamics and transport diffusion in wetland basins and the ecological processes of nutrient uptake, convers...

  13. Sources of Nutrients for Ocean Enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, I. S.

    2008-12-01

    The remarkable doubling of the productivity of the land over the last 50 years raises the question of opportunities to follow suit in the sea. The rapidly rising population makes increasing demands on food supply and the disposal of waste in the atmosphere from fossil fuel burning It is well known that the supply of nutrients to the photic zone of the ocean limits primary production and this limitation can be removed by the addition of nutrients. The surface waters of the ocean are typically in the photic zone for a decade and their initial quota of nutrients are supplemented by cyanobacteria, atmospheric deposition and river inflows. Together with upwelling these nutrients support about 10,000GtC of new primary production per year. Extra nutrients can be sourced from the thermocline, from enhancing the diazotrophs or by chemically transforming elements on the land or in the atmosphere. Using thermocline nutrients to enhance productivity but are first order neutral for carbon sequestration. Diazotrophs seem restricted to temperate and tropical waters and need phosphate and other nutrients. The increased nitrogen they provide is expected to lead to more carbon storage in the ocean. The macronutrients, nitrogen and phosphorus and the micronutrients have all been shown to be beneficial. With increased new primary production we expect increased sustainable fish production but the species composition will depend on the success of recruitment.

  14. Nutrient elements in large Chinese estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing

    1996-07-01

    Based on comprehensive observations since 1983, this study summarizes major features of nutrient elements (nitrogen, phosphorus and silicon) in large Chinese river/estuary systems. Elevated nutrient element levels were observed in Chinese rivers, when compared to large and less disturbed aquatic systems (e.g. the Amazon, Zaire and Orinoco). Data from this study are similar to those obtained from the polluted and/or eutrophic rivers in Europe and North America (e.g. the Rhóne and Loire). Nutrient elements may have either conservative or active distributions, or both, in the mixing zone, depending on the element and the estuary. For example, non-conservative behaviors were observed in the upper estuary, where nutrient elements may be remobilized due to the strong desorption and variations of the fresh water end-member, but conservative distributions were found afterwards in the lower estuary. Outside the riverine effluent plumes, nutrient elements may be depleted in surface waters relative to elevated bioproduction, whereas the regeneration with respect to decomposition of organic material and/or nitrification/denitrification offshore, may sustain high levels of nutrient elements in near-bottom waters. Laboratory experiment data generally compares well with field observations. The high fluxes and area] yields of nutrient elements from large Chinese rivers, indicate the extensive use of chemical fertilizers and domestic waste drainage over watersheds in China.

  15. Regulation of intestinal ontogeny by intraluminal nutrients.

    PubMed

    Castillo, R O; Feng, J J; Stevenson, D K; Kerner, J A; Kwong, L K

    1990-02-01

    Major events in gastrointestinal ontogeny occur in the infant rat in association with weaning, resulting in striking alterations in small intestinal structure and function. Although the dietary changes attendant to weaning are not essential for the initiation of these events, dietary nutrients have been shown to participate in the maturation of some intestinal parameters. In order to define more precisely the role of intraluminal nutrients in the regulation of small intestinal ontogeny, a longitudinal study was conducted using a unique animal model in which intraluminal nutrients were excluded from the intact maturing intestine in vivo throughout the entire weaning period without major compromise in nutritional status. The absence of intraluminal nutrients over the weaning period resulted in diminished lengthening and accretion of mucosal mass, suggesting a slower rate of intestinal growth. Lower mucosal DNA, protein, and mitotic indices in intestines of animals receiving no intraluminal nutrients suggested that the lack of intraluminal nutrients resulted in the blunting of the striking increases in cellular proliferation normally exhibited by the developing intestinal mucosa at this time. Maturation of intestinal lactase-phlorizin hydrolase and maltase-glucoamylase was not affected by the absence of intraluminal nutrients. Although the appearance of sucrase-isomaltase was not altered by the absence of intraluminal nutrients, activity levels rose to only 50% of control levels. These data suggest that during this period of rapid intestinal maturation, intestinal growth is more dependent upon intraluminal nutrients than are the characteristic enzymic alterations normally expressed during this period.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2303970

  16. Nutrient content of some winter grouse foods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Treichler, R.R.; Stow, R.W.; Nelson, A.L.

    1946-01-01

    Seventeen preferred grouse foods were collected during the late winter and analyzed for nutrient content. The results include moisture, crude protein, ether extract, crude fiber, nitrogenfree extract, ash, calcium, phosphorus, and gross energy content expressed both on moisture free and fresh bases.....The preferred winter foods of grouse are characterized by a high content of dry substance and of nitrogen-free extract......On the basis of nutrient content, the foods examined are well qualified as sources of energy and other essential nutrients required for maintenance of grouse during the winter season.

  17. Nutrient profiling of foods: creating a nutrient-rich food index.

    PubMed

    Drewnowski, Adam; Fulgoni, Victor

    2008-01-01

    Nutrient profiling of foods, described as the science of ranking foods based on their nutrient content, is fast becoming the basis for regulating nutrition labels, health claims, and marketing and advertising to children. A number of nutrient profile models have now been developed by research scientists, regulatory agencies, and by the food industry. Whereas some of these models have focused on nutrients to limit, others have emphasized nutrients known to be beneficial to health, or some combination of both. Although nutrient profile models are often tailored to specific goals, the development process ought to follow the same science-driven rules. These include the selection of index nutrients and reference amounts, the development of an appropriate algorithm for calculating nutrient density, and the validation of the chosen nutrient profile model against healthy diets. It is extremely important that nutrient profiles be validated rather than merely compared to prevailing public opinion. Regulatory agencies should act only when they are satisfied that the scientific process has been followed, that the algorithms are transparent, and that the profile model has been validated with respect to objective measures of a healthy diet. PMID:18254882

  18. Recovery of agricultural nutrients from biorefineries.

    PubMed

    Carey, Daniel E; Yang, Yu; McNamara, Patrick J; Mayer, Brooke K

    2016-09-01

    This review lays the foundation for why nutrient recovery must be a key consideration in design and operation of biorefineries and comprehensively reviews technologies that can be used to recover an array of nitrogen, phosphorus, and/or potassium-rich products of relevance to agricultural applications. Recovery of these products using combinations of physical, chemical, and biological operations will promote sustainability at biorefineries by converting low-value biomass (particularly waste material) into a portfolio of higher-value products. These products can include a natural partnering of traditional biorefinery outputs such as biofuels and chemicals together with nutrient-rich fertilizers. Nutrient recovery not only adds an additional marketable biorefinery product, but also avoids the negative consequences of eutrophication, and helps to close anthropogenic nutrient cycles, thereby providing an alternative to current unsustainable approaches to fertilizer production, which are energy-intensive and reliant on nonrenewable natural resource extraction. PMID:26948442

  19. NUTRIENTS IN WATERSHEDS: DEVELOPING ENHANCED MODELING TOOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nutrient enrichment is one of the most important stressors causing water-resource impairment. These impairments are causing devastating changes: 1) high nitrate concentrations have rendered the groundwaters and reservoirs in many regions impotable -- especially in the rural area...

  20. Application of nutrient intake values (NIVs)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The process of applying nutrient intake values (NIVs) for dietary assessment, planning, and implementing programs is discussed in this paper. In addition to assessing, monitoring, and evaluating nutritional situations, applications include planning food policies, strategies, and programs for promoti...

  1. MANGROVE-DERIVED NUTRIENTS AND CORAL REEFS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the consequences of the declining global cover of mangroves due to anthropogenic disturbance necessitates consideration of how mangrove-derived nutrients contribute to threatened coral reef systems. We sampled potential sources of organic matter and a suite of sessi...

  2. NRMRL'S NUTRIENT-RELATED RISK MANAGEMENT RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anthropogenic loadings of nutrients into our Nation's atmosphere, aquatic, and terrestrial ecosystems have increased dramatically within the past few decades. Environmental impairments associated with this over fertilization include aquatic habitat loss due to low dissolved oxyge...

  3. USDA NATIONAL NUTRIENT DATABASE FOR STANDARD REFERENCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USDA Nutrient Database for Standard Reference (SR) is the major source of food composition data in the United States. It provides the foundation for most food composition databases in the public and private sectors.

  4. Nutrient Enrichment Increases Mortality of Mangroves

    PubMed Central

    Lovelock, Catherine E.; Ball, Marilyn C.; Martin, Katherine C.; C. Feller, Ilka

    2009-01-01

    Nutrient enrichment of the coastal zone places intense pressure on marine communities. Previous studies have shown that growth of intertidal mangrove forests is accelerated with enhanced nutrient availability. However, nutrient enrichment favours growth of shoots relative to roots, thus enhancing growth rates but increasing vulnerability to environmental stresses that adversely affect plant water relations. Two such stresses are high salinity and low humidity, both of which require greater investment in roots to meet the demands for water by the shoots. Here we present data from a global network of sites that documents enhanced mortality of mangroves with experimental nutrient enrichment at sites where high sediment salinity was coincident with low rainfall and low humidity. Thus the benefits of increased mangrove growth in response to coastal eutrophication is offset by the costs of decreased resilience due to mortality during drought, with mortality increasing with soil water salinity along climatic gradients. PMID:19440554

  5. Nutrient shielding in clusters of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrentovich, Maxim O.; Koschwanez, John H.; Nelson, David R.

    2013-06-01

    Cellular nutrient consumption is influenced by both the nutrient uptake kinetics of an individual cell and the cells' spatial arrangement. Large cell clusters or colonies have inhibited growth at the cluster's center due to the shielding of nutrients by the cells closer to the surface. We develop an effective medium theory that predicts a thickness ℓ of the outer shell of cells in the cluster that receives enough nutrient to grow. The cells are treated as partially absorbing identical spherical nutrient sinks, and we identify a dimensionless parameter ν that characterizes the absorption strength of each cell. The parameter ν can vary over many orders of magnitude among different cell types, ranging from bacteria and yeast to human tissue. The thickness ℓ decreases with increasing ν, increasing cell volume fraction ϕ, and decreasing ambient nutrient concentration ψ∞. The theoretical results are compared with numerical simulations and experiments. In the latter studies, colonies of budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are grown on glucose media and imaged under a confocal microscope. We measure the growth inside the colonies via a fluorescent protein reporter and compare the experimental and theoretical results for the thickness ℓ.

  6. Nutrient Shielding in Clusters of Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lavrentovich, Maxim O.; Koschwanez, John H.; Nelson, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular nutrient consumption is influenced by both the nutrient uptake kinetics of an individual cell and the cells’ spatial arrangement. Large cell clusters or colonies have inhibited growth at the cluster's center due to the shielding of nutrients by the cells closer to the surface. We develop an effective medium theory that predicts a thickness ℓ of the outer shell of cells in the cluster that receives enough nutrient to grow. The cells are treated as partially absorbing identical spherical nutrient sinks, and we identify a dimensionless parameter ν that characterizes the absorption strength of each cell. The parameter ν can vary over many orders of magnitude between different cell types, ranging from bacteria and yeast to human tissue. The thickness ℓ decreases with increasing ν, increasing cell volume fraction ϕ, and decreasing ambient nutrient concentration ψ∞. The theoretical results are compared with numerical simulations and experiments. In the latter studies, colonies of budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are grown on glucose media and imaged under a confocal microscope. We measure the growth inside the colonies via a fluorescent protein reporter and compare the experimental and theoretical results for the thickness ℓ. PMID:23848711

  7. Nutrient additions to mitigate for loss of Pacific salmon: consequences for stream biofilm and nutrient dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marcarelli, Amy M.; Baxter, Colden V.; Wipfli, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    Mitigation activities designed to supplement nutrient and organic matter inputs to streams experiencing decline or loss of Pacific salmon typically presuppose that an important pathway by which salmon nutrients are moved to fish (anadromous and/or resident) is via nutrient incorporation by biofilms and subsequent bottom-up stimulation of biofilm production, which is nutrient-limited in many ecosystems where salmon returns have declined. Our objective was to quantify the magnitude of nutrient incorporation and biofilm dynamics that underpin this indirect pathway in response to experimental additions of salmon carcasses and pelletized fish meal (a.k.a., salmon carcass analogs) to 500-m reaches of central Idaho streams over three years. Biofilm standing crops increased 2–8-fold and incorporated marine-derived nutrients (measured using 15N and 13C) in the month following treatment, but these responses did not persist year-to-year. Biofilms were nitrogen (N) limited before treatments, and remained N limited in analog, but not carcass-treated reaches. Despite these biofilm responses, in the month following treatment total N load was equal to 33–47% of the N added to the treated reaches, and N spiraling measurements suggested that as much as 20%, but more likely 2–3% of added N was taken up by microbes. Design of biologically and cost-effective strategies for nutrient addition will require understanding the rates at which stream microbes take up nutrients and the downstream distance traveled by exported nutrients.

  8. Variation in wood nutrients along a tropical soil fertility gradient.

    PubMed

    Heineman, Katherine D; Turner, Benjamin L; Dalling, James W

    2016-07-01

    Wood contains the majority of the nutrients in tropical trees, yet controls over wood nutrient concentrations and their function are poorly understood. We measured wood nutrient concentrations in 106 tree species in 10 forest plots spanning a regional fertility gradient in Panama. For a subset of species, we quantified foliar nutrients and wood density to test whether wood nutrients scale with foliar nutrients at the species level, or wood nutrient storage increases with wood density as predicted by the wood economics spectrum. Wood nutrient concentrations varied enormously among species from fourfold in nitrogen (N) to > 30-fold in calcium (Ca), potassium (K), magnesium (Mg) and phosphorus (P). Community-weighted mean wood nutrient concentrations correlated positively with soil Ca, K, Mg and P concentrations. Wood nutrients scaled positively with leaf nutrients, supporting the hypothesis that nutrient allocation is conserved across plant organs. Wood P was most sensitive to variation in soil nutrient availability, and significant radial declines in wood P indicated that tropical trees retranslocate P as sapwood transitions to heartwood. Wood P decreased with increasing wood density, suggesting that low wood P and dense wood are traits associated with tree species persistence on low fertility soils. Substantial variation among species and communities in wood nutrient concentrations suggests that allocation of nutrients to wood, especially P, influences species distributions and nutrient dynamics in tropical forests. PMID:26922861

  9. Nutrient budgeting as an approach for improving nutrient management on Australian dairy farms.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dairy farming in Australia continues to intensify. Increased stocking rates have resulted in increased milk production per ha, but have also required greater inputs of purchased feed and fertiliser. The imbalance between nutrient inputs, primarily as feed and fertiliser, and nutrient outputs, in mil...

  10. YAQUINA ESTUARY NUTRIENT CRITERIA CASE STUDY: GUIDANCE FOR DEVELOPING NUTRIENT CRITERIA IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides an introduction to the Yaquina Estuary Nutrient Case Study which includes considerations for development of estuarine nutrient criteria in the Pacific Northwest. As part of this effort, a database of historic and recent data has been assembled consistin...

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF SAV LOSS-NUTRIENT LOAD RELATIONSHIPS AND FACTORS WHICH CONTROL SAV RESPONSE TO NUTRIENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research aims to understand the relationship between SAV loss and nutrient loading (N and P). A set of models will be developed and used to examine how nutrients interact with the physical and biological components to affect the health of SAV populations. First, a literat...

  12. Modeling the Response of Nutrient Concentrations and Primary Productivity in Lake Michigan to Nutrient Loading Scenarios

    EPA Science Inventory

    A water quality model, LM3 Eutro, will be used to estimate the response of nutrient concentrations and primary productivity in Lake Michigan to nutrient loading scenarios. This work is part of a larger effort, the Future Midwestern landscapes study, that will estimate the produc...

  13. Are nutrient databases and nutrient analysis systems ready for the International implications of nutrigenomics?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our objective is to discuss the implications internationally of the increased focus on nutrigenomics as the underlying basis for individualized health promotion and chronic disease prevention and the challenges presented to existing nutrient database and nutrient analysis systems by these trends. De...

  14. Nutrient Requirements of Domestic Animals, Number 10: Nutrient Requirements of Laboratory Animals. Third Revised Edition, 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Board on Agricultural and Renewable Resources.

    This report deals with the nutrient requirements of seven species of animals used extensively for biomedical research in the United States. Following an introductory chapter of general information on nutrition, chapters are presented on the nutrient requirements of the laboratory rat, mouse, gerbil, guinea pig, hamster, vole, and fishes. Each…

  15. Microbial life at extremely low nutrient levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, P.

    Many microorganisms (``oligotrophs'') grow in distilled water: Pseudomonas spp., Caulobacter spp., Hyphomicrobium spp., Arthrobacter spp., Seliberia spp., Bactoderma alba, Corynebacterium spp., Amycolata (Nocardia) autotrophica, Mycobacterium spp., yeasts, and Chlorella spp. Also, certain lower fungi can be found here. In the laboratory, these organisms thrive on contaminations of the air (CO, hydrocarbons, H2, alcohols etc.). All are euryosmotic and often grow also in higher concentrations of salts and nutrients. Natural locations with extremely low nutrient levels (snow, rain water pools, springs, free ocean water, Antarctic rocks and soils) do not contain more than 1-5 mg/1 of organic carbon. Oligotrophs found here are especially adapted to constant famine: they frequently live attached to surfaces, form polymers and storage products even while starving, and often aggregate. Many of these oligotrophs alter their morphology (surface to volume ratio) with changing nutrient concentrations. Extreme oligotrophs also occur in generally nutrient-rich environments such as sewage aeration tanks or compost soil. Here they are thought to survive in nutrient-depauperate microhabitats.

  16. Fishing down nutrients on coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Allgeier, Jacob E; Valdivia, Abel; Cox, Courtney; Layman, Craig A

    2016-01-01

    Fishing is widely considered a leading cause of biodiversity loss in marine environments, but the potential effect on ecosystem processes, such as nutrient fluxes, is less explored. Here, we test how fishing on Caribbean coral reefs influences biodiversity and ecosystem functions provided by the fish community, that is, fish-mediated nutrient capacity. Specifically, we modelled five processes of nutrient storage (in biomass) and supply (via excretion) of nutrients, as well as a measure of their multifunctionality, onto 143 species of coral reef fishes across 110 coral reef fish communities. These communities span a gradient from extreme fishing pressure to protected areas with little to no fishing. We find that in fished sites fish-mediated nutrient capacity is reduced almost 50%, despite no substantial changes in the number of species. Instead, changes in community size and trophic structure were the primary cause of shifts in ecosystem function. These findings suggest that a broader perspective that incorporates predictable impacts of fishing pressure on ecosystem function is imperative for effective coral reef conservation and management. PMID:27529748

  17. Nutrients affecting brain composition and behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurtman, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    This review examines the changes in brain composition and in various brain functions, including behavior, that can follow the ingestion of particular foods or nutrients. It details those that are best understood: the increases in serotonin, catecholamine, or acetylcholine synthesis that can occur subsequent to food-induced increases in brain levels of tryptophan, tyrosine, or choline; it also discusses the various processes that must intervene between the mouth and the synapse, so to speak, in order for a nutrient to affect neurotransmission, and it speculates as to additional brain chemicals that may ultimately be found to be affected by changes in the availability of their nutrient precursors. Because the brain chemicals best known to be nutrient dependent overlap with those thought to underlie the actions of most of the drugs used to treat psychiatric diseases, knowledge of this dependence may help the psychiatrist to understand some of the pathologic processes occurring in his/her patients, particularly those with appetitive symptoms. At the very least, such knowledge should provide the psychiatrist with objective criteria for judging when to take seriously assertions that particular foods or nutrients do indeed affect behavior (e.g., in hyperactive children). If the food can be shown to alter neurotransmitter release, it may be behaviorally-active; however, if it lacks a discernible neurochemical effect, the likelihood that it really alters behavior is small.

  18. Fishing down nutrients on coral reefs

    PubMed Central

    Allgeier, Jacob E.; Valdivia, Abel; Cox, Courtney; Layman, Craig A.

    2016-01-01

    Fishing is widely considered a leading cause of biodiversity loss in marine environments, but the potential effect on ecosystem processes, such as nutrient fluxes, is less explored. Here, we test how fishing on Caribbean coral reefs influences biodiversity and ecosystem functions provided by the fish community, that is, fish-mediated nutrient capacity. Specifically, we modelled five processes of nutrient storage (in biomass) and supply (via excretion) of nutrients, as well as a measure of their multifunctionality, onto 143 species of coral reef fishes across 110 coral reef fish communities. These communities span a gradient from extreme fishing pressure to protected areas with little to no fishing. We find that in fished sites fish-mediated nutrient capacity is reduced almost 50%, despite no substantial changes in the number of species. Instead, changes in community size and trophic structure were the primary cause of shifts in ecosystem function. These findings suggest that a broader perspective that incorporates predictable impacts of fishing pressure on ecosystem function is imperative for effective coral reef conservation and management. PMID:27529748

  19. Development of numeric nutrient criteria in Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, K.; Nearhoof, F.; Frydenborg, R.

    2005-05-01

    Building on the success of the recently adopted numeric phosphorus criterion for the Florida Everglades, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) is developing numeric nutrient criteria for all Florida freshwaters. FDEP is currently pursuing a reference site-based approach for streams and lakes. Least disturbed reference lakes and streams have been delineated based on landuse patterns (Landscape Development Intensity Index) and the knowledge of local experts. As a means of reducing and explaining the overall variance among reference lakes or reference streams, FDEP is evaluating different types of natural waterbodies (e.g., Florida ecoregions based on geography, physiography, etc.). The goal of these evaluations is to subdivide natural waterbodies into homogenous groups. It is anticipated that criteria will be statistically derived, for each homogenous waterbody group, from the frequency distribution of reference site nutrient concentrations and will likely be expressed as the long-term level required to preserve the least-disturbed condition in that waterbody type. Furthermore, FDEP is pursuing the development and evaluation of biological indices (vegetation, algae, macroinvertebrates) that may be used in conjunction with the reference nutrient concentration distribution approach in establishing nutrient criteria or verifying waterbody impairment status relative to the nutrient criteria.

  20. Nutrient-dense food groups have high energy costs: an econometric approach to nutrient profiling.

    PubMed

    Maillot, Matthieu; Darmon, Nicole; Darmon, Michel; Lafay, Lionel; Drewnowski, Adam

    2007-07-01

    Consumers wishing to replace some of the foods in their diets with more nutrient-dense options need to be able to identify such foods on the basis of nutrient profiling. The present study used nutrient profiling to rank 7 major food groups and 25 subgroups in terms of their contribution to dietary energy, diet quality, and diet cost for 1332 adult participants in the French National INCA1 Study. Nutrient profiles were based on the presence of 23 qualifying nutrients, expressed as the percentage of nutrient adequacy per 8 MJ, and 3 negative or disqualifying nutrients, expressed as the percentage of the maximal recommended values for saturated fatty acids, added sugar, and sodium per 1.4 kg. Calculated cost of energy (euro/8 MJ) was based on the mean retail price of 619 foods in the nutrient composition database. The meat and the fruit and vegetables food groups had the highest nutritional quality but were associated with highest energy costs. Sweets and salted snacks had the lowest nutritional quality but were also one of the least expensive sources of dietary energy. Starches and grains were unique because they were low in disqualifying nutrients yet provided low-cost dietary energy. Within each major food group, some subgroups had a higher nutritient-to-price ratio than others. However, the fact that food groups with the more favorable nutrient profiles were also associated with higher energy costs suggests that the present structure of food prices may be a barrier to the adoption of food-based dietary guidelines, at least by low-income households. PMID:17585036

  1. Dietary Restriction and Nutrient Balance in Aging.

    PubMed

    Santos, Júlia; Leitão-Correia, Fernanda; Sousa, Maria João; Leão, Cecília

    2016-01-01

    Dietary regimens that favour reduced calorie intake delay aging and age-associated diseases. New evidences revealed that nutritional balance of dietary components without food restriction increases lifespan. Particular nutrients as several nitrogen sources, proteins, amino acid, and ammonium are implicated in life and healthspan regulation in different model organisms from yeast to mammals. Aging and dietary restriction interact through partially overlapping mechanisms in the activation of the conserved nutrient-signalling pathways, mainly the insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IIS) and the Target Of Rapamycin (TOR). The specific nutrients of dietary regimens, their balance, and how they interact with different genes and pathways are currently being uncovered. Taking into account that dietary regimes can largely influence overall human health and changes in risk factors such as cholesterol level and blood pressure, these new findings are of great importance to fully comprehend the interplay between diet and humans health. PMID:26682004

  2. Dietary Restriction and Nutrient Balance in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Leitão-Correia, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    Dietary regimens that favour reduced calorie intake delay aging and age-associated diseases. New evidences revealed that nutritional balance of dietary components without food restriction increases lifespan. Particular nutrients as several nitrogen sources, proteins, amino acid, and ammonium are implicated in life and healthspan regulation in different model organisms from yeast to mammals. Aging and dietary restriction interact through partially overlapping mechanisms in the activation of the conserved nutrient-signalling pathways, mainly the insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IIS) and the Target Of Rapamycin (TOR). The specific nutrients of dietary regimens, their balance, and how they interact with different genes and pathways are currently being uncovered. Taking into account that dietary regimes can largely influence overall human health and changes in risk factors such as cholesterol level and blood pressure, these new findings are of great importance to fully comprehend the interplay between diet and humans health. PMID:26682004

  3. Information from USDA's Nutrient Data Bank.

    PubMed

    Haytowitz, D B

    1995-07-01

    The United States Department of Agriculture's Nutrient Data Bank contains a wealth of information on the composition of foods. These data are made available to the public through Agriculture Handbook No. 8, Composition of Foods: Raw, Processed, Prepared, its computerized form-the USDA Nutrient Data Base for Standard Reference, and other publications. Food components in Agriculture Handbook No. 8 include proximate components, minerals, vitamins, fatty acids, cholesterol, phytosterols, and amino acids. Other tables and data sets containing food components of special interest such as vitamins D and K, selenium, and sugars, are also available. This paper describes how to obtain the data in either printed or electronic form. Information on obtaining the data through the Nutrient Data Bank Bulletin Board or the Internet is also presented. PMID:7616313

  4. Nutrient limitations to secondary forest regrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Eric A.; Martinelli, Luiz A.

    The old, highly weathered soils of the lowland forest within the Amazon Basin generally exhibit conservative P cycles and leaky N cycles. This generalization applies to mature forests, but accelerating land use change is altering Amazonian landscapes. About 16% of the original forest area has been cleared, and about 160,000 km2 is in secondary forest cover. Secondary forests are common in agricultural regions, but few persist in one place for much more than 5 years. The nutrients within ephemeral forests are important for smallholder traditional slash-and-burn agriculture and in alternatives developed to conserve nutrients. Forest clearing causes an initial loss of nutrients through timber harvesting, fire, erosion, soil gaseous emissions, and hydrologic leaching, with N losses exceeding P losses. In contrast, the Ca, Mg, and K present in woody biomass are largely conserved as ash following fire, redistributing these nutrients to the soil. After the initial postclearing pulse of nutrient availability, rates of N cycling and loss consistently decline as cattle pastures age. Fertilization experiments have demonstrated that growth of young forests in abandoned agricultural land is nutrient limited. Several N cycling indicators in a secondary forest chronosequence study also demonstrated a conservative N cycle in young forests. Variable N limitation in young forests helps explain a negative relationship observed between the burn frequency during previous agricultural phases and the rate of forest regrowth. Recuperation of the N cycle gradually occurs during decades of secondary forest succession, such that mature lowland forests eventually recover abundant N relative to a conservative P cycle.

  5. Export of nutrients from the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Valdés, Sinhué; Tsubouchi, Takamasa; Bacon, Sheldon; Naveira-Garabato, Alberto C.; Sanders, Richards; McLaughlin, Fiona A.; Petrie, Brian; Kattner, Gerhard; Azetsu-Scott, Kumiko; Whitledge, Terry E.

    2013-04-01

    study provides the first physically based mass-balanced transport estimates of dissolved inorganic nutrients (nitrate, phosphate, and silicate) for the Arctic Ocean. Using an inverse model-generated velocity field in combination with a quasi-synoptic assemblage of hydrographic and hydrochemical data, we quantify nutrient transports across the main Arctic Ocean gateways: Davis Strait, Fram Strait, the Barents Sea Opening (BSO), and Bering Strait. We found that the major exports of all three nutrients occur via Davis Strait. Transports associated with the East Greenland Current are almost balanced by transports associated with the West Spitsbergen Current. The most important imports of nitrate and phosphate to the Arctic occur via the BSO, and the most important import of silicate occurs via Bering Strait. Oceanic budgets show that statistically robust net silicate and phosphate exports exist, while the net nitrate flux is zero, within the uncertainty limits. The Arctic Ocean is a net exporter of silicate (-15.7 ± 3.2 kmol s-1) and phosphate (-1.0 ± 0.3 kmol s-1; net ± 1 standard error) to the North Atlantic. The export of excess phosphate (relative to nitrate) from the Arctic, calculated at -1.1 ± 0.3 kmol s-1, is almost twice as large as previously estimated. Net transports of silicate and phosphate from the Arctic Ocean provide 12% and 90%, respectively, of the net southward fluxes estimated at 47°N in the North Atlantic. Additional sources of nutrients that may offset nutrient imbalances are explored, and the relevance and the pathway of nutrient transports to the North Atlantic are discussed.

  6. Nutrient limitation in tropical savannas across multiple scales and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Adam F A

    2016-02-01

    Nutrients have been hypothesized to influence the distribution of the savanna biome through two possible mechanisms. Low nutrient availability may restrict growth rates of trees, thereby allowing for intermittent fires to maintain low tree cover; alternatively, nutrient deficiency may even place an absolute constraint on the ability of forests to form, independent of fire. However, we have little understanding of the scales at which nutrient limitation operates, what nutrients are limiting, and the mechanisms that influence how nutrient limitation regulates savanna-forest transitions. Here, I review literature, synthesize existing data, and present a simple calculation of nutrient demand to evaluate how nutrient limitation may regulate the distribution of the savanna biome. The literature primarily supports the hypothesis that nutrients may interact dynamically with fire to restrict the transition of savanna into forest. A compilation of indirect metrics of nutrient limitation suggest that nitrogen and phosphorus are both in short supply and may limit plants. Nutrient demand calculations provided a number of insights. First, trees required high rates of nitrogen and phosphorus supply relative to empirically determined inputs. Second, nutrient demand increased as landscapes approached the transition point between savanna and forest. Third, the potential for fire-driven nutrient losses remained high throughout transitions, which may exaggerate limitation and could be a key feedback stabilizing the savanna biome. Fourth, nutrient limitation varied between functional groups, with fast-growing forest species having substantially greater nutrient demand and a higher susceptibility to fire-driven nutrient losses. Finally, African savanna trees required substantially larger amounts of nutrients supplied at greater rates, although this varied across plant functional groups. In summary, the ability of nutrients to control transitions emerges at individual and landscape

  7. DETECTING TEMPORAL CHANGE IN WATERSHED NUTRIENT YIELDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Meta-analyses reveal that nutrient yields tend to be higher for watersheds dominated by anthropogenic uses (e.g., urban, agriculture) and lower for watersheds dominated by natural vegetation. One implication of this pattern is that loss of natural vegetation will produce increase...

  8. Grassland productivity limited by multiple nutrients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Limitation of aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) by nitrogen (N) is widely accepted, but the roles of phosphorus (P), potassium (K) and their combinations remain unclear. Thus we may underestimate nutrient limitation of primary productivity. We conducted standardized sampling of ANPP and ...

  9. Nutrient Estimation Using Subsurface Sensing Methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report investigates the use of precision management techniques for measuring soil conductivity on feedlot surfaces to estimate nutrient value for crop production. An electromagnetic induction soil conductivity meter was used to collect apparent soil electrical conductivity (ECa) from feedlot p...

  10. Inventory of nutrients in the Bohai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei Liu, Su; Wei Li, Ling; Zhang, Zhinan

    2011-10-01

    Biogeochemical observations were carried out to address the influence of major sources on nutrient composition and the ecosystem of the Bohai. Relatively high concentrations of nutrients off the Huanghe mouth and the shallow water areas were observed in the Bohai suggesting the effects of tidal and residual currents and anthropogenic perturbation. Sediment in the Bohai represents a source for ammonium, phosphate and dissolved silicate, while it is a sink for nitrite and nitrate. Benthic nutrient fluxes were 2-3 times higher than the riverine input with the regeneration rate of phosphate being slower relative to DIN and dissolved silicate. The release of dissolved silicate and phosphate from sediments may mitigate the decrease of dissolved silicate and phosphate due to the reduction of freshwater discharge. Compared with submarine groundwater discharge, nutrient regeneration in sediment provides similar DIN flux, 2-5 times phosphate and dissolved silicate fluxes. DIN/P molar ratios in the three mentioned sources were 155-845, indicating that phosphorus limitation for phytoplankton growth could be intensified, which likely results in changes of ecosystems of the Bohai.

  11. ATMOSPHERIC DEPOSITION MODELING AND MONITORING OF NUTRIENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This talk presents an overview of the capabilities and roles that regional atmospheric deposition models can play with respect to multi-media environmental problems. The focus is on nutrient deposition (nitrogen). Atmospheric deposition of nitrogen is an important contributor to...

  12. Dietary nutrients, additives, and fish health

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disease outbreaks have become a major threat to the sustainability of the aquaculture industry, with antibiotics and chemicals historically used to treat animals ineffective or not allowed to be used today. In this book Dietary Nutrients, Additives, and Fish Health, the relationships between dietar...

  13. Foliar nutrient retranslocation in Eucalyptus globulus.

    PubMed

    Saur, E; Nambiar, E K; Fife, D N

    2000-10-01

    We measured patterns of change in concentrations and contents of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, magnesium and calcium in fully expanded leaves of young Eucalyptus globulus (Labill.) trees growing in a plantation in southeastern Australia, over a 12-month period beginning at the onset of spring. There was significant net retranslocation of mobile nutrients on a seasonal basis from green leaves, coinciding with continued growth and production of foliage. There was a close positive relationship between initial nutrient content (N, P and K) of the leaf and amount retranslocated, and a tight coupling between N and P retranslocated from leaves. Net retranslocation was significantly correlated with basal area growth increments. Artificial shading of leaves resulted in senescence and reduction in leaf mass. It also induced retranslocation of N, P and K from leaves of different ages and from different position in the canopy. Although the mechanisms underlying the effects of shading intensity on these changes were not elucidated, shading provided an experimental tool for studying retranslocation. Comparison of the results with published data for Pinus radiata (D. Don) grown in the same environment indicated a similarity between the species in patterns of change in foliar nutrient contents and in factors governing foliar nutrient retranslocation, giving rise to unifying principles. PMID:11269962

  14. Nutrients and Food Composition: Data Needs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For more than 100 years the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has supported the generation and compilation of food composition data. Today the Agricultural Research Service, USDA develops and maintains the National Nutrient Data Bank, a repository of food composition data which provides the foun...

  15. MIDDLE SNAKE RIVER PRODUCTIVITY AND NUTRIENT ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    From 1992 to 1994, the University of Idaho conducted a research project on the water quality- limited section of the MIddle Snake River from Twin Falls downstream to Upper Salmon Falls Dam in an effort to determine the relationship between the nutrients and sediments entering thi...

  16. NUTRIENT RESPONSE IN GREAT LAKES WETLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA National Health and Environmental Effects Laboratory's Aquatic Stressor Framework and associated Nutrient Implementation Plan define scientific and regulatory needs, and lay-out research goals too for a cross divisional program to investigate stressor-response relati...

  17. SOUTHEASTERN PLAINS NUTRIENT RESPONSE (SPNR) PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study is part of a multi-year effort to examine nutrient biological responses and to develop accurate tools for measuring and assessing those responses. For 2007, this work involves developing a methodology for sampling and analysis of periphyton from sand and sediment. We...

  18. Nutrient element interactions in pecan orchards

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pecan trees are remarkably capable of maintaining a satisfactory internal balance among essential macro-, micro- and beneficial nutrients; however, this balance is potentially disrupted when trees are sufficiently stressed. Stress can be due to many factors, but is most typically linked to either e...

  19. Nutrient levels in the Yazoo River Basin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) loadings to aquatic ecosystems are linked to environmental problems including harmful algal blooms and hypoxia. Presented is an assessment of accessible data on nutrient sources, sinks and inputs to streams within the Yazoo River Basin of northern Mississippi. Ac...

  20. Nutrient requirements of term and preterm infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growth of the healthy breast-fed term infant is the most widely accepted standard for growth from birth through 4-6 months of age. Thus, it is logical to assume that the amounts of each nutrient ingested by the breast-fed term infant during this period are adequate and the most recent dietary refer...

  1. Uncertainty Propagation in an Ecosystem Nutrient Budget.

    EPA Science Inventory

    New aspects and advancements in classical uncertainty propagation methods were used to develop a nutrient budget with associated error for a northern Gulf of Mexico coastal embayment. Uncertainty was calculated for budget terms by propagating the standard error and degrees of fr...

  2. [A nutrient medium for isolating Lactobacilli].

    PubMed

    Abrosimova, N A; Kushnareva, M V

    1991-01-01

    The composition of and method for preparation of nutrient medium for the isolation of Lactobacilli from biologic material are described. The medium is simple to prepare, consists of only Soviet reagents, this making it available for laboratories in this country. PMID:1710734

  3. Nutrient management on pasture and haylands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrient management on pastures is a critical part of maintaining and improving their ability to provide key ecosystem services including forage and fuel production, clean air and water, and climate mitigation. Our objective was to determine the scientific underpinning for purported benefits of nutr...

  4. NUTRIENTS AND EPIGENETICS IN BOVINE CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is a chapter for a book titled “Livestock Epigenetics” edited by Dr. Hasan Khatib and published by Wiley-Blackwell. This chapter is focused on the research development in our laboratory in the area of interaction of nutrients and genomic phonotype in bovine cells. Briefly, the Research on nutri...

  5. Nutrient management studies in biofuel cropping systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research was conducted to determine the effect of nutrient management practices on biofuel crop production, and to evaluate long term effects of biofuel crop production on selected chemical, physical and microbiological properties. Experimental plots for research on biofuel crop production were esta...

  6. Recapturing nutrients from dairy waste using biochar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkhot, D.; Ghezzehei, T. A.; Berhe, A. A.

    2009-12-01

    Biochar or biomass derived black carbon is known to be highly resistant to decomposition with half-life periods ranging from hundreds of years to millennia. It is also reported to enhance soil productivity due to high nutrient retention and favorable effects on soil pH, water retention capacity as well as microbial population. Brazilian Terra Preta soils have shown the potential of biochar for long-term carbon sequestration capacity and productivity of soil and many researchers have now focused on utilizing this phenomenon to create fertile, carbon-rich soils, called Terra Preta Nova. Although the highly adsorptive nature of biochar is well characterized, the potential for using biochar in environmental cleanup efforts is relatively unexplored. Dairy waste is a source of significant water pollution because it introduces excess nutrients such as phosphates and nitrates into the soil and water system. Since many soils have limited capacity to retain nitrate and phosphate, especially for long periods of time, the utility of dairy waste manure to enhance soil fertility and nutrient availability to plants is limited. Here, we present results from a project that we started to determine the potential of biochar to recover the excess nutrients from dairy flushed manure. In this initial study, a commercially available biochar amendment was ground and used in a batch sorption experiment with the dairy flushed manure from a local dairy in Merced, California. Four manure dilutions viz. 10, 25, 50 and 100%, and three shaking times, viz. 1, 12 and 24 hours were used for this study. We then calculated the amount of ammonia, nitrate and phosphate adsorbed by the biochar using differences in nutrient concentrations before and after the sorption experiment. Biochar showed significant capacity of adsorbing these nutrients, suggesting a potential for controlling the dairy pollution. The resulting enriched biochar can potentially act as a slow release fertilizer and enhance soil

  7. Dairy manure nutrient analysis using quick tests.

    PubMed

    Singh, A; Bicudo, J R

    2005-05-01

    Rapid on-farm assessment of manure nutrient content can be achieved with the use of quick tests. These tests can be used to indirectly measure the nutrient content in animal slurries immediately before manure is applied on agricultural fields. The objective of this study was to assess the reliability of hydrometers, electrical conductivity meter and pens, and Agros N meter against standard laboratory methods. Manure samples were collected from 34 dairy farms in the Mammoth Cave area in central Kentucky. Regression equations were developed for combined and individual counties located In the area (Barren, Hart and Monroe). Our results indicated that accuracy in nutrient estimation could be improved if separate linear regressions were developed for farms with similar facilities in a county. Direct hydrometer estimates of total nitrogen were among the most accurate when separate regression equations were developed for each county (R2 = 0.61, 0.93, and 0.74 for Barren, Hart and Monroe county, respectively). Reasonably accurate estimates (R2 > 0.70) were also obtained for total nitrogen and total phosphorus using hydrometers, either by relating specific gravity to nutrient content or to total solids content. Estimation of ammoniacal nitrogen with Agros N meter and electrical conductivity meter/pens correlated well with standard laboratory determinations, especially while using the individual data sets from Hart County (R2 = 0.70 to 0.87). This study indicates that the use of quick test calibration equations developed for a small area or region where farms are similar in terms of manure handling and management, housing, and feed ration are more appropriate than using "universal" equations usually developed with combined data sets. Accuracy is expected to improve if individual farms develop their own calibration curves. Nevertheless, we suggest confidence intervals always be specified for nutrients estimated through quick testing for any specific region, county, or farm

  8. Nutrient and nonnutrient renal blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J.S.; Passmore, J.C.; Hartupee, D.A.; Baker, C.H. )

    1990-06-01

    The role of prostaglandins in the distribution of total renal blood flow (TRBF) between nutrient and nonnutrient compartments was investigated in anesthetized mongrel dogs. Renal blood flow distribution was assessed by the xenon 133 freeze-dissection technique and by rubidium 86 extraction after ibuprofen treatment. Ibuprofen (13 mg/kg) significantly decreased TRBF by 16.3% +/- 1.2% (mean +/- SEM electromagnetic flow probe; p less than 0.005), but did not alter blood flows to the outer cortex (3.7 vs 4.3 ml/min per gram), the inner cortex (2.6 vs 2.7 ml/min per gram), and the other medulla (1.5 vs 1.5 ml/min per gram), which suggests a decrease in nonnutrient flow. In a separate group of animals the effect of reduced blood flow on the nutrient and nonnutrient components was determined by mechanically reducing renal arterial blood flow by 48%. Unlike the ibuprofen group, nutrient blood flows were proportionally reduced with the mechanical decrease in TRBF in the outer cortex (1.9 ml/min per gram, p less than 0.05), the inner cortex (1.4 ml/min per gram, p less than 0.05), and the outer medulla (0.8 ml/min per gram, p less than 0.01). These results indicate no shift between nutrient and nonnutrient compartments. Nutrient and nonnutrient renal blood flows of the left kidney were also determined by 86Rb extraction. After ibuprofen treatment, nonextracted 86Rb decreased to 12.1% from the control value of 15.6% (p less than 0.05). Mechanical reduction of TRBF did not significantly decrease the proportion of unextracted 86Rb (18.7%).

  9. Nutrient Status of Adults with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    GORDON, CATHERINE M.; ANDERSON, ELLEN J.; HERLYN, KAREN; HUBBARD, JANE L.; PIZZO, ANGELA; GELBARD, RONDI; LAPEY, ALLEN; MERKEL, PETER A.

    2011-01-01

    Nutrition is thought to influence disease status in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). This cross-sectional study sought to evaluate nutrient intake and anthropometric data from 64 adult outpatients with cystic fibrosis. Nutrient intake from food and supplements was compared with the Dietary Reference Intakes for 16 nutrients and outcomes influenced by nutritional status. Attention was given to vitamin D and calcium given potential skeletal implications due to cystic fibrosis. Measurements included weight, height, body composition, pulmonary function, and serum metabolic parameters. Participants were interviewed about dietary intake, supplement use, pulmonary function, sunlight exposure, and pain. The participants’ mean body mass index (±standard deviation) was 21.8±4.9 and pulmonary function tests were normal. Seventy-eight percent used pancreatic enzyme replacement for malabsorption. Vitamin D deficiency [25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD)<37.5 nmol/L] was common: 25 (39%) were deficient despite adequate vitamin D intake. Lipid profiles were normal in the majority, even though total and saturated fat consumption represented 33.0% and 16.8% of energy intake, respectively. Reported protein intake represented 16.9% of total energy intake (range 10%–25%). For several nutrients, including vitamin D and calcium, intake from food and supplements in many participants exceeded recommended Tolerable Upper Intake Levels. Among adults with cystic fibrosis, vitamin D deficiency was common despite reported adequate intake, and lipid profiles were normal despite a relatively high fat intake. Mean protein consumption was adequate, but the range of intake was concerning, as both inadequate or excessive intake may have deleterious skeletal effects. These findings call into question the applicability of established nutrient thresholds for patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:18060897

  10. Nutrient-substituted hydroxyapatites: synthesis and characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.

    1999-01-01

    Incorporation of Mg, S, and plant-essential micronutrients into the structure of synthetic hydroxyapatite (HA) may be advantageous for closed-loop systems, such as will be required on Lunar and Martian outposts, because these apatites can be used as slow-release fertilizers. Our objective was to synthesize HA with Ca, P, Mg, S, Fe, Cu, Mn, Zn, Mo, B, and Cl incorporated into the structure, i.e., nutrient-substituted apatites. Hydroxyapatite, carbonate hydroxyapatite (CHA), nutrient-substituted hydroxyapatite (NHA), and nutrient-substituted carbonate hydroxyapatite (NCHA) were synthesized by precipitating from solution. Chemical and mineralogical analysis of precipitated samples indicated a considerable fraction of the added cations were incorporated into HA, without mineral impurities. Particle size of the HA was in the 1 to 40 nm range, and decreased with increased substitution of nutrient elements. The particle shape of HA was elongated in the c-direction in unsubstituted HA and NHA but more spherical in CHA and NCHA. The substitution of cations and anions in the HA structure was confirmed by the decrease of the d[002] spacing of HA with substitution of ions with an ionic radius less than that of Ca or P. The DTPA-extractable Cu ranged from 8 to 8429 mg kg-1, Zn ranged from 57 to 1279 mg kg-1, Fe from 211 to 2573 mg kg-1, and Mn from 190 to 1719 mg kg-1, depending on the substitution level of each element in HA. Nutrient-substituted HA has the potential to be used as a slow-release fertilizer to supply micronutrients, S, and Mg in addition to Ca and P.

  11. Plasticity of the Arabidopsis root system under nutrient deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Benjamin D; Giehl, Ricardo F H; Friedel, Swetlana; von Wirén, Nicolaus

    2013-09-01

    Plant roots show a particularly high variation in their morphological response to different nutrient deficiencies. Although such changes often determine the nutrient efficiency or stress tolerance of plants, it is surprising that a comprehensive and comparative analysis of root morphological responses to different nutrient deficiencies has not yet been conducted. Since one reason for this is an inherent difficulty in obtaining nutrient-deficient conditions in agar culture, we first identified conditions appropriate for producing nutrient-deficient plants on agar plates. Based on a careful selection of agar specifically for each nutrient being considered, we grew Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants at four levels of deficiency for 12 nutrients and quantified seven root traits. In combination with measurements of biomass and elemental concentrations, we observed that the nutritional status and type of nutrient determined the extent and type of changes in root system architecture (RSA). The independent regulation of individual root traits further pointed to a differential sensitivity of root tissues to nutrient limitations. To capture the variation in RSA under different nutrient supplies, we used principal component analysis and developed a root plasticity chart representing the overall modulations in RSA under a given treatment. This systematic comparison of RSA responses to nutrient deficiencies provides a comprehensive view of the overall changes in root plasticity induced by the deficiency of single nutrients and provides a solid basis for the identification of nutrient-sensitive steps in the root developmental program. PMID:23852440

  12. Variation in nutrients formulated and nutrients supplied on 5 California dairies.

    PubMed

    Rossow, H A; Aly, S S

    2013-01-01

    Computer models used in ration formulation assume that nutrients supplied by a ration formulation are the same as the nutrients presented in front of the cow in the final ration. Deviations in nutrients due to feed management effects such as dry matter changes (i.e., rain), loading, mixing, and delivery errors are assumed to not affect delivery of nutrients to the cow and her resulting milk production. To estimate how feed management affects nutrients supplied to the cow and milk production, and determine if nutrients can serve as indexes of feed management practices, weekly total mixed ration samples were collected and analyzed for 4 pens (close-up cows, fresh cows, high-milk-producing, and low-milk-producing cows, if available) for 7 to 12 wk on 5 commercial California dairies. Differences among nutrient analyses from these samples and nutrients from the formulated rations were analyzed by PROC MIXED of SAS (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC). Milk fat and milk protein percentages did not vary as much [coefficient of variation (CV) = 18 to 33%] as milk yield (kg; CV = 16 to 47 %) across all dairies and pens. Variability in nutrients delivered were highest for macronutrient fat (CV = 22%), lignin (CV = 15%), and ash (CV = 11%) percentages and micronutrients Fe (mg/kg; CV = 48%), Na (%; CV = 42%), and Zn (mg/kg; CV = 38%) for the milking pens across all dairies. Partitioning of the variability in random effects of nutrients delivered and intraclass correlation coefficients showed that variability in lignin percentage of TMR had the highest correlation with variability in milk yield and milk fat percentage, followed by fat and crude protein percentages. But, variability in ash, fat, and lignin percentages of total mixed ration had the highest correlation with variability in milk protein percentage. Therefore, lignin, fat, and ash may be the best indices of feed management to include effects of variability in nutrients on variability in milk yield, milk fat, and milk

  13. Global nutrients data synthesis based on Reference Material of Nutrients of Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Michio; Murata, Akihiko; Nishino, Shigeto

    2013-04-01

    Realistic distributions of nitrate, phosphate and silicate and inventories of them in the world's ocean are basic issues of geochemical study of nitrogen, phosphorous and silicon cycles as well as tracer use of nutrients for deep ocean circulation. WOA09 and WGHC were global hydrographic datasets created by objective analysis and offset correction/objective analysis, respectively. However synthesis using mathematics methods and experience could get apparent global comparability but does not have a firm foundation, therefore accuracy is unknown for nutrients data in WOA05/09 and WGHC. Recently hydrographic dataset such as CARINA and PACIFICA were also created by synthesis. We did global synthesis work based on Reference Material of Nutrients in Seawater (RMNS) for WOCE/CLIVAR cruises datasets, WGHC datasets and some new hydrographic cruises which cover the Pacific Ocean, the Atlantic Ocean, the Indian Ocean, the Southern Ocean and the Arctic Ocean. Among 69982 profiles in 5174 cruises, we could put correction factors of nutrients concentration for 14491 profiles in 268 cruises for nitrate, 18378 profiles in 412 cruises for phosphate and 15825 profiles in 268 cruises for silicate. Global Nutrients Dataset 2010, GND10, is newly created as 0.5 deg. × 0.5 deg. and 50 m interval of 138 levels gridded dataset based on corrected nutrients profiles described above. One feature of GND10 is that nitrate vs. phosphate ratio in deep waters in WOA dataset showed a peak at 14.6 while nitrate vs. phosphate ratio in GND10 showed a peak at 14.3 and kurtosis of frequency distribution of nitrate vs. phosphate ratio is larger in GND10 dataset rather than that in WOA dataset. A reason of larger kurtosis of distribution of nitrate vs. phosphate ratio might be that comparability of nitrate and phosphate concentration data was improved. Newly created GND10 can provide more realistic distribution of nutrients in the world ocean because comparability of nutrients concentration in GND10 is

  14. Fire alters ecosystem carbon and nutrients but not plant nutrient stoichiometry or composition in tropical savanna.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Adam F A; Hedin, Lars O; Staver, A Carla; Govender, Navashni

    2015-05-01

    Fire and nutrients interact to influence the global distribution and dynamics of the savanna biome, but the results of these interactions are both complex and poorly known. A critical but unresolved question is whether short-term losses of carbon and nutrients caused by fire can trigger long-term and potentially compensatory responses in the nutrient stoichiometry of plants, or in the abundance of dinitrogen-fixing trees. There is disagreement in the literature about the potential role of fire on savanna nutrients, and, in turn, on plant stoichiometry and composition. A major limitation has been the lack of fire manipulations over time scales sufficiently long for these interactions to emerge. We use a 58-year, replicated, large-scale, fire manipulation experiment in Kruger National Park (South Africa) in savanna to quantify the effect of fire on (1) distributions of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus at the ecosystem scale; (2) carbon: nitrogen: phosphorus stoichiometry of above- and belowground tissues of plant species; and (3) abundance of plant functional groups including nitrogen fixers. Our results show dramatic effects of fire on the relative distribution of nutrients in soils, but that individual plant stoichiometry and plant community composition remained unexpectedly resilient. Moreover, measures of nutrients and carbon stable isotopes allowed us to discount the role of tree cover change in favor of the turnover of herbaceous biomass as the primary mechanism that mediates a transition from low to high 'soil carbon and nutrients in the absence of fire. We conclude that, in contrast to extra-tropical grasslands or closed-canopy forests, vegetation in the savanna biome may be uniquely adapted to nutrient losses caused by recurring fire. PMID:26236841

  15. Nutrient release, recovery and removal from waste sludge of a biological nutrient removal system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Zheng, Shu-Jian; Pei, Li-Ying; Ke, Li; Peng, Dang-Cong; Xia, Si-Qing

    2014-01-01

    The uncontrolled release of nutrients from waste sludge results in nitrogen and phosphorus overloading in wastewater treatment plants when supernatant is returned to the inlet. A controlled release, recovery and removal of nutrient from the waste sludge of a Biological Nutrient Removal system (BNR) are investigated. Results showed that the supernatant was of high mineral salt, high electrical conductivity and poor biodegradability, in addition to high nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations after the waste sludge was hydrolysed through sodium dodecyl sulphate addition. Subsequently, over 91.8% of phosphorus and 10.5% of nitrogen in the supernatants were extracted by the crystallization method under the conditions of 9.5 pH and 400 rpm. The precipitate was mainly struvite according to X-ray diffraction and morphological examination. A multistage anoxic-oxic Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor (MBBR) was then adopted to remove the residual carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in the supernatant. The MBBR exhibited good performance in simultaneously removing carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus under a short aeration time, which accounted for 31.25% of a cycle. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis demonstrated that nitrifiers presented mainly in floc, although higher extracellular polymeric substance content, especially DNA, appeared in the biofilm. Thus, a combination of hydrolysis and precipitation, followed by the MBBR, can complete the nutrient release from the waste sludge of a BNR system, recovers nutrients from the hydrolysed liquor and removes nutrients from leftovers effectively. PMID:25176308

  16. Comparison of Nutrient Drivers and Response Metrics in Oregon Estuaries

    EPA Science Inventory

    With the goal of assessing sensitivity to nutrient enrichment, we present a cross-estuary comparison of nutrient sources, levels, and biological responses (phytoplankton and macroalgae) for thirteen Oregon estuaries. Nitrogen levels in the upstream portions of the estuaries are ...

  17. Herbivores and nutrients control grassland plant diversity via light limitation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human alterations to nutrient cycles and herbivore communities are dramatically altering global biodiversity. Theory predicts these changes to be strongly counteractive: nutrient addition drives plant species loss through intensified competition for light, whereas herbivores prevent competitive excl...

  18. Nutrient Attenuation Under Natural Conditions in Agricultural Drainage Ditches

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drainage ditches are common practice in agricultural landscapes with poorly drained soils. Even though high concentrations of nutrients and other agricultural chemicals have been reportedly associated with agricultural drainage ditches, processes affecting nutrient transport in these ditches are not...

  19. Nontronite and Montmorillonite as Nutrient Sources for Life on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickol, R. L.; Craig, P. I.; Kral, T. A.

    2016-05-01

    Methanogens were grown in media containing bicarbonate buffer, nontronite or montmorillonite clay, and hydrogen gas. No other nutrients were added. These results suggest that martian clays may provide adequate nutrients to support organism growth.

  20. Nutrient supplements and cardiovascular disease – A heartbreaking story

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Observational data have identified negative associations between carotenoids, folic acid and vitamin E, or metabolites altered by these nutrients, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Despite biological plausibility, for the most part, data derived from nutrient supplement trials using moderate t...

  1. ENHANCED NUTRIENT REMOVAL FROM ON-SITE WASTEWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorus) runoffs impact streams and ecosystems. Furthermore, on-site wastewater treatment systems are important sources of nutrient discharges because effluents from septic tanks typically contain high concentrations of organic matter, nitrogen and ph...

  2. [The development of a dispensing cabinet of total nutrient admixture].

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-an

    2002-03-01

    A dispensing cabinet of total nutrient admixture is introduced in this paper. Which can be used for nutrient solution dispensing. The clinical application shows that it can provide a practical, simple, safe and satisfactory sterile environment. PMID:16104182

  3. OXYGEN UPTAKE AND NUTRIENT REGENERATION IN THE PECONIC ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: OXYGEN UPTAKE AND NUTRIENT REGENERATION IN THE PECONIC ESTUARY Rates of oxygen consumption and nutrient regeneration were measured annually throughout the Peconic Estuarine System. Sediment and water column oxygen uptake were measured to determine the potential...

  4. Relating watershed nutrient loads to satellite derived estuarine water quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nutrient enhanced phytoplankton production is a cause of degraded estuarine water quality. Yet, relationships between watershed nutrient loads and the spatial and temporal scales of phytoplankton blooms and subsequent water quality impairments remain unquantified for most systems...

  5. NUTRIENT DYNAMICS IN RELATION TO GEOMORPHOLOGY OF RIVERINE WETLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Variation in water depth and soil properties associated with geomorphic structures can affect riverine wetland nutrient dynamics by altering biogeochemical processes. We examined the seasonal influence of soils and geomorphology on nutrient forms and concentrations in riverine we...

  6. Assessment of Nutrient Stability in Space Foods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwart, S. R.; Perchonok, M.; Braby, L. A.; Kloeris, V. A.; Smith, S. M.

    2009-01-01

    Maintaining an intact nutrient supply in the food system flown on spacecraft is a critical issue for mission success and crew health and safety. Early polar expeditions and exploration expeditions by sailing vessels have taught us that a deficiency, or excess, of even a single vitamin in the food supply can be catastrophic. Evidence from ground-based research indicates that some vitamins are destroyed and fatty acids are oxidized (and therefore rendered dangerous or useless) by different types of radiation and by conditions of long-term storage. We hypothesize that radiation and long-term storage in the space-flight environment will affect the stability of vitamins, amino acids, and fatty acids in the space food system. The research objectives of our ongoing stability studies are to determine the stability of water- and fat-soluble vitamins, fatty acids, and amino acids in the space food supply before and after space flight on the International Space Station (ISS). Foods were analyzed after 2 weeks (a flight control), 11, 19, and 28 months of flight. Along with the space-flown foods, ground-based controls matched for time, light, and temperature are analyzed. The flight studies complement planned ground-based studies of the effects of radiation on vitamins, amino acids, and fatty acids. Flight studies are needed because a model based on ground-based data cannot predict all of the effects of the space-flight environment. Flight studies provide a more accurate test system to determine the effects on these nutrients of the temperature, and radiation conditions in the space-flight environment. Ground studies are required to evaluate longer missions and higher radiation levels expected outside low-Earth orbit. In addition to providing information about nutrient stability in space, the results of these studies will help NASA determine if a need exists to develop special packaging that can ensure stability of foods and nutrients in space, or if further studies of nutrient

  7. Land Cover - Nutrient Export Relationships in Space and Time

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relationship between watershed land-cover composition and nutrient export has been well established through several meta-analyses. The meta-analyses reveal that nutrient loads from watersheds dominated by natural vegetation tend to be lower than nutrient loads from watershed...

  8. Nutrient Content of Single – Muscle Pork Cuts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The two objectives of this study were to determine the nutrient profiles of four fresh pork cuts (fabricated from individual muscles extracted from subprimals) for dissemination in the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference (SR) and determine cooking yields and nutrient retention fac...

  9. Nutrient leaching from container-grown ornamental tree production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Economically producing marketable container-grown ornamental shade trees with minimum amounts of nutrient leachate requires better management of nutrient applications during a growing season. Fertilizer practices with 16 treatments were used to test the nutrient leachate for growing Acer rubrum ‘Red...

  10. Nutrient export in tile drainage: Comparing manure injection to fertigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Subsurface tile drainage of agricultural land is implicated as a major source of nutrients to the Mississippi River. To protect water quality, land application of manure should maximize crop nutrient use and minimize nutrient loss. Weather constraints and regulations restrict the period during which...

  11. Improving Mississippi water quality: CAFO regulations and nutrient TMDLs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Confined Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) are regulated to reduce nutrient discharges to local waters, although nutrient water quality standards do not yet exist. At first, it may seem that there is some discontinuity between requiring CAFOs to limit nutrient discharges without knowing what levels...

  12. Spatial variations in nutrient and microbial transport from feedlot surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrient and microbial transport by runoff may vary at different locations within a beef cattle feedlot. If the areas making the greatest contributions to nutrient and microbial transport can be identified, it may be possible to institute precision management practices to reduce nutrient and microbi...

  13. Nutrients in the Great Lakes. Teacher's Guide and Student Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brothers, Chris; And Others

    This teacher guide and student workbook set presents two learning activities, designed for fifth through ninth grade students, that concentrate on nutrients in the Great Lakes. In activity A, students simulate aquatic habitats using lake water and goldfish in glass jars and observe the effects of nutrient loading and nutrient limitation on aquatic…

  14. Nutrient prices and concentrations in midwestern agricultural watersheds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Policies to reduce nutrient emissions from agriculture rest on the assumption that it is very difficult to link inputs on farms to nutrient outputs. As a result, conservation programs fund the installation of best management practices that attempt to avoid, trap, or otherwise control nutrient emissi...

  15. 21 CFR 101.69 - Petitions for nutrient content claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Petitions for nutrient content claims. 101.69... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FOOD LABELING Specific Requirements for Nutrient Content Claims § 101... claim on food consumption and of any corresponding changes in nutrient intake. The latter item...

  16. Nutrient Management Certification for Delaware: Developing a Water Quality Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, David J.; Binford, Gregory D.

    2004-01-01

    Water quality is a critical environmental, social, and political issue in Delaware. In the late 1990s, a series of events related to water quality issues led to the passage of a state nutrient management law. This new law required nutrient management planning and established a state certification program for nutrient users in the agricultural and…

  17. Artificial Soil With Build-In Plant Nutrients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Douglas W.; Allen, Earl; Henninger, Donald; Golden, D. C.

    1995-01-01

    Nutrients contained in sandlike material. Artificial soil provides nutrients to plants during several growing seasons without need to add fertilizer or nutrient solution. When watered, artificial soil slowly releases all materials a plant needs to grow. Developed as medium for growing crops in space. Also used to grow plants on Earth under controlled conditions or even to augment natural soil.

  18. Whole Farm Nutrient Balance Calculator for New York Dairy Farms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soberon, Melanie A.; Ketterings, Quirine M.; Rasmussen, Caroline N.; Czymmek, Karl J.

    2013-01-01

    Nutrient loss and accumulation as well as associated environmental degradation have been a concern for animal agriculture for many decades. Federal and New York (NY) regulations apply to Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations and a comprehensive nutrient management plan (CNMP) is required for regulated farms. The whole farm nutrient mass balance…

  19. 21 CFR 101.69 - Petitions for nutrient content claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Petitions for nutrient content claims. 101.69 Section 101.69 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FOOD LABELING Specific Requirements for Nutrient Content Claims § 101.69 Petitions for nutrient content claims....

  20. Developing a web-based forecasting tool for nutrient management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Modern nutrient management planning tools provide strategic guidance that, in the best cases, educates farmers and others involved in nutrient management to make prudent management decisions. The strategic guidance provided by nutrient management plans does not provide the day-to-day support require...

  1. Leaf herbivory and nutrients increase nectar alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Adler, Lynn S; Wink, Michael; Distl, Melanie; Lentz, Amanda J

    2006-08-01

    Correlations between traits may constrain ecological and evolutionary responses to multispecies interactions. Many plants produce defensive compounds in nectar and leaves that could influence interactions with pollinators and herbivores, but the relationship between nectar and leaf defences is entirely unexplored. Correlations between leaf and nectar traits may be mediated by resources and prior damage. We determined the effect of nutrients and leaf herbivory by Manduca sexta on Nicotiana tabacum nectar and leaf alkaloids, floral traits and moth oviposition. We found a positive phenotypic correlation between nectar and leaf alkaloids. Herbivory induced alkaloids in nectar but not in leaves, while nutrients increased alkaloids in both tissues. Moths laid the most eggs on damaged, fertilized plants, suggesting a preference for high alkaloids. Induced nectar alkaloids via leaf herbivory indicate that species interactions involving leaf and floral tissues are linked and should not be treated as independent phenomena in plant ecology or evolution. PMID:16913940

  2. Nutrient Sensing and the Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    Peek, Clara B.; Ramsey, Kathryn M.; Marcheva, Biliana; Bass, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    The circadian system synchronizes behavioral and physiologic processes with daily changes in the external light-dark cycle, optimizing energetic cycles with the rising and setting of the sun. Molecular clocks are organized hierarchically, with neural clocks orchestrating the daily switch between periods of feeding and fasting, and peripheral clocks generating 24hr oscillations of energy storage and utilization. Recent studies indicate that clocks respond to nutrient signals, and that high-fat diet influences the period of locomotor activity under free-running conditions, a core property of the clock. A major goal is to identify the molecular basis for the reciprocal relationship between metabolic and circadian pathways. Here, we highlight the role of peptidergic hormones and macromolecules as nutrient signals integrating circadian and metabolic systems. PMID:22424658

  3. Porous membrane utilization in plant nutrient delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreschel, T. W.; Hinkle, C. R.; Prince, R. P.; Knott, W. M., III

    1987-01-01

    A spacecraft hydroponic plant growth unit of tubular configuration, employing a microporous membrane as a capilary interface between plant roots and a nutrient solution, is presented. All three of the experimental trials undertaken successfully grew wheat from seed to harvest. Attention is given to the mass/seed, number of seeds/head, ratio of seed dry mass to total plant dry mass, production of tillers, and mass of seed/plant. Dry matter production is found to be reduced with increasing suction pressure; this is true for both average seed and average total dry matter/plant. This may be due to a reduction in water and nutrient availability through the microporous membrane.

  4. Nutrients, Foods, and Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Song, Mingyang; Garrett, Wendy S.; Chan, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Diet has an important role in the development of colorectal cancer. In the past few decades, findings from extensive epidemiologic and experimental investigation have linked consumption of several foods and nutrients to the risk of colorectal neoplasia. Calcium, fiber, milk, and whole grain have been associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer, and red meat and processed meat with an increased risk. There is substantial evidence for the potential chemopreventive effects of vitamin D, folate, fruits and vegetables. Nutrients and foods may also interact, as a dietary pattern, to influence colorectal cancer risk. Diet likely influences colorectal carcinogenesis through several interacting mechanisms. These include the direct effects on immune responsiveness and inflammation, and the indirect effects of over-nutrition and obesity—risk factors for colorectal cancer. Emerging evidence also implicates the gut microbiota as an important effector in the relationship between diet and cancer. Dietary modification therefore has the promise of reducing colorectal cancer incidence. PMID:25575572

  5. Recent Advances in Gut Nutrient Chemosensing

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, C.A.; Akiba, Y.; Kaunitz, J.D.

    2016-01-01

    The field of gut nutrient chemosensing is evolving rapidly. Recent advances have uncovered the mechanism by which specific nutrient components evoke multiple metabolic responses. Deorphanization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the gut has helped identify previously unliganded receptors and their cognate ligands. In this review, we discuss nutrient receptors, their ligand preferences, and the evoked neurohormonal responses. Family A GPCRs includes receptor GPR93, which senses protein and proteolytic degradation products, and free fatty acid-sensing receptors. Short-chain free fatty acids are ligands for FFA2, previously GPR43, and FFA3, previously GPR41. FFA1, previously GPR40, is activated by long-chain fatty acids with GPR120 activated by medium- and long-chain fatty acids. The GPR119 agonist ethanolamide oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and bile acid GPR131 agonists have also been identified. Family C receptors ligand preferences include L-amino acids, carbohydrate, and tastants. The metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR), calcium-sensing receptor (CaR), and GPCR family C, group 6, subtype A receptor (GPRC6A) mediate L-amino acid-sensing. Taste receptors have a proposed role in intestinal chemosensing; sweet, bitter, and umami evoke responses in the gut via GPCRs. The mechanism of carbohydrate-sensing remains controversial: the heterodimeric taste receptor T1R2/T1R3 and sodium glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT-1) expressed in L cells are the two leading candidates. Identification of specific nutrient receptors and their respective ligands can provide novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of diabetes, acid reflux, foregut mucosal injury, and obesity. PMID:22300073

  6. Chasing Nutrients with an Arctic Sedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iverson, S. L.; Schimel, J.

    2013-12-01

    Climate change has put the Arctic into a state of flux. Understanding the effects an altered climate will have on vegetation and nutrient cycling requires more knowledge of the key plant and soil functions of major arctic ecosystems. One of these ecosystems, moist acidic tussock tundra, is dominated by a single plant species, the tussock-forming sedge Eriophorum vaginatum. This plant has unusual underground biomass: long, fast-growing, non-branching, non-mycorrhizal roots. In contrast to many other plants in nutrient-limiting environments, this sedge is highly successful without maximizing its root surface area to volume ratio. The benefits of this growth strategy to the plants and its effects on the accompanying soil-microbe-plant relationships are not fully understood. One possibility is that the roots may help the plant take advantage of nutrients released into the active layer of soil as it thaws in the spring. The roots may also stimulate microbial activity, increasing nutrient turnover and availability. A study was undertaken to explore the nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) dynamics in these plants, as well as the microbial populations associated with active E. vaginatum roots. Intact tussock microcosms (plant and accompanying soil) were removed from the tundra and cultivated in transparent boxes. Half the plants were kept in light to encourage photosynthesis (and thus greater plant activity), while the other half was kept in the dark to inhibit it. Using a 15N isotopic tracer injected at the extremity of root penetration into the soil, the N uptake capacity of E. vaginatum roots at depth was explored. This uptake capacity is compared to measures of plant activity, microbial activity, and soil solution chemistry in order to paint a clearer picture of the role of E. vaginatum in the soil ecosystem.

  7. Yield Gap, Indigenous Nutrient Supply and Nutrient Use Efficiency for Maize in China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xinpeng; Liu, Xiaoyan; He, Ping; Johnston, Adrian M; Zhao, Shicheng; Qiu, Shaojun; Zhou, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Great achievements have been attained in agricultural production of China, while there are still many difficulties and challenges ahead that call for put more efforts to overcome to guarantee food security and protect environment simultaneously. Analyzing yield gap and nutrient use efficiency will help develop and inform agricultural policies and strategies to increase grain yield. On-farm datasets from 2001 to 2012 with 1,971 field experiments for maize (Zea mays L.) were collected in four maize agro-ecological regions of China, and the optimal management (OPT), farmers' practice (FP), a series of nutrient omission treatments were used to analyze yield gap, nutrient use efficiency and indigenous nutrient supply by adopting meta-analysis and ANOVA analysis. Across all sites, the average yield gap between OPT and FP was 0.7 t ha-1, the yield response to nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) were 1.8, 1.0, and 1.2 t ha-1, respectively. The soil indigenous nutrient supply of N, P, and K averaged 139.9, 33.7, and 127.5 kg ha-1, respectively. As compared to FP, the average recovery efficiency (RE) of N, P, and K with OPT increased by percentage point of 12.2, 5.5, and 6.5, respectively. This study indicated that there would be considerable potential to further improve yield and nutrient use efficiency in China, and will help develop and inform agricultural policies and strategies, while some management measures such as soil, plant and nutrient are necessary and integrate with advanced knowledge and technologies. PMID:26484543

  8. Nutrient uptake dynamics across a gradient of nutrient concentrations and ratios at the landscape scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Catherine A.; O'Reilly, Catherine M.; Conine, Andrea L.; Lipshutz, Sondra M.

    2015-02-01

    Understanding interactions between nutrient cycles is essential for recognizing and remediating human impacts on water quality, yet multielemental approaches to studying nutrient cycling in streams are currently rare. Here we utilized a relatively new approach (tracer additions for spiraling curve characterization) to examine uptake dynamics for three essential nutrients across a landscape that varied in absolute and relative nutrient availability. We measured nutrient uptake for soluble reactive phosphorous, ammonium-nitrogen, and nitrate-nitrogen in 16 headwater streams in the Catskill Mountains, New York. Across the landscape, ammonium-nitrogen and soluble reactive phosphorus had shorter uptake lengths and higher uptake velocities than nitrate-nitrogen. Ammonium-nitrogen and soluble reactive phosphorus uptake velocities were tightly correlated, and the slope of the relationship did not differ from one, suggesting strong demand for both nutrients despite the high ambient water column dissolved inorganic nitrogen: soluble reactive phosphorus ratios. Ammonium-nitrogen appeared to be the preferred form of nitrogen despite much higher nitrate-nitrogen concentrations. The uptake rate of nitrate-nitrogen was positively correlated with ambient soluble reactive phosphorus concentration and soluble reactive phosphorus areal uptake rate, suggesting that higher soluble reactive phosphorus concentrations alleviate phosphorus limitation and facilitate nitrate-nitrogen uptake. In addition, these streams retained a large proportion of soluble reactive phosphorus, ammonium-nitrogen, and nitrate-nitrogen supplied by the watershed, demonstrating that these streams are important landscape filters for nutrients. Together, these results (1) indicated phosphorus limitation across the landscape but similarly high demand for ammonium-nitrogen and (2) suggested that nitrate-nitrogen uptake was influenced by variability in soluble reactive phosphorus availability and preference for

  9. Yield Gap, Indigenous Nutrient Supply and Nutrient Use Efficiency for Maize in China

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xinpeng; Liu, Xiaoyan; He, Ping; Johnston, Adrian M.; Zhao, Shicheng; Qiu, Shaojun; Zhou, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Great achievements have been attained in agricultural production of China, while there are still many difficulties and challenges ahead that call for put more efforts to overcome to guarantee food security and protect environment simultaneously. Analyzing yield gap and nutrient use efficiency will help develop and inform agricultural policies and strategies to increase grain yield. On-farm datasets from 2001 to 2012 with 1,971 field experiments for maize (Zea mays L.) were collected in four maize agro-ecological regions of China, and the optimal management (OPT), farmers’ practice (FP), a series of nutrient omission treatments were used to analyze yield gap, nutrient use efficiency and indigenous nutrient supply by adopting meta-analysis and ANOVA analysis. Across all sites, the average yield gap between OPT and FP was 0.7 t ha-1, the yield response to nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) were 1.8, 1.0, and 1.2 t ha-1, respectively. The soil indigenous nutrient supply of N, P, and K averaged 139.9, 33.7, and 127.5 kg ha-1, respectively. As compared to FP, the average recovery efficiency (RE) of N, P, and K with OPT increased by percentage point of 12.2, 5.5, and 6.5, respectively. This study indicated that there would be considerable potential to further improve yield and nutrient use efficiency in China, and will help develop and inform agricultural policies and strategies, while some management measures such as soil, plant and nutrient are necessary and integrate with advanced knowledge and technologies. PMID:26484543

  10. Nutrient Addition Dramatically Accelerates Microbial Community Succession

    PubMed Central

    Knelman, Joseph E.; Schmidt, Steven K.; Lynch, Ryan C.; Darcy, John L.; Castle, Sarah C.; Cleveland, Cory C.; Nemergut, Diana R.

    2014-01-01

    The ecological mechanisms driving community succession are widely debated, particularly for microorganisms. While successional soil microbial communities are known to undergo predictable changes in structure concomitant with shifts in a variety of edaphic properties, the causal mechanisms underlying these patterns are poorly understood. Thus, to specifically isolate how nutrients – important drivers of plant succession – affect soil microbial succession, we established a full factorial nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) fertilization plot experiment in recently deglaciated (∼3 years since exposure), unvegetated soils of the Puca Glacier forefield in Southeastern Peru. We evaluated soil properties and examined bacterial community composition in plots before and one year after fertilization. Fertilized soils were then compared to samples from three reference successional transects representing advancing stages of soil development ranging from 5 years to 85 years since exposure. We found that a single application of +NP fertilizer caused the soil bacterial community structure of the three-year old soils to most resemble the 85-year old soils after one year. Despite differences in a variety of soil edaphic properties between fertilizer plots and late successional soils, bacterial community composition of +NP plots converged with late successional communities. Thus, our work suggests a mechanism for microbial succession whereby changes in resource availability drive shifts in community composition, supporting a role for nutrient colimitation in primary succession. These results suggest that nutrients alone, independent of other edaphic factors that change with succession, act as an important control over soil microbial community development, greatly accelerating the rate of succession. PMID:25050551

  11. Revised U.S. nutrient management standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    A newly revised National Nutrient Management Standard could have "a continental impact on how we use nutrients" on potentially hundreds of millions of acres of farmland in the United States, Dave White, chief of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Natural Resources Conservation Service (USDA/NRCS), said at a 13 December news briefing. NRCS uses the voluntary standard, which was last updated in 2006, to help producers better manage the application of nutrients—including fertilizers, animal manures, legumes, and crop cover—on agricultural land. Proper application of nitrogen and phosphorous is of particular concern, White said, adding that the new standard has an increased emphasis on the "four R's" of nutrient management: using the right amount of fertilizer and the right source, and applying the fertilizer in the right place at the right time. In addition, he said, the new standard emphasizes a number of technological tools for fertilizer and farmland management that have become available since the last update of the standards.

  12. Impact of nutrients on circadian rhythmicity

    PubMed Central

    Oosterman, Johanneke E.; Kalsbeek, Andries; la Fleur, Susanne E.

    2014-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the mammalian hypothalamus functions as an endogenous pacemaker that generates and maintains circadian rhythms throughout the body. Next to this central clock, peripheral oscillators exist in almost all mammalian tissues. Whereas the SCN is mainly entrained to the environment by light, peripheral clocks are entrained by various factors, of which feeding/fasting is the most important. Desynchronization between the central and peripheral clocks by, for instance, altered timing of food intake can lead to uncoupling of peripheral clocks from the central pacemaker and is, in humans, related to the development of metabolic disorders, including obesity and Type 2 diabetes. Diets high in fat or sugar have been shown to alter circadian clock function. This review discusses the recent findings concerning the influence of nutrients, in particular fatty acids and glucose, on behavioral and molecular circadian rhythms and will summarize critical studies describing putative mechanisms by which these nutrients are able to alter normal circadian rhythmicity, in the SCN, in non-SCN brain areas, as well as in peripheral organs. As the effects of fat and sugar on the clock could be through alterations in energy status, the role of specific nutrient sensors will be outlined, as well as the molecular studies linking these components to metabolism. Understanding the impact of specific macronutrients on the circadian clock will allow for guidance toward the composition and timing of meals optimal for physiological health, as well as putative therapeutic targets to regulate the molecular clock. PMID:25519730

  13. Appropriate nutrient supplementation in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Roberta; Pallone, Francesco; Stasi, Elisa; Romeo, Samanta; Monteleone, Giovanni

    2013-12-01

    Reduced levels of iron, folate, vitamin B12, vitamin D, zinc, and magnesium are common in untreated celiac disease (CD) patients probably due to loss of brush border proteins and enzymes needed for the absorption of these nutrients. In the majority of patients, removal of gluten from the diet leads to histological recovery and normalization of iron, vitamin, and mineral levels. Iron deficiency anemia is the most common extra-intestinal sign of CD and usually resolves with adherence to a gluten-free diet. However, deficiencies of both folate and vitamin B12 may persist in some patients on a gluten-free diet, thus requiring vitamin supplementation to improve subjective health status. Similarly, exclusion of gluten from the diet does not always normalize bone mineral density; in these cases, supplementation of vitamin D and calcium is recommended. Resolution of mucosal inflammation may not be sufficient to abrogate magnesium deficiency. Since gluten-free cereal products have a lower magnesium content as compared with gluten-containing counterparts, a magnesium-enriched diet should be encouraged in CD patients. In this article we discuss the frequency and clinical relevance of nutrient deficiency in CD and whether and when nutrient supplementation is needed. PMID:24195595

  14. Bile acids are nutrient signaling hormones.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huiping; Hylemon, Phillip B

    2014-08-01

    Bile salts play crucial roles in allowing the gastrointestinal system to digest, transport and metabolize nutrients. They function as nutrient signaling hormones by activating specific nuclear receptors (FXR, PXR, Vitamin D) and G-protein coupled receptors [TGR5, sphingosine-1 phosphate receptor 2 (S1PR2), muscarinic receptors]. Bile acids and insulin appear to collaborate in regulating the metabolism of nutrients in the liver. They both activate the AKT and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. Bile acid induction of the FXR-α target gene, small heterodimer partner (SHP), is highly dependent on the activation PKCζ, a branch of the insulin signaling pathway. SHP is an important regulator of glucose and lipid metabolism in the liver. One might hypothesize that chronic low grade inflammation which is associated with insulin resistance, may inhibit bile acid signaling and disrupt lipid metabolism. The disruption of these signaling pathways may increase the risk of fatty liver and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Finally, conjugated bile acids appear to promote cholangiocarcinoma growth via the activation of S1PR2. PMID:24819989

  15. Invasive aquarium fish transform ecosystem nutrient dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Capps, Krista A.; Flecker, Alexander S.

    2013-01-01

    Trade of ornamental aquatic species is a multi-billion dollar industry responsible for the introduction of myriad fishes into novel ecosystems. Although aquarium invaders have the potential to alter ecosystem function, regulation of the trade is minimal and little is known about the ecosystem-level consequences of invasion for all but a small number of aquarium species. Here, we demonstrate how ecological stoichiometry can be used as a framework to identify aquarium invaders with the potential to modify ecosystem processes. We show that explosive growth of an introduced population of stoichiometrically unique, phosphorus (P)-rich catfish in a river in southern Mexico significantly transformed stream nutrient dynamics by altering nutrient storage and remineralization rates. Notably, changes varied between elements; the P-rich fish acted as net sinks of P and net remineralizers of nitrogen. Results from this study suggest species-specific stoichiometry may be insightful for understanding how invasive species modify nutrient dynamics when their population densities and elemental composition differ substantially from native organisms. Risk analysis for potential aquarium imports should consider species traits such as body stoichiometry, which may increase the likelihood that an invasion will alter the structure and function of ecosystems. PMID:23966642

  16. Nutrients Impact the Pathogenesis and Development of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wan; Fang, Jing-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is a commonly diagnosed cancer and the cause of many cancer deaths worldwide. Nutrients might be crucial in the pathogenesis and development of colorectal cancer. Although a number of studies have demonstrated the potential effects of nutrients, many challenges still remain Summary A tremendous amount of research has emerged concerning the roles of nutrients in colorectal cancer during the past decades. Here, we review the latest research progress on nutrients, including vitamins, folic acid, calcium, selenium and dietary fiber, involved in colorectal cancer prevention Key Message Nutrients are commonly consumed in foods or dietary supplements. It is clear that nutrients could play an important role and influence colorectal cancer outcomes. The relationship between nutrients and colorectal risk is complex. Vitamins, folic acid, calcium, selenium and dietary fiber have been proposed as potential agents to prevent colorectal cancer. However, some studies found that these nutrients did not reduce the incidence of colorectal cancer Practical Implications The supplementary dose of nutrients, the length of time required to observe the effects and confounding factors during the study might influence the role of nutrients in the prevention of colorectal cancer. Therefore, more evidence from ongoing clinical trials with different population groups and longer follow-up periods is critical to determine the relationship between nutrients and colorectal cancer. PMID:27403415

  17. Nutrient sensing and signaling in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Michaela; Schothorst, Joep; Kankipati, Harish Nag; Van Zeebroeck, Griet; Rubio-Texeira, Marta; Thevelein, Johan M

    2014-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been a favorite organism for pioneering studies on nutrient-sensing and signaling mechanisms. Many specific nutrient responses have been elucidated in great detail. This has led to important new concepts and insight into nutrient-controlled cellular regulation. Major highlights include the central role of the Snf1 protein kinase in the glucose repression pathway, galactose induction, the discovery of a G-protein-coupled receptor system, and role of Ras in glucose-induced cAMP signaling, the role of the protein synthesis initiation machinery in general control of nitrogen metabolism, the cyclin-controlled protein kinase Pho85 in phosphate regulation, nitrogen catabolite repression and the nitrogen-sensing target of rapamycin pathway, and the discovery of transporter-like proteins acting as nutrient sensors. In addition, a number of cellular targets, like carbohydrate stores, stress tolerance, and ribosomal gene expression, are controlled by the presence of multiple nutrients. The protein kinase A signaling pathway plays a major role in this general nutrient response. It has led to the discovery of nutrient transceptors (transporter receptors) as nutrient sensors. Major shortcomings in our knowledge are the relationship between rapid and steady-state nutrient signaling, the role of metabolic intermediates in intracellular nutrient sensing, and the identity of the nutrient sensors controlling cellular growth. PMID:24483210

  18. Nature of Random Variation in the Nutrient Composition of Meals

    PubMed Central

    Balintfy, Joseph L.; Prekopa, Andras

    1966-01-01

    The mathematical formulation of nutrient variation in meals in presented by means of random vectors. The primary sources of nutrient variation in unit portions of menu items are identified and expressed in terms of random food-nutrient, random portion size and random ingredient composition variations. A secondary source of nutrient variation can be traced to the random selection process of combining menu items into individual meals from multiple choice menus. The separate as well as the joint effect of these sources on the total variation of the nutrient content of meals is described with the aid of variance-covariance matrices. The investigation is concluded with the formulation of multivariate probability statements concerning the adequacy of the nutrient content of meals relative to the distribution of the nutrient requirements over a given population. PMID:5971545

  19. Nutrient flows between ecosystems can destabilize simple food chains.

    PubMed

    Marleau, Justin N; Guichard, Frédéric; Mallard, François; Loreau, Michel

    2010-09-01

    Dispersal of organisms has large effects on the dynamics and stability of populations and communities. However, current metacommunity theory largely ignores how the flows of limiting nutrients across ecosystems can influence communities. We studied a meta-ecosystem model where two autotroph-consumer communities are spatially coupled through the diffusion of the limiting nutrient. We analyzed regional and local stability, as well as spatial and temporal synchrony to elucidate the impacts of nutrient recycling and diffusion on trophic dynamics. We show that nutrient diffusion is capable of inducing asynchronous local destabilization of biotic compartments through a diffusion-induced spatiotemporal bifurcation. Nutrient recycling interacts with nutrient diffusion and influences the susceptibility of the meta-ecosystem to diffusion-induced instabilities. This interaction between nutrient recycling and transport is further shown to depend on ecosystem enrichment. It more generally emphasizes the importance of meta-ecosystem theory for predicting species persistence and distribution in managed ecosystems. PMID:20600133

  20. The role of arbuscular mycorrhizas in reducing soil nutrient loss.

    PubMed

    Cavagnaro, Timothy R; Bender, S Franz; Asghari, Hamid R; Heijden, Marcel G A van der

    2015-05-01

    Substantial amounts of nutrients are lost from soils via leaching and as gaseous emissions. These losses can be environmentally damaging and expensive in terms of lost agricultural production. Plants have evolved many traits to optimize nutrient acquisition, including the formation of arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM), associations of plant roots with fungi that acquire soil nutrients. There is emerging evidence that AM have the ability to reduce nutrient loss from soils by enlarging the nutrient interception zone and preventing nutrient loss after rain-induced leaching events. Until recently, this important ecosystem service of AM had been largely overlooked. Here we review the role of AM in reducing nutrient loss and conclude that this role cannot be ignored if we are to increase global food production in an environmentally sustainable manner. PMID:25840500

  1. Leaf mineral nutrient remobilization during leaf senescence and modulation by nutrient deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Maillard, Anne; Diquélou, Sylvain; Billard, Vincent; Laîné, Philippe; Garnica, Maria; Prudent, Marion; Garcia-Mina, José-Maria; Yvin, Jean-Claude; Ourry, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Higher plants have to cope with fluctuating mineral resource availability. However, strategies such as stimulation of root growth, increased transporter activities, and nutrient storage and remobilization have been mostly studied for only a few macronutrients. Leaves of cultivated crops (Zea mays, Brassica napus, Pisum sativum, Triticum aestivum, Hordeum vulgare) and tree species (Quercus robur, Populus nigra, Alnus glutinosa) grown under field conditions were harvested regularly during their life span and analyzed to evaluate the net mobilization of 13 nutrients during leaf senescence. While N was remobilized in all plant species with different efficiencies ranging from 40% (maize) to 90% (wheat), other macronutrients (K–P–S–Mg) were mobilized in most species. Ca and Mn, usually considered as having low phloem mobility were remobilized from leaves in wheat and barley. Leaf content of Cu–Mo–Ni–B–Fe–Zn decreased in some species, as a result of remobilization. Overall, wheat, barley and oak appeared to be the most efficient at remobilization while poplar and maize were the least efficient. Further experiments were performed with rapeseed plants subjected to individual nutrient deficiencies. Compared to field conditions, remobilization from leaves was similar (N–S–Cu) or increased by nutrient deficiency (K–P–Mg) while nutrient deficiency had no effect on Mo–Zn–B–Ca–Mn, which seemed to be non-mobile during leaf senescence under field conditions. However, Ca and Mn were largely mobilized from roots (-97 and -86% of their initial root contents, respectively) to shoots. Differences in remobilization between species and between nutrients are then discussed in relation to a range of putative mechanisms. PMID:26029223

  2. Leaf mineral nutrient remobilization during leaf senescence and modulation by nutrient deficiency.

    PubMed

    Maillard, Anne; Diquélou, Sylvain; Billard, Vincent; Laîné, Philippe; Garnica, Maria; Prudent, Marion; Garcia-Mina, José-Maria; Yvin, Jean-Claude; Ourry, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Higher plants have to cope with fluctuating mineral resource availability. However, strategies such as stimulation of root growth, increased transporter activities, and nutrient storage and remobilization have been mostly studied for only a few macronutrients. Leaves of cultivated crops (Zea mays, Brassica napus, Pisum sativum, Triticum aestivum, Hordeum vulgare) and tree species (Quercus robur, Populus nigra, Alnus glutinosa) grown under field conditions were harvested regularly during their life span and analyzed to evaluate the net mobilization of 13 nutrients during leaf senescence. While N was remobilized in all plant species with different efficiencies ranging from 40% (maize) to 90% (wheat), other macronutrients (K-P-S-Mg) were mobilized in most species. Ca and Mn, usually considered as having low phloem mobility were remobilized from leaves in wheat and barley. Leaf content of Cu-Mo-Ni-B-Fe-Zn decreased in some species, as a result of remobilization. Overall, wheat, barley and oak appeared to be the most efficient at remobilization while poplar and maize were the least efficient. Further experiments were performed with rapeseed plants subjected to individual nutrient deficiencies. Compared to field conditions, remobilization from leaves was similar (N-S-Cu) or increased by nutrient deficiency (K-P-Mg) while nutrient deficiency had no effect on Mo-Zn-B-Ca-Mn, which seemed to be non-mobile during leaf senescence under field conditions. However, Ca and Mn were largely mobilized from roots (-97 and -86% of their initial root contents, respectively) to shoots. Differences in remobilization between species and between nutrients are then discussed in relation to a range of putative mechanisms. PMID:26029223

  3. Prediction of nutrient digestibility and energy concentrations in fresh grass using nutrient composition.

    PubMed

    Stergiadis, S; Allen, M; Chen, X J; Wills, D; Yan, T

    2015-05-01

    Improved nutrient utilization efficiency is strongly related to enhanced economic performance and reduced environmental footprint of dairy farms. Pasture-based systems are widely used for dairy production in certain areas of the world, but prediction equations of fresh grass nutritive value (nutrient digestibility and energy concentrations) are limited. Equations to predict digestible energy (DE) and metabolizable energy (ME) used for grazing cattle have been either developed with cattle fed conserved forage and concentrate diets or sheep fed previously frozen grass, and the majority of them require measurements less commonly available to producers, such as nutrient digestibility. The aim of the present study was therefore to develop prediction equations more suitable to grazing cattle for nutrient digestibility and energy concentrations, which are routinely available at farm level by using grass nutrient contents as predictors. A study with 33 nonpregnant, nonlactating cows fed solely fresh-cut grass at maintenance energy level for 50 wk was carried out over 3 consecutive grazing seasons. Freshly harvested grass of 3 cuts (primary growth and first and second regrowth), 9 fertilizer input levels, and contrasting stage of maturity (3 to 9 wk after harvest) was used, thus ensuring a wide representation of nutritional quality. As a result, a large variation existed in digestibility of dry matter (0.642-0.900) and digestible organic matter in dry matter (0.636-0.851) and in concentrations of DE (11.8-16.7 MJ/kg of dry matter) and ME (9.0-14.1 MJ/kg of dry matter). Nutrient digestibilities and DE and ME concentrations were negatively related to grass neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and acid detergent fiber (ADF) contents but positively related to nitrogen (N), gross energy, and ether extract (EE) contents. For each predicted variable (nutrient digestibilities or energy concentrations), different combinations of predictors (grass chemical composition) were found to be

  4. Relevance of dissolved organic nutrients for the Arctic Ocean nutrient budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Valdés, Sinhué; Tsubouchi, Takamasa; Davey, Emily; Yashayaev, Igor; Bacon, Sheldon

    2016-06-01

    We ask whether dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) and phosphorus (DOP) could account for previously identified Arctic Ocean (AO) inorganic nutrient budget imbalances. We assess transports to/from the AO by calculating indicative budgets. Marked DON:DOP ratio differences between the Amerasian and Eurasian AO reflect different physical and biogeochemical pathways. DON and DOP are exported to the North Atlantic via Davis Strait potentially being enhanced in transit from Bering Strait. Fram Strait transports are balanced. Barents Sea Opening transports may provide an additional nutrient source to the Barents Sea or may be locked within the wider AO Atlantic Water circulation. Gaps in our knowledge are identified and discussed.

  5. Carnivorous mammals: nutrient digestibility and energy evaluation.

    PubMed

    Clauss, Marcus; Kleffner, Helen; Kienzle, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Estimating the energy content is the first step in diet formulation, as it determines the amount of food eaten and hence the concentration of nutrients required to meet the animal's requirements. Additionally, being able to estimate the energy content of a diet empirically known to maintain body condition in an animal will facilitate an estimation of maintenance energy requirements. We collated data on nutrient composition of diets fed to captive wild canids, felids, hyenids, mustelids, pinnipeds, and ursids and the digestibility coefficients from the literature (45 species, 74 publications) to test whether differences in protein and fat digestibility could be detected between species groups, and whether approaches suggested for the estimation of dietary metabolizable energy (ME) content in domestic carnivores (NRC [2006] Nutrient requirements of dogs and cats. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.) can be applied to wild carnivores as well. Regressions of digestible protein or fat content vs. the crude protein (CP) or fat content indicated no relevant differences in the digestive physiology between the carnivore groups. For diets based on raw meat, fish, or whole prey, applying the calculation of ME using "Atwater factors" (16.7  kJ/g CP; 16.7  kJ/g nitrogen-free extracts; 37.7  kJ/g crude fat) provided estimates that compared well to experimental results. This study suggests that ME estimation in such diets is feasible without additional digestion trials. For comparative nutrition research, the study implicates that highly digestible diets typically fed in zoos offer little potential to elucidate differences between species or carnivore groups, but research on diets with higher proportions of difficult-to-digest components (fiber, connective tissues) is lacking. PMID:20073050

  6. River nutrient loads and catchment size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, S.V.; Swaney, D.P.; Buddemeier, R.W.; Scarsbrook, M.R.; Weatherhead, M.A.; Humborg, Christoph; Eriksson, H.; Hannerz, F.

    2005-01-01

    We have used a total of 496 sample sites to calibrate a simple regression model for calculating dissolved inorganic nutrient fluxes via runoff to the ocean. The regression uses the logarithms of runoff and human population as the independent variables and estimates the logarithms of dissolved inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus loading with R 2 values near 0.8. This predictive capability is about the same as has been derived for total nutrient loading with process-based models requiring more detailed information on independent variables. We conclude that population and runoff are robust proxies for the more detailed application, landscape modification, and in-stream processing estimated by more process-based models. The regression model has then been applied to a demonstration data set of 1353 river catchments draining to the sea from the North American continent south of the Canadian border. The geographic extents of these basins were extracted from a 1-km digital elevation model for North America, and both runoff and population were estimated for each basin. Most of the basins (72% of the total) are smaller than 103 km2, and both runoff and population density are higher and more variable among small basins than among larger ones.While total load to the ocean can probably be adequately estimated from large systems only, analysis of the geographic distribution of nutrient loading requires consideration of the small basins, which can exhibit significant hydrologic and demographic heterogeneity between systems over their range even within the same geographic region. High-resolution regional and local analysis is necessary for environmental assessment and management. ?? Springer 2005.

  7. Cyanobacterial Bioreporters as Sensors of Nutrient Availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullerjahn, George S.; Boyanapalli, Ramakrishna; Rozmarynowycz, Mark J.; McKay, R. Michael L.

    Due to their ubiquity in aquatic environments and their contribution to total biomass, especially in oligotrophic systems, cyanobacteria can be viewed as a proxy for primary productivity in both marine and fresh waters. In this chapter we describe the development and use of picocyanobacterial bioreporters to measure the bioavailability of nutrients that may constrain total photosynthesis in both lacustrine and marine systems. Issues pertaining to bioreporter construction, performance and field applications are discussed. Specifically, luminescent Synechococcus spp. and Synechocystis spp. bioreporters are described that allow the bioavailability of phosphorus, nitrogen and iron to be accurately measured in environmental samples.

  8. Nutrient absorption and intestinal adaptation with ageing.

    PubMed

    Woudstra, Trudy; Thomson, Alan B R

    2002-02-01

    Malabsorption of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, minerals and vitamins has been described in the elderly. The ability of the intestine to adapt may be impaired in the elderly and this may lead to further malnutrition. Dietary manipulation may prove to be useful to enhance the needed intestinal absorption with ageing. There is an age-associated increase in the prevalence of dyslipidaemia as well as diabetes. These conditions may benefit from nutritional intervention targeted at reducing the absorption of some nutrients. With the continued characterization of the proteins involved in sterol and fatty acid absorption, therapeutic interventions to modify absorption may become available in the future. PMID:11977925

  9. Biological nutrient removal from dairy wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Danalewich, J.R.; Papagiannis, T.G.; Gerards, R.; Vriens, L.; Belyea, R.; Tumbleson, M.E.; Raskin, L.

    1998-07-01

    The authors developed a synthetic wastewater which closely represents actual milk processing wastewater. The design of this synthetic wastewater was facilitated by the collection of composite wastewater samples from 15 milk processing plants in the Upper Midwest. These samples, milk, and milk products were analyzed for various chemical parameters. Based on these results, they diluted evaporated milk and cottage cheese, as well as a number of dry chemicals to create a synthetic wastewater. The concentrations in the resulting synthetic wastewater matched average concentrations of 15 composite wastewater samples. Four continuous-flow activated sludge treatment systems are currently being operated to evaluate biological nutrient removal using this synthetic wastewater as an influent.

  10. Optimizing Nutrient Uptake in Biological Transport Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronellenfitsch, Henrik; Katifori, Eleni

    2013-03-01

    Many biological systems employ complex networks of vascular tubes to facilitate transport of solute nutrients, examples include the vascular system of plants (phloem), some fungi, and the slime-mold Physarum. It is believed that such networks are optimized through evolution for carrying out their designated task. We propose a set of hydrodynamic governing equations for solute transport in a complex network, and obtain the optimal network architecture for various classes of optimizing functionals. We finally discuss the topological properties and statistical mechanics of the resulting complex networks, and examine correspondence of the obtained networks to those found in actual biological systems.

  11. Design of nutrient removal activated sludge systems.

    PubMed

    Manga, J; Ferrer, J; Seco, A; Garcia-Usach, F

    2003-01-01

    A mechanistic mathematical model for nutrient and organic matter removal was used to describe the behavior of a nitrification denitrification enhanced biological phosphorus removal (NDEBPR) system. This model was implemented in a user-friendly software DESASS (design and simulation of activated sludge systems). A 484-L pilot plant was operated to verify the model results. The pilot plant was operated for three years over three different sludge ages. The validity of the model was confirmed with data from the pilot plant. Also, the utility of DESASS as a valuable tool for designing NDEBPR systems was confirmed. PMID:12906279

  12. Noninvasive detection of plant nutrient stress using fiber optic spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun-Wei; Asundi, Anand K.; Liew, Oi Wah; Boey, William S. L.

    2001-05-01

    In a previous paper, we described the use of fiber optic spectrophotometry as a non-destructive and sensitive method to detect early symptoms of plant nutrient deficiency. We report further developments of our work on Brassica chinensis var parachinensis (Bailey) showing reproducibility of our data collected at a different seasonal period. Plants at the mid-log growth phase were subjected to nutrient stress by transferring them to nitrate- and calcium- deficient nutrient solution in a standing aerated hydroponic system. After tracking changes in leaf reflectance by FOSpectr for nine days, the plants were returned to complete nutrient solution and their recovery was monitored for a further nine days. The responses of nutrient stressed plants were compared with those grown under complete nutrient solution over the 18-day trial period. We also compared the sensitivity of FOSpectr detection against plant growth measurements vis-a-vis average leaf number and leaf width and show that the former method gave an indication of nutrient stress much earlier than the latter. In addition, this work indicated that while normal and nutrient-stressed plants could not be distinguished within the first 7 days by tracking plant growth indicators, stressed plants did show a clear decline in average leaf number and leaf width in later stages of growth even after the plants were returned to complete nutrient solution. The results further reinforce the need for early detection of nutrient stress, as late remedial action could not reverse the loss in plant growth in later stages of plant development.

  13. 4 Rs are not enough: We need 7 Rs for nutrient management and conservation to increase nutrient use efficiency and reduce off-site transport of nutrients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cox (2010) reported that under business as usual, the environmental impacts of nutrient losses from agriculture will not be resolved and that precision conservation and precision regulation are two mechanisms to reduce the environmental impacts of nutrient losses. This is in agreement with the rece...

  14. Quantitative Nutrient Limitation Analysis of Global Forests by Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, A. M.; Badgley, G. M.; Field, C. B.

    2015-12-01

    Nutrient availability in terrestrial ecosystems may be the primary determinant of the long-term carbon storage capacity of vegetation. Both nutrient availability and carbon storage capacity are highly uncertain and limit our ability to predict atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Terrestrial vegetation, especially forests, play a critical role in regulating the global carbon cycle and Earth's climate by sequestering carbon from the atmosphere. The broad relationship between nutrient availability and increased biomass production can be captured using remotely-sensed spectral information. We develop an approach to estimate total nutrient availability in 848 global forest sites at 1-km spatial resolution by combining the ecological principle of functional convergence with MODIS gross primary productivity (GPP) and evapotranspiration (ET) products from 2000-2013. Convergence in the relationship between maximum GPP and ET of nutrient-rich forests indicate that any sites deviating from this upper-limit are associated with a lower availability of nutrients. This method offers a way to examine the severity, as well as the spatial extent of nutrient limitation at the global scale. We find that the degree to which forests are nutrient limited range between 0% and 81% with an average limitation of 16 ± 17%. Our method agrees with regional nutrient gradients (i.e. SW-NE Amazon), but does not tightly correspond with recently published nutrient limitation classification standards (Fernandez-Martinez et al., 2014). A global terrestrial nutrient limitation map can assist in diagnosing the health of vegetation while removing the necessity for extensive field sampling or local nutrient addition experiments. Further research will expand the study sites to obtain a complete global terrestrial nutrient limitation map.

  15. Detecting terrestrial nutrient limitation: a global meta-analysis of foliar nutrient concentrations after fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostertag, Rebecca; DiManno, Nicole

    2016-03-01

    Examining foliar nutrient concentrations after fertilization provides an alternative method for detecting nutrient limitation of ecosystems, which is logistically simpler to measure than biomass change. We present a meta-analysis of response ratios of foliar nitrogen and phosphorus (RRN, RRP) after addition of fertilizer of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), or the two elements in combination, in relation to climate, ecosystem type, life form, family, and methodological factors. Results support other meta-analyses using biomass, and demonstrate there is strong evidence for nutrient limitation in natural communities. However, because N fertilization experiments greatly outnumber P fertilization trials, it is difficult to discern the absolute importance of N vs. P vs. co-limitation across ecosystems. Despite these caveats, it is striking that results did not follow "conventional wisdom" that temperate ecosystems are N-limited and tropical ones are P-limited. In addition, the use of ratios of N-to-P rather than response ratios also are a useful index of nutrient limitation, but due to large overlap in values, there are unlikely to be universal cutoff values for delimiting N vs. P limitation. Differences in RRN and RRP were most significant across ecosystem types, plant families, life forms, and between competitive environments, but not across climatic variables.

  16. Nutrient Limitation in Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM): Phytoplankton Communities and Photosynthesis Respond to Nutrient Pulse

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yan; Quigg, Antonietta

    2014-01-01

    Although the Mississippi-Atchafalaya River system exports large amounts of nutrients to the Northern Gulf of Mexico annually, nutrient limitation of primary productivity still occurs offshore, acting as one of the major factors controlling local phytoplankton biomass and community structure. Bioassays were conducted for 48 hrs at two stations adjacent to the river plumes in April and August 2012. High Performance of Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) combined with ChemTax and a Fluorescence Induction and Relaxation (FIRe) system were combined to observe changes in the phytoplankton community structure and photosynthetic activity. Major fluorescence parameters (Fo, Fv/Fm) performed well to reveal the stimulating effect of the treatments with nitrogen (N-nitrate) and with nitrogen plus phosphate (+NPi). HPLC/ChemTax results showed that phytoplankton community structure shifted with nitrate addition: we observed an increase in the proportion of diatoms and prasinophytes and a decrease in cyanobacteria and prymnesiophytes. These findings are consistent with predictions from trait-based analysis which predict that phytoplankton groups with high maximum growth rates (μmax) and high nutrient uptake rates (Vmax) readily take advantage of the addition of limiting nutrients. Changes in phytoplankton community structure, if persistent, could trigger changes of particular organic matter fluxes and alter the micro-food web cycles and bottom oxygen consumption. PMID:24551144

  17. Nutrient content and variability in newly obtained salmon data for USDA Nutrient Database for Standard Reference

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because different species, sources, and forms of salmon are now available, we sampled selected salmon products to determine variability of nutrient profiles from those items. Sample units of retail raw wild, raw farmed, and canned salmon were obtained from 12 locations using statistically valid samp...

  18. Effect of peanut hull and pine chip biochar on soil nutrients, corn nutrient status and yield

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pyrolysis is the process of anaerobic thermal conversion of biomass for energy production that may offer an option of returning carbon and nutrients to the soil while producing energy. The Ultisols in the southeastern United States have inherently low soil organic carbon and fertility. These soils m...

  19. Estimation of sow milk nutrient output.

    PubMed

    Noblet, J; Etienne, M

    1989-12-01

    Ten replicates of two littermate gilts were used during a 21-d lactation in order to calculate relationships between milk nutrient intake and piglet growth rate and composition of gain. Gilts were fed 14.2 or 10.4 Mcal ME/d and litter size was standardized to 9 or 10 piglets. Piglets had no access to creep feed. Milk production was measured on 10 sucklings over 12 h on d 1, 5, 9, 13, 17 and 21 by the weigh-suckle-weigh method. Heat production of the piglets was measured (RQ method) on the same days in a confinement chamber. Milk composition was determined on the days following milk production measurements. Four to ten piglets/litter were slaughtered at weaning and their body composition was determined. Milk nutrient production during part of lactation was related closely to piglet weight gain and body weight (R2 = .80 to .96). Milk DM, energy and N output over the entire lactation were predicted from piglet ADG (R2 = .87 to .90) when, for each litter, the difference between energy in piglet daily weight gain measured by the slaughter technique and energy in piglet daily weight gain estimated by the RQ method was included in the model. This variable corrects for milk production measurement errors. The relationships were slightly improved, especially for energy output, when the composition of piglet weight gain was taken into account (R2 = .93 to .97). PMID:2613581

  20. Nutrient Enrichment Drives Gulf of Mexico Hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boesch, Donald F.; Boynton, Walter R.; Crowder, Larry B.; Diaz, Robert J.; Howarth, Robert W.; Mee, Laurence D.; Nixon, Scott W.; Rabalais, Nancy N.; Rosenberg, Rutger; Sanders, James G.; Scavia, Donald; Turner, R. Eugene

    2009-04-01

    During most summers over the past 30 years, bottom dissolved oxygen across a large area of the Louisiana and upper Texas continental shelf declined to concentrations too low (hypoxia) for most fish and large invertebrate animals to survive. This area is one of the best known “dead zones” proliferating around the world [Diaz and Rosenberg, 2008]. During July 2008, hypoxic bottom waters extended across 20,720 square kilometers (Figure 1), but they were probably even more extensive because winds from Hurricane Dolly mixed the waters off Texas before the survey could be completed. Increased inputs of nutrients (principally nitrogen and phosphorus) from the U.S. agricultural heartland within the Mississippi-Atchafalaya River Basin (MARB) are implicated in the development and spread of hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico. Consequently, the causes of, and solutions for, hypoxia have been subjects of extensive debate and analysis. An integrated scientific assessment led to a 2001 Action Plan [Mississippi River/Gulf of Mexico Watershed Nutrient Task Force, 2001] with a goal of reducing the area of the hypoxic zone to less than 5000 square kilometers by reducing nitrogen loading [Rabalais et al., 2007].

  1. Plant Available Nutrients, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer

    Sloan, Victoria; Liebig, Jenny; Curtis, Bryan; Hahn, Melanie; Iversen, Colleen; Siegrist, Julie

    2014-02-19

    This dataset consists of measurements of plant available nutrients made using Plant Root Simulator probes (Western Ag Innovations Inc.) during 2012 and 2013. In 2012, Ca, Mg, K, P, Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, B, S, Pb, Al, Cd, NO3-N and NH4-N were measured during spring, summer and winter in the centers, edges and troughs of four polygons in each of four areas of contrasting moisture regime and polygon type. In 2013, probes were installed in centers, edges and troughs of four polygons in each of two areas (high-centered and low-centered polygons) at two-week intervals and at 3 soil depths to capture fine-scale season dynamics of NO3-N and NH4-N. PRS probes are ion exchange resin membranes held in plastic supports that are inserted into soil to measure ion supply in situ. The anion and cation exchange with the membrane is intended to mimic plant uptake and thus provide a relevant measure of soil nutrient bioavailability. Measurements are made per area of probe membrane and cannot be converted to concentrations or related to soil volume.

  2. Understanding stress concentration about a nutrient foramen.

    PubMed

    Götzen, Nils; Cross, Alan R; Ifju, Peter G; Rapoff, Andrew J

    2003-10-01

    We investigated the microstructural basis of a reduced stress concentration around the primary nutrient foramen of the equine third metacarpus. We quantified the spatial variations of compositional parameters (mineral content, volume fraction, histological architecture, and osteonal trajectories) from microradiographs and polarizing microscopic images of thin sections. These variations in composition and organization in turn cause variations in mechanical properties of cortical bone. We modeled the spatially inhomogeneous anisotropic elastic properties based on the measured compositional parameters and used the properties as inputs to a finite element model of the bone containing the foramen. This model, spatially constructed solely from the microscopic images, was subsequently validated by our mechanical test results. We found that: (1) a primary mechanism for stress concentration reduction appears to be due to an increased compliance near the foramen: the sharp discontinuity represented by the hole is softened by embedding it in a compliant region; (2) a reinforcing ring of increased stiffness exists at some distance from the foramen; and (3) a ring of lamellar bone exists along the foramen inside edge, which might serve to reduce the chance of cracks forming there. Our work is allowing us to design biomimetic structures with holes by mimicking the microstructure near the nutrient foramen. PMID:14499300

  3. Endocytotic uptake of nutrients in carnivorous plants.

    PubMed

    Adlassnig, Wolfram; Koller-Peroutka, Marianne; Bauer, Sonja; Koshkin, Edith; Lendl, Thomas; Lichtscheidl, Irene K

    2012-07-01

    Carnivorous plants trap, digest and absorb animals in order to supplement their mineral nutrition. Nutrients absorbed by the plant include different nitrogen species, phosphate, potassium, trace elements and small organic compounds. Uptake is usually thought to be performed via specific channels, but this study provides evidence that endocytosis is involved as well. Traps of the carnivorous plants Nepenthes coccinea, Nepenthes ventrata, Cephalotus follicularis, Drosophyllum lusitanicum, Drosera capensis, Dionaea muscipula, Aldrovanda vesiculosa, Genlisea violacea × lobata, Sarracenia psittacina and Sarracenia purpurea were stained with methylene blue in order to identify possible sites of uptake. The permeable parts of the traps were incubated with fluorescein isothiocyanate labelled bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA) and other fluorescent endocytosis markers, combined with the soluble protein BSA or respiratory inhibitors. Uptake was studied by confocal microscopy. In Nepenthes, small fluorescent vesicles became visible 1 h after incubation with FITC-BSA. These vesicles fused to larger compartments within 30 h. A similar behaviour was found in the related genera Drosera, Dionaea, Aldrovanda and Drosophyllum but also in Cephalotus with glands of different evolutionary origin. In Genlisea and Sarracenia, no evidence for endocytosis was found. We propose that in many carnivorous plants, nutrient uptake by carriers is supplemented by endocytosis, which enables absorption and intracellular digestion of whole proteins. The advantage for the plant of reducing secretion of enzymes for extracellular digestion is evident. PMID:22417315

  4. Nutrients, Microglia Aging, and Brain Aging

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhou; Yu, Janchun; Zhu, Aiqin; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    As the life expectancy continues to increase, the cognitive decline associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) becomes a big major issue in the world. After cellular activation upon systemic inflammation, microglia, the resident immune cells in the brain, start to release proinflammatory mediators to trigger neuroinflammation. We have found that chronic systemic inflammatory challenges induce differential age-dependent microglial responses, which are in line with the impairment of learning and memory, even in middle-aged animals. We thus raise the concept of “microglia aging.” This concept is based on the fact that microglia are the key contributor to the acceleration of cognitive decline, which is the major sign of brain aging. On the other hand, inflammation induces oxidative stress and DNA damage, which leads to the overproduction of reactive oxygen species by the numerous types of cells, including macrophages and microglia. Oxidative stress-damaged cells successively produce larger amounts of inflammatory mediators to promote microglia aging. Nutrients are necessary for maintaining general health, including the health of brain. The intake of antioxidant nutrients reduces both systemic inflammation and neuroinflammation and thus reduces cognitive decline during aging. We herein review our microglia aging concept and discuss systemic inflammation and microglia aging. We propose that a nutritional approach to controlling microglia aging will open a new window for healthy brain aging. PMID:26941889

  5. Compatibility considerations in parenteral nutrient solutions.

    PubMed

    Niemiec, P W; Vanderveen, T W

    1984-05-01

    Information on compatibility of nutrients and drugs with parenteral nutrient (PN) solutions is reviewed and evaluated. Precipitation of calcium phosphate when calcium and phosphate salts are added can be affected by pH, amino acid concentration, amino acid product, temperature, sequence of additives, specific salt used, and time since admixture; precipitate formation can occur gradually over 24 hours. Insulin is chemically stable in PN solutions, but adsorption to the infusion system can cause decreased availability. Poor delivery of vitamin A via PN solutions has been reported. The sodium bisulfite content of amino acid injections may cause degradation of thiamine, but studies simulating clinical use are needed. Folic acid stability in PN solutions has been demonstrated, and phytonadione appears to be stable. Drug administration via PN solutions may be advantageous when fluid intake is restricted or peripheral vein access is limited and in home PN therapy. Summarized are results of studies involving heparin, cimetidine hydrochloride, aminophylline, amphotericin B, iron dextran, hydrochloric acid, corticosteroids, narcotics, metoclopramide, digoxin, and fluorouracil. Many antibiotics are probably stable, especially when administered by co-infusion rather than by direct mixture in the PN solution container. When lipids are mixed in the same container with amino acid-dextrose solutions, compatibility and stability of electrolytes, vitamins, and trace elements must be reassessed. Practical research is needed, and availability of additives should be studied in specific patient populations and for specific PN formulations. Valid conclusions are dependent on careful study design. PMID:6328980

  6. Placental Nutrient Transport and Intrauterine Growth Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Gaccioli, Francesca; Lager, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction refers to the inability of the fetus to reach its genetically determined potential size. Fetal growth restriction affects approximately 5–15% of all pregnancies in the United States and Europe. In developing countries the occurrence varies widely between 10 and 55%, impacting about 30 million newborns per year. Besides having high perinatal mortality rates these infants are at greater risk for severe adverse outcomes, such as hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy and cerebral palsy. Moreover, reduced fetal growth has lifelong health consequences, including higher risks of developing metabolic and cardiovascular diseases in adulthood. Numerous reports indicate placental insufficiency as one of the underlying causes leading to altered fetal growth and impaired placental capacity of delivering nutrients to the fetus has been shown to contribute to the etiology of intrauterine growth restriction. Indeed, reduced expression and/or activity of placental nutrient transporters have been demonstrated in several conditions associated with an increased risk of delivering a small or growth restricted infant. This review focuses on human pregnancies and summarizes the changes in placental amino acid, fatty acid, and glucose transport reported in conditions associated with intrauterine growth restriction, such as maternal undernutrition, pre-eclampsia, young maternal age, high altitude and infection. PMID:26909042

  7. Hydrologic and biologic influences on stream network nutrient concentrations: Interactions of hydrologic turnover and concentration-dependent nutrient uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallard, John; McGlynn, Brian; Covino, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Stream networks lie in a crucial landscape position between terrestrial ecosystems and downstream water bodies. As such, whether inferring terrestrial watershed processes from watershed outlet nutrient signals or predicting the effect of observed terrestrial processes on stream nutrient signals, it is requisite to understand how stream networks can modulate terrestrial nutrient inputs. To date integrated understanding and modeling of physical and biological influences on nutrient concentrations at the stream network scale have been limited. However, watershed scale groundwater ‑ surface water exchange (hydrologic turnover), concentration-variable biological uptake, and the interaction between the two can strongly modify stream water nutrient concentrations. Stream water and associated nutrients are lost to and replaced from groundwater with distinct nutrient concentrations while in-stream nutrients can also be retained by biological processes at rates that vary with concentration. We developed an empirically based network scale model to simulate the interaction between hydrologic turnover and concentration-dependent nutrient uptake across stream networks. Exchange and uptake parameters were measured using conservative and nutrient tracer addition experiments in the Bull Trout Watershed, central Idaho. We found that the interaction of hydrologic turnover and concentration-dependent uptake combined to modify and subsequently stabilize in-stream concentrations, with specific concentrations dependent on the magnitude of hydrologic turnover, groundwater concentrations, and the shape of nutrient uptake kinetic curves. We additionally found that by varying these physical and biological parameters within measured ranges we were able to generate a spectrum of stream network concentration distributions representing a continuum of shifting magnitudes of physical and biological influences on in-stream concentrations. These findings elucidate the important and variable role

  8. Hydrologic and biologic influences on stream network nutrient concentrations: Interactions of hydrologic turnover and concentration-dependent nutrient uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallard, J. M.; McGlynn, B. L.; Covino, T. P.; Bergstrom, A.

    2012-12-01

    Stream networks lie in a crucial landscape position between terrestrial ecosystems and downstream water bodies. As such, whether inferring terrestrial watershed processes from watershed outlet nutrient signals or predicting the effect of observed terrestrial processes on stream nutrient signals, it is requisite to understand how stream networks can modulate terrestrial nutrient inputs. To date integrated understanding and modeling of physical and biological influences on nutrient concentrations at the stream network scale have been limited. However, watershed scale groundwater - surface water exchange (hydrologic turnover), concentration-variable biological uptake, and the interaction between the two can strongly modify stream water nutrient concentrations. Stream water and associated nutrients are lost to and replaced from groundwater with a distinct nutrient concentrations while in-stream nutrients can also be retained by biological processes at rates that vary with concentration. We developed an empirically based network scale model to simulate the interaction between hydrologic turnover and concentration-dependent nutrient uptake across stream networks. Exchange and uptake parameters were measured using conservative and nutrient tracer addition experiments in the Bull Trout Watershed, central Idaho. We found that the interaction of hydrologic turnover and concentration-dependent uptake combined to modify and subsequently stabilize in-stream concentrations, with specific concentrations dependent on the magnitude of hydrologic turnover, groundwater concentrations, and the shape of nutrient uptake kinetic curves. We additionally found that by varying these physical and biological parameters within measured ranges we were able to generate a spectrum of stream network concentration distributions representing a continuum of shifting magnitudes of physical and biological influences on in-stream concentrations. These findings elucidate the important and variable role

  9. Nutrient availability and phytoplankton nutrient limitation across a gradient of atmospheric nitrogen deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elser, J.J.; Kyle, M.; Steuer, L.; Nydick, K.R.; Baron, J.S.

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition to lakes and watersheds has been increasing steadily due to various anthropogenic activities. Because such anthropogenic N is widely distributed, even lakes relatively removed from direct human disturbance are potentially impacted. However, the effects of increased atmospheric N deposition on lakes are not well documented, We examined phytoplankton biomass, the absolute and relative abundance of limiting nutrients (N and phosphorus [P]), and phytoplankton nutrient limitation in alpine lakes of the Rocky Mountains of Colorado (USA) receiving elevated (>6 kg N??ha-1??yr-1) or low (<2 kg N??ha-1??yr-1) levels of atmospheric N deposition. Highdeposition lakes had higher NO3-N and total N concentrations and higher total N : total P ratios. Concentrations of chlorophyll and seston carbon (C) were 2-2.5 times higher in highdeposition relative to low-deposition lakes, while high-deposition lakes also had higher seston C:N and C:P (but not N:P) ratios. Short-term enrichment bioassays indicated a qualitative shift in the nature of phytoplankton nutrient limitation due to N deposition, as highdeposition lakes had an increased frequency of primary P limitation and a decreased frequency and magnitude of response to N and to combined N and P enrichment. Thus elevated atmospheric N deposition appears to have shifted nutrient supply from a relatively balanced but predominantly N-deficient regime to a more consistently P-limited regime in Colorado alpine lakes. This adds to accumulating evidence that sustained N deposition may have important effects on lake phytoplankton communities and plankton-based food webs by shifting the quantitative and qualitative nature of nutrient limitation. ?? 2009 by the Ecological Society of America.

  10. Nutrient-centrism and perceived risk of chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Schuldt, Jonathon P; Pearson, Adam R

    2015-06-01

    This experiment explored consequences of two common lay theories about the diet-disease link: nutrient-centrism, the belief that nutrients (e.g. potassium) are crucial to staving off disease, and whole-food centrism, the belief that whole foods (e.g. bananas), containing these nutrients in their natural context, are most beneficial. Depicting an individual's diet in terms of nutrients rather than whole foods containing these nutrients reduced the perceived likelihood that the individual would experience leading diet-related diseases (e.g. heart disease, diabetes). Although nutrition experts increasingly emphasize the health benefits of natural whole foods, people nevertheless appear to privilege nutrients when estimating disease risks. PMID:26032805

  11. Posidonia oceanica meadow: a low nutrient high chlorophyll (LNHC) system?

    PubMed Central

    Gobert, Sylvie; Laumont, Noémie; Bouquegneau, Jean-Marie

    2002-01-01

    Background In spite of very low nutrient concentrations in its vicinity – both column and pore waters-, the Posidonia oceanica of the Revellata Bay displays high biomass and productivity. We measured the nutrient fluxes from the sediment into the water enclosed among the leaf shoots ("canopy water") to determine if it is possible source of nutrients for P. oceanica leaves. Results During the summer, the canopy water appears to act as a nutrient reservoir for the plant. During that period, the canopy water layer displays both a temperature 0.5°C cooler than the upper water column, and a much higher nutrient content, as shown in this work using a very simple original technique permitting to sample water with a minimal disturbance of the water column's vertical structure. Despite low nutrient concentrations in pore water, mean net fluxes were measured from the sediment to the canopy water. These fluxes are sufficient to provide 20% of the mean daily nitrogen and phosphorus requirement of the P. oceanica shoots. Conclusion An internal cycling of nutrients from P. oceanica senescent leaves was previously noted as an efficient strategy to help face low nutrient availability. The present study points out a second strategy which consists in holding back, in the canopy, the nutrients released at the water-sediment interface. This process occurs when long leaves, during poor nutrient periods in the water column, providing, to P. oceanica, the possibility to develop, high biomass, high chlorophyll quantities in low nutrient environment (a Low Nutrients High Chlorophyll system). PMID:12188926

  12. Microalgal and cyanobacterial cultivation: the supply of nutrients.

    PubMed

    Markou, Giorgos; Vandamme, Dries; Muylaert, Koenraad

    2014-11-15

    Microalgae and cyanobacteria are a promising new source of biomass that may complement agricultural crops to meet the increasing global demand for food, feed, biofuels and chemical production. Microalgae and cyanobacteria cultivation does not interfere directly with food production, but care should be taken to avoid indirect competition for nutrient (fertilizer) supply. Microalgae and cyanobacteria production requires high concentrations of essential nutrients (C,N,P,S,K,Fe, etc.). In the present paper the application of nutrients and their uptake by microalgae and cyanobacteria is reviewed. The main focus is on the three most significant nutrients, i.e. carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus; however other nutrients are also reviewed. Nutrients are generally taken up in the inorganic form, but several organic forms of them are also assimilable. Some nutrients do not display any inhibition effect on microalgal or cyanobacterial growth, while others, such as NO2 or NH3 have detrimental effects when present in high concentrations. Nutrients in the gaseous form, such as CO2 and NO face a major limitation which is related mainly to their mass transfer from the gaseous to the liquid state. Since the cultivation of microalgae and cyanobacteria consumes considerable quantities of nutrients, strategies to improve the nutrient application efficiency are needed. Additionally, a promising strategy to improve microalgal and cyanobacterial production sustainability is the utilization of waste streams by recycling of waste nutrients. However, major constraints of using waste streams are the reduction of the range of the biomass applications due to production of contaminated biomass and the possible low bio-availability of some nutrients. PMID:25113948

  13. Relevance of nutrient media composition for hydrogen production in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Ballester, David; Jurado-Oller, Jose Luis; Fernandez, Emilio

    2015-09-01

    Microalgae are capable of biological H2 photoproduction from water, solar energy, and a variety of organic substrates. Acclimation responses to different nutrient regimes finely control photosynthetic activity and can influence H2 production. Hence, nutrient stresses are an interesting scenario to study H2 production in photosynthetic organisms. In this review, we mainly focus on the H2-production mechanisms in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and the physiological relevance of the nutrient media composition when producing H2. PMID:25952745

  14. Death and dessert: Nutrient signalling pathways and ageing

    PubMed Central

    Alic, Nazif; Partridge, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Reduction in nutrient intake without malnutrition can delay ageing and extend healthy life in diverse organisms from yeast to primates. This effect can be recapitulated by genetic or pharmacological dampening of the signal through nutrient signalling pathways, making them a promising target for intervention into human ageing and age-related diseases. Here we review the current knowledge of the interactions between nutrient signalling pathways and ageing, focusing on the findings emerged in the last few years. PMID:21835601

  15. The Plant Ionome Revisited by the Nutrient Balance Concept

    PubMed Central

    Parent, Serge-Étienne; Parent, Léon Etienne; Egozcue, Juan José; Rozane, Danilo-Eduardo; Hernandes, Amanda; Lapointe, Line; Hébert-Gentile, Valérie; Naess, Kristine; Marchand, Sébastien; Lafond, Jean; Mattos, Dirceu; Barlow, Philip; Natale, William

    2013-01-01

    Tissue analysis is commonly used in ecology and agronomy to portray plant nutrient signatures. Nutrient concentration data, or ionomes, belong to the compositional data class, i.e., multivariate data that are proportions of some whole, hence carrying important numerical properties. Statistics computed across raw or ordinary log-transformed nutrient data are intrinsically biased, hence possibly leading to wrong inferences. Our objective was to present a sound and robust approach based on a novel nutrient balance concept to classify plant ionomes. We analyzed leaf N, P, K, Ca, and Mg of two wild and six domesticated fruit species from Canada, Brazil, and New Zealand sampled during reproductive stages. Nutrient concentrations were (1) analyzed without transformation, (2) ordinary log-transformed as commonly but incorrectly applied in practice, (3) additive log-ratio (alr) transformed as surrogate to stoichiometric rules, and (4) converted to isometric log-ratios (ilr) arranged as sound nutrient balance variables. Raw concentration and ordinary log transformation both led to biased multivariate analysis due to redundancy between interacting nutrients. The alr- and ilr-transformed data provided unbiased discriminant analyses of plant ionomes, where wild and domesticated species formed distinct groups and the ionomes of species and cultivars were differentiated without numerical bias. The ilr nutrient balance concept is preferable to alr, because the ilr technique projects the most important interactions between nutrients into a convenient Euclidean space. This novel numerical approach allows rectifying historical biases and supervising phenotypic plasticity in plant nutrition studies. PMID:23526060

  16. The Interactions of Aquaporins and Mineral Nutrients in Higher Plants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Ding, Lei; Gao, Limin; Li, Yingrui; Shen, Qirong; Guo, Shiwei

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporins, major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) present in the plasma and intracellular membranes, facilitate the transport of small neutral molecules across cell membranes in higher plants. Recently, progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms of aquaporin subcellular localization, transport selectivity, and gating properties. Although the role of aquaporins in maintaining the plant water status has been addressed, the interactions between plant aquaporins and mineral nutrients remain largely unknown. This review highlights the roles of various aquaporin orthologues in mineral nutrient uptake and transport, as well as the regulatory effects of mineral nutrients on aquaporin expression and activity, and an integrated link between aquaporins and mineral nutrient metabolism was identified. PMID:27483251

  17. Improving crop nutrient efficiency through root architecture modifications.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinxin; Zeng, Rensen; Liao, Hong

    2016-03-01

    Improving crop nutrient efficiency becomes an essential consideration for environmentally friendly and sustainable agriculture. Plant growth and development is dependent on 17 essential nutrient elements, among them, nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) are the two most important mineral nutrients. Hence it is not surprising that low N and/or low P availability in soils severely constrains crop growth and productivity, and thereby have become high priority targets for improving nutrient efficiency in crops. Root exploration largely determines the ability of plants to acquire mineral nutrients from soils. Therefore, root architecture, the 3-dimensional configuration of the plant's root system in the soil, is of great importance for improving crop nutrient efficiency. Furthermore, the symbiotic associations between host plants and arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi/rhizobial bacteria, are additional important strategies to enhance nutrient acquisition. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in the current understanding of crop species control of root architecture alterations in response to nutrient availability and root/microbe symbioses, through gene or QTL regulation, which results in enhanced nutrient acquisition. PMID:26460087

  18. The Interactions of Aquaporins and Mineral Nutrients in Higher Plants

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Ding, Lei; Gao, Limin; Li, Yingrui; Shen, Qirong; Guo, Shiwei

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporins, major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) present in the plasma and intracellular membranes, facilitate the transport of small neutral molecules across cell membranes in higher plants. Recently, progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms of aquaporin subcellular localization, transport selectivity, and gating properties. Although the role of aquaporins in maintaining the plant water status has been addressed, the interactions between plant aquaporins and mineral nutrients remain largely unknown. This review highlights the roles of various aquaporin orthologues in mineral nutrient uptake and transport, as well as the regulatory effects of mineral nutrients on aquaporin expression and activity, and an integrated link between aquaporins and mineral nutrient metabolism was identified. PMID:27483251

  19. Therapeutic perspectives of epigenetically active nutrients.

    PubMed

    Remely, M; Lovrecic, L; de la Garza, A L; Migliore, L; Peterlin, B; Milagro, F I; Martinez, A J; Haslberger, A G

    2015-06-01

    Many nutrients are known for a wide range of activities in prevention and alleviation of various diseases. Recently, their potential role in regulating human health through effects on epigenetics has become evident, although specific mechanisms are still unclear. Thus, nutriepigenetics/nutriepigenomics has emerged as a new and promising field in current epigenetics research in the past few years. In particular, polyphenols, as part of the central dynamic interaction between the genome and the environment with specificity at physiological concentrations, are well known to affect mechanisms underlying human health. This review summarizes the effects of dietary compounds on epigenetic mechanisms in the regulation of gene expression including expression of enzymes and other molecules responsible for drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion in cancer, metabolic syndrome, neurodegenerative disorders and hormonal dysfunction. PMID:25046997

  20. Therapeutic perspectives of epigenetically active nutrients

    PubMed Central

    Remely, M; Lovrecic, L; de la Garza, A L; Migliore, L; Peterlin, B; Milagro, F I; Martinez, A J; Haslberger, A G

    2015-01-01

    Many nutrients are known for a wide range of activities in prevention and alleviation of various diseases. Recently, their potential role in regulating human health through effects on epigenetics has become evident, although specific mechanisms are still unclear. Thus, nutriepigenetics/nutriepigenomics has emerged as a new and promising field in current epigenetics research in the past few years. In particular, polyphenols, as part of the central dynamic interaction between the genome and the environment with specificity at physiological concentrations, are well known to affect mechanisms underlying human health. This review summarizes the effects of dietary compounds on epigenetic mechanisms in the regulation of gene expression including expression of enzymes and other molecules responsible for drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion in cancer, metabolic syndrome, neurodegenerative disorders and hormonal dysfunction. PMID:25046997

  1. Choline: An Essential Nutrient for Public Health

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Kerry-Ann

    2009-01-01

    Choline was officially recognized as an essential nutrient by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in 1998. There is a significant variation in the dietary requirement for choline that can be explained by common genetic polymorphisms. Because of its wide-ranging roles in human metabolism, from cell structure to neurotransmitter synthesis, choline-deficiency is now thought to have an impact on diseases such as liver disease, atherosclerosis and possibly neurological disorders. Choline is found in a wide variety of foods. Egg yolks are the most concentrated source of choline in the American diet, providing 680 milligrams per 100 grams. Mean choline intakes for older children, men, women and pregnant women are far below the Adequate Intake established by the IOM. Given the importance of choline in a wide range of critical functions in the human body, coupled with less than optimal intakes among the population, dietary guidance should be developed to encourage the intake of choline-rich foods. PMID:19906248

  2. Nutrient-contaminant (Pu) plant accumulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, C.E.; Jenne, E.A.; Simpson, J.C.; Cataldo, D.A.

    1981-12-01

    A model was developed which simulates the movement and daily accumulation of nutrients and contaminants in crop plants resulting from known physiological processes in the plant. In the model, the daily contaminant accumulation is governed by daily increase in plant biomass derived from photosynthesis and by the specified thermodynamic activity of the bioavailable contaminant species in soil or hydroponic solutin. Total accumulation and resulting concentration in the plant's root, stem and branch, leaf, and reproductive compartments can be simulated any time during the growing season. Parameters were estimated from data on plutonium accumulation in soybeans and the model was calibrated against this same data set. The plutonium distribution in the plant was found to be most sensitive to parameters related to leaf accumulation. Contamination at different times during the growing season resulted in a large change in predicted leaf accumulation but very little change in predicted accumulation in other plant parts except when contamination occurred very late in the growing season.

  3. Nutrient pathways of flexor tendons in primates

    SciTech Connect

    Manske, P.R.; Lesker, P.A.

    1982-09-01

    The perfusion and diffusion pathways to the flexor profundus tendons of 40 monkeys were investigated by measuring the uptake of tritiated proline by various tendon segments. In the absence of all vascular connections, the process of diffusion provides nutrients to all areas of flexor tendon and in this study the process of diffusion was greater. The distal segment of tendon was observed to be profused most rapidly. The proximal tendon segment is perfused from both the muscular-tendinous junction and the vinculum longus; vincular segment perfusion is via the vinculum longus vessels alone; central segment perfusion is shared by the vinculum longus and vinculum brevis vasculature. The distal segment uptake is by both the process of diffusion or vinculum brevis perfusion. The osseous attachment at the distal phalanx contributes little to tendon nutrition.

  4. Nutrient Intake in Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Grossniklaus, Daurice A.; O’Brien, Marian C.; Clark, Patricia C.; Dunbar, Sandra B.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Research Objective Approximately 50% of heart failure (HF) patients are thought to be malnourished, and macronutrient and micronutrient deficiencies may potentially aggravate HF symptoms. Thus, concerns have been raised about the overall nutrient composition of diets in HF populations. The purpose of this study was to examine the macronutrient and micronutrient intake by caloric adequacy among community-dwelling adults with HF. Participants and Methods A secondary analysis of baseline data of participants in an HF lifestyle intervention study was conducted. Participants (n = 45) were predominantly male (55.6%), white, and non-Hispanic (64.4%); had a mean age of 61 years (SD, 11 years) and mean body mass index of 31.2 kg/m2 (SD, 7.3 kg/m2); were of New York Heart Association functional classes II and III (77.8%); and had a mean ejection fraction of 31.9% (SD,13.2%); and 69% had a college or higher level of education. The Block Food Habits Questionnaire was used to assess the intake of macronutrients and micronutrients. Analysis included descriptive statistics and Mann-Whitney U tests. Results and Conclusions Individuals reporting inadequate daily caloric intake reported a lower intake of macronutrients and micronutrients as well as other differences in dietary patterns compared with individuals reporting adequate daily caloric intake. More than half of the individuals reporting adequate caloric intake did not meet the recommended dietary allowance for magnesium and vitamin E. Interventions aimed at increasing overall intake and nutrient density are suggested. Further research is needed to better understand the relationship between dietary factors and outcomes in HF. PMID:18596500

  5. Lateral Diffusion of Nutrients by Mammalian Herbivores in Terrestrial Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Adam; Doughty, Christopher E.; Malhi, Yadvinder

    2013-01-01

    Animals translocate nutrients by consuming nutrients at one point and excreting them or dying at another location. Such lateral fluxes may be an important mechanism of nutrient supply in many ecosystems, but lack quantification and a systematic theoretical framework for their evaluation. This paper presents a mathematical framework for quantifying such fluxes in the context of mammalian herbivores. We develop an expression for lateral diffusion of a nutrient, where the diffusivity is a biologically determined parameter depending on the characteristics of mammals occupying the domain, including size-dependent phenomena such as day range, metabolic demand, food passage time, and population size. Three findings stand out: (a) Scaling law-derived estimates of diffusion parameters are comparable to estimates calculated from estimates of each coefficient gathered from primary literature. (b) The diffusion term due to transport of nutrients in dung is orders of magnitude large than the coefficient representing nutrients in bodymass. (c) The scaling coefficients show that large herbivores make a disproportionate contribution to lateral nutrient transfer. We apply the diffusion equation to a case study of Kruger National Park to estimate the conditions under which mammal-driven nutrient transport is comparable in magnitude to other (abiotic) nutrient fluxes (inputs and losses). Finally, a global analysis of mammalian herbivore transport is presented, using a comprehensive database of contemporary animal distributions. We show that continents vary greatly in terms of the importance of animal-driven nutrient fluxes, and also that perturbations to nutrient cycles are potentially quite large if threatened large herbivores are driven to extinction. PMID:23951141

  6. Porous tube plant nutrient delivery system development: A device for nutrient delivery in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreschel, T. W.; Brown, C. S.; Piastuch, W. C.; Hinkle, C. R.; Knott, W. M.

    1994-01-01

    The Porous Tube Plant Nutrient Delivery Systems or PTPNDS (U.S. Patent #4,926,585) has been under development for the past six years with the goal of providing a means for culturing plants in microgravity, specifically providing water and nutrients to the roots. Direct applications of the PTPNDS include plant space biology investigations on the Space Shuttle and plant research for life support in the Space Station Freedom. In the past, we investigated various configurations, the suitability of different porous materials, and the effects of pressure and pore size on plant growth. Current work is focused on characterizing the physical operation of the system, examining the effects of solution aeration, and developing prototype configurations for the Plant Growth Unit (PGU), the flight system for the Shuttle mid-deck. Future developments will involve testing on KC-135 parabolic flights, the design of flight hardware and testing aboard the Space Shuttle.

  7. Porous Tube Plant Nutrient Delivery System development: a device for nutrient delivery in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Dreschel, T W; Brown, C S; Piastuch, W C; Hinkle, C R; Knott, W M

    1994-11-01

    The Porous Tube Plant Nutrient Delivery System or PTPNDS (U.S. Patent #4,926,585) has been under development for the past six years with the goal of providing a means for culturing plants in microgravity, specifically providing water and nutrients to the roots. Direct applications of the PTPNDS include plant space biology investigations on the Space Shuttle and plant research for life support in Space Station Freedom. In the past, we investigated various configurations, the suitability of different porous materials, and the effects of pressure and pore size on plant growth. Current work is focused on characterizing the physical operation of the system, examining the effects of solution aeration, and developing prototype configurations for the Plant Growth Unit (PGU), the flight system for the Shuttle mid-deck. Future developments will involve testing on KC-135 parabolic flights, the design of flight hardware and testing aboard the Space Shuttle. PMID:11540217

  8. The Coupling of Solution Chemistry to Plant Nutrient Demand in an on Demand Nutrient Delivery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Wayne

    1998-01-01

    The goal of the proposal will be to determine the suitability of the DASI instrument in providing a signal that can be recognized and be utilized as an indicator of plant stress. The method to be utilized for evaluating stress is the presentation of an every increasing level of nutrient deficiency and salinity stress (addition of salt (NACl) or increasing concentration of balanced nutrient) while simultaneously recording spectral reflectance using the DASI instrument and monitoring the traditional processes of gas exchange and nutrient uptake parameters. In this manner, we will be able to directly compare the DASI measurements with known stresses as determined by the traditional gas exchange and nutrient uptake measures of stress. We anticipate that the DASI will provide a sensitive identifier of plant stress; recording signals of the resulting changes in plant metabolism in real time, far before any visible effects of stress could be observed. Thus, there is a potential for very early management intervention to correct a stress condition before damage could develop. The present response time for the observation of visual symptoms of plant stress is considerable and only provides an indication that a stress is present after it has been present for an extended period of time. Thus, the impact of a plant-based life support function will have already been significant. An additional benefit of this research to regenerative life support will be the characterization of a potential recovery scenario from various degrees of stress. The experimental approach to be employed includes the removal of the stress at various points in the stress gradient and the characterization of plant performance and reflectance spectra during recovery from various degrees of stress. Spectral reflectance imaging techniques have been developed and used to measure the biochemical composition of plants and relate these characteristics to the fluxes of biochemical elements within the ecosystem.

  9. Excess nutrients in hydroponic solutions alter nutrient content of rice, wheat, and potato

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKeehen, J. D.; Mitchell, C. A.; Wheeler, R. M.; Bugbee, B.; Nielsen, S. S.

    1996-01-01

    Environment has significant effects on the nutrient content of field-grown crop plants. Little is known, however, about compositional changes caused by controlled environments in which plants receive only artificial radiation and soilless, hydroponic culture. This knowledge is essential for developing a safe, nutritious diet in a Controlled Ecological Life-Support System (CELSS). Three crops that are candidates for inclusion in a CELSS (rice, wheat, and white potato) were grown both in the field and in controlled environments where the hydroponic nutrient solution, photosynthetic photon flux (PPF), and CO2 level were manipulated to achieve rapid growth rates. Plants were harvested at maturity, separated into discrete parts, and dried prior to analysis. Plant materials were analyzed for proximate composition (protein, fat, ash, and carbohydrate), total nitrogen (N), nitrate, minerals, and amino-acid composition. The effect of environment on nutrient content varied by crop and plant part. Total N and nonprotein N (NPN) contents of plant biomass generally increased under controlled-environment conditions compared to field conditions, especially for leafy plant parts and roots. Nitrate levels were increased in hydroponically-grown vegetative tissues, but nitrate was excluded from grains and tubers. Mineral content changes in plant tissue included increased phosphorus and decreased levels of certain micronutrient elements under controlled-environment conditions. These findings suggest that cultivar selection, genetic manipulation, and environmental control could be important to obtain highly nutritious biomass in a CELSS.

  10. Runoff and nutrient losses during winter periods in cold climates--requirements to nutrient simulation models.

    PubMed

    Deelstra, Johannes; Kvaernø, Sigrun H; Granlund, Kirsti; Sileika, Antanas Sigitas; Gaigalis, Kazimieras; Kyllmar, Katarina; Vagstad, Nils

    2009-03-01

    Large areas in Europe may experience frozen soils during winter periods which pose special challenges to modelling. Extensive data are collected in small agricultural catchments in Nordic and Baltic countries. An analysis on measurements, carried out in four small agricultural catchments has shown that a considerable amount of the yearly nutrient loss occurs during the freezing period. A freezing period was defined as the time period indicated by the maximum and minimum points on the cumulative degree-day curve. On average 6-32% of the yearly runoff was generated during this period while N-loss varied from 5-35% and P loss varied from 3-33%. The results indicate that infiltration into frozen soils might occur during the freezing period and that the runoff generating processes, at least during a considerable part of the freezing period, are rather similar compared to the processes outside the freezing period. Freeze-thaw cycles affect the infiltration capacity and aggregate stability, thereby the erosion and nutrient losses. The Norwegian catchment had a high P loss during the freezing period compared to the other catchments, most likely caused by catchment characteristics such as slope, soil types, tillage methods and fertiliser application. It is proposed to use data, collected on small agricultural dominated catchments, in the calibration and validation of watershed management models and to take into account runoff and nutrient loss processes which are representative for cold climates, thereby obtaining reliable results. PMID:19280038

  11. Plant nutrients do not covary with soil nutrients under changing climatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wentao; Elser, James J.; Lü, Xiao-Tao; Wang, Zhengwen; Bai, Edith; Yan, Caifeng; Wang, Chao; Li, Mai-He; Zimmermann, Niklaus E.; Han, Xingguo; Xu, Zhuwen; Li, Hui; Wu, Yunna; Jiang, Yong

    2015-08-01

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) play vital roles in plant growth and development. Yet how climate regimes and soil fertility influence plant N and P stoichiometry is not well understood, especially in the belowground plant parts. Here we investigated plant aboveground and belowground N and P concentrations ([N] and [P]) and their stoichiometry in three dominant genera along a 2200 km long climatic gradient in northern China. Results showed that temperature explained more variation of [N] and [P] in C4 plants, whereas precipitation exerted a stronger influence on [N] and [P] in C3 plants. Both plant aboveground and belowground [N] and [P] increased with decreasing precipitation, and increasing temperatures yet were negatively correlated with soil [N] and [P]. Plant N:P ratios were unrelated with all climate and soil variables. Plant aboveground and belowground [N] followed an allometric scaling relationship, but the allocation of [P] was isometric. These results imply that internal processes stabilize plant N:P ratios and hence tissue N:P ratios may not be an effective parameter for predicting plant nutrient limitation. Our results also imply that past positive relationships between plant and nutrient stocks may be challenged under changing climatic conditions. While any modeling would need to be able to replicate currently observed relationships, it is conceivable that some relationships, such as those between temperature or rainfall and carbon:nutrient ratios, should be different under changing climatic conditions.

  12. Excess nutrients in hydroponic solutions alter nutrient content of rice, wheat, and potato

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeehen, J. D.; Mitchell, C. A.; Wheeler, R. M.; Bugbee, B.; Nielsen, S. S.

    Environment has significant effects on the nutrient content of field-grown crop plants. Little is known, however, about compositional changes caused by controlled environments in which plants receive only artificial radiation and soilless, hydroponic culture. This knowledge is essential for developing a safe, nutritious diet in a Controlled Ecological Life-Support System (CELSS). Three crops that are candidates for inclusion in a CELSS (rice, wheat, and white potato) were grown both in the field and in controlled environments where the hydroponic nutrient solution, photosynthetic photon flux (PPF), and CO_2 level were manipulated to achieve rapid growth rates. Plants were harvested at maturity, separated into discrete parts, and dried prior to analysis. Plant materials were analyzed for proximate composition (protein, fat, ash, and carbohydrate), total nitrogen (N), nitrate, minerals, and amino-acid composition. The effect of environment on nutrient content varied by crop and plant part. Total N and nonprotein N (NPN) contents of plant biomass generally increased under controlled-environment conditions compared to field conditions, especially for leafy plant parts and roots. Nitrate levels were increased in hydroponically-grown vegetative tissues, but nitrate was excluded from grains and tubers. Mineral content changes in plant tissue included increased phosphorus and decreased levels of certain micronutrient elements under controlled-environment conditions. These findings suggest that cultivar selection, genetic manipulation, and environmental control could be important to obtain highly nutritious biomass in a CELSS.

  13. The effect of sucrose application on soil nutrient availability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil nutrient availability is a principal factor constraining the invasiveness of exotic weeds such as cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.). The soil microbial community is generally C limited; thus, providing a labile C source can cause microbes to proliferate and immobilize soil nutrients, particularly...

  14. THE REVISED USDA NUTRIENT DATA SET FOR FRESH PORK

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrient composition data for fresh pork products in the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference (SR) have not been updated since 1991. Since that time, changes in animal husbandry practices and industry procedures have led to the availability of leaner cuts. In order to provide up-to...

  15. BENTHIC NUTRIENT FLUX IN A SMALL ESTUARY IN NORTHWESTERNFLORIDA (USA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benthic Nutrient Flux in a Small Estuary in Northwestern Florida(USA).Gulf and Caribbean Research 18, 15-25, 2006.

    Benthic nutrient fluxes of ammonium (NH4+), nitrite/nitrate (NO2-+NO3-), phosphate (PO4-), and dissolved silica (DSi) were measured in Escambia Bay, an estuar...

  16. Manure Application under Winter Conditions: Nutrient Runoff and Leaching Losses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Winter application of manure is commonly practiced and potential nutrient losses can be difficult to predict due to wide variations in weather within a year and between years. This study was conducted to determine nutrient losses via surface runoff and subsurface leachate from winter-applied manure ...

  17. Manure Application Under Winter Conditions: Nutrient Runoff and Leaching Losses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Winter application of manure is commonly practiced and potential nutrient losses are difficult to predict. This study was conducted in order to determine nutrient losses via surface runoff and subsurface leachate from winter-applied manure based on its relative placement with respect to snow. A labo...

  18. Manure application under winter conditions: Nutrient runoff and leaching losses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Winter application of manure is commonly practiced and potential nutrient losses are difficult to predict. This study was conducted in order to determine nutrient losses via surface runoff and subsurface leachate from winter-applied manure based on its relative placement with respect to snow. A labo...

  19. USDA Nutrient Data Set for Retail Veal Cuts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Nutrient Data Laboratory (NDL), in collaboration with Colorado State University, conducted a research study designed to update and expand the data on veal cuts in the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference (SR). This research has been necess...

  20. Fate of Indicator Microorganisms Under Nutrient Management Plan Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrient management plans (NMPs) for application of wastewater from concentration animal feeding operations are designed to meet crop water and nutrient requirements, but implicitly assume that pathogenic microorganisms in the wastewater will be retained and die-off in the root zone. A NMP was impl...

  1. Nutrient Exchange through Hyphae in Intercropping Systems Affects Yields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thun, Tim Von

    2013-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizae fungi (AMF) play a large role in the current understanding of the soil ecosystem. They increase nutrient and water uptake, improve soil structure, and form complex hyphal networks that transfer nutrients between plants within an ecosystem. Factors such as species present, the physiological balance between the plants in the…

  2. Insights into Digestion and Absorption of Major Nutrients in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Barbara E.

    2010-01-01

    Nutrient digestion and absorption is necessary for the survival of living organisms and has evolved into the complex and specific task of the gastrointestinal (GI) system. While most people simply assume that their GI tract will work properly to use nutrients, provide energy, and release wastes, few nonscientists know the details about how various…

  3. USDA updates nutrient values for fast food pizza

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumption of quick service pizza has increased as Americans are spending more on food away from home. Pizza is consistently a primary Key Food in the USDA National Food and Nutrient Analysis Program (NFNAP) because it is a contributor of more than 14 nutrients of public health significance to the...

  4. Landscape influence on soil carbon and nutrient levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Past runoff, erosion, and management practices influence nutrient levels on the landscape. These starting levels affect future nutrient transport due to runoff, erosion, and leaching events. The purpose of this study was to examine closed-depression landscape effects on surface soil organic matter, ...

  5. Monitoring nutrient loss in runoff from dairy cattle lots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) loss from agriculture persists as a water quality issue. For dairy, nutrients can be lost from cropland, pastures, barnyards, and outdoor cattle lots. We monitored nutrient runoff for 3.5 years from plots representing cattle lots and corn silage cropland, and tested t...

  6. Mariculture: significant and expanding cause of coastal nutrient enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouwman, Lex; Beusen, Arthur; Glibert, Patricia M.; Overbeek, Ciska; Pawlowski, Marcin; Herrera, Jorge; Mulsow, Sandor; Yu, Rencheng; Zhou, Mingjiang

    2013-12-01

    Mariculture (marine aquaculture) generates nutrient waste either through the excretion by the reared organisms, or through direct enrichment by, or remineralization of, externally applied feed inputs. Importantly, the waste from fish or shellfish cannot easily be managed, as most is in dissolved form and released directly to the aquatic environment. The release of dissolved and particulate nutrients by intensive mariculture results in increasing nutrient loads (finfish and crustaceans), and changes in nutrient stoichiometry (all mariculture types). Based on different scenarios, we project that nutrients from mariculture will increase up to six fold by 2050 with exceedance of the nutrient assimilative capacity in parts of the world where mariculture growth is already rapid. Increasing nutrient loads and altered nutrient forms (increased availability of reduced relative to oxidized forms of nitrogen) and/or stoichiometric proportions (altered nitrogen:phosphorus ratios) may promote an increase in harmful algal blooms (HABs) either directly or via stimulation of algae on which mixotrophic HABs may feed. HABs can kill or intoxicate the mariculture product with severe economic losses, and can increase risks to human health.

  7. SOUTHEASTERN PLAINS IN-STREAM NUTRIENT AND BIOLOGICAL RESPONSE (SPINBR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    States and EPA lack a tool to characterize and measure biological response to nutrients in flowing waters. This study is designed to describe, examine and characterize the relationship between biological response and aquatic nutrients as a potential causal variable along a gradi...

  8. Narrow grass hedge effects on nutrient transport following compost application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of stiff-stemmed grass hedges can be a valuable soil conservation measure. A study was conducted to measure the effectiveness of a narrow grass hedge, planted on the contour along the hillslope, in reducing runoff nutrient transport from plots with a range of soil nutrient values. Composted ...

  9. Nutrient transport as affected by rate of overland flow

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little information is currently available concerning the effects of varying flow rate on nutrient transport by overland flow. The objective of this study was to measure the effects of overland flow rate on nutrient transport following the application of beef cattle or swine manure to plots containin...

  10. Wheat strip effects on nutrient loads following variable manure application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Narrow grass hedges have been shown to significantly reduce nutrient loads in runoff. The effectiveness of narrow wheat strips in reducing nutrient loads was examined in this investigation. The objectives of this study were to: (1) determine the effects of a narrow wheat strip, varying manure applic...

  11. Association of arsenic with nutrient elements in rice plants.

    PubMed

    Duan, Guilan; Liu, Wenju; Chen, Xueping; Hu, Ying; Zhu, Yongguan

    2013-06-01

    Rice is the main cereal crop that feeds half of the world's population, and two thirds of the Chinese population. Arsenic (As) contamination in paddy soil and irrigation water elevates As concentration in rice grains, thus rice consumption is an important As intake route for populations in south and south-east Asia, where rice is the staple food. In addition to direct toxicity of As to human, As may limit the accumulation of micro-nutrients in rice grains, such as selenium (Se) and zinc (Zn). These micro-nutrients are essential for humans, while mineral deficiencies, especially iron (Fe) and Zn, are prevalent in China. Therefore, it is important to understand the interactions between As and micro-nutrients in rice plants, which is the principal source of these nutrients for people on rice diets. In addition, during the processes of As uptake, translocation and transformation, the status of macro-nutrients (e.g. silicon (Si), phosphors (P), sulfur (S)) are important factors affecting As dynamics in soil-plant systems and As accumulation in rice grains. Recently, synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques have been applied to map the distribution of As and nutrient elements in rice plants, which will aid to understand how As are accumulated, complexed and transported within plants. This paper reviews the interactions between As and macro-nutrients, as well as micro-nutrients in rice plants. PMID:23771154

  12. Intestinal maturation in the rat: the role of enteral nutrients.

    PubMed

    Castillo, R O; Pittler, A; Costa, F

    1988-01-01

    In order to investigate the role of enteral nutrients in intestinal maturation, an animal model was developed consisting of provision of intravenous nutrient infusions to immature suckling rats over the period of weaning. Age- and litter-matched controls were provided identical amounts of the parenteral solution by entered cannula using the same model. At the end of the period of weaning, animals were killed and the intestines removed for measurement of morphologic parameters and disaccharidase, DNA, and protein levels. The absence of enteral nutrients during weaning resulted in striking inhibition of intestinal growth, diminution in mucosal cell mass, and delayed development of lactase. Although the appearance of sucrase was not affected by the lack of enteral nutrients, sucrase levels rose to only one-third of control levels. Jejunoileal gradients were not present in animals deprived of enteral nutrients but were present in animals receiving enteral nutrients. These results are distinct from adult animals treated in identical experimental fashion and indicate that major parameters of intestinal maturation are altered by the absence of intraluminal nutrients. A critical role for intraluminal nutrients in regulation of intestinal development is therefore suggested. The animal model developed for these studies is well suited for investigation of the interactions of the intraluminal environment with intestinal maturation. PMID:3141647

  13. Development of Sampling Strategies for Foods to Determine Nutrient Values

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    National nutrient databases rely, in part, on the generation of original analytical data to estimate nutrient values for commonly consumed foods. The generation of representative analytical values for nutritional components requires the development of a sampling plan which includes both the demograp...

  14. Effects of broiler litter application on nutrient accumulation in soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Excessive nutrient accumulation in soils due to land application of broiler litter is a growing environmental concern. A four-year study was conducted on a Pembroke silt loam soil (Mollic Paleudalf) cropped to orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.) to evaluate accumulation of soil nutrients from broil...

  15. Nutrient Transport in Tile-Fed Drainage Ditches

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drainage ditches receive water and associated contaminants from agricultural fields via surface runoff or sub-surface tile drains. Little consideration has been given to the processes affecting nutrient transport once in surface water. The objective of this research was to evaluate the nutrient fa...

  16. Approaches for Development of Nutrient Criteria in Oregon Estuaries

    EPA Science Inventory

    Development of nutrient criteria for all water body types of the US remains a top priority for EPA. Estuaries in the Pacific Northwest receive nutrients from both the watershed and the coastal ocean, and thus are particularly complex systems in which to establish water quality c...

  17. Reference Condition Approach for Numeric Nutrient Criteria for Oregon Estuaries

    EPA Science Inventory

    Development of nutrient criteria for all water body types of the US remains a top priority for EPA. Estuaries in the Pacific Northwest receive nutrients from both the watershed and the coastal ocean, and thus are particularly complex systems in which to establish water quality c...

  18. NUTRIENT CONTENT OF THE FOOD SUPPLY, 1909 - 1999

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under Secretary Shirley Watkins the publication the "Nutrient Content of the U.S. Food Supply, 1909-94" was released. It was prepared by the USDA Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion and presents historical data on the nutrient content of the U.S. food supply through 1994, w...

  19. Rice lines with high leaf mineral nutrient levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphorus (P) and Potassium (K), and sometimes other mineral nutrients are often applied as fertilizer, in addition to Nitrogen, to help achieve high yields in Texas rice production. For some mineral nutrients, total levels in soil would be sufficient to support the desired rice crop growth, but th...

  20. Effect of acute heat stress on plant nutrient metabolism proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abrupt heating decreased the levels (per unit total root protein) of all but one of the nutrient metabolism proteins examined, and for most of the proteins, effects were greater for severe vs. moderate heat stress. For many of the nutrient metabolism proteins, initial effects of heat (1 d) were r...

  1. Biomass production and nutrient removal by switchgrass under irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Switchgrass has been identified to supply a major portion of U.S. energy needs when used as a fuel. Assessments of the export of essential plant nutrients are needed to determine impacts on soil fertility that will influence fertilizer recommendations since the nutrients contained in the above groun...

  2. Effects of broiler litter application on nutrient accumulations in soil.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Excessive nutrient accumulation in soils due to land application of broiler litter is a growing environmental concern. A four year study was conducted on a Pembroke silt loam soil (Mollic Paleudalf) cropped to orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.) to evaluate accumulation of soil nutrients from broil...

  3. Nutrient Composition in Ground Pork using Regression Techniques

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New data on nutrient composition of ground pork products available in the US retail market were needed to update the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference (SR) and to support nutritional intake studies of the population. A collaborative study was conducted to determine the mathemati...

  4. Nutrient mitigation capacity in Mississippi Delta, USA drainage ditches

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eutrophication and hypoxia within aquatic systems are a serious international concern. Various management practices have been proposed to help alleviate nutrient loads transported to the Gulf of Mexico and other high-profile aquatic systems. The current study examined the nutrient mitigation capac...

  5. Nutrient uptake of peanut genotypes under different water regimes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drought is a serious environmental stress limiting growth and productivity in peanut and other crops. Nutrient uptake of peanut is reduced under drought conditions, which reduces yield. The objectives of this study were to investigate nutrient uptake of peanut genotypes in response to drought and ...

  6. Nutrient availability at Mer Bleue bog measured by PRSTM probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, M.; Moore, T. R.; Talbot, J.

    2015-12-01

    Bogs, covering ~0.7 million km2 in Canada, store a large amount of C and N. As nutrient deficient ecosystems, it's critical to examine the nutrient availabilities and seasonal dynamics. We used Plant Root Simulators (PRSTM) at Mer Bleue bog to provide some baseline data on nutrient availability and its variability. In particular, we focused on ammonium, nitrate, phosphate, calcium, magnesium and potassium, iron, sulphate and aluminum. We placed PRS probes at a depth of 5 - 15 cm in pristine plots and plots with long term N, P and K fertilization for 4 weeks and determined the availability of these nutrients, from spring through to fall. Probes were also placed beneath the water table in hummock and hollow microtopography and along a transect including part of the bog which had been drained through the creation of a ditch 80 years ago. The result showed that there was limited available ammonium, nitrate and phosphate in the bog, the seasonal variation of nutrient availabilities probably due to mineralization, an increase in the availability of some nutrients between different water table depths or as a result of drainage, and the relative availability of nutrients compared to the input from fertilization. We suggest that PRS probes could be a useful tool to examine nutrient availability and dynamics in wetlands, with careful consideration of installing condition, for example, proper exposure period, depth relative to water table etc.

  7. ENERGY AND NUTRIENT EXTRACTION FROM ONSITE WASTEWATER - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    Onsite wastewater systems are a significant source of nutrient loading to the environment and there is a demand for technologies that remove nutrients at the source. Most desired are passive, low-...

  8. ASSIGNING PYRAMID SERVINGS TO USDA NUTRIENT DATABASE CODES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals utilizes the USDA Nutrient Database (NDB) for Standard Reference and the Survey Recipe Database to calculate the nutrient values for USDA survey foods. The Community Nutrition Research Group (CNRG) has assigned Pyramid servings to USDA survey foo...

  9. Estimation of postfire nutrient loss in the Florida everglades.

    PubMed

    Qian, Y; Miao, S L; Gu, B; Li, Y C

    2009-01-01

    Postfire nutrient release into ecosystem via plant ash is critical to the understanding of fire impacts on the environment. Factors determining a postfire nutrient budget are prefire nutrient content in the combustible biomass, burn temperature, and the amount of combustible biomass. Our objective was to quantitatively describe the relationships between nutrient losses (or concentrations in ash) and burning temperature in laboratory controlled combustion and to further predict nutrient losses in field fire by applying predictive models established based on laboratory data. The percentage losses of total nitrogen (TN), total carbon (TC), and material mass showed a significant linear correlation with a slope close to 1, indicating that TN or TC loss occurred predominantly through volatilization during combustion. Data obtained in laboratory experiments suggest that the losses of TN, TC, as well as the ratio of ash total phosphorus (TP) concentration to leaf TP concentration have strong relationships with burning temperature and these relationships can be quantitatively described by nonlinear equations. The potential use of these nonlinear models relating nutrient loss (or concentration) to temperature in predicting nutrient concentrations in field ash appear to be promising. During a prescribed fire in the northern Everglades, 73.1% of TP was estimated to be retained in ash while 26.9% was lost to the atmosphere, agreeing well with the distribution of TP during previously reported wild fires. The use of predictive models would greatly reduce the cost associated with measuring field ash nutrient concentrations. PMID:19643746

  10. Nutrient and Pesticide Removal From Laboratory Simulated Tile Drainage Discharge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Excess nutrient and pesticide transport through subsurface tile drainage is well documented. One approach receiving consideration for reducing the amount of nutrients and pesticides in subsurface drainage waters is end-of-tile filters. The filters are often comprised of industrial wastes or by-produ...

  11. 9 CFR 381.413 - Nutrient content claims; general principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... formulas and medical foods, as described in 21 CFR 101.13(q)(4). (5) (6) Nutrient content claims that were... sodium” or “contains 100 calories.” (2) An implied nutrient content claim is any claim that: (i... false or misleading in any respect (e.g., “100 calories” or “5 grams of fat”), in which case...

  12. 9 CFR 381.413 - Nutrient content claims; general principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... formulas and medical foods, as described in 21 CFR 101.13(q)(4). (5) (6) Nutrient content claims that were... sodium” or “contains 100 calories.” (2) An implied nutrient content claim is any claim that: (i... false or misleading in any respect (e.g., “100 calories” or “5 grams of fat”), in which case...

  13. 9 CFR 381.413 - Nutrient content claims; general principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... formulas and medical foods, as described in 21 CFR 101.13(q)(4). (5) (6) Nutrient content claims that were... sodium” or “contains 100 calories.” (2) An implied nutrient content claim is any claim that: (i... false or misleading in any respect (e.g., “100 calories” or “5 grams of fat”), in which case...

  14. Linkages between nutrients and assemblages of macroinvertebrates and fish in wadeable streams: Implication to nutrient criteria development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, L.; Robertson, D.M.; Garrison, P.J.

    2007-01-01

    We sampled 240 wadeable streams across Wisconsin for different forms of phosphorus and nitrogen, and assemblages of macroinvertebrates and fish to (1) examine how macroinvertebrate and fish measures correlated with the nutrients; (2) quantify relationships between key biological measures and nutrient forms to identify potential threshold levels of nutrients to support nutrient criteria development; and (3) evaluate the importance of nutrients in influencing biological assemblages relative to other physicochemical factors at different spatial scales. Twenty-three of the 35 fish and 18 of the 26 macroinvertebrate measures significantly correlated (P < 0.05) with at least one nutrient measure. Percentages of carnivorous, intolerant, and omnivorous fishes, index of biotic integrity, and salmonid abundance were fish measures correlated with the most nutrient measures and had the highest correlation coefficients. Percentages of Ephemeroptera-Plecoptera-Trichoptera individuals and taxa, Hilsenhoff biotic index, and mean tolerance value were macroinvertebrate measures that most strongly correlated with the most nutrient measures. Selected biological measures showed clear trends toward degradation as concentrations of phosphorus and nitrogen increased, and some measures showed clear thresholds where biological measures changed drastically with small changes in nutrient concentrations. Our selected environmental factors explained 54% of the variation in the fish assemblages. Of this explained variance, 46% was attributed to catchment and instream habitat, 15% to nutrients, 3% to other water quality measures, and 36% to the interactions among all the environmental variables. Selected environmental factors explained 53% of the variation in macroinvertebrate assemblages. Of this explained variance, 42% was attributed to catchment and instream habitat, 22% to nutrients, 5% to other water quality measures, and 32% to the interactions among all the environmental variables. ?? 2006

  15. Linkages Between Nutrients and Assemblages of Macroinvertebrates and Fish in Wadeable Streams: Implication to Nutrient Criteria Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lizhu; Robertson, Dale M.; Garrison, Paul J.

    2007-02-01

    We sampled 240 wadeable streams across Wisconsin for different forms of phosphorus and nitrogen, and assemblages of macroinvertebrates and fish to (1) examine how macroinvertebrate and fish measures correlated with the nutrients; (2) quantify relationships between key biological measures and nutrient forms to identify potential threshold levels of nutrients to support nutrient criteria development; and (3) evaluate the importance of nutrients in influencing biological assemblages relative to other physicochemical factors at different spatial scales. Twenty-three of the 35 fish and 18 of the 26 macroinvertebrate measures significantly correlated ( P < 0.05) with at least one nutrient measure. Percentages of carnivorous, intolerant, and omnivorous fishes, index of biotic integrity, and salmonid abundance were fish measures correlated with the most nutrient measures and had the highest correlation coefficients. Percentages of Ephemeroptera-Plecoptera-Trichoptera individuals and taxa, Hilsenhoff biotic index, and mean tolerance value were macroinvertebrate measures that most strongly correlated with the most nutrient measures. Selected biological measures showed clear trends toward degradation as concentrations of phosphorus and nitrogen increased, and some measures showed clear thresholds where biological measures changed drastically with small changes in nutrient concentrations. Our selected environmental factors explained 54% of the variation in the fish assemblages. Of this explained variance, 46% was attributed to catchment and instream habitat, 15% to nutrients, 3% to other water quality measures, and 36% to the interactions among all the environmental variables. Selected environmental factors explained 53% of the variation in macroinvertebrate assemblages. Of this explained variance, 42% was attributed to catchment and instream habitat, 22% to nutrients, 5% to other water quality measures, and 32% to the interactions among all the environmental variables.

  16. Nutrient budgets for large Chinese estuaries and embayment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S. M.; Hong, G.-H.; Ye, X. W.; Zhang, J.; Jiang, X. L.

    2009-01-01

    Nutrient concentrations among the Chinese rivers and bays vary 10-75 fold depending on nutrient elements. The silicic acid levels in South China rivers are higher than those from North China rivers and the yields of dissolved silicate increased from the north to the south of China, indicating the effect of climate on weathering. The nutrient levels in Chinese rivers are higher than those from the large and less-disturbed world rivers such as Amazon and Zaire, but comparable to the values for European and North American polluted and eutrophic rivers like the Loire and Po. This may be ascribed to both of extensive leaching and influences from agricultural and domestic activities over the drainage basins of Chinese rivers. DIN:PO3-4 ratios in most of Chinese rivers and bays are higher (up to 2800) than the other rivers in the world. The atomic ratios of DIN to PO43- in the major Chinese rivers and embayment decrease in exponential trend with increase in the atomic ratios of PO43- to Si(OH)4, indicating that primary production in coastal environments changes with the nutrients transport when the urbanization develops to a certain extent, and the potential limited nutrient elements can be changed from phosphorus to nitrogen limitation, which can modify aquatic food webs and then the ocean ecosystem. A simple steady-state mass-balance box model was employed. The output shows that the estuaries and embayment behave as a sink or source of nutrients. For the major Chinese estuaries, both residual and mixing flow transport nutrients off the estuaries, and nutrient transport fluxes in summer is 3-4 fold that in winter except comparable for NH4+. These fluxes are 1.0-1.7 fold that estimated by timing riverine nutrient concentrations and freshwater discharge. For the major Chinese embayment, nutrient elements are transported to China Seas except PO43- and Si(OH)4 in Sanggou Bay and Jiaozhou Bay. Seasonally, nutrients transport fluxes off the bays in the summer are 2.2-7.0 fold

  17. Optimal foraging for specific nutrients in predatory beetles

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kim; Mayntz, David; Toft, Søren; Clissold, Fiona J.; Hunt, John; Raubenheimer, David; Simpson, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Evolutionary theory predicts that animals should forage to maximize their fitness, which in predators is traditionally assumed equivalent to maximizing energy intake rather than balancing the intake of specific nutrients. We restricted female predatory ground beetles (Anchomenus dorsalis) to one of a range of diets varying in lipid and protein content, and showed that total egg production peaked at a target intake of both nutrients. Other beetles given a choice to feed from two diets differing only in protein and lipid composition selectively ingested nutrient combinations at this target intake. When restricted to nutritionally imbalanced diets, beetles balanced the over- and under-ingestion of lipid and protein around a nutrient composition that maximized egg production under those constrained circumstances. Selective foraging for specific nutrients in this predator thus maximizes its reproductive performance. Our findings have implications for predator foraging behaviour and in the structuring of ecological communities. PMID:22237910

  18. Nutrient vectors and riparian nutrient processing in African semiarid savanna ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobs, Shayne M.; Bechtold, J.S.; Biggs, Harry C.; Grimm, N. B.; McClain, M.E.; Naiman, R.J.; Perakis, Steven S.; Pinay, G.; Scholes, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    This review article describes vectors for nitrogen and phosphorus delivery to riparian zones in semiarid African savannas, the processing of nutrients in the riparian zone and the effect of disturbance on these processes. Semiarid savannas exhibit sharp seasonality, complex hillslope hydrology and high spatial heterogeneity, all of which ultimately impact nutrient fluxes between riparian, upland and aquatic environments. Our review shows that strong environmental drivers such as fire and herbivory enhance nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment transport to lower slope positions by shaping vegetative patterns. These vectors differ significantly from other arid and semiarid ecosystems, and from mesic ecosystems where the impact of fire and herbivory are less pronounced and less predictable. Also unique is the presence of sodic soils in certain hillslopes, which substantially alters hydrological flowpaths and may act as a trap where nitrogen is immobilized while sediment and phosphorus transport is enhanced. Nutrients and sediments are also deposited in the riparian zone during seasonal, intermittent floods while, during the dry season, subsurface movement of water from the stream into riparian soils and vegetation further enrich riparian zones with nutrients. As is found in mesic ecosystems, nutrients are immobilized in semiarid riparian corridors through microbial and plant uptake, whereas dissimilatory processes such as denitrification may be important where labile nitrogen and carbon are in adequate supply and physical conditions are suitablea??such as in seeps, wallows created by animals, ephemeral wetlands and stream edges. Interaction between temporal hydrologic connectivity and spatial heterogeneity are disrupted by disturbances such as large floods and extended droughts, which may convert certain riparian patches from sinks to sources for nitrogen and phosphorus. In the face of increasing anthropogenic pressure, the scientific challenges are to provide a basic

  19. Modeling Natural Stream Nutrient Concentrations from Landscape Predictors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, J. R.; Hawkins, C. P.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding how much land use change has affected nutrient concentrations in aquatic ecosystems requires a way of estimating the nutrient concentrations that were present in these systems before they were altered. Pre-alteration data are generally not available, but models that associate natural landscape variation with stream nutrient concentrations can be used to predict natural nutrient concentrations. These models can also provide insight into which processes are primarily responsible for observed natural spatial and temporal variability in stream nutrient concentrations. We used data from 782 reference sites across the western USA to develop empirical models that predict natural, base-flow concentrations of total phosphorus (TP) and total nitrogen (TN). Models were built using Random Forests, a nonparametric regression technique that accounts for both interactions between variables and non-linear relationships. We developed candidate predictor variables associated with nutrient sources, sinks, or other processes potentially affecting nutrient concentrations among sites. Factors associated with watershed geology and P availability were the most important predictors of TP. Climate and co-precipitates were less important predictors. TN concentrations were equally associated with climate, atmospheric deposition, and vegetation phenology. Both models were relatively accurate (Root Mean Squared Errors < 12% of the range of observations for independent validation sites) and made better predictions than previous models of natural nutrient concentrations. However, the models were not very precise (r2 = 0.46 for the TP model, and r2 = 0.23 for the TN model). An analysis of the sources of variation showed that our models accounted for a majority of the spatial variation in nutrient concentrations, and much of the imprecision was due to temporal or measurement variation in nutrient concentrations.

  20. Farmers' use of nutrient management: lessons from watershed case studies.

    PubMed

    Osmond, Deanna L; Hoag, Dana L K; Luloff, Al E; Meals, Donald W; Neas, Kathy

    2015-03-01

    Nutrient enrichment of water resources has degraded coastal waters throughout the world, including in the United States (e.g., Chesapeake Bay, Gulf of Mexico, and Neuse Estuary). Agricultural nonpoint sources have significant impacts on water resources. As a result, nutrient management planning is the primary tool recommended to reduce nutrient losses from agricultural fields. Its effectiveness requires nutrient management plans be used by farmers. There is little literature describing nutrient management decision-making. Here, two case studies are described that address this gap: (i) a synthesis of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, the Conservation Effects Assessment Project, and (ii) field surveys from three nutrient-impaired river basins/watersheds in North Carolina (Neuse, Tar-Pamlico, and Jordan Lake drainage areas). Results indicate farmers generally did not fully apply nutrient management plans or follow basic soil test recommendations even when they had them. Farmers were found to be hesitant to apply N at university-recommended rates because they did not trust the recommendations, viewed abundant N as insurance, or used recommendations made by fertilizer dealers. Exceptions were noted when watershed education, technical support, and funding resources focused on nutrient management that included easing management demands, actively and consistently working directly with a small group of farmers, and providing significant resource allocations to fund agency personnel and cost-share funds to farmers. Without better dialogue with farmers and meaningful investment in strategies that reward farmers for taking what they perceive as risks relative to nutrient reduction, little progress in true adoption of nutrient management will be made. PMID:26023957

  1. Effect of soil in nutrient cycle assessment at dairy farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, Maricke; de Boer, Imke; van Dam, Jos; van Middelaar, Corina; Stoof, Cathelijne

    2016-04-01

    Annual farm nutrient cycle assessments give valuable insight in the nutrient cycles and nutrient losses at dairy farms. It describes nutrient use efficiencies for the entire farm and for the underlying components cattle, manure, crops and soil. In many modelling studies, soil is kept as a constant factor, while soil quality is vital for soil functioning of the ecosystem. Improving soil quality will improve the nutrient cycle, and will also have positive effect on the soil functions crop production, water cycling and greenhouse gas mitigation. Spatial variation of soil properties within a farm, however, are not included in annual nutrient cycle assessments. Therefore it is impossible to identify fields where most profit can be gained by improving farm management at field level, and it is not possible to identify and to quantify nutrient flow path ways. The aim of this study is to develop a framework to improve the annual nutrient cycle assessment at Dutch dairy farms, by including soil properties and their spatial variation within farms. Soil type and soil quality will be described by visual soil assessment of soil quality characteristics. The visual observations will be linked to the nutrient cycle assessment, using soil-hydrological model SWAP. We will demonstrate how soil quality at field level can impact on crop production, eutrophication potential and greenhouse gas potential at farm level. Also, we will show how this framework can be used by farmers to improve their farm management. This new approach is focusing on annual nutrient cycle assessment, but could also be used in life cycle assessment. It will improve understanding of soil functioning and dairy farm management.

  2. The influence of the forest canopy on nutrient cycling.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Cindy E

    2002-11-01

    Rates of key soil processes involved in recycling of nutrients in forests are governed by temperature and moisture conditions and by the chemical and physical nature of the litter. The forest canopy influences all of these factors and thus has a large influence on nutrient cycling. The increased availability of nutrients in soil in clearcuts illustrates how the canopy retains nutrients (especially N) on site, both by storing nutrients in foliage and through the steady input of available C in litter. The idea that faster decomposition is responsible for the flush of nitrate in clearcuts has not been supported by experimental evidence. Soil N availability increases in canopy gaps as small as 0.1 ha, so natural disturbances or partial harvesting practices that increase the complexity of the canopy by creating gaps will similarly increase the spatial variability in soil N cycling and availability within the forest. Canopy characteristics affect the amount and composition of leaf litter produced, which largely determines the amount of nutrients to be recycled and the resulting nutrient availability. Although effects of tree species on soil nutrient availability were thought to be brought about largely through differences in the decomposition rate of their foliar litter, recent studies indicate that the effect of tree species can be better predicted from the mass and nutrient content of litter produced, hence total nutrient return, than from litter decay rate. The greater canopy complexity in mixed species forests creates similar heterogeneity in nutritional characteristics of the forest floor. Site differences in slope position, parent material and soil texture lead to variation in species composition and productivity of forests, and thus in the nature and amount of litter produced. Through this positive feedback, the canopy accentuates inherent differences in site fertility. PMID:12414379

  3. The nutrient density approach to healthy eating: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Nicklas, Theresa A; Drewnowski, Adam; O'Neil, Carol E

    2014-12-01

    The term 'nutrient density' for foods/beverages has been used loosely to promote the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans defined 'all vegetables, fruits, whole grains, fat-free or low-fat milk and milk products, seafood, lean meats and poultry, eggs, beans and peas (legumes), and nuts and seeds that are prepared without added solid fats, added sugars, and sodium' as nutrient dense. The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans further states that nutrient-dense foods and beverages provide vitamins, minerals and other substances that may have positive health effects with relatively few (kilo)calories or kilojoules. Finally, the definition states nutrients and other beneficial substances have not been 'diluted' by the addition of energy from added solid fats, added sugars or by the solid fats naturally present in the food. However, the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee and other scientists have failed to clearly define 'nutrient density' or to provide criteria or indices that specify cut-offs for foods that are nutrient dense. Today, 'nutrient density' is a ubiquitous term used in the scientific literature, policy documents, marketing strategies and consumer messaging. However, the term remains ambiguous without a definitive or universal definition. Classifying or ranking foods according to their nutritional content is known as nutrient profiling. The goal of the present commentary is to address the research gaps that still exist before there can be a consensus on how best to define nutrient density, highlight the situation in the USA and relate this to wider, international efforts in nutrient profiling. PMID:25166614

  4. Evaluation of nutrient variability in highly consumed "fast foods" under the National Food and Nutrient Analysis Program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    USDA's National Food and Nutrient Analysis Program generates means and standard errors (S.E.) of nutrients in foods from nationally representative sample sets used in dietary assessment and consumer education. However, genetic makeup, growing/shipping/storage conditions, preparation techniques, and ...

  5. Comparison of Nutrient Content and Cost of Home-Packed Lunches to Reimbursable School Lunch Nutrient Standards and Prices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Cara M.; Bednar, Carolyn; Kwon, Junehee; Gustof, Alissa

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare nutrient content and cost of home-packed lunches to nutrient standards and prices for reimbursable school lunches. Methods: Researchers observed food and beverage contents of 333 home packed lunches at four north Texas elementary schools. Nutritionist Pro was used to analyze lunches for calories,…

  6. Reference Materials for Determination of the Nutrient Composition of Foods: Results from USDA's National Food and Nutrient Analysis Program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Certified reference materials (CRMs) play a critical role in validating the accuracy of nutrient data for food samples. A number of available food CRMs of differing matrix composition have assigned concentrations for various nutrients, along with associated uncertainty intervals (UIs) for those valu...

  7. Nutrient cycling in a tropical seasonal rain forest of Xishuangbanna, Southwest China. Part 1: tree species: nutrient distribution and uptake.

    PubMed

    Shanmughavel, P; Sha, L; Zheng, Z; Cao, M

    2001-12-01

    Tropical rain forests are characterized by large numbers of the species with diverse growth habits. The objective of the present study was to determine the distribution of nutrient content in the major trees of the tropical rain forests in Xishuangbanna. This will improve the understanding of the nutrient losses from such sites that result from harvesting and flow of nutrients within the ecosystem and lead to the development of effective and rational forest management strategies. Based on the results in this study, the distribution of nutrients among biomass components of trees varied: The ordering of major elements concentrations was K > N > Mg > Ca > P in branch, stem and root tissues but was N > K > Mg > Ca > P in leaves. The maximum amount of all nutrients per ha occurred in the stems followed by branches, roots and leaves. Of the total uptake of 6167.7 kg ha(-1) of all nutrients, the contribution of various nutrients was found to be N (2010.6 t ha(-1)), P (196.3 t ha(-1)), K (2123.8 kg ha(-1)), Ca (832 kg ha(-1)) and Mg (1005 kg ha(-1)). However, comparing the nutrient uptake of other tropical and sub tropical forests, the results indicated that rates for the Xishuangbanna forests were 20-35% lower than previously reported values. PMID:11601539

  8. Nutrient resorption helps drive intra-specific coupling of foliar nitrogen and phosphorus under nutrient-enriched conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xiao-Tao, Lü; Reed, Sasha C.; Yu, Qiang; Han, Xing-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Taken together, the results suggest plants in this ecosystem are much more responsive to changing N cycles than P cycles and emphasize the significance of nutrient resorption as an important plant control over the stoichiometric coupling of N and P under nutrient enriched conditions.

  9. Strategies for optimization of mineral nutrient transport in plants: multilevel regulation of nutrient-dependent dynamics of root architecture and transporter activity.

    PubMed

    Aibara, Izumi; Miwa, Kyoko

    2014-12-01

    How do sessile plants cope with irregularities in soil nutrient availability? The uptake of essential minerals from the soil influences plant growth and development. However, most environments do not provide sufficient nutrients; rather nutrient distribution in the soil can be uneven and change temporally according to environmental factors. To maintain mineral nutrient homeostasis in their tissues, plants have evolved sophisticated systems for coping with spatial and temporal variability in soil nutrient concentrations. Among these are mechanisms for modulating root system architecture in response to nutrient availability. This review discusses recent advances in knowledge of the two important strategies for optimizing nutrient uptake and translocation in plants: root architecture modification and transporter expression control in response to nutrient availability. Recent studies have determined (i) nutrient-specific root patterns; (ii) their physiological consequences; and (iii) the molecular mechanisms underlying these modulation systems that operate to facilitate efficient nutrient acquisition. Another mechanism employed by plants in nutrient-heterogeneous soils involves modification of nutrient transport activities in a nutrient concentration-dependent manner. In recent years, considerable progress has been made in characterizing the diverse functions of transporters for specific nutrients; it is now clear that the expression and activities of nutrient transporters are finely regulated in multiple steps at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels for adaptation to a wide range of nutrient conditions. PMID:25378690

  10. Nutrient management effects on sweetpotato genotypes under controlled environment.

    PubMed

    David, P P; Bonsi, C K; Trotman, A A; Douglas, D Z

    1996-12-01

    Sweetpotato is one of several crops recommended by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for bioregenerative life support studies. One of the objectives of the Tuskegee University NASA Center is to optimize growth conditions for adaptability of sweetpotatoes for closed bioregenerative systems. The role of nutrient solution management as it impacts yield has been one of the major thrusts in these studies. Nutrient solution management protocol currently used consists of a modified half Hoagland solution that is changed at 14-day intervals. Reservoirs are refilled with deionized water if the volume of the nutrient solution was reduced to 8 liters or less before the time of solution change. There is the need to recycle and replenish nutrient solution during crop growth, rather than discard at 14 day intervals as previously done, in order to reduce waste. Experiments were conducted in an environmental growth room to examine the effects of container size on the growth of several sweetpotato genotypes grown under a nutrient replenishment protocol. Plants were grown from vine cuttings of 15cm length and were planted in 0.15 x 0.15 x 1.2m growth channels using a closed nutrient film technique system. Nutrient was supplied in a modified half strength Hoagland's solution with a 1:2.4 N:K ratio. Nutrient replenishment protocol consisted of daily water replenishment to a constant volume of 30.4 liters in the small containers and 273.6 liters in the large container. Nutrients were replenished as needed when the EC of the nutrient solution fell below 1200 mhos/cm. The experimental design used was a split-plot with the main plot being container size and genotypes as the subplot. Nine sweetpotato genotypes were evaluated. Results showed no effect of nutrient solution container size on storage root yield, foliage fresh and dry mass, leaf area or vine length. However, plants grown using the large nutrient solution container accumulated more storage root dry mass than

  11. ALGAL RESPONSE TO NUTRIENT ENRICHMENT IN FORESTED OLIGOTROPHIC STREAM(1).

    PubMed

    Veraart, Annelies J; Romaní, Anna M; Tornés, Elisabet; Sabater, Sergi

    2008-06-01

    Nutrient input in streams alters the density and species composition of attached algal communities in open systems. However, in forested streams, the light reaching the streambed (rather than the local nutrient levels) may limit the growth of these communities. A nutrient-enrichment experiment in a forested oligotrophic stream was performed to test the hypothesis that nutrient addition has only minor effects on the community composition of attached algae and cyanobacteria under light limitation. Moderate nutrient addition consisted of increasing basal phosphorus (P) concentrations 3-fold and basal nitrogen (N) concentrations 2-fold. Two upstream control reaches were compared to a downstream reach before and after nutrient addition. Nutrients were added continuously to the downstream reach for 1 year. Algal biofilms growing on ceramic tiles were sampled and identified for more than a year before nutrient addition to 12 months after. Diatoms were the most abundant taxonomic group in the three stream reaches. Nutrient enrichment caused significant variations in the composition of the diatom community. While some taxa showed significant decreases (e.g., Achnanthes minutissima, Gomphonema angustum), increases for other taxa (such as Rhoicosphenia abbreviata and Amphora ovalis) were detected in the enriched reach (for taxonomic authors, see Table 2). Epiphytic and adnate taxa of large size were enhanced, particularly during periods of favorable growth conditions (spring). Nutrients also caused a change in the algal chl a, which increased from 0.5-5.8 to 2.1-10.7 μg chl · cm(-2) . Our results indicate that in oligotrophic forested streams, long-term nutrient addition has significant effects on the algal biomass and community composition, which are detectable despite the low light availability caused by the tree canopy. Low light availability moderates but does not detain the long-term tendency toward a nutrient-tolerant community. Furthermore, the effects

  12. Nutrient management effects on sweetpotato genotypes under controlled environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    David, P. P.; Bonsi, C. K.; Trotman, A. A.; Douglas, D. Z.

    1996-01-01

    Sweetpotato is one of several crops recommended by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for bioregenerative life support studies. One of the objectives of the Tuskegee University NASA Center is to optimize growth conditions for adaptability of sweetpotatoes for closed bioregenerative systems. The role of nutrient solution management as it impacts yield has been one of the major thrusts in these studies. Nutrient solution management protocol currently used consists of a modified half Hoagland solution that is changed at 14-day intervals. Reservoirs are refilled with deionized water if the volume of the nutrient solution was reduced to 8 liters or less before the time of solution change. There is the need to recycle and replenish nutrient solution during crop growth, rather than discard at 14 day intervals as previously done, in order to reduce waste. Experiments were conducted in an environmental growth room to examine the effects of container size on the growth of several sweetpotato genotypes grown under a nutrient replenishment protocol. Plants were grown from vine cuttings of 15cm length and were planted in 0.15 x 0.15 x 1.2m growth channels using a closed nutrient film technique system. Nutrient was supplied in a modified half strength Hoagland's solution with a 1:2.4 N:K ratio. Nutrient replenishment protocol consisted of daily water replenishment to a constant volume of 30.4 liters in the small containers and 273.6 liters in the large container. Nutrients were replenished as needed when the EC of the nutrient solution fell below 1200 mhos/cm. The experimental design used was a split-plot with the main plot being container size and genotypes as the subplot. Nine sweetpotato genotypes were evaluated. Results showed no effect of nutrient solution container size on storage root yield, foliage fresh and dry mass, leaf area or vine length. However, plants grown using the large nutrient solution container accumulated more storage root dry mass than

  13. Metabolic adjustments to moderate maternal nutrient restriction.

    PubMed

    Schlabritz-Loutsevitch, Natalia E; Dudley, Christopher J; Gomez, Jeremiah J; Nevill, C Heath; Smith, Bonnie K; Jenkins, Susan L; McDonald, Thomas J; Bartlett, Thad Q; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Nijland, Mark J

    2007-08-01

    Reduced food availability in pregnancy influences fetal growth, obstetric outcomes and offspring health in both developing and developed countries. The objective of the present study was to determine responses to moderate global maternal nutrient restriction (MNR) during pregnancy in baboons (Papio hamadryas) - an established non-human primate model for pregnancy-related research. Starting at 30 d gestation (dG), twelve pregnant baboons received 70 % of food (MNR group) consumed by twenty ad libitum-fed pregnant controls. Maternal body weight, BMI, food intake and physical activity were measured before pregnancy, at 90 dG and at 165 dG (full-term 180 dG). Fetal and placental weights were recorded at the time of Caesarean section (90 and 165 dG). Activity patterns were also evaluated in fourteen non-pregnant female baboons. Behavioural observations were made in five non-pregnant, six control and four MNR animals. Pregnant baboons decreased overall physical activity and energy-expensive behaviours compared with non-pregnant baboons. In the MNR group, maternal weight, weight gain and maternal physical activity were reduced compared with the control animals. MNR decreased placental weight and volume compared with control, while fetal weight and length were unaffected. We conclude that decreased physical activity and increased usage of maternal available body stores play an important role in the maternal response to pregnancy. Also, adaptations in maternal behaviour and energy utilisation protect fetal growth during moderate MNR. PMID:17391566

  14. [Prevention of Alzheimer's Disease and Nutrients].

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Mieko

    2016-07-01

    The dietary recommendations for the prevention and management of Alzheimer's disease (AD), are the Mediterranean diet and the Japanese-style diet, both of which contain well-balanced nutrients from fish and vegetables. These diets are rich in vitamin E, carotenes, antioxidant flavonoids, vitamin B12, folate, and n-3PUFA. According to recent review supplementation of folate and vitamin E may protect against elderly people's cognitive decline when the serum folate is <12 nmol/L or the vitamin E intake is <6.1 mg/day. Another nutritional topic with regard to dementia and diet is the association of type-2 diabetes and hyperinsulinemia with AD. Expression array data of the brain tissue of AD patients in the Hisayama study strongly suggests a disturbance in insulin signaling in the AD brain. The dysfunction of insulin signaling could directly lead to disrupted glucose utilization in the AD brain. Instead of improperly utilized glucose, the medium chain triglyceride ketone bodies can be an alternative energy resource for the AD brain. In conclusion, the dietary recommendations for the prevention and management of AD are a high consumption of fish, vegetables, and low glycemic index fruits; a moderate amount of meat and dairy products; and a lower amount of carbohydrates and refined sugar. PMID:27395465

  15. Nutrient dyshomeostasis in congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kamalov, German; Holewinski, Joshua P; Bhattacharya, Syamal K; Ahokas, Robert A; Sun, Yao; Gerling, Ivan C; Weber, Karl T

    2009-07-01

    The clinical syndrome congestive heart failure (CHF) has its origins rooted in a salt-avid state mediated largely by effector hormones of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. In recent years, this cardiorenal perspective of CHF has taken on a broader perspective. One which focuses on a progressive systemic illness, whose major features include the presence of oxidative stress in diverse tissues and elevated circulating levels of proinflammatory cytokines coupled with a wasting of soft tissues and bone. Experimental studies, which simulate chronic renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system activation, and translational studies in patients with salt avidity having decompensated biventricular failure with hepatic and splanchnic congestion have forged a broader understanding of this illness and the important contribution of a dyshomeostasis of Ca2+, Mg2+, Zn2+, Se2+, and vitamins D, B12, and B1. Herein, we review biomarkers indicative of the nutrient imbalance found in CHF and raise the question of a need for a polynutrient supplement in the overall management of CHF. PMID:19593100

  16. Nutrient support of the healing wound.

    PubMed

    Meyer, N A; Muller, M J; Herndon, D N

    1994-05-01

    Wound healing is a series of complex physicochemical interactions that require various micronutrients at every step. In the critically ill or severely injured patient, wound healing is impaired by the protein-catabolic, hypermetabolic response to stress. The hypothalamus responds to cytokine stimulation by increasing the thermoregulatory set-point and by augmenting elaboration of stress hormones (catecholamines, cortisol, and glucagon). In turn, the stress hormones induce thermogenic futile substrate cycling, lipolysis, and proteolysis. Increased glucose production results at the expense of skeletal muscle degradation, producing amino acid substrate for hepatic gluconeogenesis. Nutritional support of the hypermetabolic state is an essential part of ensuring efficient wound healing in these patients. Protein catabolism cannot be reversed by increased amino acid availability alone, due partly to a defect in amino acid transport. This defect can be reversed by anabolic agents, such as growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1. Growth hormone treatment dramatically improves wound healing in severely burned children. Supplementation with protein and vitamins, specifically arginine and vitamins A, B, and C, provides optimum nutrient support of the healing wound. PMID:7922445

  17. Closing Domestic Nutrient Cycles Using Microalgae.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos Fernandes, Tânia; Shrestha, Rabin; Sui, Yixing; Papini, Gustavo; Zeeman, Grietje; Vet, Louise E M; Wijffels, Rene H; Lamers, Packo

    2015-10-20

    This study demonstrates that microalgae can effectively recover all P and N from anaerobically treated black water (toilet wastewater). Thus, enabling the removal of nutrients from the black water and the generation of a valuable algae product in one step. Screening experiments with green microalgae and cyanobacteria showed that all tested green microalgae species successfully grew on anaerobically treated black water. In a subsequent controlled experiment in flat-panel photobioreactors, Chlorella sorokiniana was able to remove 100% of the phosphorus and nitrogen from the medium. Phosphorus was depleted within 4 days while nitrogen took 12 days to reach depletion. The phosphorus and nitrogen removal rates during the initial linear growth phase were 17 and 122 mg·L(-1)·d(-1), respectively. After this initial phase, the phosphorus was depleted. The nitrogen removal rate continued to decrease in the second phase, resulting in an overall removal rate of 80 mg·L(-1)·d(-1). The biomass concentration at the end of the experiment was 11.5 g·L(-1), with a P content of approximately 1% and a N content of 7.6%. This high algal biomass concentration, together with a relatively short P recovery time, is a promising finding for future post-treatment of black water while gaining valuable algal biomass for further application. PMID:26389714

  18. Turbulence effects on the ratio of particulate carbon production to nutrient assimilation across nutrient gradients: An experimental approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, M.; Alcaraz, M.; Egge, J.; Jacobsen, A.; Marrasé, C.; Peters, F.; Roldán, C.; Thingstad, T. F.

    2003-04-01

    The uptake of inorganic carbon by the marine biota has been extensively studied in the context of the biological carbon pump. Carbon incorporation into biomass has been related to the availability of light and essential nutrients, such as dissolved inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus. Usually, it has been considered that nutrients are assimilated concurrently to inorganic carbon at constant Redfield proportions. Nevertheless, recent measurements have shown that, in some oceanic regions, the amount of inorganic carbon removed from the water significantly exceeded the amount expected from the removal of dissolved inorganic nutrients. This finding suggested that carbon incorporated into biomass per unit of consumed nitrogen or phosphorus might vary with time and across systems. The possible generalisation of this variability should have important consequences on the exportation of carbon and the role of the microbial plankton community on global carbon fluxes. Nutrient availability and light conditions have been invoked as the main factors influencing the ratio of particulate carbon production to nutrient assimilation. Despite the recognition of turbulence as a key factor influencing microbial dynamics, there is a lack of studies specifically relating the effect of turbulence on that ratio. Turbulence has been recently shown to increase the living carbon produced per phosphate consumed in microcosm experiments done with Mediterranean nutrient-starved plankton communities. According to this, we hypothesise that this effect may be found in other plankton communities and vary across gradients of nutrient concentration. We enclosed natural plankton communities from both Norwegian and Mediterranean coastal waters and subjected them to varying turbulence conditions and nutrient loads to monitor particulate and dissolved carbon and nutrient dynamics. We found that the effect of turbulence increased as nutrient concentration decreased. The magnitude of the response differed

  19. SUSPENDED AND BENTHIC SEDIMENT RELATIONSHIPS IN THE YAQUINA ESTUARY, OREGON: NUTRIENT PROCESSING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements of nutrient loading and subsequent nutrient processing are fundamental for determining biogeochemical processes in rivers and estuaries. In Oregon coastal watersheds, nutrient transport is strongly seasonal with up to 94% of the riverine dissolved nitrate and silic...

  20. A Comparison of the Role of Episode Nutrient Supply on Pathways of Carbon in Upwelling Regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, M. E.

    1997-01-01

    Nutrient supply is episode in the ocean even in regions of fairly high and continuous nutrient supply, such as coastal upwelling regimes. The structure of the ecosystem depends on nutrient availability and the different requirements of phytoplankton cells.

  1. Coping with uncertainty: Nutrient deficiencies motivate insect migration at a cost to immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Migration is often associated with movement away from areas with depleted nutrients or other resources, and yet migration itself is energetically demanding. Migrating Mormon crickets Anabrus simplex (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) lack nutrients, and supplementation of deficient nutrients slows migrator...

  2. Agricultural water consumption decreasing nutrient burden at Bohai Sea, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yindong; Wang, Xuejun; Zhen, Gengchong; Li, Ying; Zhang, Wei; He, Wei

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we discussed the impacts of human water consumption to the nutrient burden in a river estuary, and used Huanghe River as a case study. The agricultural water consumption from the Huanghe River has significantly decreased the natural water flows, and the amount of water consumption could be almost twice as high as the water entering into the estuary. According to our calculation, agricultural water usage decreased TN outflows by 6.5 × 104 Mg/year and TP outflows by 2.0 × 103 Mg/year. These account for 74% and 77% of the total output loads. It has been widely reported that the majority of the rivers in northern China were severely polluted by nutrients. Its implication on the budget of nutrient in the estuary ecosystem is not well characterized. Our study showed that the discharge of nutrients in the coast waters from polluted rivers was over concerned. Nutrients in the polluted rivers were transported back to the terrestrial systems when water was drawn for human water consumption. The magnitudes of changes in riverine nutrient discharges even exceed the water-sediment regulation trails in the Huanghe River. It has non-negligible impact on estimating the nutrient burden in costal water ecosystem.

  3. The Mauna Loa environmental matrix: foliar and soil nutrients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vitousek, P.M.; Aplet, G.; Turner, D.; Lockwood, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    The accumulation of total carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus in soils, available soil nutrients, and foliar nutrients in the native dominant Metrosideros polymorpha were determined across a wide elevational range on 9 lava flows on Mauna Loa, Hawai'i. The flows included a young (2800 y) a??a?? (rough surface texture) and pa??hoehoe (smooth) flow on the wet east and dry northwest side of the mountain. Soil element pools and nutrient availability increased with flow age independent of climate. The dry sites accumulated organic matter and nutrients more slowly than comparable wet sites, but relative nutrient availability to plants (as indicated by soil assays and foliar nutrients) was greater in the dry sites. Accumulation of soil organic matter and nutrients occurred most rapidly in lowerelevation sites on the young flows, but the largest accumulations occurred at higher elevations on old flows. The range of sites sampled represents a complete and largely independent matrix of major factors governing ecosystem structure and function. ?? 1992 Springer-Verlag.

  4. Nutrient enrichment affects the mechanical resistance of aquatic plants.

    PubMed

    Lamberti-Raverot, Barbara; Puijalon, Sara

    2012-10-01

    For many plant species, nutrient availability induces important anatomical responses, particularly the production of low-density tissues to the detriment of supporting tissues. Due to the contrasting biomechanical properties of plant tissues, these anatomical responses may induce important modifications in the biomechanical properties of plant organs. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of nutrient enrichment on the anatomical traits of two freshwater plant species and its consequences on plant biomechanical performance. Two plant species were grown under controlled conditions in low versus high nutrient levels. The anatomical and biomechanical traits of the plant stems were measured. Both species produced tissues with lower densities under nutrient-rich conditions, accompanied by modifications in the structure of the aerenchyma for one species. As expected, nutrient enrichment also led to important modifications in the biomechanical properties of the stem for both species. In particular, mechanical resistance (breaking force and strength) and stiffness of stems were significantly reduced under nutrient rich conditions. The production of weaker stem tissues as a result of nutrient enrichment may increase the risk of plants to mechanical failure, thus challenging plant maintenance in mechanically stressful or disturbed habitats. PMID:23028018

  5. Pulsed nutrient delivery for control of pore plugging

    SciTech Connect

    Peyton, B.M.; Skeen, R.S.; Hooker, B.S.

    1994-12-31

    Nutrient cycling has been shown to enhance the degradation rate of carbon tetrachloride in anaerobic batch cultures. In addition, nutrient pulsing has been suggested as a method for controlling near-bore biofouling in application of in-situ bioremediation. To determine the effects of nutrient pulsing on biomass accumulation, soil columns were fed with nitrate and acetate to develop a denitrifying biofilm within a porous sand matrix to compare two nutrient delivery strategies. The strategies that were compared were continuous nutrient feeding and pulsed nutrient feeding. Acetate, as the sole carbon and energy source, was fed to the columns continuously at 83 mg/L or pulsed at 2,222 mg/L for 30 minutes every 12 hours. This resulted in the same time-averaged substrate loading to the soil columns. Final biomass profiles indicate a much more uniform biomass accumulation profile using a pulsed nutrient strategy. Also, notable differences in the effluent suspended cell concentrations were measured. These data were used to help calibrate a detailed model for bacterial transport in porous media, which will be used to aid in the design and implementation of in-situ bioremediation at the Hanford site.

  6. Nutrient density in complementary feeding of infants and toddlers.

    PubMed

    Solomons, N W; Vossenaar, M

    2013-05-01

    The paradigm of the first 1000 days of life, the period from conception to the second birthday, has been advanced as a critical window of opportunity to save a life and a child's future. Infancy and toddler life, through the first 24 months after birth, is a unique period during which human milk is recommended as either the exclusive source of nutrition (6 months) or a variable component thereof. After the maternal delivery of milk is accounted for, the remainder of the energy and nutrients needs come from complementary foods. There is an intrinsic gap left by the maternal milk supply in volume and micronutrient content in relation to expanding infant and toddler needs. The nutrient density approach provides us with a mathematical framework to manage the closing of the nutrient gap. The intrinsic nutrient content of the unprocessed foods appropriate for young children is limited. The most problematic nutrients are calcium, iron and zinc. Some manner to enhance the nutrient density of the complementary foods is an incontestable necessity. The nutrient density consideration, which identifies for us the nature of the problem, offers a tool for the titrating of the fortification to an adequate--but safe--addition. PMID:23443831

  7. Water and nutrient acquisition by roots and canopies

    SciTech Connect

    Oren, R.; Sheriff, D.W.

    1995-07-01

    Water and nutrient supply rates, as well as internal (plant) and external (soil) deficits, can have major effects on physiological activity and growth. Effects of water or nutrient deficits on growth can be demonstrated separately, but they often interact, as shown for several Pinus species, and by Turner (1982) for Pinus radiata. Moist soil and wet canopy surfaces facilitate nutrient uptake through roots and foliage, respectively. Water uptake is affected by the number and distribution of roots in relation to the distribution of soil moisture, and by the wetness and hydraulic permeability of foliage. Nutrient uptake is similarly affected by tissue characteristics and nutrient concentration, but also depends on the moisture regime in the bulk soil and in the vicinity of absorbing surfaces. In this chapter, we discuss generalities based on results from observational studies of unmanipulated plants and of stands. We also consider information from experimental manipulation of nutrient and water availability. A more thorough treatment of the effects of mycorrhizae and anthropogenic pollution on water and nutrient acquisition is given, respectively.

  8. Stoichiometric patterns in foliar nutrient resorption across multiple scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, Sasha C.; Townsend, Alan R.; Davidson, Eric A.; Cleveland, Cory C.

    2012-01-01

    *Nutrient resorption is a fundamental process through which plants withdraw nutrients from leaves before abscission. Nutrient resorption patterns have the potential to reflect gradients in plant nutrient limitation and to affect a suite of terrestrial ecosystem functions. *Here, we used a stoichiometric approach to assess patterns in foliar resorption at a variety of scales, specifically exploring how N : P resorption ratios relate to presumed variation in N and/or P limitation and possible relationships between N : P resorption ratios and soil nutrient availability. *N : P resorption ratios varied significantly at the global scale, increasing with latitude and decreasing with mean annual temperature and precipitation. In general, tropical sites (absolute latitudes < 23°26′) had N : P resorption ratios of < 1, and plants growing on highly weathered tropical soils maintained the lowest N : P resorption ratios. Resorption ratios also varied with forest age along an Amazonian forest regeneration chronosequence and among species in a diverse Costa Rican rain forest. *These results suggest that variations in N : P resorption stoichiometry offer insight into nutrient cycling and limitation at a variety of spatial scales, complementing other metrics of plant nutrient biogeochemistry. The extent to which the stoichiometric flexibility of resorption will help regulate terrestrial responses to global change merits further investigation.

  9. Where do the Nutrients go in Tropical Estuaries?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, R., VI

    2015-12-01

    Anthropogenic inputs of nutrients to the estuaries have rapidly increased during last couple of decades, resulting in deterioration of coastal water quality at regional scales. It is imperative to assess and quantify the ability of coastal systems to utilize, transport, and transform the 'excess' dissolved nutrients that enter the coast via land based activities. A LOICZ biogeochemical mass budget model was applied to the largest Indian estuary - the Ganges (Hooghly). Model studies indicate that despite high nutrient concentrations, the estuary remained net heterotrophic throughout the year. However if suspended particulate matter (SPM) was considered while estimating net metabolism, the system was net autotrophic. This model clearly highlights the influence of adsorption and desorption of nutrient and buffering action of SPM on nutrient dynamics under varying environmental conditions. Case studies from estuaries (e.g. Godavari and Tapi) and lagoon systems(Chilika and Vembanad) of India with differing levels of discharge and pollution were studied to determine the role of SPM on the trophic shift of these systems. Biogeochemical mass budget for all the systems suggested that in spite of high nutrient availability, high load of SPM (>100 mg L-1) controlled the trophic state and nutrient dynamics of a system. Indian estuaries and lagoons are predominantly heterotrophic, due to increasing anthrpogenic pressures from land based nutrient loading. The lagoon systems such as Chilika and Vembanad were predominantly heterotrophic and are a major source of phosphorus to the coastal waters. Overall, the source/sink characteristics of a system with respect to the adjacent coastal ocean were dependent on the in-situ biogeochemical processes (release, uptake and burial) and the residence time. The results further suggest that Hooghly estuary acts as a conduit of land-derived nutrients to the coastal ocean.

  10. Influence of nutrient level on methylmercury content in water spinach.

    PubMed

    Greger, Maria; Dabrowska, Beata

    2010-08-01

    Widely consumed vegetables are often cultivated in sewage waters with high nutrient levels. They can contain high levels of methylmercury (MeHg), because they can form MeHg from inorganic Hg in their young shoots. We determined whether the MeHg uptake and the MeHg formation in the shoots of water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica) were affected by the presence of a high nutrient level in the growth medium. Water spinach shoots were rooted and pretreated in growth medium containing 7% (low) or 70% (high) Hoagland nutrient solution; thereafter, the plants were treated with either 0.02 microM MeHg or 0.2 microM HgCl2 for 3 d. Half the plants were then analyzed for total Hg and MeHg. The remaining plants were transferred to mercury-free medium with low or high nutrient levels and posttreated for 3 days before analysis of total Hg and MeHg in order to measure MeHg formation in the absence of external Hg. The results indicate that nutrient level did not influence MeHg uptake, but that a high nutrient level reduced the distribution of MeHg to the shoots 2.7-fold versus low nutrient level. After treatment with HgCl2, MeHg was found in roots and new shoots but not in old shoots. The MeHg:total-Hg ratio was higher in new shoots than in roots, being 13 times higher at high versus low nutrient levels. Thus, MeHg formation was the same in new shoots independent of inorganic Hg concentration, since the total Hg level decreased at a high nutrient level. PMID:20821626

  11. Global nutrient transport in a world of giants

    PubMed Central

    Doughty, Christopher E.; Roman, Joe; Faurby, Søren; Wolf, Adam; Haque, Alifa; Bakker, Elisabeth S.; Malhi, Yadvinder; Dunning, John B.; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2016-01-01

    The past was a world of giants, with abundant whales in the sea and large animals roaming the land. However, that world came to an end following massive late-Quaternary megafauna extinctions on land and widespread population reductions in great whale populations over the past few centuries. These losses are likely to have had important consequences for broad-scale nutrient cycling, because recent literature suggests that large animals disproportionately drive nutrient movement. We estimate that the capacity of animals to move nutrients away from concentration patches has decreased to about 8% of the preextinction value on land and about 5% of historic values in oceans. For phosphorus (P), a key nutrient, upward movement in the ocean by marine mammals is about 23% of its former capacity (previously about 340 million kg of P per year). Movements by seabirds and anadromous fish provide important transfer of nutrients from the sea to land, totalling ∼150 million kg of P per year globally in the past, a transfer that has declined to less than 4% of this value as a result of the decimation of seabird colonies and anadromous fish populations. We propose that in the past, marine mammals, seabirds, anadromous fish, and terrestrial animals likely formed an interlinked system recycling nutrients from the ocean depths to the continental interiors, with marine mammals moving nutrients from the deep sea to surface waters, seabirds and anadromous fish moving nutrients from the ocean to land, and large animals moving nutrients away from hotspots into the continental interior. PMID:26504209

  12. Nutrient sources and transport along urban flowpaths to aquatic ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlay, J. C.; Janke, B.; Baker, L. A.; Hobbie, S. E.; Nidzgorski, D.; Sterner, R.; Wilson, B. N.

    2012-12-01

    Water quality of urban freshwater ecosystems is widely impaired by eutrophication, with little recent improvement and much potential for further degradation due to urban expansion and intensification. Despite the degradation of water quality in urban streams and lakes and adjacent coastal areas, relatively little is known about the relative importance of specific nutrient sources and the processes that regulate their movement across highly modified land-water interfaces. To better understand the nutrient sources and cycling that affect aquatic ecosystems, we assess nutrient movement through urban drainage networks in St. Paul, Minnesota. Nutrient concentrations and flux in stormwater at six intensively monitored sites show consistent seasonal patterns, with peaks in total nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in the late spring. Trees contributed to nutrient movement via litterfall and throughfall to impervious surfaces, with peaks in inputs that corresponded to stormwater nutrient patterns. Despite runoff generated primarily from impervious surfaces, organic carbon and nitrogen concentrations were high, with organic N accounting for >80% of stormwater N loading. Together, these data suggested an important role for urban tree canopies in nutrient mobilization in stormwater. Base flow, present in larger storm drains and buried streams, results primarily from groundwater seepage and from outflow of surface water connected to drains. Base flow contributed significantly to nutrient export, particularly for N (33 to 68% of warm season export) but also for P (8 to 34%). Sites with upstream hydrologic connections to lakes and remnant above-ground stream reaches had higher baseflow organic carbon and P, and reduced N concentrations compared to sites dominated by groundwater. Together, these data show that the characteristics of urban vegetation and the nature of human alterations to hydrologic connections are dominant features influencing the form and amount of nutrient movement

  13. Natural selection for costly nutrient recycling in simulated microbial metacommunities.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Richard A; Williams, Hywel T P; Lenton, Timothy M

    2012-11-01

    Recycling of essential nutrients occurs at scales from microbial communities to global biogeochemical cycles, often in association with ecological interactions in which two or more species utilise each others' metabolic by-products. However, recycling loops may be unstable; sequences of reactions leading to net recycling may be parasitised by side-reactions causing nutrient loss, while some reactions in any closed recycling loop are likely to be costly to participants. Here we examine the stability of nutrient recycling loops in an individual-based ecosystem model based on microbial functional types that differ in their metabolism. A supplied nutrient is utilised by a "source" functional type, generating a secondary nutrient that is subsequently used by two other types-a "mutualist" that regenerates the initial nutrient at a growth rate cost, and a "parasite" that produces a refractory waste product but does not incur any additional cost. The three functional types are distributed across a metacommunity in which separate patches are linked by a stochastic diffusive migration process. Regions of high mutualist abundance feature high levels of nutrient recycling and increased local population density leading to greater export of individuals, allowing the source-mutualist recycling loop to spread across the system. Individual-level selection favouring parasites is balanced by patch-level selection for high productivity, indirectly favouring mutualists due to the synergistic productivity benefits of the recycling loop they support. This suggests that multi-level selection may promote nutrient cycling and thereby help to explain the apparent ubiquity and stability of nutrient recycling in nature. PMID:22842011

  14. Global nutrient transport in a world of giants.

    PubMed

    Doughty, Christopher E; Roman, Joe; Faurby, Søren; Wolf, Adam; Haque, Alifa; Bakker, Elisabeth S; Malhi, Yadvinder; Dunning, John B; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2016-01-26

    The past was a world of giants, with abundant whales in the sea and large animals roaming the land. However, that world came to an end following massive late-Quaternary megafauna extinctions on land and widespread population reductions in great whale populations over the past few centuries. These losses are likely to have had important consequences for broad-scale nutrient cycling, because recent literature suggests that large animals disproportionately drive nutrient movement. We estimate that the capacity of animals to move nutrients away from concentration patches has decreased to about 8% of the preextinction value on land and about 5% of historic values in oceans. For phosphorus (P), a key nutrient, upward movement in the ocean by marine mammals is about 23% of its former capacity (previously about 340 million kg of P per year). Movements by seabirds and anadromous fish provide important transfer of nutrients from the sea to land, totalling ∼150 million kg of P per year globally in the past, a transfer that has declined to less than 4% of this value as a result of the decimation of seabird colonies and anadromous fish populations. We propose that in the past, marine mammals, seabirds, anadromous fish, and terrestrial animals likely formed an interlinked system recycling nutrients from the ocean depths to the continental interiors, with marine mammals moving nutrients from the deep sea to surface waters, seabirds and anadromous fish moving nutrients from the ocean to land, and large animals moving nutrients away from hotspots into the continental interior. PMID:26504209

  15. Fish-derived nutrient hotspots shape coral reef benthic communities.

    PubMed

    Shantz, Andrew A; Ladd, Mark C; Schrack, Elizabeth; Burkepile, Deron E

    2015-12-01

    Animal-derived nutrients play an important role in structuring nutrient regimes within and between ecosystems. When animals undergo repetitive, aggregating behavior through time, they can create nutrient hotspots where rates of biogeochemical activity are higher than those found in the surrounding environment. In turn, these hotspots can influence ecosystem processes and community structure. We examined the potential for reef fishes from the family Haemulidae (grunts) to create nutrient hotspots and the potential impact of these hotspots on reef communities. To do so, we tracked the schooling locations of diurnally migrating grunts, which shelter at reef sites during the day but forage off reef each night, and measured the impact of these fish schools on benthic communities. We found that grunt schools showed a high degree of site fidelity, repeatedly returning to the same coral heads. These aggregations created nutrient hotspots around coral heads where nitrogen and phosphorus delivery was roughly 10 and 7 times the respective rates of delivery to structurally similar sites that lacked schools of these fishes. In turn, grazing rates of herbivorous fishes at grunt-derived hotspots were approximately 3 times those of sites where grunts were rare. These differences in nutrient delivery and grazing led to distinct benthic communities with higher cover of crustose coralline algae and less total algal abundance at grunt aggregation sites. Importantly, coral growth was roughly 1.5 times greater at grunt hotspots, likely due to the important nutrient subsidy. Our results suggest that schooling reef fish and their nutrient subsidies play an important role in mediating community structure on coral reefs and that overfishing may have important negative consequences on ecosystem functions. As such, management strategies must consider mesopredatory fishes in addition to current protection often offered to herbivores and top-tier predators. Furthermore, our results suggest that

  16. External nutrient sources, internal nutrient pools, and phytoplankton production in Chesapeake Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Magnien, R.E.; Summers, R.M. ); Sellner, K.G. )

    1992-12-01

    External nutrient loadings, internal nutrient pools, and phytoplankton production were examined for three major subsystems of the Chesapeake Bay Estuary-the upper Mainstem, the Patuxent Estuary, and the Potomac Estuary-during 1985-1989. The atomic nitrogen to phosphorus ratios (TN:TP) of total loads were 51, 29 and 35, respectively. Most of these loads entered at the head of the estuaries from riverine sources and major wastewater treatment plants. Seven-16% of the nitrogen load entered the head of each estuary as particulate matter in contrast to 48-69% for phosphorus. The difference seems to favor a greater loss of phosphorus than nitrogen through sedimentation and burial. A major storm event in the Potomac watershed greatly increased the particulate fraction of nitrogen and phosphorus and lowered the TN:TP in the river-borne loads and accounted for 11% of the nitrogen and 31% of the phosphorus delivered to the estuary by the Potomac River during the entire 60- month period examined here. Within the Mainstem estuary, salinity dilution plots revealed strong net sources of ammonium and phosphate in the oligohaline to upper mesohaline region. indicating considerable internal recycling of nutrients to surface waters. A net sink of nitrate was indicated during summer. Phytoplankton biomass in the mesohaline Mainstem reached a peak in spring and was relatively constant throughout the other seasons. In the Patuxent and Potomac, the TN:TP ratios of external loads are 2-4 times higher than those observed over the previous two decades. These changes are attributed to point-source phosphorus controls and the likelihood that nitrogen-rich nonpoint source inputs, including contributions from the atmosphere, have increased. These higher N:P ratios now suggest a greater overall potential for phosphorus-limitation rather than nitrogen-limitation of phytoplankton in the areas studied. 66 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. Porewater nutrient concentrations and benthic nutrient fluxes across the Pakistan margin OMZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woulds, Clare; Schwartz, Matthew C.; Brand, Tim; Cowie, Greg L.; Law, Gareth; Mowbray, Stephen R.

    2009-03-01

    Porewater concentrations and benthic fluxes of phosphate, silicate, ammonia, nitrate and nitrite were measured at five sites spanning the Pakistan margin oxygen minimum zone (OMZ), in order to characterise the biogeochemical processes occurring, and to assess whether oxygen concentration and a seasonal pulse of organic matter are controlling factors. Typical concentrations of 1-70 μM, 50-250 μM, 0-270 μM, <5 μM and 0-4 μM for PO 43-, H 4SiO 4, NH 4+, NO 3- and NO 2-, respectively were obtained. Evidence was found for the occurrence of intense denitrification, sorption of PO 43- onto iron and manganese oxyhydroxides and possibly fluoroapatite precipitation at depth (>30 cm) in the sediment. These processes are all redox-sensitive, and their intensities varied across the margin, suggesting that oxygen concentration exerts a strong influence over nutrient concentrations and cycling. Variation in nutrient concentrations and fluxes before and after the summer monsoon was limited to an oxygen-driven change to the PO 43- profile at one site, indicating that either nutrient profiles do not generally alter on seasonal timescales, or that any impact of the monsoon had subsided before the post-monsoon sampling period. Porewater profile modelling tended to underestimate the magnitude of fluxes, but was in general agreement with the directions of measured fluxes, and in situ and shipboard flux measurements also generally agreed. Phosphate and H 4SiO 4 concentrations and benthic fluxes on the Pakistan margin were similar to those reported at abyssal sites from around the world, while NH 4+ and NO 3- concentrations and fluxes were comparable to shallower, more productive and/or hypoxic marine settings.

  18. Hydroponic Crop Production using Recycled Nutrients from Inedible Crop Residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garland, Jay L.; Mackowiak, Cheryl L.; Sager, John C.

    1993-01-01

    The coupling of plant growth and waste recycling systems is an important step toward the development of bioregenerative life support systems. This research examined the effectiveness of two alternative methods for recycling nutrients from the inedible fraction (residue) of candidate crops in a bioregenerative system as follows: (1) extraction in water, or leaching, and (2) combustion at 550 C, with subsequent reconstitution of the ash in acid. The effectiveness of the different methods was evaluated by (1) comparing the percent recovery of nutrients, and (2) measuring short- and long-term plant growth in hydroponic solutions, based on recycled nutrients.

  19. The Vacuum-Operated Nutrient Delivery System: hydroponics for microgravity.

    PubMed

    Brown, C S; Cox, W M; Dreschel, T W; Chetirkin, P V

    1992-11-01

    A nutrient delivery system that may have applicability for growing plants in microgravity is described. The Vacuum-Operated Nutrient Delivery System (VONDS) draws nutrient solution across roots that are under a partial vacuum at approximately 91 kPa. Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Blue Lake 274) plants grown on the VONDS had consistently greater leaf area and higher root, stem, leaf, and pod dry weights than plants grown under nonvacuum control conditions. This study demonstrates the potential applicability of the VONDS for growing plants in microgravity for space biology experimentation and/or crop production. PMID:11537607

  20. Response of algal metrics to nutrients and physical factors and identification of nutrient thresholds in agricultural streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Black, R.W.; Moran, P.W.; Frankforter, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    Many streams within the United States are impaired due to nutrient enrichment, particularly in agricultural settings. The present study examines the response of benthic algal communities in agricultural and minimally disturbed sites from across the western United States to a suite of environmental factors, including nutrients, collected at multiple scales. The first objective was to identify the relative importance of nutrients, habitat and watershed features, and macroinvertebrate trophic structure to explain algal metrics derived from deposition and erosion habitats. The second objective was to determine if thresholds in total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) related to algal metrics could be identified and how these thresholds varied across metrics and habitats. Nutrient concentrations within the agricultural areas were elevated and greater than published threshold values. All algal metrics examined responded to nutrients as hypothesized. Although nutrients typically were the most important variables in explaining the variation in each of the algal metrics, environmental factors operating at multiple scales also were important. Calculated thresholds for TN or TP based on the algal metrics generated from samples collected from erosion and deposition habitats were not significantly different. Little variability in threshold values for each metric for TN and TP was observed. The consistency of the threshold values measured across multiple metrics and habitats suggest that the thresholds identified in this study are ecologically relevant. Additional work to characterize the relationship between algal metrics, physical and chemical features, and nuisance algal growth would be of benefit to the development of nutrient thresholds and criteria. ?? 2010 The Author(s).

  1. Response of algal metrics to nutrients and physical factors and identification of nutrient thresholds in agricultural streams.

    PubMed

    Black, Robert W; Moran, Patrick W; Frankforter, Jill D

    2011-04-01

    Many streams within the United States are impaired due to nutrient enrichment, particularly in agricultural settings. The present study examines the response of benthic algal communities in agricultural and minimally disturbed sites from across the western United States to a suite of environmental factors, including nutrients, collected at multiple scales. The first objective was to identify the relative importance of nutrients, habitat and watershed features, and macroinvertebrate trophic structure to explain algal metrics derived from deposition and erosion habitats. The second objective was to determine if thresholds in total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) related to algal metrics could be identified and how these thresholds varied across metrics and habitats. Nutrient concentrations within the agricultural areas were elevated and greater than published threshold values. All algal metrics examined responded to nutrients as hypothesized. Although nutrients typically were the most important variables in explaining the variation in each of the algal metrics, environmental factors operating at multiple scales also were important. Calculated thresholds for TN or TP based on the algal metrics generated from samples collected from erosion and deposition habitats were not significantly different. Little variability in threshold values for each metric for TN and TP was observed. The consistency of the threshold values measured across multiple metrics and habitats suggest that the thresholds identified in this study are ecologically relevant. Additional work to characterize the relationship between algal metrics, physical and chemical features, and nuisance algal growth would be of benefit to the development of nutrient thresholds and criteria. PMID:20577796

  2. Nutrients and Risk of Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jinfu; La Vecchia, Carlo; Negri, Eva; Mery, Les

    2010-01-01

    Dietary fats are thought to be important in the etiology of colon cancer. However, the evidence linking them is inconclusive. Studies on dietary protein, cholesterol and carbohydrate and the risk of colon cancer are also inconsistent. This study examined the association between dietary intake of protein, fats, cholesterol and carbohydrates, and the risk of colon cancer. Mailed questionnaires were completed by 1731 individuals with histologically confirmed cases of colon cancer and 3097 population controls between 1994 and 1997 in seven Canadian provinces. Measurements included socio-economic status, lifestyle habits and diet. A 69-item food frequency questionnaire was used to provide data on eating habits from two years before the study. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were computed using unconditional logistic regression. The nutrients were categorized by quartiles based on the distributions among the controls. Intake of polyunsaturated fat, trans-fat and cholesterol were significantly associated with the risk of colon cancer; the ORs for the highest quartiles were 1.36 (95% CI, 1.02–1.80), 1.37 (95% CI, 1.10–1.71) and 1.42 (95% CI, 1.10–1.84), respectively. The association was stronger with proximal colon cancer (PCC). An increased risk was also observed with increasing intake of sucrose for both proximal and distal colon cancers; the ORs for the highest quartiles were 1.67 (95% CI, 1.22–2.29) for PCC and 1.58 (95% CI, 1.18–2.10) for distal colon cancer (DCC). An elevated risk of PCC was also found with increased lactose intake. Our findings provide evidence that a diet low in fat and sucrose could reduce the risk of various colon cancers. PMID:24281033

  3. Enteral nutrient solutions. Limiting bacterial growth.

    PubMed

    Paauw, J D; Fagerman, K E; McCamish, M A; Dean, R E

    1984-06-01

    Bacterial contamination of enteral nutrient solutions ( ENS ) in FFcess of food product standards is known to occur in the hospital setting. The large amounts of bacteria often given with ENS have been shown to create a reservoir for nosocomial infections, and nonpathogenic bacteria have been implicated. Patient tolerance is dependent on immune status and the bacterial load delivered to the gut. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bacterial growth-sustaining properties of various ENS and to devise methods to limit bacterial growth. Five commercial products were prepared under sterile conditions. After inoculation with approximately 5 X 10(3) organisms/cm3 of Enterobacter cloacae, each solution was hung at room temperature for 24 hours with samples drawn at fixed intervals and plated for bacterial counts. Bacterial growth rates in Ensure, Travasorb , and Vital were markedly higher than those in Precision and Vivonex. Vivonex was noted to contain potassium sorbate (KS) used as a fungistatic agent. Recent studies have identified KS as a broad-spectrum bacteriostatic food preservative that is federally approved for this use. KS (0.03%) was added to Travasorb inoculated with 5 X 10(3) organisms/cm(3) of E. cloacae. The bacterial growth rate was reduced by 75 per cent, and the final count of 2-3 X 10(4) organisms/ml was within the federally regulated limit for milk. This study suggests that initial inoculum, growth rate, and hang time can be altered to provide a significant reduction in final bacterial counts in ENS . PMID:6428286

  4. Controlled environments alter nutrient content of soybeans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurgonski, L. J.; Smart, D. J.; Bugbee, B.; Nielsen, S. S.

    1997-01-01

    Information about compositional changes in plants grown in controlled environments is essential for developing a safe, nutritious diet for a Controlled Ecological Life-Support System (CELSS). Information now is available for some CELSS candidate crops, but detailed information has been lacking for soybeans. To determine the effect of environment on macronutrient and mineral composition of soybeans, plants were grown both in the field and in a controlled environment where the hydroponic nutrient solution, photosynthetic flux (PPF), and CO_2 level were manipulated to achieve rapid growth rates. Plants were harvested at seed maturity, separated into discrete parts, and oven dried prior to chemical analysis. Plant material was analyzed for proximate composition (moisture, protein, lipid, ash, and carbohydrate), total nitrogen (N), nonprotein N (NPN), nitrate, minerals, amino acid composition, and total dietary fiber. The effect of environment on composition varied by cultivar and plant part. Chamber-grown plants generally exhibited the following characteristics compared with field-grown plants: 1) increased total N and protein N for all plant parts, 2) increased nitrate in leaves and stems but not in seeds, 3) increased lipids in seeds, and 4) decreased Ca:P ratio for stems, pods, and leaves. These trends are consistent with data for other CELSS crops. Total N, protein N, and amino acid contents for 350 ppm CO_2 and 1000 ppm CO_2 were similar for seeds, but protein N and amino acid contents for leaves were higher at 350 ppm CO_2 than at 1000 ppm CO_2. Total dietary fiber content of soybean leaves was higher with 350 ppm CO_2 than with 1000 ppm CO_2. Such data will help in selecting of crop species, cultivars, and growing conditions to ensure safe, nutritious diets for CELSS.

  5. Changes in phytoplankton communities along nutrient gradients in Lake Taihu: evidence for nutrient reduction strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Ying; Bi, Yonghong; Hu, Zhengyu

    2015-03-01

    An annual investigation on phytoplankton communities was conducted to reveal the effects of nutrients on phytoplankton assemblages in Lake Taihu, East China. A total of 78 phytoplankton taxa were identified. Phytoplankton biomass was higher in the northern part of the lake than in the southern part. Cyanobacteria and Bacillariophyta alternated dominance in the northern area, where algal blooms often appear, and co-dominated in the southern area. In the northern part, the proportions of cyanobacteria and Bacillariophyta varied significantly in total biovolume, both along the phosphorus (P) gradient, and between total nitrogen levels (≤3 mg/L and >3 mg/L TN). The proportions of cyanobacteria and Bacillariophyta had no significant variations in total biovolume along P and N (nitrogen) gradients in the southern part. Correlation analysis and CCA results revealed that P was the key factor regulating phytoplankton community structure. Nitrogen was also important for the phytoplankton distribution pattern. It was concluded that nutrient structure was heterogeneous in space and shaped the distribution pattern of phytoplankton in the lake. Both exogenous P and internally sourced P release needs to be considered. N reduction should be considered simultaneously with P control to efficiently reduce eutrophication and algal blooms.

  6. ANALYSIS OF PARTICULATE BOUND NUTRIENTS IN URBAN STORMWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nutrients are important players in the degradation of waterbodies because they are often the elements that limit primary productivity and, hence, are the key factors controlling eutrophication. Eutrophication causes unsightly algal blooms leading to oxygen depletion, stress on o...

  7. Nutrient environment influences competition among Aspergillus flavus genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Structures of Aspergillus flavus populations, shaped by intraspecific competition, influence the incidences and severities of crop aflatoxin contamination. Competition for nutrients may be one factor modulating intraspecific interactions, but influences of specific types and concentrations of nutrie...

  8. The Effects of Nutrient Dynamics on Root Patch Choice

    PubMed Central

    Gersani, Mordechai; Ovadia, Ofer; Novoplansky, Ariel

    2010-01-01

    Plants have been recognized to be capable of allocating more roots to rich patches in the soil. We tested the hypothesis that in addition to their sensitivity to absolute differences in nutrient availability, plants are also responsive to temporal changes in nutrient availability. Different roots of the same Pisum sativum plants were subjected to variable homogeneous and heterogeneous temporally – dynamic and static nutrient regimes. When given a choice, plants not only developed greater root biomasses in richer patches; they discriminately allocated more resources to roots that developed in patches with increasing nutrient levels, even when their other roots developed in richer patches. These results suggest that plants are able to perceive and respond to dynamic environmental changes. This ability might enable plants to increase their performance by responding to both current and anticipated resource availabilities in their immediate proximity. PMID:20520811

  9. Gustatory and metabolic perception of nutrient stress in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Linford, Nancy J.; Ro, Jennifer; Chung, Brian Y.; Pletcher, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep loss is an adaptive response to nutrient deprivation that alters behavior to maximize the chances of feeding before imminent death. Organisms must maintain systems for detecting the quality of the food source to resume healthy levels of sleep when the stress is alleviated. We determined that gustatory perception of sweetness is both necessary and sufficient to suppress starvation-induced sleep loss when animals encounter nutrient-poor food sources. We further find that blocking specific dopaminergic neurons phenocopies the absence of gustatory stimulation, suggesting a specific role for these neurons in transducing taste information to sleep centers in the brain. Finally, we show that gustatory perception is required for survival, specifically in a low nutrient environment. Overall, these results demonstrate an important role for gustatory perception when environmental food availability approaches zero and illustrate the interplay between sensory and metabolic perception of nutrient availability in regulating behavioral state. PMID:25675472

  10. Calcification generates protons for nutrient and bicarbonate uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnaughey, T. A.; Whelan, J. F.

    1997-03-01

    The biosphere's great carbonate deposits, from caliche soils to deep-sea carbonate oozes, precipitate largely as by-products of autotrophic nutrient acquisition physiologies. Protons constitute the critical link: Calcification generates protons, which plants and photosynthetic symbioses use to assimilate bicarbonate and nutrients. A calcium ATPase-based "trans" mechanism underlies most biological calcification. This permits high calcium carbonate supersaturations and rapid carbonate precipitation. The competitive advantages of calcification become especially apparent in light and nutrient-deficient alkaline environments. Calcareous plants often dominate the lower euphotic zone in both the benthos and the plankton. Geographically and seasonally, massive calcification concentrates in nutrient-deficient environments including alkaline soils, coral reefs, cyanobacterial mats and coccolithophorid blooms. Structural and defensive uses for calcareous skeletons are sometimes overrated.

  11. Diet History Questionnaire: Development of the DHQ Nutrient Database

    Cancer.gov

    The nutrient and food group database, created for analyzing the DHQ, is based on national dietary intake data from the 1994-96 US Department of Agriculture's Continuing Survey of Food Intake by Individuals (CSFII).

  12. Ozone alters the concentrations of nutrients in bean tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Tingey, D.T.; Rodecap, K.D.; Lee, E.H.; Moser, T.J.; Hogsett, W.E.

    1986-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the impact of ozone on the nutrient concentrations in tissue from various organs of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv Bush Bluelake 290). The plants were exposed to episodic concentrations of ozone in open-top field exposure chambers from soon after emergence until pod maturity. At harvest the leaf, stem, root and pod tissue were separated and dried (at 70C) to a constant weight. Nutrient concentrations in the tissue were determined using an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer. Ozone exposure decreased the foliar concentrations of only four of the twelve nutrients analyzed (Ca, Mg, Fe and Mn) and increased the concentrations of three nutrients (K,P and Mo) in the pods. There were no significant changes in the macro- or micronutrient levels in the stem or root tissue. The decreased concentrations in the foliage appear to be the result of reduced transport into the leaves rather than reduced uptake or leaching.

  13. Nutrient removal from swine lagoon effluent by duckweed

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, B.A.; Cheng, J.; Classen, J.; Stomp, A.M.

    2000-04-01

    Three duckweed geographic isolates were grown on varying concentrations of swine lagoon effluent in a greenhouse to determine their ability to remove nutrients from the effluent. Duckweed biomass was harvested every other day over a 12-day period. Duckweed biomass production, nutrient loss from the swine lagoon effluent, and nutrient content of duckweed biomass were used to identify effluent concentrations/geographic isolate combinations that are effective in terms of nutrient utilization from swine lagoon effluent and production of healthy duckweed biomass. When Lemna minor geographic isolate 8627 was grown on 50% swine lagoon effluent, respective losses of TKN, NH{sub 3}-N, TP, OPO{sub 4}-P, TOC, K, Cu, and Zn were 83, 100, 49, 31, 68, 21, 28 and 67%.

  14. Tillage effect on early growth and nutrient accumulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conservation tillage is widely used in cotton production (Gossypium hirsutum L.). A review of the literature suggests optimizing production with conservation tillage management may require some modifications to nutrient management programs. Nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, and sulfur are the four nu...

  15. Herbivores and nutrients control grassland plant diversity via light limitation.

    PubMed

    Borer, Elizabeth T; Seabloom, Eric W; Gruner, Daniel S; Harpole, W Stanley; Hillebrand, Helmut; Lind, Eric M; Adler, Peter B; Alberti, Juan; Anderson, T Michael; Bakker, Jonathan D; Biederman, Lori; Blumenthal, Dana; Brown, Cynthia S; Brudvig, Lars A; Buckley, Yvonne M; Cadotte, Marc; Chu, Chengjin; Cleland, Elsa E; Crawley, Michael J; Daleo, Pedro; Damschen, Ellen I; Davies, Kendi F; DeCrappeo, Nicole M; Du, Guozhen; Firn, Jennifer; Hautier, Yann; Heckman, Robert W; Hector, Andy; HilleRisLambers, Janneke; Iribarne, Oscar; Klein, Julia A; Knops, Johannes M H; La Pierre, Kimberly J; Leakey, Andrew D B; Li, Wei; MacDougall, Andrew S; McCulley, Rebecca L; Melbourne, Brett A; Mitchell, Charles E; Moore, Joslin L; Mortensen, Brent; O'Halloran, Lydia R; Orrock, John L; Pascual, Jesús; Prober, Suzanne M; Pyke, David A; Risch, Anita C; Schuetz, Martin; Smith, Melinda D; Stevens, Carly J; Sullivan, Lauren L; Williams, Ryan J; Wragg, Peter D; Wright, Justin P; Yang, Louie H

    2014-04-24

    Human alterations to nutrient cycles and herbivore communities are affecting global biodiversity dramatically. Ecological theory predicts these changes should be strongly counteractive: nutrient addition drives plant species loss through intensified competition for light, whereas herbivores prevent competitive exclusion by increasing ground-level light, particularly in productive systems. Here we use experimental data spanning a globally relevant range of conditions to test the hypothesis that herbaceous plant species losses caused by eutrophication may be offset by increased light availability due to herbivory. This experiment, replicated in 40 grasslands on 6 continents, demonstrates that nutrients and herbivores can serve as counteracting forces to control local plant diversity through light limitation, independent of site productivity, soil nitrogen, herbivore type and climate. Nutrient addition consistently reduced local diversity through light limitation, and herbivory rescued diversity at sites where it alleviated light limitation. Thus, species loss from anthropogenic eutrophication can be ameliorated in grasslands where herbivory increases ground-level light. PMID:24670649

  16. Herbivores and nutrients control grassland plant diversity via light limitation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borer, Elizabeth T.; Seabloom, Eric W.; Gruner, Daniel S.; Harpole, W. Stanley; Hillebrand, Helmut; Lind, Eric M.; Alder, Peter B.; Alberti, Juan; Anderson, T. Michael; Bakker, Jonathan D.; Biederman, Lori; Blumenthal, Dana; Brown, Cynthia S.; Brudvig, Lars A.; Buckley, Yvonne M.; Cadotte, Marc; Chu, Cheng-Jin; Cleland, Elsa E.; Crawley, Michael J.; Daleo, Pedro; Damschen, Ellen Ingman; Davies, Kendi F.; DeCrappeo, Nicole M.; Du, Guozhen; Firn, Jennifer; Hautier, Yann; Heckman, Robert W.; Hector, Andy; HilleRisLambers, Janneke; Iribarne, Oscar; Klein, Julia A.; Knops, Johannes M.H.; La Pierre, Kimberly J.; Leakey, Andrew D.B.; Li, Wei; MacDougall, Andrew S.; McCulley, Rebecca L.; Melbourne, Brett A.; Mitchell, Charles E.; Moore, Joslin L.; Mortensen, Brent; O'Halloran, Lydia R.; Orrock, John L.; Pascual, Jesús; Prober, Suzanne M.; Pyke, David A.; Risch, Anita C.; Schuetz, Martin; Smith, Melinda D.; Stevens, Carly J.; Sullivan, Lauren L.; Williams, Ryan J.; Wragg, Peter D.; Wright, Justin P.; Yang, Louie H.

    2014-01-01

    Human alterations to nutrient cycles and herbivore communities are affecting global biodiversity dramatically. Ecological theory predicts these changes should be strongly counteractive: nutrient addition drives plant species loss through intensified competition for light, whereas herbivores prevent competitive exclusion by increasing ground-level light, particularly in productive systems. Here we use experimental data spanning a globally relevant range of conditions to test the hypothesis that herbaceous plant species losses caused by eutrophication may be offset by increased light availability due to herbivory. This experiment, replicated in 40 grasslands on 6 continents, demonstrates that nutrients and herbivores can serve as counteracting forces to control local plant diversity through light limitation, independent of site productivity, soil nitrogen, herbivore type and climate. Nutrient addition consistently reduced local diversity through light limitation, and herbivory rescued diversity at sites where it alleviated light limitation. Thus, species loss from anthropogenic eutrophication can be ameliorated in grasslands where herbivory increases ground-level light.

  17. Marsh Soil Responses to Nutrients: Belowground Structural and Organic Properties

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coastal marsh responses to nutrient enrichment apparently depend upon soil matrix and whether the system is primarily biogenic or minerogenic. Deteriorating organic rich marshes (Jamaica Bay, NY) receiving wastewater effluent had lower belowground biomass, organic matter, and soi...

  18. Marsh Soil Responses to Nutrients: Belowground Structural and Organic Properties.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coastal marsh responses to nutrient enrichment apparently depend upon soil matrix and whether the system is primarily biogenic or minerogenic. Deteriorating organic rich marshes (Jamaica Bay, NY) receiving wastewater effluent had lower belowground biomass, organic matter, and soi...

  19. QUANTIFYING ASSAY VARIATION IN NUTRIENT ANALYSIS OF FEEDSTUFFS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analytical results from different laboratories have greater variation than those from a single laboratory, and this variation differs by nutrient. Objectives of this presentation are to describe methods for quantifying the analytical reproducibility among and repeatability within laboratories, estim...

  20. Marine science: Storms bring ocean nutrients to light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palter, Jaime

    2015-09-01

    Ships and ocean-observing robots have been used to quantify the amount of nutrients that a storm brings up from the Stygian ocean depths to the sunlit surface -- a first step in assessing how storms affect oceanic biomass production.

  1. Designer crops: optimal root system architecture for nutrient acquisition.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiangpei; Zhang, Maolin; De Smet, Ive; Ding, Zhaojun

    2014-12-01

    Plant root systems are highly plastic in response to environmental stimuli. Improved nutrient acquisition can increase fertilizer use efficiency and is critical for crop production. Recent analyses of field-grown crops highlighted the importance of root system architecture (RSA) in nutrient acquisition. This indicated that it is feasible in practice to exploit genotypes or mutations giving rise to optimal RSA for crop design in the future, especially with respect to plant breeding for infertile soils. PMID:25450041

  2. Groundwater - the underestimated component in lake nutrient balances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowski, Joerg; Nuetzmann, Gunnar

    2010-05-01

    Eutrophication is one of the most important threats to lakes in temperate climatic zones. It is necessary to determine the relevance of different nutrient sources to conduct effective management measures, to understand in-lake processes and to model future scenarios. A prerequisite for nutrient balances are water balances. Surface inflows from streams, rivers and ditches can be precisely quantified and based on local weather data precipitation and evaporation can be calculated. Quantifications of groundwater infiltration and exfiltration are more difficult. Often they are determined as residual in the water balance equation or estimated based on groundwater flow models. For nutrient balances some additional input paths have to be taken into account, for example, dry deposition, waterfowl, swimmer and anglers. Furthermore, concentration fluctuations of the different inflows have to be considered. The determination of nutrient imports via the groundwater paths is quite complex and often disregarded in nutrient balances or based on dubious assumptions. Nevertheless, groundwater might be an important nutrient source in several lakes. There are three major reasons for neglecting the groundwater path: (1) The groundwater-lake interface is difficult to access, especially in deeper lakes. (2) The size of the interface gives much space for spatial heterogeneity and requires an enormous amount of measurements for reliable determinations. (3) The lake sediment is a reactive interface, i. e., there might be some processing of the nutrients at the immediate groundwater-lake interface. In the present study we suggest a combined approach of localization of major water infiltration zones with distributed temperature sensing, quantification of water infiltration at some locations based on temperature gradients at the groundwater-lake interface and determination of nutrient concentrations with seepage meters at the same locations.

  3. Selection of Optimal Auxiliary Soil Nutrient Variables for Cokriging Interpolation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Genxin; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Ke

    2014-01-01

    In order to explore the selection of the best auxiliary variables (BAVs) when using the Cokriging method for soil attribute interpolation, this paper investigated the selection of BAVs from terrain parameters, soil trace elements, and soil nutrient attributes when applying Cokriging interpolation to soil nutrients (organic matter, total N, available P, and available K). In total, 670 soil samples were collected in Fuyang, and the nutrient and trace element attributes of the soil samples were determined. Based on the spatial autocorrelation of soil attributes, the Digital Elevation Model (DEM) data for Fuyang was combined to explore the coordinate relationship among terrain parameters, trace elements, and soil nutrient attributes. Variables with a high correlation to soil nutrient attributes were selected as BAVs for Cokriging interpolation of soil nutrients, and variables with poor correlation were selected as poor auxiliary variables (PAVs). The results of Cokriging interpolations using BAVs and PAVs were then compared. The results indicated that Cokriging interpolation with BAVs yielded more accurate results than Cokriging interpolation with PAVs (the mean absolute error of BAV interpolation results for organic matter, total N, available P, and available K were 0.020, 0.002, 7.616, and 12.4702, respectively, and the mean absolute error of PAV interpolation results were 0.052, 0.037, 15.619, and 0.037, respectively). The results indicated that Cokriging interpolation with BAVs can significantly improve the accuracy of Cokriging interpolation for soil nutrient attributes. This study provides meaningful guidance and reference for the selection of auxiliary parameters for the application of Cokriging interpolation to soil nutrient attributes. PMID:24927129

  4. Multivitamin-multimineral supplements' effect on total nutrient intake.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Suzanne P; White, Kami K; Park, Song-Yi; Sharma, Sangita

    2007-01-01

    Use of multivitamin-multimineral supplements is widespread and can contribute substantially to total nutrient intakes. In the Hawaii-Los Angeles Multiethnic Cohort (MEC), 48% of men and 56% of women without chronic diseases reported use of multivitamin supplements at least weekly over the past year. We calculated the prevalence of nutrient adequacy for 17 nutrients based on responses to a self-administered quantitative food-frequency questionnaire administered to MEC participants at baseline in 1993-1996. Although the prevalence of nutrient adequacy from food only was higher for multivitamin supplement users (n = 21,056) than for nonusers (n = 69,715), differences averaged only 2 percentage points. For multivitamin users, the prevalence of adequacy improved by an average of 8 percentage points for both men and women when intake from supplements was included. Users were also more likely to have potentially excessive intakes, particularly for iron, zinc, vitamin A, and niacin. The 26,735 MEC participants in Hawaii who answered an open-ended question about multivitamin use in 1999-2001 reported using 1246 different products. The nutrient profile of these products varied widely, and the composition of products at the 90th percentile was 10-fold greater than the composition at the median for some nutrients. We conclude that analyses of nutrient adequacy and excess for supplement users should be extended to national samples and that composition data on actual supplements used are preferable to assuming a default nutrient profile for multivitamin supplements. Multivitamin products could be better formulated to reduce the prevalence of inadequacy and also to reduce the risk of excessive intakes. PMID:17209210

  5. Selection of optimal auxiliary soil nutrient variables for Cokriging interpolation.

    PubMed

    Song, Genxin; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Ke

    2014-01-01

    In order to explore the selection of the best auxiliary variables (BAVs) when using the Cokriging method for soil attribute interpolation, this paper investigated the selection of BAVs from terrain parameters, soil trace elements, and soil nutrient attributes when applying Cokriging interpolation to soil nutrients (organic matter, total N, available P, and available K). In total, 670 soil samples were collected in Fuyang, and the nutrient and trace element attributes of the soil samples were determined. Based on the spatial autocorrelation of soil attributes, the Digital Elevation Model (DEM) data for Fuyang was combined to explore the coordinate relationship among terrain parameters, trace elements, and soil nutrient attributes. Variables with a high correlation to soil nutrient attributes were selected as BAVs for Cokriging interpolation of soil nutrients, and variables with poor correlation were selected as poor auxiliary variables (PAVs). The results of Cokriging interpolations using BAVs and PAVs were then compared. The results indicated that Cokriging interpolation with BAVs yielded more accurate results than Cokriging interpolation with PAVs (the mean absolute error of BAV interpolation results for organic matter, total N, available P, and available K were 0.020, 0.002, 7.616, and 12.4702, respectively, and the mean absolute error of PAV interpolation results were 0.052, 0.037, 15.619, and 0.037, respectively). The results indicated that Cokriging interpolation with BAVs can significantly improve the accuracy of Cokriging interpolation for soil nutrient attributes. This study provides meaningful guidance and reference for the selection of auxiliary parameters for the application of Cokriging interpolation to soil nutrient attributes. PMID:24927129

  6. Interactive Effects of Nutrient and Mechanical Stresses on Plant Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Puijalon, Sara; Lena, Jean-Paul; Bornette, Gudrun

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Plant species frequently encounter multiple stresses under natural conditions, and the way they cope with these stresses is a major determinant of their ecological breadth. The way mechanical (e.g. wind, current) and resource stresses act simultaneously on plant morphological traits has been poorly addressed, even if both stresses often interact. This paper aims to assess whether hydraulic stress affects plant morphology in the same way at different nutrient levels. Methods An examination was made of morphological variations of an aquatic plant species growing under four hydraulic stress (flow velocity) gradients located in four habitats distributed along a nutrient gradient. Morphological traits covering plant size, dry mass allocation, organ water content and foliage architecture were measured. Key Results Significant interactive effects of flow velocity and nutrient level were observed for all morphological traits. In particular, increased flow velocity resulted in size reductions under low nutrient conditions, suggesting an adaptive response to flow stress (escape strategy). On the other hand, moderate increases in flow velocity resulted in increased size under high nutrient conditions, possibly related to an inevitable growth response to a higher nutrient supply induced by water renewal at the plant surface. For some traits (e.g. dry mass allocation), a consistent sense of variation as a result of increasing flow velocity was observed, but the amount of variation was either reduced or amplified under nutrient-rich compared with nutrient-poor conditions, depending on the traits considered. Conclusions These results suggest that, for a given species, a stress factor may result, in contrasting patterns and hence strategies, depending on a second stress factor. Such results emphasize the relevance of studies on plant responses to multiple stresses for understanding the actual ecological breadth of species. PMID:17913725

  7. 9 CFR 317.313 - Nutrient content claims; general principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... formulas and medical foods, as described in 21 CFR 101.13(q)(4). (5) (6) Nutrient content claims that were... product, e.g., “low sodium” or “contains 100 calories.” (2) An implied nutrient content claim is any claim... misleading in any respect (e.g., “100 calories” or “5 grams of fat”), in which case no disclaimer is...

  8. 9 CFR 317.313 - Nutrient content claims; general principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... formulas and medical foods, as described in 21 CFR 101.13(q)(4). (5) (6) Nutrient content claims that were... product, e.g., “low sodium” or “contains 100 calories.” (2) An implied nutrient content claim is any claim... misleading in any respect (e.g., “100 calories” or “5 grams of fat”), in which case no disclaimer is...

  9. 9 CFR 317.313 - Nutrient content claims; general principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... formulas and medical foods, as described in 21 CFR 101.13(q)(4). (5) (6) Nutrient content claims that were... product, e.g., “low sodium” or “contains 100 calories.” (2) An implied nutrient content claim is any claim... misleading in any respect (e.g., “100 calories” or “5 grams of fat”), in which case no disclaimer is...

  10. Effects of mountain agriculture on nutrient cycling at upstream watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, T.-C.; Shaner, P. L.; Wang, L.-J.; Shih, Y.-T.; Wang, C.-P.; Huang, G.-H.; Huang, J.-C.

    2015-05-01

    The expansion of agriculture to rugged mountains can exacerbate negative impacts of agriculture activities on ecosystem function. In this study, we monitored streamwater chemistry of four watersheds with varying proportions of agricultural lands (0.4, 3, 17, 22%) and rainfall chemistry of two of the four watersheds at Feitsui Reservoir Watershed in northern Taiwan to examine the effects of agriculture on watershed nutrient cycling. We found that the greater the proportions of agricultural lands, the higher the ion concentrations, which is evident for fertilizer-associated ions (NO3-, K+) but not for ions that are rich in soils (SO42-, Ca2+, Mg2+), suggesting that agriculture enriched fertilizer-associated nutrients in streamwater. The watershed with the highest proportion of agricultural lands had higher concentrations of ions in rainfall and lower nutrient retention capacity (i.e. higher output-input ratio of ions) compared to the relatively pristine watershed, suggesting that agriculture can influence atmospheric deposition of nutrients and a system's ability to retain nutrients. Furthermore, we found that a forested watershed downstream of agricultural activities can dilute the concentrations of fertilizer-associated ions (NO3-, K+) in streamwater by more than 70%, indicating that specific landscape configurations help mitigate nutrient enrichment to aquatic systems. We estimated that agricultural lands at our study site contributed approximately 400 kg ha-1 yr-1 of NO3-N and 260 kg ha-1 yr-1 of PO4-P output via streamwater, an order of magnitude greater than previously reported around the globe and can only be matched by areas under intense fertilizer use. Furthermore, we re-constructed watershed nutrient fluxes to show that excessive leaching of N and P, and additional loss of N to the atmosphere via volatilization and denitrification, can occur under intense fertilizer use. In summary, this study demonstrated the pervasive impacts of agriculture activities

  11. Prevention and treatment of cancers by immune modulating nutrients.

    PubMed

    Janakiram, Naveena B; Mohammed, Altaf; Madka, Venkateshwar; Kumar, Gaurav; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiological and laboratory data support the protective effects of bioactive nutrients in our diets for various diseases. Along with various factors, such as genetic history, alcohol, smoking, exercise, and dietary choices play a vital role in affecting an individual's immune responses toward a transforming cell, by either preventing or accelerating a neoplastic transformation. Ample evidence suggests that dietary nutrients control the inflammatory and protumorigenic responses in immune cells. Immunoprevention is usually associated with the modulation of immune responses that help in resolving the inflammation, thus improving clinical outcome. Various metabolic pathway-related nutrients, including glutamine, arginine, vitamins, minerals, and long-chain fatty acids, are important components of immunonutrient mixes. Epidemiological studies related to these substances have reported different results, with no or minimal effects. However, several studies suggest that these nutrients may have immune-modulating effects that may lower cancer risk. Preclinical studies submit that most of these components may provide beneficial effects. The present review discusses the available data, the immune-modulating functions of these nutrients, and how these substances could be used to study immune modulation in a neoplastic environment. Further research will help to determine whether the mechanistic signaling pathways in immune cells altered by nutrients can be exploited for cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:26833775

  12. Application of controlled nutrient release to permeable reactive barriers.

    PubMed

    Freidman, Benjamin L; Gras, Sally L; Snape, Ian; Stevens, Geoff W; Mumford, Kathryn A

    2016-03-15

    The application of controlled release nutrient (CRN) materials to permeable reactive barriers to promote biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater was investigated. The longevity of release, influence of flow velocity and petroleum hydrocarbon concentration on nutrient release was assessed using soluble and ion exchange CRN materials; namely Polyon™ and Zeopro™. Both CRN materials, assessed at 4 °C and 23 °C, demonstrated continuing release of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (N-P-K) at 3500 bed volumes passing, with longer timeframes of N-P-K release at 4 °C. Zeopro™-activated carbon mixtures demonstrated depletion of N-P-K prior to 3500 bed volumes passing. Increased flow velocity was shown to lower nutrient concentrations in Polyon™ flow cells while nutrient release from Zeopro™ was largely unchanged. The presence of petroleum hydrocarbons, at 1.08 mmol/L and 3.25 mmol/L toluene, were not shown to alter nutrient release from Polyon™ and Zeopro™ across 14 days. These findings suggest that Polyon™ and Zeopro™ may be suitable CRN materials for application to PRBs in low nutrient environments. PMID:26735866

  13. Status of selected nutrients in obese dogs undergoing caloric restriction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that dog plasma concentrations of selected nutrients decrease after undergoing caloric restriction for weight loss. Thirty-one overweight dogs that had successfully lost at least 15% of initial body weight were included in the study. Nutrients that had been previously identified to be at potential risk of deficiency during caloric restriction were measured in plasma (choline, amino acids) and urine (selenium) at the initiation and completion of a standardized weight loss regimen in dogs. Results Dogs remained healthy throughout the study, and no signs attributable to nutrient deficiency were noted. Percentage weight loss was 28.3% (16.0-40.1%) starting body weight, over a period of 250 days (91–674 days). Median energy intake during the weight loss period was 62 (44 to 74) Kcal/kg0.75 target weight per day. Choline (P = 0.046) and threonine (P = 0.02) decreased after weight loss. Glycine (P = 0.041), and urinary selenium:creatinine ratio (P = 0.006) both increased after weight loss. There were no other significant differences in plasma nutrient concentrations. Conclusions Since concentrations of most measured nutrients did not change significantly, the data are not consistent with widespread nutrient deficiency in dogs undergoing caloric restriction using a diet formulated for weight loss. However, the significance of the decrease in plasma choline concentration requires further assessment. PMID:24156605

  14. A swine integrator's perspective on nutrient management procedures.

    PubMed

    Coffey, M T

    1999-02-01

    The goal of pork producers is to operate in a sustainable manner that includes among other requirements, environmental soundness, social acceptability, and profitability. Gains in efficiency have reduced nutrient by-products per pig, but competitive forces have led to specialization, larger farms, and concentrated areas of production that have resulted in new opportunities related to nutrient management. Available technology uses on-farm processing or storage facilities, and manure is applied to the land as an organic fertilizer. Knowledge of nutrient content of soils and crop uptake of nutrients is incorporated into manure application and crop removal plans to prevent either runoff or nutrient buildup on the land. This is to ensure water quality protection. Existing systems are adequate but lack flexibility, require effective management, may not have been incorporated into older farms, and do not offer obvious solutions to odor concerns. Cost-effective alternatives should address those needs. Advancement in nutrient management procedures will likely accelerate the ongoing changes in the structure of the swine industry. PMID:10100675

  15. Quantifying the nutrient flux within a lowland karstic catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormack, T.; Naughton, O.; Johnston, P. M.; Gill, L. W.

    2015-10-01

    Nutrient contamination of surface and groundwaters is an issue of growing importance as the risks associated with agricultural runoff escalate due to increasing demands on global food production. In this study, the nutrient flux occurring within the surface and groundwaters of a lowland karst catchment in western Ireland was investigated with the aid of alkalinity sampling and a hydrological model. Water samples were tested from a variety of rivers, lakes (or turloughs), boreholes and springs at monthly intervals over three years. Alkalinity sampling was used to elucidate the contrasting hydrological functioning between different turloughs. Such disparate hydrological functioning was further investigated with the aid of a hydrological model which allowed for an estimate of allogenic and autogenic derived nutrient loading into the karst system. The model also allowed for an investigation of mixing within the turloughs, comparing observed behaviours with the hypothetical conservative behaviour allowed for by the model. Within the turloughs, nutrient concentrations were found to reduce over the flooded period, even though the turloughs hydrological functioning (and the hydrological model) suggested this should not occur. As such, it was determined that nutrient loss processes were occurring within the system. Denitrification during stable flooded periods (typically 3-4 months per year) was deemed to be the main process reducing nitrogen concentrations within the turloughs whereas phosphorus loss is thought to occur mostly via sedimentation and subsequent soil deposition. The results from this study suggest that, in stable conditions, ephemeral lakes can impart considerable nutrient losses on a karst groundwater system.

  16. Substrate and nutrient limitation regulating microbial growth in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bååth, Erland

    2015-04-01

    Microbial activity and growth in soil is regulated by several abiotic factors, including temperature, moisture and pH as the most important ones. At the same time nutrient conditions and substrate availability will also determine microbial growth. Amount of substrate will not only affect overall microbial growth, but also affect the balance of fungal and bacterial growth. The type of substrate will also affect the latter. Furthermore, according to Liebig law of limiting factors, we would expect one nutrient to be the main limiting one for microbial growth in soil. When this nutrient is added, the initial second liming factor will become the main one, adding complexity to the microbial response after adding different substrates. I will initially describe different ways of determining limiting factors for bacterial growth in soil, especially a rapid method estimating bacterial growth, using the leucine incorporation technique, after adding C (as glucose), N (as ammonium nitrate) and P (as phosphate). Scenarios of different limitations will be covered, with the bacterial growth response compared with fungal growth and total activity (respiration). The "degree of limitation", as well as the main limiting nutrient, can be altered by adding substrate of different stoichiometric composition. However, the organism group responding after alleviating the nutrient limitation can differ depending on the type of substrate added. There will also be situations, where fungi and bacteria appear to be limited by different nutrients. Finally, I will describe interactions between abiotic factors and the response of the soil microbiota to alleviation of limiting factors.

  17. PIKfyve Regulates Vacuole Maturation and Nutrient Recovery following Engulfment.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Shefali; Palm, Wilhelm; Lee, Yongchan; Yang, Wendy; Bandyopadhyay, Urmi; Xu, Haoxing; Florey, Oliver; Thompson, Craig B; Overholtzer, Michael

    2016-09-12

    The scavenging of extracellular macromolecules by engulfment can sustain cell growth in a nutrient-depleted environment. Engulfed macromolecules are contained within vacuoles that are targeted for lysosome fusion to initiate degradation and nutrient export. We have shown that vacuoles containing engulfed material undergo mTORC1-dependent fission that redistributes degraded cargo back into the endosomal network. Here we identify the lipid kinase PIKfyve as a regulator of an alternative pathway that distributes engulfed contents in support of intracellular macromolecular synthesis during macropinocytosis, entosis, and phagocytosis. We find that PIKfyve regulates vacuole size in part through its downstream effector, the cationic transporter TRPML1. Furthermore, PIKfyve promotes recovery of nutrients from vacuoles, suggesting a potential link between PIKfyve activity and lysosomal nutrient export. During nutrient depletion, PIKfyve activity protects Ras-mutant cells from starvation-induced cell death and supports their proliferation. These data identify PIKfyve as a critical regulator of vacuole maturation and nutrient recovery during engulfment. PMID:27623384

  18. Characterization of Pseudomonas putida Genes Responsive to Nutrient Limitation

    SciTech Connect

    Syn, Chris K.; Magnuson, Jon K.; Kingsley, Mark T.; Swarup, Sanjay

    2004-06-01

    The low bioavailability of nutrients and oxygen in the soil environment has hampered successful expression of biodegradation/biocontrol genes that are driven by promoters highly active during routine laboratory conditions of high nutrient- and oxygen-availability. Hence, in the present study, expression of the gus-tagged genes in 12 Tn5-gus mutants of the soil microbe Pseudomonas putida PNL-MK25 was examined under various conditions chosen to mimic the soil environment: low carbon, phosphate, nitrate, or oxygen, and in the rhizosphere. Based on their expression profiles, three nutrient-responsive mutant (NRM) strains, NRM5, NRM7, and NRM17, were selected for identification of the tagged genes. In the mutant strain NRM5, expression of the glutamate dehydrogenase (gdhA) gene was increased between 4.9- to 26.4-fold under various low nutrient conditions. In NRM7, expression of the novel NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase-like (nql) gene was consistently amongst the highest and was synergistically upregulated by low nutrient and anoxic conditions. The cyoD gene in NRM17, which encodes the fourth subunit of the cytochrome o ubiquinol oxidase complex, had decreased expression in low nutrient conditions but its absolute expression levels was still amongst the highest. Additionally, it was independent of oxygen availability, in contrast to that in E. coli.

  19. Nutrient and media recycling in heterotrophic microalgae cultures.

    PubMed

    Lowrey, Joshua; Armenta, Roberto E; Brooks, Marianne S

    2016-02-01

    In order for microalgae-based processes to reach commercial production for biofuels and high-value products such as omega-3 fatty acids, it is necessary that economic feasibility be demonstrated at the industrial scale. Therefore, process optimization is critical to ensure that the maximum yield can be achieved from the most efficient use of resources. This is particularly true for processes involving heterotrophic microalgae, which have not been studied as extensively as phototrophic microalgae. An area that has received significant conceptual praise, but little experimental validation, is that of nutrient recycling, where the waste materials from prior cultures and post-lipid extraction are reused for secondary fermentations. While the concept is very simple and could result in significant economic and environmental benefits, there are some underlying challenges that must be overcome before adoption of nutrient recycling is viable at commercial scale. Even more, adapting nutrient recycling for optimized heterotrophic cultures presents some added challenges that must be identified and addressed that have been largely unexplored to date. These challenges center on carbon and nitrogen recycling and the implications of using waste materials in conjunction with virgin nutrients for secondary cultures. The aim of this review is to provide a foundation for further understanding of nutrient recycling for microalgae cultivation. As such, we outline the current state of technology and practical challenges associated with nutrient recycling for heterotrophic microalgae on an industrial scale and give recommendations for future work. PMID:26572520

  20. A global model of carbon-nutrient interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Berrien, III; Gildea, Patricia; Vorosmarty, Charles; Mellilo, Jerry M.; Peterson, Bruce J.

    1985-01-01

    The global biogeochemical model presented has two primary objectives. First, it characterizes natural elemental cycles and their linkages for the four elements significant to Earth's biota: C, N, S, and P. Second, it describes changes in these cycles due to human activity. Global nutrient cycles were studied within the drainage basins of several major world rivers on each continent. The initial study region was the Mississippi drainage basin, concentrating on carbon and nitrogen. The model first establishes the nutrient budgets of the undisturbed ecosystems in a study region. It then uses a data set of land use histories for that region to document the changes in these budgets due to land uses. Nutrient movement was followed over time (1800 to 1980) for 30 ecosystems and 10 land use categories. A geographically referenced ecological information system (GREIS) was developed to manage the digital global data bases of 0.5 x 0.5 grid cells needed to run the model: potential vegetation, drainage basins, precipitation, runoff, contemporary land cover, and FAO soil maps of the world. The results show the contributions of land use categories to river nutrient loads on a continental scale; shifts in nutrient cycling patterns from closed, steady state systems to mobile transient or open, steady state systems; soil organic matter depletion patterns in U.S. agricultural lands; changing nutrient ratios due to land use changes; and the effect of using heavy fertilizer on aquatic systems.

  1. Potato growth and yield using nutrient film technique (NFT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, R. M.; Mackowiak, C. L.; Sager, J. C.; Knott, W. M.; Hinkle, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    Potato plants, cvs Denali and Norland, were grown in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) trays using a continuous flowing nutrient film technique (NFT) to study tuber yield for NASA's Controlled Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS) program. Nutrient solution pH was controlled automatically using 0.39M (2.5% (v/v) nitric acid (HNO3), while water and nutrients were replenished manually each day and twice each week, respectively. Plants were spaced either one or two per tray, allotting 0.2 or 0.4 m2 per plant. All plants were harvested after 112 days. Denali plants yielded 2850 and 2800 g tuber fresh weight from the one- and two-plant trays, respectively, while Norland plants yielded 1800 and 2400 g tuber fresh weight from the one- and two-plant trays. Many tubers of both cultivars showed injury to the periderm tissue, possibly caused by salt accumulation from the nutrient solution on the surface. Total system water usage throughout the study for all the plants equaled 709 liters (L), or approximately 2 L m-2 d-1. Total system acid usage throughout the study (for nutrient solution pH control) equaled 6.60 L, or 18.4 ml m-2 d-1 (7.2 mmol m-2 d-1). The results demonstrate that continuous flowing nutrient film technique can be used for tuber production with acceptable yields for the CELSS program.

  2. Oxygen Consumption Rates of Bacteria under Nutrient-Limited Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Timothy E.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Finkel, Steven E.

    2013-01-01

    Many environments on Earth experience nutrient limitation and as a result have nongrowing or very slowly growing bacterial populations. To better understand bacterial respiration under environmentally relevant conditions, the effect of nutrient limitation on respiration rates of heterotrophic bacteria was measured. The oxygen consumption and population density of batch cultures of Escherichia coli K-12, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, and Marinobacter aquaeolei VT8 were tracked for up to 200 days. The oxygen consumption per CFU (QO2) declined by more than 2 orders of magnitude for all three strains as they transitioned from nutrient-abundant log-phase growth to the nutrient-limited early stationary phase. The large reduction in QO2 from growth to stationary phase suggests that nutrient availability is an important factor in considering environmental respiration rates. Following the death phase, during the long-term stationary phase (LTSP), QO2 values of the surviving population increased with time and more cells were respiring than formed colonies. Within the respiring population, a subpopulation of highly respiring cells increased in abundance with time. Apparently, as cells enter LTSP, there is a viable but not culturable population whose bulk community and per cell respiration rates are dynamic. This result has a bearing on how minimal energy requirements are met, especially in nutrient-limited environments. The minimal QO2 rates support the extension of Kleiber's law to the mass of a bacterium (100-fg range). PMID:23770901

  3. Enabling nutrient security and sustainability through systems research.

    PubMed

    Kaput, Jim; Kussmann, Martin; Mendoza, Yery; Le Coutre, Ronit; Cooper, Karen; Roulin, Anne

    2015-05-01

    Human and companion animal health depends upon nutritional quality of foods. Seed varieties, seasonal and local growing conditions, transportation, food processing, and storage, and local food customs can influence the nutrient content of food. A new and intensive area of investigation is emerging that recognizes many factors in these agri-food systems that influence the maintenance of nutrient quality which is fundamental to ensure nutrient security for world populations. Modeling how these systems function requires data from different sectors including agricultural, environmental, social, and economic, but also must incorporate basic nutrition and other biomedical sciences. Improving the agri-food system through advances in pre- and post-harvest processing methods, biofortification, or fortifying processed foods will aid in targeting nutrition for populations and individuals. The challenge to maintain and improve nutrient quality is magnified by the need to produce food locally and globally in a sustainable and consumer-acceptable manner for current and future populations. An unmet requirement for assessing how to improve nutrient quality, however, is the basic knowledge of how to define health. That is, health cannot be maintained or improved by altering nutrient quality without an adequate definition of what health means for individuals and populations. Defining and measuring health therefore becomes a critical objective for basic nutritional and other biomedical sciences. PMID:25876838

  4. Implications of premature needle abscission to the elemental nutrient status and nutrient retranslocation patterns of ozone injured Jeffrey pine

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, M.T.; Rundel, P.W. )

    1993-06-01

    The foliar nutrient relations of ozone stressed Jeffrey pine growing in the southern Sierra Nevada of California was compared in trees retaining different numbers of needle cohorts. A 20% reduction in foliar nitrogen occurred in the oldest needles of both sensitive trees (retaining two years of needles) and resistant trees (retaining five years of needles) which coincided with the flush of new needles in late June. Nitrogen content of recently expanded needles on sensitive trees was 15% lower than needles of similar age on resistant trees immediately after becoming fully expanded, but was not significantly different two months after expansion. Resistant trees retranslocated higher fractions of all phloem-mobile nutrients measured (N, K, P and Mg) although the differences were small (between 3 and 9%). The smaller foliar pool of nutrients resulting from premature abscission may result in ozone sensitive trees relying more heavily on soil supplies for both short and long term nutrient requirements.

  5. Soil nutrient competition in earth system models: an important but underappreciated driver of plant responses to nutrient fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Q.; Riley, W. J.; Tang, J.; Koven, C.

    2015-12-01

    Earth System Models (ESMs) used to project future biosphere-climate feedbacks rely on predictions of terrestrial carbon dynamics. Furthermore, soil nutrient availability strongly modulates land surface carbon dynamics, including plant sequestration of atmospheric CO2. Plant growth under future environmental changes (e.g., nitrogen and phosphorus deposition) depends on how well plants compete with microbial and abiotic competitors. Here, we surveyed recent developments of nutrient competition representations in ESMs that participated in the CMIP5 project. We found that nutrient competition is over-simplified despite its ecological significance. Existing ESMs either assume that soil-decomposing microbes (1) outcompete plants or (2) are evenly competitive, both of which are inconsistent with theoretical understanding and field observations. We compiled and synthesized global data of forest carbon productivity in response to nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization experiments. Using this synthesis, we show that existing ESMs with the first and second competition schemes lead to underestimation and overestimation, respectively, of fertilization effects on plant growth. We reduced these systematic biases by applying a new competition scheme in CLM4.5 and the essentially equivalent ACME land model (ALMv0) based on the Equilibrium Chemistry Approximation, which is based on classical equilibrium chemical kinetics theory. This approach dynamically updates nutrient competitiveness among multiple consumers (e.g., plants, decomposing microbes, nitrifier, denitrifier, mineral surfaces) as a function of soil nutrient status. There has been a long-term debate regarding how to implement theoretically realistic and computationally efficient nutrient competition schemes in ESMs. Our approach reconciles the complex nature of ecosystem nutrient competition with a computationally tractable approach applicable to ESMs. More importantly, our results imply that previous estimates of plant

  6. Potential Effects of Nutrient Profiles on Nutrient Intakes in the Netherlands, Greece, Spain, USA, Israel, China and South-Africa

    PubMed Central

    Roodenburg, Annet J. C.; Schlatmann, Anke; Dötsch-Klerk, Mariska; Daamen, Robert; Dong, Jie; Guarro, Marta; Stergiou, Margarita; Sayed, Nazeeia; Ronoh, Eunice; Jansen, Léon; Seidell, Jacob C.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Nutrient profiling is defined as the science of categorising foods based on their nutrient composition. The Choices Programme is a nutrient profile system with criteria that determine whether foods are eligible to carry a “healthier option” stamp. The Daily Menu Method which has been developed to evaluate these criteria is described here. This method simulates the change in calculated nutrient intakes which would be the result of consumers changing their diets in favour of food products that comply with the criteria. Methods Average intakes of energy, trans fatty acids (TFA), saturated fatty acids (SAFA), sodium, added sugar and fibre were derived from dietary intake studies and food consumption surveys of 7 countries: The Netherlands, Greece, Spain, the USA, Israel, China and South Africa. For each of the key nutrients, these average intakes were translated into three Typical Daily Menus per country. Average intakes based on these three menus were compared with average intakes from three Choices Daily Menus. To compose the Choices Menus, foods from the Typical Menus that did not comply with the Choices criteria were replaced with foods that did comply and are available on the market. Results Comparison of intakes from the Choices Menus with the survey data showed that calculated intakes of energy, SAFA, TFA, sodium and added sugar were reduced. Fibre intakes were increased. The size of the effect differed per country. Conclusion The Daily Menu Method is a useful means to predict the potential effects of nutrient profiles such as the Choices criteria, on daily nutrient intakes. The method can be applied internationally and confirms that the criteria of the Choices Programme are in line with the aim of the programme: to improve nutrient intakes in the direction of the recommendations. PMID:21373186

  7. Modelling of Usual Nutrient Intakes: Potential Impact of the Choices Programme on Nutrient Intakes in Young Dutch Adults

    PubMed Central

    Roodenburg, Annet J. C.; van Ballegooijen, Adriana J.; Dötsch-Klerk, Mariska; van der Voet, Hilko; Seidell, Jacob C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The Choices Programme is an internationally applicable nutrient profiling system with nutrition criteria for trans fatty acids (TFA), saturated fatty acids, sodium, added sugar and for some product groups energy and fibre. These criteria determine whether foods are eligible to carry a “healthier option” stamp. In this paper a nutrient intake modelling method is described to evaluate these nutritional criteria by investigating the potential effect on nutrient intakes. Methods Data were combined from the 2003 Dutch food consumption survey in young adults (aged 19–30) and the Dutch food composition table into the Monte Carlo Risk Assessment model. Three scenarios were calculated: the “actual intakes” (scenario 1) were compared to scenario 2, where all foods that did not comply were replaced by similar foods that did comply with the Choices criteria. Scenario 3 was the same as scenario 2 adjusted for the difference in energy density between the original and replacement food. Additional scenarios were calculated where snacks were not or partially replaced and stratified analyses for gender, age, Body Mass Index (BMI) and education. Results Calculated intake distributions showed that median energy intake was reduced by 16% by replacing normally consumed foods with Choices compliant foods. Intakes of nutrients with a maximal intake limit were also reduced (ranging from −23% for sodium and −62% for TFA). Effects on intakes of beneficial nutrients varied from an unintentional reduction in fat soluble vitamin intakes (−15 to −28%) to an increase of 28% for fibre and 17% calcium. Stratified analyses in this homogeneous study population showed only small differences across gender, age, BMI and education. Conclusions This intake modelling method showed that with consumption of Choices compliant foods, nutrient intakes shift towards population intake goals for the nutrients for which nutrition criteria were defined, while effects on beneficial

  8. Light, nutrients, and herbivore growth in oligotrophic streams

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Walter R; Smith, John G; Stewart, Arthur J

    2010-02-01

    The light : nutrient hypothesis posits that herbivore growth is increasingly constrained by low food quality as the ratio of light to nutrients increases in aquatic ecosystems. We tested predictions of this hypothesis by examining the effects of large seasonal cycles in light and nutrients on the mineral content of periphyton and the growth rate of a dominant herbivore (the snail Elimia clavaeformis) in two oligotrophic streams. Streambed irradiances in White Oak Creek and Walker Branch (eastern Tennessee, USA) varied dramatically on a seasonal basis due to leaf phenology in the surrounding deciduous forests and seasonal changes in sun angle. Concentrations of dissolved nutrients varied inversely with light, causing light : nitrate and light : phosphate to range almost 100-fold over the course of any individual year. Periphyton nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations were much lower than the concentrations of these elements in snails, and they bottomed out in early spring when streambed irradiances were highest. Snail growth, however, peaked in early spring when light:nutrient ratios were highest and periphyton nutrient concentrations were lowest, Growth was linearly related to primary production (accounting for up to 85% of growth variance in individual years), which in turn was driven by seasonal variation in light. Conceptual models of herbivore growth indicate that growth should initially increase as increasing light levels stimulate primary production, but then level off, and then decrease as the negative effects of decreasing algal nutrient content override the positive effects of increased food production. Our results showed no evidence of an inflection point where increasing ratios of light to nutrients negatively affected growth. Snail growth in these intensively grazed streams is probably unaffected by periphyton nutrient content because exploitative competition for food reduces growth rates to levels where the demand for nitrogen and phosphorus is small

  9. Hydromorphological control of nutrient cycling in complex river floodplain systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, T.; Bondar-Kunze, E.; Felkl, M.; Habersack, H.; Mair, M.; Pinay, G.; Tritthart, M.; Welti, N.

    2009-04-01

    Riparian zones and floodplains are key components within river ecosystems controlling nutrient cycling by promoting transformation processes and thus, act as biogeochemical hot spots. The intensity of these processes depends on the exchange conditions (the connectivity) with the main channel and the morphological setting of the water bodies. At the landscape scale, three interrelated principles of hydromorphological dynamics can be formulated regarding the cycling and transfer of carbon and nutrients in large rivers ecosystems: a) The mode of carbon and nutrient delivery affects ecosystem functioning; b) Increasing residence time and contact area impact nutrient transformation; c) Floods and droughts are natural events that strongly influence pathways of carbon and nutrient cycling. These three principles of hydromorphological dynamics control the nutrient uptake and retention and are linked over different temporal and spatial scales. All three factors can be strongly affected by natural disturbances or anthropogenic impacts, through a change in either the water regime or the geomorphologic setting of the river valley. Any change in natural water regimes will affect the biogeochemistry of riparian zones and floodplains as well as their ability to cycle and mitigate nutrient fluxes originating from upstream and/or upslope. Especially these areas have been altered by river regulation and land use changes over the last 200 years leading to the deterioration of the functioning of these compartments within the riverine landscape. The resulting deficits have prompted rehabilitation and restoration measures aiming to increase the spatial heterogeneity, the complexity, of these ecosystems. Yet, a more integrated approach is needed considering the present status of nutrient dynamics and the effects of restoration measures at different scales. The present paper analyses the effects of river side-arm restoration on ecosystem functions within the side-arm and highlights

  10. Nutrient allocation among plant organs across 13 tree species in three Bornean rain forests with contrasting nutrient availabilities.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Ryota; Kitayama, Kanehiro

    2016-07-01

    Allocation of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) among plant organs is an important factor regulating growth rate, which is a key ecological process associated with plant life-history strategies. However, few studies have explored how N and P investment in photosynthetic (leaves) and non-photosynthetic (stems and roots) organs changes in relation to depletion of each element. We investigated nutrient concentrations of plant organs in relation to whole-plant nutrient concentration (total nutrient weight per total biomass) as an index of nutrient status of each individual using the saplings of the 13 species in three tropical rain forests with contrasting N and P availabilities (tropical evergreen forests and tropical heath forests). We found a steeper decrease in foliar N concentration than foliar P concentration with decreasing whole-plant nutrient concentration. Moreover, the steeper decrease in foliar N concentration was associated with relatively stable N concentration in stems, and vice versa for P. We suggest that the depletion of N is associated with a rapid dilution of foliar N because the cell walls in non-photosynthetic organs function as an N sink. On the other hand, these species can maintain foliar P concentration by decreasing stem P concentrations despites the depletion of P. Our results emphasize the significance of non-photosynthetic organs as an N sink for understanding the variation of foliar nutrient concentrations for the tree species in the three Bornean rain forests with different N and P availabilities. PMID:27056098

  11. Increased Nutrient Sensitivity and Plasma Concentrations of Enteral Hormones during Duodenal Nutrient Infusion in Functional Dyspepsia

    PubMed Central

    Bharucha, Adil E.; Camilleri, Michael; Burton, Duane D.; Thieke, Shannon L.; Feuerhak, Kelly J.; Basu, Ananda; Zinsmeister, Alan R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Functional dyspepsia is predominantly attributed to gastric sensorimotor dysfunctions. The contribution of intestinal chemosensitivity to symptoms is not understood. We evaluated symptoms and plasma hormones during enteral nutrient infusion and the association with impaired glucose tolerance and quality-of-life (QOL) scores in functional dyspepsia vs health. Design Enteral hormonal responses and symptoms were measured during isocaloric and isovolumic dextrose and lipid infusions into the duodenum in 30 patients with functional dyspepsia (n=27) or nausea and vomiting (n=3) and 35 healthy controls. Infusions were administered in randomized order over 120 minutes each, with a 120-minute washout. Cholecystokinin, glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide, glucagonlike peptide 1 (GLP1), and peptide YY were measured during infusions. Results Moderate or more severe symptoms during lipid (4 controls vs 14 patients) and dextrose (1 control vs 12 patients) infusions were more prevalent in patients than controls (P≤.01), associated with higher dyspepsia symptom score (P=.01), worse QOL (P=.01), and greater plasma hormone concentrations (eg, GLP1 during lipid infusion). Moderate or more severe symptoms during enteral infusion explained 18%, and depression score explained 21%, of interpatient variation in QOL. Eight patients had impaired glucose tolerance, associated with greater plasma GLP1 and peptide YY concentrations during dextrose and lipid infusions, respectively. Conclusions Increased sensitivity to enteral dextrose and lipid infusions was associated with greater plasma enteral hormone concentrations, more severe daily symptoms, and worse QOL in functional dyspepsia. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that enteral hormones mediate increased intestinal sensitivity to nutrients in functional dyspepsia. PMID:25403365

  12. Adaptive management and the USDA-NRCS Nutrient Management (590) conservation practice standard

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of the USDA-NRCS Nutrient Management (590) conservation practice standard is to budget and supply nutrients for plant production, to properly utilize organic amendments as plant nutrient sources, to minimize pollution from application of nutrients, and to maintain or improve the conditio...

  13. Methods of Imputation used in the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: To present the predominate methods of imputing used to estimate nutrient values for foods in the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference (SR20). Materials and Methods: The USDA Nutrient Data Laboratory developed standard methods for imputing nutrient values for foods wh...

  14. Reducing future nutrient inputs to the Black Sea.

    PubMed

    Strokal, Maryna Petrivna; Kroeze, Carolien; Kopilevych, Volodymyr Abramovych; Voytenko, Larysa Vladyslavivna

    2014-01-01

    Rivers export increasing amounts of dissolved inorganic (DIN, DIP) and organic (DON, DOP) nitrogen and phosphorus to the Black Sea causing coastal eutrophication. The aim of this study is to explore future trends in river export of these nutrients to the sea through a sensitivity analysis. We used the Global NEWS (Nutrient Export from WaterSheds) model to this end. We calculated that between 2000 and 2050 nutrient inputs to the Black Sea may increase or decrease, depending on the assumed environmental management. We analyzed the effects of agricultural and sewage management on nutrient inputs to the sea in 2050 relative to two Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MEA) scenarios, Global Orchestration (GO) and Adaptive Mosaic (AM). In these baselines, total N and P inputs to the Black Sea decrease between 2000 and 2050, but not for all rivers and nutrient forms. Our results indicate that it is possible to reduce nutrient inputs to the sea further between 2000 and 2050 in particular for dissolved inorganic N and P and for many river basins, but not for all. For scenarios assuming combined agricultural and sewage management dissolved inorganic N and P inputs to the Black Sea are reduced by up to two-thirds between 2000 and 2050 and dissolved organic N and P inputs by one-third. River export of DIN is mainly affected by agricultural management and that of DIP by sewage management. On the other hand, in scenarios assuming increased fertilizer use for, for instance bioenergy crops, nutrient inputs to the sea increase. An increase in DIP inputs by southern rivers seems difficult to avoid because of the increasing number of people connected to sewage systems. PMID:23906857

  15. Nutrient trends through time in Sweden's Baltic Drainage Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, I.; Destouni, G.; Prieto, C.

    2015-12-01

    Changes in climate and land-use have and will continue to modify regional hydrology, in turn impacting environmental health, agricultural productivity and water resource quality and availability. The Baltic region is an area of interest as the coast spans nine countries- serving over 100 million people. The Baltic Sea contains one of the largest human caused hypoxic dead zones due to eutrophication driven by anthropogenic excess loading of nutrients. Policies to reduce these loads include also international directives and agreements, such as the EU Water Framework Directive, adopted in 2000 to protect and improve water quality throughout the European Union, and the Baltic Sea Action Plan under the Helsinki Commission aimed specifically at reducing the nutrient loading to and mitigating the eutrophication of the Baltic Sea. In light of these policies and amidst the number of studies on the Baltic Sea we ask, using the accessible nutrient and discharge data what does nutrient loading look like today? Are the most excessive loads going down? Observed nutrient and flow time series across Sweden allow for answering these questions, by spatial and temporal trend analysis of loads from various parts of Sweden to the Baltic Sea. Analyzing these observed time series in conjunction with the ecological health status classifications of the EU Water Framework Directive, allows in particular for answering the question if the loads into the water bodies with the poorest water quality, and from those to the Baltic Sea, are improving, being maintained or deteriorating. Such insight is required to contribute to relevant and efficient water and nutrient load management. Furthermore, empirically calculating nutrient loads, rather than only modeling, reveals that the water body health classification may not reflect what water bodies actually contribute the heaviest loads to the Baltic Sea. This work also underscores the importance of comprehensive analysis of all available data from

  16. Deciphering the Interconnections between Nutrient Supply, Demand, and Limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covino, T. P.; Heffernan, J. B.; Bernhardt, E. S.

    2015-12-01

    Studies of stream nutrient dynamics have often focused on the influence of a single potentially limiting nutrient; however, it has become increasingly evident that ecosystems are constrained by the supply of numerous limiting resources. These resources may vary seasonally as a function of temperature, sunlight, and input of carbon and nutrients from upstream or terrestrial sources. We used multiple approaches, including plateau and TASCC nutrient additions, as well as analysis of diel nitrate dynamics as three different and complementary measures of nutrient demand/limitation in New Hope Creek, a third order stream in the Duke Forest of North Carolina over the course of one year. Nitrate-N concentrations were relatively high during the winter, spring, and summer months ranging from 105 - 518 and averaging 383 µg/L between January - August. During this time frame there was low demand for and limited uptake of added nitrate during plateau or TASCC additions (i.e., addition of N did not stimulate increased N uptake) although there was processing of background N evident from diel N and oxygen analyses. During autumn litterfall ecosystem respiration increased strongly and nitrate-N concentrations dropped precipitously, ranging from 9 - 34 and averaging 23 µg/L between September - December. During this period of low in-stream nitrate-N, demand for and uptake of added nitrate was high with maximum uptake rates of 560 µg/m2/min. This highlights the importance of understanding the relationship between nutrient supply and demand and the need to determine multiple resource controls over system processing. We also suggest that nutrient addition experiments need to be interpreted within the context of the supply and demand of multiple potentially limiting resources and the that the temporal dynamics of these relationships should be considered.

  17. Sources of Errors in Developing Monthly to Seasonal Nutrient Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libera, D.; Arumugam, S.

    2014-12-01

    Excess nitrogen in a river system can cause an overabundance of aquatic plant growth that can cause negative effects on larger water bodies downstream. This can result in eutrophication resulting in large algae blooms that hurt local recreation and fish populations. Recent studies have focused on developing seasonal nutrient forecasts that can be used to control nonpoint reduction strategies. Given that the seasonal nutrients are developed using large-scale climate forecasts, it needs to be pre-processed for ingesting into a water quality model. By considering the LOADEST model, a USGS constituent load estimator, and the Soil &Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) this study quantifies the sources of errors in developing monthly to seasonal nutrient forecasts using climate information. For this purpose, we consider the observed streamflow and nutrient loadings at the Tar River at Tarboro, NC station for developing and testing the water quality models. This streamgage was chosen since it is part of the Hydro-Climatic Data Network (HCDN) which naturally considers basins that are relatively undeveloped with limited storage and pumping. The study also proposes two bias-correction procedures, a bivariate copula-based model and a canonical correlation model, for preserving the cross-correlation structure between the observed nutrients and streamflows. Climate forecasts from the ECHAM4.5 model and NOAA NCEP Climate Forecast System (CFS) will be downscaled and disaggregated for developing nutrient forecasts from the SWAT model and the LOADEST model. Using both the canonical correlation model and the bi-variate copula based bias-correction procedures, the forecasted streamflow and TN loadings will be bias-corrected to preserve the correlation structure. The study will also quantify and compare different sources of errors that propagate in developing monthly to seasonal nutrient forecasts using climate information.

  18. Soil nutrient assessment for urban ecosystems in Hubei, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Guo; Zhang, Guo-Shi; Liu, Yi; Wan, Kai-Yuan; Zhang, Run-Hua; Chen, Fang

    2013-01-01

    Recent urban landscape vegetation surveys conducted in many cities in China identified numerous plant nutrient deficiencies, especially in newly developed cities. Soil nutrients and soil nutrient management in the cities of Hubei province have not received adequate attention to date. The aims of this study were to characterize the available nutrients of urban soils from nine cities in Hubei province, China, and to assess how soil nutrient status is related to land use type and topography. Soil nutrients were measured in 405 sites from 1,215 soil samples collected from four land use types (park, institutional [including government building grounds, municipal party grounds, university grounds, and garden city institutes], residential, and roadside verges) and three topographies (mountainous [142-425 m a.s.l], hilly [66-112 m a.s.l], and plain [26-30 m a.s.l]). Chemical analyses showed that urban soils in Hubei had high pH and lower soil organic matter, available nitrogen (N), available phosphorus (P), and available boron (B) concentrations than natural soils. Nutrient concentrations were significantly different among land use types, with the roadside and residential areas having greater concentrations of calcium (Ca), sulfur (S), copper (Cu), manganese (Mn), and zinc (Zn) that were not deficient against the recommended ranges. Topographic comparisons showed statistically significant effects for 8 of the 11 chemical variables (p < 0.05). Concentrations of N, Ca, Mg, S, Cu, and Mn in plain cities were greater than those in mountainous cities and show a negative correlation with city elevation. These results provide data on urban soils characteristics in land use types and topography, and deliver significant information for city planners and policy makers. PMID:24086647

  19. Sleep Symptoms Associated with Intake of Specific Dietary Nutrients

    PubMed Central

    Grandner, Michael A.; Jackson, Nicholas; Gerstner, Jason R.; Knutson, Kristen L.

    2013-01-01

    Sleep symptoms are associated with weight gain and cardiometabolic disease. The potential role of diet has been largely unexplored. Data from the 2007–2008 NHANES were used (N=4,552) to determine which nutrients were associated with sleep symptoms in a nationally-representative sample. Survey items assessed difficulty falling asleep, sleep maintenance difficulties, non-restorative sleep, and daytime sleepiness. Analyses were adjusted for energy intake, other dietary factors, exercise, BMI and sociodemographics. Population-weighted, logistic regression, with backwards-stepwise selection, examined which nutrients were associated with sleep symptoms. Odds ratios (ORs) reflect the difference in odds of sleep symptoms associated with a doubling in nutrient. Nutrients that were independently associated with difficulty falling asleep included (in order): Alpha-Carotene (OR=0.96), Selenium (OR=0.80), Dodecanoic Acid (OR=0.91), Calcium (OR=0.83), and Hexadecanoic Acid (OR=1.10). Nutrients that were independently associated with sleep maintenance difficulties included: Salt (OR=1.19), Butanoic Acid (0,81), Carbohydrate (OR=0.71), Dodecanoic Acid (OR=0.90), Vitamin D (OR=0.84),, Lycopene (OR=0.98), Hexanoic Acid (OR= 1.25), and Moisture (OR=1.27). Nutrients that were independently associated with non-restorative sleep included Butanoic Acid (OR=1.09), Calcium (OR=0.81), Vitamin C (OR=0.92), Water (OR=0.98), Moisture (OR= 1.41), and Cholesterol (OR= 1.10). Nutrients that were independently associated with sleepiness included: Moisture (OR=1.20), Theobromine (OR=1.04), Potassium (OR= 0.70), Water (OR=0.97). These results suggest novel associations between sleep symptoms and diet/metabolism, potentially explaining associations between sleep and cardiometabolic diseases. PMID:23992533

  20. Soil Nutrient Assessment for Urban Ecosystems in Hubei, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi-guo; Zhang, Guo-shi; Liu, Yi; Wan, Kai-yuan; Zhang, Run-hua; Chen, Fang

    2013-01-01

    Recent urban landscape vegetation surveys conducted in many cities in China identified numerous plant nutrient deficiencies, especially in newly developed cities. Soil nutrients and soil nutrient management in the cities of Hubei province have not received adequate attention to date. The aims of this study were to characterize the available nutrients of urban soils from nine cities in Hubei province, China, and to assess how soil nutrient status is related to land use type and topography. Soil nutrients were measured in 405 sites from 1,215 soil samples collected from four land use types (park, institutional [including government building grounds, municipal party grounds, university grounds, and garden city institutes], residential, and roadside verges) and three topographies (mountainous [142–425 m a.s.l], hilly [66–112 m a.s.l], and plain [26–30 m a.s.l]). Chemical analyses showed that urban soils in Hubei had high pH and lower soil organic matter, available nitrogen (N), available phosphorus (P), and available boron (B) concentrations than natural soils. Nutrient concentrations were significantly different among land use types, with the roadside and residential areas having greater concentrations of calcium (Ca), sulfur (S), copper (Cu), manganese (Mn), and zinc (Zn) that were not deficient against the recommended ranges. Topographic comparisons showed statistically significant effects for 8 of the 11 chemical variables (p < 0.05). Concentrations of N, Ca, Mg, S, Cu, and Mn in plain cities were greater than those in mountainous cities and show a negative correlation with city elevation. These results provide data on urban soils characteristics in land use types and topography, and deliver significant information for city planners and policy makers. PMID:24086647

  1. Biomarkers for nutrient intake with focus on alternative sampling techniques.

    PubMed

    Holen, T; Norheim, F; Gundersen, T E; Mitry, P; Linseisen, J; Iversen, P O; Drevon, C A

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers of nutrient intake or nutrient status are important objective measures of foods/nutrients as one of the most important environmental factors people are exposed to. It is very difficult to obtain accurate data on individual food intake, and there is a large variation of nutrient composition of foods consumed in a population. Thus, it is difficult to obtain precise measures of exposure to different nutrients and thereby be able to understand the relationship between diet, health, and disease. This is the background for investing considerable resources in studying biomarkers of nutrients believed to be important in our foods. Modern technology with high sensitivity and specificity concerning many nutrient biomarkers has allowed an interesting development with analyses of very small amounts of blood or tissue material. In combination with non-professional collection of blood by finger-pricking and collection on filters or sticks, this may make collection of samples and analyses of biomarkers much more available for scientists as well as health professionals and even lay people in particular in relation to the marked trend of self-monitoring of body functions linked to mobile phone technology. Assuming standard operating procedures are used for collection, drying, transport, extraction, and analysis of samples, it turns out that many analytes of nutritional interest can be measured like metabolites, drugs, lipids, vitamins, minerals, and many types of peptides and proteins. The advantage of this alternative sampling technology is that non-professionals can collect, dry, and mail the samples; the samples can often be stored under room temperature in a dry atmosphere, requiring small amounts of blood. Another promising area is the potential relation between the microbiome and biomarkers that may be measured in feces as well as in blood. PMID:27551313

  2. Predicting the profile of nutrients available for absorption: from nutrient requirement to animal response and environmental impact.

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, J; Kebreab, E; Mills, J A N; Pellikaan, W F; López, S; Bannink, A; France, J

    2007-02-01

    Current feed evaluation systems for dairy cattle aim to match nutrient requirements with nutrient intake at pre-defined production levels. These systems were not developed to address, and are not suitable to predict, the responses to dietary changes in terms of production level and product composition, excretion of nutrients to the environment, and nutrition related disorders. The change from a requirement to a response system to meet the needs of various stakeholders requires prediction of the profile of absorbed nutrients and its subsequent utilisation for various purposes. This contribution examines the challenges to predicting the profile of nutrients available for absorption in dairy cattle and provides guidelines for further improved prediction with regard to animal production responses and environmental pollution.The profile of nutrients available for absorption comprises volatile fatty acids, long-chain fatty acids, amino acids and glucose. Thus the importance of processes in the reticulo-rumen is obvious. Much research into rumen fermentation is aimed at determination of substrate degradation rates. Quantitative knowledge on rates of passage of nutrients out of the rumen is rather limited compared with that on degradation rates, and thus should be an important theme in future research. Current systems largely ignore microbial metabolic variation, and extant mechanistic models of rumen fermentation give only limited attention to explicit representation of microbial metabolic activity. Recent molecular techniques indicate that knowledge on the presence and activity of various microbial species is far from complete. Such techniques may give a wealth of information, but to include such findings in systems predicting the nutrient profile requires close collaboration between molecular scientists and mathematical modellers on interpreting and evaluating quantitative data. Protozoal metabolism is of particular interest here given the paucity of quantitative data

  3. A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF NUTRIENT LOADING, NUTRIENT RETENTION AND NET ECOSYSTEM METABOLISM IN THREE TIDAL RIVER ESTUARIES DIFFERING PREDOMINATELY BY THEIR WATERSHED LAND USE TYPES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract and oral presentation for the Estuarine Research Federation Conference.

    Estuarine retention of watershed nutrient loads, system-wide nutrient biogeochemical fluxes, and net ecosystem metabolism (NEM) were determined in three estuaries exhibiting differing magnitud...

  4. Changes in the nutrient ratios and phytoplankton community after declines in nutrient concentrations in a semi-enclosed bay in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Lie, Alle A Y; Wong, C Kim; Lam, Jackie Y C; Liu, J H; Yung, Y K

    2011-04-01

    Tolo Harbour is a landlocked bay with poor tidal flushings in the northeastern part of Hong Kong. During the 1980s, excessive nutrient loading led to dramatic increase in nutrient concentrations, accompanied by lower N:P ratios, higher algal biomass and shifts in the phytoplankton community. We studied the effects of nutrient loading reduction measures on nutrient concentrations, nutrient ratios and phytoplankton dynamics in Tolo Harbour by comparing data collected before the full implementation of nutrient loading reduction measures (1986-1997) to those after the implementation (1998-2008). Such measures led to declines in nutrient concentrations, changes in N:P and N:Si ratios, lower chlorophyll-a concentrations and fewer algal blooms. Diatoms were the most abundant phytoplankton group in Tolo Harbour both before and after declines in nutrient concentrations. The density of dinoflagellates did not change, but substantial increase in other algal group abundance was recorded. PMID:21316754

  5. Nutrient dynamics in Amazon shelf waters: results from AMASSEDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demaster, David J.; Pope, Robert H.

    1996-03-01

    Four hydrographic cruises were conducted on the Amazon shelf as part of the AMASSEDS field program. During each cruise, approximately 55 stations were occupied and nutrients, as well as other hydrographic parameters, were measured. The results of this time series sampling program indicate that the nutrient concentrations in the riverine end-member (silicate = 144 μmol kg -1, phosphate = 0.7 μmol kg -1, nitrate = 16 μmol kg -1, ammonium = 0.4 μmol kg -1, and urea = 0.9 μmol kg -1) remain relatively constant, despite a two-fold seasonal variation in river water discharge rate. Of the major nutrients (nitrate, phosphate, ammonium and silicate), nitrate shows the greatest seasonal change in riverine end-member concentration with a high value (23 μmol kg -1) during the March cruise (rising river discharge) and a low value (12 μmol kg -1) during the November cruise (falling river discharge). Nitrate is the dominant nutrient form of inorganic nitrogen throughout most of the river/ocean mixing zone, however, in the outershelf area, where nitrate has been depleted by biological production, this nutrient occurs at concentrations comparable to the other nitrogen species (ammonium, nitrite and urea), which are at levels < 1 μmol kg -1. Nearshore, high turbidity inhibits phytoplankton production because of light limitation, whereas on the outershelf, nitrate appears to be limiting growth more than silicate or phosphate. Nutrient uptake was observed during all four cruises, however, nearly all of this production must be regenerated in shelf bottom waters, because very little of the biogenic materials are buried in the seabed (silicate burial <4% of flux to algal blooms; ˜10% burial of biologically available inorganic nitrogen reaching the river/ocean mixing zone; and <3% burial of phosphate flux to shelf environment). Clearly the Amazon shelf is not an efficient nutrient trap. Initial estimates of primary production on the Amazon shelf suggest that algal blooms are

  6. Nutrients and defoliation increase soil carbon inputs in grassland.

    PubMed

    Ziter, Carly; MacDougall, Andrew S

    2013-01-01

    Given the regulatory impact of resources and consumers on plant production, decomposition, and soil carbon sequestration, anthropogenic changes to nutrient inputs and grazing have likely transformed how grasslands process atmospheric CO2. The direction and magnitude of these changes, however, remain unclear in this system, whose soils contain -20% of the world's carbon pool. Nutrients stimulate production but can also increase tissue palatability and decomposition. Grazing variously affects tissue quality and quantity, decreasing, standing biomass, but potentially increasing leaf nutrient concentrations, root production, or investment in tissue defenses that slow litter decay. Here, we quantified individual and interactive impacts of nutrient addition and simulated grazing (mowing) on above- and belowground production, tissue quality, and soil carbon inputs in a western North American grassland with globally distributed agronomic species. Given that nutrients and grazing are often connected with increased root production and higher foliar tissue quality, we hypothesized that these treatments would combine to reduce inputs of recalcitrant-rich litter critical for C storage. This hypothesis was unsupported. Nutrients and defoliation combined to significantly increase belowground production but did not affect root tissue quality. There were no significant interactions between nutrients and defoliation for any measured response. Three years of nutrient addition increased root and shoot biomass by 37% and 23%, respectively, and had no impact on decomposition, resulting in a -15% increase in soil organic matter and soil carbon. Defoliation triggered a significant burst of short-lived lignin-rich roots, presumably a compensatory response to foliar loss, which increased root litter inputs by 33%. The majority of root and shoot responses were positively correlated, with aboveground biomass a reasonable proxy for whole plant responses. The exceptions were decomposition, with

  7. Algal remediation of CO₂ and nutrient discharges: A review.

    PubMed

    Judd, Simon; van den Broeke, Leo J P; Shurair, Mohamed; Kuti, Yussuf; Znad, Hussein

    2015-12-15

    The recent literature pertaining to the application of algal photobioreactors (PBRs) to both carbon dioxide mitigation and nutrient abatement is reviewed and the reported data analysed. The review appraises the influence of key system parameters on performance with reference to (a) the absorption and biological fixation of CO2 from gaseous effluent streams, and (b) the removal of nutrients from wastewaters. Key parameters appraised individually with reference to CO2 removal comprise algal speciation, light intensity, mass transfer, gas and hydraulic residence time, pollutant (CO2 and nutrient) loading, biochemical and chemical stoichiometry (including pH), and temperature. Nutrient removal has been assessed with reference to hydraulic residence time and reactor configuration, along with C:nutrient ratios and other factors affecting carbon fixation, and outcomes compared with those reported for classical biological nutrient removal (BNR). Outcomes of the review indicate there has been a disproportionate increase in algal PBR research outputs over the past 5-8 years, with a significant number of studies based on small, bench-scale systems. The quantitative impacts of light intensity and loading on CO2 uptake are highly dependent on the algal species, and also affected by solution chemical conditions such as temperature and pH. Calculations based on available data for biomass growth rates indicate that a reactor CO2 residence time of around 4 h is required for significant CO2 removal. Nutrient removal data indicate residence times of 2-5 days are required for significant nutrient removal, compared with <12 h for a BNR plant. Moreover, the shallow depth of the simplest PBR configuration (the high rate algal pond, HRAP) means that its footprint is at least two orders of magnitude greater than a classical BNR plant. It is concluded that the combined carbon capture/nutrient removal process relies on optimisation of a number of process parameters acting synergistically

  8. Critical source times for nutrient loss in agricultural catchment streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melland, Alice; Shore, Mairead; Mellander, Per-Erik; McDonald, Noeleen; Shortle, Ger; Murphy, Paul; Jordan, Phil

    2014-05-01

    Identifying periods of the year when there is a high risk of incidental nutrient loss from farms via runoff to streams underpins current nutrient management legislation in Europe. This research explored high-temporal resolution nutrient transfer patterns relative to the time that manure and fertiliser are prohibited from being spread (the mandatory spreading 'closed' period) in five Irish agricultural catchments. Catchment nutrient losses during the 12 week closed periods in 2009-10, 2010-11 and 2011-12 were compared with losses during the remainder of the year, and with losses in the two week 'shoulder' periods immediately before and after the closed period. The closed period losses were assumed to be residual from soil nutrient stores and the 'shoulder' periods were considered to also include incidental losses. Nutrient loss was measured at sub-hourly frequency as total phosphorus (P) and total oxidised nitrogen (mostly nitrate-N) fluxes in streamflow. The streamflow fluxes showed that the proportion of the annual nitrate-N loss occurring during the closed periods (33-61%) was high compared with the remainder of the year. Six to ten times more nitrate-N loss occurred in the two weeks after, compared with the two weeks before, the closed period. These two week 'shoulder' period losses were, on average, less than or equal to 2.5 kg nitrate-N/ha and 9% of total annual nitrate-N loss in streamflow. On average, 40-53% of the annual P loss occurred during the closed periods but in a runoff-prone catchment in a year with a wet summer, the closed period was the less risky period. Similar to nitrate-N, two to twenty times more P loss occurred in the two weeks after, compared with the two weeks before, the closed period. These shoulder period losses were, on average, less than or equal to 0.027 kg/ha and 4.2% of total annual P loss in streamflow. The proportion of the shoulder period loss that could be attributed to recently spread nutrients was not known but can be

  9. Efficient solution techniques for simulation nutrient uptake by plant roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abesha, Betiglu; Vanderborght, Jan; Javaux, Mathieu; Schnepf, Andrea; Vereecken, Harry

    2015-04-01

    Water and nutrient transfer to plant roots is determined by processes occurring from the single root to the entire root system. A mechanistic spatially distributed description of these processes would require a sub mm discretization which is computationally not feasible. In this contribution, we present efficient solution techniques to represent accurate nutrient uptake by plant roots. The first solution technique describes nutrient transport towards a single root segment using a 1-D radially axisymmetric model (Barber and Cushman 1981). Transport to the entire root system is represented by a network of connected cylindrical models around the roots. This network of cylinders was coupled to a 3-D regular grid that was used to solve the flow and transport equations in the soil at the root system scale (Javaux et al. 2008). The second technique was a modified time compression approximation (TCA), which can be a simple and reasonably accurate semi-analytical method for predicting cumulative nutrient uptake when the convection flux and diffusion coefficient change over time due to for instance soil drying. The analytical approach presented by Roose et al. (2001) to calculate solute cumulative uptake provides means to analyze cumulative nutrient uptake at a changing diffusive-convective flux over time but with constant convection and diffusion coefficient. This analytical solution was used in TCA framework to predict uptake when convection and diffusion coefficient change over time. We compared cumulative nutrient uptake by the 1D / 3D coupled model with results obtained by spatially highly resolved 3-D model and the approximate analytical solution of Roose et al. (2001). The good agreement between both model approaches allows the use of the 1D/3D coupling approach to simulate water and nutrient transport at the a root system scale with minimal computational cost and good accuracy. This approach also accounts for the effect of transpiration and soil drying on nutrient

  10. Climate Variability Impacts on Watershed Nutrient Delivery and Reservoir Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, J. D.; Prochnow, S. J.; Zygo, L. M.; Byars, B. W.

    2005-05-01

    Reservoirs in agricultural dominated watersheds tend to exhibit pulse-system behavior especially if located in climates dominated by summer convective precipitation inputs. Concentration and bulk mass of nutrient and sediment inputs into reservoir systems vary in terms of timing and magnitude of delivery from watershed sources to reservoirs under these climate conditions. Reservoir management often focuses on long-term average inputs without considering short and long-term impacts of variation in loading. In this study we modeled a watershed-reservoir system to assess how climate variability affects reservoir primary production through shifts in external loading and internal recycling of limiting nutrients. The Bosque watershed encompasses 423,824 ha in central Texas which delivers water to Lake Waco, a 2900 ha reservoir that is the primary water source for the city of Waco and surrounding areas. Utilizing the Soil Water Assessment Tool for the watershed and river simulations and the CE-Qual-2e model for the reservoir, hydrologic and nutrient dynamics were simulated for a 10 year period encompassing two ENSO cycles. The models were calibrated based on point measurement of water quality attributes for a two year time period. Results indicated that watershed delivery of nutrients was affected by the presence and density of small flood-control structure in the watershed. However, considerable nitrogen and phosphorus loadings were derived from soils in the upper watershed which have had long-term waste-application from concentrated animal feeding operations. During El Niño years, nutrient and sediment loads increased by 3 times above non-El Niño years. The simulated response within the reservoir to these nutrient and sediment loads had both direct and indirect. Productivity evaluated from chlorophyll a and algal biomass increased under El Niño conditions, however species composition shifts were found with an increase in cyanobacteria dominance. In non-El Niño years

  11. Assessment of nutrient retention by Natete wetland Kampala, Uganda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanyiginya, V.; Kansiime, F.; Kimwaga, R.; Mashauri, D. A.

    Natete wetland which is located in a suburb of Kampala city in Uganda is dominated by C yperus papyrus and covers an area of approximately 1 km 2. The wetland receives wastewater and runoff from Natete town which do not have a wastewater treatment facility. The main objective of this study was to assess nutrient retention of Natete wetland and specifically to: determine the wastewater flow patterns in the wetland; estimate the nutrient loads into and out of the wetland; determine the nutrient retention by soil, plants and water column in the wetland; and assess the above and belowground biomass density of the dominant vegetation. Soil, water and plant samples were taken at 50 m intervals along two transects cut through the wetland; soil and water samples were taken at 10 cm just below the surface. Physico-chemical parameters namely pH, electrical conductivity and temperature were measured in situ. Water samples were analyzed in the laboratory for ammonium-nitrogen, nitrate-nitrogen, total nitrogen, orthophosphate and total phosphorus. Electrical conductivity ranged between 113 μS/cm and 530 μS/cm and the wastewater flow was concentrated on the eastern side of the wetland. pH varied between 6 and 7, temperature ranged from 19 °C to 24 °C. NH 4-N, NO 3-N, and TN concentrations were retained by 21%, 98%, and 35% respectively. Phosphorus concentration was higher at the outlet of the wetland possibly due to release from sediments and leaching. Nutrient loads were higher at the inlet (12,614 ± 394 kgN/day and 778 ± 159 kgP/day) than the outlet (2368 ± 425 kgN/day and 216 ± 56 kgP/day) indicating retention by the wetland. Plants stored most nutrients compared to soil and water. The belowground biomass of papyrus vegetation in the wetland was higher (1288.4 ± 8.3 gDW/m 2) than the aboveground biomass (1019.7 ± 13.8 gDW/m 2). Plant uptake is one of the important routes of nutrient retention in Natete wetland. It is recommended that harvesting papyrus can be an

  12. Groundwater - The Disregarded Component in Lake Water and Nutrient Budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowski, J.; Meinikmann, K.; Pöschke, F.; Nuetzmann, G.; Rosenberry, D. O.

    2015-12-01

    Lake eutrophication is a large and still growing problem in many parts of the world, commonly due to anthropogenic sources of nutrients such as fertilizer, manure or sewage. Improved quantification of nutrient inputs is required to address this problem. Lacustrine groundwater discharge (LGD) transports nutrients from catchments to lakes. Unfortunately, LGD has often been disregarded in lake nutrient studies due to many different reasons, although first reports of LGD are more than 40 years old. Most measurement techniques are based on separate determinations of seepage volume and nutrient concentration of exfiltrating groundwater; i.e., by multiplying both values. We review the international literature, give a brief overview of measurement techniques, and present typical volumes, concentrations and loads reported in literature. Furthermore, we describe the fate of nitrogen and phosphorus on their subsurface pathway from the catchment through the reactive aquifer-lake interface into the lake, and compare LGD related processes with those of two other groundwater-surface water interfaces: the hyporheic zone in streams and the interface between aquifer and marine systems where SGD (submarine groundwater discharge) occurs.

  13. Extracellular enzyme activities and nutrient availability during artificial groundwater recharge.

    PubMed

    Kolehmainen, Reija E; Korpela, Jaana P; Münster, Uwe; Puhakka, Jaakko A; Tuovinen, Olli H

    2009-02-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) removal is the main objective of artificial groundwater recharge (AGR) for drinking water production and biodegradation plays a substantial role in this process. This study focused on the biodegradation of NOM and nutrient availability for microorganisms in AGR by the determination of extracellular enzyme activities (EEAs) and nutrient concentrations along a flow path in an AGR aquifer (Tuusula Water Works, Finland). Natural groundwater in the same area but outside the influence of recharge was used as a reference. Determination of the specific alpha-d-glucosidase (alpha-Glu), beta-d-glucosidase (beta-Glu), phosphomonoesterase (PME), leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) and acetate esterase (AEST) activities by fluorogenic model substrates revealed major increases in the enzymatic hydrolysis rates in the aquifer within a 10m distance from the basin. The changes in the EEAs along the flow path occurred simultaneously with decreases in nutrient concentrations. The results support the assumption that the synthesis of extracellular enzymes in aquatic environments is up and down regulated by nutrient availability. The EEAs in the basin sediment and pore water samples (down to 10cm) were in the same order of magnitude as in the basin water, suggesting similar nutritional conditions. Phosphorus was likely to be the limiting nutrient at this particular AGR site. Furthermore, the extracellular enzymes functioned in a synergistic and cooperative way. PMID:19028394

  14. Pathogen infection drives patterns of nutrient resorption in citrus plants.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jirong; Cheng, Chunzhen; Yang, Junjie; Wang, Qibing

    2015-01-01

    Nutrient resorption processes in the plants infected by pathogen remain poorly understood. Huanglongbing (HLB) is a destructive disease of citrus. HLB-pathogen 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' grows specifically in the phloem of hosts and may cause problems in the plant vascular system after infection. Therefore, it brings a great concern about the phloem nutrient transport and nutrient intra-cycling in HLB-affected plants. We investigated the effects of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' infection on nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) concentrations and resorption in different citrus species (i.e. Citrus reticulata, Citrus limon and Citrus maxima). HLB-pathogen infection had distinctive impacts on nutrient resorption in different species. P resorption efficiency substantially decreased in infected C. reticulata plants relative to the healthy plants in summer, which may account for the marked decrease in the average fruit yield. P resorption was more efficient in infected C. limon plants than in the healthy plants. However, for C. maxima plants, HLB had no significant effects on N:P ratio in live leaves and resorption efficiency as well as on fruit yield. Keeping efficient internal nutrient cycling can be a strategy of citrus species being tolerant to HLB. PMID:26419510

  15. Modelling macrofaunal biomass in relation to hypoxia and nutrient loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmermann, Karen; Norkko, Joanna; Janas, Urszula; Norkko, Alf; Gustafsson, Bo G.; Bonsdorff, Erik

    2012-12-01

    Nutrient loading of aquatic ecosystems results in more food for benthic macrofaunal communities but also increases the risk of hypoxia, resulting in a reduction or complete loss of benthic biomass. This study investigates the interaction between eutrophication, hypoxia and benthic biomass with emphasis on the balance between gains and loss of benthic biomass due to changes in nutrient loadings. A physiological fauna model with 5 functional groups was linked to a 3D coupled hydrodynamic-ecological Baltic Sea model. Model results revealed that benthic biomass increased between 0 and 700% after re-oxygenating bottom waters. Nutrient reduction scenarios indicated improved oxygen concentrations in bottom waters and decreased sedimentation of organic matter up to 40% after a nutrient load reduction following the Baltic Sea Action Plan. The lower food supply to benthos reduced the macrofaunal biomass up to 35% especially in areas not currently affected by hypoxia, whereas benthic biomass increased up to 200% in areas affected by eutrophication-induced hypoxia. The expected changes in benthic biomass resulting from nutrient load reductions and subsequent reduced hypoxia may not only increase the food supply for benthivorous fish, but also significantly affect the biogeochemical functioning of the ecosystem.

  16. Quantifying the nutrient flux within a lowland karstic catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormack, T.; Naughton, O.; Johnston, P. M.; Gill, L. W.

    2015-01-01

    Nutrient contamination of surface and groundwaters is an issue of growing importance as the risks associated with agricultural runoff escalate due to increasing demands on global food production. In this study, the nutrient flux occurring within the surface and groundwaters of a lowland karst catchment in western Ireland was investigated with the aid of alkalinity sampling and a hydrological model. Water samples were collected and tested from a variety of rivers, lakes (or turloughs), boreholes and springs at monthly intervals over a three year period. Alkalinity sampling was used to elucidate the contrasting hydrological functioning between different turloughs. Such disparate hydrological functioning was further investigated with the aid of a hydrological model which allowed for an estimate of allogenic and autogenic derived nutrient loading into the karst system. The model also allowed for an investigation of mixing within the turloughs, comparing observed behaviours with the hypothetical conservative behaviour allowed for by the model. Results indicated that at the system outlet to the sea, autogenic recharge had added approximately 35% to the total flow and approximately 85% to the total N-load. Within some turloughs, nutrient loads were found to reduce over the flooded period, even though the turloughs hydrological functioning (and the hydrological model) suggested this should not occur. As such, it was determined that nutrient loss processes were occurring within the system. Denitrification was deemed to be the main process reducing nitrogen concentrations within the turloughs whereas phosphorus loss is thought to occur mostly within the diffuse/epikarst zone.

  17. The imprint of crop choice on global nutrient needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jobbágy, Esteban G.; Sala, Osvaldo E.

    2014-08-01

    Solutions to meet growing food requirements in a world of limited suitable land and degrading environment focus mainly on increasing crop yields, particularly in poorly performing regions, and reducing animal product consumption. Increasing yields could alleviate land requirements, but imposing higher soil nutrient withdrawals and in most cases larger fertilizer inputs. Lowering animal product consumption favors a more efficient use of land as well as soil and fertilizer nutrients; yet actual saving may largely depend on which crops and how much fertilizer are used to feed livestock versus people. We show, with a global analysis, how the choice of cultivated plant species used to feed people and livestock influences global food production as well as soil nutrient withdrawals and fertilizer additions. The 3 to 15-fold differences in soil nutrient withdrawals per unit of energy or protein produced that we report across major crops explain how composition shifts over the last 20 years have reduced N, maintained P and increased K harvest withdrawals from soils while contributing to increasing dietary energy, protein and, particularly, vegetable fat outputs. Being highly variable across crops, global fertilization rates do not relate to actual soil nutrient withdrawals, but to monetary values of harvested products. Future changes in crop composition could contribute to achieve more sustainable food systems, optimizing land and fertilizer use.

  18. Effects of Salinity and Nutrient Addition on Mangrove Excoecaria agallocha

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yaping; Ye, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Effects of salinity on seed germination and growth of young (1 month old) and old (2-year old) seedlings of Excoecaria agallocha were investigated. Combined effects of salinity and nutrient level were also examined on old seedlings. Seed germination was best at 0 and 5 psu salinity. 15 psu salinity significantly delayed root initiation and decreased final establishment rate. All seeds failed to establish at 25 psu salinity. Young seedlings performed best at 0 and 5 psu, but growth was stunned at 15 psu, and all seedlings died within 90 days at 25 psu. Old seedlings grew best at salinities below 5 psu and they survived the whole cultivation at 25 psu. This indicated that E. agallocha increased salt tolerance over time. Gas exchange was significantly compromised by salinities above 15 psu but evidently promoted by high nutrient. Proline accumulated considerably at high nutrient, and its contents increased from 0 to 15 psu but decreased at 25 psu salinity. Lipid peroxidation was aggravated by increasing salinity beyond 15 psu but markedly alleviated by nutrient addition. These responses indicated that E. agallocha was intolerant to high salinity but it can be greatly enhanced by nutrient addition. PMID:24691495

  19. Nutrient mobility within river basins: a European perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Colin; Heathwaite, A. L.

    2005-03-01

    The research presented in this special issue of the Journal of Hydrology is brought together with associated information of relevance to the thematic area in this concluding paper. Some of the important gaps in our current knowledge are outlined with a view to identifying future research needs for the development of an integrated analysis of nutrients in river basins and their management. Identification of these needs is important if we are to meet the defined set of catchment management objectives specified under the EU Water Framework Directive that must be delivered against a specified timetable. The Directive raises wider concerns such as how to define 'good ecological status' and pertinent to this special issue: what role nutrients have in framing this definition. In this paper, the importance of nutrient pressures on receiving waters is evaluated in the context of the key scientific uncertainties and options for characterising the biological, physico-chemical and hydro-morphological parameters necessary to meet the science needs of the Directive. An assessment of the significance of nutrient mobility within river basins for current understanding of freshwater systems functioning on a catchment and basin scale is made together with an evaluation of where research on nutrient pressures should be focussed in order underpin effective management.

  20. Nutrient budget for Saguling Reservoir, West Java, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Hart, Barry T; van Dok, Wendy; Djuangsih, Nani

    2002-04-01

    A preliminary nutrient budget for Saguling Reservoir is reported as a first attempt to quantify the behaviour of nutrients entering this reservoir. This work is part of a larger Indonesia-Australia collaborative research and training project, involving Padjadjaran University and Monash University, established to study nutrient dynamics in Saguling Reservoir. Saguling Reservoir, the first of a chain of three large reservoirs (Saguling, Cirata and Jatilahur), built on the Citarum River in central Java, was completed in 1985. It has already become highly polluted, particularly with domestic and industrial effluent (organic matter, nutrients, heavy metals) from the urban areas of Bandung (population 2 million). The reservoir experiences major water quality problems, including excessive growths of floating plants, toxic cyanobacterial blooms and regular fish-kills. The work reported in this paper shows that Saguling receives a very large nutrient load from the city of Bandung and because of this, is highly eutrophic. It is unlikely that the water quality of Saguling will improve until a substantial part of Bandung is sewered and adequate discharge controls are placed on the many industries in the region upstream of the reservoir. PMID:12092591

  1. Pathogen infection drives patterns of nutrient resorption in citrus plants

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jirong; Cheng, Chunzhen; Yang, Junjie; Wang, Qibing

    2015-01-01

    Nutrient resorption processes in the plants infected by pathogen remain poorly understood. Huanglongbing (HLB) is a destructive disease of citrus. HLB-pathogen ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ grows specifically in the phloem of hosts and may cause problems in the plant vascular system after infection. Therefore, it brings a great concern about the phloem nutrient transport and nutrient intra-cycling in HLB-affected plants. We investigated the effects of ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’ infection on nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) concentrations and resorption in different citrus species (i.e. Citrus reticulata, Citrus limon and Citrus maxima). HLB-pathogen infection had distinctive impacts on nutrient resorption in different species. P resorption efficiency substantially decreased in infected C. reticulata plants relative to the healthy plants in summer, which may account for the marked decrease in the average fruit yield. P resorption was more efficient in infected C. limon plants than in the healthy plants. However, for C. maxima plants, HLB had no significant effects on N:P ratio in live leaves and resorption efficiency as well as on fruit yield. Keeping efficient internal nutrient cycling can be a strategy of citrus species being tolerant to HLB. PMID:26419510

  2. Future productivity and carbon storage limited by terrestrial nutrient availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieder, William R.; Cleveland, Cory C.; Smith, W. Kolby; Todd-Brown, Katherine

    2015-06-01

    The size of the terrestrial sink remains uncertain. This uncertainty presents a challenge for projecting future climate-carbon cycle feedbacks. Terrestrial carbon storage is dependent on the availability of nitrogen for plant growth, and nitrogen limitation is increasingly included in global models. Widespread phosphorus limitation in terrestrial ecosystems may also strongly regulate the global carbon cycle, but explicit considerations of phosphorus limitation in global models are uncommon. Here we use global state-of-the-art coupled carbon-climate model projections of terrestrial net primary productivity and carbon storage from 1860-2100 estimates of annual new nutrient inputs from deposition, nitrogen fixation, and weathering; and estimates of carbon allocation and stoichiometry to evaluate how simulated CO2 fertilization effects could be constrained by nutrient availability. We find that the nutrients required for the projected increases in net primary productivity greatly exceed estimated nutrient supply rates, suggesting that projected productivity increases may be unrealistically high. Accounting for nitrogen and nitrogen-phosphorus limitation lowers projected end-of-century estimates of net primary productivity by 19% and 25%, respectively, and turns the land surface into a net source of CO2 by 2100. We conclude that potential effects of nutrient limitation must be considered in estimates of the terrestrial carbon sink strength through the twenty-first century.

  3. Nutrient depletion in Bacillus subtilis biofilms triggers matrix production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenbo; Seminara, Agnese; Suaris, Melanie; Brenner, Michael P.; Weitz, David A.; Angelini, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Many types of bacteria form colonies that grow into physically robust and strongly adhesive aggregates known as biofilms. A distinguishing characteristic of bacterial biofilms is an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) matrix that encases the cells and provides physical integrity to the colony. The EPS matrix consists of a large amount of polysaccharide, as well as protein filaments, DNA and degraded cellular materials. The genetic pathways that control the transformation of a colony into a biofilm have been widely studied, and yield a spatiotemporal heterogeneity in EPS production. Spatial gradients in metabolites parallel this heterogeneity in EPS, but nutrient concentration as an underlying physiological initiator of EPS production has not been explored. Here, we study the role of nutrient depletion in EPS production in Bacillus subtilis biofilms. By monitoring simultaneously biofilm size and matrix production, we find that EPS production increases at a critical colony thickness that depends on the initial amount of carbon sources in the medium. Through studies of individual cells in liquid culture we find that EPS production can be triggered at the single-cell level by reducing nutrient concentration. To connect the single-cell assays with conditions in the biofilm, we calculate carbon concentration with a model for the reaction and diffusion of nutrients in the biofilm. This model predicts the relationship between the initial concentration of carbon and the thickness of the colony at the point of internal nutrient deprivation.

  4. Solution culture method for studying nutrient uptake and stress

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, L.E.; Gutschick, V.P.

    1984-01-01

    In order to study the uptake of two (or more) different mineral nutrients at very low concentrations, a solution culture system with new capabilities was developed. It allows tight control of nutrient concentrations of very low levels, accurate uptake rate measurements, and frequent non-destructive measurements of plant mass and dimensions. The hydroponic system includes (1) a water-deionizing system, (2) an automated mixing system that can provide up to 3000 liters/day of the base solution containing the non-varied nutrients; (3) seven separate reciprocating syringe pumps, each of which mixes base solution and concentrates of the two varied nutrients and supplies an entire set of plants for one nutritional treatment; (4) growth pots, consisting of 2-liter plastic beakers divided internally into three separate compartments, each provided with a separate nutrient inflow, drain, and aerator/mixer. This once-through (non-recirculating) flow system is constructed entirely of plastics and lesser amounts of other materials in order to minimize chemical contamination. Numerous other advantages are discussed. 3 references, 1 table.

  5. Phytotoxicity studies with Lactuca sativa in soil and nutrient solution

    SciTech Connect

    Hulzebos, E.M.; Dirven-van Breemen, E.M.; Dis, W.A. van; Herbold, H.A.; Hoekstra, J.A.; Baerselman, R.; Gestel, C.A.M van ); Adema, D.M.M.; Henzen, L. )

    1993-06-01

    The toxicity of 76 priority pollutants to lettuce (Lactuca sativa) was determined in soil and in nutrient solution. In the first case a static and in the latter a semistatic exposure was established. Volatile and easily degradable compounds had high EC50 values in soil. In nutrient solution, however, several of these compounds were rather toxic. Quantitative structure activity relationships (QSARs) relating EC50 values to log K[sub ow] could be described for the toxicity in nutrient solution. Generally, the toxicity of the compounds increased with increasing lipophilicity. Deviations were caused by reactivity (N-containing compounds, double bonds in compounds), low lipophilicity, and EC50 values close to solubility. To relate toxicity in soil and nutrient solution, soil EC50 values were recalculated to values in the soil pore water using calculated adsorption coefficients. Estimated pore-water EC50 values showed a good correlation with values determined in nutrient solution but were not equal to these values. The differences can be attributed to differences in exposure.

  6. Parallel Exploitation of Diverse Host Nutrients Enhances Salmonella Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Steeb, Benjamin; Claudi, Beatrice; Burton, Neil A.; Tienz, Petra; Schmidt, Alexander; Farhan, Hesso; Mazé, Alain; Bumann, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Pathogen access to host nutrients in infected tissues is fundamental for pathogen growth and virulence, disease progression, and infection control. However, our understanding of this crucial process is still rather limited because of experimental and conceptual challenges. Here, we used proteomics, microbial genetics, competitive infections, and computational approaches to obtain a comprehensive overview of Salmonella nutrition and growth in a mouse typhoid fever model. The data revealed that Salmonella accessed an unexpectedly diverse set of at least 31 different host nutrients in infected tissues but the individual nutrients were available in only scarce amounts. Salmonella adapted to this situation by expressing versatile catabolic pathways to simultaneously exploit multiple host nutrients. A genome-scale computational model of Salmonella in vivo metabolism based on these data was fully consistent with independent large-scale experimental data on Salmonella enzyme quantities, and correctly predicted 92% of 738 reported experimental mutant virulence phenotypes, suggesting that our analysis provided a comprehensive overview of host nutrient supply, Salmonella metabolism, and Salmonella growth during infection. Comparison of metabolic networks of other pathogens suggested that complex host/pathogen nutritional interfaces are a common feature underlying many infectious diseases. PMID:23633950

  7. Physical characteristics and feeding skills as predictors of adequacy of nutrient intakes of mentally retarded individuals.

    PubMed

    Litchford, M D

    1986-03-01

    Characteristics common to mentally retarded adults with marginal or inadequate nutrient intakes who may be high risk for specific nutrient deficiencies were identified. Although physiological and psychological influences, feeding practices, and weight status were not found to influence the average nutrient intakes of the sample population, intakes of iron, calcium, and riboflavin were affected by sex of the resident. Inadequate intakes of these key nutrients may predispose this vulnerable population to nutrient-related disorders. PMID:3953684

  8. Global Expanded Nutrient Supply (GENuS) Model: A New Method for Estimating the Global Dietary Supply of Nutrients

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Christopher D.; Mozaffarian, Dariush

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient data exist for accurate estimation of global nutrient supplies. Commonly used global datasets contain key weaknesses: 1) data with global coverage, such as the FAO food balance sheets, lack specific information about many individual foods and no information on micronutrient supplies nor heterogeneity among subnational populations, while 2) household surveys provide a closer approximation of consumption, but are often not nationally representative, do not commonly capture many foods consumed outside of the home, and only provide adequate information for a few select populations. Here, we attempt to improve upon these datasets by constructing a new model—the Global Expanded Nutrient Supply (GENuS) model—to estimate nutrient availabilities for 23 individual nutrients across 225 food categories for thirty-four age-sex groups in nearly all countries. Furthermore, the model provides historical trends in dietary nutritional supplies at the national level using data from 1961–2011. We determine supplies of edible food by expanding the food balance sheet data using FAO production and trade data to increase food supply estimates from 98 to 221 food groups, and then estimate the proportion of major cereals being processed to flours to increase to 225. Next, we estimate intake among twenty-six demographic groups (ages 20+, both sexes) in each country by using data taken from the Global Dietary Database, which uses nationally representative surveys to relate national averages of food consumption to individual age and sex-groups; for children and adolescents where GDD data does not yet exist, average calorie-adjusted amounts are assumed. Finally, we match food supplies with nutrient densities from regional food composition tables to estimate nutrient supplies, running Monte Carlo simulations to find the range of potential nutrient supplies provided by the diet. To validate our new method, we compare the GENuS estimates of nutrient supplies against independent

  9. Global Expanded Nutrient Supply (GENuS) Model: A New Method for Estimating the Global Dietary Supply of Nutrients.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew R; Micha, Renata; Golden, Christopher D; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Myers, Samuel S

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient data exist for accurate estimation of global nutrient supplies. Commonly used global datasets contain key weaknesses: 1) data with global coverage, such as the FAO food balance sheets, lack specific information about many individual foods and no information on micronutrient supplies nor heterogeneity among subnational populations, while 2) household surveys provide a closer approximation of consumption, but are often not nationally representative, do not commonly capture many foods consumed outside of the home, and only provide adequate information for a few select populations. Here, we attempt to improve upon these datasets by constructing a new model--the Global Expanded Nutrient Supply (GENuS) model--to estimate nutrient availabilities for 23 individual nutrients across 225 food categories for thirty-four age-sex groups in nearly all countries. Furthermore, the model provides historical trends in dietary nutritional supplies at the national level using data from 1961-2011. We determine supplies of edible food by expanding the food balance sheet data using FAO production and trade data to increase food supply estimates from 98 to 221 food groups, and then estimate the proportion of major cereals being processed to flours to increase to 225. Next, we estimate intake among twenty-six demographic groups (ages 20+, both sexes) in each country by using data taken from the Global Dietary Database, which uses nationally representative surveys to relate national averages of food consumption to individual age and sex-groups; for children and adolescents where GDD data does not yet exist, average calorie-adjusted amounts are assumed. Finally, we match food supplies with nutrient densities from regional food composition tables to estimate nutrient supplies, running Monte Carlo simulations to find the range of potential nutrient supplies provided by the diet. To validate our new method, we compare the GENuS estimates of nutrient supplies against independent

  10. Method and apparatus for determining nutrient stimulation of biological processes

    DOEpatents

    Colwell, F.S.; Geesey, G.G.; Gillis, R.J.; Lehman, R.M.

    1999-07-13

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for determining the nutrients to stimulate microorganisms in a particular environment. A representative sample of microorganisms from a particular environment are contacted with multiple support means wherein each support means has intimately associated with the surface of the support means a different nutrient composition for microorganisms in the sample. The multiple support means is allowed to remain in contact with the microorganisms in the sample for a time period sufficient to measure difference in microorganism effects for the multiple support means. Microorganism effects for the multiple support means are then measured and compared. The invention is particularly adaptable to being conducted in situ. The additional steps of regulating nutrients added to the particular environment of microorganisms can enhance the desired results. Biological systems particularly suitable for this invention are bioremediation, biologically enhanced oil recovery, biological leaching of metals, and agricultural bioprocesses. 5 figs.

  11. The Everglades are still threatened by excess nutrients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Atreyee

    2012-10-01

    Since 1985, a Florida state agency constructed and maintained hundreds of square kilometers of wetlands built to regulate the amount of nutrients reaching the Everglades in southern Florida. However, Zapata-Rios et al. show that this is proving to be ineffective in controlling concentrations of phosphorous, a key nutrient, in the surface waters of the wetland. Historically, the Everglades has been a nutrient-poor environment, a characteristic that determines the delicate ecological balance and distinct flora and fauna in this region. Agricultural development and urbanization since the 1800s have not only claimed two- thirds of the natural Everglades (only 6000 square kilometers now exist in their natural form) but have also dramatically increased phosphorus levels in surface water, at times exceeding the acceptable limit of 10 micrograms per liter by severalfold.

  12. Sediment and nutrient losses from an irrigated watershed.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjorneberg, D.; Ippolito, J.

    2011-12-01

    Irrigated agriculture is an essential part of stable food and fiber production. However, water returning from irrigated watersheds can contain excess sediment, nutrients and salts. Applying polyacrylamide to furrow irrigated fields reduces erosion 60 to 90%. Converting from furrow irrigation to sprinkler irrigation eliminates planned irrigation runoff necessary for uniform water application. Installing sediment ponds removes 50 to 80% of the suspended sediment from water before it flows back to major water bodies. In southern Idaho, irrigation watershed monitoring showed that implementing these conservation practices has reduced average suspended sediment loss from 460 kg/ha in 1970 to less than 100 kg/ha in 2005. These practices, however, have had less effect on soluble nutrients. Median nitrate concentrations have almost doubled from 1970 to 2005. Current research is focusing on identifying practices to reduce soluble nutrient losses.

  13. Bilateral Femoral Nutrient Foraminal Cement Penetration during Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Coomber, Ross; Bhumbra, Rej S; Marston, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Cement pressurisation is important for the insertion of both the acetabular and femoral components during Total Hip Arthroplasty (THA). Secondary to pressurization the rare phenomenon of unilateral cement incursion into the nutrient foramen has previously been reported. No bilateral case has been reported to date. This has implications both for misdiagnosis of periprosthetic fractures and for medico-legal consequences due to a presumed adverse intra-operative event. Case Report: We present a case report of a 59 year old, caucasian female who underwent staged bilateral cemented Stanmore THA. The post-operative radiographs demonstrate evidence of bilateral nutrient foramen penetration intra-operatively by standard viscosity cement. The patient suffered no adverse consequences. Conclusions: In summary, cement extravasation into the nutrient foramen is an important differential to be considered in presence of posterior-medial cement in the diaphysis of femur following THA. This requires no further intervention and has no effect on the outcome.

  14. Intestinal organoids for assessing nutrient transport, sensing and incretin secretion

    PubMed Central

    Zietek, Tamara; Rath, Eva; Haller, Dirk; Daniel, Hannelore

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal nutrient transport and sensing are of emerging interest in research on obesity and diabetes and as drug targets. Appropriate in vitro models are lacking that allow both, studies on transport processes as well as sensing and subsequent incretin hormone secretion including intracellular signaling. We here demonstrate that murine small-intestinal organoids are the first in vitro model system enabling concurrent investigations of nutrient and drug transport, sensing and incretin hormone secretion as well as fluorescent live-cell imaging of intracellular signaling processes. By generating organoid cultures from wild type mice and animals lacking different nutrient transporters, we show that organoids preserve the main phenotypic features and functional characteristics of the intestine. This turns them into the best in vitro model currently available and opens new avenues for basic as well as medical research. PMID:26582215

  15. Method and apparatus for determining nutrient stimulation of biological processes

    DOEpatents

    Colwell, F.S.; Geesey, G.G.; Gillis, R.J.; Lehman, R.M.

    1997-11-11

    A method and apparatus is described for determining the nutrients to stimulate microorganisms in a particular environment. A representative sample of microorganisms from a particular environment are contacted with multiple support means wherein each support means has intimately associated with the surface of the support means a different nutrient composition for said microorganisms in said sample. The multiple support means is allowed to remain in contact with the microorganisms in the sample for a time period sufficient to measure differences in microorganism effects for the multiple support means. Microorganism effects for the multiple support means are then measured and compared. The invention is particularly adaptable to being conducted in situ. The additional steps of regulating nutrients added to the particular environment of microorganisms can enhance the desired results. Biological systems particularly suitable for this invention are bioremediation, biologically enhanced oil recovery, biological leaching of metals, and agricultural bioprocesses. 5 figs.

  16. Microbial community composition in sediments resists perturbation by nutrient enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Jennifer L; Ward, Bess B; Morrison, Hilary G; Hobbie, John E; Valiela, Ivan; Deegan, Linda A; Sogin, Mitchell L

    2011-01-01

    Functional redundancy in bacterial communities is expected to allow microbial assemblages to survive perturbation by allowing continuity in function despite compositional changes in communities. Recent evidence suggests, however, that microbial communities change both composition and function as a result of disturbance. We present evidence for a third response: resistance. We examined microbial community response to perturbation caused by nutrient enrichment in salt marsh sediments using deep pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA and functional gene microarrays targeting the nirS gene. Composition of the microbial community, as demonstrated by both genes, was unaffected by significant variations in external nutrient supply in our sampling locations, despite demonstrable and diverse nutrient-induced changes in many aspects of marsh ecology. The lack of response to external forcing demonstrates a remarkable uncoupling between microbial composition and ecosystem-level biogeochemical processes and suggests that sediment microbial communities are able to resist some forms of perturbation. PMID:21412346

  17. Nutrient adequacy of a very low-fat vegan diet.

    PubMed

    Dunn-Emke, Stacey R; Weidner, Gerdi; Pettengill, Elaine B; Marlin, Ruth O; Chi, Christine; Ornish, Dean M

    2005-09-01

    This study assessed the nutrient adequacy of a very low-fat vegan diet. Thirty-nine men (mean age=65 years) with early stage prostate cancer who chose the "watchful waiting" approach to disease management, were instructed by a registered dietitian and a chef on following a very low-fat (10%) vegan diet with the addition of a fortified soy protein powdered beverage. Three-day food diaries, excluding vitamin and mineral supplements, were analyzed and nutrient values were compared against Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI). Mean dietary intake met the recommended DRIs. On the basis of the Adequate Intake standard, a less than adequate intake was observed for vitamin D. This demonstrates that a very low-fat vegan diet with comprehensive nutrition education emphasizing nutrient-fortified plant foods is nutritionally adequate, with the exception of vitamin D. Vitamin D supplementation, especially for those with limited sun exposure, can help assure nutritional adequacy. PMID:16129088

  18. Food waste as nutrient source in heterotrophic microalgae cultivation.

    PubMed

    Pleissner, Daniel; Lam, Wan Chi; Sun, Zheng; Lin, Carol Sze Ki

    2013-06-01

    Glucose, free amino nitrogen (FAN), and phosphate were recovered from food waste by fungal hydrolysis using Aspergillus awamori and Aspergillus oryzae. Using 100g food waste (dry weight), 31.9 g glucose, 0.28 g FAN, and 0.38 g phosphate were recovered after 24h of hydrolysis. The pure hydrolysate has then been used as culture medium and nutrient source for the two heterotrophic microalgae Schizochytrium mangrovei and Chlorella pyrenoidosa, S. mangrovei and C. pyrenoidosa grew well on the complex food waste hydrolysate by utilizing the nutrients recovered. At the end of fermentation 10-20 g biomass were produced rich in carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Results of this study revealed the potential of food waste hydrolysate as culture medium and nutrient source in microalgae cultivation. PMID:23587816

  19. Nutrient limitation of phytoplankton growth in Georgia nearshore waters

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, S.S.; Emmanuele, K.A.; Yoder, J.A.

    1984-12-01

    Nutrient enrichment experiments were conducted to investigate the utilization of dissolved organic (DON) and inorganic nitrogen (DIN) by marine phytoplankton in Georgia coastal waters. Natural populations of marine phytoplankton, enriched with different concentrations of ammonium chloride and other plant nutrients, were grown under controlled temperature and irradiance conditions until the populations reached ''stationary phase.'' Results showed that (1) phytoplankton are limited by DIN up to ca. 20 ..mu..M, when another nutrient (phosphate or silicate) becomes limiting, (2) very little naturally-occuring DON is directly utilized for growth, (3) very little DON is indirectly made available for growth over time periods of days to ca. 1 week, and (4) trace metals and vitamins do not significantly limit phytoplankton growth.

  20. World fertilizer nutrient reserves: a view to the future.

    PubMed

    Fixen, Paul E; Johnston, Adrian M

    2012-03-30

    The increasing need for food production in subtropical regions likely translates to a need for additional plant nutrients. As a consequence, knowledge of world fertilizer nutrient reserves is of particular relevance to sustainable agriculture in the subtropics. The stewardship responsibilities of agriculture include the wise use of the raw materials from which commercial fertilizers are produced. Development and implementation of fertilizer best management practices with focus on the 4Rs-right source, right rate, right time, right place-are timely not only for short-term economic and environmental reasons, but also for the wise stewardship of the non-renewable nutrient resources upon which food, feed, fiber, and fuel production depend. PMID:22415449

  1. Method and apparatus for determining nutrient stimulation of biological processes

    DOEpatents

    Colwell, Frederick S.; Geesey, Gill G.; Gillis, Richard J.; Lehman, R. Michael

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the nutrients to stimulate microorganisms in a particular environment. A representative sample of microorganisms from a particular environment are contacted with multiple support means wherein each support means has intimately associated with the surface of the support means a different nutrient composition for said microorganisms in said sample. The multiple support means is allowed to remain in contact with the microorganisms in the sample for a time period sufficient to measure difference in microorganism effects for the multiple support means. Microorganism effects for the multiple support means are then measured and compared. The invention is particularly adaptable to being conducted in situ. The additional steps of regulating nutrients added to the particular environment of microorganisms can enhance the desired results. Biological systems particularly suitable for this invention are bioremediation, biologically enhanced oil recovery, biological leaching of metals, and agricultural bioprocesses.

  2. Method and apparatus for determining nutrient stimulation of biological processes

    DOEpatents

    Colwell, Frederick S.; Geesey, Gill G.; Gillis, Richard J.; Lehman, R. Michael

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the nutrients to stimulate microorganisms in a particular environment. A representative sample of microorganisms from a particular environment are contacted with multiple support means wherein each support means has intimately associated with the surface of the support means a different nutrient composition for said microorganisms in said sample. The multiple support means is allowed to remain in contact with the microorganisms in the sample for a time period sufficient to measure differences in microorganism effects for the multiple support means. Microorganism effects for the multiple support means are then measured and compared. The invention is particularly adaptable to being conducted in situ. The additional steps of regulating nutrients added to the particular environment of microorganisms can enhance the desired results. Biological systems particularly suitable for this invention are bioremediation, biologically enhanced oil recovery, biological leaching of metals, and agricultural bioprocesses.

  3. The role of carbon in fungal nutrient uptake and transport

    PubMed Central

    Fellbaum, Carl R.; Mensah, Jerry A.; Pfeffer, Philip E.; Kiers, E. Toby; Bücking, Heike

    2012-01-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, which forms between plant hosts and ubiquitous soil fungi of the phylum Glomeromycota, plays a key role for the nutrient uptake of the majority of land plants, including many economically important crop species. AM fungi take up nutrients from the soil and exchange them for photosynthetically fixed carbon from the host. While our understanding of the exact mechanisms controlling carbon and nutrient exchange is still limited, we recently demonstrated that (i) carbon acts as an important trigger for fungal N uptake and transport, (ii) the fungus changes its strategy in response to an exogenous supply of carbon, and that (iii) both plants and fungi reciprocally reward resources to those partners providing more benefit. Here, we summarize recent research findings and discuss the implications of these results for fungal and plant control of resource exchange in the AM symbiosis. PMID:22990447

  4. Whole-tree harvesting: Fourth year progress report for 1982 - nutrient depletion estimates, postharvest impacts on nutrient dynamics, and regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    West, D.C.; Mann, L.K.

    1983-12-01

    The environmental effects of residue removal and whole-tree utilization for several forest types in the United States are being studied. Sites were selected to include central hardwoods, northern hardwoods, northern hardwood, northern coniferous, southern Appalachian oak-hickory, northwestern coniferous, and southern pine forests. All sites have been established at locations having a long history of biomass and nutrient cycling research to provide a foundation of data to assess the effects of whole-tree harvest on erosion, nutrients, water quality, and productivity. This report (the fourth in a series) describes the direct effects of intensive harvesting and some regeneration effects. Harvesting, including bole only and residue removal, is complete at all sites, and ecosystem nutrient budgets for most sites are presented. Short-term direct effects on nutrients cycling processes, impacts of different intensities of harvest on nutrient pools, and uncertainties of long-term effects are discussed. A brief discussion of implications of whole-tree removal is included. 12 references, 9 figures, 43 tables.

  5. Nutrient concentrations and fluxes in the upper catchment of the Miyun Reservoir, China, and potential nutrient reduction strategies.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jian; Du, Pengfei; Lang, Cong

    2015-03-01

    The Miyun Reservoir is Beijing's main drinking water source. Increased nutrient levels in the reservoir have resulted in an increased risk of harmful algal blooms. One hundred ten water samples were collected at a range of spatial scales in the upper catchment of the Miyun Reservoir and were analyzed for total nitrogen (TN), nitrate (NO3 (-)-N), ammonium (NH4 (+)-N), total phosphorus (TP), and the potassium permanganate index (CODMn). Empirical equations were developed from relationships between nutrient concentrations and the main controls on nutrient, and were used to identify parts of the catchment that should be targeted with nutrient load reduction measures. Cropland was the main source of sediment for the streams, and much of the phosphorus was associated with sediment. The annual mean TP concentrations were closely correlated with both the annual mean suspended sediment concentrations and the ratio of the cropland area to the total basin area. There was a linear relationship between the annual mean TN concentration and the population density in the basins. Soil conservation may play an important role in reducing TP concentrations in the upper reaches of the Chao and Bai Rivers. It may be useful to (1) construct natural riparian buffers and vegetated buffers along croplands close to the watercourses, (2) implement management strategies to reduce nitrogen (N) fertilizer applications, and (3) construct additional wetlands to reduce nutrient loads in the study area. PMID:25673273

  6. Global assessment of nutrient loads to the world's largest lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Gabriel; Reder, Klara; Malsy, Marcus; Eisner, Stephanie; Flörke, Martina

    2015-04-01

    Lakes are essential resources of drinking water for a large part of mankind. Even so, most of the industrial and domestic waste water is discharged - often untreated - into rivers and streams that are finally the tributaries of these important freshwater bodies. Additionally, diffuse nutrient sources such as fertilizer and atmospheric deposition exacerbate existing algal blooms and low oxygen concentrations in rivers, lakes, and reservoirs. In this tense atmosphere of competing water uses, it is necessary to analyze all sources of pollution as well as their total contributions in order to protect these water bodies against deterioration. Finally, this is a general and urgently needed basis for developing recommendations for involved stakeholders and decision makers. Therefore, the project eartH2Observe, initiated and financed by the European Commission, creates the necessary and underlying quantitative and qualitative hydrological and water use data. In this context, information for global as well as for regional water resource assessments is being prepared based on new earth observations and an ensemble of global hydrological models. As a member of this ensemble, WaterGAP3 provides global estimates of lake water quality relevant parameters on a 5 arc minutes grid, namely total phosphorus and total nitrogen. These nutrient loads to lakes from different sources such as industrial fertilizer, organic fertilizer, domestic loads, atmospheric deposition, and urban surface runoff are estimated for the period 1990 to 2010 in a monthly time step. Whereas nutrient loads and their changes into numerous lakes worldwide are calculated, a special focus is set on nutrient loads into the large and shallow Lake Peipus, which is located between Estonia and Russia and subject to blooms of harmful cyanobacteria. We present estimates, trends, as well as sources of present nutrient loads (TN and TP) to the world's largest lakes with detailed insights to the Lake Peipus situation

  7. Predator-Driven Nutrient Recycling in California Stream Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Munshaw, Robin G.; Palen, Wendy J.; Courcelles, Danielle M.; Finlay, Jacques C.

    2013-01-01

    Nutrient recycling by consumers in streams can influence ecosystem nutrient availability and the assemblage and growth of photoautotrophs. Stream fishes can play a large role in nutrient recycling, but contributions by other vertebrates to overall recycling rates remain poorly studied. In tributaries of the Pacific Northwest, coastal giant salamanders (Dicamptodon tenebrosus) occur at high densities alongside steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and are top aquatic predators. We surveyed the density and body size distributions of D. tenebrosus and O. mykiss in a California tributary stream, combined with a field study to determine mass-specific excretion rates of ammonium (N) and total dissolved phosphorus (P) for D. tenebrosus. We estimated O. mykiss excretion rates (N, P) by bioenergetics using field-collected data on the nutrient composition of O. mykiss diets from the same system. Despite lower abundance, D. tenebrosus biomass was 2.5 times higher than O. mykiss. Mass-specific excretion summed over 170 m of stream revealed that O. mykiss recycle 1.7 times more N, and 1.2 times more P than D. tenebrosus, and had a higher N:P ratio (8.7) than that of D. tenebrosus (6.0), or the two species combined (7.5). Through simulated trade-offs in biomass, we estimate that shifts from salamander biomass toward fish biomass have the potential to ease nutrient limitation in forested tributary streams. These results suggest that natural and anthropogenic heterogeneity in the relative abundance of these vertebrates and variation in the uptake rates across river networks can affect broad-scale patterns of nutrient limitation. PMID:23520520

  8. Efficiency of nutrient acquisition by fine roots and mycorrhizae

    SciTech Connect

    Yanai, R.D.; Fahey, T.J.; Miller, S.L.

    1995-07-01

    It is difficult to assess claims about the adaptive advantages of root foraging strategies without a conceptual model specific enough to allow quantitative prediction and testing. Application of a solute uptake model in combination with a calculation of carbon costs provides a means of assessing the efficiency of carbon expenditures in procuring nutrients from soil. We analyzed the optimal values of root properties, such as longevity, diameter, and mycorrhizal association, that maximized the efficiency of carbon exchange for nutrient uptake in different environments. Optimal longevity was found to decrease with increased soil fertility if the kinetics of nutrient uptake were assumed to decline with increased root longevity. Optimal diameter was found to be smaller than observed in roots, suggesting that other constraints on root structure or function limit their minimum diameter. Mycorrhizal hyphae were found to be more efficient than roots regardless of soil fertility. The steady-state approach to calculating carbon costs and nutrient gain enabled combinations of root and soil properties to be very simply evaluated. However, this approach ignored spatial heterogeneity and temporal variation in root and soil properties, such as aging of roots and patchiness of soil fertility. Furthermore, finding the values of root parameters that maximize root E may not predict the optimal root deployment for the plant, which depends on the relative value of carbon and nutrients in the whole plant. Estimation of the rate of exchange of carbon and nutrients in roots is a necessary step toward an economic analysis of allocation strategies; it also reveals areas of ignorance and helps to identify future research needs.

  9. Carbon and nutrient use efficiencies optimally balance stoichiometric imbalances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzoni, Stefano; Čapek, Petr; Lindahl, Björn; Mooshammer, Maria; Richter, Andreas; Šantrůčková, Hana

    2016-04-01

    Decomposer organisms face large stoichiometric imbalances because their food is generally poor in nutrients compared to the decomposer cellular composition. The presence of excess carbon (C) requires adaptations to utilize nutrients effectively while disposing of or investing excess C. As food composition changes, these adaptations lead to variable C- and nutrient-use efficiencies (defined as the ratios of C and nutrients used for growth over the amounts consumed). For organisms to be ecologically competitive, these changes in efficiencies with resource stoichiometry have to balance advantages and disadvantages in an optimal way. We hypothesize that efficiencies are varied so that community growth rate is optimized along stoichiometric gradients of their resources. Building from previous theories, we predict that maximum growth is achieved when C and nutrients are co-limiting, so that the maximum C-use efficiency is reached, and nutrient release is minimized. This optimality principle is expected to be applicable across terrestrial-aquatic borders, to various elements, and at different trophic levels. While the growth rate maximization hypothesis has been evaluated for consumers and predators, in this contribution we test it for terrestrial and aquatic decomposers degrading resources across wide stoichiometry gradients. The optimality hypothesis predicts constant efficiencies at low substrate C:N and C:P, whereas above a stoichiometric threshold, C-use efficiency declines and nitrogen- and phosphorus-use efficiencies increase up to one. Thus, high resource C:N and C:P lead to low C-use efficiency, but effective retention of nitrogen and phosphorus. Predictions are broadly consistent with efficiency trends in decomposer communities across terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems.

  10. Allocation of Nutrients to Somatic Tissues in Young Ovariectomized Grasshoppers

    PubMed Central

    Judd, Evan T.; Hatle, John D.; Drewry, Michelle D.; Wessels, Frank J.; Hahn, Daniel A.

    2010-01-01

    The disposable soma hypothesis predicts that when reproduction is reduced, life span is increased because more nutrients are invested in the soma, increasing somatic repair. Rigorously testing the hypothesis requires tracking nutrients from ingestion to allocation to the soma or to reproduction. Fruit flies on life-extending dietary restriction increase allocation to the soma “relative” to reproduction, suggesting that allocation of nutrients can be associated with extension of life span. Here, we use stable isotopes to track ingested nutrients in ovariectomized grasshoppers during the first oviposition cycle. Previous work has shown that ovariectomy extends life span, but investment of protein in reproduction is not reduced until after the first clutch of eggs is laid. Because ovariectomy does not affect investment in reproduction at this age, the disposable soma hypothesis would predict that ovariectomy should also not affect investment in somatic tissues. We developed grasshopper diets with distinct signatures of 13C and 15N, but that produced equivalent reproductive outputs. These diets are, therefore, appropriate for the reciprocal switches in diet needed for tracking ingested nutrients. Incorporation of stable isotopes into eggs showed that grasshoppers are income breeders, especially for carbon. Allocation to the fat body of nitrogen ingested as adults was slightly increased by ovariectomy; this was our only result that was not consistent with the disposable soma hypothesis. In contrast, ovariectomy did not affect allocation of nitrogen to femoral muscles. Further, allocation of carbon to the fat body or femoral muscles did not appear to be affected by ovariectomy. Total anti-oxidant activities in the hemolymph and femoral muscles were not affected by ovariectomy. These experiments showed that allocation of nutrients was altered little by ovariectomy in young grasshoppers. Additional studies on older individuals are needed to further test the disposable

  11. Effects of nutrient enrichment on mangrove leaf litter decomposition.

    PubMed

    Keuskamp, Joost A; Hefting, Mariet M; Dingemans, Bas J J; Verhoeven, Jos T A; Feller, Ilka C

    2015-03-01

    Nutrient enrichment of mangroves, a common phenomenon along densely populated coastlines, may negatively affect mangrove ecosystems by modifying internal carbon and nutrient cycling. The decomposition of litter exerts a strong influence on these processes and is potentially modified by eutrophication. This study describes effects of N and P enrichment on litter decomposition rate and mineralisation/immobilisation patterns. By making use of reciprocal litter transplantation experiments among fertiliser treatments, it was tested if nutrient addition primarily acts on the primary producers (i.e. changes in litter quantity and quality) or on the microbial decomposers (i.e. changes in nutrient limitation for decomposition). Measurements were done in two mangrove forests where primary production was either limited by N or by P, which had been subject to at least 5 years of experimental N and P fertilisation. Results of this study indicated that decomposers were always N-limited regardless of the limitation of the primary producers. This leads to a differential nutrient limitation between decomposers and primary producers in sites where mangrove production was P-limited. In these sites, fertilisation with P caused litter quality to change, resulting in a higher decomposition rate. This study shows that direct effects of fertilisation on decomposition through an effect on decomposer nutrient availability might be non-significant, while the indirect effects through modifying litter quality might be quite substantial in mangroves. Our results show no indication that eutrophication increases decomposition without stimulating primary production. Therefore we do not expect a decline in carbon sequestration as a result of eutrophication of mangrove ecosystems. PMID:25497680

  12. Nutrient enrichment coupled with sedimentation favors sea anemones over corals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pi-Jen; Hsin, Min-Chieh; Huang, Yen-Hsun; Fan, Tung-Yung; Meng, Pei-Jie; Lu, Chung-Cheng; Lin, Hsing-Juh

    2015-01-01

    Fine sediments, which account for the majority of total fluvial sediment flux, have been suggested to degrade coral reefs on a global scale. Furthermore, sediment impacts can be exacerbated by extreme rainfall events associated with global climate change and anthropogenic nutrient enrichment. We report the findings from a series of mesocosm experiments exploring the effects of short-term sedimentation and nutrient enrichment on the interactions between the hard coral Acropora muricata, the sea anemone Mesactinia ganesis, and the green macroalga Codium edule. Mesocosms were manipulated to simulate either unimpacted reefs or reefs exposed to elevated levels of fine sediments for 10 or 14 days to simulate the effects of heavy rainfall. The first and second experiments were aimed to examine the effects of inorganic and organic sediments, respectively. The third experiment was designed to examine the interactive effects of nutrient enrichment and elevated sediment loads. Neither inorganic nor organic sediment loadings significantly affected the physiological performance of the coral, but, importantly, did reduce its ability to compete with other organisms. Photosynthetic efficiencies of both the green macroalga and the sea anemone increased in response to both sediment loadings when they were simultaneously exposed to nutrient enrichment. While organic sediment loading increased the nitrogen content of the green macroalga in the first experiment, inorganic sediment loading increased its phosphorus content in the second experiment. The coral mortality due to sea anemones attack was significantly greater upon exposure to enriched levels of organic sediments and nutrients. Our findings suggest that the combined effects of short-term sedimentation and nutrient enrichment could cause replacement of corals by sea anemones on certain coral reefs. PMID:25897844

  13. Nutrient Enrichment Coupled with Sedimentation Favors Sea Anemones over Corals

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pi-Jen; Hsin, Min-Chieh; Huang, Yen-Hsun; Fan, Tung-Yung; Meng, Pei-Jie; Lu, Chung-Cheng; Lin, Hsing-Juh

    2015-01-01

    Fine sediments, which account for the majority of total fluvial sediment flux, have been suggested to degrade coral reefs on a global scale. Furthermore, sediment impacts can be exacerbated by extreme rainfall events associated with global climate change and anthropogenic nutrient enrichment. We report the findings from a series of mesocosm experiments exploring the effects of short-term sedimentation and nutrient enrichment on the interactions between the hard coral Acropora muricata, the sea anemone Mesactinia ganesis, and the green macroalga Codium edule. Mesocosms were manipulated to simulate either unimpacted reefs or reefs exposed to elevated levels of fine sediments for 10 or 14 days to simulate the effects of heavy rainfall. The first and second experiments were aimed to examine the effects of inorganic and organic sediments, respectively. The third experiment was designed to examine the interactive effects of nutrient enrichment and elevated sediment loads. Neither inorganic nor organic sediment loadings significantly affected the physiological performance of the coral, but, importantly, did reduce its ability to compete with other organisms. Photosynthetic efficiencies of both the green macroalga and the sea anemone increased in response to both sediment loadings when they were simultaneously exposed to nutrient enrichment. While organic sediment loading increased the nitrogen content of the green macroalga in the first experiment, inorganic sediment loading increased its phosphorus content in the second experiment. The coral mortality due to sea anemones attack was significantly greater upon exposure to enriched levels of organic sediments and nutrients. Our findings suggest that the combined effects of short-term sedimentation and nutrient enrichment could cause replacement of corals by sea anemones on certain coral reefs. PMID:25897844

  14. Relating watershed nutrient loads to satellite derived estuarine water quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehrter, J. C.; Le, C.

    2015-12-01

    Nutrient enhanced phytoplankton production is a cause of degraded estuarine water quality. Yet, relationships between watershed nutrient loads and the spatial and temporal scales of phytoplankton blooms and subsequent water quality impairments remain unquantified for most systems. This is partially due to a lack of observations. In many systems, satellite remote sensing of water quality variables may be used to supplement limited field observations and improve understanding of linkages to nutrients. Here, we present the results from a field and satellite ocean color study that quantitatively links nutrients to variations in estuarine water quality endpoints. The study was conducted in Pensacola Bay, Florida, an estuary in the northern Gulf of Mexico that is impacted by watershed nutrients. We developed new empirical band ratio algorithms to retrieve phytoplankton biomass as chlorophyll a (chla), colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM), and suspended particulate matter (SPM) from the MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS). MERIS had suitable spatial resolution (300-m) for the scale of Pensacola Bay (area = 370 km2, mean depth = 3.4 m) and a spectral band centered at wavelength 709 nm that was used to minimize the effect of organic matter on chla retrieval. The algorithms were applied to daily MERIS remote sensing reflectance (level 2) data acquired from 2003 to 2011 to calculate nine-year time-series of mean monthly chla, CDOM, and SPM concentrations. The MERIS derived time-series were then analyzed for statistical relations with time-series of mean monthly river discharge and river loads of nitrogen, phosphorus, dissolved organic carbon, and SPM. Regression analyses revealed significant relationships between river loads and MERIS water quality variables. The simple regression models provide quantitative predictions about how much chla, CDOM, and SPM concentrations in Pensacola Bay will increase with increased river loading, which is necessary information

  15. Alternative nutrient sources for biotechnological use of Sporosarcina pasteurii.

    PubMed

    Cuzman, Oana Adriana; Richter, Katharina; Wittig, Linda; Tiano, Piero

    2015-06-01

    The potential use of Sporosarcina pasteurii in possible biotechnological applications on a large scale (ground improvement, consolidation of building structures and ornamental stone, or in developing bio-materials for the building industry), is based on its ability to produce high amounts of carbonate in a short period of time via urea hydrolysis. Industrial biomass production would have a low environmental impact and would be most economical if the standard growth media could be replaced with alternative nutrient sources, such as byproducts or wastes from other industries, or other low cost ingredients. The use of cost effective ingredients must guarantee ureolytic activities and growth conditions that are comparable to those resulting from the standard nutrient medium. In this work, three types of alternative media were tested for growing the ureolytic active bacteria S. pasteurii: (1) alternative nutrient sources such as industrial wastes resulting from the dairy and brewery industries, (2) fertilizer urea as an alternative urea substitute, and (3) different types of poultry manure based fertilizers as nutrient and urea substitutes. The comparison between the standard media, the nutrient alternatives and urea substitutes was possible by taking the protein concentration and nitrogen content into account. Bacterial activity was evaluated in terms of biomass changes over time (CFU, optical density, ATP measurements) and indirect estimation of the enzyme production (Nessler assay, conductivity measurement). The results revealed that some of the dairy wastes tested, such as whey and buttermilk, are potential alternative nutrients for bacterial development, while the urea fertilizer is perfectly suitable as an economical substitute for pure laboratory grade urea. PMID:25813200

  16. A changing nutrient regime in the Gulf of Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, David W.; Rebuck, Nathan D.; Thomas, Maura A.; Karp-Boss, Lee; Gettings, Rachel M.

    2010-04-01

    Recent oceanographic observations and a retrospective analysis of nutrients and hydrography over the past five decades have revealed that the principal source of nutrients to the Gulf of Maine, the deep, nutrient-rich continental slope waters that enter at depth through the Northeast Channel, may have become less important to the Gulf's nutrient load. Since the 1970s, the deeper waters in the interior Gulf of Maine (>100 m) have become fresher and cooler, with lower nitrate (NO 3) but higher silicate (Si(OH) 4) concentrations. Prior to this decade, nitrate concentrations in the Gulf normally exceeded silicate by 4-5 μM, but now silicate and nitrate are nearly equal. These changes only partially correspond with that expected from deep slope water fluxes correlated with the North Atlantic Oscillation, and are opposite to patterns in freshwater discharges from the major rivers in the region. We suggest that accelerated melting in the Arctic and concomitant freshening of the Labrador Sea in recent decades have likely increased the equatorward baroclinic transport of the inner limb of the Labrador Current that flows over the broad continental shelf from the Grand Banks of Newfoundland to the Gulf of Maine. That current system now brings a greater fraction of colder and fresher deep shelf waters into the Gulf than warmer and saltier offshore slope waters which were previously thought to dominate the flux of nutrients. Those deep shelf waters reflect nitrate losses from sediment denitrification and silicate accumulations from rivers and in situ regeneration, which together are altering the nutrient regime and potentially the structure of the planktonic ecosystem.

  17. Allocation of nutrients to somatic tissues in young ovariectomized grasshoppers.

    PubMed

    Judd, Evan T; Hatle, John D; Drewry, Michelle D; Wessels, Frank J; Hahn, Daniel A

    2010-11-01

    The disposable soma hypothesis predicts that when reproduction is reduced, life span is increased because more nutrients are invested in the soma, increasing somatic repair. Rigorously testing the hypothesis requires tracking nutrients from ingestion to allocation to the soma or to reproduction. Fruit flies on life-extending dietary restriction increase allocation to the soma "relative" to reproduction, suggesting that allocation of nutrients can be associated with extension of life span. Here, we use stable isotopes to track ingested nutrients in ovariectomized grasshoppers during the first oviposition cycle. Previous work has shown that ovariectomy extends life span, but investment of protein in reproduction is not reduced until after the first clutch of eggs is laid. Because ovariectomy does not affect investment in reproduction at this age, the disposable soma hypothesis would predict that ovariectomy should also not affect investment in somatic tissues. We developed grasshopper diets with distinct signatures of ¹³C and ¹⁵N, but that produced equivalent reproductive outputs. These diets are, therefore, appropriate for the reciprocal switches in diet needed for tracking ingested nutrients. Incorporation of stable isotopes into eggs showed that grasshoppers are income breeders, especially for carbon. Allocation to the fat body of nitrogen ingested as adults was slightly increased by ovariectomy; this was our only result that was not consistent with the disposable soma hypothesis. In contrast, ovariectomy did not affect allocation of nitrogen to femoral muscles. Further, allocation of carbon to the fat body or femoral muscles did not appear to be affected by ovariectomy. Total anti-oxidant activities in the hemolymph and femoral muscles were not affected by ovariectomy. These experiments showed that allocation of nutrients was altered little by ovariectomy in young grasshoppers. Additional studies on older individuals are needed to further test the disposable

  18. Mathematical modelling of plant water and nutrient uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roose, Tiina

    2010-05-01

    In this presentation I will describe a model of plant water and nutrient uptake and how to translate this model and experimental data from the single root scale to the root branching structure scale. The model starts at the single root scale and describes the water and nutrient movement in the soil using Richards' equation (water uptake) and diffusion-convection equation (nutrient uptake). The water and nutrient uptake in the single root scale model is represented by boundary conditions. In the case of nutrient uptake this has the form of a non-linear Michaelis-Menten uptake law and in the case of water this is given by a soil-xylem pressure difference boundary condition. The flow of water in the xylem is modeled as Poiseuille flow. We solve the single root scale models using the analytic approximate technique of asymptotic expansions similar to Oseen expansions known from fluid dynamics. We will then discuss how to use the analytic expression to estimate the water and nutrient uptake by growing root branching systems. We model the growth of the root system using a dynamic population model to describe the branching and elongation of roots in the branching system. This root branching population model results in a hyperbolic equation similar to age dependent population models and it can be solved fully analytically using the method of characteristics. Thus we have a fully analytic description of the root branching system evolution. We use this branching model to estimate the nutrient uptake in a scenario when the competition between subbranches is small, i.e., as it is in the case of phosphate, potassium and arsenic. We compare our approximate analytic model to a full 3d simulation of the root system phosphate uptake and find that the analytic model almost perfectly reproduces the 3d numerical model. In addition the analytic model can be included in larger field/catchment/climate scale models something which is not practically possible with the numerical simulations

  19. Molecular nutrition: Interaction of nutrients, gene regulations and performances.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kan

    2016-07-01

    Nutrition deals with ingestion of foods, digestion, absorption, transport of nutrients, intermediary metabolism, underlying anabolism and catabolism, and excretion of unabsorbed nutrients and metabolites. In addition, nutrition interacts with gene expressions, which are involved in the regulation of animal performances. Our laboratory is concerned with the improvement of animal productions, such as milks, meats and eggs, with molecular nutritional aspects. The present review shows overviews on the nutritional regulation of metabolism, physiological functions and gene expressions to improve animal production in chickens and dairy cows. PMID:27110862

  20. Through form to function: root hair development and nutrient uptake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilroy, S.; Jones, D. L.

    2000-01-01

    Root hairs project from the surface of the root to aid nutrient and water uptake and to anchor the plant in the soil. Their formation involves the precise control of cell fate and localized cell growth. We are now beginning to unravel the complexities of the molecular interactions that underlie this developmental regulation. In addition, after years of speculation, nutrient transport by root hairs has been demonstrated clearly at the physiological and molecular level, with evidence for root hairs being intense sites of H(+)-ATPase activity and involved in the uptake of Ca(2+), K(+), NH(4)(+), NO(3)(-), Mn(2+), Zn(2+), Cl(-) and H(2)PO(4)(-).

  1. Nutrient resources for crop production in the tropics

    PubMed Central

    Vlek, P. L. G.; Kühne, R. F.; Denich, M.

    1997-01-01

    For the foreseeable future a majority of the population, and almost all the mal- and under-nourished, will continue to be found in the tropics and subtropics. Food security in these parts of the world will have to be met largely from local resources. The productivity of the land is to a large extent determined by the fertlity of the soil, which in turn is mostly determined by its organic matter content and stored nutrients. Soil organic matter is readily lost when organic matter inputs are reduced upon cultivation and more so upon intensification. The concomitant loss of topsoil and possible exposure of subsoil acidity may cause further soil degradation.
    Plant nutrients to replenish what is yearly taken from the soil to meet the demands for food and fibre amount to 230 million tonnes (Mt). Current fertilizer consumption stands at about 130 Mt of N, P2O5,and K2O, supplemented by an estimated 90 Mt of N from biological nitrogen fixation worldwide. Although 80 per cent of the population lives in the developing world, only half the world's fertilizer is consumed there. Yet, as much as 50% of the increase in agricultural productivity in the developing world is due to the adoption of fertilizers. World population growth will cause a doubling in these nutrients requirements for the developing world by 2020, which, in the likely case of inadequate production, will need to be met from soil reserves. Because expansion of the cultivable land area is reaching its limits, the reliance on nutrient inputs and their efficient use is bound to grow.
    With current urban expansion, nutrients in harvested products are increasingly lost from the rural environment as a whole. Estimates of soil nutrient depletion rates for sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) are alarmingly high. The situation may be more favourable in Latin America and Asia where fertilizer inputs are tenfold those of SSA. Closing the nutrient cycle at a community level in rural areas may be tedious; on an inter-regional level

  2. A new insight into root responses to external cues: Paradigm shift in nutrient sensing

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Deepak; Medici, Anna; Gojon, Alain; Lacombe, Benoît; Tuteja, Narendra

    2015-01-01

    Higher plants are sessile and their growth relies on nutrients present in the soil. The acquisition of nutrients is challenging for plants. Phosphate and nitrate sensing and signaling cascades play significant role during adverse conditions of nutrient unavailability. Therefore, it is important to dissect the mechanism by which plant roots acquire nutrients from the soil. Root system architecture (RSA) exhibits extensive developmental flexibility and changes during nutrient stress conditions. Growth of root system in response to external concentration of nutrients is a joint operation of sensor or receptor proteins along with several other cytoplasmic accessory proteins. After nutrient sensing, sensor proteins start the cellular relay involving transcription factors, kinases, ubiquitin ligases and miRNA. The complexity of nutrient sensing is still nebulous and many new players need to be better studied. This review presents a survey of recent paradigm shift in the advancements in nutrient sensing in relation to plant roots. PMID:26146897

  3. A new insight into root responses to external cues: Paradigm shift in nutrient sensing.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Deepak; Medici, Anna; Gojon, Alain; Lacombe, Benoît; Tuteja, Narendra

    2015-01-01

    Higher plants are sessile and their growth relies on nutrients present in the soil. The acquisition of nutrients is challenging for plants. Phosphate and nitrate sensing and signaling cascades play significant role during adverse conditions of nutrient unavailability. Therefore, it is important to dissect the mechanism by which plant roots acquire nutrients from the soil. Root system architecture (RSA) exhibits extensive developmental flexibility and changes during nutrient stress conditions. Growth of root system in response to external concentration of nutrients is a joint operation of sensor or receptor proteins along with several other cytoplasmic accessory proteins. After nutrient sensing, sensor proteins start the cellular relay involving transcription factors, kinases, ubiquitin ligases and miRNA. The complexity of nutrient sensing is still nebulous and many new players need to be better studied. This review presents a survey of recent paradigm shift in the advancements in nutrient sensing in relation to plant roots. PMID:26146897

  4. Carbon storage in seagrass soils: long-term nutrient history exceeds the effects of near-term nutrient enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armitage, A. R.; Fourqurean, J. W.

    2015-10-01

    The carbon sequestration potential in coastal soils is linked to aboveground and belowground plant productivity and biomass, which in turn, is directly and indirectly influenced by nutrient input. We evaluated the influence of long-term and near-term nutrient input on aboveground and belowground carbon accumulation in seagrass beds, using a nutrient enrichment (nitrogen and phosphorus) experiment embedded within a naturally occurring, long-term gradient of phosphorus availability within Florida Bay (USA). We measured organic carbon stocks in soils and above- and belowground seagrass biomass after 17 months of experimental nutrient addition. At the nutrient-limited sites, phosphorus addition increased the carbon stock in aboveground seagrass biomass by more than 300 %; belowground seagrass carbon stock increased by 50-100 %. Soil carbon content slightly decreased (~ 10 %) in response to phosphorus addition. There was a strong but non-linear relationship between soil carbon and Thalassia testudinum leaf nitrogen: phosphorus (N : P) or belowground seagrass carbon stock. When seagrass leaf N : P exceeded a threshold of 75 : 1, or when belowground seagrass carbon stock was less than 100 g m-2, there was less than 3 % organic carbon in the sediment. Despite the marked difference in soil carbon between phosphorus-limited and phosphorus-replete areas of Florida Bay, all areas of the bay had relatively high soil carbon stocks near or above the global median of 1.8 % organic carbon. The relatively high carbon content in the soils indicates that seagrass beds have extremely high carbon storage potential, even in nutrient-limited areas with low biomass or productivity.

  5. Carbon storage in seagrass soils: long-term nutrient history exceeds the effects of near-term nutrient enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armitage, A. R.; Fourqurean, J. W.

    2016-01-01

    The carbon sequestration potential in coastal soils is linked to aboveground and belowground plant productivity and biomass, which in turn, is directly and indirectly influenced by nutrient input. We evaluated the influence of long-term and near-term nutrient input on aboveground and belowground carbon accumulation in seagrass beds, using a nutrient enrichment (nitrogen and phosphorus) experiment embedded within a naturally occurring, long-term gradient of phosphorus availability within Florida Bay (USA). We measured organic carbon stocks in soils and above- and belowground seagrass biomass after 17 months of experimental nutrient addition. At the nutrient-limited sites, phosphorus addition increased the carbon stock in aboveground seagrass biomass by more than 300 %; belowground seagrass carbon stock increased by 50-100 %. Soil carbon content slightly decreased ( ˜ 10 %) in response to phosphorus addition. There was a strong but non-linear relationship between soil carbon and Thalassia testudinum leaf nitrogen : phosphorus (N : P) or belowground seagrass carbon stock. When seagrass leaf N : P exceeded an approximate threshold of 75 : 1, or when belowground seagrass carbon stock was less than 100 g m-2, there was less than 3 % organic carbon in the sediment. Despite the marked difference in soil carbon between phosphorus-limited and phosphorus-replete areas of Florida Bay, all areas of the bay had relatively high soil carbon stocks near or above the global median of 1.8 % organic carbon. The relatively high carbon content in the soils indicates that seagrass beds have extremely high carbon storage potential, even in nutrient-limited areas with low biomass or productivity.

  6. The response of nutrient assimilation and biochemical composition of Arctic seaweeds to a nutrient input in summer.

    PubMed

    Gordillo, Francisco J L; Aguilera, José; Jiménez, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    Twenty-one species of macroalgae (four Chlorophyta, eight Rhodophyta, and nine Phaeophyta) from the Kongsfjord (Norwegian Arctic) were examined for their response to nutrient enrichment (nitrate and phosphate) in the summer period. The enzymatic activities related to nutrient assimilation, external carbonic anhydrase (CAext, EC 4.2.1.1), nitrate reductase (NR, EC 1.6.6.1), and alkaline phosphatase (AP, EC 3.1.3.1), as well as the biochemical composition (total C and N, soluble carbohydrates, soluble proteins, and pigments) were measured. CAext activity was present in all species, and showed a general decrease after nutrient enrichment. Inversely, NR activity increased in most of the species examined. Changes in pigment ratios pointed to the implication of light harvesting system in the acclimation strategy. Despite enzymatic and pigmentary response, the Arctic seaweeds can be regarded as not being N-limited even in summer, as shown by the slight effect of nutrient enrichment on biochemical composition. The exception being the nitrophilic species Monostroma arcticum and, to a lesser extent, Acrosiphonia sp. For the rest of the species studied, changes in total internal C and N, soluble proteins, soluble carbohydrates, pigment content, and the internal pool of inorganic N were recorded only for particular species and no general pattern was shown. Acclimation to unexpected nutrient input seemed to ensure the maintenance of a stable biomass composition, rather than an optimized use of the newly available resource (except for the nitrophilic species). This indicates a high degree of resilience of the algal community to a disruption in the natural nutrient availability pattern. PMID:16829547

  7. Proximate versus ultimate limiting nutrients in the Mississippi River Plume and Implications for Hypoxia Reductions through Nutrient Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fennel, Katja; Laurent, Arnaud

    2016-04-01

    A large hypoxic area (15,000 km2 on average) forms every summer over the Texas-Louisiana shelf in the northern Gulf of Mexico due to decay of organic matter that is primarily derived from nutrient inputs from the Mississippi/Atchafalaya River System. Efforts are underway to reduce the extent of hypoxic conditions through nutrient management in the watershed; for example, an interagency Hypoxia Task Force is developing Action Plans with input from various stakeholders that set out targets for hypoxia reduction. An open question is how far nutrient loads would have to be decreased in order to produce the desired reductions in hypoxia and when these would be measurable given significant natural variability. We have simulated a large number of multi-year nutrient load reduction scenarios with a regional biogeochemical model for the region. The model is based on the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS), explicitly includes nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) species as inorganic nutrients, and has been shown to realistically reproduce the key processes responsible for hypoxia generation. We have quantified the effects of differential reductions in river N and P loads on hypoxic extent. An assessment of the effects of N versus P reductions is important because, thus far, nutrient management efforts have focused on N, yet P is known to limit primary production in spring and early summer. A debate is ongoing as to whether targets for P reductions should be set and whether nutrient reduction efforts should focus solely on P, which results primarily from urban and industrial point sources and is uncoupled from agricultural fertilizer application. Our results strongly indicate that N is the 'ultimate' limiting nutrient to primary production determining the areal extent and duration of hypoxic conditions in a cumulative sense, while P is temporarily limiting in spring. Although reductions in river P load would decrease hypoxic extent in early summer, they would have a much

  8. Radiation Preservation of Foods and Its Effect on Nutrients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josephson, Edward S.; Thomas, Miriam H.

    1970-01-01

    Presents a discussion of (1) some possible applications of ionizing radiation to the treatment and preservation of food and (2) the effects of irradiation on nutrients such as proteins, fats, oils, carbohydrates and vitamins. The authors suggest that the irradiation process has great potential in food technology. Bibliography. (LC)

  9. In situ determination of slurry nutrient content by electrical conductivity.

    PubMed

    Provolo, G; Martínez-Suller, L

    2007-12-01

    Land application of animal slurries has both agronomic and environmental implications. It can be supported by the quantification of available nutrients in the field. A prototype device for indirect measurement of the nutrient content of slurry based on electrical conductivity (EC) was calibrated on manure samples collected from farms with different livestock typologies. The resulting correlations between EC and nutrient contents of slurries from laboratory analyses have shown good agreement (r(2) from 0.73 to 0.95) with total and ammoniacal nitrogen and, with some exception, Potassium, but failed to demonstrate any significant relationship with total phosphorous. The mean errors obtained using the device in field conditions for nitrogen content were always lower or equal to 10%, while the standard deviations were 12-13% for pig and calf slurries, and 20-21% for dairy cow slurry. The results obtained suggest that the equipment, provided the regression line used to convert EC readings to nutrient contents is related to the livestock typology under observation, can provide good support to practical slurry spreading, even though it does not reach an accuracy comparable to laboratory methods and does not give reliable information on phosphorus. PMID:16919932

  10. Manure Management to Improve Nutrient Use Efficiency and Environmental Quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Manure from livestock operations can be a valuable source of N, P, K, and micronutrients for crop production, but careful management is important to maximize nutrient use efficiency and minimize N and P losses that can adversely impact the environment. Volatilization of NH3-N, the largest N loss pot...

  11. NUTRIENT SYNCHRONY: SOUND IN THEORY, ELUSIVE IN PRACTICE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The concept of improving animal performance through synchronizing ruminal availability of nutrients has been with us for at least 3 decades. Though theoretically appealing, research and field results have not supported this approach to diet formulation. Why? Essential to successful ruminal synchrony...

  12. Valine Nutrient Recommendations for Ross × Ross 308 Broilers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies delineating dietary Val needs of modern commercial broilers are sparse. Three studies were conducted to determine the dietary Val nutrient minimum of Ross × Ross 308 male broilers. Three time periods were evaluated independently, 0 to 14 d (starter), 14 to 28 d (grower) and 28 to 42 d (finis...

  13. IMPROVED SCIENCE AND DECISION SUPPORT FOR MANAGING WATERSHED NUTRIENT LOADS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proposed research addresses two critical gaps in the TMDL process: (1) the inadequacy of presently existing receiving water models to accurately simulate nutrient-sediment-water interactions and fixed plants; and (2) the lack of decision-oriented optimization f...

  14. Nutrient losses from an irrigated watershed in southern Idaho

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water, sediment and nutrients flowing into and out of the 82,000 ha Twin Falls, ID irrigation tract were measured from 2005 to 2008. Approximately 80% of the water flowing into the watershed was irrigation water diverted from the Snake River. About 40% of the watershed inflow returned to the Snake R...

  15. The nutrient density approach to healthy eating: challenges and opportunities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The term 'nutrient density' for foods/beverages has been used loosely to promote the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans defined 'all vegetables, fruits, whole grains, fat-free or low-fat milk and milk products, seafood, lean meats and poultry, eggs, beans and...

  16. Nutrients and the Great Lakes Nearshore, Circa 2002-2007

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nearshore nutrient impressions were largely limited to observations of local spatial trends from a few site-specific studies and some temporal trends at a set of Canadian water intake locations (later summarized in Nicholls et al. 1999). Lacking a systematic information base fo...

  17. Nutrient leaching when compost is part of plant growth media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioretention cells collect urban runoff and are used to slow storm water surge, reduce or remove nutrients or other pollutants, and provide aesthetics to the landscape. A cell is filled with soil mixed with sand, compost, and other materials, and underlain by an aggregate layer and drainage pipe. Th...

  18. DIAGNOSTIC INDICATORS OF STREAM IMPAIRMENT AS A RESULT OF NUTRIENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The main goal of this project is to provide information needed by States to set nutrient criteria at a level appropriately protective of their water bodies' aquatic life uses. The information that would be generated by this study is critically needed in order for States to use it...

  19. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 23

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 23 contains data for over 7,600 food items for up to 146 food components when a complete profile is available for a food item. It replaces the previous release, SR22, issued in September 2009. Data in SR23 supersede values in the printed h...

  20. Nutrient Losses from Row Crop Agriculture in Indiana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrient losses from agriculture in the Midwestern United States have been identified as contributing to water quality problems such as hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico, and eutrophication in the great lakes. Fields and catchments in the Cedar Creek sub-watershed of the St. Joseph River basin were mon...

  1. Nutrient removal by root zone treatment systems: a review.

    PubMed

    Sonavane, P G; Munavalli, G R; Ranade, S V

    2008-07-01

    The Root Zone Treatment System (RZTS) has been used widely for nutrient removal in European countries. In spite of having its more adaptability in tropical region like India its use to address nutrient induced issues in the country is very less. The lack of widely accepted data, non consensus of scientists over nutrient removal mechanism and inability to apply performance standards observed in other countries directly might have hampered the acceptance of this technology in India. A few technology assessment programs are being conducted in collaboration with other countries to engineer this technology but nutrient removal aspects are not essentially focused. In this context, there is need to direct lab scale research to identify potential wetland plants, bed media and comparative study of their combination specific performance under similar conditions. The field application of the data will help to understand variability in performance and disparities in the mechanism. The systems would be amended based on these studies to establish combination specific performance standards for typical Indian conditions. Maintenance strategy and optimization of design will help to foster the technology. The development strategy should give due consideration to the contributions of other countries so as to avoid repetition of work which will save time, money and efforts, and help for the real acceptance of RZTS in Indian conditions. PMID:19552081

  2. Temporal Changes in the Spatial Variability of Soil Nutrients

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskinson, Reed Louis; Hess, John Richard; Alessi, Randolph Samuel

    1999-07-01

    This paper reports the temporal changes in the spatial variability of soil nutrient concentrations across a field during the growing season, over a four-year period. This study is part of the Site-Specific Technologies for Agriculture (SST4Ag) precision farming research project at the INEEL. Uniform fertilization did not produce a uniform increase in fertility. During the growing season, several of the nutrients and micronutrients showed increases in concentration although no additional fertilization had occurred. Potato plant uptake did not explain all of these changes. Some soil micronutrient concentrations increased above levels considered detrimental to potatoes, but the plants did not show the effects in reduced yield. All the nutrients measured changed between the last sampling in the fall and the first sampling the next spring prior to fertilization. The soil microbial community may play a major role in the temporal changes in the spatial variability of soil nutrient concentrations. These temporal changes suggest potential impact when determining fertilizer recommendations, and when evaluating the results of spatially varying fertilizer application.

  3. CONTROLS OF SEAGRASS EPIPHYTE ABUNDANCE: DOES LIGHT TRUMP NUTRIENTS?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epiphytes on seagrass growing in the lower intertidal were examined along an estuarine gradient within Yaquina Bay, Oregon over a period of 4 years. The Yaquina Estuary receives high levels of nutrients from the watershed during the wet season and from the ocean during the dry s...

  4. Plant Leachate Nutrient Recovery with Biological, Thermal, and Photocatalytic Pretreatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Les

    2015-01-01

    Plants are ideal for long term space travel: provide essential resources - oxygen, water, food; Water-soaked plants expel soluble nutrients in a leachate solution - toxins and wastes are also expelled and inhibit growth; biological, thermal, photocatalytic coupled with an acid digestion treatment will hopefully maximize recovery and remove wastes

  5. Assessing Nutrient Transport Following Dredging of Agricultural Drainage Ditches

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural drainage ditches are vital for many agricultural landscapes in the U.S. Previous research has indicated that dredging agricultural drainage ditches may degrade water quality. In this study, we monitored nutrient transport in two drainage ditches for six years (2003-2008), during which t...

  6. Nutrient analysis of the Beef Alternative Merchandising cuts.

    PubMed

    Desimone, T L; Acheson, R A; Woerner, D R; Engle, T E; Douglass, L W; Belk, K E

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to generate raw and cooked nutrient composition data to identify Quality Grade differences in proximate values for eight Beef Alternative Merchandising (BAM) cuts. The data generated will be used to update the nutrient data in the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference (SR). Beef Rib, Oven-Prepared, Beef Loin, Strip Loin, and Beef Loin, Top Sirloin Butt subprimals were collected from a total of 24 carcasses from four packing plants. The carcasses were a combination of USDA Yield Grades 2 (n=12) and 3 (n=12), USDA Quality Grades upper two-thirds Choice (n=8), low Choice (n=8), and Select (n=8), and two genders, steer (n=16) and heifer (n=8). After aging, subprimals were fabricated into the BAM cuts, dissected, and nutrient analysis was performed. Sample homogenates from each animal were homogenized and composited for analysis of the following: proximate analysis, long chain and trans-fatty acids, conjugated linoleic acid, total cholesterol, vitamin B-12, and selenium. This study identified seven BAM cuts from all three Quality Grades that qualify for USDA Lean; seven Select cuts that qualify for USDA Extra Lean; and three Select cuts that qualify for the American Heart Association's Heart Healthy Check. PMID:23261533

  7. Exploring the Sulfur Nutrient Cycle Using the Winogradsky Column

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogan, Brian; Lemke, Michael; Levandowsky, Michael; Gorrell, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The Winogradsky column demonstrates how the metabolic diversity of prokaryotes transforms sulfur to different forms with varying redox states and hence, supplies nutrients and/or energy to the organism. The Winogardsky column is an excellent way to show that not all bacteria are pathogens and they have an important role in the geochemical cycling…

  8. Nutrient Infiltrate Concentrations from Three Permeable Pavement Types

    EPA Science Inventory

    While permeable pavement is increasingly being used to control stormwater runoff, field-based, side-by-side investigations on the effects different pavement types have on nutrient concentrations present in stormwater runoff are limited. In 2009, the U.S. EPA constructed a 0.4-ha...

  9. Water, weed, and nutrient management practices in organic blackberries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of our study is to investigate the effects of organic management on plant and soil water and nutrient relations, plant growth, yield, and fruit quality in an organic trailing blackberry production system. Treatments include: cultivar ('Marion' and 'Black Diamond'); irrigation (post-harve...

  10. Methods of measuring nutrient substrate utilization using stable isotopes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Following cessation of the transplacental flow of nutrients, most healthy term newborn infants promptly initiate hepatic glucose production to meet their high glucose demands and maintain normoglycemia. Since the hepatic glycogen content is limited, the neonate becomes dependent on gluconeogenesis a...

  11. ALGAL RESPONSES TO NUTRIENT LOADING IN GREAT LAKES COASTAL WETLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We are evaluating the influence of nutrient loading on phytoplankton and periphyton in coastal wetlands of the Great Lakes as part of an EPA study associated with the Great Lakes Environmental Indicator (GLEI) project. A primary goal is to assess the role of wetland morphology an...

  12. Genotypic response to multiple abiotic stresses: Functional relationships among nutrients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Macro- and micro-nutrients estimated in leaves, stems and seed of eleven genotypes of five physiologically diverse crop species (chickpeas, corn, safflower, soybean, and wheat, respectively producing protein, carbohydrates, oil, protein-oil, and carbohydrates-protein, as main seed storage macromolec...

  13. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, release 28

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 28 contains data for nearly 8,800 food items for up to 150 food components. SR28 replaces the previous release, SR27, originally issued in August 2014. Data in SR28 supersede values in the printed handbooks and previous electronic...

  14. Avoidance of dairy products: Implications for nutrient adequacy and health

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dairy products are an important contributor of many essential nutrients often lacking in the typical North American diet, including calcium, potassium, and vitamin D, and limiting dairy intake may adversely affect health. Dairy exclusion diets may exacerbate the risk of osteoporosis and negatively i...

  15. CHALLENGES IN INTEGRATING CAFO NUTRIENT MANAGEMENT WITH ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In general, 70 to 90% of nutrients fed to livestock subsequently end up in manure and can potentially be lost to the environment. Thus, the effects of livestock operations, especially larger concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFO), on the environment are a growing concern among many groups...

  16. Nutrient disorders of 'Evolution' mealy-cup sage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To produce popular floriculture crops like mealy-cup sage (Salvia farinacea (Benth.)), growers must be equipped with cultural information including the ability to recognize and characterize disorders. Diagnostic criteria of nutrient disorders of mealy-cup sage are absent from the literature. Theref...

  17. Measuring Nitrification: A Laboratory Approach to Nutrient Cycling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, David J.

    1990-01-01

    Presented is an approach to the study of nutrient cycling in the school laboratory. Discussed are obtaining, processing, and incubating samples; extraction of ions from soil; procedures for nitrate and ammonium analysis; data analysis; an example of results; and other aspects of the nitrogen cycle. (CW)

  18. Found: genes controlling the nutrient content of the rice grain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biofortification refers to nutrient enhancement of the grain/food product through traditional breeding. Since it does not require genetic engineering, it is acceptable to many consumers, and is compatible with organic labeling. Enhancing the nutritional value of rice is of particular interest beca...

  19. USDA NATIONAL NUTRIENT DATABASE FOR STANDARD REFERENCE, RELEASE 19

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 19 contains data for 7,291 food items for up to 140 food components when a complete profile is available for a food item. It replaces the previous release, SR18, issued in August 2005. Data in SR19 supersede values in the printed Handbooks a...

  20. Characterization of heat transfer in nutrient materials, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, J. E.; Bannerot, R. B.; Chen, C. K.; Witte, L. C.

    1973-01-01

    The principles involved in food heating are discussed. The food heating system for Skylab is described. Thermal models of nutrient materials are analyzed including models in zero-g and low pressure conditions. Results are presented of parametric studies to establish the effect of individual parameters on the thermal response of the system.